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Sample records for antinuclear antibody positive

  1. Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA) Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA) Fast Facts Autoimmune diseases can be treated. ... juvenile arthritis . How do you test for antinuclear antibodies? There are several methods used to test for ...

  2. Antinuclear antibodies in rosacea patients

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, Ma?gorzata; McCauliffe, Daniel; Sysa-J?drzejowska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Rosacea is a common inflammatory disorder, characterized by a spectrum of facial manifestations. The clinical similarity to other dermatoses, like lupus erythematosus, might lead to misdiagnosis, particularly in patients with elevated antinuclear antibody titers. Aim To assess the frequency, titer and specificity of antinuclear antibodies in rosacea patients and correlate these findings with clinical features. Material and methods The study included 101 rosacea patients and 26 sex- and age-matched controls. Immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody testing was performed on HEp-2 substrates. Patients’ sera with ANA titers of 1 : 160 or higher were evaluated by Euroline analysis. Results Over a half (53.5%) of rosacea patients had an ANA titer greater than or equal to 1 : 160. Within this group 13.86% had a titer of 1 : 320, 8.91% had a titer of 1 : 640, and 6.93% had a titer of 1 : 1,280 or higher. The specificity of these antibodies could not be identified. Elevated ANA titers were present more often in women (55.8%) than in men (44.15%). Only two of 26 healthy volunteers had elevated ANA titers. One had a titer of 1 : 160 and the other of 1 : 320. During a two-year observation period, after the initial ANA testing, none of the patients with ANA titers above 1 : 640 developed an apparent autoimmune disorder. Conclusions Elevated ANA titers are commonly found in rosacea patients, what with simultaneously existing facial erythema and photosensitivity might lead to misdiagnosis of lupus erythematosus. Clinicians should beware of these findings to avoid misdiagnosing lupus erythematosus in rosacea patients with elevated ANA titers. PMID:24278039

  3. Clinical and Serological Features of Patients Referred through a Rheumatology Triage System because of Positive Antinuclear Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fitch-Rogalsky, Christie; Steber, Whitney; Mahler, Michael; Lupton, Terri; Martin, Liam; Barr, Susan G.; Mosher, Dianne P.; Wick, James; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The referral of patients with positive anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) tests has been criticized as an inappropriate use of medical resources. The utility of a positive ANA test in a central triage (CT) system was studied by determining the autoantibody profiles and clinical diagnoses of patients referred to rheumatologists through a CT system because of a positive ANA test. Methods Patients that met three criteria were included: (1) referred to Rheumatology CT over a three year interval; (2) reason for referral was a “positive ANA”; (3) were evaluated by a certified rheumatologist. The CT clinical database was used to obtain demographic and clinical information and a serological database was used to retrieve specific ANA and/or extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) test results. Clinical information was extracted from the consulting rheumatologist's report. Results 15,357 patients were referred through the CT system; 643 (4.1%) of these because of a positive ANA and of these 263 (40.9%) were evaluated by a certified rheumatologist. In 63/263 (24%) of ANA positive patients, the specialist provided a diagnosis of an ANA associated rheumatic disease (AARD) while 69 (26.2%) had no evidence of any disease; 102 (38.8%) had other rheumatologic diagnoses and 29 (11%) had conditions that did not meet AARD classification criteria. Of ANA positive archived sera, 15.1% were anti-DFS70 positive and 91.2% of these did not have an AARD. Conclusions This is the first study to evaluate the serological and clinical features of patients referred through a CT system because of a positive ANA. The spectrum of autoantibody specificities was wide with anti-Ro52/TRIM21 being the most common autoantibody detected. Approximately 15% of referrals had only antibodies to DFS70, the vast majority of which did not have clinical evidence for an AARD. These findings provide insight into the utility of autoantibody testing in a CT system. PMID:24705829

  4. Outcome of high titer antinuclear antibody positivity in individuals without connective tissue disease: a 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wijeyesinghe, Udara; Russell, Anthony S

    2008-11-01

    To ascertain the development of disease in a cohort of connective tissue disease (CTD)-negative patients 10 years after testing positive for antinuclear antibody (ANA) in high titer, a telephone survey and serological tests were conducted on a group of CTD-negative patients with high ANA titer identified in a previous study. Thirty-four out of 62 patients (55%) completed only the telephone survey and 27 completed both. The mean length of follow-up was 11.5 years. The ages ranged from 27 to 89 years with the mean being 58.9 years. The sex distribution included 4 (12%) men and 30 (88%) women. Twenty-one out of 27 patients (78%) remained ANA-positive. A total of five patients were diagnosed with CTD with two in the last 5 years. Common symptoms described, in order of frequency, were joint pain, Raynaud's phenomenon, and Sicca symptoms. This study shows that a considerable percentage of CTD-negative individuals with an initial high ANA titer continue to maintain their positivity even after an extended period. It is reassuring, however, that only a small number of these individuals go on to develop CTD. It confirms the fact that the ANA test, despite remaining a useful clinical tool, needs to be used in conjunction with other evidence and clinical judgement when attempting to validate the diagnosis of CTD. PMID:18500432

  5. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  8. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  10. Hydroxychloroquine is a good second-line treatment for adults with immune thrombocytopenia and positive antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed

    Khellaf, Mehdi; Chabrol, Amèlie; Mahevas, Matthieu; Roudot-Thoraval, Françoise; Limal, Nicolas; Languille, Laetitia; Bierling, Philippe; Michel, Marc; Godeau, Bertrand

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of patients with lupus-associated thrombocytopenia (SLE-ITP) is not standardized. We report data on efficacy and safety of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) in this setting and in ITP patients with positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA) without definite SLE. Inclusion criteria were: definite diagnosis of ITP with a platelet count (PLT) <50 × 10(9) /L, ANA ? 1/160 on Hep2 cells with or without a definite diagnosis of SLE, and no sustained response to at least one previous treatment-line and treatment with HCQ. Response criteria were Complete Response (CR) for PLT ? 100 × 10(9) /L and Response (R) for PLT ?30 × 10(9) /L and at least twice the initial value. Forty patients (32 females) with a mean age of 35 ± 17 years and PLT at ITP diagnosis of 14 ± 13 × 10(9) /L were analyzed. Twelve (30%) patients had a SLE-ITP, 28 patients had only positive ANA. All the patients failed to respond to oral prednisone with a median of two treatment-lines (1-5) before HCQ which was initially given in combination with another ITP treatment in 36 patients. Overall response rate was 60% (24/40) including 18 lasting CR and six lasting R maintained with a median follow-up of 64 months (6-146), in ¾ of cases with only HCQ and no concomitant ITP treatment. The response rate (CR+R) was higher in the SLE group vs ANA-positive group (83% vs 50%, P < 0.05). No patient stopped HCQ because of a side-effect. HCQ appears to be a safe and effective second line treatment for patients with SLE-ITP or ITP and high titer of ANA. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as # NCT01549184. PMID:24254965

  11. Antinuclear antibody determination in a routine laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Feltkamp, T E

    1996-01-01

    Pitfalls in the method for demonstrating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by the indirect immunofluorescence technique are described and the use of international standard preparations outlined. Determination of the optimal border dilution dividing positive from negative results is discussed. Each laboratory is a unique setting; it must define its own method, which should rarely be changed. One should not rely on copying methods from other laboratories or commercial firms, but the reproducibility of the nuclear substrate, the conjugate, and other variables should be controlled daily by the use of a control serum which has been related to the WHO standard preparation for ANA of the homogeneous type. Since many sera contain mixtures of different ANA, the results of routine tests are best expressed in titres or expressions of the intensity of fluorescence. The ANA test using the immunofluorescence technique should be used as a screening method for other tests allowing a more defined interpretation of the ANA. Each laboratory should individually determine the border between positive and negative results. Therefore about 200 sera from local healthy controls equally distributed over sex and age, and 100 sera from local patients with definite SLE should be tested. Since the local clinicians should become acquainted with this border it should rarely be changed. Finally each laboratory should participate regularly in national and international quality control rounds, where sera known to be difficult to interpret are tested. The judgment of the organisers of these rounds should stimulate improvements in the participating laboratories. PMID:8984936

  12. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...antibody immunological test system. 866.5100 Section...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5100 Antinuclear...antibody immunological test system is a device that consists...antibodies in serum, other body fluids,...

  13. The Prevalence of Antinuclear Antibodies in Patients with Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobak, Senol; Yilmaz, Hatice; Sever, Fidan; Duran, Arzu; Sen, Nazime; Karaarslan, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Sarcoidosis, which is a chronic inflammatory granulomatous disease, can mimic different rheumatologic diseases including connective tissue diseases. Antinuclear antibodies are the markers used for connective tissue diseases. Aim. To determine antinuclear antibody frequency and any possible correlation with clinical and laboratory data in sarcoidosis patients. Material and Method. Forty-two sarcoidosis patients, 45 rheumatoid arthritis patients, and 45 healthy volunteers who were followed up in rheumatology outpatient clinic were included in this study. Demographic, clinical, serological, and radiological data of all patients were recorded. Antinuclear antibodies were determined with indirect immunofluorescent method and 1/100 titration was accepted as positive. The cases that were ANA positive were evaluated with immunoblot method. Results. Average age of the 42 patients (10 males) with sarcoidosis was 45.2 (20–70 years), and average disease duration was 3.5 years. ANA positivity was detected in 12 (28.5%) patients with sarcoidosis (1/100 in 10 patients, 1/320 in two patients), in 19 of RA patients (42.2%), and in two of healthy volunteers in low titer (P < 0.001). In the subgroup analysis made by immunblot test, one patient had anticentromere antibody, one had anti-Ro antibody, one had anti-Scl-70 antibody, one had anti-dsDNA antibody, and eight patients were negative. The two patients who had anticentromere and anti-Scl-70 antibodies had also Sjögren's syndrome and scleroderma diagnosis, respectively. Discussion. The prevalence of ANA in patients with sarcoidosis was found to be significantly higher than healthy control group and lower than RA patients. This result shows that ANA may have an important role in the pathogenesis of sarcoidosis and also could be important in revealing the overlap syndromes of sarcoidosis-connective tissue diseases. Further studies with larger series are necessary in this subject. PMID:25580285

  14. Antinuclear antibodies in patients on anticonvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Reyes, P. A.; Díes, H.; Shwadsky, S.

    1972-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies to calf thymus nuclei, NP, DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen were investigated in sera from 170 patients on various programmes of prolonged anticonvulsant treatment. Findings were compared to those on 214 tuberculous patients on isoniazid, 109 SLE patients and 66 healthy subjects. Patients on anticonvulsants had a significantly higher incidence of ANA to DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen than the controls but had a lower incidence of ANA to all antigens, except sNP, than the SLE patients. Patients on isoniazid did not have DNA antibodies, but had antibodies to whole nuclei and to NP which were practically absent in the anticonvulsant group. Of all patients on anticonvulsants only those receiving hydantoins had ANA to Sm antigen, while those receiving only primidone had antibodies to sNP but no antibodies to DNA. Alteration of sNP with isoniazid did not result in an increased incidence of ANA in the anticonvulsant group as it does in isoniazid treated subjects. It is concluded that the SLE-activating properties of diverse anticonvulsants probably resides in their potential to induce ANA. Although all anticonvulsants elicit ANA directed primarily to sNP, each may do so by different mechanisms or by altering different sites in the sNP molecule. The mechanisms by which anticonvulsant and isoniazid intake results in ANA probably differ. Presence of DNA antibodies in some patients on anticonvulsants may indicate that their convulsions were due to SLE. PMID:4117275

  15. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...antibody immunological test system. 866.5100 Section...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5100 Antinuclear...antibody immunological test system is a device that consists...antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and...

  16. [Significance of antinuclear anti-histone antibodies].

    PubMed

    Ferec, C; Youinou, P; Le Goff, P; Miossec, P; Morin, J F; Pennec, Y; Morin, P P; Le Menn, G

    1984-01-01

    The results of routine antihistone antibody (AHA) assay in a preliminary series of 189 sera are presented. There were 23 positive tests (systemic lupus erythematosus, 8 cases; drug induced SLE, 4 cases; rheumatoid arthritis 7 cases; and multiple sclerosis, 1 case; chronic active hepatitis, 1 case; systemic sclerosis, 1 case and primary biliary cirrhosis 1 case). The results of routine assay in 5 other patients groups are reported: 30 spontaneous SLE (9 positive AHA), 63 rheumatoid arthritis (2 positive AHA), 19 Sjögren syndrome (no AHA), 11 primary biliary cirrhosis (1 positive AHA) and 7 mixed connective tissue disease (no AHA). PMID:6334466

  17. Sperm auto - antibodies and anti-nuclear antigen antibodies in chronic dioxin - exposed veterans.

    PubMed

    Chinh, T T; Phi, P T; Thuy, N T

    1996-02-01

    The authors studied anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) in 25 chronic dioxin - exposed veterans by IIF technics with Hep-2 cell line and sperm autoantibodies by agglutination test of Franklin-Dukes. The site of antibody binding on spermatozoon is detected by IIF test. The control group for ANA detection is 63 healthy persons of the same age as that of dioxin - exposed veterans and the control group for sperm autoantibodies is 36 healthy males of 28-63 years old, having 1-2 children. Obtained results show that the rate of ANA positive in veterans group is normal, and sperm auto-antibodies is also at normal range. The site of antibody binding on spermatozoon is predominantly head - head, rarely head - neck or tail - tail. PMID:8907229

  18. Antinuclear antibodies prevalence in Filipinos migrated to Italy.

    PubMed

    Cacciapaglia, F; Arcarese, L; Rigon, A; Vadacca, M; Valorani, M G; Pozzilli, P; Afeltra, A

    2008-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) represent the main diagnostic markers for systemic autoimmune disease (AD), although their presence can be detected in blood donors. The aim of this study was to study ANA prevalence in healthy subjects of different racial groups, exposed to the same environmental factors, in order to understand the relevance of genetics or environment in determining autoimmunity. We enrolled in this study 80 healthy Filipinos (Polynesian), migrated to Italy from an average of 15 years, and 60 healthy native Italians (Caucasian) and ANA were detected in their sera (at 1:80 screening dilution) through indirect immunofluorescence assay. We found a higher prevalence of ANA positivity in Filipinos compared to Italians (23.7% vs 8.3%--P = 0.02; OR 3.43; 95% CI 1.2-9.8), above all in females and elderly, although demographic characteristics, clinical history and habits were not significantly different between the two groups. These data confirm that ANA positivity is not a rare condition and healthy non-Caucasians present a higher prevalence of autoantibodies. This could be determined by their autoimmunity-prone immune system or by the exposition to infective agents, pollution, drugs or nutrition of a western country. Future studies to evaluate the ANA prevalence in Filipinos in their own country and the follow-up of positive patients could clarify the real predisposition to AD of this population. PMID:18727460

  19. Detection of antinuclear antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence and by solid phase assay.

    PubMed

    Op De Beeck, Katrijn; Vermeersch, Pieter; Verschueren, Patrick; Westhovens, René; Mariën, Godelieve; Blockmans, Daniel; Bossuyt, Xavier

    2011-10-01

    Testing for antinuclear antibodies is useful for the diagnosis of systemic rheumatic diseases. Solid phase assays are increasingly replacing indirect immunofluorescence for detection of antinuclear antibodies. In the most recent generation of solid phase assays, manufacturers attempt to improve the performance of the assays by adding extra antigens. Solid phase assay (EliA CTD Screen, Phadia, in which antibodies to 17 antigens are detected) was compared to indirect immunofluorescence for the detection of antinuclear antibodies in diagnostic samples of 236 patients with autoimmune connective tissue diseases, in 149 healthy blood donors, 139 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, and 134 diseased controls. The sensitivity of EliA CTD Screen for systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, primary Sjögren's syndrome, mixed connective tissue disease, and inflammatory myopathy was 74%, 72%, 89%, 100%, and 39%, respectively. The reactivity in blood donors, in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, and in diseased controls was <4%. Likelihood ratios increased with increasing antibody concentrations. Generally, a positive test result by EliA CTD Screen had a higher likelihood ratio for systemic rheumatic disease than a positive test result by indirect immunofluorescence. A negative test result by indirect immunofluorescence, however, had a lower likelihood ratio than a negative test result by EliA CTD Screen, indicating that the negative predictive value was higher for indirect immunofluorescence than for EliA CTD screen. PMID:21741497

  20. Prevalence and clinical significance of antinuclear antibodies in Iranian women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Molazadeh, Morteza; Karimzadeh, Hadi; Azizi, Mohammad R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in women with recurrent miscarriage have been reported. The presence of moderate to high titers of these antibodies represents an autoimmune condition that can endanger the health of the fetus in pregnant women. Objective: In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of ANAs in Iranian women with a history of two or more unexplained abortion. Materials and Methods: 560 women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage and 560 healthy controls accounted for this study over a period of 13 months. ANAs were detected by indirect immunofluorescence technique. Results: ANAs were detected in 74 of 560 (13.21%) patient with recurrent miscarriage, and in only 5 of 560 (0.9%) controls (p<0.001). ANA positivity was generally found with low-positive results (1.40-1.80) in about 38% of positive cases, whereas moderate titres (1.160-1.320) and high titres (>1.640) were seen in about 46% and 16% of cases respectively. Finally evaluating of microscopic ANA patterns revealed that about half of positive cases had antibodies against DNA- histone complex, associated with systemic lupus erythematosus disease. Conclusion: Antinuclear antibodies are not uncommon in women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage, suggesting the possible role of an autoimmune disorder on abortion, at least in a subgroup of patients. PMID:24799884

  1. Antigenic specificity of chlorpromazine-induced antinuclear antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Cetina, J. A.; Raya, R. J.; Barrera, E.

    1973-01-01

    A few patients have been reported who developed systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the course of prolonged treatment with chlorpromazine. Patients on this drug have also been found to have antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) although they do not develop lupus. We have studied the antigenic specificity of ANAs in fifty-four patients on longterm chlorpromazine treatment and compared our findings with those on 175 patients on anticonvulsants, 215 patients on isoniazid, 109 SLE patients and fifty-four healthy subjects, sex and age matched to the chlorpromazine patients. Thirty-nine per cent of patients on chlorpromazine had ANAs which were most frequently directed to single stranded (s)DNA. In contrast, patients on anticonvulsants as well as those on isoniazid had ANA directed to soluble nucleoprotein (sNP) most frequently and none of the patients on isoniazid had ANA to sDNA. The mechanisms by which chlorpromazine, isoniazid or anticonvulsant intake results in ANAs probably differ. Our findings suggest that development of ANAs in patients on chlorpromazine may be initiated by interaction of the drug with denatured DNA. PMID:4130538

  2. Association of Immunofluorescence pattern of Antinuclear Antibody with Specific Autoantibodies in the Bangladeshi Population.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, S; Ahmed, S; Abu Saleh, A; Rahman, F; Choudhury, M R; Hassan, M M

    2014-08-01

    Antinuclear antibody (ANA) is useful in the diagnosis of connective tissue disorder (CTD). Association of specific autoantibodies with the immunofluorescence pattern of ANA in CTD, noted in western literature has been considered as reference in all over the world. However, in Bangladesh no such research work or data correlating the autoantibodies and their ANA patterns is found. Objective of the study was to identify an association between immunofluorescence patterns of antinuclear antibody on HEp-2 cell and more specific antinuclear reactivities (e.g. anti-dsDNA and anti-extractable nuclear antigen) in the serum samples of CTD patients. Serum samples of 152 CTD patients (Systemic lupus erythematosus, Rhumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's syndrome, Systemic sclerosis, Polymyositis, Mixed connective tissue disease) were diagnosed clinically, attending at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) during the study period of January, 2010 to December, 2010. Samples were subjected for ANA testing by Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) on HEp-2 cell (ALPHADIA) in dilution of 1:40, anti-dsDNA by ELISA and anti- extractable nuclear antigen (anti-ENA) by Dot Immunoblot. Dot blot strips were tested for anti-Sm, anti-RNP, anti-SSA/Ro, anti-SSB/La, anti-Scl-70 and anti-Jo-1. Out of 152 patients 110 (72.3%) cases were ANA positive by IIF on HEp-2 cell. ANA positive sera exhibited four fluorescence patterns such as speckled (50.8%), peripheral (21.6%) , homogenous (18.1%) and nucleolar pattern (9%). Peripheral pattern and homogenous pattern was predominantly associated with anti-dsDNA (p < 0.05). Speckled pattern was significantly associated with anti-ENA (p < 0.05).The most commonly identified antinuclear autoreactivity was directed towards anti-RNP (25.7%) then anti-Scl-70 (20%), anti-SSA (14.2%) and anti-SSB (5.7%). Multiple anti-ENA reactivities were identified in 34.28% cases. Peripheral and homogenous pattern is strongly associated with anti-dsDNA and speckled pattern may predict anti-ENA (specially ribonucleoprotiens). As a definite correlation between the ANA patterns and the group of antibodies was detected by dot immunoblot, one could predict presence of certain specific auto antibodies for a particular ANA pattern identified. This may restrict on the cost of laboratory investigations in a developing country like Bangladesh. Thus, ANA-IIF method may reduce the expense of detailed immunological work-up with minimal loss in diagnostic accuracy. PMID:26415344

  3. Antinuclear antibody detection by automated multiplex immunoassay in untreated patients at the time of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Op De Beéck, Katrijn; Vermeersch, Pieter; Verschueren, Patrick; Westhovens, René; Mariën, Godelieve; Blockmans, Daniel; Bossuyt, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    Fully automated multiplex immunoassays are increasingly used as first line screening for antinuclear antibodies. The diagnostic performance of such multiplex assays in untreated patients at the time of diagnosis has not been reported. Antinuclear antibodies were measured by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) (dilution 1:160) and by BioPlex 2200 ANA screen (antibodies to dsDNA, chromatin, ribosomal protein, SSA-52, SSA-60, SSB, Sm, SmRNP, RNP-A, RNP-68, Scl-70, Jo-1, and centromere B) in 236 patients with a systemic rheumatic disease at the time of diagnosis, 149 blood donors, 139 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and 134 diseased controls. BioPlex ANA screen and IIF were positive in, respectively, 79% and 90% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 60% and 60% with cutaneous lupus, 72% and 93% with systemic sclerosis (SSc), 100% and 100% with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 89% and 56% with primary Sjögren's (SS) syndrome, 36% and 36% with polymyositis/dermatomyositis, 5.4% and 6% of blood donors, 7.2% and 3.6% of patients with CFS, and 11% and 18% of diseased controls. BioPlex test result interval specific likelihood ratios increased with increasing antibody concentration. The simultaneous presence of at least three antibodies by BioPlex was found in 35% of patients with SLE, 4% with SSc, 100% with MCTD, 64% with SS, 7% with inflammatory myopathy, 0.7% of CFS and diseased controls, and none of the blood donors. In conclusion, test result specific likelihood ratios and the presence of multiple autoantibodies help with the interpretation of data generated by multiplex immunoassays. PMID:22387973

  4. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  5. Antinuclear Antibodies as Potential Markers of Lung Cancer1 Felix Fernandez-Madrid,2

    E-print Network

    VandeVord, Pamela

    Antinuclear Antibodies as Potential Markers of Lung Cancer1 Fe´lix Ferna´ndez-Madrid,2 Pamela J of ANAs in lung cancer. We have previously reported that autoantibodies to collagen antigens resembling those found in the connective tissue diseases are consistently detected in the sera from lung cancer

  6. Mercury Exposure and Antinuclear Antibodies among Females of Reproductive Age in the United States: NHANES

    PubMed Central

    Ganser, Martha A.; Warren, Jeffrey S.; Basu, Niladri; Wang, Lu; Zick, Suzanna M.; Park, Sung Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune dysregulation associated with mercury has been suggested, although data in the general population are lacking. Chronic exposure to low levels of methylmercury (organic) and inorganic mercury is common, such as through fish consumption and dental amalgams. Objective We examined associations between mercury biomarkers and antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity and titer strength. Methods Among females 16–49 years of age (n = 1,352) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2004, we examined cross-sectional associations between mercury and ANAs (indirect immunofluorescence; cutoff ? 1:80). Three biomarkers of mercury exposure were used: hair (available 1999–2000) and total blood (1999–2004) predominantly represented methylmercury, and urine (1999–2002) represented inorganic mercury. Survey statistics were used. Multivariable modeling adjusted for several covariates, including age and omega-3 fatty acids. Results Sixteen percent of females were ANA positive; 96% of ANA positives had a nuclear speckled staining pattern. Geometric mean (geometric SD) mercury concentrations were 0.22 (0.03) ppm in hair, 0.92 (0.05) ?g/L blood, and 0.62 (0.04) ?g/L urine. Hair and blood, but not urinary, mercury were associated with ANA positivity (sample sizes 452, 1,352, and 804, respectively), after adjusting for confounders: for hair, odds ratio (OR) = 4.10 (95% CI: 1.66, 10.13); for blood, OR = 2.32 (95% CI: 1.07, 5.03) comparing highest versus lowest quantiles. Magnitudes of association were strongest for high-titer (? 1:1,280) ANA: hair, OR = 11.41 (95% CI: 1.60, 81.23); blood, OR = 5.93 (95% CI: 1.57, 22.47). Conclusions Methylmercury, at low levels generally considered safe, was associated with subclinical autoimmunity among reproductive-age females. Autoantibodies may predate clinical disease by years; thus, methylmercury exposure may be relevant to future autoimmune disease risk. Citation Somers EC, Ganser MA, Warren JS, Basu N, Wang L, Zick SM, Park SK. 2015. Mercury exposure and antinuclear antibodies among females of reproductive age in the United States: NHANES. Environ Health Perspect 123:792–798;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408751 PMID:25665152

  7. The Prevalence of Antinuclear Antibodies in the General Population of China: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ya-Ping; Wang, Chun-Guang; Liu, Xin; Huang, Yi-Qian; Guo, De-Li; Jing, Xing-Zhuo; Yuan, Chun-Gang; Yang, Song; Liu, Jin-Mei; Han, Meng-Si; Li, Hong-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and primary biliary cirrhosis has increased significantly in China. Information about the susceptibility or potential of autoimmune diseases in the general population is lacking. Objective To explore the prevalence of antinuclear antibody (ANA) and its specificities in the general population in China. Methods Twenty thousand nine hundred seventy sera samples were taken from the physical examination center in Baoding, China. Indirect immunofluorescence and line immunoassays were used to detect ANA and its specificities, respectively. Results Samples from females had a higher prevalence of ANA than samples from males (?2 = 278.55; P < 0.01). For both sexes, the prevalence of ANA positively correlated with age and there were significant differences among different age groups at 10-year intervals, except the 80 years group (P < 0.05). One thousand two hundred forty-three ANA-positive samples were further analyzed with line immunoassays. There was a significant difference among age groups and between sex groups in terms of the specific autoantibodies (P < 0.01). The autoantibodies with the top-3 positive frequencies were anti-Ro-52, anti-M2, and anti-SSA. Conclusions There was a high prevalence of ANA positivity in the general Chinese population that seemed to be influenced by sex and age and correlated with specific autoantibodies. PMID:25473438

  8. Erythrocyte antinuclear antibodies in sera of chickens hyperimmunized with group A streptococcal vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Luster, M I; Leslie, G A

    1976-01-01

    Chickens hyperimmunized with group A streptococcal vaccine often synthesize high levels of antibody to group A streptococcal carbohydrate (SACHO). Indirect immunofluorescent analysis revealed that sera of these chickens also contain antinuclear antibodies capable of reacting with chicken erythrocyte nuclei (EANA) at titers up to 2,560. Removal of the anti-SACHO antibodies from hyperimmune serum did not significantly reduce EANA titers, indicating that anti-SACHO antibodies are not responsible for the EANA reactions. The time course for antibody development as well as the immunoglobulin class distribution of EANA and anti-SACHO antibodies were very similar. Localization of EANA activity to Fab fragments indicated that the immunfluorescent reaction represents an antigen-antibody reaction. Findings point out an important consequence of using chicken immunoglobulin Y in immunofluorescent assays. The purified Fc fragment of immunoglobulin Y is cytophilic for the substrate when tested at high concentrations, which suggests that some cytophilic immunoglobulins are involved in the reaction. PMID:773827

  9. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...of systemic lupus erythematosus (a multisystem autoimmune disease in which antibodies attack the victim's own tissues), hepatitis (a liver disease), rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome (arthritis with inflammation of the eye, eyelid,...

  10. Determination of Anti-nuclear Antibody Pattern Distribution and Clinical Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Mengeloglu, Zafer; Tas, Tekin; Kocoglu, Esra; Aktas, Gülali; Karabörk, Seyda

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Autoantibodies are immunglobulins occurred directly against autoantigens that are known as endogen antigens. Autoimmune disease is an occasion that the body begins a fight against its own cells and tissues. The antibodies that are created by the body against its own cell nuclei are called as anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), and one of the methods used for detection and pattern of ANA is indirect immunofluorescence test (IIF). In the present study, it was aimed to determine the rate of ANA positivity and patterns of the positive specimens, and to investigate the relationship between ANA positivity and diseases in patients. Methods: ANA test results of a total of 3127 patients admitted during March 2010 to December 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. ANA test (HEp 20-10, EUROIMMUN, Germany) was used in dilution of 1:100 in IIF test. Results: A total of 494 (15.8%) resulted as ANA positive. ANA positivity rate was significantly higher in female patients than the male ones (p<0.001). The most frequent ANA patterns were coarse speckled pattern (154 patients, 31.2%), nucleolar pattern (89 patients, 18.0%), fine speckled pattern (57 patients, 11.5%), and speckled pattern (48 patients, 9.7%). ANA positivity was most commonly determined in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (42 patients, 8.5%), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (29 patients, 5.9%), and rheumatoid vasculitis (RV) (28 patients, 5.7%). The most frequent symptoms or findings were joint pain (127 patients, 26.0%) and anemia (28 patients, 5.7%). ANA positivity rates were found to be significantly higher in patients with RA (p<0.001), with SLE (p<0.001), and with Raynaud phenomenon (p=0.001) in comparison to the controls. Amongst the most frequent diseases evaluated, no significant differences were found between the control groups and the groups of RV (p=0.089), multiple sclerosis (p=0.374), and Sjögren syndrome (p=0.311) in terms of ANA positivity rates. Conclusions: The present study is the first study reporting the positivity rate and distribution of ANA in Bolu located in northwestern Turkey. Information about the pattern types and the distribution of the patterns according to the diseases and symptoms contribute in diagnosis of autoimmune diseases. It is observed that clinical diagnosis has been supported significantly by ANA test according to data of our study. PMID:24772147

  11. The range and specificity of antinuclear antibodies in systematic lupus erythematosus*

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Alcalá, Hilda; Olguín-Palacios, Eugenia; Estrada-Parra, S.

    1970-01-01

    Antibodies to nine calf thymus nuclear antigens were sought by complement fixation methods in twenty-four sera from sixteen patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. These antigens included whole nuclei, native and heat denatured DNA, particulate and soluble nucleoprotein and Sm antigen. Soluble antigens were also tested by tanned red-cell agglutination tests. A wide variation in the presence and titres of antibodies to these various antigens was found in the sera studied even when from the same patient but at different times. To further test the range and specificity of antinuclear antibodies in SLE, nineteen ribonucleosides, nucleotides and monophosphoric dinucleotides were coupled to human serum albumin and used as antigens in precipitin studies. A wide variation of reactivity was also found in each serum. Exquisite specificity became apparent, capable of reacting with a nucleoside but not with the corresponding nucleotide or vice versa, with a dinucleotide but not with the nucleotides or nucleosides which it contained, with a given dinucleotide but not with the opposite sequence. Antinuclear antibodies in systemic lupus are, therefore, markedly heterogeneous. Those to a `single' antigen such as DNA may be directed to antigenic sites which may variously be at the bases, single or in sequence, at the site of union of base and sugar–phosphate moiety, at the backbone of deoxyribophosphate or actually dependent on the secondary structure. PMID:4097823

  12. Anti-nuclear antibody screening using HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Carol; Bryant, Cassandra; Eslami, Anna; Lakos, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The American College of Rheumatology position statement on ANA testing stipulates the use of IIF as the gold standard method for ANA screening(1). Although IIF is an excellent screening test in expert hands, the technical difficulties of processing and reading IIF slides--such as the labor intensive slide processing, manual reading, the need for experienced, trained technologists and the use of dark room--make the IIF method difficult to fit in the workflow of modern, automated laboratories. The first and crucial step towards high quality ANA screening is careful slide processing. This procedure is labor intensive, and requires full understanding of the process, as well as attention to details and experience. Slide reading is performed by fluorescent microscopy in dark rooms, and is done by trained technologists who are familiar with the various patterns, in the context of cell cycle and the morphology of interphase and dividing cells. Provided that IIF is the first line screening tool for SARD, understanding the steps to correctly perform this technique is critical. Recently, digital imaging systems have been developed for the automated reading of IIF slides. These systems, such as the NOVA View Automated Fluorescent Microscope, are designed to streamline the routine IIF workflow. NOVA View acquires and stores high resolution digital images of the wells, thereby separating image acquisition from interpretation; images are viewed an interpreted on high resolution computer monitors. It stores images for future reference and supports the operator's interpretation by providing fluorescent light intensity data on the images. It also preliminarily categorizes results as positive or negative, and provides pattern recognition for positive samples. In summary, it eliminates the need for darkroom, and automates and streamlines the IIF reading/interpretation workflow. Most importantly, it increases consistency between readers and readings. Moreover, with the use of barcoded slides, transcription errors are eliminated by providing sample traceability and positive patient identification. This results in increased patient data integrity and safety. The overall goal of this video is to demonstrate the IIF procedure, including slide processing, identification of common IIF patterns, and the introduction of new advancements to simplify and harmonize this technique. PMID:24998977

  13. Meta-Analysis: Diagnostic Accuracy of Antinuclear Antibodies, Smooth Muscle Antibodies and Antibodies to a Soluble Liver Antigen/Liver Pancreas in Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Chen, Wei-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Background Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) and antibodies to a soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas (anti-SLA/LP) are useful markers that can help clinicians to diagnose and classify autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Objectives To determine whether ANA, SMA and anti-SLA/LP help to accurately diagnose patients with AIH. Search strategy The PubMed, CNKI, WANFANG, and SinoMed databases were accessed to retrieve studies published in English and Chinese. Studies published up to October 2013 were reviewed. Selection criteria Studies on the diagnostic value of ANA, SMA or anti-SLA/LP in the diagnosis of known or suspected AIH were included. Data collection and analysis Two authors evaluated studies independently and rated their methodological quality using quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS) tools; relevant data were abstracted. The random-effects method was used to summarize sensitivities, specificities, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) from all 29 studies. Results The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and DOR for ANA were 0.650 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.619 to 0.680), 0.751 (95%CI, 0.737 to 0.764), 3.030 (95%CI, 2.349 to 3.910), 0.464 (95%CI, 0.356 to 0.604), and 7.380 (95%CI, 4.344 to 12.539), respectively. For SMA, the values were 0.593 (95%CI, 0.564 to 0.621), 0.926 (95%CI, 0.917 to 0.934), 11.740 (95%CI, 7.379 to 18.678), 0.449 (95%CI, 0.367 to 0.549), and 31.553 (95%CI, 17.147 to 58.060), respectively. Finally, for anti-SLA/LP, the values were 0.194 (95%CI, 0.168 to 0.222), 0.989 (95%CI, 0.985 to 0.993), 11.089 (95%CI, 7.601 to 16.177), 0.839 (95%CI, 0.777 to 0.905), and 16.867 (95%CI, 10.956 to 25.967), respectively. Authors’ conclusions ANA provided moderate sensitivity and specificity, while SMA gave moderate sensitivity and high specificity, and anti-SLA/LP exhibited low sensitivity and high specificity. All three antibodies were limited by their unsatisfactory sensitivities and lack of consistency. PMID:24651126

  14. A computer program that periodically monitors the ability to interpret the antinuclear antibody test.

    PubMed

    Astion, M L; Wener, M H; Hutchinson, K; Olsen, G B; Orkand, A R; Pagliaro, L J

    1996-05-01

    Our laboratory has been developing computer programs that help medical technologists improve their performance of the microscope-based immunofluorescence assay for antinuclear antibodies (ANA). This image-based laboratory test has been associated with poor reproducibility. We have previously described our first program, ANA-Tutor, which systematically teaches the ANA test by using approximately 150 processed digital images of ANA test results. The program we describe here, Pattern Plus Auditor, is a logical extension to ANA-Tutor. Pattern Plus Auditor tests the ability of laboratory personnel to interpret the ANA test, and tracks individual and laboratory performance over time. The program consists of image-based questions that test a variety of ANA staining patterns, including homogeneous, speckled, centromere, nucleolar, mixed patterns, and rare patterns. For each question, the program provides correct answers with explanations and color overlays that highlight key image features. By entering the proper password, users gain access to exam results for individuals and for the laboratory as a whole. Results are available for the current exam, any previous exam, or cumulatively on all exams to date. Intralaboratory testing with computer programs such as Pattern Plus Auditor might be a useful part of quality-assurance procedures for many image-based laboratory tests. PMID:8653925

  15. Predictive value of antinuclear antibodies in autoimmune diseases classified by clinical criteria: Analytical study in a specialized health institute, one year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Soto, María Elena; Hernández-Becerril, Nidia; Perez-Chiney, Ada Claudia; Hernández-Rizo, Alfredo; Telich-Tarriba, José Eduardo; Juárez-Orozco, Luis Eduardo; Melendez, Gabriela; Bojalil, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Determination of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) is usually the initial test for the diagnosis of systemic rheumatic diseases (SRD). Assigning predictive values to positive and negative results of the test is vital because lack of knowledge about ANAs and their usefulness in classification criteria of SRD leads to inappropriate use. Methods: Retrospective study, ANA tests requested by different specialties, correlation to patients' final diagnosis. Results: The prevalence of autoimmune disease was relatively low in our population yielding a low PPV and a high NPV for the ANA test. 40% of the patients had no clinical criteria applied prior to test. Coexistence of two or more autoimmune disorders affects prevalence and predictive values. Conclusion: Application of the test after careful evaluation for clinical criteria remarkably improves the positive likelihood ratio for the diagnosis.

  16. Report of the First International Consensus on Standardized Nomenclature of Antinuclear Antibody HEp-2 Cell Patterns 2014–2015

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Edward K. L.; Damoiseaux, Jan; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; Conrad, Karsten; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; von Mühlen, Carlos A.; Andrade, Luis E. C.

    2015-01-01

    During the 12th International Workshop on Autoantibodies and Autoimmunity held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 28, 2014, a full day session was devoted to establishing a consensus on the nomenclature of staining patterns observed in the antinuclear antibody (ANA) indirect immunofluorescence test on HEp-2 cells. The current report summarizes the collective agreements with input from the host Brazilian and international communities that represented research, clinical, and diagnostic service laboratories. Patterns are categorized in three major groups (nuclear, cytoplasmic, and mitotic patterns) and each pattern has been defined and described in detail. The consensus nomenclature and representative patterns are made available online at the international consensus on antinuclear antibody pattern (ICAP) website (www.ANApatterns.org). To facilitate continuous improvement and input, specific comments on ICAP are encouraged and these will be discussed in subsequent ICAP meetings. The ultimate goal with the establishment of the ICAP is to promote harmonization and understanding of autoantibody test nomenclature, as well as interpretation guidelines for ANA testing, thereby optimizing usage in patient care. PMID:26347739

  17. Report of the First International Consensus on Standardized Nomenclature of Antinuclear Antibody HEp-2 Cell Patterns 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Chan, Edward K L; Damoiseaux, Jan; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; Conrad, Karsten; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; von Mühlen, Carlos A; Andrade, Luis E C

    2015-01-01

    During the 12th International Workshop on Autoantibodies and Autoimmunity held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 28, 2014, a full day session was devoted to establishing a consensus on the nomenclature of staining patterns observed in the antinuclear antibody (ANA) indirect immunofluorescence test on HEp-2 cells. The current report summarizes the collective agreements with input from the host Brazilian and international communities that represented research, clinical, and diagnostic service laboratories. Patterns are categorized in three major groups (nuclear, cytoplasmic, and mitotic patterns) and each pattern has been defined and described in detail. The consensus nomenclature and representative patterns are made available online at the international consensus on antinuclear antibody pattern (ICAP) website (www.ANApatterns.org). To facilitate continuous improvement and input, specific comments on ICAP are encouraged and these will be discussed in subsequent ICAP meetings. The ultimate goal with the establishment of the ICAP is to promote harmonization and understanding of autoantibody test nomenclature, as well as interpretation guidelines for ANA testing, thereby optimizing usage in patient care. PMID:26347739

  18. Identification of specific antinuclear antibodies in dogs using a line immunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Hanna D; Lattwein, Erik; Renneker, Stefanie; Lilliehöök, Inger; Rönnelid, Johan; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene

    2015-12-15

    Circulating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are commonly present in the systemic autoimmune disease Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and in other systemic rheumatic diseases, in humans as well as in dogs. The indirect immunofluorescence (IIF)-ANA test is the standard method for detecting ANA. Further testing for specific ANA with immunoblot techniques or ELISAs is routinely performed in humans to aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease. Several specific ANA identified in humans have been identified also in suspected canine SLE but, in contrast to humans, investigation of autoantibodies in canine SLE is mainly restricted to the IIF-ANA test. Our aim was to identify both known and novel specific ANA in dogs and to investigate if different IIF-ANA patterns are associated with different specific ANA in dogs. Sera from 240 dogs with suspicion of autoimmune disease (210 IIF-ANA positive (ANA(pos)) and 30 IIF-ANA negative (ANA(neg))) as well as sera from 27 healthy controls were included. The samples were analysed with a line immunoassay, LIA (Euroline ANA Profile 5, Euroimmun, Lübeck, Germany) and four different ELISAs (Euroimmun). The ANA(pos) dogs were divided in two groups depending on the type of IIF-ANA pattern. Of the 210 ANA(pos) samples 68 were classified as ANA homogenous (ANA(H)) and 141 as ANA speckled (ANA(S)), one sample was not possible to classify. Dogs in the ANA(H) group had, compared to the other groups, most frequently high levels of anti-double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) and anti-nucleosome ANA. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were confirmed in some dogs with the Crithidia luciliae indirect immunofluorescence test (CLIFT). The frequency of ANA(H) dogs with values above those observed in the healthy group was significantly higher compared to ANA(S) dogs for anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome, and anti-histone reactivity. Dogs in the ANA(S) group had, compared to the other groups, most frequently high levels of anti-ribonucleoproteins (RNP) and/or anti-Smith (Sm) antibodies. Reactivity against Sjögren's syndrome related antigens (SS)-A (including the Ro-60 and Ro-52 subcomponents), SS-B, histidyl tRNA synthetase (Jo-1), topoisomerase I antigen (Scl-70), polymyositis-scleroderma antigen (PM-Scl) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was also noted in individual dogs. In conclusion, by using a commercial LIA and different ELISAs originally developed for detection of human ANA, we identified several specific ANA in serum samples from dogs sampled for IIF-ANA testing. Further, we found that the types of IIF-ANA pattern were associated with reactivity against some particular nuclear antigens. PMID:26547884

  19. Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice show increased titers of serum anti-nuclear and anti-dsDNA antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuehai; Huang, Ziyang; Lu, Huixia; Lin, Huili; Wang, Zhenhua; Chen, Xiaoqing; Ouyang, Qiufang; Tang, Mengxiong; Hao, Panpan; Ni, Jingqin; Xu, Dongming; Zhang, Mingxiang; Zhang, Qunye; Lin, Ling; and others

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibodies were higher in ApoE{sup -/-} than C57B6/L mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spleen was greater and splenocyte apoptosis lower in ApoE{sup -/-} than B6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of TLR4 was lower in spleen tissue of ApoE{sup -/-} than B6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TLR4 pathway may participate in maintaining the balance of splenocyte apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TLR4 pathway may participate in antibody production in spleen tissue. -- Abstract: Apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE{sup -/-}) mice, atherosclerosis-prone mice, show an autoimmune response, but the pathogenesis is not fully understood. We investigated the pathogenesis in female and male ApoE{sup -/-} mice. The spleens of all ApoE{sup -/-} and C57BL/6 (B6) mice were weighed. The serum IgG level and titers of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibody were assayed by ELISA. Apoptosis of spleen tissue was evaluated by TUNEL. TLR4 level in spleen tissue was tested by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Levels of MyD88, p38, phosphorylated p38 (pp38), interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) in spleen tissue were detected by Western blot analysis. We also survey the changes of serum autoantibodies, spleen weight, splenocyte apoptosis and the expressions of TLR4, MyD88, pp38, IRF3 and Bax in spleen tissue in male ApoE{sup -/-} mice after 4 weeks of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Toll-like receptor 4 ligand, administration. ApoE{sup -/-} mice showed splenomegaly and significantly increased serum level of IgG and titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibody as compared with B6 mice. Splenocyte apoptosis and the expression of TLR4, MyD88, pp38, IRF3 and Bax in spleen tissue were significantly lower in ApoE{sup -/-} than B6 mice. The expression of TLR4, MyD88, IRF3, pp38, and Bax differed by sex in ApoE{sup -/-} spleen tissue. The down-regulation of TLR4 signal molecules induced by LPS led to decreased expression of Bax and increased serum titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibody. Therefore, the TLR4 signal pathway may participate in maintaining the balance of splenocyte apoptosis and autoantibody production in ApoE{sup -/-} mice.

  20. Current Concepts and Future Directions for the Assessment of Autoantibodies to Cellular Antigens Referred to as Anti-Nuclear Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Michael; Meroni, Pier-Luigi; Bossuyt, Xavier; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    The detection of autoantibodies that target intracellular antigens, commonly termed anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), is a serological hallmark in the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD). Different methods are available for detection of ANA and all bearing their own advantages and limitations. Most laboratories use the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay based on HEp-2 cell substrates. Due to the subjectivity of this diagnostic platform, automated digital reading systems have been developed during the last decade. In addition, solid phase immunoassays using well characterized antigens have gained widespread adoption in high throughput laboratories due to their ease of use and open automation. Despite all the advances in the field of ANA detection and its contribution to the diagnosis of SARD, significant challenges persist. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current status on ANA testing including automated IIF reading systems and solid phase assays and suggests an approach to interpretation of results and discusses meeting the problems of assay standardization and other persistent challenges. PMID:24868563

  1. Development of antinuclear antibodies and a genetic linkage in pigs infected with porcine circovirus type 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives. Prominent nuclear immunohistochemical staining of a PCV-2 free porcine kidney cell line (PK-15) was detected with a rabbit polyclonal antibody produced against a conserved PCV2 Rep-protein peptide. This unexpected finding led us to retrospectively test sera from gnotobiotic pigs for the ...

  2. Reproductive and hormonal risk factors for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in a representative sample of U.S. women

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Christine G.; Miller, Frederick W.; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward K.L.; Andrushchenko, Zhanna; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Jusko, Todd A.; Kissling, Grace E.; Patel, Mehul D.; Rose, Kathryn M.; Weinberg, Clarice; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Sandler, Dale P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Autoantibodies are of growing interest in cancer research as potential biomarkers; yet the determinants of autoimmunity are not well understood. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are common in the general population, and are more prevalent in women and older adults. Here we examined the relationship of ANA with reproductive and hormonal factors in a representative sample of U.S. women. Methods We analyzed data on reproductive history and exogenous hormone use in relation to serum ANA in 2,037 females ages 12 and older from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; 1999–2004). Estimated ANA prevalences were adjusted for sampling weights. Prevalence odds ratios (POR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were adjusted for age, race and poverty-income-ratio, and models were stratified by menopause status. Results In premenopausal women ages 20 and older, ANA prevalence was associated with parity (p<0.001; parous versus nulliparous POR=2.0; 95%CI 1.2, 3.4), but in parous women ANA did not vary by number of births, age at first birth, years since last birth or breastfeeding. In postmenopausal women, ANA prevalence was associated with an older age at menarche (p=0.019; age 16–20 versus 10–12 years POR=3.0, 95%CI 1.6, 5.9), but not with parity. Oral contraceptives and estrogen therapy were not associated with a higher ANA prevalence. Conclusions Childbearing (having had one or more births) may explain age-associated elevations in ANA prevalence seen in premenopausal women. Impact These findings highlight the importance of considering reproductive history in studies of autoimmunity and cancer in women. PMID:25086100

  3. ANA (Antinuclear Antibody Test)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... patterns include: Homogenous (diffuse)—associated with SLE , mixed connective tissue disease, and drug-induced lupus Speckled—associated with ... Sjögren syndrome , scleroderma , polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis , and ... disease Nucleolar—associated with scleroderma and polymyositis Centromere ...

  4. Antinuclear antibody panel

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have signs of an autoimmune disorder, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus . This test may be done if you ... ANA does not confirm a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE). However, a lack of ANA makes ...

  5. Presence of immune-complexes, and absence of antinuclear antibodies, in sera of dogs naturally and experimentally infected with Ehrlichia canis.

    PubMed

    Harrus, S; Day, M J; Waner, T; Bark, H

    2001-12-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentrations and circulating immune-complexes (CIC) were measured, over a period of 3 years, in 6 dogs experimentally infected with Ehrlichia canis, and in 10 dogs naturally infected with the rickettsia. No ANA were detected in any of the samples tested. The IgG concentrations were shown to be higher in the infected dogs when compared to the control dogs. CIC were detected in 2 of 10 naturally and 2 of 6 experimentally infected dogs, during both the acute and the subclinical phases of the disease. The results of this study suggest that ANA do not play a role in the pathogenesis of CME. It is however suggested that some manifestations in canine ehrlichiosis are immune-complex mediated. PMID:11600268

  6. Mercury exposure, serum antinuclear/antinucleolar antibodies, and serum cytokine levels in mining populations in Amazonian Brazil: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Renee M; Nyland, Jennifer F; Silva, Ines A; Ventura, Ana Maria; de Souza, Jose Maria; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2010-05-01

    Mercury is an immunotoxic substance that has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in rodent models, characterized by lymphoproliferation, overproduction of immunoglobulin (IgG and IgE), and high circulating levels of auto-antibodies directed at antigens located in the nucleus (antinuclear auto-antibodies, or ANA) or the nucleolus (antinucleolar auto-antibodies, or ANoA). We have reported elevated levels of ANA and ANoA in human populations exposed to mercury in artisanal gold mining, though other confounding variables that may also modulate ANA/ANoA levels were not well controlled. The goal of this study is to specifically test whether occupational and environmental conditions (other than mercury exposure) that are associated with artisanal gold mining affect the prevalence of markers of autoimmune dysfunction. We measured ANA, ANoA, and cytokine concentrations in serum and compared results from mercury-exposed artisanal gold miners to those from diamond and emerald miners working under similar conditions and with similar socio-economic status and risks of infectious disease. Mercury-exposed gold miners had higher prevalence of detectable ANA and ANoA and higher titers of ANA and ANoA as compared to diamond and emerald miners with no occupational mercury exposure. Also, mercury-exposed gold miners with detectable ANA or ANoA in serum had significantly higher concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma in serum as compared to the diamond and emerald miners. This study provides further evidence that mercury exposure may lead to autoimmune dysfunction and systemic inflammation in affected populations. PMID:20176347

  7. The Parasitic Worm Product ES-62 Targets Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88–Dependent Effector Mechanisms to Suppress Antinuclear Antibody Production and Proteinuria in MRL/lpr Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, David T; McGrath, Mairi A; Pineda, Miguel A; Al-Riyami, Lamyaa; Rzepecka, Justyna; Lumb, Felicity; Harnett, William; Harnett, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    Objective The hygiene hypothesis suggests that parasitic helminths (worms) protect against the development of autoimmune disease via a serendipitous side effect of worm-derived immunomodulators that concomitantly promote parasite survival and limit host pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ES-62, a phosphorylcholine-containing glycoprotein secreted by the filarial nematode Acanthocheilonema viteae, protects against kidney damage in an MRL/lpr mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods MRL/lpr mice progressively produce high levels of autoantibodies, and the resultant deposition of immune complexes drives kidney pathology. The effects of ES-62 on disease progression were assessed by measurement of proteinuria, assessment of kidney histology, determination of antinuclear antibody (ANA) production and cytokine levels, and flow cytometric analysis of relevant cellular populations. Results ES-62 restored the disrupted balance between effector and regulatory B cells in MRL/lpr mice by inhibiting plasmablast differentiation, with a consequent reduction in ANA production and deposition of immune complexes and C3a in the kidneys. Moreover, by reducing interleukin-22 production, ES-62 may desensitize downstream effector mechanisms in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Highlighting the therapeutic importance of resetting B cell responses, adoptive transfer of purified splenic B cells from ES-62–treated MRL/lpr mice mimicked the protection afforded by the helminth product. Mechanistically, this reflects down-regulation of myeloid differentiation factor 88 expression by B cells and also kidney cells, resulting in inhibition of pathogenic cross-talk among Toll-like receptor–, C3a-, and immune complex–mediated effector mechanisms. Conclusion This study provides the first demonstration of protection against kidney pathology by a parasitic worm–derived immunomodulator in a model of SLE and suggests therapeutic potential for drugs based on the mechanism of action of ES-62. PMID:25546822

  8. A proposed mechanism for the adverse effects of acebutolol: CES2 and CYP2C19-mediated metabolism and antinuclear antibody production.

    PubMed

    Muta, Kyotaka; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki

    2015-12-15

    Acebutolol, a ?-adrenergic receptor-blocker, occasionally causes drug-induced lupus erythematosus (DILE). Acebutolol is mainly metabolized to diacetolol. Because metabolic activation has been considered to be related to acebutolol-induced toxicity, we sought to identify the enzymes that are responsible for acebutolol metabolism and investigate their involvement in acebutolol-induced toxicity. By using human liver microsomes (HLM) or intestinal microsomes and recombinant enzymes, we found that diacetolol was produced via hydrolysis by carboxylesterase 2 (CES2) and subsequent acetylation by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). When acetolol, a hydrolytic metabolite of acebutolol, was incubated with HLM and an NADPH-generating system, a metabolite conjugated with N-acetylcystein was generated. This metabolite was found to be formed by CYP2C19 based on studies with a panel of recombinant cytochrome P450 enzymes and an inhibition study using HLM with tranylcypromine, a CYP2C19 inhibitor. Because antinuclear antibody (ANA) production is associated with DILE, we investigated whether ANA was detected in plasma from mice treated with acebutolol. Administration of acebutolol (100mg/kg, p.o.) to female C57BL/6 mice for 30 days resulted in ANA production in plasma in seven of thirteen mice. The number of mice that showed ANA production was larger in mice co-treated with pregnenolone 16?-carbonitrile, an inducer of P450s, whereas it was lower in mice co-treated with tri-o-tolylphosphate or 1-aminobenzotriazole, which are inhibitors of esterases or P450s, respectively. These results suggested that the hydrolysis and oxidation of acebutolol was associated with ANA production. In summary, this study demonstrated that metabolic activation may be a causal factor of adverse reactions of acebutolol. PMID:26408002

  9. Serum antinuclear and extractable nuclear antigen antibody prevalence and associated morbidity and mortality in the general population over 15years.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo; Ceribelli, Angela; Generali, Elena; Scirè, Carlo A; Alborghetti, Fausto; Colloredo, Guido; Porrati, Luisa; Achenza, Maria I S; De Santis, Maria; Cavaciocchi, Francesca; Massarotti, Marco; Isailovic, Natasa; Paleari, Valentina; Invernizzi, Pietro; Matthias, Torsten; Zucchi, Alberto; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of ANA and anti-ENA in the general population is not well established, especially their clinical significance in healthy subjects. We herein determined the prevalence and predictive value of serum ANA and anti-ENA for connective tissue diseases (CTD), cancer, and mortality. We took advantage of a randomly selected sample of the 1998 general population (Isola I) consisting of 2828 subjects (53% women, age 43±13 years) from a well-defined Northern Italian area. Serum ANA and anti-ENA were tested on the 2690 samples available in 2012 (Isola II, 50% women, age 58±13 years). Administrative databases were searched for CTD, cancer diagnosis, and death cases occurring between enrollment and December 31, 2013. The hazard ratio (HR) was calculated for incident cases. Serum ANA is positive in 18.1% for any titer and 6.1% for titers ?1:160, 23% in subjects over 50 years and 13.1% and 6.1% for any titer and titers ?1:160, respectively, in women. The HR for CTD development was significantly high for all ANA titers, with the highest for ANA ?1:160 (HR 14.19, 95% CI 3.07-65.68). ANA positivity was not associated with cancer (HR 1.03; 95% CI 0.75-1.43), or with mortality (HR adjusted for age and sex 1.40; 95% CI 0.94-2.09). Serum anti-ENA is positive in a minority of subjects with highest figures for anti-nucleosome (1.9%), -histone (1.6%) and -PM/Scl (1.5%). In conclusion, serum ANA prevalence in the general population is highest in senior subjects and in women, while the female predominance is significantly lower compared to overt CTD. Serum ANA is associated with an increased probability of CTD development over time, but does not influence survival or cancer risk. PMID:26524640

  10. Prevalence of symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and of fluorescent antinuclear antibodies associated with chronic exposure to trichloroethylene and other chemicals in well water

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.; Warshaw, R.H. )

    1992-02-01

    Criteria for the recognition of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were applied to 362 subjects exposed to trichloroethylene, trichloroethane, inorganic chromium, and other chemicals in water obtained from wells in an industrially contaminated aquifer in Tucson, Arizona. Their antinuclear autoantibodies were measured by fluorescence (FANA) in serum. Ten patients with clinical SLE and/or other collagen-vascular diseases were considered separately. Results were compared to an Arizona control group, to published series, and to laboratory controls. Frequencies of each of 10 ARA symptoms were higher in exposed subjects than in any comparison group except those with clinical SLE. The number of subjects with 4 or more symptoms was 2.3 times higher compared to referent women and men. FANA titers > 1:80 was approximately 2.3 times higher in women but equally frequent in men as in laboratory controls. ARA score and FANA rank were correlated with a coefficient (cc) of .1251, r{sup 2} = .0205 in women and this correlation was almost statistically significant in men cc = .1282, r{sup 2} = .0253. In control men and women neither correlation was significant. Long-term low-dose exposure to TCE and other chemicals in contaminated well water significantly increased symptoms of lupus erthematosus as perceived by the ARA score and the increased FANA titers.

  11. An Automatic Image Based Single Dilution Method for End Point Titre Quantitation of Antinuclear

    E-print Network

    Sanderson, Conrad

    Antibodies Tests using HEp-2 Cells Arnold Wiliem, Peter Hobson, Rodney F. Minchin and Brian C. Lovell- ithelial (HEp-2) cells test has been the golden standard for identifying the presence of Anti Immunofluorescence (IIF) on HEp-2 cells test has been the hallmark method for the detection of antinuclear antibodies

  12. A positive antibody screen--an encounter with the Augustine antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Burnette, Robert E.; Couter, Kyle

    2002-01-01

    An antibody screen is performed on the blood of patients who may require blood transfusion. If an antibody is detected, it must be identified to avoid transfusing the patient with blood that contains the corresponding antigen. Antibody screens are also performed as part of a prenatal profile to detect antibodies that may cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. In this article we report the detection of a unique antibody to an antigen of high incidence, the anti-Augustine antibody. We describe problems that may occur when this antibody is encountered, including its identification and obtaining suitable transfusion products for the patient. A brief historical review of the clinical significance of this antibody is included in the article. PMID:11918386

  13. Characterization of IgG4 anti-neurofascin 155 antibody-positive polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Hidenori; Yamasaki, Ryo; Hiwatashi, Akio; Oka, Nobuyuki; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Matsuse, Dai; Kuwahara, Motoi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kusunoki, Susumu; Fujimoto, Yuichi; Ikezoe, Koji; Kishida, Hitaru; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Matsushita, Takuya; Murai, Hiroyuki; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate anti-neurofascin 155 (NF155) antibody-positive chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Methods Sera from 50 consecutive CIDP patients diagnosed in our clinic, 32 patients with multiple sclerosis, 40 patients with other neuropathies including 26 with Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS)/Fisher syndrome, and 30 healthy controls were measured for anti-NF antibodies by flow cytometry using HEK293 cell lines stably expressing human NF155 or NF186. Four additional CIDP patients with anti-NF155 antibodies referred from other clinics were enrolled for clinical characterization. Results The positivity rate for anti-NF155 antibodies in CIDP patients was 18% (9/50), who all showed a predominance of IgG4 subclass. No other subjects were positive, except one GBS patient harboring IgG1 anti-NF155 antibodies. No anti-NF155 antibody carriers had anti-NF186 antibodies. Anti-NF155 antibody-positive CIDP patients had a significantly younger onset age, higher frequency of drop foot, gait disturbance, tremor and distal acquired demyelinating symmetric phenotype, greater cervical root diameter on magnetic resonance imaging neurography, higher cerebrospinal fluid protein levels, and longer distal and F-wave latencies than anti-NF155 antibody-negative patients. Marked symmetric hypertrophy of cervical and lumbosacral roots/plexuses was present in all anti-NF155 antibody-positive CIDP patients examined by neurography. Biopsied sural nerves from two patients with anti-NF155 antibodies demonstrated subperineurial edema and occasional paranodal demyelination, but no vasculitis, inflammatory cell infiltrates, or onion bulbs. Among anti-NF155 antibody-positive patients, treatment responders more frequently had daily oral corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants in addition to intravenous immunoglobulins than nonresponders did. Interpretation Anti-NF155 antibodies occur in a subset of CIDP patients with distal-dominant involvement and symmetric nerve hypertrophy. PMID:26478896

  14. Quantitative measurement of C6 antibody following antibiotic treatment of Borrelia burgdorferi antibody-positive nonclinical dogs.

    PubMed

    Levy, Steven A; O'Connor, Thomas P; Hanscom, Jancy L; Shields, Paulette; Lorentzen, Leif; Dimarco, Anthony A

    2008-01-01

    The detection of antibody to the Borrelia burgdorferi C6 peptide by use of enzyme-linked immunoassays is a widely accepted method for the diagnosis of Lyme disease spirochete infection in dogs and in humans. Antibody to the C6 peptide is highly specific for B. burgdorferi and declines following treatment of dogs and humans exposed to B. burgdorferi. A quantitative assay for determining C6 antibody levels was developed and used to measure changes in antibody levels following antibiotic treatment of B. burgdorferi antibody-positive nonclinical dogs. One hundred thirty-two client-owned dogs were used in the study; 64 were negative, 53 of 68 positive animals received treatment, and 15 were untreated controls. Test sera were collected at 3, 6, and 12 months from seropositive dogs receiving treatment and untreated controls. Dogs in the treated group were assigned to moderate-to-high (> or =29 U/ml)- and low (<29 U/ml)-C6-level groups because the change in the C6 level after treatment was dependent on the level prior to treatment. There were significant declines in the 30 dogs with moderate-to-high initial C6 levels that exceeded the maximal declines of the untreated control dogs in all cases at 6 months (16 data points) and 12 months (29 data points) posttreatment. There was little change in C6 level following antibiotic therapy in the 23 dogs with low initial C6 levels. The quantitative C6 antibody test can be used to measure changes in C6 antibody levels following treatment of antibody-positive nonclinical dogs. PMID:18003819

  15. Antimyenteric neuronal antibodies in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Howe, S; Eaker, E Y; Sallustio, J E; Peebles, C; Tan, E M; Williams, R C

    1994-08-01

    The pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility in scleroderma is incompletely understood, although previous studies have proposed a neuropathic mechanism. We studied patients with scleroderma as compared with other connective tissue disease patients and normal controls for the presence of circulating antibodies to myenteric neurons. Serial dilutions of sera were overlaid on rat intestine, double-labeled with antineurofilament antibody as a myenteric plexus marker, and imaged using indirect immunofluorescence techniques. High titer sera (> or = 1:50) from 19 out of 41 scleroderma patients stained myenteric neurons, whereas none of 22 normals or 5 patients with idiopathic GI dysmotility were positive. Although 6 out of 20 SLE and 6 out of 10 mixed connective tissue disease patients' sera stained myenteric plexus neurons, when positive sera were absorbed with calf thymus extract to remove antinuclear antibody, 15 scleroderma sera, 0 SLE, and 2 mixed connective tissue disease patients retained positive staining of myenteric neurons. Western blotting using actin and neuronal intermediate filament preparations failed to show immunoreactivity with scleroderma sera containing antimyenteric neuronal antibodies. Paraneoplastic sera associated with GI dysmotility stained myenteric neurons in a different pattern than seen with scleroderma sera. A positive correlation between the presence of Raynaud's phenomenon and antimyenteric neuronal antibodies was observed in scleroderma patients. Our results indicate that IgG antibodies reacting with myenteric neurons are present in many patients with scleroderma. Although the neuronal antigen has not yet been identified, the presence of myenteric neuronal antibodies in patients with GI dysmotility and scleroderma suggests a neuropathic process. PMID:8040331

  16. Heterophilic antibodies interfering with radioimmunoassay. A false-positive pregnancy test

    SciTech Connect

    Vladutiu, A.O.; Sulewski, J.M.; Pudlak, K.A.; Stull, C.G.

    1982-11-19

    A young woman with amenorrhea had a consistently positive pregnancy test result (serum radioimmunoassay measurement of ..beta..-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone). No fetal or placental tissue was found after uterine curettage and exploratory laparotomy. The false-positive pregnancy test result was due to heterophilic antibovine and antigoat antibodies in the patient's serum. These antibodies interfered with radioimmunoassays using goat antibodies. This case shows that serum heterophilic antibodies can interfere with immunoassays and result in unnecessary diagnostic procedures and/or unnecessary treatment.

  17. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients show a characteristic necrotizing perifascicular myositis.

    PubMed

    Mescam-Mancini, Lénaig; Allenbach, Yves; Hervier, Baptiste; Devilliers, Hervé; Mariampillay, Kuberaka; Dubourg, Odile; Maisonobe, Thierry; Gherardi, Romain; Mezin, Paulette; Preusse, Corinna; Stenzel, Werner; Benveniste, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies can be classified as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy, sporadic inclusion body myositis or non-specific myositis. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients are assigned to either polymyositis or dermatomyositis suggesting overlapping pathological features. We aimed to determine if anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive myopathy has a specific morphological phenotype. In a series of 53 muscle biopsies of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, relevant descriptive criteria defining a characteristic morphological pattern were identified. They were tested in a second series of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients and compared to 63 biopsies from patients suffering from other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. In anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, necrotic fibres, which strongly clustered in perifascicular regions, were frequently observed. Sarcolemmal complement deposition was detected specifically in perifascicular areas. Inflammation was mainly located in the perimysium and around vessels in 90.6%. Perimysial fragmentation was observed in 90% of cases. Major histocompatibility complex class I staining was diffusely positive, with a perifascicular reinforcement. Multivariate analysis showed that criteria defining perifascicular pathology: perifascicular necrosis, atrophy, and perimysial fragmentation allow the distinction of anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients, among patients suffering from other idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. Anti-Jo-1 antibody-positive patients displayed perifascicular necrosis, whereas dermatomyositis patients exhibited perifascicular atrophy. PMID:26198592

  18. A Peer Counselling Program for Persons Testing H.I.V. Antibody Positive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baiss, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Describes need for and development of a peer counseling program for persons who have tested positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibodies. Discusses selection of peer counselors, training, and confidentiality. Includes discussion of future plans. (ABL)

  19. PLCG2-associatiated antibody deficiency immune dysregulation (PLAID)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area PLCG2-associated Antibody Deficiency and Immune Dysregulation (PLAID) PLAID and PLAID- ... tend to have high levels of anti-nuclear antibodies, which react against their own cells and tissues ...

  20. Anti-mitochondrial M2 antibody-positive autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    TOMIZAWA, MINORU; SHINOZAKI, FUMINOBU; FUGO, KAZUNORI; MOTOYOSHI, YASUFUMI; SUGIYAMA, TAKAO; YAMAMOTO, SHIGENORI; KISHIMOTO, TAKASHI; ISHIGE, NAOKI

    2015-01-01

    Anti-mitochondrial M2 antibody (AMA-M2) is specific to primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but can also be found in certain patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Effective methods of differentiating between PBC and AIH are required, as their clinical course and management are different. Titers of AMA-M2 were analyzed before and after follow-up in patients with PBC or AIH. Patients who underwent liver biopsy and were diagnosed with either AIH (10 patients) or PBC (3 patients) were enrolled in the study. The AMA-M2 antibody titers of these patients were analyzed upon hospital admission. AMA-M2 reacted with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2, branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complex and 2-oxoglutaric acid dehydrogenase complex in the assay utilized for this study. The cut-off value for AMA-M2 was 5. Six AIH patients were AMA-M2(-) and 4 were AMA-M2(+). The titer for the AIH patients who were AMA-M2(+) was 24.8±14.8, compared with 324±174 in the patients with PBC (P=0.0138). Three AMA-M2(+) AIH patients were followed-up after liver biopsy. The AMA-M2 levels had decreased in all 3 patients, becoming undetectable in 2 of them. In conclusion, certain patients with AIH in this study were found to be AMA-M2(+), but the titers were significantly lower than those in the patients with PBC. At follow-up, the AIH patients exhibited decreased AMA-M2 titers. PMID:26622500

  1. Antibody

    MedlinePLUS

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  2. Clinicoimmunopathologic findings in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus with positive cetacean morbillivirus antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Bossart, Gregory D; Romano, Tracy A; Peden-Adams, Margie M; Schaefer, Adam; McCulloch, Stephen; Goldstein, Juli D; Rice, Charles D; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Fair, Patricia A; Reif, John S

    2011-12-01

    Sera from free-ranging Atlantic bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus inhabiting the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), Florida were tested for antibodies to cetacean morbilliviruses from 2003 to 2007 as part of a multidisciplinary study of individual and population health. A suite of clinicoimmunopathologic variables were evaluated in morbillivirus-seropositive dolphins (n = 14) and seronegative healthy dolphins (n = 49). Several important differences were found. Serum alkaline phosphatase, creatine phosphokinase, chloride, albumin and albumin/globulin ratios were significantly lower in seropositive dolphins. Innate immunity appeared to be upregulated with significant increases in lysozyme concentration and marginally significant increases in monocytic phagocytosis. Adaptive immunity was also impacted in dolphins with positive morbillivirus antibody titers. Mitogen-induced T lymphocyte proliferation responses were significantly reduced in dolphins with positive morbillivirus antibody titers, and marginally significant decreases were found for absolute numbers of CD4+ lymphocytes. The findings suggest impairment of cell-mediated adaptive immunity, similar to the immunologic pattern reported with acute morbillivirus infection in other species. In contrast, dolphins with positive morbillivirus antibody titers appeared to have at least a partially upregulated humoral immune response with significantly higher levels of gamma globulins than healthy dolphins, which may represent an antibody response to morbillivirus infection or other pathogens. These data suggest that subclinical dolphin morbillivirus infection in IRL dolphins may produce clinicoimmunopathologic perturbations that impact overall health. PMID:22303627

  3. Eculizumab for rescue of thrombotic microangiopathy in PM-Scl antibody-positive autoimmune overlap syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Christie P.; Nester, Carla M.; Phan, Andrew C.; Sharma, Manisha; Steele, Amanda L.; Lenert, Petar S.

    2015-01-01

    A 46-year-old female with interstitial lung disease presented with proximal muscle weakness, worsening hypertension, microangiopathic hemolysis, thrombocytopenia and deteriorating renal function. She had no sclerodactyly, but had abnormal capillaroscopy. She tested positive for PM-Scl antibodies, and a renal biopsy showed an acute thrombotic microangiopathy consistent with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC). She failed to respond to corticosteroids, plasmapheresis and renin–angiotensin pathway inhibitors. She recovered quickly with the anti-C5 antibody, eculizumab. She had no genetic abnormalities associated with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome except a DNA variant of unknown significance in C3. This case suggests that eculizumab may be effective for SRC. PMID:26613027

  4. Clinicoimmunopathologic findings in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus with positive Chlamydiaceae antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Bossart, Gregory D; Romano, Tracy A; Peden-Adams, Margie M; Schaefer, Adam; McCulloch, Stephen; Goldstein, Juli D; Rice, Charles D; Fair, Patricia A; Cray, Carolyn; Reif, John S

    2014-02-01

    Sera from free-ranging Atlantic bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus inhabiting the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), Florida, and coastal waters of Charleston (CHS), South Carolina, USA, were tested for antibodies to Chlamydiaceae as part of a multidisciplinary study of individual and population health. A suite of clinicoimmunopathologic variables was evaluated in Chlamydiaceae-seropositive dolphins (n = 43) and seronegative healthy dolphins (n = 83). Fibrinogen, lactate dehydrogenase, amylase, and absolute numbers of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and basophils were significantly higher, and serum bicarbonate, total alpha globulin, and alpha-2 globulin were significantly lower in dolphins with positive Chlamydiaceae titers compared with seronegative healthy dolphins. Several differences in markers of innate and adaptive immunity were also found. Concanavalin A-induced T lymphocyte proliferation, lipopolysaccharide-induced B lymphocyte proliferation, and granulocytic phagocytosis were significantly lower, and absolute numbers of mature CD 21 B lymphocytes, natural killer cell activity and lysozyme concentration were significantly higher in dolphins with positive Chlamydiaceae antibody titers compared to seronegative healthy dolphins. Additionally, dolphins with positive Chlamydiaceae antibody titers had significant increases in ELISA antibody titers to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. These data suggest that Chlamydiaceae infection may produce subclinical clinicoimmunopathologic perturbations that impact health. Any potential subclinical health impacts are important for the IRL and CHS dolphin populations, as past studies have indicated that both dolphin populations are affected by other complex infectious and neoplastic diseases, often associated with immunologic perturbations and anthropogenic contaminants. PMID:24492056

  5. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...nuclear constituents (molecules present in the nucleus of a cell, such as ribonucleic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid, or nuclear proteins). The measurements aid in the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (a multisystem autoimmune disease in which...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...nuclear constituents (molecules present in the nucleus of a cell, such as ribonucleic acid, deoxyribonucleic acid, or nuclear proteins). The measurements aid in the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (a multisystem autoimmune disease in which...

  7. Isolation of Highly Active Monoclonal Antibodies against Multiresistant Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Friederike S.; Laverde, Diana; Kropec, Andrea; Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Meyer-Buehn, Melanie; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL) of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA). At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium), a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC) and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030) and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 ?g/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials. PMID:25706415

  8. Uterine blood flow indices, antinuclear autoantibodies and unexplained recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Pietropolli, A.; Capogna, M. V.; Bernardini, S.; Piccione, E.; Ticconi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the correlation between 2D and 3D uterine flow indexes and the presence or the absence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage (uRM). Methods Fifty-two subjects (26 uRM and 26 control women) underwent 2D Doppler measurement of pulsatility index and resistance index of the uterine arteries in both the follicular and midluteal phase of the cycle. Additionally, 3D ultrasonography determination of vascularisation index, flow index, and vascularisation flow index was carried out with the aid of the VOCAL technique. Serum assay for the presence of ANA was performed in all women. Results Pulsatility index of ANA+ uRM women was higher than that of ANA- uRM women and control ANA+ and ANAwomen, both in the follicular and in the midluteal phase of the cycle. Vascularisation index in ANA- uRM women was significantly higher than that in ANA+ control women. Flow index in uRM ANA+ women was significantly lower than that of each of the other groups. Conclusion ANA might be involved in uRM by determining an impairment in uterine blood flow hemodynamic, particularly in uterine blood flow intensity and uterine artery impedance. PMID:26623408

  9. Effect of Selenious Yeast Tablets on the Thyroglobulin Antibody Level in ThyroglobulinAntibody-positive Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hui; Li, Hui; Liang, Jun; Yang, Ke; Zhao, Teng; Qiu, Wen-Sheng; Lin, Yan-Song

    2015-10-31

    Objective To investigate the change of thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) after the application of selenious yeast tablet (SYT) in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients with positive TgAb (>115 U/ml). Methods We enrolled 41 DTC patients with positive TgAb who had undergone total thyroidectomy and subsequent (131)I therapy as well as applied SYT in group 1 (G1). Patients with an interval of more than 6 months between SYT use and (131)I therapy or with repeated TgAb measurements before the use of SYTs were divided into group 2 (G2) and group 3 (G3),respectively. Changes in TgAb after application of SYT in both G1 and G2 were observed and analyzed by rank sum test. Comparison of TgAb gradient over certain time before and after the application was analyzed by t-test. Results The proportions of patients with decreased or elevated TgAb were 85.4% and 14.6% in G1 and 90.9% and 9.1% in G2,respectively. Compared with the previous TgAb levels,TgAb decreased significantly after the application of SYT in either G1 (P=0.000) or G2(P=0.003). In G3,the TgAb level rose by 5.6% every month before applying SYT and fell 8.3% every month after the application (P=0.086). Conclusion Application of SYT in DTC patients with positive TgAb can effectively decrease the TgAb level.
    . PMID:26564513

  10. Takayasu Arteritis With Antiphosphatidylserine/Prothrombin Antibody-Positive Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Shoichi; Hirota, Shogo; Iwamoto, Naoki; Karata, Hiroki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A relationship between Takayasu arteritis (TA) and positive antiphospholipid antibody states has been pointed out, but patients with TA complicated with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) are rare. Here we report the case of a 17-year-old Japanese man diagnosed with TA based on pulselessness of the left brachial artery, discrepancy of blood pressure between the upper extremities, and arterial wall thickening and narrowing of artery in contrast computed tomography. He was also diagnosed with provisional APS based on a pulmonary infarction without narrowing of the pulmonary artery and positive antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibody. The patient also had concurrent Crohn's disease (CD) based on histopathological findings, which may have been associated with TA. We started high-dose corticosteroid therapy and anticoagulation therapy, and his symptoms including fever, dizziness, chest pain, and lower-right uncomfortable abdomen improved. We reviewed 9 cases of TA with APS including our patient by conducting a PubMed search. Based on past reports, we considered the relationship among TA, APS, and CD. Clinicians should bear in mind that many etiologies can exist in 1 patient, and differential diagnoses are essential. PMID:26705229

  11. Relationship between Antibody-Positive Rate against Plasmodium vivax Circumsporozoite Protein and Incidence of Malaria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong-Woo; Kang, Yoon-Joong; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Pak, Jhang Ho; Nam, Ho-Woo; Park, Yun-Kyu; Sohn, Youngjoo; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between anti- Plasmodium vivax circumsporozoite protein (CSP) antibody levels and the prevalence of malaria in epidemic areas of South Korea was evaluated. Blood samples were collected from inhabitants of Gimpo-si (city), Paju-si, and Yeoncheon-gun (county) in Gyeonggi-do (province), as well as Cheorwon-gun in Gangwon-do from November to December 2004. Microscopic examinations were used to identify malaria parasites. ELISA was used to quantitate anti-circumsporozoite protein (CSP) antibodies against P. vivax. A total of 1,774 blood samples were collected. The overall CSP-ELISA-positive rate was 7.7% (n=139). The annual parasite incidences (APIs) in these areas gradually decreased from 2004 to 2005 (1.09 and 0.80, respectively). The positive rate in Gimpo (10.4%, 44/425) was the highest identified by CSP-ELISA. The highest API was found in Yeoncheon, followed by Cheorwon, Paju, and Gimpo in both years. The positive rates of CSP-ELISA were closely related to the APIs in the study areas. These results suggest that seroepidemiological studies based on CSP may be helpful in estimating the malaria prevalence in certain areas. In addition, this assay can be used to establish and evaluate malaria control and eradication programs in affected areas. PMID:25925175

  12. Social-movement analysis of the American antinuclear movement

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.E.

    1981-01-01

    Utilizing data from a survey of participants at the May 6, 1979 antinuclear rally in Washington, DC (N = 420), this dissertation explored some of the major structural and ideological characteristics of the American Antinuclear Movement. By organizing the data around three of the key analytical concepts in the study of social movements - mobilization, recruitment, and ideology - the author was able to derive from the demonstration sample a descriptive and illustrative analysis of those individuals, organizations, and processes involved in the national antinuclear crusade. Given that few researchers have actively studied the antinuclear movement beyond the scope of local or regional protests, this work constitutes the only empirical study to date examining a cross section of the movement's participants from a sociological perspective. It is also one of the few attempts to use a national demonstration as a social laboratory for the study of a social movement in general. In terms of the mobilization variables examined in the study, it was found that organizational networks, past movement activism, and individual resources were important factors in the May 6 mobilization effort. While less than one-half of the demonstrators were part of the antinuclear organizational network per se, most of them had been active in the major protest movements of the 1960's and 1970's. The demonstrators were relatively high in socio-economic resources and had occupational or educational schedules conducive to creating the necessary discretionary time for movement participation.

  13. High positive frequency of antibodies to metallothionein and heat shock protein 70 in sera of patients with metal allergy

    PubMed Central

    JIN, G-B; NAKAYAMA, H; SHMYHLO, M; INOUE, S; KONDO, M; IKEZAWA, Z; OUCHI, Y; CYONG, J-C

    2003-01-01

    Two principal types of stress protein, heat shock proteins (hsps) and metallothionein (MT), are induced in cells responding to a variety of stresses. They play an important role in protecting cells from these stresses. However, many reports indicate that antibodies to hsps are present in human serum and are associated with several autoimmunity diseases. Metals, which are commonly allergenic to humans, induce both MT and hsp70 (one of the hsps family). Until now, there has been no report of any antibody to MT in human serum. In the present study, serum samples from healthy controls (Group I), and patients suffering from atopic dermatitis without (Group II) or with (Group III) metal allergy, were measured for antibodies to MT and hsp70, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Metal allergy was confirmed by patch testing. We first found that antibody to MT exists in human serum. We also found a high positive frequency of antibody to MT (51·3%) and to hsp70 (43·6%) in the sera of Group III, compared to those of Group I (3·8% and 5·1%) or Group II (6·4% and 5·1%). Furthermore, there was a strong positive correlation between antibody to MT and antibody to hsp70 in Group III (P = 0·0013), but not in Group I and Group II. Our results indicate that antibody to MT exists in human serum, as do antibodies to hsps, and suggest that elevated levels of MT and hsp70 antibodies are associated with metal allergy in atopic patients. PMID:12562388

  14. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive conversion and microscopic polyangiitis development in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kagiyama, Naho; Takayanagi, Noboru; Kanauchi, Tetsu; Ishiguro, Takashi; Yanagisawa, Tsutomu; Sugita, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence indicates that antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-positive conversion occurs in patients initially diagnosed with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and as a result, some of these patients develop microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). However, the incidence density of these patients is not well known. Objectives To explore the incidence of ANCA-positive conversion and development of MPA during the disease course in patients with IPF and to evaluate whether corticosteroid therapy reduces MPA development in patients with IPF with myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA positivity at diagnosis or who later acquire MPO-ANCA positivity. Methods We retrospectively analysed the medical records of 504 Asian patients with IPF treated at our institution in Saitama, Japan. Results Of the 504 patients with IPF, 20 (4.0%) had MPO-ANCA and 16 (3.2%) had PR-3-ANCA when first evaluated. In 264 of 504 patients with IPF, ANCA was measured repeatedly and seroconversion to MPO-ANCA and PR3-ANCA occurred in 15 (5.7%) and 14 (5.3%) patients, respectively, and 9 of 35 patients who were either MPO-ANCA positive at IPF diagnosis or who subsequently seroconverted developed MPA. None of the nine patients who developed MPA had been previously treated with steroids. The incidence of MPA tended to be lower in patients treated than not treated with corticosteroids although this was not statistically significant. Conclusions Some patients with IPF with MPO-ANCA positivity at IPF diagnosis or with MPO-ANCA-positive conversion during follow-up developed MPA. Clinical trials to determine whether corticosteroid therapy can reduce MPA development and prolong survival in MPO-ANCA-positive patients with IPF should be considered. PMID:25593704

  15. Antithyroid peroxidase antibody positivity is associated with lower incidence of metastasis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    KEMAL, YASEMIN; DEMIRAG, GUZIN; EKIZ, KUBILAY; YUCEL, IDRIS

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid extracts were first used to treat patients with metastatic breast cancer over a century ago. Since then, a number of studies have investigated the association between thyroid disorders and breast cancer. The presence of antibodies to thyroid peroxidase (TPOab) was recently reported to be associated with improved outcome in these patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between TPOab positivity and clinicopathological characteristics in breast cancer patients. The study included 318 newly diagnosed cases of breast cancer treated at Ondokuz Mayis University Hospital, Samsun, Turkey, between 2008 and 2012. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine levels were measured at the time of diagnosis. Of the 318 patients, 253 were considered to be TPOab-negative (TPOab ?34 IU/ml) and 65 TPOab-positive (TPOab >34 IU/ml). No cases with distant metastases were found in the TPOab-positive group. However, 20 (7.9%) of the 253 patients displayed distant metastases in the TPOab-negative group (P=0.01). Therefore, TPOab positivity was found to be associated with a lower incidence of metastasis in breast cancer patients. PMID:26137279

  16. [Small cell lung cancer associated with anti-Hu antibody-positive paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kuronuma, K; Nishiyama, K; Murakami, S; Tanaka, N; Takahashi, M; Kojima, H; Fujishima, T; Tanaka, H; Takahashi, H; Koba, H; Tanaka, K; Abe, S

    2000-02-01

    We report a case of small cell lung cancer with anti-Hu antibody-positive paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome preceded by variable neurological symptoms. A 57-year-old man first noticed a numbness on the inner side of his right leg in April 1998. He was later admitted to a hospital following the development of polyneuropathy, cerebellar dysfunction, and psychological symptoms. Chest plain X-ray films and computed tomographic scans disclosed a mass shadow in the right upper lobe, in addition to enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. Small cell lung cancer was suspected on the basis of pathologic findings on an enlarged right supraclavicular lymph node and radiologic findings. The patient was referred to our hospital in October 1998. Anti-Hu antibody was detected both in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Small cell lung cancer (clinical T1N3M0, stage IIIB) with paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome was diagnosed. Three courses of combination chemotherapy (carboplatin and etoposide) were administered with a partial response. However, the patient's neurological symptoms were not alleviated. We discussed the mechanism, clinical symptoms, and treatment of this disease. PMID:10774176

  17. Remarkably increased resistin levels in anti-AChR antibody-positive myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Da-Qi; Wang, Rong; Li, Ting; Li, Xin; Qi, Yuan; Wang, Jing; Yang, Li

    2015-06-15

    Resistin is a pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. To investigate serum resistin levels in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) and determine if there are associations between resistin levels and disease severity, we measured serum resistin levels in 102 patients with anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG (AChR-MG). We further analyzed associations between serum resistin levels and clinical variables in patients with MG. Our findings demonstrate that serum resistin levels are elevated in patients with AChR-generalized MG and AChR-MG with thymoma and are correlated with disease severity. Resistin has potential as a useful serum biomarker for inflammation in AChR-MG. PMID:26004149

  18. Effects of abstract and concrete antinuclear filmed presentations on participation in a petition campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Gellis, J.

    1989-01-01

    The goal was to examine the effects of abstract and concrete anti-nuclear images and previous political activity on interest in the topic of nuclear war and participation in an anti-nuclear petition campaign. Subjects were 254 undergraduate students at Hofstra University in three political science classes, three psychology classes and three communication classes: 128 males and 126 females. They were assigned by class to one of three image conditions: concrete, abstract, or no image. After completing a questionnaire measuring their previous level of political activity, students in the concrete condition saw The Last Epidemic, a 30-minute video depicting the aftermath of a nuclear explosion. Subjects in the abstract condition saw Preventing Nuclear War-First Step, a 30 minute video conveying factual information about missile systems and the arms race. Subjects in the no-image condition were not exposed to a video and served as controls. They were asked to respond to a short questionnaire that elicited emotional and intellectual reactions to the topic of nuclear war. After viewing the video tape, subjects in the abstract and concrete conditions responded to a brief questionnaire that elicited emotional and intellectual reactions to the videos. Subjects in all three conditions were asked to provide their names addresses if they were interested in receiving more information on this topic. Subjects who provided their name and addresses were mailed, within 24-hours, a one page petition advocating an anti-nuclear position. Recipients were asked to sign the petition, gather as many signature as possible, and return the petition. Participation was measured by the number of signatures gathered. Data were analyzed by analyzes of variance. The type of image had no effect on either interest or participation in the petition campaign. A modest positive relationship was found between previous political activity and interest.

  19. Affinity Maturation of Monoclonal Antibody 1E11 by Targeted Randomization in CDR3 Regions Optimizes Therapeutic Antibody Targeting of HER2-Positive Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Bong-Kook; Choi, Soyoung; Cui, Lei Guang; Lee, Young-Ha; Hwang, In-Sik; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Shim, Hyunbo; Lee, Jong-Seo

    2015-01-01

    Anti-HER2 murine monoclonal antibody 1E11 has strong and synergistic anti-tumor activity in HER2-overexpressing gastric cancer cells when used in combination with trastuzumab. We presently optimized this antibody for human therapeutics. First, the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the murine antibody were grafted onto human germline immunoglobulin variable genes. No difference in affinity and biological activity was observed between chimeric 1E11 (ch1E11) and humanized 1E11 (hz1E11). Next, affinity maturation of hz1E11 was performed by the randomization of CDR-L3 and H3 residues followed by stringent biopanning selection. Milder selection pressure favored the selection of more diverse clones, whereas higher selection stringency resulted in the convergence of the panning output to a smaller number of clones with improved affinity. Clone 1A12 had four amino acid substitutions in CDR-L3, and showed a 10-fold increase in affinity compared to the parental clone and increased potency in an in vitro anti-proliferative activity assay with HER2-overepxressing gastric cancer cells. Clone 1A12 inhibited tumor growth of NCI-N87 xenograft model with similar efficacy to trastuzumab alone, and the combination treatment of 1A12 and trastuzumab completely removed the established tumors. These results suggest that humanized and affinity matured monoclonal antibody 1A12 is a highly optimized molecule for future therapeutic development against HER2-positive tumors. PMID:26225765

  20. Antigenic specificity of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity directed against human immunodeficiency virus in antibody-positive sera.

    PubMed Central

    Koup, R A; Sullivan, J L; Levine, P H; Brewster, F; Mahr, A; Mazzara, G; McKenzie, S; Panicali, D

    1989-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) specific for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been described for HIV-infected individuals. To determine the antigenic specificity of this immune response and to define its relationship to the disease state, an ADCC assay was developed using Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line targets infected with vaccinia virus vectors expressing HIV proteins. The vaccinia virus vectors induced appropriate HIV proteins (envelope glycoproteins gp160, gp120, and gp41 or gag proteins p55, p40, p24, and p17) in infected lymphoblastoid cell lines as demonstrated by radioimmunoprecipitation and syncytia formation with c8166 cells. Killer cell-mediated, HIV-specific ADCC was found in sera from HIV-seropositive but not HIV-seronegative hemophiliacs. This HIV-specific response was directed against envelope glycoprotein but was completely absent against target cells expressing the HIV gag proteins. The ADCC directed against gp160 was present at serum dilutions up to 1/316,000. There was no correlation between serum ADCC titer and the stage of HIV-related illness as determined by T-helper-cell numbers. These experiments clearly implicated gp160 as the target antigen of HIV-specific ADCC activity following natural infection. Vaccines which stimulate antibodies directed against gp160, which are capable of mediating ADCC against infected cells, could be important for protection against infection by cell-associated virus. PMID:2536094

  1. Evaluation of Disulfide Bond Position to Enhance the Thermal Stability of a Highly Stable Single Domain Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Zabetakis, Dan; Olson, Mark A.; Anderson, George P.; Legler, Patricia M.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2014-01-01

    Single domain antibodies are the small recombinant variable domains derived from camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies. They are renowned for their stability, in large part due to their ability to refold following thermal or chemical denaturation. In addition to refolding after heat denaturation, A3, a high affinity anti-Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B single domain antibody, possesses a melting temperature of ?84°C, among the highest reported for a single domain antibody. In this work we utilized the recently described crystal structure of A3 to select locations for the insertion of a second disulfide bond and evaluated the impact that the addition of this second bond had on the melting temperature. Four double-disulfide versions of A3 were constructed and each was found to improve the melting temperature relative to the native structure without reducing affinity. Placement of the disulfide bond at a previously published position between framework regions 2 and 3 yielded the largest improvement (>6°C), suggesting this location is optimal, and seemingly provides a universal route to raise the melting temperature of single domain antibodies. This study further demonstrates that even single domain antibodies with extremely high melting points can be further stabilized by addition of disulfide bonds. PMID:25526640

  2. The Drug User's Identity and How It Relates to Being Hepatitis C Antibody Positive: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    The increasing health problem of hepatitis C virus infection has only recently attracted the attention of psychosocial research, especially among subjects at higher risk (e.g. injecting drug users). There is a lack of information about the knowledge, perceptions and feelings that injecting drug users hold about their hepatitis C antibody positive

  3. Specificity of antinuclear autoantibodies recognizing the dense fine speckled nuclear pattern: Preferential targeting of DFS70/LEDGFp75 over its interacting partner MeCP2.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anamika; Woods-Burnham, Leanne; Ortiz, Greisha; Rios-Colon, Leslimar; Figueroa, Johnny; Albesa, Roger; Andrade, Luis E; Mahler, Michael; Casiano, Carlos A

    2015-12-01

    Human antinuclear autoantibodies (ANAs) targeting the dense fine speckled (DFS) nuclear protein DFS70, commonly known as lens epithelium derived growth factor p75 (LEDGFp75), present a clinical puzzle since their significance remains elusive. While their frequencies are low in ANA-positive autoimmune rheumatic diseases, they are relatively elevated in clinical laboratory referrals, diverse inflammatory conditions, and 'apparently' healthy individuals. We reported previously that DFS70/LEDGFp75 is an autoantigen in prostate cancer that closely interacts with another 70kD DFS nuclear protein, methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). This led us to investigate if anti-DFS sera exclusively target DFS70/LEDGFp75 or also recognize MeCP2. Using several complementary autoantibody detection platforms and cellular/molecular approaches we evaluated 65 human sera producing anti-DFS autoantibodies. Our results show that these antibodies are highly specific for DFS70/LEDGFp75 and do not target MeCP2. Establishing the specificity of anti-DFS autoantibodies has implications for increasing our understanding of their biological significance and clinical utility. PMID:26235378

  4. Positive dermal hypersensitivity and specific antibodies in workers exposed to bio-engineered enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, R.E.; Henningsen, G.M.; Driscoll, R.; MacKenzie, B.A.; Wilcox, T.; Scinto, J.D.; Bernstein, D.M.; Swanson, M. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN )

    1991-03-15

    Thirty-six employees who produced industrial enzymes from bio-engineered strains of bacteria and fungi were evaluated by skin prick testing and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays for specific IgE and IgG antibodies. The workers complained of asthma- and flu-like' symptoms which generally lessened away from work. The enzymes evaluated were {alpha}-amylase from A. niger (ind-AAN), B. licheniformis (ind-AAL) and B. subtilis (ind-AAS); purified {alpha}-amylase from B. subtilis (AAS) and A. niger (AAN); alkaline protease from B. licheniformis (ind-APL) and purified alkaline protease (APL); amylase glucosidase from A. niger (ind-AGN) and purified amylase glucosidase (AGN). Significantly positive skin tests were found for APL, AGN and ind-AAN. Significantly elevated specific IgE results were observed for AAN, AGN, and ind-AAN; elevated specific IgGs were observed for AAN, ind-AAN, ind-AAS, ind-AAL and ind-AGN. Radioimmunoassays of air filter samples (using sera with high Ab titers) for 4 of the ind-enzymes showed only ind-AAN at extremely high environmental levels. These results indicate that occupational exposure to some ind-enzymes causes immediate onset dermal hypersensitivity reactions. The results are equivocal as to whether these reactions are IgE mediated, as IgE titers were low. Contrary to this, IgG titers were extremely high and suggest that these biomarkers can be used as indicators of both individual exposure and environmental analyses.

  5. Amyophatic dermatomyositis presenting as a flagellated skin eruption with positive MDA5 antibodies and thyroid cancer: a real association?

    PubMed

    Molina-Ruiz, A M; Romero, F; Carrasco, L; Feltes, F; Haro, R; Requena, L

    2015-12-01

    Amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM) is characterized clinically by typical skin lesions with hypomyopathy or no muscular involvement. ADM has been recently reported to be complicated by rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD), especially in patients with positive antibodies against melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). These patients may have a low risk of cancer, but no clinical, histological or laboratory markers completely specific for paraneoplastic DM have been identified to date. We report a case of flagellate erythema as the initial presentation of ADM associated with ILD, positive MDA5 antibodies and a concomitant diagnosis of thyroid cancer. We discuss the unusual clinical features and associations that make this case particularly interesting. PMID:25958950

  6. Cytokine and Antibody Based Diagnostic Algorithms for Sputum Culture-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Joy; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yunxia; Li, Haicheng; Guo, Huixin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Xunxun; Chen, Yuhui; Liao, Qinghua; Shu, Yang; Tan, Yaoju; Yu, Meiling; Li, Guozhou; Zhou, Lin; Zhong, Qiu; Bi, Lijun; Guo, Lina; Zhao, Meigui

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most serious infectious diseases globally and has high mortality rates. A variety of diagnostic tests are available, yet none are wholly reliable. Serum cytokines, although significantly and frequently induced by different diseases and thus good biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis, are not sufficiently disease-specific. TB-specific antibody detection, on the other hand, has been reported to be highly specific but not sufficiently sensitive. In this study, our aim was to improve the sensitivity and specificity of TB diagnosis by combining detection of TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies in peripheral blood samples. Methods TB-related serum cytokines were screened using a human cytokine array. TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies were detected in parallel with microarray technology. The diagnostic performance of the new protocol for active TB was systematically compared with other traditional methods. Results Here, we show that cytokines I-309, IL-8 and MIG are capable of distinguishing patients with active TB from healthy controls, patients with latent TB infection, and those with a range of other pulmonary diseases, and that these cytokines, and their presence alongside antibodies for TB-specific antigens Ag14-16kDa, Ag32kDa, Ag38kDa and Ag85B, are specific markers for active TB. The diagnostic protocol for active TB developed here, which combines the detection of three TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies, is highly sensitive (91.03%), specific (90.77%) and accurate (90.87%). Conclusions Our results show that combining detection of TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies significantly enhances diagnostic accuracy for active TB, providing greater accuracy than conventional diagnostic methods such as interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs), TB antibody Colloidal Gold Assays and microbiological culture, and suggest that this diagnostic protocol has potential for clinical application. PMID:26674517

  7. De novo hepatitis B virus infection developing after liver transplantation using a graft positive for hepatitis B core antibody

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae Hyun; Na, Gun Hyung; Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Soo Ho; Hong, Tae Ho; You, Young Kyoung; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The use of hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb)-positive grafts is increasing, especially where hepatitis B is endemic. However, this remains controversial because of the risk of development of de novo HBV infection. Methods We collected information obtained between January 2000 and December 2012 and retrospectively analyzed data on 187 HBsAg-negative donors and recipients were analyzed retrospectively. De novo HBV infection was defined as development of HBsAg positivity with or without detection of HBV DNA. Results Forty patients (21.4%) received HBcAb-positive grafts. Survival rate did not differ by donor HBcAb status (P = 0.466). De novo HBV infection occurred in five patients (12.5%) who were not treated with anti-HBV prophylaxis, and was significantly more prevalent in hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb)- and HBcAb-negative than HBsAb- and HBcAb-positive recipients (50% vs. 4.2%, P = 0.049). All patients except one were treated with entecavir with/without antihepatitis B immunoglobulin and four were negative in terms of HBV DNA seroconversion. No patient died. Conclusion HBcAb-positive grafts are safe without survival difference. However, the risk of de novo hepatitis B virus infection was significantly increased in HBsAb- and HBcAb-negative recipients. All patients were successfully treated even after recurrence. PMID:26366384

  8. Antibody-based targeting of FGFR3 in bladder carcinoma and t(4;14)-positive multiple myeloma in mice.

    PubMed

    Qing, Jing; Du, Xiangnan; Chen, Yongmei; Chan, Pamela; Li, Hao; Wu, Ping; Marsters, Scot; Stawicki, Scott; Tien, Janet; Totpal, Klara; Ross, Sarajane; Stinson, Susanna; Dornan, David; French, Dorothy; Wang, Qian-Rena; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Wu, Yan; Wiesmann, Christian; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2009-05-01

    Overexpression of FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) is implicated in the development of t(4;14)-positive multiple myeloma. While FGFR3 is frequently overexpressed and/or activated through mutations in bladder cancer, the functional importance of FGFR3 and its potential as a specific therapeutic target in this disease have not been elucidated in vivo. Here we report that inducible knockdown of FGFR3 in human bladder carcinoma cells arrested cell-cycle progression in culture and markedly attenuated tumor progression in xenografted mice. Further, we developed a unique antibody (R3Mab) that inhibited not only WT FGFR3, but also various mutants of the receptor, including disulfide-linked cysteine mutants. Biochemical analysis and 2.1-A resolution crystallography revealed that R3Mab bound to a specific FGFR3 epitope that simultaneously blocked ligand binding, prevented receptor dimerization, and induced substantial conformational changes in the receptor. R3Mab exerted potent antitumor activity against bladder carcinoma and t(4;14)-positive multiple myeloma xenografts in mice by antagonizing FGFR3 signaling and eliciting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). These studies provide in vivo evidence demonstrating an oncogenic role of FGFR3 in bladder cancer and support antibody-based targeting of FGFR3 in hematologic and epithelial cancers driven by WT or mutant FGFR3. PMID:19381019

  9. Antibody-based targeting of FGFR3 in bladder carcinoma and t(4;14)-positive multiple myeloma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Jing; Du, Xiangnan; Chen, Yongmei; Chan, Pamela; Li, Hao; Wu, Ping; Marsters, Scot; Stawicki, Scott; Tien, Janet; Totpal, Klara; Ross, Sarajane; Stinson, Susanna; Dornan, David; French, Dorothy; Wang, Qian-Rena; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Wu, Yan; Wiesmann, Christian; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) is implicated in the development of t(4;14)-positive multiple myeloma. While FGFR3 is frequently overexpressed and/or activated through mutations in bladder cancer, the functional importance of FGFR3 and its potential as a specific therapeutic target in this disease have not been elucidated in vivo. Here we report that inducible knockdown of FGFR3 in human bladder carcinoma cells arrested cell-cycle progression in culture and markedly attenuated tumor progression in xenografted mice. Further, we developed a unique antibody (R3Mab) that inhibited not only WT FGFR3, but also various mutants of the receptor, including disulfide-linked cysteine mutants. Biochemical analysis and 2.1-Å resolution crystallography revealed that R3Mab bound to a specific FGFR3 epitope that simultaneously blocked ligand binding, prevented receptor dimerization, and induced substantial conformational changes in the receptor. R3Mab exerted potent antitumor activity against bladder carcinoma and t(4;14)-positive multiple myeloma xenografts in mice by antagonizing FGFR3 signaling and eliciting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). These studies provide in vivo evidence demonstrating an oncogenic role of FGFR3 in bladder cancer and support antibody-based targeting of FGFR3 in hematologic and epithelial cancers driven by WT or mutant FGFR3. PMID:19381019

  10. Clinical Phenotypes of Patients with Anti-DFS70/LEDGF Antibodies in a Routine ANA Referral Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Miyara, Makoto; Albesa, Roger; Charuel, Jean-Luc; El Amri, Mohamed; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Ghillani-Dalbin, Pascale; Amoura, Zahir; Musset, Lucile; Mahler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the clinical value of anti-DFS70 antibodies in a cohort of patients undergoing routine antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) testing. Methods. Sera with a dense fine speckled (DFS) indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) pattern from 100 consecutive patients and 100 patients with other IIF patterns were tested for anti-DFS70 antibodies by a novel chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA) and for ANA by ANA Screen ELISA (both INOVA). Results. Among the 100 patients with a DFS IIF pattern, 91% were anti-DFS70 positive by CIA compared to 3% in the comparator group (P < 0.0001). The CIA and IIF titers of anti-DFS antibodies were highly correlated (rho = 0.89). ANA by ELISA was positive in 35% of patients with the DFS IIF pattern as compared to 67% of patients with other patterns (P < 0.0001). Only 12.0% of patients with DFS pattern and 13.4% with DFS pattern and anti-DFS70 antibodies detected by CIA had systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease (SARD). Only 5/91 (5.5%) patients with anti-DFS70 antibodies had SARD and their sera were negative on the ANA Screen ELISA. Conclusion. Although anti-DFS70 antibodies cannot exclude the presence of SARD, the likelihood is significantly lower than in patients with other IIF patterns and should be included in test algorithms for ANA testing. PMID:23476678

  11. M pneumoniae infection, pulmonary thromboembolism and antiphospholipid antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ascer, Elia; Marques, Marcus; Gidlund, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    A 28-year-old, hypertensive and hypercholesterolaemic patient, was referred to our emergency unit with a mild thoracic pain, productive cough and a body temperature of 37.3°C. Laboratory examinations showed normal white cell count and moderate elevation of C reactive protein (CRP). Later, the thoracic pain increased accompanied by shortness of breath. High D-dimer was detected. Positive lupic anticoagulant factor and anticardiolipin and antibodies anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae were present and high titres of antinuclear factor. Recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator plus heparin and vancomycin were administered due the high possibility of mycoplasma pneumonia associated with pulmonary thromboembolism. CRP increased to very high levels with very mild modification of white blood cells during the evolution. Thoracic tomography and pulmonary scintigraphy of the lungs confirmed the diagnosis. The patient responded well and he was discharged after 25 days medicated with hydroxychloroquine sulphate, warfarin and aspirin. At present date he is well (150 days). PMID:22696636

  12. Anti-DFS70 antibodies: a useful biomarker in a pediatric case with suspected autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Martina; Zago, Silvia; Tosolini, Raffaello; Melli, Paola; Bizzaro, Nicola; Tonutti, Elio

    2014-12-01

    Antidense fine speckles 70 (anti-DFS70) antibodies, a peculiar antinuclear antibody (ANA) pattern by indirect immunofluorescence, is frequently observed in ANA-positive individuals with no evidence of systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease. They may be found in many different inflammatory conditions and in healthy individuals. We herein report a case of an 8-year-old girl presenting with generalized edema, hypertension, hepatomegaly, and a history of pharyngitis, which occurred 3 weeks earlier. Laboratory analysis revealed low complement C3 (6 mg/dL), microhematuria, and proteinuria. A diagnosis of acute glomerulonephritis was made. Anti-dsDNA, antiextractable nuclear antigens, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies were negative. However, a highly positive (1:640) ANA immunofluorescence test with dense fine speckles pattern was found. The presence of anti-DFS70 immunoglobulin G antibodies was confirmed by a specific immunoassay. In conclusion, the presence of isolated anti-DFS70 antibodies may be useful to exclude an autoimmune pathogenesis in those children with a positive ANA test and a clinical picture possibly attributable to systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease. This will avoid further unnecessary investigation with the potential for incorrect diagnosis and possibly harmful treatment. PMID:25384487

  13. Political returns: irony, theory, and the antinuclear movement

    SciTech Connect

    Seery, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation explores the theoretical relationship between the concept of irony and the concept of politics, and culminates in an argument regarding the presence of irony within the politics of the anti-nuclear movement. The work begins with a discussion of certain contemporary accounts of the concept of politics in ancient Greece, and a critique of a literal notion of political community is proposed as an indirect introduction for the theme of political community as ironic. In the second chapter, the thesis regarding the place of irony within the Greek conception of political community is illustrated by way of an intensive reading and reinterpretation of Plato's Republic. The next chapter attempts to answer the question, What is irony.; and to that end, an argument concerning the relationship between philosophic and literary formulations of irony is forwarded. The fourth chapter examines the theorists and theories of philosophic irony in the 19th century. In the final chapter, certain theories of the strategy of nonviolent resistance are analyzed and in response it is argued that an element of political irony is implicit within the general idea of nonviolent resistance and that an ironic view of political community informs the nonviolent protest activities of the anti-nuclear movement in particular.

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus sera antilymphocyte reactivity: detection of antibodies to Tac-antigen positive T cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Sano, H; Kumagai, S; Namiuchi, S; Uchiyama, T; Yodoi, J; Maeda, M; Takatsuki, K; Suginoshita, T; Imura, H

    1986-01-01

    Sera obtained from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were tested for their reactivity to cell lines derived from cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), or adult T cell leukaemia (ATL), and with other cell lines, by indirect immunofluorescence method. Approximately one half of SLE sera reacted with the surface antigens of HUT-102 cells, a cell line from CTCL, which constitutively expresses Tac antigen. The titre tended to be higher in the active than in the inactive stage. These positive sera also reacted with other neoplastic or normal T cell lines having Tac antigen. SLE sera reacting with HUT-102 surface antigens were further examined for their reactivities to Tac antigen, the putative IL-2 receptor, using HUT-102 or ATL-2. Pretreatment with anti-Tac monoclonal antibody partially blocked the reactivities to HUT-102 surface antigens in nine of 15 SLE sera tested. The binding of 125I-labelled anti-Tac monoclonal antibody was displaced by the addition of sera from six of 15 SLE patients. In addition, nine of the 15 SLE sera could inhibit the binding of 125I-labelled IL-2 to ATL-2 cells. These results suggested that some of SLE sera contained antibodies against the IL-2 receptor. PMID:3006953

  15. Characterization of antibody drug conjugate positional isomers at cysteine residues by peptide mapping LC-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Janin-Bussat, Marie-Claire; Dillenbourg, Marina; Corvaia, Nathalie; Beck, Alain; Klinguer-Hamour, Christine

    2015-02-15

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are becoming a major class of oncology therapeutics. Because ADCs combine the monoclonal antibody specificity with the high toxicity of a drug, they can selectively kill tumor cells while minimizing toxicity to normal cells. Most of the current ADCs in clinical trials are controlled, but heterogeneous mixtures of isomers and isoforms. Very few protocols on ADC characterization at the peptide level have been published to date. Here, we report on the improvement of an ADC peptide mapping protocol to characterize the drug-loaded peptides by LC-MS analysis. These methods were developed on brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris), a commercial ADC with an average of four drugs linked to interchain cysteine residues of its antibody component. Because of the drug hydrophobicity, all the steps of this protocol including enzymatic digestion were improved to maintain the hydrophobic drug-loaded peptides in solution, allowing their unambiguous identification by LC-MS. For the first time, the payloads positional isomers observed by RP-HPLC after IdeS-digestion and reduction of the ADC were also characterized. PMID:25596378

  16. [Classification of allergens by positive percentage agreement and cluster analysis based on specific IgE antibodies in asthmatic children].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, E; Baba, M

    1992-10-01

    Classification and characterization of allergens is important because allergic patients are sensitized by a variety of allergens. One hundred and sixty-one sera from asthmatic children were investigated for specific IgE antibodies against 35 allergens including 20 inhalants and 15 foods by means of the MAST method. We assessed the allergenic properties of the allergens based on positive percentage agreement and cluster analysis. There was a high positive percentage agreement of specific IgE antibodies between house dust and Dermatophagoides spp., a relatively high agreement between 5 molds, cat and dog epithelium, mugwort and wormwood and 5 grasses. Among the food allergens, the positive percentage agreements were relatively high, especially between cow's milk, casein, cheese, and between 3 cereal grains. In the cluster analysis, house dust and Dermatophagoides spp. made a big cluster; therefore 32 allergens except house dust and mites were analyzed. From the results of the cluster analysis, the major cluster consisted of (1) ragweed, (2) mugwort and wormwood, (3) timothy, sweet vernal, velvet and cultivated rye, (4) wheat, barley and rice, (5) molds, (6) cow's milk, casein, soybean and cheese, (7) shrimp and crab, (8) egg white, (9) Japanese cedar, (10) dog epithelium, (11) cat epithelium. The cluster of grass pollens and cereal grains made one cluster. These results tend to confirm the presence of species cross-reactivities within the major classes of allergens. PMID:1482294

  17. High Body Mass Index Is an Indicator of Maternal Hypothyroidism, Hypothyroxinemia, and Thyroid-Peroxidase Antibody Positivity during Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Mao, Jinyuan; Wang, Weiwei; Xie, Xiaochen; Zhou, Weiwei; Li, Chenyang; Xu, Bin; Bi, Lihua; Meng, Tao; Du, Jianling; Zhang, Shaowei; Gao, Zhengnan; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yang, Liu; Fan, Chenling; Teng, Weiping; Shan, Zhongyan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Maternal thyroid dysfunction in early pregnancy may increase the risk of adverse pregnancy complications and neurocognitive deficiencies in the developing fetus. Currently, some researchers demonstrated that body mass index (BMI) is associated with thyroid function in nonpregnant population. Hence, the American Thyroid Association recommended screening thyroid function in obese pregnant women; however, the evidence for this is weak. For this purpose, our study investigated the relationship between high BMI and thyroid functions during early pregnancy in Liaoning province, an iodine-sufficient region of China. Methods. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid-peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) concentration, urinary iodine concentration (UIC), and BMI were determined in 6303 pregnant women. Results. BMI ? 25?kg/m2 may act as an indicator of hypothyroxinemia and TPOAb positivity and BMI ? 30?kg/m2 was associated with increases in the odds of hypothyroidism, hypothyroxinemia, and TPOAb positivity. The prevalence of isolated hypothyroxinemia increased among pregnant women with BMI > 24?kg/m2. Conclusions. High BMI during early pregnancy may be an indicator of maternal thyroid dysfunction; for Asian women whose BMI > 24?kg/m2 and who are within 8 weeks of pregnancy, thyroid functions should be assessed especially. PMID:26273610

  18. Suppression of Fc?-Receptor-Mediated Antibody Effector Function during Persistent Viral Infection

    E-print Network

    Yamada, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of IgE antinuclear antibodies in rheumatoidof antibody Fc components (IgM, IgD, IgG, IgE, and IgA) thatantibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) (97, 98). The Fc portion of IgE

  19. [A case of neonatal lupus syndrome and congenital atrioventricular block associated with maternal antibodies antiRo/SS-A].

    PubMed

    De Leonibus, C; Lembo, C; Giliberti, P; Rojo, S; Foglia, M C; Giordano, L; Fratta, A

    2012-04-01

    The neonatal lupus erythematosus syndrome (LEN) is a disease due to the transplacental passage of maternal antiextractable nuclear antigens (ENA) antibodies, particularly anti-Ro/SS-A and anti-La/SS-B. The disease affects neonates born from mothers with autoimmune diseases. It is characterized by erythematous annular polycylic skin lesions, slightly scaling with prevalent face localization, hematologic and liver diseases and only in 2% of cases with extracutaneous lesions including complete atrioventricular block. The Authors describe a case of LEN characterized by isolated atrioventricular block at birth and endocardial fibroelastosis without skin lesions in a preterm infant female. She was born from asymptomatic, ANA (Anti-Nuclear Antibodies) and ENA (anti-Extractable Nuclear Antigen) positive mother, with a previous miscarriage at the 5th week of gestation. PMID:22495199

  20. Serum auto antibodies and clinical/pathological features in German shepherd dogs with a lupuslike syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thoren-Tolling, K; Ryden, L

    1991-01-01

    This study presents 8 dogs of German Shepherd breed (6 males, 2 females, 2-5 years of age at onset of the disease) with a lupus like syndrome characterized by febrile polyarthritis, wasting, nephropathy, cutaneous lesions and high positive titres of ANA (antinuclear antibodies) of speckled type. The serum autoantibodies were further characterized by double immunodiffusion against ENA (extractable nuclear antigen), ELISA for Histone antibodies (Histon fraction H-24A and H-3S), indirect IF on rat-liver sections, non treated and RNase/DNase digested sections for DNP/RNP antibodies, and smears of a hemoflagellate C. luciliae for antibodies vs doubbel strained DNA, (dsDNA). Thus, the high ANA titres in these dogs represent varying types of autoantibodies against nucleoproteins of both DNA and RNA nature, associated histone antigens and non-histone antibodies (RNA and Sm) as well. Rheumatoid Factor titres in serum from these dogs were low or negative. Immunoglobulin deposits at dermo-epidermal junctions were demonstrated in some of the dogs with hyperkeratotic skin lesions. High concentration of serum-IgG was a constant finding in combination with anemia and in most cases leukopenia probably related to the chronic inflammatory process in these animals. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) or thrombocytopenia was not detected in these dogs. PMID:1950849

  1. A case of anti-PL7 antibody positive myositis and a clinical and pathological review of the anti-synthetase syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Masaaki; Shimizu, Yuka; Takahashi, Ikuko; Sato, Kazunori; Hirotani, Makoto; Kano, Takahiro; Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2015-11-21

    A 52-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with muscle pain and an elevated creatine kinase level. She had experienced wrist pain at onset seven years ago. The initial possible diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis and adult-onset Still disease. The patient received corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy but experienced deterioration of symptoms. The symptoms of muscle pain and mild creatine kinase elevation emerged four years prior to her visit. Further elevation of creatine kinase was observed for three months before her visit despite adjusting the immunosuppressant dose. On admission, she presented with muscle moderate weakness of the trunk and extremities and pain of the shoulder and medial thigh muscles. Elevation of muscle enzymes and inflammatory response were also detected, and the anti-PL7 antibody was positive. Muscle biopsy from biceps brachii revealed necrotizing myopathy with necrotic and regenerated muscle fibers. The final diagnosis was anti-PL7 antibody positive myositis. The patient was treated with a higher dose of prednisolone and an adequate dose of tacrolimus. Following this treatment, the symptoms were improved. Anti-ARS (aminoacyl t-RNA synthetase) antibodies such as anti-PL7 antibody are useful in diagnosis and for prognostic prediction. Further investigation of patients with anti-ARS antibodies positive myositis is required. PMID:26458569

  2. Clinical phenotype associations with various types of anti-dsDNA antibodies in patients with recent onset of rheumatic symptoms. Results from a multicentre observational study

    PubMed Central

    Compagno, Michele; Rekvig, Ole P; Bengtsson, Anders A; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Heegaard, Niels H H; Jönsen, Andreas; Jacobsen, Rasmus Sleimann; Eilertsen, Gro Ø; Fenton, Christopher G; Truedsson, Lennart; Nossent, Johannes C; Jacobsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Despite anti-dsDNA antibodies constitute a wide range of specificities, they are considered as the hallmark for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Objective To identify clinical phenotypes associated with anti-dsDNA antibodies, independently of any clinical diagnoses. Methods Patients with recent onset of any rheumatic symptoms were screened for antinuclear antibodies (ANA). All ANA-positive and matching ANA-negative patients were examined, and their clinical phenotypes were registered, using a systematic chart formulated after consensus between the participating centres. All patients were tested for different anti-dsDNA antibody specificities with assays habitually used in each participating laboratory. Crithidia Luciliae Immuno Fluorescence Test (CLIFT) was performed three times (with two different commercial kits); solid and solution phase ELISA were performed four times. Associations between clinical phenotypes and results of anti-dsDNA assays were evaluated by linear regression analysis (LRA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Results Totally, 292 ANA-positive and 292 matching ANA-negative patients were included in the study. A full dataset for statistical analysis was obtained in 547 patients. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were most frequently detected by ELISA. LRA showed that overall positivity of anti-dsDNA antibodies was associated with proteinuria and pleuritis. Alopecia was significantly associated only with CLIFT-positivity. Besides confirming the same findings, PCA showed that combined positivity of CLIFT and ELISA was also associated with lymphopenia. Conclusions Our results show that different anti-dsDNA antibody specificities are associated with nephropathy, pleuritis, alopecia and lymphopenia, regardless of the diagnosis. It may challenge the importance of anti-dsDNA antibodies as a diagnostic hallmark for SLE. PMID:25396058

  3. Positive association between serum thymic stromal lymphopoietin and anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Koyama, K; Ohba, T; Haro, H; Nakao, A

    2015-08-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has been suggested recently to play an important role in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, there is little information on serum TSLP concentrations in RA and its clinical significance. The present study investigated whether serum TSLP concentrations were affected in patients with RA. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we measured TSLP concentrations in the serum obtained from 100 patients with RA, 60 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and 34 healthy volunteers. We also investigated the correlation between serum TSLP concentrations and clinical parameters of disease activity in RA [disease activity score using 28 joint counts (DAS28)-C-reactive protein (CRP), DAS28-erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI]), patient's/-physician's Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), swollen joints count, tender joints count, CRP, ESR and matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) concentrations]. In addition, we investigated the correlation between serum TSLP concentrations and anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) and serum tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-?. Serum TSLP levels in patients with RA were significantly higher than those in patients with OA and in healthy volunteers. Interestingly, serum TSLP concentrations were correlated significantly with ACPA titres, but not with other clinical parameters. There was a significant increase in serum TSLP concentrations in patients with RA, which was correlated positively with serum ACPA titres. These findings suggest that in patients with RA, TSLP may play a role in ACPA production by B cells. PMID:25817699

  4. False-positive reactions in the rapid plasma reagin-card, fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorbed, and hemagglutination treponemal syphilis serology tests.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, C R; Thompson, M A; Wilson, D L

    1979-01-01

    Sera from 628 nonsyphilitic individuals were tested with the Rapid Plasma Reagin-Card, Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody-Absorbed, and Hemagglutination Treponemal Test for Syphilis tests to ascertain the comparative specificity of these tests. Many sera were also tested with the quantitative Venereal Disease Research Laboratory test. Sera included in the study were from both normal individuals and patients with a variety of illnesses and conditions. The Hemagglutination Treponemal Test for Syphilis gave the lowest overall percentage of false-positive reactions (1.6%), followed by the Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody-Absorbed test (3.3%) and the Rapid Plasma Reagin-Card test (10.8%). PMID:379033

  5. Available means: manifestations of Aristotle's three modes of rhetorical appeal in antinuclear fiction

    SciTech Connect

    Mannix, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The abundance of sympathetic scientists, military men and clergymen in antinuclear fiction reflects a public perception that authorities speak most knowledgeably about an issue. Other antinuclear works employ characters with less traditional ethical appeals: nurturing women, vital youths, and even infallible computers. Antinuclear fiction uses enthymeme and example to reflect the history of the nuclear weapons debate. Some works attach the immorality of the weapons by examining the moral dilemmas of nuclear scientists. Others admit the permanence of the nuclear threat. By arousing emotions, fiction is capable of mobilizing its audience's active support for the ideas it presents. The principal emotions that various antinuclear works arouse highlight the close relationship between literature and rhetoric. The most dominant emotions, pity and fear, are the two Aristotle links to tragedy. Scorn, the principal emotion that Dr. Strangelove arouses - is the crucial emotion on which all satire depends. However, the other principal emotion in anti-nuclear fiction - hope - has principally a rhetorical function ensuring that the feelings the works provoke will be channeled constructively.

  6. 42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Antinuclear antibody Antistreptolysin O Anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Complement C3 Complement C4...) Target value ±3 SD. Antinuclear antibody Target value ±2 dilutions or positive or...

  7. Maternal HLA Panel Reactive Antibodies in Early Gestation Positively Correlates with Chronic Chorioamnionitis: Evidence in Support of the Chronic Nature of Maternal Anti-fetal Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JoonHo; Romero, Roberto; Xu, Yi; Kim, Jung-Sun; Park, Ji Young; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Hassan, Sonia S.; Kim, Chong Jai

    2011-01-01

    Problem Maternal tolerance of the fetus is essential for viviparity, yet anti-fetal rejection occurs in several pregnancy complications. Chronic chorioamnionitis (CCA) is a feature of anti-fetal cellular rejection. There is a robust association between CCA and maternal seropositivity for anti-HLA panel reactive antibodies (PRA) at the time of delivery. This longitudinal study was performed to assess maternal HLA PRA status in early gestation and the temporal evolution of maternal HLA PRA in the context of CCA and thereby to determine whether HLA PRA during the course of pregnancy is useful for the detection of anti-fetal rejection. Method of Study Maternal sera obtained before 16 weeks of gestation and at delivery were analyzed for HLA panel reactive antibodies (PRA) in cases with (N=100) and without (N=150) CCA. Results IgG but not IgM HLA class I and II PRA positivity at delivery was higher in cases with CCA than in those without CCA. IgG HLA class I PRA positivity before 16 weeks of gestation was higher in cases with CCA than in those without (30.3% vs. 13.3%; p=0.001). Positive conversion (negative HLA PRA before 16 weeks of gestation but positive at delivery) of IgG HLA class I and II PRA was significantly associated with CCA. Fetal HLA class I antigen-specific antibodies were confirmed in 12 of 16 mothers tested who were sensitized to HLA class I antigens before 16 weeks of gestation. Conclusion Positive maternal HLA PRA before 16 weeks of gestation and the temporal evolution of maternal HLA PRA are associated with the presence of CCA at the time of delivery. Maternal IgG HLA PRA has potential to be a monitoring tool of anti-fetal rejection. Furthermore, the findings herein indicate that subsets of fetuses are exposed to alloimmune HLA antibodies for months, especially in cases with CCA. PMID:21951517

  8. [Polymyalgia rheumatica and myelitis associated with anti-cardiolipin antibody].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, A; Nomura, K; Ohno, R; Kurihara, K; Yoshida, H; Ohnuki, M; Tomioka, R; Hosokawa, T; Hamaguchi, K; Shimazu, K

    1998-12-01

    A 78-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital on September 14, 1992, because of systemic myalgia and stiffness, joint pain, and gait disturbance. She had begun to feel headache and pain in the neck and shoulder in the middle of August, 1992. The pain became systemic, and was accompanied by a low-grade fever, which was unresponsive to NSAIDs. On admission, she had no joint swelling or deformities in the extremities. Neurological examination revealed weakness in the right leg, hypoalgesia below the left C4 level, hyperreflexia in the right extremities, and right Babinski's sign. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was very high (100 mm/h). Levels of other acute phase reactants were also high. Tests for antinuclear antibody and anti-cardiolipin antibody were positive, but a test for rheumatoid factor was negative. Creatine kinase activity was within normal limits. A T1-weighted magnetic resonance image of the cervical spine at 0.5 T showed an intramedullary low signal. A T2-weighted image showed a borderless spindle-like high signal. Four nodules enhanced by Gd DTPA were seen at C1-C4. The age at onset, myalgia, stiffness, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were considered to be consistent with a diagnosis of polymyalgia rheumatica. Glucocorticoid treatment was therefore started, and a dramatic clinical improvement was evident within a few days. The patient was discharged from hospital on November 30, 1992. To our knowledge, myelopathy complicated by polymyalgia rheumatica has never been reported previously. Recently, some patients with polymyalgia rheumatica have been reported to have anti-cardiolipin antibody in serum. In the present case anti-cardiolipin antibody may have played a role in the formation of microemboli or in angitis of the cervical spine. PMID:10214070

  9. Co-Positivity for Anti-dsDNA, -Nucleosome and -Histone Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis Is Indicative of High Serum Levels and Severe Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Manshu; Han, Jihua; Sun, Lijie; Jia, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Haiyu; Han, Changsong; Jin, Xiaoming; Gao, Fei; Liu, Yanhong; Li, Yang; Cao, Jianbin; Ling, Hong; Zhang, Fengmin; Ren, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize the significance of correlated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its complication lupus nephritis (LN) in a large cohort of patients. Methods Clinical data were statistically analyzed in 1699 SLE patients with or without nephritis who were diagnosed and treated during 2002–2013 in the northeast region of China. Reactivity to a list of 16 autoantibodies was detected by the serum test Euroline ANA profile (IgG). Serum titers of the anti-nucleosome autoantibodies were measured by ELISA assays. Kidney biopsies were examined by pathologists. Immune complex deposition was identified by immunohistochemistry stain. Results Simultaneous positivity of anti-dsDNA, -nucleosome and -histone antibodies (3-pos) was prevalent in SLE patients with LN compared to Non-renal SLE patients (41% vs 11%, p< 0.001). Significant correlations were found between any two of the above three anti-nucleosome antibodies in LN patients. In comparison to non-3-pos cohorts, 3-pos patients with LN had significantly higher serum levels of the three antibodies and more active disease; was associated with type IV disease; suffered from more severe renal damages; received more intensive treatment and had worse disease outcome. The serum levels of these three autoantibodies in 3-pos LN patients were significantly decreased when they underwent clinical recovery. Conclusions Simultaneous reactivity to anti-dsDNA, -nucleosome and -histone antibodies by Euroline ANA profile (IgG) may indicate severe nephropathy in patients with SLE. PMID:26465327

  10. Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor-? Antibody Therapy Management Before and After Intestinal Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A CCFA Position Paper.

    PubMed

    Holubar, Stefan D; Holder-Murray, Jennifer; Flasar, Mark; Lazarev, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Biologic therapy with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? antibody medications has become part of the standard of care for medical therapy for patients with inflammatory bowel disease and may help to avoid surgery in some. However, many of these patients will still require surgical intervention in the form of bowel resection and anastomosis or ostomy formation for the treatment of their disease. Postsurgical studies suggest up to 30% of patients with inflammatory bowel disease may be on or have used anti-TNF-? antibody medications for disease management preoperatively. Significant controversy exists regarding the potential deleterious impact of these medications on the outcomes of surgery, specifically overall and/or infectious complications. In this position statement, we systematically reviewed the literature regarding the potential risk of anti-TNF-? antibody use in the perioperative period, offer recommendations based both on the best-available evidence and expert opinion on the use and timing of anti-TNF-? antibody therapy in the perioperative period, and discuss whether or not the presence of these medications should lead to an alteration in surgical technique such as temporary stoma formation. PMID:26422516

  11. Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor-? Antibody Therapy Management Before and After Intestinal Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A CCFA Position Paper

    PubMed Central

    Holder-Murray, Jennifer; Flasar, Mark; Lazarev, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Biologic therapy with anti–tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? antibody medications has become part of the standard of care for medical therapy for patients with inflammatory bowel disease and may help to avoid surgery in some. However, many of these patients will still require surgical intervention in the form of bowel resection and anastomosis or ostomy formation for the treatment of their disease. Postsurgical studies suggest up to 30% of patients with inflammatory bowel disease may be on or have used anti–TNF-? antibody medications for disease management preoperatively. Significant controversy exists regarding the potential deleterious impact of these medications on the outcomes of surgery, specifically overall and/or infectious complications. In this position statement, we systematically reviewed the literature regarding the potential risk of anti–TNF-? antibody use in the perioperative period, offer recommendations based both on the best-available evidence and expert opinion on the use and timing of anti–TNF-? antibody therapy in the perioperative period, and discuss whether or not the presence of these medications should lead to an alteration in surgical technique such as temporary stoma formation. PMID:26422516

  12. Antithyroid Antibodies Are Implicated in Epileptogenesis of Adult Patients With Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Meng-Han; Fu, Ting-Ying; Chen, Nai-Ching; Shih, Fu-Yuan; Lu, Yan-Ting; Cheng, Mei-Yun; Chuang, Hung-Yi; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Antithyroid antibodies (Abs) are associated with epilepsy in steroid-responsive encephalopathy, but have been rarely studied in unselected epilepsy patients. This study aimed to characterize the prevalence and associated factors of antithyroid Abs and other auto-Abs in adult patients with epilepsy. Epilepsy patients without autoimmune disorders were surveyed for antinuclear antibody (ANA), anti-?2 glycoprotein 1 antibody (a?2GP1), anticardiolipin IgG Ab, antimicrosomal antibody (AMA), antithyroglobulin antibody (ATA), and thyroid function test. Of 319 patients, 75 (23.5%) were positive for at least 1 Ab. The most common Ab was anticardiolipin antibody (aCL) (30/319, 9.4%), followed by AMA (24/319, 7.5%), ANA (18/319, 5.6%), a?2GP1 (18/319, 6.5%), and ATA (6/319, 3.25%). Antimicrosomal Abs were significantly more frequent in patients who were female, older at disease onset, older at the time of study, and had unknown seizure etiology. The presence of aCL was significantly associated with more frequent seizures. Most patients with antithyroid Ab were female and had focal seizures with unknown etiology. The association of different auto-Abs with different factors suggests that they may have different roles in adult patients with epilepsy. Recurrent seizures and certain antiepileptic medications may cause the production of aCL. The role of antithyroid Abs in adult focal epilepsy with unknown cause, especially in females, warrants further evaluation because of the potential implications on treatment. PMID:26131823

  13. Public Health Laboratory Service enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Toxoplasma specific IgM antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, R A; Joynson, D H; Balfour, A H; Harford, J P; Fleck, D G; Mythen, M; Saunders, R J

    1987-01-01

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on the antibody class capture method for the detection of specific IgM against Toxoplasma gondii, using the microtitre plate format, was developed. Antigen binding was detected using a monoclonal antibody, CIE3, conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. Prior mixing of the conjugate and antigen improved the stability of these reagents as well as removing an incubation stage from the assay. The incubation time of less than four hours permits a rapid throughput of specimens. Using the assay, a total of 163 sera were examined in a three centre study and good agreement was found. Results were expressed as arbitrary enzyme immunoassay units (EIUs) against a freeze dried standard. Throughout the study the standard serum showed a coefficient of variation less than 10% across the microtitre plate. By measuring IgM titres in patients having toxoplasmic lymphadenopathy with a known date of onset, IgM class antibodies were shown to peak at two months, persisting for about six months. In addition, a case of laboratory acquired toxoplasmosis was monitored. Sera shown to contain rheumatoid factor and antinuclear factor did not give false positive results. This rapid, robust, and simplified assay is used by the Public Health Laboratory Service Toxoplasma Reference Units and will provide a standard with which other assays can be compared. PMID:3558860

  14. Thyroid Antibodies

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Thyroid Antibodies Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Thyroid Autoantibodies; Antithyroid Antibodies; Antimicrosomal Antibody; Thyroid Microsomal Antibody; Thyroid Peroxidase Antibody; ...

  15. Alternative diagnosis to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in two critically ill patients despite a positive PF4/heparin-antibody test.

    PubMed

    Hron, Gregor; Knutson, Folke; Thiele, Thomas; Althaus, Karina; Busemann, Christoph; Friesecke, Sigrun; Greinacher, Andreas; Lubenow, Norbert

    2013-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia can cause diagnostic challenges in patients who have received heparin. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is often considered in the differential diagnosis, and a positive screening can be mistaken as confirmation of the disorder. We present two patients who both received low-molecular-weight heparin for several days. In the first patient, clinical judgment rejected the suspicion of HIT despite a positive screening assay, and treatment for the alternative diagnosis of post-transfusion purpura was correctly initiated. In the second patient, the inaccurate diagnosis HIT was pursued due to a positive screening assay, while the alternative diagnosis of drug-dependent thrombocytopenia caused by piperacillin/tazobactam was rejected. This resulted in re-exposure to piperacillin/tazobactam which caused a second episode of severe thrombocytopenia. A positive screening assay for platelet factor 4/heparin-antibody should be verified by a functional assay, especially in patients with low pretest probability for HIT. PMID:24102149

  16. Alternative diagnosis to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in two critically ill patients despite a positive PF4/heparin-antibody test

    PubMed Central

    Hron, Gregor; Knutson, Folke; Thiele, Thomas; Althaus, Karina; Busemann, Christoph; Friesecke, Sigrun; Greinacher, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia can cause diagnostic challenges in patients who have received heparin. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is often considered in the differential diagnosis, and a positive screening can be mistaken as confirmation of the disorder. We present two patients who both received low-molecular-weight heparin for several days. In the first patient, clinical judgment rejected the suspicion of HIT despite a positive screening assay, and treatment for the alternative diagnosis of post-transfusion purpura was correctly initiated. In the second patient, the inaccurate diagnosis HIT was pursued due to a positive screening assay, while the alternative diagnosis of drug-dependent thrombocytopenia caused by piperacillin/tazobactam was rejected. This resulted in re-exposure to piperacillin/tazobactam which caused a second episode of severe thrombocytopenia. A positive screening assay for platelet factor 4/heparin-antibody should be verified by a functional assay, especially in patients with low pretest probability for HIT. PMID:24102149

  17. High Levels of Soluble Ctla-4 Are Present in Anti-Mitochondrial Antibody Positive, but Not in Antibody Negative Patients with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Saverino, Daniele; Pesce, Giampaola; Antola, Princey; Porcelli, Brunetta; Brusca, Ignazio; Villalta, Danilo; Tampoia, Marilina; Tozzoli, Renato; Tonutti, Elio; Alessio, Maria Grazia; Bagnasco, Marcello; Bizzaro, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic autoimmune cholestatic liver disease frequently characterized by anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies (AMA). A minority of patients are AMA-negative. Cytotoxic-T-Lymphocyte-Antigen-4 (CTLA-4) is a surface molecule expressed on activated T-cells delivering a critical negative immunoregulatory signal. A soluble form of CTLA-4 (sCTLA-4) has been detected at high concentrations in several autoimmune diseases, and its possible functional meaning has been suggested. We aimed to evaluate sCTLA-4 concentration in sera of patients with PBC and to correlate it to immunological abnormalities associated with the disease. Blood samples were collected from 82 PBC-patients diagnosed according to international criteria (44 AMA-positive/MIT3-positive and 38 AMA-negative-MIT3-negative), and 65 controls. sCTLA-4 levels were evaluated by ELISA and Western blot. Increased sCTLA-4 concentrations were found in all AMA-positive PBC-patients, but in none of the AMA-negative ones, nor in normal controls or in controls with unrelated liver diseases. sCTLA-4 presence was associated with autoantibodies against MIT3, but not with nuclear autoantibodies (sp100, gp210). This is the first study to demonstrate that levels of sCTLA-4 are elevated in sera of PBC patients. However, they are clearly restricted to patients with AMA positivity, suggesting an immunological difference with respect to AMA-negative ones. PMID:25383768

  18. T-Cell and Antibody Responses to Mycobacterial Antigens in Tuberculin Skin-Test-Positive Bos indicus and Bos taurus Cattle in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Ameni, Gobena; Cockle, Paul; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Vordermeier, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Higher IFN-? responses to mycobacterial antigens were observed in Bos taurus (Holsteins) than in Bos indicus (Zebu) cattle which could due to differences in antigen recognition profiles between the two breeds. The present study was conducted to evaluate mycobacterial antigen recognition profiles of the two breeds. Twenty-three mycobacterial antigens were tested on 46 skin test positive (24 Zebu and 22 Holstein) using enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and multiple antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA). Herds from which the study cattle obtained were tested for Fasciola antibody. The T cells from both breeds recognized most of the mycobacterial antigens at lower and comparable frequencies. However, antigens such as CFP-10, ESAT-6, Rv0287, Rv0288, MPB87, Acr-2, Rv3616c, and Rv3879c were recognized at higher frequencies in zebu while higher frequencies of T cell responses were observed to Hsp65 in both breeds. Furthermore, comparable antibody responses were observed in both breeds; MPB83 being the sero-dominant antigen in both breeds. The prevalence of Fasciola antibody was 81% and similar in both breeds. This piece of work could not lead to a definitive conclusion if there are differences in mycobacterial recognition profiles between the two breeds warranting for further similar studies using sound sample size from the two breeds. PMID:22685689

  19. Prevalence and clinical associations of anti-Ku antibodies in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana, I; Ceribelli, A; Quinzanini, M; Scarsi, M; Airò, P; Cattaneo, R; Franceschini, F

    2008-08-01

    We retrospectively analysed the prevalence and clinical features associated to anti-Ku antibodies in patients affected by different autoimmune diseases. Anti-Ku antibodies are detected in 147 sera out of 7239 anti-ENA positive sera (2%). They are found in 2% of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) (8 out of 379), 1.8% of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (7 out of 372) and 1.8% of undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) (9 out of 496) and more rarely in Sjögren Syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis. Most of anti-Ku positive patients were affected by UCTD and overlap syndromes, including polymyositis, SSc and SLE. Interstitial lung disease, myositis, articular symptoms, Raynaud's phenomenon and sicca represents the main clinical features detected in our cohort. The rate and severity of pulmonary disease is similar to those found in other SSc patients. Isolated anti-Ku were detected in about 47% of sera. No clinical differences were observed between these patients and subjects with multiple anti-nuclear specificities. However, anti-Ku are usually detected in association with other serological markers in SLE and Sjögren Syndrome, while they occurred isolated in SSc and polymyositis. PMID:18625650

  20. Presence of anti-mitochondrial antibodies and elevated serum immunoglobulin G levels: is this primary biliary cirrhosis-autoimmune hepatitis overlap syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Muttaqillah, Najihan Abdul Samat; Abdul Wahab, Asrul; Ding, Chuan Hun; Mohammad, Marlyn; Biswas, Suvra; Rahman, Md. Mostafizur

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis in combination with autoimmune hepatitis has been termed “overlap syndrome”, but its diagnosis is challenging. We report a case of a 43-year-old lady who presented with a six-month history of jaundice and pruritus. She subsequently developed gum bleeds. Laboratory investigations revealed hypochromic microcytic anemia, abnormal coagulation profiles, elevated serum alanine transferase and alkaline phosphatase levels, and raised serum IgG and IgM levels. Her serum was also positive for anti-nuclear and anti-mitochondrial antibodies. The findings from her abdominal CT scan were suggestive of early liver cirrhosis and the histopathological examination results of her liver biopsy were consistent with primary biliary cirrhosis. The patient was treated with ursodeoxycholic acid and her liver function test parameters normalized after six months.

  1. Trouble in the Family: New Zealand's Anti-Nuclear Policy

    E-print Network

    Hanson, F. Allan

    1987-01-01

    forests and tattooed Maori natives in this remote corner of the world. Attempting to domes- ticate the alien setting by transplanting familiar British culture wholesale, they imported sheep and established British farms and towns, planted English gardens... superpower.23 THE LIBERAL POSITION has been official government policy since the Labour party came into power after the 1984 election. A port ban against nuclear vessels was an issue in the election and was favored by the two minor parties (Social Credit...

  2. Placental Hofbauer cells assemble and sequester HIV-1 in tetraspanin-positive compartments that are accessible to broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Erica L; Chu, Hin; Byrareddy, Siddappa Nagadenahalli; Spearman, Paul; Chakraborty, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Within monocyte-derived macrophages, HIV-1 accumulates in intracellular virus-containing compartments (VCCs) that are inaccessible to the external environment, which implicate these cells as latently infected HIV-1 reservoirs. During mother-to-child transmission of HIV-1, human placental macrophages (Hofbauer cells (HCs)) are viral targets, and have been shown to be infected in vivo and sustain low levels of viral replication in vitro; however, the risk of in utero transmission is less than 7%. The role of these primary macrophages as viral reservoirs is largely undefined. The objective of this study is to define potential sites of viral assembly, accumulation and neutralization in HCs given the pivotal role of the placenta in preventing HIV-1 infection in the mother-infant dyad. Methods Term placentae from 20 HIV-1 seronegative women were obtained following caesarian section. VCCs were evaluated by 3D confocal and electron microscopy. Colocalization R values (Pearson's correlation) were quantified with colocalization module of Volocity 5.2.1. Replication kinetics and neutralization studies were evaluated using p24 ELISA. Results We demonstrate that primary HCs assemble and sequester HIV-1BaL in intracellular VCCs, which are enriched in endosomal/lysosomal markers, including CD9, CD81, CD63 and LAMP-1. Following infection, we observed HIV-1 accumulation in potentially acidic compartments, which stained intensely with Lysotracker-Red. Remarkably, these compartments are readily accessible via the cell surface and can be targeted by exogenously applied small molecules and HIV-1-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies. In addition, broadly neutralizing antibodies (4E10 and VRC01) limited viral replication by HIV-1-infected HCs, which may be mediated by Fc?RI. Conclusions These findings suggest that placental HCs possess intrinsic adaptations facilitating unique sequestration of HIV-1, and may serve as a protective viral reservoir to permit viral neutralization and/or antiretroviral drug entry in utero. PMID:25623930

  3. Nanoparticle mediated drug delivery of rolipram to tyrosine kinase B positive cells in the inner ear with targeting peptides and agonistic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Glueckert, Rudolf; Pritz, Christian O.; Roy, Soumen; Dudas, Jozsef; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Systemic pharmacotherapies have limitation due to blood-labyrinth barrier, so local delivery via the round window membrane opens a path for effective treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticle (NP)-mediated cell specific drug delivery may enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. Different NPs with ligands to target TrkB receptor were tested. Distribution, uptake mechanisms, trafficking, and bioefficacy of drug release of rolipram loaded NPs were evaluated. Methods: We tested lipid based nanocapsules (LNCs), Quantum Dot, silica NPs with surface modification by peptides mimicking TrkB or TrkB activating antibodies. Bioefficacy of drug release was tested with rolipram loaded LNCs to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. We established different cell culture models with SH-SY-5Y and inner ear derived cell lines and used neonatal and adult mouse explants. Uptake and trafficking was evaluated with FACS and confocal as well as transmission electron microscopy. Results: Plain NPs show some selectivity in uptake related to the in vitro system properties, carrier material, and NP size. Some peptide ligands provide enhanced targeted uptake to neuronal cells but failed to show this in cell cultures. Agonistic antibodies linked to silica NPs showed TrkB activation and enhanced binding to inner ear derived cells. Rolipram loaded LNCs proved as effective carriers to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Discussion: Most NPs with targeting ligands showed limited effects to enhance uptake. NP aggregation and unspecific binding may change uptake mechanisms and impair endocytosis by an overload of NPs. This may affect survival signaling. NPs with antibodies activate survival signaling and show effective binding to TrkB positive cells but needs further optimization for specific internalization. Bioefficiacy of rolipram release confirms LNCs as encouraging vectors for drug delivery of lipophilic agents to the inner ear with ideal release characteristics independent of endocytosis. PMID:26042029

  4. Anti-Hu antibody-positive paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with acute motor sensory neuropathy resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takeo; Wakida, Kenji; Kimura, Akio; Inuzuka, Takashi; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2015-12-23

    A 69-year-old man experienced general malaise, weight loss, amnesia, gait disturbance, and restlessness a month prior to admission. Brain MRI showed high intensity areas in the bilateral medial temporal lobes and insular cortices on FLAIR images, and therefore, he was diagnosed with limbic encephalitis. After admission, quadriplegia and respiratory failure progressed rapidly, and he needed ventilatory management. A nerve conduction study revealed low compound muscle action potential amplitude with loss of sensory nerve action potential, which indicated axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. We administered intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone pulse therapy, but he did not recover. Although no tumor was found on CT, his serum was positive for anti-Hu antibody; therefore, we diagnosed him with paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. An FDG-PET study showed accumulation at lesions on two hilar lymph nodes. Small cell lung carcinoma was detected by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. Although paraneoplastic acute sensorimotor neuropathy with respiratory failure resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome is rare, identification of antibodies and servey of tumors aids accurate diagnosis. PMID:26511029

  5. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment–apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Natasha M.; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A.; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B.; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I.; Forte, Trudy M.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    A fusion protein comprising an ?-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. ?-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with ?-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed ?-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with ?-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with ?-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25994015

  6. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment-apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Natasha M; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-01

    A fusion protein comprising an ?-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. ?-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with ?-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed ?-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with ?-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with ?-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25994015

  7. Positive correlation between replication rate and pathotype of Marek’s disease virus strains in maternal antibody negative chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathotyping of new field strains of MDV requires both a long period of time and a large number of birds. Confirming a positive correlation of virus replication and pathotype may lead to faster and cheaper alternative pathotyping methods or as a screening assay for choosing isolates to be pathotyped....

  8. A strong association between thyrotropin receptor-blocking antibody-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis and HLA-DR8 and HLA-DQB1 0302 in Koreans

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Bo Youn; Chung, Jae Hoon; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang-Soon; Lee, Jung-Bin ); Shong, Young Kee ); Han, Hoon ); Chang, Youn Bok )

    1993-09-01

    The authors investigated whether the associations between HLA alleles of patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism varied according to the presence or absence of TSH receptor-blocking antibody (TRBab). They analyzed the HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DR antigens by serotyping and the DQA1 and DQB1 genes using both enzymatic DNA amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridizations. The patient population consisted of 47 Korean patients with atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis and 62 patients with goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis. The antigen frequency of HLA-DR8 was significantly increased in 23 atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis patients that were positive for TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) compared to 136 controls [52% vs. 16%; x[sup 2] = 13.1; Pc (corrected P value) = 0.003]. This relative risk was 5.7; the etiological fraction was 0.43. HLA-DQB1*0302 was also increased in patients with TBII-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis (24% vs. 7%; x[sup 2] = 11.2; Pc = 0.012; relative risk = 4.4; etiological fraction = 0.19). No specific DR antigens or DQB1 alleles were increased in either TBII-negative atrophic autoimmune thyroidities or goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis. A significant decrease in the frequency of HLA-DR6 antigen was observed in both TBII-positive atrophic antoimmune thyroiditis (0% vs. 32%; x[sup 2] = 8.4; Pc = 0.03) and goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis (0% vs. 32%; x[sup 2] = 23.2; Pc < 0.001) patients. The frequency of the HLC-Cwl antigen was significantly increased in all patient groups. The authors conclude that TRBab-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis is immunogenetically different from both goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis and TRBab-negative atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis. It is possible that HLA-DR8 and/or DQB1*0302 may be related to the susceptibility genes involved in the production of TRBab in Koreans. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  9. Fluorophore Conjugation of Antibodies Here Alexa conjugation of IgG antibodies

    E-print Network

    Lamond, Angus I.

    Fluorophore Conjugation of Antibodies Here Alexa conjugation of IgG antibodies Reagents conjugating an antibody to Alexa Fluor 488 or Alexa Fluor 546, a range of Alexa dye to antibody concentrations mg antibody. Compare each conjugate by cell staining. Select conjugate with the brightest `positive

  10. Anti-C1q antibodies in nephritis: correlation between titres and renal disease activity and positive predictive value in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Marto, N; Bertolaccini, M; Calabuig, E; Hughes, G; Khamashta, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate antibodies to complement 1q (anti-C1q) and investigate the correlation between anti-C1q titres and renal disease in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods: 151 SLE patients were studied. In patients with biopsy proven lupus nephritis (n = 77), activity of renal disease was categorised according to the BILAG renal score. Sera were tested for anti-C1q by enzyme immunoassay. Serum samples were randomly selected from 83 SLE patients who had no history of renal disease, and the positive and negative predictive value of the antibodies was studied. Results: Patients with active lupus nephritis (BILAG A or B) had a higher prevalence of anti-C1q than those with no renal disease (74% v 32%; relative risk (RR) = 2.3 (95% confidence interval, 1.6 to 3.3)) (p<0.0001). There was no significant difference in anti-C1q prevalence between SLE without nephritis and SLE with non-active nephritis (BILAG C or D) (32% v 53%, p = 0.06) or between active and non-active nephritis (74% v 53%, p = 0.06). Patients with nephritis had higher anti-C1q levels than those without nephritis (36.0 U/ml (range 4.9 to 401.0) v 7.3 U/ml (4.9 to 401.0)) (p<0.001). Anti-C1q were found in 33 of 83 patients (39%) without history of renal disease. Nine of the 33 patients with anti-C1q developed lupus nephritis. The median renal disease-free interval was nine months. One patient with positive anti-C1q was diagnosed as having hypocomplementaemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome during follow up. Conclusions: Anti-C1q in SLE are associated with renal involvement. Monitoring anti-C1q and their titres in SLE patients could be important for predicting renal flares. PMID:15286009

  11. Role of salivary anti-SSA/B antibodies for diagnosing primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Pan; Li, Chunlei; Qiang, Lu; He, Jing; Li, Zhanguo

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) is complex, and the saliva test is a potential method to improve the existing diagnostic criteria. Objective: To estimate the diagnostic accuracy of salivary anti-SSA/B antibodies in primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS), and to analyze their correlations with clinical and laboratory profiles. Study Design: This study enrolled 100 pSS patients and 140 non-pSS controls, including 40 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, 40 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, and 60 healthy controls. Unstimulated whole saliva and stimulated parotid saliva samples were collected from the subjects. Salivary anti-SSA/B antibodies were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Clinical and laboratory data were retrieved from the medical records. Results: In the pSS group, the sensitivity of anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies in whole saliva was 49% and 29%, respectively, and the specificity was 87.5% and 95%. The sensitivity of anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies in parotid saliva was 32% and 8%, respectively, and the specificity was 95.52% and 97.86%, respectively. In the pSS group, the diagnostic accuracy of anti-SSA/B antibodies in whole saliva was significantly higher than in parotid saliva (p<0.05), but was significantly lower than in serum (p<0.05). The salivary flow rate in the pSS group positive for whole salivary anti-SSA was significantly lower than in the negative group (p<0.05). The prevalence of rheumatoid factor and antinuclear factor were significantly higher in salivary SSB-positive pSS patients than in SSB-negative patients (p<0.05). Conclusions: Compared to parotid saliva, whole saliva is a more suitable diagnostic fluid. Using salivary anti-SSA/B antibodies as a single test item is insufficient given the relatively low sensitivity. Further studies should investigate the possibility of combining tests for different salivary autoantibodies as a method for diagnosing pSS. Key words:Primary Sjögren’s syndrome, salivary diagnostics, anti-SSA autoantibodies, anti-SSB autoantibodies. PMID:25475778

  12. Aseptic meningitis in a patient with cerebrospinal fluid anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody-positive preclinical rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Yuichi; Miyaji, Yosuke; Nakano, Tatsu; Joki, Hideto; Tanaka, Fumiaki

    2015-12-23

    A 69-year-old woman presented with non-fluent aphasia, ideomotor apraxia, right hemiparesis and convulsion. Her medical history was unremarkable, and she had not suffered from arthritis. DWI and FLAIR image of brain MRI showed hyperintensities in the subarachnoid space along the left frontal and both parietal lobes, and these lesions were associated with gadolinium enhancement. The levels of serum anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody, anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody and matrix metalloproteinase-3 were elevated. The results of blood cultures were negative. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed monocytic pleocytosis and negative findings for infection or malignancy. The level of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody in CSF was elevated. The antibody index (AI) of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody (the ratio between the CSF/serum quotient for IgG antibodies, and the CSF/serum quotient for total IgG; normal value of AI < 1.3) showed considerably high value of 8.4, indicating the intrathecal-specific antibody synthesis. As a result, the pathogenesis of her disease was consistent with rheumatoid meningitis despite lack of arthritis. After intravenous administration of methylprednisolone, her symptoms, the level of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody in CSF, and the MRI findings were ameliorated. Anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody in the CSF was a helpful biomarker in diagnosis and assessment of the severity of rheumatoid meningitis. PMID:26511025

  13. De novo hepatitis B after liver transplantation from hepatitis B core antibody-positive donors in an area with high prevalence of anti-HBc positivity in the donor population.

    PubMed

    Prieto, M; Gómez, M D; Berenguer, M; Córdoba, J; Rayón, J M; Pastor, M; García-Herola, A; Nicolás, D; Carrasco, D; Orbis, J F; Mir, J; Berenguer, J

    2001-01-01

    Transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection from donors who are negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg-) but positive for antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc+) has been reported. However, previous studies were generally performed in geographic regions with a low prevalence of anti-HBc positivity in the liver donor population. The aims of this study are (1) to assess the risk for de novo hepatitis B in recipients of livers from anti-HBc+ donors in an area of high prevalence of anti-HBc positivity in the donor population, and (2) to analyze the risk factors for acquisition of HBV infection from anti-HBc+ donors. The transplantation experience of a single center between 1995 and 1998 was reviewed. Thirty-three of 268 liver donors (12%) were HBsAg- and anti-HBc+ during the study period. The proportion of anti-HBc+ donors increased with age; it was lowest (3.6%) in donors aged 1 to 20 years and highest (27.1%) in donors aged older than 60 years. Of the 211 HBsAg- recipients with 3 months or more of HBV serological follow-up, 30 received a liver from an anti-HBc+ donor and 181 received a liver from an anti-HBc- donor. Hepatitis B developed in 15 of 30 recipients (50%) of livers from anti-HBc+ donors but in only 3 of 181 recipients (1.7%) of livers from anti-HBc- donors (P < .0001). None of the 4 recipients who were antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs)+ at the time of transplantation developed HBV infection after receiving a liver from an anti-HBc+ donor compared with 15 of 26 recipients (58%) who were anti-HBs- (P =.10). None of the 5 anti-HBc+ recipients developed hepatitis B compared with 15 of 25 anti-HBc- recipients (60%; P = 0.04). Child-Pugh score was significantly higher in recipients of livers from anti-HBc+ donors who developed HBV infection than in those who did not (9 +/- 2 v 7 +/- 1; P =.03). In our area, testing liver donors for anti-HBc is mandatory, particularly in older donors. With such information available, anti-HBc+ donors can be safely directed to appropriate recipients, mainly those with anti-HBs and/or anti-HBc at the time of transplantation. In the current era of donor shortage, this policy would allow adequate use of such donors. PMID:11150423

  14. Increased rate of death related to presence of viremia among hepatitis C virus antibody-positive subjects in a community-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Stuver, Sherri O.; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kumagai, Kotaro; Sasaki, Fumisato; Kanmura, Shuji; Numata, Masatsugu; Moriuchi, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Susumu; Oketani, Makoto; Ido, Akio; Kusumoto, Kazunori; Hasuike, Satoru; Nagata, Kenji; Kohara, Michinori; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2013-01-01

    The overall mortality of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to analyze mortality in subjects positive for antibody to HCV (anti-HCV) in a community-based, prospective cohort study conducted in an HCV hyperendemic area of Japan. During a 10-year period beginning in 1995, 1,125 anti-HCV seropositive residents of Town C were enrolled into the study and followed for mortality through 2005. Cause of death was assessed by death certificates. Subjects with detectable HCV core antigen (HCVcAg) or HCV RNA were considered as having hepatitis C viremia and were classified as HCV carriers; subjects who were negative for both HCVcAg and HCV RNA (i.e., viremia-negative) were considered as having had a prior HCV infection and were classified as HCV noncarriers. Among the anti-HCV-positive subjects included in the analysis, 758 (67.4%) were HCV carriers, and 367 were noncarriers. A total of 231 deaths occurred in these subjects over a mean follow-up of 8.2 years: 176 deaths in the HCV carrier group and 55 in the noncarrier group. The overall mortality rate was higher in HCV carriers than in noncarriers, adjusted for age and gender (hazard ratio [HR], 1.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13–2.07). Although liver-related deaths occurred more frequently among the HCV carriers (HR, 5.94; 95% CI, 2.58–13.7), the rates of other causes of death did not differ between HCV carriers and noncarriers. Among HCV carriers, a higher level of HCVcAg (?100 pg/ml) and persistently elevated alanine aminotransferase levels were important predictors of liver-related mortality. Conclusions The presence of viremia increases the rate of mortality, primarily due to liver-related death, among anti-HCV seropositive persons in Japan. PMID:19585614

  15. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePLUS

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked to an increased risk ...

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  17. Antibodies to nucleoprotein and to hydrazide-altered soluble nucleoprotein in tuberculous patients receiving isoniazid

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Betancourt, V. M.

    1969-01-01

    Antibodies to calf thymus nuclei, nucleoprotein, DNA, soluble nucleoprotein and hydrazide (hydrallazine and isoniazid)-altered nucleoprotein were investigated by a standard complement-fixation method in 214 tuberculous patients receiving isoniazid. Findings were compared to those on thirty-seven sera from lupus patients receiving neither steroids nor immunosuppressants and on sixty-six sera from normal controls. The incidence of antibodies to all antigens studied except DNA was significantly higher in isoniazid-treated tuberculous patients than in the normal controls, but lower than in the lupus patients. Unlike lupus there were no detectable DNA antibodies in the tuberculous or in the control sera. Antibodies to nucleoprotein (soluble and insoluble) and particularly to hydrazide-altered nucleoprotein were the most frequently found in the isoniazid-treated tuberculous patients. In general, antinuclear antibodies were more frequent in the isoniazid-treated tuberculous female than in the male; in the adult than in the child. It is suggested that hydrazides may cause in vivo similar alteration of nucleoprotein to that which they cause in vitro. Hydrazide-altered nucleoprotein probably elicits the production of antinuclear antibodies which in turn may activate systemic lupus erythematosus in otherwise predisposed individuals. PMID:5359961

  18. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  19. Antibody validation

    PubMed Central

    Bordeaux, Jennifer; Welsh, Allison W.; Agarwal, Seema; Killiam, Elizabeth; Baquero, Maria T.; Hanna, Jason A.; Anagnostou, Valsamo K.; Rimm, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most frequently used tools in basic science research and in clinical assays, but there are no universally accepted guidelines or standardized methods for determining the validity of these reagents. Furthermore, for commercially available antibodies, it is clear that what is on the label does not necessarily correspond to what is in the tube. To validate an antibody, it must be shown to be specific, selective, and reproducible in the context for which it is to be used. In this review, we highlight the common pitfalls when working with antibodies, common practices for validating antibodies, and levels of commercial antibody validation for seven vendors. Finally, we share our algorithm for antibody validation for immunohistochemistry and quantitative immunofluorescence. PMID:20359301

  20. Human Germline Antibody Gene Segments Encode Polyspecific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Jordan R.; Briney, Bryan S.; DeLuca, Samuel L.; Crowe, James E.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding. PMID:23637590

  1. Relationship between Presence of Cows with Milk Positive for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific Antibody by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Dust in Cattle Barns

    PubMed Central

    Chuchaisangrat, Ruj; Nielen, Mirjam; Koets, Ad P.

    2013-01-01

    Paratuberculosis, or Johne's disease, in cattle is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which has recently been suspected to be transmitted through dust. This longitudinal study on eight commercial M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-positive dairy farms studied the relationship between the number of cows with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibody-positive milk and the presence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in settled-dust samples, including their temporal relationship. Milk and dust samples were collected in parallel monthly for 2 years. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibodies in milk were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and used as a proxy for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedding. Settled-dust samples were collected by using electrostatic dust collectors (EDCs) at six locations in housing for dairy cattle and young stock. The presence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was identified by liquid culture and PCR. The results showed a positive relationship (odds ratio [OR], 1.2) between the number of cows with ELISA-positive milk and the odds of having positive EDCs in the same airspace as the adult dairy cattle. Moreover, the total number of lactating cows also showed an OR slightly above 1. This relationship remained the same for settled-dust samples collected up to 2 months before or after the time of milk sampling. The results suggest that removal of adult cows with milk positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibody by ELISA might result in a decrease in the presence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in dust and therefore in the environment. However, this decrease is likely delayed by several weeks at least. In addition, the data support the notion that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis exposure of young stock is reduced by separate housing. PMID:23793639

  2. Passive protection of suckling infant mice against F41-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains by intravenous inoculation of the dams with monoclonal antibodies against F41.

    PubMed

    Duchet-Suchaux, M; Menanteau, P; van Zijderveld, F G

    1992-07-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against five different epitope clusters of adhesion factor F41 (two MAbs per cluster) were tested for protection of infant mice against an oral challenge with F41-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) B2C and B41M. Infant mice suckling dams intravenously inoculated with MAbs were orally challenged, and the survival rates were measured for 12 days after inoculation and challenge. Irrespective of their epitope specificity, all F41 MAbs given in a single dose of 4 mg per dam had a protective effect against both ETEC strains. In contrast, one K99 MAb of the same isotype and given in the same dose as the F41 MAbs did not protect infant mice at all. A reduction in the dose of F41 MAbs to 0.032 mg per dam resulted in a decrease in protection. Two different MAbs against the same epitope cluster were not necessarily equally protective. Combining MAbs two by two, whether the MAbs recognized the same epitope cluster or not, resulted in protective activity essentially similar to that obtained with each MAb separately, without any improvement. Therefore, one MAb against any epitope may be sufficient for protection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titers of MAbs in the serum of dams were similar, irrespective of the epitope specificity of the MAbs, and gradually decreased from day 1 to day 12 after inoculation. We found a good correlation between colostrum and milk ELISA titers of MAbs and serum ELISA titers of MAbs. Colostrum and milk MAb titers were 10-fold lower than corresponding serum MAb titers and stayed high until day 5 after inoculation. The most protective MAb had the highest ELISA titers in colostrum and milk for the first 5 days after inoculation. ETEC strain B2C colonized the intestines of infant mice suckling MAb-inoculated mothers until day 12 after challenge. Intestinal levels of the challenge strain were high on day 2 but never reached the very high numbers (10(9) to 10(10)) described previously in a diarrheic infant mouse model. MAbs did not eliminate the challenge ETEC strain from the intestines of infant mice. PMID:1351882

  3. Importance of the Side Chain at Position 296 of Antibody Fc in Interactions with Fc?RIIIa and Other Fc? Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Isoda, Yuya; Yagi, Hirokazu; Satoh, Tadashi; Shibata-Koyama, Mami; Masuda, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Mitsuo; Kato, Koichi; Iida, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is an important effector function determining the clinical efficacy of therapeutic antibodies. Core fucose removal from N-glycans on the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG) improves the binding affinity for Fc? receptor IIIa (Fc?RIIIa) and dramatically enhances ADCC. Our previous structural analyses revealed that Tyr–296 of IgG1-Fc plays a critical role in the interaction with Fc?RIIIa, particularly in the enhanced Fc?RIIIa binding of nonfucosylated IgG1. However, the importance of the Tyr–296 residue in the antibody in the interaction with various Fc? receptors has not yet been elucidated. To further clarify the biological importance of this residue, we established comprehensive Tyr–296 mutants as fucosylated and nonfucosylated anti-CD20 IgG1s rituximab variants and examined their binding to recombinant soluble human Fc? receptors: shFc?RI, shFc?RIIa, shFc?RIIIa, and shFc?RIIIb. Some of the mutations affected the binding of antibody to not only shFc?RIIIa but also shFc?RIIa and shFc?RIIIb, suggesting that the Tyr–296 residue in the antibody was also involved in interactions with Fc?RIIa and Fc?RIIIb. For Fc?RIIIa binding, almost all Tyr–296 variants showed lower binding affinities than the wild-type antibody, irrespective of their core fucosylation, particularly in Y296K and Y296P. Notably, only the Y296W mutant showed improved binding to Fc?RIIIa. The 3.00 Å-resolution crystal structure of the nonfucosylated Y296W mutant in complex with shFc?RIIIa harboring two N-glycans revealed that the Tyr-to-Trp substitution increased the number of potential contact atoms in the complex, thus improving the binding of the antibody to shFc?RIIIa. The nonfucosylated Y296W mutant retained high ADCC activity, relative to the nonfucosylated wild-type IgG1, and showed greater binding affinity for Fc?RIIa. Our data may improve our understanding of the biological importance of human IgG1-Fc Tyr–296 in interactions with various Fc? receptors, and have applications in the modulation of the IgG1-Fc function of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:26444434

  4. Anti-nuclear weapons activism in the United States and Great Britain: a comparative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, G.

    1987-01-01

    This study is a response to the lacuna in empirical research into political activism and the nuclear issue and seeks to ascertain the social and value characteristics, political attitudes, and political behavior of activists in the United States and Great Britain. Consideration is also given to gender differences in light of evidence of an emerging gender gap in these two countries. The study investigates the common forces cited in two sets of literature - post-industrialism and anti-nuclear weapons movements - which provide a framework for analysis. Survey research data is employed to assess cross-national similarities and differences. The findings obtained indicate that while American and British activists exhibit common social and value characteristics, British activists appear more integrated in their political opposition to nuclear weapons compared with their American counterparts. Survey results indicate that the political-action repertoire of these activists is quite diverse, suggesting a new style of politics in advanced industrial democracies. Gender-based analysis reveals two important findings. First, activist American men differ significantly from the other three social groups in their attitudes towards nuclear weapons. Second, activist women in both national settings participate at a level equal to or exceeding that of activist men.

  5. Nuclear energy in postwar Japan and anti-nuclear movements in the 1950s.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masakatsu

    2009-01-01

    The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 revealed the most destructive power to-date of man-made weapons. Their impact was so great that Japanese scientists thought that a bigger disaster could be prevented only if war was abolished. Thus they welcomed the international control of atomic energy. It was, however, only after the occupation that the Japanese general public began to learn about the horror of these atomic disasters due to the censorship imposed by the occupational forces. The hydrogen bomb test by the US in the Bikini atoll on March 1, 1954 renewed fears of nuclear weapons. The crew of a Japanese fishing vessel, the "Daigo Fukuryu Maru" (Lucky Dragon No. 5) suffered from exposure to radiation from the test. Even after the incident the US did not stop nuclear tests which continued to radioactively contaminate fish and rains in Japan. As a result, the petition movement for the ban of nuclear trials suddenly spread all over the country. By the summer of 1955 the number of the signatures grew to more than one third of Japan's population at the time. Under the strong influence of anti-nuclear Japanese public opinion the Science Council of Japan announced the so-called three principles of atomic energy: "openness," "democracy," and "independence" to ensure atomic energy was used for peaceful uses only. These principles were included in the Atomic Energy Basic Law established in December 1955. With this law, military uses of nuclear energy were strictly forbidden. PMID:20521422

  6. In defiance of nuclear deterrence: anti-nuclear New Zealand after two decades.

    PubMed

    Reitzig, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    In 1984, nuclear-armed and nuclear-powered vessels were banned from New Zealand to express the country's rejection of the nuclear deterrence concept. This led to a disagreement with the United States. Today, the ban on nuclear-powered ships is the only element of the nuclear-free legislation that still strains US-New Zealand relations. This article presents the reasons for the ban on nuclear-powered ships, which include scientific safety concerns, a symbolic rejection of the nuclear deterrence posture, and patriotic factors such as a nuclear-free national identity. The military and economic consequences of the ban are also examined. Since the ban on nuclear-powered vessels appears to be neither widely known abroad nor commonly recognised as a supportive disarmament measure outside New Zealand, it is concluded that whatever the future of this ban will be, New Zealand's anti-nuclear image will remain known internationally through the ban on nuclear arms. PMID:16749477

  7. One-Step 2-Minute Test To Detect Typhoid-Specific Antibodies Based on Particle Separation in Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Pak-Leong; Tam, Frankie C. H.; Cheong, Yuet-Meng; Jegathesan, M.

    1998-01-01

    Typhoid fever is caused by Salmonella typhi. Detection of anti-S. typhi antibodies in the patient is a useful diagnostic aid. Among the various methods developed over the years for this purpose, the Widal test, based on bacterial agglutination, has remained the most widely used, even though it is neither specific nor sensitive. Its popularity stems from the fact that it is simple to use and inexpensive. We describe a new test which also uses a simple one-step procedure but is more rapid and accurate than the Widal. The new test (TUBEX) detects anti-Salmonella O9 (both immunoglobulin M [IgM] and IgG) antibodies in patients by inhibiting the binding between an anti-O9 IgM monoclonal antibody (MAb) conjugated to colored latex particles and S. typhi lipopolysaccharide (LPS) conjugated to magnetic latex particles. The reactants are mixed in a specially designed microtube for 2 min, and the result is read based on the resultant color of the supernatant following forced sedimentation of the magnetic beads. In the absence of inhibitory antibodies, there is a color change (from blue to red) due to cosedimentation of the indicator particles with the magnetic particles, whereas if these antibodies are present, they prevent such a change to a degree dependent on their concentration. Preliminary examination of TUBEX using the anti-O9 MAb and irrelevant MAbs as inhibitors revealed the test to be specific and reproducible, with an analytical sensitivity of 16 ?g per ml of antibody. The reagents remained stable for at least 9 months when kept at 4°C. In the examination of 16 stored sera obtained from 14 patients with proven cases of typhoid fever and 78 serum samples from 75 subjects without typhoid fever, TUBEX was found to be 100% sensitive and 100% specific. The nontyphoid group comprised 26 healthy blood donors, 30 antinuclear antibody (ANA)-negative patients, 9 ANA-positive patients, of whom 1 was positive for anti-DNA antibody, 4 typhus patients, and 6 septicemic patients. In addition, the sera obtained from 11 patients clinically diagnosed as having typhoid fever were all positive in the test. The TUBEX results correlated to some extent, albeit insignificantly (r = 0.38, P = 0.07), with those of an enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) which used a similar detection format (inhibition) and reagents (S. typhi LPS and anti-O9 antibody). TUBEX correlated very well with ELISAs which detected anti-S. typhi LPS IgM (r = 0.58, P = 0.003) or IgG (r = 0.54, P = 0.006) antibodies from the typhoid patients. There was no correlation with the Widal test. The TUBEX test, if performed on slides (instead of tubes) or with soluble antigen (instead of antigen-conjugated magnetic beads), suffered significantly in sensitivity. Direct agglutination tests using LPS-conjugated indicator particles performed either on slides or in microwells also failed to detect antibodies from the majority of typhoid patients. Thus, TUBEX appears to be well designed and well suited for use in the laboratory or by the bedside as a simple, rapid aid to the routine diagnosis of typhoid fever. PMID:9666004

  8. DOTA-Functionalized Polylysine: A High Number of DOTA Chelates Positively Influences the Biodistribution of Enzymatic Conjugated Anti-Tumor Antibody chCE7agl

    PubMed Central

    Sarko, Dikran; Dennler, Patrick; Zimmermann, Kurt; Mier, Walter; Schibli, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Site-specific enzymatic reactions with microbial transglutaminase (mTGase) lead to a homogenous species of immunoconjugates with a defined ligand/antibody ratio. In the present study, we have investigated the influence of different numbers of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N-N?-N??-N???-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) chelats coupled to a decalysine backbone on the in vivo behavior of the chimeric monoclonal anti-L1CAM antibody chCE7agl. The enzymatic conjugation of (DOTA)1-decalysine, (DOTA)3-decalysine or (DOTA)5-decalysine to the antibody heavy chain (via Gln295/297) gave rise to immunoconjugates containing two, six or ten DOTA moieties respectively. Radiolabeling of the immunoconjugates with 177Lu yielded specific activities of approximately 70 MBq/mg, 400 MBq/mg and 700 MBq/mg with increasing numbers of DOTA chelates. Biodistribution experiments in SKOV3ip human ovarian cancer cell xenografts demonstrated a high and specific accumulation of radioactivity at the tumor site for all antibody derivatives with a maximal tumor accumulation of 43.6±4.3% ID/g at 24 h for chCE7agl-[(DOTA)-decalysine]2, 30.6±12.0% ID/g at 24 h for chCE7agl-[(DOTA)3-decalysine]2 and 49.9±3.1% ID/g at 48 h for chCE7agl-[(DOTA)5-decalysine)]2. The rapid elimination from the blood of chCE7agl-[(DOTA)-decalysine]2 (1.0±0.1% ID/g at 24 h) is associated with a high liver accumulation (23.2±4.6% ID/g at 24 h). This behavior changed depending on the numbers of DOTA moieties coupled to the decalysine peptide with a slower blood clearance (5.1±1.0 (DOTA)3 versus 11.7±1.4% ID/g (DOTA)5, p<0.005 at 24 h) and lower radioactivity levels in the liver (21.4±3.4 (DOTA)3 versus 5.8±0.7 (DOTA)5, p<0.005 at 24 h). We conclude that the site-specific and stoichiometric uniform conjugation of the highly DOTA-substituted decalysine ((DOTA)5-decalysine) to an anti-tumor antibody leads to the formation of immunoconjugates with high specific activity and excellent in vivo behavior and is a valuable option for radioimmunotherapy and potentially antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs). PMID:23565233

  9. Antibody profile in Indian severe haemophilia A patients with and without FVIII inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patricia; Shetty, Shrimati; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srini; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of haemophilia patients with inhibitors is often tricky due to the heterogeneous nature of the antibodies with regard to their kinetics, as well as the co-existence of other interfering antibodies. Plasma samples from severe haemophilia A patients from India with and without FVIII inhibitors were analysed for the presence of possible co-existing antibodies such as lupus anticoagulants (LA), anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACLA), anti-?2-glycoprotein-I (anti-?2-GP-I) antibodies, viral transfusion transmitted disease (HIV, HBsAg, HCV) related antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP), and anti-nuclear antibodies. A high incidence of LA and anti-HCV antibodies was detected in Indian haemophilia A patients similar to earlier reports. More importantly, a relatively high incidence of autoantibodies to nuclear antigens (18.62%) and anti-CCP antibodies (1.38%) associated with autoimmune disorders was also seen in these congenital haemophilia A patients with and without inhibitors. Knowledge on the antibody profile in these haemophilia patients especially in those with FVIII inhibitors along with correlation with the clinical manifestations and other risk factors for inhibitor development could possibly shed more light on the complex immune response in these patients. PMID:26433059

  10. RhD Specific Antibodies Are Not Detectable in HLA-DRB1*1501 Mice Challenged with Human RhD Positive Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Lidice; Denomme, Gregory A.; Shah, Kunjlata; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to study the immune response to the RhD antigen in the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn has been hampered by the lack of a mouse model of RhD immunization. However, the ability of transgenic mice expressing human HLA DRB1*1501 to respond to immunization with purified RhD has allowed this question to be revisited. In this work we aimed at inducing anti-RhD antibodies by administering human RhD+ RBCs to mice transgenic for the human HLA DRB1*1501 as well as to several standard inbred and outbred laboratory strains including C57BL/6, DBA1/J, CFW(SW), CD1(ICR), and NSA(CF-1). DRB1*1501 mice were additionally immunized with putative extracellular immunogenic RhD peptides. DRB1*1501 mice immunized with RhD+ erythrocytes developed an erythrocyte-reactive antibody response. Antibodies specific for RhD could not however be detected by flow cytometry. Despite this, DRB1*1501 mice were capable of recognizing immunogenic sequences of Rh as injection with Rh peptides induced antibodies reactive with RhD sequences, consistent with the presence of B cell repertoires capable of recognizing RhD. We conclude that while HLA DRB1*1501 transgenic mice may have the capability of responding to immunogenic sequences within RhD, an immune response to human RBC expressing RhD is not directly observed. PMID:25628657

  11. HNA-3a–specific antibodies recognize choline transporter–like protein-2 peptides containing arginine, but not glutamine at Position 154

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Brian R.; Sullivan, Mia J.; Holyst, M. Trudy; Szabo, Aniko; Bougie, Daniel W.; Aster, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Antibodies specific for the neutrophil antigen HNA-3a cause severe, sometimes fatal transfusion-related acute lung disease (TRALI) when transfused, but it has not been possible to screen blood donors for anti-HNA-3a because using neutrophils as targets was impractical and molecular properties of the antigen were unknown. Recently it was shown that HNA-3a is carried on choline transporter–like protein-2 (CTL2) and that the HNA-3a/b phenotype is closely correlated with an R154Q amino acid polymorphism in CTL2. However, it has not been shown by direct experiment that R154 is essential for the HNA-3a epitope. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Preliminary attempts to express recombinant full-length CTL2 (R154) recognized by anti-HNA-3a were unsuccessful. We therefore tested HNA-3a–specific antibodies from donors implicated in TRALI reactions for reactivity against chemically synthesized linear and cyclic CTL2 peptides containing R154 or Q154. RESULTS Nine of 20 HNA-3a antibodies recognized the R154, but not the Q154 version of a cyclic 36-residue CTL2 peptide (D131-K166). However, 11 others failed to distinguish between the two versions of this peptide. CONCLUSION The findings provide direct evidence that R154 in the context of CTL2 D131-K166 is necessary to create the HNA-3a epitope but, in the context of cyclic CTL2 peptide D131-K166, is sufficient to detect only about one-half of the HNA-3a–specific antibodies implicated in TRALI. It is likely that fragments of CTL2 longer than can be made on a large scale with an automated synthesizer will be needed to produce a target capable of detecting all examples of anti-HNA-3a in donated blood. PMID:21517890

  12. RhD Specific Antibodies Are Not Detectable in HLA-DRB1(*)1501 Mice Challenged with Human RhD Positive Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lidice; Denomme, Gregory A; Shah, Kunjlata; Lazarus, Alan H

    2014-01-01

    The ability to study the immune response to the RhD antigen in the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn has been hampered by the lack of a mouse model of RhD immunization. However, the ability of transgenic mice expressing human HLA DRB1(*)1501 to respond to immunization with purified RhD has allowed this question to be revisited. In this work we aimed at inducing anti-RhD antibodies by administering human RhD(+) RBCs to mice transgenic for the human HLA DRB1(*)1501 as well as to several standard inbred and outbred laboratory strains including C57BL/6, DBA1/J, CFW(SW), CD1(ICR), and NSA(CF-1). DRB1(*)1501 mice were additionally immunized with putative extracellular immunogenic RhD peptides. DRB1(*)1501 mice immunized with RhD(+) erythrocytes developed an erythrocyte-reactive antibody response. Antibodies specific for RhD could not however be detected by flow cytometry. Despite this, DRB1(*)1501 mice were capable of recognizing immunogenic sequences of Rh as injection with Rh peptides induced antibodies reactive with RhD sequences, consistent with the presence of B cell repertoires capable of recognizing RhD. We conclude that while HLA DRB1(*)1501 transgenic mice may have the capability of responding to immunogenic sequences within RhD, an immune response to human RBC expressing RhD is not directly observed. PMID:25628657

  13. Rapid HIV testing using Determine™ HIV 1/2 antibody tests: is there a difference between the visual appearance of true- and false-positive tests?

    PubMed

    Sacks, R; Omodele-Lucien, A; Whitbread, N; Muir, D; Smith, A

    2012-09-01

    HIV point-of-care tests (POCTs) give occasional false positive results, causing unnecessary patient anxiety. We aimed to elicit whether false- and true-positive POCTs differed visually. Seventeen false- and 17 true-positive serum samples were randomized into pairs, comprising one false- and one true-positive sample. Two independent readers identified each POCT as negative or positive and compared line strength between pairs. Six further readers graded line strength, 0-5, from POCT photographs. All true-positive samples were identified positive and 8/17 false-positive samples negative, on repeat testing of stored sera. Eight out of the 9 remaining false-positive tests were described as having weaker pigment uptake than their paired true-positive POCT. Mean grade of line strength was 4.2 in true- and 0.9 in false-positive samples, on photographic evaluation. These results suggest false-positive POCTs may differ visually from true-positive POCTs. If larger studies confirm these findings, we may be able to alleviate anxiety in low risk patients with faintly positive POCTs awaiting their confirmatory laboratory result, where the possibility of a false-positive result could be emphasized. PMID:23033518

  14. Anti-idiotypic antibody against anti-DNA in sera of laboratory personnel exposed to lupus sera or nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, M; Evans, M; Suenaga, R; Hassanein, K M; Abdou, N I

    1987-01-01

    We tested for anti-DNA, anti-idiotypic, antinuclear, and lymphocytotoxic antibodies in the sera of three groups of normals: volunteers never exposed to lupus sera or nucleic acids (group I), research personnel handling nucleic acids (group II), and laboratory personnel handling lupus sera (group III). There was no significant differences among the groups with respect to levels of either single stranded or double stranded anti-DNA. Group I showed no significant differences in binding to F(ab')2 fragments of lupus anti-DNA, lupus non-anti-DNA or normal IgG. Compared to group I, groups II and III bound significantly higher to anti-DNA F(ab')2 fragments compared to non-anti-DNA F(ab')2 or normal F(ab')2 fragments. Sera from the three groups were negative for antibodies and all but one individual from group III had normal antinuclear antibody titres. These results indicate that sera of normals exposed to lupus sera or to nucleic acids contain an anti-idiotype directed against anti-DNA antibody. The possible role of these anti-idiotypes in regulating the anti-DNA antibody is discussed. PMID:3500815

  15. Autoantibodies: Focus on anti-DNA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Nina; Winkler, Thomas H; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the days of Ehrlich and the birth of humoral immunity, self-reactivity or 'horror autotoxicus' as referred to by Paul Ehrlich, has been of great concern. For instance, in patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anti-nuclear and anti-DNA antibodies have been recognized for many years. Despite this, the exact mechanism as to how the immune system fails to protect the individual and allows these autoantibodies to develop in this and other systemic autoimmune diseases remains uncertain. So how can we explain their presence? Evidence suggests that B cells expressing autoreactive antibodies do not normally arise but rather undergo negative selection as they develop. In light of this, it might seem contradictory that not all autoreactive B cell clones are eliminated, although this may not even be the intention since autoantibodies are also found in healthy individuals and may even protect from autoimmunity. Here, we will discuss autoantibodies, in particular those recognizing DNA, with regard to their reactivity and their potentially pathogenic or protective properties. PMID:21776330

  16. Problems and process of identity maintenance in the anti-nuclear movement in America: a qualitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    These strategic and tactical problems are examined within two basic areas of concern: (1) external public relations and (2) internal membership identify. This study contributes to the resource-mobilization perspective by theoretically reducing the significant variables of concern to external and internal identity maintenance and by stressing the constant dilemma between the structure of the movement and the actual process by which this structure is carried out. It is based on a social psychological analysis in which the dynamics of social movements is viewed both externally and internally in relation to the movement structure and process. The Sunbelt Alliance anti-nuclear group of Oklahoma is used as the empirical example. The research methodology consists of a series of focused personal interviews. The Sunbelt Alliance anti-nuclear organization experienced a dilemma resulting from the tension between external and internal contingencies. The promotion of cooperative interdependence based on member cohesiveness within the group suffered because of the inability of the organization to maintain consistent agreement concerning external targets. The structure of the group, or its goals and ideology, was not consistently reflected in its process. Disagreement over external priorities eventually reduced internal solidarity, and the organization dissolved.

  17. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with massive intestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miyeon; Kim, Young Uck; Boo, Sun Jin; Kim, So Mi; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2015-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman was admitted to hospital because of generalized edema and proteinuria. Her renal function deteriorated rapidly. Serum immunoglobulin and complement levels were within normal ranges. An autoantibody examination showed negative for antinuclear antibody and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody. Histologic examination of a renal biopsy specimen revealed that all of the glomeruli had severe crescent formations with no immune deposits. The patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy with cyclophosphamide followed by oral prednisolone. Fifteen days later, she experienced massive recurrent hematochezia. Angiography revealed an active contrast extravasation in a branch of the distal ileal artery. We selectively embolized with a permanent embolic agent. On the 45th hospital day, the patient suddenly lost consciousness. Brain computed tomography showed intracerebral hemorrhage. We report a case of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody–negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with massive intestinal bleeding and cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:26484044

  18. Radioimmunoguided surgery using monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, E.W. Jr.; Mojzisik, C.M.; Hinkle, G.H. Jr.; Sampsel, J.; Siddiqi, M.A.; Tuttle, S.E.; Sickle-Santanello, B.; Colcher, D.; Thurston, M.O.; Bell, J.G.

    1988-11-01

    The potential proficiency of radioimmunoguided surgery in the intraoperative detection of tumors was assessed using labeled monoclonal antibody B72.3 in 66 patients with tissue-proved tumor. Monoclonal antibody B72.3 was injected 5 to 42 days preoperatively, and the hand-held gamma-detecting probe was used intraoperatively to detect the presence of tumor. Intraoperative probe counts of less than 20 every 2 seconds, or tumor-to-adjacent normal tissue ratios less than 2:1 were considered negative (system failure). Positive probe counts were detected in 5 of 6 patients with primary colon cancer (83 percent), in 31 of 39 patients with recurrent colon cancer (79 percent), in 4 of 5 patients with gastric cancer (80 percent), in 3 of 8 patients with breast cancer (37.5 percent), and in 4 of 8 patients with ovarian cancer (50 percent) undergoing second-look procedures. Additional patients in each group were scored as borderline positive. Overall, radioimmunoguided surgery using B72.3 identified tumors in 47 patients (71.2 percent), bordered on positive in 6 patients (9.1 percent), and failed to identify tumor in 13 patients (19.7 percent). Improved selection of patients for antigen-positive tumors, the use of higher affinity second-generation antibodies, alternate routes of antibody administration, alternate radionuclides, and more sophisticatedly bioengineered antibodies and antibody combinations should all lead to improvements in radioimmunoguided surgery.

  19. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B e antigen (HBe antigen) and B core antibodies (IgG anti-HBcore and IgM anti-HBcore) among hepatitis B surface antigen positive blood donors at a Tertiary Centre in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a common cause of liver disease throughout the world. HBV is transmitted through blood and other body fluids, including semen and saliva. Chronic replication of HBV virons is characterized by persistence circulation of HBsAg, HBeAg and HBV DNA; usually with anti-HBc and occasionally with anti-HBs. Aim: To determine the prevalence of HBeAg, IgG anti-HBcore and IgM anti-HBcore amongst HBsAg positive blood donors. These parameters are reflective of transmissibility and active hepatitis B infection. A cross sectional study was carried out at the blood donor clinics of Lagos State University Teaching Hospital Ikeja and Lagos University Teaching Hospital Idiaraba. A total of 267 donors were recruited to determine HBe antigen, IgG and IgM anti-HBcore antibodies amongst hepatitis BsAg positive donors. Five milliliters of blood was collected from those who tested positive to HBsAg screen during donation. The sera were subjected to enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Pearson chi-squared test was used for the analytical assessment. Findings A total number of 267 HBsAg positive blood donors were studied. A seroprevalence of 8.2% (22 of 267) HBeAg was obtained, 4 of 267 (1.5%) were indeterminate while 241 (90.3%) tested negative. Only 27 out of 267 donors (10.1%) tested positive to IgM anti-HBcore, 234(87.6%) tested negative, while 6(2.2%) were indeterminate. A higher percentage of 60.7% (162 of 267) tested positive to IgG anti-HBcore, while 39.3% (105 of 267) tested negative. Conclusion There is a low seroprevalence rate of HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis and relatively high IgG anti-HBcore and IgM anti-HBcore rates in South West Nigeria. PMID:22455501

  20. Recently Added Antibodies

    Cancer.gov

    Reagents Data Portal AntibodiesNCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit. Print

  1. Risk factors for ANA positivity in healthy persons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The finding of antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity in a healthy individual is usually of unknown significance and in most cases is benign. However, a subset of such individuals is at risk for development of autoimmune disease. We examined demographic and immunological features that are associated with ANA positivity in clinically healthy persons to develop insights into when this marker carries risk of progression to lupus. Methods Biological samples from healthy individuals and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were obtained from the Dallas Regional Autoimmune Disease Registry (DRADR). Measurements carried out on serum samples included ANA, extractable nuclear antibodies (ENA) and autoantibody profiling using an array with more than 100 specificities. Whole blood RNA samples from a subset of individuals were used to analyze gene expression on the Illumina platform. Data were analyzed for associations of high ANA levels with demographic features, the presence of other autoantibodies and with gene expression profiles. Results Overall, ANA levels are significantly higher in females than in males and this association holds in patients with the autoimmune diseases lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as in healthy controls (HC). Age was not significantly associated with ANA levels and the elevated ANA values could not be explained by higher IgG levels. Another autoantibody, anti- cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP), did not show gender dimorphism in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or healthy individuals. The autoantigen array showed significant elevations of other autoantibodies in high ANA HCs. Some of these autoantibodies were directed to antigens in skin and others were related to autoimmune conditions of kidney, thyroid or joints. Gene expression analyses showed a greater prevalence of significantly upregulated genes in HCs with negative ANA values than in those with significant ANA positivity. Genes upregulated in high ANA HCs included a celiac disease autoantigen and some components of the Type I interferon (IFN) gene signature. Conclusions Risks for ANA positivity include female gender and organ-specific autoimmunity. Upregulation of skin-specific autoantibodies may indicate that early events in the break of tolerance take place in cutaneous structures. Some of these changes may be mediated by Type I IFN. Blood profiling for expressed autoantibodies and genes has the potential to identify individuals at risk for development of autoimmune diseases including lupus. PMID:21366908

  2. A clinico-immunological study of serum and synovial fluid antinuclear factors in rheumatoid arthritis and other arthritides

    PubMed Central

    MacSween, R. N. M.; Dalakos, T. G.; Jasani, M. K.; Boyle, J. A.; Buchanan, W. W.; Goudie, R. B.

    1968-01-01

    Samples of serum and synovial fluid from 161 patients with various forms of arthritis have been examined for the presence of antinuclear factors (ANF). In rheumatoid arthritis 28% of patients had ANF in their serum, and in 22% ANF was found in the synovial fluid. In ten patients ANF was present in the serum alone. In three patients ANF was present in only the synovial fluid, and in one of these patients the finding of ANF in only one of two joints examined is adduced as evidence in favour of local production of ANF in synovial tissue. The ANF was present in the serum and synovial fluid as IgM in 75%, as IgG in 22% and as IgM/IgG in 3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. PMID:4171043

  3. Serum Antibodies Positivity to 12 Helicobacter pylori Virulence Antigens in Patients with Benign or Malignant Gastroduodenal Diseases – Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Filipec Kanižaj, Tajana; Kati?i?, Miroslava; Prese?ki, Vladimir; Gašparov, Slavko; Coli? Cvrlje, Vesna; Kolari?, Branko; Mrzljak, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Aim To investigate the association of gastric histological and endoscopic findings in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), according to presence of seropositivity to 12 bacterial virulence antigens. Methods This is a cross-sectional single-center study of 360 consecutive outpatients referred in the period of one year to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of dyspeptic complaints. Patients sera were tested by Western blot method to determine the presence of serum antibodies to bacterial virulence antigens – p120 (CagA – cytotoxin-associated antigen), p95 (VacA – vacuolating cytotoxin), p67 (FSH – flagellar sheath protein), p66 (UreB – urease enzyme heavy subunit), p57 (HSP homologue – heath shock protein homologue), p54 (flagellin), p33, p30 (OMP – outer membrane protein), p29 (UreA – urease enzyme light subunit), p26, p19, and p17. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed, endoscopic diagnosis recorded, and 4 mucosal biopsy samples were obtained and assessed according to Updated Sydney protocol. Results The sera of 207 patients were analyzed. Thirty patients had gastric adenocarcinoma, 126 peptic ulcers, and 51 normal finding. p120 (CagA) seropositivity was significantly more often present in patients with higher activity grade in the antrum (P?=?0.025), p30 in patients with greater inflammation in the antrum (P?=?0.025) and the corpus (P?=?0.010), p33 in patients with greater inflammation in the corpus (P?=?0.050), and p19 (OMP) in patients with lower intestinal metaplasia grades in the corpus (P?=?0.025). Seroreactivity to all other bacterial proteins showed no association with the histological status of the stomach mucosa. Except for the seropositivity to protein p95 (VacA), which was more often present in patients with duodenal ulcer (P?=?0.006), there was no difference in seroreactivity to other bacterial proteins and upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings. Conclusions p120 (CagA), p33, p 30 (OMP), and p19 (OMP) seropositivity was more often present in patients with higher grades of the histological parameters of gastritis and seropositivity to protein p95 (VacA) with endoscopic presence of duodenal ulcer. Histological parameters of gastritis are more associated with bacterial virulence than endoscopic findings. PMID:19399945

  4. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  5. Association of Valine and Leucine at HLA–DRB1 Position 11 With Radiographic Progression in Rheumatoid Arthritis, Independent of the Shared Epitope Alleles but Not Independent of Anti–Citrullinated Protein Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    van Steenbergen, H. W.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, L.; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, S.; Berglin, E.; Toes, R. E. M.; Huizinga, T. W. J.; Fernández-Gutiérrez, B.; Gregersen, P. K.; van der Helm-van Mil, A. H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective For decades it has been known that the HLA–DRB1 shared epitope (SE) alleles are associated with an increased risk of development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recently, the following variations in the peptide-binding grooves of HLA molecules that predispose to RA development have been identified: Val and Leu at HLA–DRB1 position 11, Asp at HLA–B position 9, and Phe at HLA–DPB1 position 9. This study was undertaken to investigate whether these variants are also associated with radiographic progression in RA, independent of SE and anti–citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) status. Methods A total of 4,911 radiograph sets from 1,878 RA patients included in the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic (The Netherlands), Umeå (Sweden), Hospital Clinico San Carlos–Rheumatoid Arthritis (Spain), and National Data Bank for Rheumatic Diseases (US) cohorts were studied. HLA was imputed using single-nucleotide polymorphism data from an Immunochip, and the amino acids listed above were tested in relation to radiographic progression per cohort using an additive model. Results from the 4 cohorts were combined in inverse-variance weighted meta-analyses using a fixed-effects model. Analyses were conditioned on SE and ACPA status. Results Val and Leu at HLA–DRB1 position 11 were associated with more radiographic progression (meta-analysis P = 5.11 × 10?7); this effect was independent of SE status (meta-analysis P = 0.022) but not independent of ACPA status. Phe at HLA–DPB1 position 9 was associated with more severe radiographic progression (meta-analysis P = 0.024), though not independent of SE status. Asp at HLA–B position 9 was not associated with radiographic progression. Conclusion Val and Leu at HLA–DRB1 position 11 conferred a risk of a higher rate of radiographic progression independent of SE status but not independent of ACPA status. These findings support the relevance of these amino acids at position 11. PMID:25580908

  6. Several regions in the major histocompatibility complex confer risk for anti-CCP-antibody positive rheumatoid arthritis, independent of the DRB1 locus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Soon; Lee, Annette T; Criswell, Lindsey A; Seldin, Michael F; Amos, Christopher I; Carulli, John P; Navarrete, Cristina; Remmers, Elaine F; Kastner, Daniel L; Plenge, Robert M; Li, Wentian; Gregersen, Peter K

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that additional risk loci for RA are present in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), independent of the class II HLA-DRB1 locus. We have now tested a total of 1,769 SNPs across 7.5Mb of the MHC located from 6p22.2 (26.03 Mb) to 6p21.32 (33.59 Mb) derived from the Illumina 550K Beadchip (Illumina, San Diego, CA, USA). For an initial analysis in the whole dataset (869 RA CCP + cases, 1,193 controls), the strongest association signal was observed in markers near the HLA-DRB1 locus, with additional evidence for association extending out into the Class I HLA region. To avoid confounding that may arise due to linkage disequilibrium with DRB1 alleles, we analyzed a subset of the data by matching cases and controls by DRB1 genotype (both alleles matched 1:1), yielding a set of 372 cases with 372 controls. This analysis revealed the presence of at least two regions of association with RA in the Class I region, independent of DRB1 genotype. SNP alleles found on the conserved A1-B8-DR3 (8.1) haplotype show the strongest evidence of positive association (P ~ 0.00005) clustered in the region around the HLA-C locus. In addition, we identified risk alleles that are not present on the 8.1 haplotype, with maximal association signals (P ~ 0.001-0.0027) located near the ZNF311 locus. This latter association is enriched in DRB1*0404 individuals. Finally, several additional association signals were found in the extreme centromeric portion of the MHC, in regions containing the DOB1, TAP2, DPB1, and COL11A2 genes. These data emphasize that further analysis of the MHC is likely to reveal genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis that are independent of the DRB1 shared epitope alleles. PMID:18309376

  7. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antibody Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Screen; HIV Serology Formal name: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody Test Related tests: p24 Antigen ; HIV Antigen/Antibody ...

  8. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Indirect Coombs Test; Indirect Anti-human Globulin Test; Antibody Screen Formal name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Screen ...

  9. X antigen/antibody markers in hepadnavirus infections. Antibodies to the X gene product(s).

    PubMed

    Feitelson, M A; Clayton, M M

    1990-08-01

    Antibodies to the X antigen of hepatitis B virus and woodchuck hepatitis virus were assayed in serial sera from infected individuals and compared with other markers of infection. Antibody to the X antigen was found in 11 of 17 (65%) patients and 17 of 40 (42%) woodchucks that were surface-antigen positive. In comparison, this antibody was found in 5 of 14 (36%) patients and in none of 4 woodchucks that were surface-antigen negative. In 5 of 6 patients showing seroconversion from hepatitis B e antigen to antibody, antibody to X appeared at or near the time of seroconversion. In patients persistently positive for e antigen, X antibody often appeared when viral DNA became undetectable in the serum. In 14 of 17 (82%) woodchucks positive for antibody to X antigen, it also appeared near or after the time that viral DNA in serum disappeared. X antibodies were detected with great frequency only in populations with high frequencies of other hepatitis B virus markers. The results are consistent with the conclusion that antibody to X antigen is a marker of hepadnavirus infections that seems to be associated with a decrease in viral replication. Antibodies to the X antigen, then, may be a host response to the replication complex of the virus. PMID:2365196

  10. A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial to Evaluate Efficacy, Safety, and Tolerability of Single Doses of Tirasemtiv in Patients with Acetylcholine Receptor-Binding Antibody-Positive Myasthenia Gravis.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Donald B; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Dimachkie, Mazen M; Meng, Lisa; Malik, Fady I

    2015-04-01

    Tirasemtiv is a fast skeletal troponin activator that sensitizes the sarcomere to calcium and increases muscle force following subtetanic nerve input. In an animal model of myasthenia gravis (MG), single oral doses of tirasemtiv improved muscle force and reduced fatigability. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of single doses of tirasemtiv on skeletal muscle function and fatigability in patients with generalized MG. Thirty-two patients with acetylcholine receptor-antibody positive MG and muscle weakness received single doses of tirasemtiv (250 mg or 500 mg) or placebo in a double-blind, randomized treatment sequence with each treatment separated by at least 1 week. Outcome measures included the Quantitative MG Score (QMG), MG Composite, Manual Muscle Testing, and forced vital capacity. At 6 h after dosing, tirasemtiv produced dose-related improvements from baseline in the QMG score (slope: -0.49 QMG point per 250 mg; p?=?0.02) and in percent predicted forced vital capacity (slope: 2.2% per 250 mg; p?=?0.04). QMG improved >3 points in twice as many patients after 500 mg tirasemtiv than after placebo. Both doses of tirasemtiv were well tolerated; there were no premature terminations or serious adverse events. The results of this study suggest that tirasemtiv may improve muscle function in MG and will be used to support further development of tirasemtiv in neuromuscular diseases. PMID:25742919

  11. Aged venous thrombi: radioimmunoimaging with fibrin-specific monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Rosebrough, S.F.; Grossman, Z.D.; McAfee, J.G.; Kudryk, B.J.; Subramanian, G.; Ritter-Hrncirik, C.A.; Witanowski, L.S.; Tillapaugh-Fay, G.; Urrutia, E.

    1987-02-01

    Radioimmunoimaging of fresh canine venous thrombi with a murine monoclonal antibody specific for human and dog fibrin has been reported. Successful imaging of canine deep venous thrombi 1, 3, and 5 days old at the time of antibody injection is reported. Images were positive in all dogs, and the uptake of fibrin-specific antibody was equivalent to that of fresh thrombi.

  12. Affinity of FVIII-specific antibodies reveals major differences between neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies in humans.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Christoph J; Whelan, Shawn F J; Hirschler, Maria; Allacher, Peter; Horling, Frank M; Lawo, John-Philip; Oldenburg, Johannes; Tiede, Andreas; Male, Christoph; Windyga, Jerzy; Greinacher, Andreas; Knöbl, Paul N; Schrenk, Gerald; Koehn, Jadranka; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Reipert, Birgit M

    2015-02-12

    Recently, we reported that distinct immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes and IgG subclasses of factor VIII (FVIII)-specific antibodies are found in different cohorts of patients with hemophilia A and in healthy individuals. Prompted by these findings, we further investigated the distinguishing properties among the different populations of FVIII-specific antibodies. We hypothesized that the affinity of antibodies would discriminate between the neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies found in different study cohorts. To test this idea, we established a competition-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technology to assess the apparent affinities for each isotype and IgG subclass of FVIII-specific antibodies without the need for antibody purification. We present a unique data set of apparent affinities of FVIII-specific antibodies found in healthy individuals, patients with congenital hemophilia A with and without FVIII inhibitors, and patients with acquired hemophilia A. Our data indicate that FVIII-specific antibodies found in patients with FVIII inhibitors have an up to 100-fold higher apparent affinity than that of antibodies found in patients without inhibitors and in healthy individuals. High-affinity FVIII-specific antibodies could be retrospectively detected in longitudinal samples of an individual patient with FVIII inhibitors 543 days before the first positive Bethesda assay. This finding suggests that these antibodies might serve as potential biomarkers for evolving FVIII inhibitor responses. PMID:25515962

  13. Effects of specific anti-B and/or anti-plasma cell immunotherapy on antibody production in baboons: depletion of CD20- and CD22-positive B cells does not result in significantly decreased production of anti-alphaGal antibody.

    PubMed

    Alwayn, I P; Xu, Y; Basker, M; Wu, C; Buhler, L; Lambrigts, D; Treter, S; Harper, D; Kitamura, H; Vitetta, E S; Abraham, S; Awwad, M; White-Scharf, M E; Sachs, D H; Thall, A; Cooper, D K

    2001-08-01

    Anti-Galalpha1-3Gal antibodies (antialphaGal Ab) are a major barrier to clinical xenotransplantation as they are believed to initiate both hyperacute and acute humoral rejection. Extracorporeal immunoadsorption (EIA) with alphaGal oligosaccharide columns temporarily depletes antialphaGal Ab, but their return is ultimately associated with graft destruction. We therefore assessed the ability of two immunotoxins (IT) and two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to deplete B and/or plasma cells both in vitro and in vivo in baboons, and to observe the rate of return of antialphaGal Ab following EIA. The effects of the mouse anti-human IT anti-CD22-ricin A (proportional to CD22-IT, directed against a B cell determinant) and anti-CD38-ricin A (proportional to CD38-IT, B and plasma cell determinant) and the mouse anti-human anti-CD38 mAb (proportional to CD38 mAb) and mouse/human chimeric anti-human anti-CD20 mAb (proportional to CD20 mAb, Rituximab, B cell determinant) on B and plasma cell depletion and antialphaGal Ab production were assessed both in vitro and in vivo in baboons (n = 9) that had previously undergone splenectomy. For comparison, two baboons received nonmyeloablative whole body irradiation (WBI) (300 cGy), and one received myeloablative WBI (900 cGy). Depletion of B cells was monitored by flow cytometry of blood, bone marrow (BM) and lymph nodes (LN), staining with anti-CD20 and/or anti-CD22 mAbs, and by histology of LN. EIA was carried out after the therapy and antialphaGal Ab levels were measured daily. In vitro proportional to CD22-IT inhibited protein synthesis in the human Daudi B cell line more effectively than proportional to CD38-IT. Upon differentiation of B cells into plasma cells, however, less inhibition of protein synthesis after proportional to CD22-IT treatment was observed. Depleting CD20-positive cells in vitro from a baboon spleen cell population already depleted of granulocytes, monocytes, and T cells led to a relative enrichment of CD20-negative cells, that is plasma cells, and consequently resulted in a significant increase in antialphaGal Ab production by the remaining cells, whereas depleting CD38-positive cells resulted in a significant decrease in antialphaGal Ab production. In vivo, WBI (300 or 900 cGy) resulted in 100% B cell depletion in blood and BM, > 80% depletion in LN, with substantial recovery of B cells after 21 days and only transient reduction in antialphaGal Ab after EIA. Proportional to CD22-IT depleted B cells by > 97% in blood and BM, and by 60% in LN, but a rebound of B cells was observed after 14 and 62 days in LN and blood, respectively. At 7 days, serum antialphaGal IgG and IgM Ab levels were reduced by a maximum of 40-45% followed by a rebound to levels up to 12-fold that of baseline antialphaGal Ab by day 83 in one baboon. The results obtained with proportional to CD38-IT were inconclusive. This may have been, in part, due to inadequate conjugation of the toxin. Cell coating was 100% with proportional to CD38 mAb, but no changes in antialphaGal Ab production were observed. Proportional to CD20 mAb resulted in 100% depletion of B cells in blood and BM, and 80% in LN, with recovery of B cells starting at day 42. Adding 150cGy WBI at this time led to 100% depletion of B cells in the BM and LN. Although B cell depletion in blood and BM persisted for > 3 months, the reduction of serum antialphaGal IgG or IgM Ab levels was not sustained beyond 2 days. Proportional to CD20 mAb + WBI totally and efficiently depleted CD20- and CD22-positive B cells in blood, BM, and LN for > 3 months in vivo, but there was no sustained clinically significant reduction in serum antialphaGal Ab. The majority of antibody secretors are CD38-positive cells, but targeting these cells in vitro or in vivo with proportional to CD38-IT was not very effective. These observations suggest that CD20-and CD22-positive B cells are not the major source of antialphaGal Ab production. Future efforts will be directed towards suppression of plasma cell function. PMID:11472623

  14. Diagnostic associations in a large and consecutively identified population positive for anti-SSA and/or anti-SSB: the range of associated diseases differs according to the detailed serotype

    PubMed Central

    Peene, I; Meheus, L; Veys, E; De Keyser, F

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic distribution in a consecutive anti-SSA and/or anti-SSB positive population. Methods: A total of 15 937 serum samples from 10 550 consecutive patients were analysed for antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) on HEp-2 cells. Serum samples positive for ANAs were analysed by immunodiffusion and line immunoassay with recombinant SSA-Ro52, natural SSA-Ro60, and recombinant SSB. Results: Among ANA positive patients in whom clinical information was available, 181 consecutive patients with anti-SSA and/or anti-SSB antibodies were identified, Disease associations were systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (45.3%), primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) (14.4%), scleroderma (8.8%), RA (7.7%), cutaneous lupus (7.7%), and dermatomyositis (2.2%). The ratio of diagnoses differed according to the anti-SSA/anti-SSB serotype. Scleroderma and dermatomyositis were enriched among mono-Ro52 reactive serum samples (34.2% and 10.5% respectively). Single reactivity towards Ro60 or anti-Ro60 with anti-Ro52 predisposed for SLE (80.0% and 52.2% respectively). Triple reactivity towards Ro52, Ro60, and SSB was primarily linked with SLE (55.8%) followed by pSS (20.9%). Anti-SSA on immunodiffusion increased the chance for SLE (62.8%), whereas isolated anti-SSB reactivity on immunodiffusion was less indicative for SLE (14.3%) and predisposed more for cutaneous lupus (23.8%) and pSS (33.3%). Conclusion: The diagnostic range associated with anti-SSA or anti-SSB reactivity differs significantly according to the detailed serotype defined by line immunoassay and immunodiffusion. PMID:12429541

  15. GE Healthcare Antibody Purification

    E-print Network

    Lebendiker, Mario

    GE Healthcare Antibody Purification Handbook GE Healthcare imagination at work agination at work from GE Healthcare #12;Antibody Purification Handbook #12; Handbook 18-1037-46 AD Contents Introduction

  16. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Tests People with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... rye and barley that are generically known as “gluten.” Antibody Testing: Only A First Step To help ...

  17. Monoclonal AntibodiesMonoclonal Antibodies Raymond LiuRaymond Liu

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Monoclonal AntibodiesMonoclonal Antibodies Raymond LiuRaymond Liu Biochemistry 118QBiochemistry 118Q Spring 2004Spring 2004 #12;OverviewOverview Monoclonal AntibodiesMonoclonal Antibodies SpecificitySpecificity TargetingTargeting VarietyVariety #12;Antibodies and the Immune SystemAntibodies

  18. Fc-Small Molecule Antibody Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Wold, Erik D; Axup, Jun Y; Felding, Brunhilde H; Smider, Vaughn V

    2015-12-16

    Antibody therapeutics are a promising drug class due to their high specificity and favorable pharmacokinetics. While there are many methods for the development of antibodies specific to disease associated antigens, selecting antibodies against functional epitopes with high specificity and affinity can be difficult for certain epitopes. We describe a generalizable method for synthesizing antibody mimetics by site specifically conjugating small molecules (with high affinity and specificity to disease associated antigens) to an Fc fragment to develop drugs with the benefits of an antibody. As a proof of concept, an E269pAcPhe Fc antibody Fc fragment was produced and subsequently site-specifically labeled with a linker-modified folic acid compound to generate an Fc-folic acid antibody-mimetic. This was chosen as the model system because the high-affinity folate receptor FR-? is highly expressed in a number of cancer types including breast and ovarian cancer. The specificity of the Fc-folic acid conjugate was assessed via flowcytometry with the folate-receptor positive breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 by measuring Fc-folic acid binding in both the absence and presence of an excess of folic acid. Fc-small molecule conjugates could be developed into a unique class of antibody-like therapeutics. PMID:26536496

  19. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  20. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  1. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  2. [Hepatitis C antibodies in health personnel].

    PubMed

    Pazdiora, P; Topolcan, O; Herynková, R

    1994-03-01

    Using the second generation test, the authors examined 320 health professionals of the Faculty Hospital in Plzen and dialyzation centres in Karlovy Vary and Sokolov for the presence of antibodies against the hepatitis C virus. Antibodies were detected in 7 of them (2.2%). Serum positivity was confirmed only in paramedical workers, the highest herd immunity was recorded in workers in the dialyzation centre in Plzen. The authors evaluate the prevalence of antibodies in relation to age and period of practice in the health services. PMID:7513266

  3. Immunologically driven chemical engineering of antibodies for catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Dias, Sonia; Jovic, Florence; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Taran, Fréderic; Créminon, Christophe; Mioskowski, Charles; Grassi, Jacques

    2002-11-01

    We describe a new strategy for the preparation of catalytic antibodies based on a two-step procedure. Firstly, monoclonal antibodies are selected only if displaying the following binding features: binding both the substrate and a reactive group in such a way that the two groups are in a reactive position towards each other. Secondly, the selected monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are chemically engineered by covalently binding the reactive group into the binding pocket of the antibody. Using previously isolated monoclonal antibodies, we have focused our studies on the control of this second step. PMID:12379354

  4. Autoimmune encephalitis: Clinical diagnosis versus antibody confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Cyril, Asha Caroline; Nair, Sruthi S.; Mathai, Annamma; Kannoth, Sudheeran; Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune encephalitis is a heterogeneous disorder which is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. The diagnosis of these disorders is based on the detection of autoantibodies and characteristic clinical profiles. Aims: We aimed to study the antibody profile in encephalitis patients with suspected autoimmune etiology presenting to a tertiary care center. Settings and Design: The subjects were selected by screening all patients with clinical profile suggesting autoimmune encephalitis admitted in the neuromedical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care center in South India. Materials and Methods: Patients who fulfilled modified Zuliani et al.'s, criteria for autoimmune encephalitis were identified during the period December 2009–June 2013. Blood samples from these subjects were screened for six neuronal antibodies. Statistical analysis used: Chi-square test was applied to compare the antibody positive and negative patients. Results: Out of 1,227 patients screened, 39 subjects (14 males: 25 females) were identified with a mean age of 15.95 years and 19 cases were assessed in the acute and 20 in the convalescent phase of the illness. Seizure (87.8 %) was the most common presenting symptom; status epilepticus occurred in 23 (60.5%) patients during the course of the illness. Fourteen (35.9%) patients were N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-positive and all were negative for the other antibodies tested. Conclusions: One-third of patients presenting with acute noninfective encephalitis would be positive for NMDAR antibodies with the remaining two-thirds with clinically suspected autoimmune encephalitis being antibody-negative. There are few markers in the clinical and investigative profiles to distinguish antibody-positive and -negative patients. PMID:26713011

  5. Antibody to carbonic anhydrase II is present in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) irrespective of antimitochondrial antibody status

    PubMed Central

    INVERNIZZI, P; BATTEZZATI, P M; CROSIGNANI, A; ZERMIANI, P; BIGNOTTO, M; DEL PAPA, N; ZUIN, M; PODDA, M

    1998-01-01

    Antibody to carbonic anhydrase II, an enzyme abundantly present in biliary epithelium, has been proposed as a diagnostic marker for antimitochondrial antibody-negative PBC. In this study we determine its prevalence and clinical significance in a large series of patients with antimitochondrial antibody-positive and -negative PBC. Reactivity to carbonic anhydrase II was sought by Western immunoblotting in sera from 215 consecutive patients with PBC (26 antimitochondrial antibody-negative), 13 with autoimmune hepatitis, 25 with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), 12 with systemic sclerosis, 19 with systemic lupus erythematosus and 73 healthy subjects. The prevalence of antibody to carbonic anhydrase II (titre 1:100) in PBC was 8%. No specific reactivity to carbonic anhydrase II was found in antimitochondrial antibody-negative PBC (7% versus 8% in antimitochondrial antibody-positive PBC). Ascites (P = 0.006) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS) (P = 0.022) in PBC were significantly associated with presence of the antibody. In patients with SS associated with PBC, the prevalence (19%) was similar to that observed in pSS (16%). At a serum dilution of 1:40, the prevalence of positive sera in PBC rose to 27% but disease specificity was reduced. Our findings in a large population of PBC patients rule out a relation between presence of antibody to carbonic anhydrase II and lack of antimitochondrial antibody. The higher prevalence of ascites found in positive patients warrants further evaluation. PMID:9844056

  6. Subclass restriction and polyclonality of the systemic lupus erythematosus marker antibody anti-Sm.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, R A; Dyer, K; Craven, S Y; Fuller, C R; Yount, W J

    1985-01-01

    Anti-Sm antibodies are highly specific markers for the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This specificity suggests that the immunoregulation of these autoantibodies would reflect fundamental immune abnormalities in this disorder. As a clue to this immunoregulation, we have investigated the isotype distribution of anti-Sm antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We have found that the anti-Sm response is markedly restricted to the IgG1 heavy chain isotype. On the other hand, the light chain distribution reflects that in normal serum, while isoelectric focusing analysis fails to show an oligoclonal pattern. The related specificity, anti-ribonucleoprotein, is also restricted to IgG1, while the SLE-specific antibody anti-double-stranded DNA is mostly IgG1 with a lesser contribution by IgG3. These results suggest that antinuclear antibodies that are strongly associated with SLE are produced by a T cell-dependent response, probably driven by antigen. The immunoregulation of the response to several autoantigens may be quite similar. Images PMID:3872886

  7. Advances in Antibody Design.

    PubMed

    Tiller, Kathryn E; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics requires optimizing several of their key attributes. These include binding affinity and specificity, folding stability, solubility, pharmacokinetics, effector functions, and compatibility with the attachment of additional antibody domains (bispecific antibodies) and cytotoxic drugs (antibody-drug conjugates). Addressing these and other challenges requires the use of systematic design methods that complement powerful immunization and in vitro screening methods. We review advances in designing the binding loops, scaffolds, domain interfaces, constant regions, post-translational and chemical modifications, and bispecific architectures of antibodies and fragments thereof to improve their bioactivity. We also highlight unmet challenges in antibody design that must be overcome to generate potent antibody therapeutics. PMID:26274600

  8. Nephropathia epidemica in Norway: antigen and antibodies in rodent reservoirs and antibodies in selected human populations.

    PubMed Central

    Traavik, T.; Sommer, A. I.; Mehl, R.; Berdal, B. P.; Stavem, K.; Hunderi, O. H.; Dalrymple, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Nephropathia epidemica (NE) antigen was detected by IFAT (indirect fluorescent antibody technique) in the lungs of 14 of 97 bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) collected in three endemic areas. The distribution of antigen positive voles within an endemic location was scattered. Antibodies to Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) virus antigens were detected by IFAT in 12 of 14 NE antigen positive bank voles and in 15 of 83 that were antigen negative. NE antigen positive voles exhibited higher antibody titres. Antibodies to KHF were demonstrated in sera from C. rutilus and C. rufocanus collected more than 200 km north of the distribution area for C. glareolus. It appears likely that these vole species can serve as virus vectors for NE cases occurring north of the bank vole area. NE antibodies cross-reacting with KHF virus seem to diminish with time after infection in some NE patients, while for others such cross-reacting antibodies were detected up to 12 years after the disease. Antibodies to KHF were detected in eight of 106 healthy forestry workers with no clinical history of NE. No serological cross-reactions were detected between NE/KHF antigens and representative Bunyaviridae present in Norway. NE/KHF-like viruses appear widespread in Norway, both within and outside of the distribution area of the bank vole. PMID:6146649

  9. Method for altering antibody light chain interactions

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J. (Naperville, IL); Stevens, Priscilla Wilkins (Evanston, IL); Raffen, Rosemarie (Elmhurst, IL); Schiffer, Marianne (Downers Grove, IL)

    2002-01-01

    A method for recombinant antibody subunit dimerization including modifying at least one codon of a nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in the interface segment of the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a first polarity; and modifying at least one codon of the nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in an interface segment of the heavy polypeptide variable region corresponding to a position in the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a second polarity opposite the first polarity. Nucleic acid sequences which code for novel light chain proteins, the latter of which are used in conjunction with the inventive method, are also provided.

  10. Passive West Nile virus antibody transfer from maternal Eastern Screech-Owls (Megascops asio) to progeny

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hahn, D.C.; Nemeth, N.M.; Edwards, E.; Bright, P.R.; Komar, N.

    2006-01-01

    Transovarial antibody transfer in owls has not been demonstrated for West Nile virus (WNV). We sampled chicks from captive adult WNV-antibody-positive Eastern Screech-Owls (Megascops asio) to evaluate the prevalence of transovarial maternal antibody transfer, as well as titers and duration of maternal antibodies. Twenty-four owlets aged 1 to 27 days old circulated detectable antibodies with neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 20 to 1600 (median 1:40). Demonstrating that WNV antibodies are passively transferred transovarially is important for accurate interpretation of serologic data from young birds.

  11. Immunoperoxidase inhibition assay for rabies antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Batista, H B C R; Lima, F E S; Maletich, D; Silva, A C R; Vicentini, F K; Roehe, L R; Spilki, F R; Franco, A C; Roehe, P M

    2011-06-01

    An immunoperoxidase inhibition assay (IIA) for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera is described. Diluted test sera are added to microplates with paraformaldehyde-fixed, CER cells infected with rabies virus. Antibodies in test sera compete with a rabies polyclonal rabbit antiserum which was added subsequently. Next, an anti-rabbit IgG-peroxidase conjugate is added and the reaction developed by the addition of the substrate 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The performance of the assay was compared to that of the "simplified fluorescence inhibition microtest" (SFIMT), an established virus neutralization assay, by testing 422 human sera. The IIA displayed 97.6% sensitivity, 98% specificity and 97.6% accuracy (Kappa correlation coefficient=0.9). The IIA results can be read by standard light microscopy, where the clearly identifiable specific staining is visible in antibody-negative sera, in contrast to the absence of staining in antibody-positive samples. The assay does not require monoclonal antibodies or production of large amounts of virus; furthermore, protein purification steps or specialized equipment are not necessary for its performance. The IIA was shown to be suitable for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera, with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy comparable to that of a neutralization-based assay. This assay may be advantageous over other similar methods designed to detect rabies-specific binding antibodies, in that it can be easily introduced into laboratories, provided basic cell culture facilities are available. PMID:21458492

  12. Antibodies to selected minor target antigens in patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA).

    PubMed

    Talor, M V; Stone, J H; Stebbing, J; Barin, J; Rose, N R; Burek, C L

    2007-10-01

    In patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, indirect immunofluorescence (IF) distinguishes between cytoplasmic (C-ANCA) and perinuclear (P-ANCA) neutrophil staining patterns. In patients with primary systemic vasculitis such as Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and Churg-Strauss syndrome, these IF staining patterns correspond broadly with antibodies to the two major antigens: the C-ANCA pattern is associated generally with antibodies to serine protease 3 (PR3) and the P-ANCA pattern with antibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO). However, some sera positive for ANCA by IF are negative for anti-PR3 and anti-MPO antibodies, suggesting the presence of antibodies to minor antigens of PMN granules. We tested sera from a previously well-defined clinical cohort of patients for antibodies to four possible minor antigens: bactericidal permeability increasing protein, elastase, cathepsin G and lactoferrin. IF-positive (+) sera had significantly higher antibody frequencies to the minor antigens than did the IF-negative (-) sera (P < 0.01). Patients with IF(+) PR3(-)MPO(-) sera showed the most varied reactivity to the minor antigens. Among the IF(+) groups, the IF(+) PR3(+)/MPO(-) sera showed the lowest reactivity to the minor antigens. Patients with well-defined ANCA specificities, e.g. the PR3-ANCA response associated with Wegener's granulomatosis, are less likely than are other patient subsets to have antibodies to minor antigen targets. Autoantibodies to these minor antigens contribute to the overall pattern of ANCA identified by IF and help to explain why the correlation between IF and enzyme immunoassays show discrepancies. While the pathophysiological significance of antibodies to minor target antigens needs further evaluation, they may be markers of inflammation associated with disease processes. PMID:17614969

  13. Anti-protamine-heparin antibodies: incidence, clinical relevance, and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bakchoul, Tamam; Zöllner, Heike; Amiral, Jean; Panzer, Simon; Selleng, Sixten; Kohlmann, Thomas; Brandt, Sven; Delcea, Mihaela; Warkentin, Theodore E; Sachs, Ulrich J; Greinacher, Andreas

    2013-04-11

    Protamine, which is routinely used after cardiac surgery to reverse the anticoagulant effects of heparin, is known to be immunogenic. Observing patients with an otherwise unexplained rapid decrease in platelet count directly after protamine administration, we determined the incidence and clinical relevance of protamine-reactive antibodies in patients undergoing cardiac-surgery. In vitro, these antibodies activated washed platelets in a Fc?RIIa-dependent fashion. Using a nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mouse model, those antibodies induced thrombocytopenia only when protamine and heparin were present but not with protamine alone. Of 591 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, 57 (9.6%) tested positive for anti-protamine-heparin antibodies at baseline and 154 (26.6%) tested positive at day 10. Diabetes was identified as a risk factor for the development of anti-protamine-heparin antibodies. In the majority of the patients, these antibodies were transient and titers decreased substantially after 4 months (P < .001). Seven patients had platelet-activating, anti-protamine-heparin antibodies at baseline and showed a greater and more prolonged decline in platelet counts compared with antibody-negative patients (P = .003). In addition, 2 of those patients experienced early arterial thromboembolic complications vs 9 of 584 control patients (multivariate analysis: odds ratio, 21.58; 95% confidence interval, 2.90-160.89; P = .003). Platelet-activating anti-protamine-heparin antibodies show several similarities with anti-platelet factor 4-heparin antibodies and are a potential risk factor for early postoperative thrombosis. PMID:23325832

  14. Natural Antibodies Against Sialoglycans.

    PubMed

    Shilova, Nadezhda; Huflejt, Margaret E; Vuskovic, Marko; Obukhova, Polina; Navakouski, Maksim; Khasbiullina, Nailya; Pazynina, Galina; Galanina, Oxana; Bazhenov, Alexey; Bovin, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    Natural antibodies, part of the innate immunity system, are produced at strictly regulated levels in normal sera without immunization and thus are part of the innate immune system. The best studied natural antibodies are those directed against blood group antigens A and B and xeno-antigens including glycolylneuraminic acid containing Hanganutziu-Deicher (HD) glycolipid. Abnormal levels of anti-glycan antibodies were found in a number of pathologies. In many cases pathological antibodies are known to bind gangliosides. The genesis of anti-glycan antibodies in healthy humans and the reasons for their changes in pathologies are poorly understood. With a growing interest in their diagnostic applications, it is important to determine the carbohydrate structures that are recognized by antibodies present in the circulation of healthy individuals. We tested a large number of healthy donors using a printed glycan array (PGA) in a microchip format. The PGA contained ~300 glycans, representing mostly normal mammalian structures of glycoproteins and glycolipids, and many of the structures presented are biologically relevant sialylated motifs. As revealed by PGA, the sera interacted with at least 70 normal human glycans. With only few exceptions, antibodies recognizing sialosides have not been identified. Moderate levels of antibodies and moderate variability were observed in the case of SiaT n and its glycolyl variant. Unexpectedly, we found minimal antibody titer directed against Neu5Gc? and the trisaccharide Neu5Gc?2-6Gal?1-4GlcNAc, although this form of neuraminic acid does not occur naturally in humans. Antibodies recognizing sialosides in unnatural ?-configuration have been detected and confirmed Springer's paradigm that circulating antibodies represent a reaction against bacteria. Gram-negative bacteria contain LPS with ?KDN and/or ?KDO which are very close analogs of Neu5Ac that are found in ?-connected form. Antibodies against the biantennary N-glycan chain, (Neu5Ac?2-6Gal?1-4GlcNAc?1-2Man?)2-3,6-Man?1-4GlcNAc?1-4GlcNAc were never observed and similarly we never saw antibodies directed against the SiaLe(a)/SiaLe (x) motifs. Anti-sialoglycan antibodies can be masked with gangliosides: for example, we observe about a five times higher level of anti-GD3 in purified total IgG compared to the same concentration of total Ig in the composition of native serum. For several antibodies we observed anomalous binding in diluted sera, namely, the signals towards sialylated glycans were increased in the PGA if diluted sera were used. PMID:24037491

  15. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  16. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  17. Antibody engineering for cancer therapy

    E-print Network

    Yeung, Yik Andy

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies targeting various tumor-associated antigens have been developed successfully to treat cancer. In this Thesis, novel antibodies and antibody-conjugate against two tumor antigens, AF-20 antigen and human aspartyl ...

  18. Ideology, interest-group formation, and protest: the case of the anti-nuclear power movement, the Clamshell Alliance, and the New Left

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    The thesis analyzes the development of the Clamshell Alliance, the first and most successful anti-nuclear power protest group. The key question the dissertation asks is how did this organization stage such popular and well-attended protests during a period when leftist political activity seemed to have died out, and little mass protest was taking place. The thesis also explores why the Clamshell Alliance disintegrated at the same time as the anti-nuclear power movement's cause was gaining public acceptance in the wake of the Three Mile Island power-plant accident. The thesis finds that the principal resources the Clamshell drew upon to solve the problems of organizational formation were the activists, organizations, and ideology of the surviving New Left. The dissertation studies the struggles of the Clamshell Alliance as an example of the recurrent problems of leftist political activism in the U.S. It is concluded that only under special conditions can protest outside of regular political channels be both popular and effective. It is also proved that a larger organizational and ideological legacy of the sixties remains than is generally recongnized. Leftist beliefs continued to have adherents even after the protests stopped. Further, many individuals who came to political maturity after the sixties also were found to hold leftist beliefs. However, the political potential of this group can only be realized when an organization temporarily overcomes the barriers to mass leftist political action by developing an issue and a set of tactics that can appeal to leftists and nonleftists alike. Between such special acts of innovation the Left remains a political undercurrent outside of mainstream politics and without a means of effective influence because of its unwillingness to engage in conventional politics.

  19. Delivery of antibodies to the cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Andrea LJ; Zhang, Congcong; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Perez, Franck; Dübel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibodies to target their antigens in living cells is a powerful analytical tool for cell biology research. Not only can molecules be localized and visualized in living cells, but interference with cellular processes by antibodies may allow functional analysis down to the level of individual post-translational modifications and splice variants, which is not possible with genetic or RNA-based methods. To utilize the vast resource of available antibodies, an efficient system to deliver them into the cytosol from the outside is needed. Numerous strategies have been proposed, but the most robust and widely applicable procedure still remains to be identified, since a quantitative ranking of the efficiencies has not yet been done. To achieve this, we developed a novel efficiency evaluation method for antibody delivery based on a fusion protein consisting of a human IgG1 Fc and the recombination enzyme Cre (Fc-Cre). Applied to suitable GFP reporter cells, it allows the important distinction between proteins trapped in endosomes and those delivered to the cytosol. Further, it ensures viability of positive cells and is unsusceptible to fixation artifacts and misinterpretation of cellular localization in microscopy and flow cytometry. Very low cytoplasmic delivery efficiencies were found for various profection reagents and membrane penetrating peptides, leaving electroporation as the only practically useful delivery method for antibodies. This was further verified by the successful application of this method to bind antibodies to cytosolic components in living cells. PMID:24848507

  20. Monoclonal antibody to chicken oviduct progesterone receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Radanyi, C; Joab, I; Renoir, J M; Richard-Foy, H; Baulieu, E E

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies to molybdate-stabilized chicken oviduct progesterone receptor were raised in a Wistar rat and detected by interaction with homogeneous radioiodinated progesterone receptor. Spleen cells of this rat were then fused with mouse Sp2/0-Ag14 myeloma cells and the antibodies produced by the hybrid cells were detected by double immunoprecipitation using the 125I-labeled receptor. Cells of one of the positive cultures were then cloned by limiting dilution and one hybridoma cell line was studied. The monoclonal antibody produced was an IgG2b, and it reacted with the molybdate-stabilized "8-9S" form of the chicken oviduct progesterone receptor, labeled with either [3H]progesterone or [3H]ORG 2058 (a high-affinity synthetic progestin). Kd for the 8-9S progesterone receptor was approximately equal to 1 nM. Progesterone receptor-monoclonal antibody complexes were labeled with radioactive progesterone, suggesting that antibody does not prevent hormone binding. By using a [35S]methionine-labeled antibody, we were able to detect the progesterone receptor independently of its characteristic function of binding radioactive hormone. No crossreaction with human progesterone receptor was detected. PMID:6574454

  1. Antibodies to Trichomonas vaginalis surface glycolipid

    PubMed Central

    Bastida-Corcuera, F D; Singh, B N; Gray, G C; Stamper, P D; Davuluri, M; Schlangen, K; Corbeil, R R; Corbeil, L B

    2015-01-01

    Background Human trichomoniasis is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease, yet immune responses are not well studied. Methods Since the Trichomonas vaginalis lipophosphoglycan (TvLPG) is an important virulence factor, a bank of eight monoclonal antibodies was generated to define the antigen in clinical isolates. The TvLPG-specific antibody response of women who were culture positive (n=33) or negative (n=33) for T vaginalis infection was determined by isotype-specific ELISA. Results The bank of monoclonal antibodies reacted with conserved surface TvLPG epitopes in 27 isolates from pregnant women at their first prenatal visit. Conserved TvLPG epitopes were shown to be surface exposed by immunofluorescence. Sera collected from the same patients at the same time were assayed for specific antibodies. Serum and vaginal secretions from 33 T vaginalis-positive women had statistically higher IgG anti-TvLPG levels than age-matched and race-matched negative controls in the same clinical study (p<0.01). Vaginal IgA anti-TvLPG levels of the women with trichomoniasis were almost significantly higher than controls (p=0.055). Infected women with normal pregnancies had significantly higher vaginal IgG anti-TvLPG values than infected women with adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Conclusions These antibody responses show that infected women can respond to the conserved TvLPG antigen. Since antibodies to trichomonad surface LPG protect in a bovine model of trichomoniasis, the role of these antibodies in the human disease should be investigated. PMID:23785040

  2. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  3. Generation of neutralising antibodies against porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaulitz, Danny; Fiebig, Uwe; Eschricht, Magdalena; Wurzbacher, Christian; Kurth, Reinhard; Denner, Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies neutralising porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) were induced in different animal species by immunisation with the transmembrane envelope protein p15E. These antibodies recognised epitopes, designated E1, in the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) of p15E, and E2 in the membrane proximal external region (MPER). E2 is localised in a position similar to that of an epitope in the transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), recognised by the monoclonal antibody 4E10 that is broadly neutralising. To detect neutralising antibodies specific for PERV, a novel assay was developed, which is based on quantification of provirus integration by real-time PCR. In addition, for the first time, highly effective neutralising antibodies were obtained by immunisation with the surface envelope protein of PERV. These data indicate that neutralising antibodies can be induced by immunisation with both envelope proteins.

  4. EQUINE ANTIHAPTEN ANTIBODY

    PubMed Central

    Rockey, John H.

    1967-01-01

    Eight antigenically unique immunoglobulins have been identified in purified equine anti-p-azophenyl-?-lactoside (Lac) antibody isolated from a single horse. The Fc fragments of the ?Ga-, ?Gb-, ?Gc-, and -?A-globulins have been shown to possess unique antigenic determinants. Common ?G- and ?A-Fc fragment antigenic determinants, which were absent from the 10S?1- and ?M-globulins, have also been observed. All antibody populations share two antigenically distinct light (B, L) chain variants. The association of anti-Lac antibody with the hapten p-(p-dimethylamino-benzeneazo)-phenyl-?-lactoside has been measured by equilibrium dialysis and by fluorescence quenching. A variation in the affinity of anti-Lac antibody for hapten has been observed. The affinity of antibody was unaltered by enzymatic removal of the Fc fragments by peptic digestion or dissociation of the two combining sites on the papain 3.5S Fab fragments, indicating that the observed heterogeneity of affinities was not a direct function of the heterogeneity in structure of the Fc fragments. Isolated heavy (A, H) chains of ?A-anti-Lac antibody have been shown to have retamed affinity for Lac dye by equilibrium dialysis and by analytical ultracentrifugation, employing a combination of schlieren and absorption optics. The heavy (A, H) chains from two physically separable, antigenically distinct antibody populations, isolated from the same animal and having affinity for the same haptenic determinant, have been found to differ in their amino acid composition. Anti-Lac antibody light (B, L) chains have also been shown to be chemically heterogeneous, and contained populations of polypeptide chains possessing, and populations lacking methionine. The relevance of the observed structural heterogeneity of equine anti-Lac antibody to the problem of defining the mechanism of acquisition of immunological specificity is briefly discussed. PMID:4959973

  5. Tumor localization by combinations of monoclonal antibodies in a new human colon carcinoma cell line (LIM1899)

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, S.M.; Teh, J.G.; Johnstone, R.W.; Russell, S.M.; Whitehead, R.H.; McKenzie, I.F.; Pietersz, G.A. )

    1990-09-01

    One of the problems of in vivo diagnosis and therapy of tumors with monoclonal antibodies is their heterogeneity with respect to antigen expression, with some cells expressing no antigen and others being weakly or strongly positive. Selected mixtures of antibodies to different antigens are therefore likely to react with more cells than single antibodies and be more effective for imaging and therapy. With this in mind, we have examined a new human colon cancer cell line (LIM1899) which has a heterogeneous expression of several cell surface molecules: by flow cytometry 38% were carcinoembryonic antigen positive; 64%, human milk fat globule positive, and 73%, CD46 positive; 87% of tumor cells bound a mixture of all three antibodies in vitro. Some blocking of the binding of anti-human milk fat globule antibody by the anti-CD46 antibody was noted. LIM1899 was established as a xenograft in nude mice and in vivo biodistribution studies performed using antibodies alone or in combination. Mixtures of antibodies clearly showed a higher percentage of injected dose of antibody in the tumor than did single antibodies: one antibody gave 10%; two together, 17 to 21%; and all three together gave 29% of the injected dose in the tumor. Tumor:blood ratios were also superior for combinations of antibodies, provided that low doses of the antibodies were used; at higher doses the effect was lost. The study demonstrates that combinations of antibodies are better than single antibodies for localization, provided that the dose used is carefully selected.

  6. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Visit Global Sites Search Help? Heparin-induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Heparin-PF4 Antibody; HIT Antibody; HIT PF4 Antibody; Heparin Induced Antibody; ...

  7. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  8. Intracellular antibody immunity.

    PubMed

    Watkinson, Ruth E; McEwan, William A; James, Leo C

    2014-07-01

    Antibodies allow the immune system to target pathogens despite their tremendous diversity and rapid evolution. Once bound to a pathogen, antibodies induce a broad range of effector mechanisms, including phagocytosis and complement. However, these mechanisms are all initiated in the extracellular space, meaning that pathogens like viruses evade them upon infection of their target cells. Recently, it has been shown that, in addition to mediating extracellular immune responses, antibodies also activate immunity inside infected cells. Antibodies that are bound to the surface of non-enveloped viruses or bacteria are carried into the cell during pathogen entry. Once inside the cell, these pathogen-attached antibodies are recognised by a highly conserved, high affinity cytosolic antibody receptor called TRIM21. TRIM21 initiates both sensor and effector responses that reduce viral replication and induce an antiviral state. These responses are an important part of antiviral immunity and the removal of TRIM21 results in uncontrolled viraemia and death in a mouse model of infection. PMID:24722852

  9. Structural Comparison of Different Antibodies Interacting with Parvovirus Capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Hafenstein, Susan; Bowman, Valorie D.; Sun, Tao; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Palermo, Laura M.; Chipman, Paul R.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Parrish, Colin R.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Cornell; Purdue

    2009-05-13

    The structures of canine parvovirus (CPV) and feline parvovirus (FPV) complexed with antibody fragments from eight different neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) reconstruction to resolutions varying from 8.5 to 18 {angstrom}. The crystal structure of one of the Fab molecules and the sequence of the variable domain for each of the Fab molecules have been determined. The structures of Fab fragments not determined crystallographically were predicted by homology modeling according to the amino acid sequence. Fitting of the Fab and virus structures into the cryoEM densities identified the footprints of each antibody on the viral surface. As anticipated from earlier analyses, the Fab binding sites are directed to two epitopes, A and B. The A site is on an exposed part of the surface near an icosahedral threefold axis, whereas the B site is about equidistant from the surrounding five-, three-, and twofold axes. One antibody directed to the A site binds CPV but not FPV. Two of the antibodies directed to the B site neutralize the virus as Fab fragments. The differences in antibody properties have been linked to the amino acids within the antibody footprints, the position of the binding site relative to the icosahedral symmetry elements, and the orientation of the Fab structure relative to the surface of the virus. Most of the exposed surface area was antigenic, although each of the antibodies had a common area of overlap that coincided with the positions of the previously mapped escape mutations.

  10. Antibodies to GABAA receptor ?1 and ?2 subunits

    PubMed Central

    Pettingill, Philippa; Kramer, Holger B.; Coebergh, Jan Adriaan; Pettingill, Rosie; Maxwell, Susan; Nibber, Anjan; Malaspina, Andrea; Jacob, Anu; Irani, Sarosh R.; Buckley, Camilla; Beeson, David; Lang, Bethan; Waters, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To search for antibodies against neuronal cell surface proteins. Methods: Using immunoprecipitation from neuronal cultures and tandem mass spectrometry, we identified antibodies against the ?1 subunit of the ?-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABAAR) in a patient whose immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies bound to hippocampal neurons. We searched 2,548 sera for antibodies binding to GABAAR ?, ?, and ? subunits on live HEK293 cells and identified the class, subclass, and GABAAR subunit specificities of the positive samples. Results: GABAAR-Abs were identified in 40 of 2,046 (2%) referred sera previously found negative for neuronal antibodies, in 5/502 (1%) previously positive for other neuronal surface antibodies, but not in 92 healthy individuals. The antibodies in 40% bound to either the ?1 (9/45, 20%) or the ?2 subunits (9/45, 20%) and were of IgG1 (94%) or IgG3 (6%) subclass. The remaining 60% had lower antibody titers (p = 0.0005), which were mainly immunoglobulin M (IgM) (p = 0.0025), and showed no defined subunit specificity. Incubation of primary hippocampal neurons with GABAAR IgG1 sera reduced surface GABAAR membrane expression. The clinical features of 15 patients (GABAAR ?1 n = 6, ?2 n = 5, undefined n = 4) included seizures (47%), memory impairment (47%), hallucinations (33%), or anxiety (20%). Most patients had not been given immunotherapies, but one with new-onset treatment-resistant catatonia made substantial improvement after plasma exchange. Conclusions: The GABAAR ?1 and ?2 are new targets for antibodies in autoimmune neurologic disease. The full spectrum of clinical features, treatment responses, correlation with antibody specificity, and in particular the role of the IgM antibodies will need to be assessed in future studies. PMID:25636713

  11. Salivary IgA antibody to glucosyltransferase in man.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Taubman, M A; Ebersole, J L

    1985-01-01

    Parotid salivas of 97 young adults were screened for IgA antibody to glucosyltransferase (GTF) from laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans (serotypes c and g). Antibody levels to GTF from serotype c positively correlated with levels to serotype g GTF among these salivas. GTF's were prepared from S. mutans obtained from a subset of individuals in this population. All but one saliva showed IgA antibody activity to all of the GTF tested. In addition, the relative magnitude of each subject's antibody level was generally the highest to the GTF from their own S. mutans. Fractions, enriched for IgA by ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration, showed patterns of functional inhibition of GTF activity which were consistent with patterns of IgA antibody activity in ELISA of unfractionated salivas. These data indicate that detectable levels of IgA antibody to S. mutans GTF exist in many young adult salivas, while this IgA antibody activity reacts with GTF from different biotypes, subjects generally show the highest secretory IgA antibody levels to their own GTF, and the relative amount of IgA antibody to GTF and the ability to inhibit GTF activity are roughly correlated. PMID:2931224

  12. Re-188 labelled antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, B A; Lambert, C R; Marek, M J; Knapp, F F; Harvey, E B

    1996-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies can be directly labelled with 188Re using a simple one-step radiolabelling kit. Using B72.3 as a model antibody, the formulation was optimized and kits were made and tested and compared to data previously reported for the same antibody labelled with other radioisotopes. Labelling with Re-188 was carried out with the eluate of a W-188/Re-188 generator from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Fresh generator eluate was added to the pre-reduced lyophilized antibody and the mixture allowed to incubate overnight at room temperature. The radiochemical purity, immunoreactive fraction, and biodistribution in normal and LS174T tumor bearing nude mice was determined. The radiochemical purity was 88 +/- 7%, the immunoreactive fraction was 68.46 +/- 3.8%. The immunoreactive fraction was higher than any previously reported for this antibody when labelled with other radioisotopes. At 48 h, 7.9 +/- 2.4% of the injected dose per gram was found in the tumor. The biodistribution and tumor uptake of Re-188 labelled B72.3 was similar to that previously reported for Re-186 and In-111 labelled B72.3. PMID:8589673

  13. Anti-dsDNA antibodies in laboratory workers handling blood from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Zarmbinski, M A; Messner, R P; Mandel, J S

    1992-09-01

    The presence of antinuclear antibodies was determined in female laboratory workers with varying degrees of exposure to blood from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Subjects recruited from SLE research laboratories and a membership roster provided by the American Society for Medical Technology were classified according to self-reported frequency of handling blood from patients with SLE into high and low exposure groups. Employment and medical history were obtained by questionnaire from each study subject and their sera were tested for antibodies to double stranded DNA, single stranded DNA, and synthetic polynucleotide poly(dA-dC).poly(dG-dT) by ELISA. Analysis of the results using an independent t test showed the mean optical density for anti-dsDNA was higher in the high exposure group (mean = 0.010) than in the low exposure group (mean = 0.005, p = 0.016). There were no significant differences found between the 2 groups for anti-ssDNA or anti-poly(dA-dC).poly(dG-dT), but the means for both anti-dsDNA and anti-poly(dA-dC).poly(dG-dT) were higher in the laboratory workers than in an unexposed nonlaboratory group of women (p less than 0.001). Our results are provocative for they lend support to the hypothesis that a transmissible agent capable of causing autoantibody formation may exist in blood from patients with SLE. PMID:1433005

  14. Assessments of antibody biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Patrick M; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Balthasar, Joseph P

    2015-03-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics are in use for several disease conditions, and have generally shown excellent clinical benefit, in large part due to their high specificity and affinity for target proteins. As this therapeutic class continues to grow in size, improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling mAb biodistribution and protein binding may be expected to allow better prediction of safety and efficacy. Due to the large size and polarity of antibodies, rates of mAb distribution and elimination are typically much slower than those reported for small molecule drugs. Additionally, high affinity interaction with target proteins will often influence mAb pharmacokinetics, leading to complex, nonlinear tissue distribution and elimination. In this report, we summarize key determinants of mAb disposition, methods for assessing antibody exposure and protein binding, and model-based approaches that may be utilized to predict mAb pharmacokinetics. PMID:25707961

  15. Humoral antibody to Mobiluncus curtisii, a potential serological marker for bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Schwebke, J R; Morgan, S C; Hillier, S L

    1996-01-01

    While bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a polymicrobial syndrome, Mobiluncus spp. are the organisms most highly associated with this condition. It is possible that serum antibody to Mobiluncus spp. could be used as a serological marker for BV. Using immunofluorescence techniques, we studied the prevalence of antibody to M. curtisii among three cohorts-pregnant women, pediatric patients, and sexually inexperienced women. The prevalence of antibody in each of these three groups was 75, 6, and 0%, respectively. Of the three pediatric patients with antibody to Mobiluncus curtisii, two were neonates, and the only class of antibody detected was immunoglobulin G. Among the cohort of pregnant women, the presence of antibody could not be correlated with a clinical history of BV. Serum antibody to M. curtisii could be a useful serological marker for BV. The lack of correlation of antibody positivity to historical information regarding BV suggests that unrecognized or undiagnosed episodes of BV may be common. PMID:8877136

  16. Construction of Recombinant Single Chain Variable Fragment (ScFv) Antibody Against Superantigen for Immunodetection Using Antibody Phage Display Technology.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Agrawal, Ranu; Kamboj, D V; Singh, Lokendra

    2016-01-01

    Superantigens are a class of antigens that bind to the major histocompatibility complex class (MHC) II and T-cell receptor (TCR) and cause the nonspecific activation of T cells, resulting in a massive release of pro-inflammatory mediators. They are produced by the gram-positive organisms Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, and by a variety of other microbes such as viruses and mycoplasma, and cause toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and even death in some cases. The immunodetection of superantigens is difficult due to the polyclonal activation of T-cells leading to nonspecific antibody production. The production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies against superantigens can solve this problem and are far better than polyclonal antibodies in terms of detection. Here, we describe the construction of recombinant single chain variable fragments (ScFv) antibodies against superantigens with specific reference to SEB (staphylococcal enterotoxin B) using antibody phage display technology. PMID:26676049

  17. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  18. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePLUS

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  19. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red ...

  20. Molecular versatility of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Henry

    2002-07-01

    As immunology developed into a discrete discipline, the principal experimental efforts were directed towards uncovering the molecular basis of the specificity exhibited by antibodies and the mechanism by which antigens induced their production. Less attention was given to how antibodies carry out some of their effector functions, although this subject presents an interesting protein-chemical and evolutionary problem; that is, how does a family of proteins that can bind a virtually infinite variety of ligands, many of which the species producing that protein has never encountered, reproducibly initiate an appropriate response? The experimental data persuasively suggested that aggregation of the antibody was a necessary and likely sufficient initiating event, but this only begged the question: how does aggregation induce a response? I used the IgE:mast cell system as a paradigm to investigate this subject. Data from our own group and from many others led to a molecular model that appears to explain how a cell 'senses' that antigen has reacted with the IgE. The model is directly applicable to one of the fundamental questions cited above, i.e. the mechanism by which antigens induce the production of antibodies. Although the model is conceptually simple, incorporating the actual molecular events into a quantitatively accurate scheme represents an enormous challenge. PMID:12190931

  1. Natural antibodies to glycans.

    PubMed

    Bovin, N V

    2013-07-01

    A wide variety of so-called natural antibodies (nAbs), i.e. immunoglobulins generated by B-1 cells, are directed to glycans. nAbs to glycans can be divided in three groups: 1) conservative nAbs, i.e. practically the same in all healthy donors with respect to their epitope specificity and level in blood; 2) allo-antibodies to blood group antigens; 3) plastic antibodies related to the first or the second group but discussed separately because their level changes considerably during diseases and some temporary conditions, in particular inflammation and pregnancy. Antibodies from the third group proved to be prospective markers of a number of diseases, whereas their unusual level (below or above the norm) is not necessarily the consequence of disease/state. Modern microarrays allowed the determination of the human repertoire, which proved to be unexpectedly broad. It was observed that the content of some nAbs reaches about 0.1% of total immunoglobulins. Immunoglobulins of M class dominate for most nAbs, constituting up to 80-90%. Their affinity (to a monovalent glycan, in KD terms) were found to be within the range 10(-4)-10(-6) M. Antibodies to Gal?1-3GlcNAc (Le(C)), 4-HSO3Gal?1-4GalNAc (4'-O-SuLN), Fuc?1-3GlcNAc, Fuc?1-4GlcNAc, GalNAc?1-3Gal (Adi), Gal?1-4Gal?1-4Glc (P(k)), Gal?1-4Gal?1-4GlcNAc (P1), GlcNAc?-terminated glycans, and hyaluronic acid should be noted among the nAbs revealed and studied during the last decade. At the same time, a kind of "taboo" is observed for a number of glycans: antibodies to Le(X) and Le(Y), and almost all gangliosides have not been observed in healthy persons. Many of the revealed nAbs were directed to constrained inner (core) part of glycan, directly adjoined to lipid of cell membrane or protein. The biological function of these nAbs remains unclear; for anti-core antibodies, a role of surveillance on appearance of aberrant, especially cancer, antigens is supposed. The first data related to oncodiagnostics based on quantitation of anti-glycan nAbs are reported. PMID:24010841

  2. Antibody modeling assessment.

    PubMed

    Almagro, Juan C; Beavers, Mary Pat; Hernandez-Guzman, Francisco; Maier, Johannes; Shaulsky, Jodi; Butenhof, Kenneth; Labute, Paul; Thorsteinson, Nels; Kelly, Kenneth; Teplyakov, Alexey; Luo, Jinquan; Sweet, Raymond; Gilliland, Gary L

    2011-11-01

    A blinded study to assess the state of the art in three-dimensional structure modeling of the variable region (Fv) of antibodies was conducted. Nine unpublished high-resolution x-ray Fab crystal structures covering a wide range of antigen-binding site conformations were used as benchmark to compare Fv models generated by four structure prediction methodologies. The methodologies included two homology modeling strategies independently developed by CCG (Chemical Computer Group) and Accerlys Inc, and two fully automated antibody modeling servers: PIGS (Prediction of ImmunoGlobulin Structure), based on the canonical structure model, and Rosetta Antibody Modeling, based on homology modeling and Rosetta structure prediction methodology. The benchmark structure sequences were submitted to Accelrys and CCG and a set of models for each of the nine antibody structures were generated. PIGS and Rosetta models were obtained using the default parameters of the servers. In most cases, we found good agreement between the models and x-ray structures. The average rmsd (root mean square deviation) values calculated over the backbone atoms between the models and structures were fairly consistent, around 1.2 Å. Average rmsd values of the framework and hypervariable loops with canonical structures (L1, L2, L3, H1, and H2) were close to 1.0 Å. H3 prediction yielded rmsd values around 3.0 Å for most of the models. Quality assessment of the models and the relative strengths and weaknesses of the methods are discussed. We hope this initiative will serve as a model of scientific partnership and look forward to future antibody modeling assessments. PMID:21935986

  3. NMDA receptor antibodies associated with distinct white matter syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Hemingway, Cheryl; Jacobson, Leslie; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Pike, Mike; Pullaperuma, Sunil; Siddiqui, Ata; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waters, Patrick; Irani, Sarosh R.; Buckley, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical and radiologic findings of children with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies and white matter disorders. Method: Ten children with significant white matter involvement, with or without anti-NMDAR encephalitis, were identified from 46 consecutive NMDAR antibody–positive pediatric patients. Clinical and neuroimaging features were reviewed and the treatment and outcomes of the neurologic syndromes evaluated. Results: Three distinct clinicoradiologic phenotypes were recognized: brainstem encephalitis (n = 3), leukoencephalopathy following herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) (n = 2), and acquired demyelination syndromes (ADS) (n = 5); 3 of the 5 with ADS had myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein as well as NMDAR antibodies. Typical NMDAR antibody encephalitis was seen in 3 patients remote from the first neurologic syndrome (2 brainstem, 1 post-HSVE). Six of the 7 patients (85%) who were treated acutely, during the original presentation with white matter involvement, improved following immunotherapy with steroids, IV immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, either individually or in combination. Two patients had escalation of immunotherapy at relapse resulting in clinical improvement. The time course of clinical features, treatments, and recoveries correlated broadly with available serum antibody titers. Conclusion: Clinicoradiologic evidence of white matter involvement, often distinct, was identified in 22% of children with NMDAR antibodies and appears immunotherapy responsive, particularly when treated in the acute phase of neurologic presentation. When observed, this clinical improvement is often mirrored by reduction in NMDAR antibody levels, suggesting that these antibodies may mediate the white matter disease. PMID:25340058

  4. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  5. Biological and physiocochemical properties of purified anti-DNP guinea-pig non-precipitating antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia

    1973-01-01

    Methods for isolation and purification of precipitating and non-precipitating guinea-pig antibodies are described. The physicochemical properties of ?1 and ?2 non-precipitating antibodies are similar to ?1 and ?2 precipitating ones. Biological properties are also similar excepting the reverse Arthus reaction, which is positive with the precipitating and negative with the non-precipitating antibodies. Bivalence of these antibodies was experimentally demonstrated. Precipitating antibodies K0 do not differ greatly from those obtained with the corresponding non-precipitating ones. The incapacity to precipitates with the antigen may be a consequence of a steric impediment. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4267511

  6. Her2 Monoclonal Antibodies, Antibody Drug Conjugates, and Site Specific Antibody Conjugate Methods

    Cancer.gov

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADC) can demonstrate high efficacy as cancer therapeutics, however, much more can be done to improve their efficacy and safety profile. Site-specific antibody drug conjugation is a promising way to do this.

  7. Rapid development of broadly influenza neutralizing antibodies through redundant mutations.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Leontios; Foglierini, Mathilde; Piccoli, Luca; Kallewaard, Nicole L; Turrini, Filippo; Silacci, Chiara; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Agatic, Gloria; Giacchetto-Sasselli, Isabella; Pellicciotta, Gabriele; Sallusto, Federica; Zhu, Qing; Vicenzi, Elisa; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2014-12-18

    The neutralizing antibody response to influenza virus is dominated by antibodies that bind to the globular head of haemagglutinin, which undergoes a continuous antigenic drift, necessitating the re-formulation of influenza vaccines on an annual basis. Recently, several laboratories have described a new class of rare influenza-neutralizing antibodies that target a conserved site in the haemagglutinin stem. Most of these antibodies use the heavy-chain variable region VH1-69 gene, and structural data demonstrate that they bind to the haemagglutinin stem through conserved heavy-chain complementarity determining region (HCDR) residues. However, the VH1-69 antibodies are highly mutated and are produced by some but not all individuals, suggesting that several somatic mutations may be required for their development. To address this, here we characterize 197 anti-stem antibodies from a single donor, reconstruct the developmental pathways of several VH1-69 clones and identify two key elements that are required for the initial development of most VH1-69 antibodies: a polymorphic germline-encoded phenylalanine at position 54 and a conserved tyrosine at position 98 in HCDR3. Strikingly, in most cases a single proline to alanine mutation at position 52a in HCDR2 is sufficient to confer high affinity binding to the selecting H1 antigen, consistent with rapid affinity maturation. Surprisingly, additional favourable mutations continue to accumulate, increasing the breadth of reactivity and making both the initial mutations and phenylalanine at position 54 functionally redundant. These results define VH1-69 allele polymorphism, rearrangement of the VDJ gene segments and single somatic mutations as the three requirements for generating broadly neutralizing VH1-69 antibodies and reveal an unexpected redundancy in the affinity maturation process. PMID:25296253

  8. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-04-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  9. Antibody Titer Has Positive Predictive Value for Vaccine Protection against Challenge with Natural Antigenic-Drift Variants of H5N1 High-Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Viruses from Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, David L.; Spackman, Erica; Jadhao, Samadhan; Dauphin, Gwenaelle; Kim-Torchetti, Mia; McGrane, James; Weaver, John; Daniels, Peter; Wong, Frank; Selleck, Paul; Wiyono, Agus; Indriani, Risa; Yupiana, Yuni; Sawitri Siregar, Elly; Prajitno, Teguh; Smith, Derek; Fouchier, Ron

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccines are used in integrated control strategies to protect poultry against H5N1 high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI). H5N1 HPAI was first reported in Indonesia in 2003, and vaccination was initiated in 2004, but reports of vaccine failures began to emerge in mid-2005. This study investigated the role of Indonesian licensed vaccines, specific vaccine seed strains, and emerging variant field viruses as causes of vaccine failures. Eleven of 14 licensed vaccines contained the manufacturer's listed vaccine seed strains, but 3 vaccines contained a seed strain different from that listed on the label. Vaccines containing A/turkey/Wisconsin/1968 (WI/68), A/chicken/Mexico/28159-232/1994 (Mex/94), and A/turkey/England/N28/1973 seed strains had high serological potency in chickens (geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition [HI] titers, ?1:169), but vaccines containing strain A/chicken/Guangdong/1/1996 generated by reverse genetics (rg; rgGD/96), A/chicken/Legok/2003 (Legok/03), A/chicken/Vietnam/C57/2004 generated by rg (rgVN/04), or A/chicken/Legok/2003 generated by rg (rgLegok/03) had lower serological potency (geometric mean HI titers, ?1:95). In challenge studies, chickens immunized with any of the H5 avian influenza vaccines were protected against A/chicken/West Java/SMI-HAMD/2006 (SMI-HAMD/06) and were partially protected against A/chicken/Papua/TA5/2006 (Papua/06) but were not protected against A/chicken/West Java/PWT-WIJ/2006 (PWT/06). Experimental inactivated vaccines made with PWT/06 HPAI virus or rg-generated PWT/06 low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus seed strains protected chickens from lethal challenge, as did a combination of a commercially available live fowl poxvirus vaccine expressing the H5 influenza virus gene and inactivated Legok/03 vaccine. These studies indicate that antigenic variants did emerge in Indonesia following widespread H5 avian influenza vaccine usage, and efficacious inactivated vaccines can be developed using antigenic variant wild-type viruses or rg-generated LPAI virus seed strains containing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE H5N1 high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus has become endemic in Indonesian poultry, and such poultry are the source of virus for birds and mammals, including humans. Vaccination has become a part of the poultry control strategy, but vaccine failures have occurred in the field. This study identified possible causes of vaccine failure, which included the use of an unlicensed virus seed strain and induction of low levels of protective antibody because of an insufficient quantity of vaccine antigen. However, the most important cause of vaccine failure was the appearance of drift variant field viruses that partially or completely overcame commercial vaccine-induced immunity. Furthermore, experimental vaccines using inactivated wild-type virus or reverse genetics-generated vaccines containing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of wild-type drift variant field viruses were protective. These studies indicate the need for surveillance to identify drift variant viruses in the field and update licensed vaccines when such variants appear. PMID:25609805

  10. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  11. An Unusual Mimicker of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aluoch, Aloice O; Farbman, Mathew; Gladue, Heather

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 47 year-old African American female with 15 pack-years of tobacco use and heavy alcohol use who presented with arthritis and was found to have a positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti double stranded DNA antibodies (anti-dsDNA), and anti-Sjogren’s syndrome-related antigen A and antigen B (anti-SSA and anti-SSB). She was subsequently found to have a lung adenocarcinoma associated with hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPO). This demonstrates a case of positive antinuclear antibodies and arthritis in a patient with lung adenocarcinoma, which can be falsely diagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26106457

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to gonadotropin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, P.H.; Moyle, W.R.; Canfield, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies to peptide hormones, with their unifocal binding sites, can provide tools for understanding hormone structure and function. The paper focuses on techniques that are important for the study of monoclonal antibodies to chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), including hybridoma production, methods of screening for desired clones, properties of the monoclonal antibodies, effect of antibodies on hormone-receptor interaction, inhibition of binding of radiolabeled hCG, inhibition of hCG induced steroidogenesis, determination of relative orientation of epitopes, and synergistic actions of monoclonal antibodies to hCG.

  13. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  14. Effects of the orientation of anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibody immobilized on scaffold in antibody-mediated osseous regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Sahar; Freire, Marcelo; Choi, Moon G; Tavari, Azadeh; Almohaimeed, Mohammad; Moshaverinia, Alireza; Zadeh, Homayoun H

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can trap endogenous osteogenic BMP ligands, which can in turn mediate osteodifferentiation of progenitor cells. The effectiveness of this strategy requires the availability of the anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies antigen-binding sites for anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies to bind to the scaffold through a domain that will leave its antigen-binding region exposed and available for binding to an osteogenic ligand. We examined whether antibodies bound to a scaffold by passive adsorption versus through Protein G as a linker will exhibit differences in mediating bone formation. In vitro anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies was immobilized on absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) with Protein G as a linker to bind the antibody through its Fc region and implanted into rat calvarial defects. The biomechanical strength of bone regenerated by absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies immune complex was compared to ACS/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies or ACS/Protein G/isotype mAb control group. Results demonstrated higher binding of anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies/BMPs to C2C12 cells, when the mAb was initially attached to recombinant Protein G or Protein G-coupled microbeads. After eight weeks, micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses revealed increased bone formation within defects implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies compared with defects implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies (p < 0.05). Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) confirmed increased BMP-2, -4, and -7 detection in sites implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Biomechanical analysis revealed the regenerated bone in sites with Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies had higher mechanical strength in comparison to anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies. The negative control group, Protein G/isotype mAb, did not promote bone regeneration and exhibited significantly lower mechanical properties (p < 0.05). Altogether, our results demonstrated that application of Protein G as a linker to adsorb anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies onto the scaffold was accompanied by increased in vitro binding of the anti-BMP-2 mAb/BMP immune complex to BMP-receptor positive cell, as well as increased volume and strength of de novo bone formation in vivo. PMID:26184354

  15. Effects of the orientation of anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibody immobilized on scaffold in antibody-mediated osseous regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Sahar; Freire, Marcelo; Choi, Moon G; Tavari, Azadeh; Almohaimeed, Mohammad; Moshaverinia, Alireza; Zadeh, Homayoun H

    2015-11-01

    Recently, we have shown that anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can trap endogenous osteogenic BMP ligands, which can in turn mediate osteodifferentiation of progenitor cells. The effectiveness of this strategy requires the availability of the anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies antigen-binding sites for anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies to bind to the scaffold through a domain that will leave its antigen-binding region exposed and available for binding to an osteogenic ligand. We examined whether antibodies bound to a scaffold by passive adsorption versus through Protein G as a linker will exhibit differences in mediating bone formation. In vitro anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies was immobilized on absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) with Protein G as a linker to bind the antibody through its Fc region and implanted into rat calvarial defects. The biomechanical strength of bone regenerated by absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies immune complex was compared to ACS/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies or ACS/Protein G/isotype mAb control group. Results demonstrated higher binding of anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies/BMPs to C2C12 cells, when the mAb was initially attached to recombinant Protein G or Protein G-coupled microbeads. After eight weeks, micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses revealed increased bone formation within defects implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies compared with defects implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies (p?antibodies in vivo. Biomechanical analysis revealed the regenerated bone in sites with Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies had higher mechanical strength in comparison to anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies. The negative control group, Protein G/isotype mAb, did not promote bone regeneration and exhibited significantly lower mechanical properties (p?antibodies onto the scaffold was accompanied by increased in vitro binding of the anti-BMP-2 mAb/BMP immune complex to BMP-receptor positive cell, as well as increased volume and strength of de novo bone formation in vivo. PMID:26184354

  16. Commercial antibodies and their validation

    PubMed Central

    Voskuil, JLA

    2014-01-01

    Despite an impressive growth in the business of research antibodies a general lack of trust in commercial antibodies remains in place. A variety of issues, each one potentially causing an antibody to fail, underpin the frustrations that scientists endure. Lots of money goes to waste in buying and trying one failing antibody after the other without realizing all the pitfalls that come with the product: Antibodies can get inactivated, both the biological material and the assay itself can potentially be flawed, a single antibody featuring in many different catalogues can be deemed as a set of different products, and a bad choice of antibody type, wrong dilutions, and lack of proper validation can all jeopardize the intended experiments. Antibodies endorsed by scientific research papers do not always meet the scientist’s requirements either due to flawed specifications, or due to batch-to-batch variations. Antibodies can be found with Quality Control data obtained from previous batches that no longer represent the batch on sale. In addition, one cannot assume that every antibody is fit for every application. The best chance of success is to try an antibody that already was confirmed to perform correctly in the required platform. PMID:25324967

  17. Therapeutic antibodies against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark J.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics against cancer are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential; 13 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for clinical use in the European Union and in the United States (one, mylotarg, was withdrawn from market in 2010). Three of the mAbs (bevacizumab, rituximab, trastuzumab) are in the top six selling protein therapeutics with sales in 2010 of more than $5 bln each. Hundreds of mAbs including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs and mAbs with optimized pharmacokinetics are in clinical trials. However, challenges remain and it appears that deeper understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major problems including resistance to therapy, access to targets, complexity of biological systems and individual variations. PMID:22520975

  18. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  19. Transfer of Maternal Antibodies against Avian Influenza Virus in Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Jacintha G. B.; Mateman, A. Christa; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Maternal antibodies protect chicks from infection with pathogens early in life and may impact pathogen dynamics due to the alteration of the proportion of susceptible individuals in a population. We investigated the transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus (AIV) in a key AIV host species, the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). Combining observations in both the field and in mallards kept in captivity, we connected maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs to (i) female body condition, (ii) female AIV antibody concentration, (iii) egg laying order, (iv) egg size and (v) embryo sex. We applied maternity analysis to the eggs collected in the field to account for intraspecific nest parasitism, which is reportedly high in Anseriformes, detecting parasitic eggs in one out of eight clutches. AIV antibody prevalence in free-living and captive females was respectively 48% and 56%, with 43% and 24% of the eggs receiving these antibodies maternally. In both field and captive study, maternal AIV antibody concentrations in egg yolk correlated positively with circulating AIV antibody concentrations in females. In the captive study, yolk AIV antibody concentrations correlated positively with egg laying order. Female body mass and egg size from the field and captive study, and embryos sex from the field study were not associated with maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs. Our study indicates that maternal AIV antibody transfer may potentially play an important role in shaping AIV infection dynamics in mallards. PMID:25386907

  20. Clinical utility and implications of asparaginase antibodies in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, C; Kawedia, J D; Cheng, C; Pei, D; Fernandez, C A; Cai, X; Crews, K R; Kaste, S C; Panetta, J C; Bowman, W P; Jeha, S; Sandlund, J T; Evans, W E; Pui, C-H; Relling, M V

    2012-11-01

    Hypersensitivity to asparaginase is common, but the differential diagnosis can be challenging and the diagnostic utility of antibody tests is unclear. We studied allergic reactions and serum antibodies to E. coli asparaginase (Elspar) in 410 children treated on St. Jude Total XV protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Of 169 patients (41.2%) with clinical allergy, 147 (87.0%) were positive for anti-Elspar antibody. Of 241 patients without allergy, 89 (36.9%) had detectable antibody. Allergies (P=0.0002) and antibodies (P=6.6 × 10(-6)) were higher among patients treated on the low-risk arm than among those treated on the standard/high-risk arm. Among those positive for antibody, the antibody titers were higher in those who developed allergy than in those who did not (P<1 × 10(-15)). Antibody measures at week 7 of continuation therapy had a sensitivity of 87-88% and a specificity of 68-69% for predicting or confirming clinical reactions. The level of antibodies was inversely associated with serum asparaginase activity (P=7.0 × 10(-6)). High antibody levels were associated with a lower risk of osteonecrosis (odds ratio=0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.78-0.89; P=0.007). Antibodies were related to clinical allergy and to low systemic exposure to asparaginase, leading to lower risk of some adverse effects of therapy. PMID:22484422

  1. Fluorescence intensity positivity classification of Hep-2 cells images using fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazali, Dayang Farzana Abang; Janier, Josefina Barnachea; May, Zazilah Bt.

    2014-10-01

    Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) is a good standard used for antinuclear autoantibody (ANA) test using Hep-2 cells to determine specific diseases. Different classifier algorithm methods have been proposed in previous works however, there still no valid set as a standard to classify the fluorescence intensity. This paper presents the use of fuzzy logic to classify the fluorescence intensity and to determine the positivity of the Hep-2 cell serum samples. The fuzzy algorithm involves the image pre-processing by filtering the noises and smoothen the image, converting the red, green and blue (RGB) color space of images to luminosity layer, chromaticity layer "a" and "b" (LAB) color space where the mean value of the lightness and chromaticity layer "a" was extracted and classified by using fuzzy logic algorithm based on the standard score ranges of antinuclear autoantibody (ANA) fluorescence intensity. Using 100 data sets of positive and intermediate fluorescence intensity for testing the performance measurements, the fuzzy logic obtained an accuracy of intermediate and positive class as 85% and 87% respectively.

  2. Is galectin-3 antibody a useful marker in the diagnosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma?

    PubMed

    Mlika, Mona; Ayadi-Kaddour, Aida; Ksantini, Meriem; Bouraoui, Saadia; Mzabi, Sabah; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2013-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a challenging diagnosis characterized by the absence of real specific diagnostic markers. Positivity with the galectin-3 antibody was assessed by a cytoplasmic expression in 17 MPM. Fourteen cases expressed the galectin-3 antibody. The three negative cases consisted of epithelioid, biphasic, and sarcomatoid MPM. The 14 positive cases consisted of epithelioid MPM in 12 cases, sarcomatoid MPM in one case, and biphasic MPM in one case. In spite of our inability to prove the real diagnostic value of the galectin-3 antibody, our findings make us wonder about the implication of this antibody in the carcinogenesis of MPM. PMID:23537297

  3. Radiolabeled antifibrin antibody in the detection of venous thrombosis: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, A.; Palevsky, H.I.; Gupta, N.; Meranze, S.; Kelley, M.A.; Jatlow, A.D.; Schaible, T.F.; Brown, J.; Berger, H.J. )

    1990-04-01

    The recent development of monoclonal antibodies against components of coagulated blood may provide new approaches to the diagnosis of venous thrombosis. Scanning with an indium-111-labeled Fab fragment of a murine monoclonal antifibrin antibody (59D8) and ascending contrast venography were performed in 33 patients. Images of the calves, popliteal fossae, thighs, and pelvis were obtained immediately, 4-6 hours, and 24 hours after injection of 2 mCi (74 MBq) of the antibody. All images were read in a blinded manner. Findings in both studies were positive in 28 patients and negative in three. In 19 patients not undergoing heparin therapy, 19 specific anatomic sites were positive on venograms and 29 were positive on antibody images (19 sites matched). In 14 patients undergoing heparin therapy, 34 sites were positive on venograms and 27 were positive on antibody images (22 sites matched). In most patients, positive results were noted within 1 hour of antibody injection. No adverse effects were noted with the antibody preparation. Preliminary data suggest that antifibrin antibody imaging is sensitive in detecting clots, is safe to use, and may have a role in diagnosing and managing venous thrombosis.

  4. Imaging of primary and metastatic colorectal carcinoma with monoclonal antibody 791T/36 and the therapeutic potential of antibody-drug conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Pimm, M.V.; Armitage, N.C.; Ballantyne, K.; Baldwin, R.W.; Perkins, A.C.; Durrant, L.G.; Garnett, M.C.; Hardcastle, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 791T/36, prepared against a tumor-associated 72,000 dalton glycoprotein, reacted with cells from primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas. I-131 or In-111-labelled antibody localized in xenografts of colorectal carcinomas established from in vitro clonogenic populations. Clinically, with I-131-labelled antibody, 8/11 colonic tumors imaged positively. Imaging was negative in four patients with benign colon disease. 5/11 rectal tumors were positively imaged, but excreted I-131 in the bladder obscured tumors in several studies. In-111-labelled antibody gave superior images and positively imaged primary and metastatic sites in 13/14 patients. Prospectively in the detection of recurrent disease, I-131 or In-111-antibody detected 29/33 separate sites in 24 patients. Seven negative patients remain disease free. There were 3 false positives; overall sensitivity was 88%, with 70% specificity. Specific localization of radiolabel was confirmed immunochemically and by counting radioactivity in resected specimens. Antibody conjugates with methotrexate, vindesine and daunomycin retained drug activity and antibody function, including xenograft localization and conjugates were therapeutically effective against xenografts. 791T/36 antibody has potential for immunodetection of primary and recurrent colorectal carcinoma and for targeting of therapeutic agents.

  5. Heparin-independent, PF4-dependent binding of HIT antibodies to platelets: implications for HIT pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Anand; Jones, Curtis G; Bougie, Daniel W; Curtis, Brian R; McFarland, Janice G; Wang, Demin; Aster, Richard H

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies specific for platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes are the hallmark of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis (HIT), but many antibody-positive patients have normal platelet counts. The basis for this is not fully understood, but it is believed that antibodies testing positive in the serotonin release assay (SRA) are the most likely to cause disease. We addressed this issue by characterizing PF4-dependent binding of HIT antibodies to intact platelets and found that most antibodies testing positive in the SRA, but none of those testing negative, bind to and activate platelets when PF4 is present without any requirement for heparin (P < .0001). Binding of SRA-positive antibodies to platelets was inhibited by chondroitinase ABC digestion (P < .05) and by the addition of chondroitin-4-sulfate (CS) or heparin in excess quantities. The findings suggest that although all HIT antibodies recognize PF4 in a complex with heparin, only a subset of these antibodies recognize more subtle epitopes induced in PF4 when it binds to CS, the major platelet glycosaminoglycan. Antibodies having this property could explain "delayed HIT" seen in some individuals after discontinuation of heparin and the high risk for thrombosis that persists for weeks in patients recovered from HIT. PMID:25342714

  6. Evaluation of antibody frequency against HBV, HCV and HTLV-1

    PubMed Central

    Tahaei, Seyed Mohammad Ebrahim; Fatemi, Seyed Reza; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Mirsattari, Dariush; Sanati, Azar; Sharifian, Afsaneh

    2012-01-01

    Aim This study was designed to evaluate the frequency of antibody against these viruses in individuals attending the endoscopy ward of Taleghani hospital Tehran, Iran. Background Blood-borne viruses such as hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus and HTLV-1 virus are among the world’s public health problems. Hepatitis viruses cause liver problems and HTLV-1 infection can lead to adult T-Cell lymphoma (ATL). Patients and methods Blood samples of 219 individuals attending the endoscopy ward of Taleghani hospital between years 2009-2011 were collected. A questionnaire containing demographic data was completed for each subject. Blood samples were tested for antibody against HTLV-1, HCV and HBc by ELISA (Dia.pro Italy). In case of positive results for anti-HBc, samples were also tested for HBs Ag antigen. Results Ninety two subjects were male and 127 were female. Mean age of the population was 39.87 ± 16.47. None of the subjects had anti-HCV antibody, while 4 of them had anti-HTLV-1 antibody and 26 anti-HBc antibody; which only two of these individuals had HBs Antibody. Conclusion The results of this study show that frequency of anti-HCV and anti-HTLV-1 antibodies are very low, while the frequency of anti-HBc was higher in the population. Since HTLV-1 is the causative agent of a type of blood cancer, it seems that screening of donated bloods in this region should be considered. PMID:24834218

  7. The future of monoclonal antibody technology

    PubMed Central

    Zider, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid growth of monoclonal antibody-based products, new technologies have emerged for creating modified forms of antibodies, including fragments, conjugates and multi-specific antibodies. We created a database of 450 therapeutic antibodies in development to determine which technologies and indications will constitute the “next generation” of antibody products. We conclude that the antibodies of the future will closely resemble the antibodies that have already been approved for commercial sale. PMID:20676053

  8. Vaccination Strategies to Promote Mucosal Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    There are great interest and demand for the development of vaccines to prevent and treat diverse microbial infections. Mucosal vaccines elicit immune protection by stimulating the production of antibodies at mucosal surfaces and systemic districts. Being positioned in close proximity to a large community of commensal microbes, the mucosal immune system deploys a heterogeneous population of cells and a complex regulatory network to maintain the balance between surveillance and tolerance. A successful mucosal vaccine relies on leveraging the functions of these immune cells and regulatory components. This article reviews the important cellular interactions and molecular pathways underlying the induction and regulation of mucosal antibody responses and discusses their implications on mucosal vaccination. PMID:21029959

  9. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The physicochemical and biological properties of purified guinea-pig reaginic antibody were studied. It is a labile protein different to ?1. Its antibody activity is completely destroyed by heating at 56° for 6 hours and by treatment with mercaptoethanol. The capacity to give PCA is decreased by repeated freezing and thawing. It is a bivalent antibody, haemagglutinating, does not fix complement and is capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA reaction after a latent period of a week but not after 3 hours. Reaginic antibody appears on day 7–8 after the first inoculation and the higher levels (PCA reaction) are obtained at the eleventh to thirteenth days. After the fifteenth to seventeenth days the PCA is negative. The reaginic antibody does not pass the placenta. Higher levels of reaginic antibody were obtained when the guinea-pigs were inoculated with the antigen in saline with simultaneous inoculation, intraperitoneally, of killed Bordetella pertussis, phase I. PMID:4354828

  10. Glycosylation of recombinant antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Jefferis, Royston

    2005-01-01

    The adaptive immune system has the capacity to produce antibodies with a virtually infinite repertoire of specificities. Recombinant antibodies specific for human targets are established in the clinic as therapeutics and represent a major new class of drug. Therapeutic efficacy depends on the formation of complexes with target molecules and subsequent activation of downstream biologic effector mechanisms that result in elimination of the target. The activation of effector mechanisms is dependent on structural characteristics of the antibody molecule that result from posttranslational modifications, in particular, glycosylation. The production of therapeutic antibody with a consistent human glycoform profile has been and remains a considerable challenge to the biopharmaceutical industry. Recent research has shown that individual glycoforms of antibody may provide optimal efficacy for selected outcomes. Thus a further challenge will be the production of a second generation of antibody therapeutics customized for their clinical indication. PMID:15903235

  11. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is defined by the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with recurrent venous or arterial thromboembolism or pregnancy morbidity. Anti-thrombotic therapy is the mainstay of treatment given the high risk of recurrent thromboembolism that characterizes this condition. Despite the prothrombotic nature of APS, thrombocytopenia is present in a proportion of patients. which can complicate management and limit the use of antithrombotic therapy. The mechanism of APS-associated thrombocytopenia is multifactorial and its relation to thrombotic risk poorly characterized. However, the presence of thrombocytopenia does not appear to reduce thrombotic risk in patients with APS, who can develop thromboembolic complications necessitating antithrombotic treatment. In these cases, treatment of the thrombocytopenia may be necessary to facilitate administration of antithrombotic agents. Clinical trials have demonstrated that patients with antiphospholipid antibodies and venous thromboembolism should be treated with vitamin K antagonists (warfarin); that ischemic stroke may be treated with aspirin or warfarin; and that women with recurrent pregnancy loss should receive prophylactic-dose heparin and aspirin. However, application of these trial results to patients with APS-associated thrombocytopenia can be challenging since there are limited data on the optimal use of antithrombotic agents in this setting. Issues such as determining the platelet threshold at which antithrombotic agents can be safely used and managing patients with both bleeding and thromboembolic complications remain unresolved. Ultimately the risks and benefits of antithrombotic therapy, balanced against the severity of the thrombocytopenia and its potential bleeding risks, need to be assessed using an individualized patient approach. PMID:20008203

  12. The use of combinations of monoclonal antibodies in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Linda M; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-12-01

    Treatment with monoclonal antibodies is becoming increasingly important in clinical oncology. These antibodies specifically inhibit signaling pathways in tumor growth and/or induce immunological responses against tumor cells. By combining monoclonal antibodies several pathways may be targeted simultaneously, potentially leading to additive or synergistic effects. Theoretically, antibodies are very suitable for use in combination therapy, because of limited overlapping toxicity and lack of pharmacokinetic interactions. In this article an overview is given of preclinical and clinical data on twenty-five different combinations of antibodies in oncology. Some of these combinations have proven clinical benefit, for example the combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer, which exemplifies an additive or synergistic effect on antitumor activity in clinical studies and the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab, which results in significant increases in progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanoma. However, other combinations may lead to unfavorable results, such as bevacizumab with cetuximab or panitumumab in advanced colorectal cancer. These combinations result in shorter progression-free survival and increased toxicity compared to therapy with a single antibody. In summary, the different published studies showed widely varying results, depending on the combination of antibodies, indication and patient population. More preclinical and clinical studies are necessary to unravel the mechanisms behind synergistic or antagonistic effects of combining monoclonal antibodies. Most research on combination therapies is still in an early stage, but it is expected that for several tumor types the use of combination therapy of antibodies will become standard of care in the near future. PMID:26547132

  13. Antibodies: Protective, destructive and regulatory role

    SciTech Connect

    Milgrom, F.; Abeyounis, C.J.; Albini, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers under 10 subject headings. The headings are: Production and Function of Antibodies, Protective Role of Antibodies, Antibodies to Foreign and Neoplastic Cells, Autoantibodies, Regulatory Mechanisms, Allergy, Immune Complexes, Antibodies in Pregnancy and Aging, Administration of Antibodies for Prevention and Therapy, and Abstracts of Poster Presentations.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  15. Selection of Antibodies Interfering with Cell Surface Receptor Signaling Using Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Melidoni, Anna N; Dyson, Michael R; McCafferty, John

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies able to bind and modify the function of cell surface signaling components in vivo are increasingly being used as therapeutic drugs. The identification of such "functional" antibodies from within large antibody pools is, therefore, the subject of intense research. Here we describe a novel cell-based expression and reporting system for the identification of functional antibodies from antigen-binding populations preselected with phage display. The system involves inducible expression of the antibody gene population from the Rosa-26 locus of embryonic stem (ES) cells, followed by secretion of the antibodies during ES cell differentiation. Target antigens are cell-surface signaling components (receptors or ligands) with a known effect on the direction of cell differentiation (FGFR1 mediating ES cell exit from self renewal in this particular protocol). Therefore, inhibition or activation of these components by functional antibodies in a few elite clones causes a shift in the differentiation outcomes of these clones, leading to their phenotypic selection. Functional antibody genes are then recovered from positive clones and used to produce the purified antibodies, which can be tested for their ability to affect cell fates exogenously. Identified functional antibody genes can be further introduced in different stem cell types. Inducible expression of functional antibodies has a temporally controlled protein-knockdown capability, which can be used to study the unknown role of the signaling pathway in different developmental contexts. Moreover, it provides a means for control of stem cell differentiation with potential in vivo applications. PMID:26036698

  16. Identification of anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies using IgG platelet antibody detection and crossmatch system assay with Galileo Echo.

    PubMed

    Di Cristofaro, Julie; Frassati, Coralie; Montagnie, Rolande; Basire, Agnes; Merieux, Yves; Picard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Fetal/neonatal allo-immune thrombocytopenia is the most frequent and the most dangerous clinical condition involving anti-human platelet antigens (HPA)-1a allo-antibodies. Anti-HPA-1a allo-immunization requires rapid and accurate diagnosis to determine appropriate treatment. The Capture-P Ready-Screen assay (C-PRS) is a new qualitative immunoassay to detect IgG anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and anti-HPA allo-antibodies. The aim of this study is to assess the identification of anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies using the C-PRS assay, associated with HLA class I stripping reagents, on the automated benchtop analyzer Galileo Echo. Forty-nine sera were analyzed: without anti-HLA class I or anti-HPA allo-antibodies, with anti-HLA class I allo-antibodies, with anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies, among which with anti-HLA class I allo-antibodies. None of the samples without allo-antibodies were reactive. Only anti-HLA antibodies, detected by cytotoxicity-dependent complement and not by Luminex, remained positive before and after stripping reagents. Of the 13 samples, anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies that were correctly identified before and after incubation with HLA assassin reagent were 70% and 85%, respectively. Anti-glycoprotein auto-antibodies and anti-HLA allo-antibodies do not interfere with the detection of anti-HPA-1a antibodies. This preliminary study indicates that further improvement of the test will be helpful in developing a clinically useful assay in the future. PMID:25101933

  17. Radiolabeled antibodies in cancer. Oncology Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-11-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories through the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiolabeled antibodies--labeling and imaging techniques; Radiolabeled antibodies--carcinoembryonic antigen; Radiolabeled antibodies--alpha-fetoprotein; Radiolabeled antibodies--human chorionic gonadotropin; Radiolabeled antibodies--ferritin; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of colorectal tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of malignant melanoma; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of urogenital tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of thyroid tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--other clinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--selected preclinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--reviews.

  18. Platelet-associated antibodies blood test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... be a harmful substance. In the case of platelet antibodies, your body created antibodies to attack platelets. As ... This means that you do not have anti-platelet antibodies in your blood. Normal value ranges may vary ...

  19. Antibodies - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    NCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit.

  20. Micromechanical antibody sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Jacobson, K. Bruce (Oak Ridge, TN); Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN); Kennel, Stephen J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Warmack, Robert J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A sensor apparatus is provided using a microcantilevered spring element having a coating of a detector molecule such as an antibody or antigen. A sample containing a target molecule or substrate is provided to the coating. The spring element bends in response to the stress induced by the binding which occurs between the detector and target molecules. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers.

  1. Positive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive

  2. SINGLE CHAIN ANTIBODY WITH SPECIFICITY FOR LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single chain antibody (scFv) fragments exhibiting specific binding to Listeria monocytogenes strains were isolated from a pool of random scFv fragments expressed on the surface of filamentous bacteriophage. Positive selection (panning) using L. monocytogenes was used to enrich for phage clones with...

  3. Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Antibodies in Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodu, Brad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of 125 sophomore preclinical dental students found that these young professionals, because of having a low prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies, are at risk for acquiring a primary HSV infection when treating HSV positive patients and should take precautions to avoid virus transmission. (MSE)

  4. Prevalence of antiphospholipid antibodies in Chilean patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Iván; Pinochet, Carmen; Alarcón, Marcelo; Sandoval, Rodrigo; Gonzalez, Jaime; Monsalves, Francisco; Forastiero, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies found in patients with autoimmune diseases are also detected in those with inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of these antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to evaluate the association of these antibodies with thrombosis and/or other clinical characteristics of this inflammatory disorder. Eighty-four patients with RA and 82 normal controls were studied. Anticardiolipin (aCL), anti-beta(2) glycoprotein I (anti-beta(2)GPI), and antiprothrombin (aPT) antibodies and the lupus anticoagulant (LA) activity were determined. Seven out of 84 (8.3%) patients were positive for aCL, six out of 84 (7.2%) for anti-beta(2)GPI, and six out of 84 (7.2%) for aPT, while in controls the overall prevalence of aPL antibodies was 3.6% (3 out of 82). All patients and controls were LA negative. There was no correlation between the presence of aPL with thrombosis and/or other clinical features of the antiphospholipid syndrome. We found aPL antibodies in 19.1% (16 out of 84) of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis and this prevalence was statistically higher than in normal controls (P<0.003). In this study, the presence of aPL antibodies was not associated with the development of thrombosis and/or thrombocytopenia. Whether the presence of aPL antibodies implies an increased risk for thrombosis and atherosclerosis in these patients should be studied further. PMID:16960897

  5. Antiphospholipid antibodies in Chilean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Ivan; Pereira, Jaime; Alarcon, Marcelo; Larrain, Ana Maria; Pinochet, Carmen; Vasquez, Marcela; Velez, Maria T; Leon, M; Espinola, Ricardo; Pierangeli, Silvia

    2002-11-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are a heterogeneous family of antibodies found in autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, and other situations. The presence of different aPLs has been associated with various clinical manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of aPLs in a group of 90 Chilean patients with systemic lupus erytematosus (SLE) and 90 healthy controls. We measured anticardiolipin antibodies (aCLs), antiphosphatidylserine antibodies (aPSs), anti-beta(2) glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-beta(2)GPIs), and antiprothrombin antibodies (aPTs) with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent technique using "in-house" assays. Fifty-four of 90 SLE patients (60.0%) had some type of aPL. Forty of 90 (44.4%) were positive for aCLs, 9 of 61 (14.8%) had aPSs, 21 of 90 (23.3%) had anti-beta(2)GPIs, and 18 of 90 (20.0%) had aPTs. In the control group, prevalences were as follows: aCLs, 3.3%; aPSs, 1.1%; anti-beta(2)GPIs, 1.1%; aPTs, 2.2%. In most cases, values were in the low-positive range. Of all aPL detected, 29.5% was of the IgG isotype, 37.5% IgM, and 33.0% IgA. We observed a correlation between aCLs and aPSs and of these antibodies with anti-beta(2)GPIs and aPTs but not between anti-beta(2)GPIs and aPTs. Our results show a high prevalence of aPLs in SLE patients. An association between different specificities and isotypes of aPLs was also observed. PMID:12434135

  6. Voltage gated calcium channel antibody-related neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bekircan-Kurt, Can Ebru; Derle Çiftçi, Eda; Kurne, Asl? Tuncer; Anlar, Banu

    2015-01-01

    Voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) antibodies are generally associated with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome. However the presence of this antibody has been associated with paraneoplastic as well as non-paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Most patients with VGCC-antibody-positivity have small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is an autoimmune disease of the presynaptic part of the neuromuscular junction. Its classical clinical triad is proximal muscle weakness, areflexia and autonomic dysfunction. Fifty to sixty percent of LEMS patients have a neoplasia, usually SCLC. The co-occurrence of SCLC and LEMS causes more severe and progressive disease and shorter survival than non-paraneoplastic LEMS. Treatment includes 3,4 diaminopyridine for symptomatic purposes and immunotherapy with prednisolone, azathioprine or intravenous immunoglobulin in patients unresponsive to 3,4 diaminopyridine. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is a syndrome characterized with severe, subacute pancerebellar dysfunction. Serum is positive for VGCC antibody in 41%-44% of patients, usually with the co-occurrence of SCLC. Clinical and electrophysiological features of LEMS are also present in 20%-40% of these patients. Unfortunately, PCD symptoms do not improve with immunotherapy. The role of VGCC antibody in the immunopathogenesis of LEMS is well known whereas its role in PCD is still unclear. All patients presenting with LEMS or PCD must be investigated for SCLC. PMID:25789302

  7. Rapid Isolation of Antibody from a Synthetic Human Antibody Library by Repeated Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Sung Sun; Bang, Hyun Bae; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Yong Jae; Jeong, Gu Min; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies and their derivatives are the most important agents in therapeutics and diagnostics. Even after the significant progress in the technology for antibody screening from huge libraries, it takes a long time to isolate an antibody, which prevents a prompt action against the spread of a disease. Here, we report a new strategy for isolating desired antibodies from a combinatorial library in one day by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). First, we constructed a library of synthetic human antibody in which single-chain variable fragment (scFv) was expressed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. After labeling the cells with fluorescent antigen probes, the highly fluorescent cells were sorted by using a high-speed cell sorter, and these cells were reused without regeneration in the next round of sorting. After repeating this sorting, the positive clones were completely enriched in several hours. Thus, we screened the library against three viral antigens, including the H1N1 influenza virus, Hepatitis B virus, and Foot-and-mouth disease virus. Finally, the potential antibody candidates, which show KD values between 10 and 100 nM against the target antigens, could be successfully isolated even though the library was relatively small (?106). These results show that repeated FACS screening without regeneration of the sorted cells can be a powerful method when a rapid response to a spreading disease is required. PMID:25303314

  8. Human monoclonal antibody with dual GM2/GD2 specificity derived from an immunized melanoma patient.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, H; Furukawa, K; Fortunato, S R; Livingston, P O; Lloyd, K O; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1990-01-01

    GM2 ganglioside is a common cell surface constituent of human melanoma and other tumors of neuroectodermal origin, and vaccination with GM2 ganglioside results in high levels of anti-GM2 antibodies in patients with melanoma. Lymphocytes from a GM2-vaccinated patient (VS) were transformed by Epstein-Barr virus and tested for production of antibodies with reactivity for GM2-positive tumor cells. A high percentage of antibody-producing B cells was detected, but antibody reactivity was generally lost during culture expansion. Two cultures, however, remained stable for antibody productivity and one was used to develop a stable hybrid line with mouse myeloma. The monoclonal antibody (designated 3-207) derived from patient VS has dual specificity for GM2 and GD2, despite the fact that only GM2 antibody could be detected in the patient's serum. Monoclonal antibody 3-207 shows high-titered reactivity with a range of melanoma, astrocytoma, neuroblastoma, and leukemia cell lines, cells with prominent cell surface expression of GM2 and GD2. The cell surface reactivity of monoclonal antibody 3-207 was not abolished by treatment of target cells with neuraminidase, as the enzyme converted GD2 to GM2, which was still detected by monoclonal antibody 3-207. Images PMID:2159145

  9. Fully Human Antagonistic Antibodies against CCR4 Potently Inhibit Cell Signaling and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Géraudie, Solène; Scheffler, Ulrike; Griep, Remko A.; Reiersen, Herald; Duncan, Alexander R.; Kiprijanov, Sergej M.

    2014-01-01

    Background CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) represents a potentially important target for cancer immunotherapy due to its expression on tumor infiltrating immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and on tumor cells in several cancer types and its role in metastasis. Methodology Using phage display, human antibody library, affinity maturation and a cell-based antibody selection strategy, the antibody variants against human CCR4 were generated. These antibodies effectively competed with ligand binding, were able to block ligand-induced signaling and cell migration, and demonstrated efficient killing of CCR4-positive tumor cells via ADCC and phagocytosis. In a mouse model of human T-cell lymphoma, significant survival benefit was demonstrated for animals treated with the newly selected anti-CCR4 antibodies. Significance For the first time, successful generation of anti- G-protein coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR) antibodies using human non-immune library and phage display on GPCR-expressing cells was demonstrated. The generated anti-CCR4 antibodies possess a dual mode of action (inhibition of ligand-induced signaling and antibody-directed tumor cell killing). The data demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity in vivo is mediated, at least in part, through Fc-receptor dependent effector mechanisms, such as ADCC and phagocytosis. Anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibodies inhibiting receptor signaling have potential as immunomodulatory antibodies for cancer. PMID:25080123

  10. Prevalence of antibodies to canine parvovirus and distemper virus in wolves in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Brynn; Hebblewhite, Mark; Ezenwa, Vanessa; Shury, Todd; Merrill, Evelyn H; Paquet, Paul C; Schmiegelow, Fiona; Seip, Dale; Skinner, Geoff; Webb, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Wild carnivores are often exposed to diseases via contact with peridomestic host species that travel through the wildland-urban interfaces. To determine the antibody prevalences and relationships to human activity for two common canid pathogens, we sampled 99 wolves (Canis lupus) from 2000 to 2008 for antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) in Banff and Jasper National Parks and surrounding areas of the Canadian Rockies. This population was the source for wolves reintroduced into the Northern Rockies of the US. Of 99 wolves sampled, 94 had detectable antibody to CPV (95%), 24 were antibody-positive for CDV (24%), and 24 had antibodies to both pathogens (24%). We tested whether antibody prevalences for CPV and CDV were higher closer to human activity (roads, town sites, First Nation reserves) and as a function of sex and age class. Wolves ?2 yr old were more likely to be have antibodies to CPV. For CDV, male wolves, wolves ?2 yr, and those closer to First Nation reserves were more likely to have antibodies. Overall, however, we found minimal support for human influence on antibody prevalence for CDV and CPV. The similarity between our antibody prevalence results and results from recent studies in Yellowstone National Park suggests that at least in the case of CDV, and perhaps CPV, these could be important pathogens with potential effects on wolf populations. PMID:22247375

  11. Malaria-induced acquisition of antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum variant surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Ofori, Michael F; Dodoo, Daniel; Staalsoe, Trine; Kurtzhals, Jørgen A L; Koram, Kwadwo; Theander, Thor G; Akanmori, Bartholomew D; Hviid, Lars

    2002-06-01

    In areas of intense Plasmodium falciparum transmission, protective immunity is acquired during childhood in parallel with acquisition of agglutinating antibodies to parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSA) expressed on parasitized red blood cells. In a semi-immune child in such an area, clinical disease is caused mainly by parasites expressing VSA not recognized by preexisting VSA-specific antibodies in that child. Such malaria episodes are known to cause an increase in agglutinating antibodies specifically recognizing VSA expressed by the parasite isolate causing the illness, whereas antibody responses to other parasite isolates are relatively unaffected. However, the detailed kinetics of this VSA antibody acquisition are unknown and hence were the aim of this study. We show that P. falciparum malaria in Ghanaian children generally caused a rapid and sustained increase in variant-specific VSA antibody levels, while more transient and limited increases in levels of antibodies to VSA expressed by other parasite isolates were also seen. Plasma VSA antibody levels were positively correlated with the age of the healthy plasma donors but negatively correlated with the age of the parasite donors (the malaria patient). The data from this first detailed longitudinal study of acquisition of VSA antibodies support the hypothesis that naturally acquired protective immunity to P. falciparum malaria is mediated, at least in part, by VSA-specific antibodies. PMID:12010988

  12. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ? four new products per year, ? 70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  13. 42 CFR 493.927 - General immunology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Test Procedure Alpha-l antitrypsin Alpha-fetoprotein (tumor marker) Antinuclear antibody Antistreptolysin O Anti-human...antitrypsin Target value ±3 SD. Alpha-fetoprotein (tumor marker) Target value ±3 SD. Antinuclear antibody...

  14. Reducing heterophilic antibody interference in immunoassays using single chain antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Tan, Ruimin; Fischer, Christopher J.; Victry, Kristin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2011-12-15

    Sandwich ELISA microarrays have the potential to simultaneously quantify the levels of multiple diagnostic targets in a biological sample. However, as seen with traditional ELISA diagnostics, heterophilic antibodies (HA) in patient sera have the potential to cause interference in these assays. We demonstrate here that reducing the diagnostic capture antibody to its minimal functional unit, the variable heavy and light domains artificially connected with a short polypeptide linker (scFv), is an effective strategy for reducing the HA assay interference.

  15. Anti-Ganglioside Antibodies in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kollewe, Katja; Wurster, Ulrich; Sinzenich, Thomas; Körner, Sonja; Dengler, Reinhard; Mohammadi, Bahram; Petri, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder with typical onset in the 5th- 6th decade of life. The hypothesis of an autoimmune origin of ALS receives less attention today, but immunological phenomena still seem to be involved and mechanisms such as protective autoimmunity may be important. Detection of antibodies against a variety of gangliosides has been repeatedly described in ALS-patients by several authors, but widely differing frequencies and titres have been reported. Therefore, we investigated the presence of six common antibodies with a commercially available test panel for GA1, GM1, GM2, GD1a, GD1b and GQ1b in a large group of clinically well-characterized ALS patients and compared them to a collective of 200 healthy blood donors. Methods IgG and IgM antibodies to the six gangliosides asialoGM1 (GA1), GM1, GM2, GD1a, GD1b, GQ1b were determined by GanglioCombi ELISA in sera of 84 ALS patients. Results were expressed as a %-ratio of a highly positive control and categorized as negative (<30%), borderline (30–50%), moderately (50–100%) and strongly positive (>100%). The values obtained from 200 Swiss blood donors served as a reference group. Results In twenty-two (26.2%) ALS-patients elevated anti-ganglioside antibodies could be detected: Taking all subspecific antibodies together, IgG antibodies were found in 9/84 (10.7%) and IgM in 15/84 (17.9%) patients. There was no correlation between age, gender, site of onset or survival and anti-ganglioside-positive/-negative titres in ALS-patients. No statistically significant difference in the frequency of anti-ganglioside antibodies compared to the group of healthy blood donors was found. Conclusion Even with this more comprehensive approach, anti-ganglioside antibody frequencies and patterns in our ALS cohort closely resembled the values measured in healthy controls. In accordance with other studies, we did not observe any association of a distinct ALS phenotype with elevated anti-ganglioside antibodies or an impact on survival. PMID:25875836

  16. DOWN'S SYNDROME WITH NEONATAL ALLOIMMUNE THROMBOCYTOPENIA DUE TO HLA-A2 ANTIBODY.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshihiko; Nomura, Tomoaki; Kamohara, Takashi; Takahashi, Hidehiro; Hatanaka, Daisuke; Kusakari, Michiko; Nakamura, Mari; Kawabata, Kinuyo; Ohto, Hitoshi

    2015-12-19

    Anti-HLA antibodies reportedly exist in the one third of pregnant women. But few occurrences of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) caused by anti-HLA antibodies have been reported. Here a male baby, who was admitted for low birth weight with Down syndrome (DS), was suffered from thrombocytopenia without transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD). Positive reactions of HLA-specific antibodies were detected in maternal serum. Cross-matching tests between maternal serum and paternal platelets and lymphocytes were strongly positive. It is most conceivable that the previous pregnancy of the mother induced the production of anti-HLA-A2 antibody, which crossed the placenta and subsequently caused an NAIT in the case presented. This is the first case of DS with NAIT due to anti-HLA antibodies. PMID:26632192

  17. Anti–JC virus antibody levels in serum or plasma further define risk of natalizumab-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Plavina, Tatiana; Subramanyam, Meena; Bloomgren, Gary; Richman, Sandra; Pace, Amy; Lee, Sophia; Schlain, Brian; Campagnolo, Denise; Belachew, Shibeshih; Ticho, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Objective The increased risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) with natalizumab treatment is associated with the presence of anti–JC virus (JCV) antibodies. We analyzed whether anti-JCV antibody levels, measured as index, may further define PML risk in seropositive patients. Methods The association between serum or plasma anti-JCV antibody levels and PML risk was examined in anti-JCV antibody–positive multiple sclerosis (MS) patients from natalizumab clinical studies and postmarketing sources. For PML and non-PML patients, the probabilities of having an index below and above a range of anti-JCV antibody index thresholds were calculated using all available data and applied to the PML risk stratification algorithm. Longitudinal stability of anti-JCV antibody index was also evaluated. Results Anti-JCV antibody index data were available for serum/plasma samples collected >6 months prior to PML diagnosis from 71 natalizumab-treated PML patients and 2,522 non-PML anti-JCV antibody–positive patients. In patients with no prior immunosuppressant use, anti-JCV antibody index distribution was significantly higher in PML patients than in non-PML patients (p?antibody negative at baseline in the AFFIRM and STRATIFY-1 trials, 97% remained consistently negative or below an index threshold of 1.5 over 18 months. Retrospective analyses of pre-PML samples collected longitudinally from PML patients displayed sustained higher anti-JCV antibody index over time. Interpretation Anti-JCV antibody levels in serum/plasma, measured as index, may differentiate PML risk in anti-JCV antibody–positive MS patients with no prior immunosuppressant use. Continued evaluation of anti-JCV antibody index and PML risk is warranted. Ann Neurol 2014;76:802–812 PMID:25273271

  18. Repeated infusions of infliximab, a chimeric anti-TNF? monoclonal antibody, in patients with active spondyloarthropathy: one year follow up

    PubMed Central

    Kruithof, E; Van den Bosch, F; Baeten, D; Herssens, A; De Keyser, F; Mielants, H; Veys, E

    2002-01-01

    Background: In a pilot study, the anti-tumour necrosis factor ? monoclonal antibody, infliximab, induced a rapid and significant improvement in global, peripheral, and axial disease manifestations of patients with active spondyloarthropathy. Objective: To determine whether repeated infusions of infliximab would effectively and safely maintain the observed effect. Methods: Safety and efficacy of a maintenance regimen (5 mg/kg infliximab every 14 weeks) was evaluated using the measurements reported in the pilot study. Of the 21 patients, 19 completed the one year follow up for efficacy; two patients changed to another dosing regimen after week 12 owing to partial lack of efficacy. However, they are still being followed up for safety analysis. Results: After each re-treatment a sustained significant decrease of all disease manifestations was observed. Before re-treatment, symptoms recurred in 3/19 (16%) at week 20, in 13/19 (68%) at week 34, and in 15/19 (79%) at week 48. No withdrawals due to adverse events occurred. Twelve minor infectious episodes were observed. Twelve patients (57%) developed antinuclear antibodies; in four of them (19%) anti-dsDNA antibodies were detected. However, no lupus-like symptoms occurred. Conclusion: In this open study of infliximab in patients with active spondyloarthropathy, the significant improvement of all disease manifestations was maintained over a one year follow up period without major adverse events. Although recurrence of symptoms was noted in a rising number of patients before each re-treatment, no loss of efficacy was observed after re-treatment. PMID:11830424

  19. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    MedlinePLUS

    Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining of cells. These substances prevent blood clotting in ... Most often lupus anticoagulants and aPL are found in people with ... as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus anticoagulants and ...

  20. Heterophile antibodies in human transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, F. T.; Kano, K.; Milgrom, F.

    1968-01-01

    Sensitization of human recipients with transplantation antigens (leucocytes, skin, or kidney allografts) has resulted in the appearance of serum hemagglutinins directed against sheep, guinea pig, and rat erythrocytes. Such hemagglutinins have been identified as IgG and IgM antibodies. Their appearance was not related to AB0 erythrocyte group incompatibility between donors and recipients, and the antibodies were not of the Forssman or Paul-Bunnel type. The antibody responses appeared to be primarily directed against antigen(s) present on rat erythrocytes, but shared to varying extents by other species. The peak antibody titers occurred in association with allograft rejection. In this regard, they may be of interest as a possible early warning system for the diagnosis and prompt management of rejection crises in clinical organ transplantation. Images PMID:4866325

  1. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  2. CATNAP: a tool to compile, analyze and tally neutralizing antibody panels.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyejin; Macke, Jennifer; West, Anthony P; Foley, Brian; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Korber, Bette; Yusim, Karina

    2015-07-01

    CATNAP (Compile, Analyze and Tally NAb Panels) is a new web server at Los Alamos HIV Database, created to respond to the newest advances in HIV neutralizing antibody research. It is a comprehensive platform focusing on neutralizing antibody potencies in conjunction with viral sequences. CATNAP integrates neutralization and sequence data from published studies, and allows users to analyze that data for each HIV Envelope protein sequence position and each antibody. The tool has multiple data retrieval and analysis options. As input, the user can pick specific antibodies and viruses, choose a panel from a published study, or supply their own data. The output superimposes neutralization panel data, virus epidemiological data, and viral protein sequence alignments on one page, and provides further information and analyses. The user can highlight alignment positions, or select antibody contact residues and view position-specific information from the HIV databases. The tool calculates tallies of amino acids and N-linked glycosylation motifs, counts of antibody-sensitive and -resistant viruses in conjunction with each amino acid or N-glycosylation motif, and performs Fisher's exact test to detect potential positive or negative amino acid associations for the selected antibody. Website name: CATNAP (Compile, Analyze and Tally NAb Panels). Website address: http://hiv.lanl.gov/catnap. PMID:26044712

  3. Novel antibodies as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zafir-Lavie, I; Michaeli, Y; Reiter, Y

    2007-05-28

    In recent years antibodies, whether generated by traditional hybridoma technology or by recombinant DNA strategies, have evolved from Paul Ehrlich's 'magic bullets' to a modern age 'guided missile'. In the recent years of immunologic research, we are witnessing development in the fields of antigen screening and protein engineering in order to create specific anticancer remedies. The developments in the field of recombinant DNA, protein engineering and cancer biology have let us gain insight into many cancer-related mechanisms. Moreover, novel techniques have facilitated tools allowing unique distinction between malignantly transformed cells, and regular ones. This understanding has paved the way for the rational design of a new age of pharmaceuticals: monoclonal antibodies and their fragments. Antibodies can select antigens on both a specific and a high-affinity account, and further implementation of these qualities is used to target cancer cells by specifically identifying exogenous antigens of cancer cell populations. The structure of the antibody provides plasticity resonating from its functional sites. This review will screen some of the many novel antibodies and antibody-based approaches that are being currently developed for clinical applications as the new generation of anticancer agents. PMID:17530025

  4. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, David Sherman

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  5. Antibodies to watch in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 6 antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, evolocumab, mepolizumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, necitumumab) are undergoing a first regulatory review in the EU or US. Of the 39 novel mAbs currently in Phase 3 studies, a marketing application for one (alirocumab) may be submitted in late 2014, and marketing application submissions for at least 4 (reslizumab, ixekizumab, ocrelizumab, obiltoxaximab) are expected in 2015. Other ‘antibodies to watch’ are those in Phase 3 studies with estimated primary completion dates in late 2014 or 2015, which includes 13 for non-cancer indications (brodalumab, bimagrumab, bococizumab, MABp1, gevokizumab, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, tildrakizumab, guselkumab, epratuzumab, combination of actoxumab + bezlotoxumab, romosozumab) and 2 (racotumomab and clivatuzumab tetraxetan) undergoing evaluation as treatments for cancer. In addition to the novel antibody therapeutics mentioned, biosimilar infliximab and biosimilar trastuzumab are ‘antibodies to watch’ in 2015 because of their potential for entry into the US market and regulatory review, respectively. PMID:25484055

  6. SPECIFICITY OF ANTIBODIES: UNEXPECTED CROSS-REACTIVITY OF ANTIBODIES DIRECTED AGAINST THE EXCITATORY AMINO ACID

    E-print Network

    Bergles, Dwight

    SPECIFICITY OF ANTIBODIES: UNEXPECTED CROSS-REACTIVITY OF ANTIBODIES DIRECTED AGAINST--Specific antibodies are essential tools for identify- ing individual proteins in biological samples. While genera- tion of antibodies is often straightforward, determination of the antibody specificity is not. Here we

  7. Clinical significance of anti-Ro52 (TRIM21) antibodies non-associated with anti-SSA 60kDa antibodies: results of a multicentric study.

    PubMed

    Ghillani, P; André, C; Toly, C; Rouquette, A M; Bengoufa, D; Nicaise, P; Goulvestre, C; Gleizes, A; Dragon-Durey, M A; Alyanakian, M A; Chretien, P; Chollet-Martin, S; Musset, L; Weill, B; Johanet, C

    2011-07-01

    Ro52 antigen has recently been identified as TRIM21 protein, but the clinical significance of anti-Ro52/TRIM21 antibodies remains controversial. The aim of this multicentric study was to investigate the significance of anti-Ro52 antibodies without anti-SSA/Ro60 antibodies in various connective diseases. Sera were selected by each laboratory using its own method (ELISA, immunodot or Luminex technology), and then performed with ANA Screen BioPlex™ reagent (BIO-RAD). Among the 247 screened sera, 155/247 (63%) were confirmed as anti-Ro52 positive and anti-SSA/Ro60 negative. These sera were analyzed for the detection of other antibodies in relation with clinical settings. Isolated anti-Ro52 antibodies were detected in 89/155 (57%) sera. For the remaining sera (66/155), the main antibodies associations were Sm/SmRNP or Chromatin (n=38; 57%), Jo1 (n=17; 26%) and CenpB (n=9; 14%). Clinical data from the 155 patients showed high prevalence in autoimmune diseases (73%) including myositis or dermatomyositis (n=30), lupus (n=23); Sjögren and/or sicca syndrome (n=27); CREST or Systemic sclerosis (n=11) and autoimmune hepatitis (n=11). We found that pulmonary manifestations were often associated with the presence of anti-Ro52 antibodies (n=34, 22%), in addition with anti-tRNA synthetases, anti-SRP or anti-Ku antibodies (18/34) or isolated in half of cases (16/34). Separate detection of anti-Ro52 antibodies might be useful in related antisynthetase syndrome diagnosis. The presence of anti-Ro52 antibodies should probably precede development of autoimmune disease and must induce sequential follow-up of positive patients, particularly in interstitial lung disease progression. PMID:21447407

  8. In vitro sensitization for human monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Niedba?a, W; Kurpisz, M

    1993-02-01

    We have found that cell adhesion prior to in vitro antigenic stimulation enriched the B-cell population and diminished the CD8 lymphocyte subset. These changes in lymphocyte proportions were favourable for increasing the percentage of antibody-producing cells after culturing in vitro followed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The immunodepletion of leukocytes by methyl esters did not yield satisfying results under analogous culture conditions. In vitro primary antigenic stimulations with the addition of IL-2 (25 U/ml medium) and low amounts of interferon-gamma provided better recruitment of antibody-producing cells and higher binding activity of antibodies to sperm than secondary antigenic stimulation. IL-6 did not positively influence the EBV-transformed cell lines. PMID:8389733

  9. Detecting Lyme disease using antibody-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, Jennifer; Lerner, Mitchell; Goldsmith, Brett; Brisson, Dustin; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-03-01

    We combine antibodies for Lyme flagellar protein with carbon nanotube transistors to create an electronic sensor capable of definitive detection of Lyme disease. Over 35,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported in the United States each year, of which more than 23 percent are originally misdiagnosed. Rational design of the coupling of the biological system to the electronic system gives us a flexible sensor platform which we can apply to several biological systems. By coupling these antibodies to carbon nanotubes in particular, we allow for fast, sensitive, highly selective, electronic detection. Unlike antibody or biomarker detection, bacterial protein detection leads to positive identification of both early and late stage bacterial infections, and is easily expandable to environmental monitoring.

  10. Human anti-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antibodies in patients treated with synthetic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Meakin, J.L.; Keogh, E.J.; Martin, C.E.

    1985-05-01

    One hundred sixty-three patients who were given synthetic LH-RH therapeutically underwent monitoring of serum IgG anti-LH-RH antibodies. Five of the patients showed specific binding to antibodies. Development of anti-LH-RH antibodies was not limited to those patients with a congenital deficiency of LH-RH. Urticarial responses occurred in four patients, only one of whom had IgG antibodies. Patients who had IgG antibodies or an urticarial response underwent monitoring of their serum IgE anti-LH-RH antibodies, but none had a positive binding response. The refractory state which has been reported in patients in whom similar antibodies to LH-RH develop was not invariably observed among these patients.

  11. Rab antibody characterization: comparison of Rab14 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Andrew J; McCaffrey, Mary W

    2015-01-01

    Rab14 functions in the endocytic recycling pathway, having been implicated in the trafficking of the ADAM10 protease, GLUT4, and components of cell-cell junctions to the plasma membrane. It localizes predominantly to endocytic membranes with a pool also found on trans-Golgi network (TGN) membranes, and is most closely related to the Rab11 subfamily of GTPases. Certain intracellular bacteria such as Legionella pneumophila, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Salmonella enterica utilize Rab14 to promote their maturation and replication. Furthermore, the HIV envelope glycoprotein complex subverts the function of Rab14, and its effector the Rab Coupling Protein (RCP), in order to direct its transport to the plasma membrane. Since the use of antibodies is critical for the functional characterization of cellular proteins and their specificity and sensitivity is crucial in drawing reliable conclusions, it is important to rigorously characterize antibodies prior to their use in cell biology or biochemistry experiments. This is all the more critical in the case of antibodies raised to a protein which belongs to a protein family. In this chapter, we present our evaluation of the specificity and sensitivity of a number of commercially available Rab14 antibodies. We hope that this analysis provides guidance for researchers for antibody characterization prior to its use in cellular biology or biochemistry. PMID:25800840

  12. Prevalence of Antibodies to Coxiella burnetii Among Veterinarians and Slaughterhouse Workers in Nova Scotia

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, Thomas J.; Fraser, James

    1985-01-01

    The complement fixation and the microimmunofluorescence tests were used to determine the prevalence of antibodies to Coxiella burnetii, the etiological agent of Q fever, among veterinarians and slaughterhouse workers in Nova Scotia. Seventeen percent of the 65 veterinarians and 12.5% of the 96 slaughterhouse workers tested had complement fixing antibodies to phase II C. burnetii antigen. Forty-nine percent of the veterinarians and 35% of the slaughterhouse workers had an antibody titer of ? 1:8 to phase II C. burnetii antigen using the microimmunofluorescence test while 30% of the veterinarians and 14.5% of the slaughterhouse workers had antibodies detected to phase I antigen. Male veterinarians had a significantly higher rate of antibodies to C. burnetii phase II antigen compared with female veterinarians (p < 0.0087). An univariate analysis revealed that positive antibody titers (microimmunofluorescence test) to phase II antigen among veterinarians were significantly associated with exposure to cow, sheep and goat placentas; to stillborn calves, newborn foals, lambs and kids. By multivariate analysis the risk was highest for male veterinarians exposed to sheep placentas. Slaughtering cattle was a significant risk factor for positive antibody titers among slaughterhouse workers. We conclude that the high rate of antibodies to C. burnetii among Nova Scotia veterinarians and slaughterhouse workers is a reflection of the prevalence of Q fever in Nova Scotia and indicates that domestic ungulates are probably important in the epidemiology of Q fever in this province. PMID:17422540

  13. Imaging of bone tumors using a monoclonal antibody raised against human osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, N.C.; Perkins, A.C.; Pimm, M.V.; Wastie, M.; Hopkins, J.S.; Dowling, F.; Baldwin, R.W.; Hardcastle, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    The radiolabeled monoclonal antibody 791T/36 raised against a human osteosarcoma was injected into 20 patients with known or suspected bone tumors. Gamma camera images were acquired at 48 or 72 hours after injection, and assessed for antibody localization. Positive images were obtained in all five osteosarcomas and four other primary malignant sarcomas. Two of the four other primary bone tumors gave positive images. Three patients with trauma had negative images as did one patient with Paget's disease. Two patients with suppurative disease gave positive images. The antibody localized in the majority of malignant sarcomas tested. In one tumor where tissue was available, a tumor:non-tumor ratio of 2.8:1 was measured. Repeat imaging was performed in five patients. Immunoscintigraphy using the monoclonal antibody 791T/36 has shown tumor localization in patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  14. Protein microarrays for gene expression and antibody screening.

    PubMed

    Lueking, A; Horn, M; Eickhoff, H; Büssow, K; Lehrach, H; Walter, G

    1999-05-15

    Proteins translate genomic sequence information into function, enabling biological processes. As a complementary approach to gene expression profiling on cDNA microarrays, we have developed a technique for high-throughput gene expression and antibody screening on chip-size protein microarrays. Using a picking/spotting robot equipped with a new transfer stamp, protein solutions were gridded onto polyvinylidene difluoride filters at high density. Specific purified protein was detected on the filters with high sensitivity (250 amol or 10 pg of a test protein). On a microarray made from bacterial lysates of 92 human cDNA clones expressed in a microtiter plate, putative protein expressors could be reliably identified. The rate of false-positive clones, expressing proteins in incorrect reading frames, was low. Product specificity of selected clones was confirmed on identical microarrays using monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivities of some antibodies with unrelated proteins imply the use of protein microarrays for antibody specificity screening against whole libraries of proteins. Because this application would not be restricted to antigen-antibody systems, protein microarrays should provide a general resource for high-throughput screens of gene expression and receptor-ligand interactions. PMID:10328771

  15. Prevalence of antipituitary antibodies in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Federica; Caturegli, Patrizio; Salvatori, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disorder due to an excessive production of growth hormone (GH), typically caused by a GH-secreting pituitary adenoma. Anti-pituitary antibodies (APAs) are often seen in patients with different kinds of pituitary pathologies. Because GH has been proposed as a possible antigen recognized by such antibodies, the prevalence of APAs may be higher in conditions characterized by excessive GH secretion. The primary aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of APAs in patients with acromegaly and in controls with other types of pituitary tumors and healthy subjects. Secondary aim was to characterize the pituitary cells targeted by the APAs. Thirty eight acromegaly patients and 215 controls, including 38 patients with prolactinomas, 64 with non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA), and 113 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. All subjects were tested for APAs using indirect immunofluorescence. Target cells recognized by APAs were identified by double staining immunofluorescence. APAs were significantly more prevalent in acromegaly cases than in healthy controls (10.5% vs. 1.8%, P < 0.05). This prevalence was similar to that found in patients with prolactinomas (7.9%) and NFPA (12.5%). Among APAs-positive subjects, antibodies recognizing somatotrope cells were more common in acromegaly cases than in healthy controls (3/4 vs. 0/113, P < 0.0001), but had similar frequencies in NFPA (2/8) and prolactinomas (1/3). APAs are more frequently found in patients with pituitary adenomas than healthy subjects, with no significant difference among the tumor types studied. GH-secreting cells could represent a target of the autoimmune response. PMID:22002711

  16. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies. PMID:26210205

  17. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Derek B.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-08-01

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays.

  18. Production of recombinant antibodies using bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Shukra, A. M.; Sridevi, N. V.; Dev Chandran

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant antibody fragments such as Fab, scFv, diabodies, triabodies, single domain antibodies and minibodies have recently emerged as potential alternatives to monoclonal antibodies, which can be engineered using phage display technology. These antibodies match the strengths of conventionally produced monoclonal antibodies and offer advantages for the development of immunodiagnostic kits and assays. These fragments not only retain the specificity of the whole monoclonal antibodies but also easy to express and produce in prokaryotic expression system. Further, these antibody fragments are genetically stable, less expensive, easy to modify in response to viral mutations and safer than monoclonal antibodies for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This review describes the potential of antibody fragments generated using phage display and their use as diagnostic reagents. PMID:24883194

  19. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  20. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  1. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bush, Derek B; Knotts, Thomas A

    2015-08-14

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays. PMID:26277119

  2. Positive Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C.

    2006-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported…

  3. Antibodies against some viruses of domestic animals in southern African wild animals.

    PubMed

    Barnard, B J

    1997-06-01

    Twenty-four species of South African wild animals were tested for the presence of antibodies against the viruses of 16 common diseases of domestic animals. Positive results were obtained for African horsesickness, equine encephalosis, equid herpes virus-1, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, Allerton disease (Herpes mammillitis), lumpy skin disease, parainfluenza, encephalomyocarditis, bluetongue, Wesselsbron disease, bovine ephemeral fever, and Akabane disease complex. No antibodies could be demonstrated against the viruses of equine influenza, equine infectious anaemia, equine viral arteritis and Rift Valley fever. The negative results substantiate observations that the latter diseases, with the exception of equine viral arteritis, are absent in South Africa. The number of animal species found positive for a specific virus, ranged from 0-16. No antibodies were found in crocodiles and warthogs, whereas antibodies against Wesselsbron and bovid herpes virus-1 were present in 16 species. Antibodies against viruses of horses were found almost exclusively in zebras and, although elephants reacted to African horsesickness, no neutralizing antibodies against it could be demonstrated in their sera. Zebras were also found to be positive for Wesselsbron and Akabane, which are usually regarded as viruses of ruminants. Antibodies against most viruses were encountered in all vegetation zones in South Africa but, as a rule, most viruses were more prevalent in the high-rainfall zone in KwaZulu-Natal. PMID:9352558

  4. Clinical Characteristics of Anti-3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Antibodies in Chinese Patients with Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yongpeng; Lu, Xin; Peng, Qinglin; Shu, Xiaoming; Wang, Guochun

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to detect the prevalence of anti-3-hydroxyl-3- methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (anti-HMGCR) antibodies in Chinese patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs), and to analyze the clinical features of the antibody-positive IIM patients. Methods The presence of anti-HMGCR antibodies was detected in 405 patients with IIMs, 90 healthy controls, and 221 patients with other rheumatic diseases by using an ELISA kit. Clinical data from anti-HMGCR antibody-positive and -negative patients were compared. Long-term follow-up of the anti-HMGCR antibody-positive patients was conducted to evaluate the role of anti-HMGCR antibody in IIM disease prognosis. Results Of the 405 IIM patients, 22 (5.4%) were found to carry the anti-HMGCR antibody. These IIM patients were predominantly female (73%), and only 3 anti-HMGCR antibody-positive patients with IIM were exposure to statins. Most patients experienced progressive onset, and presented with muscular weakness. Dysphagia was observed in half of the patients (p < 0.01), and 15% of these patients experienced the complication of interstitial lung disease (ILD) (p > 0.05). Mean creatine kinase (CK) levels were higher in antibody-positive patients than in antibody-negative patients (p < 0.05). Muscle biopsies were available from 12 anti-HMGCR antibody-positive patients, eight who experienced myofiber necrosis and showed very little or no evidence of inflammatory cell infiltrates in their muscle biopsies. Of these eleven patients who were followed-up 2.5- to 29-month, 73% experienced improvement after treatment. A cross-sectional study showed that anti-HMGCR antibody levels were significantly associated with CK levels (r = 0.486, p = 0.026) as well as with Myositis Disease Activity Assessment (MYOACT) scores (r = -0.67, p = 0.003) during the initial visit. However, changes in serum anti-HMGCR antibody levels did not correlate with changes in CK levels, Manual Muscle Testing 8 (MMT-8) scores or MYOACT scores in long-term follow-up. Conclusion The major clinical features of anti-HMGCR antibody-positive Chinese IIM patients were muscle weakness and dysphagia, which were seen in patients with and without statin exposure. This subtype of patients were responsive to immunosuppressive treatment and received good prognoses after treatment, but serum levels of the anti-HMGCR antibody do not correlate with disease activity. PMID:26509687

  5. Helicobacter pylori Antibody Titer and Gastric Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kishikawa, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kayoko; Takarabe, Sakiko; Kaida, Shogo; Nishida, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    The “ABC method” is a serum gastric cancer screening method, and the subjects were divided based on H. pylori serology and atrophic gastritis as detected by serum pepsinogen (PG): Group A [H. pylori (?) PG (?)], Group B [H. pylori (+) PG (?)], Group C [H. pylori (+) PG (+)], and Group D [H. pylori (?) PG (+)]. The risk of gastric cancer is highest in Group D, followed by Groups C, B, and A. Groups B, C, and D are advised to undergo endoscopy, and the recommended surveillance is every three years, every two years, and annually, respectively. In this report, the reported results with respect to further risk stratification by anti-H. pylori antibody titer in each subgroup are reviewed: (1) high-negative antibody titer subjects in Group A, representing posteradicated individuals with high risk for intestinal-type cancer; (2) high-positive antibody titer subjects in Group B, representing active inflammation with high risk for diffuse-type cancer; and (3) low-positive antibody titer subjects in Group C, representing advanced atrophy with increased risk for intestinal-type cancer. In these subjects, careful follow-up with intervals of surveillance of every three years in (1), every two years in (2), and annually in (3) should be considered. PMID:26494936

  6. Antibody recognition of carbohydrate epitopes†.

    PubMed

    Haji-Ghassemi, Omid; Blackler, Ryan J; Martin Young, N; Evans, Stephen V

    2015-09-01

    Carbohydrate antigens are valuable as components of vaccines for bacterial infectious agents and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and for generating immunotherapeutics against cancer. The crystal structures of anti-carbohydrate antibodies in complex with antigen reveal the key features of antigen recognition and provide information that can guide the design of vaccines, particularly synthetic ones. This review summarizes structural features of anti-carbohydrate antibodies to over 20 antigens, based on six categories of glyco-antigen: (i) the glycan shield of HIV glycoproteins; (ii) tumor epitopes; (iii) glycolipids and blood group A antigen; (iv) internal epitopes of bacterial lipopolysaccharides; (v) terminal epitopes on polysaccharides and oligosaccharides, including a group of antibodies to Kdo-containing Chlamydia epitopes; and (vi) linear homopolysaccharides. PMID:26033938

  7. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shuptrine, Casey; Surana, Rishi; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, the clinical utility of monoclonal antibodies has been realized and antibodies are now a mainstay for the treatment of cancer. Antibodies have the unique capacity to target and kill tumor cells while simultaneously activating immune effectors to kill tumor cells through the complement cascade or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). This multifaceted mechanism of action combined with target specificity underlies the capacity of antibodies to elicit anti-tumor responses while minimizing the frequency and magnitude of adverse events. This review will focus on mechanisms of action, clinical applications and putative mechanisms of resistance to monoclonal antibody therapy in the context of cancer. PMID:22245472

  9. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Eduardo B; Farah, Michel E; Maia, Maurício; Penha, Fernando M; Regatieri, Caio; Melo, Gustavo B; Pinheiro, Marcelo M; Zanetti, Carlos R

    2009-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be used therapeutically by binding to molecular targets with high specificity. Therefore, they have excellent therapeutic applications in ophthalmology. This manuscript presents four aspects of the therapeutic use of mAbs in ophthalmology: the scientific rationale, the unique characteristics of selected mAbs, the current state-of-the-art application, and relevant therapeutic mAbs for future applications in ophthalmology. We identified in the literature various single-agent therapies that inhibit the following targets: tumor necrosis factor (TNF), epithelial growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, basic fibroblast growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor, and cluster of differentiation antigens. The roles of all biochemical targets in ocular diseases were evaluated. Current and future mAbs against various cytokines were assessed for the treatment of ocular diseases. The medical literature showed the clinical benefits of mAbs for treating angiogenic and inflammatory ocular diseases. Two anti-VEGF mAbs, bevacizumab and ranibizumab, and three anti-TNF agents, infliximab, etanercept, and adalimumab, control ocular neovascularization and intraocular inflammation. Other mAbs such as rituximab, daclizumab, efalizumab, and alemtuzumab showed positive results in animal and early clinical studies and may represent useful adjuvant therapies for ocular lymphoma or ocular inflammation. Ranibizumab is the only FDA-approved therapy; for other mAbs the so-called off-label application remains the standard. Intravenous administration of mAbs has demonstrated acceptable toxicity profiles, while intraocular injection may decrease the chances of systemic complications and increase the amount of drug available to the retina and choroid. In conclusion, effective clinical use of mAbs in ophthalmology is more commonly seen in the field of angiogenic vitreoretinal and autoimmune inflammatory diseases. The challenge for the future is combining biologic therapies to improve the quality and duration of responses while diminishing side effects. The role of mAbs within ophthalmic treatments will be defined according to future clinical experience and the results of randomized clinical trials. PMID:19114125

  10. Novel Antibody Vectors for Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Olafsen, Tove; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging approaches include nuclear, optical, MRI, CT, ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging, which require accumulation of a signal delivered by a probe at the target site. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are high affinity molecules that can be used for specific, high signal delivery to cell surface molecules. However, their long circulation time in blood makes them unsuitable as imaging probes. Efforts to improve antibodies pharmacokinetics without compromising affinity and specificity have been made through protein engineering. Antibody variants that differ in antigen binding sites and size have been generated and evaluated as imaging probes to target tissues of interest. Fast clearing fragments such as single-chain Fv (scFv; 25 kDa) with one antigen binding site (monovalent) demonstrated low accumulation in tumors due the low exposure time to the target. Using scFv as building block to produce larger, bivalent fragments such as scFv dimers (diabodies, 50 kDa) and scFv-fusion proteins (80 kDa minibodies and 105 kDa scFv-Fc) resulted in higher tumor accumulation due to their longer residence time in blood. Imaging studies with these fragments following radiolabeling have demonstrated excellent, high contrast images in gamma cameras and PET scanners. Several studies have also investigated antibody fragments conjugated to fluorescence (near infrared dyes), bioluminescence (luciferases) and quantum dots for optical imaging and iron oxides nanoparticles for MRI. However, these studies indicate that there are several factors that influence successful targeting and imaging. These include stability of the antibody fragment, the labeling chemistry (direct or indirect), whether critical residues are modified, the number of antigen expressed on the cell, and whether the target has a rapid recycling rate or internalizes upon binding. The preclinical data presented are compelling and it is evident that antibody-based molecular imaging tracers will play an important future role in the diagnosis and management of cancer and other diseases. PMID:20350626

  11. Antibody penetration into living cells. IV. Different effects of anti-native DNA and anti-ribonucleoprotein IgG on the cell cycle of activated T gamma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D; Llorente, L

    1983-01-01

    Normal T cells bearing receptors for the Fc portion of IgG that were incubated in anti-RNP or anti-DNA at the time of activation with phytohaemagglutinin showed different effects on this activation as determined by flow cytometric analysis of acridine orange stained cells. Incubation in anti-RNP caused an arrest in the progression from the G0 + G1 to the S + G2 phases of the cell cycle. Incubation in anti-native DNA caused activated cells to have an increase in their RNA content without a concomitant increase in their DNA content (DNA block). These effects were not seen in T cells that were depleted of T gamma cells by means of their property of forming rosettes with high affinity for sheep erythrocytes. Use of F(ab')2 fragments of either autoantibody, pre-incubation with aggregated IgG, or incubation with the respective autoantibodies in the cold effectively prevented their effect on the nucleic acid content of T gamma cells. Despite their different effect on the cell cycle both antibodies caused similar increase of 51Cr release of low affinity T cells 6 h after incubation in them. Our findings show that different anti-nuclear antibodies seem to cause different effects upon the cells they penetrate. These differences may have pathogenetic significance in the diseases where these antibodies occur. PMID:6190600

  12. Serologic survey of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi in coyotes and red foxes from Pennsylvania and Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Rosypal, Alexa C; Smith, Trynecia; Alexander, Andrew; Weaver, Melanie; Stewart, Richard; Houston, Allan; Gerhold, Richard; Van Why, Kyle; Dubey, Jitender P

    2014-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a zoonotic parasite of humans and other mammalian hosts with distribution throughout the Americas. Domestic and wild canine species are reservoirs for human T. cruzi infections. The present study examined the prevalence of antibodies to T. cruzi in wild canids from the United States. Sera from 13 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and 263 coyotes (Canis latrans), originating in Pennsylvania and Tennessee, were assayed for antibodies to T. cruzi with immunochromatographic tests. Antibodies to T. cruzi were found in 2 of 276 (0.72%) of all wild canids tested. Both T. cruzi-positive wild canids were coyotes and represented 2 of 21 (9.52%) wild canids assayed from Tennessee. Antibodies to T. cruzi were not detected in red fox. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies were not found in any wild canids from Pennsylvania. These results suggest that coyotes are exposed to T. cruzi in Tennessee but not in Pennsylvania. PMID:25632700

  13. DNA-binding antibodies and hepatitis B markers in acute and chronic liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Kingham, J G; Rassam, S; Ganguly, N; Mcguire, M J; Nasrat, B; Holgate, S T; Triger, D R; Wright, R

    1978-01-01

    A Farr technique has been used to assay antibodies to double-stranded DNA in the serum of patients with acute and chronic liver disease and carriers of HBsAg from the United Kingdom and Iraq. These antibodies were found in all groups from both countries. The highest levels were found in chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis. In the Iraqi patients there was a strongly positive correlation between DNA-binding antibody levels and the presence of hepatitis B markers but not with disease activity. In the patients from the United Kingdom there was little correlation with disease activity and none with autoantibodies. Ninety-five per cent of asymptomatic carriers of HBsAG had elevated DNA-binding antibodies. It is suggested that hepatitis B-specific DNA might be one trigger to DNA antibody formation, though in liver disease a variety of factors are clearly operative. PMID:309808

  14. The European antibody network's practical guide to finding and validating suitable antibodies for research.

    PubMed

    Roncador, Giovanna; Engel, Pablo; Maestre, Lorena; Anderson, Amanda P; Cordell, Jacqueline L; Cragg, Mark S; Šerbec, Vladka ?; Jones, Margaret; Lisnic, Vanda J; Kremer, Leonor; Li, Demin; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Pascual, Núria; Rodríguez-Barbosa, Jose-Ignacio; Torensma, Ruurd; Turley, Helen; Pulford, Karen; Banham, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are widely exploited as research/diagnostic tools and therapeutics. Despite providing exciting research opportunities, the multitude of available antibodies also offers a bewildering array of choice. Importantly, not all companies comply with the highest standards, and thus many reagents fail basic validation tests. The responsibility for antibodies being fit for purpose rests, surprisingly, with their user. This paper condenses the extensive experience of the European Monoclonal Antibody Network to help researchers identify antibodies specific for their target antigen. A stepwise strategy is provided for prioritising antibodies and making informed decisions regarding further essential validation requirements. Web-based antibody validation guides provide practical approaches for testing antibody activity and specificity. We aim to enable researchers with little or no prior experience of antibody characterization to understand how to determine the suitability of their antibody for its intended purpose, enabling both time and cost effective generation of high quality antibody-based data fit for publication. PMID:26418356

  15. Positive Proof.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoffrey

    1988-01-01

    Presents experiments which show that in electrostatics there are logical reasons for describing charged materials as positive or negative. Indicates that static and current electricity are not separate areas of physics. Diagrams of experiments and circuits are included. (RT)

  16. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Nursing Positions KidsHealth > Parents > Pregnancy & Baby > All About Breastfeeding > ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ...

  17. Prevalence of antibodies against Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale in broilers and breeders in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Canal, Cláudio W; Leão, Joice Aparecida; Ferreira, Danilo José; Macagnan, Marisa; Pippi Salle, Carlos Tadeu; Back, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    In this investigation, we determined the prevalence of the Ornithobacerium rhinotracheale (ORT) infection in broilers and broiler breeders in southern Brazil. We also correlated the presence of antibodies in broilers with performance. Sera from 1550 broilers from 50 flocks were collected during the slaughter time in nine companies with federal veterinary inspection of the state of Rio Grande do Sul. Sera from 480 meat-type breeders of 40 flocks from 14 companies in southern Brazil were also analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the prevalence of antibodies was determined. The prevalence of ORT antibodies in broiler flocks was 63.83%, but in each individual flock only 6.52% of the birds were positive. The prevalence in broiler breeder flocks was 100.00%, and in each individual flock 94.62% of the birds were positive. There was a positive correlation between the presence of antibodies to ORT and decreased body weight in broilers. There was no significant correlation between presence of antibodies to ORT and age, lineage, efficiency index, feed conversion, and mortality. There was a positive correlation between the presence of respiratory signs and antibodies to ORT, although the reverse correlation was not significant. These results confirm that ORT is present and widespread in broilers and broiler breeders in southern Brazil. PMID:14562904

  18. Legionella micdadei and Legionella dumoffii monoclonal antibodies for laboratory diagnosis of Legionella infections.

    PubMed Central

    Cercenado, E; Edelstein, P H; Gosting, L H; Sturge, J C

    1987-01-01

    Two different monoclonal antibodies directed against Legionella micdadei and L. dumoffii (Genetic Systems Corp., Seattle, Wash.) were evaluated for their specificity and ability to detect L. micdadei and L. dumoffii in human and animal clinical samples and bacterial isolates in an indirect immunofluorescence assay. All three frozen sputum samples and all three Formalin-fixed sputum and liver samples from patients with culture-documented L. micdadei pneumonia were positive when tested with the L. micdadei monoclonal antibody. A Formalin-preserved lung sample from a patient with culture-documented L. dumoffii pneumonia was positive with its homologous monoclonal antibody. No cross-staining reactions were found with either monoclonal antibody on any of 25 human sputum samples tested from patients without Legionella infections. A total of 66 Legionella strains and 56 non-Legionella strains including 22 Pseudomonas strains and 34 other bacterial strains were studied. No cross-staining reactions were found except in Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1 ATCC 12598. The lower limit of detection in seeded sputum samples was about 7 X 10(4) cells per ml for both monoclonal antibodies. Lung and tracheal lavage specimens from L. micdadei- or L. dumoffii-infected guinea pigs showed specific staining only with their respective monoclonal antibodies. The monoclonal antibodies stained homologous bacteria slightly less intensely than did the polyclonal antisera, but the signal-to-noise ratio was considerably higher for the monoclonal antibodies. No differences in sensitivity of staining of clinical specimens or bacterial isolates were noted between the monoclonal antibodies and the polyclonal reagents for L. micdadei and L. dumoffii (Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Ga., and BioDx, Denville, N.J. These monoclonal antibodies ae sensitive and specific, making them good candidates for laboratory diagnostic purposes. PMID:3320084

  19. Chemical engineering of cell penetrating antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Lou, D; Burkett, J; Kohler, H

    2001-08-01

    Antibodies, being exquisitely specific tools in biology, are routinely used to detect and identify intra-cellular structures. However, current intra-cellular application of antibodies requires that the membrane be rendered leaky, resulting in the death of cells. Here, we present a novel method to allow antibodies to penetrate the cellular membrane of living cells without affecting cell viability. A peptide (MTS, membrane transport sequence) that facilitates transport across membranes has been site-specifically attached to antibodies. MTS-antibodies enter the living cells in culture and can be detected by immunofluorescence and ELISA after extraction. Cellular structures are visualized in living cells using a specific MTS-antibody. Antibodies with membrane penetrating properties can become an important tool for the study of intra-cellular processes in living cells. Furthermore, such membrane penetrating antibodies can be used to selectively stimulate or suppress functions of the cellular machinery. PMID:11406159

  20. Towards a carbon nanotube antibody sensor

    E-print Network

    Bojö, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This work investigated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/polymer-protein A complexes for optically reporting antibody concentration via a change in near infrared fluorescent emission after antibody binding. SWNT have ...

  1. Antarctic seals carry antibodies against seal herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Stenvers, O; Plötz, J; Ludwig, H

    1992-01-01

    Weddell seals in the Antarctica had high neutralizing antibody titres to seal- and feline herpesvirus and none against phocine distemper virus. Crab-eater seals were free of antibodies. This suggests an evolutionary wide spread of seal herpesvirus. PMID:1562238

  2. Abnormal Glycoprotein Antibodies Possible Detection Biomarkers

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have found that cancer patients produce antibodies that target abnormal glycoproteins (proteins with sugar molecules attached) made by their tumors. The result of this work suggests that antitumor antibodies in the blood may provide a fruitful

  3. Presence of Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibodies and Myeloperoxidase Anti-Neutrophilic Cytoplasmic Antibodies in a Case of Rapidly Progressive Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Mavani, Gaurang P.; Pommier, Max; Win, Sandar; Michelis, Michael F.; Rosenstock, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old male had initially presented with low-grade proteinuria, microhematuria, and a positive myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophilic antibody (ANCA). He subsequently developed deterioration of kidney function and developed uremic symptoms. Creatinine was 486.2??mol/L (5.5?mg/dL). Anti-MPO was positive (titer >8?U, normal <0.4). He was clinically diagnosed with rapidly proliferative glomerulonephritis most likely due to ANCA vasculitis. He received three doses of pulse methylprednisolone therapy. Kidney biopsy showed pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. Immunofluorescence was positive for faint linear IgG staining of glomerular basement membrane (GBM). Anti-GBM antibody was positive 2.1?U (normal <1). He was started on high-dose oral steroids; monthly intravenous cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis were also initiated. His symptoms improved and creatinine is 247.5??mol/L (2.8?mg/dL). His repeat anti-GBM antibody was negative. This is a rare case of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis due to dual MPO-ANCA antibodies and anti-GBM antibodies (DAV). PMID:26301224

  4. Structural Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody-Maytansinoid Immunoconjugate.

    PubMed

    Luo, Quanzhou; Chung, Hyo Helen; Borths, Christopher; Janson, Matthew; Wen, Jie; Joubert, Marisa K; Wypych, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Structural characterization was performed on an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), composed of an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), mertansine drug (DM1), and a noncleavable linker. The DM1 molecules were conjugated through nonspecific modification of the mAb at solvent-exposed lysine residues. Due to the nature of the lysine conjugation process, the ADC molecules are heterogeneous, containing a range of species that differ with respect to the number of DM1 per antibody molecule. The DM1 distribution profile of the ADC was characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF), which showed that 0-8 DM1s were conjugated to an antibody molecule. By taking advantage of the high-quality MS/MS spectra and the accurate mass detection of diagnostic DM1 fragment ions generated from the higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) approach, we were able to identify 76 conjugation sites in the ADC, which covered approximately 83% of all the putative conjugation sites. The diagnostic DM1 fragment ions discovered in this study can be readily used for the characterization of other ADCs with maytansinoid derivatives as payload. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis of the ADC indicated that the conjugation of DM1 destabilized the CH2 domain of the molecule, which is likely due to conjugation of DM1 on lysine residues in the CH2 domain. As a result, methionine at position 258 of the heavy chain, which is located in the CH2 domain of the antibody, is more susceptible to oxidation in thermally stressed ADC samples when compared to that of the naked antibody. PMID:26629796

  5. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed Central

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  6. Characterization of M2 antibodies in asymptomatic Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiao-Hua; Zhong, Ren-Qian; Fan, Xiao-Yun; Hu, Yin; An, Feng; Sun, Jian-Wen; Kong, Xian-Tao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence of M2 antibodies specific for primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) in asymptomatic Chinese and identify patients with early PBC. METHODS: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests for M2 antibodies to recombinant protein were performed in 5011 subjects (age range, 26-85 years; mean age: 45.81 ± 15.02 years) who took an annual physical examination. M2-positive subjects were further analyzed for immunoglobulin (Ig) classes and subclasses of M2 antibodies. Clinical, biochemical and immunological data were obtained for M2-positive subjects. In addition, ultrasonography (US) or endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) was performed to exclude any disorders other than PBC. RESULTS: M2 antibodies were detected in 8 (0.16%) of the 5011 subjects studied. Of the 8 subjects, 7 were female and 1 was male (age range: 40-74 years). An unexplained increase of serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (?-GT) values, often to striking levels, was detected in 4 M2-positive subjects, 3 of them accorded with the diagnostic criteria recommended by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, even though they had no symptoms of PBC (such as fatigue, pruritus or jaundice). Liver biopsy was performed in two M2-positive subjects and the histology was compatible with PBC in both cases. CONCLUSION: Our data, while not assessing the true prevalence of asymptomatic PBC in the general population, suggest that asymptomatic PBC is much more common in China than has been supposed. PMID:12970922

  7. Anesthetic management of right atrial mass removal and pulmonary artery thrombectomy in a patient with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rawat, S K S; Mehta, Yatin; Vats, Mayank; Mishra, Yugal; Khurana, Poonam; Trehan, Naresh

    2010-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APLAS) characterises a clinical condition of arterial and venous thrombosis associated with phospholipids directed antibodies. APLAS occurs in 2% of the general population. However, one study demonstrated that 7.1% of hospitalised patients were tested positive for at least one of the three anticardiolipin antibody idiotype. Antiphospholipid antibodies often inhibit phospholipids dependent coagulation in vitro and interfere with laboratory testing of hemostasis. Therefore, the management of anticoagulation during cardiopulmonary bypass can be quite challenging in these patients. Here, we present a case of right atrial mass removal and pulmonary thrombectomy in a patient of APLAS. PMID:20075534

  8. Glycine receptor antibodies in PERM and related syndromes: characteristics, clinical features and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-González, Alexander; Leite, M. Isabel; Waters, Patrick; Woodhall, Mark; Coutinho, Ester; Balint, Bettina; Lang, Bethan; Pettingill, Philippa; Carr, Aisling; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Press, Raomand; Lunn, Michael P.; Lim, Ming; Maddison, Paul; Meinck, H.-M.; Vandenberghe, Wim

    2014-01-01

    The clinical associations of glycine receptor antibodies have not yet been described fully. We identified prospectively 52 antibody-positive patients and collated their clinical features, investigations and immunotherapy responses. Serum glycine receptor antibody endpoint titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:60 000. In 11 paired samples, serum levels were higher than (n = 10) or equal to (n = 1) cerebrospinal fluid levels; there was intrathecal synthesis of glycine receptor antibodies in each of the six pairs available for detailed study. Four patients also had high glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (>1000 U/ml), and one had high voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibody (2442 pM). Seven patients with very low titres (<1:50) and unknown or alternative diagnoses were excluded from further study. Three of the remaining 45 patients had newly-identified thymomas and one had a lymphoma. Thirty-three patients were classified as progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus, and two as stiff person syndrome; five had a limbic encephalitis or epileptic encephalopathy, two had brainstem features mainly, two had demyelinating optic neuropathies and one had an unclear diagnosis. Four patients (9%) died during the acute disease, but most showed marked improvement with immunotherapies. At most recent follow-up, (2–7 years, median 3 years, since first antibody detection), the median modified Rankin scale scores (excluding the four deaths) decreased from 5 at maximal severity to 1 (P < 0.0001), but relapses have occurred in five patients and a proportion are on reducing steroids or other maintenance immunotherapies as well as symptomatic treatments. The glycine receptor antibodies activated complement on glycine receptor-transfected human embryonic kidney cells at room temperature, and caused internalization and lysosomal degradation of the glycine receptors at 37°C. Immunoglobulin G antibodies bound to rodent spinal cord and brainstem co-localizing with monoclonal antibodies to glycine receptor-?1. Ten glycine receptor antibody positive samples were also identified in a retrospective cohort of 56 patients with stiff person syndrome and related syndromes. Glycine receptor antibodies are strongly associated with spinal and brainstem disorders, and the majority of patients have progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. The antibodies demonstrate in vitro evidence of pathogenicity and the patients respond well to immunotherapies, contrasting with earlier studies of this syndrome, which indicated a poor prognosis. The presence of glycine receptor antibodies should help to identify a disease that responds to immunotherapies, but these treatments may need to be sustained, relapses can occur and maintenance immunosuppression may be required. PMID:24951641

  9. New Insights into the Functional Behavior of Antibodies as Revealed by Binding Studies on an Anti-Uranium Monoclonal Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.; Xia Li; Haini Yu; Blake, Robert C.

    2004-03-17

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop immunoassays for chelated uranium(VI) on a hand-held flow fluorimeter, an anti-uranium monoclonal antibody designated as 8A11 was fluorescently labeled using two different strategies. When 8A11 was coupled via reactive lysines to either ALEXATM 488 or Cy5TM, the resulting fluorescent antibody conjugate exhibited positive cooperativity in the presence of its antigen, U(VI) chelated with 2,9-dicarboxy-1,10-phenanthroline (U(VI)-DCP). That is, when one of the two binding sites on the covalently modified 8A11 was occupied with bound antigen, the affinity of the remaining site on the antibody for U(VI)-DCP appeared to increase. Unmodified 8A11 bound U(VI)-DCP with the expected hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of antigen, consistent with independent and equal binding of ligand at both sites. Proteolytic cleavage of the fluorescently conjugated 8A11 to produce the fluorescent monovalent Fab fragment yielded an active preparation that now bound U(VI)-DCP with no evidence of positive cooperativity. Although, in principle, any divalent antibody has the potential to exhibit positive cooperativity in its binding interactions with its antigen, very little literature precedent for this type of behavior exists. Native 8A11 was also noncovalently labeled with highly fluorescent ZENONTM reagents. These reagents are fluorescently-labeled Fab fragments of goat anti-mouse antibodies that bind to the Fc portion of 8A11. These high-affinity, monovalent fluorescent reagents permitted the intact 8A11 mouse antibody to be labeled in situ with no covalent modifications. Incubation of the 8A11 with ZENON 647 produced a fluorescent protein complex that showed an 8-fold higher affinity for U(VI)-DCP than did the free 8A11 alone. Again, very few literature precedents exist for this phenomenon, where agents that bind to the Fc portion of an intact antibody change the affinity of the antibody for the antigen at the structurally distant Fab portion of the molecule. The addition of protein G, a bacterial protein that also binds to the Fc portion of mouse IgG, to the covalently modified 8A11 produced an antibody preparation that showed a lower affinity for U(VI)-DCP than that observed in the absence of protein G. This protein G-dependent decrease in the affinity of 8A11for U(VI)-DCP was dose-dependent. Similarly, U(VI)-DCP was observed to decrease the affinity between 8A11 and protein G, also in a dose-dependent manner. These reciprocal binding effects between protein G and U(VI)-DCP were taken as further evidence that binding to the Fc portion on the intact 8A11 antibody could influence the strength of the interaction at the antigen binding sites on the Fab portions of the protein, and vice versa. These practical, development-driven binding experiments have revealed a fundamental facet of antibody functional behavior that appears to have been largely unnoticed. The binding phenomena described for the first time in this report may have physiological relevance and can be purposefully exploited to improve the sensitivity and utility of selected immunoassays.

  10. Comparison of rabies humoral antibody titers in rabbits and humans by indirect radioimmunoassay, rapid-fluorescent-focus-inhibition technique, and indirect fluorescent-antibody assay.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T K; Hutchinson, H D; Ziegler, D W

    1977-01-01

    Rabies humoral antibodies were induced in eight New Zealand rabbits by a single intramuscular injection of inactivated suckling mouse brain rabies vaccine. The primary response to immunization was measured in blood samples taken at selected intervals for 6 months. The anamnestic response was measured in blood samples obtained 2 weeks after the rabbits received a booster immunization. The humoral antibody concentrations were measured by the rapid-fluorescent-focus-inhibition technique (RFFIT), indirect fluorescent-antibody assay (IFA), and indirect radioimmunoassay (RIA). The maximal neutralizing antibody titers as measured by RFFIT were attained by the 4th week and persisted into the 24th week. After booster immunization the antibody response was almost 10-fold higher than the highest level attained in the primary response. The antibody levels as measured by IFA and RIA were similar, but the titers as measured by either procedure were almost 10-fold lower than those determined by RFFIT. After booster immunizations the antibody levels, as measured by IFA and RIA, were three- and sixfold higher, respectively, than the maximal levels attained in the primary response. Twenty-two human serum specimens were tested by the same serological procedures, with disparate results. Both RIA and RFFIT effectively differentiated antirabies-positive sera from antirabies-negative sera. PMID:323278

  11. Mechanisms of Allergen-Antibody Interaction of Cockroach Allergen Bla g 2 with Monoclonal Antibodies

    E-print Network

    Mechanisms of Allergen-Antibody Interaction of Cockroach Allergen Bla g 2 with Monoclonal Antibodies That Inhibit IgE Antibody Binding Jill Glesner1 , Sabina Wu¨ nschmann1 , Mi Li2,3 , Alla Gustchina is strongly associated with asthma, and involves the production of IgE antibodies against inhaled allergens

  12. West Nile virus IgM and IgG antibodies three years post- infection

    PubMed Central

    Papa, A; Anastasiadou, A; Delianidou, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: West Nile virus (WNV) causes to humans a variety of symptoms, from asymptomatic infection to severe neuroinvasive disease. In a previous study, it was shown that WNV IgM antibodies persisted in three of 26 (12%) patients, nine months after onset of the symptoms. The aim of the present study was to test 10 of these patients, three years post-infection for probable persistence of IgM antibodies and to investigate their IgG antibody patterns. Material and Methods: In summer 2013 serum samples were collected from 10 persons who were infected with WNV in 2010; 6 of them had a neuroinvasive disease. The three persons with detectable WNV IgM antibodies, nine months after onset of the symptoms, were included in the study. All samples were tested by ELISA in parallel with their stored paired samples taken in 2011. The positive results were confirmed by neutralization test. Results: WNV IgM antibodies were still detectable in the three persons, while high levels of WNV IgG and neutralizing antibodies were present in nine of the 10 persons, regardless the involvement of the nervous system. Conclusions: WNV IgM antibodies persist for more than three years in 12% of patients with WNV infection, while WNV IgG antibodies persist and even increase their levels, regardless the involvement of the nervous system, suggesting that the immune response in the symptomatic WNV infections is strong and long-lasting. Hippokratia 2015, 19 (1): 34-36. PMID:26435644

  13. Immunoblotting profiles in 55 systemic lupus erythematosus sera lacking precipitating antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, O; Bourgeois, P; Aeschlimann, A; Haim, T; Mery, J P; Kahn, M F

    1989-01-01

    Serum samples from 55 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were selected for the absence of anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibodies after routine immunodiffusion tests. These sera were immunoblotted for anti-Sm and anti-RNP antibodies on a HeLa cell nuclear extract. Ten (18%) were negative and 45 (82%) produced complex patterns: 10 (18%) suggestive of anti-Sm, three (5%) anti-RNP, and 32 (58%) a combination of anti-Sm and anti-RNP antibodies. These data were very similar to those obtained from sera from a control group of 28 SLE sera selected for positivity of anti-Sm and anti-RNP precipitins with the immunodiffusion test. IgM isotype antibodies to the D peptide were significantly more prevalent than IgG isotype antibodies, whereas antibodies to the 68 kD polypeptide were of both IgM and IgG isotypes. Sera with an anti-Sm/RNP immunoblotting pattern stemmed from a group of patients with SLE with a higher titre of anti-dsDNA antibodies. Among clinical symptoms, the incidence of haemolytic anaemia was higher in the group of patients with the anti-Sm immunoblotting profile. Patients with an anti-RNP immunoblotting profile showed a higher incidence of cutaneous symptoms. It is concluded that immunoblotting for anti-Sm or anti-RNP antibody determination is a very sensitive diagnostic tool in patients with SLE. Images PMID:2789021

  14. Temperature-Triggered Purification of Antibodies

    E-print Network

    Chen, Wilfred

    Temperature-Triggered Purification of Antibodies Jae-Young Kim,1,2 Ashok Mulchandani,1 Wilfred Chen) to reversibly precipitate was combined with the high affinity and specificity of antibody-binding do- mains such as Protein G, Protein L, or Protein LG as a general method for antibody purification that combines

  15. Effects of medium concentration on antibody production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J.

    1984-01-01

    Antibody production by two different cell lines was measured as the media were supplemented with varied amounts of glucose and fetal bovine serum. Both cell lines elaborated antidinitrophenyl hapten antibodies. Two basic media were used: RPMI 1640 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. The production of antibodies was followed from 0 to 180 h and was assayed by radioimmunoassay.

  16. Structure and specificity of lamprey monoclonal antibodies

    E-print Network

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    Structure and specificity of lamprey monoclonal antibodies Brantley R. Herrin*§ , Matthew N. Alder with particulate antigens induces VLR-B-bearing lymphocytes to secrete antigen-specific VLR-B antibodies. Here, we describe the production of recombinant VLR-B antibodies specific for BclA, a major coat protein of Bacillus

  17. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  18. Position indicator

    DOEpatents

    Tanner, David E. (Poway, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described in which a position indicator is provided for detecting and indicating the position of a movable element inside a pressure vessel. The movable element may be a valve element or similar device which moves about an axis. Light from a light source is transmitted from a source outside the pressure vessel to a first region inside the pressure vessel in alignment with the axis of the movable element. The light is redirected by a reflector prism to a second region displaced radially from the first region. The reflector prism moves in response to movement of the movable element about its axis such that the second region moves arcuately with respect to the first region. Sensors are arrayed in an arc corresponding to the arc of movement of the second region and signals are transmitted from the sensors to the exterior of the reactor vessel to provide indication of the position of the movable element.

  19. Toxoplasma gondii antibodies on domiciled cats from Lages municipality, Santa Catarina State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dalla Rosa, Luciana; Moura, Anderson Barbosa de; Trevisani, Natascha; Medeiros, Alessandra Pereira; Sartor, Amélia Aparecida; Souza, Antonio Pereira de; Bellato, Valdomiro

    2010-01-01

    Sera were collected from 300 domiciled cats from the municipality of Lages, Southern Brazil, to determine the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies and risk factors associated. Tests for T. gondii antibodies were performed using indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT). Positive reactions with titers ?1:64 were found in 43 (14.33%) cats. A significant number of seropositive cats were ?6 month old (p = 0.03758) and had access to the streets or/and rural areas (p = 0.04185). The results indicate that T. gondii is widespread in cats in Lages with a prevalence of 14.33%. PMID:21184709

  20. Serologic survey for Coxiella burnetii phase II antibodies among slaughterhouse workers in Kerman, southeast of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Mohammad; Mosavi, Morteza; Diali, Hamzeh Ghobadian; Mirza, Hossein Norouzian

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the presence of antibodies against phase II among slaughterhouse workers in Kerman, southeast of Iran. Methods The antibody titers of the serum samples were measured by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay using phase II Coxiella burnetii as the antigen [kit (Virion\\Serion, Wurzburg, Germany) according to the manufacturer's protocol]. Results The positive rate of IgG antibody was 68% in the slaughterhouse workers. Conclusions Our findings suggest that slaughterhouse workers in Kerman area have a higher risk of infection and should consider potential infection with Coxiella burnetii. PMID:25183082

  1. [Research into the antibody detection technology of mink plasmacytosis and its current applications].

    PubMed

    Wan, Hongli; Feng, Erkai; Wu, Hongchao; Yang, Yanling; Ni, Jia; Chen, Lizhi

    2015-01-01

    Mink plasmacytosis, caused by Aleutian Mink Disease Virus (AMDV), poses a threat to the development of the animal fur industry. Neutralizing antibodies against AMDV may result in a persistent infection rather than providing protection for minks. To date,no specific methods to prevent or cure this disease have been developed. In order to eliminate mink plasmacytosis, antibody detection technology has been used globally as a dominant approach to screen for AMDV-positive minks. This paper introduces the classical technology, counterimmunoelectrophoresis and emerging technology in terms of AMDV antibody detection,and provides a glimpse into the future development of these technologies. PMID:25997336

  2. Immunolocalization of neuroblastoma using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody UJ13A

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, A.; Vivian, G.; Gordon, I.; Pritchard, J.; Kemshead, J.

    1984-08-01

    The monoclonal antibody UJ13A, raised after immunization of mice with human fetal brain, recognized an antigen expressed on human neuroblastoma cell lines and fresh tumors. Antibody was purified and radiolabeled with iodine isotopes using chloramine-T. In preclinical studies, 125I-labeled UJ13A was injected intravenously into nude mice bearing xenografts of human neuroblastoma. Radiolabeled UJ13A uptake by the tumors was four to 23 times greater than that by blood. In control animals, injected with a similar quantity of a monoclonal antibody known not to bind to neuroblastoma cells in vitro (FD44), there was no selective tumor uptake. Nine patients with histologically confirmed neuroblastoma each received 100 to 300 micrograms UJ13A radiolabeled with 1 to 2.8 mCi 123I or 131I. Sixteen positive sites were visible on gamma scans 1 to 7 days after injection: 15 were primary or secondary tumor sites, and one was a false positive; there were two false negatives. In two of the 15 positive sites, tumor had not been demonstrated by other imaging techniques; these were later confirmed as areas of malignant infiltration. No toxicity was encountered.

  3. Prevalence of antibodies to spotted fever group rickettsiae along the eastern coast of the Adriatic sea.

    PubMed Central

    Radulovic, S; Walker, D H; Weiss, K; Dzelalija, B; Morovic, M

    1993-01-01

    A seroepidemiological survey in coastal Croatia detected antibodies reactive with Rickettsia conorii in 4.2% of sera by immunofluorescence assay and in 5.0% of sera by enzyme immunoassay. Western immunoblotting demonstrated antibodies to the 120-kDa surface protein in all 20 positive serum samples examined and to rickettsial lipopolysaccharide in 3 of these serum samples. Humans in this area are clearly being exposed to spotted fever rickettsiae. PMID:8370756

  4. Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis antibodies among a rural Appalachian population--Kentucky, 2013.

    PubMed

    Russell, Elizabeth S; Gray, Elizabeth B; Marshall, Rebekah E; Davis, Stephanie; Beaudoin, Amanda; Handali, Sukwan; McAuliffe, Isabel; Davis, Cheryl; Woodhall, Dana

    2014-11-01

    We investigated whether Strongyloides infection remains endemic in rural Kentucky's Appalachian regions; 7 of 378 (1.9%) participants tested positive for Strongyloides antibodies. We identified no statistically significant association between a positive test and travel to a known endemic country (P = 0.58), indicating that transmission in rural Kentucky might be ongoing. PMID:25157122

  5. Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis Antibodies among a Rural Appalachian Population—Kentucky, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Elizabeth S.; Gray, Elizabeth B.; Marshall, Rebekah E.; Davis, Stephanie; Beaudoin, Amanda; Handali, Sukwan; McAuliffe, Isabel; Davis, Cheryl; Woodhall, Dana

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether Strongyloides infection remains endemic in rural Kentucky's Appalachian regions; 7 of 378 (1.9%) participants tested positive for Strongyloides antibodies. We identified no statistically significant association between a positive test and travel to a known endemic country (P = 0.58), indicating that transmission in rural Kentucky might be ongoing. PMID:25157122

  6. Prevalence of antibodies to arbovirus in various animals in Israel*

    PubMed Central

    Akov, Y.; Goldwasser, R.

    1966-01-01

    A serological survey of the prevalence of arbovirus antibodies in various mammals and birds was made in Israel during the years 1959-60, employing the haemagglutination-inhibition technique and using group-A and group-B antigens. High proportions of the animals of several species were found to be positive to group-B arboviruses. Most of these animals showed higher titres against the West Nile virus than against that of turkey meningoencephalitis, but in some cases there were higher titres against the latter virus. Group-A positive sera were also encountered, but in a smaller proportion of the tested animals. Most of the group-A positive sera were also group-B positive, and very few were group-A positive only. PMID:5296538

  7. Double-blotting: a solution to the problem of nonspecific binding of secondary antibodies in immunoblotting procedures.

    PubMed

    Lasne, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Nonspecific interactions between blotted proteins and unrelated secondary antibodies generate false positives in immunoblotting techniques. Some procedures have been developed to reduce this adsorption, but they may work in specific applications and be ineffective in others. "Double-blotting" has been developed to overcome this problem. It consists of interpolating a second blotting step between the usual probings of the blot membrane with the primary antibody and the secondary antibodies. This step, by isolating the primary antibody from the interfering proteins, guarantees the specificity of the probing with the secondary antibody. This method has been developed for the study of erythropoietin in concentrated urine since a strong nonspecific binding of biotinylated secondary antibodies to some urinary proteins is observed using classical immunoblotting protocols. However, its concept makes it usable in other applications that come up against this kind of problem. This method is expected to be especially useful for investigating proteins that are present in minute amounts in complex biological media. PMID:26044010

  8. Positively Adolescent!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Believes that music teachers should reassess their views toward adolescent behavior in the music classroom by learning to see their behavior in a positive light. Describes teaching strategies that build on four adolescent behaviors: (1) desire for peer acceptance; (2) abundant energy; (3) love of fun; and (4) limited time-managing skills. (CMK)

  9. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  10. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  11. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  12. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  13. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  14. Monoclonal Antibody-Based Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detection of Morbillivirus Antibody in Marine Mammal Sera

    PubMed Central

    Saliki, Jeremiah T.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.

    2001-01-01

    A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), using two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), was developed and compared with the standard virus neutralization test (VNT) for detecting antibodies against canine distemper virus (CDV) and phocine distemper virus (PDV) in sera from dogs and various species of marine mammals. The test depends on the blocking of MAb binding to solid-phase antigen in the presence of positive serum. Test conditions were optimized by using control VNT-negative and -positive sera specific for CDV and PDV. A positive cutoff value of 30% inhibition, which represents the mean cutoff of a VNT-negative population (n = 623) plus 2 standard deviations, was adopted for the test. A total of 736 serum samples were tested by the new cELISA and by the VNT as the “gold standard.” An unexpected but useful finding was the ability of this CDV- and PDV-specific cELISA to also detect antibodies against the related pair dolphin morbillivirus and porpoise morbillivirus. Based on a subpopulation of 625 sera used in statistical analyses, the overall sensitivity and specificity of cELISA relative to those of the VNT were 94.9 and 97.7%, respectively. Because the cELISA proved to be nearly as sensitive and specific as the VNT while being simpler and more rapid, it would be an adequate screening test for suspect CDV or PDV cases and would also be useful for epidemiological surveillance of morbilliviral infections in marine mammal populations. PMID:11326007

  15. Antibody biosimilars: Fears or opportunities?

    PubMed Central

    Guillon-Munos, Audrey; Daguet, Arnaud; Watier, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    The annual “LabEx MAbImprove industrial workshops” are primarily intended to provide scientists involved in therapeutic antibodies, a comprehensive view about topics of interest for the pharmaceutical industry. They are organized by the “LabEx MAbImprove industrial committee”, for this first edition especially in partnership with ARITT, the regional agency for innovation and technology transfer which operates in the French Région Centre, the 1st French region for pharmaceutical production. The 2013 edition, held May 28 at the Vinci Center of Tours, was dedicated to antibody biosimilars. Depending on opinions, the impending expiry of antibody patents and the imminent marketing approval of competitors to blockbusters can be perceived as good or bad things. Fears or opportunities? Risks for patients? Breath of fresh air for the health systems? Opportunity for re-industrializing France? In this context, it is necessary for people to form a fair and informed opinion on the current landscape of antibody biosimilars. In particular, this is especially important for scientists from the academic world, from the industry or from the regulation agencies, for pharmacists, for pharmacovigilance specialists, for health authorities, and staff from health insurance and decision makers. The first session was devoted to market and regulatory issues, and included both an overview of the evolution of the patent landscape and a description of biosimilars regulation in the European Union (EU). This session was closed by a talk on manufacturing processes for biosimilars. In the next session, quality control attributes of biosimilars were discussed and compared with the consistent quality of biotechnology products to raise the question: “How close is close enough?” In vitro assays for evaluating the Fc function of therapeutic antibodies were also discussed. The third session focused on development of biosimilars and primarily on the stepwise process for introducing an antibody biosimilar on the EU market, and included a presentation of the ongoing clinical evaluation of an infliximab biosimilar. The session concluded with a rich debate on the indication extrapolation of a biosimilar compared to the originator. The last session was dedicated to societal issues and focused on two aspects: (1) the need of biosimilars for EU health economy; and (2) last but not least, the ethical issues about clinical evaluation of biosimilars. All speakers and attendees enjoyed this very stimulating and rewarding meeting, which gathered many people with divergent scientific backgrounds from the academic or industrial world. PMID:24714167

  16. Therapeutic antibodies: Discovery, design and deployment.

    PubMed

    Ramsland, Paul A; Hutchinson, Andrew T; Carter, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have come of age with major progress being made in cancer, autoimmunity and chronic inflammation, as well as a wide range of other human diseases. Antibody engineering is further driving development of novel antibody formats and genetically modified cell-based therapies that harness the power of the immune system to progress cures in otherwise intractable human diseases. Nevertheless, there are still significant challenges ahead for basic and applied research relating to therapeutic antibodies. This special issue of the journal provides reviews and opinions that relate to the discovery, design and deployment of antibodies as therapeutics. PMID:25990602

  17. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Dia Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Jethava, Ashif; Olivares, Esperanza; Shariatmadar, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Dia is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Dia antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500?mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10?mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate's red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+) red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Dia must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis. PMID:26682081

  18. Serum anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies and oxidant-antioxidant balance in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Aliyazicioglu, Rezzan; Guven, Suleyman; Mentese, Ahmet; Kolayli, Sevgi; Cengiz, Sevil; Deger, Orhan; Alver, Ahmet

    2011-10-01

    PROBLEM? The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of anti-carbonic anhydrase II antibodies (anti-CA II) antibodies in pre-eclampsia and the relationships between the autoantibodies, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant capacity (TOC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and oxidative stres index (OSI) parameters. METHOD OF STUDY? We studied 40 early and late onset pre-eclamptic patients and 40 healthy pregnant control and 39 healthy non-pregnant control subjects. Serum CA II antibodies, TAC and TOC, and MDA parameters were studied by ELISA. RESULTS? The mean values for TAC, TOC, OSI, MDA, and anti-CA II were significantly increased in patients with pre-eclampsia compared to the other groups. The anti-CA II antibody levels for the pregnant control subjects were 0.129 ± 0.04 and that for the pre-eclamptic patients were 0.282 ± 0.18. In this study, any absorbance value higher than 0.136, the mean absorbance + 2 S.D. of pregnant control subjects, was defined as positive. Positive results were obtained in 29 of 40 pre-eclamptic patients (72.5%). There were significant positive correlations between serum anti-CA II antibodies and TOC, MDA levels, and OSI levels. CONCLUSION? The results suggest that anti-CA II antibodies and impairment in oxidant-antioxidant balance may be involved in multifactorial etiology of pre-eclampsia. PMID:21244564

  19. IgY antibodies in human nutrition for disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sandra; Schubert, Andreas; Zajac, Julia; Dyck, Terry; Oelkrug, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Oral administration of preformed specific antibodies is an attractive approach against infections of the digestive system in humans and animals in times of increasing antibiotic resistances. Previous studies showed a positive effect of egg yolk IgY antibodies on bacterial intoxications in animals and humans. Immunization of chickens with specific antigens offers the possibility to create various forms of antibodies. Research shows that orally applied IgY's isolated from egg yolks can passively cure or prevent diseases of the digestive system. The use of these alternative therapeutic drugs provides further advantages: (1) The production of IgY's is a non-invasive alternative to current methods; (2) The keeping of chickens is inexpensive; (3) The animals are easy to handle; (4) It avoids repetitive bleeding of laboratory animals; (5) It is also very cost effective regarding the high IgY concentration within the egg yolk. Novel targets of these antigen specific antibodies are Helicobacter pylori and also molecules involved in signaling pathways in gastric cancer. Furthermore, also dental caries causing bacteria like Streptococcus mutans or opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients are possible targets. Therefore, IgY's included in food for human consumption may be able to prevent or cure human diseases. PMID:26487372

  20. Design of trials for antibody treatment of tumour.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, G T

    1994-06-01

    Our discussion is summarized in Fig. 1. Cytotoxic drugs are shown with the classical sigmoid relationship of response to log dose, with a parallel increase in toxicity which suits the Phase I approach. With antibody it is doubtful that clinical tumour ever responds to single doses with an asymptote of 100% ablation, so arbitrarily lower asymptotes have been used, higher for immunotoxins than for antibodies (n). The response curves have been made sigmoid simply by selecting, among the infinity of mathematical functions, two hypothetical functions of dose which yield sigmoid transformations of the data. After superimposing on the graphs the occurrence of toxicity, one discerns with antibodies (n) only a threshold dose, above which any toxicity will be highly dependent on the extent of encounter with readily accessible cellular or molecular antigen. Immunotoxins display an increasing toxicity with dose, but the positioning of the toxicity gradient in relation to dose is uncertain because of the ameliorating effect of uptake by tumour. The toxicity of an antibody and its derivatives can and should be clearly documented, but a case is presented here against trials of these reagents which systematically seek MTDs with only subsidiary attention to therapeutic effects. With concurrent evaluation of therapeutic effects. With concurrent evaluation of therapy and toxicity--in studies labelled Phase I/II in the current nomenclature--it may prove just as appropriate to relate toxicity to therapeutic efficacy as to dose. PMID:8207956

  1. Production of therapeutic antibodies with controlled fucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Yamane-Ohnuki, Naoko

    2009-01-01

    The clinical success of therapeutic antibodies is demonstrated by the number of antibody therapeutics that have been brought to market and the increasing number of therapeutic antibodies in development. Recombinant antibodies are molecular-targeted therapeutic agents and represent a major new class of drugs. However, it is still very important to optimize and maximize the clinical efficacy of therapeutic antibodies, in part to help lower the cost of therapeutic antibodies by potentially reducing the dose or the duration of treatment. Clinical trials using therapeutic antibodies fully lacking core fucose residue in the Fc oligosaccharides are currently underway, and their remarkable physiological activities in humans in vivo have attracted attention as next-generation therapeutic antibody approaches with improved efficacy. Thus, an industrially applicable antibody production process that provides consistent yields of fully non-fucosylated antibody therapeutics with fixed quality has become a key goal in the successful development of next-generation therapeutic agents. In this article, we review the current technologies for production of therapeutic antibodies with control of fucosylation of the Fc N-glycans. PMID:20065644

  2. Immunologic and pharmacologic concepts of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zuckier, L S; Rodriguez, L D; Scharff, M D

    1989-07-01

    While monoclonal antibodies have solved many of the difficulties of using immunologic reagents for radioimmunodiagnosis and therapy, in the 13 years since their introduction a number of persistent problems remain, most notably a low yield of antibody-producing cells from the fusion process, difficulty in obtaining high-affinity antibodies, and the potential immunogenicity of murine immunoglobulins (Igs). Several solutions are under development, including fusion techniques that enrich for cells producing desired antibodies, production of human-mouse chimeric antibodies by recombinant DNA technology, and the generation of human monoclonal antibodies by promising new approaches. Until these upcoming methodologies are established, and to better direct their development and application, a sound understanding of the pharmacology of presently available native and modified monoclonal antibodies is crucial. Although much has been already determined in this area, a great deal of further clarification remains necessary. PMID:2669128

  3. Antibodies directed against receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    FAUVEL, Bénédicte; Yasri, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for cancers and inflammatory diseases, and monoclonal antibodies continue to be one of the fastest growing classes of therapeutic molecules. Because aberrant signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is a commonly observed factor in cancer, most of the subclasses of RTKs are being extensively studied as potential targets for treating malignancies. The first two RTKs that have been targeted by antibody therapy, with five currently marketed antibodies, are the growth factor receptors EGFR and HER2. However, due to systemic side effects, refractory patients and the development of drug resistance, these treatments are being challenged by emerging therapeutics. This review examines current monoclonal antibody therapies against RTKs. After an analysis of agents that have already been approved, we present an analysis of antibodies in clinical development that target RTKs. Finally, we highlight promising RTKs that are emerging as new oncological targets for antibody-based therapy. PMID:24859229

  4. Antibody engineering and therapeutics conference

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul WHI; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A; Burton, Dennis R; Adams, Gregory P; Weiner, Louis M; Scott, Jamie K; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    The 25th anniversary of the Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics Conference, the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA, December 7–11, 2014. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the event will celebrate past successes, educate participants on current activities and offer a vision of future progress in the field. Keynote addresses will be given by academic and industry experts Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Ira Pastan (National Cancer Institute), James Wells (University of California, San Francisco), Ian Tomlinson (GlaxoSmithKline) and Anthony Rees (Rees Consulting AB and Emeritus Professor, University of Bath). These speakers will provide updates of their work, placed in the context of the substantial growth of the industry over the past 25 years. PMID:25517297

  5. Biomimetic biosensor to distinguish between inhibitory and non-inhibitory factor VIII antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kocot, Carmen; Schindler, Aline R; Le Blanc, Alexander; Schmalenberg, Michael; Miesbach, Wolfgang; Spannagl, Michael; Luppa, Peter B

    2015-07-01

    Patients with hereditary or acquired haemophilia A may develop inhibitory factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies. These disrupt FVIII activity predominantly by preventing the formation of the tenase complex, leading to a serious bleeding disorder. Antibodies without inhibiting activity, however, can also be found when screening patients with haemophilia A under FVIII supplementation. Therefore, the detection of only these allo- or autoantibodies from plasma is not sufficient. Rather, the characterization of the antibody-induced effects on the coagulation cascade should be considered due to its great diagnostic importance. Currently, inhibitory activities are detected by the functional Bethesda assay, which directly measures the delay in clotting time by the patient plasma. However, this assay does not provide information on the cause of the inhibition. Here, we report the development of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor that has the potential to integrate both quantitative and functional information on patient antibody characteristics in one measurement. Recombinant FVIII protein was immobilized on the sensor surface to detect antibodies from patient plasma. The interaction of the FIX- and FXa-clotting proteins with the formed anti-FVIII/FVIII complex could be detected subsequently within the same SPR measurement cycle. Inhibitory antibodies led to the prevention of these interactions. Thus, discrimination between the clinically relevant inhibitory and non-inhibitory antibodies was enabled. In a group of 16 patients with inhibitory antibodies (both ELISA- and Bethesda-positive), 5 patients with non-inhibitory antibodies (ELISA-positive but Bethesda-negative) and 12 healthy controls, diagnostic sensitivity and specificity data of 100% for the FIX interaction were achieved using this biomimetic biosensor approach. The new method allows for detection and quantification, as well as for evaluation of inhibitory activity of allo- and autoantibodies, using small sample volume and short analysis time. PMID:25957847

  6. STUDIES ON FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY STAINING

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Gerald; Slizys, Irene S.; Chase, Merrill W.

    1961-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the non-specific fluorescent staining of splenic imprints treated with fluorescent sheep antibody globulins. 2. In tissue imprints made with the spleens of antigen-stimulated animals, no morphological distinction was evident between areas showing non-specific fluorescence and specific fluorescence. 3. Elimination of non-specific fluorescence was not achieved by any one, or any combination of the following: (a) conjugating only gamma globulins with fluorescein isothiocyanate; (b) removal of dialyzable fluorescent products on sephadex, followed by concentration through the use of pressure dialysis; (c) use of crystalline preparations of fluorescein isothiocyanate. 4. Individual preparations of fluorescent antibodies were separated by gradient elution chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) cellulose into fractions possessing different numbers of fluorescein radicals per molecule of globulin. 5. The coupling ratio of 50 mg fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) per gm of protein, as commonly advocated, can not be recommended for the precise localization of antibody globulin in tissues owing to the capacity of the coupled products to give non-specific fluorescent staining. When crystalline preparations of FITC are used instead of the amorphous product at 50 mg/gm protein, far too high non-specific fluorescence results. 6. A fraction with bright specific fluorescence and no or negligible nonspecific fluorescence was obtained from each fluorescent antibody that was prepared by using 6 to 8 mg of crystalline fluorescein isothiocyanate per gm of globulin and was then subjected to DEAE-cellulose chromatography and gradient elution to eliminate the most highly coupled molecules. PMID:13706641

  7. Positive Psychologists on Positive Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article by McNulty and Fincham (see record 2011-15476-001). In their article, the authors offered compelling evidence that constructs such as forgiveness and optimism can have both beneficial and adverse consequences, depending on the context. Their caution about labeling particular psychological processes as "positive" is…

  8. PHYLOGENETIC ORIGINS OF ANTIBODY STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Marchalonis, J.; Edelman, G. M.

    1965-01-01

    The elasmobranch Mustelus canis has been shown to produce antibodies to Limulus hemocyanin. The serum of both normal and immunized M. canis contains immunoglobulins having sedimentation coefficients of approximately 7S and 17S. Antibody activity was found in the 17S immunoglobulin which may be dissociated to 7S components with concomitant loss of activity. Both 17S and 7S serum, immunoglobulins were antigenically identical. They consisted of light and heavy chains present in amounts comparable to those of higher vertebrates. Peptide maps indicated that the light chains had an entirely different primary structure than the heavy chains, but that the corresponding chains of 7S and 17S dogfish serum immunoglobulins were similar in primary structure. The heavy chains appeared to resemble the n chains of immunoglobulins of higher vertebrates in their starch gel electrophoretic behavior. It is suggested that the elasmobranch M. canis may have only one major class of immunoglobulins resembling that of macroglobulins (?M-immunoglobulins) seen in higher vertebrates. The results indicate that the multichain structure of antibodies is an ancient evolutionary development. PMID:4158437

  9. Single-Chain Antibody Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baird, Cheryl

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have constructed a nonimmune library consisting of 109 human antibody scFv fragments, which have been cloned and expressed on the surface of yeast. Nanomolar-affinity scFvs are routinely obtained by magnetic bead screening and flow cytometric sorting. The yeast library can be amplified 1010 fold without measurable loss of clonal diversity. This allows for indefinite expansion of the library. All scFv clones can be assessed directly on the yeast cell surface by immunofluorescent labeling and flow cytometry, obviating separate subcloning, expression, and purification steps. The ability to use multiplex library screening demonstrates the utility of this approach for high-throughput antibody isolation for proteomic applications. The yeast library may be used for research projects or teaching performed for U.S. Government purposes only. If you would like to request an aliquot of the single-chain antibody library for your research, please print and fill out the Materials Transfer Agreement (MTA) [PDF, 20K]. The website provides the contact information for mailing the MTA. [copied from http://www.sysbio.org/dataresources/singlechain.stm

  10. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  11. Thrombotic microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia and antiphospholipid antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, G; Bucciarelli, S; Cervera, R; Lozano, M; Reverter, J; de la Red, G; Gil, V; Ingelmo, M; Font, J; Asherson, R

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the clinical and laboratory features of patients with thrombotic microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (TMHA) associated with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Methods: A computer assisted (PubMed) search of the literature was performed to identify all cases of TMHA associated with aPL from 1983 to December 2002. Results: 46 patients (36 female) with a mean (SD) age at presentation of TMHA of 34 (15) years were reviewed. Twenty eight (61%) patients had primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). TMHA was the first clinical manifestation of APS in 26 (57%) patients. The clinical presentations were haemolytic-uraemic syndrome (26%), catastrophic APS (23%), acute renal failure (15%), malignant hypertension (13%), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (13%), and HELLP (haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count in association with eclampsia) syndrome (4%). Lupus anticoagulant was detected in 86% of the episodes of TMHA, and positive anticardiolipin antibodies titres in 89%. Steroids were the most common treatment (69% of episodes), followed by plasma exchange (PE) (62%), anticoagulant or antithrombotic agents (48%), immunosuppressive agents (29%), and immunoglobulins (12%). Recovery occurred in only 10/29 (34%) episodes treated with steroids, and in 19/27 (70%) episodes treated with PE. Death occurred in 10/46 (22%) patients. Conclusions: The results emphasise the need for systematic screening for aPL in all patients with clinical and laboratory features of TMHA. The existence of TMHA in association with an APS forces one to rule out the presence of the catastrophic variant of this syndrome. PE is indicated as a first line of treatment for all patients with TMHA associated with aPL. PMID:15140782

  12. Measurement of antibody avidity for hepatitis C virus distinguishes primary antibody responses from passively acquired antibody.

    PubMed

    Ward, K N; Dhaliwal, W; Ashworth, K L; Clutterbuck, E J; Teo, C G

    1994-08-01

    A new IgG antibody avidity test for hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been developed and was validated using sera from 12 renal dialysis patients infected with HCV. In primary HCV infection low avidity antibody (mean avidity index 24%) was detected within 50 days of seroconversion whereas in long-term infection (at least 300 days after seroconversion), the mean avidity index was high (88%); in five patients, the avidity index was shown to increase rapidly as time elapsed after primary infection, whereas immunosuppressive therapy was found to delay maturation of the immune response in two further patients. The assay was then employed to confirm that a spurious outbreak of primary HCV infection in eight bone marrow transplant patients was explicable by passive acquisition of high avidity anti-HCV after intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. It is concluded that this avidity test will have an important role in the investigation of HCV infection in patients. PMID:7525865

  13. Position Number: 0000XXXX Current Position Information

    E-print Network

    Stuart, Steven J.

    Page 1 Position Number: 0000XXXX Current Position Information Budget Center Name: Department Number: Supervisor's Name: Supervisor's Position Number: Supervisor's State Position Number: Supervisor's State Title: Supervisor's Job Code: Supervisor's Slot: Employee Name: Employee ID: Business Title: State Position Number

  14. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, M.A.; Alter, P.

    1983-07-07

    An apparatus is provided for precisely adjusting the position of an article relative to a beam emerging from a neutron source disposed in a housing. The apparatus includes a support pivotably mounted on a movable base plate and freely suspended therefrom. The support is gravity biased toward the housing and carries an article holder movable in a first direction longitudinally of the axis of said beam and normally urged into engagement against said housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the suspended holder in two mutually perpendicular directions, respectively, normal to the axis of the beam.

  15. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, Max A. (Kennewick, WA); Alter, Paul (Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for precisely positioning materials test specimens within the optimum neutron flux path emerging from a neutron source located in a housing. The test specimens are retained in a holder mounted on the free end of a support pivotably mounted and suspended from a movable base plate. The support is gravity biased to urge the holder in a direction longitudinally of the flux path against the housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the holder in two mutually perpendicular directions normal to the axis of the flux path.

  16. Donor-Specific Antibodies Accelerate Arteriosclerosis after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nochy, Dominique; Bruneval, Patrick; van Huyen, J. P. Duong; Glotz, Denis; Suberbielle, Caroline; Zuber, Julien; Anglicheau, Dany; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Loupy, Alexandre

    2011-01-01

    In biopsies of renal allografts, arteriosclerosis is often more severe than expected based on the age of the donor, even without a history of rejection vasculitis. To determine whether preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) may contribute to the severity of arteriosclerosis, we examined protocol biopsies from patients with (n = 40) or without (n = 59) DSA after excluding those with any evidence of vasculitis. Among DSA-positive patients, arteriosclerosis significantly progressed between month 3 and month 12 after transplant (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 1.12 ± 0.10, P = 0.014); in contrast, among DSA-negative patients, we did not detect a statistically significant progression during the same timeframe (mean Banff cv score 0.65 ± 0.11 to 0.81 ± 0.10, P = not significant). Available biopsies at later time points supported a rate of progression of arteriosclerosis in DSA-negative patients that was approximately one third that in DSA-positive patients. Accelerated arteriosclerosis was significantly associated with peritubular capillary leukocytic infiltration, glomerulitis, subclinical antibody-mediated rejection, and interstitial inflammation. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that donor-specific antibodies dramatically accelerate post-transplant progression of arteriosclerosis. PMID:21493773

  17. Specific targeting of tumor cells by lyophilisomes functionalized with antibodies.

    PubMed

    van Bracht, Etienne; Stolle, Sarah; Hafmans, Theo G; Boerman, Otto C; Oosterwijk, Egbert; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Daamen, Willeke F

    2014-05-01

    Lyophilisomes are a novel class of proteinaceous biodegradable nano/micro drug delivery capsules prepared by freezing, annealing and Iyophilization. In the present study, lyophilisomes were functionalized for active targeting by antibody conjugation in order to obtain a selective drug-carrier system. Lyophilisomes were vapor crosslinked for 2h, resulting in stable capsules, while leaving sufficient primary amines for further modification. The humanized KC4 (hKC4) antibody was conjugated to lyophilisomes to achieve specific targeting to mucin 1 (MUC1)-overexpressing tumor cells. For this, thiolated antibodies were conjugated to maleimide-activated lyophilisomes, resulting in an hKC4 specific drug targeting system toward MUC1-overexpressing human ovarian and cervical tumor cells. FACS analysis demonstrated that hKC4-conjugated lyophilisomes bound specifically to MUC1-overexpressing tumor cells (HeLa, OVCAR-3, and SKOV-3 cells), compared to MUC1-negative cells (LS174T). In addition, control non-specific IgG-conjugated lyophilisomes did not bind to MUC1-overexpressing tumor cells. When MUC1-positive and -negative cells were combined in one culture, hKC4-conjugated lyophilisomes specifically targeted MUC1-positive cells, whereas negative cells showed merely background levels. Transmission electron microscopy showed uptake of hKC4-conjugated lyophilisomes via phagocytosis or macropinocytosis. In conclusion, hKC4-conjugated albumin-based lyophilisomes represent a potential drug delivery system for targeted drug transport to MUC1-overexpressing tumor cells. PMID:24463217

  18. Epitope Mapping of Antibodies to Alpha-Synuclein in LRRK2 Mutation Carriers, Idiopathic Parkinson Disease Patients, and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Castelao, Beatriz; Gorostidi, Ana; Ruíz-Martínez, Javier; López de Munain, Adolfo; Castaño, José G.

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein (Snca) plays a major role in Parkinson disease (PD). Circulating anti-Snca antibodies has been described in PD patients and healthy controls, but they have been poorly characterized. This study was designed to assess the prevalence of anti-Snca reactivity in human subjects carrying the LRRK2 mutation, idiopathic PD (iPD) patients, and healthy controls and to map the epitopes of the anti-Snca antibodies. Antibodies to Snca were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting using purified recombinant Snca in plasma from individuals carrying LRRK2 mutations (104), iPD patients (59), and healthy controls (83). Epitopes of antibodies were mapped using recombinant protein constructs comprising different regions of Snca. Clear positive anti-Snca reactivity showed no correlation with age, sex, years of evolution, or the disability scores for PD patients and anti-Snca reactivity was not prevalent in human patients with other neurological or autoimmune diseases. Thirteen of the positive individuals were carriers of LRRK2 mutations either non-manifesting (8 out 49 screened) or manifesting (5 positive out 55), three positive (out of 59) were iPD patients, and five positive (out of 83) were healthy controls. Epitope mapping showed that antibodies against the N-terminal (a.a. 1–60) or C-terminal (a.a. 109–140) regions of Snca predominate in LRRK2 mutation carriers and iPD patients, being N122 a critical amino acid for recognition by the anti-C-terminal directed antibodies. Anti-Snca circulating antibodies seem to cluster within families carrying the LRRK2 mutation indicating possible genetic or common environmental factors in the generation of anti-Snca antibodies. These results suggest that case-controls’ studies are insufficient and further studies in family cohorts of patients and healthy controls should be undertaken, to progress in the understanding of the possible relationship of anti-Snca antibodies and PD pathology. PMID:25076905

  19. Diagnostic value of antibody responses to multiple antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in active and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Senoputra, Muhammad Andrian; Shiratori, Beata; Hasibuan, Fakhrial Mirwan; Koesoemadinata, Raspati Cundarani; Apriani, Lika; Ashino, Yugo; Ono, Kenji; Oda, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Makoto; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Hattori, Toshio

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the antibody responses to 10 prospective Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) antigens and evaluated their ability to discriminate between latent (LTBI) and active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Our results indicate that plasma levels of anti-?-crystallin (ACR), antilipoarabinomannan, anti-trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate, and anti-tubercular-glycolipid antigen antibodies were higher in patients with active TB, compared to those in the LTBI and control subjects. No differences in the antibodies were observed between the control and LTBI subjects. Antibodies against the glycolipid antigens could not distinguish between Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC)-negative TB patients and MAC-infected LTBI individuals. The most useful serological marker was antibodies to ACR, with MAC-negative TB patients having higher titers than those observed in MAC-positive LTBI and control subjects. Our data indicate that antibody to ACR is a promising target for the serological diagnosis of patients with active TB patients. When dealing with antiglycolipid antibodies, MAC coinfection should always be considered in serological studies. PMID:26307672

  20. Immunological diagnosis of childhood coeliac disease: comparison between antigliadin, antireticulin and antiendomysial antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, A; Kumar, V; Iancu, T C

    1994-01-01

    The immunological markers proposed to supplement intestinal biopsy for the diagnosis of coeliac disease are antigliadin, antireticulin and antiendomysial antibodies. These antibodies have been studied separately or compared as pairs, but no prospective comparison of all three antibodies in childhood coeliac disease exists. Thirty-four confirmed coeliacs were compared with nine non-coeliacs with pathological small intestines, and 32 children with a normal intestinal histology. Sera were examined for IgG- and IgA-antigliadin antibodies (AGA) by ELISA, and for IgA-antireticulin antibodies (ARA) and IgA endomysial antibodies (EMA) by indirect immunofluorescence. In active coeliac disease, IgA-EMA was the most sensitive (97%), while IgA-AGA the least sensitive antibody (52%). The specificity of IgA-AGA, IgG-AGA, IgA-ARA, IgA-EMA was 95%, 92%, 100% and 98%, respectively. Positive predicted values of ARA and EMA were comparable (97-100%), while EMA had the highest negative predicted value (98%). Compared with IgG-AGA, IgA-EMA titres better reflected variations in dietary gluten, and correlated best with intestinal pathology. Compared with AGA and ARA sensitivity, specificity and predictive values, EMA is the most reliable serological marker for the diagnosis of coeliac disease. It reflects dietary changes in gluten and correlates best with intestinal histopathology. Therefore, it should be considered the best of the three serological tests available for childhood coeliac disease. PMID:8287612

  1. Anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Yoshinari; Yamanaka, Kenjiro; Takasaki, Chiho; Matsushita, Masakazu; Yamada, Hirofumi; Nawata, Masuyuki; Matsudaira, Ran; Ikeda, Keigo; Kaneda, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    The clinical significance of anticyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies in patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) was assessed. Altogether, 86 sera from MCTD patients, 96 from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, 42 from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, 23 from systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, 21 from polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) patients, and 17 from those with Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) were tested for anti-CCP antibodies using an enzyme-lined immunosorbent assay. Among the 96 RA patients, anti-CCP antibodies were detected in 85%, with the frequency being significantly higher than in MCTD, SLE, SSc, PM/DM, and SjS patients (9%, 14%, 13%, 14%, and 18%, respectively; P < 0.001). Among eight MCTD patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for RA, only 50% had anti-CCP antibodies, and the prevalence was significantly lower than for all RA patients (p < 0.01). All eight patients who fulfilled the criteria for RA had overlap of SLE and SSc, except one patient, whereas the four anti-CCP-positive patients who did not fulfill the criteria for RA had SjS without overlapping features of SLE and SSc; moreover, most of their antibody titers were low. These results suggested that anti-CCP antibodies are associated with RA in MCTD patients, but careful diagnosis of RA is required if patients with low titers of anti-CCP antibodies lack overlapping SLE and SSc. PMID:17143695

  2. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies are associated with a non-MS course in children

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Deiva, Kumaran; Hemingway, Cheryl; Nytrova, Petra; Woodhall, Mark; Palace, Jacqueline; Wassmer, Evangeline; Tardieu, Marc; Vincent, Angela; Waters, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies (MOG-Abs) were predictive of a demyelination phenotype in children presenting with acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS). Method: Sixty-five children with a first episode of ADS (12 acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 24 optic neuritis, 18 transverse myelitis, 11 other clinically isolated syndrome) were identified from 2 national demyelination programs in the United Kingdom and France. Acute serum samples were tested for MOG-Abs by cell-based assay. Antibodies were used to predict diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) at 1 year. Results: Twenty-three of 65 (35%) children had MOG-Abs. Antibody-positive and antibody-negative patients were not clinically different at presentation, but identification of MOG-Abs predicted a non-MS course at 1-year follow-up: only 2/23 (9%) MOG-Ab–positive patients were diagnosed with MS compared to 16/42 (38%) MOG-Ab–negative patients (p = 0.019, Fisher exact test). Antibody positivity at outset was a useful predictor for a non-MS disease course, with a positive predictive value of 91% (95% confidence interval [CI] 72–99), negative predictive value of 38% (95% CI 24–54), positive likelihood ratio of 4.02 (CI 1.0–15.4), and odds ratio of 6.5 (CI 1.3–31.3). Conclusions: MOG-Abs are found at presentation in 35% of patients with childhood ADS, across a range of demyelinating disorders. Antibody positivity can be useful in predicting a non-MS disease course at onset. PMID:25798445

  3. Poliovirus RNA synthesis in vitro: structural elements and antibody inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, B.L.; Hanecak, R.; Dorner, L.F.; Anderson, C.W.; Wimmer, E.

    1983-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA polymerase complex has been analyzed by immunoautoradiography using antibody probes derived from purified replicase (P3) region viral polypeptides. Antibody preparations made against the polio RNA polymerase, P3-4b, detected a previously unreported cellular protein that copurifies with the RNA polymerase. An IgG fraction purified from rabbit antiserum to polypeptide P3-2, a precursor fo the RNA polymerase, specifically inhibits poliovirus RNA synthesis in vitro. The authors have also immunoprecipitated a 60,000-dalton protein (P3-4a) with antiserum to protein P3-4b and have determined the precise genomic map position of this protein by automated Edman degradation. Protein P3-4a originates by cleavage of the RNA polymerase precursor at a glutamine-glucine amino acid pair not previously reported to be a viral cleavage site.

  4. [Improved IgG Antibody Diagnostics of Feather Duvet Lung by an Antibody Screening Test].

    PubMed

    Sennekamp, J; Lehmann, E

    2015-11-01

    The underdiagnosed feather duvet lung, an extrinsic allergic alveolitis (hypersensitivity pneumonitis) caused by duck and goose feathers, can be more frequently diagnosed, if duck and goose feather antibodies are included in the panel of the routinely applied IgG antibody screening test. This does not necessarily require extending the screening test to include duck and goose feather antigens. By analysing 100 sera with duck and goose antibodies we found that the commonly used pigeon and budgerigar antibodies can also screen for feather duvet antibodies. All examined sera lacking pigeon and budgerigar antibodies also lacked clear-cut duck and goose feather antibodies. The examined sera with strong pigeon or budgerigar antibodies always also contained feather duvet antibodies. However, sera with medium or low concentrated pigeon or budgerigar antibodies are not always associated with feather duvet antibodies. In the light of these observations, we find that 71?% of the duck and goose antibody analyses would be dispensable without essential loss of quality, if the results of screening for pigeon and budgerigar antibodies were incorporated into the procedure of a step-by- step diagnostics. PMID:26458127

  5. Nanoliposome-mediated targeting of antibodies to tumors: IVIG antibodies as a model.

    PubMed

    Nikpoor, Amin Reza; Tavakkol-Afshari, Jalil; Gholizadeh, Zahra; Sadri, Kayvan; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Badiee, Ali; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-11-10

    Monoclonal antibodies are routinely used as tools in immunotherapies against solid tumors. However, administration of monoclonal antibodies may cause undesired side effects due to their accumulation in non-targeted organs. Nanoliposomes of less than 200nm can target antibodies to tumors by enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) mechanisms. To direct monoclonal antibodies to tumors, nanoliposomes encapsulating intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) as a model antibody were prepared. The liposomes had average diameters of 100nm and encapsulation efficiencies of 31 to 46%. They showed less than 10% release in plasma at 37°C up to seven days. The secondary and tertiary structures of liposome-encapsulated antibodies were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The near and far-UV spectra analyses revealed no obvious conformational changes in the structures of the encapsulated antibodies. The biodistribution of free and liposome-encapsulated iodinated antibodies was investigated in mice bearing C-26 colon carcinoma tumors. The accumulation of liposome-encapsulated antibodies in tumors was significantly greater than that of free antibodies due to the EPR effect. The PEGylated liposomes were more efficient in the delivery of antibodies to the tumor site than non-PEGylated liposomes. We conclude that administration of monoclonal antibodies in PEGylated liposomes is more efficient than administration of non-encapsulated monoclonal antibodies for solid tumor immunotherapy. PMID:26302860

  6. Seroprevalence of antibodies of Neospora spp. and Toxoplasma gondii in horses from southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Bartova, Eva; Machacova, Tereza; Sedlak, Kamil; Budikova, Marie; Mariani, Ugo; Veneziano, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of horse meat has been epidemiologically linked to clinical toxoplasmosis in humans and neosporosis that may cause clinical illness in horses. Here we determined seroprevalence of antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii Nicolle et Manceaux, 1908 and species of Neospora Dubey, Carpenter, Speer, Topper et Uggla, 1988 in horses from Italy. Blood samples were collected from 643 apparently healthy horses from 60 farms of 51 municipalities in southern Italy. The presence of antibodies against T. gondii and Neospora spp. were detected by indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT); a titre ? 50 was considered positive. The same sera were also tested for antibodies against Neospora spp. by a competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA); samples with ? 30% inhibition were considered positive. Antibodies against T. gondii and Neospora spp. were detected in 19 (3.0%) and 15 (2.3%) horses by IFAT, respectively, without statistical difference between gender, age and breeds (p-value ? 0.05). Antibodies against species of Neospora were detected in 70 (10.9%) horses by cELISA with statistical difference in gender (6.0-18.5%, p-value ? 0.05) and breeds (0-19.4%, p-value ? 0.05). Although T. gondii infection rates were low, the risk of human infection should not be dismissed, particularly in Italy where consumption of raw or undercooked horse meat has a long tradition. PMID:26278845

  7. Isolation of IgG Antibodies to Toxocara in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients with Acute Anterior Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Balderas, Francisco-Javier; García-Jaimes, Janete; Ríos, Rita; Zonana-Nacach, Abraham; Tapia-Romero, Raquel; Villanueva, Nayeli; Méndez-Samperio, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Since few reports had been published on the prevalence of toxocariasis in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients with acute non-granulomatous anterior uveitis (ANGAU), the aim of this work was to determine the presence of antibodies against Toxocara canis in AS patients with ANGAU. Methods Thirty-six patients (14 female and 22 male) with AS were enrolled in the study. The history of ANGAU was accepted only if diagnosed by an ophthalmologist. The detection of IgG antibodies to T. canis was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, antibodies to Ascaris lumbricoides were also tested to verify non-specific reactions. Results The prevalence of ANGAU in the AS patients was 58% (21 / 36), and 38% (8 / 21) of the patients with ANGAU were positive for antibodies to Toxocara, while 7% (1 / 15) of AS patients without ANGAU were positive for T. canis (p = 0.038, two tails; mid-p exact). No antibodies were detected to A. lumbricoides antigens in the serum samples of patients with AS. Conclusions These data suggest that the seroprevalence of antibodies to T. canis is high in Mexican patients with AS-associated uveitis, suggesting a chronic asymptomatic toxocariosis, which could be associated with the pathogenesis of ANGAU; however, further larger-scale studies are needed to confirm this observation. PMID:24882953

  8. Evaluation of a monoclonal antibody (TB72) based serological test for tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ivanyi, J; Krambovitis, E; Keen, M

    1983-01-01

    A serological test for tuberculosis (TB), based on competitive inhibition by human sera of antigen binding by a murine monoclonal antibody (TB72) has been performed using solid phase radioimmunoassay. The test was evaluated on sera from patients with pulmonary or extra-pulmonary active TB as well as from control hospitalized patients--half of whom had various chest complaints. Positive values were found in 74% of all or 55% of untreated active pulmonary TB. Patients with extrapulmonary TB segregated, whereby antibody titres were increased in cases of pleural, peritoneal, pericardial or bone infection but only marginal or negative values were found in the majority of patients with lymphatic and genitourinary infection. None of the subjects with suspected but excluded tuberculosis or sarcoidosis had demonstrable TB72 antibodies. Generally there was a positive correlation between the levels of TB72 like and 'total' Mycobacterium tuberculosis sonicate binding antibodies. In particular, the titre of sonicate binding antibodies did not exceed background levels in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis who were negative in the TB72 competition test. None of these false negative patients received drug therapy whereas most patients with the highest antibody levels were under chemotherapy for 1-8 months prior to serum testing. The serodiagnostic value of the TB72 based competition test has been discussed. PMID:6197217

  9. Prevalence of antibodies against influenza virus in non-vaccinated equines from the Brazilian Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Gaíva e Silva, Lucas; Borges, Alice Mamede Costa Marques; Villalobos, Eliana Monteforte Cassaro; Lara, Maria do Carmo Custodio Souza Hunold; Cunha, Elenice Maria Siquetin; de Oliveira, Anderson Castro Soares; Braga, Isis Assis; Aguiar, Daniel Moura

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of antibodies against Equine Influenza Virus (EIV) was determined in 529 equines living on ranches in the municipality of Poconé, Pantanal area of Brazil, by means of the hemagglutination inhibition test, using subtype H3N8 as antigen. The distribution and possible association among positive animal and ranches were evaluated by the chi-square test, spatial autoregressive and multiple linear regression models. The prevalence of antibodies against EIV was estimated at 45.2% (95% CI 30.2 - 61.1%) with titers ranging from 20 to 1,280 HAU. Seropositive equines were found on 92.0% of the surveyed ranches. Equine from non-flooded ranches (66.5%) and negativity in equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) (61.7%) were associated with antibodies against EIV. No spatial correlation was found among the ranches, but the ones located in non-flooded areas were associated with antibodies against EIV. A negative correlation was found between the prevalence of antibodies against EIV and the presence of EIAV positive animals on the ranches. The high prevalence of antibodies against EIV detected in this study suggests that the virus is circulating among the animals, and this statistical analysis indicates that the movement and aggregation of animals are factors associated to the transmission of the virus in the region. PMID:25351542

  10. Antibody engineering and therapeutics, The Annual Meeting of the Antibody Society: December 8-12, 2013, Huntington Beach, CA.

    PubMed

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul W H I; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  11. Detection of antibody responses against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis proteins in children with community-acquired pneumonia: effects of combining pneumococcal antigens, pre-existing antibody levels, sampling interval, age, and duration of illness.

    PubMed

    Borges, I C; Andrade, D C; Vilas-Boas, A-L; Fontoura, M-S H; Laitinen, H; Ekström, N; Adrian, P V; Meinke, A; Cardoso, M-R A; Barral, A; Ruuskanen, O; Käyhty, H; Nascimento-Carvalho, C M

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated the effects of combining different numbers of pneumococcal antigens, pre-existing antibody levels, sampling interval, age, and duration of illness on the detection of IgG responses against eight Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, three Haemophilus influenzae proteins, and five Moraxella catarrhalis proteins in 690 children aged <5 years with pneumonia. Serological tests were performed on acute and convalescent serum samples with a multiplexed bead-based immunoassay. The median sampling interval was 19 days, the median age was 26.7 months, and the median duration of illness was 5 days. The rate of antibody responses was 15.4 % for at least one pneumococcal antigen, 5.8 % for H. influenzae, and 2.3 % for M. catarrhalis. The rate of antibody responses against each pneumococcal antigen varied from 3.5 to 7.1 %. By multivariate analysis, pre-existing antibody levels showed a negative association with the detection of antibody responses against pneumococcal and H. influenzae antigens; the sampling interval was positively associated with the detection of antibody responses against pneumococcal and H. influenzae antigens. A sampling interval of 3 weeks was the optimal cut-off for the detection of antibody responses against pneumococcal and H. influenzae proteins. Duration of illness was negatively associated with antibody responses against PspA. Age did not influence antibody responses against the investigated antigens. In conclusion, serological assays using combinations of different pneumococcal proteins detect a higher rate of antibody responses against S. pneumoniae compared to assays using a single pneumococcal protein. Pre-existing antibody levels and sampling interval influence the detection of antibody responses against pneumococcal and H. influenzae proteins. These factors should be considered when determining pneumonia etiology by serological methods in children. PMID:25894988

  12. Controlled delivery of antibodies from injectable hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Nathan A; Babcock, Lyndsey R; Murray, Ellen A; Krebs, Melissa D

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are currently used for the treatment of various diseases, but large doses delivered systemically are typically required. Localized controlled delivery techniques would afford major benefits such as decreasing side effects and required doses. Injectable biopolymer systems are an attractive solution due to their minimally invasive potential for controlled release in a localized area. Here, alginate-chitosan hydrogels are demonstrated to provide controlled delivery of IgG model antibodies and also of Fab antibody fragments. Also, an alternate delivery system comprised of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded with antibodies and encapsulated in alginate was shown to successfully provide another level of control over release. These biopolymer systems that offer controlled delivery for antibodies and antibody fragments will be promising for many applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine. PMID:26652435

  13. Seronegative Antiphospholipid Syndrome with Anti-phosphatidylethanolamine Antibody in a Boy.

    PubMed

    Asano, Takeshi; Narazaki, Hidehiko; Kaizu, Kiyohiko; Kuwabara, Kentaroh; Fujino, Osamu; Itoh, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease caused by antiphospholipid antibodies. At our institution, APS is diagnosed on the basis of the Sapporo criteria, which consist of thrombosis and recurrent pregnancy-related complications and the following laboratory findings: the presence of lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibody, or anti-?2 glycoprotein 1 antibody. However, we sometimes treat patients we strongly suspect of having APS but who do not satisfy the laboratory criteria. To accommodate such suspected cases, a subtype of APS termed seronegative APS has been proposed. Here, we report on a man with chronic thromobocytopenic purpura since the age of 3 years and multiple cerebral infarctions since the age of 14 years who finally received a diagnosis of seronegative APS with positive antiphosphatidylethanolamine antibodies. PMID:25959205

  14. Diagnostic and prognostic significance of the IgM antibody to the Hepatitis delta virus

    SciTech Connect

    Farci, P.; Gerin, J.L.; Aragona, M.; Lindsey, I.; Crivelli, O.; Balestrieri, A.; Smedile, A.; Thomas, H.C.; Rizzetto, M.

    1986-03-21

    The IgM class antibody to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) was determined in different clinical categories of hepatitis B surface antigen carriers infected by the HDV (positive in the test for total antibody to HDV). The IgM antibody was found at high titers in each 70 patients with inflammatory liver disease and at a low titer in one six patients with inactive cirrhosis; it was not found in eight carriers with normal liver histology. Testing for Igm antibody to HDV distinguishes hepatitis B surface antigen carriers who have underlying inflammatory HDV liver disease from those with past HDV infection and provides prognostic information on the course of chronic HDV hepatitis.

  15. Naturally acquired anthrax antibodies in a cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Good, Kyle M; Houser, Annmarie; Arntzen, Lorraine; Turnbull, Peter C B

    2008-07-01

    An outbreak of anthrax in the Jwana Game Reserve in Jwaneng, Botswana, was first observed when three cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) died of the disease in November 2004. In the aftermath of this event, banked serum samples collected from 23 wild-caught cheetahs were examined, by the inhibition enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), for antibodies to the protective antigen (PA) of Bacillus anthracis. Of the 23 cheetahs, 16 regularly accessed the reserve. Antibodies to PA were detected in one cheetah collected in May 2004, indicating the disease was occurring well before it was first noticed. This appears to be the first demonstration of naturally acquired anthrax antibodies in cheetahs. The finding of one antibody-positive animal amongst at least 16 potentially exposed individuals is consistent with existing reports that it is uncommon for cheetahs to develop natural immunity to anthrax. PMID:18689661

  16. Gluten antibodies in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A L; Rees, B W; Jones, L T

    1984-04-01

    The level of gluten antibodies has been determined in plasma samples from 36 patients with MS using a haemagglutination technique. Only one of the 36 patients studied showed any evidence of gluten antibodies and the level of antibodies in this patient did not justify putting the patient on a gluten-free diet. This study has provided no evidence to support the use of a gluten-free diet as part of the management of MS. PMID:6746319

  17. Antigen binding and idiotype analysis of antibodies obtained after electroporation of heavy and light chain genes encoding phosphocholine- specific antibodies: a model for T15-idiotype dominance

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Antibodies bearing the T15 idiotype dominate the murine primary immune response to phosphocholine (PC). Analysis of antigen binding of antibodies derived from V1:DFL16.1:JH1 (VH1) germline and N region- derived variant heavy (H) chains and kappa 22, kappa 24, and kappa 8 light (L) chains demonstrates that the T15H:kappa 22L (T15) antibody binds PC at least 20-40 times better than other antibodies derived from alternate germline forms of the VH1 H chain and kappa 22, kappa 24, or kappa 8 L chains. To achieve affinities in the same range as the T15 antibody, kappa 24 and kappa 8 L chain-containing antibodies must have H chains derived from variant N region or somatically mutated VH1 genes. Single amino acid differences at the VD junction of the various germline and N region variant VH1 H chains dictate the L chain that can associate with the H chain to produce a PC-specific antibody. Several H:L combinations give rise to T15 or M167 idiotype-positive antibodies that lack specificity for PC, and single amino acid substitutions or insertions at the VH1:D junction result in the loss of T15 or M167 idiotopes. Based on these observations, our data support a molecular model involving both preferential gene rearrangement and antigen-driven B cell selection to explain T15 idiotype dominance in the immune response to PC. In the absence of N region diversification, large numbers of neonatal B cells bearing the T15H:kappa 22L surface immunoglobulin M (sIgM) receptors would be selected and expanded by autologous or environmental PC antigen into the long-lived peripheral B cell pool. PMID:1460422

  18. Monoclonal antibodies with group specificity toward sulfonamides: Selection of hapten and antibody selectivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although many antibodies to sulfonamides have been generated, immunoassays based on the current available antibodies for large multi-sulfonamide screening programs have properties dependent on the immunizing hapten structure and have always suffered from high selectivity for individual sulfonamides....

  19. Kinetics of Anti-Phlebotomus perniciosus Saliva Antibodies in Experimentally Bitten Mice and Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Inés; Molina, Ricardo; Jiménez, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Background Sand flies are hematophagous arthropods that act as vectors of Leishmania parasites. When hosts are bitten they develop cellular and humoral responses against sand fly saliva. A positive correlation has been observed between the number of bites and antibody levels indicating that anti-saliva antibody response can be used as marker of exposure to sand flies. Little is known about kinetics of antibodies against Phlebotomus perniciosus salivary gland homogenate (SGH) or recombinant salivary proteins (rSP). This work focused on the study of anti-P. perniciosus saliva antibodies in sera of mice and rabbits that were experimentally exposed to the bites of uninfected sand flies. Methodology/Principal Findings Anti-saliva antibodies were evaluated by ELISA and Western blot. In addition, antibody levels against two P. perniciosus rSP, apyrase rSP01B and D7 related protein rSP04 were determined in mice sera. Anti-saliva antibody levels increased along the immunizations and correlated with the number of sand fly bites. Anti-SGH antibody levels were detected in sera of mice five weeks after exposure, and persisted for at least three months. Anti-apyrase rSP01B antibodies followed similar kinetic responses than anti-SGH antibodies while rSP04 showed a delayed response and exhibited a greater variability among sera of immunized mice. In rabbits, anti-saliva antibodies appeared after the second week of exposure and IgG antibodies persisted at high levels, even 7 months post-exposure. Conclusions/Significance Our results contributed to increase the knowledge on the type of immune response P. perniciosus saliva and individual proteins elicited highlighting the use of rSP01B as an epidemiological marker of exposure. Anti-saliva kinetics in sera of experimentally bitten rabbits were studied for the first time. Results with rabbit model provided useful information for a better understanding of the anti-saliva antibody levels found in wild leporids in the human leishmaniasis focus in the Madrid region, Spain. PMID:26569103

  20. Cancer therapy with bispecific antibodies: Clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Archana; Lum, Lawrence G

    2013-01-01

    The binding of at least two molecular targets simultaneously with a single bispecific antibody is an attractive concept. The use of bispecific antibodies as possible therapeutic agents for cancer treatment was proposed in the mid-1980s. The design and production of bispecific antibodies using antibody- and/or receptor-based platform technology has improved significantly with advances in the knowledge of molecular manipulations, protein engineering techniques, and the expression of antigens and receptors on healthy and malignant cells. The common strategy for making bispecific antibodies involves combining the variable domains of the desired mAbs into a single bispecific structure. Many different formats of bispecific antibodies have been generated within the research field of bispecific immunotherapeutics, including the chemical heteroconjugation of two complete molecules or fragments of mAbs, quadromas, F(ab’)2, diabodies, tandem diabodies and single-chain antibodies. This review describes key modifications in the development of bispecific antibodies that can improve their efficacy and stability, and provides a clinical perspective on the application of bispecific antibodies for the treatment of solid and liquid tumors, including the promises and research limitations of this approach. PMID:20521223

  1. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations

    PubMed Central

    Gearhart, Patricia J.; Castiblanco, Diana P.; Russell Knode, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations. PMID:26641938

  2. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  3. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  4. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  5. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Gearhart, Patricia J; Castiblanco, Diana P; Russell Knode, Lisa M

    2015-12-01

    Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations. PMID:26641938

  6. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies as Diagnostics; an Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M. Z.

    2010-01-01

    Ever since the development of Hybridoma Technology in 1975 by Kohler and Milstein, our vision for antibodies as tools for research for prevention, detection and treatment of diseases, vaccine production, antigenic characterization of pathogens and in the study of genetic regulation of immune responses and disease susceptibility has been revolutionized. The monoclonal antibodies being directed against single epitopes are homogeneous, highly specific and can be produced in unlimited quantities. In animal disease diagnosis, they are very useful for identification and antigenic characterization of pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies have tremendous applications in the field of diagnostics, therapeutics and targeted drug delivery systems, not only for infectious diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and protozoa but also for cancer, metabolic and hormonal disorders. They are also used in the diagnosis of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, tissue typing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, radio immunoassay, serotyping of microorganisms, immunological intervention with passive antibody, antiidiotype inhibition, or magic bullet therapy with cytotoxic agents coupled with anti mouse specific antibody. Recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology through genetic engineering has successfully led to the possibility of reconstruction of monoclonal antibodies viz. chimeric antibodies, humanized antibodies and complementarily determining region grafted antibodies and their enormous therapeutic use. PMID:20582184

  8. Reconciling the Structural Attributes of Avian Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, Paul J.; Law, Ruby H. P.; Gilgunn, Sarah; Hearty, Stephen; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T.; Lloyd, Gordon; O'Kennedy, Richard J.; Whisstock, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are high value therapeutic, diagnostic, biotechnological, and research tools. Combinatorial approaches to antibody discovery have facilitated access to unique antibodies by surpassing the diversity limitations of the natural repertoire, exploitation of immune repertoires from multiple species, and tailoring selections to isolate antibodies with desirable biophysical attributes. The V-gene repertoire of the chicken does not utilize highly diverse sequence and structures, which is in stark contrast to the mechanism employed by humans, mice, and primates. Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has generated high quality, high affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic, diagnostic and biotechnological applications. Furthermore, extensive examination of the amino acid characteristics of the chicken repertoire has provided significant insight into mechanisms employed by the avian immune system. A paucity of avian antibody crystal structures has limited our understanding of the structural consequences of these uniquely chicken features. This paper presents the crystal structure of two chicken single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies generated from large libraries by phage display against important human antigen targets, which capture two unique CDRL1 canonical classes in the presence and absence of a non-canonical disulfide constrained CDRH3. These structures cast light on the unique structural features of chicken antibodies and contribute further to our collective understanding of the unique mechanisms of diversity and biochemical attributes that render the chicken repertoire of particular value for antibody generation. PMID:24737329

  9. Optimization of monoclonal antibody delivery via the lymphatics: the dose dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Steller, M.A.; Parker, R.J.; Covell, D.G.; Holton, O.D. 3d.; Keenan, A.M.; Sieber, S.M.; Weinstein, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    After interstitial injection in mice, antibody molecules enter local lymphatic vessels, flow with the lymph to regional lymph nodes, and bind to target antigens there. Compared with i.v. administration, delivery via the lymphatics provides a more efficient means for localizing antibody in lymph nodes. An IgG2a (36-7-5) directed against the murine class I major histocompatibility antigen H-2Kk has proved useful for studying the pharmacology of lymphatic delivery. At very low doses, most of the antibody remains at the injection site in Kk-positive animals. As the dose is progressively increased, most effective labeling occurs first in nodes proximal to the injection site and then in the next group of nodes along the lymphatic chain. At higher doses, antibody overflows the lymphatic system and enters the blood-stream via the thoracic duct and other lymphatic-venous connections. Once in the blood, antibody is rapidly cleared, apparently by binding to Kk-bearing cells. These findings indicate that the single-pass distribution of monoclonal antibodies in the lymphatics can be strongly dose dependent, a principle which may be of clinical significance in the improvement of immunolymphoscintigraphic imaging, especially with antibodies directed against normal and malignant lymphoid cells. Monoclonal antibodies directed against normal cell types in the lymph node may be useful for assessing the integrity of lymphatic chains by immunolymphoscintigraphy or, more speculatively, for altering the status of regional immune function. The results presented here indicate that a low or intermediate antibody dose may optimize the signal:noise ratio for imaging. In Kk-negative animals, the percentage of dose taken up in the major organs was essentially independent of the dose administered; there was no evidence for saturable sites of nonspecific binding.

  10. Surface plasmon resonance-based methodology for anti-adalimumab antibody identification and kinetic characterization.

    PubMed

    Real-Fernández, Feliciana; Cimaz, Rolando; Rossi, Giada; Simonini, Gabriele; Giani, Teresa; Pagnini, Ilaria; Papini, Anna Maria; Rovero, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Adalimumab (ADA) is a TNF-? blocker drug antibody fully humanized and thus indistinguishable in structure and function from natural human IgG1, used in the juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) treatment. Immunogenicity against the drug has been frequently detected in treated patients, and the presence of anti-ADA antibodies is correlated to treatment failure or lower clinical remission. Herein, we measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) both the binding and the affinity of anti-ADA antibodies to the ADA-immobilized biosensor. The binding of anti-ADA antibodies was evaluated by testing sera from ADA-treated patients (n?=?30), untreated patients (n?=?9), and healthy donors (n?=?20) in the SPR biosensor. The optimal cut-off point was defined using the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-curve) analysis with 79 % (60.28 to 92.01 %, 95 % CI) sensitivity, 99 % (88.06 to 100.0 %, 95 % CI) specificity, and a positive likelihood ratio of 23. The area under the curve was 0.9298 (p?antibodies from pediatric patients' sera was measured, analyzing the interaction of anti-drug antibodies using whole sera, enriched IgG fractions, and isolated anti-ADA antibodies. The immobilized drug ADA interacted with purified antibodies at low affinities (10(-6) M?>?K D?>?10(-9) M). Graphical Abstract Adalimumab immobilized on the biosensor chip surface detects specific anti-drug antibodies in treated patients' sera. PMID:26210546

  11. [Comparison of eight screening tests for ant-HCV antibody].

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Matsuo; Kagita, Masanori; Yamashita, Naoko; Nakano, Takasi; Tahara, Kazuko; Asari, Seishi; Iwatani, Yoshinori

    2002-09-01

    We compared eight HCV screening tests for detection of anti-HCV antibody; Ortho Quick Chaser HCV Ab (QC), Ortho HCV Ab ELISA III (ELISA), Ortho HVC Ab PA test III (PA), Lumipulse II Ortho HCV (LUMI), IMx HCV.DAINAPACKII (IMx), ARCHITECT HCV (ARCH), Immucheck.F-HCV C50 Ab (Immu), RANREAM HCV Ab Ex II (RAN). Sera from six hundred patients were examined by these eight screening tests. The positive rates of the eight screening tests were from 9.0% to 13.2%. Forty-five sera showed discrepant results between the eight screening tests, and about half of them showed weak positive reaction and/or false positive. Twenty-five of the forty-five sera were negative for ant-HCV antibody in the CHIRON RIBA III confirmatory test, and forty-four of them were negative for HCV-RNA in the PCR method. The agreement rates between the two reagents were from 95.5% to 99.2%, but were not always high between the two reagents that used similar antigen. The specificities and sensitivities evaluated by using the RIBA III confirmatory test were excellent in ELISA, LUMI, IMx, ARCH and Immu. Three BBI seroconversion panels were used to compare the positive readings in the initial stage of HCV infection by eight screening tests. ELISA and ARCH showed the earliest positive readings, and then IMx, LUMI = RAN, PA, QC and Immu in this order. These findings indicate that ELISA and ARCH were the most excellent in the sensitivity, specificity and early diagnosis of HCV infection. However, we must pay attention to the weak positive reaction in the screening tests, because there is a possibility of "false positive". PMID:12391674

  12. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  13. Wholemount immunostaining with Alkaline Phosphatase Antibodies Hiroki Kuroda

    E-print Network

    De Robertis, Eddy M.

    Wholemount immunostaining with Alkaline Phosphatase Antibodies Hiroki Kuroda Kuroda et al. Genes Dev. 19, 1022-1027 (2005) Immunostaining is done using anti-dpERK mouse antibody (1:10,000) for the first antibody and anti-mouse IgG-AP conjugated antibody (1:1,000) for the second antibody. Conditions

  14. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  17. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  18. Mathematical and Experimental Analyses of Antibody Transport in Hollow-Fiber-Based Specific Antibody Filters

    E-print Network

    Federspiel, William J.

    Mathematical and Experimental Analyses of Antibody Transport in Hollow-Fiber-Based Specific mathematical model of SAF-based antibody removal and performed in vitro antibody removal experiments to test to facilitate ABO blood group-incompatible kidney transplants (1) and heart (2) and kidney (3) xenotransplants

  19. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. Maternal antibodies provide early protection from disease, but may interfere with the vaccination efficacy in the chick. MAb are thought to interfere wit...

  20. ANTIBODY TITRATION PROTOCOL NOTE: When titrating an antibody for use in flow cytometry, you should

    E-print Network

    ANTIBODY TITRATION PROTOCOL NOTE: When titrating an antibody for use in flow cytometry, you should attempt to titrate it under the same conditions in which it will be used during your experimental cell're titrating. You should titrate each new vial of antibody you receive in your lab, even if you've used

  1. PHYLOGENETIC ORIGINS OF ANTIBODY STRUCTURE

    PubMed Central

    Marchalonis, J.; Edelman, G. M.

    1966-01-01

    The anuran amphibian, Rana catesbiana, has been found to possess at least two kinds of immunoglobulins corresponding to ?G- and ?M-classes. These classes have the same chain structures as those of their counterparts in higher animal species. Light chains of both immunoglobulins had molecular weights of 20,000. Heavy chains of the ?M-class had molecular weights of 72,100; those of the ?G-class had molecular weights of 53,600. The carbohydrate content of the ?G-immunoglobulin was 2.1%, and that of the ?M-protein was 10.8%. The amino acid compositions of the immunoglobulins were generally similar to those of mammalian immunoglobulins. After a single injection of phage antigen (f2), the order of appearance of phage-neutralizing activity in the frog immunoglobulin classes was (a) ?M-antibodies, and (b) ?G-antibodies. The results of this and previous studies suggest that the ?G-immunoglobulins emerged at some point in evolution between the elasmobranchs and the anuran amphibians. PMID:4162734

  2. A bioinformatics pipeline to build a knowledge database for in silico antibody engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shanrong; Lu, Jin

    2011-04-01

    A challenge to antibody engineering is the large number of positions and nature of variation and opposing concerns of introducing unfavorable biochemical properties. While large libraries are quite successful in identifying antibodies with improved binding or activity, still only a fraction of possibilities can be explored and that would require considerable effort. The vast array of natural antibody sequences provides a potential wealth of information on (1) selecting hotspots for variation, and (2) designing mutants to mimic natural variations seen in hotspots. The human immune system can generate an enormous diversity of immunoglobulins against an almost unlimited range of antigens by gene rearrangement of a limited number of germline variable, diversity and joining genes followed by somatic hypermutation and antigen selection. All the antibody sequences in NCBI database can be assigned to different germline genes. As a result, a position specific scoring matrix for each germline gene can be constructed by aligning all its member sequences and calculating the amino acid frequencies for each position. The position specific scoring matrix for each germline gene characterizes "hotspots" and the nature of variations, and thus reduces the sequence space of exploration in antibody engineering. We have developed a bioinformatics pipeline to conduct analysis of human antibody sequences, and generated a comprehensive knowledge database for in silico antibody engineering. The pipeline is fully automatic and the knowledge database can be refreshed anytime by re-running the pipeline. The refresh process is fast, typically taking 1min on a Lenovo ThinkPad T60 laptop with 3G memory. Our knowledge database consists of (1) the individual germline gene usage in generation of natural antibodies; (2) the CDR length distributions; and (3) the position specific scoring matrix for each germline gene. The knowledge database provides comprehensive support for antibody engineering, including de novo library design in selection of favorable germline V gene scaffolds and CDR lengths. In addition, we have also developed a web application framework to present our knowledge database, and the web interface can help people to easily retrieve a variety of information from the knowledge database. PMID:21310488

  3. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3–5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4–5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society’s special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5–6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  4. Modification of Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Assay for the Detection of Platelet Antibodies in Patients With Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Vongchan, Preeyanat; Nawarawong, Weerasak; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet refractoriness is caused by HLA antibodies and platelet-specific antibodies. Current methods used to detect antiplatelet antibodies have limitations. Solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) lacks sensitivity and requires a second assay using chloroquine-treated intact platelets to specify the response due to anti-HLA. We modified SPRCA by using 2 types of antihuman platelet antibodies with different specificities toward platelet lysate and tested samples from 361 patients (69 with unexplained thrombocytopenia and 292 with poor response to platelet transfusions not explicable by alloimmunization or the clinical situation) and 50 from healthy volunteers. Our method compared favorably with platelet suspension direct immunofluorescence. All samples from healthy volunteers were negative; of the samples from the patient population, 240 were positive (147 samples had only antiplatelet and 3 samples had only anti-HLA antibodies). This modified technique had a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 91%. PMID:18701420

  5. IgM-class rheumatoid factor interference in the solid-phase radioimmunoassay of rubella-specific IgM antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Meurman, O H; Ziola, B R

    1978-01-01

    The interference of IgM-class rheumatoid factor (RF) in the solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) of rubella virus IgM antibodies was studied. Acute rubella infections did not significantly activate RF. False-positive rubella antibody results were obtained, however, when patients with raised RF levels were tested. If a low rubella IgG antibody titre was present, a high level of RF was required to cause a false-positive IgM result; conversely, in sera with high IgG titres, only a low level of RF was required for interference. Although the false-positive IgM titres obtained were generally low, thet did show a positive correlation to both RF levels and rubella IgG titres. False-positive results were successfully avoided by removing the RF by absorption with heat-aggregated human gamma globulin. The absorption procedure did not affect true rubella IgM antibody titres. PMID:77280

  6. Mechanisms of Neonatal Mucosal Antibody Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following an abrupt transition at birth from the sterile uterus to an environment with abundant commensal and pathogenic microbes, neonatal mammals are protected by maternal antibodies at mucosal surfaces. We show in mice that different antibody isotypes work in distinct ways to protect the neonatal...

  7. Structural Biology of Moonlighting --Lessons from Antibodies

    E-print Network

    Martin, Andrew C.R.

    this detailed definition, antibodies as a family are consummate moon- lighters. However, individual antibodies chal- lenged in a number of ways. First, the importance of RNA as a functional molecule rather than, and performs RNA splicing. More importantly, many ncRNAs are involved in the regulation of many thousands

  8. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  9. Antibody-drug conjugates: Intellectual property considerations.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates are highly complex entities that combine an antibody, a linker and a toxin. This complexity makes them demanding both technically and from a regulatory point of view, and difficult to deal with in their patent aspects. This article discusses different issues of patent protection and freedom to operate with regard to this promising new class of drugs. PMID:26292154

  10. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  11. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  12. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  13. How to successfully patent therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lahrtz, Fritz

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have become an established class of drugs for the treatment of a variety of diseases, especially cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory disorders, and a sufficient patent protection is a prerequisite for their successful commercialization. As monoclonal antibodies and their therapeutic potential have been well known for decades, the mere production of yet another therapeutic antibody is in many jurisdictions not considered a patentable invention. In contrast, antibodies with novel structural features and/or improved properties may be patentable. When drafting the claims, care should be taken to obtain a broad patent scope that protects both the antibody of interest and related antibodies having the same functional features, thereby preventing competitors from marketing a functionally equivalent antibody. Furthermore, the application should contain experimental evidence showing the improved properties of the claimed antibody. After the filing of a priority patent application, patent protection should be initiated at least in countries that are of particular commercial importance. Subsequent inventions relating to novel uses, formulations, dosage regimens, and combinations with other treatment modalities should be protected by further patent applications to extend patent term. PMID:25614506

  14. 8th Annual European Antibody Congress 2012

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Alain; Carter, Paul J.; Gerber, Hans-Peter; Lugovskoy, Alexey A.; Wurch, Thierry; Junutula, Jagath R.; Kontermann, Roland E; Mabry, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The 8th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The new agenda format for 2012 included three parallel tracks on: (1) naked antibodies; (2) antibody drug conjugates (ADCs); and (3) bispecific antibodies and alternative scaffolds. The meeting started and closed with three plenary lectures to give common background and to share the final panel discussion and conclusions. The two day event included case studies and networking for nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The monoclonal antibody track was focused on understanding the structure-function relationships, optimization of antibody design and developability, and processes that allow better therapeutic candidates to move through the clinic. Discussions on novel target identification and validation were also included. The ADC track was dedicated to evaluation of the ongoing success of the established ADC formats alongside the rise of the next generation drug-conjugates. The bispecific and alternative scaffold track was focused on taking stock of the multitude of bispecific formats being investigated and gaining insight into recent innovations and advancements. Mechanistic understanding, progression into the clinic and the exploration of multispecifics, redirected T cell killing and alternative scaffolds were extensively discussed. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:23493119

  15. Monoclonal antibodies specific for mercuric ions.

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, D E; Lu, D; Carlson, L D; Carlson, R; Babacan, K F; Schuster, S M; Wagner, F W

    1992-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that react with soluble mercuric ions have been produced by injection of BALB/c mice with a hapten-carrier complex designed to maximize exposure of the metal to the immune system. Three hybridomas producing antibodies that reacted with bovine serum albumin (BSA)-glutathione-HgCl, but not with BSA-glutathione, were isolated from the spleen of a mouse given multiple injections with glutathione-HgCl conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Stable subclones were established from two of these antibodies, designated mAb 4A10 and mAb 1F10. The binding of both antibodies to immobilized BSA-glutathione-HgCl was inhibited by soluble HgCl2, and dissociation constants for mercuric chloride binding were 2.3 and 3.7 nM for mAbs 4A10 and 1F10, respectively. Both antibodies bound mercuric acetate with similar affinities, demonstrating that the antibodies were capable of binding to mercuric ions in the presence of a different counterion than the one used in the immunogen. Reactions were not observed with other metal cations by either antibody. These data demonstrate the successful induction of antibodies that react very specifically with mercuric ions in solution regardless of the presence of a carrier. PMID:1570337

  16. The therapeutic antibodies market to 2008.

    PubMed

    Pavlou, Alex K; Belsey, Mark J

    2005-04-01

    The therapeutic biologics market is currently dominated by recombinant protein products. However, many of these products are mature, and growth of the biologics market will increasingly rely on the expansion of the therapeutic monoclonal antibody sector. Successive technology waves have driven the growth of the monoclonal antibody sector, which is currently dominated by chimeric antibodies. Chimeric products, led by Remicade and Rituxan, will continue to drive market share through to 2008. However, over the forecast period, humanized and fully human monoclonal antibodies, together with technologies such as Fabs and conjugated antibodies, will play an increasingly important role, driving monoclonal antibody market growth at a forecast compound annual growth rate of 20.9%, to reach $16.7 billion by 2008. In terms of therapeutic focus, the monoclonal antibody market is heavily focused on oncology and arthritis, immune and inflammatory disorders, and products within these therapeutic areas are set to continue to be the key growth drivers over the forecast period. Underlying the growth of the market is the evolution of the monoclonal antibody company business model, set to transition towards the highly successful innovator model. PMID:15760719

  17. Prevalence and isotype distribution of antiphospholipid antibodies in unselected Chilean patients with venous and arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Palomo, Iván; Pereira, Jaime; Alarcón, Marcelo; Vásquez, Marcela; Pinochet, Carmen; Vélez, María T; Sandoval, Jorge; Icaza, Gloria; Pierangeli, Silvia

    2004-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are a heterogeneous family of antibodies associated with thrombotic events and other complications. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of aPL in a group of Chilean patients with thrombosis. Two hundred and twenty-six patients with venous and arterial thrombosis and 95 healthy controls were studied. Anticardiolipin (aCL), anti-beta(2 )glycoprotein I (anti-beta(2)GPI), and antiprothrombin (aPT) antibodies were determined. Eighty-eight out of 226 (38.9%) patients with thrombosis had some type of aPL. Fifty-seven patients (25.2%) were positive for aCL, 31 (13.7%) for aPT, and 14 (6.2%) for anti-beta(2)GPI antibodies. Twelve patients (5.3%) were positive for more than one aPL. IgG, IgM and IgA isotypes were observed in aCL, anti-beta(2)GPI, and aPT antibodies. Twenty-six out of 92 (28.3%) patients with venous thrombosis and 31/134 (23.1%) patients with arterial thrombosis were positive for aCL antibodies. With regard to the control group (4/95=4.2%), the odd ratios (OR) were 5.2 (1.3-19.8; p0.01) and 5.7 (1.6-22.3; p0.01), respectively. Additionally, we observed statistically significant OR with aPT and anti-beta(2)GPI antibodies; in the first, with venous and arterial thrombosis, and in the second, only with arterial thrombosis. Our results show a significant prevalence of aPL, predominantly aCL and aPT antibodies, in patients with thrombosis. Additionally, aCL and aPT antibodies appear to be a risk factor for venous and arterial thrombosis, and anti-beta(2)GPI antibodies appear to be a risk factor for arterial thrombosis. PMID:15045627

  18. Prevalence and Dynamics of Antibodies against NcSAG1 and NcGRA7 Antigens of Neospora caninum in Cattle during the Gestation Period

    PubMed Central

    TAKASHIMA, Yasuhiro; TAKASU, Masaki; YANAGIMOTO, Isao; HATTORI, Naoki; BATANOVA, Tatiana; NISHIKAWA, Yoshifumi; KITOH, Katsuya

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bovine abortion caused by the Apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum is a major economic problem in the livestock industry worldwide. Our study measured the prevalence and temporal changes in levels of antibodies specific for two N. caninum derived antigens, NcSAG1 and NcGRA7, to determine an appropriate strategy for serodiagnosis. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), blood samples showed that 71 cows out of 129 were positive for anti-NcSAG1 antibodies and that only nine cows were positive for anti-NcGRA7 antibodies. By longitudinal sampling, it was revealed that positive and negative antibody conversion occurred frequently for anti-NcGRA7, but that anti-NcSAG1 antibodies persisted for a long-term. These results indicate the usefulness of measuring anti-NcSAG1 antibody levels for the detection of chronically infected cows. Twelve cows showed positive seroconversion during pregnancy, nine of which showed seropositivity for anti-NcGRA7 antibody at the sixth and/or seventh month of pregnancy; serum samples were not obtained from the remaining three cows during this period. Therefore, the optimal time for detection of anti-NcGRA7 antibodies appears to be between the fifth and eighth month of pregnancy. PMID:23782543

  19. Detection of Bovine Leukaemia Virus Antibodies and Proviral DNA in Colostrum Replacers.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, B; Finnegan, C; Phillips, A; Horigan, M; Pollard, T; Steinbach, F

    2015-10-01

    Great Britain has been bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) disease free since 1999. We recently reported three separate incidents of BLV seropositivity on farms with home-reared cattle due to the use of colostrum replacer rather than infection with BLV (Emerg. Infect. Dis., 19, 2013, 1027). These cases were all linked via the use of the same brand of colostrum replacer. Here, we investigate further by examining multiple brands of colostrum replacer for proviral DNA and BLV antibodies. BLV antibodies were detected in 7 of the colostrum replacers tested, with PCR concurring in two cases. Thus, the use of these BLV antibody-positive colostrum replacers may also lead to false-positive serological diagnostics. PMID:24268042

  20. Prevalence of antibodies to Legionella pneumophila in animal populations.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M T; Cho, S N; Reif, J S

    1982-01-01

    We examined more than 2,800 human and animal sera for antibodies to four serogroups of Legionella pneumophila by using the microagglutination test. Antibody titers of greater than or equal to 1:64 were considered positive. The occurrence of positive equine sera (31.4%) was significantly higher than the occurrence of positive sera in cattle (5.1%), swine (2.9%), sheep (1.9%), dogs (1.9%), goats (0.5%), wildlife (0%), and humans (0.4%). The highest titer measured in horses was 1:512. The occurrence of positive sera in horses was related directly to age. In horses less than or equal to 1, 2 to 3, 4 to 7, 8 to 12, and greater than or equal to 13 years old, the percentages of positive sera were 0, 10.1, 30.3, 44.9 and 58.1%, respectively. When we compared age-specific serogroup-specific rates in horses from Colorado and Pennsylvania, we found differences. With horses 8 to 12 and greater than or equal to 13 years old, there was a significantly higher (P less than 0.05) occurrence of sera that reacted to serogroups II and III in horses from Pennsylvania. Of 242 positive sera, 43.8% reacted to a single serogroup (serogroup III or I most commonly), and 56.2% reacted to multiple serogroups (serogroups II and III or serogroups I, II, and III most commonly). A high percentage of seropositive horses suggested that horses are commonly infected with L. pneumophila or related organisms, and the age-specific rates of occurrence indicated that infection was related directly to duration of exposure. A definitive demonstration of equine infection will depend on isolation of the agent and repetition of this serological study with antigens obtained from organisms isolated from horses. PMID:7186901

  1. Neutralising antibodies for Mayaro virus in Pantanal, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Juliano, Raquel Soares; Campos, Zilca; Velez, Jason; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro; Komar, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    The Pantanal hosts diverse wildlife species and therefore is a hotspot for arbovirus studies in South America. A serosurvey for Mayaro virus (MAYV), eastern (EEEV), western (WEEV) and Venezuelan (VEEV) equine encephalitis viruses was conducted with 237 sheep, 87 free-ranging caimans and 748 equids, including 37 collected from a ranch where a neurologic disorder outbreak had been recently reported. Sera were tested for specific viral antibodies using plaque-reduction neutralisation test. From a total of 748 equids, of which 264 were immunised with vaccine composed of EEEV and WEEV and 484 had no history of immunisation, 10 (1.3%) were seropositive for MAYV and two (0.3%) for VEEV using criteria of a ? 4-fold antibody titre difference. Among the 484 equids without history of immunisation, 48 (9.9%) were seropositive for EEEV and four (0.8%) for WEEV using the same criteria. Among the sheep, five were sero- positive for equine encephalitis alphaviruses, with one (0.4%) for EEEV, one (0.4%) for WEEV and three (1.3%) for VEEV. Regarding free-ranging caimans, one (1.1%) and three (3.4%), respectively, had low titres for neutralising antibodies to VEEV and undetermined alphaviruses. The neurological disorder outbreak could not be linked to the alphaviruses tested. Our findings represent strong evidence that MAYV and all equine encephalitis alphaviruses circulated in the Pantanal. PMID:25742272

  2. Neutralising antibodies for Mayaro virus in Pantanal, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Juliano, Raquel Soares; Campos, Zilca; Velez, Jason; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro; Komar, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    The Pantanal hosts diverse wildlife species and therefore is a hotspot for arbovirus studies in South America. A serosurvey for Mayaro virus (MAYV), eastern (EEEV), western (WEEV) and Venezuelan (VEEV) equine encephalitis viruses was conducted with 237 sheep, 87 free-ranging caimans and 748 equids, including 37 collected from a ranch where a neurologic disorder outbreak had been recently reported. Sera were tested for specific viral antibodies using plaque-reduction neutralisation test. From a total of 748 equids, of which 264 were immunised with vaccine composed of EEEV and WEEV and 484 had no history of immunisation, 10 (1.3%) were seropositive for MAYV and two (0.3%) for VEEV using criteria of a ? 4-fold antibody titre difference. Among the 484 equids without history of immunisation, 48 (9.9%) were seropositive for EEEV and four (0.8%) for WEEV using the same criteria. Among the sheep, five were sero- positive for equine encephalitis alphaviruses, with one (0.4%) for EEEV, one (0.4%) for WEEV and three (1.3%) for VEEV. Regarding free-ranging caimans, one (1.1%) and three (3.4%), respectively, had low titres for neutralising antibodies to VEEV and undetermined alphaviruses. The neurological disorder outbreak could not be linked to the alphaviruses tested. Our findings represent strong evidence that MAYV and all equine encephalitis alphaviruses circulated in the Pantanal. PMID:25742272

  3. Association of Helicobacter pylori antibodies and severity of migraine attack

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Behnaz; Basiri, Keivan; Meamar, Rokhsareh; Chitsaz, Ahmad; Nematollahi, Shahrzad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have shown a positive correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and migraine headache. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of H. pylori infection in migraine headache with (MA) and without aura (MO). Methods: This is a case-control study containing information on 84 patients (including MA, MO) and 49 healthy individuals. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test was used to measure immunoglobulin G (IgG,) immunoglobulin M (IgM) titer in two groups. Headache severity was evaluated according to Headache Impact Test (HIT6) questionnaire. Results: Mean ± SD of IgM antibody in Migrainous patients 26.3 (23.1) showed significantly difference with control group 17.5 (11.2) (P = 0.004). In addition, the mean ± SD HIT6 in Migrainous patients differed significantly between MA and MO groups 65.5 (4.7), 54.9 (5.3) respectively, P < 0.001). The only significant correlation was found for IgG antibody and HIT6 in MA patients (r = 0.407, P = 0.011) and MO group (r = 0.499, P = 0.002). The risk of migraine occurrence in patients did not significantly associate with the level of IgG and IgM antibodies. Conclusion: The results give a hope that definite treatment and eradication of this bacterium could be a cure or to reduce the severity and course of migraine headaches.

  4. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 2014-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section...These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to... (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  5. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section...These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to... (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  6. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 2013-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section...These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to... (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  7. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 2012-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section...These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to... (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  8. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section...These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to... (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  9. RESEARCH ARTICLE Detection of pancreatic cancer using antibody

    E-print Network

    Peterson, Carsten

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Detection of pancreatic cancer using antibody microarray-based serum proteinFv antibody microarray in an attempt to classify sera derived from pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients versus profiling proteome analysis / Oncopro- teomics / Pancreatic cancer / Recombinant antibody microarray

  10. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kassis, Amin I. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Khawli, Leslie A. (Newton Centre, MA)

    1991-01-01

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabelled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody.

  11. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Antibody Scientific Committee

    Cancer.gov

    The Antibody Scientific Committee provides scientific insight and guidance to the National Cancer Institute's Antibody Characterization Program. Specifically the members of this committee evaluate request from the external scientific community for development and characterization of antibodies by the program.

  12. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kassis, A.I.; Khawli, L.A.

    1991-02-19

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabeled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody. No Drawings

  13. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial...antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification...antibody immunological test system is a device that consists...antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements...produced against the body's own...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5090 - Antimitochondrial antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5090 Antimitochondrial...antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification...antibody immunological test system is a device that consists...antimitochondrial antibodies in human serum. The measurements...produced against the body's own...

  15. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-mediated cell recognition plays a critical role in various biological and biomedical applications. However, strong antibody-cell interactions can lead to the difficulty of separating antibodies from the bound cells in a simple and non-destructive manner, which is often necessary to numerous applications such as cell sorting or separation. Thus, this thesis research is aimed to create an antibody-like nanomaterial with the function of reversible cell recognition It was hypothesized that nucleic acid aptamer and dendrimer could be used as fundamental structural components to develop an antibody-like nanomaterial. The aptamer functions as the binding site of an antibody; the dendrimer is used as a robust, defined nano-scaffold to support the aptamer and to carry small molecules (e.g., fluorophores). To test this hypothesis, a novel method was first developed to discover the essential nucleotides of full-length aptamers to mimic the binding sites of antibodies. The essential nucleotides were further conjugated with a dendrimer to synthesize a monovalent aptamer-dendrimer nanomaterial. The results clearly showed that the essential nucleotides could maintain high affinity and specificity after tethered on dendrimer surface. To further test the hypothesis that antibody-like nanomaterials can be rationally designed to acquire the capability of reversible cell recognition, an aptamer that was selected at 0 °C was used as a model to synthesize a "Y-shaped" nanomaterial by conjugating two aptamers to the same dendrimer. The results showed that the nanomaterial-cell interaction could be affected by the distance between two binding aptamers. In addition, the "Y-shaped" antibody-like nanomaterial could bind target cells more strongly than its monovalent control. Importantly, the strong cell-nanomaterial interaction could be rapidly reversed when the temperature was shifted from 0 °C to 37 °C. In summary, we developed a synthetic antibody that can not only mimic the functional structure and cell recognition capability of antibodies, but also possess specific features that natural antibodies do not possess. This study has opened a new avenue for developing synthetic antibodies and has also advanced the understanding of the functionality of multivalent nanomaterials. This novel synthetic antibody holds great potential for various biological and biomedical applications such as cell separation.

  16. Dual targeting strategies with bispecific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammatory and infectious diseases and other disorders. Most of the marketed antibodies are monospecific and therefore capable of interacting and interfering with a single target. However, complex diseases are often multifactorial in nature, and involve redundant or synergistic action of disease mediators or upregulation of different receptors, including crosstalk between their signaling networks. Consequently, blockade of multiple, different pathological factors and pathways may result in improved therapeutic efficacy. This result can be achieved by combining different drugs, or use of the dual targeting strategies applying bispecific antibodies that have emerged as an alternative to combination therapy. This review discusses the various dual targeting strategies for which bispecific antibodies have been developed and provides an overview of the established bispecific antibody formats. PMID:22453100

  17. ENHANCEMENT OF ANTIBODY SYNTHESIS BY 6-MERCAPTOPURINE

    PubMed Central

    Chanmougan, Devendrathan; Schwartz, Robert S.

    1966-01-01

    The administration of 6-MP to rabbits led to either suppression or enhancement of antibody production, depending on when the drug was given in relation to the antigenic challenge. Maximum enhancement of antibody synthesis was found when a small dose of BGG was administered 5 days after the last dose of a 1 wk course of 6-MP. There were no indications that the macrophage system or immunological memory was affected in animals with augmented antibody synthesis. It was proposed that enhancement of antibody production by 6-MP was due to nucleic acids released from cells killed or injured by the drug. It was suggested that lymphocytes incorporating these nucleic acids were transformed into specialized cells capable of direct and immediate stimulation by antigen and lacking immunological memory (hemocytoblasts). A relatively small dose of antigen was apparently capable of stimulating all the hemocytoblasts representing a given clone) with the result that large amounts of antibody rapidly appeared in the serum. PMID:4162484

  18. Genetically engineered antibody molecules and their application.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S L; Wims, L; Wallick, S; Tan, L; Oi, V T

    1987-01-01

    Immunoglobulin genes can be efficiently expressed following transfection into myeloma cells. Using protoplast fusion, transfection frequencies greater than 10(-3) can be achieved. Compatible plasmids containing two different selectible markers are used to simultaneously deliver heavy and light chain genes to the same cell. To produce molecules with differing specificities the rearranged and expressed variable regions can be cloned from the appropriate hybridoma. In some cases, variable regions from cDNAs can be inserted into the expression vectors. It is possible to manipulate the immunoglobulin genes and produce novel antibody molecules. Antibodies have been produced in which the variable regions from mouse antibodies have been joined to human constant regions. In addition, antibodies with altered constant regions have been produced. These genetically engineered antibodies provide a unique set of reagents to study structure-function relationships within the molecule. They also can potentially be used in the diagnosis and therapy of human disease. PMID:3327412

  19. Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.; Suzuki, M.; Adachi, S.

    1983-04-01

    Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization at low temperatures was studied. The antibody activity of antibody was not affected by irradiation at an irradiation dose of below 8 MR and low temperatures. Immobilization of peroxidase-labeled anti-rabbit IgG goat IgG, anti-peroxidase, peroxidase, and anti-alpha-fetoprotein was carried out with hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers. The activity of the immobilized enzyme-labeled antibody membranes varied with the thickness of the membranes and increased with decreasing membrane thickness. The activity of the immobilized antibody particles was varied by particle size. Immobilized anti-alpha-fetoprotein particles and membranes can be used for the assay of alpha-fetoprotein by the antigen-antibody reaction, such as a solid-phase sandwich method with high sensitivity.

  20. Recombinant human polyclonal antibodies: A new class of therapeutic antibodies against viral infections.

    PubMed

    Bregenholt, Søren; Jensen, Allan; Lantto, Johan; Hyldig, Sara; Haurum, John S

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian immune system eliminates pathogens by generating a specific antibody response. Polyclonality is a key feature of this immune response: the immune system produces antibodies which bind to different structures on a given pathogen thereby increasing the likelihood of its elimination. The vast majority of current recombinant antibody drugs rely on monospecific monoclonal antibodies. Inherently, such antibodies do not represent the benefits of polyclonality utilized by a natural immune system and this has impeded the identification of efficacious antibody drugs against infectious agents, including viruses. The development of novel technologies has allowed the identification and manufacturing of antigen-specific recombinant polyclonal human antibodies, so-called symphobodies. This review describes the rationale for designing drugs based on symphobodies against pathogenic viruses, including HIV, vaccinia and smallpox virus, and respiratory syncytial virus. PMID:16787244

  1. Not all antibodies are equal

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been validated as a therapeutic target in several human tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC).1,2 Occupancy of the EGFR with ligand can activate the RAS/RAF/MAPK, STAT, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These pathways modulate cellular proliferation, adhesion, angiogenesis, migration, and survival.3 Anti-EGFR targeted antibodies, such as cetuximab and panitumumab, have shown response and disease stabilization rates of approximately 10% and 30%, respectively, when administered as monotherapy in CRC.1,4 EGFR expression is used for patient selection for these studies. However, clinical results have suggested that the level of EGFR expression as measured by immunohistochemistry may not predict clinical benefit.4,5 PMID:24317328

  2. B Cells, Antibodies, and More.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G; Chalasani, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell-targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell-targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  3. Clinical considerations for biosimilar antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mellstedt, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Biosimilar agents are approximate copies of branded biologic therapies. Since the first biosimilar was authorized in the European Union in 2006, fifteen additional agents have been approved by the European Medicines Agency, including two biosimilar monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Biosimilar mAbs represent a distinct class given their large molecular size, complex protein structure, and post-translational modifications. While guidelines have been established for the development, approval, and use of biosimilars, further scrutiny and discussion is necessary to fully understand their potential impact on clinical outcomes. This review takes a critical look at the structural complexity of biosimilar mABs, the feasibility of indication extrapolation, the impact of product variability on immunogenicity, the importance of comprehensive pharmacovigilance, and the potential for ongoing pharmacoeconomic impact. PMID:26217160

  4. Dengue NS1-specific antibody responses: isotype distribution and serotyping in patients with Dengue fever and Dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Shu, P Y; Chen, L K; Chang, S F; Yueh, Y Y; Chow, L; Chien, L J; Chin, C; Lin, T H; Huang, J H

    2000-10-01

    To understand the antibody responses to dengue (DEN) nonstructural 1 (NS1) glycoprotein and their roles in protective immunity or pathogenesis of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), we have analyzed the NS1-speccific IgM, IgA and IgG antibodies from patients with DF and DHF. An isotype-specific, indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was established by coating a NS1-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb), D2/8-1, to capture soluble NS1 antigens secreted in the culture supernatants of Vero cells infected with DEN virus. We observed strong anti-NS1 antibody responses in all of the convalescent sera of patients with DF and DHF. Similar NS1-specific isotypic and serotypic antibody responses were found in the sera from DF and DHF patients. The results showed that all DEN infections induced significant NS1-specific IgG, whereas 75% and 60% of primary DF patients vs. 40% and 90% of secondary DF patients produced IgM and IgA antibodies, respectively. Specificity analysis showed that DEN NS1-specific IgG and IgA antibodies cross-react strongly to Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus NS1 glycoprotein, whereas DEN NS1-specific IgM antibodies do not cross-react to JE virus NS1 glycoprotein at all. The serotype specificity of NS1-specific IgM, IgA and IgG were found to be 80%, 67% and 75% for primary infections, and 50%, 22% and 30% for secondary infections in positive samples of DF patients. Similar pattern was found in DHF patients. The results showed that all of the DF and DHF patients produced significant NS1-specific antibodies. We did not observe direct correlation between the anti-NS1 antibody responses and DHF because sera from patients with DF and DHF showed similar anti-NS1 antibody responses. PMID:11002252

  5. Antibodies to plasma proteins: an association with platelet transfusion refractoriness.

    PubMed

    Heal, J M; Cowles, J; Masel, D; Rowe, J M; Blumberg, N

    1992-01-01

    We hypothesized that antibodies to HLA-linked polymorphic plasma proteins could be involved in platelet refractoriness by an 'innocent bystander' or immune complex mechanism. Employing a kinetic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique the ability of IgG from the plasma of refractory patients to bind to albumin, fibrinogen, complement components C2 and C4 was measured. As compared with controls a high percentage of refractory patients had increased IgG capable of binding to all four plasma proteins: C2 (83%), C4 (83%), albumin (75%), fibrinogen (34%). In the presence of exogenous plasma proteins these antibodies mediated increased deposition of IgG onto normal donor platelets. The plasma protein binding IgG consisted both of monomeric IgG and a broad range of high molecular weight complexes. IgG anti-plasma protein antibody could be eluted from platelets of refractory patients. The development of anti-plasma protein IgG was studied during the course of platelet transfusion therapy and found to increase progressively so that by the 20th transfusion greater than 90% of samples were positive. The presence of plasma protein binding activity correlated with the development of increased levels of platelet bound IgG and refractoriness. Multiple platelet transfusions lead to sensitization to polymorphic determinants on C2 and C4 as well as the formation of high molecular weight complexes. These antibodies and complexes contribute to the deposition of IgG on platelets and may contribute to refractoriness. PMID:1536814

  6. AMA Test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Liver/Kidney Microsomal Antibody , ALP , ALT , Liver Panel , Smooth Muscle Antibody , ANA At a Glance Test Sample ... Web). Other tests that may be ordered include: Smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) Alkaline phosphatase ( ...

  7. Influenza Virus-Specific Neutralizing IgM Antibodies Persist for a Lifetime

    PubMed Central

    Skountzou, Ioanna; Satyabhama, Lakshmipriyadarshini; Stavropoulou, Anastasia; Ashraf, Zuhha; Esser, E. Stein; Vassilieva, Elena; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios; Compans, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Detection of immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies has long been used as an important diagnostic tool for identifying active viral infections, but their relevance in later stages has not been clearly defined in vivo. In this study, we followed the kinetics, longevity, and function of influenza virus-specific IgM antibodies for 2 years following sublethal infection of mice with live mouse-adapted A/PR/8/34 virus or immunization with formalin-inactivated virus. These groups mounted robust protective immune responses and survived lethal challenges with 50× 50% lethal dose (LD50) mouse-adapted A/PR/8/34 virus 600 days after the primary exposure. Surprisingly, the virus-specific IgM antibodies persisted along with IgG antibodies, and we found a significantly higher number of IgM-positive (IgM+) virus-specific plasma cells than IgG+ plasma cells that persisted for at least 9 months postexposure. The IgM antibodies were functional as they neutralized influenza virus in the presence of complement just as well as IgG antibodies did. PMID:25165027

  8. Suppression of allergen-specific B lymphocytes by chimeric protein-engineered antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kerekov, Nikola; Michova, Antoaneta; Muhtarova, Maryia; Nikolov, Georgi; Mihaylova, Nikolina; Petrunov, Bogdan; Nikolova, Maria; Tchorbanov, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    House dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) are among the most frequent causes of allergy symptoms in Europe. Der p 1 is one of the major allergenic compounds of Dpt and the pathological Der p 1-specific B cells play a key role as producers of allergen-binding antibodies. The selective elimination of these cells by artificial protein molecules which inhibit the production of Dpt-recognizing IgE antibodies is a perspective therapeutic goal of allergy. A protein engineered chimeric molecule has been constructed, which binds Der p 1-specific B cells via their BCR and suppresses selectively the production of anti-Der p 1 antibodies via CR1. The synthetic peptide Der p 1 p52-71 and an anti-CD35 monoclonal antibody were used for the construction of Der p 1 chimera. The functional effects of engineered antibodies were analyzed in vitro using PBMCs from allergy patients. Significant inhibition of allergen-specific proliferation and reduction of Der p 1-IgE antibody production were observed after treatment of PBMCs from allergic patients with Der p 1-peptide chimera. Culturing of these PBMCs in the presence of the chimeric molecule increased the percentage of apoptotic (Annexin V-positive) B lymphocytes, but not T lymphocytes. PMID:24021574

  9. Generation and characterization of chicken egg yolk antibodies (IgY) against TNFR1.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, M; Amirijavid, S; Entezari, M; Shafaroodi, H; Saghafi, Z Jokar

    2015-01-01

    TNF is from a big family of cytokines with different activities in different parts of the body. Among the various activities of TNFR1, induction of apoptosis by a receptor appears to be an attractive and promising one. This can be achieved through the death domain of the receptor in cells that are stimulated by ligand, to induce apoptosis. Activation of the receptor occurs through its occupation by ligands or its antagonists such as antibodies. Several kinds of antibodies, including antibodies of mammals and birds are used in the research and therapy field. Avian antibodies are highly regarded which is due to the many positive characteristics they have. Firstly, total protein of TNFR1 was cloned. Blood sampling was performed, white blood cell separation, extraction of RNA and at cDNA synthesis. After making sure from synthesis of cDNA, it was used as template for PCR reaction. The cloned fragment in the prokaryotic expression vector, pET28a, transferred to prokaryotic host, BL21(DE3) and the protein (TNFR1) expressed. After protein purification by affinity column were injected to immunize the chickens. Interestingly, antibodies purified from egg yolk of immunized chickens, in ELISA assay showed sufficient specificity. Such antibodies could able to ensure quick and immediate protection against several biotargets (Fig. 4, Ref. 37). PMID:25924641

  10. Antiplatelet antibodies contribute to thrombocytopenia associated with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Aref, Salah; Sleem, Tarek; El Menshawy, Nadia; Ebrahiem, Lamiaa; Abdella, Dooa; Fouda, Manal; Samara, Nashwa Abou; Menessy, Aymen; Abdel-Ghaffar, Hassen; Bassam, Ansaf; Abdel Wahaab, Mohamed

    2009-10-01

    Thrombocytopenia is one of the most frequent hematological manifestations of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection; which typically worsens with progression of the liver disease and can become a major clinical complication. Several mechanisms have been postulated to explain thrombocytopenia in HCV hepatic patients, including immune mechanisms. The aim of the present work is to investigate the role of immune mechanisms as a causative agent of thrombocytopenia in HCV hepatic patients. The study included 50 hepatic patients with HCV infection (30 with thrombocytopenia and 20 with normal platelets counts). Platelets associated glycoprotein specific antibodies were evaluated by flow cytometry and confirmed by quantitative monoclonal immobilization of platelet antibodies (MAIPA). The frequency of platelet associated immunoglobulin (PAIg) in thrombocytopenic HCV positive hepatic patients by FCM was 86.7, 83.3, 46.7 and 33.3% for total PAIg, PAIgG, PAIgM and PAIgA respectively. MAIPA found platelet specific antibodies in 26/30 (86.7%) of patients. The most likely target antigen for platelets antibodies were glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa (30%), followed by GP IIIa (20.5), GP IIb (13.3%), GPIb (13.3%), then GPIa (10%). The platelets count was inversely correlated to the levels of platelets GP specific antibodies (r=-0.42, p=0.024), and significantly parallel to spleen size (p=0.024). Platelet associated glycoprotein specific antibodies represent a common mechanism inducing thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic HCV infections. PMID:19843383

  11. Monoclonal antibody that inhibits infection of HeLa and rhabdomyosarcoma cells by selected enteroviruses through receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, R.L.; Field, A.K.; Schleif, W.A.; Long, W.L.; Colonno, R.J.; Mapoles, J.E.; Emini, E. A.

    1986-02-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with HeLa cells, and their spleen cells were fused with myeloma cells to produce hybridomas. Initial screening of culture fluids from 800 fusion products in a cell protection assay against coxsackievirus B3 (CB3) and the CB3-RD virus variant yielded five presumptive monoclonal antibodies with three specificities: (i) protection against CB3 on HeLa, (ii) protection against CB3-RD on rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells, and (iii) protection against both viruses on the respective cells. Only one of the monoclonal antibodies (with dual specificity) survived two subclonings and was studied in detail. The antibody was determined to have an immunoglobulin G2a isotype and protected cells by blockade of cellular receptors, since attachment of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled CB3 was inhibited by greater than 90%. The monoclonal antibody protected HeLa cells against infection by CB1, CB3, CB5, echovirus 6, and coxsackievirus A21 and RD cells against CB1-RD, CB3-RD, and CB5-Rd virus variants. The monoclonal antibody did not protect either cell type against 16 other immunotypes of picornaviruses. The monoclonal antibody produced only positive fluorescence on those cells which were protected against infection, and /sup 125/I-labeled antibody confirmed the specific binding to HeLa and RD cells. The results suggest that this monoclonal antibody possesses some of the receptor specificity of the group B coxsackieviruses.

  12. Longitudinal monitoring of the development of antifilarial antibodies and acquisition of Wuchereria bancrofti in a highly endemic area of Haiti.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, Katy L; Moss, Delynn M; Priest, Jeffrey W; Roberts, Jacquelin; Kubofcik, Joseph; Gass, Katherine; Streit, Thomas G; Nutman, Thomas B; Eberhard, Mark L; Lammie, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    Antifilarial antibody testing has been established as a sensitive and specific method of diagnosing lymphatic filariasis. However, the development of serological responses to specific filarial antigens and their relationship to acquisition of infection is poorly understood. In order to evaluate whether the development of antigen specific antifilarial antibodies precedes microfilaremia and antigenemia, we compared the antibody responses of serum samples collected between 1990 and 1999 from a cohort of 142 Haitian children followed longitudinally. Antigen status was determined using the Og4C3 ELISA and the presence of microfilaremia was detected using microscopy. Antibody responses to Wb123, a Wuchereria bancrofti L3 antigen, were measured using a Luciferase Immunoprecipitation System (LIPS) assay. Antibody responses to Bm14 and Bm33, Brugia malayi antigens and to a major surface protein (WSP) from Wolbachia were analyzed using a multiplex bead assay. Over follow-up, 80 (56%) of the children became antigen-positive and 30 (21%) developed microfilaremia. Detectable antibody responses to Bm14, Bm33, Wb123, and WSP developed in 95%, 100%, 92%, and 29% of children, respectively. With the exception of WSP, the development of antibody responses generally preceded detection of filarial antigen. Our results show that antifilarial antibody responses can serve as an important epidemiological indicator in a sentinel population of young children and thus, may be valuable as tool for surveillance in the context of lymphatic filariasis elimination programs. PMID:23236534

  13. Longitudinal Monitoring of the Development of Antifilarial Antibodies and Acquisition of Wuchereria bancrofti in a Highly Endemic Area of Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Hamlin, Katy L.; Moss, Delynn M.; Priest, Jeffrey W.; Roberts, Jacquelin; Kubofcik, Joseph; Gass, Katherine; Streit, Thomas G.; Nutman, Thomas B.; Eberhard, Mark L.; Lammie, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Antifilarial antibody testing has been established as a sensitive and specific method of diagnosing lymphatic filariasis. However, the development of serological responses to specific filarial antigens and their relationship to acquisition of infection is poorly understood. In order to evaluate whether the development of antigen specific antifilarial antibodies precedes microfilaremia and antigenemia, we compared the antibody responses of serum samples collected between 1990 and 1999 from a cohort of 142 Haitian children followed longitudinally. Antigen status was determined using the Og4C3 ELISA and the presence of microfilaremia was detected using microscopy. Antibody responses to Wb123, a Wuchereria bancrofti L3 antigen, were measured using a Luciferase Immunoprecipitation System (LIPS) assay. Antibody responses to Bm14 and Bm33, Brugia malayi antigens and to a major surface protein (WSP) from Wolbachia were analyzed using a multiplex bead assay. Over follow-up, 80 (56%) of the children became antigen-positive and 30 (21%) developed microfilaremia. Detectable antibody responses to Bm14, Bm33, Wb123, and WSP developed in 95%, 100%, 92%, and 29% of children, respectively. With the exception of WSP, the development of antibody responses generally preceded detection of filarial antigen. Our results show that antifilarial antibody responses can serve as an important epidemiological indicator in a sentinel population of young children and thus, may be valuable as tool for surveillance in the context of lymphatic filariasis elimination programs. PMID:23236534

  14. Anti-heparin-platelet factor 4 antibody is a risk factor for vascular access obstruction in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Hwang, Kyu-Yoon; Yang, Jong-Oh; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2003-01-01

    Since heparin is an anticoagulant commonly used in hemodialysis and the patients on hemodialysis are repeatedly exposed to heparin, heparin may be the cause of the development of heparin-dependent antibodies and thrombotic complications in patients on hemodialysis. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and the clinical significance of the antibodies against heparin-platelet factor 4 complexes as determined by enzyme immunoassay in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. The prevalence of anti-heparin-platelet factor 4 antibodies was higher in hemodialysis patients than in normal subjects (8.8 vs 0.0%, p<0.05). The number of past episodes of vascular access obstruction per year was significantly higher in the anti-heparin-platelet factor 4 antibody positive group than antibody negative group. Anti-heparin-platelet factor 4 antibody positive patients experienced more frequent vascular access obstructions than control subjects. In conclusion, anti-heparin-platelet factor 4 antibody might be a risk factor for vascular access obstructions in patients with end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis. PMID:12589090

  15. Production of antibodies against glycolipids from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall in aerosol murine models of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cardona, P J; Julián, E; Vallès, X; Gordillo, S; Muñoz, M; Luquin, M; Ausina, V

    2002-06-01

    Evolution of antibodies against glycolipids from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall has been studied for the first time in experimental murine models of tuberculosis induced by aerosol, in which infection, reinfection, reactivation, prophylaxis and treatment with antibiotics have been assayed. Results show a significant humoral response against these antigens, where diacyltrehaloses (DAT) and sulpholipid I (SL-I) elicited higher antibody levels than protein antigens like antigen 85 protein complex (Ag85), culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and purified protein derivative (PPD). Only immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies have been detected against DAT and SL-I. Their evolution has a positive correlation with bacillary concentration in tissues. PMID:12028568

  16. Prevalence of eastern equine encephalitis virus antibodies among white-tailed deer populations in Maine.

    PubMed

    Mutebi, John-Paul; Godsey, Marvin; Smith, Robert P; Renell, Melanie R; Smith, Leticia; Robinson, Sara; Sears, Stephen; Lubelczyk, Charles

    2015-03-01

    During the fall of 2010, 332 deer serum samples were collected from 15 of the 16 (93.8%) Maine counties and screened for eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) antibodies using plaque reduction neutralizing tests (PRNTs). The aim was to detect and map EEEV activity in the state of Maine. Forty-seven of the 332 (14.2%) sera were positive for EEEV antibodies, showing a much wider distribution of EEEV activity in Maine than previously known. The percentage of EEEV antibody-positive deer sera was ?10% in six counties-Piscataquis (100%), Somerset (28.6%), Waldo (22.2%), Penobscot (21.7%), Kennebec (13.7%), and Sagadahoc (10%). Positive sera were detected in all the six counties (Somerset, Waldo, Penobscot, Kennebec, Cumberland, and York) that were positive in 2009, suggesting endemic EEEV activity in these counties. EEEV antibodies were not detected in sera collected in five counties-Franklin, Knox, Lincoln, Oxford, and Washington-which was either due to low sample size or lack of EEEV activity in these counties. Our data suggest higher EEEV activity in central Maine compared to southern Maine, whereas EEEV activity in Maine has historically been associated with the southern counties of York and Cumberland. PMID:25793477

  17. Seroprevalence of anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in dogs and horses in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bhide, Mangesh; Yilmaz, Zeki; Golcu, Esin; Torun, Serhat; Mikula, Ivan

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the seroprevalence of anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in a population of Turkish dogs and horses, as well as to compare the sensitivity of novel flow-cytometry-based borreliacidal antibody test (BAT) with ELISA assay. Serum samples collected from 400 dogs and 300 horses were tested with enzyme-linked protein A/G assay (ELPAGA), using Borrelia whole cell antigens. ELPAGA test showed 93 dogs (23.2%) and 18 horses (6%) serologically positive for anti-Borrelia antibodies. In parallel testing of sera with BAT, we found 27.75% positive dogs and 6.33% positive horses. When the results of these serological testes were compared with the health status of the animals, the most common clinical signs noticed in dogs were skin manifestations, urinary tract disorder and anemia; however, no clinical symptoms were observed in horses positive for the anti-Borrelia antibodies. This is a first time that seroprevalence of Lyme disease in dogs and horses has been reported from Turkey, as well as the use of novel BAT in animals. PMID:18581984

  18. Prevalence of antibodies to Leptospira in wild mammals trapped on livestock farms in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Allen, Samantha E; Ojkic, Davor; Jardine, Claire M

    2014-07-01

    To determine the prevalence and diversity of Leptospira serogroups circulating in wildlife on farms in Ontario, we tested samples from 51 raccoons (Procyon lotor), seven skunks (Mephitis mephitis), four rats (Rattus norvegicus), and three opossums (Didelphis virginiana) that were trapped on 27 livestock (swine [Sus scrofa], cattle [Bos taurus]) farms in 2010. Seventeen of 51 raccoons (33%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 21-48%) sampled were positive for at least one Leptospira serogroup using the microscopic agglutination test. None of the other 14 animals had detectable Leptospira antibodies. On swine farms, 13 of 30 raccoons (43%; 95% CI, 27-61%) were antibody positive, and on cattle farms, four of 21 raccoons (19%; 95% CI, 8-40%) were positive. Leptospira antibody prevalence in raccoons did not differ between swine and cattle farms. Raccoons were positive to serovars representative of serogroups Grippotyphosa, Australis, Icterohaemorrhagiae, and Pomona and were negative to serovars of serogroups Autumnalis, Canicola, and Sejroe. The prevalence of Leptospira antibodies in raccoons in this study is similar to what has been reported previously; however, the diversity of serogroups was higher in this study than what has been reported in raccoons from an urban area of Ontario, Canada. Understanding the prevalence and distribution of Leptospira serogroups in wildlife in Ontario, Canada, is important for the development and maintenance of appropriate disease management strategies in humans, livestock, and companion animals. PMID:24807356

  19. Affective and Behavioral Responses of Gay and Bisexual Men to HIV Antibody Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, James; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 56 gay and bisexual men tested for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus. Subjects who tested positive experienced increased anxiety, depression and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome anxiety; subjects who tested negative experienced decrease in these feelings after learning results. Subjects who chose not to learn results experienced…

  20. Randomised controlled trial of aspirin and aspirin plus heparin in pregnant women with recurrent miscarriage associated with phospholipid antibodies (or antiphospholipid antibodies)

    PubMed Central

    Rai, R.; Cohen, H.; Dave, M.; Regan, L.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether treatment with low dose aspirin and heparin leads to a higher rate of live births than that achieved with low dose aspirin alone in women with a history of recurrent miscarriage associated with phospholipid antibodies (or antiphospholipid antibodies), lupus anticoagulant, and cardiolipin antibodies (or anticardiolipin antibodies). DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Specialist clinic for recurrent miscarriages. SUBJECTS: 90 women (median age 33 (range 22-43)) with a history of recurrent miscarriage (median number 4 (range 3-15)) and persistently positive results for phospholipid antibodies. INTERVENTION: Either low dose aspirin (75 mg daily) or low dose aspirin and 5000 U of unfractionated heparin subcutaneously 12 hourly. All women started treatment with low dose aspirin when they had a positive urine pregnancy test. Women were randomly allocated an intervention when fetal heart activity was seen on ultrasonography. Treatment was stopped at the time of miscarriage or at 34 weeks' gestation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of live births with the two treatments. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the two groups in age or the number and gestation of previous miscarriages. The rate of live births with low dose aspirin and heparin was 71% (32/45 pregnancies) and 42% (19/45 pregnancies) with low dose aspirin alone (odds ratio 3.37 (95% confidence interval 1.40 to 8.10)). More than 90% of miscarriages occurred in the first trimester. There was no difference in outcome between the two treatments in pregnancies that advanced beyond 13 weeks' gestation. Twelve of the 51 successful pregnancies (24%) were delivered before 37 weeks' gestation. Women randomly allocated aspirin and heparin had a median decrease in lumbar spine bone density of 5.4% (range -8.6% to 1.7%). CONCLUSION: Treatment with aspirin and heparin leads to a significantly higher rate of live births in women with a history of recurrent miscarriage associated with phospholipid antibodies than that achieved with aspirin alone. PMID:9022487

  1. Characterization of a Large Panel of Rabbit Monoclonal Antibodies against HIV-1 gp120 and Isolation of Novel Neutralizing Antibodies against the V3 Loop

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yali; Shi, Heliang; Banasik, Marisa; Lin, Feng; Rohl, Kari; LaBranche, Celia; Montefiori, David C.; Cho, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported the induction of potent, cross-clade neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) in rabbits using gp120 based on an M-group consensus sequence. To better characterize these antibodies, 93 hybridomas were generated, which represent the largest panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) ever generated from a vaccinated rabbit. The single most frequently recognized epitope of the isolated mAbs was at the very C-terminal end of the protein (APTKAKRRVVEREKR), followed by the V3 loop. A total of seven anti-V3 loop mAbs were isolated, two of which (10A3 and 10A37) exhibited neutralizing activity. In contrast to 10A3 and most other anti-V3 loop nAbs, 10A37 was atypical with its epitope positioned more towards the C-terminal half of the loop. To our knowledge, 10A37 is the most potent and broadly neutralizing anti-V3 loop mAb induced by vaccination. Interestingly, all seven anti-V3 loop mAbs competed with PGT121, suggesting a possibility that early induction of potent anti-V3 loop antibodies could prevent induction of more broadly neutralizing PGT121-like antibodies that target the conserved base of the V3 loop stem. PMID:26039641

  2. Anti-apolipoprotein A-I antibodies and paraoxonase 1 activity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Mohammed Mahmoud; Elserougy, Eman Mahmoud; Al-Gazzar, Iman Ibrahim; Fikry, Iman Mohamed; Habib, Dawoud Fakhry; Younes, Khaled Mohamed; Salem, Neveen Abd El-hameed

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients have an increased risk of atherosclerosis. Identification of at-risk patients and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in SLE remain elusive. Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and anti-apolipoprotein A-I antibody (anti-Apo A-I) appear to have a potential role in premature atherosclerosis in SLE. The aim of this work was to study PON1 activity and anti-Apo A-I antibody in SLE female patients and to demonstrate their relations to disease activity as well as disease related damage. Forty SLE female patients and 40 apparently healthy volunteers were included. Anti-Apo A-I antibodies levels and PON1 activity levels were assessed. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and systemic Lupus International Collaboration Clinics (SLICC)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) damage index were preformed in all patients. Compared with controls, SLE patients showed significantly lower PON1 activity and significantly higher titers of anti-Apo A-I. Anti-Apo A-I antibody titers correlated inversely with PON1 activity. Elevated titers of anti-Apo A-I antibody and reduced PON activity were related to increased SLEDAI and (SLICC/ACR) damage index scores. We concluded that there is decreased PON1 activity and formation of anti-Apo A-I antibodies in female patients with SLE. SLE-disease activity assessed by SLEDAI and SLE disease related organ damage assessed by SLICC/ACR damage index are negatively correlated with PON1 activity and positively correlated with anti-Apo A-I antibodies. PON1 activity and anti-Apo A-I antibodies might be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in SLE patients.

  3. Subtype-specific influenza A virus antibodies in Canada geese (Branta canadensis).

    PubMed

    Kistler, Whitney M; Stallknecht, David E; DeLiberto, Thomas J; Van Why, Kyle; Yabsley, Michael J

    2015-06-12

    Historically, surveillance for influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild birds has relied on viral detection assays. This was largely due to poor performance of serological assays in wild birds; however, recently developed commercial serological assays have improved the ability to detect IAV antibodies in wild birds. Serological surveillance for IAV antibodies in Canada geese (Branta canadensis) has shown that, despite a low prevalence of virus isolations, Canada geese are frequently exposed to IAVs and that exposure increases with latitude, which follows virus isolation prevalence patterns observed in dabbling ducks. The objectives of this study were to further evaluate IAV antibodies in Canada geese using a subtype-specific serological assay to determine if Canada geese are exposed to subtypes that commonly circulate in dabbling ducks. We collected serum samples from Canada geese in Minnesota, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin and tested for antibodies to IAVs using a blocking ELISA. Positive samples were further tested by hemagglutination inhibition for 10 hemagglutinin IAV subtypes (H1-H10). Overall, we detected antibodies to NP in 24% (714/2919) of geese. Antibodies to H3, H4, H5, and H6 subtypes predominated, with H5 being detected most frequently. A decrease in H5 HI antibody prevalence and titers was observed from 2009 to 2012. We also detected similar exposure pattern in Canada geese from New Jersey, Minnesota, Washington and Wisconsin. Based on the published literature, H3, H4, and H6 viruses are the most commonly reported IAVs from dabbling ducks. These results indicate that Canada geese also are frequently exposed to viruses of the same HA subtypes; however, the high prevalence of antibodies to H5 viruses was not expected as H5 IAVs are generally not well represented in reported isolates from ducks. PMID:25845755

  4. Neuraminidase-specific antibody responses to inactivated influenza virus vaccine in young and elderly adults.

    PubMed Central

    Powers, D C; Kilbourne, E D; Johansson, B E

    1996-01-01

    Little information is available on the potential role of antibody to influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) in vaccine-induced immunity. In the present study, serologic responses to the N1Texas/91 and N2Beijing/92 NA components of trivalent inactivated influenza virus vaccine were measured by NA inhibition (NI) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the results for adults aged 18 to 45 (young) or > or = 65 (elderly) years were compared. The two age groups had comparable rates (32 to 50%) of NI response. In contrast, ELISA immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses to N1 and N2 NAs occurred in 70 to 71 and 67 to 83%, respectively, of young subjects but in only 3 to 18 and 18 to 35%, respectively, of elderly subjects. prevaccination mean ELISA IgG and IgA NA antibody titers were generally lower for the young adults than they were for the elderly, whereas the corresponding NI titers were comparable. In young adults, plaque size-reducing NA antibody increases were positively associated with ELISA but not with NI antibody increases. There were no apparent age-related differences in the immunoglobulin isotype distribution of the anti-NA response, with IgG being the dominant class and IgG1 the dominant subclass of serum antibody. Anti-hemagglutinin antibody responses to H1Texas/91 and H3Beijing/92 were greater in magnitude and frequency than the corresponding NA-specific responses to N1Texas/91 and N2Beijing/92 when measured by hemagglutination inhibition and NI, respectively, but not when measured by ELISA. The discordance between NI and ELISA for measurement of NA-specific vaccine responses may reflect the relative insensitivity of NI in discriminating differences when initial antibody titers are low. PMID:8877127

  5. Iodine-131 labeled anti-CEA polyclonal antibody detection of gastrointestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nabi, H.A.; Hinkle, G.H.; Olsen, J.O.; Haagensen, D.A.; Thurston, M.O.; Mojzisik, C.; Houchens, D.; Martin, E.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To localize gastrointestinal tumor, 31 patients were injected with 1.7-2.1 mCi I-131 anti-CEA baboon polyclonal antibody. Whole body imaging at 48, 72, and occasionally 96 hrs was performed with a Signa Camera (Technicare) peaked at 364 keV with 20% window. Additional spot views were usually obtained. No subtraction methods were used. All patients had surgical and pathological confirmation of the nuclear medicine studies. Labeled antibody images were positive in 15 (8 recurrent or metastatic colorectal, 2 gastric, 1 pancreatic, 1 primary colon, and 1 breast metastatic to chest wall). In 1, antibody images were positive for metastatic deposits in para-aortic lymph nodes, but negative for primary rectal tumor. True negative images were observed in 6; false negative images in 9 (4 liver metastases, 2 rectal, 1 pancreatic, 1 mesenteric lymph node metastasis, 1 bone metastasis). In all cases, no correlation existed between preoperative CEA serum levels and imaging. I-131 labeled anti-CEA polyclonal antibody imaging proved highly efficient in detecting gastric cancer (2/2) and moderately efficient in detecting recurrent colorectal cancer (8/15). On the other hand, the I-131 labeled polyclonal anti-CEA antibody imaging was of limited value in detecting colon cancer (1/9), pancreatic cancer (1/4) and metastatic liver disease (0/4).

  6. Use of amino acid composition to predict epitope residues of individual antibodies.

    PubMed

    Soga, Shinji; Kuroda, Daisuke; Shirai, Hiroki; Kobori, Masato; Hirayama, Noriaki

    2010-06-01

    We identified specific amino acid propensities at the interfaces of antigen-antibody interactions in non-redundant qualified antigen-antibody complex structures from Protein Data Bank. Propensities were expressed by the frequency of each of the 20 x 20 standard amino acid pairs that appeared at the interfaces of the complexes and were named the antibody-specific epitope propensity (ASEP) index. Using this index, we developed a novel method of predicting epitope residues for individual antibodies by narrowing down candidate epitope residues which was predicted by the conventional method. The 74 benchmarked antigens were used in ASEP prediction. The efficiency of this method was assessed using the leave-one-out approach. On elimination of residues with ASEP indices in the lowest 10% of all measured, true positives were enriched for 49 antigens. On subsequent elimination of residues with ASEP indices in the lowest 50%, true positives were enriched for 40 of the 74 antigens assessed. The ASEP index is the first benchmark proposed to predict epitope residues for an individual antibody. Used in combination with mutation experiments, this index has the potential to markedly increase the success ratio of epitope analysis. PMID:20304974

  7. Antibodies in the Pathogenesis of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Christopher T.; Lieu, Maggie; Toh, Ban-Hock; Kyaw, Tin S.; Bobik, Alexander; Sobey, Christopher G.; Drummond, Grant R.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that circulating levels of IgG and IgM antibodies are elevated in patients with essential and pregnancy-related hypertension. Recent studies indicate these antibodies target, and in many cases activate, G-protein coupled receptors and ion channels. Prominent among these protein targets are AT1 receptors, ?1-adrenoceptors, ?1-adrenoceptors, and L-type voltage operated Ca2+ channels, all of which are known to play key roles in the regulation of blood pressure through modulation of vascular tone, cardiac output, and/or Na+/water reabsorption in the kidneys. This suggests that elevated antibody production may be a causal mechanism in at least some cases of hypertension. In this brief review, we will further describe the protein targets of the antibodies that are elevated in individuals with essential and pregnancy-related hypertension and the likely pathophysiological consequences of antibody binding to these targets. We will speculate on the potential mechanisms that underlie elevated antibody levels in hypertensive individuals and, finally, we will outline the therapeutic opportunities that could arise with a better understanding of how and why antibodies are produced in hypertension. PMID:25050352

  8. Secretory IgA antibodies from plants.

    PubMed

    Wycoff, K L

    2005-01-01

    Secretory IgA (SIgA) is the antibody type produced in both mammals and birds that protects the body from infection at mucosal surfaces. While monoclonal IgG antibodies, particularly those against tumor antigens, have received a great deal of attention, both scientific and commercial, as immunotherapeutic agents, the potential of SIgA antibodies has only recently begun to be exploited. Part of the reason for this is that SIgA production in vivo normally requires the cooperation of two different cell types, and single animal cell systems for monoclonal SIgA production are inefficient. Transgenic plants are currently the most productive and economical system for making SIgA. The only monoclonal SIgA to be tested therapeutically in a human clinical trial is a product called CaroRx, made in transgenic tobacco, which is designed to block adherence to teeth of the bacteria that causes cavities. This antibody accumulates to high levels in the leaves of tobacco, where it is located primarily in the endoplasmic reticulum. The antibody can be efficiently purified using the affinity reagent protein G. Topical oral treatment in human subjects was safe and effective. Characterization of the expression, secretion, purification and therapeutic use of this antibody serves as a model for additional plant-made therapeutic SIgA antibodies under development. PMID:16026297

  9. Antibodies Against Three Forms of Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that bind to preselected regions of the urokinase molecule have been developed. These antibodies can be used to measure small quantities of each of three molecular forms of urokinase that could be contained in microsamples or conditioned media harvested from cultures of mammalian cells. Previously available antibodies and assay techniques do not yield both clear distinctions among, and measurements of, all three forms. Urokinase is a zymogen that is synthesized in a single-chain form, called ScuPA, which is composed of 411 amino acid residues (see figure). ScuPA has very little enzyme activity, but it can be activated in two ways: (1) by cleavage of the peptide bond lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the loss of lysine 158 to obtain the high molecular-weight (HMW) form of the enzyme or (2) by cleavage of the bond lysine 135/lysine 136 to obtain the low-molecular-weight (LMW) form of the enzyme. The antibodies in question were produced in mice and rabbits by use of peptides as immunogens. The peptides were selected to obtain antibodies that bind to regions of ScuPA that include the lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the lysine 135/lysine 136 bonds. The antibodies include monoclonal and polyclonal ones that yield indications as to whether either of these bonds is intact. The polyclonal antibodies include ones that preferentially bind to the HMW or LMW forms of the urokinase molecule. The monoclonal antibodies include ones that discriminate between the ScuPA and the HMW form. A combination of these molecular-specific antibodies will enable simultaneous assays of the ScuPA, HMW, and LMW forms in the same specimen of culture medium.

  10. Benign positional vertigo

    MedlinePLUS

    Vertigo - positional; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; BPPV: dizziness- positional ... Benign positional vertigo is also called benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). It is caused by a problem in the inner ear. ...

  11. HIT-antibodies promote their own antigen.

    PubMed

    Greinacher, Andreas; Krauel, Krystin; Jensch, Inga

    2012-08-01

    Antiplatelet factor 4 (PF4) antibodies have an important role in the most frequent drug-induced immune disorder, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT). In this issue of Blood, Sachais and coworkers propose a new feature that may explain why only some anti-PF4 antibodies are pathogenic.(1) In addition to epitope specificity-determining affinity and a high titer, the ability of antibodies to promote formation of their own target antigens seems to be a key factor for pathogenicity. PMID:22859710

  12. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  13. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  14. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  15. Uses of monoclonial antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-06-23

    This invention provides an antibody that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the heavy chain CDR (Complementary Determining Region)1 comprises NYDIN, heavy chain CDR2 comprises WIFPGDGSTQY, heavy chain CDR3 comprises QTTATWFAY, and the light chain CDR1 comprises RASQSISDYLH, light chain CDR2 comprises YASQSIS, and light chain CDR3 comprises QNGHSFPLT. In another embodiment, there is provided a polypeptide that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the polypeptide comprises NYDIN, WIFPGDGSTQY, QTTATWFAY, RASQSISDYLH, YASQSIS, and QNGHSFPLT.

  16. Antibody Drug Conjugates for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Polakis, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) constitute a family of cancer therapeutics designed to preferentially direct a cytotoxic drug to cells expressing a cell-surface antigen recognized by an antibody. The antibody and drug are linked through chemistries that enable release of the cytotoxic drug or drug adduct upon internalization and digestion of the ADC by the cell. Over 40 distinct ADCs, targeting an array of antigens and utilizing a variety of drugs and linkers, are undergoing clinical evaluation. This review primarily covers ADCs that have advanced to clinical investigation with a particular emphasis on how the individual targets, linker chemistries, and appended drugs influence their behavior. PMID:26589413

  17. Antibody against infectious salmon anaemia virus among feral Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cipriano, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    Archived sera from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) that returned to the Penobscot River (Maine), Merrimack River (Massachusetts), and Connecticut River (in Massachusetts) from 1995 to 2002 were analysed for antibodies against infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Up to 60 samples were archived per river system per year. In a given year, the number of fish sampled by ELISA for ISAV antibodies in the Penobscot River ranged from 2.9 to 11.2, and the range of salmon sampled in the Merrimack River and the Connecticut River was 31.3-100 and 20.0-67.5, respectively. Archived sera were not available for the 1995 and 2002 year classes from the Connecticut River. In all, 1141 samples were processed; 14 serum samples tested positive for antibodies to ISAV. In the Penobscot River, serum from one fish tested positive in each of the 1995 and 1999 year-class returns, and sera from two fish tested positive in the 1998 returns. In the Merrimack River, sera from four fish tested positive in each of the 1996 and 1997 returns, and sera from two fish were positive in the 2002 return. None of the archived sera from Atlantic salmon that returned to the Connecticut River tested positive. ?? 2009 United States Government, Department of the Interior.

  18. Detection of Antibodies against Turkey Astrovirus in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Andrew; Oshansky, Christine M.; Thomas, Paul G.; Gray, Gregory C.; Beck, Melinda A.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Astroviruses are a leading cause of gastroenteritis in mammals and birds worldwide. Although historically thought to be species-specific, increasing evidence suggests that astroviruses may cross species barriers. In this report, we used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to screen sera from three distinct human cohorts involved in influenza studies in Memphis, TN or Chapel Hill, NC, and Midwestern poultry abattoir workers for antibodies to turkey astrovirus type 2 (TAstV-2). Surprisingly, 26% of one cohort’s population was TAstV-2 positive as compared to 0 and 8.9% in the other cohorts. This cohort was composed of people with exposure to turkeys in the Midwestern United States including abattoir workers, turkey growers, and non-occupationally exposed participants. The odds of testing positive for antibodies against turkey astrovirus among abattoir workers were approximately 3 times higher than the other groups. These studies suggest that people with contact to turkeys can develop serological responses to turkey astrovirus. Further work is needed to determine if these exposures result in virus replication and/or clinical disease. PMID:24826893

  19. [HLA and hepatitis C virus positive cardiomyopathy].

    PubMed

    Naruse, T K; Inoko, H

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between HCV (hepatitis C virus) and the susceptibility of cardiomyopathy has been indicated, but the detailed mechanism for close association is still unknown. It is well known that the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) may regulate the development of chronic hepatitis in HCV positive patients. We have analyzed the distribution of HLA class II alleles in Japanese patients with HCV antibody positive dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and HLA-DPB1*0901 was significantly increased in HCV Ab positive DCM, and the HLA-DRB1*0901-DQB1*0303 haplotype was in HCV Ab positive HCM. These results suggested that molecular mechanism for the development of cardiomyopathy mediated by HCV is different between DCM and HCM. PMID:10885316

  20. Reaction of human smooth muscle antibody with human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, R; Fagraeus, A; Lidman, K

    1975-01-01

    Platelets, prepared from fresh human platelet-rich plasma smeared on slides and stained with human serum containing smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) in indirect IFL, showed a bright cytoplasmic fluorescence with numerous projections extending from the surface. A prerequisite for obtaining a positive reaction with SMA-positive serum was that a chelating agent was present in the suspending medium when preparing the smears. The projections could be demonstrated also by anti-HeLa cell (anti-species) serum. This indicates that the projections had a membraneous cover. Staining of live platelets was always negative. Platelets treated with cytochalasin B for 1 hr were smooth and spherical and did not show any surface projections. PMID:810283