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Sample records for antinuclear antibody positive

  1. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA. PMID:21794718

  2. Hypertrophic Pulmonary Osteoarthropathy with Positive Antinuclear Antibodies: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, C.; Rocha, M.; Andrade, D.; Guimarães, F.; Silva, V.; Souza, S.; Moura, C.A.; Moura, C.G.

    2012-01-01

    A male Afro-descendant patient, 57 years old, complaining of polyarticular involvement and weight loss for 18 months, with a load of 13.5 pack years of smoking. On physical examination there was pain on palpation of the right knee and right leg, with signs of inflammation on the knee. We also observed digital clubbing in all fingers. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-Sm antibodies were positive. X-rays of the legs and arm showed cortical thickening of long bones. The computed tomography demonstrated a large mass located in the middle lobe of the right lung. The anatomopathological study revealed a bronchial adenocarcinoma. The history of polyarticular involvement associated with positive anti-Sm and ANA antibodies could lead to an erroneous diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Considering the bad consequences of delayed diagnosis in this patient, the medical team should be alerted for suspecting and look for a lung cancer under these circumstances. PMID:22740821

  3. Antiphospholipid antibodies: a disease marker in 25 patients with antinuclear antibody negative systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Comparison with a group of 91 patients with antinuclear antibody positive SLE.

    PubMed

    Meyer, O; Piette, J C; Bourgeois, P; Fallas, P; Bletry, O; Jungers, P; Kahn, M F; Godeau, P; Ryckewaert, A

    1987-06-01

    Twenty-five antinuclear antibody (ANA) negative patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or lupus-like disease were compared to 91 ANA positive patients with SLE for clinical and biological symptoms. Cutaneous symptoms were infrequent in ANA negative patients (p less than 0.03). Thrombocytopenia (p less than 0.001), venous or arterial thrombosis (p less than 0.02) as well as cerebral infarction (p less than 0.001) were more frequent. Three types of antiphospholipid antibodies were determined by different methods; the VDRL, the lupus anticoagulant and an ELISA for IgG anticardiolipin antibody (aCL). The frequency of a positive VDRL test was significantly higher in the ANA negative group (p less than 0.05). Correlation studies suggest that the 3 methods are not redundant and detect overlapping but not identical antibodies. Of the 3 antiphospholipid antibody assays, only the IgG aCL test was significantly associated with thrombosis in the ANA negative group (p less than 0.02). PMID:3114485

  4. Antinuclear antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Teague, P. O.; Friou, G. J.

    1969-01-01

    Seven-week-old and 16-week-old A/Jax mice were injected with viable spleen cells or homogenates of spleen cells obtained from older syngeneic mice which either had autoimmune anti-deoxyribonucleoprotein (DNP) antibody in their sera or lacked this activity. None of the 7-week-old recipients developed detectable anti-DNP antibody. However, most of the animals in the 16-week-old group developed this autoantibody. The viability of the cells and the presence of or absence of anti-DNP antibody in the donor's sera did not appear to influence the autoimmune response of these recipients. When viable thymus cells which were obtained from young A/Jax mice were transferred to groups of older syngeneic animals that had developed anti-DNP antibody spontaneously, the anti-DNP decreased or disappeared from the sera of most recipients. Untreated controls did not show this variation. When 36-week-old A/Jax mice which lacked anti-DNP antibody were injected with thymus or spleen cells obtained from young donors, none of the recipients or untreated controls developed anti-DNP antibody. After specific immunization with DNP, however, the control animals began to produce autoimmune anti-DNP antibody while the animals treated with thymus or spleen cells remained unresponsive. These observations support the hypothesis that in A/Jax mice: (1) autoimmunity to DNP may result from failure of normal homeostasis mechanisms which allow proliferation of autoimmune cells; (2) the number of cells with autoimmune potential may increase during ageing; (3) the efficiency of the homeostasis system may decrease during ageing as the result of microbial or genetic factors; and (4) cells which participate in homeostasis are found in the thymus and spleen of young mice and may be the thymus dependent lymphocytes. PMID:5307745

  5. ANA (Antinuclear Antibody Test)

    MedlinePlus

    ... frequency increases with age. These would be considered false-positive results because they are not associated with an autoimmune disease . Such instances are ... the Lab In the News Article Index About This Site Send Us Your ...

  6. Antinuclear antibodies in rosacea patients

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, Małgorzata; McCauliffe, Daniel; Sysa-Jędrzejowska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Rosacea is a common inflammatory disorder, characterized by a spectrum of facial manifestations. The clinical similarity to other dermatoses, like lupus erythematosus, might lead to misdiagnosis, particularly in patients with elevated antinuclear antibody titers. Aim To assess the frequency, titer and specificity of antinuclear antibodies in rosacea patients and correlate these findings with clinical features. Material and methods The study included 101 rosacea patients and 26 sex- and age-matched controls. Immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody testing was performed on HEp-2 substrates. Patients’ sera with ANA titers of 1 : 160 or higher were evaluated by Euroline analysis. Results Over a half (53.5%) of rosacea patients had an ANA titer greater than or equal to 1 : 160. Within this group 13.86% had a titer of 1 : 320, 8.91% had a titer of 1 : 640, and 6.93% had a titer of 1 : 1,280 or higher. The specificity of these antibodies could not be identified. Elevated ANA titers were present more often in women (55.8%) than in men (44.15%). Only two of 26 healthy volunteers had elevated ANA titers. One had a titer of 1 : 160 and the other of 1 : 320. During a two-year observation period, after the initial ANA testing, none of the patients with ANA titers above 1 : 640 developed an apparent autoimmune disorder. Conclusions Elevated ANA titers are commonly found in rosacea patients, what with simultaneously existing facial erythema and photosensitivity might lead to misdiagnosis of lupus erythematosus. Clinicians should beware of these findings to avoid misdiagnosing lupus erythematosus in rosacea patients with elevated ANA titers. PMID:24278039

  7. Two cases of food additive-induced severe liver damage associated with positive results on lymphocyte stimulation test and for antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Rena; Ohishi, Chitose; Kim, Miniru; Shiina, Masaaki; Kusayanagi, Satoshi; Ogawa, Masazumi; Munakata, Kazuo; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Sato, Yuzuru

    2012-08-01

    Two cases of severe liver injury and positive result for antinuclear antibodies induced by food additives are reported. The first patient reported long-term intake of Mabo Ramen(®) noodle soup, nutritional supplements, and over-the-counter drugs. Total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, and alanine aminotransferase were 9.6 mg/dL, 1,048, and 1,574 IU/L, respectively. Antinuclear antibody was 80×. The drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test (DLST) was positive for Mabo Ramen(®) and its additives such as Xanthan gum, guar gum, and Doubanjiang. Histologic examination of a liver biopsy specimen showed lymphocyte infiltration and necrosis. The autoimmune hepatitis score was 3. The second patient reported intake of dietary supplements, including Bimore C(®) and Chokora BB(®). Laboratory tests revealed that total bilirubin was 9.8 mg/dL, aspartate aminotransferase was 1,130 IU/L, and alanine aminotransferase was 1,094 IU/L. Antinuclear antibody was 320×. Co-existing pancreatic damage was confirmed by the findings on abdominal CT and elevation of serum lipase, span-1, and DUPAN-2. DLSTs were positive for both supplements. These two supplements contained additives such as titanium oxide, magnesium stearate, and hydroxypropylcellulose. DLSTs for all three additives were positive. Histologic examination revealed periportal necrosis and lymphocyte infiltration of lobular and portal areas. These two cases demonstrate that repeating DLSTs is useful for identifying causative constituents in foods and supplements. PMID:26182392

  8. Circulating Antinuclear Antibody and Rheumatoid Factor in Coal Pneumoconiosis

    PubMed Central

    Soutar, C. A.; Turner-Warwick, Margaret; Parkes, W. Raymond

    1974-01-01

    Circulating antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor have been measured in 109 coal miners with pneumoconiosis whose chest radiograph showed a range of abnormalities varying from simple pneumoconiosis of mild degree to advanced progressive massive fibrosis. At a screening dilution of 1/10 the overall incidence of antinuclear antibody was 17%. In almost half of the positive cases the titre was 1/40 or greater. The prevalence of antinuclear antibody was lowest in those with simple pneumoconiosis (9%) and highest in those with category C progressive massive fibrosis (27%). A similar but less striking trend was seen with rheumatoid factor, ranging from 6% in simple pneumoconiosis to 18% in category C progressive massive fibrosis. The trend of increasing frequency of autoantibodies with advancing radiographic category was most marked when the frequencies of antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor were combined. These autoantibodies were found in 13% of the miners with simple pneumoconiosis and 45% of those with category C progressive massive fibrosis (P for the trend=0·01). PMID:4602134

  9. Antinuclear antibodies in patients on anticonvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Reyes, P. A.; Díes, H.; Shwadsky, S.

    1972-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies to calf thymus nuclei, NP, DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen were investigated in sera from 170 patients on various programmes of prolonged anticonvulsant treatment. Findings were compared to those on 214 tuberculous patients on isoniazid, 109 SLE patients and 66 healthy subjects. Patients on anticonvulsants had a significantly higher incidence of ANA to DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen than the controls but had a lower incidence of ANA to all antigens, except sNP, than the SLE patients. Patients on isoniazid did not have DNA antibodies, but had antibodies to whole nuclei and to NP which were practically absent in the anticonvulsant group. Of all patients on anticonvulsants only those receiving hydantoins had ANA to Sm antigen, while those receiving only primidone had antibodies to sNP but no antibodies to DNA. Alteration of sNP with isoniazid did not result in an increased incidence of ANA in the anticonvulsant group as it does in isoniazid treated subjects. It is concluded that the SLE-activating properties of diverse anticonvulsants probably resides in their potential to induce ANA. Although all anticonvulsants elicit ANA directed primarily to sNP, each may do so by different mechanisms or by altering different sites in the sNP molecule. The mechanisms by which anticonvulsant and isoniazid intake results in ANA probably differ. Presence of DNA antibodies in some patients on anticonvulsants may indicate that their convulsions were due to SLE. PMID:4117275

  10. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. 866.5100 Section 866.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological...

  11. High Prevalence of Antinuclear Antibodies in Children with Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Segni, Maria; Pucarelli, Ida; Truglia, Simona; Turriziani, Ilaria; Serafinelli, Chiara; Conti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Background. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are a hallmark of many autoimmune diseases and can be detected many years before disease onset. Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are frequently associated with other organ- and non-organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Objectives. To assess the prevalence of ANA in pediatric patients with AITD and their clinical correlations. Methods. Ninety-three consecutive pediatric patients with AITD were enrolled (86 children with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis and 7 with Graves' disease). ANA, anti-double DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies, anti-extractable nuclear antigen (anti-ENA), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), and rheumatoid factor (RF) was obtained. Signs and symptoms potentially related to rheumatic diseases in children were investigated by a questionnaire. Results. ANA positivity was found in 66/93 children (71%), anti-ENA in 4/93 (4.3%), anti-dsDNA in 1/93 (1.1%), RF in 3/93 (3.2%), and anti-CCP in none. No significant differences were found between the ANA-positive and ANA-negative groups with respect to age, sex, L-thyroxine treatment, or prevalence of other autoimmune diseases. Overall, parental autoimmunity was found in 23%. Conclusions. ANA positivity was demonstrated in 71% of children with AITD. ANA positivity was not related to overt immune-rheumatic diseases. However, because the positivity of ANA can occur even many years before the onset of systemic autoimmune diseases, prospective studies are warranted. PMID:24741574

  12. Clinical correlates of the "rods and rings" antinuclear antibody pattern.

    PubMed

    Climent, Joan; Morandeira, Francisco; Castellote, José; Xiol, Javier; Niubó, Jordi; Calatayud, Laura; Mestre, Mariona; Bas, Jordi

    2016-03-01

    The "rods and rings" (RR) antinuclear antibody (ANA) pattern is believed to be restricted to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and related to the treatment. This is a 4-year retrospective study of all patients with RR pattern from the 20 000 serum samples received at the Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge for ANA testing. Two control groups with HCV patients without RR pattern: ANA-positive (n = 74) and ANA negative (n = 75) were included. Eighty-seven patients had samples with the RR pattern. Seventy-three were infected with HCV (prevalence of 15% in the HCV population). The RR pattern could not be related to ribavirin treatment, clinical status, biochemistry data, hepatic fibrosis, IL28B genotype, HCV genotype or the presence of autoantibodies related with autoimmune hepatitis. As 14 cases presented other diseases, mainly of autoimmune origin, the presence of RR antibodies may also be explained by alterations in immune regulation caused by autoimmunity or HCV in a particular genetic background. PMID:26699543

  13. Antinuclear antibodies prevalence in Filipinos migrated to Italy.

    PubMed

    Cacciapaglia, F; Arcarese, L; Rigon, A; Vadacca, M; Valorani, M G; Pozzilli, P; Afeltra, A

    2008-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) represent the main diagnostic markers for systemic autoimmune disease (AD), although their presence can be detected in blood donors. The aim of this study was to study ANA prevalence in healthy subjects of different racial groups, exposed to the same environmental factors, in order to understand the relevance of genetics or environment in determining autoimmunity. We enrolled in this study 80 healthy Filipinos (Polynesian), migrated to Italy from an average of 15 years, and 60 healthy native Italians (Caucasian) and ANA were detected in their sera (at 1:80 screening dilution) through indirect immunofluorescence assay. We found a higher prevalence of ANA positivity in Filipinos compared to Italians (23.7% vs 8.3%--P = 0.02; OR 3.43; 95% CI 1.2-9.8), above all in females and elderly, although demographic characteristics, clinical history and habits were not significantly different between the two groups. These data confirm that ANA positivity is not a rare condition and healthy non-Caucasians present a higher prevalence of autoantibodies. This could be determined by their autoimmunity-prone immune system or by the exposition to infective agents, pollution, drugs or nutrition of a western country. Future studies to evaluate the ANA prevalence in Filipinos in their own country and the follow-up of positive patients could clarify the real predisposition to AD of this population. PMID:18727460

  14. Detection of serum antinuclear antibodies in lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Zou, H Y; Gu, X; Yu, W Z; Wang, Z; Jiao, M

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the presence of serum antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) and autoantibodies and their relationship with serum prognostic indicators in lymphoma patients. The study population comprised 127 patients diagnosed with lymphoma and 138 healthy control subjects. The blood samples of the participants were assayed for ANAs by immunofluorescence, and autoantibodies were detected by western blotting. Serum ANAs were detected in 31.5 (40/127) and 6.5% (9/138) of lymphoma patients and control subjects, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the lymphoma and the control groups (P < 0.05). The level of lactate dehydrogenase in the ANA-positive subjects was significantly lower than in the ANA-negative subjects (P < 0.05). Low ANA titers (1:100) were commonly found in the ANA-positive subjects and the control subjects, and the fluorescence models were diverse. Autoantibodies were found in 35% (14/40) of the ANA-positive patients by western blotting. Detection of ANAs in lymphoma patients helps in determining the diagnosis and prognosis of lymphoma, but has no independent diagnostic value; there are still various autoantibodies of unknown significance that require further study. PMID:26681000

  15. Performance of antinuclear antibody connective tissue disease screen.

    PubMed

    López-Hoyos, Marcos; Rodríguez-Valverde, Vicente; Martinez-Taboada, Victor

    2007-08-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) have become routine laboratory parameters in clinical hospitals. However, ANA testing by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assays is not an automated laboratory test. Efforts are being made to develop easy and semi- or automated methods to screen for ANAs. We evaluated the clinical performance of a new ELISA developed to screen for connective tissue disease related ANAs. The presence of serum ANA was studied with a commercial ELISA (Varelisa ANA CTD Screen) in 472 patients (202 SLE, 41 Sjögren syndrome, 11 CREST, 59 rheumatoid arthritis, 30 seronegative spondyloarthropaties, 77 inflammatory bowel disease, 13 reactive arthritis, 11 giant cell arteritis, 28 ankylosing spondilitis). A hundred and five sera from healthy subjects were used as controls. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis was carried out in order to optimize the cutoff. At target specificities of 80/90%, sensitivities of 80.8/ 73.9% were achieved. At the manufacturer's cutoff (ratio >or=1.0) sensitivity/specificity of 71.4/91.2% was found. At that cutoff, a positive likelihood ratio of 8.11 was found. For helping in the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases a test employing a subset of the most prevalent specificities reveals a good compromise as indicated by a high-positive likelihood ratio. However, the presence of ANAs in pathologies other than connective tissue diseases, such as SLE or Sjögren syndrome, may be of clinical significance as well. In these cases an IIF assay test is still mandatory, especially in autoimmune laboratories. PMID:17785321

  16. Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA) in Gordon Setters with Symmetrical Lupoid Onychodystrophy and Black Hair Follicular Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bohnhorst, J Øvrebø; Hanssen, I; Moen, T

    2001-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were demonstrated in 3 out of 10 Gordon setters with symmetrical lupoid onychodystrophy and in 5 out of 13 Gordon setters with black hair follicular dysplasia. Two dogs showed both symmetrical lupoid onychodystrophy and black hair follicular dysplasia, and one of these was ANA positive. The results suggest that symmetrical lupoid onychodystrophy and black hair follicular dysplasia in the Gordon setter might be autoimmune diseases that are pathogenetically related, which might indicate a common genetic predisposition. PMID:11887392

  17. Antinuclear antibodies and bromoxynil exposure in a rural sample.

    PubMed

    Semchuk, Karen M; Rosenberg, Alan M; McDuffie, Helen H; Cessna, Allan J; Pahwa, Punam; Irvine, Donald G

    2007-04-01

    Previous research suggests that farmers may have an increased risk of developing autoimmunity and that exposure to certain pesticides may alter immune function. Little is known, however, about the immunologic effects of farming and pesticide exposures. As part of the Prairie Ecosystem Study, associations between detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), an autoimmunity indicator, and exposure to the herbicide bromoxynil (3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzonitrile) were investigated in a cross-sectional study of 208 residents (94 women, 114 men) of a cereal-producing region in Saskatchewan, Canada, during spring herbicide application, 1996. The ANA were assayed in serum by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells. Bromoxynil was measured in plasma by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. Associations were explored between ANA detection and detection of bromoxynil in plasma, self-reported use of bromoxynil and other pesticides, farming exposures, gender, age, body mass index (BMI), and residency. The mean age (SD) of the participants was 50.8 (13.6) yr [women: 49.7 (13.5) yr, men: 51.6 (13.6) yr]. ANA prevalence was 37.5% (women: 39.4%, men: 36%,) at 1:40 serum dilution, 17.3% (women: 20.2%, men: 14.9%) at 1:80, and 10.1% (women: 13.8%, men: 7%) at 1:160. In the multiple-variable Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) logistic regression analyses, female gender was a positive predictor of ANA detection and gender differences were observed in the relative importance of other study factors. None of the variables examined in the multiple-variable GEE analysis were statistically significant predictors of ANA detection for women. For many of these variables, however, the point estimates for women are similar to those seen in men. For men, with adjustment for age, ANA presence was inversely associated with detection of concentrations of bromoxynil in winter or spring samples and recent occupational use of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and the positive ANA predictors included having a BMI in the obese (BMI > 30.04 kg/m2) category, recent occupational use of trifluralin or fungicides, and current exposure to oilseed, poultry, or dairy production. The inverse association between ANA detection and bromoxynil exposure observed in farmers in this study is consistent with earlier empirical observations that certain pesticides may suppress immune function. Further research is needed to examine whether these findings are confirmed in other populations and to elucidate the biological mechanisms involved. PMID:17365618

  18. Antinuclear antibodies in the sera of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Takimoto, T.; Ishikawa, S.; Masuda, K.; Tanaka, S.; Yoshizaki, T.; Umeda, R. )

    1989-11-01

    We studied the production of heterophile antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in the sera of 50 patients, 20 with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and 30 with other head and neck cancers (laryngeal cancer and maxillary cancer), before and after radiation therapy. A higher incidence of ANAs was found in the sera of patients with NPC and ANA production in these patients was higher after radiation therapy. We therefore performed in vitro experiments to explore the mechanisms of ANA production in the serum of postirradiated NPC patients. X-ray-irradiated NPC-derived cells (NPC-KT) produced a large amount of Epstein-Barr virus (NPC EBV) compared with non-irradiated NPC-KT cells. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma EBV-infected lymphocytes produced high levels of ANAs. These data suggest that lymphocytes infected by EBV from NPC cells may produce ANAs in the sera of NPC patients.

  19. [Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in patients with malignant diseases: frequency of occurrence and immunological characterization (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Idel, H; Bunke, R; Seemayer, N

    1978-09-01

    We report about the occurrence and importance of antinuclear antibodies in patients with malignant diseases. - We analyzed 110 sera of patients with tumors and found in 42% ANA. In contrast a corresponding control group contained ANA in 1.8%. - Patients with bronchogenic carcinoma and those of the digestive tract possessed ANA in a comparable percentage of 36 and 39, respectively. - Sera of patients with mamma- and uteruscarcinoma contained ANA in nearly 50%. - A connection between the type of the tumor and occurrence of ANA can be assumed. - Antibodies were directed against different antigens of the nucleus, often simultaneously occurring. Antibodies which we have detected, belong to different classes of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM and IgA). In most cases we found a combination of antibodies. In 51% of positive cases antibodies were able to fix complement. PMID:104483

  20. Antinuclear antibodies and their detection methods in diagnosis of connective tissue diseases: a journey revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Yashwant; Bhatia, Alka; Minz, Ranjana Walker

    2009-01-01

    It has been more than 50 years since antinuclear antibodies were first discovered and found to be associated with connective tissue diseases. Since then different methods have been described and used for their detection or confirmation. For many decades immunofluorescent antinuclear antibody test has been the "gold standard" in the diagnosis of these disorders. However to increase the sensitivity and specificity of antinuclear antibody detection further approaches were explored. Today a battery of newer techniques are available some of which are now considered better and are competing with the older methods. This article provides an overview on advancement in antinuclear antibody detection methods, their future prospects, advantages, disadvantages and guidelines for use of these tests. PMID:19121207

  1. Antinuclear antibodies and their detection methods in diagnosis of connective tissue diseases: a journey revisited.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yashwant; Bhatia, Alka; Minz, Ranjana Walker

    2009-01-01

    It has been more than 50 years since antinuclear antibodies were first discovered and found to be associated with connective tissue diseases. Since then different methods have been described and used for their detection or confirmation. For many decades immunofluorescent antinuclear antibody test has been the "gold standard" in the diagnosis of these disorders. However to increase the sensitivity and specificity of antinuclear antibody detection further approaches were explored. Today a battery of newer techniques are available some of which are now considered better and are competing with the older methods. This article provides an overview on advancement in antinuclear antibody detection methods, their future prospects, advantages, disadvantages and guidelines for use of these tests. PMID:19121207

  2. Frequency of anticardiolipin, antinuclear and anti-beta2 glycoprotein I antibodies in children with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Markić, Josko; Mestrović, Marija; Valić, Ivan; Sapunar, Ada; Bosnjak, Nada

    2007-09-01

    A high prevalence of epilepsies in specific immunological diseases suggests that the immune system may play a role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy or might be associated with it. In this study the frequency of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL), antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I antibodies (anti-beta2-GPI) in 40 children with epilepsy and in 38 healthy subjects was determined. Positive aCL was found in 3 patients, and anti-beta2-GPI in 1 patient. In control group they were negative. ANA antibodies were negative in both groups. Duration of epilepsy < 1 year was observed in all three patients with positive aCL. No statistically significant difference was found concerning the presence of these antibodies between patients and controls. There was no statistically significant correlation of age, sex, age at the onset of epilepsy, duration of epilepsy, type of epilepsy, seizure frequency or specific antiepileptic medications with the presence of any measured antibodies. PMID:18041382

  3. Antinuclear antibody detection by automated multiplex immunoassay in untreated patients at the time of diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Op De Beéck, Katrijn; Vermeersch, Pieter; Verschueren, Patrick; Westhovens, René; Mariën, Godelieve; Blockmans, Daniel; Bossuyt, Xavier

    2012-12-01

    Fully automated multiplex immunoassays are increasingly used as first line screening for antinuclear antibodies. The diagnostic performance of such multiplex assays in untreated patients at the time of diagnosis has not been reported. Antinuclear antibodies were measured by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) (dilution 1:160) and by BioPlex 2200 ANA screen (antibodies to dsDNA, chromatin, ribosomal protein, SSA-52, SSA-60, SSB, Sm, SmRNP, RNP-A, RNP-68, Scl-70, Jo-1, and centromere B) in 236 patients with a systemic rheumatic disease at the time of diagnosis, 149 blood donors, 139 patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), and 134 diseased controls. BioPlex ANA screen and IIF were positive in, respectively, 79% and 90% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 60% and 60% with cutaneous lupus, 72% and 93% with systemic sclerosis (SSc), 100% and 100% with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), 89% and 56% with primary Sjögren's (SS) syndrome, 36% and 36% with polymyositis/dermatomyositis, 5.4% and 6% of blood donors, 7.2% and 3.6% of patients with CFS, and 11% and 18% of diseased controls. BioPlex test result interval specific likelihood ratios increased with increasing antibody concentration. The simultaneous presence of at least three antibodies by BioPlex was found in 35% of patients with SLE, 4% with SSc, 100% with MCTD, 64% with SS, 7% with inflammatory myopathy, 0.7% of CFS and diseased controls, and none of the blood donors. In conclusion, test result specific likelihood ratios and the presence of multiple autoantibodies help with the interpretation of data generated by multiplex immunoassays. PMID:22387973

  4. 'LE cells' result from phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies induced by antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Acevedo, S; Pérez-Romano, B; Ruiz-Argüelles, A

    2000-08-01

    Lupus erythematosus (LE) cells are believed to represent phagocytosis by granulocytes of cell nuclei whose DNA has been 'depolymerized' and opsonized by serum factors, most likely antinuclear antibodies and C3b. Since it is known that certain antinuclear antibodies are capable of inducing apoptosis after intracellular penetration; and that the resulting apoptotic bodies can be ingested by non-professional phagocytes, we decided to investigate the possibility that LE cells could result from the phagocytosis of apoptotic bodies induced by antinuclear antibodies. We demonstrate herein, through different methodological approaches, that the ingested material within LE cells corresponds to apoptotic bodies, and that the LE cell phenomenon can be reproduced, in the absence of other serum factors, by penetrating murine monoclonal anti DNA antibodies. PMID:10936024

  5. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  6. [The automated analysis of anti-nuclear antibodies using technique of indirect reaction of immunofluorescence with application of HEP-2-cells].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, E N; Verijnikova, J G; Novikov, A A; Baranov, A A; Abaitova, N E; Lapkina, N A; Roggenbuk, D; Nasonov, E L

    2015-03-01

    The identification of antinuclear antibodies in blood serum based on indirect reaction of immunofluorescence using cells of line HEp-2 (IRIF HEp-2)--a "golden standard" and key screening technique of laboratory diagnostic of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. The automated systems of interpretation of samples offluorescence promote standardization and increase effectiveness of detection of content of antinuclear antibodies with IRIF HEp-2 technique. The study was organized to comparatively analyze automated and visual interpretation of results of IRIF HEp-2 in detection of content antinuclear antibodies in patients with rheumatic diseases. The level of antinuclear antibodies in blood serums of 1178 patients with rheumatic diseases was detected using IRIF HEp-2 technique. The results of IRIF HEp-2 were evaluated by visual microscopy and using automated platform "AKLIDES". The degree of consistency of positive/negative results of detection (k = 0.5), types (k = 0.7) and titers/intensity of fluorescence (k = 0.45) of antinuclear antibodies under automated and traditional interpretation of IRIF HEp-2 was "good". The discordance of positive/negative results of analysis of content of IRIF HEp-2 was established in 18.5% of patients. The automated technique more often detected homogeneous (37.6%) and speckled (32.3%) fluorescence of nucleus. At the same time, there were no differentiation of type of fluorescence in 21.4% of patients. The visual technique detected mixed type of fluorescence in blood serums of most of the patients (72.8%). The mixed fluorescence was identified by system "AKLIDES" as homogeneous (40.5%), speckled (32.7%), nucleolar (2.4%), centromeric (0.9%), undifferentiated (23.5%). Under visual analysis of samples of fluorescence with undifferentiated type of fluorescence was identified as mixed (79.8%), homogeneous (5.9%) and speckled (14.3%). The titers of antinuclear antibodies less than 1:160 associated with intensity of fluorescence 0/B; 1:160-0, B, +, ++; more than 1:1280--+++, ++++. In common practice the automated system "AKLIDES" permits identifying positive/negative results of detection of content of antinuclear antibodies comparably with "classic" visual technique of interpretation of IRIF HEp-2 and prognosticate maximal finite titer of antinuclear antibodies in serums in patients with rheumatic diseases according intensity of fluorescence. To confirm results of automated evaluation of types of nuclear fluorescence and to specify titers of antinuclear antibodies it is recommended to apply additional expert visual analysis of positive samples of fluorescence. PMID:26031162

  7. Mercury Exposure and Antinuclear Antibodies among Females of Reproductive Age in the United States: NHANES

    PubMed Central

    Ganser, Martha A.; Warren, Jeffrey S.; Basu, Niladri; Wang, Lu; Zick, Suzanna M.; Park, Sung Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune dysregulation associated with mercury has been suggested, although data in the general population are lacking. Chronic exposure to low levels of methylmercury (organic) and inorganic mercury is common, such as through fish consumption and dental amalgams. Objective We examined associations between mercury biomarkers and antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity and titer strength. Methods Among females 16–49 years of age (n = 1,352) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2004, we examined cross-sectional associations between mercury and ANAs (indirect immunofluorescence; cutoff ≥ 1:80). Three biomarkers of mercury exposure were used: hair (available 1999–2000) and total blood (1999–2004) predominantly represented methylmercury, and urine (1999–2002) represented inorganic mercury. Survey statistics were used. Multivariable modeling adjusted for several covariates, including age and omega-3 fatty acids. Results Sixteen percent of females were ANA positive; 96% of ANA positives had a nuclear speckled staining pattern. Geometric mean (geometric SD) mercury concentrations were 0.22 (0.03) ppm in hair, 0.92 (0.05) μg/L blood, and 0.62 (0.04) μg/L urine. Hair and blood, but not urinary, mercury were associated with ANA positivity (sample sizes 452, 1,352, and 804, respectively), after adjusting for confounders: for hair, odds ratio (OR) = 4.10 (95% CI: 1.66, 10.13); for blood, OR = 2.32 (95% CI: 1.07, 5.03) comparing highest versus lowest quantiles. Magnitudes of association were strongest for high-titer (≥ 1:1,280) ANA: hair, OR = 11.41 (95% CI: 1.60, 81.23); blood, OR = 5.93 (95% CI: 1.57, 22.47). Conclusions Methylmercury, at low levels generally considered safe, was associated with subclinical autoimmunity among reproductive-age females. Autoantibodies may predate clinical disease by years; thus, methylmercury exposure may be relevant to future autoimmune disease risk. Citation Somers EC, Ganser MA, Warren JS, Basu N, Wang L, Zick SM, Park SK. 2015. Mercury exposure and antinuclear antibodies among females of reproductive age in the United States: NHANES. Environ Health Perspect 123:792–798; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408751 PMID:25665152

  8. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... 866.5100 Section 866.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular nuclear...), and systemic sclerosis (chronic hardening and shrinking of many body tissues). (b)...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... 866.5100 Section 866.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular nuclear...), and systemic sclerosis (chronic hardening and shrinking of many body tissues). (b)...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... 866.5100 Section 866.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular nuclear...), and systemic sclerosis (chronic hardening and shrinking of many body tissues). (b)...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 866.5100 Section 866.5100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular nuclear...), and systemic sclerosis (chronic hardening and shrinking of many body tissues). (b)...

  12. Comparison of indirect immunofluorescence and multiplex antinuclear antibody screening in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Swistowski, Donna R; Saddic, Nicole; Wang, Hong; Steen, Virginia D

    2011-10-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence antinuclear antibodies (IIF-ANA) are detected in approximately 90% of scleroderma patients, and the staining pattern correlates with scleroderma-specific antibody subsets. Solid-phase ANA assays that are dependent on multiplex bead technology (MULTIPLEX-ANA) are replacing immunofluorescence in many commercial labs; however, performance of these assays has not been compared to IIF-ANA in scleroderma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a proportion of scleroderma patients have negative testing on MULTIPLEX-ANA assays and demonstrate whether negative MULTIPLEX-ANA is associated with particular scleroderma-specific autoantibodies. A retrospective chart review was completed on all 238 scleroderma patients evaluated in the Georgetown scleroderma clinic between June 1, 2008 and May 31, 2009. Autoantibody results, demographics, and scleroderma features were collected. Data were analyzed using unpaired t test and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous variables, and Fisher's exact test for dichotomous variables. Simple kappa coefficient was used to measure the level of agreement between MULTIPLEX-ANA and IIF-ANA results. Two-tailed p values <0.05 were considered significant. MULTIPLEX-ANA testing was available in 57 patients and only 29 (51%) tested positive. In contrast, IIF-ANA was positive in 91% of these patients. Using simple kappa coefficient, there was a good agreement between the MULTIPLEX-ANA, and presence of Scl70, RNP, and centromere antibodies (0.76; 95% CI 0.59, 0.92), but there was no agreement between MULTIPLEX-ANA and presence of other IIF-ANA patterns including nucleolar ANA (-0.40; 95% CI -0.64, -0.16). Because RNA polymerase III and nucleolar antibodies are seen in 43% of the entire scleroderma population, we are concerned that these false-negative tests could result in delays in referral and diagnosis. Until the MULTIPLEX-ANA assays can be modified to include the antigens for RNA polymerase III and the nucleolar ANA subsets, IIF-ANA remains the recommended screening test for ANA in suspected scleroderma. PMID:21614475

  13. The range and specificity of antinuclear antibodies in systematic lupus erythematosus*

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Alcalá, Hilda; Olguín-Palacios, Eugenia; Estrada-Parra, S.

    1970-01-01

    Antibodies to nine calf thymus nuclear antigens were sought by complement fixation methods in twenty-four sera from sixteen patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. These antigens included whole nuclei, native and heat denatured DNA, particulate and soluble nucleoprotein and Sm antigen. Soluble antigens were also tested by tanned red-cell agglutination tests. A wide variation in the presence and titres of antibodies to these various antigens was found in the sera studied even when from the same patient but at different times. To further test the range and specificity of antinuclear antibodies in SLE, nineteen ribonucleosides, nucleotides and monophosphoric dinucleotides were coupled to human serum albumin and used as antigens in precipitin studies. A wide variation of reactivity was also found in each serum. Exquisite specificity became apparent, capable of reacting with a nucleoside but not with the corresponding nucleotide or vice versa, with a dinucleotide but not with the nucleotides or nucleosides which it contained, with a given dinucleotide but not with the opposite sequence. Antinuclear antibodies in systemic lupus are, therefore, markedly heterogeneous. Those to a `single' antigen such as DNA may be directed to antigenic sites which may variously be at the bases, single or in sequence, at the site of union of base and sugar–phosphate moiety, at the backbone of deoxyribophosphate or actually dependent on the secondary structure. PMID:4097823

  14. Anti-nuclear antibody screening using HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Carol; Bryant, Cassandra; Eslami, Anna; Lakos, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    The American College of Rheumatology position statement on ANA testing stipulates the use of IIF as the gold standard method for ANA screening(1). Although IIF is an excellent screening test in expert hands, the technical difficulties of processing and reading IIF slides--such as the labor intensive slide processing, manual reading, the need for experienced, trained technologists and the use of dark room--make the IIF method difficult to fit in the workflow of modern, automated laboratories. The first and crucial step towards high quality ANA screening is careful slide processing. This procedure is labor intensive, and requires full understanding of the process, as well as attention to details and experience. Slide reading is performed by fluorescent microscopy in dark rooms, and is done by trained technologists who are familiar with the various patterns, in the context of cell cycle and the morphology of interphase and dividing cells. Provided that IIF is the first line screening tool for SARD, understanding the steps to correctly perform this technique is critical. Recently, digital imaging systems have been developed for the automated reading of IIF slides. These systems, such as the NOVA View Automated Fluorescent Microscope, are designed to streamline the routine IIF workflow. NOVA View acquires and stores high resolution digital images of the wells, thereby separating image acquisition from interpretation; images are viewed an interpreted on high resolution computer monitors. It stores images for future reference and supports the operator's interpretation by providing fluorescent light intensity data on the images. It also preliminarily categorizes results as positive or negative, and provides pattern recognition for positive samples. In summary, it eliminates the need for darkroom, and automates and streamlines the IIF reading/interpretation workflow. Most importantly, it increases consistency between readers and readings. Moreover, with the use of barcoded slides, transcription errors are eliminated by providing sample traceability and positive patient identification. This results in increased patient data integrity and safety. The overall goal of this video is to demonstrate the IIF procedure, including slide processing, identification of common IIF patterns, and the introduction of new advancements to simplify and harmonize this technique. PMID:24998977

  15. [Antiphospholipid antibodies in a series of 25 cases of lupus without antinuclear antibodies. Comparison with a series of 91 lupus patients with antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Meyer, O; Piette, J C; Bourgeois, P; Fallas, P; Blétry, O; Jungers, P; Kahn, M F; Godeau, P; Ryckewaert, A

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with at least 3 of 1982 ARA criteria of SLE but without the ANA, were compared with 91 patients with 4 or more of the ARA criteria of lupus with positive ANA. The ANA-negative group was characterised by the low incidence of skin involvement, serous effusions and alopecia, and a relatively high incidence of thrombocytopaenia and venous and arterial thrombosis. Three types of antiphospholipid antibodies were looked for: the VDRL, antiprothrombinase and anticardiolipin antibodies by an immuno-enzymatic method. The VDRL was the only antibody which was significantly commoner in the ANA-negative group. Statistical studies showed that the three methods of demonstrating antiphospholipid antibodies detected crossed but not identical specificities. In the ANA-positive group only the antiprothrombinase was associated with a high incidence of venous thrombosis and stroke. In the ANA-negative group, only the anticardiolipin antibodies were associated with a high incidence of arterial or venous thrombosis. Two subgroups may be identified in the group of ANA-negative lupus patients: firstly, those with high anticardiolipin antibody titres with a high incidence of thrombotic and haematological complications, and, secondly, patients with low anticardiolipin antibody levels with a high incidence of cutaneous involvement, serous effusions and Raynaud's phenomenon. PMID:3498423

  16. Immunoregulation and anti-nuclear antibodies in mercury-induced glomerulopathy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Weening, J J; Hoedemaeker, P J; Bakker, W W

    1981-07-01

    The pathogenesis of drug-induced autoimmune antibodies is in most cases uncertain. The recent demonstration of T cell aberrations in human and experimental drug-induced autoimmune disease suggests that immunodysregulation might form the basis of an uncontrolled B cell autoreactivity leading to autoantibody production. In the present study, lymphocytic stimulation by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A-activated suppressor cell activity was measured in an experimental model of mercury-induced immune complex glomerulopathy associated with anti-nuclear antibodies and vasculitis in PVG/c rats. Both general T cell reactivity to PHA and concanavalin A-activated suppressor function as measured by a syngeneic target cell assay were found to be significantly decreased in mercury-diseased rats as compared with saline-injected control rats. Furthermore, the effect of neonatal and adult thymectomy on the course of the mercury-induced disease was studied. Anti-nuclear antibody activity and glomerular immune aggregate formation were found to be accelerated considerably by neonatal thymectomy, whereas thymectomy at adult age had no significant effect on the interval between the start of mercury administration and the appearance of serological and renal abnormalities. From the results it is concluded that mercury affects both effector and regulatory T cell functions and that immunodysregulation seems to be of pathogenetic significance in this model of drug-induced disease. PMID:6458435

  17. Antinuclear Antibodies in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis Treated or Not with Biologics

    PubMed Central

    Silvy, Florent; Bertin, Daniel; Bardin, Nathalie; Auger, Isabelle; Guzian, Marie-Caroline; Mattei, Jean-Pierre; Guis, Sandrine; Roudier, Jean; Balandraud, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Background With the emergence of biotherapies, accurate diagnosis in early arthritis is needed. At this time, there is no biological marker of psoriatic arthritis. Objective To test whether antinuclear antibodies (ANA) can be used as a diagnostic tool in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we evaluated the prevalence of ANA in biologic-naïve PsA patients and in healthy blood donors. Methods 232 patients from the Rheumatology department, St Marguerite's Hospital, Marseilles, who fulfilled the CASPAR criteria for PsA, underwent clinical and laboratory investigations. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibodies (ENA), rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) were assayed. Ninety-one healthy blood donors were also tested. Results Detection of ANA by indirect immunofluorescence was significantly more frequent in sera from PsA patients than those from controls at serum dilution of 1:100 (57% compared with 40%, Odds Ratio (OR) 1.98 (1.2-3.4) p<0.02) and 1:160 (52% compared with 24%, OR 3,7 (1.9-7.2) p<0.001). No patients had lupus specific autoantibodies, 15 % had RF (34/232), and 1.7 % had ACPA (4/232). Conclusions Detection of ANA was more frequent in sera from PsA patients than in those from healthy controls. This suggests that ANA could be a diagnosis orientation tool in PsA. Nevertheless, the specificity of these antibodies still remains to be investigated. PMID:26230924

  18. Associations Between Selected Xenobiotics and Antinuclear Antibodies in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999–2004

    PubMed Central

    Dinse, Gregg E.; Jusko, Todd A.; Whitt, Irene Z.; Co, Caroll A.; Parks, Christine G.; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward K.L.; Rose, Kathryn M.; Walker, Nigel J.; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Miller, Frederick W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Potential associations between background environmental chemical exposures and autoimmunity are understudied. Objectives: Our exploratory study investigated exposure to individual environmental chemicals and selected mixtures in relation to the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), a widely used biomarker of autoimmunity, in a representative sample of the U.S. population. Methods: This cross-sectional analysis used data on 4,340 participants from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2004), of whom 14% were ANA positive, to explore associations between ANA and concentrations of dioxins, dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorines, organophosphates, phenols, metals, and other environmental exposures and metabolites measured in participants’ serum, whole blood, or urine. For dioxin-like compounds with toxic equivalency factors, we developed and applied a new statistical approach to study selected mixtures. Lognormal models and censored-data methods produced estimates of chemical associations with ANA in males, nulliparous females, and parous females; these estimates were adjusted for confounders and accommodated concentrations below detectable levels. Results: Several associations between chemical concentration and ANA positivity were observed, but only the association in males exposed to triclosan remained statistically significant after correcting for multiple comparisons (mean concentration ratio = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.8, 4.5; p < 0.00001). Conclusions: These data suggest that background levels of most xenobiotic exposures typical in the U.S. population are not strongly associated with ANA. Future studies should ideally reduce exposure misclassification by including prospective measurement of the chemicals of concern and should track changes in ANA and other autoantibodies over time. Citation: Dinse GE, Jusko TA, Whitt IZ, Co CA, Parks CG, Satoh M, Chan EKL, Rose KM, Walker NJ, Birnbaum LS, Zeldin DC, Weinberg CR, Miller FW. 2016. Associations between selected xenobiotics and antinuclear antibodies in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999–2004. Environ Health Perspect 124:426–436; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409345 PMID:26252071

  19. Immune-Mediated Fever in the Dog. Occurrence of Antinuclear Antibodies, Rheumatoid Factor, Tumor Necrosis Factor and Interleukin-6 in Serum

    PubMed Central

    Bohnhorst, Øvrebø; Hanssen, I; Moen, Torolf

    2002-01-01

    Contents of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), rheumatoid factor (RF), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured in serum from 20 dogs with immune-mediated fever. Seven out of 20 patients were ANA positive, 1 out of 20 was positive to antibodies against extractable nuclear antigens (ENA), 1 out of 20 was positive to antibodies against deoxynucleoproteins (DNP), 2 out of 13 were RF positive and none out of 20 patients had antibodies against native DNA in the serum. TNF-α was not detected in any serum of 15 dogs with immune-mediated fever, while 10 out of 13 presented with elevated IL-6. The results varied between patients, but the IL-6 level was high in most of them. This indicate a role for IL-6 in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated fever in most cases. PMID:12564546

  20. How should a district general hospital immunology service screen for anti-nuclear antibodies? An 'in-the-field' audit.

    PubMed

    Hira-Kazal, R; Shea-Simonds, P; Peacock, J L; Maher, J

    2015-04-01

    Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) testing assists in the diagnosis of several immune-mediated disorders. The gold standard method for detection of these antibodies is by indirect immunofluorescence testing on human epidermoid laryngeal carcinoma (HEp-2) cells. However, many laboratories test for these antibodies using solid-phase assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which allows for higher throughput testing at reduced cost. In this study, we have audited the performance of a previously established ELISA assay to screen for ANA, making comparison with the gold standard HEp-2 immunofluorescence test. A prospective and unselected sample of 89 consecutive ANA test requests by consultant rheumatologists were evaluated in parallel over a period of 10 months using both tests. ELISA and HEp-2 screening assays yielded 40 (45%) and 72 (81%) positive test results, respectively, demonstrating lack of concordance between test methods. Using standard and clinical samples, it was demonstrated that the ELISA method did not detect several ANA with nucleolar, homogeneous and speckled immunofluorescence patterns. None of these ELISA(NEG) HEp-2(POS) ANA were reactive with a panel of six extractable nuclear antigens or with double-stranded DNA. Nonetheless, 13 of these samples (15%) originated from patients with recognized ANA-associated disease (n = 7) or Raynaud's phenomenon (n = 6). We conclude that ELISA screening may fail to detect clinically relevant ANA that lack defined specificity for antigen. PMID:25412573

  1. Development of the Antinuclear and Anticytoplasmic Antibody Consensus Panel by the Association of Medical Laboratory Immunologists

    PubMed Central

    James, Karen; Carpenter, A. Betts; Cook, Linda; Marchand, Richard; Nakamura, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    The Association of Medical Laboratory Immunologists (AMLI) have developed a panel of antinuclear and anticytoplasmic antibody consensus sera that can be useful for enzyme immunoassay (EIA), Ouchterlony, and immunofluorescence assay methods. It was developed to assist in the evaluation of newly available EIA methods for the detection of autoantibodies. The panel of sera was evaluated in several clinical laboratories and a large number of laboratories owned by manufacturers of clinical autoantibody testing kits. The majority of sera performed well for the EIAs in both the clinical laboratories and the manufacturers' laboratories, but some samples had discrepant results. A major source of discrepancy is the current inability of the EIA results to be directly compared in a quantitative way as no standardization exists. The evaluation demonstrated lower sensitivity of detection by the Ouchterlony method. The limited evaluation of the sera with immunoblotting and Western blotting did not show good agreement with other methods. Further work must be done to standardize blotting methods prior to their use in routine clinical testing. The sera are now available to vendors and clinical laboratories for use in the detection of SS-A, SS-B, Sm, U1-RNP, Scl-70, Jo-1, double-stranded DNA, and centromere antibodies. The availability of the consensus sera will help evaluate and improve the EIA methods currently being used. PMID:10799458

  2. Development of the antinuclear and anticytoplasmic antibody consensus panel by the Association of Medical Laboratory Immunologists.

    PubMed

    James, K; Carpenter, A B; Cook, L; Marchand, R; Nakamura, R M

    2000-05-01

    The Association of Medical Laboratory Immunologists (AMLI) have developed a panel of antinuclear and anticytoplasmic antibody consensus sera that can be useful for enzyme immunoassay (EIA), Ouchterlony, and immunofluorescence assay methods. It was developed to assist in the evaluation of newly available EIA methods for the detection of autoantibodies. The panel of sera was evaluated in several clinical laboratories and a large number of laboratories owned by manufacturers of clinical autoantibody testing kits. The majority of sera performed well for the EIAs in both the clinical laboratories and the manufacturers' laboratories, but some samples had discrepant results. A major source of discrepancy is the current inability of the EIA results to be directly compared in a quantitative way as no standardization exists. The evaluation demonstrated lower sensitivity of detection by the Ouchterlony method. The limited evaluation of the sera with immunoblotting and Western blotting did not show good agreement with other methods. Further work must be done to standardize blotting methods prior to their use in routine clinical testing. The sera are now available to vendors and clinical laboratories for use in the detection of SS-A, SS-B, Sm, U1-RNP, Scl-70, Jo-1, double-stranded DNA, and centromere antibodies. The availability of the consensus sera will help evaluate and improve the EIA methods currently being used. PMID:10799458

  3. Evaluation of the Canadian Rheumatology Association Choosing Wisely recommendation concerning anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) testing.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Canadian Rheumatology Association Choosing Wisely recommendation concerning anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) testing. Patients with joint pain/stiffness/swelling were assessed to determine if ANA testing was indicated. An a priori threshold was set before ANA testing would be considered. Those who did not have ANA testing ordered were followed for 1 year to determine if any of them went on to have a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or other connective tissue disease. A parallel study was conducted with a similar a priori threshold for the use of rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody testing in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and again, patients were followed for 1 year. A total of 866 subjects were examined, 509 females (58.8 %) and 357 males (41.2 %). The mean age of the group was 47.5??16.8 years. The mean duration of symptoms was 12.0??5.6 weeks. Of the 866 subjects, 68 met an a priori threshold for ordering ANA, RF, and anti-CCP testing. Of these 68, there was a newly diagnosed case of SLE, 4 newly diagnosed cases of RA, and 3 cases of polymyalgia rheumatica. The remaining 798 subjects were followed for approximately 1 year and none developed evidence of SLE, RA, or other connective tissue disease. In the evaluation of non-specific musculoskeletal symptoms, setting an a priori threshold for ordering serology in keeping with the spirit of the Canadian Rheumatology Association Choosing Wisely recommendation for antibody testing results in a very low risk of missing a case of systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26032433

  4. Choosing wisely: Review and commentary on anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) testing.

    PubMed

    Fritzler, Marvin J

    2016-03-01

    Choosing Wisely®: Next Steps in Improving Healthcare Value is an initiative of the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation. The driving forces for the Choosing Wisely (CW) campaign include rising and unstainable health care expenditures and evidence that there is lack of fiscal stewardship of health care resources. The American College of Rheumatology and the Canadian Rheumatology Association published their top five Choosing Wisely recommendations, the first of which pertained to antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and ANA subserology testing. Concerns about the wasteful use of these tests prompted an analysis of the expenditures attributable to ANA testing as a proportion of total health care expenditures and based on a financial model was in the range of 0.00125%. It is suggested that if the sole use of ANA testing is to add evidence to support a diagnosis when the pre-test probability is high, then the ANA test has limited clinical value. Accordingly, the goal of ANA testing needs to be reconsidered and expanded beyond an approach to simply confirming a diagnosis with 'intention to treat' to a goal of case finding of 'pre- or early disease' with an 'intent to prevent' disease. This an area where more significant inroads can be made in preventing end organ disease and thereby reducing health care expenditures HCE. One CW recommendation that bears emphasizing is that, with a few possible exceptions, repeat ANA or ANA subserology testing has little clinical value in monitoring disease activity or predicting a flare. PMID:26687321

  5. Biosensor for total antinuclear antibody determination at the point-of-care.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Robert L; Konstantinov, Konstantin N

    2016-09-15

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are important in diagnosis and follow-up of patients with autoimmune conditions. The current increase in ANA requests is driven by broadening the use of ANA from a test for lupus to a test for diverse autoimmune diseases, but the standard method is protracted, cumbersome and prone to error. We describe an electrochemical method for quantifying total ANA for use as a point-of-care diagnostic aid. In this technology the target autoantigens are derived from a protein/nucleoprotein mixture prepared from an inexpensive source and adsorbed to a porous membrane with high protein binding capacity. Serum is slowly drawn through the membrane comprising the high density autoantigen mixture to induce rapid binding of patient autoantibodies. After rinsing, peroxidase-conjugated anti-IgG is drawn through the membrane followed by rinsing, insertion of an electrode assembly, and addition of the enzyme substrate. Substrate peroxidation is measured by microamperage-level current accompanying electrochemical reduction of the intermediate product. Values are comparable to a standard ANA test but require a total processing time of ~20min. This method has the promise to greatly expand ANA testing in clinical settings for initial patient assessment of autoimmune disease. PMID:27132005

  6. Meta-Analysis: Diagnostic Accuracy of Antinuclear Antibodies, Smooth Muscle Antibodies and Antibodies to a Soluble Liver Antigen/Liver Pancreas in Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Chen, Wei-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Background Antinuclear antibodies (ANA), smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) and antibodies to a soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas (anti-SLA/LP) are useful markers that can help clinicians to diagnose and classify autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Objectives To determine whether ANA, SMA and anti-SLA/LP help to accurately diagnose patients with AIH. Search strategy The PubMed, CNKI, WANFANG, and SinoMed databases were accessed to retrieve studies published in English and Chinese. Studies published up to October 2013 were reviewed. Selection criteria Studies on the diagnostic value of ANA, SMA or anti-SLA/LP in the diagnosis of known or suspected AIH were included. Data collection and analysis Two authors evaluated studies independently and rated their methodological quality using quality assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies (QUADAS) tools; relevant data were abstracted. The random-effects method was used to summarize sensitivities, specificities, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) from all 29 studies. Results The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and DOR for ANA were 0.650 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.619 to 0.680), 0.751 (95%CI, 0.737 to 0.764), 3.030 (95%CI, 2.349 to 3.910), 0.464 (95%CI, 0.356 to 0.604), and 7.380 (95%CI, 4.344 to 12.539), respectively. For SMA, the values were 0.593 (95%CI, 0.564 to 0.621), 0.926 (95%CI, 0.917 to 0.934), 11.740 (95%CI, 7.379 to 18.678), 0.449 (95%CI, 0.367 to 0.549), and 31.553 (95%CI, 17.147 to 58.060), respectively. Finally, for anti-SLA/LP, the values were 0.194 (95%CI, 0.168 to 0.222), 0.989 (95%CI, 0.985 to 0.993), 11.089 (95%CI, 7.601 to 16.177), 0.839 (95%CI, 0.777 to 0.905), and 16.867 (95%CI, 10.956 to 25.967), respectively. Authors’ conclusions ANA provided moderate sensitivity and specificity, while SMA gave moderate sensitivity and high specificity, and anti-SLA/LP exhibited low sensitivity and high specificity. All three antibodies were limited by their unsatisfactory sensitivities and lack of consistency. PMID:24651126

  7. Antinuclear Antibody-Negative Lupus Nephritis with Full House Nephropathy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Sierra C; Smith, Maxwell L; Chang-Miller, April; Keddis, Mira T

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a serious and common complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that predisposes to significant morbidity and mortality. Studies show that prompt diagnosis and treatment improves patient survival. We present a case of a 49-year-old female with an atypical presentation of LN who initially presented with new-onset hypertension, edema, arthritis, serositis and recently diagnosed leukocytoclastic vasculitis who later developed acute kidney injury, hematuria and nephrotic syndrome. Laboratory testing showed mixed cryoglobulinemia and elevated perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic (p-ANCA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) antibodies. SLE-related serologies were negative. Kidney biopsy showed diffuse proliferative global glomerulonephritis with a full-house nephropathy pattern on immunofluorescence suggestive of LN. Due to high clinical suspicion and renal biopsy findings, she was treated for LN with prompt renal response to immunosuppression. Cryoglobulins, p-ANCA and MPO titers normalized and the negative SLE serologies remained negative. Literature review on antinuclear antibody (ANA)-negative and seronegative LN revealed the following patient presentations: (1) renal-limited or renal and extra-renal manifestations of SLE with negative serologies and (2) renal and extra-renal manifestations of SLE with negative serologies at presentation who develop positive serologies later in follow-up. Both groups represent a unique and challenging cohort of patients who may require longer follow-up and further testing to rule out other glomerular diseases that may mimic LN on renal biopsy. The absence of SLE-related serologies should be weighed against a high pre-test probability of ANA-negative or seronegative LN. If highly suspected, the patient should be treated promptly with close monitoring. PMID:26812129

  8. A girl with cutaneous lesions, polyarthritis, and antinuclear antibodies positivity.

    PubMed

    Musuruana, Jorge L; Cavallasca, Javier A

    2011-01-01

    On October 1996, a 14-year-old girl was admitted to the hospital because cutaneous lesions, asthenia, and arthralgias. On examination, there was nonscarring hair thinning with a widened part over the frontal hairline, polymorphic papulosquamous rash on her face, neck, arms, and trunk, and livedo reticularis in her legs. Multiple aphtous ulcers were present on the buccal and nasal mucosa. There was polyarthritis involving the wrist, metacarpophalangeal joints, proximal interphalangeal joints, and metatarsophalangeal joints of both hands and feet. Skin biopsy of the face was compatible with subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. She started on prednisone 60 mg/d without improvement, and later hdroxhchloroquine (HCQ) 6 mg/kg/d was added for one year. Cutaneous lesions were almost healed, with just a hypopigmented macules left. Over the last 14 years, she has not shown any cutaneous or systemic manifestations. PMID:22363856

  9. A Girl with Cutaneous Lesions, Polyarthritis, and Antinuclear Antibodies Positivity

    PubMed Central

    Musuruana, Jorge L.; Cavallasca, Javier A.

    2011-01-01

    On October 1996, a 14-year-old girl was admitted to the hospital because cutaneous lesions, asthenia, and arthralgias. On examination, there was nonscarring hair thinning with a widened part over the frontal hairline, polymorphic papulosquamous rash on her face, neck, arms, and trunk, and livedo reticularis in her legs. Multiple aphtous ulcers were present on the buccal and nasal mucosa. There was polyarthritis involving the wrist, metacarpophalangeal joints, proximal interphalangeal joints, and metatarsophalangeal joints of both hands and feet. Skin biopsy of the face was compatible with subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. She started on prednisone 60?mg/d without improvement, and later hdroxhchloroquine (HCQ) 6?mg/kg/d was added for one year. Cutaneous lesions were almost healed, with just a hypopigmented macules left. Over the last 14 years, she has not shown any cutaneous or systemic manifestations. PMID:22363856

  10. Applying Choosing Wisely: Antinuclear Antibody (ANA) and Sub-Serology Testing in a Safety Net Hospital System

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lisa Anne; Goldstein, Barbara; Tran, Vivian; Keniston, Angela; Yazdany, Jinoos; Hirsh, Joel; Storfa, Amy; Zell, JoAnn

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In 2013, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) participated in the Choosing Wisely campaign and devised a recommendation to avoid testing antinuclear antibody (ANA) subserologies without a positive ANA and clinical suspicion of disease. The goals of our study were to describe ANA and subserology ordering practices and predictors of ordering concurrent ANA and subserologies in a safety-net hospital. Methods: We identified ANA and subserologies (dsDNA, Sm, RNP, SSA, SSB, Scl-70 and centromere) completed at Denver Health between 1/1/2005 and 12/31/2011. Variables included demographics, primary insurance, service, and setting from which the test was ordered. We performed multivariable logistic regression to determine predictors of concurrent ordering of ANA and subserologies. Results: During seven years, 3221 ANA were performed in 2771 individuals and 211 (6.6%) were performed concurrently with at least one subserology. The most common concurrent subserologies were dsDNA (21.8%), SSA (20.8%), and SSB (19.7%). In the multivariable logistic analysis, significant predictors of concurrent ANA and subserologies were the labs being ordered from subspecialty care (OR 8.12, 95% CI 5.27-12.50, p-value <0.0001) or from urgent/inpatient care (OR 3.86, 95% CI 1.78-8.38, p-value 0.001). A significant predictor of decreased odds was male gender (OR 0.32, 95% CI 0.21-0.49, p-value <0.0001). Five individuals (2.2% of the negative ANA with subserologies ordered) had a negative ANA but positive subserologies. Conclusion: Of 3221 ANA, 6.6% were performed concurrently with subserologies, and subspecialists were more likely to order concurrent tests. A negative ANA predicted negative subserologies with rare exceptions, which validates the ACRs recommendations. PMID:26862352

  11. Aging-dependent decline of IL-10 producing B cells coincides with production of antinuclear antibodies but not rheumatoid factors.

    PubMed

    van der Geest, Kornelis S M; Lorencetti, Pedro G; Abdulahad, Wayel H; Horst, Gerda; Huitema, Minke; Roozendaal, Caroline; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Boots, Annemieke M H

    2016-03-01

    Aging is associated with development of autoimmunity. Loss of B cell tolerance in the elderly is suggested by an increased prevalence of anti-nuclear antibodies (ANAs) and rheumatoid factors (RFs). Accumulating evidence indicates that B cells also impact autoimmunity via secretion of cytokines. So far, few studies have directly assessed the effect of aging on the latter B cell function. Here, we determined if and how human aging influences the production of cytokines by B cells. In a cross-sectional study, we found that absolute numbers of circulating B cells were similar in 31 young (ages 19-39) and 73 old (age≥60) individuals. Numbers of transitional B cells (CD19(+)CD27(-)CD38(High)CD24(High)) were decreased in old individuals, whereas numbers of naive and memory B cell subsets were comparable in young and old individuals. Short-term in vitro stimulation of whole blood samples revealed that numbers of B cells capable of producing TNF-α were similar in young and old individuals. In contrast, B cells capable of IL-10 production were decreased in old subjects. This decline of IL-10(+) B cells was observed in old individuals that were ANA positive, and in those that were negative for both ANAs and RFs. However, IL-10(+) B cells were remarkably well retained in the circulation of old subjects that were RF positive. Thus, pro-inflammatory TNF-α(+) B cells are retained in the elderly, whereas IL-10(+) B cells generally decline. In addition, our findings indicate that IL-10(+) B cells may differentially impact the development of ANAs and RFs in the elderly. PMID:26721376

  12. Report of the First International Consensus on Standardized Nomenclature of Antinuclear Antibody HEp-2 Cell Patterns 2014–2015

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Edward K. L.; Damoiseaux, Jan; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; Conrad, Karsten; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; von Mühlen, Carlos A.; Andrade, Luis E. C.

    2015-01-01

    During the 12th International Workshop on Autoantibodies and Autoimmunity held in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on August 28, 2014, a full day session was devoted to establishing a consensus on the nomenclature of staining patterns observed in the antinuclear antibody (ANA) indirect immunofluorescence test on HEp-2 cells. The current report summarizes the collective agreements with input from the host Brazilian and international communities that represented research, clinical, and diagnostic service laboratories. Patterns are categorized in three major groups (nuclear, cytoplasmic, and mitotic patterns) and each pattern has been defined and described in detail. The consensus nomenclature and representative patterns are made available online at the international consensus on antinuclear antibody pattern (ICAP) website (www.ANApatterns.org). To facilitate continuous improvement and input, specific comments on ICAP are encouraged and these will be discussed in subsequent ICAP meetings. The ultimate goal with the establishment of the ICAP is to promote harmonization and understanding of autoantibody test nomenclature, as well as interpretation guidelines for ANA testing, thereby optimizing usage in patient care. PMID:26347739

  13. Induction of Antinuclear Antibodies by De Novo Autoimmune Hepatitis Regulates Alloimmune Responses in Rat Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Toshiaki; Goto, Shigeru; Lai, Chia-Yun; Hsu, Li-Wen; Tseng, Hui-Peng; Chen, Kuang-Den; Wang, Chih-Chi; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Chen, Chao-Long

    2013-01-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A) is a lectin originating from the jack-bean and well known for its ability to stimulate T cells and induce autoimmune hepatitis. We previously demonstrated the induction of immunosuppressive antinuclear autoantibody in the course of Con A-induced transient autoimmune hepatitis. This study aimed to clarify the effects of Con A-induced hepatitis on liver allograft rejection and acceptance. In this study, we observed the unique phenomenon that the induction of transient de novo autoimmune hepatitis by Con A injection paradoxically overcomes the rejection without any immunosuppressive drug and exhibits significantly prolonged survival after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Significantly increased titers of anti-nuclear Abs against histone H1 and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and reduced donor specific alloantibody response were observed in Con A-injected recipients. Induction of Foxp3 and IL-10 in OLT livers of Con A-injected recipients suggested the involvement of regulatory T cells in this unique phenomenon. Our present data suggest the significance of autoimmune responses against nuclear histone H1 and HMGB1 for competing allogeneic immune responses, resulting in the acceptance of liver allografts in experimental liver transplantation. PMID:24454474

  14. Diagnostic profile on the IFA 40: HEp-20-10 - an immunofluorescence test for reliable antinuclear antibody screening.

    PubMed

    Rohwder, Edda; Locke, Michael; Fraune, Johanna; Fechner, Kai

    2015-04-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence assay is the recommended gold standard to test for antinuclear antibodies (ANA), which are important biomarkers for systemic rheumatic autoimmune diseases. It is internationally accepted that indirect immunofluorescence assay ANA screening is most sensitive on human epithelial (HEp-2) cells. The cells present a multitude of antigens that display distinguishable localization patterns in interphase and mitotic cells in indirect immunofluorescence analysis. Here, we present the IFA 40: HEp-20-10 test kit (Euroimmun AG, Lbeck, Germany), which is cleared for sale on the US market by the FDA. The test has been designed for qualitative and semiquantitative screening of ANA in human sera. It uses the commonly applied 1:40 cutoff dilution and the enhanced HEp-20-10 cell line for more efficient pattern recognition and has been validated in various studies and by method comparison. The IFA 40: HEp-20-10 test fulfills the essential criteria for reliable application in autoimmune diagnostics. PMID:25530004

  15. Identification of specific antinuclear antibodies in dogs using a line immunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Hanna D; Lattwein, Erik; Renneker, Stefanie; Lilliehöök, Inger; Rönnelid, Johan; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene

    2015-12-15

    Circulating antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are commonly present in the systemic autoimmune disease Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and in other systemic rheumatic diseases, in humans as well as in dogs. The indirect immunofluorescence (IIF)-ANA test is the standard method for detecting ANA. Further testing for specific ANA with immunoblot techniques or ELISAs is routinely performed in humans to aid in the diagnosis and monitoring of disease. Several specific ANA identified in humans have been identified also in suspected canine SLE but, in contrast to humans, investigation of autoantibodies in canine SLE is mainly restricted to the IIF-ANA test. Our aim was to identify both known and novel specific ANA in dogs and to investigate if different IIF-ANA patterns are associated with different specific ANA in dogs. Sera from 240 dogs with suspicion of autoimmune disease (210 IIF-ANA positive (ANA(pos)) and 30 IIF-ANA negative (ANA(neg))) as well as sera from 27 healthy controls were included. The samples were analysed with a line immunoassay, LIA (Euroline ANA Profile 5, Euroimmun, Lübeck, Germany) and four different ELISAs (Euroimmun). The ANA(pos) dogs were divided in two groups depending on the type of IIF-ANA pattern. Of the 210 ANA(pos) samples 68 were classified as ANA homogenous (ANA(H)) and 141 as ANA speckled (ANA(S)), one sample was not possible to classify. Dogs in the ANA(H) group had, compared to the other groups, most frequently high levels of anti-double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) and anti-nucleosome ANA. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were confirmed in some dogs with the Crithidia luciliae indirect immunofluorescence test (CLIFT). The frequency of ANA(H) dogs with values above those observed in the healthy group was significantly higher compared to ANA(S) dogs for anti-dsDNA, anti-nucleosome, and anti-histone reactivity. Dogs in the ANA(S) group had, compared to the other groups, most frequently high levels of anti-ribonucleoproteins (RNP) and/or anti-Smith (Sm) antibodies. Reactivity against Sjögren's syndrome related antigens (SS)-A (including the Ro-60 and Ro-52 subcomponents), SS-B, histidyl tRNA synthetase (Jo-1), topoisomerase I antigen (Scl-70), polymyositis-scleroderma antigen (PM-Scl) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was also noted in individual dogs. In conclusion, by using a commercial LIA and different ELISAs originally developed for detection of human ANA, we identified several specific ANA in serum samples from dogs sampled for IIF-ANA testing. Further, we found that the types of IIF-ANA pattern were associated with reactivity against some particular nuclear antigens. PMID:26547884

  16. Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice show increased titers of serum anti-nuclear and anti-dsDNA antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuehai; Huang, Ziyang; Lu, Huixia; Lin, Huili; Wang, Zhenhua; Chen, Xiaoqing; Ouyang, Qiufang; Tang, Mengxiong; Hao, Panpan; Ni, Jingqin; Xu, Dongming; Zhang, Mingxiang; Zhang, Qunye; Lin, Ling; and others

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibodies were higher in ApoE{sup -/-} than C57B6/L mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spleen was greater and splenocyte apoptosis lower in ApoE{sup -/-} than B6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Level of TLR4 was lower in spleen tissue of ApoE{sup -/-} than B6 mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TLR4 pathway may participate in maintaining the balance of splenocyte apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The TLR4 pathway may participate in antibody production in spleen tissue. -- Abstract: Apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE{sup -/-}) mice, atherosclerosis-prone mice, show an autoimmune response, but the pathogenesis is not fully understood. We investigated the pathogenesis in female and male ApoE{sup -/-} mice. The spleens of all ApoE{sup -/-} and C57BL/6 (B6) mice were weighed. The serum IgG level and titers of anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibody were assayed by ELISA. Apoptosis of spleen tissue was evaluated by TUNEL. TLR4 level in spleen tissue was tested by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Levels of MyD88, p38, phosphorylated p38 (pp38), interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) in spleen tissue were detected by Western blot analysis. We also survey the changes of serum autoantibodies, spleen weight, splenocyte apoptosis and the expressions of TLR4, MyD88, pp38, IRF3 and Bax in spleen tissue in male ApoE{sup -/-} mice after 4 weeks of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Toll-like receptor 4 ligand, administration. ApoE{sup -/-} mice showed splenomegaly and significantly increased serum level of IgG and titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibody as compared with B6 mice. Splenocyte apoptosis and the expression of TLR4, MyD88, pp38, IRF3 and Bax in spleen tissue were significantly lower in ApoE{sup -/-} than B6 mice. The expression of TLR4, MyD88, IRF3, pp38, and Bax differed by sex in ApoE{sup -/-} spleen tissue. The down-regulation of TLR4 signal molecules induced by LPS led to decreased expression of Bax and increased serum titers of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibody. Therefore, the TLR4 signal pathway may participate in maintaining the balance of splenocyte apoptosis and autoantibody production in ApoE{sup -/-} mice.

  17. Current concepts and future directions for the assessment of autoantibodies to cellular antigens referred to as anti-nuclear antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Michael; Meroni, Pier-Luigi; Bossuyt, Xavier; Fritzler, Marvin J

    2014-01-01

    The detection of autoantibodies that target intracellular antigens, commonly termed anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), is a serological hallmark in the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD). Different methods are available for detection of ANA and all bearing their own advantages and limitations. Most laboratories use the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay based on HEp-2 cell substrates. Due to the subjectivity of this diagnostic platform, automated digital reading systems have been developed during the last decade. In addition, solid phase immunoassays using well characterized antigens have gained widespread adoption in high throughput laboratories due to their ease of use and open automation. Despite all the advances in the field of ANA detection and its contribution to the diagnosis of SARD, significant challenges persist. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current status on ANA testing including automated IIF reading systems and solid phase assays and suggests an approach to interpretation of results and discusses meeting the problems of assay standardization and other persistent challenges. PMID:24868563

  18. Role of Nucleic AcidSensing TLRs in Diverse Autoantibody Specificities and Anti-nuclear AntibodyProducing B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Yi Ting; Scatizzi, John C.; Gahan, Jennifer D.; Lawson, Brian R.; Baccala, Roberto; Pollard, K. Michael; Beutler, Bruce A.; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N.; Kono, Dwight H.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid (NA)sensing TLRs (NA-TLRs) promote the induction of anti-nuclear Abs in systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the extent to which other nonnuclear pathogenic autoantibody specificities that occur in lupus and independently in other autoimmune diseases depend on NA-TLRs, and which immune cells require NA-TLRs in systemic autoimmunity, remains to be determined. Using Unc93b13d lupus-prone mice that lack NA-TLR signaling, we found that all pathogenic nonnuclear auto-antibody specificities examined, even anti-RBC, required NA-TLRs. Furthermore, we document that NA-TLRs in B cells were required for the development of antichromatin and rheumatoid factor. These findings support a unifying NA-TLRmediated mechanism of autoantibody production that has both pathophysiological and therapeutic implications for systemic lupus erythematosus and several other humoral-mediated autoimmune diseases. In particular, our findings suggest that targeting of NA-TLR signaling in B cells alone would be sufficient to specifically block production of a broad diversity of autoantibodies. PMID:23589617

  19. Current Concepts and Future Directions for the Assessment of Autoantibodies to Cellular Antigens Referred to as Anti-Nuclear Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Michael; Meroni, Pier-Luigi; Bossuyt, Xavier; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2014-01-01

    The detection of autoantibodies that target intracellular antigens, commonly termed anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), is a serological hallmark in the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD). Different methods are available for detection of ANA and all bearing their own advantages and limitations. Most laboratories use the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assay based on HEp-2 cell substrates. Due to the subjectivity of this diagnostic platform, automated digital reading systems have been developed during the last decade. In addition, solid phase immunoassays using well characterized antigens have gained widespread adoption in high throughput laboratories due to their ease of use and open automation. Despite all the advances in the field of ANA detection and its contribution to the diagnosis of SARD, significant challenges persist. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current status on ANA testing including automated IIF reading systems and solid phase assays and suggests an approach to interpretation of results and discusses meeting the problems of assay standardization and other persistent challenges. PMID:24868563

  20. Development of antinuclear antibodies and a genetic linkage in pigs infected with porcine circovirus type 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives. Prominent nuclear immunohistochemical staining of a PCV-2 free porcine kidney cell line (PK-15) was detected with a rabbit polyclonal antibody produced against a conserved PCV2 Rep-protein peptide. This unexpected finding led us to retrospectively test sera from gnotobiotic pigs for the ...

  1. TLR Tolerance Reduces IFN-Alpha Production Despite Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Expansion and Anti-Nuclear Antibodies in NZB Bicongenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Christina; Lajoie, Ginette; Wither, Joan E.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic loci on New Zealand Black (NZB) chromosomes 1 and 13 play a significant role in the development of lupus-like autoimmune disease. We have previously shown that C57BL/6 (B6) congenic mice with homozygous NZB chromosome 1 (B6.NZBc1) or 13 (B6.NZBc13) intervals develop anti-nuclear antibodies and mild glomerulonephritis (GN), together with increased T and B cell activation. Here, we produced B6.NZBc1c13 bicongenic mice with both intervals, and demonstrate several novel phenotypes including: marked plasmacytoid and myeloid dendritic cell expansion, and elevated IgA production. Despite these changes, only minor increases in anti-nuclear antibody production were seen, and the severity of GN was reduced as compared to B6.NZBc1 mice. Although bicongenic mice had increased levels of baff and tnf-α mRNA in their spleens, the levels of IFN-α-induced gene expression were reduced. Splenocytes from bicongenic mice also demonstrated reduced secretion of IFN-α following TLR stimulation in vitro. This reduction was not due to inhibition by TNF-α and IL-10, or regulation by other cellular populations. Because pDC in bicongenic mice are chronically exposed to nuclear antigen-containing immune complexes in vivo, we examined whether repeated stimulation of mouse pDC with TLR ligands leads to impaired IFN-α production, a phenomenon termed TLR tolerance. Bone marrow pDC from both B6 and bicongenic mice demonstrated markedly inhibited secretion of IFN-α following repeated stimulation with a TLR9 ligand. Our findings suggest that the expansion of pDC and production of anti-nuclear antibodies need not be associated with increased IFN-α production and severe kidney disease, revealing additional complexity in the regulation of autoimmunity in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22574220

  2. Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Walk Test (SMWT) Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales (AIMS) Evidence Based Practice (EBP) Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) Fracture Risk ... Investigators Resources for Doctoral Students/Post-Doctoral Fellows Evidence-Based Practice for Academic Researchers Responsible Data Management in ...

  3. Differences in individual efficacy of two Sairei-to preparations (Sojyutu-Sairei-to and Byakujyutu-Sairei-to) on recurrent spontaneous abortions of autoimmune etiologies evaluated by antinuclear antibody and anticardiolipin antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Kano, Takashi; Shimizu, Masahiko; Kanda, Takayoshi

    2010-01-01

    The differences in individual efficacy of two Sairei-to preparations (Sojyutu-Sairei-to and Byakujyutu-Sairei-to) on antinuclear antibody (ANA) and anticardiolipin antibody (ACLA) positive recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) was analyzed in 52 patients (a total of 61 treatment sessions). Patients who failed to respond to initial treatment with Sojyutu-Sairei-to were additionally treated with Byakujyutu- Sairei-to, and the time course of ANA and ACLA titers in these patients was analyzed. ACLA titers were decreased significantly by the treatment of Byakujyutu-Sairei-to, however, the percentage of successfully prevented abortion cases did not differ significantly between the Sojyutu-Sairei-to treatment group and the Byakujyutu-Sairei-to treatment group. ACLA titer was decreased in all 10 cases where abortion was successfully prevented by the treatment with Sojyutu-Sairei-to or Byakujyutu-Sairei-to. In the cases where both ANA and ACLA were decreased following treatment with Sojyutu-Sairei-to or Byakujyutu-Sairei-to, the percentage of cases rated as "Kyo" and "Rikan" were significantly higher in the Byakujyutu-Sairei-to group. These results indicate that Byakujyutu-Sairei-to is effective against ACLA positive RSA through the antibody-reducing activity, which differs from that of Sojyutu-Sairei-to in individual cases. On the basis of these results, Sairei-to therapy, which is superior to aspirin and heparin in terms of efficacy and safety, is recommended as the first-line therapy for RSA of autoimmune etiologies. Furthermore, to elevate the percentage of successfully prevented abortions, it is advisable to select one of the two Sairei-to preparations (Sojyutu-Sairei-to and Byakujyutu-Sairei-to) on the basis of differential diagnosis using the methods of Oriental medicine. PMID:20128042

  4. Specificity of antinuclear antibodies in scleroderma-like chronic graft-versus-host disease: clinical correlation and histocompatibility locus antigen association.

    PubMed

    Bell, S A; Faust, H; Mittermüller, J; Kolb, H J; Meurer, M

    1996-05-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantation presents, in a few cases, as mild to severe scleroderma-like changes. Patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease with and without sclerodermatous skin changes were analysed for antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) and antinucleolar autoantibodies (ANoA) and the results correlated with disease symptoms and histocompatibility locus antigen (HLA) pattern. Nineteen patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease and scleroderma-like skin changes, 18 with chronic graft-versus-host disease without scleroderma, and 17 controls on immunosuppressive treatment were screened for ANA and ANoA using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunodiffusion and immunoblot techniques. Four patients with severe scleroderma had antibodies to topoisomerase I, two had antibodies against PM-Scl, both characteristic serological findings in idiopathic systemic scleroderma. One patient had La/SSB antibodies and, in three cases, antibodies to the nucleolar antigen C23 (nucleolin) could be identified. A possible correlation between antinucleolin antibodies and disease activity was observed. HLA-A1, -B1, and -B2 were found significantly more often in patients with scleroderma-like symptoms in comparison to patients without scleroderma-like symptoms. Chronic graft-versus-host disease with scleroderma-like manifestations can be associated with the occurrence of ANA specific for idiopathic scleroderma. The development of scleroderma after bone marrow transplantation might have a HLA-linked genetic background. PMID:8736324

  5. Speckled antinuclear factor in African sera

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, B. M.; Herrick, Erina M.; Holborow, E. J.

    1970-01-01

    Speckled antinuclear factor reacting with rat liver nuclei was found in a high proportion of sera from apparently healthy inhabitants of Western Nigeria, Northern Nigeria, Liberia and Uganda. A significant relationship was found between the occurrence of the antibody in Nigerian sera and the presence of high levels of malaria antibody and of high levels of IgM. Speckled antinuclear factor was also found in the sera of CBA mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. These findings suggest that the speckled antinuclear factor found in African sera may be a cross-reacting antibody to a nuclear component of malaria parasites. The demonstration of speckled antinuclear factor in the serum of a subject who has been resident in part of tropical Africa cannot be taken as a reliable indication of the presence of a connective tissue disease. PMID:4991609

  6. Mercury exposure, serum antinuclear/antinucleolar antibodies, and serum cytokine levels in mining populations in Amazonian Brazil: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Renee M; Nyland, Jennifer F; Silva, Ines A; Ventura, Ana Maria; de Souza, Jose Maria; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2010-05-01

    Mercury is an immunotoxic substance that has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in rodent models, characterized by lymphoproliferation, overproduction of immunoglobulin (IgG and IgE), and high circulating levels of auto-antibodies directed at antigens located in the nucleus (antinuclear auto-antibodies, or ANA) or the nucleolus (antinucleolar auto-antibodies, or ANoA). We have reported elevated levels of ANA and ANoA in human populations exposed to mercury in artisanal gold mining, though other confounding variables that may also modulate ANA/ANoA levels were not well controlled. The goal of this study is to specifically test whether occupational and environmental conditions (other than mercury exposure) that are associated with artisanal gold mining affect the prevalence of markers of autoimmune dysfunction. We measured ANA, ANoA, and cytokine concentrations in serum and compared results from mercury-exposed artisanal gold miners to those from diamond and emerald miners working under similar conditions and with similar socio-economic status and risks of infectious disease. Mercury-exposed gold miners had higher prevalence of detectable ANA and ANoA and higher titers of ANA and ANoA as compared to diamond and emerald miners with no occupational mercury exposure. Also, mercury-exposed gold miners with detectable ANA or ANoA in serum had significantly higher concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma in serum as compared to the diamond and emerald miners. This study provides further evidence that mercury exposure may lead to autoimmune dysfunction and systemic inflammation in affected populations. PMID:20176347

  7. The Parasitic Worm Product ES-62 Targets Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88Dependent Effector Mechanisms to Suppress Antinuclear Antibody Production and Proteinuria in MRL/lpr Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, David T; McGrath, Mairi A; Pineda, Miguel A; Al-Riyami, Lamyaa; Rzepecka, Justyna; Lumb, Felicity; Harnett, William; Harnett, Margaret M

    2015-01-01

    Objective The hygiene hypothesis suggests that parasitic helminths (worms) protect against the development of autoimmune disease via a serendipitous side effect of worm-derived immunomodulators that concomitantly promote parasite survival and limit host pathology. The aim of this study was to investigate whether ES-62, a phosphorylcholine-containing glycoprotein secreted by the filarial nematode Acanthocheilonema viteae, protects against kidney damage in an MRL/lpr mouse model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods MRL/lpr mice progressively produce high levels of autoantibodies, and the resultant deposition of immune complexes drives kidney pathology. The effects of ES-62 on disease progression were assessed by measurement of proteinuria, assessment of kidney histology, determination of antinuclear antibody (ANA) production and cytokine levels, and flow cytometric analysis of relevant cellular populations. Results ES-62 restored the disrupted balance between effector and regulatory B cells in MRL/lpr mice by inhibiting plasmablast differentiation, with a consequent reduction in ANA production and deposition of immune complexes and C3a in the kidneys. Moreover, by reducing interleukin-22 production, ES-62 may desensitize downstream effector mechanisms in the pathogenesis of kidney disease. Highlighting the therapeutic importance of resetting B cell responses, adoptive transfer of purified splenic B cells from ES-62treated MRL/lpr mice mimicked the protection afforded by the helminth product. Mechanistically, this reflects down-regulation of myeloid differentiation factor 88 expression by B cells and also kidney cells, resulting in inhibition of pathogenic cross-talk among Toll-like receptor, C3a-, and immune complexmediated effector mechanisms. Conclusion This study provides the first demonstration of protection against kidney pathology by a parasitic wormderived immunomodulator in a model of SLE and suggests therapeutic potential for drugs based on the mechanism of action of ES-62. PMID:25546822

  8. A proposed mechanism for the adverse effects of acebutolol: CES2 and CYP2C19-mediated metabolism and antinuclear antibody production.

    PubMed

    Muta, Kyotaka; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki

    2015-12-15

    Acebutolol, a β-adrenergic receptor-blocker, occasionally causes drug-induced lupus erythematosus (DILE). Acebutolol is mainly metabolized to diacetolol. Because metabolic activation has been considered to be related to acebutolol-induced toxicity, we sought to identify the enzymes that are responsible for acebutolol metabolism and investigate their involvement in acebutolol-induced toxicity. By using human liver microsomes (HLM) or intestinal microsomes and recombinant enzymes, we found that diacetolol was produced via hydrolysis by carboxylesterase 2 (CES2) and subsequent acetylation by N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2). When acetolol, a hydrolytic metabolite of acebutolol, was incubated with HLM and an NADPH-generating system, a metabolite conjugated with N-acetylcystein was generated. This metabolite was found to be formed by CYP2C19 based on studies with a panel of recombinant cytochrome P450 enzymes and an inhibition study using HLM with tranylcypromine, a CYP2C19 inhibitor. Because antinuclear antibody (ANA) production is associated with DILE, we investigated whether ANA was detected in plasma from mice treated with acebutolol. Administration of acebutolol (100mg/kg, p.o.) to female C57BL/6 mice for 30 days resulted in ANA production in plasma in seven of thirteen mice. The number of mice that showed ANA production was larger in mice co-treated with pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile, an inducer of P450s, whereas it was lower in mice co-treated with tri-o-tolylphosphate or 1-aminobenzotriazole, which are inhibitors of esterases or P450s, respectively. These results suggested that the hydrolysis and oxidation of acebutolol was associated with ANA production. In summary, this study demonstrated that metabolic activation may be a causal factor of adverse reactions of acebutolol. PMID:26408002

  9. Serum antinuclear and extractable nuclear antigen antibody prevalence and associated morbidity and mortality in the general population over 15years.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo; Ceribelli, Angela; Generali, Elena; Scirè, Carlo A; Alborghetti, Fausto; Colloredo, Guido; Porrati, Luisa; Achenza, Maria I S; De Santis, Maria; Cavaciocchi, Francesca; Massarotti, Marco; Isailovic, Natasa; Paleari, Valentina; Invernizzi, Pietro; Matthias, Torsten; Zucchi, Alberto; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of ANA and anti-ENA in the general population is not well established, especially their clinical significance in healthy subjects. We herein determined the prevalence and predictive value of serum ANA and anti-ENA for connective tissue diseases (CTD), cancer, and mortality. We took advantage of a randomly selected sample of the 1998 general population (Isola I) consisting of 2828 subjects (53% women, age 43±13 years) from a well-defined Northern Italian area. Serum ANA and anti-ENA were tested on the 2690 samples available in 2012 (Isola II, 50% women, age 58±13 years). Administrative databases were searched for CTD, cancer diagnosis, and death cases occurring between enrollment and December 31, 2013. The hazard ratio (HR) was calculated for incident cases. Serum ANA is positive in 18.1% for any titer and 6.1% for titers ≥1:160, 23% in subjects over 50 years and 13.1% and 6.1% for any titer and titers ≥1:160, respectively, in women. The HR for CTD development was significantly high for all ANA titers, with the highest for ANA ≥1:160 (HR 14.19, 95% CI 3.07-65.68). ANA positivity was not associated with cancer (HR 1.03; 95% CI 0.75-1.43), or with mortality (HR adjusted for age and sex 1.40; 95% CI 0.94-2.09). Serum anti-ENA is positive in a minority of subjects with highest figures for anti-nucleosome (1.9%), -histone (1.6%) and -PM/Scl (1.5%). In conclusion, serum ANA prevalence in the general population is highest in senior subjects and in women, while the female predominance is significantly lower compared to overt CTD. Serum ANA is associated with an increased probability of CTD development over time, but does not influence survival or cancer risk. PMID:26524640

  10. Distinction between MOG antibody-positive and AQP4 antibody-positive NMO spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Douglas Kazutoshi; Callegaro, Dagoberto; Lana-Peixoto, Marco Aurelio; Waters, Patrick J.; Jorge, Frederico M. de Haidar; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Nakashima, Ichiro; Apostolos-Pereira, Samira Luisa; Talim, Natalia; Simm, Renata Faria; Lino, Angelina Maria Martins; Misu, Tatsuro; Leite, Maria Isabel; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical features among patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) who have myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies, aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibodies, or seronegativity for both antibodies. Methods: Sera from patients diagnosed with NMOSD in 1 of 3 centers (2 sites in Brazil and 1 site in Japan) were tested for MOG and AQP4 antibodies using cell-based assays with live transfected cells. Results: Among the 215 patients with NMOSD, 7.4% (16/215) were positive for MOG antibodies and 64.7% (139/215) were positive for AQP4 antibodies. No patients were positive for both antibodies. Patients with MOG antibodies represented 21.1% (16/76) of the patients negative for AQP4 antibodies. Compared with patients with AQP4 antibodies or patients who were seronegative, patients with MOG antibodies were more frequently male, had a more restricted phenotype (optic nerve more than spinal cord), more frequently had bilateral simultaneous optic neuritis, more often had a single attack, had spinal cord lesions distributed in the lower portion of the spinal cord, and usually demonstrated better functional recovery after an attack. Conclusions: Patients with NMOSD with MOG antibodies have distinct clinical features, fewer attacks, and better recovery than patients with AQP4 antibodies or patients seronegative for both antibodies. PMID:24415568

  11. A retrospective study on IVF/ICSI outcome in patients with anti-nuclear antibodies: the effects of prednisone plus low-dose aspirin adjuvant treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are suspected of having relevance to adverse reproductive events. Methods This study aims to investigate the potential effect of ANA on IVF/ICSI outcome and the therapeutic role of prednisone plus low-dose aspirin (P + A) adjuvant treatment in ANA + patients. The first IVF/ICSI cycles without P + A of sixty-six ANA + women were enrolled as the ANA + group, and the 233 first IVF/ICSI cycles of matched ANA- women served as the ANA- group. The ANA + group was divided into the Titre < =1:320 subgroup and the Titre > 1:320 subgroup. Twenty-one ANA + women with adverse outcomes in their first cycles (ANA + cycles without P + A) received P + A adjuvant treatment for three months before the second IVF/ICSI cycle (ANA + cycles with P + A). The clinical characteristics and the IVF/ICSI outcomes were compared, respectively, between 1) the ANA + group and the ANA- group, 2) the Titre < =1:320 subgroup and the Titre > 1:320 subgroup, and 3) the ANA + cycles without P + A and the ANA + cycles with P + A. Results No significant differences were observed between each of the two-group pairs in the clinical characteristics. The ANA + group exhibited significantly lower MII oocytes rate, normal fertilisation, pregnancy and implantation rates, as well as remarkably higher abnormal fertilisation and early miscarriage rates. The Titre < =1:320 subgroup’s IVF/ICSI outcomes were as poor as those of the Titre > 1:320 subgroup. After the P + A adjuvant treatment, the number of two pro-nuclei, perfect embryos and available embryos, and the implantation rate increased significantly. Conclusions These observations suggest that ANA could exert a detrimental effect on IVF/ICSI outcome that might not be titre-dependent, and P + A adjuvant treatment could be useful for ANA + patients. This hypothesis should be verified in further prospective randomised studies. PMID:24093222

  12. Prevalence of symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and of fluorescent antinuclear antibodies associated with chronic exposure to trichloroethylene and other chemicals in well water

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.; Warshaw, R.H. )

    1992-02-01

    Criteria for the recognition of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were applied to 362 subjects exposed to trichloroethylene, trichloroethane, inorganic chromium, and other chemicals in water obtained from wells in an industrially contaminated aquifer in Tucson, Arizona. Their antinuclear autoantibodies were measured by fluorescence (FANA) in serum. Ten patients with clinical SLE and/or other collagen-vascular diseases were considered separately. Results were compared to an Arizona control group, to published series, and to laboratory controls. Frequencies of each of 10 ARA symptoms were higher in exposed subjects than in any comparison group except those with clinical SLE. The number of subjects with 4 or more symptoms was 2.3 times higher compared to referent women and men. FANA titers > 1:80 was approximately 2.3 times higher in women but equally frequent in men as in laboratory controls. ARA score and FANA rank were correlated with a coefficient (cc) of .1251, r{sup 2} = .0205 in women and this correlation was almost statistically significant in men cc = .1282, r{sup 2} = .0253. In control men and women neither correlation was significant. Long-term low-dose exposure to TCE and other chemicals in contaminated well water significantly increased symptoms of lupus erthematosus as perceived by the ARA score and the increased FANA titers.

  13. Mercury exposure, serum antinuclear/antinucleolar antibodies, and serum cytokine levels in mining populations in Amazonian Brazil: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Renee M.; Nyland, Jennifer F.; Silva, Ines A.; Ventura, Ana Maria; Souza, Jose Maria de; Silbergeld, Ellen K.

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is an immunotoxic substance that has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in rodent models, characterized by lymphoproliferation, overproduction of immunoglobulin (IgG and IgE), and high circulating levels of autoantibodies directed at antigens located in the nucleus (anti-nuclear autoantibodies, or ANA) or the nucleolus (anti-nucleolar autoantibodies, or ANoA). We have reported elevated levels of ANA and ANoA in human populations exposed to mercury in artisanal gold mining, though other confounding variables that may also modulate ANA/ANoA levels were not well-controlled. The goal of this study is to specifically test whether occupational and environmental conditions (other than mercury exposure) that are associated with artisanal gold mining affect the prevalence of markers of autoimmune dysfunction. We measured ANA, ANoA, and cytokine concentrations in serum and compared results from mercury-exposed artisanal gold miners to those from diamond and emerald miners working under similar conditions and with similar socioeconomic status and risks of infectious disease. Mercury-exposed gold miners had higher prevalence of detectable ANA and ANoA and higher titers of ANA and ANoA as compared to diamond and emerald miners with no occupational mercury exposure. Also, mercury-exposed gold-miners with detectable ANA or ANoA in serum had significantly higher concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ in serum as compared to the diamond and emerald miners. This study provides further evidence that mercury exposure may lead to autoimmune dysfunction and systemic inflammation in affected populations. PMID:20176347

  14. Original Approach for Automated Quantification of Antinuclear Autoantibodies by Indirect Immunofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Daniel; Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Bongrand, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) is the gold standard method for the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) which are essential markers for the diagnosis of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases. For the discrimination of positive and negative samples, we propose here an original approach named Immunofluorescence for Computed Antinuclear antibody Rational Evaluation (ICARE) based on the calculation of a fluorescence index (FI). Methods. We made comparison between FI and visual evaluations on 237 consecutive samples and on a cohort of 25 patients with SLE. Results. We obtained very good technical performance of FI (95% sensitivity, 98% specificity, and a kappa of 0.92), even in a subgroup of weakly positive samples. A significant correlation between quantification of FI and IIF ANA titers was found (Spearman's ρ = 0.80, P < 0.0001). Clinical performance of ICARE was validated on a cohort of patients with SLE corroborating the fact that FI could represent an attractive alternative for the evaluation of antibody titer. Conclusion. Our results represent a major step for automated quantification of IIF ANA, opening attractive perspectives such as rapid sample screening and laboratory standardization. PMID:24454469

  15. Pathogenic Profiles and Molecular Signatures of Antinuclear Autoantibodies Rescued from NZM2410 Lupus Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhiyan; Xie, Chun; Chen, Cui; Kreska, Desi; Hsu, Kelvin; Li, Liunan; Zhou, Xin J.; Mohan, Chandra

    2004-01-01

    Two outstanding questions concerning antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) in lupus involve their pathogenic potential and their molecular signatures. To address these questions, a panel of 56 antinuclear and 47 nonnuclear binding monoclonal antibodies was rescued from four seropositive NZM2410 lupus mice. The monoclonals varied in their reactivity to nucleosomes, ssDNA, dsDNA, and glomerular substrate. A large fraction of the antibodies demonstrated apparent polyreactivity (to DNA, histones, and glomerular antigens) due to bound, DNase-1 sensitive nuclear antigenic bridges. Although nephrophilic immunoglobulin (Ig) M and IgG antibodies were the most pathogenic, the dsDNA-binding antibodies were modestly so; in contrast, antinucleosome antibodies were clearly not pathogenic. Compared with the nonnuclear antigen-binding monoclonal antibodies rescued from the same mice, ANAs exhibited increased utilization of VH5/7183 genes and highly cationic heavy chain (HC) CDR3 regions. Most intriguingly, the CDR3 regions of the ANAs exhibited alternating arginine/lysine peaks at H96, H98, and H100, with neutral troughs at H95, H97, and H99. To summarize, glomerular-binding anti-dsDNA antibodies appear to be the most pathogenic variety of lupus autoantibodies. The presence of an alternating charge pattern in their HC CDR3 regions appears to be a prominent hallmark of ANAs. PMID:14757744

  16. Nonspecific positivity on the Luminex crossmatch assay for anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies due to antibodies directed against the antibody coated beads

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, M. P.; Augustin, A.; David, V. G.; Valson, A. T.; Daniel, D.

    2016-01-01

    Two cases are described of previously unreported false positivity on the Luminex crossmatch assay due to non HLA specific antibodies directed against the beads. In both cases the Luminex crossmatch indicated the presence of donor specific antibodies to class II HLA antigens, which was not substantiated by the clinical scenario or other assays. We could demonstrate the non specificity of these antibodies through using the same assay in a modified form where beads were unexposed to cell lysate and therefore did not carry HLA antigens at all. These cases further serve to emphasize the absolute necessity of correlating positive results with the priming history, and confirming their relevance using other platforms. PMID:27051139

  17. Characterization of IgG4 anti-neurofascin 155 antibody-positive polyneuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Hidenori; Yamasaki, Ryo; Hiwatashi, Akio; Oka, Nobuyuki; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Matsuse, Dai; Kuwahara, Motoi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kusunoki, Susumu; Fujimoto, Yuichi; Ikezoe, Koji; Kishida, Hitaru; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Matsushita, Takuya; Murai, Hiroyuki; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate anti-neurofascin 155 (NF155) antibody-positive chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Methods Sera from 50 consecutive CIDP patients diagnosed in our clinic, 32 patients with multiple sclerosis, 40 patients with other neuropathies including 26 with Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS)/Fisher syndrome, and 30 healthy controls were measured for anti-NF antibodies by flow cytometry using HEK293 cell lines stably expressing human NF155 or NF186. Four additional CIDP patients with anti-NF155 antibodies referred from other clinics were enrolled for clinical characterization. Results The positivity rate for anti-NF155 antibodies in CIDP patients was 18% (9/50), who all showed a predominance of IgG4 subclass. No other subjects were positive, except one GBS patient harboring IgG1 anti-NF155 antibodies. No anti-NF155 antibody carriers had anti-NF186 antibodies. Anti-NF155 antibody-positive CIDP patients had a significantly younger onset age, higher frequency of drop foot, gait disturbance, tremor and distal acquired demyelinating symmetric phenotype, greater cervical root diameter on magnetic resonance imaging neurography, higher cerebrospinal fluid protein levels, and longer distal and F-wave latencies than anti-NF155 antibody-negative patients. Marked symmetric hypertrophy of cervical and lumbosacral roots/plexuses was present in all anti-NF155 antibody-positive CIDP patients examined by neurography. Biopsied sural nerves from two patients with anti-NF155 antibodies demonstrated subperineurial edema and occasional paranodal demyelination, but no vasculitis, inflammatory cell infiltrates, or onion bulbs. Among anti-NF155 antibody-positive patients, treatment responders more frequently had daily oral corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants in addition to intravenous immunoglobulins than nonresponders did. Interpretation Anti-NF155 antibodies occur in a subset of CIDP patients with distal-dominant involvement and symmetric nerve hypertrophy. PMID:26478896

  18. Quantitative Measurement of C6 Antibody following Antibiotic Treatment of Borrelia burgdorferi Antibody-Positive Nonclinical Dogs▿

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Steven A.; O'Connor, Thomas P.; Hanscom, Jancy L.; Shields, Paulette; Lorentzen, Leif; DiMarco, Anthony A.

    2008-01-01

    The detection of antibody to the Borrelia burgdorferi C6 peptide by use of enzyme-linked immunoassays is a widely accepted method for the diagnosis of Lyme disease spirochete infection in dogs and in humans. Antibody to the C6 peptide is highly specific for B. burgdorferi and declines following treatment of dogs and humans exposed to B. burgdorferi. A quantitative assay for determining C6 antibody levels was developed and used to measure changes in antibody levels following antibiotic treatment of B. burgdorferi antibody-positive nonclinical dogs. One hundred thirty-two client-owned dogs were used in the study; 64 were negative, 53 of 68 positive animals received treatment, and 15 were untreated controls. Test sera were collected at 3, 6, and 12 months from seropositive dogs receiving treatment and untreated controls. Dogs in the treated group were assigned to moderate-to-high (≥29 U/ml)- and low (<29 U/ml)-C6-level groups because the change in the C6 level after treatment was dependent on the level prior to treatment. There were significant declines in the 30 dogs with moderate-to-high initial C6 levels that exceeded the maximal declines of the untreated control dogs in all cases at 6 months (16 data points) and 12 months (29 data points) posttreatment. There was little change in C6 level following antibiotic therapy in the 23 dogs with low initial C6 levels. The quantitative C6 antibody test can be used to measure changes in C6 antibody levels following treatment of antibody-positive nonclinical dogs. PMID:18003819

  19. Heterophilic antibodies interfering with radioimmunoassay. A false-positive pregnancy test

    SciTech Connect

    Vladutiu, A.O.; Sulewski, J.M.; Pudlak, K.A.; Stull, C.G.

    1982-11-19

    A young woman with amenorrhea had a consistently positive pregnancy test result (serum radioimmunoassay measurement of ..beta..-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone). No fetal or placental tissue was found after uterine curettage and exploratory laparotomy. The false-positive pregnancy test result was due to heterophilic antibovine and antigoat antibodies in the patient's serum. These antibodies interfered with radioimmunoassays using goat antibodies. This case shows that serum heterophilic antibodies can interfere with immunoassays and result in unnecessary diagnostic procedures and/or unnecessary treatment.

  20. Spastic paraparesis, abnormal muscle biopsy and positive antithyroid antibodies.

    PubMed

    George, A; Abdurahman, P; James, J

    2007-08-01

    A 35 year old lady presented with progressive spastic paraparesis and hyperintense signals in the spinal cord and brain. She was noted to have high titres of antithyroid antibodies and primary hypothyroidism. Her muscle biopsy showed perivascular lymphocytes around endomysial vessels. We highlight the association of spinal cord involvement and abnormal muscle biopsy in a case of Hashimotos encephalopathy. PMID:18019801

  1. Identification of patients with triple antiphospholipid antibody positivity is platform and method independent.

    PubMed

    Iwaniec, Teresa; Kaczor, Marcin P; Celi?ska-Lwenhoff, Magdalena; Pola?ski, Stanis?aw; Musia?, Jacek

    2016-02-01

    INTRODUCTION The risk of clinical complications in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) increases when a patient is positive for all 3 types of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies. However, there is a considerable disagreement between various platforms for aCL and anti-?2-glycoprotein I (anti-?2GPI) measurement, which leads to discrepancies between these platforms in assessing aPL antibody positivity. OBJECTIVES The aim of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to assess whether 2 different platforms, the QUANTA Lite enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the QUANTA Flash chemiluminescent immunoassay, identify the same subjects as triple positive in a group of patients with APS and comorbid autoimmune diseases. PATIENTS AND METHODS The study included 220 patients with systemic autoimmune diseases (74 with primary APS; 47 with secondary APS; and 99 with systemic lupus erythematosus without APS). All patients were tested for IgG and IgM aCL and anti-?2GPI antibodies using both platforms. RESULTS The agreement between the positive results for individual antibodies obtained using both platforms was not full, ranging from 81.8% to 90.9% in a pair-wise comparison. However, the number of patients with triple aPL antibody positivity was similar (80 by QUANTA Lite and 86 by QUANTA Flash); the agreement between the 2 platforms for the identification of patients with triple antibody positivity was 95.5% (Cohen's kappa coefficient = 0.90). This resulted in a similar risk for APS-related clinical complications: an odds ratio of 24.9 for QUANTA Lite and of 24.7 for QUANTA Flash. CONCLUSIONS Our results confirm a strong association between triple aPL antibody positivity and APS and indicate that the identification of patients with triple antibody positivity is platform independent. When aPL antibody profiles are assessed, the agreement between various methods is much higher than that for individual antibodies. PMID:26810938

  2. A Peer Counselling Program for Persons Testing H.I.V. Antibody Positive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baiss, Alan

    1989-01-01

    Describes need for and development of a peer counseling program for persons who have tested positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibodies. Discusses selection of peer counselors, training, and confidentiality. Includes discussion of future plans. (ABL)

  3. Anti-mitochondrial M2 antibody-positive autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    TOMIZAWA, MINORU; SHINOZAKI, FUMINOBU; FUGO, KAZUNORI; MOTOYOSHI, YASUFUMI; SUGIYAMA, TAKAO; YAMAMOTO, SHIGENORI; KISHIMOTO, TAKASHI; ISHIGE, NAOKI

    2015-01-01

    Anti-mitochondrial M2 antibody (AMA-M2) is specific to primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), but can also be found in certain patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Effective methods of differentiating between PBC and AIH are required, as their clinical course and management are different. Titers of AMA-M2 were analyzed before and after follow-up in patients with PBC or AIH. Patients who underwent liver biopsy and were diagnosed with either AIH (10 patients) or PBC (3 patients) were enrolled in the study. The AMA-M2 antibody titers of these patients were analyzed upon hospital admission. AMA-M2 reacted with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex-E2, branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complex and 2-oxoglutaric acid dehydrogenase complex in the assay utilized for this study. The cut-off value for AMA-M2 was 5. Six AIH patients were AMA-M2(-) and 4 were AMA-M2(+). The titer for the AIH patients who were AMA-M2(+) was 24.814.8, compared with 324174 in the patients with PBC (P=0.0138). Three AMA-M2(+) AIH patients were followed-up after liver biopsy. The AMA-M2 levels had decreased in all 3 patients, becoming undetectable in 2 of them. In conclusion, certain patients with AIH in this study were found to be AMA-M2(+), but the titers were significantly lower than those in the patients with PBC. At follow-up, the AIH patients exhibited decreased AMA-M2 titers. PMID:26622500

  4. PLCG2-associatiated antibody deficiency immune dysregulation (PLAID)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area PLCG2-associated Antibody Deficiency and Immune Dysregulation (PLAID) PLAID and PLAID- ... tend to have high levels of anti-nuclear antibodies, which react against their own cells and tissues ...

  5. Alloimmunization due to red cell antibodies in Rhesus positive Omani Pregnant Women: Maternal and Perinatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dughaishi, Tamima; Al-Rubkhi, Ikhlass S.; Al-Duhli, Maymoona; Al-Harrasi, Yusra; Gowri, Vaidyanathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed to determine the prevalence of alloimmunization due to antibodies to red blood cell (RBC) antigens (other than rhesus [Rh] antigen) and report the maternal, perinatal, and neonatal outcomes. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of all patients with minor RBCs antibodies alloimmunization who were followed and delivered at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman from June 2011 to June 2013. Maternal characteristics, antibody type, antibody titer in addition to perinatal and neonatal outcomes were reviewed. Results: There were 1160 patients with Rh positive status in the study. The most common ABO blood group was O, followed by A, B, and AB. We found 33 out of 1160 Rh positive women alloimmunized with minor RBCs antibodies that gave a prevalence of minor RBCs alloimmunization of 2.7%. The most frequent antibody was anti-E 38%, followed by anti-c 17% and anti-kell 17%. 6 of these 33 patients were identified to have significant antibody titer, and two cases showed evidence of fetal anemia. Only one case required an intrauterine blood transfusion. The most common neonatal complication was jaundice in 53%, followed by respiratory distress syndrome in 28%. Two cases complicated by neonatal anemia required a postnatal blood transfusion. Conclusion: Alloimmunization with anti-E, anti-c, and anti-kell were the most common antibodies among the study group. Minor RBCs alloimmunization was an important cause of neonatal morbidity. PMID:26420934

  6. Uterine blood flow indices, antinuclear autoantibodies and unexplained recurrent miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Pietropolli, A.; Capogna, M. V.; Bernardini, S.; Piccione, E.; Ticconi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the correlation between 2D and 3D uterine flow indexes and the presence or the absence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in women with unexplained recurrent miscarriage (uRM). Methods Fifty-two subjects (26 uRM and 26 control women) underwent 2D Doppler measurement of pulsatility index and resistance index of the uterine arteries in both the follicular and midluteal phase of the cycle. Additionally, 3D ultrasonography determination of vascularisation index, flow index, and vascularisation flow index was carried out with the aid of the VOCAL technique. Serum assay for the presence of ANA was performed in all women. Results Pulsatility index of ANA+ uRM women was higher than that of ANA- uRM women and control ANA+ and ANAwomen, both in the follicular and in the midluteal phase of the cycle. Vascularisation index in ANA- uRM women was significantly higher than that in ANA+ control women. Flow index in uRM ANA+ women was significantly lower than that of each of the other groups. Conclusion ANA might be involved in uRM by determining an impairment in uterine blood flow hemodynamic, particularly in uterine blood flow intensity and uterine artery impedance. PMID:26623408

  7. Antinuclear antibodies in asthma patients- a special asthma phenotype?

    PubMed

    Agache, Ioana; Duca, Liliana; Anghel, Mariana; Pamfil, Gheorghe

    2009-03-01

    Several studies reported the appearance of asthma and autoimmune conditions in the same patient, but the clinical significance of this association was not yet assessed. One hundred asthmatic patients were observed for one year evolution with death, severe exacerbations, intake of > 1000 micrograms of beclometasone or equivalent (high ICS) and FEV1 decline >100 ml, in relation with ANA (ELISA), sputum and blood eosinophilia (EO), NSAID intolerance, BMI >25, chronic rhinosinusitis, smoking status and FEV1 <30% predicted (low FEV1). After 1 year of observation, there were 5 deaths, 28 severe asthma exacerbations requiring hospitalisations, 24 cases requiring high inhaled corticosteroid intake, and 19 patients with fast FEV1 decline (>100 ml/year). Multiple regression analysis pointed out several different independent risk factors for severe asthma evolution: for death presence of ANA (P=0.037), NSAID intolerance (P<0.001) and low FEV1 (P=0.021); for evolution with severe exacerbations ANA (p=0.011), sputum EO (P<0.001), smoking (P=0.044) and NSAID intolerance (P=0.022); for high ICS intake ANA (P=0.036), sputum EO (P=0.026) and low FEV1 (P=0.006); for FEV1 decline >100 ml ANA (P=0.006), sputum EO (P=0.037), BMI>25 (P=0.046) and NSAID intolerance (P=0.017). The presence of ANA is an independent risk factor in asthma for evolution with death, severe exacerbations, high inhaled corticosteroid intake and FEV1 decline >100 ml. PMID:19279359

  8. Antinuclear antibodies: a contemporary nomenclature using HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wiik, Allan S; Høier-Madsen, Mimi; Forslid, Jan; Charles, Peter; Meyrowitsch, Jan

    2010-11-01

    The choice of terms used to describe indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) staining patterns of autoantibodies binding to HEp-2 cells is at present quite varied and disordered because no accurate consensus on names and descriptions exist. The aim of our study was to propose a logical and ordered IIF classification taxonomy based on 29 different selected IIF patterns. In a preliminary project carried out at Statens Serum Institut it was first shown by use of a software programme named DOORS developed by Percepton Ltd, that reading of digitized images of HEp-2 patterns on an LCD monitor could be used instead of traditional microscopy. Digitized images of HEp-2 patterns were then used in the EU supported project named CANTOR (June 1998-July 2000) aiming to reach consensus among three clinical immunology expert centres and collaborating to attain a classification version that could be used to qualitatively and quantitatively test and train image recognitions skills of laboratory technicians against expert consensus. The usability of this classification version was then tested in a course consisting of training and certification. The conclusion was that participants in the training programme clearly increased their perceptive skills using images, terms, descriptions and the graphic and statistic tools in the self-administered DOORS programme and that software-assisted training could achieve a common and accurate level of visual pattern interpretation. All results from this project were reported to the European Commission but have not previously been published in scientific literature. This communication presents the final results of agreed image classifications. PMID:20650611

  9. Profiling antibody drug conjugate positional isomers: a system-of-equations approach.

    PubMed

    Le, Lan N; Moore, Jamie M R; Ouyang, Jun; Chen, Xiaoying; Nguyen, Mary D H; Galush, William J

    2012-09-01

    Antibody drug conjugates enable the targeted delivery of potent chemotherapeutic agents directly to cancerous cells. They are made by the chemical conjugation of cytotoxins to monoclonal antibodies, which can be achieved by first reducing interchain disulfide bonds followed by conjugation of the resulting free thiols with drugs. This process yields a controlled, but heterogeneous, population of conjugated products that contains species with various numbers of drugs linked to different former interchain disulfide cysteine residues on the antibodies. We have developed a mathematical approach using inputs from capillary electrophoresis and hydrophobic interaction chromatography to determine the positional isomer distribution within a population of antibody drug conjugates. The results are confirmed by analyzing isolated samples of specific drug-to-antibody ratio species. The procedure is amenable to rapid determination of positional isomer distributions and features low material requirements. A survey of several antibody drug conjugates based on the same IgG framework and small molecule drug combination has shown a very similar distribution of isomers among all of the molecules using this technique, suggesting a robust conjugation process. PMID:22913809

  10. Myocardial infarction in a young man with systemic lupus erythematosus, deep vein thrombosis, and antibodies to phospholipid.

    PubMed Central

    Asherson, R A; Mackay, I R; Harris, E N

    1986-01-01

    From the age of 17 a young man had recurrent venous thrombosis, with pulmonary embolism on two occasions. Laboratory investigations showed increased DNA binding, thrombocytopenia, positive antinuclear antibodies, and immunoglobulin A deficiency. A plasminogen activator deficiency was suspected because the euglobulin lysis time was considerably prolonged. Variant lupus was diagnosed. He had a severe myocardial infarct at the age of 20 and subsequent investigations showed the presence in serum of the lupus anticoagulant and antibodies to cardiolipin. The presence of these antiphospholipid antibodies explains the features of his illness and establishes that this case fits into a subset of systemic lupus erythematosus characterised by thrombotic events. Images Figure PMID:3089242

  11. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  12. Antibody elutions in Thai patients with a positive direct antiglobulin test

    PubMed Central

    Nathalang, Oytip; Sriwanitchrak, Pramote; Tubrod, Jintana; Kupatawintu, Pawinee

    2011-01-01

    Background The direct antiglobulin test is performed to determine whether an anaemic patient with evidence of haemolysis has autoimmune or alloimmune haemolytic anaemia. Materials and methods We determined the antibody specificity of eluted IgG antibodies from patients’ blood samples with a positive direct antiglobulin test. Overall, 134 Thai patients were included in this study. EDTA blood samples were obtained from recently transfused patients, patients with unexplained anaemia and patients who had serum antibodies detected during routine pre-transfusion tests from different hospital blood banks. These complicated samples were sent to the National Blood Centre of the Thai Red Cross Society for investigation and to find compatible blood components. Each blood sample underwent a direct antiglobulin test with the gel technique using polyspecific antihuman globulin and mononospecific anti-IgG and anti-C3d. Acid eluates were prepared from the samples for which the direct antiglobulin test was positive and the specificities of the eluted antibodies were determined by the gel technique. Results Of the samples tested, 101 showed a positive direct antiglobulin test result (75.4%) using polyspecific antihuman globulin sera whereas only 95 samples (70.9%) were positive with anti-IgG or anti-IgG and anti-C3d. Moreover, 54 of 95 eluates (56.8%) were positive for antibody screening and tested with the reagent panel cells. Twenty-one eluates had specific alloantibodies, which were concordant with the findings in the patients’ sera and all patients had a history of blood transfusion. Additionally, 33 eluates contained pan-agglutinins. Interestingly, alloantibodies could be determined using titration studies in 5 of 26 eluates with pan-agglutinins. Conclusion Although the direct antiglobulin test is not routinely performed in pre-transfusion screening, this test and elution studies would be useful in patients with a history of previous transfusions, and in those for whom compatible blood cannot be found. PMID:21084008

  13. Antibody variable region glycosylation: position effects on antigen binding and carbohydrate structure.

    PubMed

    Wright, A; Tao, M H; Kabat, E A; Morrison, S L

    1991-10-01

    The presence of N-linked carbohydrate at Asn58 in the VH of the antigen binding site of an antibody specific for alpha(1----6)dextran (TKC3.2.2) increases its affinity for dextran 10- to 50-fold. Site-directed mutagenesis has now been used to create novel carbohydrate addition sequences in the CDR2 of a non-glycosylated anti-dextran at Asn54 (TST2) and Asn60 (TSU7). These antibodies are glycosylated and the carbohydrates are accessible for lectin binding. The amino acid change in TSU7 (Lys62----Thr62) decreases the affinity for antigen; however, glycosylation of TSU7 increased its affinity for antigen 3-fold, less than the greater than 10-fold increase in affinity seen for glycosylated TKC3.2.2. The difference in impact of glycosylation could result either from the position of the carbohydrate or from its structure; unlike the other antibodies, TSU7 attaches a high mannose, rather than complex, carbohydrate in CDR2. In contrast, glycosylation of TST2 at amino acid 54 inhibits dextran binding. Thus slight changes in the position of the N-linked carbohydrate in the CDR2 of this antibody result in substantially different effects on antigen binding. Unlike what was observed for the anti-dextrans, a carbohydrate addition site placed in a similar position in an anti-dansyl is not utilized. PMID:1717254

  14. Clinicoimmunopathologic findings in Atlantic bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus with positive Chlamydiaceae antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Bossart, Gregory D; Romano, Tracy A; Peden-Adams, Margie M; Schaefer, Adam; McCulloch, Stephen; Goldstein, Juli D; Rice, Charles D; Fair, Patricia A; Cray, Carolyn; Reif, John S

    2014-02-01

    Sera from free-ranging Atlantic bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus inhabiting the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), Florida, and coastal waters of Charleston (CHS), South Carolina, USA, were tested for antibodies to Chlamydiaceae as part of a multidisciplinary study of individual and population health. A suite of clinicoimmunopathologic variables was evaluated in Chlamydiaceae-seropositive dolphins (n = 43) and seronegative healthy dolphins (n = 83). Fibrinogen, lactate dehydrogenase, amylase, and absolute numbers of neutrophils, lymphocytes, and basophils were significantly higher, and serum bicarbonate, total alpha globulin, and alpha-2 globulin were significantly lower in dolphins with positive Chlamydiaceae titers compared with seronegative healthy dolphins. Several differences in markers of innate and adaptive immunity were also found. Concanavalin A-induced T lymphocyte proliferation, lipopolysaccharide-induced B lymphocyte proliferation, and granulocytic phagocytosis were significantly lower, and absolute numbers of mature CD 21 B lymphocytes, natural killer cell activity and lysozyme concentration were significantly higher in dolphins with positive Chlamydiaceae antibody titers compared to seronegative healthy dolphins. Additionally, dolphins with positive Chlamydiaceae antibody titers had significant increases in ELISA antibody titers to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. These data suggest that Chlamydiaceae infection may produce subclinical clinicoimmunopathologic perturbations that impact health. Any potential subclinical health impacts are important for the IRL and CHS dolphin populations, as past studies have indicated that both dolphin populations are affected by other complex infectious and neoplastic diseases, often associated with immunologic perturbations and anthropogenic contaminants. PMID:24492056

  15. Isolation of Highly Active Monoclonal Antibodies against Multiresistant Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Friederike S.; Laverde, Diana; Kropec, Andrea; Romero-Saavedra, Felipe; Meyer-Buehn, Melanie; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL) of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA). At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium), a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC) and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030) and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 μg/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials. PMID:25706415

  16. Antimyenteric neuronal antibodies in scleroderma.

    PubMed Central

    Howe, S; Eaker, E Y; Sallustio, J E; Peebles, C; Tan, E M; Williams, R C

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility in scleroderma is incompletely understood, although previous studies have proposed a neuropathic mechanism. We studied patients with scleroderma as compared with other connective tissue disease patients and normal controls for the presence of circulating antibodies to myenteric neurons. Serial dilutions of sera were overlaid on rat intestine, double-labeled with antineurofilament antibody as a myenteric plexus marker, and imaged using indirect immunofluorescence techniques. High titer sera (> or = 1:50) from 19 out of 41 scleroderma patients stained myenteric neurons, whereas none of 22 normals or 5 patients with idiopathic GI dysmotility were positive. Although 6 out of 20 SLE and 6 out of 10 mixed connective tissue disease patients' sera stained myenteric plexus neurons, when positive sera were absorbed with calf thymus extract to remove antinuclear antibody, 15 scleroderma sera, 0 SLE, and 2 mixed connective tissue disease patients retained positive staining of myenteric neurons. Western blotting using actin and neuronal intermediate filament preparations failed to show immunoreactivity with scleroderma sera containing antimyenteric neuronal antibodies. Paraneoplastic sera associated with GI dysmotility stained myenteric neurons in a different pattern than seen with scleroderma sera. A positive correlation between the presence of Raynaud's phenomenon and antimyenteric neuronal antibodies was observed in scleroderma patients. Our results indicate that IgG antibodies reacting with myenteric neurons are present in many patients with scleroderma. Although the neuronal antigen has not yet been identified, the presence of myenteric neuronal antibodies in patients with GI dysmotility and scleroderma suggests a neuropathic process. Images PMID:8040331

  17. Studies on production of anticollagen antibodies in silicosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nagaoka, Tadasu; Tabata, Masaji; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Okada, Akira )

    1993-01-01

    Silicosis is characterized by pulmonary fibrotic changes which consist primarily of an increase in collagen. In this study, anticollagen antibodies in the serum of 134 silicosis patients versus 40 normal subjects were examined and their relationship with immunoglobulin, autoantibodies, and procollagen III peptide (PIIIP) was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mean levels of antihuman type I collagen (HI) and anti-human type Ill collagen (HIII) antibodies were significantly higher in the silicosis patients versus the normal subjects (P < 0.001). However, no differences were observed in the mean levels of anti-human type IV collagen (HIV) antibodies in the silicosis patients versus the normal subjects. Anticollagen antibodies in the sera of silicosis patients appear to be formed at an early stage of the disease. We observed a correlation between anticollagen antibodies and immunoglobulin. There was a tendency toward high values of anticollagen antibodies in the sera of patients positive for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and rheumatoid factor (RF), both of which are autoantibodies. However, no correlation was observed between serum PIIIP and anticollagen antibodies. These observations suggest that, in silicosis, there is a relationship between anticollagen antibodies and immunoglobulins, as well as between anticollagen antibodies and autoantibodies. Measurement of anticollagen antibodies in the sera of silicosis patients offers a useful index for evaluating the prognosis of pulmonary fibrosis and autoimmune abnormality in silicosis. 49 refs. 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Takayasu Arteritis With Antiphosphatidylserine/Prothrombin Antibody-Positive Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Shoichi; Hirota, Shogo; Iwamoto, Naoki; Karata, Hiroki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A relationship between Takayasu arteritis (TA) and positive antiphospholipid antibody states has been pointed out, but patients with TA complicated with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) are rare. Here we report the case of a 17-year-old Japanese man diagnosed with TA based on pulselessness of the left brachial artery, discrepancy of blood pressure between the upper extremities, and arterial wall thickening and narrowing of artery in contrast computed tomography. He was also diagnosed with provisional APS based on a pulmonary infarction without narrowing of the pulmonary artery and positive antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibody. The patient also had concurrent Crohn's disease (CD) based on histopathological findings, which may have been associated with TA. We started high-dose corticosteroid therapy and anticoagulation therapy, and his symptoms including fever, dizziness, chest pain, and lower-right uncomfortable abdomen improved. We reviewed 9 cases of TA with APS including our patient by conducting a PubMed search. Based on past reports, we considered the relationship among TA, APS, and CD. Clinicians should bear in mind that many etiologies can exist in 1 patient, and differential diagnoses are essential. PMID:26705229

  19. Takayasu Arteritis With Antiphosphatidylserine/Prothrombin Antibody-Positive Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Shoichi; Hirota, Shogo; Iwamoto, Naoki; Karata, Hiroki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-12-01

    A relationship between Takayasu arteritis (TA) and positive antiphospholipid antibody states has been pointed out, but patients with TA complicated with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) are rare. Here we report the case of a 17-year-old Japanese man diagnosed with TA based on pulselessness of the left brachial artery, discrepancy of blood pressure between the upper extremities, and arterial wall thickening and narrowing of artery in contrast computed tomography. He was also diagnosed with provisional APS based on a pulmonary infarction without narrowing of the pulmonary artery and positive antiphosphatidylserine/prothrombin antibody. The patient also had concurrent Crohn's disease (CD) based on histopathological findings, which may have been associated with TA. We started high-dose corticosteroid therapy and anticoagulation therapy, and his symptoms including fever, dizziness, chest pain, and lower-right uncomfortable abdomen improved.We reviewed 9 cases of TA with APS including our patient by conducting a PubMed search. Based on past reports, we considered the relationship among TA, APS, and CD.Clinicians should bear in mind that many etiologies can exist in 1 patient, and differential diagnoses are essential. PMID:26705229

  20. Antibody Depletion for the Treatment of Crossmatch Positive Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kevin P.; Chandler, Stephanie F.; Almond, Christopher S.; Singh, Tajinder P.; Mah, Helen; Milford, Edgar; Matte, Gregory S.; Bastardi, Heather J.; Mayer, John E.; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; Blume, Elizabeth D.

    2013-01-01

    Sensitization to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) is a risk factor for adverse outcomes after heart transplantation. Requiring a negative prospective crossmatch results in longer waiting times and increased waitlist mortality. We report outcomes in a cohort of sensitized children who underwent transplant despite a positive complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) crossmatch (CM+) using a protocol of antibody depletion at time of transplant, followed by serial intravenous immunoglobulin administration. All patients less than 21 years old who underwent heart transplantation at Boston Children’s Hospital from 1/1998-1/2011 were included. We compared freedom from allograft loss, allograft rejection, and serious infection between CM+ and CM− recipients. Of 134 patients in the cohort, 33 (25%) were sensitized prior to transplantation and 12 (9%) received a CM+ heart transplant. Serious infection in the first post-transplant year was more prevalent in the CM+ patients compared to CM− patients (50% vs. 16%;P=0.005), as was hemodynamically significant antibody mediated rejection (50% vs. 2%;P<0.001). There was no difference in freedom from allograft loss or any rejection. At our center, children transplanted despite a positive crossmatch had acceptable allograft survival and risk of any rejection, but a higher risk of hemodynamically significant antibody-mediated rejection and serious infection. PMID:23919762

  1. MPO-ANCA-positive anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease successfully treated by plasma exchange and immunosuppressive therapy.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Taichi; Nagai, Kojiro; Matsuura, Motokazu; Kondo, Naoki; Kishi, Seiji; Araoka, Toshikazu; Kishi, Fumi; Sakiyama, Tsutomu; Mima, Akira; Bando, Yoshimi; Abe, Hideharu; Doi, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease is clinically manifested as rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN) with crescentic changes. The renal prognosis is poor. We report here the case of a 61-year-old woman with myeloperoxidase antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-positive anti-GBM antibody disease. This patient was referred to our hospital because of RPGN. Anti-GBM antibody was positive with a titer of 38 EU. The MPO-ANCA titer was 65 EU. Chest imaging examination revealed pulmonary multiple nodules. ANCA-associated vasculitis was suspected. Renal pathology revealed cellular crescents in 13 out of 17 glomeruli. Immunofluorescence with anti-IgG antibody, anti-C3 antibody, and anti-fibrin antibody showed linear staining along the glomerular capillary walls. Based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed with anti-GBM antibody disease. Hemodialysis was started because of uremic syndrome with elevated serum creatinine (6.84 mg/dL). In addition, treatment with plasma exchange using 3.6 L (90 mL/kg) of fresh frozen plasma combined with an oral dose of 40 mg of prednisolone was initiated. Within 3 weeks, both types of autoantibodies became undetectable. Subsequently, this patient achieved dialysis independence and remission of glomerulonephritis. No adverse effects were observed. In patients with MPO-ANCA-positive anti-GBM antibody disease, intensive therapy predominantly with plasma exchange might be operative, even though renal function is less likely to recover. PMID:21599422

  2. Surface display of a single-domain antibody library on Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fleetwood, Filippa; Devoogdt, Nick; Pellis, Mireille; Wernery, Ulrich; Muyldermans, Serge; Ståhl, Stefan; Löfblom, John

    2013-03-01

    Combinatorial protein engineering for selection of proteins with novel functions, such as enzymes and affinity reagents, is an important tool in biotechnology, drug discovery, and other biochemical fields. Bacterial display is an emerging technology for isolation of new affinity proteins from such combinatorial libraries. Cells have certain properties that are attractive for directed evolution purposes, in particular the option to use quantitative flow-cytometric cell sorting for selection of binders. Here, an immune library of around 10(7) camelid single-domain antibody fragments (Nanobodies) was displayed on both the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus carnosus and on phage. As demonstrated for the first time, the antibody repertoire was found to be well expressed on the bacterial surface and flow-cytometric sorting yielded a number of Nanobodies with subnanomolar affinity for the target protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP). Interestingly, the staphylococcal output repertoire and the binders from the phage display selection contained two slightly different sets of clones, containing both unique as well as several similar variants. All of the Nanobodies from the staphylococcal selection were also shown to enhance the fluorescence of GFP upon binding, potentially due to the fluorescence-based sorting principle. Our study highlights the impact of the chosen display technology on the variety of selected binders and thus the value of having alternative methods available, and demonstrates in addition that the staphylococcal system is suitable for generation of high-affinity antibody fragments. PMID:23064703

  3. Aquaporin 4 antibody positive central nervous system autoimmunity and multiple sclerosis are characterized by a distinct profile of antibodies to herpes viruses.

    PubMed

    Sellner, Johann; Cepok, Sabine; Kalluri, Sudhakar Reddy; Nestler, Axel; Kleiter, Ingo; Kümpfel, Tania; Linker, Ralf; Melms, Arthur; Menge, Til; Tumani, Hayrettin; Paul, Friedemann; Hemmer, Bernhard; Berthele, Achim

    2010-11-01

    Viral infections are implicated in the onset and promotion of autoimmunity in genetically predisposed individuals. In this study, immune response patterns to herpes viruses were compared in aquaporin 4 (AQP4) antibody positive central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity and multiple sclerosis (MS). Serum samples of patients with AQP4 antibody positive CNS autoimmunity (n=52), relapsing-remitting MS (n=55) and controls including non-autoimmune neurological disorders and healthy individuals (n=56) were tested for IgG antibodies to herpes viruses 1-6 (HSV-1, HSV-2, VZV, EBV, CMV, HHV-6) using commercial ELISA kits. AQP4 antibody positive CNS autoimmunity cases most frequently had IgG responses to four viruses (38.5%), while presence of antibodies to three herpes viruses was most common in MS and controls (41.8% and 35.7%, respectively). Compared to MS, AQP4 positive cases had a significantly higher CMV seropositivity rate (P=0.003) and a lower prevalence of EBV antibodies (P=0.01). The analysis of immunoreactivity of samples above the diagnostic threshold revealed that in AQP4 positive CNS autoimmunity the IgG response to EBV (P<0.001) and VZV (P<0.01) was lower than in MS, whereas immununoreactivity to HSV-1 was higher than in controls (P<0.01). The distinct pattern of seroprevalence and immunoreactivity against herpes viruses in AQP4 positive CNS autoimmunity and MS provide further insights to the pathogenetical heterogeneity. Whether these findings reflect an epi-phenomenon of autoimmune disorders or indicate a disease-specific deregulated virus-host interaction needs to be examined in further studies. PMID:20705110

  4. The Malignant Transformation of Retrorectal Cystic Hamartomas With Blood Irregular Antibodies Positive: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang-Rong; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Yong-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Retrorectal cystic hamartomas are rare congenital presacral lesions and malignancy is extremely rare. Although surgical excision is the essential for treatment, a unique feature of our case compared with previously reported tailgut cysts is that this patient's blood irregular antibodies are positive with higher operational risks.A 44-year-old woman presented to our department complaining of pelvic and perineal pain for 6 months. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a well-demarcated hypodense, multilocular cystic lesion, 10 cm in size, in the presacral region of the right of the midline. We found her blood irregular antibodies were positive in the preoperative examination. So she quitted surgery. Exploratory laparotomy and incision and drainage of pelvic tumor were operated. Postoperative routine pathology showed: (retroperitoneal tumors) moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Combined with clinical symptom and imaging, malignant transformation of retrorectal cystic hamartomas (tailgut cysts) was diagnosed. Taking into account that cyst is not sensitive to radiotherapy, so tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and raltitrexed were infused into the cysts and 3 cycles oxaliplatin (130 mg/m) were completed. Now although the lesion is shrink, but yellow, viscous mucus still secrete constantly, 100 ml/w.Given surgical excision is the essential for treatment, complete surgical excision should be implemented as far as possible. But if surgery cannot be carried out like the presented case, systemic chemotherapy and local radiotherapy are also available, which can alleviate the symptoms of oppression and improve the quality of life partly. PMID:26656372

  5. VL position 34 is a key determinant for the engineering of stable antibodies with fast dissociation rates.

    PubMed

    Hugo, N; Weidenhaupt, M; Beukes, M; Xu, B; Janson, J-C; Vernet, T; Altschuh, D

    2003-05-01

    Predictive engineering of antibodies exhibiting fast kinetic properties could provide reagents for biotechnological applications such as continuous monitoring of compounds or affinity chromatography. Based on covariance analysis of murine germline antibody variable domains, we selected position L34 (Kabat numbering) for mutational studies. This position is located at the VL/VH interface, at the base of the paratope but with limited antigen contacts, thus making it an attractive position for mild alterations of antigen binding properties. We introduced a serine at position L34 in two different antibodies: Fab (fragment antigen binding) 57P (Asn34Ser) and scFv (single chain fragment variable) 1F4 (Gln34Ser), that recognize peptides derived from the coat protein of tobacco mosaic virus and the oncoprotein E6, respectively. Both mutated antibodies exhibited similar properties: (i) expression levels of active fragments in Escherichia coli were markedly improved; (ii) thermostability was enhanced; and (iii) dissociation rate parameters (k(off)) were increased by 2- and at least 57-fold for scFv1F4 and Fab57P, respectively, while their association rate parameters (k(on)) remained unchanged. The L34 Ala and Thr mutants of both antibody fragments did not possess these properties. This first demontration of similar effects observed in two antibodies with different specificities may open the way to the predictive design of molecules with enhanced stability and fast dissociation rates. PMID:12826730

  6. Antithyroid peroxidase antibody positivity is associated with lower incidence of metastasis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    KEMAL, YASEMIN; DEMIRAG, GUZIN; EKIZ, KUBILAY; YUCEL, IDRIS

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid extracts were first used to treat patients with metastatic breast cancer over a century ago. Since then, a number of studies have investigated the association between thyroid disorders and breast cancer. The presence of antibodies to thyroid peroxidase (TPOab) was recently reported to be associated with improved outcome in these patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between TPOab positivity and clinicopathological characteristics in breast cancer patients. The study included 318 newly diagnosed cases of breast cancer treated at Ondokuz Mayis University Hospital, Samsun, Turkey, between 2008 and 2012. Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine levels were measured at the time of diagnosis. Of the 318 patients, 253 were considered to be TPOab-negative (TPOab ≤34 IU/ml) and 65 TPOab-positive (TPOab >34 IU/ml). No cases with distant metastases were found in the TPOab-positive group. However, 20 (7.9%) of the 253 patients displayed distant metastases in the TPOab-negative group (P=0.01). Therefore, TPOab positivity was found to be associated with a lower incidence of metastasis in breast cancer patients. PMID:26137279

  7. High positive frequency of antibodies to metallothionein and heat shock protein 70 in sera of patients with metal allergy

    PubMed Central

    JIN, G-B; NAKAYAMA, H; SHMYHLO, M; INOUE, S; KONDO, M; IKEZAWA, Z; OUCHI, Y; CYONG, J-C

    2003-01-01

    Two principal types of stress protein, heat shock proteins (hsps) and metallothionein (MT), are induced in cells responding to a variety of stresses. They play an important role in protecting cells from these stresses. However, many reports indicate that antibodies to hsps are present in human serum and are associated with several autoimmunity diseases. Metals, which are commonly allergenic to humans, induce both MT and hsp70 (one of the hsps family). Until now, there has been no report of any antibody to MT in human serum. In the present study, serum samples from healthy controls (Group I), and patients suffering from atopic dermatitis without (Group II) or with (Group III) metal allergy, were measured for antibodies to MT and hsp70, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Metal allergy was confirmed by patch testing. We first found that antibody to MT exists in human serum. We also found a high positive frequency of antibody to MT (51·3%) and to hsp70 (43·6%) in the sera of Group III, compared to those of Group I (3·8% and 5·1%) or Group II (6·4% and 5·1%). Furthermore, there was a strong positive correlation between antibody to MT and antibody to hsp70 in Group III (P = 0·0013), but not in Group I and Group II. Our results indicate that antibody to MT exists in human serum, as do antibodies to hsps, and suggest that elevated levels of MT and hsp70 antibodies are associated with metal allergy in atopic patients. PMID:12562388

  8. High positive frequency of antibodies to metallothionein and heat shock protein 70 in sera of patients with metal allergy.

    PubMed

    Jin, G-B; Nakayama, H; Shmyhlo, M; Inoue, S; Kondo, M; Ikezawa, Z; Ouchi, Y; Cyong, J-C

    2003-02-01

    Two principal types of stress protein, heat shock proteins (hsps) and metallothionein (MT), are induced in cells responding to a variety of stresses. They play an important role in protecting cells from these stresses. However, many reports indicate that antibodies to hsps are present in human serum and are associated with several autoimmunity diseases. Metals, which are commonly allergenic to humans, induce both MT and hsp70 (one of the hsps family). Until now, there has been no report of any antibody to MT in human serum. In the present study, serum samples from healthy controls (Group I), and patients suffering from atopic dermatitis without (Group II) or with (Group III) metal allergy, were measured for antibodies to MT and hsp70, using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Metal allergy was confirmed by patch testing. We first found that antibody to MT exists in human serum. We also found a high positive frequency of antibody to MT (51.3%) and to hsp70 (43.6%) in the sera of Group III, compared to those of Group I (3.8% and 5.1%) or Group II (6.4% and 5.1%). Furthermore, there was a strong positive correlation between antibody to MT and antibody to hsp70 in Group III (P = 0.0013), but not in Group I and Group II. Our results indicate that antibody to MT exists in human serum, as do antibodies to hsps, and suggest that elevated levels of MT and hsp70 antibodies are associated with metal allergy in atopic patients. PMID:12562388

  9. Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody-positive pulmonary-renal syndrome in a patient with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tonneijck, Lennart; Tanna, Anisha; Pusey, Charles D

    2013-01-01

    A 72-year-old male patient with known diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (SSc) presented with severe haemoptysis and blood and protein in the urine. In light of his known interstitial lung disease, he had been repeatedly treated for recurrent community-acquired pneumonia. Immunological testing demonstrated a strongly positive perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody with a high titre antimyeloperoxidase antibody. The patient was diagnosed with pulmonary-renal syndrome as a consequence of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis. He started immediate plasmapheresis in combination with methylprednisolone, followed by cyclophosphamide and rituximab, with good clinical outcome. PMID:23771961

  10. Green fluorescent-conjugated anti-CEA single chain antibody for the detection of CEA-positive cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Salavatifar, Maryam; Amin, Shadi; Jahromi, Zahra Moghaddassi; Rasgoo, Nasrin; Rastgoo, Nasrin; Arbabi, Mehdi

    2011-06-01

    According to World Health Organization (WHO), cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 7.4 million deaths (around 13% of all deaths) in 2004. Monoclonal/recombinant antibodies, which specifically target clinical biomarkers of disease, have increasingly been applied as powerful tools in cancer imaging and therapy, a fact that is highlighted by some nine FDA-approved monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) or their immunoconjugates (as of December 2008) for use in cancer treatment. In this study, five monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were generated and characterized against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), which is widely used clinically as both a blood and tissue tumor marker of epithelial malignancy. Variable domains (VH and VL) of one the stable MAbs with highest affinity were PCR-amplified and assembled as single-chain antibody fragment (scFv). Following the cloning and expression of scFv antibody fragments in Escherichia coli, the functional binding and specificity of the recombinant antibody were confirmed by ELISA. To develop a direct in vitro detection of CEA-positive cancer cells, scFv DNA was genetically fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene and expressed in bacteria. The chimeric fluorescent protein is able to specifically detect CEA-positive cell lines; no cross-reactivity was observed with a negative control cell line. This strategy will likely allow the establishment of a rapid, single-step detection assay of CEA, which is considered to be one of the best predictors of malignancy among all other tumor markers. PMID:21707357

  11. Specificity of antinuclear autoantibodies recognizing the dense fine speckled nuclear pattern: Preferential targeting of DFS70/LEDGFp75 over its interacting partner MeCP2.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anamika; Woods-Burnham, Leanne; Ortiz, Greisha; Rios-Colon, Leslimar; Figueroa, Johnny; Albesa, Roger; Andrade, Luis E; Mahler, Michael; Casiano, Carlos A

    2015-12-01

    Human antinuclear autoantibodies (ANAs) targeting the dense fine speckled (DFS) nuclear protein DFS70, commonly known as lens epithelium derived growth factor p75 (LEDGFp75), present a clinical puzzle since their significance remains elusive. While their frequencies are low in ANA-positive autoimmune rheumatic diseases, they are relatively elevated in clinical laboratory referrals, diverse inflammatory conditions, and 'apparently' healthy individuals. We reported previously that DFS70/LEDGFp75 is an autoantigen in prostate cancer that closely interacts with another 70kD DFS nuclear protein, methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). This led us to investigate if anti-DFS sera exclusively target DFS70/LEDGFp75 or also recognize MeCP2. Using several complementary autoantibody detection platforms and cellular/molecular approaches we evaluated 65 human sera producing anti-DFS autoantibodies. Our results show that these antibodies are highly specific for DFS70/LEDGFp75 and do not target MeCP2. Establishing the specificity of anti-DFS autoantibodies has implications for increasing our understanding of their biological significance and clinical utility. PMID:26235378

  12. Serum cholesterol levels in middle-aged euthyroid subjects with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongmei; Yin, Quhua; Yan, Xiaoli; Song, Huaidong; Gao, Guanqi; Liang, Jun; Zhao, Jiajun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate serum cholesterol levels in middle-aged euthyroid subjects with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs). Methods: We screened 1607 euthyroid subjects aged 35-65 years old. All the subjects were divided into 2 groups (i.e., TPOAb-positive group, n=205; TPOAb-negative group, n=1402) according to the level of TPOAb. The subjects were then subgrouped according to serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels; those with a TSH level of 0.3-0.99 mIU/L, 1.0-1.89 mIU/L, and 1.9-4.80 mIU/L were classified into the low-normal, mid-range, and high-normal TSH subgroups, respectively). Each TSH group further subdivided into TPOAb-positive and TPOAb-negative subgroup. Data regarding the subjects’ height, body weight, blood pressure, and levels of serum TSH, TPOAb, fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were collected. Results: Compared with TPOAb-negative subjects, TPOAb-positive patients had higher levels of TSH, TC, and HDL-C (P=0.001, P=0.012, and P=0.049 respectively) with a tendency for increased LDL-C levels (P=0.053). In the low-normal TSH subgroup, subjects with and without TPOAb had similar levels of TSH, TC, HDL-C, and LDL-C (P>0.05). In mid-range TSH subgroup, TPOAb-positive patients had higher HDL-C levels compared to TPOAb-negative subjects (P=0.008) and a tendency for increased TC levels (P=0.121). In the high-normal TSH subgroup, TPOAb-positive patients had higher TSH and TC levels compared to TPOAb-negative subjects (P<0.001 and P=0.046 respectively). Conclusions: High TPOAb levels above the normal range appears in euthyroid population, dyslipidemia have begun. PMID:26885115

  13. Affinity Maturation of Monoclonal Antibody 1E11 by Targeted Randomization in CDR3 Regions Optimizes Therapeutic Antibody Targeting of HER2-Positive Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Bong-Kook; Choi, Soyoung; Cui, Lei Guang; Lee, Young-Ha; Hwang, In-Sik; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Shim, Hyunbo; Lee, Jong-Seo

    2015-01-01

    Anti-HER2 murine monoclonal antibody 1E11 has strong and synergistic anti-tumor activity in HER2-overexpressing gastric cancer cells when used in combination with trastuzumab. We presently optimized this antibody for human therapeutics. First, the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the murine antibody were grafted onto human germline immunoglobulin variable genes. No difference in affinity and biological activity was observed between chimeric 1E11 (ch1E11) and humanized 1E11 (hz1E11). Next, affinity maturation of hz1E11 was performed by the randomization of CDR-L3 and H3 residues followed by stringent biopanning selection. Milder selection pressure favored the selection of more diverse clones, whereas higher selection stringency resulted in the convergence of the panning output to a smaller number of clones with improved affinity. Clone 1A12 had four amino acid substitutions in CDR-L3, and showed a 10-fold increase in affinity compared to the parental clone and increased potency in an in vitro anti-proliferative activity assay with HER2-overepxressing gastric cancer cells. Clone 1A12 inhibited tumor growth of NCI-N87 xenograft model with similar efficacy to trastuzumab alone, and the combination treatment of 1A12 and trastuzumab completely removed the established tumors. These results suggest that humanized and affinity matured monoclonal antibody 1A12 is a highly optimized molecule for future therapeutic development against HER2-positive tumors. PMID:26225765

  14. Evaluation of disulfide bond position to enhance the thermal stability of a highly stable single domain antibody.

    PubMed

    Zabetakis, Dan; Olson, Mark A; Anderson, George P; Legler, Patricia M; Goldman, Ellen R

    2014-01-01

    Single domain antibodies are the small recombinant variable domains derived from camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies. They are renowned for their stability, in large part due to their ability to refold following thermal or chemical denaturation. In addition to refolding after heat denaturation, A3, a high affinity anti-Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B single domain antibody, possesses a melting temperature of ∼84°C, among the highest reported for a single domain antibody. In this work we utilized the recently described crystal structure of A3 to select locations for the insertion of a second disulfide bond and evaluated the impact that the addition of this second bond had on the melting temperature. Four double-disulfide versions of A3 were constructed and each was found to improve the melting temperature relative to the native structure without reducing affinity. Placement of the disulfide bond at a previously published position between framework regions 2 and 3 yielded the largest improvement (>6°C), suggesting this location is optimal, and seemingly provides a universal route to raise the melting temperature of single domain antibodies. This study further demonstrates that even single domain antibodies with extremely high melting points can be further stabilized by addition of disulfide bonds. PMID:25526640

  15. Epidemiology and infectious complications of human immunodeficiency virus antibody positive patients.

    PubMed

    Yangco, B G; Kenyon, V S

    1993-01-01

    From July 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992, 156 patients (pts) with positive antibody titers to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) were seen in our clinic. A retrospective review of the epidemiology and infectious complications of these patients is presented. There were 129 males and 27 females (4.8:1, ratio). Only 10/156 (12.8%) were non-whites (13 blacks and 7 hispanics). The majority, 126 (80.7%), were 25 to 44 years old. The most common risk factor was homosexuality or bisexuality 100 (64.1%), followed by heterosexual acquisition 25 (16%), intravenous drug abuse 23 (13.7%), unknown 6 (3.8%) and transfusion-related 3 (1.9%). Sixty-five pts had no infections. In the remaining 91 pts, the infections noted were: candidiasis (54 pts); Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (25 pts); Herpes simplex (13 pts); cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis (11 pts) and CMV esophagitis (1 pt), central nervous system toxoplasmosis (8); Herpes zoster (6 pts); cryptococcal meningitis (5 pts); Mycobacterium avium complex bacteremia (4 pts); Molluscum contagiosum, hepatitis-B, staphylococcal infection, perirectal abscess and oral hairy leukoplakia (2 pts each); syphilis, cryptosporidiosis, nocardiosis, histoplasmosis and laryngeal papillomatosis (1 pt each). Infections were multiple in 57/91 (62%) pts and tend to occur more often when the helper cells are < 200 47/57 (82%) pts. Appropriate antimicrobials for prophylaxis and maintenance therapy appeared to decrease the occurrence or relapse of infections such as pneumocystosis, candidiasis, cryptococcosis, tuberculosis and toxoplasmosis. PMID:7901972

  16. The Drug User's Identity and How It Relates to Being Hepatitis C Antibody Positive: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    The increasing health problem of hepatitis C virus infection has only recently attracted the attention of psychosocial research, especially among subjects at higher risk (e.g. injecting drug users). There is a lack of information about the knowledge, perceptions and feelings that injecting drug users hold about their hepatitis C antibody positive

  17. Utilization of hepatitis B core antibody-positive donor liver grafts

    PubMed Central

    MacConmara, Malcolm P; Vachharajani, Neeta; Wellen, Jason R; Anderson, Christopher D; Lowell, Jeffrey A; Shenoy, Surendra; Chapman, William C; Doyle, Maria B Majella

    2012-01-01

    Background The inclusion of hepatitis B core antibody-positive (HBcAb+) liver donors is a strategy utilized to increase organ availability. This study examined HBcAb+ transplantation practices to identify specific factors influencing outcomes. Methods Twenty-five HBcAb+ liver transplants were identified retrospectively among 868 adult transplants performed between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2009. Twelve (48%) recipients had hepatitis C and five (20%) had hepatitis B. Patient and donor demographics, preoperative morbidity, transplant data and outcomes were examined. Statistical analysis was completed using Student's t-test or the Kaplan–Meier method. A P-value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results There was no difference in age, body mass index or comorbidities between HBcAb+ liver recipients and control subjects. Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) scores of >30 were significantly more frequent in HBcAb+ liver recipients (32% vs. 15%; P = 0.04). All patients received immunoglobulin and longterm antiviral therapy as prophylaxis against graft hepatitis B resurgence. No patients who received HBcAb+ livers developed hepatitis B infection on follow-up. Overall survival at 30 days, 1 year and 5 years in HBcAb+ liver recipients was 92%, 74% and 74%, respectively, compared with 96%, 89% and 76%, respectively, in the control group (P = not significant, log-rank test). All except one of the deaths in the HBcAb+ liver recipient group occurred within 90 days postoperatively and in patients with MELD scores >30. Conclusions The practice of transplanting HBcAb+ grafts incurs low risk for infection using current methods of prophylaxis. The highest mortality risk was in the early postoperative period, specifically in patients with very high MELD scores. This probably reflects the practice of using positive serology grafts in emergent situations. PMID:22151450

  18. Political returns: irony, theory, and the antinuclear movement

    SciTech Connect

    Seery, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation explores the theoretical relationship between the concept of irony and the concept of politics, and culminates in an argument regarding the presence of irony within the politics of the anti-nuclear movement. The work begins with a discussion of certain contemporary accounts of the concept of politics in ancient Greece, and a critique of a literal notion of political community is proposed as an indirect introduction for the theme of political community as ironic. In the second chapter, the thesis regarding the place of irony within the Greek conception of political community is illustrated by way of an intensive reading and reinterpretation of Plato's Republic. The next chapter attempts to answer the question, What is irony.; and to that end, an argument concerning the relationship between philosophic and literary formulations of irony is forwarded. The fourth chapter examines the theorists and theories of philosophic irony in the 19th century. In the final chapter, certain theories of the strategy of nonviolent resistance are analyzed and in response it is argued that an element of political irony is implicit within the general idea of nonviolent resistance and that an ironic view of political community informs the nonviolent protest activities of the anti-nuclear movement in particular.

  19. Biopsy findings on a stable recipient after secondary donor specific antibody (DSA) positive and ABO incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sugitani, Atsushi; Takahashi, Chihiro; Naka, Takuji; Hisamitsu, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Osamu; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kimura, Mari; Yoshida, Haruhiko; Hanaki, Takehiko; Hamazoe, Ryuichi

    2015-07-01

    Using desensitization protocol, we performed a secondary donor specific antibody (DSA) positive and ABO incompatible kidney transplantation. One-hour biopsy showed no C4d deposition. The protocol biopsy after 2 weeks showed diffuse C4d deposition with peritubulitis. After 12 weeks, however, the protocol biopsy showed disappearance of tubulitis in spite of remaining C4d deposition. The recipient was in stable condition with excellent graft function despite high titer of the DSA. Monitoring of protocol biopsy is critical while antibody titer and the interpretation of the histological findings correlating with clinical markers must be considered. PMID:26031593

  20. Antibody profiling in ultrasound normal individuals with positive serology for cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Mourglia-Ettlin, G; Miles, S; Hernández, A; Dematteis, S

    2016-02-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the cestode parasite Echinococcus granulosus. In endemic regions, seropositive individuals to E. granulosus usually and markedly outnumber image-confirmed cases of cystic echinococcosis, suggesting that some parasite challenges derive in unsuccessful infection establishments. However, it is still unknown whether such parasite-specific antibodies in healthy individuals might play a role in resistance/susceptibility to the infection. Therefore, we have here analysed the profile of antibodies recognizing E. granulosus antigens in seropositive but ultrasound normal individuals, as well as in surgery-confirmed patients and healthy donors. Our results showed that ultrasound normal individuals exhibited low avidity IgG antibodies, as well as low levels of parasite-specific IgG1 and IgG4 antibodies. In addition, they displayed significant levels of specific IgE, and thus, they revealed a uniquely high IgE:IgG4 ratio. Moreover, high levels of parasite-specific IgM were detected in such individuals, which showed characteristics of natural cross-reacting antibodies. Therefore, our results indicate that ultrasound normal individuals but seropositive for E. granulosus antigens exhibit a distinctive antibody profile. In this regard, possible associations between their antiparasite antibodies and potential resistance mechanisms to cystic echinococcosis are discussed. PMID:26729409

  1. Positive dermal hypersensitivity and specific antibodies in workers exposed to bio-engineered enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, R.E.; Henningsen, G.M.; Driscoll, R.; MacKenzie, B.A.; Wilcox, T.; Scinto, J.D.; Bernstein, D.M.; Swanson, M. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN )

    1991-03-15

    Thirty-six employees who produced industrial enzymes from bio-engineered strains of bacteria and fungi were evaluated by skin prick testing and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays for specific IgE and IgG antibodies. The workers complained of asthma- and flu-like' symptoms which generally lessened away from work. The enzymes evaluated were {alpha}-amylase from A. niger (ind-AAN), B. licheniformis (ind-AAL) and B. subtilis (ind-AAS); purified {alpha}-amylase from B. subtilis (AAS) and A. niger (AAN); alkaline protease from B. licheniformis (ind-APL) and purified alkaline protease (APL); amylase glucosidase from A. niger (ind-AGN) and purified amylase glucosidase (AGN). Significantly positive skin tests were found for APL, AGN and ind-AAN. Significantly elevated specific IgE results were observed for AAN, AGN, and ind-AAN; elevated specific IgGs were observed for AAN, ind-AAN, ind-AAS, ind-AAL and ind-AGN. Radioimmunoassays of air filter samples (using sera with high Ab titers) for 4 of the ind-enzymes showed only ind-AAN at extremely high environmental levels. These results indicate that occupational exposure to some ind-enzymes causes immediate onset dermal hypersensitivity reactions. The results are equivocal as to whether these reactions are IgE mediated, as IgE titers were low. Contrary to this, IgG titers were extremely high and suggest that these biomarkers can be used as indicators of both individual exposure and environmental analyses.

  2. Treponemal antibody in CSF and cellular immunity in peripheral blood of syphilitic patients with persisting positive rapid plasma regain

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Huan-Li; Zhong, Dao-Qing; Lin, Lu-Yang; Qiu, Xiao-Shan; Yang, Ri-Dong

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of patients with RPR constant positive more than 2 years despite receiving standard syphilis treatment has been reported to be 11.54%~31.3%. The current interpretations on this phenomenon are cellular immune function restrained and the existence of neurosyphilis or asymptomatic neurosyphilis. We conducted this study to detect the treponemal antibody in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood of syphilis patients with persisting RPR positive more than 2 years without neurologic signs, and then explore their relationship. In this study, Treponemal antibody in CSF of 46 syphilitic with HIV negative were measured by syphilis serum test and compared with that of 5 neurosyphilis. Lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry (FCM) and compared with that of 30 healthy controls. We observed that treponemal antibody in CSF was detected not only in 12 cases (25.21%) of 46 treated patients, but also in 5 neurosyphilis. The ratio of lymphocyte subsets revealed that CD3+, CD4+ T cells and natural killer (NK) cells showed no significant differences between the patient and healthy controls (P > 0.05), while CD8+ T cells in patients were significant higher than that in healthy controls (P < 0.001). Lymphocyte subsets showed no significant differences between the patients with treponemal antibody positive and negative in CSF (P > 0.05). In conclusion, the treponemal antibody in CSF of treated patients suggests that part of them were asymptomatic neurosyphilis and with cellular immunodifeciency. And there is no significant relationship between asymptomatic neurosyphilis and cellular immunodeficiency in peripheral blood. PMID:26191296

  3. Cytokine and Antibody Based Diagnostic Algorithms for Sputum Culture-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Joy; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yunxia; Li, Haicheng; Guo, Huixin; Zhou, Jie; Chen, Xunxun; Chen, Yuhui; Liao, Qinghua; Shu, Yang; Tan, Yaoju; Yu, Meiling; Li, Guozhou; Zhou, Lin; Zhong, Qiu; Bi, Lijun; Guo, Lina; Zhao, Meigui

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most serious infectious diseases globally and has high mortality rates. A variety of diagnostic tests are available, yet none are wholly reliable. Serum cytokines, although significantly and frequently induced by different diseases and thus good biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis, are not sufficiently disease-specific. TB-specific antibody detection, on the other hand, has been reported to be highly specific but not sufficiently sensitive. In this study, our aim was to improve the sensitivity and specificity of TB diagnosis by combining detection of TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies in peripheral blood samples. Methods TB-related serum cytokines were screened using a human cytokine array. TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies were detected in parallel with microarray technology. The diagnostic performance of the new protocol for active TB was systematically compared with other traditional methods. Results Here, we show that cytokines I-309, IL-8 and MIG are capable of distinguishing patients with active TB from healthy controls, patients with latent TB infection, and those with a range of other pulmonary diseases, and that these cytokines, and their presence alongside antibodies for TB-specific antigens Ag14-16kDa, Ag32kDa, Ag38kDa and Ag85B, are specific markers for active TB. The diagnostic protocol for active TB developed here, which combines the detection of three TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies, is highly sensitive (91.03%), specific (90.77%) and accurate (90.87%). Conclusions Our results show that combining detection of TB-related cytokines and TB-specific antibodies significantly enhances diagnostic accuracy for active TB, providing greater accuracy than conventional diagnostic methods such as interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs), TB antibody Colloidal Gold Assays and microbiological culture, and suggest that this diagnostic protocol has potential for clinical application. PMID:26674517

  4. Trends in anti-nuclear protests in the United States, 1984-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Ondaatje, E.H.

    1989-01-01

    This report updates previous RAND research on U.S. anti-nuclear protest groups, examines trends in anti-nuclear and related protests, and assess what these trends may imply for possible terrorist violence, either by terrorists infiltrating the anti-nuclear movement or violent elements arising within the movement. Two recent trends in protest activity may signal greater militancy in the movement. First, the number of protesters who are willing to face arrest, fines, and imprisonment has steadily increased over the past four years. In the first eleven months of 1987, nearly 3,000 protesters were arrested for anti-nuclear civil disobedience, compared with 1,056 in 1984. Second, some large, diverse groups of protesters have stretched the ability of their own organizers to control events involving civil disobedience. Consequently, the number of skirmishes between protesters and security personnel has increased. Third, radical environmentalist groups previously uninvolved in anti-nuclear activities have recently organized protests at uranium mines. Regular involvement by such groups in anti-nuclear protests, coupled with the trend toward greater cooperation between peace activists and environmentalists over such issues as uranium mining, nuclear testing, land and sea use, and transport and storage of toxic waste, could signal a more volatile, though not necessarily more violent, future for the anti-nuclear movement.

  5. Selective loss of Purkinje cells in a patient with anti-gliadin-antibody-positive autoimmune cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The patient was an 84-year-old woman who had the onset of truncal ataxia at age 77 and a history of Basedow's disease. Her ataxic gait gradually deteriorated. She could not walk without support at age 81 and she was admitted to our hospital at age 83. Gaze-evoked nystagmus and dysarthria were observed. Mild ataxia was observed in all limbs. Her deep tendon reflex and sense of position were normal. IgA anti-gliadin antibody, IgG anti-gliadin antibody, anti-SS-A/Ro antibody, anti-SS-B/La antibody and anti-TPO antibody were positive. A conventional brain MRI did not show obvious cerebellar atrophy. However, MRI voxel based morphometry (VBM) and SPECT-eZIS revealed cortical cerebellar atrophy and reduced cerebellar blood flow. IVIg treatment was performed and was moderately effective. After her death at age 85, the patient was autopsied. Neuropathological findings were as follows: selective loss of Purkinje cells; no apparent degenerative change in the efferent pathways, such as the dentate nuclei or vestibular nuclei; no prominent inflammatory reaction. From these findings, we diagnosed this case as autoimmune cerebellar atrophy associated with gluten ataxia. All 3 autopsies previously reported on gluten ataxia have noted infiltration of inflammatory cells in the cerebellum. In this case, we postulated that the infiltration of inflammatory cells was not found because the patient's condition was based on humoral immunity. The clinical conditions of gluten ataxia have not yet been properly elucidated, but are expected to be revealed as the number of autopsied cases increases. PMID:21294863

  6. Imaging of Hsp70-positive tumors with cmHsp70.1 antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gehrmann, Mathias K; Kimm, Melanie A; Stangl, Stefan; Schmid, Thomas E; Noël, Peter B; Rummeny, Ernst J; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Real-time imaging of small tumors is still one of the challenges in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of clinical outcome. Targeting novel biomarkers that are selectively expressed on a large variety of different tumors but not normal cells has the potential to improve the imaging capacity of existing methods such as computed tomography. Herein, we present a novel technique using cmHsp70.1 monoclonal antibody-conjugated spherical gold nanoparticles for quantification of the targeted uptake of gold nanoparticles into membrane Hsp70-positive tumor cells. Upon binding, cmHsp70.1-conjugated gold nanoparticles but not nanoparticles coupled to an isotype-matched IgG1 antibody or empty nanoparticles are rapidly taken up by highly malignant Hsp70 membrane-positive mouse tumor cells. After 24 hours, the cmHsp70.1-conjugated gold nanoparticles are found to be enriched in the perinuclear region. Specificity for membrane Hsp70 was shown by using an Hsp70 knockout tumor cell system. Toxic side effects of the cmHsp70.1-conjugated nanoparticles are not observed at a concentration of 1–10 µg/mL. Experiments are ongoing to evaluate whether cmHsp70.1 antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles are suitable for the detection of membrane-Hsp70-positive tumors in vivo. PMID:26392771

  7. Association of genes in the NF-κB pathway with antibody-positive primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nordmark, Gunnel; Wang, Chuan; Vasaitis, Lilian; Eriksson, Per; Theander, Elke; Kvarnström, Marika; Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena; Jazebi, Helmi; Sjöwall, Christopher; Reksten, Tove Ragna; Brun, Johan G; Jonsson, Malin V; Johnsen, Svein J; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Omdal, Roald; Jonsson, Roland; Bowman, Simon; Ng, Wan-Fai; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2013-11-01

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is a systemic autoimmune inflammatory disease characterized by focal lymphocytic infiltrates in the lachrymal and salivary glands and autoantibodies against the SSA/Ro and SSB/La antigens. Experimental studies have shown an activation of NF-κB in primary SS. NF-κB activation results in inflammation and autoimmunity and is regulated by inhibitory and activating proteins. Genetic studies have shown an association between multiple autoimmune diseases and TNFAIP3 (A20) and TNIP1 (ABIN1), both repressors of NF-κB and of IKBKE (IKKε), which is an NF-κB activator. The aim of this study was to analyse single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the IKBKE, NFKB1, TNIP1 and TNFAIP3 genes for association with primary SS. A total of 12 SNPs were genotyped in 1105 patients from Scandinavia (Sweden and Norway, n = 684) and the UK (n = 421) and 4460 controls (Scandinavia, n = 1662, UK, n = 2798). When patients were stratified for the presence of anti-SSA and/or anti-SSB antibodies (n = 868), case-control meta-analysis found an association between antibody-positive primary SS and two SNPs in TNIP1 (P = 3.4 × 10(-5) , OR = 1.33, 95%CI: 1.16-1.52 for rs3792783 and P = 1.3 × 10(-3) , OR = 1.21, 95%CI: 1.08-1.36 for rs7708392). A TNIP1 risk haplotype was associated with antibody-positive primary SS (P = 5.7 × 10(-3) , OR = 1.47, 95%CI: 1.12-1.92). There were no significant associations with IKBKE, NFKB1 or TNFAIP3 in the meta-analysis of the Scandinavian and UK cohorts. We conclude that polymorphisms in TNIP1 are associated with antibody-positive primary SS. PMID:23944604

  8. Antibody-based targeting of FGFR3 in bladder carcinoma and t(4;14)-positive multiple myeloma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Jing; Du, Xiangnan; Chen, Yongmei; Chan, Pamela; Li, Hao; Wu, Ping; Marsters, Scot; Stawicki, Scott; Tien, Janet; Totpal, Klara; Ross, Sarajane; Stinson, Susanna; Dornan, David; French, Dorothy; Wang, Qian-Rena; Stephan, Jean-Philippe; Wu, Yan; Wiesmann, Christian; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3) is implicated in the development of t(4;14)-positive multiple myeloma. While FGFR3 is frequently overexpressed and/or activated through mutations in bladder cancer, the functional importance of FGFR3 and its potential as a specific therapeutic target in this disease have not been elucidated in vivo. Here we report that inducible knockdown of FGFR3 in human bladder carcinoma cells arrested cell-cycle progression in culture and markedly attenuated tumor progression in xenografted mice. Further, we developed a unique antibody (R3Mab) that inhibited not only WT FGFR3, but also various mutants of the receptor, including disulfide-linked cysteine mutants. Biochemical analysis and 2.1-Å resolution crystallography revealed that R3Mab bound to a specific FGFR3 epitope that simultaneously blocked ligand binding, prevented receptor dimerization, and induced substantial conformational changes in the receptor. R3Mab exerted potent antitumor activity against bladder carcinoma and t(4;14)-positive multiple myeloma xenografts in mice by antagonizing FGFR3 signaling and eliciting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). These studies provide in vivo evidence demonstrating an oncogenic role of FGFR3 in bladder cancer and support antibody-based targeting of FGFR3 in hematologic and epithelial cancers driven by WT or mutant FGFR3. PMID:19381019

  9. Biological Evaluation of 131I- and CF750-Labeled Dmab(scFv)-Fc Antibodies for Xenograft Imaging of CD25-Positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Qing; Cai, Huawei; Yang, Hao; Li, Lin; Yuan, Cen; Lu, Xiaofeng; Wan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    A Dmab(scFv)-Fc antibody containing the single chain variable fragment of a humanized daclizumab antibody and the Fc fragment of a human IgG1 antibody was produced via recombinant expression in Pichia pastoris. The Dmab(scFv)-Fc antibody forms a dimer in solution, and it specifically binds CD25-positive tumor cells and tumor tissues. For tumor imaging, the Dmab(scFv)-Fc antibody was labeled with the 131I isotope and CF750 fluorescent dye, respectively. After intravenous injection of mice bearing CD25-positive tumor xenografts, tumor uptake of the 131I-Dmab(scFv)-Fc antibody was visible at 1 h, and clear images were obtained at 5 h using SPECT/CT. After systemic administration of the CF750-Dmab(scFv)-Fc antibody, tumor uptake was present as early as 1 h, and tumor xenografts could be kinetically imaged within 9 h after injection. These results indicate that the Dmab(scFv)-Fc antibody rapidly and specifically targets CD25-positive tumor cells, suggesting the potential of this antibody as an imaging agent for the diagnosis of lymphomatous-type ATLL. PMID:24864244

  10. Neurotropic compounds and their antibodies: effect on the brain system of positive emotional reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Epstein, O I; Vorob'eva, T M; Geiko, V V; Pan, I R; Berchenko, O G

    2003-01-01

    We studied the effects of ethanol, morphine, S100 protein, and antibodies to morphine, S100 protein, and opiate -receptors in ultralow doses on self-stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus. The reaction underwent similar changes after single administration of test preparations. Tenfold treatment produced the stimulatory and stabilizing effect, which was related to ambivalent properties of preparations in ultralow doses. Tenfold administration of water did not produce changes in control animals. PMID:12949677

  11. Post-transplant development of C1q-positive HLA antibodies and kidney graft survival.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Antonina; Poggi, Elvira; Ozzella, Giuseppina; Adorno, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    The development of de novo human leukocyte antigen (HLA) donor specific antibodies (DSA), detected by both cytotoxic or solid phase assays, was considered the major risk factor for allograft failure in kidney transplantation. However, it was shown that not all patients with persistent production of DSA suffered loss of their grafts. Modified Luminex-Single Antigen assays, able to identify C1q-fixing antibodies, represent a new strategy in assessing the clinical relevance of detected DSA. This study demonstrated that C1q-fixing capability of de novo DSA is a clinically relevant marker of worse outcome and inferior graft survival in kidney transplantation. In fact, our findings evidenced a very low graft survival only in the patients who developed DSA able to fix C1q during post-transplant course, while patients producing C1q-negative DSA had good graft survival, which was comparable to that found in our previous study for DSA-negative patients. Moreover, anti-HLA class II antibodies had a higher incidence than anti-HLA class I, and the ability to fix C1q was significantly more frequent among anti-DQ DSA than anti-DR DSA. Monitoring of de novo C1q-DSA production represents a useful, non-invasive tool for risk stratification and prediction of graft outcome in kidney transplantation. PMID:25095531

  12. Anti-Glutamate ∊2 Receptor Antibody-Positive and Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antibody-Negative Lobar Encephalitis Presenting as Global Aphasia and Swallowing Apraxia

    PubMed Central

    Hayata, Yuki; Hamada, Kensuke; Sakurai, Yasuhisa; Sugimoto, Izumi; Mannen, Toru; Takahashi, Yukitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the difference between anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-positive encephalitis and anti-glutamate receptor (GluR) antibody-positive encephalitis. Objectives To characterize anti-GluR antibody-positive encephalitis. Methods We report a 33-year-old man with nonparaneoplastic anti-GluR ∊2, ζ1 and δ2 antibody-positive and anti-NMDAR antibody-negative encephalitis, using neuropsychological tests and imaging studies including magnetic resonance imaging and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with a 99mTc-ethylcysteinate dimer. Results The patient exhibited global aphasia and swallowing apraxia (inability to transfer food to the pharyngeal cavity without sialorrhea). He was treated with 3 courses of corticosteroid pulse therapy and had recovered markedly 3 weeks after onset. Magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted images revealed hyperintensity in the bilateral frontal and left parietal cortices. Seven months later, a small area of hyperintensity in the left supramarginal gyrus remained. SPECT revealed hypoperfusion in extensive regions of the bilateral frontal lobes and left supramarginal gyrus. Thirteen months later, blood flow reduction was restricted to diffuse areas in the frontal lobes. Conclusions Frontal lobar encephalitis without medial temporal involvement, marked cognitive impairment with a relatively preserved level of consciousness, and a favorable response to corticosteroid therapy, with nearly reversible cortical damage, may characterize anti-GluR antibody-positive encephalitis. PMID:25685138

  13. A pathogenesis-based transcript signature in donor-specific antibody-positive kidney transplant patients with normal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Ó Broin, P; Hayde, N; Bao, Y; Ye, B; Calder, R B; de Boccardo, G; Lubetzky, M; Ajaimy, M; Pullman, J; Colovai, A; Akalin, E; Golden, A

    2014-12-01

    Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0-ST arrays were used to assess the gene expression profiles of kidney transplant patients who presented with donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) but showed normal biopsy histopathology and did not develop antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Biopsy and whole-blood profiles for these DSA-positive, AMR-negative (DSA +/AMR-) patients were compared to both DSA-positive, AMR-positive (DSA +/AMR +) patients as well as DSA-negative (DSA -) controls. While individual gene expression changes across sample groups were relatively subtle, gene-set enrichment analysis using previously identified pathogenesis-based transcripts (PBTs) identified a clear molecular signature involving increased rejection-associated transcripts in AMR - patients. Results from this study have been published in Kidney International (Hayde et al., 2014 [1]) and the associated data have been deposited in the GEO archive and are accessible via the following link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE50084. PMID:26484130

  14. Characterization of antibody drug conjugate positional isomers at cysteine residues by peptide mapping LC-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Janin-Bussat, Marie-Claire; Dillenbourg, Marina; Corvaia, Nathalie; Beck, Alain; Klinguer-Hamour, Christine

    2015-02-15

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are becoming a major class of oncology therapeutics. Because ADCs combine the monoclonal antibody specificity with the high toxicity of a drug, they can selectively kill tumor cells while minimizing toxicity to normal cells. Most of the current ADCs in clinical trials are controlled, but heterogeneous mixtures of isomers and isoforms. Very few protocols on ADC characterization at the peptide level have been published to date. Here, we report on the improvement of an ADC peptide mapping protocol to characterize the drug-loaded peptides by LC-MS analysis. These methods were developed on brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris), a commercial ADC with an average of four drugs linked to interchain cysteine residues of its antibody component. Because of the drug hydrophobicity, all the steps of this protocol including enzymatic digestion were improved to maintain the hydrophobic drug-loaded peptides in solution, allowing their unambiguous identification by LC-MS. For the first time, the payloads positional isomers observed by RP-HPLC after IdeS-digestion and reduction of the ADC were also characterized. PMID:25596378

  15. Contribution of spinal cord biopsy to diagnosis of aquaporin-4 antibody positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Ringelstein, M; Metz, I; Ruprecht, K; Koch, A; Rappold, J; Ingwersen, J; Mathys, C; Jarius, S; Brück, W; Hartung, H-P; Paul, F; Aktas, O

    2013-11-01

    Longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis is characteristic but not pathognomonic for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs) and may mimic local tumors. In this retrospective study based on a cohort of 175 NMOSD patients we identified seven patients who initially presented with a longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesion and underwent spinal cord biopsy due to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-suspected malignancies. Remarkably, routine neuropathology was inconclusive and did not guide the diagnostic process to anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-seropositive NMOSD. Serious postoperative complications occurred in 5/7 patients and persisted during follow-up in 2/7 patients (29%). Considering these sequelae, AQP4-antibody testing should be mandatory in patients with inconclusive longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions prior to biopsy. PMID:24192218

  16. False positive results for antibody to HIV in two men with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Esteva, M H; Blasini, A M; Ogly, D; Rodríguez, M A

    1992-01-01

    False positive results were obtained for HIV tests in two men with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who were suspected of being infected with HIV because of fever, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, and inflammatory myopathy. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for HIV were twice positive when tested three times over a period of six months. Western blot analysis showed reactivity against the gp41 band in patient 1. False positive results for HIV tests can occur in patients with SLE, potentially leading to an erroneous diagnosis of HIV infection. PMID:1417140

  17. Available means: manifestations of Aristotle's three modes of rhetorical appeal in antinuclear fiction

    SciTech Connect

    Mannix, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The abundance of sympathetic scientists, military men and clergymen in antinuclear fiction reflects a public perception that authorities speak most knowledgeably about an issue. Other antinuclear works employ characters with less traditional ethical appeals: nurturing women, vital youths, and even infallible computers. Antinuclear fiction uses enthymeme and example to reflect the history of the nuclear weapons debate. Some works attach the immorality of the weapons by examining the moral dilemmas of nuclear scientists. Others admit the permanence of the nuclear threat. By arousing emotions, fiction is capable of mobilizing its audience's active support for the ideas it presents. The principal emotions that various antinuclear works arouse highlight the close relationship between literature and rhetoric. The most dominant emotions, pity and fear, are the two Aristotle links to tragedy. Scorn, the principal emotion that Dr. Strangelove arouses - is the crucial emotion on which all satire depends. However, the other principal emotion in anti-nuclear fiction - hope - has principally a rhetorical function ensuring that the feelings the works provoke will be channeled constructively.

  18. Vascular dysfunction in the offspring of AT1 receptor antibody-positive pregnant rats during high-salt diet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Su-Li; Xiong, Hai-Yan; DU, Yun-Hui; Quan, Lin; Yang, Jie; Ma, Xiu-Rui; Liu, Hui-Rong

    2011-04-25

    Antibody against the angiotensin AT1 receptor (AT1-Ab) could disturb placental development. The placenta is the key organ between mother and fetus. Placental damage will seriously impair fetal growth and development in utero, leading to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Based on the fetal origins of adult disease (FOAD) hypothesis, IUGR could increase a propensity to develop adult onset cardiovascular disease (CVD). The present study was designed to determine whether vascular function has changed in the adult offspring of AT1-Ab positive pregnant rats. Twenty four female rats (8-week-old, AT1-Ab negative) were randomly divided into two groups, immunized and vehicle groups. Immunized group received active immunization to establish AT1-Ab-positive model, while vehicle group was subjected to Freund's adjuvant without antigen. After 8 weeks of immunization, the antibody titers in sera from the female rats were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Then all the female rats were mated with normal Wistar male rats and became pregnant. Immunized/vehicle group offspring rats (I offspring/V offspring) were raised to 40-week-old under standard chow feeding. Then the two groups' offspring rats were given a high-salt diet for 12 weeks (4% NaCl in chow feeding). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured dynamically by noninvasive blood pressure system. The vascular ring experiment was performed to detect vascular function and reactivity. As detected by ELISA, the titers of antibody peaked at the 8th week (OD values: 2.75 ± 0.08 vs 0.33 ± 0.01, P < 0.01 vs vehicle group at the same time point). There was no significant difference of SBP between the two groups' offspring rats during the high-salt diet (P > 0.05). Isolated thoracic aortic rings of I offspring had significantly decreased constriction under norepinephrine treatment (P < 0.01 vs V offspring) and significantly decreased dilation under acetylcholine treatment (P < 0.05 vs V offspring). These results suggest that the offspring of AT1-Ab-positive pregnant rats are more susceptible to vascular functional abnormality while being fed high-salt diet. PMID:21505730

  19. Piezometric biosensors for anti-apoptotic protein survivin based on buried positive-potential barrier and immobilized monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Stobiecka, Magdalena; Chalupa, Agata; Dworakowska, Beata

    2016-10-15

    The anti-apoptotic protein survivin (Sur) plays an important role in the regulation of cell division and inducing the chemotherapeutic drug resistance. The Sur protein and its mRNA have recently been studied as cancer biomarkers and potential targets for cancer therapy. In this work, we have focused on the design of immunosensors for the detection of Sur based on buried positive-potential barrier layer structure and anti-survivin antibody. The modification of solid AuQC piezoelectrodes was monitored by recording the resonance frequency shift and electrochemical measurements during each step of the sensor preparation. Our results indicate that the immunosensor with covalently bound monoclonal anti-survivin antibody can detect Sur with the limit of detection, LOD=1.7nM (S/N=3σ). The immunosensor applicability for the analysis of real samples was assessed by testing samples of cell lysate solutions obtained from human astrocytoma (glioblastoma) U-87MG cell line, with the experiments performed using the standard addition method. The good linearity of the calibration curves for PBS and lysate solutions at low Sur concentrations confirm the high specificity of the proposed biosensor and good discrimination against nonspecific interactions with lysate components. The calculations indicate that there is still room to increase the Sur capture capacity for Sur while miniaturizing the sensor. The important advantage of the sensor is that it can be reused by a simple regeneration procedure. PMID:26507667

  20. Prevalence of antibodies against Treponema pallidum among HIV-positive patients in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mata-Marín, José Antonio; Sandoval-Sánchez, Juan Joel; Huerta-García, Gloria; Arroyo-Anduiza, Carla Ileana; Alcalá-Martínez, Enrique; Mata-Marín, Luis Alberto; Sandoval-Ramirez, Jorge Luis; Gaytán-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    Our objective was to determine the seroprevalence of syphilis among HIV-infected patients in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City. A cross-sectional study was developed, and 318 HIV-positive patients were evaluated from January to February 2013 at Hospital de Infectología, National Medical Center 'La Raza' (a tertiary care hospital specialising in infectious diseases in Mexico City). Laboratory data were screened for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum. Patients completed a questionnaire relating to socio-demographic data and factors associated with syphilis. Of the 318 patients, 83% were men. The mean age ± SD was 36 ± 11 years; 52% were men who have sex with men and 47% had undertaken higher education. The overall seroprevalence of syphilis among these patients was 25% (95% confidence interval 21%, 30%). Men who have sex with men had a significantly higher seroprevalence (30% vs. 15%, p = 0.009). We conclude that, in Mexico, there is a high seroprevalence of syphilis antibodies in HIV-infected patients and that men who have sex with men are the group most affected. PMID:24713227

  1. Discovery of Antinuclear Antibodies in Pigs Infected with Porcine Circovirus Type 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) causes post-weaning-multisystemic-wasting-syndrome (PMWS), a swine disease first observed in Canada in 1991 (1). It is characterized by general wasting, respiratory disease, jaundice and pallor in young pigs resulting in production losses and variable...

  2. Immune Infertility Should Be Positively Diagnosed Using an Accurate Method by Monitoring the Level of Anti-ACTL7a Antibody.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jun; Yao, Rongyan; Luo, Yanyun; Yang, Dantong; Cao, Yang; Qiu, Yi; Song, Wei; Miao, Shiying; Gu, Yiqun; Wang, Linfang

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is currently a major public health problem. Anti-sperm antibodies (ASAs) markedly reduce sperm quality, which can subsequently lead to male and/or female infertility. The accurate detection of ASAs derived from specific spermatozoa is, therefore, clinically useful. We have focused on the spermatozoa-specific expression protein ACTL7a for many years and have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect the concentration of anti-ACTL7a antibodies in fertile sera (n = 267) and infertile sera (n = 193). Infertile sera were collected from the positive sera of tray agglutination tests (TAT), which is a routine ASA screening methodology. We found that the concentration of anti-ACTL7a antibodies was significantly higher in the infertile sera (than in the fertile sera, P < 0.0001) and much higher in the TAT ≥ 16 infertile sera. The ELISA was much better for male sera detection (AUC = 0.9899). If we set the standard at a strongly positive value (calculated by ROC curve), the positive predictive value of the antibody detection reached 100 percent, with a false positive rate of zero. The developed ELISA method for anti-ACTL7a antibody detection is therefore sensitive, accurate, and easy to perform, making it an excellent potential tool for future clinical use. PMID:26957350

  3. Immune Infertility Should Be Positively Diagnosed Using an Accurate Method by Monitoring the Level of Anti-ACTL7a Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jun; Yao, Rongyan; Luo, Yanyun; Yang, Dantong; Cao, Yang; Qiu, Yi; Song, Wei; Miao, Shiying; Gu, Yiqun; Wang, Linfang

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is currently a major public health problem. Anti-sperm antibodies (ASAs) markedly reduce sperm quality, which can subsequently lead to male and/or female infertility. The accurate detection of ASAs derived from specific spermatozoa is, therefore, clinically useful. We have focused on the spermatozoa-specific expression protein ACTL7a for many years and have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect the concentration of anti-ACTL7a antibodies in fertile sera (n = 267) and infertile sera (n = 193). Infertile sera were collected from the positive sera of tray agglutination tests (TAT), which is a routine ASA screening methodology. We found that the concentration of anti-ACTL7a antibodies was significantly higher in the infertile sera (than in the fertile sera, P < 0.0001) and much higher in the TAT ≥ 16 infertile sera. The ELISA was much better for male sera detection (AUC = 0.9899). If we set the standard at a strongly positive value (calculated by ROC curve), the positive predictive value of the antibody detection reached 100 percent, with a false positive rate of zero. The developed ELISA method for anti-ACTL7a antibody detection is therefore sensitive, accurate, and easy to perform, making it an excellent potential tool for future clinical use. PMID:26957350

  4. Faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin as a marker of gastrointestinal disease in HIV antibody positive individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpstone, D; Rowbottom, A; Nelson, M; Gazzard, B

    1996-01-01

    Hypoalbuminaemia and diarrhoea are common complications of HIV infection and substantial causes of morbidity, but the specific intestinal pathologies that cause enteric protein loss have not been clearly defined. Two hundred and twenty stool samples from patients with a variety of HIV related conditions were analysed for faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin. Patients with intestinal Kaposi's sarcoma had a significantly raised faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin value and hypoalbuminaemia. A faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin value of greater than 0.3 mg/g wet stool has a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 76% for the diagnosis of intestinal Kaposi's sarcoma in HIV positive individuals. Patients with cytomegalovirus and bacterial enteritis had raised faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin values but levels were normal for all other intestinal pathologies compared with pathogen negative stool. The combination of faecal alpha 1 antitrypsin concentration greater than 0.2 mg/g, a negative stool culture for enteric bacteria, and the absence of palatal Kaposi's sarcoma has a sensitivity of 55% and specificity of 88% for the diagnosis of enteric cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:8801198

  5. Critical re-examination of the specificity of auto-anti-Rh antibodies in patients with a positive direct antiglobulin test.

    PubMed

    Issitt, P D; Pavone, B G

    1978-01-01

    Forty-eight autoantibodies with apparent 'simple' anti-Rh specificity (anti-e, -E, -c, -D, -C, -Ce, -G), have been studied by means of multiple absorption tests. The finding that 34 (70.8%) of these antibodies could bind to red blood cells lacking the antigens that the antibodies appeared to define, indicated that the antibodies had different specificities than seemed to be the case in initial antibody identification tests. Those autoantibodies that at first appeared to be directed against the Rh antigens e, E or c, most often had anti-Hr or anti-Hro specificity. These data explain why some apparent anti-Rh autoantibodies can be eluted from the red blood cells of patients negative for the antigens that the antibodi:s appear to define. However, they also illustrate that the phenomenon of autoantibodies mimicking specificities that they do not possess is common in patients positive for the antigens against which their autoantibodies appear to be directed. An explanation for the mode of action of these autoantibodies in complexing with the Rh agglutinogen is proposed, and the significance of the antibodies in transfusion therapy is considered. PMID:416845

  6. Purification of the Sm nuclear autoantigen. Detection and clinical significance of IgM antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, K M; Tan, E M

    1985-01-01

    Sm antigen from rabbit thymus acetone powder was purified using a combination of ammonium sulphate precipitation, DEAE-Sephacel and hydroxyapatite chromatography. This preparation was devoid of previously identified nuclear antigens including ribonucleoprotein (U1-RNP), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Sjgren's syndrome antigen A (SS-A/Ro), Sjgren's syndrome antigen B (SS-B/La), Sjgren's lupus antigen (SL), scleroderma antigen 70 (Scl-70), DNA and histones. The purified material was used in an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect anti-Sm antibody. All sera with precipitating Sm antibody detected by immunodiffusion gave reactions in ELISA greater than 0.40 OD405 and contained predominantly IgG anti-Sm antibody. Of 112 sera which did not have anti-Sm by immunodiffusion there were five which gave reactions greater than 0.40 OD405. Four of these five sera contained only IgM antibody and the fifth contained both IgM and IgG. Of these five, one came from a 'normal' control who had a positive anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), facial rash and diabetes, two were from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and two were from patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). These findings demonstrate that there are patients whose anti-Sm response may be restricted to IgM and in some of these patients the clinical presentation may be different from that of classical SLE. PMID:4017287

  7. Combination of novel HER2-targeting antibody 1E11 with trastuzumab shows synergistic antitumor activity in HER2-positive gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ko, Bong-Kook; Lee, Sook-Yeon; Lee, Young-Ha; Hwang, In-Sik; Persson, Helena; Rockberg, Johan; Borrebaeck, Carl; Park, Dongeun; Kim, Kyu-Tae; Uhlen, Mathias; Lee, Jong-Seo

    2015-02-01

    The synergistic interaction of two antibodies targeting the same protein could be developed as an effective anti-cancer therapy. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in 20-25% of breast and gastric cancer patients, and HER2-targeted antibody therapy using trastuzumab is effective in many of these patients. Nonetheless, improving therapeutic efficacy and patient survival is important, particularly in patients with HER2-positive gastric cancer. Here, we describe the development of 1E11, a HER2-targeted humanized monoclonal antibody showing increased efficacy in a highly synergistic manner in combination with trastuzumab in the HER2-overexpressing gastric cancer cell lines NCI-N87 and OE-19. The two antibodies bind to sub-domain IV of the receptor, but have non-overlapping epitopes, allowing them to simultaneously bind HER2. Treatment with 1E11 alone induced apoptosis in HER2-positive cancer cells, and this effect was enhanced by combination treatment with trastuzumab. Combination treatment with 1E11 and trastuzumab reduced the levels of total HER2 protein and those of aberrant HER2 signaling molecules including phosphorylated HER3 and EGFR. The synergistic antitumor activity of 1E11 in combination with trastuzumab indicates that it could be a novel potent therapeutic antibody for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing gastric cancers. PMID:25306393

  8. Intestinal titres of anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 antibodies correlate positively with mucosal damage degree and inversely with gluten-free diet duration in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Tosco, A; Auricchio, R; Aitoro, R; Ponticelli, D; Primario, M; Miele, E; Rotondi Aufiero, V; Discepolo, V; Greco, L; Troncone, R; Maglio, M

    2014-09-01

    It has always been known that anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 (anti-TG2) antibodies are produced in the small intestine. Their serum titres correlate with mucosal damage degree and decrease on a gluten-free diet (GFD). We aimed to correlate intestinal anti-TG2 antibodies levels with degree of mucosal damage and GFD duration. Thirty-four active, 71 potential and 24 CD patients on GFD for at least 2 years were enrolled. Anti-TG2 deposits were detected in intestinal biopsies by double immunofluorescence. Biopsies were cultured for 24 h with medium, and with gliadin peptic tryptic digest (PTG) or A-gliadin peptide 31-43 (P31-43). Anti-TG2 antibodies secreted into supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). All active CD patients secreted high titres of anti-TG2 antibodies into culture medium that increased with the worsening of mucosal injury (Spearman's r = 0·71; P < 0·0001). Seventy of 71 potential CD patients and 15 of 24 treated CD patients secreted low titres of anti-TG2 antibodies into supernatants, eight of nine negative treated patients being on GFD for more than 10 years. An inverse correlation between antibody titres and duration of GFD was found, (Spearman's r = -0·52; P < 0·01). All active, 53 of 71 potential and six of 24 treated, CD patients showed anti-TG2 mucosal deposits. Five of six positive treated CD patients had been on GFD for fewer than 6 years and were also positive for secreted anti-TG2. In treated patients, PTG/P31-43 was not able to induce secretion of anti-TG2 antibodies into culture medium. Measurement of anti-TG2 antibodies in biopsy supernatants proved to be more sensitive than detection by immunofluorescence to reveal their intestinal production. Intestinal antiTG2 antibodies titres correlated positively with the degree of mucosal damage and inversely with the duration of GFD. PMID:24773630

  9. International Consensus Statement on Testing and Reporting of Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies (ANCA)

    PubMed

    Savige, J; Gillis, D; Benson, E; Davies, D; Esnault, V; Falk, R J; Hagen, E C; Jayne, D; Jennette, J C; Paspaliaris, B; Pollock, W; Pusey, C; Savage, C O; Silvestrini, R; van der Woude, F; Wieslander, J; Wiik, A

    1999-04-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) tests are used to diagnose and monitor inflammatory activity in the primary systemic small vessel vasculitides. ANCA is best demonstrated in these diseases by using a combination of indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) of normal peripheral blood neutrophils and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) that detect ANCA specific for proteinase 3 (PR3) or myeloperoxidase (MPO). For ANCA testing in "new" patients, IIF must be performed on all serum samples. Serum samples containing ANCA, any other cytoplasmic fluorescence, or an antinuclear antibody (ANA) that results in homogeneous or peripheral nuclear fluorescence then should be tested in ELISAs for PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA. Optimally, ELISAs for PR3-ANCA and MPO-ANCA should be performed on all serum samples. Inclusion of the most recent positive sample in the IIF or ELISA may help demonstrate a change in antibody level. Reports should use recommended terms. Any report of positive neutrophil fluorescence issued before the ELISA results are available should indicate that positive fluorescence alone is not specific for the diagnosis of Wegener granulomatosis or microscopic polyangiitis and that decisions about treatment should not be based solely on the ANCA results. PMID:10191771

  10. Molecular characterization of monoclonal CRIA-positive anti-arsonate antibodies derived from idiotype-negative mice bearing a light chain polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Tassignon, J; Brait, M; Ismaili, J; Urbain, J; Gottlieb, P; Brown, A; Hasemann, C A; Capra, J D; Meek, K

    1993-01-01

    We have elicited anti-arsonate antibodies bearing the major cross-reactive idiotype (CRIA) in a double congenic idiotype-negative strain (C.C58.AL-20) bearing a light chain polymorphism that has previously been shown serologically not to complement idiotype-positive heavy chains. Using the idiotype cascade (Ab1-->Ab2-->Ab3-->-->Ab1'), CRIA-positive antibodies were raised and monoclonal antibodies were isolated and characterized serologically and by nucleotide sequence analysis. Two types of idiotype-positive anti-arsonate antibodies were generated in the C.C58.AL-20 strain. One group of hybridomas used the canonical VH1.8 heavy chain gene segment with V kappa 10 variant light chains. A second group used a VHGAM3.8 heavy chain with V kappa 10 variant light chains. This latter heavy-light pairing has been observed in CRIA-like responses previously in BALB/c mice after idiotypic manipulation (or rarely after antigen alone). These studies demonstrate the plasticity of the immune response when manipulated with idiotype reagents as well as its structural variability. Additionally, they provide important insights into the potentials of idiotype vaccines. PMID:8415731

  11. Clinical phenotype associations with various types of anti-dsDNA antibodies in patients with recent onset of rheumatic symptoms. Results from a multicentre observational study

    PubMed Central

    Compagno, Michele; Rekvig, Ole P; Bengtsson, Anders A; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Heegaard, Niels H H; Jönsen, Andreas; Jacobsen, Rasmus Sleimann; Eilertsen, Gro Ø; Fenton, Christopher G; Truedsson, Lennart; Nossent, Johannes C; Jacobsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Despite anti-dsDNA antibodies constitute a wide range of specificities, they are considered as the hallmark for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Objective To identify clinical phenotypes associated with anti-dsDNA antibodies, independently of any clinical diagnoses. Methods Patients with recent onset of any rheumatic symptoms were screened for antinuclear antibodies (ANA). All ANA-positive and matching ANA-negative patients were examined, and their clinical phenotypes were registered, using a systematic chart formulated after consensus between the participating centres. All patients were tested for different anti-dsDNA antibody specificities with assays habitually used in each participating laboratory. Crithidia Luciliae Immuno Fluorescence Test (CLIFT) was performed three times (with two different commercial kits); solid and solution phase ELISA were performed four times. Associations between clinical phenotypes and results of anti-dsDNA assays were evaluated by linear regression analysis (LRA) and principal component analysis (PCA). Results Totally, 292 ANA-positive and 292 matching ANA-negative patients were included in the study. A full dataset for statistical analysis was obtained in 547 patients. Anti-dsDNA antibodies were most frequently detected by ELISA. LRA showed that overall positivity of anti-dsDNA antibodies was associated with proteinuria and pleuritis. Alopecia was significantly associated only with CLIFT-positivity. Besides confirming the same findings, PCA showed that combined positivity of CLIFT and ELISA was also associated with lymphopenia. Conclusions Our results show that different anti-dsDNA antibody specificities are associated with nephropathy, pleuritis, alopecia and lymphopenia, regardless of the diagnosis. It may challenge the importance of anti-dsDNA antibodies as a diagnostic hallmark for SLE. PMID:25396058

  12. Myasthenic Crisis in an Elderly Patient with Positive Antibodies against Acetylcholine and Anti-MuSK, Successfully Treated with Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, José A.; Fernández-Valiñas, Antonio; Hernández, Daniel; Orozco, Joel; Lugo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness. Subjects with antibodies against acetylcholine usually have greater ocular symptoms, lower bulbar weakness, and fewer respiratory complications, compared to individuals with anti-MuSK antibodies. The presence of positivity to both types of antibodies in the same patient is uncommon, and the clinical behavior of these individuals is uncertain. A myasthenic crisis is characterized by respiratory and bulbar muscle weakness, causing acute respiratory failure which requires mechanical ventilatory support. We present the case of a 73-year-old man with a medical history of myasthenia gravis and positive antibody titers against acetylcholine and anti-MuSK, who sought for medical assessment because of respiratory tract infection symptoms, dysphagia, and generalized weakness. Initially, no respiratory distress was found. After 24 hours the patient showed respiratory deterioration and neurological impairment. Endotracheal intubation was rejected, so ventilatory support with noninvasive ventilation was started. The patient was supported by intense respiratory therapy, and infusion of immunoglobulin was initiated. The individual responded favorably, improving his general condition. Weaning from noninvasive mechanical ventilation was possible after six days. Our case illustrates that noninvasive ventilation, properly supported by intense respiratory therapy, can be a great option to avoid intubation in the myasthenic patient. PMID:26783473

  13. Defining a social problem: socio-historical analysis of the antinuclear weapons movement

    SciTech Connect

    McCrea, F.B.

    1988-01-01

    This dissertation is a socio-historical analysis of the anti-nuclear weapons movement in the United States. This work conceptualizes social movements in advanced industrial societies by synthesizing certain aspects of social constructionism, resource mobilization, and new class theory. The research design is a socio-historical, comparative case study. Both qualitative and quantitative methods are employed for data analysis. Extensive content analysis of documents and interviews with key actors are supplemented with a critical analysis of a wide variety of primary and secondary data. All major antinuclear weapons protest, particularly the Atomic Scientists Movement of the 1940s, the Ban-the-Bomb Movement of the 1950s and 1960s, and the Freeze Movement of the 1980s, shared similar characteristics, and experienced similar problems. The findings are congruent with the theoretical synthesis. Antinuclear weapons protest is best understood as a new class phenomenon, in which intellectuals have mobilized resources to challenge the ruling elite. Yet, though the protest has succeeded in challenging the legitimacy of the ruling apparatus, successes of the movement have been mostly symbolic.

  14. Detection of anti-U3-RNP/fibrillarin IgG antibodies by line immunoblot assay has comparable clinical significance to immunoprecipitation testing in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lisa K; Jaskowski, Troy D; Mayes, Maureen D; Tebo, Anne E

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance and clinical relevance of a commercially available line immunoblot assay (LIA) for detecting anti-U3-RNP/fibrillarin (anti-U3-RNP), against immunoprecipitation (gold standard). This study involved a multi-ethnic cohort of 1000 American systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients and 50 healthy controls. Antinuclear antibodies and centromere antibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescent antibody test, anti-topo I by immunodiffusion and anti-RNAP III by ELISA. The presence of anti-U3-RNP in select serum samples was detected by immunoprecipitation (IP) and LIA. By IP, U3-RNP antibody was detected in 75 (7.5 %) patients with SSc. Overall agreement between LIA and IP was very good (κ = 0.966). Analytic sensitivity and specificity of the U3-RNP LIA was 100 and 94.7 %, respectively. Clinical features associated with positivity for the anti-U3-RNP antibody include diffuse cutaneous SSc and increased prevalence of renal crisis, consistent with previous studies that used IP. Testing for U3-RNP antibodies is only performed by a small number of laboratories due to the complexity of both performance and interpretation of the IP. LIA is faster and less complex than IP. Excellent agreement between IP and LIA demonstrates that LIA is an acceptable and attractive alternative to IP for anti-U3-RNP detection. PMID:26467972

  15. False positive reaction of the immunohistochemistry technique using anti-BCG polyclonal antibodies to identify Mycobacterium leprae in wild nine-banded armadillos.

    PubMed

    Deps, Patrcia D; Michalany, Nilceo S; Tomimori-Yamashita, Jane

    2004-09-01

    The authors studied 66 wild nine-banded armadillos from Brazil. The ear samples were collected and Ziehl-Neelsen or Fite-Faraco stains were performed, as well as immunostaining using polyclonal BCG antibody, to avaluate the presence of the Mycobacterium leprae. The AFB were not detected by the Ziehl-Neelsen or Fite-Faraco staining, neither immunoexpression of the BCG marker. However, many normal structures from the ears of the nine-banded armadillos, such as condrocytes, condroblasts, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, and Gram positive bacteria cocci, showed false positive reaction by the BCG marker. The authors discuss the use of the immunohistochemical studies with the polyclonal BCG antibody to identify M. leprae antigens in wild armadillos. PMID:15485291

  16. The IgM isotype of anti-annexin A5 antibodies and multiple positivity of conventional antiphospholipid antibodies: increasing the number of clinical manifestations of primary antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bećarević, Mirjana; Stojanović, Ljudmila; Ignjatović, Svetlana; Dopsaj, Violeta

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the importance of anti-annexin A5 antibodies (aanxA5 Abs) for clinical (thrombosis and/or recurrent pregnancy loss) and serologic (presence of antiphospholipid antibodies: lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin (aCL), and anti-β2 glycoprotein I (aβ2GPI) antibodies) features of patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS). Our study included 70 patients with PAPS according to the international consensus criteria for APS. The mean age of the analyzed patients was 45.97 ± 12.72. The disease duration above 5 years was present in 31/70 of patients. Concentrations of analyzed antibodies were measured by ELISA. Cutoff values were set in accordance to the manufacturers' recommendations. History of recurrent pregnancy loss was associated with double positivity for aanxA5 IgM and LA (χ (2) = 4.000, P = 0.046) and triple positivity for aanxA5 IgM + LA + aβ2GPI IgM (χ (2) = 4.168, P = 0.041). Venous thromboses were associated with triple positivity for aanxA5 IgM + aCLIgG + aβ2GPI IgM (χ (2) = 3.965, P = 0.046). The IgG isotype of aanxA5 Abs was in positive correlation with aCL Abs of the IgG (r = 0.310, P = 0.009) and IgM (r = 0.254, P = 0.034) isotype. The presence of the clinical manifestations of PAPS is increasing with the number of positive conventional aPL and the IgM aanxA5 Abs tests. This new combination of Abs is beneficial even when the number of patients with positivity for aanxA5 Abs is low. This is important in further detection of patients prone to recurrence of thrombotic episodes. PMID:26971791

  17. HLA class II genes associated with anticentromere antibody in Japanese patients with systemic sclerosis (scleroderma).

    PubMed Central

    Kuwana, M; Okano, Y; Kaburaki, J; Inoko, H

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To define further HLA class II gene associations with anticentromere antibody (ACA), a major serum antinuclear antibody in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). METHODS--HLA class II genes were determined using polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 94 Japanese patients with SSc (22 ACA positive and 72 ACA negative) and 50 race matched normal control subjects. RESULTS--Frequency of DQB1*0501 was increased in ACA positive SSc patients compared with ACA negative SSc patients (36% versus 13%; p = 0.02, odds ratio = 4.0, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 13.9), but the association of ACA with a polar amino acid at position 26 in the DQB1 beta 1 domain, which was demonstrated in white North Americans, was not observed in Japanese. The DRB1*0101, *0405, and *1302 alleles were associated with high ACA titres, whereas DRB1*1502 was associated with low ACA titres and a low frequency of centromere protein C (CENP-C) reactivity. CONCLUSIONS--These results suggest that the ACA response is associated with multiple HLA class II genes and that ACA positive SSc patients are heterogeneous in terms of immunogenetic background. PMID:8546531

  18. The Drug User's Identity and How It Relates to Being Hepatitis C Antibody Positive: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    The increasing health problem of hepatitis C virus infection has only recently attracted the attention of psychosocial research, especially among subjects at higher risk (e.g. injecting drug users). There is a lack of information about the knowledge, perceptions and feelings that injecting drug users hold about their hepatitis C antibody positive…

  19. Co-Positivity for Anti-dsDNA, -Nucleosome and -Histone Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis Is Indicative of High Serum Levels and Severe Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Manshu; Han, Jihua; Sun, Lijie; Jia, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Haiyu; Han, Changsong; Jin, Xiaoming; Gao, Fei; Liu, Yanhong; Li, Yang; Cao, Jianbin; Ling, Hong; Zhang, Fengmin; Ren, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize the significance of correlated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its complication lupus nephritis (LN) in a large cohort of patients. Methods Clinical data were statistically analyzed in 1699 SLE patients with or without nephritis who were diagnosed and treated during 2002–2013 in the northeast region of China. Reactivity to a list of 16 autoantibodies was detected by the serum test Euroline ANA profile (IgG). Serum titers of the anti-nucleosome autoantibodies were measured by ELISA assays. Kidney biopsies were examined by pathologists. Immune complex deposition was identified by immunohistochemistry stain. Results Simultaneous positivity of anti-dsDNA, -nucleosome and -histone antibodies (3-pos) was prevalent in SLE patients with LN compared to Non-renal SLE patients (41% vs 11%, p< 0.001). Significant correlations were found between any two of the above three anti-nucleosome antibodies in LN patients. In comparison to non-3-pos cohorts, 3-pos patients with LN had significantly higher serum levels of the three antibodies and more active disease; was associated with type IV disease; suffered from more severe renal damages; received more intensive treatment and had worse disease outcome. The serum levels of these three autoantibodies in 3-pos LN patients were significantly decreased when they underwent clinical recovery. Conclusions Simultaneous reactivity to anti-dsDNA, -nucleosome and -histone antibodies by Euroline ANA profile (IgG) may indicate severe nephropathy in patients with SLE. PMID:26465327

  20. [A case of an anti-Ma2 antibody-positive patient presenting with variable CNS symptoms mimicking multiple system atrophy with a partial response to immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Wataru; Iwanaga, Yasutaka; Yamamoto, Akifumi

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old man with a 5-month history of progressive bradykinesia of the bilateral lower extremities was admitted to our hospital. At the age of 64, he underwent proximal gastrectomy for gastric cancer. He also had a history of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord since the age of 67, which was successfully treated with vitamin B12 therapy. Four weeks before admission to our hospital, he admitted himself to his former hospital complaining of walking difficulty. Two weeks later, however, his symptoms progressed rapidly; he was immobilized for two weeks and did not respond to the vitamin therapy. On admission to our hospital, he showed moderate paralysis of the lower extremities, cog-wheel rigidity of the four extremities, and dystonic posture of his left hand. He also showed orthostatic hypotension and vesicorectal disorders. Blood examination and cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed no remarkable abnormalities. Electroencephalography showed frontal dominant, high voltage, sharp waves. His brain and spinal MRI revealed no notable abnormalities. We suspected autoimmune disease and commenced one course of intravenous methylprednisolone therapy, resulting in improvement of the parkinsonism and orthostatic hypotension. Based on these results, we investigated possible neural antigens and detected anti-Ma2 antibody. In addition to limbic encephalitis, anti-Ma2 antibody-positive neural disorders are characterized by rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorders or parkinsonism. Here, we report an anti-Ma2 antibody positive patient presenting variable CNS symptoms mimicking multiple system atrophy, who responded to immunotherapy. PMID:25746072

  1. Presence of antibodies to a putatively immunosuppressive part of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein gp41 is strongly associated with health among HIV-positive subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P J; Pipkorn, R; Blomberg, J

    1988-01-01

    The IgG response to gp41 (envelope glycoprotein of Mr 41,000) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was studied with eight synthetic peptides derived from three different regions of the protein. We tested sera from 17 HIV-seronegative and 68 HIV-seropositive subjects in an enzyme immunoassay. No HIV antibody-negative serum reacted with any of the peptides. The peptide HIV-env 583-599 has a sequence similarity with immunosuppressive peptides derived from the transmembrane proteins of other retroviruses. Antibodies to this 17-mer (HIV-env 583-599; hereafter also referred to as pHIVIS, putative HIV immunosuppressive sequence) were detected in 27 of the 35 sera from healthy HIV-positive persons but only in 1 of the 33 sera from patients with HIV-related disease. Another 17-mer, displaced four amino acids N-terminally from pHIVIS, reacted with fewer of the sera from healthy seropositive subjects than pHIVIS but with no serum from ill seropositive patients. HIV-env 586-603, which shares two-thirds of its sequence with pHIVIS, reacted with the sera from nearly all subjects, regardless of clinical status. The remaining five peptides did not discriminate between healthy and ill seropositive subjects either but gave lower reactivity rates. HIV-positive sera thus exhibited distinct patterns of reactivity with subsequences of gp41. We have mapped two overlapping epitopes within a narrow part of gp41; antibodies to the most N-terminally located of the two--i.e., the pHIVIS-reactive antibodies--might counteract a possible immunosuppressive effect of gp41. Images PMID:2455899

  2. A new type of protein chip to detect hepatocellular carcinoma-related autoimmune antibodies in the sera of hepatitis C virus-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We report here a new type of protein chip to detect antibodies in sera. This chip method was used to a prototype created to detect hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) -related autoantibodies in the sera of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected individuals. Results Five cysteine-tagged (Cys-tag) and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused recombinant heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), and peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6), were spotted and immobilized on maleimide-incorporated diamond-like carbon (DLC) substrates. The antibodies in diluted sera were trapped by these proteins at each spot on the chip, and visualized by a fluorescence-conjugated anti-human IgG. The total immobilized protein level of each spot was detected with anti-GFP mouse IgG and a fluorescence-conjugated secondary anti-mouse IgG. The ratio between the two fluorescence intensities was used to quantify autoantibody levels in each serum sample. Heat treatment of the chip in a solution of denaturing and reducing agents, before serum-incubation, improved autoantibody detection. We tested serum samples from healthy individuals and HCC patients using the chips. The HSP70 autoantibodies were found at high levels in sera from HCV-positive HCC patients, but not in HCV-negative sera. Conclusion This protein chip system may have useful properties to capture a specific set of antibodies for predicting the onset of particular cancers such as HCC in HCV-infected individuals. PMID:23866785

  3. Clinical and laboratory features of myelitis patients with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, I; Fujihara, K; Endo, M; Seki, H; Okita, N; Takase, S; Itoyama, Y

    1998-04-15

    Although perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (pANCA) are associated with vasculitic neuropathy, their association with central nervous system (CNS) disorders has not been studied except for one report on optic-spinal type of multiple sclerosis associated with serum pANCA. We examined pANCA in sera from 98 patients with various CNS disorders, such as 58 MS, 17 myelitis, 12 HTLV-1 associated myelopathy, and 11 other CNS diseases using indirect immunofluorescence methods. The results showed serum pANCA to be positive in five patients with a peculiar type of myelitis, including two with MS and three with etiology unknown myelitis. All of these ANCA-positive patients were women and had acute or subacute myelopathy with various severities. MRI revealed segmental swelling of the spinal cord with T2 hyperintensity in the acute stage of the disease. Marked pleocytosis (227.8+/-101/mm3) and elevated protein level (128.8+/-52 mg/dl) in CSF were noted. Four of the patients had anti-nuclear antibodies and two had previous histories of symptoms suggesting autoimmune disorders. In a search for target antigens of pANCA, myeloperoxidase reactivity was found in the sera from two myelitis patients. Clinical and laboratory features of myelitis patients with pANCA in the present study are different from those of typical MS patients. Further study will be needed to delineate the role of pANCA in the pathogenesis of a specific type of myelitis. PMID:9600678

  4. Anti-AQP4 antibody in idiopathic acute transverse myelitis with recurrent clinical course: frequency of positivity and influence in prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvarenga, Marina Papais; Alvarenga, Regina Maria Papais; Alvarenga, Marcos Papais; Santos, Adriano Miranda; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos

    2012-01-01

    Background The anti-aquaporin4 (anti-AQP4) antibody is specific for neuromyelitis optica (NMO), but is also found in limited forms. The presence of this antibody in acute transverse myelitis (ATM) has been associated with recurrence and conversion to NMO, but the influence on disability has not yet been described. Objective To describe the frequency of anti-AQP4 in ATM and analyze the influence in long-term prognosis. Design Cross-sectional and retrospective study. Methods Consecutive ATM cases in a multiple sclerosis center in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 2000 through 2009 were reviewed. Recurrent cases tested for anti-AQP4 were selected. ATM with magnetic resonance imaging spinal cord lesions extending over three or more vertebral segments was classified as longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM); Kurtzke scale was applied at last evaluation. Outcome measures Frequency of anti-AQP4; severity of spinal cord dysfunction at last follow-up. Results Twenty six patients (21 female:5 male; 17 white:9 African descent) were studied. The first ATM occurred at 38.04 ± 12.7 years. The interval between the first and the second ATM was eight months (1–150) and the number of ATM varied from two to seven. After 40.5 months (12–192) of disease, the median Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score was three (0–9). Anti-AQP4 antibody was positive in 26.9%. LETM was found in 65.4%. LETM presented later onset, higher disability and higher positivity to anti-AQP4 (LETM 41.2% versus no-LETM 0%, P = 0.024). Dysfunction at long-term follow-up was similar in anti-AQP4 positive and negative cases. Conclusion The frequency of anti-AQP4 in recurrent ATM was 26.9%, increasing to 41.2% among LETM. Presence of the antibody had no influence on morbidity. PMID:22925751

  5. A Novel Monoclonal Antibody Against Neuroepithelial and Ependymal Cells and Characteristics of Its Positive Cells in Neurospheres.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Masaharu; Sato, Yasunori; Ueno, Akemichi; Ito, Toshinori; Itoh, Kouichi; Imada, Masato

    2016-01-01

    There are still few useful cell membrane surface antigens suitable for identification and isolation of neural stem cells (NSCs). We generated a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated as mAb against immature neural cell antigens (INCA mAb), which reacted with the areas around a lateral ventricle of a fetal cerebrum. INCA mAb specifically reacted with neuroepithelial cells in fetal cerebrums and ependymal cells in adult cerebrums. The recognition molecules were O-linked 40 and 42 kDa glycoproteins on the cell membrane surface (gp40 INCA and gp42 INCA). Based on expression pattern analysis of the recognition molecules in developing cerebrums, it was concluded that gp42 INCA was a stage-specific antigen expressed on undifferentiated neuroepithelial cells, while gp40 INCA was a cell lineage-specific antigen expressed at the stages of differentiation from neuroepithelial cells to ependymal cells. A flow cytometric analysis showed that fetal and young adult neurospheres were divided into INCA mAb(-) CD133 polyclonal antibody (pAb)(-), INCA mAb(+) CD133 pAb(-), and INCA mAb(+) CD133 pAb(+) cell populations based on the reactivity against INCA mAb and CD133 pAb. The proportion of cells having the neurosphere formation capability in the INCA mAb(+) CD133 pAb(+) cell population was significantly larger than that of undivided neurospheres. Neurospheres formed by clonal expansion of INCA mAb(+) CD133 pAb(+) cells gave rise to neurons and glial cells. INCA mAb will be a useful immunological probe in the study of NSCs. PMID:26012782

  6. Ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1): a novel antibody-drug conjugate for the treatment of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Baron, Jessica M; Boster, Bonnie L; Barnett, Chad M

    2015-04-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer is an aggressive form of breast cancer associated with poorer prognosis and shortened survival. Primary and acquired resistance to existing HER2-targeted therapies presents a challenge for the management of patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Ado-trastuzumab emtansine, a drug-antibody conjugate, has shown promising results for patients failing prior treatment with trastuzumab. Ado-trastuzumab emtansine consists of the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab linked to a potent microtubule inhibitor (emtansine), allowing a targeted delivery of chemotherapy to cells that overexpress HER2. Ado-trastuzumab emtansine has been approved for use in patients with metastatic breast cancer who have failed prior therapy with trastuzumab and a taxane. Although well-tolerated in clinical trials, thrombocytopenia has been reported and platelet values should be monitored closely. Increased liver enzymes and bilirubin, as well as cardiotoxicity, have also been documented, and recommendations for dose reduction or discontinuation due to these toxicities are available. Clinical trials are currently ongoing to further define the role of ado-trastuzumab emtansine in both the metastatic and early breast cancer settings. PMID:24682654

  7. Nanoparticle mediated drug delivery of rolipram to tyrosine kinase B positive cells in the inner ear with targeting peptides and agonistic antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Glueckert, Rudolf; Pritz, Christian O.; Roy, Soumen; Dudas, Jozsef; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Systemic pharmacotherapies have limitation due to blood-labyrinth barrier, so local delivery via the round window membrane opens a path for effective treatment. Multifunctional nanoparticle (NP)-mediated cell specific drug delivery may enhance efficacy and reduce side effects. Different NPs with ligands to target TrkB receptor were tested. Distribution, uptake mechanisms, trafficking, and bioefficacy of drug release of rolipram loaded NPs were evaluated. Methods: We tested lipid based nanocapsules (LNCs), Quantum Dot, silica NPs with surface modification by peptides mimicking TrkB or TrkB activating antibodies. Bioefficacy of drug release was tested with rolipram loaded LNCs to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. We established different cell culture models with SH-SY-5Y and inner ear derived cell lines and used neonatal and adult mouse explants. Uptake and trafficking was evaluated with FACS and confocal as well as transmission electron microscopy. Results: Plain NPs show some selectivity in uptake related to the in vitro system properties, carrier material, and NP size. Some peptide ligands provide enhanced targeted uptake to neuronal cells but failed to show this in cell cultures. Agonistic antibodies linked to silica NPs showed TrkB activation and enhanced binding to inner ear derived cells. Rolipram loaded LNCs proved as effective carriers to prevent cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Discussion: Most NPs with targeting ligands showed limited effects to enhance uptake. NP aggregation and unspecific binding may change uptake mechanisms and impair endocytosis by an overload of NPs. This may affect survival signaling. NPs with antibodies activate survival signaling and show effective binding to TrkB positive cells but needs further optimization for specific internalization. Bioefficiacy of rolipram release confirms LNCs as encouraging vectors for drug delivery of lipophilic agents to the inner ear with ideal release characteristics independent of endocytosis. PMID:26042029

  8. The level of the serum opsonin, mannan-binding protein in HIV-1 antibody-positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, S L; Andersen, P L; Koch, C; Jensenius, J C; Thiel, S

    1995-01-01

    The concentrations of mannan-binding protein (MBP) in consecutive samples from 10 HIV+ persons were estimated using an ELISA based on polyclonal rabbit anti-MBP. The changes in MBP with time were similar in HIV+ and HIV- persons, and did not appear to be of clinical significance. MBP was determined in a further 70 persons found HIV-1+ during a period of 2.5 years (1984-1986). Out of the total of 80 patients, 32 have by now died from AIDS. According to the serum level of MBP the HIV-infected persons were grouped into high (> 650 ng MBP/ml), intermediate (101-650 ng/ml), and low MBP (< 101 ng/ml). At the termination of the study the frequency of deaths/total in each of the groups were: high MBP, 14/39 (36%); intermediate MBP, 12/26 (46%); and low MBP, 6/14 (43%). There was no association between the MBP level of the individual and the progressive loss of CD4+ T cells, and the level of MBP was not predictive for the length of time between the detection of HIV antibodies and development of AIDS, nor for the duration of AIDS before death occurred. The number of HIV+ persons without detectable MBP (10%) was significantly higher than previously reported for healthy persons (2.4%, P = 0.027). The course of HIV infection does not seem to be influenced by the level of MBP, nor does the antimicrobial activity of MBP appear to affect the progression of AIDS. Further studies are required to substantiate the significance of absence of MBP in the susceptibility to HIV. PMID:7743658

  9. Positive correlation between replication rate and pathotype of Marek’s disease virus strains in maternal antibody negative chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathotyping of new field strains of MDV requires both a long period of time and a large number of birds. Confirming a positive correlation of virus replication and pathotype may lead to faster and cheaper alternative pathotyping methods or as a screening assay for choosing isolates to be pathotyped....

  10. Clinical significance of immunopathological findings in patients with post-pericardiotomy syndrome. I. Relevance of antibody pattern

    PubMed Central

    Maisch, B.; Berg, P. A.; Kochsiek, K.

    1979-01-01

    Sera from sixty-five patients were collected before and after cardiac surgery to determine striated muscle antibodies (anti-heart and anti-skeletal), non-organ-specific antibodies, immunoglobulin and complement levels. According to the clinical features of pericarditis, fever and leucocytosis, patients were divided into three groups: (1) complete post-pericardotomy syndrome (PPS) (n = 19) with all three symptoms; (2) incomplete PPS with two symptoms (n = 18); and (3) no PPS with one or no symtpoms (n = 28). Almost all the patients with complete PPS, two thirds of the patients with incomplete PPS and one third of the patients with no PPS showed striated muscle antibodies. Anti-sarcolemmal antibodies predominated. In patients with complete PPS, antibodies persisted beyond the fourth post-operative week and correlated well with symptoms. An even better correlation with the syndrome could be obtained by including the post-operative occurrence of anti-endothelial (AEA), smooth muscle (SMA), the pre- and post-operative frequency of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and the increase in immunoglobulin concentrations after surgery in an immunological grading system. These criteria permitted a redistribution of the nineteen patients with an incomplete PPS: fourteen were immunologically positive for a PPS. Although autoantibodies are predominantly associated with PPS, their role in the pathogenesis of the syndrome is not clear. The complementary influence of surgical and non-surgical factors, such as the degree of myocardial damage, the time of ischemia during the operation and a possible viral infection by blood transfusion, is analysed. PMID:527258

  11. Anti-Hu antibody-positive paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with acute motor sensory neuropathy resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Takeo; Wakida, Kenji; Kimura, Akio; Inuzuka, Takashi; Nishida, Hiroshi

    2015-12-23

    A 69-year-old man experienced general malaise, weight loss, amnesia, gait disturbance, and restlessness a month prior to admission. Brain MRI showed high intensity areas in the bilateral medial temporal lobes and insular cortices on FLAIR images, and therefore, he was diagnosed with limbic encephalitis. After admission, quadriplegia and respiratory failure progressed rapidly, and he needed ventilatory management. A nerve conduction study revealed low compound muscle action potential amplitude with loss of sensory nerve action potential, which indicated axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. We administered intravenous immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone pulse therapy, but he did not recover. Although no tumor was found on CT, his serum was positive for anti-Hu antibody; therefore, we diagnosed him with paraneoplastic neurological syndrome. An FDG-PET study showed accumulation at lesions on two hilar lymph nodes. Small cell lung carcinoma was detected by endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration. Although paraneoplastic acute sensorimotor neuropathy with respiratory failure resembling Guillain-Barré syndrome is rare, identification of antibodies and servey of tumors aids accurate diagnosis. PMID:26511029

  12. Risk factors for herds to test positive for Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-antibodies with a commercial milk enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in Ontario and western Canada.

    PubMed

    Sorge, Ulrike S; Lissemore, Kerry; Godkin, Ann; Jansen, Jocelyn; Hendrick, Steven; Wells, Scott; Kelton, David F

    2012-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify risk factors associated with i) a Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP)-antibody milk enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAP milk ELISA)-positive herd status, and ii) the within-herd MAP milk ELISA-positive prevalence in Canadian dairy herds. This prospective cohort study was conducted between 2005 and 2009 on 226 herds in Ontario and western Canada, which participated in a voluntary risk assessment (RA)-based Johne's disease control program. Two MAP milk ELISA and risk assessments and a previsit survey were available per herd. The overall farm RA scores alone could not be used to predict whether a herd would test positive for MAP antibodies. However, the results of this study indicated that increasing the likelihood of exposing calves to MAP through certain management practices, as assessed with the RA, increased the likelihood of a herd being test-positive for MAP antibodies. PMID:23450860

  13. [Rituximab therapy in the treatment of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) -positive interstitial pneumonia: case report].

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Tokiko; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Kumon, Saeko; Akiyama, Kenichi; Iwabuchi, Yuko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Takahito; Takei, Takashi; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient treated with rituximab for interstitial pneumonia (IP) associated with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) and who was undergoing hemodialysis. A 59-year-old woman who had been treated with tacrolimus for 1 year for rheumatic arthritis was referred to the Department of Nephrology for fatigue, fever, weight loss, and rapidly developing renal dysfunction. On the first admission, severe renal dysfunction, proteinuria, hematuria, and an elevated titer of MPO-ANCA were observed, and the woman was diagnosed with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis because of MPA. At that point, IP was found to be present but not active. Although steroid semipulse therapy following an initial prednisolone (PSL) administration of 40 mg/day, IVCY, and plasma exchange were administered, renal dysfunction did not recover, and the patient required maintenance hemodialysis. Upon discharge, a high titer of MPO-ANCA was continuously observed. Nine months after the initiation of hemodialysis, respiratory discomfort and desaturation developed. Interstitial shadow and ground glass opacity were seen on a CT scan, and the patient was diagnosed with exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia caused by MPA recurrence. At the second admission, acute findings identified by imaging techniques had improved. However, the high titer of MPO-ANCA continued in spite of the steroid semi-pulse therapy following PSL administration, and rituximab corresponding to 200 mg/weekly for 1 month was also administered. The dose of rituximab was decreased subsequently because the patient was judged to be compromised by the hemodialysis. At the same time, internal administration of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim was initiated. After the rituximab treatment, MPO-ANCA antibodies gradually decreased, and the respiratory condition improved. Five months after the rituximab treatment, respiratory dysfunction recurred. Based on the CT findings and a high level of β-D-glycan, the patient was diagnosed with ARDS due to pneumocystis pneumonia. In this case, rituximab was effective for IP due to MPA, but pneumocystis pneumonia could not be prevented in spite of prophylactic antibiotics. This case suggests that deliberative dose adjustments, careful patient observation, and prophylactic measures for infection are critical in rituximab treatment. PMID:26950980

  14. Successful Treatment of Dual-Positive Anti-Myeloperoxidase and Anti-Glomerular Basement Membrane Antibody Vasculitis with Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinxian; Wu, Ling; Huang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Yan; Yu, Jinquan; Yang, Jin; Fang, Huiqiong; Zhang, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis and anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease are two separate diseases, while sometimes they can coexist together. The exact mechanisms are not clear, but due to the rapid progression and poor prognosis, prompt and aggressive treatment is usually required. We treated with steroids combined with cyclophosphamide and rituximab an 84-year-old man with ANCA-associated vasculitis and anti-GBM disease who had prior pulmonary fibrosis and a coexisting anterosuperior mediastinal mass. Conventional therapy including steroids, plasmapheresis and cyclophosphamide failed to attenuate the anti-GBM disease, yet he responded to an alternative treatment of rituximab. This case suggests the efficacy of steroids and immunosuppressant for the treatment of a dual-positive case with an anterosuperior mediastinal mass. PMID:26889474

  15. Shared Epitope Alleles Remain A Risk Factor for Anti-Citrullinated Proteins Antibody (ACPA) Positive Rheumatoid Arthritis in Three Asian Ethnic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Chun-Lai, Too; Padyukov, Leonid; Dhaliwal, Jasbir Singh; Lundstrm, Emeli; Yahya, Abqariyah; Muhamad, Nor Asiah; Klareskog, Lars; Alfredsson, Lars; Larsson, Per Tobias; Murad, Shahnaz

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate the associations between HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE) alleles and rheumatoid arthritis in subsets of rheumatoid arthritis defined by autoantibodies in three Asian populations from Malaysia. Methods 1,079 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 1,470 healthy controls were included in the study. Levels of antibodies to citrullinated proteins (ACPA) and rheumatoid factors were assessed and the PCR-SSO method was used for HLA-DRB1 genotyping. Results The proportion of ACPA positivity among Malay, Chinese and Indian rheumatoid arthritis patients were 62.9%, 65.2% and 68.6%, respectively. An increased frequency of SE alleles was observed in ACPA-positive rheumatoid arthritis among the three Asian ethnic groups. HLA-DRB1*10 was highly associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility in these Asian populations. HLA-DRB1*0405 was significantly associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis in Malays and Chinese, but not in Indians. HLA-DRB1*01 did not show any independent effect as a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis in this study and HLA-DRB1*1202 was protective in Malays and Chinese. There was no association between SE alleles and ACPA- negative rheumatoid arthritis in any of the three Asian ethnic groups. Conclusion The HLA-DRB1 SE alleles increase the risk of ACPA-positive rheumatoid arthritis in all three Asian populations from Malaysia. PMID:21698259

  16. A strong association between thyrotropin receptor-blocking antibody-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis and HLA-DR8 and HLA-DQB1 0302 in Koreans

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Bo Youn; Chung, Jae Hoon; Lee, Hong Kyu; Koh, Chang-Soon; Lee, Jung-Bin ); Shong, Young Kee ); Han, Hoon ); Chang, Youn Bok )

    1993-09-01

    The authors investigated whether the associations between HLA alleles of patients with autoimmune hypothyroidism varied according to the presence or absence of TSH receptor-blocking antibody (TRBab). They analyzed the HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DR antigens by serotyping and the DQA1 and DQB1 genes using both enzymatic DNA amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridizations. The patient population consisted of 47 Korean patients with atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis and 62 patients with goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis. The antigen frequency of HLA-DR8 was significantly increased in 23 atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis patients that were positive for TSH binding inhibitor immunoglobulin (TBII) compared to 136 controls [52% vs. 16%; x[sup 2] = 13.1; Pc (corrected P value) = 0.003]. This relative risk was 5.7; the etiological fraction was 0.43. HLA-DQB1*0302 was also increased in patients with TBII-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis (24% vs. 7%; x[sup 2] = 11.2; Pc = 0.012; relative risk = 4.4; etiological fraction = 0.19). No specific DR antigens or DQB1 alleles were increased in either TBII-negative atrophic autoimmune thyroidities or goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis. A significant decrease in the frequency of HLA-DR6 antigen was observed in both TBII-positive atrophic antoimmune thyroiditis (0% vs. 32%; x[sup 2] = 8.4; Pc = 0.03) and goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis (0% vs. 32%; x[sup 2] = 23.2; Pc < 0.001) patients. The frequency of the HLC-Cwl antigen was significantly increased in all patient groups. The authors conclude that TRBab-positive atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis is immunogenetically different from both goitrous autoimmune thyroiditis and TRBab-negative atrophic autoimmune thyroiditis. It is possible that HLA-DR8 and/or DQB1*0302 may be related to the susceptibility genes involved in the production of TRBab in Koreans. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  17. Clinical significance and diagnostic usefulness of anti-centromere antibody in Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Tetsutaro; Shibasaki, Koichi; Toya, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    Anti-SS-A/Ro antibody (SS-A) and anti-SS-B/La antibody (SS-B) are important serologic markers in the diagnostic criteria for Primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Although anti-centromere antibody (ACA)-positive SS is frequently experienced, ACA is not included in these criteria. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical features of ACA-positive SS and discuss the usefulness of ACA in diagnosing SS. Forty-five patients with SS were divided into the following three groups: SS-A only-positive group (n = 17), SS-A and SS-B both-positive group (n = 18), and ACA only-positive group (n = 10). As a control, 54 patients without SS who were negative for antinuclear antibodies were also evaluated. The following items were compared among groups: Saxon's test, unstimulated whole salivary flow (UWSF), salivary gland scintigraphy (SGS), histopathologic examination of the minor salivary glands, Schirmer's test, and fluorescein staining of the cornea. In the ACA only-positive group, Saxon's test was 0.21 ± 0.26 g/2 min (mean ± SD) and UWSF was 0.16 ± 0.25 ml/10 min (mean ± SD), showing a significant decrease in salivary secretion (p < 0.05; vs. non-SS). On SGS, accumulation and disappearance of (99m)TcO (4) (-) were significantly decreased (p < 0.05; vs. non-SS). Histopathologic examination showed moderate or severe lymphocytic infiltration and tissue destruction in all cases, similar to that in the SS-A- and/or SS-B-positive groups. Schirmer's test and fluorescein staining were positive in 60% and 80%, respectively. Impaired lacrimal secretion and keratoconjunctivitis sicca were similar to those in SS-A- and/or SS-B-positive groups. These results suggest that ACA is an autoantibody reflecting impairment in the salivary and lacrimal glands and may be a useful serologic marker for SS. PMID:21670951

  18. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment–apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Crosby, Natasha M.; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A.; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B.; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I.; Forte, Trudy M.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25994015

  19. Anti-CD20 single chain variable antibody fragment-apolipoprotein A-I chimera containing nanodisks promote targeted bioactive agent delivery to CD20-positive lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Natasha M; Ghosh, Mistuni; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Kamei, Ayako; Simonsen, Jens B; Luo, Bing; Gordon, Leo I; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-01

    A fusion protein comprising an α-CD20 single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, a spacer peptide, and human apolipoprotein (apo) A-I was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli. The lipid interaction properties intrinsic to apoA-I as well as the antigen recognition properties of the scFv were retained by the chimera. scFv•apoA-I was formulated into nanoscale reconstituted high-density lipoprotein particles (termed nanodisks; ND) and incubated with cultured cells. α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND bound to CD20-positive non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) cells (Ramos and Granta) but not to CD20-negative T lymphocytes (i.e., Jurkat). Binding to NHL cells was partially inhibited by pre-incubation with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody directed against CD20. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of Granta cells following incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND formulated with the intrinsically fluorescent hydrophobic polyphenol, curcumin, revealed α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I localizes to the cell surface, while curcumin off-loads and gains entry to the cell. Compared to control incubations, viability of cultured NHL cells was decreased upon incubation with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I ND harboring curcumin. Thus, formulation of curcumin ND with α-CD20 scFv•apoA-I as the scaffold component confers cell targeting and enhanced bioactive agent delivery, providing a strategy to minimize toxicity associated with chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25994015

  20. Phase I study of the anti-MET antibody onartuzumab in patients with solid tumors and MET-positive lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Makoto; Horiike, Atsushi; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Nakamichi, Shinji; Wakui, Hiroshi; Ohyanagi, Fumiyoshi; Kudo, Keita; Yanagitani, Noriko; Takahashi, Shunji; Kuboki, Yasutoshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Yamada, Yasuhide; Abe, Masaichi; Tahata, Takashi; Tamura, Tomohide

    2015-06-01

    Onartuzumab is a monovalent, humanized, monoclonal antibody that showed significant survival benefits in combination with erlotinib in MET-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in pre-specified subgroup analyses of a randomized phase II study. We conducted a two-stage, open-label, multicenter, phase I study of onartuzumab in Japanese patients. Stage 1 investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and recommended dose of onartuzumab in patients with solid tumors, and Stage 2 determined the safety, tolerability, and PK of onartuzumab plus erlotinib in patients with MET-positive NSCLC. Nine patients received onartuzumab monotherapy (4, 15, or 30 mg/kg on Day 1 of each 21-day cycle) in Stage 1, and six patients received onartuzumab (15 mg/kg) plus erlotinib (150 mg/day) in Stage 2. There were no dose-limiting toxicities in either stage. Serious adverse events (AEs) occurred in one patient in Stage 1 (convulsion), and two patients in Stage 2 (once case each of diarrhea, vomiting, and pulmonary embolism), but there were no grade 4 AEs or AEs leading to death. Onartuzumab PKs were linear in the dose range of 4 to 30 mg/kg, and were not affected by co-administration with erlotinib. PK parameters of onartuzumab were similar to those reported in non-Japanese patients. A partial response was observed in a patient with MET immunohistochemistry 3+ NSCLC without MET gene amplification. Based on these results, the recommended dose of onartuzumab in Japanese patients with solid tumors is 15 mg/kg every 21 days. The combination of onartuzumab with erlotinib is feasible in Japanese patients with MET-positive lung cancer. PMID:25777467

  1. [Aseptic meningitis in a patient with cerebrospinal fluid anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody-positive preclinical rheumatoid arthritis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Yuichi; Miyaji, Yosuke; Nakano, Tatsu; Joki, Hideto; Tanaka, Fumiaki

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented with non-fluent aphasia, ideomotor apraxia, right hemiparesis and convulsion. Her medical history was unremarkable, and she had not suffered from arthritis. DWI and FLAIR image of brain MRI showed hyperintensities in the subarachnoid space along the left frontal and both parietal lobes, and these lesions were associated with gadolinium enhancement. The levels of serum anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody, anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody and matrix metalloproteinase-3 were elevated. The results of blood cultures were negative. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed monocytic pleocytosis and negative findings for infection or malignancy. The level of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody in CSF was elevated. The antibody index (AI) of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody (the ratio between the CSF/serum quotient for IgG antibodies, and the CSF/serum quotient for total IgG; normal value of AI < 1.3) showed considerably high value of 8.4, indicating the intrathecal-specific antibody synthesis. As a result, the pathogenesis of her disease was consistent with rheumatoid meningitis despite lack of arthritis. After intravenous administration of methylprednisolone, her symptoms, the level of anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody in CSF, and the MRI findings were ameliorated. Anti-agalactosyl IgG antibody in the CSF was a helpful biomarker in diagnosis and assessment of the severity of rheumatoid meningitis. PMID:26511025

  2. Nuclear energy in postwar Japan and anti-nuclear movements in the 1950s.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masakatsu

    2009-01-01

    The atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 revealed the most destructive power to-date of man-made weapons. Their impact was so great that Japanese scientists thought that a bigger disaster could be prevented only if war was abolished. Thus they welcomed the international control of atomic energy. It was, however, only after the occupation that the Japanese general public began to learn about the horror of these atomic disasters due to the censorship imposed by the occupational forces. The hydrogen bomb test by the US in the Bikini atoll on March 1, 1954 renewed fears of nuclear weapons. The crew of a Japanese fishing vessel, the "Daigo Fukuryu Maru" (Lucky Dragon No. 5) suffered from exposure to radiation from the test. Even after the incident the US did not stop nuclear tests which continued to radioactively contaminate fish and rains in Japan. As a result, the petition movement for the ban of nuclear trials suddenly spread all over the country. By the summer of 1955 the number of the signatures grew to more than one third of Japan's population at the time. Under the strong influence of anti-nuclear Japanese public opinion the Science Council of Japan announced the so-called three principles of atomic energy: "openness," "democracy," and "independence" to ensure atomic energy was used for peaceful uses only. These principles were included in the Atomic Energy Basic Law established in December 1955. With this law, military uses of nuclear energy were strictly forbidden. PMID:20521422

  3. Anti-nuclear weapons activism in the United States and Great Britain: a comparative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, G.

    1987-01-01

    This study is a response to the lacuna in empirical research into political activism and the nuclear issue and seeks to ascertain the social and value characteristics, political attitudes, and political behavior of activists in the United States and Great Britain. Consideration is also given to gender differences in light of evidence of an emerging gender gap in these two countries. The study investigates the common forces cited in two sets of literature - post-industrialism and anti-nuclear weapons movements - which provide a framework for analysis. Survey research data is employed to assess cross-national similarities and differences. The findings obtained indicate that while American and British activists exhibit common social and value characteristics, British activists appear more integrated in their political opposition to nuclear weapons compared with their American counterparts. Survey results indicate that the political-action repertoire of these activists is quite diverse, suggesting a new style of politics in advanced industrial democracies. Gender-based analysis reveals two important findings. First, activist American men differ significantly from the other three social groups in their attitudes towards nuclear weapons. Second, activist women in both national settings participate at a level equal to or exceeding that of activist men.

  4. Profiling anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA), have high specificity for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Some children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), phenotypically resemble RA and test positive for rheumatoid factor (RF) a characteristic biomarker of RA. We investigated the prevalence of ACPA and its relationship to other serologic markers associated with RA in a well-characterized JIA cohort. Methods Cases were 334 children with JIA, 30 of whom had RF + polyarticular JIA. Sera from all cases and 50 healthy pediatric controls were investigated by ELISA at a single time point for anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) IgG, RF IgM, IgA and IgG, anti-RA33 IgG, and antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Comparisons between cases and controls were made using Chi-square or Fisher exact tests and T-tests. Results The prevalence of RF was 8% among controls, and 12% among cases (ns). The prevalence of ACPA was 2% in controls and 14.3% in cases (OR 8.2, p <0.01). Children who were ACPA-positive and RF-negative (n = 23) had a significantly earlier onset-age (4.6 years vs. 12.1 years, p <0.00001) and had fewer HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles than those positive for both RF and ACPA (n = 25). Prevalence of anti-RA33 was not different between cases and controls. Conclusions ACPAs are detectable in 14% of children with JIA. Children with positive ACPA but negative RF are frequent, and may define a distinct subset of children with JIA. ACPA testing should be included in the classification of JIA. PMID:22931121

  5. IgG RF and anti-CCP2 antibody can be positive in undifferentiated arthritis due to streptococcal infection, hepatitis B virus, tuberculosis, trauma and hypothyroidism: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Usha; Verma, Pamod Kumar; Bhagat, Priyanka; Singh, Sangeeta; Singh, Suman; Singh, Nand Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Anti-CCP2 antibody and rheumatoid (RF) tests are used for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Out of these two, anti-CCP2 antibody is supposed to be more specific for RA. Aim of the study was to present 33 cases of undifferentiated arthritis (UA) in which features of RA were not present, but anti-CCP2 antibody was positive. Out of the 33 cases of UA, 19 had well-known disease like hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, tubercular arthritis, traumatic arthritis, pneumonia with arthritis, varicose vein with pain in legs, cervical spondylitis and SSA. The duration of disease was more than one year in 67.86% cases. Majority of the patients were females (63.64%). Knee joint involvement was seen in maximum number (i.e. 20 cases). All 33 cases were positive for anti-CCP2 Ab. Maximum number of cases (78.78%) had involvement of one or two joints. CRP positivity was seen in 23.07% cases. Morning stiffness was present in (36.36%) cases, while swelling of the joint was present in 33.33% cases. In 16 cases, only serum sample was available for further analysis. About 62.5% cases showed IgG RF positivity. Antitubercular IgM and IgG were detected in 18.75% cases; ASO was elevated in 12.5% cases, and HBs Ag was positive in 6.25% cases. None of the controls (30 cases) were positive for these infections, anti-CCP2 antibody or RF. Thus, our study concludes that chronic infections like streptococcus, hepatitis B, tuberculosis and autoimmune thyroid diseases can produce raised levels of anti-CCP2 antibody and IgG RF. PMID:21789619

  6. CYP3A-mediated drug-drug interaction potential and excretion of brentuximab vedotin, an antibody-drug conjugate, in patients with CD30-positive hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Han, Tae H; Gopal, Ajay K; Ramchandren, Radhakrishnan; Goy, Andre; Chen, Robert; Matous, Jeffrey V; Cooper, Maureen; Grove, Laurie E; Alley, Stephen C; Lynch, Carmel M; O'Connor, Owen A

    2013-08-01

    Brentuximab vedotin is an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) that selectively delivers monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) into CD30-expressing cells. This study evaluated the CYP3A-mediated drug-drug interaction potential of brentuximab vedotin and the excretion of MMAE. Two 21-day cycles of brentuximab vedotin (1.2 or 1.8 mg/kg intravenously) were administered to 56 patients with CD30-positive hematologic malignancies. Each patient also received either a sensitive CYP3A substrate (midazolam), an effective inducer (rifampin), or a strong inhibitor (ketoconazole). Brentuximab vedotin did not affect midazolam exposures. ADC exposures were unaffected by concomitant rifampin or ketoconazole; however, MMAE exposures were lower with rifampin and higher with ketoconazole. The short-term safety profile of brentuximab vedotin in this study was generally consistent with historic clinical observations. The most common adverse events were nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, headache, pyrexia, and neutropenia. Over a 1-week period, ∼23.5% of intact MMAE was recovered after administration of brentuximab vedotin; all other species were below the limit of quantitation. The primary excretion route is via feces (median 72% of the recovered MMAE). These results suggest that brentuximab vedotin (1.8 mg/kg) and MMAE are neither inhibitors nor inducers of CYP3A; however, MMAE is a substrate of CYP3A. PMID:23754575

  7. Phase I study of chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in Chinese patients with CD20-positive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Lin; Han, Xiaohong; He, Xiaohui; Song, Yuanyuan; Yao, Jiarui; Yang, Jianliang; Liu, Peng; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Weijing; Gai, Wenlin; Xie, Liangzhi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to determine the safety, pharmacokinetics and biologic effects of a human-mouse chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (SCT400) in Chinese patients with CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (CD20+ B-cell NHL). SCT400 has an identical amino acid sequence as rituximab, with the exception of one amino acid in the CH1 domain of the heavy chain, which is common in Asians. Methods: Fifteen patients with CD20+ B-cell NHL received dose-escalating SCT400 infusions (250 mg/m2: n=3; 375 mg/m2: n=9; 500 mg/m2: n=3) once weekly for 4 consecutive weeks with a 24-week follow-up period. The data of all patients were collected for pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses. Results: No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Most drug-related adverse events were grade 1 or 2. Two patients had grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. Under premedication, the drug-related infusion reaction was mild. A rapid, profound and durable depletion of circulating B cells was observed in all dose groups without significant effects on T cell count, natural killer (NK) cell count or immunoglobulin levels. No patient developed anti-SCT400 antibodies during the course of the study. SCT400 serum half-life (T1/2), maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC) generally increased between the first and fourth infusions (P<0.05). At the 375 mg/m2 dose, the T1/2 was 122.5±46.7 h vs. 197.0±75.0 h, respectively, and the Cmax was 200.6±20.2 g/mL vs. 339.1±71.0 g/mL, respectively. From 250 mg/m2 to 500 mg/m2, the Cmax and AUC increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05). Patients with a high tumor burden had markedly lower serum SCT400 concentrations compared with those without or with a low tumor burden. Of the 9 assessable patients, 1 achieved complete response and 2 achieved partial responses. Conclusions: SCT400 is well-tolerated and has encouraging preliminary efficacy in Chinese patients with CD20+ B-cell NHL. PMID:27199517

  8. Penetration of anti-DNA antibodies into immature live cells.

    PubMed

    Ruíz-Argüelles, A; Pérez-romano, B; Llorente, L; Alarcón-Segovia, D; Castellanos, J M

    1998-10-01

    Several data suggest that immature lymphoid cells are more prone to penetration and therefore are affected more by antibodies than their mature counterparts. In this study, we examined the penetration of monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies in several models of immature cells. Results confirm that most anti-DNA antibodies penetrate larger proportions of immature cells than normal adult cells. It was also proven that anti-DNA antibodies induce larger fractions of immature cells to undergo apoptosis than mature cells; however, there is not a numerical association between penetration and apoptosis. Additionally, the penetration and induction of apoptosis of several anti-DNA monoclonal antibodies into U937 and NIH-3T3 cells followed a rather heterogeneous pattern. When mature and immature cells were stimulated polyclonally, it was shown that polyreactive antibodies might act as an accessory signal to induce apoptosis in immature cells. This process could contribute to the edition of the immune repertoire. We propose that naturally occurring polyreactive antinuclear antibodies, through penetration and deletion of self-reacting cells, could participate, either as a unique or secondary signal, in the mechanism of self tolerance. If these polyreactive antibodies undergo affinity maturation, it is possible they may develop into pathogenic antibodies. PMID:9802942

  9. Chronic Malaria Revealed by a New Fluorescence Pattern on the Antinuclear Autoantibodies Test

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Benjamin; Charuel, Jean-Luc; Jaureguiberry, Stphane; Arnaud, Laurent; Courtin, Regis; Kassab, Petra; Prendki, Virginie; Paris, Luc; Ghillani-Dalbin, Pascale; Thellier, Marc; Caumes, Eric; Amoura, Zahir; Mazier, Dominique; Musset, Lucile; Buffet, Pierre; Miyara, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Background Several clinical forms of malaria such as chronic carriage, gestational malaria or hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly may follow a cryptic evolution with afebrile chronic fatigue sometimes accompanied by anemia and/or splenomegaly. Conventional parasitological tests are often negative or not performed, and severe complications may occur. Extensive explorations of these conditions often include the search for antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA). Methods We analysed fluorescence patterns in the ANA test in patients with either chronic cryptic or acute symptomatic malaria, then conducted a one-year prospective study at a single hospital on all available sera drawn for ANA detections. We then identified autoantibodies differentially expressed in malaria patients and in controls using human protein microarray. Results We uncovered and defined a new, malaria-related, nucleo-cytoplasmic ANA pattern displaying the specific association of a nuclear speckled pattern with diffuse cytoplasmic perinuclearly-enhanced fluorescence. In the one-year prospective analysis, 79% of sera displaying this new nucleo-cytoplasmic fluorescence were from patients with malaria. This specific pattern, not seen in other parasitic diseases, allowed a timely reorientation of the diagnosis toward malaria. To assess if the autoantibody immune response was due to autoreactivity or molecular mimicry we isolated 42 autoantigens, targets of malarial autoantibodies. BLAST analysis indicated that 23 of recognized autoantigens were homologous to plasmodial proteins suggesting autoimmune responses directly driven by the plasmodial infection. Conclusion In patients with malaria in whom parasitological tests have not been performed recognition of this new, malaria-related fluorescence pattern on the ANA test is highly suggestive of the diagnosis and triggers immediate, easy confirmation and adapted therapy. PMID:24551116

  10. Human parvovirus B19 infection and antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed

    von Landenberg, Philipp; Lehmann, Hartwig W; Modrow, Susanne

    2007-04-01

    Erythema infectiosum is the main manifestation of human parvovirus B19 infections. Further B19-related diseases commonly associated with the acute infection are flue-like symptoms, transient aplastic crisis, transient arthralgias, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia, spontaneous abortion and hydrops fetalis in pregnant women. Hepatitis, myocarditis, meningitis, encephalitis as well as pure red cell anemia may occur occasionally. In addition parvovirus B19 infections have been frequently described as cause or trigger of various forms of autoimmune diseases affecting all blood cell lines, joints, connective tissue, uvea, large and small vessels. Molecular mimicry may be one major contribution to the appearance of autoimmune antibodies, f.e. antiphospholipid and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies as well as antinuclear antigens. These mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of parvovirus B19 triggered autoimmune diseases, especially focused on the development of antiphospholipid antibodies will be discussed in this short review. PMID:17412298

  11. Human Papillomavirus neutralizing and cross-reactive antibodies induced in HIV-positive subjects after vaccination with quadrivalent and bivalent HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Faust, Helena; Toft, Lars; Sehr, Peter; Müller, Martin; Bonde, Jesper; Forslund, Ola; Østergaard, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Dillner, Joakim

    2016-03-18

    Ninety-one HIV-infected individuals (61 men and 30 women) were randomized to vaccination either with quadrivalent (Gardasil™) or bivalent (Cervarix™) HPV vaccine. Neutralizing and specific HPV-binding serum antibodies were measured at baseline and 12 months after the first vaccine dose. Presence of neutralizing and binding antibodies had good agreement (average Kappa for HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 was 0.65). At baseline, 88% of subjects had antibodies against at least one genital HPV. Following vaccination with Cervarix™, all subjects became seropositive for HPV16 and 18. After Gardasil™ vaccination, 96% of subjects seroconverted for HPV16 and 73% for HPV18. Levels of HPV16-specific antibodies were <1 international unit (IU) in 87% of study subjects before vaccination but >10IU in 85% of study subjects after vaccination. Antibodies against non-vaccine HPV types appeared after Gardasil™ vaccination for >50% of vaccinated females for HPV 31, 35 and 73 and for >50% of Cervarix™-vaccinated females for HPV 31, 33, 35, 45, 56 and 58. Cross-reactivity with non-genital HPV types was also detected. In conclusion, HIV-infected subjects responded to HPV vaccination with induction of neutralizing antibodies against both vaccine and non-vaccine types. PMID:26896686

  12. Antibodies to nucleoprotein and to hydrazide-altered soluble nucleoprotein in tuberculous patients receiving isoniazid

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Betancourt, V. M.

    1969-01-01

    Antibodies to calf thymus nuclei, nucleoprotein, DNA, soluble nucleoprotein and hydrazide (hydrallazine and isoniazid)-altered nucleoprotein were investigated by a standard complement-fixation method in 214 tuberculous patients receiving isoniazid. Findings were compared to those on thirty-seven sera from lupus patients receiving neither steroids nor immunosuppressants and on sixty-six sera from normal controls. The incidence of antibodies to all antigens studied except DNA was significantly higher in isoniazid-treated tuberculous patients than in the normal controls, but lower than in the lupus patients. Unlike lupus there were no detectable DNA antibodies in the tuberculous or in the control sera. Antibodies to nucleoprotein (soluble and insoluble) and particularly to hydrazide-altered nucleoprotein were the most frequently found in the isoniazid-treated tuberculous patients. In general, antinuclear antibodies were more frequent in the isoniazid-treated tuberculous female than in the male; in the adult than in the child. It is suggested that hydrazides may cause in vivo similar alteration of nucleoprotein to that which they cause in vitro. Hydrazide-altered nucleoprotein probably elicits the production of antinuclear antibodies which in turn may activate systemic lupus erythematosus in otherwise predisposed individuals. PMID:5359961

  13. A case of new daily persistent headache with elevated antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Hamada, T; Ohshima, K; Ide, Y; Sakato, S; Takamori, M

    1991-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman presented with persistent headache which was of acute onset and occurred daily. Laboratory findings included thrombocytosis, elevated levels of antinuclear antibody, rheumatoid factor, and antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Magnetic resonance image of the head, left selective external carotid angiography, temporal arterial biopsy, and cerebrospinal fluid revealed no abnormal findings that could explain her headache. Her headache was compatible with NDPH, which has been reported by Vanast, and was thought to be related to EBV reactivation. PMID:1650858

  14. Lysine at position 222 of the goat prion protein inhibits the binding of monoclonal antibody F99/97.6.1.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Maria; Guglielmetti, Chiara; Pagano, Marianna; Sciuto, Simona; Ingravalle, Francesco; Martucci, Francesca; Caramelli, Maria; Acutis, Pier Luigi

    2012-09-01

    Prion protein (PrP) is encoded by the PRNP gene, which is highly polymorphic in goats, with polymorphisms encoding amino acid substitutions at the protein level. In the current study, the reactivity of monoclonal antibody (mAb) F99/97.6.1 in binding PrP from goats polymorphic at PRNP codon 222 was investigated. Nervous tissue from 30 scrapie-negative goats with 3 different genotypes (222Q/Q, 222Q/K, and 222K/K) was analyzed by Western blot using mAbs P4 and F99/97.6.1. Although PrP was detected in all 30 samples by mAb P4, detection of PrP by mAb F99/97.6.1 was limited to 222Q/Q (12/12). No PrP was detected by mAb F99/97.6.1 in the 222K/K samples (n = 6), and the signal intensity of mAb F99/97.6.1 for PrP was lower for the 222Q/K samples (12/12 samples). To further investigate these results, additional Western blot analyses were performed, and the PrP signals detected by mAbs F99/97.6.1 and SAF84 were then quantified. The mean F99/SAF84 ratio (± standard deviation) calculated for the 222Q/Q group was 0.73 ± 1.26, and the mean for the 222Q/K group was 0.27 ± 1.31. Statistical analysis of these values evidenced statistically significant differences between the 222Q/Q and 222Q/K samples. The results of the study thus revealed an inhibition by lysine at position 222 on the binding of mAb F99/97.6.1 to goat PrP. This has implications for the use of mAb F99/97.6.1 for diagnostic purposes. Because the 222K allele could be a target for genetic selection in goats, the differential reactivity of mAb F99/97.6.1 could be exploited with a genotyping test setup. PMID:22914824

  15. Passive protection of suckling infant mice against F41-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains by intravenous inoculation of the dams with monoclonal antibodies against F41.

    PubMed

    Duchet-Suchaux, M; Menanteau, P; van Zijderveld, F G

    1992-07-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against five different epitope clusters of adhesion factor F41 (two MAbs per cluster) were tested for protection of infant mice against an oral challenge with F41-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) B2C and B41M. Infant mice suckling dams intravenously inoculated with MAbs were orally challenged, and the survival rates were measured for 12 days after inoculation and challenge. Irrespective of their epitope specificity, all F41 MAbs given in a single dose of 4 mg per dam had a protective effect against both ETEC strains. In contrast, one K99 MAb of the same isotype and given in the same dose as the F41 MAbs did not protect infant mice at all. A reduction in the dose of F41 MAbs to 0.032 mg per dam resulted in a decrease in protection. Two different MAbs against the same epitope cluster were not necessarily equally protective. Combining MAbs two by two, whether the MAbs recognized the same epitope cluster or not, resulted in protective activity essentially similar to that obtained with each MAb separately, without any improvement. Therefore, one MAb against any epitope may be sufficient for protection. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) titers of MAbs in the serum of dams were similar, irrespective of the epitope specificity of the MAbs, and gradually decreased from day 1 to day 12 after inoculation. We found a good correlation between colostrum and milk ELISA titers of MAbs and serum ELISA titers of MAbs. Colostrum and milk MAb titers were 10-fold lower than corresponding serum MAb titers and stayed high until day 5 after inoculation. The most protective MAb had the highest ELISA titers in colostrum and milk for the first 5 days after inoculation. ETEC strain B2C colonized the intestines of infant mice suckling MAb-inoculated mothers until day 12 after challenge. Intestinal levels of the challenge strain were high on day 2 but never reached the very high numbers (10(9) to 10(10)) described previously in a diarrheic infant mouse model. MAbs did not eliminate the challenge ETEC strain from the intestines of infant mice. PMID:1351882

  16. Importance of the Side Chain at Position 296 of Antibody Fc in Interactions with FcγRIIIa and Other Fcγ Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Isoda, Yuya; Yagi, Hirokazu; Satoh, Tadashi; Shibata-Koyama, Mami; Masuda, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Mitsuo; Kato, Koichi; Iida, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is an important effector function determining the clinical efficacy of therapeutic antibodies. Core fucose removal from N-glycans on the Fc portion of immunoglobulin G (IgG) improves the binding affinity for Fcγ receptor IIIa (FcγRIIIa) and dramatically enhances ADCC. Our previous structural analyses revealed that Tyr–296 of IgG1-Fc plays a critical role in the interaction with FcγRIIIa, particularly in the enhanced FcγRIIIa binding of nonfucosylated IgG1. However, the importance of the Tyr–296 residue in the antibody in the interaction with various Fcγ receptors has not yet been elucidated. To further clarify the biological importance of this residue, we established comprehensive Tyr–296 mutants as fucosylated and nonfucosylated anti-CD20 IgG1s rituximab variants and examined their binding to recombinant soluble human Fcγ receptors: shFcγRI, shFcγRIIa, shFcγRIIIa, and shFcγRIIIb. Some of the mutations affected the binding of antibody to not only shFcγRIIIa but also shFcγRIIa and shFcγRIIIb, suggesting that the Tyr–296 residue in the antibody was also involved in interactions with FcγRIIa and FcγRIIIb. For FcγRIIIa binding, almost all Tyr–296 variants showed lower binding affinities than the wild-type antibody, irrespective of their core fucosylation, particularly in Y296K and Y296P. Notably, only the Y296W mutant showed improved binding to FcγRIIIa. The 3.00 Å-resolution crystal structure of the nonfucosylated Y296W mutant in complex with shFcγRIIIa harboring two N-glycans revealed that the Tyr-to-Trp substitution increased the number of potential contact atoms in the complex, thus improving the binding of the antibody to shFcγRIIIa. The nonfucosylated Y296W mutant retained high ADCC activity, relative to the nonfucosylated wild-type IgG1, and showed greater binding affinity for FcγRIIa. Our data may improve our understanding of the biological importance of human IgG1-Fc Tyr–296 in interactions with various Fcγ receptors, and have applications in the modulation of the IgG1-Fc function of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:26444434

  17. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked to an increased risk ...

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  19. Problems and process of identity maintenance in the anti-nuclear movement in America: a qualitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tate, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    These strategic and tactical problems are examined within two basic areas of concern: (1) external public relations and (2) internal membership identify. This study contributes to the resource-mobilization perspective by theoretically reducing the significant variables of concern to external and internal identity maintenance and by stressing the constant dilemma between the structure of the movement and the actual process by which this structure is carried out. It is based on a social psychological analysis in which the dynamics of social movements is viewed both externally and internally in relation to the movement structure and process. The Sunbelt Alliance anti-nuclear group of Oklahoma is used as the empirical example. The research methodology consists of a series of focused personal interviews. The Sunbelt Alliance anti-nuclear organization experienced a dilemma resulting from the tension between external and internal contingencies. The promotion of cooperative interdependence based on member cohesiveness within the group suffered because of the inability of the organization to maintain consistent agreement concerning external targets. The structure of the group, or its goals and ideology, was not consistently reflected in its process. Disagreement over external priorities eventually reduced internal solidarity, and the organization dissolved.

  20. Role of salivary anti-SSA/B antibodies for diagnosing primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Pan; Li, Chunlei; Qiang, Lu; He, Jing; Li, Zhanguo

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) is complex, and the saliva test is a potential method to improve the existing diagnostic criteria. Objective: To estimate the diagnostic accuracy of salivary anti-SSA/B antibodies in primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS), and to analyze their correlations with clinical and laboratory profiles. Study Design: This study enrolled 100 pSS patients and 140 non-pSS controls, including 40 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, 40 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, and 60 healthy controls. Unstimulated whole saliva and stimulated parotid saliva samples were collected from the subjects. Salivary anti-SSA/B antibodies were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Clinical and laboratory data were retrieved from the medical records. Results: In the pSS group, the sensitivity of anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies in whole saliva was 49% and 29%, respectively, and the specificity was 87.5% and 95%. The sensitivity of anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies in parotid saliva was 32% and 8%, respectively, and the specificity was 95.52% and 97.86%, respectively. In the pSS group, the diagnostic accuracy of anti-SSA/B antibodies in whole saliva was significantly higher than in parotid saliva (p<0.05), but was significantly lower than in serum (p<0.05). The salivary flow rate in the pSS group positive for whole salivary anti-SSA was significantly lower than in the negative group (p<0.05). The prevalence of rheumatoid factor and antinuclear factor were significantly higher in salivary SSB-positive pSS patients than in SSB-negative patients (p<0.05). Conclusions: Compared to parotid saliva, whole saliva is a more suitable diagnostic fluid. Using salivary anti-SSA/B antibodies as a single test item is insufficient given the relatively low sensitivity. Further studies should investigate the possibility of combining tests for different salivary autoantibodies as a method for diagnosing pSS. Key words:Primary Sjögren’s syndrome, salivary diagnostics, anti-SSA autoantibodies, anti-SSB autoantibodies. PMID:25475778

  1. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  2. RhD Specific Antibodies Are Not Detectable in HLA-DRB1(*)1501 Mice Challenged with Human RhD Positive Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lidice; Denomme, Gregory A; Shah, Kunjlata; Lazarus, Alan H

    2014-01-01

    The ability to study the immune response to the RhD antigen in the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn has been hampered by the lack of a mouse model of RhD immunization. However, the ability of transgenic mice expressing human HLA DRB1(*)1501 to respond to immunization with purified RhD has allowed this question to be revisited. In this work we aimed at inducing anti-RhD antibodies by administering human RhD(+) RBCs to mice transgenic for the human HLA DRB1(*)1501 as well as to several standard inbred and outbred laboratory strains including C57BL/6, DBA1/J, CFW(SW), CD1(ICR), and NSA(CF-1). DRB1(*)1501 mice were additionally immunized with putative extracellular immunogenic RhD peptides. DRB1(*)1501 mice immunized with RhD(+) erythrocytes developed an erythrocyte-reactive antibody response. Antibodies specific for RhD could not however be detected by flow cytometry. Despite this, DRB1(*)1501 mice were capable of recognizing immunogenic sequences of Rh as injection with Rh peptides induced antibodies reactive with RhD sequences, consistent with the presence of B cell repertoires capable of recognizing RhD. We conclude that while HLA DRB1(*)1501 transgenic mice may have the capability of responding to immunogenic sequences within RhD, an immune response to human RBC expressing RhD is not directly observed. PMID:25628657

  3. Cross-reactive antigens shared by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Helicobacter pylori, Campylobacter jejuni, and Haemophilus influenzae may cause false-positive titers of antibody to H. pylori.

    PubMed

    Johansen, H K; Nørgaard, A; Andersen, L P; Jensen, P; Nielsen, H; Høiby, N

    1995-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffer from many of the gastrointestinal conditions which occur in non-CF individuals, e.g., dyspepsia and peptic ulceration. These symptoms may be caused by Helicobacter pylori but could also be due to either pancreatic insufficiency or the intensive antibiotic treatment used in CF patients. Since CF patients chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa produce antibodies against a wide range of antigens, including antigens common to many other bacteria, e.g., GroEL and lipopolysaccharide, we studied, by the Western blot (immunoblot) technique, the specificity of immunoglobulin G antibodies to H. pylori in Danish CF patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa, CF patients without P. aeruginosa infection but with Haemophilus influenzae infection, patients with dyspeptic ulcers associated with H. pylori, and patients recovering from acute Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli infection. Sera from CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa or H. influenzae infection and patients recovering from acute C. jejuni infection cross-reacted with H. pylori antigens. A strong cross-reacting protein antigen at approximately 14 kDa and minor cross-reactive antigens at approximately 27, 30, and 60 kDa (the heat shock protein GroEL is equivalent to the common antigen of P. aeruginosa) could be demonstrated. The results of this study show that high immunoglobulin G antibody titers against H. pylori in CF patients cannot be regarded as indicating present or past H. pylori infection unless their specificity is proven by absorption studies. PMID:7697522

  4. Serum Antibodies from a Subset of Horses Positive for Babesia caballi by Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Demonstrate a Protein Recognition Pattern That Is Not Consistent with Infection

    PubMed Central

    Awinda, Peter O.; Mealey, Robert H.; Williams, Laura B. A.; Conrad, Patricia A.; Packham, Andrea E.; Reif, Kathryn E.; Grause, Juanita F.; Pelzel-McCluskey, Angela M.; Chung, Chungwon; Bastos, Reginaldo G.; Kappmeyer, Lowell S.; Howe, Daniel K.; Ness, SallyAnne L.; Knowles, Donald P.

    2013-01-01

    Tick-borne pathogens that cause persistent infection are of major concern to the livestock industry because of transmission risk from persistently infected animals and the potential economic losses they pose. The recent reemergence of Theileria equi in the United States prompted a widespread national survey resulting in identification of limited distribution of equine piroplasmosis (EP) in the U.S. horse population. This program identified Babesia caballi-seropositive horses using rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP-1)–competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA), despite B. caballi being considered nonendemic on the U.S. mainland. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the suitability of RAP-1–cELISA as a single serological test to determine the infection status of B. caballi in U.S. horses. Immunoblotting indicated that sera from U.S. horses reacted with B. caballi lysate and purified B. caballi RAP-1 protein. Antibody reactivity to B. caballi lysate was exclusively directed against a single ∼50-kDa band corresponding to a native B. caballi RAP-1 protein. In contrast, sera from experimentally and naturally infected horses from regions where B. caballi is endemic bound multiple proteins ranging from 30 to 50 kDa. Dilutions of sera from U.S. horses positive by cELISA revealed low levels of antibodies, while sera from horses experimentally infected with B. caballi and from areas where B. caballi is endemic had comparatively high antibody levels. Finally, blood transfer from seropositive U.S. horses into naive horses demonstrated no evidence of B. caballi transmission, confirming that antibody reactivity in cELISA-positive U.S. horses was not consistent with infection. Therefore, we conclude that a combination of cELISA and immunoblotting is required for the accurate serodiagnosis of B. caballi. PMID:24049108

  5. Human Germline Antibody Gene Segments Encode Polyspecific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Jordan R.; Briney, Bryan S.; DeLuca, Samuel L.; Crowe, James E.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding. PMID:23637590

  6. Antisperm antibodies and in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Janssen, H J; Bastiaans, B A; Goverde, H J; Hollanders, H M; Wetzels, A A; Schellekens, L A

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of antisperm antibodies in the male, the female, or both partners on the outcome of in vitro fertilization treatment. The results in terms of ongoing pregnancies in the male and female antibody-positive group were the same as in the antibody-negative group. In the double antibody-positive group two of the three patients became pregnant. When high levels of antisperm antibodies were present on the spermatozoa, the fertilization rate was significantly reduced. In the female positive group no clear relationship between the antibody titer and the fertilization percentage could be detected. Abnormal semen quality was responsible for a much lower fertilization rate than the presence of antibodies. The conclusion of this study is that in vitro fertilization provides an equal change of conception in couples with antisperm antibodies in comparison with couples with no antibodies if the other semen parameters are normal. PMID:1472812

  7. The Clinical and Genomic Significance of Donor-Specific AntibodyPositive/C4d-Negative and Donor-Specific AntibodyNegative/C4d-Negative Transplant Glomerulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hayde, Nicole; Bao, Yi; Pullman, James; Ye, Bin; Calder, R. Brent; Chung, Monica; Schwartz, Daniel; Lubetzky, Michelle; Ajaimy, Maria; de Boccardo, Graciela

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background This study investigated the mechanisms involved in development of donor-specific antibody (DSA) and/or C4d-negative transplant glomerulopathy (TGP) by allograft gene expression profiles using microarrays. Design, Setting, Participants, & Measurements This cohort study was conducted in kidney transplant recipients. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they required a clinically indicated biopsy at any time point after their transplant. They were then classified according to their histopathology findings and DSA and C4d results. Eighteen chronic antibody-mediated rejection (CAMR), 14 DSA+/C4d? TGP, 25 DSA?/C4d? TGP, and 47 nonspecific interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (IFTA) biopsy specimens were identified. In a subset of patients from the study population, biopsy specimens in each group and normal transplant kidney specimens were analyzed with Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays. Results The mean sum score of glomerulitis and peritubular capillaritis increased from 0.280.78 in IFTA specimens to 0.750.85 in DSA?/C4d? TGP specimens, 1.711.49 in DSA+/C4d?/TGP specimens, and 2.111.74 in CAMR specimens (P<0.001). During a median follow-up time of 2 (interquartile range, 1.42.8) years after biopsy, graft loss was highest in CAMR specimens (27.8%) compared to IFTA specimens (8.5%), DSA+/C4d? TGP specimens (14.3%), and DSA?/C4d? TGP specimens (16%) (P=0.01). With use of microarrays, comparison of the gene expression profiles of DSA?/C4d? TGP specimens with glomerulitis + peritubular capillaritis scores > 0 to normal and IFTA biopsy specimens revealed higher expression of quantitative cytotoxic T cellassociated transcripts (QCAT). However, both CAMR and DSA+/C4d? TGP specimens had higher expression of not only QCAT but also IFN-? and rejection-induced, constitutive macrophage-associated, natural killer cellassociated, and DSA-selective transcripts. Endothelial cellassociated transcript expression was upregulated only in CAMR biopsy specimens. Conclusions These results suggested that DSA+/C4d? TGP biopsy specimens may be classified as CAMR. In contrast, DSA?/C4d? TGP specimens showed increased cytotoxic T cellassociated transcripts, suggesting T cell activation as a mechanism of injury. PMID:24030736

  8. Antibody profile in Indian severe haemophilia A patients with and without FVIII inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patricia; Shetty, Shrimati; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sebastien; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srini; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis and management of haemophilia patients with inhibitors is often tricky due to the heterogeneous nature of the antibodies with regard to their kinetics, as well as the co-existence of other interfering antibodies. Plasma samples from severe haemophilia A patients from India with and without FVIII inhibitors were analysed for the presence of possible co-existing antibodies such as lupus anticoagulants (LA), anti-cardiolipin antibodies (ACLA), anti-β2-glycoprotein-I (anti-β2-GP-I) antibodies, viral transfusion transmitted disease (HIV, HBsAg, HCV) related antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP), and anti-nuclear antibodies. A high incidence of LA and anti-HCV antibodies was detected in Indian haemophilia A patients similar to earlier reports. More importantly, a relatively high incidence of autoantibodies to nuclear antigens (18.62%) and anti-CCP antibodies (1.38%) associated with autoimmune disorders was also seen in these congenital haemophilia A patients with and without inhibitors. Knowledge on the antibody profile in these haemophilia patients especially in those with FVIII inhibitors along with correlation with the clinical manifestations and other risk factors for inhibitor development could possibly shed more light on the complex immune response in these patients. PMID:26433059

  9. Galactorrhea in a Patient With Aquaporin-4 Antibody-positive Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiko; Furusho, Kentaro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-12-01

    This is the first report of a case of galactorrhea in a patient with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) diagnosed on the basis of antiaquaporin-4 antibody seropositivity. The hypothalamus is becoming known as an area highly expressing aquaporin-4 and frequently involved in intracranial lesions of patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO). We reviewed cases of hypothalamic endocrinopathy among patients with NMO, NMOSD, and the Japanese opticospinal form of MS. Among these cases, galactorrhea was the second most common symptom. Signs of hypothalamic endocrinopathies may be obscured by the grave neurological deficits caused by NMO. We recommend paying special attention to hypothalamic endocrinopathies among patients with NMO or NMOSD, irrespective of brain MRI findings. PMID:26671741

  10. The Position of His-Tag in Recombinant OspC and Application of Various Adjuvants Affects the Intensity and Quality of Specific Antibody Response after Immunization of Experimental Mice.

    PubMed

    Krupka, Michal; Masek, Josef; Barkocziova, Lucia; Turanek Knotigova, Pavlina; Kulich, Pavel; Plockova, Jana; Lukac, Robert; Bartheldyova, Eliska; Koudelka, Stepan; Chaloupkova, Radka; Sebela, Marek; Zyka, Daniel; Droz, Ladislav; Effenberg, Roman; Ledvina, Miroslav; Miller, Andrew D; Turanek, Jaroslav; Raska, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi-caused infection, if not recognized and appropriately treated by antibiotics, may lead to chronic complications, thus stressing the need for protective vaccine development. The immune protection is mediated by phagocytic cells and by Borrelia-specific complement-activating antibodies, associated with the Th1 immune response. Surface antigen OspC is involved in Borrelia spreading through the host body. Previously we reported that recombinant histidine tagged (His-tag) OspC (rOspC) could be attached onto liposome surfaces by metallochelation. Here we report that levels of OspC-specific antibodies vary substantially depending upon whether rOspC possesses an N' or C' terminal His-tag. This is the case in mice immunized: (a) with rOspC proteoliposomes containing adjuvants MPLA or non-pyrogenic MDP analogue MT06; (b) with free rOspC and Montanide PET GEL A; (c) with free rOspC and alum; or (d) with adjuvant-free rOspC. Stronger responses are noted with all N'-terminal His-tag rOspC formulations. OspC-specific Th1-type antibodies predominate post-immunization with rOspC proteoliposomes formulated with MPLA or MT06 adjuvants. Further analyses confirmed that the structural features of soluble N' and C' terminal His-tag rOspC and respective rOspC proteoliposomes are similar including their thermal stabilities at physiological temperatures. On the other hand, a change in the position of the rOspC His-tag from N' to C' terminal appears to affect substantially the immunogenicity of rOspC arguably due to steric hindrance of OspC epitopes by the C' terminal His-tag itself and not due to differences in overall conformations induced by changes in the His-tag position in rOspC variants. PMID:26848589

  11. The Position of His-Tag in Recombinant OspC and Application of Various Adjuvants Affects the Intensity and Quality of Specific Antibody Response after Immunization of Experimental Mice

    PubMed Central

    Krupka, Michal; Masek, Josef; Barkocziova, Lucia; Turanek Knotigova, Pavlina; Kulich, Pavel; Plockova, Jana; Lukac, Robert; Bartheldyova, Eliska; Koudelka, Stepan; Chaloupkova, Radka; Sebela, Marek; Zyka, Daniel; Droz, Ladislav; Effenberg, Roman; Ledvina, Miroslav; Miller, Andrew D.; Turanek, Jaroslav; Raska, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi-caused infection, if not recognized and appropriately treated by antibiotics, may lead to chronic complications, thus stressing the need for protective vaccine development. The immune protection is mediated by phagocytic cells and by Borrelia-specific complement-activating antibodies, associated with the Th1 immune response. Surface antigen OspC is involved in Borrelia spreading through the host body. Previously we reported that recombinant histidine tagged (His-tag) OspC (rOspC) could be attached onto liposome surfaces by metallochelation. Here we report that levels of OspC-specific antibodies vary substantially depending upon whether rOspC possesses an N' or C' terminal His-tag. This is the case in mice immunized: (a) with rOspC proteoliposomes containing adjuvants MPLA or non-pyrogenic MDP analogue MT06; (b) with free rOspC and Montanide PET GEL A; (c) with free rOspC and alum; or (d) with adjuvant-free rOspC. Stronger responses are noted with all N'-terminal His-tag rOspC formulations. OspC-specific Th1-type antibodies predominate post-immunization with rOspC proteoliposomes formulated with MPLA or MT06 adjuvants. Further analyses confirmed that the structural features of soluble N' and C' terminal His-tag rOspC and respective rOspC proteoliposomes are similar including their thermal stabilities at physiological temperatures. On the other hand, a change in the position of the rOspC His-tag from N' to C' terminal appears to affect substantially the immunogenicity of rOspC arguably due to steric hindrance of OspC epitopes by the C' terminal His-tag itself and not due to differences in overall conformations induced by changes in the His-tag position in rOspC variants. PMID:26848589

  12. Risk factors for ANA positivity in healthy persons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The finding of antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity in a healthy individual is usually of unknown significance and in most cases is benign. However, a subset of such individuals is at risk for development of autoimmune disease. We examined demographic and immunological features that are associated with ANA positivity in clinically healthy persons to develop insights into when this marker carries risk of progression to lupus. Methods Biological samples from healthy individuals and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were obtained from the Dallas Regional Autoimmune Disease Registry (DRADR). Measurements carried out on serum samples included ANA, extractable nuclear antibodies (ENA) and autoantibody profiling using an array with more than 100 specificities. Whole blood RNA samples from a subset of individuals were used to analyze gene expression on the Illumina platform. Data were analyzed for associations of high ANA levels with demographic features, the presence of other autoantibodies and with gene expression profiles. Results Overall, ANA levels are significantly higher in females than in males and this association holds in patients with the autoimmune diseases lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) as well as in healthy controls (HC). Age was not significantly associated with ANA levels and the elevated ANA values could not be explained by higher IgG levels. Another autoantibody, anti- cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP), did not show gender dimorphism in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or healthy individuals. The autoantigen array showed significant elevations of other autoantibodies in high ANA HCs. Some of these autoantibodies were directed to antigens in skin and others were related to autoimmune conditions of kidney, thyroid or joints. Gene expression analyses showed a greater prevalence of significantly upregulated genes in HCs with negative ANA values than in those with significant ANA positivity. Genes upregulated in high ANA HCs included a celiac disease autoantigen and some components of the Type I interferon (IFN) gene signature. Conclusions Risks for ANA positivity include female gender and organ-specific autoimmunity. Upregulation of skin-specific autoantibodies may indicate that early events in the break of tolerance take place in cutaneous structures. Some of these changes may be mediated by Type I IFN. Blood profiling for expressed autoantibodies and genes has the potential to identify individuals at risk for development of autoimmune diseases including lupus. PMID:21366908

  13. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with massive intestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Miyeon; Kim, Young Uck; Boo, Sun Jin; Kim, So Mi; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2015-09-01

    A 61-year-old woman was admitted to hospital because of generalized edema and proteinuria. Her renal function deteriorated rapidly. Serum immunoglobulin and complement levels were within normal ranges. An autoantibody examination showed negative for antinuclear antibody and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody. Histologic examination of a renal biopsy specimen revealed that all of the glomeruli had severe crescent formations with no immune deposits. The patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy with cyclophosphamide followed by oral prednisolone. Fifteen days later, she experienced massive recurrent hematochezia. Angiography revealed an active contrast extravasation in a branch of the distal ileal artery. We selectively embolized with a permanent embolic agent. On the 45(th) hospital day, the patient suddenly lost consciousness. Brain computed tomography showed intracerebral hemorrhage. We report a case of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-negative pauci-immune glomerulonephritis with massive intestinal bleeding and cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:26484044

  14. Phase I study of IMGN901, a CD56-targeting antibody-drug conjugate, in patients with CD56-positive solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manisha H; Lorigan, Paul; O'Brien, Mary E R; Fossella, Frank V; Moore, Kathleen N; Bhatia, Shailender; Kirby, Maurice; Woll, Penella J

    2016-06-01

    Background IMGN901 is a CD56-targeting antibody-drug conjugate designed for tumor-selective delivery of the cytotoxic maytansinoid DM1. This phase 1 study investigated the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary activity of IMGN901 in patients with CD56-expressing solid tumors. Methods Patients were enrolled in cohorts of escalating IMGN901 doses, administered intravenously, on 3 consecutive days every 21 days. A dose-expansion phase accrued patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), or ovarian cancer. Results Fifty-two patients were treated at doses escalating from 4 to 94 mg/m(2)/day. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was determined to be 75 mg/m(2). Dose-limiting toxicities included fatigue, neuropathy, headache or meningitis-like symptoms, chest pain, dyspnea, and myalgias. In the dose-expansion phase (n = 45), seven patients received 75 mg/m(2) and 38 received 60 mg/m(2) for up to 21 cycles. The recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) was established at 60 mg/m(2) during dose expansion. Overall, treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were experienced by 96.9 % of all patients, the majority of which were Grade 1 or 2. The most commonly reported Grade 3 or 4 TEAEs were hyponatremia and dyspnea (each 8.2 %). Responses included 1 complete response (CR), 1 clinical CR, and 1 unconfirmed partial response (PR) in MCC; and 1 unconfirmed PR in SCLC. Stable disease was seen for 25 % of all evaluable patients who received doses ≥60 mg/m(2). Conclusions The RP2D for IMGN901 of 60 mg/m(2) administered for 3 consecutive days every 3 weeks was associated with an acceptable tolerability profile. Objective responses were observed in patients with advanced CD56+ cancers. PMID:26961907

  15. Human lymphocyte subpopulations. Human thymus-lymphoid tissue (HTL) antigen-positive lymphocytes forming rosettes with sheep erythrocytes and HTL antigen-negative lymphocytes interacting with antigen-antibody-complement complexes

    PubMed Central

    Yata, J.; Tsukimoto, I.; Tachibana, T.

    1973-01-01

    Human lymphocytes from various lymphoid tissues were studied for the relationship between the existence of HTL (human thymus-lymphoid tissue) antigen, and binding of sheep erythrocytes (E) or sheep erythrocyte–antibody-complement complexes (EA(IgM)C43). E adhered to the majority of thymus lymphocytes and formed rosettes. These lymphocytes were shown to be HTL antigen positive by immunofluorescence performed simultaneously. In the peripheral lymphoid tissues, 10–30% of lymphocytes formed E rosettes and almost all E rosette-forming lymphocytes were HTL antigen positive. Conversely HTL antigen-negative cells did not form E rosettes. In contrast, the cells binding EA(IgM)C43 were always HTL antigen negative. There were very few HTL antigen-positive or rosette-forming lymphocytes either with E or EA(IgM)C43 in bone marrow. From these data we conclude that E-rosette-forming and HTL antigen-positive lymphocytes are of thymus origin and EA(IgM)C43-rosette-forming cells are not thymus-dependent cells. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:4579778

  16. Serum Antibodies Positivity to 12 Helicobacter pylori Virulence Antigens in Patients with Benign or Malignant Gastroduodenal Diseases – Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Filipec Kanižaj, Tajana; Katičić, Miroslava; Presečki, Vladimir; Gašparov, Slavko; Colić Cvrlje, Vesna; Kolarić, Branko; Mrzljak, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Aim To investigate the association of gastric histological and endoscopic findings in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), according to presence of seropositivity to 12 bacterial virulence antigens. Methods This is a cross-sectional single-center study of 360 consecutive outpatients referred in the period of one year to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy because of dyspeptic complaints. Patients sera were tested by Western blot method to determine the presence of serum antibodies to bacterial virulence antigens – p120 (CagA – cytotoxin-associated antigen), p95 (VacA – vacuolating cytotoxin), p67 (FSH – flagellar sheath protein), p66 (UreB – urease enzyme heavy subunit), p57 (HSP homologue – heath shock protein homologue), p54 (flagellin), p33, p30 (OMP – outer membrane protein), p29 (UreA – urease enzyme light subunit), p26, p19, and p17. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed, endoscopic diagnosis recorded, and 4 mucosal biopsy samples were obtained and assessed according to Updated Sydney protocol. Results The sera of 207 patients were analyzed. Thirty patients had gastric adenocarcinoma, 126 peptic ulcers, and 51 normal finding. p120 (CagA) seropositivity was significantly more often present in patients with higher activity grade in the antrum (P = 0.025), p30 in patients with greater inflammation in the antrum (P = 0.025) and the corpus (P = 0.010), p33 in patients with greater inflammation in the corpus (P = 0.050), and p19 (OMP) in patients with lower intestinal metaplasia grades in the corpus (P = 0.025). Seroreactivity to all other bacterial proteins showed no association with the histological status of the stomach mucosa. Except for the seropositivity to protein p95 (VacA), which was more often present in patients with duodenal ulcer (P = 0.006), there was no difference in seroreactivity to other bacterial proteins and upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings. Conclusions p120 (CagA), p33, p 30 (OMP), and p19 (OMP) seropositivity was more often present in patients with higher grades of the histological parameters of gastritis and seropositivity to protein p95 (VacA) with endoscopic presence of duodenal ulcer. Histological parameters of gastritis are more associated with bacterial virulence than endoscopic findings. PMID:19399945

  17. Antibodies to the five histones and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) in drug induced lupus: implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, R N; Clayton, A L; Bernstein, R M

    1987-01-01

    Certain drugs are a frequent source of antinuclear antibody (ANA) induction, and ANA is invariably present in the few patients who progress to the drug induced lupus syndrome. This report concerns the fine specificity of the ANA response to hydralazine, penicillamine, and sulphasalazine therapy. Using highly purified individual histones in fluorimetric assays, antihistone antibodies are always detectable, often in large amounts, but the pattern of response to individual histones is variable and not drug specific. In addition to the response to the three histones H1, H2B, and H3 reminiscent of idiopathic systemic lupus erythematosus, antibody to histone H2A predominates in some drug induced cases. Contrary to previous thought, histones are not the sole target of the antinuclear response: we also demonstrate a significant correlation between ANA titre and antibody to poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose). Like the histones, this is a macromolecule that can bind to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). It is proposed that drug induced damage to chromatin leads to ANA production, while drug induced impairment of complement activity may then enable these autoantibodies to mediate the lupus syndrome. PMID:2884934

  18. Antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The antibody molecule is modular and separate domains can be extracted through biochemical or genetic means. It is clear from review of the literature that a wave of novel, antigen-specific molecular forms may soon enter clinical evaluation. This report examines the developmental histories of therapeutics derived from antigen-specific fragments of antibodies produced by recombinant processes. Three general types of fragments were observed, antigen-binding fragments (Fab), single chain variable fragments (scFv) and “third generation” (3G), each representing a successive wave of antibody fragment technology. In parallel, drug developers have explored multi-specificity and conjugation with exogenous functional moieties in all three fragment types. Despite high hopes and an active pipeline, enthusiasm for differentiating performance of fragments should, perhaps, be tempered as there are yet few data that suggest these molecules have distinct clinical properties due only to their size. PMID:20093855

  19. Antibody penetration of viable human cells. I. Increased penetration of human lymphocytes by anti-RNP IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, J; Chapman, G V; Chen, S L; Melick, G; Penny, R; Breit, S N

    1991-01-01

    Antibody penetration of viable cells and interaction with intracellular antigens may have major consequences for immunopathological processes in connective tissue diseases. We have reported previously that antibody can penetrate viable human lymphocytes. To assess further the role of antinuclear antibodies in this process, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBMC) were incubated with FITC-conjugated IgG fractions from sera containing anti-RNP (anti-RNP IgG), Ro(SS-A), La(SS-B) and dsDNA antibodies and control sera for 24 h. Using crystal violet to quench cell surface staining, intracellular fluorescence of viable lymphocytes was quantified on the flow cytometer. It was noted that anti-RNP IgG entered 46.4 +/- 7.2% of lymphocytes which was significantly higher than anti-Ro(SS-A) (29.9 +/- 4.1%, P less than 0.05), La(SS-B) (22.0 +/- 7.5%, P less than 0.01) IgG and control IgG (28.8 +/- 2.1%, P less than 0.05) and not statistically different from anti-dsDNA IgG (32.6 +/- 14.3%). Inhibition experiments showed that the increased number of cells penetrated by anti-RNP IgG was a specific process. Time-course studies showed that anti-RNP IgG entry into cells was different from pooled control IgG. With anti-RNP IgG, positive-staining lymphocytes gradually increased in number from 12 to 24 h incubation, whilst with pooled control IgG, the peak was reached within 5 min. Dual staining experiments suggested that whereas both anti-RNP IgG and pooled control IgG entered B and NK cells, anti-RNP IgG also entered T cells. Using IgG F(ab')2 and Fc fragments from either anti-RNP IgG or pooled control IgG to compete with their FITC-conjugated counterparts indicated that the entry of anti-RNP IgG into-viable cells appeared to involve both F(ab')2 and Fc fragments, and pooled control IgG depended exclusively on the Fc portion of IgG. Further investigation by incubating anti-RNP IgG with 35S-methionine-labelled monocyte-depleted PBMC (MD-PBMC) suggested that anti-RNP IgG might react with the corresponding antigens either on the cell surface or within the cytoplasm. Images Fig. 6 PMID:1901780

  20. Reduced IgG anti-small nuclear ribonucleoprotein autoantibody production in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with positive IgM anti-cytomegalovirus antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Palafox Sánchez, Claudia Azucena; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward KL; Carcamo, Wendy C; Muñoz Valle, José Francisco; Orozco Barocio, Gerardo; Oregon Romero, Edith; Navarro Hernández, Rosa Elena; Salazar Páramo, Mario; Cabral Castañeda, Antonio; Vázquez del Mercado, Mónica

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by production of autoantibodies to RNA or DNA–protein complexes such as small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). A role of Epstein–Barr virus in the pathogenesis has been suggested. Similar to Epstein–Barr virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects the majority of individuals at a young age and establishes latency with a potential for reactivation. Homology of CMV glycoprotein B (UL55) with the U1snRNP-70 kDa protein (U1–70 k) has been described; however, the role of CMV infection in production of anti-snRNPs is controversial. We investigated the association of CMV serology and autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Sixty-one Mexican patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were tested for CMV and Epstein–Barr virus serology (viral capsid antigen, IgG, IgM) and autoantibodies by immunoprecipitation and ELISA (IgG and IgM class, U1RNP/Sm, U1–70 k, P peptide, rheumatoid factor, dsDNA, β2-glycoprotein I). Results IgG anti-CMV and IgM anti-CMV were positive in 95% (58/61) and 33% (20/61), respectively, and two cases were negative for both. Clinical manifestation and autoantibodies in the IgM anti-CMV(+) group (n = 20) versus the IgM anti-CMV(-)IgG (+) (n = 39) group were compared. Most (19/20) of the IgM anti-CMV(+) cases were IgG anti-CMV(+), consistent with reactivation or reinfection. IgM anti-CMV was unrelated to rheumatoid factor or IgM class autoantibodies and none was positive for IgM anti-Epstein–Barr virus–viral capsid antigen, indicating that this is not simply due to false positive results caused by rheumatoid factor or nonspecific binding by certain IgM. The IgM anti-CMV(+) group has significantly lower levels of IgG anti-U1RNP/Sm and IgG anti-U1–70 k (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.0046, respectively). This finding was also confirmed by immunoprecipitation. Among the IgM anti-CMV(-) subset, anti-Su was associated with anti-U1RNP and anti-Ro (P < 0.05). High levels of IgG anti-CMV were associated with production of lupus-related autoantibodies to RNA or DNA–protein complex (P = 0.0077). Conclusions Our findings suggest a potential role of CMV in regulation of autoantibodies to snRNPs and may provide a unique insight to understand the pathogenesis. PMID:19232124

  1. Smoking interacts with HLA-DRB1 shared epitope in the development of anti-citrullinated protein antibody-positive rheumatoid arthritis: results from the Malaysian Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (MyEIRA)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease in which genetic and environmental factors interact in the etiology. In this study, we investigated whether smoking and HLA-DRB1 shared-epitope (SE) alleles interact differently in the development of the two major subgroups of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), anti-citrullinated proteins antibody (ACPA)-positive and ACPA-negative disease, in a multiethnic population of Asian descent. Methods A case-control study comprising early diagnosed RA cases was carried out in Malaysia between 2005 and 2009. In total, 1,076 cases and 1,612 matched controls participated in the study. High-resolution HLA-DRB1 genotyping was performed for shared-epitope (SE) alleles. All participants answered a questionnaire on a broad range of issues, including smoking habits. The odds ratio (OR) of developing ACPA-positive and ACPA-negative disease was calculated for smoking and the presence of any SE alleles separately. Potential interaction between smoking history (defined as "ever" and "never" smoking) and HLA-DRB1 SE alleles also was calculated. Results In our multiethnic study, both the SE alleles and smoking were associated with an increased risk of developing ACPA-positive RA (OR SE alleles, 4.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.6 to 6.2; OR smoking, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.9 to 9.2). SE-positive smokers had an odds ratio of ACPA-positive RA of 25.6 (95% CI, 10.4 to 63.4), compared with SE-negative never-smokers. The interaction between smoking and SE alleles was significant (attributable proportion due to interaction (AP) was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.5 to 1.0)). The HLA-DRB1*04:05 SE allele, which is common in Asian populations, but not among Caucasians, was associated with an increased risk of ACPA-positive RA, and this allele also showed signs of interaction with smoking (AP, 0.4; 95% CI, -0.1 to 0.9). Neither smoking nor SE alleles nor their combination was associated with an increased risk of ACPA-negative RA. Conclusions The risk of developing ACPA-positive RA is associated with a strong gene-environment interaction between smoking and HLA-DRB1 SE alleles in a Malaysian multiethnic population of Asian descent. This interaction seems to apply also between smoking and the specific HLA-DRB1*04:05 SE allele, which is common in Asian populations but not in Caucasians. PMID:22537824

  2. [Catalytic antibodies].

    PubMed

    Baron, D

    1992-01-01

    Catalytic antibodies (catabs) are currently produced by three different methods, by the generation of monoclonal antibodies against transition-state analogs of chemical reactions, by the gene technological establishment of a huge library of antigen binding sites, and by the transplantation of catalytic motifs into the antigen binding site. In addition, catabs can be further refined by chemical modification and in vitro mutagenesis. Disadvantages of the new technology are the mostly empirical production of catabs, the low affinity, and the slow turnover rate. Advantages are the immense variability of the antigen binding site and the potential of general applicability of the technology due to the conserved structure of the antigen binding site. PMID:1552949

  3. Incidence of Rubella Antibodies in Female Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Givan, Kathleen F.; Rozee, K. R.; Rhodes, A. J.

    1965-01-01

    Sera from females aged 1 to 40 years were assayed for rubella virus antibodies. Results showed that by age 14 years, 60% had antibodies and that by 19 years, 70% were positive. This figure rose to 80% by 24 years of age and remained unchanged in older age groups. A comparison of the incidence of high and low levels of antibodies in each age group revealed that antibody levels fell between ages 20 and 40 years. Only 20% of individuals in the latter group had a high antibody level compared to 80% in the former. These results are discussed as they relate to the problems of reinfection and possible vaccination procedures. PMID:14232185

  4. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  5. Trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab

    PubMed Central

    Diermeier-Daucher, Simone; Ortmann, Olaf; Buchholz, Stefan; Brockhoff, Gero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab bivalently targets the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) on epithelial (tumor) cells and the T cell specific CD3 antigen, and its Fc region is selectively recognized by Fc? type I/III receptor-positive immune cells. As a trifunctional immunoglobulin, ertumaxomab therefore not only targets Her2 on cancer cells, but also triggers immunological effector mechanisms mediated by T and accessory cells (e.g., macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells). Whether molecular effects, however, might contribute to the cellular antitumor efficiency of ertumaxomab are largely unknown. Methods: Potential molecular effects of ertumaxomab on Her2-overexpressing BT474 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells were evaluated. The dissociation constant Kd of ertumaxomab was calculated from titration curves that were recorded by flow cytometry. Treatment-induced changes in Her2 homodimerization were determined by flow cytometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements on a cell-by-cell basis. Potential activation / deactivation of Her2, ERK1/2, AKT and STAT3 were analyzed by western blotting, Immunochemistry and immunofluorescent cell staining. Results: The Kd of ertumaxomab for Her2-binding was determined at 265 nM and the ertumaxomab binding epitope was found to not overlap with that of the therapeutic anti-Her2 monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Ertumaxomab caused an increase in Her2 phosphorylation at higher antibody concentrations, but changed neither the rate of Her2-homodimerization /-phosphorylation nor the activation state of key downstream signaling proteins analyzed. Conclusions: The unique mode of action of ertumaxomab, which relies more on activation of immune-mediated mechanisms against tumor cells compared with currently available therapeutic antibodies for breast cancer treatment, suggests that modular or sequential treatment with the trifunctional bivalent antibody might complement the therapeutic activity of other anti-Her2/anti-ErbB receptor reagents. PMID:22820509

  6. Possible role of anti-SSA/Ro antibodies in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Guerreso, Kelsey; Conner, Edward Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There are many different causes of pulmonary hypertension and the pathogenesis of the disease is still being elucidated. Although they are not the most common, autoimmunity and inflammation have been identified as possible causes. No one autoantibody has been identified as the definite cause of pulmonary hypertension. We present a rare association of anti-SSA/Ro antibodies and isolated pulmonary hypertension. Case presentation A 53 year old African American female presented with abdominal pain, nausea, weight loss, dyspnea and fatigue. Upon further exam she was found to have high titers of antinuclear antibodies and anti-SSA/Ro antibodies. This antibody profile would typically be suggestive of Sjögren's Syndrome, which is characterized by dry eyes and poor salivary gland function. However, since this patient did not have any symptoms consistent with the disease a diagnosis of Sjögren's Syndrome could not be made. A combination of laboratory, imaging and diagnostic studies were done that revealed a final diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion It is known that pulmonary hypertension has association with autoimmune diseases, however no clear markers yet exist. Anti-SSA/Ro antibodies have been rarely described in cases of pulmonary disease, and less so in pulmonary hypertension. This case describes a unique association between isolated pulmonary hypertension and anti-SSA/Ro antibody, thereby illustrating the need to investigate this autoantibody and others in the pathogenesis of autoimmune pulmonary hypertension.

  7. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies. PMID:26979754

  8. Aged venous thrombi: radioimmunoimaging with fibrin-specific monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Rosebrough, S.F.; Grossman, Z.D.; McAfee, J.G.; Kudryk, B.J.; Subramanian, G.; Ritter-Hrncirik, C.A.; Witanowski, L.S.; Tillapaugh-Fay, G.; Urrutia, E.

    1987-02-01

    Radioimmunoimaging of fresh canine venous thrombi with a murine monoclonal antibody specific for human and dog fibrin has been reported. Successful imaging of canine deep venous thrombi 1, 3, and 5 days old at the time of antibody injection is reported. Images were positive in all dogs, and the uptake of fibrin-specific antibody was equivalent to that of fresh thrombi.

  9. Antiphospholipid antibodies and infertility.

    PubMed

    Chighizola, C B; de Jesus, G R

    2014-10-01

    Since the late 1980s some publications have proposed that antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) may have some relationship with infertility, considering reported deleterious effects that aPL exert on trophoblast proliferation and growth. Although not included in current classification criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome, many physicians investigate for aPL in patients with a history of infertility, including antibodies not listed in classification criteria, and most of those patients will receive anticoagulant therapy if any of those antibodies have a result considered positive. A review of literature was conducted searching for studies that investigated the association of aPL and infertility and if aPL positivity alters in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome. The definition of infertility, routine work-up to exclude other causes of infertility, definition of IVF failure as inclusion criteria and control populations were heterogeneous among studies. Most of them enrolled women over 40 years of age, and exclusion of other confounding factors was also inconsistent. Of 29 studies that assessed aPL positivity rates in infertile women, the majority had small sample sizes, implying a lack of power, and 13 (44.8%) reported higher frequency of aPL in infertile patients compared to controls, but most of them investigated a panel of non-criteria aPL tests, whose clinical significance is highly controversial. Only two studies investigated all three criteria tests, and medium-high titer of anticardiolipin cut-off conforming to international guidelines was used in one study. Considering IVF outcome, there was also disparity in this definition: few studies assessed the live birth rate, others the implantation rate. Of 14 publications that addressed the relationship between aPL and IVF outcome, only two described a detrimental effect of these autoantibodies. In conclusion, available data do not support an association between aPL and infertility, and aPL positivity does not seem to influence IVF outcome. Well-designed clinical studies recruiting women with a clear diagnosis of infertility and a high-risk aPL profile should be performed to test whether clinically relevant aPL do-or not-exert an effect on human fertility. PMID:25228713

  10. Auto-antibodies and Autoimmune Disease during Treatment of Children with Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Molleston, Jean P.; Mellman, William; Narkewicz, Michael R.; Balistreri, William F.; Gonzalez-Peralta, Regino P.; Jonas, Maureen M.; Lobritto, Steven J.; Mohan, Parvathi; Murray, Karen F.; Njoku, Dolores; Rosenthal, Philip; Barton, Bruce A.; Talor, Monica V.; Cheng, Irene; Schwarz, Kathleen B.; Haber, Barbara A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Auto-antibodies were studied in a well-characterized cohort of children with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) during treatment with PEG-IFN and ribavirin to assess the relationship to treatment and development of autoimmune disease. Methods 114 children (5–17 years), previously screened for the presence of high titer autoantibodies, were randomized to Peg-IFN with or without ribavirin. Anti-nuclear (ANA), anti-liver-kidney-microsomal (LKM), anti-thyroglobulin (TG), anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO), insulin (IA2), anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies were measured after trial completion using frozen sera. Results At baseline,19% had auto-antibodies: ANA (8%), LKM (4%), and GAD (4%). At 24 and 72 weeks (24 weeks after treatment completion), 23% and 26% had auto-antibodies (p=0.50, 0.48 compared to baseline). One child developed diabetes and two hypothyroidism during treatment; none developed autoimmune hepatitis. At 24 weeks, the incidence of flu-like symptoms, gastrointestinal symptoms, and headaches were 42%, 8% and 19% in those with auto-antibodies vs. 52%, 17%, and 26% in those without (p=0.18, 0.36, and 0.20, respectively). In children with negative HCV PCR at 24 weeks, there was no difference in the rate of early virologic response /sustained virologic response respectively in those with auto-antibodies 76%/69%, vs 58%/65% in those without (p=0.48). Conclusions Despite screening, we found autoantibodies commonly at baseline, during treatment for CHC and after. The presence of antibodies did not correlate with viral response, side effects, or autoimmune hepatitis. Neither screening nor archived samples assayed for thyroid and diabetes-related antibodies identified the 3 subjects who developed overt autoimmune disease, diabetes (1) and hypothyroidism (2). PMID:23439301

  11. Genetic deficiency of C4, C2 or C1q and lupus syndromes. Association with anti-Ro (SS-A) antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, O; Hauptmann, G; Tappeiner, G; Ochs, H D; Mascart-Lemone, F

    1985-01-01

    Sera from 15 patients with genetically determined complement component deficiencies were studied for the presence of antibodies to various nuclear antigens. One of three patients with C2 deficiency presented with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); all eight patients with C4 deficiency had either SLE or a lupus-like syndrome, and two of four patients with functional C1q deficiency had SLE. Five of nine complement deficiency patients with SLE studied had measurable antinuclear antibody titres, but only two had antibodies against native DNA. Precipitating antibodies against extractable nuclear antigens were found in sera from seven of the 11 complement deficient patients with SLE; one had only antibodies against antigens extracted from calf thymus (ECT), six patients (one with C2 deficiency, four with C4 deficiency and one with C1q deficiency) had anti-Ro (SS-A) antibodies with or without anti-ECT antibodies. The frequency of anti-Ro antibodies in the complement deficient population with SLE (55%) was significantly higher (P less than 0.02) than that of a control population of SLE patients without genetically determined complement deficiencies (27%). PMID:3878757

  12. Status of antithyroid antibodies in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hasanat, M; Rumi, M; Alam, M; Hasan, K; Salimullah, M; Salam, M; Fariduddin, M; Mahtab, H.; Khan, A

    2000-01-01

    To study autoimmunity among thyroid diseases, 397 thyroid patients (age 30 (13) years; M/F 75/322) from two referral centres in Bangladesh and 94 healthy controls (age 30 (13) years; M/F 24/70) were studied for antimicrosomal and antithyroglobulin antibodies. Thyroid patients were clinically grouped as suspected autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), non-autoimmune, or indeterminate groups (where no decision could be reached). Antimicrosomal antibody was strongly positive in 19.4% and weakly positive in 7.3% of patients but only 4.3% and 2.1% respectively in the controls (χ2 = 17.852; p = 0.000) whereas strong and weak positivity were 27.2% and 6.8% in patients compared with 8.5% and 4.3% respectively in the controls (χ2 = 16.916; p = 0.000) for antithyroglobulin antibody. Antibodies were positive in 63.0% with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, 36.4% with Graves' disease, and 44.7% with atrophic thyroiditis among the autoimmune group. In the non-autoimmune group antibodies were positive in 100% with multinodular hypothyroidism, 46.7% with subacute thyroiditis, 40.0% with suspected iodine deficiency goitre, 31.3% with toxic multinodular goitre, 30.8% with non-toxic solitary nodules, and 19.4% with simple diffuse goitre. None was positive for antimicrosomal antibody without being positive for antithyroglobulin antibody. The two antibodies strongly correlated in both patients (r = 0.977, p = 0.000) and controls (r = 0.986, p = 0.000). About 9% (36/397) of patients were mismatched with the final diagnosis on antibody measurement; most of them had Hashimoto's thyroiditis (33/36). Prevalence of AITD among thyroid patients was 48.36%. Specificity of antimicrosomal and antithyroglobulin antibodies were 93% and 87%. It was concluded that AITD is not uncommon in Bangladesh; antimicrosomal antibody is a useful marker for AITD and unless antibodies are checked, an appreciable number of patients with AITDs will remain undetected.


Keywords: thyroid autoimmunity; diagnostic dilemma PMID:10824048

  13. Rotaviral antibodies in cow's milk.

    PubMed

    Lecce, J G; King, M W

    1982-10-01

    In the past, it has been reported that neonatal diets made from unheated cow's milk were superior to those made from heated cow's milk. It was observed that piglets were equally protected from rotaviral diarrhea when they were fed diets made from either unheated milk that came from a cow immunized against porcine rotavirus or from a cow that was not immunized. Because of this observation, we examined four pools of "normal" cows' colostrum and 58 samples of "normal" cow's milk for the presence of antibody to rotavirus. All pools of colostrum, collected in four different years, had immunofluorescent antibody titers of 1:100 to rotavirus. Seventy-two percent of the samples of milk were also positive--titer no higher than 1:10. Antibodies to rotavirus were found in cow's milk at a creamery prior to but not after pasteurization. Rotaviral antibodies were detected in one out of eight brands of milk bought at the market--perhaps indicating inadequate pasteurization for this brand. These results support the proposition that, at least in part, unheated milk is superior to heated milk because unheated milk contains antibody to an ubiquitous enteropathogen like rotavirus. PMID:6293690

  14. Cross-reactive and pre-existing antibodies to therapeutic antibodies--Effects on treatment and immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    van Schie, Karin A; Wolbink, Gerrit-Jan; Rispens, Theo

    2015-01-01

    The potential for immunogenicity is an ever-present concern during the development of biopharmaceuticals. Therapeutic antibodies occasionally elicit an antibody response in patients, which can result in loss of response or adverse effects. However, antibodies that bind a drug are sometimes found in pre-treatment serum samples, with the amount depending on drug, assay, and patient population. This review summarizes published data on pre-existing antibodies to therapeutic antibodies, including rheumatoid factors, anti-allotype antibodies, anti-hinge antibodies, and anti-glycan antibodies. Unlike anti-idiotype antibodies elicited by the drug, pre-formed antibodies in general appear to have little consequences during treatment. In the few cases where (potential) clinical consequences were encountered, antibodies were characterized and found to bind a distinct, unusual epitope of the therapeutic. Immunogenicity testing strategies should therefore always include a proper level of antibody characterization, especially when pre-formed antibodies are present. This minimizes false-positives, particularly due to rheumatoid factors, and helps to judge the potential threat in case a genuine pre-dose antibody reactivity is identified. PMID:25962087

  15. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... rye and barley that are generically known as “gluten.” Antibody Testing: Only A First Step To help ...

  16. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome? Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody ... weeks or months. This condition is called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). People who have APS also are at ...

  17. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  18. Prevalence of anticardiolipin antibodies in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Caporali, R; Ravelli, A; De Gennaro, F; Neirotti, G; Montecucco, C; Martini, A

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of anticardiolipin antibodies was evaluated in 70 children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), in 25 adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis, in 42 healthy children and in 40 adult controls. Thirty seven (53%) patients with JCA were positive for IgG or IgM anticardiolipin antibodies, or both, and 30 (43%) for IgG anticardiolipin antibodies. In contrast, only seven (28%) adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis presented anticardiolipin antibodies, which were of IgG class in four (16%) cases. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies were negative in all control subjects while IgM anticardiolipin antibodies were detected in two (5%) children and in four (10%) adult controls. No correlations were found in patients with JCA between the presence or titres of anticardiolipin antibodies and various clinical or laboratory variables. No patient with anticardiolipin antibodies showed any feature of the anticardiolipin syndrome. PMID:1929580

  19. Coeliac Disease-Associated Antibodies in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Akbulut, Sabiye; Gür, Günes; Topal, Firdevs; Topal, Fatih Esad; Alli, Nuran; Saritas, Ülkü

    2013-01-01

    Background The possible relationship between psoriasis and coeliac disease (CD) has been attributed to the common pathogenic mechanisms of the two diseases and the presence of antigliadin antibodies in patients has been reported to increase the incidence of CD. Objective The aim of this report was to study CD-associated antibodies serum antigliadin antibody immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IgG, anti-endomysial antibody IgA and anti-transglutaminase antibody IgA and to demonstrate whether there is an increase in the frequency of those markers of CD in patients with psoriasis. Methods Serum antigliadin antibody IgG and IgA, antiendomysial antibody IgA and anti-transglutaminase antibody IgA were studied in 37 (19 males) patients with psoriasis and 50 (23 males) healthy controls. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal biopsies were performed in patients with at least one positive marker. Results Antigliadin IgA was statistically higher in the psoriasis group than in the controls (p<0.05). Serological markers were found positive in 6 patients with psoriasis and 1 person from the control group. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed in all these persons, with biopsies collected from the duodenum. The diagnosis of CD was reported in only one patient with psoriasis following the pathological examination of the biopsies. Whereas one person of the control group was found to be positive for antigliadin antibody IgA, pathological examination of the duodenal biopsies obtain from this patient were found to be normal. Conclusion Antigliadin IgA prominently increases in patients diagnosed with psoriasis. Patients with psoriasis should be investigated for latent CD and should be followed up. PMID:24003271

  20. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23149338

  1. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  2. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  3. Autoimmune encephalitis: Clinical diagnosis versus antibody confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Cyril, Asha Caroline; Nair, Sruthi S.; Mathai, Annamma; Kannoth, Sudheeran; Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune encephalitis is a heterogeneous disorder which is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. The diagnosis of these disorders is based on the detection of autoantibodies and characteristic clinical profiles. Aims: We aimed to study the antibody profile in encephalitis patients with suspected autoimmune etiology presenting to a tertiary care center. Settings and Design: The subjects were selected by screening all patients with clinical profile suggesting autoimmune encephalitis admitted in the neuromedical intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care center in South India. Materials and Methods: Patients who fulfilled modified Zuliani et al.'s, criteria for autoimmune encephalitis were identified during the period December 2009–June 2013. Blood samples from these subjects were screened for six neuronal antibodies. Statistical analysis used: Chi-square test was applied to compare the antibody positive and negative patients. Results: Out of 1,227 patients screened, 39 subjects (14 males: 25 females) were identified with a mean age of 15.95 years and 19 cases were assessed in the acute and 20 in the convalescent phase of the illness. Seizure (87.8 %) was the most common presenting symptom; status epilepticus occurred in 23 (60.5%) patients during the course of the illness. Fourteen (35.9%) patients were N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibody-positive and all were negative for the other antibodies tested. Conclusions: One-third of patients presenting with acute noninfective encephalitis would be positive for NMDAR antibodies with the remaining two-thirds with clinically suspected autoimmune encephalitis being antibody-negative. There are few markers in the clinical and investigative profiles to distinguish antibody-positive and -negative patients. PMID:26713011

  4. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  5. Synthetic antibody libraries focused towards peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    Cobaugh, Christian W; Almagro, Juan C; Pogson, Mark; Iverson, Brent; Georgiou, George

    2008-05-01

    Synthetic antibody libraries have proven immensely useful for the de novo isolation of antibodies without the need for animal immunization. Recently, focused libraries designed to recognize particular classes of ligands, such as haptens or proteins, have been employed to facilitate the selection of high-affinity antibodies. Focused libraries are built using V regions encoding combinations of canonical structures that resemble the structural features of antibodies that bind the desired class of ligands and sequence diversity is introduced at residues typically involved in recognition. Here we describe the generation and experimental validation of two different single-chain antibody variable fragment libraries that efficiently generate binders to peptides, a class of molecules that has proven to be a difficult target for antibody generation. First, a human anti-peptide library was constructed by diversifying a scaffold: the human variable heavy chain (V(H)) germ line gene 3-23, which was fused to a variant of the human variable light chain (V(L)) germ line gene A27, in which L1 was modified to encode the canonical structure found in anti-peptide antibodies. The sequence diversity was introduced into 3-23 (V(H)) only, targeting for diversification residues commonly found in contact with protein and peptide antigens. Second, a murine library was generated using the antibody 26-10, which was initially isolated based on its affinity to the hapten digoxin, but also binds peptides and exhibits a canonical structure pattern typical of anti-peptide antibodies. Diversity was introduced in the V(H) only using the profile of amino acids found at positions that frequently contact peptide antigens. Both libraries yielded binders to two model peptides, angiotensin and neuropeptide Y, following screening by solution phage panning. The mouse library yielded antibodies with affinities below 20 nM to both targets, although only the V(H) had been subjected to diversification. PMID:18384812

  6. Naturally occurring antibodies against Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, L E; Wu, M; Enkel, H; Young, L S

    1989-01-01

    Serum obtained from 57 healthy individuals and patients admitted to the hospital owing to diverse pathological causes, as well as serum from seven patients with AIDS and disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, were studied to determine the prevalence of IgG and IgM antibodies against surface proteins of M. avium complex. Immunodot assay to detect serum positivity against MAC and Western Blot technique in order to determine the MAC antigens eliciting antibody production were performed. Sera from 89 percent and 81 percent of the non-AIDS population had IgG and IgM antibodies against MAC antigens, respectively. In contrast, 43 percent and 71 percent of the AIDS population had IgG and IgM antibodies against MAC antigens, respectively, in the serum. To define further the antigens recognized by these naturally occurring antibodies, the serum of 14 non-AIDS and four acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients were studied. Multiple antigens of MAC, with molecular weight ranging from 10 to 95 kilodaltons were recognized by IgG and IgM antibodies present in the sera. The IgM type antibodies were shown to react mainly against 10 kilodalton and 31 kilodalton antigenic protein, while the IgG type antibodies were produced mainly against the 10, 31, and 65 kilodalton proteins. Although the pattern of reaction was consistent between non-AIDS and AIDS populations, IgM antibodies were not detected against the 10 kilodalton protein nor were IgG antibodies detected against the 31 kilodalton protein in the AIDS population. PMID:2690731

  7. Nephropathia epidemica in Norway: antigen and antibodies in rodent reservoirs and antibodies in selected human populations.

    PubMed Central

    Traavik, T.; Sommer, A. I.; Mehl, R.; Berdal, B. P.; Stavem, K.; Hunderi, O. H.; Dalrymple, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Nephropathia epidemica (NE) antigen was detected by IFAT (indirect fluorescent antibody technique) in the lungs of 14 of 97 bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) collected in three endemic areas. The distribution of antigen positive voles within an endemic location was scattered. Antibodies to Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) virus antigens were detected by IFAT in 12 of 14 NE antigen positive bank voles and in 15 of 83 that were antigen negative. NE antigen positive voles exhibited higher antibody titres. Antibodies to KHF were demonstrated in sera from C. rutilus and C. rufocanus collected more than 200 km north of the distribution area for C. glareolus. It appears likely that these vole species can serve as virus vectors for NE cases occurring north of the bank vole area. NE antibodies cross-reacting with KHF virus seem to diminish with time after infection in some NE patients, while for others such cross-reacting antibodies were detected up to 12 years after the disease. Antibodies to KHF were detected in eight of 106 healthy forestry workers with no clinical history of NE. No serological cross-reactions were detected between NE/KHF antigens and representative Bunyaviridae present in Norway. NE/KHF-like viruses appear widespread in Norway, both within and outside of the distribution area of the bank vole. PMID:6146649

  8. Have we overestimated the benefit of human(ized) antibodies?

    PubMed Central

    Getts, Meghann T; McCarthy, Derrick P; Chastain, Emily ML; Miller, Stephen D

    2010-01-01

    The infusion of animal-derived antibodies has been known for some time to trigger the generation of antibodies directed at the foreign protein as well as adverse events including cytokine release syndrome. These immunological phenomena drove the development of humanized and fully human monoclonal antibodies. The ability to generate human(ized) antibodies has been both a blessing and a curse. While incremental gains in the clinical efficacy and safety for some agents have been realized, a positive effect has not been observed for all human(ized) antibodies. Many human(ized) antibodies trigger the development of anti-drug antibody responses and infusion reactions. The current belief that antibodies need to be human(ized) to have enhanced therapeutic utility may slow the development of novel animal-derived monoclonal antibody therapeutics for use in clinical indications. In the case of murine antibodies, greater than 20% induce tolerable/negligible immunogenicity, suggesting that in these cases humanization may not offer significant gains in therapeutic utility. Furthermore, humanization of some murine antibodies may reduce their clinical effectiveness. The available data suggest that the utility of human(ized) antibodies needs to be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, taking a cost-benefit approach, taking both biochemical characteristics and the targeted therapeutic indication into account. PMID:20935511

  9. Method for altering antibody light chain interactions

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.; Stevens, Priscilla Wilkins; Raffen, Rosemarie; Schiffer, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    A method for recombinant antibody subunit dimerization including modifying at least one codon of a nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in the interface segment of the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a first polarity; and modifying at least one codon of the nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in an interface segment of the heavy polypeptide variable region corresponding to a position in the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a second polarity opposite the first polarity. Nucleic acid sequences which code for novel light chain proteins, the latter of which are used in conjunction with the inventive method, are also provided.

  10. Passive West Nile virus antibody transfer from maternal Eastern Screech-Owls (Megascops asio) to progeny

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hahn, D.C.; Nemeth, N.M.; Edwards, E.; Bright, P.R.; Komar, N.

    2006-01-01

    Transovarial antibody transfer in owls has not been demonstrated for West Nile virus (WNV). We sampled chicks from captive adult WNV-antibody-positive Eastern Screech-Owls (Megascops asio) to evaluate the prevalence of transovarial maternal antibody transfer, as well as titers and duration of maternal antibodies. Twenty-four owlets aged 1 to 27 days old circulated detectable antibodies with neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 20 to 1600 (median 1:40). Demonstrating that WNV antibodies are passively transferred transovarially is important for accurate interpretation of serologic data from young birds.

  11. New haptens and antibodies for ractopamine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanhui; Liu, Meixuan; Shi, Weimin; Li, Chenglong; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-09-15

    In this work, three unreported immunizing haptens of ractopamine (RAC) were synthesized and used to produce highly sensitive and specific polyclonal antibody. The spacer arms of haptens for coupling to protein carrier were located on different position of RAC with different length. High affinity polyclonal antibodies were obtained and characterized in terms of titer and sensitivity by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The best antibody employed in a heterologous competitive ELISA exhibited an IC50 value as low as 0.12ngmL(-1) and could not recognize other 10 β-agonists including clenbuterol and salbutamol. The heterologous competitive ELISA was preliminary applied to swine urine and the results showed the new antibody was sufficiently sensitive and specific, and potentially used for the detection of RAC at trace level in real samples. PMID:25863617

  12. NEW GLIOMA-ASSOCIATED AUTO-ANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Fueyo, Juan; Conrad, Charles; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Yung, WK Alfred; Tufaro, Frank; Lang, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that the immune system can recognize the antigenic changes in cancer cells, and further develop autoantibodies against these tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Therefore, these cancer-associated autoantibodies might be used to identify the antigenic changes of cellular proteins involved in the transformation process. Antibodies to tumor antigens have advantages over other serum proteins as potential cancer biomarkers as they are highly specific and easily identified with high quality secondary reagents. Currently, there is a paucity of studies on autoantibodies against TAAs in gliomas. Here we examined the antibodies against TAAs in a Phase I clinical trial of patients with recurrent gliomas treated with the intratumoral injection of Delta-24-RGD oncolytic adenovirus (Fred Lang, Neurosurgery, MDACC, Director of the Trial). METHODS: Sera from 37 patients were analysed before the administration of Delta-24-RGD and then at several time points after the administration of the adenovirus. A solid phase-modified ELISA was used to assess antibodies against the following 31 antigens: BRAF, CABYR, CRISP3, CSAG2, DHFR, FHLT17, GAGE1, LDHC, MAGEA1, MAGEA3, MAGEA4, MAGEB6, MAPK1, MUC1, NLRP4, NYESO1, p53, PBK, PRAME, SOX2, SPANXA1,SSX2, TSGA10, TSSK6, TULP2, XAGE2, ZNF165. Expression of the proteins in tumors was confirmed using western blot and/or immunohistochemistry. Data were the result of at least two independent experiments. RESULTS: 1. The majority of the patients with recurrent gliomas harbor antibodies against TAAs. 2. The titer of antibodies against TAAs drastically decreased after total resection of the tumor. 3. After surgery the antibodies became again detectable predicting relapse. 4. 80% of patients' sera have antibodies against cancer testis antigens including NYESO1 and MAGE. 5. 60% of the patients showed antibodies against MAGEA1 o MAGEA3. 6. 40% of patients were positive for NYESO1 antibodies. 7. A small percentage of patients have antibodies against BRAF or SOX2. CONCLUSIONS: We report for the first time a systematic analysis of cancer-associated antibodies in patients with recurrent gliomas treated with oncolytic adenoviruses. As illustrated in this study, the serological screening of patients using solid phase ELISA for well characterized antigens offers new opportunities for analyzing the repertoire of the humoral immune response to human gliomas. Many of the listed antibodies were never analyzed before in gliomas. More intensive screening of patients after surgery may include frequent antibody screening (i.e. every 3–6 months) as an adjunct to serial MRIs. Of further clinical relevance several of the cancer/testis antigens identified are promising targets for cancer vaccines. SECONDARY CATEGORY: Tumor Biology.

  13. Antibodies to β adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Loebel, Madlen; Grabowski, Patricia; Heidecke, Harald; Bauer, Sandra; Hanitsch, Leif G; Wittke, Kirsten; Meisel, Christian; Reinke, Petra; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Fluge, Øystein; Mella, Olav; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    Infection-triggered disease onset, chronic immune activation and autonomic dysregulation in CFS point to an autoimmune disease directed against neurotransmitter receptors. Autoantibodies against G-protein coupled receptors were shown to play a pathogenic role in several autoimmune diseases. Here, serum samples from a patient cohort from Berlin (n=268) and from Bergen with pre- and post-treatment samples from 25 patients treated within the KTS-2 rituximab trial were analysed for IgG against human α and β adrenergic, muscarinic (M) 1-5 acetylcholine, dopamine, serotonin, angiotensin, and endothelin receptors by ELISA and compared to a healthy control cohort (n=108). Antibodies against β2, M3 and M4 receptors were significantly elevated in CFS patients compared to controls. In contrast, levels of antibodies against α adrenergic, dopamine, serotonin, angiotensin, and endothelin receptors were not different between patients and controls. A high correlation was found between levels of autoantibodies and elevated IgG1-3 subclasses, but not with IgG4. Further patients with high β2 antibodies had significantly more frequently activated HLA-DR+ T cells and more frequently thyreoperoxidase and anti-nuclear antibodies. In patients receiving rituximab maintenance treatment achieving prolonged B-cell depletion, elevated β2 and M4 receptor autoantibodies significantly declined in clinical responder, but not in non-responder. We provide evidence that 29.5% of patients with CFS had elevated antibodies against one or more M acetylcholine and β adrenergic receptors which are potential biomarkers for response to B-cell depleting therapy. The association of autoantibodies with immune markers suggests that they activate B and T cells expressing β adrenergic and M acetylcholine receptors. Dysregulation of acetylcholine and adrenergic signalling could also explain various clinical symptoms of CFS. PMID:26399744

  14. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D’Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew RM

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  15. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to

  16. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  17. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  18. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  19. Antibodies as effectors.

    PubMed

    Corbeil, L B

    2002-09-10

    Antibodies are critical in protection against extracellular microbial pathogens. Although antibodies also play a role in transplant/tumor rejection and in autoimmune disease, this paper focuses on defense against bovine infections. Effector mechanisms of different bovine isotypes, subisotypes and allotypes are discussed. The importance of antigen specificity is also stressed. PMID:12072231

  20. Antibodies in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expression of antibodies in plants has several promising applications that are currently being developed. Plants are being considered for the large scale production of antibodies needed for medical purposes. The benefit of using plants is that they are able to perform post-translational modifi...

  1. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  2. Antibodies for biodefense

    PubMed Central

    Froude, Jeffrey W; Stiles, Bradley; Pelat, Thibaut

    2011-01-01

    Potential bioweapons are biological agents (bacteria, viruses and toxins) at risk of intentional dissemination. Biodefense, defined as development of therapeutics and vaccines against these agents, has seen an increase, particularly in the US, following the 2001 anthrax attack. This review focuses on recombinant antibodies and polyclonal antibodies for biodefense that have been accepted for clinical use. These antibodies aim to protect against primary potential bioweapons or category A agents as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, botulinum neurotoxins, smallpox virus and certain others causing viral hemorrhagic fevers) and certain category B agents. Potential for prophylactic use is presented, as well as frequent use of oligoclonal antibodies or synergistic effect with other molecules. Capacities and limitations of antibodies for use in biodefense are discussed, and are generally applicable to the field of infectious diseases. PMID:22123065

  3. Development of monoclonal antibodies suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Chander, Vishal; Singh, R P; Verma, P C

    2012-12-01

    The control of an infectious viral disease as rabies is made easier by rapid and accurate diagnosis. Successful rabies prophylaxis is dependent upon the active immunization with vaccine along with passive administration of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies which together clear the virus before widespread infection of central nervous system occurs. The present study aimed at the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection. For the production of rabies specific MAbs, immunization of Swiss albino mice with a commercially available vaccine was done and Polyethylene glycol mediated fusion of spleenocytes with myeloma cells was performed. The positive clones were selected on the basis of distinct reactivity by cell Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence in Indirect Fluorescent antibody test. The positive clones obtained were subjected to single cell cloning by limiting dilution method. The reactive clones were further titrated and employed for virus titration and virus neutralization. The neutralizing activity was evaluated using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter technique. Three MAb clones showed a distinct percent inhibition in the presence of positive serum. One of the MAb clone No. 5C3 was relatively more specific in detecting rabies antibodies and also found suitable for competitive ELISA to assess the antibody level in vaccinated subjects. PMID:24293819

  4. Familial autoimmune myasthenia gravis with different pathogenetic antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Provenzano, C; Arancio, O; Evoli, A; Rocca, B; Bartoccioni, E; de Grandis, D; Tonali, P

    1988-01-01

    Two cases of familial myasthenia gravis are reported. One patient is a typical case of autoimmune myasthenia with positive anti acetylcholine receptor antibodies, while in the second patient the impairment of neuromuscular transmission is likely to be due to antibodies directed against determinants other than the acetylcholine receptors. PMID:3225607

  5. Antibody discovery: sourcing of monoclonal antibody variable domains.

    PubMed

    Strohl, William R

    2014-03-01

    Historically, antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies have been sourced primarily from the mouse IgG repertoire, and typically either chimerized or humanized. More recently, human antibodies from transgenic mice producing human IgG, phage display libraries, and directly from human B lymphocytes have been used more broadly as sources of antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies. Of the total 36 antibodies approved by major maket regulatory agencies, the variable domain sequences of 26 originate from the mouse. Of these, four are marketed as murine antibodies (of which one is a mouse-rat hybrid IgG antibody), six are mouse-human chimeric antibodies, and 16 are humanized. Ten marketed antibodies have originated from human antibody genes, three isolated from phage libraries of human antibody genes and seven from transgenic mice producing human antibodies. Five antibodies currently in clinical trials have been sourced from camelids, as well as two from non-human primates, one from rat, and one from rabbit. Additional sources of antibody variable domains that may soon find their way into the clinic are potential antibodies from sharks and chickens. Finally, the various methods for retrieval of antibodies from humans, mouse and other sources, including various display technologies and amplification directly from B cells, are described. PMID:24168292

  6. Blue-fluorescent antibodies.

    PubMed

    Simeonov, A; Matsushita, M; Juban, E A; Thompson, E H; Hoffman, T Z; Beuscher, A E; Taylor, M J; Wirsching, P; Rettig, W; McCusker, J K; Stevens, R C; Millar, D P; Schultz, P G; Lerner, R A; Janda, K D

    2000-10-13

    The forte of catalytic antibodies has resided in the control of the ground-state reaction coordinate. A principle and method are now described in which antibodies can direct the outcome of photophysical and photochemical events that take place on excited-state potential energy surfaces. The key component is a chemically reactive optical sensor that provides a direct report of the dynamic interplay between protein and ligand at the active site. To illustrate the concept, we used a trans-stilbene hapten to elicit a panel of monoclonal antibodies that displayed a range of fluorescent spectral behavior when bound to a trans-stilbene substrate. Several antibodies yielded a blue fluorescence indicative of an excited-state complex or "exciplex" between trans-stilbene and the antibody. The antibodies controlled the isomerization coordinate of trans-stilbene and dynamically coupled this manifold with an active-site residue. A step was taken toward the use of antibody-based photochemical sensors for diagnostic and clinical applications. PMID:11030644

  7. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  8. Blue-Fluorescent Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Anton; Matsushita, Masayuki; Juban, Eric A.; Thompson, Elizabeth H. Z.; Hoffman, Timothy Z.; Beuscher, Albert E.; Taylor, Matthew J.; Wirsching, Peter; Rettig, Wolfgang; McCusker, James K.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Millar, David P.; Schultz, Peter G.; Lerner, Richard A.; Janda, Kim D.

    2000-10-01

    The forte of catalytic antibodies has resided in the control of the ground-state reaction coordinate. A principle and method are now described in which antibodies can direct the outcome of photophysical and photochemical events that take place on excited-state potential energy surfaces. The key component is a chemically reactive optical sensor that provides a direct report of the dynamic interplay between protein and ligand at the active site. To illustrate the concept, we used a trans-stilbene hapten to elicit a panel of monoclonal antibodies that displayed a range of fluorescent spectral behavior when bound to a trans-stilbene substrate. Several antibodies yielded a blue fluorescence indicative of an excited-state complex or ``exciplex'' between trans-stilbene and the antibody. The antibodies controlled the isomerization coordinate of trans-stilbene and dynamically coupled this manifold with an active-site residue. A step was taken toward the use of antibody-based photochemical sensors for diagnostic and clinical applications.

  9. Granulocyte Antibodies in Korean Neonates with Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Chey, Myoung-Jae; Han, Kyou Sup

    2006-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune neutropenia (NAN) is a disease that can cause severe and prolonged neutropenia in neonates. However, no report is available on the incidence of granulocyte antibody in neonates, the target antigen of this antibody, and the estimated incidence of NAN in Korea. Among a total of 856 neonates admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) over a five year period, a total of 105 neonates with neutropenia were enrolled in this study. Positive reactions were observed in the sera of six neonates (5.7%, 6/105) by mixed passive hemagglutination assay (MPHA). To confirm the presence of NAN, MPHA and granulocyte antigen typing (HNA-1a, -1b, -2a, -4a, and -5a) were performed on neonatal and maternal blood. To differentiate granulocyte antibody and HLA antibody, MPHA was also performed using HLA antibody adsorbed serum. We confirmed three cases (2.9%, 3/105) of NAN among neonates with neutropenia in which granulocyte antibody specificities (two anti-HNA-1b and one anti-HNA-1a) and fetomaternal granulocyte antigen mismatches were identified. In this study, the estimated incidence of NAN was 0.35% (3/856) among neonates admitted to NICUs in Korea. PMID:16891804

  10. A Highly Conserved Residue of the HIV-1 gp120 Inner Domain Is Important for Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Responses Mediated by Anti-cluster A Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shilei; Veillette, Maxime; Coutu, Mathieu; Prévost, Jérémie; Scharf, Louise; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Ferrari, Guido; Robinson, James E; Stürzel, Christina; Hahn, Beatrice H; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank; Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena; Finzi, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sera from HIV-1-infected individuals contain antibodies able to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). These antibodies preferentially recognize envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitopes induced upon CD4 binding. Here, we show that a highly conserved tryptophan at position 69 of the gp120 inner domain is important for ADCC mediated by anti-cluster A antibodies and sera from HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:26637462

  11. Heart antibodies in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Trueman, T; Thompson, R A; Cummins, P; Littler, W A

    1981-01-01

    The reported frequency of circulating heart reactive antibodies in cardiomyopathies has varied and their significance is unknown. In this study such antibodies were sought in patients with primary congestive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies and other heart diseases. Standard "single sandwich" and the more sensitive "double sandwich" indirect immunofluorescence techniques failed to disclose a significant difference between any cardiomyopathic group and controls in repeated experiments. With both techniques results were subject to considerable method-specific artefacts and observer variation. No published work associating heart antibodies detected by immunofluorescence methods with cariomyopathies adequately takes these into account. PMID:7028058

  12. Fluorescence intensity positivity classification of Hep-2 cells images using fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazali, Dayang Farzana Abang; Janier, Josefina Barnachea; May, Zazilah Bt.

    2014-10-01

    Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) is a good standard used for antinuclear autoantibody (ANA) test using Hep-2 cells to determine specific diseases. Different classifier algorithm methods have been proposed in previous works however, there still no valid set as a standard to classify the fluorescence intensity. This paper presents the use of fuzzy logic to classify the fluorescence intensity and to determine the positivity of the Hep-2 cell serum samples. The fuzzy algorithm involves the image pre-processing by filtering the noises and smoothen the image, converting the red, green and blue (RGB) color space of images to luminosity layer, chromaticity layer "a" and "b" (LAB) color space where the mean value of the lightness and chromaticity layer "a" was extracted and classified by using fuzzy logic algorithm based on the standard score ranges of antinuclear autoantibody (ANA) fluorescence intensity. Using 100 data sets of positive and intermediate fluorescence intensity for testing the performance measurements, the fuzzy logic obtained an accuracy of intermediate and positive class as 85% and 87% respectively.

  13. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  14. Which antibody and which cancer in which paraneoplastic syndromes?

    PubMed

    Gozzard, Paul; Maddison, Paul

    2010-10-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes can be associated with the presence of onconeural antibodies. These antibodies are the result of an immune response against a tumour that is ectopically expressing a neuronal antigen. The 'classical' onconeural antibodies (anti-Hu, Yo, Ma2, CRMP-5, amphiphysin and Ri) are directed against intracellular antigens and are strongly associated with underlying malignancy. By contrast, onconeural antibodies directed against cell surface antigens (eg, anti-NMDA, VGKC, AChR) have a weaker tumour association. This article gives a practical overview of the tumour associations, and the neurological associations, of the onconeural antibodies. There is also guidance on how to investigate occult malignancy in antibody positive cases. PMID:20858627

  15. Republished: Which antibody and which cancer in which paraneoplastic syndromes?

    PubMed

    Gozzard, Paul; Maddison, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes can be associated with the presence of onconeural antibodies. These antibodies are the result of an immune response against a tumour that is ectopically expressing a neuronal antigen. The 'classical' onconeural antibodies (anti-Hu, Yo, Ma2, CRMP-5, amphiphysin and Ri) are directed against intracellular antigens and are strongly associated with underlying malignancy. By contrast, onconeural antibodies directed against cell surface antigens (eg, anti-NMDA, VGKC, AChR) have a weaker tumour association. This article gives a practical overview of the tumour associations, and the neurological associations, of the onconeural antibodies. There is also guidance on how to investigate occult malignancy in antibody positive cases. PMID:21173051

  16. Generation of neutralising antibodies against porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaulitz, Danny; Fiebig, Uwe; Eschricht, Magdalena; Wurzbacher, Christian; Kurth, Reinhard; Denner, Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies neutralising porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) were induced in different animal species by immunisation with the transmembrane envelope protein p15E. These antibodies recognised epitopes, designated E1, in the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) of p15E, and E2 in the membrane proximal external region (MPER). E2 is localised in a position similar to that of an epitope in the transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), recognised by the monoclonal antibody 4E10 that is broadly neutralising. To detect neutralising antibodies specific for PERV, a novel assay was developed, which is based on quantification of provirus integration by real-time PCR. In addition, for the first time, highly effective neutralising antibodies were obtained by immunisation with the surface envelope protein of PERV. These data indicate that neutralising antibodies can be induced by immunisation with both envelope proteins.

  17. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  18. Encephalitozoon cuniculi in rabbits in Germany: prevalence and sensitivity of antibody testing.

    PubMed

    Hein, J; Flock, U; Sauter-Louis, C; Hartmann, K

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Encephalitozoon cuniculi antibodies in healthy and diseased rabbits in Germany. Age and gender dependencies were taken into consideration. The sensitivity of the E cuniculi antibody test and its relevance for the diagnosis of E cuniculi infection in rabbits was also examined. A total of 773 healthy and diseased rabbits were tested for E cuniculi antibodies (indirect immune fluorescence antibody test (IFAT) or carbon immunoassay (CIA). No differences between diseased and healthy rabbits were observed with regard to gender, but diseased rabbits were significantly older (P>0.001). Forty-three percent (336/773) of all rabbits were positive for E cuniculi antibodies. Of the diseased rabbits, 48 per cent (266/555) were positive for E cuniculi antibodies. While 96 per cent (91/95) of the rabbits with histopathologically or PCR confirmed encephalitozoonosis were E cuniculi antibody-positive, only 60 per cent (144/241) of the rabbits suspected of E cuniculi infection were antibody-positive. Of the healthy rabbits, 18 per cent (39/218) were positive for E cuniculi antibodies. Diseased rabbits were almost three times more likely to be E cuniculi antibody-positive than healthy ones (P>0.001; relative risk (RR): 2.68; 95% CI 1.99 to 3.61). The sensitivity of the E cuniculi antibody test was 96 per cent. PMID:24570403

  19. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Global Sites Search Help? Heparin-induced Thrombocytopenia PF4 Antibody Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Heparin-PF4 Antibody; HIT Antibody; HIT PF4 Antibody; Heparin Induced Antibody; ...

  20. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  1. Environmental origin of natural antibodies to teichoic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Rozmiarek, H; Bolton, R W; Chorpenning, F W

    1977-01-01

    In an effort to determine the origin of natural antibodies to teichoic acid, rats were fed a sterile liquid diet free of detectable teichoic acid and virtually free of gram-positive bacteria. Both germ-free and conventional Sprague-Dawley rats raised on this diet failed to produce antibodies to polyglycerophosphate, whereas 100% of their counterparts fed the usual teichoic acid-containing diet did produce these antibodies. The intestinal flora was similar in both groups of animals. When the test animals were immunized intraperitoneally or orally with gram-positive bacteria, 100% displayed immunocompetency by producing significant levels of antibody. These results demonstrate the environmental nature of the antigenic stimulus for these antibodies and suggest the importance of food as the major source of stimulation. The experimental model described here furnishes a valuable tool for studies of immunologic responses where a single known specificity and a controlled system would be advantageous. PMID:863512

  2. Antibody Titer Has Positive Predictive Value for Vaccine Protection against Challenge with Natural Antigenic-Drift Variants of H5N1 High-Pathogenicity Avian Influenza Viruses from Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, David L.; Spackman, Erica; Jadhao, Samadhan; Dauphin, Gwenaelle; Kim-Torchetti, Mia; McGrane, James; Weaver, John; Daniels, Peter; Wong, Frank; Selleck, Paul; Wiyono, Agus; Indriani, Risa; Yupiana, Yuni; Sawitri Siregar, Elly; Prajitno, Teguh; Smith, Derek; Fouchier, Ron

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vaccines are used in integrated control strategies to protect poultry against H5N1 high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI). H5N1 HPAI was first reported in Indonesia in 2003, and vaccination was initiated in 2004, but reports of vaccine failures began to emerge in mid-2005. This study investigated the role of Indonesian licensed vaccines, specific vaccine seed strains, and emerging variant field viruses as causes of vaccine failures. Eleven of 14 licensed vaccines contained the manufacturer's listed vaccine seed strains, but 3 vaccines contained a seed strain different from that listed on the label. Vaccines containing A/turkey/Wisconsin/1968 (WI/68), A/chicken/Mexico/28159-232/1994 (Mex/94), and A/turkey/England/N28/1973 seed strains had high serological potency in chickens (geometric mean hemagglutination inhibition [HI] titers, ≥1:169), but vaccines containing strain A/chicken/Guangdong/1/1996 generated by reverse genetics (rg; rgGD/96), A/chicken/Legok/2003 (Legok/03), A/chicken/Vietnam/C57/2004 generated by rg (rgVN/04), or A/chicken/Legok/2003 generated by rg (rgLegok/03) had lower serological potency (geometric mean HI titers, ≤1:95). In challenge studies, chickens immunized with any of the H5 avian influenza vaccines were protected against A/chicken/West Java/SMI-HAMD/2006 (SMI-HAMD/06) and were partially protected against A/chicken/Papua/TA5/2006 (Papua/06) but were not protected against A/chicken/West Java/PWT-WIJ/2006 (PWT/06). Experimental inactivated vaccines made with PWT/06 HPAI virus or rg-generated PWT/06 low-pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus seed strains protected chickens from lethal challenge, as did a combination of a commercially available live fowl poxvirus vaccine expressing the H5 influenza virus gene and inactivated Legok/03 vaccine. These studies indicate that antigenic variants did emerge in Indonesia following widespread H5 avian influenza vaccine usage, and efficacious inactivated vaccines can be developed using antigenic variant wild-type viruses or rg-generated LPAI virus seed strains containing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of wild-type viruses. IMPORTANCE H5N1 high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) virus has become endemic in Indonesian poultry, and such poultry are the source of virus for birds and mammals, including humans. Vaccination has become a part of the poultry control strategy, but vaccine failures have occurred in the field. This study identified possible causes of vaccine failure, which included the use of an unlicensed virus seed strain and induction of low levels of protective antibody because of an insufficient quantity of vaccine antigen. However, the most important cause of vaccine failure was the appearance of drift variant field viruses that partially or completely overcame commercial vaccine-induced immunity. Furthermore, experimental vaccines using inactivated wild-type virus or reverse genetics-generated vaccines containing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of wild-type drift variant field viruses were protective. These studies indicate the need for surveillance to identify drift variant viruses in the field and update licensed vaccines when such variants appear. PMID:25609805

  3. Vaccination strategies to promote mucosal antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2010-10-29

    There are great interest and demand for the development of vaccines to prevent and treat diverse microbial infections. Mucosal vaccines elicit immune protection by stimulating the production of antibodies at mucosal surfaces and systemic districts. Being positioned in close proximity to a large community of commensal microbes, the mucosal immune system deploys a heterogeneous population of cells and a complex regulatory network to maintain the balance between surveillance and tolerance. A successful mucosal vaccine relies on leveraging the functions of these immune cells and regulatory components. We review the important cellular interactions and molecular pathways underlying the induction and regulation of mucosal antibody responses and discuss their implications on mucosal vaccination. PMID:21029959

  4. IgG4 subclass glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) are associated with a reduced risk of developing type 1 diabetes as well as increased C-peptide levels in GADA positive gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dereke, Jonatan; Nilsson, Charlotta; Strevens, Helena; Landin-Olsson, Mona; Hillman, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Some women with gestational diabetes (GDM) present with autoantibodies associated with type 1 diabetes. These are usually directed against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) and suggested to predict development of type 1 diabetes. The primary aim of this study was to investigate if GADA IgG subclasses at onset of GDM could assist in predicting postpartum development. Of 1225 women diagnosed with first-time GDM only 51 were GADA-positive. Total GADA was determined using ELISA. GADA subclasses were determined with radioimmunoassay. Approximately 25% of GADA-positive women developed type 1 diabetes postpartum. Titers of total GADA were higher in women that developed type 1 diabetes (142.1 vs 74.2u/mL; p=0.04) and they also had lower titers of GADA IgG4 (index=0.01 vs 0.04; p=0.03). In conclusion we found that that women with high titers of total GADA but low titers of GADA IgG4 were more prone to develop type 1 diabetes postpartum. PMID:26548838

  5. Design of synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Benhar, Itai

    2007-05-01

    Antibody libraries came into existence 15 years ago when the accumulating sequence data of immunoglobulin genes and the advent of polymerase chain reaction technology made it possible to clone antibody gene repertoires. Since then, virtually hundreds of antibody libraries have been constructed, employing limitless maneuvers from the antibody engineering molecular bag of tricks towards the crucial parameters that determine library quality, library size, diversity and robustness. Phage and additional display and screening technologies were applied to pan out desired binding specificities from antibody libraries. Several biotech companies established themselves as key operators in the multibillion-dollar field of recombinant antibody technology. Out of nineteen FDA-approved therapeutic antibodies, one was isolated from an antibody library and many more are in various stages of clinical evaluation. This review highlights key milestones in the short history of antibody libraries and attempts to predict the future impact of antibody libraries on drug discovery. PMID:17477812

  6. Predominant role for activation-induced cytidine deaminase in generating IgG anti-nucleosomal antibodies of murine SLE

    PubMed Central

    Detanico, Thiago; Guo, Wenzhong; Wysocki, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Serum IgG anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) directed to complexes of DNA and histones are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and reflect a failure in lymphocyte self-tolerance. A prior study utilizing spontaneously autoimmune B6.Nba2 mice deficient in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and with heterozygous deficiencies in Jh and Igk loci underscored the importance of somatic hypermutation (SHM) as a major generator of SLE-associated ANA. This interpretation had to be qualified because of severely limited opportunities for receptor editing and restricted VHCDR3 diversity. Therefore, we performed the converse study using mice that carried functional Tdt genes and wild type Jh and Igk loci but that could not undergo SHM. Analyses of ANA and ANA-producing hybridomas from B6.Nba2 Aicda−/− mice revealed that few animals produced high titers of the prototypical ANA directed to complexes of histones and DNA, that this response was delayed and that those cells that did produce such antibody exhibited limited clonal expansion, unusual Jk use and only infrequent dual receptor expression. This, together with the additional finding of an intrinsic propensity for SHM to generate Arg codons selectively in CDRs, reinforce the view that most IgG autoimmune clones producing prototypical anti-nucleosome antibodies in wild type mice are created by SHM. PMID:25634361

  7. The role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the follow-up of well-differentiated thyroid cancer with negative thyroglobulin but positive and/or elevated antithyroglobulin antibody.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiyan

    2016-06-01

    Thyroglobulin measurement is the most sensitive and important indicator of persistent and/or recurrent disease in the follow-up of well-differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) after total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation therapy. However, positive or elevated thyroglobulin autoantibody (TgAb) interferes with the accurate measurement of serum thyroglobulin and may mask the presence of a recurrent and/or metastatic disease. It was reported that persistently positive TgAb could be viewed as evidence of the continued presence of functional thyroid cells, either benign or malignant, and elevated TgAb might indicate the recurrent and/or metastatic disease and could be used as an alternative of the tumor marker for DTC. However, the clinical application and usefulness of TgAb for the follow-up of DTC are uncertain. Imaging studies such as the neck ultrasound and whole-body radioiodine are still used widely for the detection of the lesions. Although it is not used routinely in DTC, limited clinical observations showed that fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (F-FDG) PET/computed tomography could be an additive valuable imaging modality in the detection of recurrent and/or metastatic disease in these patients, with promising sensitivity and specificity. A negative F-FDG PET/computed tomography result was associated with the absence of active disease and disappearing TgAb over time, and F-FDG-avid residual/recurrent/metastatic lesions were associated with aggressive disease, poor outcome, and persistently increased TgAb levels. PMID:26813991

  8. Antibodies in metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Bianca

    2011-09-01

    In the past century, incidences of chronic metabolic diseases, such as obesity and type II diabetes, have increased dramatically. Obesity and abnormal insulin level are associated with a wide variety of health problems including a markedly increased risk for type II diabetes, fatty liver, hepato-biliary and gallbladder diseases, cardiovascular pathologies, neurodegenerative disorders, asthma and a variety of cancers. The development of therapeutic antibodies has evolved over the past decades into a mainstay of therapeutic options for patients with inflammatory diseases and cancer, while other indication areas such as metabolic diseases have so far only been rarely addressed. Although therapeutic antibodies might have advantages over current type II diabetes treatments like favorable serum half-life and high specificity, their development is also likely to face obstacles. For example the technical feasibility of antibody generation against G protein coupled receptors and transporters is challenging, patient compliance for a likely needle application might be limited, bioavailability in organs involved in the pathogenesis like the brain might be suboptimal and reimbursement issues for high treatment costs have to be taken into account. The current review focuses on the pathogenesis and standard therapeutic approaches as well as antibodies in development and potential antibody targets for type II diabetes. PMID:21473944

  9. An Unusual Mimicker of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aluoch, Aloice O; Farbman, Mathew; Gladue, Heather

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 47 year-old African American female with 15 pack-years of tobacco use and heavy alcohol use who presented with arthritis and was found to have a positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA), anti double stranded DNA antibodies (anti-dsDNA), and anti-Sjogren’s syndrome-related antigen A and antigen B (anti-SSA and anti-SSB). She was subsequently found to have a lung adenocarcinoma associated with hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy (HPO). This demonstrates a case of positive antinuclear antibodies and arthritis in a patient with lung adenocarcinoma, which can be falsely diagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:26106457

  10. HLA antibodies and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Moncharmont, P; Dubois, V; Obegi, C; Vignal, M; Mérieux, Y; Gebuhrer, L; Rigal, D

    2004-01-01

    A female baby with a severe thrombocytopenia at 18 x 10(9)/l was born to a 29-year-old (gestation 2/partum 2) mother. Scattered petechiae were present on her legs, arms, chest and face, but there was no bleeding, infection, fever or hepatosplenomegaly. A platelet antibody screening immunocapture test was positive, which was performed on the mother's serum 3, 12 and 38 days after delivery, but no platelet-specific antibodies were found by the monoclonal-antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigen assay. The baby's platelets and lymphocytes and the father's platelets reacted strongly with the HLA antibodies present in the mother's serum. The neonate was treated with intravenous human immunoglobulin (Tegeline), 1 g/kg per day) 1, 2 and 3 days after delivery. The platelet count rose from 18 x 10(9)/l on day 0 to 37 x 10(9)/l on day 3 and to 227 x 10(9)/l on day 12. No platelet transfusion was needed. Several factors which developed hereafter lead us to think that this neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is due to the transplacental passage of maternal HLA antibodies to the baby. PMID:15153714

  11. Polyreactive Antibodies: Function and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Gunti, Sreenivasulu; Notkins, Abner Louis

    2015-07-15

    Polyreactive antibodies, a major component of the natural antibody repertoire, bind with low affinity to a variety of structurally unrelated antigens. Many of these antibodies are germline or near germline in sequence. Little is known, however, about the function of these antibodies. In the present mini-review we show: (1) that the broad antibacterial activity of the natural antibody repertoire is largely due to polyreactive antibodies, which in the presence of complement lyse bacteria and enhance phagocytosis; (2) that polyreactive antibodies bind to UV- or human immunodeficiency virus-induced apoptotic cells and with complement enhance the phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages; and (3) that dinitrophenol can be used as a surrogate for quantitating the level of polyreactive antibodies in serum. We conclude that polyreactive antibodies protect the host against both foreign invaders and its own damaged/apoptotic cells. PMID:26116731

  12. Radiolabeled antibody fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolotti, R.A.

    1989-06-06

    This patent describes an antibody conjugate of the formula: wherein Ab is the residue of a Fab fragment of a monoclonal antibody. The antibody being one which retains antigen-binding activity following enzymatic removal for the F/sub c/ fragment and reductive cleavage of the disulfide bond joining the heavy chains; -S- is the residue of the free sulfhydryl group of the Fab' fragment; R is a divalent organic linker; and R' is a nontoxic, weakly acidic chelating group capable of forming a chelate with a radionuclide metal ion that is thermodynamically stable under physiological conditions and has a higher stability constant than a chelate of the radionuclide with transferrin in vivo.

  13. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Zauner, Gerhild; Selman, Maurice H. J.; Bondt, Albert; Rombouts, Yoann; Blank, Dennis; Deelder, André M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Antibody glycosylation has been shown to change with various processes. This review presents mass spectrometric approaches for antibody glycosylation analysis at the level of released glycans, glycopeptides, and intact protein. With regard to IgG fragment crystallizable glycosylation, mass spectrometry has shown its potential for subclass-specific, high-throughput analysis. In contrast, because of the vast heterogeneity of peptide moieties, fragment antigen binding glycosylation analysis of polyclonal IgG relies entirely on glycan release. Next to IgG, IgA has gained some attention, and studies of its O- and N-glycosylation have revealed disease-associated glycosylation changes. Glycoproteomic analyses of IgM and IgE are lagging behind but should complete our picture of glycosylation's influence on antibody function. PMID:23325769

  14. Structural Comparison of Different Antibodies Interacting with Parvovirus Capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Hafenstein, Susan; Bowman, Valorie D.; Sun, Tao; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Palermo, Laura M.; Chipman, Paul R.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Parrish, Colin R.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Cornell; Purdue

    2009-05-13

    The structures of canine parvovirus (CPV) and feline parvovirus (FPV) complexed with antibody fragments from eight different neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) reconstruction to resolutions varying from 8.5 to 18 {angstrom}. The crystal structure of one of the Fab molecules and the sequence of the variable domain for each of the Fab molecules have been determined. The structures of Fab fragments not determined crystallographically were predicted by homology modeling according to the amino acid sequence. Fitting of the Fab and virus structures into the cryoEM densities identified the footprints of each antibody on the viral surface. As anticipated from earlier analyses, the Fab binding sites are directed to two epitopes, A and B. The A site is on an exposed part of the surface near an icosahedral threefold axis, whereas the B site is about equidistant from the surrounding five-, three-, and twofold axes. One antibody directed to the A site binds CPV but not FPV. Two of the antibodies directed to the B site neutralize the virus as Fab fragments. The differences in antibody properties have been linked to the amino acids within the antibody footprints, the position of the binding site relative to the icosahedral symmetry elements, and the orientation of the Fab structure relative to the surface of the virus. Most of the exposed surface area was antigenic, although each of the antibodies had a common area of overlap that coincided with the positions of the previously mapped escape mutations.

  15. Pre-existing Antibody: Biotherapeutic Modality-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Gorovits, Boris; Clements-Egan, Adrienne; Birchler, Mary; Liang, Meina; Myler, Heather; Peng, Kun; Purushothama, Shobha; Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Salazar-Fontana, Laura; Sung, Crystal; Xue, Li

    2016-03-01

    Pre-existing antibodies to biotherapeutic drugs have been detected in drug-naïve subjects for a variety of biotherapeutic modalities. Pre-existing antibodies are immunoglobulins that are either specific or cross-reacting with a protein or glycan epitopes on a biotherapeutic compound. Although the exact cause for pre-existing antibodies is often unknown, environmental exposures to non-human proteins, glycans, and structurally similar products are frequently proposed as factors. Clinical consequences of the pre-existing antibodies vary from an adverse effect on patient safety to no impact at all and remain highly dependent on the biotherapeutic drug modality and therapeutic indication. As such, pre-existing antibodies are viewed as an immunogenicity risk factor requiring a careful evaluation. Herein, the relationships between biotherapeutic modalities to the nature, prevalence, and clinical consequences of pre-existing antibodies are reviewed. Initial evidence for pre-existing antibody is often identified during anti-drug antibody (ADA) assay development. Other interfering factors known to cause false ADA positive signal, including circulating multimeric drug target, rheumatoid factors, and heterophilic antibodies, are discussed. PMID:26821802

  16. Salivary IgA antibody to glucosyltransferase in man.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Taubman, M A; Ebersole, J L

    1985-01-01

    Parotid salivas of 97 young adults were screened for IgA antibody to glucosyltransferase (GTF) from laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans (serotypes c and g). Antibody levels to GTF from serotype c positively correlated with levels to serotype g GTF among these salivas. GTF's were prepared from S. mutans obtained from a subset of individuals in this population. All but one saliva showed IgA antibody activity to all of the GTF tested. In addition, the relative magnitude of each subject's antibody level was generally the highest to the GTF from their own S. mutans. Fractions, enriched for IgA by ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration, showed patterns of functional inhibition of GTF activity which were consistent with patterns of IgA antibody activity in ELISA of unfractionated salivas. These data indicate that detectable levels of IgA antibody to S. mutans GTF exist in many young adult salivas, while this IgA antibody activity reacts with GTF from different biotypes, subjects generally show the highest secretory IgA antibody levels to their own GTF, and the relative amount of IgA antibody to GTF and the ability to inhibit GTF activity are roughly correlated. PMID:2931224

  17. Positive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive

  18. Antineurofilament and antiretinal antibodies in AIDS patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosberger, D F; Tshering, S L; Polsky, B; Heinemann, M H; Klein, R F; Cunningham-Rundles, S

    1994-01-01

    Sera obtained from AIDS patients with cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis before and after treatment with foscarnet, AIDS patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) retinopathy, AIDS patients without retinal disease, and normal healthy controls with and without positive CMV serologies were assayed for the presence of antibodies against the 200-kDa outer, 160-kDa middle, and 68-kDa core subunits of the neurofilament triplet. Additional studies were performed to determine the presence of antibodies reactive with proteins extracted from crude human retinal antigen preparations. Antibodies against the 200-, 260-, and 68-kDa proteins of the neurofilament triplet were detected in 15 of 15 AIDS patients with CMV retinitis. The expression of these antibodies was unaffected, qualitatively, by successful treatment with foscarnet. In contrast, only 30% of patients with HIV retinopathy unrelated to CMV, fewer than 35% of AIDS patients with positive CMV titers but without evident retinitis, and fewer than 25% of healthy controls with positive or negative CMV titers possessed antibodies against any of the triplet proteins (P < 0.001). Antibodies against several clusters of retinal antigens were also identified in the sera of patients with CMV retinitis. In summary, the data indicate that retinal elements damaged by CMV infection induce an antibody response against the 200-, 160-, and 68kDa components of the neurofilament triplet as well as other, as yet undefined retinal antigens. Images PMID:8556483

  19. Selection of recombinant antibodies from antibody gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Dübel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are indispensable detection reagents for research and diagnostics and represent the biggest class of biological therapeutics on the market. In vitro antibody selection systems offer many advantages over animal-based technologies because the whole selection process is independent of the in vivo immune response. In the last two decades antibody phage display has evolved to the most robust and widely used method and has already yielded thousands of antibodies. The selection of binders by phage display is also referred to as "panning" and based on the specific molecular interaction of antibody phage with an immobilized antigen thus allowing the enrichment and isolation of antigen-specific monoclonal binders from very large antibody gene libraries. Here, we give detailed protocols for the selection of recombinant antibody fragments from antibody gene libraries in microtiter plates. PMID:24233787

  20. Antithyroid antibodies and thyroid function in pediatric patients with celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kalyoncu, Derya; Urganci, Nafiye

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease, persistence of antithyroid antibodies, effect of gluten-free diet, and long-term outcome of thyroid function in pediatric patients with celiac disease (CD). Methods. 67 patients with CD aged from 1 year to 16 years were screened for thyroid antithyroperoxidase, antithyroglobulin and anti-TSH receptor antibodies, serum free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) at diagnosis and during follow-up. Results. None of the patients had antithyroid antibodies at diagnosis. Antithyroid antibodies became positive in 16.4% of the patients (11/67) 2 to 3 years after the diagnosis of CD. Clinical hypothyroidism was observed only in 3 of 11 CD patients with positive antithyroid antibodies (27.2%). The antithyroid antibodies positive and negative patients did not differ significantly according to compliance to GFD (P > 0.05). A statistically significant difference was observed only in age, in which the patients with positive antithyroid antibodies were younger than the patients with negative antithyroid antibodies (P = 0.004). None of the patients had any change in their thyroid function and antibody profile during their follow-up. Conclusion. Antithyroid antibodies were detected in younger pediatric patients with CD and the prevalence of antithyroid antibodies did not correlate with the duration of gluten intake. PMID:25788942

  1. Monoclonal antibodies in haematopathology

    SciTech Connect

    Grignani, F.; Martelli, M.F.; Mason, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Oncogene (c-myc, c-myb) amplification in acute myelogenous leukaemia; Ultrastructural characterization of leukaemic cells with monoloclonal antibodies; Origin of B-cell malignancies; Immunohistology of gut lymphomas; and Spurious evidence of lineage infidelity in monocytic leukaemia.

  2. Therapeutic antibody engineering

    PubMed Central

    Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Lugovskoy, Alexey A.

    2013-01-01

    It is an important event in any knowledge area when an authority in the field decides that it is time to share all accumulated knowledge and learnings by writing a text book. This does not occur often in the biopharmaceutical industry, likely due to both the highly dynamic environment with tight timelines and policies and procedures at many pharmaceutical companies that hamper knowledge sharing. To take on a task like this successfully, a strong drive combined with a desire and talent to teach, but also an accommodating and stimulating environment is required. Luckily for those interested in therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, Dr. William R. Strohl decided about two years ago that the time was right to write a book about the past, present and future of these fascinating molecules. Dr. Strohl’s great expertise and passion for biotechnology is evident from his life story and his strong academic and industry track record. Dr. Strohl pioneered natural product biotechnology, first in academia as a full professor of microbiology and biochemistry at Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio and later in industry while at Merck. Despite his notable advances in recombinant natural products, industry interest in this area waned and in 2001 Dr. Strohl sought new opportunities by entering the field of antibody therapeutics. He initiated antibody discovery through phage display at Merck, and then moved to Centocor Research and Development Inc. (now Janssen Biotech, Inc.) in 2008 to head Biologics Research, where he now directs the discovery of innovative therapeutic antibody candidates.

  3. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  4. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  5. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red ...

  6. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  7. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... GPI) Your provider may make the diagnosis of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) if: You have had a blood clot ... surgery to lower your risk of blood clots. ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODY SYNDROME (APS) In general you will need long-term ...

  8. Antibodies to cardiac receptors.

    PubMed

    Boivin-Jahns, V; Schlipp, A; Hartmann, S; Panjwani, P; Klingel, K; Lohse, M J; Ertl, G; Jahns, R

    2012-12-01

    Inflammation of cardiac tissue is generally associated with an activation of the host's immune system. On the one hand, this activation is mandatory to protect the heart by fighting the invading microbial agents or toxins and by engaging myocardial reparation and healing processes. On the other hand, uncontrolled activation of the immune defense has the risk of an arousal of auto- or cross-reactive immune cells, which in some cases bring more harm than good. Dependent on the individual genetic predisposition, such heart-directed autoimmune reactions most likely occur as a result of myocyte apoptosis or necrosis and subsequent liberation of self-antigens previously hidden to the immune system. During the past two decades, evidence for a pathogenic relevance of autoimmunity in human heart disease has substantially increased. Conformational cardiac (auto)antibodies affecting cardiac function and, in particular, (auto)antibodies that target G protein-coupled cardiac membrane receptors are thought to play a key role in the development of heart failure. Clinical pilot studies even suggest that such antibodies negatively affect survival in heart failure patients. However, the true prevalence and clinical impact of many cardiac (auto)antibodies in human heart diseases are still unclear, as are the events triggering their formation, their titer course, and their patterns of clearance and/or persistence. The present article summarizes current knowledge in the field of cardiac receptor (auto)antibodies including recent efforts to address some of the aforementioned gaps of knowledge, thereby attempting to pave the way for novel, more specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23183584

  9. The detection of transmissible gastroenteritis viral antibodies by immunodiffusion.

    PubMed Central

    Bohac, J; Derbyshire, J B

    1976-01-01

    Precipitating antibodies against transmissible gastroenteritis viral antigens were detected by the immunodiffusion test in two transmissible gastroenteritis viral hyperimmune antisera and in antiserum prepared against haemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus but not in sera from several species of normal animals, in antisera prepared against a variety of othet viruses and bacteria or sera from swine with bacterial enteritis. When the immunodiffusion test was compared with the virus neutralization test for the detection of transmissible gastroeneritis viral antibodies in 20 swine sera certain samples which contained high titres of virus neutralizing antibodies failed to produce precipitation while other sera were positive in the immunodiffusion test although their virus neutralizing antibody titres were relatively low. Precipitating antibodies were also detected by immunodiffusion in several samples of milk whey from a sow which had been vaccinated with inactivated transmissible gastroenteritis virus. PMID:187295

  10. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast with your other hand. The Clutch or Football Hold This is also a good position for ... same time may also choose this position. The football hold allows babies to take milk more easily — ...

  11. Positive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  12. Utility of feline coronavirus antibody tests.

    PubMed

    Addie, Diane D; le Poder, Sophie; Burr, Paul; Decaro, Nicola; Graham, Elizabeth; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Jarrett, Oswald; McDonald, Michael; Meli, Marina L

    2015-02-01

    Eight different tests for antibodies to feline coronavirus (FCoV) were evaluated for attributes that are important in situations in veterinary practice. We compared four indirect immunofluorescent antibody tests (IFAT), one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (FCoV Immunocomb; Biogal) and three rapid immunochromatographic (RIM) tests against a panel of samples designated by consensus as positive or negative. Specificity was 100% for all but the two IFATs based on transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), at 83.3% and 97.5%. The IFAT and ELISA tests were best for obtaining an antibody titre and for working in the presence of virus. The RIM tests were the best for obtaining a result quickly (10-15 mins); of these, the Speed F-Corona was the most sensitive, at 92.4%, followed by FASTest feline infectious peritonitis (FIP; 84.6%) and Anigen Rapid FCoV antibody test (64.1%). Sensitivity was 100% for the ELISA, one FCoV IFAT and one TGEV IFAT; and 98.2% for a second TGEV IFA and 96.1% for a second FCoV IFAT. All tests worked with effusions, even when only blood products were stipulated in the instruction manual. The ELISA and Anigen RIM tests were best for small quantities of sample. The most appropriate FCoV antibody test to use depends on the reason for testing: in excluding a diagnosis of FIP, sensitivity, specificity, small sample quantity, rapidity and ability to work in the presence of virus all matter. For FCoV screening, speed and sensitivity are important, and for FCoV elimination antibody titre is essential. PMID:24966245

  13. Blood Group Antibodies in Obstetrics

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, Doris; Nimrod, Carl

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective survey of the frequency, nature, and effect of blood group antibodies on obstetrical outcome was conducted over 4 years in a large community hospital. A total of 189 antibodies were identified in 165 patients. Twenty clinically significant outcomes occurred, including three stillbirths. All clinically significant cases of hemolytic disease of the newborn were caused by Rh antibodies. PMID:21229104

  14. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  15. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  16. Construction of human naive antibody gene libraries.

    PubMed

    Hust, Michael; Frenzel, Andr; Meyer, Torsten; Schirrmann, Thomas; Dbel, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Human antibodies are valuable tools for proteome research and diagnostics. Furthermore, antibodies are a rapidly growing class of therapeutic agents, mainly for inflammation and cancer therapy. The first therapeutic antibodies are of murine origin and were chimerized or humanized. The later-developed antibodies are fully human antibodies. Here, two technologies are competing the hybridoma technology using transgenic mice with human antibody gene loci and antibody phage display. The starting point for the selection of human antibodies against any target is the construction of an antibody phage display gene library.In this review we describe the construction of human naive and immune antibody gene libraries for antibody phage display. PMID:22907347

  17. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  18. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  19. The development of therapeutic antibodies against dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Fibriansah, Guntur; Lok, Shee-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Dengue virus, a positive-sense RNA virus, is one of the major human pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes. However, no fully effective licensed dengue vaccines or therapeutics are currently available. Several potent neutralizing antibodies against DENV have been isolated from mice and humans, and the characterization of their properties by biochemical and biophysical methods have revealed important insights for development of therapeutic antibodies. In this review, we summarize recently reported antibody-antigen complex structures, their likely neutralization mechanisms and enhancement propensities, as well as their prophylactic and therapeutic capabilities in mouse models. This article forms part of a symposium on flavivirus drug discovery in the journal Antiviral Research. PMID:26794397

  20. Therapeutic antibodies against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark J.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics against cancer are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential; 13 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for clinical use in the European Union and in the United States (one, mylotarg, was withdrawn from market in 2010). Three of the mAbs (bevacizumab, rituximab, trastuzumab) are in the top six selling protein therapeutics with sales in 2010 of more than $5 bln each. Hundreds of mAbs including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs and mAbs with optimized pharmacokinetics are in clinical trials. However, challenges remain and it appears that deeper understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major problems including resistance to therapy, access to targets, complexity of biological systems and individual variations. PMID:22520975

  1. Antibody Therapy for Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Hamilton, Andrew J.; Guimarães, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    The endemic human pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum is a major fungal pathogen with a broad variety of clinical presentations, ranging from mild, focal pulmonary disease to life-threatening systemic infections. Although azoles, such as itraconazole and voriconazole, and amphotericin B have significant activity against H. capsulatum, about 1 in 10 patients hospitalized due to histoplasmosis die. Hence, new approaches for managing disease are being sought. Over the past 10 years, studies have demonstrated that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can modify the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. Disease has been shown to be impacted by mAbs targeting either fungal cell surface proteins or host co-stimulatory molecules. This review will detail our current knowledge regarding the impact of antibody therapy on histoplasmosis. PMID:22347215

  2. Chemically programmed antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Due to their unlimited chemical diversity, small molecules can rival monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with respect to specificity and affinity for target molecules. However, key pharmacological properties of mAbs remain unmatched by small molecules. Chemical programming strategies have been developed for site-specific and covalent conjugation of small molecules to mAbs with unique reactivity centers. In addition to blending favorable features of small molecules and mAbs, chemically programmed antibodies (cpAbs) are economically attractive because they utilize the same mAb for a virtually unlimited number of target molecule specificities, reducing manufacturing costs and shortening drug discovery and development time. Preclinical studies and clinical trials have begun to demonstrate the broad utility of cpAbs for the treatment and prevention of human diseases. PMID:24630478

  3. Pseudorabies virus antibodies in swine slaughtered in Iowa.

    PubMed Central

    Pirtle, E C

    1982-01-01

    Sera from butcher swine (1,246 total) were evaluated qualitatively by the microimmunodiffusion test and quantitatively by the virus neutralization test for antibody to pseudorabies virus. Ten percent of the sera had antibody to pseudorabies virus. Follow-up contact with veterinarians whose clients included the farms from which the positive swine originated revealed that few feeder swine are vaccinated against pseudorabies and that most infections with pseudorabies virus are subclinical. PMID:6284324

  4. Antibody-drug conjugate targets.

    PubMed

    Teicher, B A

    2009-12-01

    The requirements for a cell surface molecule to be suitable as an antibody-drug conjugate target are stringent. The notion that antibodies-directed toward targets on the surface of malignant cells could be used for drug delivery is not new. The history of antibody-drug conjugates has been marked by hurdles identified and overcome. Early conjugates used mouse antibodies, drugs that were either not sufficiently potent, were immunogenic (proteins) or were too toxic and linkers that were not sufficiently stable in circulation. Three main avenues have been explored using antibodies to target cytotoxic species to malignant cells, antibody-protein toxin conjugates (or antibody fragment-protein toxin fusion proteins), antibody-small molecule drug conjugates and antibody-enzyme conjugates administered along with small molecule prodrugs requiring metabolism by the conjugated enzyme to release the activate species. This review focuses on cell surface proteins that have been targeted primarily by antibody-small molecule drug conjugates and briefly discusses 34 targets being investigated. While only one antibody-drug conjugate has reached regulatory approval, there are nearly 20 of these in clinical trial. The time may have come for this technology to become a major contributor to improving treatment for cancer patients. PMID:20025606

  5. Commercial antibodies and their validation

    PubMed Central

    Voskuil, JLA

    2014-01-01

    Despite an impressive growth in the business of research antibodies a general lack of trust in commercial antibodies remains in place. A variety of issues, each one potentially causing an antibody to fail, underpin the frustrations that scientists endure. Lots of money goes to waste in buying and trying one failing antibody after the other without realizing all the pitfalls that come with the product: Antibodies can get inactivated, both the biological material and the assay itself can potentially be flawed, a single antibody featuring in many different catalogues can be deemed as a set of different products, and a bad choice of antibody type, wrong dilutions, and lack of proper validation can all jeopardize the intended experiments. Antibodies endorsed by scientific research papers do not always meet the scientist’s requirements either due to flawed specifications, or due to batch-to-batch variations. Antibodies can be found with Quality Control data obtained from previous batches that no longer represent the batch on sale. In addition, one cannot assume that every antibody is fit for every application. The best chance of success is to try an antibody that already was confirmed to perform correctly in the required platform. PMID:25324967

  6. Determination of antibody glycosylation by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Christiane; Ferrara, Claudia; Umaña, Pablo; Zeck, Anne; Regula, Jörg Thomas; Koll, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) G is formed by two antigen-binding moieties termed Fabs and a conserved Fc -portion, which interacts with components of the immune systems. Within the Fc, N-linked carbohydrates are attached to each conserved asparagine residue at position 297 within the CH2 domain. These oligosaccharide moieties introduce a higher degree of heterogeneity within the molecule, by influencing stability of the antibody and its mediated effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). The carbohydrate moieties can vary strongly depending on the production host and can be manipulated by different fermentation conditions, thereby influencing the function of the antibody. Therefore it is necessary to carefully monitor changes in the carbohydrate composition during cell line development and production processes. This chapter describes two different mass spectrometry based methods used for analyses of the carbohydrate moieties attached to the Fc-part of human IgG1. In the first approach, the glycans are released from the antibody by endoglycosidase (Peptide N Glycosidase F) digestion and monitored by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS), whereas in the second method the carbohydrate structures, still attached to an enzymatically produced Fc-fragment, are analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. PMID:22723103

  7. Biological and physiocochemical properties of purified anti-DNP guinea-pig non-precipitating antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia

    1973-01-01

    Methods for isolation and purification of precipitating and non-precipitating guinea-pig antibodies are described. The physicochemical properties of γ1 and γ2 non-precipitating antibodies are similar to γ1 and γ2 precipitating ones. Biological properties are also similar excepting the reverse Arthus reaction, which is positive with the precipitating and negative with the non-precipitating antibodies. Bivalence of these antibodies was experimentally demonstrated. Precipitating antibodies K0 do not differ greatly from those obtained with the corresponding non-precipitating ones. The incapacity to precipitates with the antigen may be a consequence of a steric impediment. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:4267511

  8. Specificity of antibodies to immunodominant mycobacterial antigens in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Jackett, P S; Bothamley, G H; Batra, H V; Mistry, A; Young, D B; Ivanyi, J

    1988-01-01

    A serological survey was performed in groups of patients with active sputum smear-positive or smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis, healthy household contacts, and controls. Sera were tested for titers of antibodies which bound to each of five purified mycobacterial antigens by enzyme immunoassay and for competition of binding to single epitopes, using six radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies directed toward corresponding molecules. The evaluation of diagnostic specificity was based on a positive score represented by titers above the cutoff point of 2 standard deviations above the mean titer of a control group. For smear-positive samples, the best sensitivity (83%) was achieved by exclusive use of the 38-kilodalton (kDa) antigen or its corresponding monoclonal antibodies. For smear-negative samples, levels of antibodies binding to the 19-kDa antigen showed a lower sensitivity of 62% compared with the control group or 38% compared with the contact group. Titers of antibody binding to the 14-kDa antigen were raised in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-vaccinated contacts, indicating that the greatest potential of this antigen may be in the detection of infection in a population for which tuberculin testing is unreliable. The results demonstrated the differing antibody responses to each of the tested antigens and distinct associations with the stage of infection or disease. PMID:2466869

  9. Effects of the orientation of anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibody immobilized on scaffold in antibody-mediated osseous regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Sahar; Freire, Marcelo; Choi, Moon G; Tavari, Azadeh; Almohaimeed, Mohammad; Moshaverinia, Alireza; Zadeh, Homayoun H

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that anti-BMP2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can trap endogenous osteogenic BMP ligands, which can in turn mediate osteodifferentiation of progenitor cells. The effectiveness of this strategy requires the availability of the anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies antigen-binding sites for anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies to bind to the scaffold through a domain that will leave its antigen-binding region exposed and available for binding to an osteogenic ligand. We examined whether antibodies bound to a scaffold by passive adsorption versus through Protein G as a linker will exhibit differences in mediating bone formation. In vitro anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies was immobilized on absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) with Protein G as a linker to bind the antibody through its Fc region and implanted into rat calvarial defects. The biomechanical strength of bone regenerated by absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies immune complex was compared to ACS/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies or ACS/Protein G/isotype mAb control group. Results demonstrated higher binding of anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies/BMPs to C2C12 cells, when the mAb was initially attached to recombinant Protein G or Protein G-coupled microbeads. After eight weeks, micro-CT and histomorphometric analyses revealed increased bone formation within defects implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies compared with defects implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies (p < 0.05). Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) confirmed increased BMP-2, -4, and -7 detection in sites implanted with absorbable collagen sponge/Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Biomechanical analysis revealed the regenerated bone in sites with Protein G/anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies had higher mechanical strength in comparison to anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies. The negative control group, Protein G/isotype mAb, did not promote bone regeneration and exhibited significantly lower mechanical properties (p < 0.05). Altogether, our results demonstrated that application of Protein G as a linker to adsorb anti-BMP-2 monoclonal antibodies onto the scaffold was accompanied by increased in vitro binding of the anti-BMP-2 mAb/BMP immune complex to BMP-receptor positive cell, as well as increased volume and strength of de novo bone formation in vivo. PMID:26184354

  10. Positive Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C.

    2006-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported

  11. Positive Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C.

    2006-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported…

  12. Positioning Agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Nilay; Abrahamsson, Pekka; Conboy, Kieran

    Agile methods are increasingly adopted by European companies. Academics too are conducting numerous studies on different tenets of agile methods. Companies often feel proud in marketing themselves as ‘agile’. However, the true notion of ‘being agile’ seems to have been overlooked due to lack of positioning of oneself for agility. This raises a call for more research and interactions between academia and the industry. The proposed workshop refers to this call. It will be highly relevant to participants, interested in positioning their company’s agility from organizational, group or project perspectives. The positioning of agility will help companies to better align their agile practices with stakeholder values. Results of the workshop will be shared across participants and they will also have opportunity to continue their work on agile positioning in their companies. At broader level, the work done in this workshop will contribute towards developing Agile Positioning System.

  13. Microbials for the production of monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments

    PubMed Central

    Spadiut, Oliver; Capone, Simona; Krainer, Florian; Glieder, Anton; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments represent the most important biopharmaceutical products today. Because full length antibodies are glycosylated, mammalian cells, which allow human-like N-glycosylation, are currently used for their production. However, mammalian cells have several drawbacks when it comes to bioprocessing and scale-up, resulting in long processing times and elevated costs. By contrast, antibody fragments, that are not glycosylated but still exhibit antigen binding properties, can be produced in microbial organisms, which are easy to manipulate and cultivate. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the expression systems, strain engineering, and production processes for the three main microbials used in antibody and antibody fragment production, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Escherichia coli. PMID:24183828

  14. Antibody Therapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vedi, Aditi; Ziegler, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing cure rates for pediatric leukemia, relapsed disease still carries a poor prognosis with significant morbidity and mortality. Novel targeted therapies are currently being investigated in an attempt to reduce adverse events and improve survival outcomes. Antibody therapies represent a form of targeted therapy that offers a new treatment paradigm. Monoclonal antibodies are active in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are currently in Phase III trials. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are the next generation of antibodies where a highly potent cytotoxic agent is bound to an antibody by a linker, resulting in selective targeting of leukemia cells. ADCs are currently being tested in clinical trials for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and ALL. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibodies are a construct whereby each antibody contains two binding sites, with one designed to engage the patient’s own immune system and the other to target malignant cells. BiTE antibodies show great promise as a novel and effective therapy for childhood leukemia. This review will outline recent developments in targeted agents for pediatric leukemia including monoclonal antibodies, ADCs, and BiTE antibodies. PMID:24795859

  15. A method for constructing reshaping single-domain antibody.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ju-Long; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Zhang, Zhong; Liu, Jing; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Huang, Hua-Liang

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this research was to demonstrate a novel and practical method for constructing reshaping Single-domain antibodies. Different from other methods, our method does not need to model the configuration of antibodies with specific sequences to determine the sequences of human acceptor FRs and then determine which amino acid residues in human acceptor FRs should be substituted. Most importantly, reshaping and enhancing the antigen binding affinity shared one procedure at the same time. Using this method, the reshaping anti-CD28 single-domain antibodies were constructed. According to the amino acid sequence of a mouse anti-human CD28 monoclonal antibody VH, two most homologous sequences of human antibodies were selected from GenBank and one of them was used as a main framework region for constructing the reshaping antibody. Before the original mouse antibody CDRs were inserted into the human acceptor FRs, some amino acid residues which were different from those of the original mouse antibody in the corresponding positions of the human acceptor FRs were determined or alternatively mutated by their conservative properties in Kabat classification. When the synthesized nucleotide fragments in different length were spliced by overlap PCR into the entire reshaping genes, Taq DNA polymerase and high Mg2+ concentration were used to introduce more mutation in FRs and CDRs randomly. A phage library was constructed using these PCR products and several reshaping Single-domain antibodies with high antigen binding affinity were selected after three rounds of panning. Two of them were expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The antigen-binding affinity of refolded proteins was still in a high level measured by ELISA. These results suggested that this method was feasible and efficient for constructing reshaping Single-domain antibodies. PMID:12182069

  16. Transfer of Maternal Antibodies against Avian Influenza Virus in Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos)

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Jacintha G. B.; Mateman, A. Christa; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Maternal antibodies protect chicks from infection with pathogens early in life and may impact pathogen dynamics due to the alteration of the proportion of susceptible individuals in a population. We investigated the transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus (AIV) in a key AIV host species, the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). Combining observations in both the field and in mallards kept in captivity, we connected maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs to (i) female body condition, (ii) female AIV antibody concentration, (iii) egg laying order, (iv) egg size and (v) embryo sex. We applied maternity analysis to the eggs collected in the field to account for intraspecific nest parasitism, which is reportedly high in Anseriformes, detecting parasitic eggs in one out of eight clutches. AIV antibody prevalence in free-living and captive females was respectively 48% and 56%, with 43% and 24% of the eggs receiving these antibodies maternally. In both field and captive study, maternal AIV antibody concentrations in egg yolk correlated positively with circulating AIV antibody concentrations in females. In the captive study, yolk AIV antibody concentrations correlated positively with egg laying order. Female body mass and egg size from the field and captive study, and embryos sex from the field study were not associated with maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs. Our study indicates that maternal AIV antibody transfer may potentially play an important role in shaping AIV infection dynamics in mallards. PMID:25386907

  17. Transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Jacintha G B; Mateman, A Christa; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Maternal antibodies protect chicks from infection with pathogens early in life and may impact pathogen dynamics due to the alteration of the proportion of susceptible individuals in a population. We investigated the transfer of maternal antibodies against avian influenza virus (AIV) in a key AIV host species, the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos). Combining observations in both the field and in mallards kept in captivity, we connected maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs to (i) female body condition, (ii) female AIV antibody concentration, (iii) egg laying order, (iv) egg size and (v) embryo sex. We applied maternity analysis to the eggs collected in the field to account for intraspecific nest parasitism, which is reportedly high in Anseriformes, detecting parasitic eggs in one out of eight clutches. AIV antibody prevalence in free-living and captive females was respectively 48% and 56%, with 43% and 24% of the eggs receiving these antibodies maternally. In both field and captive study, maternal AIV antibody concentrations in egg yolk correlated positively with circulating AIV antibody concentrations in females. In the captive study, yolk AIV antibody concentrations correlated positively with egg laying order. Female body mass and egg size from the field and captive study, and embryos sex from the field study were not associated with maternal AIV antibody concentrations in eggs. Our study indicates that maternal AIV antibody transfer may potentially play an important role in shaping AIV infection dynamics in mallards. PMID:25386907

  18. Antibodies to heteromeric glycolipid complexes in multifocal motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Galban-Horcajo F, Francesc; Fitzpatrick, Amanda M.; Hutton, Andrew J.; Dunn, Siobhan M.; Kalna, Gabriela; Brennan, Kathryn M.; Rinaldi, Simon; Yu, Robert K.; Goodyear, Carl; Willison, Hugh J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Measurement of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) sera is confounded by relatively low sensitivity that limits clinical usefulness. Combinatorial assay methods, in which antibodies reactive to heteromeric complexes of 2 or more glycolipids are being increasingly applied to this area of diagnostic testing. Methods A newly developed combinatorial glycoarray able to identify antibodies to 45 different heteromeric glycolipid complexes and their 10 individual glycolipid components was applied to a randomly selected population of 33 MMN cases and 57 normal or disease controls. Comparison with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was conducted for selected single glycolipids and their complexes. Results By ELISA, 22/33 MMN cases had detectable anti-GM1 IgM antibodies, whereas 19/33 MMN samples were positive for anti-GM1 antibodies by glycoarray. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that of the 55 possible single glycolipids and their 1:1 complexes, antibodies to the GM1:galactocerebroside (GM1:GalC) complex were most significantly associated with MMN, returning 33/33 MMN samples as positive by glycoarray and 29/33 positive by ELISA. Regression analysis revealed a high correlation in absolute values between ELISA and glycocarray. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed insignificantly different diagnostic performance between the two methods, although at the lower end of sensitivity, the glycoarray appeared slightly advantageous by identifying antibodies in 4 ELISA-negative samples. Conclusions The use of combinatorial glycoarray or ELISA increased the diagnostic sensitivity of anti-glycolipid antibody testing in this cohort of MMN cases, without significantly affecting specificity, and may be a useful assay modification for routine clinical screening. PMID:22727042

  19. Antibody screening in multitransfused patients: a prerequisite before each transfusion.

    PubMed

    Lamba, Divjot S; Mittal, Kshitija; Sood, Tanvi; Bedi, Ravneet Kaur; Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-10-01

    Life-long red blood cell (RBC) transfusions remain the main treatment for severe thalassemia. We hereby report a case of anti S and anti Lu(a) in a β-thalassemia major patient detected incidentally on antibody screening. The patient was a known case of β-thalassemia major and was on regular blood transfusion every 3 weeks from the institute from the age of 6 months. Subsequently, on one occasion, patient's crossmatch was compatible despite positive antibody screen using microcolumn gel technique. Autocontrol and direct antiglobulin test were negative on microcolumn gel. Anti S and anti Lu(a) antibodies were identified. Blood unit found compatible was negative for S and Lu(a) antigens. Antibody titers were 1:1 for both anti S and anti Lu(a) in AHG phase using tube technique and antibodies were of IgG type. Blood unit was transfused uneventfully to the patient. Donors were traced back (last three donations) and called for repeat blood sample testing for S and Lu(a) antigen. Two out of three donors were found to be S antigen positive and one out of these two was Lu(a) antigen positive. Anti S and anti Lu(a) antibodies were again identified on patient's subsequent visit for transfusion. The present case re-emphasize the importance of antibody screening at each visit in earlier detection of antibodies in multi transfused patients. Encouraging patients to receive transfusion from one center and dedicating donors could reduce alloimmunization rate but larger studies are required. PMID:25294114

  20. Human anti-tetanus toxin precipitating and co-precipitating antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Perdigón, Gabriela; Margni, R. A.; Gentile, Teresa; Abatángelo, Carmen; Dokmetjian, J.

    1982-01-01

    A comparative study has been made of human precipitating and co-precipitating anti-tetanus toxin antibodies. IgG co-precipitating antibody represented 10% of the total antibodies in the serum and had immunological and biological properties similar to those described for co-precipitating antibodies of other animal species. Human precipitating and co-precipitating antibodies had the same electrophoretic mobility and were localized in the same immunoglobulin fraction. By immunoprecipitation it was not possible to find antigenic differences between precipitating and co-precipitating antibodies. Both antibodies were localized in the IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses and neither were in the IgG4 subclass. Only the precipitating antibody can form insoluble complexes with antigen. Precipitating and co-precipitating antibodies agglutinated sensitized sheep red cells, however, only the precipitating antibody agglutinated human red cells. Eight to ten times more co-precipitating antibody was required to obtain a positive reaction in PCA. Precipitating antibody activated the complement system while co-precipitating antibody lacked this capacity. This difference in behaviour could not be attributed to localization of both antibodies in different IgG subclasses. Precipitating and co-precipitating antibodies were cytophilic. Only the former activated phagocytosis and increased clearance of antigen from the blood. These results are not surprising since co-precipitating antibody does not fix complement. Competition between human precipitating and co-precipitating antibodies in opsonization was analysed. In this test competition of both antibodies for the antigen depends on their respective amounts. The K = 0.18 diminished to 0.05 when the ratio of pp:cop. antibody changed from 70:30 to 30:70. The fact that co-precipitating antibody was isolated from the sera of vertebrates other than man indicate that this antibody could possibly play a role in some immune mechanisms. Taking into account that in previous papers we have demonstrated that co-precipitating antibody functions as a molecule with one combining site of high affinity and one of low affinity, we have proposed that this antibody could function univalently and blocks the antigen. This could facilitate chronic parasitic, bacterial and viral infections, tumour growth and other chronic infections. PMID:7035342

  1. Assessment of a fluorescent antibody test for the detection of antibodies against epizootic bovine abortion.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Myra T; Anderson, Mark L; Hoar, Bruce R; Pires, Alda F A; Blanchard, Patricia C; Yeargan, Bret V; Teglas, Mike B; Belshaw, Margaret; Stott, Jeffery L

    2014-09-01

    The current study was directed at developing and validating an indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) capable of detecting antibodies specific for the agent of epizootic bovine abortion (aoEBA). Sensitivity and specificity was determined by comparing antibody titers from 114 fetuses infected with aoEBA with 68 fetuses diagnosed with alternate infectious etiologies. Data established specificity at 100% and sensitivity at 94.7% when cutoff criteria for a positive test were assigned at a titer of ≥1,000. Potential cross-reactivity was noted in samples from 3 fetuses with antibody titers of 10 or100; all were infected with Gram-positive organisms. The remaining 65 fetuses infected with microbes other than aoEBA, and an additional 12 negative reference sera, did not have detectable titers. The IFAT-based serology assay is rapid, reproducible, and unaffected by fluid color or opacity. Total fetal immunoglobulin (Ig)G was also evaluated as an aid for diagnosing EBA. Significantly higher concentrations of IgG were identified in fetuses infected with aoEBA as compared to those with alternate infectious etiologies. The presence of IgG is a sensitive indicator of EBA and increases the specificity of FAT-based serologic diagnosis when titers are 10 or 100. Taken together, serology and IgG analyses suggest that the incidence of EBA may be underestimated. PMID:25139792

  2. Selecting antibodies to detect HER2 overexpression by immunohistochemistry in invasive mammary carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gouva, Agostinho Pinto; Milanezi, Fernanda; Olson, Sandra Jean; Leitao, Dina; Schmitt, Fernando Carlos; Gobbi, Helenice

    2006-03-01

    There is an increasing clinical demand for HER2 analysis in breast cancer, especially since the release of trastuzumab. The authors assessed the ability of immunohistochemistry to detect HER2 overexpression in invasive mammary carcinomas (IMC) using five antibodies. Paraffin-embedded samples of 86 IMCs (T2N0) were used to compare the immunohistochemical overexpression of HER2 using two polyclonal antibodies (HercepTest [DAKO] and A0485 [DAKO]) and three monoclonal antibodies (CB11 from two different laboratories, Biogenex and Novocastra, and 4D5 [Genentech]). All immunostainings were scored according to the FDA-approved HercepTest recommendations. The HercepTest-positive cases were compared with gene amplification by FISH (Oncor Inform, Ventana). The HercepTest was positive in 31 of the 86 cases (36.1%). The DAKO antibody A0485 was positive in 25 of the 66 (37.8%). Monoclonal antibody 4D5 was positive in only 15 of the 86 cases (17.4%). There was almost total agreement in results between the two CB11 antibodies: 25 of the 86 positive cases (29.1%). All cases positive for CB11 or 4D5 were HercepTest positive. Most of the HercepTest 2+ cases were negative when using either monoclonal antibody. FISH was positive in 19 of the 20 HercepTest 3+ cases and negative in 5 HercepTest 2+ cases. Three CB11-2+ cases showed no amplification by FISH. In three FISH-positive cases the immunohistochemistry showed no overexpression by all antibodies used. These findings suggest that immunohistochemistry may be used reliably as a primary methodology for evaluating HER2; however, the use of polyclonal antibodies may not be adequate to assess HER2 overexpression. CB11, regardless of the manufacturer (Biogenex or Novocastra), showed better concordance with FISH (kappa=0.83) than did the polyclonal antibodies. PMID:16540740

  3. Innate antibody catalysis.

    PubMed

    Gololobov, G; Sun, M; Paul, S

    1999-12-01

    Catalysis by antibodies is often assumed to require immunization with artificial haptens, which are proposed to stimulate adaptive immune processes and enable the development of catalytic sites with the ability to bind the transition state. Contrary to this assumption, we describe here a serine protease-like catalytic triad in an antibody light chain raised by immunization with vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), the structure and function of which is inherited via a germline V(L) gene. The serine protease mechanism was evident from loss of the catalytic activity by site directed mutagenesis at a framework region residue Asp1 (present study) and at two complementarity determining region residues Ser27a and His 93 (Gao, Q-S., Sun, M., Rees, A., Paul, S., 1995. Site-directed mutagenesis of proteolytic antibody light chain. J. Mol. Biol. 253, 658-664). All three catalytic residues (Ser27a, His93, Asp1) are also present in the germline counterpart of the mature V(L) gene, but the mature and germline sequences differ by four amino acids remote from the catalytic site. Reversion mutations were introduced at these amino acids in the mature light chain (His27 d:Asp, Thr28e:Ser, Ile34:Asn, Gln96:Trp; Kabat numbering, germline encoded residues shown second), generating the germline configuration of the protein. The germline light chain expressed peptidase activity, determined by assaying the cleavage of VIP and a synthetic protease substrate, Pro-Phe-Arg-Methylcoumarinamide. Differences between the kinetic constants for the mature and germline light chains were marginal. Diisopropylfluorophosphate, a serine protease inhibitor, blocked the peptidase activity of the germline light chain, suggesting the presence of the catalytic triad in a functional state. Like the mature light chain, the germline protein preferentially cleaves peptide bonds on the C-terminal side of basic residues. We conclude that the catalytic activity of certain antibodies is an innate function, originating over the course of phylogenetic evolution of the V(L) genes, as opposed to somatic processes. PMID:10684961

  4. Antibody Glossary —

    Cancer.gov

    The components of the immune system have diverse roles in the initial development of cancers, progression of early-stage malignancies to invasive tumors, establishment of metastatic lesions, tumor dormancy, and response or resistance to therapy. Characterizing the components of the immune system and their functional status in tissues and in tumors requires the use of highly specific reagents. Researchers employ antibodies in a variety of in vitro and in vivo applications to delineate, enrich, or deplete specific immune subsets in order to understand their role(s) in tumorigenesis. This is a glossary of validated reagents and protocols that are useful for functional phenotyping of the immune system in murine cancer models.

  5. Detection of anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-elastase antibodies in vasculitides and infections.

    PubMed Central

    Gallicchio, M C; Savige, J A

    1991-01-01

    Autoantibodies that produce a perinuclear pattern on indirect immunofluorescent examination of ethanol-fixed neutrophils (pANCA) are found in about half of all cases of microscopic polyarteritis. These antibodies are often directed against myeloperoxidase or elastase and we have developed sensitive reproducible ELISAs for their detection and study. Seven sera from 19 patients with microscopic polyarteritis or segmental necrotizing glomerulonephritis contained anti-myeloperoxidase or anti-elastase antibodies or both. In contrast, only one of 18 sera from patients with Wegener's granulomatosis, where the pattern of immunofluorescence is predominantly cytoplasmic, had anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies and no anti-elastase antibodies were detected. Using sera from patients with microscopic polyarteritis, both anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-elastase antibodies were demonstrated to be of high affinity. There was no immunoglobulin class, subclass or light chain restriction noted. Anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-elastase antibodies were also found occasionally in anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, mixed connective tissue disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis and atypical pneumonia. In further studies these antibodies were not associated with other lung infections, although anti-elastase antibodies were noted in one of 14 sera positive for ASOT that were tested. Anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies were found more frequently than anti-elastase antibodies and these antibodies were occasionally present together. In addition some sera with pANCA had neither anti-myeloperoxidase nor anti-elastase antibodies. The target molecules in these cases remain unclear. Images Fig. 4 PMID:1851056

  6. Guinea-pig reaginic antibody

    PubMed Central

    Margni, R. A.; Hajos, Silvia E.

    1973-01-01

    The physicochemical and biological properties of purified guinea-pig reaginic antibody were studied. It is a labile protein different to γ1. Its antibody activity is completely destroyed by heating at 56° for 6 hours and by treatment with mercaptoethanol. The capacity to give PCA is decreased by repeated freezing and thawing. It is a bivalent antibody, haemagglutinating, does not fix complement and is capable of sensitizing guinea-pig skin for PCA reaction after a latent period of a week but not after 3 hours. Reaginic antibody appears on day 7–8 after the first inoculation and the higher levels (PCA reaction) are obtained at the eleventh to thirteenth days. After the fifteenth to seventeenth days the PCA is negative. The reaginic antibody does not pass the placenta. Higher levels of reaginic antibody were obtained when the guinea-pigs were inoculated with the antigen in saline with simultaneous inoculation, intraperitoneally, of killed Bordetella pertussis, phase I. PMID:4354828

  7. Imaging of primary and metastatic colorectal carcinoma with monoclonal antibody 791T/36 and the therapeutic potential of antibody-drug conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Pimm, M.V.; Armitage, N.C.; Ballantyne, K.; Baldwin, R.W.; Perkins, A.C.; Durrant, L.G.; Garnett, M.C.; Hardcastle, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 791T/36, prepared against a tumor-associated 72,000 dalton glycoprotein, reacted with cells from primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas. I-131 or In-111-labelled antibody localized in xenografts of colorectal carcinomas established from in vitro clonogenic populations. Clinically, with I-131-labelled antibody, 8/11 colonic tumors imaged positively. Imaging was negative in four patients with benign colon disease. 5/11 rectal tumors were positively imaged, but excreted I-131 in the bladder obscured tumors in several studies. In-111-labelled antibody gave superior images and positively imaged primary and metastatic sites in 13/14 patients. Prospectively in the detection of recurrent disease, I-131 or In-111-antibody detected 29/33 separate sites in 24 patients. Seven negative patients remain disease free. There were 3 false positives; overall sensitivity was 88%, with 70% specificity. Specific localization of radiolabel was confirmed immunochemically and by counting radioactivity in resected specimens. Antibody conjugates with methotrexate, vindesine and daunomycin retained drug activity and antibody function, including xenograft localization and conjugates were therapeutically effective against xenografts. 791T/36 antibody has potential for immunodetection of primary and recurrent colorectal carcinoma and for targeting of therapeutic agents.

  8. Optimal Synthetic Glycosylation of a Therapeutic Antibody.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Thomas B; Struwe, Weston B; Gault, Joseph; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Taylor, Thomas A; Raj, Ritu; Wals, Kim; Mohammed, Shabaz; Robinson, Carol V; Benesch, Justin L P; Davis, Benjamin G

    2016-02-01

    Glycosylation patterns in antibodies critically determine biological and physical properties but their precise control is a significant challenge in biology and biotechnology. We describe herein the optimization of an endoglycosidase-catalyzed glycosylation of the best-selling biotherapeutic Herceptin, an anti-HER2 antibody. Precise MS analysis of the intact four-chain Ab heteromultimer reveals nonspecific, non-enzymatic reactions (glycation), which are not detected under standard denaturing conditions. This competing reaction, which has hitherto been underestimated as a source of side products, can now be minimized. Optimization allowed access to the purest natural form of Herceptin to date (≥90 %). Moreover, through the use of a small library of sugars containing non-natural functional groups, Ab variants containing defined numbers of selectively addressable chemical tags (reaction handles at Sia C1) in specific positions (for attachment of cargo molecules or "glycorandomization") were readily generated. PMID:26756880

  9. Vaccination Strategies to Promote Mucosal Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kang; Cerutti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    There are great interest and demand for the development of vaccines to prevent and treat diverse microbial infections. Mucosal vaccines elicit immune protection by stimulating the production of antibodies at mucosal surfaces and systemic districts. Being positioned in close proximity to a large community of commensal microbes, the mucosal immune system deploys a heterogeneous population of cells and a complex regulatory network to maintain the balance between surveillance and tolerance. A successful mucosal vaccine relies on leveraging the functions of these immune cells and regulatory components. This article reviews the important cellular interactions and molecular pathways underlying the induction and regulation of mucosal antibody responses and discusses their implications on mucosal vaccination. PMID:21029959

  10. NMDA receptor antibodies associated with distinct white matter syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Hemingway, Cheryl; Jacobson, Leslie; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Pike, Mike; Pullaperuma, Sunil; Siddiqui, Ata; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waters, Patrick; Irani, Sarosh R.; Buckley, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical and radiologic findings of children with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies and white matter disorders. Method: Ten children with significant white matter involvement, with or without anti-NMDAR encephalitis, were identified from 46 consecutive NMDAR antibody–positive pediatric patients. Clinical and neuroimaging features were reviewed and the treatment and outcomes of the neurologic syndromes evaluated. Results: Three distinct clinicoradiologic phenotypes were recognized: brainstem encephalitis (n = 3), leukoencephalopathy following herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) (n = 2), and acquired demyelination syndromes (ADS) (n = 5); 3 of the 5 with ADS had myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein as well as NMDAR antibodies. Typical NMDAR antibody encephalitis was seen in 3 patients remote from the first neurologic syndrome (2 brainstem, 1 post-HSVE). Six of the 7 patients (85%) who were treated acutely, during the original presentation with white matter involvement, improved following immunotherapy with steroids, IV immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, either individually or in combination. Two patients had escalation of immunotherapy at relapse resulting in clinical improvement. The time course of clinical features, treatments, and recoveries correlated broadly with available serum antibody titers. Conclusion: Clinicoradiologic evidence of white matter involvement, often distinct, was identified in 22% of children with NMDAR antibodies and appears immunotherapy responsive, particularly when treated in the acute phase of neurologic presentation. When observed, this clinical improvement is often mirrored by reduction in NMDAR antibody levels, suggesting that these antibodies may mediate the white matter disease. PMID:25340058

  11. Prostate cancer, Hu antibodies and paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Storstein, A; Raspotnig, M; Vitaliani, R; Giometto, B; Graus, F; Grisold, W; Honnorat, J; Vedeler, C A

    2016-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American and European men. Nervous system affection caused by local tumor growth or osseous metastases are the main causes of neurological symptoms in prostate cancer patients. Prostate cancer is rarely reported in association with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). We have, therefore, studied clinical and paraclinical findings of a series of patients with prostate cancer and PNS, and reviewed cases reported in the literature. Case histories of 14 patients with definite PNS from the PNS Euronetwork database and from the authors' databases were reviewed. A PubMed literature search identified 23 patients with prostate cancer and PNS. Thus, a total of 37 case histories were reviewed with respect to syndrome type, cancer evolution, paraclinical investigations, antibody status, treatment and outcome. The three most frequent isolated PNS were paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis (PEM)/limbic encephalitis and subacute sensory neuronopathy (SSN). Onconeural antibodies were detected in 23 patients, in most cases the Hu antibody (17 patients, 74 % of all antibody-positive cases). Other well-characterized onconeural antibodies (Yo, CV2/CRMP5, amphiphysin, VGCC antibodies) were found in a minority. PNS was diagnosed prior to prostate cancer diagnosis in 50 % of the cases. The association of PNS with prostate cancer is quite infrequent, but clinically important. PNS often heralds prostate cancer diagnosis. Syndromes associated with Hu antibodies predominate. Another tumor more prone to associate with PNS should always be excluded. PMID:27007485

  12. Diabetes Antibody Standardization Program

    PubMed Central

    Schlosser, Michael; Mueller, Patricia W.; Achenbach, Peter; Lampasona, Vito; Bingley, Polly J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Autoantibodies to IA-2β (IA-2βA) are important risk markers of type 1 diabetes. We report the first Diabetes Antibody Standardization Program (DASP) evaluation of IA-2βA assays. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Thirteen laboratories from nine countries received coded sera from 50 patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and 100 healthy blood donors. IA-2βA results were analyzed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Concordance of antibody levels was compared using counts per minute (cpm), local and standard curve–derived common units. RESULTS Median laboratory-assigned sensitivity was 47% (interquartile range [IQR] 45–51), specificity 98% (IQR 95–99), adjusted sensitivity at 95% specificity 50% (IQR 49–53), and area under the ROC curve 0.70 (IQR 0.69–0.73). Use of common IA-2βA units improved concordance between assays compared with local units and cpm (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS IA-2βA assays in multiple laboratories worldwide achieved good concordance and high specificity for type 1 diabetes. IA-2βA are suitable for inclusion in autoantibody testing for risk assessment in prediabetes. PMID:21926293

  13. Validating Antibodies to the Cannabinoid CB2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Marchalant, Yannick; Bonnet, Amandine; Kleffmann, Torsten; Ashton, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-based methods for the detection and quantification of membrane integral proteins, in particular, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), have been plagued with issues of primary antibody specificity. In this report, we investigate one of the most commonly utilized commercial antibodies for the cannabinoid CB2 receptor, a GPCR, using immunoblotting in combination with mass spectrometry. In this way, we were able to develop powerful negative and novel positive controls. By doing this, we are able to demonstrate that it is possible for an antibody to be sensitive for a protein of interest—in this case CB2—but still cross-react with other proteins and therefore lack specificity. Specifically, we were able to use western blotting combined with mass spectrometry to unequivocally identify CB2 protein in over-expressing cell lines. This shows that a common practice of validating antibodies with positive controls only is insufficient to ensure antibody reliability. In addition, our work is the first to develop a label-free method of protein detection using mass spectrometry that, with further refinement, could provide unequivocal identification of CB2 receptor protein in native tissues. PMID:24670796

  14. Effect of gender on antisperm antibodies in infertile couples in central India.

    PubMed

    Khatoon, Maria; Chaudhari, A R; Singh, Ramji

    2012-01-01

    The presence of antisperm antibodies in serum may impair sperm function leading to immunological infertility. The aim of study was to determine the presence of antisperm antibodies in the circulating blood of infertile couples. This cross sectional study included 109 couples suffering from infertility for more than one-year duration. Serum antisperm antibodies were determined by Varelisa Sperm Antibodies Enzyme Immunoassay kit. The percentage incidence of antisperm antibodies in infertile men was 30.27% was statistically not significant from the 33.03% incidence in infertile women (P Value > 0.05). In the nineteen (15.59%) couples both the husband as well as wife was positive for sperm antibodies. The presence of antisperm antibodies may impair fertilizing ability therefore its assessment should be consideredas an essential part of infertility management. PMID:23734441

  15. Creating Ordered Antibody Arrays with Antibody-Polymer Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuehui; Obermeyer, Allie; Olsen, Bradley

    Antibodies are a category of functional proteins that play crucial roles in the immune system and have been widely applied in the area of cancer therapeutics, targeting delivery, signal detection, and sensors. Due to the extremely large size and lack of specific functional groups on the surface, it is challenging to functionalize antibodies and manipulate the ordered packing of antibodies in an array with high density and proper orientation, which is critical to achieve outstanding performance in materials. In this work, we demonstrate an efficient and facile approach for preparing antibody-polymer conjugates with two-step sequential ``click'' reaction to form antibody-polymer block copolymers. Highly ordered nanostructures are fabricated based on the principles of block copolymer self-assembly. The nanostructures are studied with both small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Lamellae with alternating antibody domain and polymer domain are observed with an overall domain size of ~50 nm. The nanostructure not only increases the packing density and promotes proper orientation of the antibody, but also provides possible channel to facilitate substrate transportation and improves the stability of the antibody.

  16. Antibody-Mediated Immunity against Tuberculosis: Implications for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new and better vaccines against tuberculosis (TB). Current vaccine design strategies are generally focused on the enhancement of cell-mediated immunity. Antibody-based approaches are not being considered, mostly due to the paradigm that humoral immunity plays little role in the protection against intracellular pathogens. Here, we reappraise and update the increasing evidence for antibody-mediated immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, discuss the complexity of antibody responses to mycobacteria, and address mechanism of protection. Based on these findings and discussions, we challenge the common belief that immunity against M. tuberculosis relies solely on cellular defense mechanisms, and posit that induction of antibody-mediated immunity should be included in TB vaccine development strategies. PMID:23498951

  17. Affinity maturation of antibodies requires integrity of the adult thymus

    PubMed Central

    AbuAttieh, Mouhammed; Bender, Diane; Liu, Esther; Wettstein, Peter; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2013-01-01

    Summary The generation of B cell responses to proteins requires a functional thymus to produce CD4-positive T cells which help in the activation and differentiation of B cells. Because the mature T cell repertoire has abundant cells with helper phenotype, one might predict that in mature individuals the generation of B cell memory would proceed independently of the thymus. Contrary to that prediction, we show here that removal of the thymus after the establishment of the T cell compartment or sham surgery without removal of the thymus impairs affinity maturation of antibodies. Because removal or manipulation of the thymus did not decrease the frequency of mutation of the Ig variable heavy chain exons encoding antigen specific antibodies, we conclude that the thymus controls affinity maturation of antibodies in the mature individual by facilitating selection of B cells with high affinity antibodies. PMID:22105515

  18. Marburg, Ebola and Rift Valley Fever virus antibodies in East African primates.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B K; Gitau, L G; Gichogo, A; Tukei, P M; Else, J G; Suleman, M A; Kimani, R; Sayer, P D

    1982-01-01

    Sera from 464 primates held at four institutes in Kenya were tested by indirect immunofluorescence for the presence of antibodies against Marburg, Ebola, Congo haemorrhagic fever, Rift Valley fever and Lassa viruses. Four of 136 vervet monkeys were positive for Marburg virus antibodies and three of 184 baboons had antibodies against Ebola virus. One baboon was positive for Marburg virus antibodies. Two vervet monkeys, three baboons and one grivet monkey (of 56 tested) had antibodies against Rift Valley fever virus. No Congo or Lassa virus antibodies were detected. A sample of 88 sera of more arboreal primates (Sykes, blue and colobus monkeys) were negative against all five antigens, as were sera from 58 staff members of the institutes who worked with or near the animals. PMID:6810518

  19. Probable C4d-negative accelerated acute antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Takahito; Yamamoto, Izumi; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kamejima, Sahoko; Katsumata, Haruki; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Furuya, Maiko; Mafune, Aki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Yamada, Hiroki; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of probable C4d-negative accelerated acute antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA antibodies. A 44 year-old male was admitted to our hospital for a kidney transplant. The donor, his wife, was an ABO minor mismatch (blood type O to A) and had Gitelman syndrome. Graft function was delayed; his serum creatinine level was 10.1 mg/dL at 3 days after transplantation. Open biopsy was performed immediately; no venous thrombosis was observed during surgery. Histology revealed moderate peritubular capillaritis and mild glomerulitis without C4d immunoreactivity. Flow cytometric crossmatching was positive, but no panel-reactive antibodies against HLA or donor-specific antibodies (DSAbs) to major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) were detected. Taken together, we diagnosed him with probable C4d-negative accelerated antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA, non-MICA antibodies, the patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day for 3 days), plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin (40 g/body), and rituximab (200 mg/body) were performed. Biopsy at 58 days after transplantation, at which time S-Cr levels were 1.56 mg/dL, found no evidence of rejection. This case, presented with a review of relevant literature, demonstrates that probable C4d-negative accelerated acute AMR can result from non-HLA antibodies. PMID:26031592

  20. Position indicator

    DOEpatents

    Tanner, David E.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described in which a position indicator is provided for detecting and indicating the position of a movable element inside a pressure vessel. The movable element may be a valve element or similar device which moves about an axis. Light from a light source is transmitted from a source outside the pressure vessel to a first region inside the pressure vessel in alignment with the axis of the movable element. The light is redirected by a reflector prism to a second region displaced radially from the first region. The reflector prism moves in response to movement of the movable element about its axis such that the second region moves arcuately with respect to the first region. Sensors are arrayed in an arc corresponding to the arc of movement of the second region and signals are transmitted from the sensors to the exterior of the reactor vessel to provide indication of the position of the movable element.

  1. Antibodies: Protective, destructive and regulatory role

    SciTech Connect

    Milgrom, F.; Abeyounis, C.J.; Albini, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers under 10 subject headings. The headings are: Production and Function of Antibodies, Protective Role of Antibodies, Antibodies to Foreign and Neoplastic Cells, Autoantibodies, Regulatory Mechanisms, Allergy, Immune Complexes, Antibodies in Pregnancy and Aging, Administration of Antibodies for Prevention and Therapy, and Abstracts of Poster Presentations.

  2. Titin antibodies in "seronegative" myasthenia gravis - A new role for an old antigen.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, C; Lazaridis, K; Zouvelou, V; Tzartos, J; Mantegazza, R; Antozzi, C; Andreetta, F; Evoli, A; Deymeer, F; Saruhan-Direskeneli, G; Durmus, H; Brenner, T; Vaknin, A; Berrih-Aknin, S; Behin, A; Sharshar, T; De Baets, M; Losen, M; Martinez-Martinez, P; Kleopa, K A; Zamba-Papanicolaou, E; Kyriakides, T; Kostera-Pruszczyk, A; Szczudlik, P; Szyluk, B; Lavrnic, D; Basta, I; Peric, S; Tallaksen, C; Maniaol, A; Gilhus, N E; Casasnovas Pons, C; Pitha, J; Jakubíkova, M; Hanisch, F; Bogomolovas, J; Labeit, D; Labeit, S; Tzartos, S J

    2016-03-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease caused by antibodies targeting the neuromuscular junction of skeletal muscles. Triple-seronegative MG (tSN-MG, without detectable AChR, MuSK and LRP4 antibodies), which accounts for ~10% of MG patients, presents a serious gap in MG diagnosis and complicates differential diagnosis of similar disorders. Several AChR antibody positive patients (AChR-MG) also have antibodies against titin, usually detected by ELISA. We have developed a very sensitive radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA) for titin antibodies, by which many previously negative samples were found positive, including several from tSN-MG patients. The validity of the RIPA results was confirmed by western blots. Using this RIPA we screened 667 MG sera from 13 countries; as expected, AChR-MG patients had the highest frequency of titin antibodies (40.9%), while MuSK-MG and LRP4-MG patients were positive in 14.6% and 16.4% respectively. Most importantly, 13.4% (50/372) of the tSN-MG patients were also titin antibody positive. None of the 121 healthy controls or the 90 myopathy patients, and only 3.6% (7/193) of other neurological disease patients were positive. We thus propose that the present titin antibody RIPA is a useful tool for serological MG diagnosis of tSN patients. PMID:26943968

  3. Clinical cytometry and progress in HLA antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Bray, Robert A; Tarsitani, Christine; Gebel, Howard M; Lee, Jar-How

    2011-01-01

    For most solid organ and selected stem cell transplants, antibodies against mismatched HLA antigens can lead to early and late graft failure. In recognition of the clinical significance of these antibodies, HLA antibody identification is one of the most critical functions of histocompatibility laboratories. Early methods employed cumbersome and insensitive complement-dependent cytotoxicity assays with a visual read-out. A little over 20 years ago flow cytometry entered the realm of antibody detection with the introduction of the flow cytometric crossmatch. Cytometry's increased sensitivity and objectivity quickly earned it popularity as a preferred crossmatch method especially for sensitized recipients. Although a sensitive method, the flow crossmatch was criticized as being "too sensitive" as false positive reactions were a know drawback. In part, the shortcomings of the flow crossmatch were due to the lack of corresponding sensitive and specific HLA antibody screening assays. However, in the mid 1990s, solid phase assays, capable of utilizing standard flow cytometers, were developed. These assays used microparticles coated with purified HLA molecules. Hence, the era of solid-phase, microparticle technology for HLA antibody detection was born permitting the sensitive and specific detection of HLA antibody. It was now possible to provide better correlation between HLA antibody detection and the flow cytometric crossmatch. This flow-based technology was soon followed by adaptation to the Luminex platform permitting a mutltiplexed approach for the identification and characterization of HLA antibodies. It is hoped that these technologies will ultimately lead to the identification of parameters that best correlate with and/or predict transplant outcomes. PMID:21722808

  4. Diagnostic usefulness of antibodies against ribosome recycling factor from Brucella melitensis in human or canine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M Victoria; Velikovsky, Carlos A; Bruno, Laura; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2002-03-01

    The diagnostic usefulness of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a purified recombinant ribosome recycling factor from Brucella melitensis (CP24 antigen) was tested in human and canine infections caused by smooth and rough Brucella species, respectively. Anti-CP24 antibodies were detected in 9 (43%) of 21 consecutive cases of canine brucellosis and in 8 (53%) of 15 dogs followed for 60 days after the diagnosis of acute brucellosis. Among eight patients with acute brucellosis, anti-CP24 antibodies were detected in four in the 10 weeks following diagnosis, but the remaining four were negative during the whole follow-up (22 weeks). The frequency of anti-CP24 antibodies was also low among 24 patients with subacute brucellosis and 23 patients with chronic illness (29 and 26%, respectively). While all patients positive for anti-CP24 antibodies were also positive for antibodies to total cytoplasmic proteins of Brucella (CP), five were negative for antibodies to another cytoplasmic protein, the Brucella lumazine synthase (BLS). When a larger sample of 35 human sera negative for anti-BLS antibodies was assayed, 85.7% were positive for anti-CP24 antibodies, suggesting that the combined measurement of both reactivities could yield a higher sensitivity than any test alone. To test this hypothesis, an ELISA combining both antigens was designed. The percentage of positive results among chronic cases was higher for this assay than for the individual measurement of anti-CP24 or anti-BLS antibodies (83 versus 26 and 65%, respectively) and was closer to the value obtained for anti-CP antibodies (91%). The frequency of anti-CP24 antibodies is low in both canine and human brucellosis. In the latter case, however, an ELISA combining CP24 and BLS is more sensitive than assays measuring anti-CP24 or anti-BLS antibodies separately and almost as sensitive as the ELISA using CP. PMID:11874879

  5. Diagnostic Usefulness of Antibodies against Ribosome Recycling Factor from Brucella melitensis in Human or Canine Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Cassataro, Juliana; Delpino, M. Victoria; Velikovsky, Carlos A.; Bruno, Laura; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2002-01-01

    The diagnostic usefulness of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a purified recombinant ribosome recycling factor from Brucella melitensis (CP24 antigen) was tested in human and canine infections caused by smooth and rough Brucella species, respectively. Anti-CP24 antibodies were detected in 9 (43%) of 21 consecutive cases of canine brucellosis and in 8 (53%) of 15 dogs followed for 60 days after the diagnosis of acute brucellosis. Among eight patients with acute brucellosis, anti-CP24 antibodies were detected in four in the 10 weeks following diagnosis, but the remaining four were negative during the whole follow-up (22 weeks). The frequency of anti-CP24 antibodies was also low among 24 patients with subacute brucellosis and 23 patients with chronic illness (29 and 26%, respectively). While all patients positive for anti-CP24 antibodies were also positive for antibodies to total cytoplasmic proteins of Brucella (CP), five were negative for antibodies to another cytoplasmic protein, the Brucella lumazine synthase (BLS). When a larger sample of 35 human sera negative for anti-BLS antibodies was assayed, 85.7% were positive for anti-CP24 antibodies, suggesting that the combined measurement of both reactivities could yield a higher sensitivity than any test alone. To test this hypothesis, an ELISA combining both antigens was designed. The percentage of positive results among chronic cases was higher for this assay than for the individual measurement of anti-CP24 or anti-BLS antibodies (83 versus 26 and 65%, respectively) and was closer to the value obtained for anti-CP antibodies (91%). The frequency of anti-CP24 antibodies is low in both canine and human brucellosis. In the latter case, however, an ELISA combining CP24 and BLS is more sensitive than assays measuring anti-CP24 or anti-BLS antibodies separately and almost as sensitive as the ELISA using CP. PMID:11874879

  6. Interference of endogenous lactoperoxidase antibodies in a solid-phase immunosorbent radioassay for antibodies to protein hormones

    SciTech Connect

    Ericsson, U.B.; Larsson, I.

    1984-11-01

    Interference of endogenous antibodies to lactoperoxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) has been demonstrated in a solid-phase immunosorbent radioassay for the detection of antibodies to protein hormones. On enzymic iodination with lactoperoxidase, a little of the /sup 125/I is incorporated in the enzyme itself by self-iodination. Because the /sup 125/I-labeled lactoperoxidase was not removed from the tracer by chromatography on Sephadex G-50, G-100, and G-200 columns, endogenous antibodies to the enzyme, which were present in 25 of 28 sera from apparently healthy individuals, were detected in conjunction with the measurement of antibodies to growth hormone (somatotropin), prolactin, and thyroglobulin, thus causing false-positive results. Contaminating radioactive lactoperoxidase can be removed by adsorption chromatography on cellulose or by liquid chromatography, and can be avoided by performing the iodination with immobilized lactoperoxidase or with Chloramine-T.

  7. Cross-reactive and pre-existing antibodies to therapeutic antibodies—Effects on treatment and immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    van Schie, Karin A; Wolbink, Gerrit-Jan; Rispens, Theo

    2015-01-01

    The potential for immunogenicity is an ever-present concern during the development of biopharmaceuticals. Therapeutic antibodies occasionally elicit an antibody response in patients, which can result in loss of response or adverse effects. However, antibodies that bind a drug are sometimes found in pre-treatment serum samples, with the amount depending on drug, assay, and patient population. This review summarizes published data on pre-existing antibodies to therapeutic antibodies, including rheumatoid factors, anti-allotype antibodies, anti-hinge antibodies, and anti-glycan antibodies. Unlike anti-idiotype antibodies elicited by the drug, pre-formed antibodies in general appear to have little consequences during treatment. In the few cases where (potential) clinical consequences were encountered, antibodies were characterized and found to bind a distinct, unusual epitope of the therapeutic. Immunogenicity testing strategies should therefore always include a proper level of antibody characterization, especially when pre-formed antibodies are present. This minimizes false-positives, particularly due to rheumatoid factors, and helps to judge the potential threat in case a genuine pre-dose antibody reactivity is identified. PMID:25962087

  8. Micromechanical antibody sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Jacobson, K. Bruce; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    A sensor apparatus is provided using a microcantilevered spring element having a coating of a detector molecule such as an antibody or antigen. A sample containing a target molecule or substrate is provided to the coating. The spring element bends in response to the stress induced by the binding which occurs between the detector and target molecules. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers.

  9. Clinical significance of antibody specificities to M, N and Lewis blood group system

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Arora, Bhavna; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Chowdhry, Mohit; Luka, Rosamma Nakamatathil

    2014-01-01

    Context: The clinically significant antibodies are those active at 37°C and/or by the indirect antiglobulin test. Most of the published literature refers to antibodies of Lewis blood group system to be insignificant, whereas antibodies to M and N blood groups are associated with variable clinical significance. Aims: The aim of this study is to find the frequency and clinical significance of antibodies to M, N and Lewis blood group systems. Settings and Design: The study was carried out retrospectively from January 2009 to December 2012. Materials and Methods: Antibody screening was performed by solid phase red cell adherence (SPRCA) technique using four cell screening panel on a fully automated platform GALILEO (Immucor Inc. USA). In case of a positive antibody screen, antibody identification was performed using SPRCA (GALILEO, Immucor Inc. USA). Results: A total of 49,077 red cell antibody screens were performed and a total of 427 identifications of red cell antibodies were carried out. A total of 304 specific antibodies were detected: 8.22% of antibodies were of anti-M specificity and 2.96% were of anti-N specificity. Majority (84%) of anti-M and 77.78% of anti-N were of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) class reacting at 37°C. 1.31% of the antibodies were directed against Lewis system antigens of which 0.65% were anti-Lea and 0.65% were anti-Leb. Half of the Lewis system antibodies, i.e., 1 each of anti-Lea and anti-Leb were of IgG class. Conclusion: Our study highlights the importance of detecting the thermal amplitude of antibodies with variable clinical significance especially if both IgG and IgM types of antibodies are associated with it so as to establish their clinical significance. PMID:25161347

  10. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed. PMID:20930555

  11. Endogenous Antibodies for Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Barrie S.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Darcy, David G.; Smith, Peter T.; Williams, Andrew R.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Johnson, Linda K.; Gönen, Mithat; Simon, Joel S.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer immunology has provided diagnostic and therapeutic instruments through serum autoantibody biomarkers and exogenous monoclonal antibodies. While some endogenous antibodies are found within or surrounding transformed tissue, the extent to which this exists has not been entirely characterized. We find that in transgenic and xenograft mouse models of cancer, endogenous gamma immunoglobulin (IgG) is present at higher concentration in malignantly transformed organs compared to non-transformed organs in the same mouse or organs of cognate wild-type mice. The enrichment of endogenous antibodies within the malignant tissue provides a potential means of identifying and tracking malignant cells in vivo as they mutate and diversify. Exploiting these antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is possible through the use of agents that bind endogenous antibodies. PMID:24875800

  12. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed. PMID:20930555

  13. SnugDock: paratope structural optimization during antibody-antigen docking compensates for errors in antibody homology models.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Aroop; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2010-01-01

    High resolution structures of antibody-antigen complexes are useful for analyzing the binding interface and to make rational choices for antibody engineering. When a crystallographic structure of a complex is unavailable, the structure must be predicted using computational tools. In this work, we illustrate a novel approach, named SnugDock, to predict high-resolution antibody-antigen complex structures by simultaneously structurally optimizing the antibody-antigen rigid-body positions, the relative orientation of the antibody light and heavy chains, and the conformations of the six complementarity determining region loops. This approach is especially useful when the crystal structure of the antibody is not available, requiring allowances for inaccuracies in an antibody homology model which would otherwise frustrate rigid-backbone docking predictions. Local docking using SnugDock with the lowest-energy RosettaAntibody homology model produced more accurate predictions than standard rigid-body docking. SnugDock can be combined with ensemble docking to mimic conformer selection and induced fit resulting in increased sampling of diverse antibody conformations. The combined algorithm produced four medium (Critical Assessment of PRediction of Interactions-CAPRI rating) and seven acceptable lowest-interface-energy predictions in a test set of fifteen complexes. Structural analysis shows that diverse paratope conformations are sampled, but docked paratope backbones are not necessarily closer to the crystal structure conformations than the starting homology models. The accuracy of SnugDock predictions suggests a new genre of general docking algorithms with flexible binding interfaces targeted towards making homology models useful for further high-resolution predictions. PMID:20098500

  14. Molecular diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection in human kidney transplants.

    PubMed

    Sellars, J; Reeve, J; Loupy, A; Mengel, M; Sis, B; Skene, A; de Freitas, D G; Kreepala, C; Hidalgo, L G; Famulski, K S; Halloran, P F

    2013-04-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection is the major cause of kidney transplant failure, but the histology-based diagnostic system misses most cases due to its requirement for C4d positivity. We hypothesized that gene expression data could be used to test biopsies for the presence of antibody-mediated rejection. To develop a molecular test, we prospectively assigned diagnoses, including C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection, to 403 indication biopsies from 315 patients, based on histology (microcirculation lesions) and donor-specific HLA antibody. We then used microarray data to develop classifiers that assigned antibody-mediated rejection scores to each biopsy. The transcripts distinguishing antibody-mediated rejection from other conditions were mostly expressed in endothelial cells or NK cells, or were IFNG-inducible. The scores correlated with the presence of microcirculation lesions and donor-specific antibody. Of 45 biopsies with scores>0.5, 39 had been diagnosed as antibody-mediated rejection on the basis of histology and donor-specific antibody. High scores were also associated with unanimity among pathologists that antibody-mediated rejection was present. The molecular score also strongly predicted future graft loss in Cox regression analysis. We conclude that microarray assessment of gene expression can assign a probability of ABMR to transplant biopsies without knowledge of HLA antibody status, histology, or C4d staining, and predicts future failure. PMID:23414212

  15. Off-rate screening for selection of high-affinity anti-drug antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ylera, Francisco; Harth, Stefan; Waldherr, Dirk; Frisch, Christian; Knappik, Achim

    2013-10-15

    The rapidly increasing number of therapeutic antibodies in clinical development and on the market requires corresponding detection reagents for monitoring the concentration of these drugs in patient samples and as positive controls for measurement of anti-drug antibodies. Phage display of large recombinant antibody libraries has been shown to enable the rapid development of fully human anti-idiotypic antibodies binding specifically to antibody drugs, since the in vitro panning approach allows for incorporation of suitable blockers to drive selection toward the paratope of the drug. A typical bottleneck in antibody generation projects is ranking of the many candidates obtained after panning on the basis of antibody binding strength. Ideally, such method will work without prior labeling of antigens and with crude bacterial lysates. We developed an off-rate screening method of crude Escherichia coli lysates containing monovalent Fab fragments obtained after phage display of the HuCAL PLATINUM® antibody library. We used the antibody drugs trastuzumab and cetuximab as antigen examples. Using the Octet® RED384 label-free sensor instrument we show that antibody off rates can be reliably determined in crude bacterial lysates with high throughput. We also demonstrate that the method can be applied to screening for high-affinity antibodies typically obtained after affinity maturation. PMID:23906643

  16. Selection of Antibodies Interfering with Cell Surface Receptor Signaling Using Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Melidoni, Anna N; Dyson, Michael R; McCafferty, John

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies able to bind and modify the function of cell surface signaling components in vivo are increasingly being used as therapeutic drugs. The identification of such "functional" antibodies from within large antibody pools is, therefore, the subject of intense research. Here we describe a novel cell-based expression and reporting system for the identification of functional antibodies from antigen-binding populations preselected with phage display. The system involves inducible expression of the antibody gene population from the Rosa-26 locus of embryonic stem (ES) cells, followed by secretion of the antibodies during ES cell differentiation. Target antigens are cell-surface signaling components (receptors or ligands) with a known effect on the direction of cell differentiation (FGFR1 mediating ES cell exit from self renewal in this particular protocol). Therefore, inhibition or activation of these components by functional antibodies in a few elite clones causes a shift in the differentiation outcomes of these clones, leading to their phenotypic selection. Functional antibody genes are then recovered from positive clones and used to produce the purified antibodies, which can be tested for their ability to affect cell fates exogenously. Identified functional antibody genes can be further introduced in different stem cell types. Inducible expression of functional antibodies has a temporally controlled protein-knockdown capability, which can be used to study the unknown role of the signaling pathway in different developmental contexts. Moreover, it provides a means for control of stem cell differentiation with potential in vivo applications. PMID:26036698

  17. Antibody Discovery via Multiplexed Single Cell Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Harriman, William D.; Collarini, Ellen J.; Sperinde, Gizette V.; Strandh, Magnus; Fatholahi, Marjan M.; Dutta, April; Lee, Yunji; Mettler, Shelley E.; Keyt, Bruce A.; Ellsworth, Stote L.; Kauvar, Lawrence M.

    2009-01-01

    The secreted immunoglobulin footprint of single hybridoma cells, containing ~10 fg of antibody purified in situ, has been probed for 9 properties concurrently by use of detection labels comprising 280 nm combinatorially colored fluorescent latex beads functionalized with proteins. Specificity of each individual hybridoma cell’s product has thereby been assessed in a primary screen. Varying the density of antigen on beads to modulate the avidity of the interaction between bead and secreted antibody footprint allowed rank ordering by affinity in the same primary screen. As more criteria were added to the selection process, the frequency of positive cells went down; in some cases, the favorable cell was present at <1/50,000. Recovery of the cell of interest was accomplished by plating the cells in a viscous medium on top of a membrane. After collecting the antibody footprint on a capture surface beneath the membrane, the immobilized cells were transferred to an incubator while the footprints were analyzed to locate the hybridoma cells of interest. The desired cells were then cloned by picking them from the corresponding locations on the membrane. PMID:19087879

  18. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    EBV antibody test; EBV serology ... a lab, where a lab specialist looks for antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus. In the first stages of an illness, little antibody may be detected. For this reason, the test ...

  19. Antibodies - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    NCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit.

  20. Position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, Siegfried (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A radiant energy angle sensor is provided wherein the sensitive portion thereof comprises a pair of linear array detectors with each detector mounted normal to the other to provide X and Y channels and a pair of slits spaced from the pair of linear arrays with each of the slits positioned normal to its associated linear array. There is also provided electrical circuit means connected to the pair of linear array detectors and to separate X and Y axes outputs.

  1. HLA phenotype and insulin antibody production.

    PubMed

    Reeves, W G; Gelsthorpe, K; Van der Minne, P; Torensma, R; Tattersall, R B

    1984-08-01

    HLA phenotypes have been determined in 79 patients as part of a prospective study of factors governing the immune response to injected insulin. IgG insulin antibody levels 6 months after starting treatment with bovine insulin were significantly higher in patients bearing HLA-DR7 and this in conjunction with the lack of a similar pattern in the IgG response to Helix pomatia haemocyanin, suggests the presence of an immune response gene for insulin. The hyporesponsiveness of HLA-B8/DR3/C4AQ0 positive individuals is more likely to reflect a non-specific abnormality of immunity. PMID:6432385

  2. Identification of anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies using IgG platelet antibody detection and crossmatch system assay with Galileo Echo.

    PubMed

    Di Cristofaro, Julie; Frassati, Coralie; Montagnie, Rolande; Basire, Agnes; Merieux, Yves; Picard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Fetal/neonatal allo-immune thrombocytopenia is the most frequent and the most dangerous clinical condition involving anti-human platelet antigens (HPA)-1a allo-antibodies. Anti-HPA-1a allo-immunization requires rapid and accurate diagnosis to determine appropriate treatment. The Capture-P Ready-Screen assay (C-PRS) is a new qualitative immunoassay to detect IgG anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and anti-HPA allo-antibodies. The aim of this study is to assess the identification of anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies using the C-PRS assay, associated with HLA class I stripping reagents, on the automated benchtop analyzer Galileo Echo. Forty-nine sera were analyzed: without anti-HLA class I or anti-HPA allo-antibodies, with anti-HLA class I allo-antibodies, with anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies, among which with anti-HLA class I allo-antibodies. None of the samples without allo-antibodies were reactive. Only anti-HLA antibodies, detected by cytotoxicity-dependent complement and not by Luminex, remained positive before and after stripping reagents. Of the 13 samples, anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies that were correctly identified before and after incubation with HLA assassin reagent were 70% and 85%, respectively. Anti-glycoprotein auto-antibodies and anti-HLA allo-antibodies do not interfere with the detection of anti-HPA-1a antibodies. This preliminary study indicates that further improvement of the test will be helpful in developing a clinically useful assay in the future. PMID:25101933

  3. Positive Psychologists on Positive Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article by McNulty and Fincham (see record 2011-15476-001). In their article, the authors offered compelling evidence that constructs such as forgiveness and optimism can have both beneficial and adverse consequences, depending on the context. Their caution about labeling particular psychological processes as "positive" is…

  4. Screening Autoimmune Anti-neuronal Antibodies in Pediatric Patients with Suspected Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Yeon; Choi, Sun Ah; Ryu, Hye Won; Kim, Hunmin; Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify and describe the pediatric autoimmune encephalitis cases positive for anti-neuronal antibody tests. Methods: Screening of six anti-neuronal antibodies in 23 children with suspected autoimmune encephalitis was performed by cell-based indirect immunofluorescence test with patients’ serum or cerebrospinal fluid. Results: Among the 23 cases enrolled here, eight patients (35%) were positive for the anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antibody and one patient (4%) was positive for the anti-contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2) antibody. In the anti-NMDA receptor antibody-positive group, seizure and movement disorders were the most prominent features and were present in all patients. A tumor was present in only one patient. Three patients with infant- and toddler-onset disease did not exhibit a classic multistage illness. In addition to seizure and dyskinesia, aphasia or mutism without severe consciousness impairment was present in all three patients. These atypical clinical presentations may suggest different pathomechanism of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis among these age groups. The patient who was positive for the anti-CASPR2 antibody was an 8-year-old girl who presented with fever, encephalopathy, and seizure. Neuromyotonia or other dyskinesia was not present. Conclusions: Eight anti-NMDA receptor antibody positive patients and one CASPR2 positive patient were identified from the screening of six anti-neuronal antibodies in pediatric patients suspected with autoimmune encephalitis. Developmental regression specifically for language skills was suggested as one of the atypical clinical features in infants and toddler onset anti-NMDA receptor antibody positive patients. PMID:25625089

  5. A Study of Circulating Gliadin Antibodies in Schizophrenia Among a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shun-Zi; Wu, Ning; Xu, Qi; Zhang, Xuan; Ju, Gui-Zhi; Law, Matthew H.; Wei, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The present work measured circulating antibodies against native gliadins, deamidated gliadinderived epitopes, and transglutaminase 2 (TGM2) in 473 patients with schizophrenia and 478 control subjects among a Chinese population. The results showed that 27.1% of patients with schizophrenia were positive for the IgA antibody against native gliadins compared with 17.8% of control subjects (?2 = 11.52, P = .0007, OR = 1.72, 95% CI 1.252.35), although this significant difference appeared to be due mainly to low IgA gliadin antibody levels in female controls. A total of 27.6% of female patients were positive for IgA gliadin antibodies compared with 13.9% of female controls (?2 = 10.46, P = .0012, OR = 2.36, 95% CI 1.394.01), and 26.4% of male patients were positive for IgA antibodies compared with 19.8% of male controls (?2 = 3.26, P = .071, OR = 1.46, 95% CI 0.972.19). Of 128 patients who were positive for the IgA antibody against native gliadins, 8 were positive for the IgA antibody against deamidated gliadin epitopes and 1 was positive for IgA anti-TGM2 antibody. However, quantitative analysis demonstrated that the mean levels of IgA antibodies against deamidated gliadin epitopes and TGM2 were significantly lower in patients with schizophrenia than the control subjects (P < .001 and P = .008, respectively). The prevalence of IgG antibodies against native gliadins was not significantly different between the patient group and the control group (?2 = 2.25, P = .134, OR = 1.32, 95% CI 0.921.88). This study suggests that specific gliadin-derived epitopes may be involved in schizophrenia. PMID:20884755

  6. A longitudinal study on avian polyomavirus-specific antibodies in captive Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii).

    PubMed

    Deb, Amrita; Foldenauer, Ulrike; Borjal, Raffy Jim; Streich, W Jürgen; Lüken, Caroline; Johne, Reimar; Müller, Hermann; Hammer, Sven

    2010-09-01

    Avian polyomavirus (APV) causes a range of disease syndromes in psittacine birds, from acute fatal disease to subclinical infections, depending on age, species, and other unidentified risk factors. To determine the prevalence of APV-specific antibodies in a captive population of Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii) in Quatar, 54 birds were tested by blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A prevalence of 48.1% for APV antibodies, which indicates viral exposure, was found. Of 36 Spix's macaws that were serially tested over a period of 4 years, 50.0% were consistently positive, 36.1% were consistently negative, 5.5% had permanently declining antibody levels, and 2.8% showed variable results. By using polymerase chain reaction testing on whole blood samples, an apparent viremia was detected in 1 of 44 birds (2.3%), although contamination provides a likely explanation for this isolated positive result in a hand-reared chick. The white blood cell count was significantly higher in antibody-positive birds compared with antibody-negative birds (P < .05). Because antibody-positive and antibody-negative birds were housed together without a change in their respective antibody status, transmission of APV within the adult breeding population appeared to be a rare event. PMID:21046939

  7. High-content Analysis of Antibody Phage-display Library Selection Outputs Identifies Tumor Selective Macropinocytosis-dependent Rapidly Internalizing Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kevin D.; Bidlingmaier, Scott M.; Zhang, Yafeng; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Many forms of antibody-based targeted therapeutics, including antibody drug conjugates, utilize the internalizing function of the targeting antibody to gain intracellular entry into tumor cells. Ideal antibodies for developing such therapeutics should be capable of both tumor-selective binding and efficient endocytosis. The macropinocytosis pathway is capable of both rapid and bulk endocytosis, and recent studies have demonstrated that it is selectively up-regulated by cancer cells. We hypothesize that receptor-dependent macropinocytosis can be achieved using tumor-targeting antibodies that internalize via the macropinocytosis pathway, improving potency and selectivity of the antibody-based targeted therapeutic. Although phage antibody display libraries have been utilized to find antibodies that bind and internalize to target cells, no methods have been described to screen for antibodies that internalize specifically via macropinocytosis. We hereby describe a novel screening strategy to identify phage antibodies that bind and rapidly enter tumor cells via macropinocytosis. We utilized an automated microscopic imaging-based, High Content Analysis platform to identify novel internalizing phage antibodies that colocalize with macropinocytic markers from antibody libraries that we have generated previously by laser capture microdissection-based selection, which are enriched for internalizing antibodies binding to tumor cells in situ residing in their tissue microenvironment (Ruan, W., Sassoon, A., An, F., Simko, J. P., and Liu, B. (2006) Identification of clinically significant tumor antigens by selecting phage antibody library on tumor cells in situ using laser capture microdissection. Mol. Cell. Proteomics. 5, 2364–2373). Full-length human IgG molecules derived from macropinocytosing phage antibodies retained the ability to internalize via macropinocytosis, validating our screening strategy. The target antigen for a cross-species binding antibody with a highly active macropinocytosis activity was identified as ephrin type-A receptor 2. Antibody-toxin conjugates created using this macropinocytosing IgG were capable of potent and receptor-dependent killing of a panel of EphA2-positive tumor cell lines in vitro. These studies identify novel methods to screen for and validate antibodies capable of receptor-dependent macropinocytosis, allowing further exploration of this highly efficient and tumor-selective internalization pathway for targeted therapy development. PMID:25149096

  8. Recent advances in the development of anti-HER2 antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Deborah J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted therapies have revolutionized the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer, both in the metastatic and early stage settings. While trastuzumab and lapatinib had been the mainstays of treatment in combination with chemotherapy, innate and acquired resistance to these therapies occur. More recently, two additional HER2-directed therapies have been approved for HER2-positive breast cancer. Pertuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds to the extracellular portion of the receptor on a domain distinct from the binding site of trastuzumab. The addition of pertuzumab to trastuzumab results in synergistic tumor cell inhibition and has been shown to significantly improve clinical outcomes for patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) compared to trastuzumab plus chemotherapy alone. In addition, ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), a novel antibody-drug conjugate linking trastuzumab with the cytotoxic maytansinoid, DM1, is an effective treatment for HER2-positive breast cancer that has progressed on other HER2-directed therapies. Both pertuzumab and T-DM1 are relatively well tolerated. This review presents the mechanisms of action as well as phase I, II and III clinical data describing the safety and efficacy of pertuzumab and T-DM1 for HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:25568875

  9. Encephalitis and GABAB receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Höftberger, Romana; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Sabater, Lidia; Dome, Balazs; Rózsás, Anita; Hegedus, Balazs; Hoda, Mir Alireza; Laszlo, Viktoria; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan; Harms, Lutz; Boyero, Sabas; de Felipe, Alicia; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical features of 20 newly diagnosed patients with GABAB receptor (GABABR) antibodies and determine the frequency of associated tumors and concurrent neuronal autoantibodies. Methods: Clinical data were retrospectively obtained and evaluated. Serum and CSF samples were examined for additional antibodies using methods previously reported. Results: Seventeen patients presented with seizures, memory loss, and confusion, compatible with limbic encephalitis (LE), one patient presented with ataxia, one patient presented with status epilepticus, and one patient presented with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS). Nineteen (95%) patients eventually developed LE during the course of the disease. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) was identified in 10 (50%) patients, all with LE. Treatment and outcome was available from 19 patients: 15 showed complete (n = 7) or partial (n = 8) neurologic improvement after steroids, IV immunoglobulins, or plasma exchange and oncologic treatment when indicated; 1 patient died of tumor progression shortly after the first cycle of immunotherapy, and 3 were not treated. Five patients with SCLC had additional onconeuronal antibodies (Ri, amphiphysin, or SOX1), and 2 without tumor had GAD65 and NMDAR antibodies, respectively. GABABR antibodies were not detected in serum of 116 patients with SCLC without neurologic symptoms. Conclusion: Our study confirms GABABR as an autoantigen of paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic LE and expands the phenotype of GABABR antibodies to ataxia, OMS, and status epilepticus. The long-term prognosis is dictated by the presence of a tumor. Recognition of syndromes associated with GABABR antibodies is important because they usually respond to treatment. PMID:24068784

  10. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, Max A.; Alter, Paul

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for precisely positioning materials test specimens within the optimum neutron flux path emerging from a neutron source located in a housing. The test specimens are retained in a holder mounted on the free end of a support pivotably mounted and suspended from a movable base plate. The support is gravity biased to urge the holder in a direction longitudinally of the flux path against the housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the holder in two mutually perpendicular directions normal to the axis of the flux path.

  11. POSITIONING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wall, R.R.; Peterson, D.L.

    1959-09-15

    A positioner is described for a vertical reactor-control rod. The positioner comprises four grooved friction rotatable members that engage the control rod on all sides and shift it longitudinally. The four friction members are drivingly interconnected for conjoint rotation and comprise two pairs of coaxial members. The members of each pair are urged toward one another by hydraulic or pneumatic pressure and thus grip the control rod so as to hold it in any position or adjust it. Release of the by-draulic or pneumatic pressure permits springs between the friction members of each pair to force them apart, whereby the control rod moves quickly by gravity into the reactor.

  12. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, M.A.; Alter, P.

    1983-07-07

    An apparatus is provided for precisely adjusting the position of an article relative to a beam emerging from a neutron source disposed in a housing. The apparatus includes a support pivotably mounted on a movable base plate and freely suspended therefrom. The support is gravity biased toward the housing and carries an article holder movable in a first direction longitudinally of the axis of said beam and normally urged into engagement against said housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the suspended holder in two mutually perpendicular directions, respectively, normal to the axis of the beam.

  13. Antibody response to Arcanobacterium haemolyticum infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Nyman, M; Alugupalli, K R; Strömberg, S; Forsgren, A

    1997-06-01

    Arcanobacterium haemolyticum causes pharyngitis, exanthema, and other infections. The evidence of the pathogenicity of A. haemolyticum depends on clinical descriptions of culture-positive patients and a comparison of carrier rates of patients with pharyngitis and healthy, matched controls. In this investigation, the antibody response of the host was studied for the first time, using SDS-PAGE and Western blot analyses. Paired acute and convalescent sera showed development of antibodies to A. haemolyticum in 7 of 8 patients. The antibodies reacted primarily with four distinct cell wall-associated proteins with estimated molecular masses of 80, 60, 50, and 30 kDa. Moreover, the reactivity of convalescent sera from 19 patients was compared with that of sera from 19 controls. Antibodies to A. haemolyticum were found in sera from 16 patients and 6 controls (P < .005); the antibody response of the patients was strong compared with that of the controls. These results indicate that A. haemolyticum infection induces an antibody response in the host. PMID:9180197

  14. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  15. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼ 70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  16. SINGLE CHAIN ANTIBODY WITH SPECIFICITY FOR LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single chain antibody (scFv) fragments exhibiting specific binding to Listeria monocytogenes strains were isolated from a pool of random scFv fragments expressed on the surface of filamentous bacteriophage. Positive selection (panning) using L. monocytogenes was used to enrich for phage clones with...

  17. Prevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Antibodies in Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodu, Brad; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study of 125 sophomore preclinical dental students found that these young professionals, because of having a low prevalence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) antibodies, are at risk for acquiring a primary HSV infection when treating HSV positive patients and should take precautions to avoid virus transmission. (MSE)

  18. Reducing heterophilic antibody interference in immunoassays using single chain antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Tan, Ruimin; Fischer, Christopher J.; Victry, Kristin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2011-12-15

    Sandwich ELISA microarrays have the potential to simultaneously quantify the levels of multiple diagnostic targets in a biological sample. However, as seen with traditional ELISA diagnostics, heterophilic antibodies (HA) in patient sera have the potential to cause interference in these assays. We demonstrate here that reducing the diagnostic capture antibody to its minimal functional unit, the variable heavy and light domains artificially connected with a short polypeptide linker (scFv), is an effective strategy for reducing the HA assay interference.

  19. Characterization of Two Human Monoclonal Antibodies Neutralizing Influenza A H7N9 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Zhang, Weijia; Xue, Ying; Pang, XingHuo; Zhang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    H7N9 was a cause of significant global health concern due to its severe infection and approximately 35% mortality in humans. By screening a Fab antibody phage library derived from patients who recovered from H7N9 infections, we characterized two human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs), HNIgGD5 and HNIgGH8. The epitope of these two antibodies was dependent on two residues in the receptor binding site at positions V186 and L226 of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein. Both antibodies possessed high neutralizing activity. PMID:26063436

  20. Marketed therapeutic antibodies compendium

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M.

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently being approved for marketing in Europe and the United States, as well as other countries, on a regular basis. As more mAbs become available to physicians and patients, keeping track of the number, types, production cell lines, antigenic targets, and dates and locations of approvals has become challenging. Data are presented here for 34 mAbs that were approved in either Europe or the United States (US) as of March 2012, and nimotuzumab, which is marketed outside Europe and the US. Of the 34 mAbs, 28 (abciximab, rituximab, basiliximab, palivizumab, infliximab, trastuzumab, alemtuzumab, adalimumab, tositumomab-I131, cetuximab, ibrituximab tiuxetan, omalizumab, bevacizumab, natalizumab, ranibizumab, panitumumab, eculizumab, certolizumab pegol, golimumab, canakinumab, catumaxomab, ustekinumab, tocilizumab, ofatumumab, denosumab, belimumab, ipilimumab, brentuximab) are currently marketed in Europe or the US. Data for six therapeutic mAbs (muromonab-CD3, nebacumab, edrecolomab, daclizumab, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, efalizumab) that were approved but have been withdrawn or discontinued from marketing in Europe or the US are also included. PMID:22531442

  1. Immunotoxicity of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are large molecules intended to bind to specific targets often expressed on the immune system, and to treat various immunopathological conditions. Therefore, mAbs can be considered to have a high potential for immunotoxicity, which is reflected in the clinical experience accumulated on mAbs-induced adverse effects related to immunosuppression, immunostimulation and hypersensitivity (immunogenicity). So far, non clinical immunotoxicity studies have been inadequate to address all safety issues in relation to the possible immunotoxicity of mAbs, because they are fraught with limitations and pitfalls primarily related to the lack of relevant animal species. In addition, clinical studies rarely include validated end-points dedicated to the prediction of immunotoxicity. With the ongoing development of mAbs as novel therapeutic strategies for a wide variety of diseases, efforts should be paid to improve our understanding of mAbs-induced immunotoxic effects and design dedicated strategies to assess their immunological safety, both non clinically and clinically. PMID:20061816

  2. Antibodies to age-β2 glycoprotein I in patients with anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sorice, M; Buttari, B; Capozzi, A; Profumo, E; Facchiano, F; Truglia, S; Recalchi, S; Alessandri, C; Conti, F; Misasi, R; Valesini, G; Riganò, R

    2016-05-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized clinically by arterial and/or venous thromboses, recurrent abortions or fetal loss and serologically by the presence of 'anti-phospholipid antibodies' (aPL). The main target antigen of the antibodies is β2 glycoprotein I (β2 GPI). Post-translational oxidative modifications of the protein have been widely described. In this study we aimed to analyse sera reactivity to glucose-modified β2 GPI (G-β2 GPI). Sera collected from 43 patients with APS [15 primary APS (PAPS) and 28 APS associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (SAPS)], 30 with SLE, 30 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 40 healthy subjects were analysed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a G-β2 GPI. Nine of 15 consecutive PAPS out-patients (60%) and 16 of 28 SAPS (57.1%) showed serum antibodies [immunoglobulin (Ig)G class] against G-β2 GPI (anti-G-β2 GPI) by ELISA. The occurrence of anti-G-β2 GPI was significantly higher in APS patients compared to patients suffering from SLE. No RA patients or control healthy subjects resulted positive for anti-G-β2 GPI. Of note, aG-β2 GPI prompted to identify some APS patients (four PAPS and seven SAPS), who were negative in the classical anti-β2 GPI test. Moreover, in APS patients, anti-G-β2 GPI titre was associated significantly with venous thrombosis and seizure in APS patients. This study demonstrates that G-β2 GPI is a target antigen of humoral immune response in patients with APS, suggesting that β2 GPI glycation products may contain additional epitopes for anti-β2 GPI reactivity. Searching for these antibodies may be useful for evaluating the risk of clinical manifestations. PMID:26702877

  3. Evaluation of murine cytomegalovirus antibody detection by serological techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C A; Murphy, J C; Fox, J G

    1983-01-01

    Naturally acquired murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection in laboratory strains of mice induces antibody levels which are generally undetectable by standard techniques; therefore, MCMV has not been included routinely in mouse viral antibody screening programs. The relative sensitivity of three assay systems, the nuclear anticomplement immunofluorescence (NACIF), the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the complement fixation (CF) test, was evaluated for the detection of MCMV antibodies. Sera were harvested from CD1 male mice (33 days old) infected intraperitoneally with salivary gland-passaged MCMV (Smith strain). The sera were assayed separately at weeks 1 through 8, and at week 11, 16, and 25 post-inoculation; a total of 167 mice in 11 groups were tested. The animals tested at 1 week post-inoculation had low levels of antibodies to MCMV as measured by the NACIF test (1:10), whereas only 25% were positive by ELISA, and none was positive by CF until 5 weeks post-inoculation. A higher titer of MCMV antibodies was measured by CF (1:640) than by NACIF (1:40) at 6 months post-inoculation; yet, a titer of 1:3,200 was detected by ELISA from the same serum. The ELISA technique was more sensitive for detecting persistent infection with MCMV, and NACIF was more useful for detecting acute MCMV infection. Since MCMV can have significant long-term effects on the immune system, it is recommended that testing for antibodies to MCMV be included in mouse viral antibody screening protocols. PMID:6313750

  4. Humanization of murine monoclonal antibodies through variable domain resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Roguska, M A; Pedersen, J T; Keddy, C A; Henry, A H; Searle, S J; Lambert, J M; Goldmacher, V S; Blättler, W A; Rees, A R; Guild, B C

    1994-02-01

    Two murine monoclonal antibodies, N901 (anti-CD56) and anti-B4 (anti-CD19), were humanized by a process we call "resurfacing." A systematic analysis of known antibody structures has been used to determine the relative solvent accessibility distributions of amino acid residues in murine and human antibody variable (Fv) regions and has shown that the sequence alignment positions of surface amino acids for human and murine variable region heavy (VH) and light (VL) chains are conserved with 98% fidelity across species. While the amino acid usage at these surface positions creates surface residue patterns that are conserved within species, there are no identical patterns across species. However, surprisingly few amino acid changes need to be made to convert a murine Fv surface pattern to that characteristic of a human surface. Resurfacing was used to change the patterns of surface accessible residues in the Fv regions of the N901 and anti-B4 antibodies to resemble those found on the Fv regions of human antibody sequences. Two different procedures for selecting a human sequence were compared. For anti-B4, a data base of clonally derived human VL-VH sequence pairs was used, while for N901, sequences for VL and VH were independently selected from the Kabat et al. data base [Kabat, E. A., Wu, T. T., Reid-Miller, M., Perry, H. M. & Gottesman, K. S. (1991) Sequences of Proteins of Immunological Interest (DHHS, Washington, DC), 5th Ed.]. Resurfaced N901 and anti-B4 antibodies had apparent affinities for their cell surface ligands that were identical to those of their respective parent murine antibodies. These data provide evidence that, despite the differences in the surfaces of mouse and human Fv regions, it is possible to substitute one for the other while retaining full antigen binding affinity. PMID:8302875

  5. Prevalence of antibodies to Rickettsiae in different regions of Serbia.

    PubMed

    Samardzic, Svetomir; Marinkovic, Tatjana; Marinkovic, Dragan; Djuricic, Bosiljka; Ristanovic, Elizabeta; Simovic, Tatjana; Lako, Branislav; Vukov, Biljana; Bozovic, Bojana; Gligic, Ana

    2008-04-01

    We assayed the presence of antibodies specific for Rickettsia typhi, R. akari, and R. conorii in sera of persons from several localities in Serbia with different geographic, climatic, and lifestyle characteristics. Sera from 140 patients with unclear clinical symptoms and 273 healthy persons were tested for the presence of rickettsiae-specific antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence assay. In this study, for the first time we detected the presence of rickettsiae from the spotted fever group in Serbia. We detected the presence of antibodies against R. conorii in the samples from all tested localities. The proportion of positive cases was low in the plain agricultural areas but reached up to 23% in the mountain areas. We also observed a significant number of cases positive for antibodies against R. akari. Antibodies specific for the antigens of R. typhi were detected in only 2 samples from the municipality of Pec (Kosovo region). These findings contribute to the prevalence of Rickettsia species in Southeast Europe. Our study also revealed a dramatic lack of awareness of rickettsioses among medical personnel and pointed to the need for urgent measures that would help improve the current situation in the region. PMID:18240971

  6. Voltage gated calcium channel antibody-related neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bekircan-Kurt, Can Ebru; Derle ifti, Eda; Kurne, Asl? Tuncer; Anlar, Banu

    2015-01-01

    Voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) antibodies are generally associated with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome. However the presence of this antibody has been associated with paraneoplastic as well as non-paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration. Most patients with VGCC-antibody-positivity have small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) is an autoimmune disease of the presynaptic part of the neuromuscular junction. Its classical clinical triad is proximal muscle weakness, areflexia and autonomic dysfunction. Fifty to sixty percent of LEMS patients have a neoplasia, usually SCLC. The co-occurrence of SCLC and LEMS causes more severe and progressive disease and shorter survival than non-paraneoplastic LEMS. Treatment includes 3,4 diaminopyridine for symptomatic purposes and immunotherapy with prednisolone, azathioprine or intravenous immunoglobulin in patients unresponsive to 3,4 diaminopyridine. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD) is a syndrome characterized with severe, subacute pancerebellar dysfunction. Serum is positive for VGCC antibody in 41%-44% of patients, usually with the co-occurrence of SCLC. Clinical and electrophysiological features of LEMS are also present in 20%-40% of these patients. Unfortunately, PCD symptoms do not improve with immunotherapy. The role of VGCC antibody in the immunopathogenesis of LEMS is well known whereas its role in PCD is still unclear. All patients presenting with LEMS or PCD must be investigated for SCLC. PMID:25789302

  7. Rapid Isolation of Antibody from a Synthetic Human Antibody Library by Repeated Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Sung Sun; Bang, Hyun Bae; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Yong Jae; Jeong, Gu Min; Jeong, Ki Jun

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies and their derivatives are the most important agents in therapeutics and diagnostics. Even after the significant progress in the technology for antibody screening from huge libraries, it takes a long time to isolate an antibody, which prevents a prompt action against the spread of a disease. Here, we report a new strategy for isolating desired antibodies from a combinatorial library in one day by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). First, we constructed a library of synthetic human antibody in which single-chain variable fragment (scFv) was expressed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. After labeling the cells with fluorescent antigen probes, the highly fluorescent cells were sorted by using a high-speed cell sorter, and these cells were reused without regeneration in the next round of sorting. After repeating this sorting, the positive clones were completely enriched in several hours. Thus, we screened the library against three viral antigens, including the H1N1 influenza virus, Hepatitis B virus, and Foot-and-mouth disease virus. Finally, the potential antibody candidates, which show KD values between 10 and 100 nM against the target antigens, could be successfully isolated even though the library was relatively small (?106). These results show that repeated FACS screening without regeneration of the sorted cells can be a powerful method when a rapid response to a spreading disease is required. PMID:25303314

  8. Antibody-mediated inhibition of ricin toxin retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Yermakova, Anastasiya; Klokk, Tove Irene; Cole, Richard; Sandvig, Kirsten; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Ricin is a member of the ubiquitous family of plant and bacterial AB toxins that gain entry into the cytosol of host cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis and retrograde traffic through the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). While a few ricin toxin-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been identified, the mechanisms by which these antibodies prevent toxin-induced cell death are largely unknown. Using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and a TGN-specific sulfation assay, we demonstrate that 24B11, a MAb against ricin's binding subunit (RTB), associates with ricin in solution or when prebound to cell surfaces and then markedly enhances toxin uptake into host cells. Following endocytosis, however, toxin-antibody complexes failed to reach the TGN; instead, they were shunted to Rab7-positive late endosomes and LAMP-1-positive lysosomes. Monovalent 24B11 Fab fragments also interfered with toxin retrograde transport, indicating that neither cross-linking of membrane glycoproteins/glycolipids nor the recently identified intracellular Fc receptor is required to derail ricin en route to the TGN. Identification of the mechanism(s) by which antibodies like 24B11 neutralize ricin will advance our fundamental understanding of protein trafficking in mammalian cells and may lead to the discovery of new classes of toxin inhibitors and therapeutics for biodefense and emerging infectious diseases. IMPORTANCE Ricin is the prototypic member of the AB family of medically important plant and bacterial toxins that includes cholera and Shiga toxins. Ricin is also a category B biothreat agent. Despite ongoing efforts to develop vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics against ricin, very little is known about the mechanisms by which antibodies neutralize this toxin. In general, it is thought that antibodies simply prevent toxins from attaching to cell surface receptors or promote their clearance through Fc receptor (FcR)-mediated uptake. In this report, however, we describe a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) against ricin's binding subunit (RTB) that not only associates with ricin after the toxin has bound to the cell's surface but actually enhances toxin uptake into host cells. Following endocytosis, the antibody-toxin complexes are then routed for degradation. The results of this study are important because they reveal a previously unappreciated role for B-subunit-specific antibodies in intracellular neutralization of ricin toxin. PMID:24713323

  9. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  10. Application of phage display to high throughput antibody generation and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Darren J; Pope, Anthony R; Clementel, Veronica; Buckell, Jenny; Chapple, Susan DJ; Clarke, Kay F; Conquer, Jennie S; Crofts, Anna M; Crowther, Sandra RE; Dyson, Michael R; Flack, Gillian; Griffin, Gareth J; Hooks, Yvette; Howat, William J; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Kunze, Susan; Martin, Cecile D; Maslen, Gareth L; Mitchell, Joanne N; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Perera, Rajika L; Roake, Wendy; Shadbolt, S Paul; Vincent, Karen J; Warford, Anthony; Wilson, Wendy E; Xie, Jane; Young, Joyce L; McCafferty, John

    2007-01-01

    We have created a high quality phage display library containing over 1010 human antibodies and describe its use in the generation of antibodies on an unprecedented scale. We have selected, screened and sequenced over 38,000 recombinant antibodies to 292 antigens, yielding over 7,200 unique clones. 4,400 antibodies were characterized by specificity testing and detailed sequence analysis and the data/clones are available online. Sensitive detection was demonstrated in a bead based flow cytometry assay. Furthermore, positive staining by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays was found for 37% (143/381) of antibodies. Thus, we have demonstrated the potential of and illuminated the issues associated with genome-wide monoclonal antibody generation. PMID:18047641

  11. A Unique Human Mycoplasma Protein that Generically Blocks Antigen-Antibody Union

    PubMed Central

    Nieusma, Travis; Jones, Teresa; Boreo, Isabel; MacLeod, Amanda S.; Mark, Adam; Niessen, Sherry; Kim, Helen J.; Kong, Leopold; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Kwon, Keehwan; Chesi, Marta; Smider, Vaughn V.; Salomon, Daniel R.; Jelinek, Diane F.; Kyle, Robert A.; Pyles, Richard B.; Glass, John I.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery and crystal structure of a human mycoplasma protein, Protein M, which binds with high affinity to antibodies, predominantly through attachment to the variable region of the ? and ? light chains. Protein M broadly blocks antibody-antigen union and its mechanism of inhibition is of considerable interest because, as a diversity system, the binding mode of each antibody is different. Protein M thus appears to function by a mechanism that is independent of the sequences of members of the extensive antibody repertoire. By anchoring to conserved regions of the antibody light chains, Protein M is in a position to extend its large C-terminal domain over the antibody combining site and block entrance to macromolecular antigens. PMID:24503852

  12. Glypican-3 targeted human heavy chain antibody as a drug carrier for hepatocellular carcinoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Nagaya, Tadanobu; Sato, Kazuhide; Nakamura, Yuko; Watanabe, Rira; Harada, Toshiko; Gao, Wei; Feng, Mingqian; Phung, Yen; Kim, Insook; Paik, Chang H; Choyke, Peter L; Ho, Mitchell; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2015-06-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) represents an attractive target for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) therapy because it is highly expressed in HCC but not in adult normal tissue. Recently, high affinity anti-GPC3 antibodies have been developed; however, full antibodies may not penetrate evenly into tumor parenchyma, reducing their effectiveness. In this study, we compared a whole IgG antibody, anti-GPC3 YP7, with an anti-GPC3 human heavy chain antibody, HN3, with regard to their relative therapeutic effects. Both YP7 and HN3 bound to GPC3-positive A431/G1 cells and were internalized by the cells by in vitro evaluation with (125)I- and (111)In-radiolabeling antibodies. In vivo biodistribution and tumor accumulation was performed with (111)In-labeled antibodies, and intratumoral microdistribution was evaluated using fluorescently labeled antibodies (IR700). HN3 showed similar high tumor accumulation but superior homogeneity within the tumor compared with YP7. Using the same IR700 conjugated antibodies photoimmunotherapy (PIT) was performed in vitro and in a tumor-bearing mouse model in vivo. PIT with IR700-HN3 and IR700-YP7 demonstrated that comparable results could be achieved despite of low reaccumulation 24 h after the first NIR light exposure. These results indicated that a heavy-chain antibody, HN3, showed more favorable characteristics than YP7, a conventional IgG, as a therapeutic antibody platform for designing molecularly targeted agents against HCC. PMID:25955255

  13. Prevalence of antibodies to canine parvovirus and distemper virus in wolves in the Canadian Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Brynn; Hebblewhite, Mark; Ezenwa, Vanessa; Shury, Todd; Merrill, Evelyn H; Paquet, Paul C; Schmiegelow, Fiona; Seip, Dale; Skinner, Geoff; Webb, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Wild carnivores are often exposed to diseases via contact with peridomestic host species that travel through the wildland-urban interfaces. To determine the antibody prevalences and relationships to human activity for two common canid pathogens, we sampled 99 wolves (Canis lupus) from 2000 to 2008 for antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) in Banff and Jasper National Parks and surrounding areas of the Canadian Rockies. This population was the source for wolves reintroduced into the Northern Rockies of the US. Of 99 wolves sampled, 94 had detectable antibody to CPV (95%), 24 were antibody-positive for CDV (24%), and 24 had antibodies to both pathogens (24%). We tested whether antibody prevalences for CPV and CDV were higher closer to human activity (roads, town sites, First Nation reserves) and as a function of sex and age class. Wolves ≥2 yr old were more likely to be have antibodies to CPV. For CDV, male wolves, wolves ≥2 yr, and those closer to First Nation reserves were more likely to have antibodies. Overall, however, we found minimal support for human influence on antibody prevalence for CDV and CPV. The similarity between our antibody prevalence results and results from recent studies in Yellowstone National Park suggests that at least in the case of CDV, and perhaps CPV, these could be important pathogens with potential effects on wolf populations. PMID:22247375

  14. Fully Human Antagonistic Antibodies against CCR4 Potently Inhibit Cell Signaling and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Géraudie, Solène; Scheffler, Ulrike; Griep, Remko A.; Reiersen, Herald; Duncan, Alexander R.; Kiprijanov, Sergej M.

    2014-01-01

    Background CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) represents a potentially important target for cancer immunotherapy due to its expression on tumor infiltrating immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs) and on tumor cells in several cancer types and its role in metastasis. Methodology Using phage display, human antibody library, affinity maturation and a cell-based antibody selection strategy, the antibody variants against human CCR4 were generated. These antibodies effectively competed with ligand binding, were able to block ligand-induced signaling and cell migration, and demonstrated efficient killing of CCR4-positive tumor cells via ADCC and phagocytosis. In a mouse model of human T-cell lymphoma, significant survival benefit was demonstrated for animals treated with the newly selected anti-CCR4 antibodies. Significance For the first time, successful generation of anti- G-protein coupled chemokine receptor (GPCR) antibodies using human non-immune library and phage display on GPCR-expressing cells was demonstrated. The generated anti-CCR4 antibodies possess a dual mode of action (inhibition of ligand-induced signaling and antibody-directed tumor cell killing). The data demonstrate that the anti-tumor activity in vivo is mediated, at least in part, through Fc-receptor dependent effector mechanisms, such as ADCC and phagocytosis. Anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibodies inhibiting receptor signaling have potential as immunomodulatory antibodies for cancer. PMID:25080123

  15. Novel antibody hinge regions for efficient production of CH2 domain-deleted antibodies.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Scott M; Hughes, Ina E; Hopp, Jennifer R; Hathaway, Karen; Perret, Daniel; Reff, Mitchell E

    2005-12-16

    HuCC49 deltaCH2 is a heavy chain constant domain 2 domain-deleted antibody under development as a radioimmunotherapeutic for treating carcinomas overexpressing the TAG-72 tumor antigen. Mammalian cell culture biosynthesis of HuCC49 deltaCH2 produces two isoforms (form A and form B) in an approximate 1:1 ratio, and consequently separation and purification of the desired form A isoform adversely impact process and yield. A protein engineering strategy was used to develop a panel of hinge-engineered HuCC49 deltaCH2 antibodies to identify hinge sequences to optimize production of the form A isoform. We found that adding a single proline residue at Kabat position 243, immediately adjacent to the carboxyl end of the core middle hinge CPPC domain, resulted in an increase from 39 to 51% form A isoform relative to the parent HuCC49 deltaCH2 antibody. Insertion of the amino acids proline-alanine-proline (PAP) at positions 243-245 enhanced production of the form A isoform to 72%. Insertion of a cysteine-rich 15-amino acid IgG3 hinge motif (CPEPKSCDTPPPCPR) in both of these mutant antibodies resulted in secretion of predominantly form A isoform with little or no detectable form B. Yields exceeding 98% of the form A isoform have been realized. Preliminary peptide mapping and mass spectrometry analysis suggest that at least two, and as many as five, inter-heavy chain disulfide linkages may be present. PMID:16221669

  16. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 56; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  17. Antibodies to watch in 2015.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 7 antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, evolocumab, mepolizumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, blinatumomab, necitumumab) are undergoing a first regulatory review in the EU or US. Of the 39 novel mAbs currently in Phase 3 studies, a marketing application for one (alirocumab) may be submitted in late 2014, and marketing application submissions for at least 4 (reslizumab, ixekizumab, ocrelizumab, obiltoxaximab) are expected in 2015. Other 'antibodies to watch' are those in Phase 3 studies with estimated primary completion dates in late 2014 or 2015, which includes 13 for non-cancer indications (brodalumab, bimagrumab, bococizumab, MABp1, gevokizumab, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, tildrakizumab, guselkumab, epratuzumab, combination of actoxumab + bezlotoxumab, romosozumab) and 2 (racotumomab and clivatuzumab tetraxetan) undergoing evaluation as treatments for cancer. In addition to the novel antibody therapeutics mentioned, biosimilar infliximab and biosimilar trastuzumab are 'antibodies to watch' in 2015 because of their potential for entry into the US market and regulatory review, respectively. PMID:25484055

  18. Computer-aided antibody design

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Daisuke; Shirai, Hiroki; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Nakamura, Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Recent clinical trials using antibodies with low toxicity and high efficiency have raised expectations for the development of next-generation protein therapeutics. However, the process of obtaining therapeutic antibodies remains time consuming and empirical. This review summarizes recent progresses in the field of computer-aided antibody development mainly focusing on antibody modeling, which is divided essentially into two parts: (i) modeling the antigen-binding site, also called the complementarity determining regions (CDRs), and (ii) predicting the relative orientations of the variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) chains. Among the six CDR loops, the greatest challenge is predicting the conformation of CDR-H3, which is the most important in antigen recognition. Further computational methods could be used in drug development based on crystal structures or homology models, including antibody–antigen dockings and energy calculations with approximate potential functions. These methods should guide experimental studies to improve the affinities and physicochemical properties of antibodies. Finally, several successful examples of in silico structure-based antibody designs are reviewed. We also briefly review structure-based antigen or immunogen design, with application to rational vaccine development. PMID:22661385

  19. Neutralising antibodies against ricin toxin.

    PubMed

    Prigent, Julie; Panigai, Laetitia; Lamourette, Patricia; Sauvaire, Didier; Devilliers, Karine; Plaisance, Marc; Volland, Hervé; Créminon, Christophe; Simon, Stéphanie

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have listed the potential bioweapon ricin as a Category B Agent. Ricin is a so-called A/B toxin produced by plants and is one of the deadliest molecules known. It is easy to prepare and no curative treatment is available. An immunotherapeutic approach could be of interest to attenuate or neutralise the effects of the toxin. We sought to characterise neutralising monoclonal antibodies against ricin and to develop an effective therapy. For this purpose, mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced against the two chains of ricin toxin (RTA and RTB). Seven mAbs were selected for their capacity to neutralise the cytotoxic effects of ricin in vitro. Three of these, two anti-RTB (RB34 and RB37) and one anti-RTA (RA36), when used in combination improved neutralising capacity in vitro with an IC(50) of 31 ng/ml. Passive administration of association of these three mixed mAbs (4.7 µg) protected mice from intranasal challenges with ricin (5 LD(50)). Among those three antibodies, anti-RTB antibodies protected mice more efficiently than the anti-RTA antibody. The combination of the three antibodies protected mice up to 7.5 hours after ricin challenge. The strong in vivo neutralising capacity of this three mAbs combination makes it potentially useful for immunotherapeutic purposes in the case of ricin poisoning or possibly for prevention. PMID:21633505

  20. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, David Sherman

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  1. Antibodies to watch in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry’s progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the “Antibodies to watch” series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration’s Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

  2. Antibodies to watch in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 6 antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, evolocumab, mepolizumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, necitumumab) are undergoing a first regulatory review in the EU or US. Of the 39 novel mAbs currently in Phase 3 studies, a marketing application for one (alirocumab) may be submitted in late 2014, and marketing application submissions for at least 4 (reslizumab, ixekizumab, ocrelizumab, obiltoxaximab) are expected in 2015. Other ‘antibodies to watch’ are those in Phase 3 studies with estimated primary completion dates in late 2014 or 2015, which includes 13 for non-cancer indications (brodalumab, bimagrumab, bococizumab, MABp1, gevokizumab, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, tildrakizumab, guselkumab, epratuzumab, combination of actoxumab + bezlotoxumab, romosozumab) and 2 (racotumomab and clivatuzumab tetraxetan) undergoing evaluation as treatments for cancer. In addition to the novel antibody therapeutics mentioned, biosimilar infliximab and biosimilar trastuzumab are ‘antibodies to watch’ in 2015 because of their potential for entry into the US market and regulatory review, respectively. PMID:25484055

  3. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... RBC antigen called the "D antigen" in the Rh blood group system. A person is considered to be Rh-positive if the D antigen is present on the person's RBCs and Rh-negative if the D antigen is not present. ...

  4. Clinical utility of quantitative multi-antibody Polycheck immunoassays in the diagnosis of coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Ewa; Grzywnowicz, Maciej; Oralewska, Beata; Cielecka-Kuszyk, Joanna; Trojanowska, Ilona; Cukrowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical utility of multi-antibody strategies in the diagnosis of coeliac disease (CD), the new quantitative Polycheck immunoassays were analysed. METHODS: Polycheck Celiac Panels (PCPs) are immunoenzyme screening assays for the quantitative measurement of coeliac-specific immunoglobulin class G (IgG) or class A (IgA) in serum. Lines of relevant antigens are coated together with five IgG or IgA standard lines used for the standard curve as positive control. PCP IgA consists of human recombinant human tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptides (DGP) as targets to detect IgA antibodies. PCP IgG consists of tTG, DGP and IF (intrinsic factor) antigens to detect antibodies in IgG class. PCPs were performed on 50 CD patients, including 6 cases with selective IgA deficiency, and 50 non-coeliac controls. CD diagnosis was performed according to the ESPGHAN recommendations: The presence of specific anti-tTG-IgA or anti-DGP-IgG (in the case of IgA deficiency) antibodies, typical histopathological changes in duodenal mucosa described in Marsh-Oberhüber classification as at least grade 2. The diagnosis of the majority of the control subjects was functional gastrointestinal disorders. The PCP results were compared with reference EliA Celikey. RESULTS: The usage of PCPs led to the correct identification of all CD patients. In our study, PCPs showed 100% agreement with the histopathological results. PCP IgA test showed a 98% concordance and correlated positively (R = 0.651, P = 0.0014) with EliA Celikey test. The highest specificity and positive predictive value (both 100%) were observed for the detection of Polycheck anti-tTG-IgA antibodies. The highest sensitivity and negative predictive value (both 100%) were achieved by Polycheck anti-DGP-IgG antibody detection. The best performance (98% sensitivity and negative predictive value, 100% specificity and positive predictive value, diagnostic accuracy - AU ROC 99%) was observed for the strategy of using both PCP IgA and IgG and determining positive outcomes of the test with two or more coeliac-specific antibodies detected. The majority of coeliac patients had multiple antibodies. All four antibodies were detected in 7 (14%) cases, 19 children (38%) were positive for three antibodies and 23 (46%) were positive for two antibodies. CONCLUSION: The present study showed that detection of coeliac-specific antibodies with multi-antibody PCPs is effective and efficacious in the diagnosis of CD. PMID:27158541

  5. Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in exotic wild felids from Brazilian zoos.

    PubMed

    Silva, J C; Ogassawara, S; Marvulo, M F; Ferreira-Neto, J S; Dubey, J P

    2001-09-01

    Serum samples from 37 captive exotic felids in 12 zoos from six Brazilian states were assayed for antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii by the modified agglutination test using formalin-fixed whole tachyzoites. Titers greater than or equal to 1:20 were considered positive. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 24 of 37 (64.9%) felids, including one European lynx (Lynx lynx), two jungle cats (Felis chaus), two servals (Leptailurus serval), two tigers (Panthera tigris), three leopards (Panthera pardus), and 14 of 27 lions (Panthera leo). This is the first serologic analysis for T. gondii infection in exotic wild felids from Brazilian zoos. PMID:12785684

  6. Anti-natrium/iodide symporter antibodies and other anti-thyroid antibodies in children with Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kucharska, Anna M; Czarnocka, Barbara; Demkow, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies against the Na/I symporter (anti-NIS ab) have been found in adult patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases. As easily available for the immune system, NIS can play a role in the initial stage of autoimmune thyroid diseases. Children with Turner's syndrome (TS) being at high risk of autoimmune thyroid disease development seem a valuable group for the investigation of the early autoimmune process. The aim of the study was to investigate the presence of anti-NIS ab and its potential clinical significance in TS children. Fifty four girls with TS were examined (age 11.9 ± 2.46 years), and 23 healthy girls with normal thyroid function, free of autoimmune diseases. Anti-NIS antibodies were measured by the in-house ELISA method and the Western blotting. Sera considered positive for anti-NIS ab were used for the iodide uptake bioassay using COS7 cells stably transfected with hNIS. In all patients the thyroid function, antithyroid antibodies presence and thyroid ultrasonography were evaluated. In 20% of the patients a subclinical hypothyroidism was diagnosed and 70.4% had antithyroid antibodies (anti-TPO - 64.8% and Anti-Tg - 24%). Anti-NISab were present in 14.8% girls with TS and in none of the control group. Their presence was unrelated to other antithyroid antibodies titre or patients' age. A positive correlation between the anti-NIS ab presence and the hypothyroidism was found (p < 0.04). Anti-NIS ab-positive sera did not suppress iodine uptake. In conclusion, anti-NIS antibodies were present in 14.8% of children with TS and they were related to the presence of hypothyroidism. PMID:22836628

  7. Antigen and epitope specificity of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies in patients with goodpasture disease with or without anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Hellmark, Thomas; Zhao, Juan; Cui, Zhao; Segelmark, Marten; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2007-04-01

    Goodpasture disease (GP) is defined by the presence of anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibodies and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Besides anti-GBM, many patients with GP produce anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). For elucidation of the pathophysiologic significance of ANCA in this setting, epitope and antigen specificity of the anti-GBM antibodies and antigen specificity of ANCA were studied. Bovine testis alpha(IV)NC1 (tNC1); recombinant human alpha1, alpha3, alpha4, and alpha5(IV)NC1 (ralpha1 through ralpha5); and three chimeric proteins that contain previously defined epitope regions designated E(A), E(B), and S2 were used to examine the anti-GBM antibodies by ELISA in 205 Chinese patients with GP with or without ANCA. In the 205 anti-GBM antibody-positive sera, 63 (30.7%) were also ANCA positive (61 myeloperoxidase-ANCA and six proteinase 3-ANCA, four being triple positive). All 205 sera recognized tNC1 and ralpha3(IV)NC1. In the double-positive group, 54.0, 66.7, 71.4% of the sera could recognize ralpha1, ralpha4, and ralpha5, respectively, compared with 49.3, 60.6, and 55.6% for patients with anti-GBM antibodies alone. The levels of the antibodies to ralpha3, tNC1, and the alpha3/alpha1 ratio were lower in the double-positive group than that in patients with anti-GBM antibody alone (P < 0.05). Most of the sera could recognize the epitope regions E(A), E(B), and S2, but the absorbance values to E(A), E(B), and S2 were lower in double-positive group (P < 0.05). Double-positive patients had a broader spectrum of anti-GBM antibodies and lower levels of antibodies against alpha3(IV)NC1 compared with that of patients with anti-GBM antibodies alone. PMID:17329569

  8. Rab antibody characterization: comparison of Rab14 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Andrew J; McCaffrey, Mary W

    2015-01-01

    Rab14 functions in the endocytic recycling pathway, having been implicated in the trafficking of the ADAM10 protease, GLUT4, and components of cell-cell junctions to the plasma membrane. It localizes predominantly to endocytic membranes with a pool also found on trans-Golgi network (TGN) membranes, and is most closely related to the Rab11 subfamily of GTPases. Certain intracellular bacteria such as Legionella pneumophila, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Salmonella enterica utilize Rab14 to promote their maturation and replication. Furthermore, the HIV envelope glycoprotein complex subverts the function of Rab14, and its effector the Rab Coupling Protein (RCP), in order to direct its transport to the plasma membrane. Since the use of antibodies is critical for the functional characterization of cellular proteins and their specificity and sensitivity is crucial in drawing reliable conclusions, it is important to rigorously characterize antibodies prior to their use in cell biology or biochemistry experiments. This is all the more critical in the case of antibodies raised to a protein which belongs to a protein family. In this chapter, we present our evaluation of the specificity and sensitivity of a number of commercially available Rab14 antibodies. We hope that this analysis provides guidance for researchers for antibody characterization prior to its use in cellular biology or biochemistry. PMID:25800840

  9. CDR2L Antibodies: A New Player in Paraneoplastic Cerebellar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Eichler, Tilo W.; Totland, Cecilie; Haugen, Mette; Qvale, Tor H.; Mazengia, Kibret; Storstein, Anette; Haukanes, Bjørn I.; Vedeler, Christian A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Yo antibodies are associated with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). We have characterized Yo sera by measuring CDR2 and CDR2L antibodies and the localization of their antigens. Methods Forty-two Yo sera from patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS), 179 sera from ovarian and 114 sera from breast cancer patients without PNS and 100 blood donors were screened for CDR2 and CDR2L antibodies by radioactive immune assay (RIA). Fluorescence microscopy was also used to determine the presence of CDR2 or CDR2L antibodies by staining of HeLa cells transfected with CDR2 or CDR2L fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Confocal microscopy was further used to localize the CDR2 and CDR2L proteins. Results RIA showed that 36 of the 42 Yo positive sera contained CDR2 and CDR2L antibodies whereas 6 sera contained only CDR2 antibodies. Five of the ovarian cancer patients had CDR2L antibodies and 4 of the breast cancer patients had either CDR2 or CDR2L antibodies. Only patients with both antibodies had PCD. RIA and staining of transfected cells showed similar results. Yo antibodies were not present in the 100 blood donors. Confocal microscopy showed that CDR2 and CDR2L were localized to the cytoplasm, whereas CDR2L was also present on the cell membrane. Interpretation Yo sera usually contain CDR2 and CDR2L antibodies and both antibodies are associated with PCD. Since only CDR2L is localized to the cell membrane it is likely that CDR2L antibodies may be of primary pathogenic importance for the development of PCD. PMID:23823982

  10. Antibody conjugate therapeutics: challenges and potential.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Chari, Ravi V J

    2011-10-15

    Antibody conjugates are a diverse class of therapeutics consisting of a cytotoxic agent linked covalently to an antibody or antibody fragment directed toward a specific cell surface target expressed by tumor cells. The notion that antibodies directed toward targets on the surface of malignant cells could be used for drug delivery is not new. The history of antibody conjugates is marked by hurdles that have been identified and overcome. Early conjugates used mouse antibodies; cytotoxic agents that were immunogenic (proteins), too toxic, or not sufficiently potent; and linkers that were not sufficiently stable in circulation. Investigators have explored 4 main avenues using antibodies to target cytotoxic agents to malignant cells: antibody-protein toxin (or antibody fragment-protein toxin fusion) conjugates, antibody-chelated radionuclide conjugates, antibody-small-molecule drug conjugates, and antibody-enzyme conjugates administered along with small-molecule prodrugs that require metabolism by the conjugated enzyme to release the activated species. Only antibody-radionuclide conjugates and antibody-drug conjugates have reached the regulatory approval stage, and nearly 20 antibody conjugates are currently in clinical trials. The time may have come for this technology to become a major contributor to improving treatment for cancer patients. PMID:22003066

  11. A Study of Anti Beta-2 Glycoprotein I and Anti-Prothrombin Antibodies in Patients with Unexplained Recurrent Pregnancy Losses.

    PubMed

    Singh, Angad; Nangia, Anita; Sharma, Sunita; Puri, Manju

    2016-06-01

    To compare the levels of IgG and IgM anti beta-2 glycoprotein I antibodies and IgG and IgM anti prothrombin antibodies among women with unexplained recurrent pregnancy losses and women with at least 2 live issues. To compare the prevalence of newer anti beta-2 glycoprotein I & anti prothrombin antibodies with conventional Lupus anticoagulant & anticardiolipin antibodies. 50 women with recurrent pregnancy losses & 50 matched controls were evaluated for the presence of: Lupus anticoagulant-screened by LA sensitive aPTT& DRVV and confirmatory Staclot Assay. ELISA kits were used for detecting IgG & IgM anticardiolipin, anti beta-2 glycoprotein I & anti prothrombin antibodies. 11/50 (22 %) women in study group and none in control group had circulating antiphospholipid antibodies. 2 cases (4 %) had lupus anticoagulant. 1 case (2 %) had anticardiolipin antibody & 6 cases (12 %) were positive for anti beta-2 Glycoprotein I antibody (p value = 0.027). 3 cases (6 %) had anti prothrombin antibody. All were mutually exclusive except for one. Women with recurrent pregnancy losses should be tested for anti beta-2 Glycoprotein I antibodies & anti prothrombin antibodies in addition to conventional lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. This approach can decrease the incidence of SNAP (seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome) cases while establishing the true prevalence of antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:27065583

  12. Detecting Lyme disease using antibody-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailey, Jennifer; Lerner, Mitchell; Goldsmith, Brett; Brisson, Dustin; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-03-01

    We combine antibodies for Lyme flagellar protein with carbon nanotube transistors to create an electronic sensor capable of definitive detection of Lyme disease. Over 35,000 cases of Lyme disease are reported in the United States each year, of which more than 23 percent are originally misdiagnosed. Rational design of the coupling of the biological system to the electronic system gives us a flexible sensor platform which we can apply to several biological systems. By coupling these antibodies to carbon nanotubes in particular, we allow for fast, sensitive, highly selective, electronic detection. Unlike antibody or biomarker detection, bacterial protein detection leads to positive identification of both early and late stage bacterial infections, and is easily expandable to environmental monitoring.

  13. Targeting of human glioma xenografts in vivo utilizing radiolabeled antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.A.; Wessels, B.W.; Wharam, M.D.; Order, S.E.; Wanek, P.M.; Poggenburg, J.K.; Klein, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies provide a potential basis for selective radiotherapy of human gliomas. We have measured tumor targeting by radiolabeled monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against neuroectodermal and tumor-associated antigens in nude mice bearing human glioma xenografts. Monoclonal P96.5, a mouse IgG2a immunoglobulin, defines an epitope of a human melanoma cell surface protein, and specifically binds the U-251 human glioma as measured by immunoperoxidase histochemistry. 111In-radiolabeled P96.5 specifically targets the U-251 human glioma xenograft and yields 87.0 microCuries (microCi) of tumor activity per gram per 100 microCi injected activity compared to 4.5 microCi following administration of radiolabeled irrelevant monoclonal antibody. Calculations of targeting ratios demonstrate deposited dose to be 11.6 times greater with radiolabeled P96.5 administration compared to irrelevant monoclonal antibody. The proportion of tumor dose found in normal organs is less than 10%, further supporting specific targeting of the human glioma xenograft by this antibody. Monoclonal antibody ZME018, which defines a second melanoma-associated antigen, and polyclonal rabbit antiferritin, which defines a tumor-associated antigen, demonstrate positive immunoperoxidase staining of the tumor, but comparatively decreased targeting. When compared to the 111In-radiolabeled antibody, 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5 demonstrates comparable tumor targeting and percentages of tumor dose found in normal organs. To test the therapeutic potential of 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5, tumors and normal sites were implanted with miniature thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Seven days following administration of 100 microCi 90Y-radiolabeled P96.5, average absorbed doses of 3770, 980, 353, and 274 cGy were observed in tumor, liver, contralateral control site, and total body, respectively.

  14. Plant biopharming of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kisung; Koprowski, Hilary

    2005-07-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology and plant biotechnology have shifted the concept of growing crops as a food source to serving as a bioreactor for the production of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Plants are potential biopharming factories because they are capable of producing unlimited numbers and amounts of recombinant proteins safely and inexpensively. In the last two decades, plant production systems have been developed for monoclonal antibody production, which has been useful in passive immunization of viral or bacterial diseases. Recently, a recombinant monoclonal antibody for rabies prophylaxis was produced in transgenic plants. Rabies virus epidemics remain still problematic throughout the world, and adequate treatment has been hampered by the worldwide shortage and high cost of prophylactic antibodies such as HRIG. Successful mass production of this monoclonal antibody in plants might help to overcome these problems. An effective plant production system for recombinant biologicals requires the appropriate heterologous plant expression system, the optimal combination of gene expression regulatory elements, control of post-translational processing of recombinant products, and efficient purification methods for product recovery. This review discusses recent biotechnology developments for plant-derived monoclonal antibodies and discusses these products as a promising approach to rabies prophylaxis and the consequence for global health benefits. PMID:15896408

  15. Antibodies to watch in 2016.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, are projected to gain first approvals in 2016. Commercial late-stage antibody therapeutics development exceeded expectations by increasing from 39 candidates in Phase 3 studies as of late 2014 to 53 as of late 2015. Of the 53 candidates, transitions to regulatory review by the end of 2016 are projected for 8 (atezolizumab, benralizumab, bimagrumab, durvalumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, lebrikizumab, ocrelizumab, tremelimumab). Other "antibodies to watch" include 15 candidates (bavituximab, bococizumab, dupilumab, fasinumab, fulranumab, gevokizumab, guselkumab, ibalizumab, LY2951742, onartuzumab, REGN2222, roledumab, romosozumab, sirukumab, Xilonix) undergoing evaluation in Phase 3 studies that have estimated primary completion dates in 2016. As evidenced by the antibody therapeutics discussed in this perspective, the biopharmaceutical industry has a highly active late-stage clinical pipeline that may deliver numerous new products to the global market in the near future. *See Note added in proof for updates through December 31, 2015. PMID:26651519

  16. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases. PMID:15844826

  17. Monoclonal Antibody Recognition of Abscisic Acid Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Walker-Simmons, Mary K.; Reaney, Martin J. T.; Quarrie, Stephen A.; Perata, Pierdomenico; Vernieri, Paolo; Abrams, Suzanne R.

    1991-01-01

    Specificities of three monoclonal antibodies (15-I-C5, DBPA 1, and MAC 62) raised against the plant hormone (S)-(+)-abscisic acid (ABA) have been compared. Immunological cross-reactivities against fifteen biologically active analogs of ABA were measured. The ABA analogs were altered at one or more of four positions: the double bonds in the ring, at C-2 C-3 and at C-4 C-5, and in the oxidation level at C-1. Several analogs were optically active with chiral centers at C-1′ and C-2′. For cross-reactivity, all three monoclonal antibodies required the carboxylic acid group, and the cis configuration of the double bond at C-2 C-3 of the ABA molecule. Monoclonals 15-I-C5 and DBPA 1 required the entire ABA sidechain from the C-1 to C-1′, but these monoclonals did cross-react with analogs with the ring double bond reduced and the C-2′ methyl cis to the sidechain. Only MAC 62 recognized analogs containing an acetylene at C-4 C-5. MAC 62 had more strict requirements for the ring double bond, but gave some cross-reactivity with acetylenic analogs having a saturated ring. All three monoclonals had higher specificity for analogs having the same absolute configuration at C-1′ as (S)-(+)-ABA. This work provides new information about the spatial regions of the ABA molecule that elicit immunological recognition, and serves as a basis for future investigations of the ABA receptor using ABA analogs and anti-idiotypic antibodies. PMID:16667979

  18. Library of monoclonal antibodies against brush border membrane epithelial antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Behar, M.; Katz, A.; Silverman, M.

    1986-03-01

    A purified fraction of proximal tubule brush border membranes (BBM) was prepared from dog kidney and used to immunize mice. The standard technique of hybridoma production was followed as described by Kohler and Milstein. Production of antibodies was detected by indirect immunofluorescence on dog kidney slices and by immunodot against the purified fraction on nitrocellulose. Five hybrids exhibited anti BBM activity. These were cloned twice and yielded stable cell lines producing IgG type monoclonal antibodies against BBM. They were designated A/sub 1/, C/sub 7/, D/sub 3/, D/sub 7/ and H/sub 4/. As a family these five monoclonals have broad tissue specificity, i.e. positive staining of the surface mucosa of intestinal kidney proximal tubules. D/sub 3/ exhibits even broader specificity for epithelium reacting with bile canaliculi and choroid plexus. The authors have verified that at least 4/5 antibodies are directed against BBM protein as revealed by immunoprecipitation of solubilized BBM and detected by Coomassie blue staining or autoradiography of lactoperoxidase labelled BBM. Most interestingly all antibodies bind to the surface of LL CPK/sub 1/ cells, a continuous pig kidney cell line of undefined origin but exhibiting many characteristics of proximal tubule cells. The library of monoclonal antibodies obtained provide important probes with which to study membrane biogenesis and polarization in epithelial cells.

  19. Production of recombinant antibody fragments in Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Eva; Hust, Michael; Roth, Andreas; Biedendieck, Rebekka; Schirrmann, Thomas; Jahn, Dieter; Dübel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Background Recombinant antibodies are essential reagents for research, diagnostics and therapy. The well established production host Escherichia coli relies on the secretion into the periplasmic space for antibody synthesis. Due to the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, only a fraction of this material reaches the medium. Recently, the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus megaterium was shown to efficiently secrete recombinant proteins into the growth medium. Here we evaluated B. megaterium for the recombinant production of antibody fragments. Results The lysozyme specific single chain Fv (scFv) fragment D1.3 was succesfully produced using B. megaterium. The impact of culture medium composition, gene expression time and culture temperatures on the production of functional scFv protein was systematically analyzed. A production and secretion at 41°C for 24 h using TB medium was optimal for this individual scFv. Interestingly, these parameters were very different to the optimal conditions for the expression of other proteins in B. megaterium. Per L culture supernatant, more than 400 μg of recombinant His6-tagged antibody fragment were purified by one step affinity chromatography. The material produced by B. megaterium showed an increased specific activity compared to material produced in E. coli. Conclusion High yields of functional scFv antibody fragments can be produced and secreted into the culture medium by B. megaterium, making this production system a reasonable alternative to E. coli. PMID:17224052

  20. Escherichia coli antibodies in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tabaqchali, S; O'Donoghue, D P; Bettelheim, K A

    1978-01-01

    Sera from 30 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (16 with Crohn's disease (CD) and 14 with ulcerative colitis (UC) were assayed for the presence of antibodies against 159 Escherichia coli O-antigens and compared with sera from 16 matched control subjects. The majority of patients with IBD had agglutinating antibodies to a higher number of Escherichia coli O-antigens and in higher titres than the control group. The number of positive agglutinins was O-33 mean 13.8 in CD, O-26 mean 7.9 for UC, and O-7 mean 1.5 in controls. Eight patients with IBD and arthropathy had antibodies to fewer O-antigens (O-7 mean 3.2). The antibodies were in the IgG and IgM, in titres corresponding to original values. No specific O-serotypes were associated with IBD. Common serotypes, R-plasmid carrying serotypes, and those associated with shigella-like adult diarrhoea were detected. O14 was detected only in five patients and O119 in none. There was no correlation between the number of Escherichia coli agglutinins and the site and severity of the disease or type of therapy. It is suggested that the presence of the high numbers of Escherichia coli antibodies is secondary to the disease process and is unlikely to be causally involved in the pathogenesis of the disease, but may play a role in the perpetuation of the disease and in the extraintestinal complications. PMID:344155

  1. VGKC positive autoimmune encephalopathy mimicking dementia

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Anna; Cassidy, Eugene; Ryan, Aisling; O’ Toole, Orna

    2011-01-01

    Voltage gated potassium channel antibodies (VGKC Abs) are known to cause three rare neurological syndromes- neuromyotonia, Morvan’s syndrome and limbic encephalitis although an increasing array of other associated neurological symptoms are becoming recognised. The authors describe the case of a 60-year-old female who presented to the neurology clinic with an apparent early onset dementing process. She was noted to have both extrapyramidal and frontal release signs on examination and was admitted for further evaluation. Her dementia investigation including a neoplastic screen was negative except for VGKC antibody positivity. Her symptoms dramatically improved with commencement of immunosuppression. A non-paraneoplastic VGKC antibody associated dementia-like syndrome has rarely been described. The authors add to the few existing reports of what represents an important reversible cause of cognitive impairment. PMID:22674939

  2. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  3. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  4. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Derek B.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-08-01

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays.

  5. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies. PMID:26210205

  6. Emerging antibody-based products.

    PubMed

    Whaley, Kevin J; Morton, Josh; Hume, Steve; Hiatt, Ernie; Bratcher, Barry; Klimyuk, Victor; Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael; Zeitlin, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-based products are not widely available to address many global health challenges due to high costs, limited manufacturing capacity, and long manufacturing lead times. There are now tremendous opportunities to address these industrialization challenges as a result of revolutionary advances in plant virus-based transient expression. This review focuses on some antibody-based products that are in preclinical and clinical development, and have scaled up manufacturing and purification (mg of purified mAb/kg of biomass). Plant virus-based antibody products provide lower upfront cost, shorter time to clinical and market supply, and lower cost of goods (COGs). Further, some plant virus-based mAbs may provide improvements in pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy. PMID:22772797

  7. Antibody recognition of carbohydrate epitopes.

    PubMed

    Haji-Ghassemi, Omid; Blackler, Ryan J; Martin Young, N; Evans, Stephen V

    2015-09-01

    Carbohydrate antigens are valuable as components of vaccines for bacterial infectious agents and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and for generating immunotherapeutics against cancer. The crystal structures of anti-carbohydrate antibodies in complex with antigen reveal the key features of antigen recognition and provide information that can guide the design of vaccines, particularly synthetic ones. This review summarizes structural features of anti-carbohydrate antibodies to over 20 antigens, based on six categories of glyco-antigen: (i) the glycan shield of HIV glycoproteins; (ii) tumor epitopes; (iii) glycolipids and blood group A antigen; (iv) internal epitopes of bacterial lipopolysaccharides; (v) terminal epitopes on polysaccharides and oligosaccharides, including a group of antibodies to Kdo-containing Chlamydia epitopes; and (vi) linear homopolysaccharides. PMID:26033938

  8. Antibodies to watch in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The transitions of antibody therapeutics to late-stage clinical development, regulatory review and the market are proceeding at a rapid pace in 2013. Since late 2012, two monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics (itolizumab, trastuzumab emtansine) received their first approvals, first marketing applications for three mAbs (vedolizumab, ramucirumab, obinutuzumab) were submitted to regulatory agencies, and five mAbs (brodalumab, MABp1, moxetumomab pasudotox, tildrakizumab, rilotumumab) entered their first Phase 3 studies. The current total of commercially-sponsored antibody therapeutics undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies is 30. Recently announced study results for farletuzumab, naptumomab estafenatox, and tabalumab indicate that clinical endpoints were not met in some Phase 3 studies of these product candidates. PMID:23727858

  9. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  10. Association analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope and smoking status in Brazilian patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yazbek, Michel Alexandre; de Barros-Mazon, Silvia; Rossi, Cláudio Lúcio; Londe, Ana Carolina; Costallat, Lilian Tereza Lavras; Bértolo, Manoel Barros

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Epstein-Barr virus exposure appears to be an environmental trigger for rheumatoid arthritis that interacts with other risk factors. Relationships among anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status have been observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis from different populations. OBJECTIVE: To perform an association analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status in Brazilian patients with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: In a case-control study, 140 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 143 healthy volunteers who were matched for age, sex, and ethnicity were recruited. Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were examined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and shared epitope alleles were identified by genotyping. Smoking information was collected from all subjects. A comparative analysis of anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, the shared epitope, and smoking status was performed in the patient group. Logistic regression analysis models were used to analyze the risk of rheumatoid arthritis. RESULTS: Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies were not associated with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies, shared epitope alleles, or smoking status. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody positivity was significantly higher in smoking patients with shared epitope alleles (OR = 3.82). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis using stepwise selection, only anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were found to be independently associated with rheumatoid arthritis (OR = 247.9). CONCLUSION: Anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 antibodies did not increase the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and were not associated with the rheumatoid arthritis risk factors studied. Smoking and shared epitope alleles were correlated with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide-antibody-positive rheumatoid arthritis. Of the risk factors, only anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides antibodies were independently associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility. PMID:21915491

  11. Detection of circulating parasite antigen and specific antibody in Toxocara canis infections.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, B D; Burkot, T R; Gillespie, S H; Kennedy, M W; Wambai, Z; Maizels, R M

    1988-01-01

    Serological surveys, measuring humoral antibody responses, have indicated significant levels of human infection with the zoonotic nematode Toxocara canis, and raised concern about the resultant risk of ocular and neurological damage. Such measurements do not distinguish with certainty current infection from past exposure. Thus, we have developed a test for circulating Toxocara antigen released by parasites in the host. This monoclonal antibody-based two-site 'sandwich' assay discriminates between T. canis and the related feline ascarid T. cati, and has been used, in tandem with the standard ELISA, to examine experimental and human infections. In experimental animals, antigen is transiently detectable, disappearing when immunocomplexed with host antibody. Antigen was also found in sera from UK patients diagnosed with visceral or ocular toxocariasis, and in four asymptomatic Papua New Guinean children. In the latter population, individuals positive for parasite antigens were not necessarily positive for antibody, implying that some infected cases may be negative in the current diagnostic ELISA. The antibody test was also adapted to measure host antibody directed to single monoclonal antibody-defined epitopes, revealing evidence of differential temporal regulation of distinct antibody specificities. PMID:2465108

  12. A new enzyme immunoassay to detect antibodies to arboviruses in the blood of wild birds.

    PubMed

    Chiles, R E; Reisen, W K

    1998-12-01

    A new indirect enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed to screen wild bird sera for antibodies against western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses. The detector antibody was made by immunizing rabbits with serum proteins pooled from single species representatives of four bird orders and was conjugated with horseradish peroxidase to allow visualization with the ABTS substrate in an EIA plate reader set at 405 nm. The detector antibody recognized a wide range of bird species and was more accurate, sensitive, and specific than a hemaglutination inhibition test when compared to a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT). EIA positive sera frequently could not be confirmed by PRNT; however, practically all sera positive by PRNT also were positive by EIA. The new EIA has been incorporated into our field research program and has been used to economically screen over 10,000 wild bird sera from 124 species for antibodies against WEE and SLE. PMID:9879069

  13. Use of an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies in sheep naturally infected with Salmonella Abortusovis.

    PubMed

    Wirz-Dittus, Sophie; Belloy, Luc; Doherr, Marcus G; Hüssy, Daniela; Sting, Reinhard; Gabioud, Patricia; Waldvogel, Andreas S

    2010-07-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was modified and validated to detect antibodies against Salmonella Abortusovis in naturally infected sheep. The ELISA was validated with 44 positive and 45 negative control serum samples. Compared with the immunoblot, the sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 98% and 100%, respectively. To follow antibody levels over time, samples from 12 infected ewes were collected at 1, 3, and 10 months after abortion. All animals showed antibody levels above the cutoff value throughout the observation period. One and 3 months after abortion, high antibody levels could be detected in all but one animal, whereas after 10 months, 9 animals had markedly lower but still positive antibody levels. The test characteristics and evidence for the persistence of detectable antibody levels in all infected animals for up to 10 months indicates that the ELISA can be used for herd surveillance testing. PMID:20622222

  14. Novel Antibody Vectors for Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Olafsen, Tove; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging approaches include nuclear, optical, MRI, CT, ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging, which require accumulation of a signal delivered by a probe at the target site. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are high affinity molecules that can be used for specific, high signal delivery to cell surface molecules. However, their long circulation time in blood makes them unsuitable as imaging probes. Efforts to improve antibodies pharmacokinetics without compromising affinity and specificity have been made through protein engineering. Antibody variants that differ in antigen binding sites and size have been generated and evaluated as imaging probes to target tissues of interest. Fast clearing fragments such as single-chain Fv (scFv; 25 kDa) with one antigen binding site (monovalent) demonstrated low accumulation in tumors due the low exposure time to the target. Using scFv as building block to produce larger, bivalent fragments such as scFv dimers (diabodies, 50 kDa) and scFv-fusion proteins (80 kDa minibodies and 105 kDa scFv-Fc) resulted in higher tumor accumulation due to their longer residence time in blood. Imaging studies with these fragments following radiolabeling have demonstrated excellent, high contrast images in gamma cameras and PET scanners. Several studies have also investigated antibody fragments conjugated to fluorescence (near infrared dyes), bioluminescence (luciferases) and quantum dots for optical imaging and iron oxides nanoparticles for MRI. However, these studies indicate that there are several factors that influence successful targeting and imaging. These include stability of the antibody fragment, the labeling chemistry (direct or indirect), whether critical residues are modified, the number of antigen expressed on the cell, and whether the target has a rapid recycling rate or internalizes upon binding. The preclinical data presented are compelling and it is evident that antibody-based molecular imaging tracers will play an important future role in the diagnosis and management of cancer and other diseases. PMID:20350626

  15. Development of a bispecific antibody tetramerized through hetero-associating peptides.

    PubMed

    Osaki, Tomohiro; Fujisawa, Shingo; Kitaguchi, Masahiro; Kitamura, Masaya; Nakanishi, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    The specific assembly of self-associating peptides can be useful in building a functional antibody complex from small antibody fragments. We have focused on the exceedingly specific heterotetrameric assembly of Lin-2 and Lin-7 (L27) domains, which work as protein-protein interaction modules in many scaffold proteins. Here, we describe a novel method for constructing a highly functional antibody based on the hetero-association of L27 domains. In this study, we used a bacterial expression system to produce a bispecific antibody that was heterotetramerized through L27 domains and that targeted both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Fcγ receptor III (FcγRIII or CD16). Gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and gel filtration analyses revealed that the constructed recombinant antibody was a disulfide-linked heterotetramer. The tetramerized antibody bound to EGFR and CD16 simultaneously, according to results from flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the bispecific antibody showed cytotoxic activity against EGFR-expressing tumor cells by using CD16-positive lymphocytes as effectors, and its cytotoxicity was comparable to that of a commercial therapeutic antibody. Taken together, the results show that our method has high potential for the cost-efficient production of highly active therapeutic antibodies. PMID:26337767

  16. Elevated serum anti-flagellin antibodies implicate subclinical bowel inflammation in ankylosing spondylitis: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) share genetic and clinical features. IBD is associated with the presence of antibodies to a variety of commensal microorganisms including anti-Saccharomyces cerevesiae antibodies (ASCA), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), anti-I2 (associated with anti-Pseudomonas activity), anti-Eschericia coli outer membrane porin C (anti-OmpC) and anti-flagellin antibodies (anti-CBir1). Subclinical intestinal inflammation may be present in up to 65% of patients with AS. This study evaluated the presence of antimicrobial antibodies in patients with AS alone, patients with AS and concomitant IBD (AS-IBD) and a control group of patients with mechanical back pain (MBP). Methods Sera were tested by ELISA for ASCA IgG and IgA, anti-OmpC, anti-CBir1 and ANCA in 76 patients with AS alone, 77 patients with AS-IBD and 48 patients with MBP. Antibody positivity rates, median quantitative antibody levels and the proportion of patients with antibody levels in the 4th quartile of a normal distribution were compared between the three groups of patients. Results Patients with AS alone demonstrated higher anti-CBir1 antibody positivity rates and median antibody levels than MBP patients. Anti-CBir1 positivity in AS was associated with elevation of acute phase reactants. AS-IBD patients demonstrated elevated responses when compared to AS alone for ASCA, anti-OmpC and anti-CBir1. Quartile analysis confirmed the findings. Conclusions These data suggest that adaptive immune responses to microbial antigens occur in AS patients without clinical IBD and support the theory of mucosal dysregulation as a mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of AS. PMID:24286190

  17. Antibodies to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in idiopathic optic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Hideki; Motomura, Masakatsu; Tanaka, Keiko; Fujikawa, Azusa; Nakata, Ruka; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Shima, Tomoaki; Mukaino, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Shunsuke; Miyazaki, Teiichiro; Shiraishi, Hirokazu; Kawakami, Atsushi; Tsujino, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the differences of clinical features, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), MRI findings and response to steroid therapies between patients with optic neuritis (ON) who have myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibodies and those who have seronegative ON. Setting We recruited participants in the department of neurology and ophthalmology in our hospital in Japan. Methods We retrospectively evaluated the clinical features and response to steroid therapies of patients with ON. Sera from patients were tested for antibodies to MOG and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) with a cell-based assay. Participants Between April 2009 and March 2014, we enrolled serial 57 patients with ON (27 males, 30 females; age range 16–84 years) who ophthalmologists had diagnosed as having or suspected to have ON with acute visual impairment and declined critical flicker frequency, abnormal findings of brain MRI, optical coherence tomography and fluorescein fundus angiography at their onset or recurrence. We excluded those patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of neuromyelitis optica (NMO)/NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD), MS McDonald's criteria, and so on. Finally we defined 29 patients with idiopathic ON (14 males, 15 females, age range 16–84 years). Results 27.6% (8/29) were positive for MOG antibodies and 3.4% (1/29) were positive for AQP4. Among the eight patients with MOG antibodies, five had optic pain (p=0.001) and three had prodromal infection (p=0.179). Three of the eight MOG-positive patients showed significantly high CSF levels of myelin basic protein (p=0.021) and none were positive for oligoclonal band in CSF. On MRIs, seven MOG-positive patients showed high signal intensity on optic nerve, three had a cerebral lesion and one had a spinal cord lesion. Seven of the eight MOG-positive patients had a good response to steroid therapy. Conclusions Although not proving primary pathogenicity of anti-MOG antibodies, the present results indicate that the measurement of MOG antibodies is useful in diagnosing and treating ON. PMID:25838512

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shuptrine, Casey; Surana, Rishi; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, the clinical utility of monoclonal antibodies has been realized and antibodies are now a mainstay for the treatment of cancer. Antibodies have the unique capacity to target and kill tumor cells while simultaneously activating immune effectors to kill tumor cells through the complement cascade or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). This multifaceted mechanism of action combined with target specificity underlies the capacity of antibodies to elicit anti-tumor responses while minimizing the frequency and magnitude of adverse events. This review will focus on mechanisms of action, clinical applications and putative mechanisms of resistance to monoclonal antibody therapy in the context of cancer. PMID:22245472

  19. Does Circulating Antibody Play a Role in the Protection of Piglets against Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus?

    PubMed Central

    Poonsuk, Korakrit; Giménez-Lirola, Luis Gabriel; Zhang, Jianqiang; Arruda, Paolo; Chen, Qi; Correa da Silva Carrion, Lucas; Magtoto, Ronaldo; Pineyro, Pablo; Sarmento, Luciana; Wang, Chong; Sun, Yaxuan; Madson, Darin; Johnson, John; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Main, Rodger

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of circulating antibody to the protection of naïve piglets against porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was evaluated using a passive antibody transfer model. Piglets (n = 62) derived from 6 sows were assigned to one of 6 different treatments using a randomized block design which provided for allocation of all treatments to all sows' litters. Each treatment was designed to achieve a different level of circulating anti-PEDV antibody via intraperitoneally administration of concentrated serum antibody. Piglets were orally inoculated with PEDV (USA/IN/2013/19338E, 1 x 103 TCID50 per piglet) 24 hours later and then monitored for 14 days. Piglets remained with their dam throughout the experiment. Sow milk samples, piglet fecal samples, and data on piglet clinical signs, body weight, and body temperature were collected daily. Fecal samples were tested by PEDV real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. Serum, colostrum, and milk were tested for PEDV IgG, IgA, and virus-neutralizing antibody. The data were evaluated for the effects of systemic PEDV antibody levels on growth, body temperature, fecal shedding, survival, and antibody response. The analysis showed that circulating antibody partially ameliorated the effect of PEDV infection. Specifically, antibody-positive groups returned to normal body temperature faster and demonstrated a higher rate of survivability than piglets without PEDV antibody. When combined with previous literature on PEDV, it can be concluded that both systemic antibodies and maternal secretory IgA in milk contribute to the protection of the neonatal pig against PEDV infections. Overall, the results of this experiment suggested that passively administered circulating antibodies contributed to the protection of neonatal piglets against PEDV infection. PMID:27050556

  20. Humanized anti-Lewis Y antibodies: in vitro properties and pharmacokinetics in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Co, M S; Baker, J; Bednarik, K; Janzek, E; Neruda, W; Mayer, P; Plot, R; Stumper, B; Vasquez, M; Queen, C; Loibner, H

    1996-03-01

    ABL 364 is a murine monoclonal IgG3 antibody directed against the Lewis Y carbohydrate antigen (Le(y)) expressed on the surface of many epithelial cell tumors. The antibody mediates cytotoxicity via activation of human complement or human effector cells, and has been evaluated in several clinical trials including two Phase I/II trials in relapsed small cell lung cancer and metastatic breast cancer. To improve the effector functions of the antibody, increase its half-life in circulation, and avoid the human antimouse antibody response, two chimeric and several humanized antibodies were constructed for evaluation. The chimeric IgG1 is more potent than the murine IgG3 in tumor cell lysis via activation of human peripheral mononuclear cells (10-fold), but somewhat less effective in complement-dependent lysis (2-3 fold). The chimeric IgG3 is slightly less potent than the IgG1. A humanized IgG1 was constructed by combining the complementarity-determining regions of the ABL 364 antibody with human framework and constant regions. Several additional variants were subsequently constructed to improve the binding affinity and increase expression of the antibody. Two of the variants, designated I and K, differ by a single amino acid at position 75 of the heavy chain. Both variants have affinity within 2-fold of the chimeric IgG1 antibody and retain the cytolytic activities toward tumor cell lines. However, it was possible to express variant K at a significantly higher level (5- 10-fold) than variant I. Pharmacokinetics of the humanized ABL 364 antibody variant K was compared with that of the parent murine antibody in rhesus monkeys. It was shown that the terminal half-life of the humanized antibody in rhesus monkeys is 14-20 days, with a mean of 16.3 days, while that of the parent murine antibody is only 1.9 days. PMID:8640770

  1. Characterization of thyroid function and antithyroid antibody tests among Saudis

    PubMed Central

    Jammah, Anwar A.; Alshehri, Anwar S.; Alrakhis, Afaf A.; Alhedaithy, Asma S.; Almadhi, Asma M.; Alkwai, Hala M.; Alhamad, Maram M.; Alzahrani, Saad H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the reference intervals for thyroid function tests and the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity in the Saudi population. Methods: A cross-sectional prospective study was conducted in King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January to June 2013. History and physical examination were obtained. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) were measured by Electro-chemiluminescence Immunoassay system-assay. Anti-thyroperoxidase, and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent-assay. Subjects with previous or a family history of thyroid disorders, those taking medications affecting thyroid function, pregnant or lactating women, and those with goiter were excluded. Individuals with positive antibodies were excluded from the final analysis of the TSH reference range, but were used to determine the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity. Results: Out of 337 Saudi subjects initially screened, 132 (aged 13-60 years) were candidates for reference calculation, the mean±standard deviation, and (2.5th-97.5th) percentile of TSH (mIU/L) was 1.96±0.9 (0.59-4.37), for FT4 (pmol/L) was 15.47±1.83 (12.04-19.13), and for FT3 (pmol/L) was 5.22±0.7 (4.07-6.76). The TSH was higher in the antibodies positive group (2.5±1.17 mIU/L) compared with the negative one (1.96±0.9 mIU/L) (p<0.05). Finally, 26% of subjects were tested positive for antithyroid antibodies. Conclusion: The TSH reference range was similar to laboratory references. Thyroid antibodies were prevalent in Saudis, necessitating further work in larger scale studies. PMID:25987111

  2. Helicobacter pylori Antibody Titer and Gastric Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Kishikawa, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kayoko; Takarabe, Sakiko; Kaida, Shogo; Nishida, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    The “ABC method” is a serum gastric cancer screening method, and the subjects were divided based on H. pylori serology and atrophic gastritis as detected by serum pepsinogen (PG): Group A [H. pylori (−) PG (−)], Group B [H. pylori (+) PG (−)], Group C [H. pylori (+) PG (+)], and Group D [H. pylori (−) PG (+)]. The risk of gastric cancer is highest in Group D, followed by Groups C, B, and A. Groups B, C, and D are advised to undergo endoscopy, and the recommended surveillance is every three years, every two years, and annually, respectively. In this report, the reported results with respect to further risk stratification by anti-H. pylori antibody titer in each subgroup are reviewed: (1) high-negative antibody titer subjects in Group A, representing posteradicated individuals with high risk for intestinal-type cancer; (2) high-positive antibody titer subjects in Group B, representing active inflammation with high risk for diffuse-type cancer; and (3) low-positive antibody titer subjects in Group C, representing advanced atrophy with increased risk for intestinal-type cancer. In these subjects, careful follow-up with intervals of surveillance of every three years in (1), every two years in (2), and annually in (3) should be considered. PMID:26494936

  3. Increased Prevalence of Transglutaminase 6 Antibodies in Sera From Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cascella, Nicola G.; Santora, Debby; Gregory, Patricia; Kelly, Deanna L.; Fasano, Alessio; Eaton, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Gluten can cause extraintestinal manifestations with or without gastrointestinal symptoms and elevated antitissue transglutaminase 2 (tTG2) autoantibodies. Organ-specific gluten reaction involves immune response toward other transglutaminase (TG) isoforms including tTG3 (expressed in the skin, leading to dermatitis herpetiformis) and tTG6 (expressed in the brain, causing gluten ataxia). This analysis focuses on tTG6 antibodies, which have never been studied before in schizophrenia (SZ) and its relationships to tTG2 and to antigliadin antibodies. We previously showed an increased prevalence of tTG2 antibodies in gluten sensitive SZ patients compared with healthy controls (HC) that was not paralleled by an increased prevalence of antiendomysial antibody. To elucidate this discrepancy, we examined those tTG2 positive SZ patients for the presence of tTG6 antibody. We also searched for tTG6 antibodies in our sample of antigliadin (AGA) positive and AGA and tTG2 negative SZ patients. Seventy-four tTG2 positive SZ patients were compared with 148 age and gender-matched HC. Of the 74 tTG2 positive SZ patients, 16 were positive for tTG6 IgA for a prevalence of 22%. Only 4 HC were positive for tTG6 IgA for a prevalence of 2.7%. Among the AGA positive SZ patients, the prevalence of tTG6 IgA was 21.3% while 13.1% of the AGA and tTG2 negative SZ patients were positive for tTG6 IgA. The HC had a prevalence of 6%. Our results indicate a higher prevalence of tTG6 antibodies in SZ that may represent a biomarker useful to identify SZ patients who would benefit from a gluten-free diet. PMID:22516148

  4. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic. PMID:24037837

  5. Bovine leukemia virus p24 antibodies reflect blood proviral load

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is worldwide distributed and highly endemic in Argentina. Among the strategies to prevent BLV dissemination, a control plan based on the selective segregation of animals according to their proviral load (PVL) is promising for our dairy productive system. The objective of this work was to study the relationship between the blood PVL and the antibody level, in order to identify whether the individual humoral response, i.e. the anti-p24 or anti-whole-BLV particle, could be used as a marker of the blood level of infection and thus help to recruit animals that may pose a lower risk of dissemination under natural conditions. Results The prevalence of p24 antibodies on the 15 farms studied was over 66%. The prevalence of p24 and whole-BLV antibodies and PVL quantification were analyzed in all the samples (n = 196) taken from herds T1 and 51. ROC analysis showed a higher AUC for p24 antibodies than whole-BLV antibodies (Zreactivity: 3.55, P < 0.001; Ztiter: 2.88, P < 0.01), and as consequence a better performance to predict the proviral load status in herd 51. No significant differences were found between the performance of p24 and whole-BLV antibodies in herd T1. A significant positive correlation was observed between PVL values and p24 antibody reactivity in both farms (r T1 = 0.7, P < 0.001, r 51 = 0.71, P < 0.0001). The analysis was extended to the whole number of weak p24 antibody reactors (n = 311) of the other 13 farms. The mean of high PVL reactors within weak p24 reactors was 17.38% (SD = 8.92). In 5/15 farms, the number of weak p24 reactors with high PVL was lower than 10%. Conclusions We found that the humoral response reflected the level of in vivo infection, and may therefore have useful epidemiological applications. Whereas the quantitative evaluation of blood proviral load using real-time PCR is expensive and technically demanding, the measurement of antibodies in blood by ELISA is relatively straightforward and could therefore constitute a cost-effective tool in a BLV control intervention strategy, especially in highly infected herds such as Argentinean dairy ones. PMID:23047073

  6. Structure, function and properties of antibody binding sites.

    PubMed

    Mian, I S; Bradwell, A R; Olson, A J

    1991-01-01

    Do antibody combining sites possess general properties that enable them to bind different antigens with varying affinities and to bind novel antigens? Here, we address this question by examining the physical and chemical characteristics most favourable for residues involved in antigen accommodation and binding. Amphipathic amino acids could readily tolerate the change of environment from hydrophilic to hydrophobic that occurs upon antibody-antigen complex formation. Residues that are large and can participate in a wide variety of van der Waals' and electrostatic interactions would permit binding to a range of antigens. Amino acids with flexible side-chains could generate a structurally plastic region, i.e. a binding site possessing the ability to mould itself around the antigen to improve complementarity of the interacting surfaces. Hence, antibodies could bind to an array of novel antigens using a limited set of residues interspersed with more unique residues to which greater binding specificity can be attributed. An individual antibody molecule could thus be cross-reactive and have the capacity to bind structurally similar ligands. The accommodation of variations in antigenic structure by modest combining site flexibility could make an important contribution to immune defence by allowing antibody binding to distinct but closely related pathogens. Tyr and Trp most readily fulfil these catholic physicochemical requirements and thus would be expected to be common in combining sites on theoretical grounds. Experimental support for this comes from three sources, (1) the high frequency of participation by these amino acids in the antigen binding observed in six crystallographically determined antibody-antigen complexes, (2) their frequent occurrence in the putative binding regions of antibodies as determined from structural and sequence data and (3) the potential for movement of their side-chains in known antibody binding sites and model systems. The six bound antigens comprise two small different haptens, non-overlapping regions of the same large protein and a 19 amino acid residue peptide. Out of a total of 85 complementarity determining region positions, only 37 locations (plus 3 framework) are directly involved in antigen interaction. Of these, light chain residue 91 is utilized by all the complexes examined, whilst light chain 32, light chain 96 and heavy chain 33 are employed by five out of the six. The binding sites in known antibody-antigen complexes as well as the postulated combining sites in free Fab fragments show similar characteristics with regard to the types of amino acids present. The possible role of other amino acids is also assessed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1988675

  7. Anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, A; Newsom Davis, J

    1980-01-01

    Early suggestions that a humoral factor might be implicated in the disorder of neuromuscular transmission in myasthenia gravis have been confirmed by the detection of anti-AChR antibody in 85-90% of the patients with generalised disease and in 75% of cases with restricted ocular myasthenia. Plasma exchange reveals that serum anti-AChR usually has an inverse relationship to muscle strength and present evidence indicates that patients responding to thymectomy and immunosuppressive durg treatment usually show a consistent decline in serum anti-AChR titres. The antibody is heterogeneous and can lead to a loss of muscle AChR by several mechanisms. Anti-AChR is produced in the thymus in relatively small amounts. Anti-AChR antibody synthesis by thymic lymphocytes and pokeweed stimulated peripheral lymphocytes in culture provides a means of studying the effect of different lymphocyte populations in vitro. Analysis of clinical, immunological and HLA antigen characteristics in MG suggest that more than one mechanism may underlie the breakdown in tolerance to AChR, leading to the production of anti-AChR antibodies. PMID:7400823

  8. Prevalence of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania infantum, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Sarcocystis neurona, and Neospora caninum in Capybara, Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, from São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Valadas, Samantha; Gennari, Solange Maria; Yai, Lucia Eiko Oishi; Rosypal, Alexa C; Lindsay, David S

    2010-06-01

    Little is known about the importance of capybara, Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris, as reservoirs for parasites of zoonotic or veterinary importance. Sera from 63 capybaras, from 6 counties in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, were examined for antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania infantum, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Sarcocystis neurona, and Neospora caninum using an indirect immunofluorescent antibody test. Five (8%) of the 63 capybaras had antibodies to T. cruzi epimastigotes. None of the samples from capybara reacted positively with L. infantum promastigotes or with spores of E. cuniculi . Two (3%) of the serum samples were positive for antibodies to S. neurona merozoites, and 2 (3%) of the serum samples were positive for antibodies to N. caninum tachyzoites. A serum sample from 1 capybara was positive for antibodies to both T. cruzi and N. caninum. None of the remaining 62 samples reacted with more than 1 parasite. PMID:20020808

  9. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  10. Humanization and simultaneous optimization of monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, T; Igawa, T; Tsunoda, H; Hattori, K

    2014-01-01

    Antibody humanization is an essential technology for reducing the potential risk of immunogenicity associated with animal-derived antibodies and has been applied to a majority of the therapeutic antibodies on the market. For developing an antibody molecule as a pharmaceutical at the current biotechnology level, however, other properties also have to be considered in parallel with humanization in antibody generation and optimization. This section describes the critical properties of therapeutic antibodies that should be sufficiently qualified, including immunogenicity, binding affinity, physiochemical stability, expression in host cells and pharmacokinetics, and the basic methodologies of antibody engineering involved. By simultaneously optimizing the antibody molecule in the light of these properties, it should prove possible to shorten the research and development period necessary to identify a highly qualified clinical candidate and consequently accelerate the start of the clinical trial. PMID:24037839

  11. Antigen protection of monoclonal antibodies undergoing labelling.

    PubMed

    Ramjeesingh, M; Zywulko, M; Rothstein, A; Whyte, R; Shami, E Y

    1990-10-19

    The effectiveness of a methodology designed to protect the antigen binding capacity of monoclonal antibodies undergoing labelling with a number of reagents was examined. The antigen binding sites of monoclonal antibodies were protected by complexing them with their antigen. Chemical modification with 6 mM of the water soluble Bolton-Hunter reagent of site protected monoclonal antibodies to glucoamylase resulted in antibodies that could tolerate a four-fold increase in reagent incorporation, without any loss of antigen binding capacity. Iodination of these antibodies (modified under site protected conditions) yielded over 70% increase in radioactivity incorporated in the active antibody fraction, compared with the incorporation into unprotected antibodies. Site protected labeling was found to be effective in retaining the antigen binding capacity of monoclonal antibodies modified with all reagents tested with the exception of chloramine-T. PMID:2230135

  12. Production of Vi monoclonal antibodies and their application as diagnostic reagents.

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, R S; Chau, P Y

    1987-01-01

    Serum antibodies to Vi antigen were detected in mice immunized with the purified antigen but not with Vi-bearing Salmonella typhi whole cells. Fusion of the spleen cells from one of the Vi antibody-producing mice with NSI myeloma cells produced four stable hybridomas that secreted antibodies to Vi. Monoclonal antibodies from these four clones were all of the immunoglobulin G class and, as determined by competition, appeared to have the same epitope specificity. Despite their immunoglobulin G nature, mouse ascitic fluids induced by one of the hybridomas strongly agglutinated the Vi-positive strains of S. typhi, S. dublin, and Citrobacter strain 5396/38. Thus, 10 clinical isolates of S. typhi but not 98 strains of other bacteria were reactive in slide agglutination tests with the monoclonal antibodies. PMID:3571457

  13. Antibodies to marine caliciviruses in the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus Schreber).

    PubMed

    Barlough, J E; Berry, E S; Goodwin, E A; Brown, R F; DeLong, R L; Smith, A W

    1987-01-01

    Sera from 145 Steller sea lions (76 adults, three subadults, 37 pups, and 29 fetuses) were tested for neutralizing antibodies to nine marine calicivirus serotypes. Antibodies were found to San Miguel sea lion virus (SMSV) types 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10 and 13, and to Tillamook (bovine) calicivirus, but no antibodies were found to the walrus calicivirus. Titers (microtiter neutralization assay) ranged from 1:20 to 1:320, with many positive reactions at the higher dilutions (greater than or equal to 1:80). Antibodies to SMSV's 5 and 10 were most common among animals sampled in Alaskan waters, while antibodies to SMSV-6 were most common among pups from the southern Oregon coast. These data provide evidence that Steller sea lions, like their California sea lion (Zalophus c. californianus Lesson) counterparts, have experienced widespread exposure to multiple serotypes of marine caliciviruses. PMID:3820427

  14. Antitumor effects of L6, an IgG2a antibody that reacts with most human carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hellström, I; Beaumier, P L; Hellström, K E

    1986-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibody L6 (IgG2a subtype) recognizes a ganglioside antigen expressed at the surface of cells from human non-small-cell lung carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and colon carcinomas. We now show that this antibody can lyse L6 antigen-positive human tumor cells in the presence of Leu-11b-positive human lymphocytes (i.e., mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity) or human serum (mediate complement-dependent cytotoxicity) and that it can inhibit the outgrowth of an L6 antigen-positive human tumor transplanted onto nude mice. PMID:3462743

  15. [Effect of maternally derived antibody levels on antibody responses to canine parvovirus, canine distemper virus and infectious canine hepatitis virus after vaccinations in beagle puppies].

    PubMed

    Iida, H; Fukuda, S; Kawashima, N; Yamazaki, T; Aoki, J; Tokita, K; Morioka, K; Takarada, N; Soeda, T

    1990-01-01

    Antibody titers against canine parvovirus (CPV), canine distemper virus (CDV) and infectious canine hepatitis virus (ICHV) in serum were measured in 6 beagle dams and their 38 puppies bred in our colony, in order to clarify the effects of maternally derived antibodies to antibody responses against the viruses after vaccinations in puppies. Correlation coefficient on antibody titers between puppies and dams were CPV: r = 0. 7935, CDV: r = 0.8194 and ICHV: r = 0.8105. Mean maternal antibody positive rates in 7-day-old puppies from their dams were CPV: 67%, CDV: 46% and ICHV: 45%. Mean half-lives of the maternal antibodies in puppies were estimated to be CPV: 13.5 days, CDV: 15.1 days and ICHV: 15.4 days. The antibody response against CPV vaccination in puppies was mainly observed in dogs being titers of less 1:5 and positivity was 39% (15/38 puppies) after 1st vaccination at 42 days after birth, and 82% (31/38 puppies) after 2nd vaccination at 70 days. That against CDV vaccination (at 56 days after birth) was seen highly in dogs being titers of less 1:10 and positivity was 53% (20/38). Also that against ICHV vaccination (at 56 days after birth) was seen frequently in dogs being titers of less 20 holds and the rate was 87% (33/38). From these results, it was estimated that the age when high antibody response against each vaccination could be expected in puppies might be CPV: between 40 and 69 days, CDV: between 32 and 92 days and ICHV: between 31 and 52 days, respectively. PMID:2303100

  16. Characterization of human hybridomas secreting antibody to tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, J W; Truitt, K E; Raubitschek, A A; Senyk, G; Wang, J C

    1983-01-01

    We have selected a thioguanine-resistant lymphoblastoid cell line (LTR228) that forms human-human hybrids with high efficiency. Fusions with peripheral B cells consistently yield one colony per 10(5) cells plated. To produce antitetanus monoclonal antibodies, we withdrew blood from persons who had recently received booster injections of tetanus toxoid. T cells were separated from peripheral mononuclear cells by 2-aminoethylisothiouronium bromide-induced rosette formation, given 1,500 rads (1 rad = 0.01 gray), and cultured in a 1:1 ratio with nonrosetting cells. After 3 days of pokeweed mitogen stimulation, heterokaryons were produced by a plate-fusion technique and cultured in Iscove's Dulbecco's minimal essential medium for 24 hr prior to hybrid selection. Colonies appeared after 10-14 days in hypoxanthine/azaserine supplemented medium. A direct binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with specific tetanus toxoid inhibition identified positive wells. The hybridomas were cloned twice in soft agarose and by limiting dilution. The subcloned hybridomas double every 26 hr (vs. every 16 hr for LTR228) and produce 1-5 micrograms of specific IgG, kappa antibody per 10(6) cells per ml per 24 hr. All subclones (almost 200) continue to secrete antibody after 11 months of continuous culture. Twelve representative subclones have near tetraploid amounts of DNA. From hybridomas grown in 5-liter spinner flasks, milligram quantities of the IgG, kappa antibody were purified by staphylococcus protein A affinity chromatography. Specific antibody from hybridoma cultures protected mice injected with 1,000 times the LD50 of tetanus toxin. Our cell line and associated techniques should permit the production of therapeutically important human monoclonal antibodies. Images PMID:6578513

  17. Structural Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody-Maytansinoid Immunoconjugate.

    PubMed

    Luo, Quanzhou; Chung, Hyo Helen; Borths, Christopher; Janson, Matthew; Wen, Jie; Joubert, Marisa K; Wypych, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Structural characterization was performed on an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), composed of an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb), mertansine drug (DM1), and a noncleavable linker. The DM1 molecules were conjugated through nonspecific modification of the mAb at solvent-exposed lysine residues. Due to the nature of the lysine conjugation process, the ADC molecules are heterogeneous, containing a range of species that differ with respect to the number of DM1 per antibody molecule. The DM1 distribution profile of the ADC was characterized by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF), which showed that 0-8 DM1s were conjugated to an antibody molecule. By taking advantage of the high-quality MS/MS spectra and the accurate mass detection of diagnostic DM1 fragment ions generated from the higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) approach, we were able to identify 76 conjugation sites in the ADC, which covered approximately 83% of all the putative conjugation sites. The diagnostic DM1 fragment ions discovered in this study can be readily used for the characterization of other ADCs with maytansinoid derivatives as payload. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analysis of the ADC indicated that the conjugation of DM1 destabilized the C(H)2 domain of the molecule, which is likely due to conjugation of DM1 on lysine residues in the C(H)2 domain. As a result, methionine at position 258 of the heavy chain, which is located in the C(H)2 domain of the antibody, is more susceptible to oxidation in thermally stressed ADC samples when compared to that of the naked antibody. PMID:26629796

  18. Human cysticercosis: antigens, antibodies and non-responders.

    PubMed Central

    Flisser, A; Woodhouse, E; Larralde, C

    1980-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis of sera from patients with brain cysticercosis against a crude antigenic extract from Cysticercus cellulosae indicates that nearly 50% of the patients do not make sufficient antibodies to ostensively precipitate. The other 50% of the patients who do make precipitating antibodies show a very heterogeneous response in the number of antigens they recognize as well as in the type of antigen--as classified by their electrophoretic mobilities. The most favoured, called antigen B, is recognized by 84% of positive sera and corresponds to one or a limited number of antigens isoelectric at pH 8.6. Indirect immunofluorescence with monospecific anti-human immunoglobulins, performed upon the immunoelectrophoretic preparations, reveal that all cysticercus antigens induced the synthesis of antibodies in the immunoglobulin classes in the order G greater than M greater than E greater than A greater than D. Finally, antigen H (an anodic component) seems to favour IgE relative to its ability to induce IgG. Thus, although in natural infection a good proportion of cysticercotic patients do not seem to mount an energetic antibody response against the parasite, giving rise to some speculations about immunosuppression, the fact that 50% do synthesize antibodies allows for some optimistic expectations from vaccination of humans--in view of the good results of vaccination in experimental animals mediated by IgG antibodies. A likely prospect for a human vaccine would be antigen B because it is the most frequently detected by humans, although its immunizing and toxic properties remain to be properly studied. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 PMID:7389197

  19. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  20. ANCA / MPO / PR3 Antibodies Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... cANCA; pANCA; Serine Protease 3; MPO; PR3; Anticytoplasmic Autoantibodies; 3-ANCA; PR3-ANCA; MPO-ANCA Formal name: ... Antibodies; Myeloperoxidase Antibodies; Proteinase 3 Antibodies Related tests: Autoantibodies ; Complete Blood Count ; ESR ; C-Reactive Protein ; Complement ; ...

  1. Effects of medium concentration on antibody production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J.

    1984-01-01

    Antibody production by two different cell lines was measured as the media were supplemented with varied amounts of glucose and fetal bovine serum. Both cell lines elaborated antidinitrophenyl hapten antibodies. Two basic media were used: RPMI 1640 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. The production of antibodies was followed from 0 to 180 h and was assayed by radioimmunoassay.

  2. B cell responses to HIV and the development of human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, J E; James, K

    1992-01-01

    In this review B cell responses in HIV-infected individuals are summarized together with the techniques used to date to produce human monoclonals to HIV and the properties of these antibodies. Profound disturbances in B cell responses are apparent both in vivo and in vitro. While there is evidence in vivo of marked polyclonal B cell activation, primary and secondary antibody responses are impaired. Similarly these cells exhibit spontaneous immunoglobulin secretion upon in vitro culture but do not readily respond to B cell mitogens and recall antigens including HIV. Furthermore, certain of these defects can be reproduced in normal B cells in vitro by incubation with HIV or HIV coded peptides. Individuals infected with HIV develop antibodies to HIV structural proteins (e.g. p17, p24, gp41 and gp120) and regulatory proteins (e.g. vif, nef, RT). Autoantibodies against a number of immunologically important molecules are also frequently observed. The anti-HIV antibodies are predominantly of the IgG1 isotype and exhibit a variety of effects on the virus in vitro. To date, using conventional immortalization strategies, an appreciable number of human monoclonals to HIV have been developed. These have been specific for gp41, gp120 and gag with antibodies of the former specificity predominating. The majority of these antibodies have been of the IgG1 isotype. Only a small number of the antibodies neutralize virus in vitro and most of these react with gp120. The neutralizing antibodies recognize conformational and carbohydrate epitopes or epitopes in amino acid positions 306-322. The predominant epitopes recognized by the anti-gp41 antibodies were in amino acid positions 579-620 and 644-662. A high percentage (congruent to 25%) of these antibodies enhance viral growth in vitro. The problems relating to the production of human monoclonals to HIV are discussed together with strategies that could be used in the future. PMID:1572084

  3. Specific antibody for pesticide residue d