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Sample records for antipsychotic-induced sexual dysfunction

  1. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Society for Reproductive Medicine Sexual dysfunction and infertility What is sexual dysfunction and how common is ... and 40% of women. For couples dealing with infertility, it is even more common. Often, people ignore ...

  2. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Pamela

    1989-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction takes place in the context of women's lives and affects their sexuality and self-esteem. Awareness of these influences are vital to the management of the dysfunction and the promotion of positive sexuality. The family physician's contribution to both the prevention and management of sexual concerns includes an awareness of societal influences and facilitation of a woman's sense of her own power and control over her life. PMID:21248971

  3. The Facts About Sexual (Dys)function in Schizophrenia: An Overview of Clinically Relevant Findings

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, Marrit K.; Castelein, Stynke; Wiersma, Durk; Schoevers, Robert A.; Knegtering, Henderikus

    2015-01-01

    A limited number of studies have evaluated sexual functioning in patients with schizophrenia. Most patients show an interest in sex that differs little from the general population. By contrast, psychiatric symptoms, institutionalization, and psychotropic medication contribute to frequently occurring impairments in sexual functioning. Women with schizophrenia have a better social outcome, longer lasting (sexual) relationships, and more offspring than men with schizophrenia. Still, in both sexes social and interpersonal impairments limit the development of stable sexual relationships. Although patients consider sexual problems to be highly relevant, patients and clinicians not easily discuss these spontaneously, leading to an underestimation of their prevalence and contributing to decreased adherence to treatment. Studies using structured interviews or questionnaires result in many more patients reporting sexual dysfunctions. Although sexual functioning can be impaired by different factors, the use of antipsychotic medication seems to be an important factor. A comparison of different antipsychotics showed high frequencies of sexual dysfunction for risperidone and classical antipsychotics, and lower frequencies for clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, and aripiprazole. Postsynaptic dopamine antagonism, prolactin elevation, and α1-receptor blockade may be the most relevant factors in the pathogenesis of antipsychotic-induced sexual dysfunction. Psychosocial strategies to treat antipsychotic-induced sexual dysfunction include psychoeducation and relationship counseling. Pharmacological strategies include lowering the dose or switching to a prolactin sparing antipsychotic. Also, the addition of a dopamine agonist, aripiprazole, or a phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor has shown some promising results, but evidence is currently scarce. PMID:25721311

  4. [Sexual dysfunction in torture victims].

    PubMed

    Theilade, Lotte D Arlø

    2002-10-01

    Sexual dysfunction is seen in up to 51% of torture victims. The torture victim seldom reports anything about having been tortured but often consults the health care system because of a somatic problem which may seem unrelated to torture. Therefore, it is important that doctors are aware of the possible correlation. Symptoms and findings may be both physical and psychical. The torture may be both sexual and non-sexual as well as physical and non-physical. Social, cultural and individual factors also influence the development of sexual dysfunction in a torture victim. The factors that cause sexual dysfunction and the identification of any direct causal relations are discussed. There are indications that sexual torture has a greater impact on the development of sexual dysfunction than other types of torture and it seems that sexual dysfunction is a result of many factors. PMID:12407879

  5. Client attributions for sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fichten, C S; Spector, I; Libman, E

    1988-01-01

    This investigation examined attributions for sexual dysfunctions made by 63 individuals and 21 of their partners who presented at a sex therapy service for the following problems: erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, and female orgasmic dysfunctions. All participants completed measures of marital adjustment, locus of control, depression and a questionnaire which assessed: attributions of responsibility for the sexual problem, perceived control over sexual functioning, distress, effort made to improve the sexual relationship, and expectations about the efficacy of sex therapy for the problem. Results indicate that both identified patients and their partners, regardless of the dysfunction, blamed the sexual problem on the "dysfunctional individual" rather than on the circumstances or the partner. With respect to the partners, husbands of women with orgasmic dysfunction were more likely to blame themselves than the circumstances, while the opposite was true for wives of males with erectile difficulties. Individuals experiencing the dysfunction perceived themselves and their partners as having little, but equal control over the identified patient's sexuality. Correlational analyses indicate that in identified patients, the better the quality of the marital relationship, the greater the self-blame and the lower the partner blame. Those with happy marriages also made greater efforts to improve their sexual relationship and had higher expectations of success with therapy. The implications of the results for research on the role of attributions in sexual dysfunction and for assessment of cognitive factors in sexually dysfunctional individuals and their partners is discussed. PMID:3172253

  6. Sexual dysfunction in uremia.

    PubMed

    Palmer, B F

    1999-06-01

    In summary, sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic renal failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently accompany the chronic renal failure patient. Fatigue and psychosocial factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected before the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men, whereas the disturbances in the hypothalamicpituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed toward optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists, sildenafil has become the first-line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow-up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic renal failure. PMID:10361878

  7. Sexual dysfunctions and psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Levine, E M; Ross, N

    1977-06-01

    The authors examine the major factors involved in recent changes in the social standards and attitudes related to homosexuality. The principal influences investigated include the misconstrued emphasis given to the humanist ideology, which properly stresses the dignity of the individual; the social sciences' relativization of the cultural norms defining homosexuality; the influence of the mass media in disseminating these perspectives and thereby tending to create an acceptable image of homosexuality, and the tendency of all these changes to result in a substantial increase in public acceptance and tolerance of homosexuality. The authors suggest that this trend in public opinion has begun to isolate psychoanalytic knowledge, to reduce its status and acceptability among the public, and to replace it with popular views concerning the meaning of sexual dysfunctions. PMID:869030

  8. Sexual dysfunction in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Zahra; Amirian, Malihe; Golmakani, Nahid; Mazlom, Reza; Laal Ahangar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual problems have different effects on the life of people by influencing their interpersonal and marital relationships and satisfaction. Relationship between sexual dysfunctions and infertility can be mutual. Sexual dysfunction may cause difficulty conceiving but also attempts to conceive, may cause sexual dysfunction. Objective: This paper compares sexual dysfunction in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 110 infertile couples referring to Montasarieh Infertility Clinic and 110 fertile couples referring to five healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected by class cluster sampling method. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Glombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction. Data were analyzed through descriptive and analytical statistical methods by SPSS. Results: There was no significant difference in total score of sexual problems and other dimensions of sexual problems (except infrequency) in fertile 28.9 (15.5) and infertile 29.0 (15.4) women. Fertile women had more infrequency than infertile women (p=0.002). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between fertile and infertile women in terms of sexual problems. Paying attention to sexual aspects of infertility and presence of programs for training of sexual skills seems necessary for couples. PMID:27200422

  9. Psychiatric disorders and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Waldinger, Marcel D

    2015-01-01

    Sexual problems are highly prevalent among patients with psychiatric disorders. They may be caused by the psychopathology of the psychiatric disorder but also by its pharmacotherapy. Both positive symptoms (e.g., psychosis, hallucinations) as well as negative symptoms (e.g., anhedonia) of schizophrenia may negatively interfere with interpersonal and sexual relationships. Atypical antipsychotics have fewer sexual side-effects than the classic antipsychotics. Mood disorders may affect libido, sexual arousal, orgasm, and erectile function. With the exception of bupropion, agomelatine, mirtazapine, vortioxetine, amineptine, and moclobemide, all antidepressants cause sexual side-effects. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may particularly delay ejaculation and female orgasm, but also can cause decreased libido and erectile difficulties. SSRI-induced sexual side-effects are dose-dependent and reversible. Very rarely, their sexual side-effects persist after SSRI discontinuation. This is often preceded by genital anesthesia. Some personality characteristics are a risk factor for sexual dysfunction. Also patients with eating disorders may suffer from sexual difficulties. So far, research into psychotropic-induced sexual side-effects suffers from substantial methodologic limitations. Patients tend not to talk with their clinician about their sexual life. Psychiatrists and other doctors need to take the initiative to talk about the patient's sexual life in order to become informed about potential medication-induced sexual difficulties. PMID:26003261

  10. Prostatic Disease and Sexual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Prostatitis and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are common prostatic diseases. Furthermore, the incidence of prostate cancer has recently shown a rapid increase, even in Korea. Pain caused by prostatitis may induce sexual dysfunction, including erectile dysfunction and ejaculatory disturbance. And BPH itself, or treatments for BPH, may affect sexual function. In addition, with increased detection of localized prostate cancer, surgical treatments and radiation therapy have also increased, and the treatments may cause sexual dysfunction. Aging is also an important factor in the deterioration of the quality of life of men. Deterioration of quality of life caused by prostate diseases may be affected not only by the prostate diseases themselves but also by the sexual dysfunction caused by the prostate diseases secondarily. Thus, consideration of these points at the time of treatment of prostate disease is required. Therapies suitable to each condition should be selected with an understanding of the close association of prostate diseases and associated sexual dysfunction with the quality of life of males. PMID:21750746

  11. Prostatic disease and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae Woong

    2011-06-01

    Prostatitis and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are common prostatic diseases. Furthermore, the incidence of prostate cancer has recently shown a rapid increase, even in Korea. Pain caused by prostatitis may induce sexual dysfunction, including erectile dysfunction and ejaculatory disturbance. And BPH itself, or treatments for BPH, may affect sexual function. In addition, with increased detection of localized prostate cancer, surgical treatments and radiation therapy have also increased, and the treatments may cause sexual dysfunction. Aging is also an important factor in the deterioration of the quality of life of men. Deterioration of quality of life caused by prostate diseases may be affected not only by the prostate diseases themselves but also by the sexual dysfunction caused by the prostate diseases secondarily. Thus, consideration of these points at the time of treatment of prostate disease is required. Therapies suitable to each condition should be selected with an understanding of the close association of prostate diseases and associated sexual dysfunction with the quality of life of males. PMID:21750746

  12. Male sexual dysfunction in Asia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Christopher Ck; Singam, Praveen; Hong, Goh Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

    2011-07-01

    Sex has always been a taboo subject in Asian society. However, over the past few years, awareness in the field of men's sexual health has improved, and interest in sexual health research has recently increased. The epidemiology and prevalence of erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism and premature ejaculation in Asia are similar in the West. However, several issues are specific to Asian males, including culture and beliefs, awareness, compliance and the availability of traditional/complementary medicine. In Asia, sexual medicine is still in its infancy, and a concerted effort from the government, relevant societies, physicians and the media is required to propel sexual medicine to the forefront of health care. PMID:21643001

  13. Male sexual dysfunction in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Christopher CK; Singam, Praveen; Hong, Goh Eng; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md

    2011-01-01

    Sex has always been a taboo subject in Asian society. However, over the past few years, awareness in the field of men's sexual health has improved, and interest in sexual health research has recently increased. The epidemiology and prevalence of erectile dysfunction, hypogonadism and premature ejaculation in Asia are similar in the West. However, several issues are specific to Asian males, including culture and beliefs, awareness, compliance and the availability of traditional/complementary medicine. In Asia, sexual medicine is still in its infancy, and a concerted effort from the government, relevant societies, physicians and the media is required to propel sexual medicine to the forefront of health care. PMID:21643001

  14. Attention bias for sexual words in female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Beard, Courtney; Amir, Nader

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive models suggest that attention processes maintain sexual dysfunction. However, few published studies have examined attention bias, and even fewer have studied female participants with sexual dysfunction. Using the Female Sexual Function Index, the authors classified undergraduates as experiencing sexual dysfunction (n = 28) or not (n = 28). The authors assessed whether participants showed attention bias for sexual words using a modified dot-probe task. As expected, female participants with sexual dysfunction showed an attention bias to sexual words, whereas control participants did not. The authors discuss implications for models of sexual dysfunction and clinical intervention. PMID:20432123

  15. [Sexual dysfunction among patients with psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Soldati, Lorenzo

    2016-03-16

    Scientific literature shows that sexual dysfunction is more common in patients suffering from psychiatric illness as opposed to the general population. It also shows that the prevalence of sexual dysfunction is underestimated by professionals, partly because patients rarely talk spontaneously about their dysfunctions. However, sexual dysfunction has an impact on patients' mental health. Furthermore, some psychotropic medication, antidepressants and antipsychotics in particular, can hinder sexual functioning and induce sexual dysfunction. These harmful effects can, in turn, reduce patients' compliance with their medical treatments. It is therefore important that practitioners take into account their patients' sexual experience. PMID:27149715

  16. Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Orgasmic disorders - When you can't have an orgasm or you have pain during orgasm. Sexual pain disorders - When you have pain during ... cream. If you have a problem having an orgasm, you may not be getting enough foreplay or ...

  17. Pharmacotherapy of Sexual Dysfunctions : Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajith; Biswas, Parthasarathy

    2004-01-01

    The sexual dysfunctions are one of the most prevalent conditions. Sexual dysfunctions can have profound effect on the psychological well-being of an individual and the psychosexual relationship of a couple. Management of the sexual dysfunction should be preceded by an accurate diagnosis reached after a complete medical and sexual history and physical examination. Current focus of researchers has been on understanding the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and other sexual dysfunctions that can help in developing newer pharmacological cures for these conditions. Recently, a number of clinical trials have studied the potential effectiveness of the phosphodiesterase (PDE)-5 inhibitor sildenafil in the treatment of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) and Premature Ejaculation (PME). The introduction of PDE-5 inhibitors like sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil has revolutionized the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. This review focuses on the recent pharmacological advances in the treatment of common sexual dysfunctions like ED and PME with special focus on the role of PDE-5 inhibitors. Also discussed is the pharmacological treatment of other less prevalent and recognized disorders like female sexual dysfunction, drug induced sexual dysfunction etc. PMID:21224902

  18. [Female sexual dysfunction: Drug treatment options].

    PubMed

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2016-01-01

    Many women will likely experience a sexual problem in their lifetime. Female sexual dysfunction is a broad term used to describe 3 categories of disorders of a multifactorial nature. Effective, but limited pharmacotherapeutic options exist to address female sexual dysfunction. The FDA recently approved the first agent for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in pre-menopausal women. Off-label use of hormonal therapies, particularly oestrogen and testosterone, are the most widely employed for female sexual dysfunction, particularly in post-menopausal women. Other drugs currently under investigation include phosphodiesterase inhibitors and agents that modulate dopamine or melanocortin receptors. PMID:27041639

  19. Sexual dysfunction within an adult developmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Fagan, P J; Meyer, J K; Schmidt, C W

    1986-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the adult who has adequately mastered the oedipal stage of psychosexual development and who presents with a sexual dysfunction. Drawing on the developmental sequence of Erik Erikson, the authors suggest that failure to address adequately an adult psychosocial crisis may result in sexual dysfunction. There may be both adult developmental deficits and regression to adolescent and adult stages previously negotiated. Both may be symptomatically represented by sexual dysfunction. The authors urge that the sexual and marital problems be evaluated within an adult developmental framework and that the therapy address the psychosocial issues which are appropriate to the developmental stage of the patient. PMID:3820320

  20. Antidepressant-Induced Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Tierney; Rullo, Jordan; Faubion, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Because 1 in 6 women in the United States takes antidepressants and a substantial proportion of patients report some disturbance of sexual function while taking these medications, it is a near certainty that the practicing clinician will need to know how to assess and manage antidepressant-related female sexual dysfunction. Adverse sexual effects can be complex because there are several potentially overlapping etiologies, including sexual dysfunction associated with the underlying mood disorder. As such, careful assessment of sexual function at the premedication visit followed by monitoring at subsequent visits is critical. Treatment of adverse sexual effects can be pharmacological (dose reduction, drug discontinuation or switching, augmentation, or using medications with lower adverse effect profiles), behavioral (exercising before sexual activity, scheduling sexual activity, vibratory stimulation, psychotherapy), complementary and integrative (acupuncture, nutraceuticals), or some combination of these modalities. PMID:27594188

  1. Sexual Dysfunction Due to Psychotropic Medications.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Alkis, Andrew R; Parikh, Nishant B; Votta, Jennifer G

    2016-09-01

    Sexual functioning is important to assess in patients with psychiatric illness as both the condition and associated treatment may contribute to sexual dysfunction (SD). Antidepressant medications, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics, and antianxiety agents may be associated with SD related to drug mechanism of action. Sexual adverse effects may be related to genetic risk factors, impact on neurotransmitters and hormones, and psychological elements. Effective strategies to manage medication-induced sexual dysfunction are initial choice of a drug unlikely to cause SD, switching to a different medication, and adding an antidote to reverse SD. Appropriate interventions should be determined on a clinical case-by-case basis. PMID:27514298

  2. Sexual dysfunction following proctocolectomy and abdominoperineal resection.

    PubMed

    Yeager, E S; Van Heerden, J A

    1980-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction after rectal excision was studied in 45 male patients who were less than 50 years of age. Of 25 patients having had proctocolectomy, one (4%) was impotent, while three (15%) of 20 patients having had abdominoperineal resection were impotent. Two patients in the abdominoperineal group reported no ejaculation with normal potency and sensation of orgasm. The age of the patient and the extent of dissection seemed to be the two main factors concerned with sexual dysfunction after rectal excision. PMID:7362286

  3. Male Pseudoheterosexuality and Minimal Sexual Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutstadt, Joseph P.

    1976-01-01

    There is often a correlation between "pseudoheterosexuality" and minor sexual dysfunction. Insight alone is not sufficient to provide relief, but when the patient can be helped to a comfortable acceptance of his homosexual feelings as a normal and healthy facet of his personality, very often the dysfunction is relieved. (Author)

  4. Pain related sexual dysfunction after inguinal herniorrhaphy.

    PubMed

    Aasvang, Eske Kvanner; Møhl, Bo; Bay-Nielsen, Morten; Kehlet, Henrik

    2006-06-01

    To determine the incidence of pain related sexual dysfunction 1 year after inguinal herniorrhaphy and to assess the impact pain has on sexual function. In contrast to the well-described about 10% risk of chronic wound related pain after inguinal herniorrhaphy, chronic genital pain, dysejaculation, and sexual dysfunction have only been described sporadically. The aim was therefore to describe these symptoms in a questionnaire study. A nationwide detailed questionnaire study in September 2004 of pain related sexual dysfunction in all men aged 18-40 years undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy between October 2002 and June 2003 (n=1015) based upon the nationwide Danish Hernia Database collaboration. The response rate was 68.4%. Combined frequent and moderate or severe pain from the previous hernia site during activity was reported by 187 patients (18.4%). Pain during sexual activity was reported by 224 patients (22.1%), of which 68 (6.7%) had moderate or severe pain occurring every third time or more. Genital or ejaculatory pain was found in 125 patients (12.3%), and 28 (2.8%) patients reported that the pain impaired their sexual activity to a moderate or severe degree. Pain during sexual activity and subsequent sexual dysfunction represent a clinically significant problem in about 3% of younger male patients with a previous inguinal herniorrhaphy. Intraoperative nerve damage and disposition to other chronic pain conditions are among the most likely pathogenic factors. PMID:16545910

  5. Sex therapy for female sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction About 45% of women suffer from some form of sexual dysfunction. Despite its high prevalence, there are few studies that have systematically evaluated sex therapy in comparison with other interventions. Objective Review randomized clinical trials that present psychotherapeutic interventions for female sexual dysfunctions. Method Through a search in three databases (Medline, Web of Science and PsycInfo), 1419 references were found. After an analysis of the abstracts, twenty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria and composed this review. Results Sex therapy, as proposed by Masters and Johnson and Heiman and LoPiccolo, is still the most commonly used form of therapy for sexual dysfunctions; although it has shown results, the results do not consistently support that this is the best alternative in the treatment of sexual dysfunctions. Conclusion There is a lack of systematic study of many female sexual dysfunctions. Orgasmic disorder and sexual pain (vaginismus and dyspaurenia) are the most extensively studied disorders and those in which sex therapy seems to have better outcomes. PMID:24066697

  6. Management of sexual dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bronner, Gila; Vodušek, David B

    2011-11-01

    Nonmotor symptoms, among them sexual dysfunction, are common and underrecognized in patients with Parkinson disease; they play a major role in the deterioration of quality of life of patients and their partners. Loss of desire and dissatisfaction with their sexual life is encountered in both genders. Hypersexuality (HS), erectile dysfunction and problems with ejaculation are found in male patients, and loss of lubrication and involuntary urination during sex are found in female patients. Tremor, hypomimia, muscle rigidity, bradykinesia, 'clumsiness' in fine motor control, dyskinesias, hypersalivation and sweating may interfere with sexual function. Optimal dopaminergic treatment should facilitate sexual encounters of the couple. Appropriate counselling diminishes some of the problems (reluctance to engage in sex, problems with ejaculation, lubrication and urinary incontinence). Treatment of erectile dysfunction with sildenafil and apomorphine is evidence based. HS or compulsive sexual behaviour are side effects of dopaminergic therapy, particularly by dopaminergic agonists, and should be treated primarily by diminishing their dose. Neurologists should actively investigate sexual dysfunction in their Parkinsonian patients and offer treatment, optimally within a multidisciplinary team, where a dedicated professional would deal with sexual counselling. PMID:22164191

  7. Sexual medicine in family practice. Part 2: Treating sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Holzapfel, S.

    1993-01-01

    Sexual problems can be caused by organic or psychological factors, or a combination of the two. Deciding which leads to an appropriate management plan. This paper describes the current status of treatments for common sexual dysfunctions seen in family practice. PMID:8471907

  8. Sexual dysfunction in female cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    DeSimone, Michael; Spriggs, Elizabeth; Gass, Jennifer S; Carson, Sandra A; Krychman, Michael L; Dizon, Don S

    2014-02-01

    Cancer survivors face a myriad of long-term effects of their disease, diagnosis, and treatment, and chief among many are problems associated with sexual dysfunction. Yet despite their frequency and the degree of distress they cause patients, sexual dysfunction is not effectively screened for or treated, and this is particularly true in female survivors. Inconsistently performed general sexual health screening at all facets of cancer care and survivorship ultimately translates into missed attempts to identify and treat dysfunction when it does arise. In this paper, we will review the current research and clinical practices addressing sexual dysfunction in female cancer survivors and propose questions in need of future research attention. This article will review the phases of sexual response and how each may be affected by the physical and emotional stress of cancer diagnosis and treatment. We will then discuss existing tools for assessment of sexual function and approaches to their treatment. Finally, we will conclude with advice to health care professionals based on current research and suggest questions for future study. PMID:22643563

  9. AB028. New drugs for sexual dysfunction complementary medicine for sexual dysfunction in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Earle, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective In Australia both oriental and western products are available as complementary medicines. Our aim was to review the current available over-the-counter (OTC) medications for sexual dysfunction and report on this market. Methods Following an earlier published review in 2010, 37 products were reviewed that were listed on the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods (ARTG) and registered with the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA). These products were manufactured in Australia and laid claim to provide treatment for sexual dysfunction. A review of these products and newer products was undertaken to establish the extent of complementary medicines in Australia for sexual dysfunction and the reported clinical experience. Results As at July 2015 there were 31 Australian manufactured OTC products registered with the TGA on the ARTG for sexual dysfunction. Twenty-four were for male sexual dysfunction, 3 for female sexual dysfunction and 4 for unisex sexual dysfunction. The main herbs used in sexual health products in Australia are tribulus terrestris, panax ginseng and horny goat weed. However, complementary medicine practitioners also promote the use of gingko Bilbo, avena sativa and damiana. Many of the ingredients found in men’s products are also in the women’s products. Although review articles for complementary medicine, sexual dysfunction and libido have been written in Australia, as far as can be investigated there are no published randomized clinical trials in the area of complementary medicine and sexual function. Conclusions Complementary medicine has reached a high degree of development in Australia. But, due to the lack of properly conducted placebo-controlled clinical trials there is not a body of supporting evidence of efficacy, certification of purity, guarantee of safety, or well-documented side effects. Even though most OTC medications for sexual health have mild side effects and some also promote general health, the lack of such evidence

  10. [How Does Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Affekt Female Sexuality?].

    PubMed

    Anding, R; Kirschner-Hermanns, R; Rantell, A; Wiedemann, A

    2016-08-01

    With increasing age many women suffer from lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) and female sexual dysfunction. An increasing body of evidence supports an association between the 2 conditions. Especially women with urodynamically proved detrusor hyperactivity suffer from sexual dysfunction and there is some evidence that in patients with stress incontinence sexual health improves after successful surgery. PMID:27328304

  11. AB271. Sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Rae

    2016-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis/ chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), or NIH category III prostatitis, is a clinical syndrome characterized by genital/ pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of urinary tract infection. CPPS is the most common prostatic disease in men younger than 50 years of age and the third most common in men older than 50 years of age. CP/CPPS is a complex entity with unclear etiology. Many articles reported that the high percentage of patients with CP/CPPS had sexual dysfunction. The most common symptoms of sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis patients are erectile dysfunction (ED), painful ejaculation and premature ejaculation. So we will discuss about ED and ejaculation problems in CP/CPPS patients.

  12. The impact of mental illness on sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zemishlany, Zvi; Weizman, Abraham

    2008-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is prevalent among psychiatric patients and may be related to both the psychopathology and the pharmacotherapy. The negative symptoms of schizophrenia limit the capability for interpersonal and sexual relationships. The first-generation antipsychotics cause further deterioration in erectile and orgasmic function. Due to their weak antagonistic activity at D2 receptors, second-generation antipsychotics are associated with fewer sexual side effects, and thus may provide an option for schizophrenia patients with sexual dysfunction. Depression and anxiety are a cause for sexual dysfunction that may be aggravated by antidepressants, especially selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction may be overcome by lowering doses, switching to an antidepressant with low propensity to cause sexual dysfunction (bupropion, mirtazapine, nefazodone, reboxetine), addition of 5HT2 antagonists (mirtazapine, mianserin) or coadministration of 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Eating disorders and personality disorders, mainly borderline personality disorder, are also associated with sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction in these cases stems from impaired interpersonal relationships and may respond to adequate psychosexual therapy. It is mandatory to identify the specific sexual dysfunction and to treat the patients according to his/her individual psychopathology, current pharmacotherapy and interpersonal relationships. PMID:18391559

  13. Sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tran, Christine N; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2013-08-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), or NIH category III prostatitis, is a common clinical syndrome characterized by genital/pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of urinary tract infection. There is also growing recognition of the association of sexual dysfunction with CP/CPPS including erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory pain, and premature ejaculation. In this review, we discuss the association between CP/CPPS and sexual dysfunction, potential mechanisms for sexual dysfunction, and treatment strategies for erectile dysfunction in CP/CPPS. PMID:23579441

  14. Female sexual dysfunction: focus on low desire.

    PubMed

    Kingsberg, Sheryl A; Woodard, Terri

    2015-02-01

    Low or absent sexual desire is the most common sexual dysfunction in women, and its prevalence peaks during midlife. Its etiology is complex and may include biologic, psychologic, and social elements. Major risk factors for its development include poor health status, depression, certain medications, dissatisfaction with partner relationship, and history of physical abuse, sexual abuse, or both. Diagnosis is based on criteria set by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th Edition) and requires that a woman experience personal distress. Clinical evaluation should include medical history, sexual history, and, sometimes, a physical examination. Laboratory data are of limited value, except when warranted by history or physical examination. Treatment options include nonpharmacologic interventions such as education, office-based counseling, and psychotherapy. Although there are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatments for low desire, pharmacologic agents have been used off-label for this purpose. Bupropion is an antidepressant that has been shown to improve desire in some women with and without depression. Systemic estrogen therapy is not recommended in the absence of vasomotor symptoms and is not directly associated with desire. However, vaginal estrogen is useful in patients presenting with concomitant vaginal atrophy and dyspareunia. Ospemifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that can be used as an alternative to vaginal estrogen. Exogenous testosterone has demonstrated efficacy in treating loss of desire in postmenopausal women. However, patients should be counseled that it is not FDA-approved for this purpose and there are limited published long-term safety data. Several agents for the treatment of low desire are currently in development. Gynecologists are in a unique position to address concerns about sexual desire in women. PMID:25569014

  15. Sexual unresponsiveness and orgastic dysfunction: an empirical comparison.

    PubMed

    Clement, U

    1980-01-01

    Testing a hypothesis made by Kaplan, the study investigates empirical differences between women diagnosed as "sexually unresponsive" (N = 50) vs. "orgastically dysfunctional" (N = 55). Treatment was carried out in the form of couples' therapy. The two groups show significant differences with regard to occupation (sexually unresponsive women are more frequently housewives), sexual behaviour (sexually unresponsive women have a more restricted sexual life), self-perception (sexually unresponsive women describe themselves as more timid, reserved and inhibited), and sexual attitude (sexually unresponsive women are more restrictive). Therapy success and one-year follow-up show no differences between the two groups. PMID:6965177

  16. Neurologic Factors in Female Sexual Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Siroky, Mike B.

    2010-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction affects both men and women, involving organic disorders, psychological problems, or both. Overall, the state of our knowledge is less advanced regarding female sexual physiology in comparison with male sexual function. Female sexual dysfunction has received little clinical and basic research attention and remains a largely untapped field in medicine. The epidemiology of female sexual dysfunction is poorly understood because relatively few studies have been done in community settings. In the United States, female sexual dysfunction has been estimated to affect 40% of women in the general population. Among the elderly, however, it has been reported that up to 87% of women complain of sexual dissatisfaction. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of female sexual arousal disorders correlates significantly with increasing age. These studies have shown that sexual arousal and frequency of coitus in the female decreases with increasing age. The pathophysiology of female sexual dysfunction appears more complex than that of males, involving multidimensional hormonal, neurological, vascular, psychological, and interpersonal aspects. Organic female sexual disorders may include a wide variety of vascular, neural, or neurovascular factors that lead to problems with libido, lubrication, and orgasm. However, the precise etiology and mechanistic pathways of age-related female sexual arousal disorders are yet to be determined. In the past two decades, some advances have been made in exploring the basic hemodynamics and neuroregulation of female sexual function and dysfunction in both animal models and in human studies. In this review, we summarize neural regulation of sexual function and neurological causes of sexual dysfunction in women. PMID:20664775

  17. Evaluation of sexual dysfunction in women with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vafaeimanesh, Jamshid; Raei, Mehdi; Hosseinzadeh, Fatemeh; Parham, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunction is a common complication of diabetes that adversely affects their quality of life. Its prevalence is known to be higher in diabetic men with and it is estimated to affect 20-85% of patients but the problem is probably less common in diabetic women. This study investigated the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and its risk factors among women with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytic study was performed during May 2012 to Feb 2013 at Diabetes clinic of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Qom and The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used for evaluation of sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: In this study, 59 (53.6%) women had sexual dysfunction. The mean age of patients with sexual dysfunction and healthy people was 48.22 ± 6.61 and 48.14 ± 5.37 years respectively and it was not statistically different in both groups (P = 0.94). Also, there was no significant difference between two groups in average duration of diabetes, fasting blood sugar (FBS), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level, insulin resistance, abdominal circumference and body mass index BMI. Although the history of hypertension, coronary artery disease and exercise levels were not significantly associated with sexual dysfunction, but there was a significant association between albuminuria and sexual dysfunction (P = 0.001). Retinopathy and sexual dysfunction had statistically significant relationship (P = 0.007) while no association was found between diabetic neuropathy and sexual dysfunction (P = 0.79). Results: Sexual dysfunction is a common complication in diabetic patients which accompanies with some complications of diabetes and should be considered especially in patients with nephropathy or retinopathy. PMID:24741512

  18. Bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina; Tateno, Fuyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency), bowel dysfunction (constipation), and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) (also called "pelvic organ" dysfunctions) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, pelvic organ autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, peripheral myenteric pathology causing slowed colonic transit (loss of rectal contractions) and central pathology causing weak strain and paradoxical anal sphincter contraction on defecation (PSD, also called as anismus) are responsible for the bowel dysfunction. In addition, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the pelvic organ dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Dietary fibers, laxatives, and "prokinetic" drugs such as serotonergic agonists are used to treat bowel dysfunction in PD. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life. PMID:21918729

  19. Bladder, Bowel, and Sexual Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina; Tateno, Fuyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency), bowel dysfunction (constipation), and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) (also called “pelvic organ” dysfunctions) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, pelvic organ autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, peripheral myenteric pathology causing slowed colonic transit (loss of rectal contractions) and central pathology causing weak strain and paradoxical anal sphincter contraction on defecation (PSD, also called as anismus) are responsible for the bowel dysfunction. In addition, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the pelvic organ dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Dietary fibers, laxatives, and “prokinetic” drugs such as serotonergic agonists are used to treat bowel dysfunction in PD. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life. PMID:21918729

  20. Female Sexual Dysfunction: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jaafarpour, Molouk; Khani, Ali; Khajavikhan, Javaher; Suhrabi, Zeinab

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Sexual dysfunction adversely affects quality of life, self esteem and interpersonal relationships and it may often be responsible for psychopathological disturbances. The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence and associated risk factors for Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD) in women with Kurdish culture from western Iran . Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive survey which included 400 women aged 18–50 years old, married, from Ilam-IR, who were interviewed as per the Iranian version of Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). The subjects were randomly selected from 4 primary health centres. Results: According to the findings, 185 (46.2%) women reported FSD. Prevalence of FSD increased with age, from 22% in women aged <20 years to 75.7% in women aged 40-50 years. FSD was detected as a desire problem in 45.3% of women, an arousal problem in 37.5%, a lubrication problem in 41.2%, an orgasm problem in 42.0%, a satisfaction problem in 44.5% and a pain problem in 42.5%. The educational level was inversely correlated with the risk of FSD (OR: 1.54 ,95% CI: 1.09-2.13). Patients with FSD were significantly more likely to be older than 40 years (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.12-2.68), who had sexual intercourse fewer than 3 times a week (OR:1.85, 95% CI: 1.23-1.99), who had been married for 10 years or more (OR:1.76, 95% CI: 1.04-1.97), who had 3 children or more (OR: 1.48, 95% CI: 0.97-1.24), who had husbands aged 40 years or more (OR: 2.11, 95% CI: 1.35-2.37) and who were unemployed (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.06-1.63). No significant differences were detected in smoking history, residences and contraception methods used (p>0.05). Conclusion: FSD needs to be recognized as a significant public health problem in Kurd women. Further research, particularly studies on awareness and competency of physicians in the management of FSD, is required. PMID:24551663

  1. SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR AND DYSFUNCTION IN DIVORCE SEEKING COUPLES

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Shiv; Batra, Lalit

    1996-01-01

    50 divorce seeking couples, when compared with 30 well adjusted couples, showed that sex-related factors and sexual dysfunctions were related to divorce seeking behaviour. A significantly high number of couples in the study group, reported a bad honeymoon, unsatisfactory coital experience, lack of cooperation from the spouse and variant sexual habits. The findings emphasis the importance of imparting adequate knowledge about sex and management of sexual dysfunctions, as part of marital therapy. PMID:21584156

  2. Sexual Dysfunction and Sexual Behaviors in a Sample of Brazilian Male Substance Misusers.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Alessandra; Pillon, Sandra Cristina; Dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Rassool, G Hussein; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential relationship between self-reported sexual dysfunction, sexual behavior, and severity of addiction of drug users. A cross-sectional design study was conducted at an inpatient addiction treatment unit in Sao Paulo, Brazil, with a sample of 508 male drug users. Sociodemographic data, sexual behavior, and severity of dependence were evaluated.The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 37.2% and premature ejaculation was 63.8%. Men with sexual dysfunction presented from moderate to severe level of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs of dependence. The findings from this study are particularly relevant identifying those sociodemographic factors, severity of drug use, and sexual behavior are related to men who experience sexual dysfunction. Health promotion and motivational interventions on sexual health targeted to male drug users can contribute in reducing these at-risk behaviors. More interdisciplinary research is desirable in future in considering men's sexual health. PMID:25643586

  3. Survey of the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions in Kurdish women.

    PubMed

    Arasteh, Modabber; Shams Alizadeh, Narges; Ghaderi, Ebrahim; Farhadifar, Fariba; Nabati, Ronak; Gharibi, Fardin

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the prevalence of female sexual dysfunctions among Kurdish women. Participants in the study were 196 women between 15 and 55 years of age who attended the gynecological clinic of Be'sat Hospital in Sanandaj Province, Iran. The authors collected relevant data using the Female Sexual Function Index. The mean score was 22.71 (SD = 5). Using a cutoff score of 26.55, the authors found that 151 women (77%) had some sexual dysfunction. Scores declined as patients' age increased; further, an older age at marriage was associated with a higher score. This study, the first about sexual dysfunctions in Kurdish society, shows that sexual dysfunctions are prevalent among women of this ethnicity. Clinicians should complete further studies to assess the factors contributing to this phenomenon. PMID:24228699

  4. Antidepressant-related sexual dysfunction - perspectives from neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Graf, Heiko; Walter, Martin; Metzger, Coraline D; Abler, Birgit

    2014-06-01

    Sexual dysfunction is not only a common symptom in major depression but also a frequent side-effect of antidepressant medication, mainly of the selective serotonin reuptake-inhibitors (SSRI) that are often prescribed as a first line treatment option. Despite of the increasing incidence and prescription rates, neuronal mechanisms underlying SSRI-related sexual dysfunction are poorly understood and investigations on this topic are scarce. Neuroimaging techniques, mainly functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), provide a feasible approach to investigate these mechanisms since SSRI-related sexual dysfunction is most likely related to central nervous processes. This review summarizes the recent literature regarding the basic clinical findings and imaging correlates of antidepressant-related sexual dysfunction linking brain regions and networks potentially involved to phases and subcomponents of sexual processing and antidepressant action. In particular, fMRI studies on SSRI antidepressants including paroxetine and SNRIs including bupropion are highlighted. PMID:24333547

  5. Male sexual dysfunction and HIV--a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Santi, Daniele; Brigante, Giulia; Zona, Stefano; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Rochira, Vincenzo

    2014-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction in men with HIV is often overlooked by clinicians owing to many factors, including the taboo of sexuality. The improved life expectancy of patients with HIV requires physicians to consider their general wellbeing and sexual health with a renewed interest. However, data on sexual dysfunction in those with HIV are scarce. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common sexual dysfunction in men, with a prevalence of ∼30-50% and is frequent even in men <40 years of age. HIV infection itself is the strongest predictor of ED, and many factors related to the infection-fear of virus transmission, changes in body image, HIV-related comorbidities, infection stigma, obligatory condom use-all impair erectile function. The diagnosis and treatment of sexual dysfunction is based on a multidisciplinary approach, which involves specialists in both infectious diseases and sexual medicine. Particular attention should be paid to the promotion of safer sex in these patients. This Review, describes the issues surrounding sexual dysfunction in men with HIV and aims to provide clinical advice for the physician treating these patients. PMID:24394405

  6. Survivorship: Sexual Dysfunction (Female), Version 1.2013

    PubMed Central

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Carlson, Robert W.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Davis, Elizabeth; Edge, Stephen B.; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; McCabe, Mary S.; McVary, Kevin T.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; O’Connor, Tracey; Paskett, Electra D.; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Cancer treatment, especially hormonal therapy and therapy directed toward the pelvis, can contribute to sexual problems, as can depression and anxiety, which are common in cancer survivors. Thus, sexual dysfunction is common in survivors and can cause increased distress and have a significant negative impact on quality of life. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for female sexual problems, including those related to sexual desire, arousal, orgasm, and pain. PMID:24586080

  7. Management and rehabilitation of neurologic patients with sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Basson, Rosemary; Bronner, Gila

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic disease frequently negatively affects sexual experience in multiple ways. The patient's sexual self-image, sexual function, propensity to sexual pain, and motivation to be sexually active may be impacted, as may the sexual experiences of the partner. Difficulties with mobility can limit both partners' sexual arousal and pleasure. Conditions associated with chronic pain or continence concerns add further distress. Thus sexual rehabilitation needs to address many areas. Comorbid depression is common and needs to be stabilized before definitive treatment of sexual dysfunction. Management strategies include cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and sex therapy and, for erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation, pharmacotherapy can be added. Benefit from all these modalities is confirmed in the general population but only pharmacologic treatment of erectile dysfunction has been studied in neurologic patients, where benefit is also seen. Testosterone is indicated only for comorbid testosterone deficit: very occasionally the neurologic condition causes secondary male hypogonadism. No androgen deficiency state has been identified in women. Results of testosterone treatment in women are conflicting: recruited women were not clearly dysfunctional and women with neurologic conditions have not been studied. Future research involving both partners using combined medical and psychologic therapy as followed in clinical practice is advocated. PMID:26003258

  8. [Therapy for male patients with sexual dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Casella, Roberto

    2010-03-01

    Phosphodiasterase type 5 inhibitors (sildenafil, vardenafil, tadalafil) are the first line symptomatic therapy for patients with erectile dysfunction. The patient should receive a meticolous information on the use of these drugs and their possible side effects. These drugs are safe and can be used even in patients with stable cardiovascular disease. Patients not responding to oral drugs may be offered intraurethral or intracavernous alprostadil. Vacuum constriction devices are a second line option more acceptable to older patients. Penile prosthesis are very seldom used in Switzerland and vascular surgery is a vanishing option. Testosterone substitution is seldom needed in this setting. Treatment of premature ejaculation subdivides into behavioural therapy ("stop-start" or "squeeze" technique) and drug therapy as well. Topical therapy with lidocaine/prilocaine-containing medications to be applied before sexual intercourse and a oral daily off label use therapy with selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (paroxetine, fluoxetine, sertraline) can be offered. Dapoxetine, a potent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor with short half life time, is the first officially approved medication for the treatment of premature ejaculation and should be available soon in Switzerland. PMID:20235039

  9. Female sexual dysfunction in female genital mutilation.

    PubMed

    Elneil, Sohier

    2016-01-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM), otherwise known as female genital cutting (FGC), is currently very topical and has become a significant global political issue. The impact of FGM on the lives of women and girls is enormous, as it often affects both their psychology and physical being. Among the complications that are often under-reported and not always acknowledged is female sexual dysfunction (FSD). FSD presents with a complex of symptoms including lack of libido, arousability and orgasm. This often occurs in tandem with chronic urogenital pain and anatomical disruption due to perineal scarring.To treat FSD in FGM each woman needs specifically directed holistic care, geared to her individual case. This may include psychological support, physiotherapy and, on occasion, reconstructive surgery. In many cases the situation is complicated by symptoms of chronic pelvic pain, which can make treatment increasingly difficult as this issue needs a defined multidisciplinary approach for its effective management in its own right. The problems suffered by women with FGM are wholly preventable, as the practice need not happen. The current global momentum to address the social, cultural, economic and medical issues of FGM is being supported by communities, governments, non-governmental agencies (NGOs) and healthcare providers. It is only by working together that the practice can be abolished and women and girls may be free from this practice and its associated consequences. PMID:26759415

  10. The Relationship between Childhood Sexual Abuse and Sexual Dysfunction in Jamaican Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swaby, Antoneal N.; Morgan, Kai A. D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the associations between early traumatic sexualization and later sexual dysfunction in a sample of 100 Jamaican adults while identifying the linkages between age, frequency of abuse, and gender on sexual functioning. Participants were selected via purposive and convenience sampling and divided equally into comparison and…

  11. Prevalence and determinants of male sexual dysfunctions during first intercourse.

    PubMed

    Santtila, Pekka; Sandnabba, N Kenneth; Jern, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    We explored the balance of genetic and environmental factors on sexual dysfunctions during first intercourse experience in young men. Gender role conflict theory predicts that young males should show high levels of such dysfunctions coupled with mixed affective reactions. Three thousand one hundred eighty six male twins and their siblings (M = 26.17 years, SD = 4.77) completed items on erectile dysfunction (ED), premature ejaculation (PE), contextual factors, and affective reactions during first intercourse, as well as parental attitudes towards nudity and sexuality. Twin modeling revealed a significant genetic effects for PE, but not for ED. Experiences of sexual dysfunction and both negative and positive affects during first intercourse were common among the participants. More positive parental attitudes were associated with less dysfunction and more positive affect during first intercourse. Having the first sexual intercourse with an unknown partner and while strongly intoxicated were, together with group pressure and reluctance to engage in intercourse, related to more negative and less positive affects. Erectile dysfunction during the first intercourse was related to more negative and less positive affects. PMID:19266379

  12. Sexual Dysfunction in Women with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Elyasi, Forouzan; Kashi, Zahra; Tasfieh, Bentolhoda; Bahar, Adele; Khademloo, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexual dysfunction (SD) is one of the important problems in diabetic patients. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of sexual problems in Iranian women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among type 2 diabetic women who visited two outpatient endocrine clinics, namely Imam Hospital and Tuba clinic (Sari, Iran) in 2012. Patients were asked to complete two validated questionnaires: Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) as well as a demographic questionnaire. Analysis was performed using descriptive and analytical tests. P<0.05 was considered to be significant. Results One hundred and fifty women with type 2 diabetes were investigated. Most of the cases aged 40-44 years old. The mean of the total score of the FSFI questionnaire was 22. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 78.7% (CI: 71.4-84.4); among these, 58% (CI: 50.0-65.6) reported problems in lubrication, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9) complained of decreased sexual desire, 50% (CI: 42.1-57.9) had problems with arousal, 47.3% (CI: 39.5-55.3) had dyspareunia, 32.7% (CI: 25.7-40.5) complained of orgasmic dysfunction and 42.7% (CI: 35.0-50.7) reported problems in sexual satisfaction. With regard to the results of the HADS questionnaire, 58.7% (CI: 50.7-66.2) of the patients had depression and 96.7% (CI: 92.4-98.6) had anxiety. Conclusion This study showed the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction in diabetic women, especially among those complaining of depression. Health care professionals dealing with diabetic patients should be aware of possible presence of sexual dysfunction in female patients. PMID:25999619

  13. Heart Rate Variability: A Risk Factor for Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Amelia M; Lorenz, Tierney A; Pulverman, Carey S; Meston, Cindy M

    2015-09-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of autonomic nervous system activity, which reflects an individual's ability to adapt to physiological and environmental changes. Low resting HRV has been linked to several mental health conditions, including depression, anxiety, and alcohol dependence (Kemp et al. in Biological Psychiatry 67(11):1067-1074, 2010. doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.12.012; Kemp et al. in PloS One, 7(2):e30777, 2012; Quintana et al. in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 132(1-2):395-398, 2013. doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2013.02.025). HRV has also been used as a method for indexing the relative balance of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity to parasympathetic nervous system activity. This balance--in particular, moderately dominant SNS activity--has been shown to play a significant role in women's genital sexual arousal in the laboratory; however, the role of SNS activity in clinically relevant sexual arousal function is unknown. The present study assessed the feasibility of using HRV as an index of women's self-reported sexual arousal function outside the laboratory. Sexual arousal function, overall sexual function, and resting HRV were assessed in 72 women, aged 18-39. Women with below average HRV were significantly more likely to report sexual arousal dysfunction (p < .001) and overall sexual dysfunction (p < .001) than both women with average HRV and women with above average HRV. In conclusion, low HRV may be a risk factor for female sexual arousal dysfunction and overall sexual dysfunction. PMID:26081002

  14. Survivorship: Sexual Dysfunction (Male), Version 1.2013

    PubMed Central

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Carlson, Robert W.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Davis, Elizabeth; Edge, Stephen B.; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; McCabe, Mary S.; McVary, Kevin T.; Melisko, Michelle; Montoya, Jose G.; Mooney, Kathi; Morgan, Mary Ann; O’Connor, Tracey; Paskett, Electra D.; Raza, Muhammad; Syrjala, Karen L.; Urba, Susan G.; Wakabayashi, Mark T.; Zee, Phyllis; McMillian, Nicole; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Various anticancer treatments, especially those directed toward the pelvis, can damage blood vessels and reduce circulation of blood to the penis and/or damage the autonomic nervous system, resulting in higher rates of erectile dysfunction in survivors than in the general population. In addition, hormonal therapy can contribute to sexual problems, as can depression and anxiety, which are common in cancer survivors. This section of the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provides screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for male sexual problems, namely erectile dysfunction. PMID:24616541

  15. Psychotherapeutic interventions for treating female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Leiblum, Sandra R; Wiegel, Markus

    2002-06-01

    A review of the current approach to the assessment and treatment of female sexual disorders from a sex therapy perspective is described. The importance of a comprehensive evaluation of both the woman and her partner, prior to formalizing a treatment plan, is stressed. Certain interventions are common in the treatment of all female sexual difficulties, for example, education and information about female sexuality generally, communication training, non-demand pleasuring, and permission to engage in self-pleasuring. Specific interventions are also described for such issues as past sexual or physical trauma. The overall goal of treatment is increased pleasure and satisfaction, rather than perfect genital response. Finally, the factors associated with treatment success are noted along with the observation that these factors are the same factors that contribute to a successful outcome in any psychotherapeutic endeavor. PMID:12107544

  16. Female sexual dysfunction in patients with substance-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, Alessandra; da Silva, Rosiane Lopes; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction symptoms and the associated risk factors in a sample of patients with substance-related disorders admitted to a specialized in-patient care unit. METHODS: This study used a cross-section design, with eight months of data collection, conducted with substance-dependent women using structured questionnaires to collect socio-demographic data and identify their drug of choice. The Drug Abuse Screening Test, Short Alcohol Dependence Data questionnaire, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence, and Arizona Sexual Experience Scale were also administered. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 105 women who had a mean age of 34.8 years (SD = 12.1, range = 18-65) and were predominantly heterosexual (74.3%), single (47.6%), Caucasian (50.5%), catholic (36.2%), and educated only to the level of primary education (40%), with a monthly family income of up to one minimum salary (37.5%). In 42.9% of the patients, crack was the drug of choice; 47.6% of the sample qualified for the Drug Abuse Screening Test (substantial problems related to drugs), 43.8% exhibited Short Alcohol Dependence Data (moderate or severe dependency), 47.6% exhibited Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (high or very high nicotine dependence). The prevalence of sexual dysfunction symptoms was 34.2% (95% CI = [25.3, 44.1]), and a high level of nicotine dependence and low income increased the chances of having sexual dysfunction by 2.72-fold and 2.54 fold, respectively. An association was also observed between female sexual dysfunction symptoms and schooling and levels of drug dependence. CONCLUSIONS: Female sexual dysfunction symptoms were common among this sample and primarily associated with high levels of nicotine use. PMID:23525317

  17. Adjunctive metformin for antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bo, Qi-Jing; Wang, Zhi-Min; Li, Xian-Bin; Ma, Xin; Wang, Chuan-Yue; de Leon, Jose

    2016-03-30

    This systematic review examines adjunctive metformin therapy for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. A computerized search of databases in Chinese and the international databases in English provided three trials with a total of 325 patients including one randomized clinical trial (RCT) and two observational studies (single-group, before-after design). A meta-analysis could not be conducted. The quality of evidence ranged from "very low" to "moderate". Metformin patients had a significant decrease in serum prolactin level with a mean of 54.6μg/l in the three trials. In the RCT, menstruation restarted in 67% of those with menstrual disturbances versus 5% in placebo. In one observational study, 91% of patients no longer had signs or symptoms of galactorrhea. In the RCT, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) occurred at similar incidence rates among metformin and placebo patients, except that no significant increases in nausea, insomnia and agitation occurred which were not associated with discontinuations. Our systematic review indicated that adjunctive metformin significantly lowered prolactin level and relieved prolactin-related symptoms in patients with antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. Future higher quality RCTs need to verify the currently available limited evidence based on three trials which suggest that adjunctive metformin may be used effectively and safely for antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. PMID:26822064

  18. The role of the sexual partner in managing erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjun; Gao, Tiejun; Wang, Run

    2016-03-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) has detrimental social and psychological effects on the quality of life of affected individuals and their sexual partners. When medical intervention is introduced to treat ED, physicians, nurses, and clinical educators should consider this disorder as a shared health problem for the men with ED and their sexual partners. New therapeutics such as phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors improve erectile function in affected men, and the ultimate goal of medical intervention for ED should be achievement of a satisfactory sex life for couples engaged sexual relationships. Sexual partners of men with ED have an important role in its management and improvement in quality of sex life; therefore, they should be involved in assessment of, diagnosis, education, counselling, and choice of therapy. This sexual- partner-engaged approach might assist treatment and rehabilitation, helping the couples affected by ED to achieve a high-quality sex life. PMID:26832165

  19. Sexual Enhancement Groups for Dysfunctional Women: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiblum, Sandra R.; Ersner-Hershfield, Robin

    1977-01-01

    Three groups of women with sexual dysfunction were evaluated pretreatment and posttreatment. Two groups did not involve partner participation, while the third group included partners on two occasions. Results for all groups were similar. The question of whether orgasm through coitus alone is a reasonable goal is raised and challenged. (Author)

  20. Insecure Attachment Style and Dysfunctional Sexual Beliefs Predict Sexual Coercion Proclivity in University Men

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Silvain S; Gorzalka, Boris B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Past studies have shown an association between low sexual functioning and engaging in sexually coercive behaviors among men. The mechanism of this relationship is not well understood. Moreover, most studies in this area have been done in incarcerated sex offenders. Aims The aim of the current study was to investigate the role of potential distal predictors of sexual coercion, including insecure attachment style and dysfunctional sexual beliefs, in mediating the relationship between sexual functioning and sexual coercion. The study also seeks to extend past findings to a novel non-forensic population. Methods Male university students (N = 367) anonymously completed online questionnaires. Main Outcome Measures Participants completed the Sexual Experiences Survey, Improved Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance Scale, Hostility Towards Women Scale, Likelihood of Rape Item, Experiences in Close Relationships Scale, Dysfunctional Sexual Beliefs Scale, and Brief Sexual Functioning Questionnaire. Results Sexual functioning was not significantly associated with sexually coercive behaviors in our sample (r = 0.08, P = 0.247), though a significant correlation between sexual functioning and rape myth acceptance was found (r = 0.18, P = 0.007). Path analysis of all variables showed that the likelihood of rape item was the strongest correlate of sexually coercive behaviors (β = 0.34, P < 0.001), while dysfunctional sexual beliefs appeared to mediate the association between anxious attachment and likelihood of rape item score. Anxious (r = −0.27, P = 0.001) and avoidant (r = −0.19, P = 0.004) attachment also correlated significantly with lower sexual functioning. Conclusions These findings suggest the relationship between sexual functioning and sexual coercion may be less robust than previously reported, and may be due to a shared association with other factors. The results elaborate on the interrelation between attachment

  1. Psychological and interpersonal dimensions of sexual function and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Assalian, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sex therapy techniques comprise behavioural and cognitive as well as psychodynamic and educational interventions, like reading (‘bibliotherapy’), videotapes and illustrations of anatomical models. Contemporary approaches focus on desire, pleasure and satisfaction. Discussion It is important to assess medical and biological factors involved in the genesis of sexual dysfunctions. Sex therapy techniques were developed by Masters and Johnson, and their premise was to eliminate ‘performance anxiety’ by emphasising the undemanding nature of the sexual relation. New methods were introduced, like Internet-administered techniques, and ‘mindfulness therapy’, and they proved to be effective. Conclusions Psychological treatments have some relieving effects on sexual dysfunction, but for studies of the outcomes it is difficult to meet the requirements of evidence-based medicine. PMID:26558085

  2. Attachment styles and sexual dysfunctions: a case-control study of female and male sexuality.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, G; Limoncin, E; Di Tommaso, S; Mollaioli, D; Gravina, G L; Marcozzi, A; Tullii, A; Carosa, E; Di Sante, S; Gianfrilli, D; Lenzi, A; Jannini, E A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate attachment styles in a group of women and men with sexual dysfunction. We recruited 44 subjects (21 women and 23 men) with sexual dysfunction and 41 subjects (21 women and 20 men) with healthy sexual function as the control group. Validated instruments for the evaluation of male and female sexual dysfunctions (M/F SD) and a psychometric tool specifically designed to investigate attachment style were administered. In women, significant differences were found between subjects with sexual dysfunction and healthy controls. The scales indicating an insecure attachment showed: discomfort with closeness (FSD = 42.85 ± 11.55 vs CTRL = 37.38 ± 8.54; P < 0.01), relationship as secondary (FSD = 26.76 ± 2.60 vs CTRL = 18.42 ± 7.99; P < 0.01), and need for approval (FSD=26.38 ± 3.61 vs CTRL = 20.76 ± 7.36; P < 0.01). Healthy women also had significantly higher scores in secure attachment (confidence: FSD = 24.57 ± 3.89 vs CTRL = 33.42 ± 5.74; P < 0.01). Men with sexual dysfunctions differed from healthy men in confidence (MSD = 30 ± 6.33 vs CTRL = 36.05 ± 5.26; P < 0.01) and in discomfort with closeness (MSD = 39.08 ± 8 vs CTRL = 34.25 ± 7.54; P < 0.05). These results suggest that particular aspects related to insecure attachment have a determinant role in people with sexual dysfunctions. It is therefore fundamental to identify the attachment styles and relational patterns in patients receiving counselling and psychological treatments focussed on sexual problems. PMID:25119586

  3. Sexual (Dys)function after Urethroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of published literature on the andrological consequences of urethral repair. Until recently authors have focused mainly on technical aspects and objective results. Reported outcomes of urethral reconstruction surgery have traditionally focused only on urodynamic parameters such as flow rates. Patient reported outcome measures have largely been neglected and there is a scarcity of well conducted systematic studies on the subject. For these reasons whether the different components of sexual life are more or less affected by different types of urethral reconstruction remains largely unknown. In an attempt to clarify the available scientific evidence, the authors make a critical review of available literature, systematizing it by sexual domain and study type. Brief pathophysiological correlations are discussed. PMID:27051420

  4. Sexual dysfunction and infertility as late effects of cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schover, Leslie R.; van der Kaaij, Marleen; van Dorst, Eleonora; Creutzberg, Carien; Huyghe, Eric; Kiserud, Cecilie E.

    2014-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common consequence of cancer treatment, affecting at least half of men and women treated for pelvic malignancies and over a quarter of people with other types of cancer. Problems are usually linked to damage to nerves, blood vessels, and hormones that underlie normal sexual function. Sexual dysfunction also may be associated with depression, anxiety, relationship conflict, and loss of self-esteem. Innovations in cancer treatment such as robotic surgery or more targeted radiation therapy have not had the anticipated result of reducing sexual dysfunction. Some new and effective cancer treatments, including aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer or chemoradiation for anal cancer also have very severe sexual morbidity. Cancer-related infertility is an issue for younger patients, who comprise a much smaller percentage of total cancer survivors. However, the long-term emotional impact of being unable to have a child after cancer can be extremely distressing. Advances in knowledge about how cancer treatments may damage fertility, as well as newer techniques to preserve fertility, offer hope to patients who have not completed their childbearing at cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately, surveys in industrialised nations confirm that many cancer patients are still not informed about potential changes to their sexual function or fertility, and all modalities of fertility preservation remain underutilised. After cancer treatment, many patients continue to have unmet needs for information about restoring sexual function or becoming a parent. Although more research is needed on optimal clinical practice, current studies suggest a multidisciplinary approach, including both medical and psychosocial treatment options. PMID:26217165

  5. Sexual dysfunction and infertility as late effects of cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Schover, Leslie R; van der Kaaij, Marleen; van Dorst, Eleonora; Creutzberg, Carien; Huyghe, Eric; Kiserud, Cecilie E

    2014-06-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common consequence of cancer treatment, affecting at least half of men and women treated for pelvic malignancies and over a quarter of people with other types of cancer. Problems are usually linked to damage to nerves, blood vessels, and hormones that underlie normal sexual function. Sexual dysfunction also may be associated with depression, anxiety, relationship conflict, and loss of self-esteem. Innovations in cancer treatment such as robotic surgery or more targeted radiation therapy have not had the anticipated result of reducing sexual dysfunction. Some new and effective cancer treatments, including aromatase inhibitors for breast cancer or chemoradiation for anal cancer also have very severe sexual morbidity. Cancer-related infertility is an issue for younger patients, who comprise a much smaller percentage of total cancer survivors. However, the long-term emotional impact of being unable to have a child after cancer can be extremely distressing. Advances in knowledge about how cancer treatments may damage fertility, as well as newer techniques to preserve fertility, offer hope to patients who have not completed their childbearing at cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately, surveys in industrialised nations confirm that many cancer patients are still not informed about potential changes to their sexual function or fertility, and all modalities of fertility preservation remain underutilised. After cancer treatment, many patients continue to have unmet needs for information about restoring sexual function or becoming a parent. Although more research is needed on optimal clinical practice, current studies suggest a multidisciplinary approach, including both medical and psychosocial treatment options. PMID:26217165

  6. Executive Dysfunction Predicts Delinquency But Not Characteristics of Sexual Aggression Among Adolescent Sexual Offenders.

    PubMed

    Burton, David; Demuynck, Sophia; Yoder, Jamie R

    2014-11-25

    Our aim in this study was to evaluate executive function and its relationship to delinquency and sexual crime in adolescents incarcerated for sexual crimes. Based on self-report data, 196 male adolescent sexual offenders from a Midwest state reported high rates of executive dysfunction. Although such deficits did not relate to the number of victims of sexual abuse, severity, or degree of force used in commission of the sexual crimes, poor executive function was significantly predictive of both general delinquency and felony theft. In both measures of delinquent conduct, behavioral regulation dysfunction was predictive of the frequency of commission of the crimes, whereas metacognition was not. Research and treatment implications are offered. PMID:25428928

  7. Sexual dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis: a hot but sensitive issue.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Deborah; El Miedany, Yasser

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has considerable personal impact for sufferers and their families. Those with RA suffer from pain, restricted joint movements, and fatigue, and can have problems with self-esteem and body image. It is also possible that medication causes sexual problems. Research on the subject is limited, and shows a divergent picture. Assessment for sexual dysfunction in clinical practice might be another hurdle, as patients and health professionals are reluctant to discuss this issue face to face. The aim of the work carried out and described in this article was to study the possibility of implementing sexual dysfunction assessment into standard rheumatology clinical practice. Results revealed that the multidimensional patient-reported outcome measures questionnaire offered the opportunity to assess the disease activity parameters, functional disability, quality of life, sexual dysfunction, and self-helplessness in one format. The patients appeared willing to complete questionnaires and this may be an acceptable tool for assessment. Improving patient education, as well as nurse-patient communication, through discussions about available options may minimize patients' feelings of isolation in addressing the problem and could help compensate for negative effects resulting from the disease. PMID:22067584

  8. Preclinical effects of melanocortins in male sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shadiack, A M; Althof, S

    2008-07-01

    The neurobiology of sexual behavior involves the interrelationships between sex steroids and neurotransmitters that result in both central nervous system (CNS) effects and effects in the genitalia. Tools such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning can help determine what areas of the brain are activated under sexual stimulation. Our understanding of the role of various neurotransmitters, neurosteroids and other CNS-acting compounds is improving. The role of CNS-acting compounds such as dopamine agonists in the treatment of male sexual dysfunction is under active investigation. Melanocortins have CNS and peripheral roles in a wide variety of bodily functions. The melanocortin agonist bremelanotide appears to act in the CNS to promote erections in preclinical models, and may also stimulate behaviors that facilitate sexual activity beyond their erectogenic effects. PMID:18552829

  9. Sexuality in eating disorders patients: etiological factors, sexual dysfunction and identity issues. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Castellini, Giovanni; Lelli, Lorenzo; Ricca, Valdo; Maggi, Mario

    2016-02-01

    The scientific community appears to be less interested in sexuality of eating disorders (EDs) as compared to other psychiatric or medical comorbidities. However, a clear association between sexual problems and ED psychopathology was reported from different perspectives. The overarching goal of this systematic review was to evaluate the general approach of the scientific literature toward the topic of sexuality and EDs. In particular, four different categories of research have been individuated, encompassing the role of puberty, and sexual abuse in the pathogenesis of the disorders, sexual dysfunctions, and the association between sexual orientation and EDs psychopathology. Timing of puberty with its hormonal consequences and the changes in the way persons perceive their own body represent a crucial period of life for the onset of the disorder. Sexual abuse, and especially childhood sexual abuse are well-recognized risk factors for the development of ED, determining a worse long-term outcome. Recent research overcome the approach that considers sexual activity of EDs patients, in terms of hypersexuality and dangerous sexual behaviors, considering the sexuality of EDs persons in terms of sexual desire, satisfaction, orgasm and pain. Results from this line of research are promising, and describe a clear relationship between sexual dysfunction and the core psychopathological features of EDs, such as body image disturbances. Finally, the analysis of the literature showed an association between sexual orientation and gender dysphoria with EDs psychopathology and pathological eating behaviors, confirming the validity of research developing new models of maintaining factors of EDs related to the topic of self-identity. PMID:26812878

  10. Avoiding experiences: sexual dysfunction in women with a history of sexual abuse in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Staples, Jennifer; Rellini, Alessandra H; Roberts, Sarah P

    2012-04-01

    Women with a history of sexual abuse during childhood/adolescence experience a high rate of sexual dysfunction. Evidence also suggests that they often use avoidant coping strategies, such as substance abuse, dissociation, and emotional suppression, which are likely factors implicated with their psychopathology. There is a dearth of information on potential psychological mechanisms affecting the sexuality of these women. Therefore, it is relevant to investigate whether avoidance, an important cognitive mechanism associated with anxiety disorders, relates to sexual functioning in this population. In this study, participants with (N = 34) and without (N = 22) a history of sexual abuse prior to age 16 years completed questionnaires on severity of sexual abuse, sexual functioning, and a tendency to avoid experiences. A three-step hierarchical regression investigated the effects of childhood/adolescent sexual abuse and avoidance tendencies on different aspects of sexual functioning. A significant interaction between childhood/adolescent sexual abuse and avoidance tendencies was found for orgasm function, with the combination of sexual abuse and avoidance tendencies explaining lower orgasm function. These findings suggest that, for women with a history of early sexual abuse, the tendency to avoid interpersonal closeness and avoid emotional involvement predicts orgasm functioning. PMID:21667232

  11. Sexual dysfunction in married women with Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frikha, Faten; Masmoudi, Jawaher; Saidi, Noura; Bahloul, Zouhir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sexuality is an often neglected area in patients with rheumatic disease. The aim of this study is to assess sexual functioning and quality of life in a group of married women with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). Methods This is a horizontal study for descriptive and analytical purposes. Married women with SSc were interviewed about their sexual functioning and their quality of life. Results A total of ten patients who met the criteria have accepted to participate to the study. Their mean age was 52, 4± 8,2 years. Eight women thought that the disease had affected their sexual activity. All patients reported a decrease in the frequency of intercourse since the onset of their disease. Eight of the sample reported a diminished desire for a sexual relationship. The reasons were fatigue, altered body image and pain. The assessment of sexual functioning using the Female sexual function index (FSFI) showed a mean FSFI score at 14,2±7,8 with nine women scoring in the range associated with sexual dysfunction (SD) (<26). All the subscales were affected. Our patients reported a mean total score on WHOQOL-brief (World Health Quality of Life-Brief Version) of 60 out of 120 indicating a moderate altered quality of life. Depression has been identified as determinants of impaired sexual function. Conclusion The prevalence of SD in women with SSc is high when a specific questionnaire is used to assess it. These results indicate that in daily practice, inquiring about sexuality and screening for depressive symptoms is indicated for every patient with SSc. PMID:25452828

  12. Altered heart rate dynamics associated with antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Ann, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Mee-Hee; Han, Ah-Young

    2013-01-01

    Background Antipsychotic-induced subjective inner restlessness is one of the common and distressing adverse effects associated with antipsychotics; however, its underlying neurobiological basis is not well understood. We examined the relationship between antipsychotic-induced subjective inner restlessness and autonomic neurocardiac function. Methods Twenty-two schizophrenia patients with antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness, 28 schizophrenia patients without antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness, and 28 matched healthy control subjects were evaluated. Assessments of the linear and nonlinear complexity measures of heart rate dynamics were performed. Multivariate analysis of variance and correlation analysis were conducted. Results The mean interbeat (RR) interval value was significantly higher in control subjects than in patients with and without antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness (P < 0.05). The low frequency/high frequency ratio was significantly higher in patients with antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness than in control subjects and in patients without antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness (P < 0.05), while the approximate entropy value was significantly lower in patients with antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness than in control subjects and in patients without antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness (P < 0.05). Correlation analyses controlling for psychotic symptom severity showed that the degree of antipsychotic-induced restlessness had a significant negative correlation with the value of approximate entropy (P < 0.05). Conclusion The results indicate that antipsychotic-induced subjective restlessness is associated with altered heart rate dynamics parameters, particularly the nonlinear complexity measure, suggesting that it might adversely affect autonomic neurocardiac integrity. Further prospective research is necessary to elucidate the precise interrelationships and causality. PMID:23986638

  13. Sexual dysfunction in 2013: Advances in epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, King Chien Joe; Fahmy, Nader; Brock, Gerald B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To provide a contemporary review of the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of premature ejaculation (PE) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Methods We searched for English-language articles published in the past 12 months using the PubMed database. Relevant articles on the subjects of sexual dysfunction, ED and PE were selected for review. Conclusions Recent studies on male sexual dysfunction have provided new therapeutic possibilities. Tramadol, a well-used analgesic, has a new role in the treatment of PE. Super-selective targeting of dorsal penile nerves by surgery or cryoablative technologies might become a viable treatment option for refractory PE in the future. The role of ED as a harbinger of important comorbidities allows for the early detection and intervention of these conditions, which can optimise therapeutic outcomes. The long-term effect of chronic phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors on endothelial dysfunction, the angiogenic potential of low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy, and further advances in drug-eluting endovascular stents might in future allow clinicians to treat ED more definitively. PMID:26558082

  14. The Sexual Beliefs of Turkish Men: Comparing the Beliefs of Men With and Without Erectile Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ejder Apay, Serap; Özorhan, Elif Yagmur; Arslan, Sevban; Özkan, Hava; Koc, Erdem; Özbey, Isa

    2015-01-01

    Sexual beliefs underlying male sexual dysfunction are known to emphasize excessively high sexual performance, among other inaccuracies. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of certain sexual beliefs among Turkish men with and without erectile dysfunction. In this comparative-descriptive study, demographic data and participant views regarding 50 common sexual beliefs were collected with a questionnaire. The study was conducted at the urology clinic of a university hospital in Turkey between May 2011 and August 2013. Participants were 815 men: 304 with erectile dysfunction and 511 without. Men with erectile dysfunction endorsed 8 beliefs about sexual activity more frequently than did men without erectile dysfunction. Findings indicate the association of certain cognitions with erectile dysfunction. Most of these cognitions concerned high expectations of male sexual function. PMID:25256444

  15. FEMALE SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION (FSD) IN WOMEN HEALTH CARE WORKERS

    PubMed Central

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos; Margariti, Maria; Nousi, Eftichia; Mistrioti, Dimitra; Lacroix, Richard; Saridi, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The main aim of this study is to investigate the occurrence and severity of FSD in women working in tertiary hospitals. Material and methods: The study sample was drawn from health care women between the ages of 20 and 65 years, working in two hospitals in Greece. This descriptive study used a structured Greek questionnaire and sexual function screener and quality of life sectors were consisted of rated scale questions. Eighty eight questionnaires were returned properly completed. The statistical analysis used the SPSS statistical program. Results: Female sexual dysfunction is a highly prevalent health issue whose exact incidence is not well defined. Factors that can contribute to female sexual dysfunction may be psychogenic, physical, mixed or unknown. Each of these factors consists of individual components that influence the sexual response; however their precise impact in FSD development and progression is unknown. Moreover, the role of circadian rhythm disorders (especially that of shift work sleep disorder) to the development and progression of FSD has been poorly investigated. Conclusion: Working environment and patterns of work schedules may play a role in FSD however it has been difficult to specify in what extent they contribute to FSD development. PMID:27482157

  16. Vajikarana: Treatment of sexual dysfunctions based on Indian concepts

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, P. K.; Tripathi, Adarsh; Gupta, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    Vajikarana or Vrishya chikitsa is a one of eight major specialty of the Ashtanga Ayurveda. This subject is concerned with aphrodisiacs, virility and improving health of progeny. As per Charak Samhita, by proper use of these formulations, one becomes endowed with good physique, potency, strength, and complexion and sexually exhilarated and sexually potent. This in turn is helpful in many common sexual dysfunctions, including Infertility, Premature Ejaculation and Erectile dysfunction. The therapy is preceded by living in strict compliance with the directions mentioned in Ayurvedic classics, various methods of body cleansing and other non-medicinal strategies like sexual health promoting conduct, behavior and diet. Certain individualized herbal and herbo-mineral combinations are administered as per the nature of a person according to the Ayurveda. Many limitations need to be considered before considering the use of theses therapy like lack of scientific studies, possibilities of adulteration in the herbal and herbo-mineral combinations available in market and possibilities of unexpected side-effects etc., The article calls upon initiating research in this area so that claims of ancient Ayurvedic texts could be substantiated and vajikaran therapy may be utilized by modern medicine. PMID:23858267

  17. Sexual dysfunction and chronic illness: the role of flexibility in coping.

    PubMed

    Barsky, Jennifer L; Friedman, Michael A; Rosen, Raymond C

    2006-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is common among individuals with chronic illnesses and is associated with distress and reduced quality of life. Because of the long-term, often irreversible nature of sexual dysfunction in chronic illness and limitations of pharmacological treatments, there is a need to understand cognitive and behavioral coping processes in this population. We present a model of coping with sexual dysfunction that focuses on the construct of flexibility, including the definition of sexual functioning and its centrality to overall self-concept. We describe how this model can be applied in a comprehensive approach to treating sexual dysfunction in individuals with chronic illnesses. PMID:16809251

  18. Prevalence and correlates of female sexual dysfunction among Turkish pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Küçükdurmaz, Faruk; Efe, Erkan; Malkoç, Önder; Kolus, Eyüp; Amasyalı, Akın Soner; Resim, Sefa

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and associated factors of female sexual dysfunction together with the concerns of women about sexuality during pregnancy. Material and methods A total of 207 healthy, sexually active pregnant women were enrolled in the study. Demographic data of all participants were noted and sexual functions were evaluated by Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Each FSFI domain score was calculated and mean scores were noted. Concerns of women about sexuality were also investigated. Results Mean age of participant women was 27.0±5.9 (range 15–44) years. Prevalence of sexual dysfunction was found to be 87% in study population. Mean FSFI score was 18.6±1.21. The rate of sexual dysfunction was higher in the first (87%) and third (92.6%) trimesters when compared to the second (80.6%) trimester (p=0.243). Among demographic variables, education levels of partners and preconceptional sexual dysfunction were found to be significantly related to FSD. The most common concerns of women about sexual relationship have been reported as the fear of having pain (35%), risk of abortion (21.3%) and religious factors (10%). Conclusion Prevalence of sexual dysfunction is relatively high among pregnant women. Educational levels and preconceptional sexual functions were found to have an impact on this high rate. Accurate counseling of partners about sexuality during pregnancy may help to reduce misbeliefs, concerns and, thereby, decrease this high rate of female sexual dysfunction.

  19. Sexual Dysfunction in Male Subjects Receiving Trifluoperazine, Risperidone, or Olanzapine: Rates Vary With Assessment Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Nebhinani, Naresh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the rate and typology of sexual dysfunction in male subjects receiving trifluoperazine, risperidone, or olanzapine using the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX), the Psychotropic Related Sexual Dysfunction Questionnaire (PRSexDQ), and the sexual function section of the modified Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser Side Effect Rating Scale (UKU). Method: The sample included 100 men with psychotic disorders (F2 category of the ICD-10) and receiving trifluoperazine (n = 20), risperidone (n = 30), or olanzapine (n = 50) for at least 3 months’ duration. Subjects with a history of sexual dysfunction prior to antipsychotic intake or chronic medical illness were excluded. A cross-sectional design was employed, and data were collected over a 1½-year period from March 2009 to August 2010. Results: The rate of sexual dysfunction varied from scale to scale among the 100 subjects. The rate of sexual dysfunction was 25% on the ASEX, 37% on the PRSexDQ, and 40% on the UKU. Sexual dysfunction in the trifluoperazine, risperidone, and olanzapine groups was 20%, 43%, and 16%, respectively, on the ASEX; 35%, 50%, and 30%, respectively, on the PRSexDQ; and 40%, 50%, and 34%, respectively, on the UKU. The most common sexual dysfunction as assessed on all scales was decreased libido, except for the risperidone group on the ASEX. Conclusions: Sexual dysfunction is quite prevalent in subjects receiving antipsychotic medications. In our study, rate of sexual dysfunction was highest for risperidone, followed by trifluoperazine and olanzapine. However, the rate of sexual dysfunction varied from scale to scale. Hence, there is a need for a comprehensive instrument to assess sexual dysfunction in patients receiving antipsychotics. PMID:22943029

  20. A biopsychosocial approach to women's sexual function and dysfunction at midlife: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Holly N; Thurston, Rebecca C

    2016-05-01

    A satisfying sex life is an important component of overall well-being, but sexual dysfunction is common, especially in midlife women. The aim of this review is (a) to define sexual function and dysfunction, (b) to present theoretical models of female sexual response, (c) to examine longitudinal studies of how sexual function changes during midlife, and (d) to review treatment options. Four types of female sexual dysfunction are currently recognized: Female Orgasmic Disorder, Female Sexual Interest/Arousal Disorder, Genito-Pelvic Pain/Penetration Disorder, and Substance/Medication-Induced Sexual Dysfunction. However, optimal sexual function transcends the simple absence of dysfunction. A biopsychosocial approach that simultaneously considers physical, psychological, sociocultural, and interpersonal factors is necessary to guide research and clinical care regarding women's sexual function. Most longitudinal studies reveal an association between advancing menopause status and worsening sexual function. Psychosocial variables, such as availability of a partner, relationship quality, and psychological functioning, also play an integral role. Future directions for research should include deepening our understanding of how sexual function changes with aging and developing safe and effective approaches to optimizing women's sexual function with aging. Overall, holistic, biopsychosocial approaches to women's sexual function are necessary to fully understand and treat this key component of midlife women's well-being. PMID:27013288

  1. Effects of Mindfulness Training on Body Awareness to Sexual Stimuli: Implications for Female Sexual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, R. Gina; Brown, Anne-Catharine H.; Roth, Harold D.; Britton, Willoughby B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Treatments of female sexual dysfunction have been largely unsuccessful because they do not address the psychological factors that underlie female sexuality. Negative self-evaluative processes interfere with the ability to attend and register physiological changes (interoceptive awareness). This study explores the effect of mindfulness meditation training on interoceptive awareness and the three categories of known barriers to healthy sexual functioning: attention, self-judgment, and clinical symptoms. Methods Forty-four college students (30 women) participated in either a 12-week course containing a “meditation laboratory” or an active control course with similar content or laboratory format. Interoceptive awareness was measured by reaction time in rating physiological response to sexual stimuli. Psychological barriers were assessed with self-reported measures of mindfulness and psychological well-being. Results Women who participated in the meditation training became significantly faster at registering their physiological responses (interoceptive awareness) to sexual stimuli compared with active controls (F(1,28) = 5.45, p = .03, ηp2 = 0.15). Female meditators also improved their scores on attention (t = 4.42, df = 11, p = .001), self-judgment, (t = 3.1, df = 11, p = .01), and symptoms of anxiety (t = −3.17, df = 11, p = .009) and depression (t = −2.13, df = 11, p < .05). Improvements in interoceptive awareness were correlated with improvements in the psychological barriers to healthy sexual functioning (r = −0.44 for attention, r = −0.42 for self-judgment, and r = 0.49 for anxiety; all p < .05). Conclusions Mindfulness-based improvements in interoceptive awareness highlight the potential of mindfulness training as a treatment of female sexual dysfunction. PMID:22048839

  2. Male sexual dysfunction and infertility associated with neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fode, Mikkel; Krogh-Jespersen, Sheila; Brackett, Nancy L; Ohl, Dana A; Lynne, Charles M; Sønksen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Normal sexual and reproductive functions depend largely on neurological mechanisms. Neurological defects in men can cause infertility through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction and semen abnormalities. Among the major conditions contributing to these symptoms are pelvic and retroperitoneal surgery, diabetes, congenital spinal abnormalities, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Erectile dysfunction can be managed by an increasingly invasive range of treatments including medications, injection therapy and the surgical insertion of a penile implant. Retrograde ejaculation is managed by medications to reverse the condition in mild cases and in bladder harvest of semen after ejaculation in more severe cases. Anejaculation might also be managed by medication in mild cases while assisted ejaculatory techniques including penile vibratory stimulation and electroejaculation are used in more severe cases. If these measures fail, surgical sperm retrieval can be attempted. Ejaculation with penile vibratory stimulation can be done by some spinal cord injured men and their partners at home, followed by in-home insemination if circumstances and sperm quality are adequate. The other options always require assisted reproductive techniques including intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The method of choice depends largely on the number of motile sperm in the ejaculate. PMID:22138899

  3. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Adolescents: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharko, Alexander M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the existing literature on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-induced sexual dysfunction in adolescents. Method: A literature review of SSRI-induced adverse effects in adolescents focusing on sexual dysfunction was done. Nonsexual SSRI-induced adverse effects were compared in adult and pediatric populations.…

  4. Genetics of Common Antipsychotic-Induced Adverse Effects.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Raymond R; Müller, Daniel J

    2016-07-01

    The effectiveness of antipsychotic drugs is limited due to accompanying adverse effects which can pose considerable health risks and lead to patient noncompliance. Pharmacogenetics (PGx) offers a means to identify genetic biomarkers that can predict individual susceptibility to antipsychotic-induced adverse effects (AAEs), thereby improving clinical outcomes. We reviewed the literature on the PGx of common AAEs from 2010 to 2015, placing emphasis on findings that have been independently replicated and which have additionally been listed to be of interest by PGx expert panels. Gene-drug associations meeting these criteria primarily pertain to metabolic dysregulation, extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS), and tardive dyskinesia (TD). Regarding metabolic dysregulation, results have reaffirmed HTR2C as a strong candidate with potential clinical utility, while MC4R and OGFR1 gene loci have emerged as new and promising biomarkers for the prediction of weight gain. As for EPS and TD, additional evidence has accumulated in support of an association with CYP2D6 metabolizer status. Furthermore, HSPG2 and DPP6 have been identified as candidate genes with the potential to predict differential susceptibility to TD. Overall, considerable progress has been made within the field of psychiatric PGx, with inroads toward the development of clinical tools that can mitigate AAEs. Going forward, studies placing a greater emphasis on multilocus effects will need to be conducted. PMID:27606321

  5. Psychological and interpersonal dimensions of sexual function and dysfunction in women: An update

    PubMed Central

    Althof, Stanley E.; Needle, Rachel B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction We reviewed the psychological and interpersonal dimensions of female sexual function and dysfunction. Methods We identified articles published in 1970–2013 using the keywords ‘female sexual dysfunction’, ‘sexual desire’, ‘sexual arousal’, ‘female orgasmic disorder’, ‘sex therapy’, ‘psychotherapy’, ‘behaviour therapy’ and ‘Internet therapy’. Over 200 articles were reviewed (Level of evidence 2b). Results and conclusions We identified the major psychological variables affecting female sexual function. The outcomes of psychological treatment interventions are reported. A collaboration between healthcare practitioners from different disciplines is necessary in the evaluation, treatment and education of female patients with sexual dysfunction. The assessment of female and couples’ sexual dysfunction should ideally include an enquiry about the predisposing, precipitating, maintaining and contextual factors. PMID:26558096

  6. The Study of Gonadal Hormonal Abnormalities and Sexual Dysfunction in HIV Positive Females: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Kallikadavil, Abithraj; Shivaswamy, Rajendraprasad; Menon, Vineetha Bharathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Every endocrine gland has been reported to be affected at varying rates in HIV. HIV is a highly stigmatized chronic disease with a substantial co-occurrence of mental and sexual health problems; however the sexual health problems in women have not been extensively studied. Aim To study the gonadal hormonal abnormalities and sexual dysfunction in HIV positive female patients and its possible association. Materials and Methods This descriptive/exploratory study was conducted in the Department of General Medicine at a tertiary care hospital from September 2013 to August 2015. The study group included 50 diagnosed HIV-positive patients. They were also subjected to specific questions regarding sexual dysfunction by female counselors using female sexual function index. Visits of the subjects were scheduled independent of the menstrual cycle. Hormonal levels (free testosterone, FSH, LH) were measured. Results Out of 50 patients, 26 patients in our study had sexual dysfunction (52%). Patients with age group between 30-39 years had the maximum sexual dysfunction compared to the other groups (<0.001). Patients with a CD4 count between 200 and 499 had the maximum sexual dysfunction (<0.02). Mean duration of HIV in the study was 30 months in sexual dysfunction group which was significant (p<0.005). Hormonal levels were found to be in normal range. All the study patients reported desire, arousal and lubrication problems whereas orgasm and satisfaction problems were noted in 60% patients with pain reported in 52%. Conclusion We identified that although the hormonal levels were in the normal range, they were comparatively in the lower range in the dysfunction group than the non-dysfunctional group. Both free testosterone and FSH levels were low indicating involvement of the pituitary rather than the gonads. We also conclude that duration of HIV and also level of CD4 count is related to sexual dysfunction. PMID:27190860

  7. Understanding and diagnosing sexual dysfunction: recent progress through psychophysiological and psychophysical methods.

    PubMed

    Rowland, D L; Slob, A K

    1995-01-01

    The psychophysiological method has been applied to the study of human sexual response for well over three decades. The value of this method in providing an objective, integrated approach to the understanding of sexual response, and more specifically sexual dysfunction, is presented. Selected results from recent studies using this methodology illustrate the complex relationships that emerge among cognitive, affective, and physiological components of the sexual response. In addition, data from a systematic study of the use of psychophysiological procedures as an aid in differential diagnosis are given as evidence that this methodology offers a further strategy for assessing problems such as erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation. Finally, recent findings utilizing sensory psychophysical procedures which relate subjective penile thresholds to sexual response and dysfunction are reviewed. Such procedures also study the interaction of physical/physiological systems with psychological events, and as such may be considered relevant to understanding the relationship between psychological aspects of sexual response. PMID:7630576

  8. Sexual dysfunction among female patients of reproductive age in a hospital setting in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Fajewonyomi, Benjamin A; Orji, Ernest O; Adeyemo, Adenike O

    2007-03-01

    Although sexual dysfunction is an important public-health problem in Nigeria, little research has been conducted on this topic in Nigeria. This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and their correlates among female patients of reproductive age using a questionnaire. Respondents were recruited from the out-patients clinics of a teaching hospital setting in Ile-Ife/ Ijesa administrative health zone, Osun State, Nigeria. Of 384 female patients interviewed, 242 (63%) were sexually dysfunctional. Types of sexual dysfunction included disorder of desire (n=20; 8.3%), disorder of arousal (n=l 3; 5.4%), disorder of orgasm (n=154; 63.6%), and painful coitus (dyspareunia) (n=55; 22.7%). The peak age of sexual dysfunction was observed among the age-group of 26-30 years. Women with higher educational status were mostly affected. The reasons for unsatisfactory sexual life mainly included psychosexual factors and medical illnesses, among which included uncaring partners, present illness, excessive domestic duties, lack of adequate foreplay, present medication, competition among wives in a polygamous family setting, previous sexual abuse, and guilt-feeling of previous pregnancy termination among infertile women. The culture of male dominance in the local environment which makes women afraid of rejection and threats of divorce if they ever complain about sexually-related matters might perpetrate sexual dysfunction among the affected individuals. Sexual dysfunction is a real social and psychological problem in the local environment demanding urgent attention. It is imperative to carry out further research in society at large so that the health and lifestyles of affected women and their partners could be improved. PMID:17615910

  9. Sexual Dysfunction in Women Undergoing Fertility Treatment in Iran: Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Afsaneh; Basirat, Zahra; Nasiri-Amiri, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunctions are one of the most fundamental difficulties for infertile women, which can be as the cause of infertility. This study investigated the prevalence of this disorder and associated factors in order to improve infertility treatment process and the quality of life of women referring to infertility center. Methods: A cross sectional study was performed on 236 women who referred to Fatima Zahra infertility center of Babol, Iran. Data collection tool was a questionnaire contained two parts; demographic characteristics and infertility information. Also, data for sexual dysfunction was obtained through diagnostic interview based on the international classification DSM-IV. For data analysis, logistic and linear regression analysis were used. The p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Most of women (84.9%) suffered from primary infertility and the mean duration of infertility was 60.2±8.4 months. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 55.5% (n=131); including dyspareunia in 28% (n=66), impaired sexual desire and lack of orgasm in 26.3% (n=62 patients), vaginismus in 15.2% (n=36) and lack of sexual stimulation in 13.6% (n=32). Binary logistic regression analysis showed that age, sexual satisfaction and history of mental illness had a significant effect on the probability of experiencing the sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of sexual dysfunction among infertile women. Considering the interaction between sexual dysfunction and infertility, professional health care centers should be sensitive to this effect. Also, more attention must be paid on marital relationships, economic and social situation and infertility characteristics in order to prevent sexual dysfunction development through early screening and psychological interference. PMID:26962480

  10. Sexual dysfunction and its determinants in Moroccan women with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Khnaba, Dina; Rostom, Samira; Lahlou, Racha; Bahiri, Rachid; Abouqal, Redouane; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To assess the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in married women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and compare it with a control group and to determine its association with clinical and disease activity factors. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study including sixty married women with a confirmed diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR)/ European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) 2010 Criteria, aged 18 or over and having sexual activity. Our controls were healthy volunteers women matched for age. Clinical and sociodemographic characteristics were collected. Sexual function was assessed by a self-reported questionnaire the index of female sexual function (FSFI). Sociodemographic and disease activity profiles were compared between those who had and did not have sexual dysfunction. Results The prevalence of female sexual dysfunction in women with rheumatoid arthritis attending El Ayachi hospital was 71.9%, it was 54% in controls. There was a significant difference in the total FSFI score between patients 18.29±9.09 and controls 23.05±7.91 (p=0.016). We found a statistically significant difference between the two groups in almost all dimensions of sexual function (desire, arousal, orgasm, satisfaction), except for pain and lubrication. In multivariate analysis, pain assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS) and depression assessed by hospital anxiety and depression score (HAD) were the independent determinants of sexual dysfunction. Conclusion Our study suggests that sexual dysfunction is more common among patients with RA compared to controls. These dysfunctions were related to desire, arousal, orgasm and satisfaction. Pain and depression appear to be the most important predictors of sexual dysfunction. PMID:27583080

  11. [Cerebral dysfunction and disorders of sexual behaviour (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gautier-Smith, P C

    1980-01-01

    The effects of epilepsy and focal brain lesions on sexual behaviour are described. Fits may be provoked by hypervenilation in epileptics during sexual activity, but also by orgasm and other sexual stimuli. Epileptic auras consisting of tactile genital sensations and sexual feelings, including orgasm, also occur. Post-ictal sexual automatisms consist of masturbation or other poorly structured activity, imitating the gestures of sexual intercourse. Focal brain lesions most commonly produce a reduction in sexual activity. However, frontal lobe lesions may produce disinhibition with inappropriate sexual behaviour and temporal lobe lesions may be associated with true hypersexuality, transvestite and transsexual behaviour. Eleven cases, which illustrate the various associations, are described. PMID:7423084

  12. Sexual Dysfunction and Help Seeking Behaviors in Newly Married Men in Sari City: a Descriptive

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad-Alizadeh Charandabi, Sakineh; Mirghafourvand, Mojgan; Khaki-Rostami, Zeynab; Malakouti, Jamileh; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Ghanbari-Homayi, Solmaz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sexual dysfunction is a major concern for people's general health. The aim of this study was to determine the status of sexual function and help-seeking behaviors in newly married men. Methods: This descriptive study was conducted on 363 newly married men. Simple random sampling was used according to premarital counseling offices in the health center of Sari city. Data collection instruments included personal and social characteristics, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX), and help-seeking behaviors questionnaires. In order to determine the relationship between characteristics and sexual function, general linear model and also between socio-demographic characteristics and receiving or lack of receiving help, multivariate logistic regression test were used. Results: The mean of sexual function score was 21.3 (2.7) out of possible 5-30, and 26% of men suffered sexual dysfunction. The highest prevalence (27.2%) of dysfunction was in the dimension of sexual stimulation, and the lowest (15.7%) in maintaining erection. For the treatment of sexual dysfunction, only 32% men had sought help, and 40% of them had visited specialists. The most frequent reasons for not seeking help were feeling uncomfortable with doctor, and their belief that doctor is not able to do much. 65% of men desired to be treated. Conclusion: The results demonstrated relatively high prevalence of sexual dysfunction among men, and unfortunately, most of them did not seek help for their sexual problem. Since Sexual dysfunction can leave damaging effects on the quality of life and marital relationship, interventions to deal with these challenges and screening to identify such problems appear necessary. PMID:26161368

  13. Laser irradiation of penile blood as treatment of sexual dysfunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koultchavenia, Ekaterina V.; Khomyakov, Victor T.

    2001-05-01

    40-60% of the men of average age suffer from the violations of sexual functions. Impotence doesn't make direct threat to life; nevertheless this disease essentially reduces quality of life, and consequently deserves the most steadfast attention. There are many methods of treatment of erectile dysfunction. However they are connected with a reception of medicines, which is expensive and has a number of contraindications, or with invasive procedures, or with surgical intervention, that also not always is desirable. We have developed the original device permitting to cause passive erection by creation of a local decompression. The second stage is the effect by an infrared laser radiation (denseness of a potency 4.2 mWt/sm2, continuous radiation with length of a wave 0.89 microns, exposition 5 minutes) on erection glans penis. We observed 24 patients with the complaints on insufficient erection (18), premature ejaculation (6); 2 patients in addition presented the complaint on small sizes of the penis. Age of the patients was 24-46 years, on the average 34.3 years. All have received treatment from 15 sessions in day.

  14. Prevalence of Sexual Concerns and Sexual Dysfunction among Sexually Active and Inactive Men and Women with Screen‐Detected Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Morten; Kristensen, Ellids; Lauritzen, Torsten; Sandbæk, Annelli; Giraldi, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Type 2 diabetes negatively impacts sexual health. Only limited information is available regarding sexual health among sexually inactive patients with type 2 diabetes. Aim The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of sexual concerns among sexually active and sexually inactive men and women with type 2 diabetes and of sexual dysfunction (SD) among sexually active. Methods Data from the Anglo–Danish–Dutch Study of Intensive Treatment in People with Screen‐Detected Diabetes in Primary Care‐Denmark study was used. A total of 1,170 Danish patients with screen‐detected type 2 diabetes attended a health examination, including assessment of sexual concerns using self‐report questionnaires and of SD using the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI‐R) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF‐5) instruments. Main Outcome Measures The main outcome measures used regarding sexual concerns are the following: prevalence of failure to fill sexual needs, of experiencing sexual distress, finding it important to have a good sexual life, and additionally, prevalence of SD. Results Data regarding sexual activity status during the last 12 months were available among 583 men and 377 women. Seventeen percent of men and 47% of women reported to be sexually inactive, among whom 57% of men and 42% of women reported failure to fill sexual needs; 31% of men and 10% of women that it was important to have a good sexual life, and 32% of men and 11% of women that they were experiencing sexual distress. Around half of men and women were excluded from the SD analysis, mainly because of reporting lack of sexual intercourse during the last 4 weeks. Among those included, 54% of men and 12% of women were found to have SD. Conclusions Sexual inactivity is highly prevalent among middle‐aged and older men and women with early type 2 diabetes and these patients often have sexual concerns. The high exclusion rates when assessing SD using the FSFI

  15. Sexual Dysfunction in Men Receiving Methadone Maintenance Treatment: Clinical History and Psychobiological Correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, Gilberto; Manfredini, Matteo; Somaini, Lorenzo; Maremmani, Icro; Leonardi, Claudio; Donnini, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    A variety of studies evidenced a relationship between drug use disorders and sexual dysfunction. In particular, heroin and opioid agonist medications to treat heroin dependence have been found to be associated with erectile dysfunction and reduced libido. Controversial findings also indicate the possibility of factors other than the pharmacological effects of opioid drugs concurring to sexual dysfunction. With the present study, we investigated the link between sexual dysfunction and long-term exposure to opioid receptor stimulation (heroin dependence, methadone maintenance treatment, methadone dosage), the potentially related hormonal changes reflecting hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis function and prolactin (PRL) pituitary release, the role of adverse childhood experiences in the clinical history and the concomitant symptoms of comorbid mental health disorders in contributing to sexual problems. Forty male patients participating in a long-term methadone treatment program were included in the present study and compared with 40 healthy control subjects who never used drugs nor abused alcohol. All patients and controls were submitted to the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX), Child Experiences of Care and Abuse-Questionnaire (CECA-Q) and the Symptom Check List-90 Scale. A blood sample for testosterone and PRL assays was collected. Methadone dosages were recorded among heroin-dependent patients on maintenance treatment. Methadone patients scored significantly higher than controls on the 5-item rating ASEX scale, on CECA-Q and on Symptoms Check List 90 (SCL 90) scale. Testosterone plasma levels were significantly lower and PRL levels significantly higher in methadone patients with respect to the healthy control group. ASEX scores reflecting sexual dysfunction were directly and significantly correlated with CECA-Q neglect scores and SCL 90 psychiatric symptoms total score. The linear regression model, when applied only to addicted patients, showed that

  16. Animal models of female sexual dysfunction: basic considerations on drugs, arousal, motivation and behavior.

    PubMed

    Ågmo, Anders

    2014-06-01

    Female sexual dysfunctions are a heterogeneous group of symptoms with unknown but probably varying etiology. Social factors may contribute both to the prevalence and to the origin of these dysfunctions. The present review focuses on female hypoactive sexual desire disorder, sexual arousal disorder and orgasmic disorder. These disorders are generally the most common, according to epidemiological studies, and they can all be considered as disorders of motivation. An incentive motivational model of sexual behavior, applicable to humans as well as to non-human animals, is described and the dysfunctions placed into the context of this model. It is shown that endocrine alterations as well as observable alterations in neurotransmitter activity are unlikely causes of the disorders. A potential role of learning is stressed. Nevertheless, the role of some transmitters in female rodent sexual behavior is analyzed, and compared to data from women, whenever such data are available. The conclusion is that there is no direct coincidence between effects on rodent copulatory behavior and sexual behavior in women. Based on these and other considerations, it is suggested that sexual approach behaviors rather than copulatory reflexes in rodents might be of some relevance for human sexual behavior, and perhaps even for predicting the effects of interventions, perhaps even the effects of drugs. Female copulatory behaviors, including the proceptive behaviors, are less appropriate. The common sexual dysfunctions in women are not problems with the performance of copulatory acts, but with the desire for such acts, by feeling aroused by such acts and experiencing the pleasure expected to be caused by such acts. Finally, it is questioned whether female sexual dysfunctions are appropriate targets for pharmacological treatment. PMID:24125786

  17. Efficacy of ellagic acid and sildenafil in diabetes-induced sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sumanta Kumar; Vishwanath, Manikanta; Gangadarappa, Suma Kallahalli; Razdan, Rema; Inamdar, Mohammed Naseeruddin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetes induced sexual dysfunction is a leading cause of male sexual disorder and an early indicator of cardiovascular complication. Reactive oxygen species generated in body during diabetes is a main causative factor for erectile dysfunction, a sexual dysfunction. Adjuvant antioxidant therapy along with phosphodiesterases type 5 enzyme inhibitor (PDE5i) is more effective than PDE5i alone. Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate efficacy of ellagic acid a known antioxidant and sildenafil in diabetes induced erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods: Type 1 diabetes was induced in male rats and rats were treated with ellagic acid (50 mg/kg, p.o.) and a combination of ellagic acid (50 mg/kg, p.o.) and sildenafil (5 mg/kg, p.o.), a PDE5i for 28 days. Sexual function was observed in diabetic rat and compared with those of treatment group and normal rats. Effect of ellagic acid was studied on advanced glycation end products (AGE) and isolated rat corpus cavernosum in vitro. Results: Sexual function of diabetic rats was found to be reduced and ellegic acid treatment could preserve sexual function of diabetic rats to some extent. Ellagic acid + sildenafil treatment was more efficient in management of diabetes induced sexual dysfunction. Ellagic acid inhibited (AGE) in vitro implying its role in reducing oxidative stress in diabetes. The polyphenol could not increase sexual function in normal rats and relax isolated rat corpus cavernosum smooth muscle significantly. Conclusion: The study proves usefulness of adjuvant antioxidant therapy in the management of erectile dysfunction in diabetes. PMID:25298678

  18. Loxapine for Reversal of Antipsychotic-Induced Metabolic Disturbances: A Chart Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jain, Seema; Andridge, Rebecca; Hellings, Jessica A.

    2016-01-01

    Loxapine substitution is a promising option for patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who develop antipsychotic-induced metabolic illness. We performed a chart review of 15 adolescents and adults meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for ASD, all with antipsychotic-associated weight gain, who received low dose loxapine in an attempt to taper or…

  19. Self-limiting Atypical Antipsychotics-induced Edema: Clinical Cases and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Musa Usman; Abdullahi, Aminu Taura

    2016-01-01

    A number of atypical antipsychotics have been associated with peripheral edema. The exact cause is not known. We report two cases of olanzapine-induced edema and a brief review of atypical antipsychotic-induced edema, possible risk factors, etiology, and clinical features. The recommendation is given on different methods of managing this side effect. PMID:27335511

  20. Racial differences in sexual dysfunction among postdeployed Iraq and Afghanistan veterans.

    PubMed

    Hosain, G M Monawar; Latini, David M; Kauth, Michael R; Goltz, Heather Honoré; Helmer, Drew A

    2013-09-01

    This study examined the racial/ethnic differences in prevalence and risk factors of sexual dysfunction among postdeployed Iraqi/Afghanistan veterans. A total of 3,962 recently deployed veterans were recruited from Houston Veterans Affairs medical center. The authors examined sociodemographic, medical, mental-health, and lifestyle-related variables. Sexual dysfunction was diagnosed by ICD9-CM code and/or medicines prescribed for sexual dysfunction. Analyses included chi-square, analysis of variance, and multivariate logistic regression. Sexual dysfunction was observed 4.7% in Whites, 7.9% in African Americans, and 6.3% in Hispanics. Age, marital status, smoking, and hypertension were risk factors for Whites, whereas age, marital status, posttraumatic stress disorder and hypertension were significant for African Americans. For Hispanics, only age and posttraumatic stress disorder were significant. This study identified that risk factors of sexual dysfunction varied by race/ethnicity. All postdeployed veterans should be screened; and psychosocial support and educational materials should address race/ethnicity-specific risk factors. PMID:23300201

  1. Racial differences in sexual dysfunction among postdeployed Iraq and Afghanistan veterans

    PubMed Central

    Monawar Hosain, G. M.; Latini, David M.; Kauth, Micahel R.; Goltz, Heather Honoré; Helmer, Drew A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the racial/ethnic differences in prevalence and risk factors of sexual dysfunction among postdeployed Iraqi/Afghanistan veterans. A total of 3,962 recently deployed veterans were recruited from Houston Veterans Affairs medical center. The authors examined sociodemographic, medical, mental-health, and lifestyle-related variables. Sexual dysfunction was diagnosed by ICD9-CM code and/or medicines prescribed for sexual dysfunction. Analyses included chi-square, analysis of variance, and multivariate logistic regression. Sexual dysfunction was observed 4.7% in Whites, 7.9% in African Americans, and 6.3% in Hispanics. Age, marital status, smoking, and hypertension were risk factors for Whites, whereas age, marital status, posttraumatic stress disorder and hypertension were significant for African Americans. For Hispanics, only age and posttraumatic stress disorder were significant. This study identified that risk factors of sexual dysfunction varied by race/ethnicity. All postdeployed veterans should be screened; and psychosocial support and educational materials should address race/ethnicity-specific risk factors. PMID:23300201

  2. Exploring gay couples' experience with sexual dysfunction after radical prostatectomy: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Mary-Ellen; Irvine, Jane; Currie, Kristen L; Ritvo, Paul; Trachtenberg, Lianne; Louis, Alyssa; Trachtenberg, John; Jamnicky, Leah; Matthew, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the experience of three gay couples managing sexual dysfunction as a result of undergoing a radical prostatectomy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted as part of a larger study at an urban hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Interview transcripts were transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The authors clustered 18 subordinate themes under 3 superordinate themes: (a) acknowledging change in sexual experience (libido, erectile function, sexual activity, orgasmic function); (b) accommodating change in sexual experience (strategies: emphasizing intimacy, embracing plan B, focus on the other; barriers: side-effect concerns, loss of naturalness, communication breakdown, failure to initiate, trial and failure, partner confounds); and (c) accepting change in sexual experience (indicators: emphasizing health, age attributions, finding a new normal; barriers: uncertain outcomes, treatment regrets). Although gay couples and heterosexual couples share many similar challenges, we discovered that gay men have particular sexual roles and can engage in novel accommodation practices, such as open relationships, that have not been noted in heterosexual couples. All couples, regardless of their level of sexual functioning, highlighted the need for more extensive programming related to sexual rehabilitation. Equitable rehabilitative support is critical to assist homosexual couples manage distress associated with prostatectomy-related sexual dysfunction. PMID:23899045

  3. Sexual Dysfunction in Heroin Dependents: A Comparison between Methadone and Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Anne; Danaee, Mahmoud; Loh, Huai Seng; Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Ng, Chong Guan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Methadone has long been regarded as an effective treatment for opioid dependence. However, many patients discontinue maintenance therapy because of its side effects, with one of the most common being sexual dysfunction. Buprenorphine is a proven alternative to methadone. This study aimed to investigate sexual dysfunction in opioid-dependent men on buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) and methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). The secondary aim was to investigate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and the quality of life in these patients. Methods Two hundred thirty-eight men participated in this cross-sectional study. Four questionnaires were used, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Opiate Treatment Index, Malay version of the International Index of Erectile Function 15 (Mal-IIEF-15), and World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Scale. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to examine the relationship between MMT and BMT and the Mal-IIEF 15 scores while controlling for all the possible confounders. Results The study population consisted of 171 patients (71.8%) on MMT and 67 (28.2%) on BMT. Patients in the MMT group who had a sexual partner scored significantly lower in the sexual desire domain (p < 0.012) and overall satisfaction (p = 0.043) domain compared with their counterparts in the BMT group. Similarly, patients in the MMT group without a sexual partner scored significantly lower in the orgasmic function domain (p = 0.008) compared with those in the BMT group without a partner. Intercourse satisfaction (p = 0.026) and overall satisfaction (p = 0.039) were significantly associated with the social relationships domain after adjusting for significantly correlated sociodemographic variables. Conclusions Sexual functioning is critical for improving the quality of life in patients in an opioid rehabilitation program. Our study showed that buprenorphine causes less sexual dysfunction than methadone. Thus

  4. Psychosocial profile of male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction in a psychiatric outpatient department in Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Gurvinder; Kamath, Ravindra; Subramanyam, Alka; Shah, Henal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sexual dysfunction can occur due to biological problems, relationship problems, lack of proper sexual knowledge or a combination of these. India is often known as the land of Kamasutra. But as far as sexuality research is concerned, there is a paucity of relevant data from India. In view of this, we conducted a study to assess the psychosocial profile of males presenting with sexual dysfunction to psychiatry out-patient department of a tertiary medical hospital. Materials and Methods: Hundred consecutive male patients presenting with sexual dysfunction were screened using Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale for clinical sexual dysfunction and after obtaining their informed consent were included in this study. They were assessed using a semi-structured proforma, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision criteria, Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, and Dyadic Adjustment Scale. Results: Majority of our respondents were in the 18–30 years age group and were married. The main source of sex knowledge for 69% of them was peer group. Age of onset of masturbation was 11–13 years for 43% of them. Premature ejaculation was the most common sexual dysfunction seen in the respondents. Marital discord was seen in significantly lesser number of respondents (32.35%) as also major depressive disorder that was seen in only 16%. Discussion: Premature ejaculation was the most common sexual dysfunction in our sample. Despite the sexual dysfunction, marital discord and depression were seen less commonly in our respondents. PMID:25657457

  5. Sexual Dysfunction Associated With Intrathecal Baclofen Use: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Saval, April; Chiodo, Anthony E

    2008-01-01

    Background/Objective: Intrathecal baclofen is considered standard treatment for severe spasticity of spinal cord and cerebral origin. Recognized side effects include fatigue and constipation. There are few reported findings of sexual dysfunction in men and none in women. Methods: Two case reports. Results: A male and a female patient with spasticity treated with intrathecal baclofen were recognized to have sexual dysfunction side effects from treatment. On reduction of the intrathecal baclofen dose, complete return to baseline sexual function was achieved for both subjects. Conclusions: Intrathecal baclofen can impair sexual function and ejaculation in some patients. Clinicians should be aware of this risk and ask about it during routine clinic follow-up for spasticity. Dosing adjustments need to be considered in these patients. PMID:18533420

  6. Late-stage clinical development in lower urogenital targets: sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Usman

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, late-stage clinical drug development that primarily focuses on urogenital targets has centered around four areas of medical need (both unmet need and aiming to improve on existing therapies). These include male sexual dysfunction (MSD), female sexual dysfunction (FSD), prostatic pathology (neoplastic, pre-neoplasitic, and non-neoplastic), and improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms. Despite the regulatory approval of compounds to treat erectile dysfunction (ED), benign prostatic hyperplasia, a number of treatments for overactive bladder, and stress urinary incontinence, there remains a deficiency in addressing a number of conditions that arise out of pathophysiological dysfunction resulting in lower urogenital tract sexual conditions. In terms of late-stage clinical development, significant progress has most recently been made in MSD development, especially in understanding further a common and complex sexual dysfunction – that of premature ejaculation. The search also continues for compounds that improve ED in terms of better efficacy and superior safety profile compared to the currently marketed phosphodiesterase-5-inhibitors. Whilst there are no approved medications to treat the subtypes of FSD, there has been significant progress in attempting to better understand how to appropriately assess treatment benefit in clinical trial settings for this difficult to diagnose and treat condition. This review will focus on late-stage human clinical development pertaining to MSD and FSD. PMID:16465180

  7. Short- and Long-term Effects of Ginkgo Biloba Extract on Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    PubMed Central

    Rellini, Alessandra H.; Telch, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) facilitates blood flow, influences nitric oxide systems, and has a relaxant effect on smooth muscle tissue. These processes are important to the sexual response in women and, hence, it is feasible that GBE may have a therapeutic effect. The present study was the first to provide an empirical examination of the effects of both short- and long-term GBE administration on subjective and physiological (vaginal photoplethysmography) measures of sexual function in women with Sexual Arousal Disorder. A single dose of 300 mg GBE had a small but significant facilitatory effect on physiological, but not subjective, sexual arousal compared to placebo in 99 sexually dysfunctional women. The long-term effects of GBE on sexual function were assessed in 68 sexually dysfunctional women who were randomly assigned to 8 weeks treatment of either (1) GBE (300 mg/daily), (2) placebo, (3) sex therapy which focused on training women to attend to genital sensations, or (4) sex therapy plus GBE. When combined with sex therapy, but not alone, long-term GBE treatment significantly increased sexual desire and contentment beyond placebo. Sex therapy alone significantly enhanced orgasm function compared with placebo. Long-term GBE administration did not significantly enhance arousal responses beyond placebo. It was concluded that (1) neither short- or long-term administration of GBE alone substantially impacts sexual function in women, (2) a substantial placebo effect on sexual function exists in women with sexual concerns, and (3) teaching women to focus on genital sensations during sex enhances certain aspects of women’s sexual functioning. PMID:18274887

  8. The effects of self-focused attention, performance demand, and dispositional sexual self-consciousness on sexual arousal of sexually functional and dysfunctional men.

    PubMed

    van Lankveld, Jacques J D M; van den Hout, Marcel A; Schouten, Erik G W

    2004-08-01

    Sexually functional (N=26) and sexually dysfunctional heterosexual men with psychogenic erectile disorder (N=23) viewed two sexually explicit videos. Performance demand was manipulated through verbal instruction that a substantial genital response was to be expected from the videos. Self-focused attention was manipulated by introducing a camera pointed at the participant. Dispositional self-consciousness was assessed by questionnaire. Performance demand was found to independently inhibit the genital response. No main effect of self-focus was found. Self-focus inhibited genital response in men scoring high on general and sexual self-consciousness traits, whereas it enhanced penile tumescence in low self-conscious men. Inhibition effects were found in both volunteers and patients. No interaction effects of performance demand and self-focus were found. Subjective sexual arousal in sexually functional men was highest in the self-focus condition. In sexually dysfunctional men, subjective sexual response proved dependent on locus of attention as well as presentation order. PMID:15178466

  9. Is Internet Pornography Causing Sexual Dysfunctions? A Review with Clinical Reports.

    PubMed

    Park, Brian Y; Wilson, Gary; Berger, Jonathan; Christman, Matthew; Reina, Bryn; Bishop, Frank; Klam, Warren P; Doan, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Traditional factors that once explained men's sexual difficulties appear insufficient to account for the sharp rise in erectile dysfunction, delayed ejaculation, decreased sexual satisfaction, and diminished libido during partnered sex in men under 40. This review (1) considers data from multiple domains, e.g., clinical, biological (addiction/urology), psychological (sexual conditioning), sociological; and (2) presents a series of clinical reports, all with the aim of proposing a possible direction for future research of this phenomenon. Alterations to the brain's motivational system are explored as a possible etiology underlying pornography-related sexual dysfunctions. This review also considers evidence that Internet pornography's unique properties (limitless novelty, potential for easy escalation to more extreme material, video format, etc.) may be potent enough to condition sexual arousal to aspects of Internet pornography use that do not readily transition to real-life partners, such that sex with desired partners may not register as meeting expectations and arousal declines. Clinical reports suggest that terminating Internet pornography use is sometimes sufficient to reverse negative effects, underscoring the need for extensive investigation using methodologies that have subjects remove the variable of Internet pornography use. In the interim, a simple diagnostic protocol for assessing patients with porn-induced sexual dysfunction is put forth. PMID:27527226

  10. Addressing sexual dysfunction after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy: Effects of a brief, psychosexual intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bober, Sharon L.; Recklitis, Christopher J.; Bakan, Jennifer; Garber, Judy E.; Patenaude, Andrea Farkas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Women at high risk for ovarian cancer due to BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation or family history are recommended to undergo risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) after age 35 or completion of childbearing. This potentially life-saving surgery leads to premature menopause, frequently resulting in distressing and unaddressed sexual dysfunction. Aim To pilot a novel sexual health intervention for women with BRCA1/2 mutations who previously underwent RRSO a using a single-arm trial. Feasibility and primary outcomes including sexual dysfunction and psychological distress were assessed. Methods This single-arm trial included a one-time, half-day educational session comprised of targeted sexual health education, body awareness and relaxation training, and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy strategies, followed by two sessions of tailored telephone counseling. Assessments were completed at baseline and two months post-intervention. Main Outcome Measure Study endpoints include feasibility and effectiveness as reported by the participant. Results Thirty-seven women completed baseline and post-intervention assessments. At baseline, participants had a mean age of 44.4 (SD=3.9) years and mean duration of 3.8 (SD=2.7) years since RRSO. Overall sexual functioning (P=.018), as well as desire (P=.003), arousal (P=.003), satisfaction (P=.028), and pain (P=.018) improved significantly. There were significant reductions in somatization (P=.029) and anxiety scores (P<.001), and, overall, for the Global Severity Index (P<.001) of the BSI. Sexual self-efficacy and sexual knowledge also improved significantly from baseline to post-intervention (both P<.001). Women were highly satisfied with the intervention content and reported utilizing new skills to manage sexual dysfunction. Conclusions This intervention integrates elements of cognitive-behavioral therapy with sexual health education to address a much-neglected problem after RRSO. Results from this promising single-arm study

  11. The Role of Leptin in Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain: Genetic and Non-Genetic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Panariello, Fabio; Polsinelli, Gina; Borlido, Carol; Monda, Marcellino; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and disabling mental illness affecting millions of people worldwide. A greater proportion of people with schizophrenia tends to be overweight. Antipsychotic medications have been considered the primary risk factor for obesity in schizophrenia, although the mechanisms by which they increase weight and produce metabolic disturbances are unclear. Several lines of research indicate that leptin could be a good candidate involved in pathways linking antipsychotic treatment and weight gain. Leptin is a circulating hormone released by adipocytes in response to increased fat deposition to regulate body weight, acting through receptors in the hypothalamus. In this work, we reviewed preclinical, clinical, and genetic data in order to infer the potential role played by leptin in antipsychotic-induced weight gain considering two main hypotheses: (1) leptin is an epiphenomenon of weight gain; (2) leptin is a consequence of antipsychotic-induced “leptin-resistance status,” causing weight gain. PMID:22523667

  12. Switching to moclobemide to reverse fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction in patients with depression.

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubbu, R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of substituting moclobemide, a reversible monoamine oxidase-A inhibitor, for fluoxetine to reverse fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction in patients with depression. DESIGN: Prospective open trial. SETTING: Outpatient treatment. PARTICIPANTS: Five patients with depressive disorder who experienced sexual side effects during treatment with standard doses of fluoxetine (20 to 40 mg per day). INTERVENTION: Discontinuation of fluoxetine and replacement with moclobemide (300 to 600 mg per day) after a 2-week washout period. OUTCOME MEASURES: Libido, orgasmic function (in women) or erectile and ejaculatory function (in men), and overall improvement in sexual function during a follow-up period of 2 months to 3 years. RESULTS: Among patients receiving fluoxetine questioned about sexual side effects, 4 (1 man and 3 women) had treatment-related diminished libido with poor orgasmic response or partial erectile failure, and 1 female patient had enhanced sexual desire with intense clitoral stimulation. In all patients, sexual disturbances resolved completely after a 2-week washout period and a switch to treatment with moclobemide. Moclobemide was well tolerated. The antidepressant effect of moclobemide was comparable to that of fluoxetine. CONCLUSIONS: Moclobemide may be preferred as a treatment for depression in patients with fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction. PMID:9987207

  13. Female sexual dysfunction: a call to arms for collaboration to understand the sexological elephant.

    PubMed

    Giraldi, Annamaria; Wåhlin-Jacobsen, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a controversial condition, which has prompted much debate regarding its aetiology, components, and even its existence. Our inability to work together as clinicians, psychologists, patients, and advocates hinders our understanding of FSD, and we will only improve matters with increased funding and collaboration. PMID:27324120

  14. The Relationship between Psychological Dysfunction and Sexuality within a Marital Context. Report on a Literature Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonnesson, Lena Nilsson

    A literature study was conducted to highlight the relationship between psychological dysfunction and sexuality within a marital context. The research reviewed suggests that women report more psychological symptoms, in particular depression, than do men. The husband's personality and functioning appeared to determine the level of marital…

  15. Male gonadal function in coeliac disease: 1. Sexual dysfunction, infertility, and semen quality.

    PubMed

    Farthing, M J; Edwards, C R; Rees, L H; Dawson, A M

    1982-07-01

    The prevalence of hypogonadism, sexual dysfunction and abnormalities of semen quality was determined in 28 consecutive males with coeliac disease. These observations were related to jejunal morphology and nutritional status, and were compared with findings in 19 men with Crohn's disease of similar age and nutritional status. Two of the 28 coeliacs (7%) had clinical evidence of hypogonadism but impotence and decreased sexual activity occurred more commonly, the latter apparently improving after gluten withdrawal. Of the married coeliacs, 19% had infertile marriages, a value greater than expected in the general population. Hypogonadism and sexual dysfunction were not detected in our patients with Crohn's disease. Seminal analysis in coeliacs revealed marked abnormalities of sperm morphology and motility, but only the former appeared to improve after gluten withdrawal. Similar abnormalities, however, were also detected in patients with Crohn's disease, although, unlike the coeliacs, 46% also had reduced concentrations of spermatozoa. Semen quality in coeliac disease could not be clearly related to general or specific (serum vitamin B(12) and red cell folate) nutritional deficiencies or to fertility, although sperm motility was markedly reduced in two of the three coeliacs with infertile marriages. The presence of antisperm antibodies did not appear to be an important aetiological factor in male infertility in coeliac disease. The pathogenesis of infertility and sexual dysfunction in coeliac disease remains unclear, suggesting that factors such as endocrine dysfunction or other specific nutritional deficiency may be involved. PMID:7200931

  16. Systematic analysis of dopamine receptor genes (DRD1-DRD5) in antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

    PubMed

    Müller, D J; Zai, C C; Sicard, M; Remington, E; Souza, R P; Tiwari, A K; Hwang, R; Likhodi, O; Shaikh, S; Freeman, N; Arenovich, T; Heinz, A; Meltzer, H Y; Lieberman, J A; Kennedy, J L

    2012-04-01

    Antipsychotic-induced weight gain has emerged as a serious complication in the treatment of patients with most antipsychotics. We have conducted the first in-depth examination of dopamine receptor genes in antipsychotic-induced weight gain. A total of 206 patients (139 of European descent and 56 African Americans) who underwent treatment for chronic schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were evaluated after on average over 6 weeks of treatment. Thirty-six tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and one variable-number tandem repeat, spanning the five dopamine receptor genes (DRD1-DRD5) were analyzed. In the total sample, we found a nominally significant association between the DRD2 rs1079598 marker and weight change using a cutoff of 7% gain (P=0.03). When stratifying the sample according to ethnicity and antipsychotics with highest risk for weight gain, we found significant associations in three DRD2 SNPs: rs6277 (C957T), rs1079598 and rs1800497 (TaqIA). The other genes were primarily negative. We provide evidence that dopamine receptor DRD2 gene variants might be associated with antipsychotic-induced weight gain in chronic schizophrenia patients. PMID:20714340

  17. A field trial of the effectiveness of behavioral treatment for sexual dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, D B; Durlak, J A

    1997-01-01

    The present study was a field trial of behavioral sex therapy for 365 married couples presenting with a range of sexual dysfunctions. Treatment occurred at an outpatient sexual dysfunction clinic of a large medical center using a multidisciplinary staff. Findings supported the external validity of behavioral sex therapy. The success rate for the total sample (65%) was comparable to that of previous investigations, and there were very few dropouts (1.6%) from treatment. In addition, outcomes did not vary significantly as a function of diagnoses, gender, or a history of sexual abuse. The amount of sensate focus completed in the last week of treatment was the strongest predictor of successful treatment. For some diagnoses, however, couple comorbidity reduced treatment success. Results indicated that behavioral sex therapy is effective in real-world clinical settings. PMID:9230489

  18. [Cognitive-behavioural therapy for sexual dysfunctions: treatment, etiology and accurate diagnosing of premature ejaculation].

    PubMed

    Rawińska, Marta; Fijałkowska, Sylwia

    2014-01-01

    Premature ejaculation (PE) is one of the most common male sexual dysfunctions. Successful treatment of PE has been hampered by the existence of a variety of definitions and diagnostic criteria and the lack of large, long-term studies of treatment efficacy. Numerous, diverse treatment approaches with varying degrees of efficacy have been used; these include behavioral, cognitive, and sex therapy techniques, and pharmacologic management with antidepressants, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and topical anesthetics. Combining a specific pharmacologic treatment for premature ejaculation with appropriate cognitive, behavioral, and sex therapy techniques should improve the overall understanding and management of sexual dysfunction, resulting in a sustainable increase in sexual satisfaction and decrease in distress for man. The aim of this article is to raise awareness of the prevalence of PE, its symptoms, and the impact it has on both partners and to discuss the benefits of adding limited behavioral and cognitive sex therapy techniques to drug therapy. PMID:24645584

  19. Sexual dysfunction in dialysis patients: does vitamin D deficiency have a role?

    PubMed Central

    Kidir, Veysel; Altuntas, Atila; Inal, Salih; Akpinar, Abdullah; Orhan, Hikmet; Sezer, Mehmet Tugrul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sexual dysfunction and vitamin D deficiency are highly prevalent in dialysis patients. Low levels of vitamin D have been linked to many diseases. To the best of our knowledge, the relationship between vitamin D and sexual dysfunction in dialysis patients has not been previously reported in the literature. Materials and methods: Cholecalciferol, 50,000 IU/week, was orally administered to 37 dialysis patients with vitamin D insufficiency for 3 months followed by dosage of 10,000 IU every other week for 3 months. The Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index questionnaires were filled out by all patients at baseline and at the sixth month of the study. Results: Sexual dysfunction, poor sleep quality, anxiety and depression rates were 83.7%, 45.9%, 18.9% and 48.6%, respectively in all patients. ASEX total score was found to be positively correlated with age and was negatively correlated with serum 25(OH)D level and serum albumin level. After cholecalciferol treatment, 25(OH)D levels increased significantly, however no significant change was observed in any of the parameters. In multivariate linear regression analysis, age and 25(OH)D level were found to be independent predictors of ASEX total score. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency seems to contribute to sexual dysfunction in dialysis patients. However, it was observed in this study that; cholecalciferol replacement given to dialysis patients with vitamin D insufficiency did not result in any significant changes in sexual functions. PMID:26885232

  20. Female Sexual Dysfunction Among the Wives of Opioid-Dependent Males in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Anvar Abnavi, Marjan; Ahmadi, Jamshid; Hamidian, Sajedeh; Ghaffarpour, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background Opiate abuse in males has significant effects on their sexual functions. In contrast, sexuality in females is a multidimensional issue that can strongly be affected by several factors in their partners. However, only a limited number of studies have assessed the role of males’ opioid dependency in their female partners’ sexual function. Objectives The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of males’ opioid dependency on their wives’ sexual function compared to the sexual function of the females whose husbands were not opioid dependent. Patients and Methods This study included 340 women who were selected through convenience sampling and divided into a control (females whose husbands were not opioid dependent) and a case group (women whose husbands were opioid dependent). The data were collected through an interview according to the DSM-IV-R criteria for female sexual dysfunctions by a senior female medical student who was one of the researchers. Finally, the data were entered into the SPSS statistical software (v. 15) and analyzed using the t-test and chi-square test. Results According to the results, the frequency of hypoactive sexual desire disorder and sexual aversion disorder in the control group was significantly higher than that of the case group (P < 0.05). Conclusions The results showed that having an addicted husband could strongly affect some sexual domains in women. It could change the pattern of desire and motivation for sexual contact in females and alter their attitude toward the sexual relationship, thereby causing disturbances in the females’ normal sexual function. PMID:27218067

  1. Viewing Sexual Stimuli Associated with Greater Sexual Responsiveness, Not Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Prause, Nicole; Pfaus, James

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Time spent viewing visual sexual stimuli (VSS) has the potential to habituate the sexual response and generalize to the partner context. Aim The aim of this study was to examine whether the time spent viewing VSS is related to sexual responsiveness felt in the laboratory or with a sexual partner. Methods Nontreatment-seeking men (N = 280) reported their weekly average VSS viewing in hours. VSS hours were examined in relation to the sexual arousal experienced while viewing a standardized sexual film in the laboratory and erectile problems experienced with a sexual partner. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported sexual arousal in response to sexual films and erectile problems on the International Index of Erectile Function were the main outcome measures. Results More hours viewing VSS was related to stronger experienced sexual responses to VSS in the laboratory, was unrelated to erectile functioning with a partner, and was related to stronger desire for sex with a partner. Conclusions VSS use within the range of hours tested is unlikely to negatively impact sexual functioning, given that responses actually were stronger in those who viewed more VSS. PMID:26185674

  2. Describing a new syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness

    PubMed Central

    Akca, Nezih; Ozdemir, Bulent; Kanat, Ayhan; Batcik, Osman Ersagun; Yazar, Ugur; Zorba, Orhan Unal

    2014-01-01

    Context: Little seems to be known about the sexual dysfunction (SD) in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Aims: Investigation of sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patient with lumbar disc hernitions. Settings and Design: A retrospective analysis. Materials and Methods: Sexual and sphincter dysfunction in patients admitted with lumbar disc herniations between September 2012-March 2014. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using the Predictive Analytics SoftWare (PASW) Statistics 18.0 for Windows (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, Illinois). The statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to evaluate the difference between patients. Results: Four patients with sexual and sphincter dysfunction were found, including two women and two men, aged between 20 and 52 years. All of them admitted without low back pain. In addition, on neurological examination, reflex and motor deficit were not found. However, almost all patients had perianal sensory deficit and sexual and sphincter dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of three patients displayed a large extruded disc fragment at L5-S1 level on the left side. In fourth patient, there were not prominent disc herniations. There was not statistically significant difference between pre-operative and post-operative sexual function, anal-urethral sphincter function, and perianal sensation score. A syndrome in L5-S1 disc herniation with sexual and sphincter dysfunction without pain and muscle weakness was noted. We think that it is crucial for neurosurgeons to early realise that paralysis of the sphincter and sexual dysfunction are possible in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. Conclusion: A syndrome with perianal sensory deficit, paralysis of the sphincter, and sexual dysfunction may occur in patients with lumbar L5-S1 disc disease. The improvement of perianal sensory deficit after surgery was counteracted by a trend

  3. Sexual Dysfunction, Depression and Quality of Life in Patients With HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Amini Lari, Mahmood; Faramarzi, Hosain; Shams, Mesbah; Marzban, Maryam; Joulaei, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In Iran, psychological aspect of HIV infection is poorly understood. The purposes of this study were to evaluate sexual dysfunction, depression rate and health-related quality of life and evaluate the association between sexual dysfunction, depression and quality of life in a group of HIV+ subjects in Shiraz, Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 278 male HIV-positive patients who had referred to voluntary counseling and testing and methadone maintenance therapy centers were recruited based on convenience sampling from May to October 2010. The purpose of the study was explained and interested individuals provided informed consent and completed validated questionnaires [Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36(, Brief Male Sexual Function Inventory (BMSFI), Beck Depression Inventory-short form(BDI)] to assess overall health related quality of life (HRQOL), sexual function, and depression. Results: Average age of the participants was 34.9 ± 10.7 years and 37.5% were severely depressed. Ordinal logistic regression indicated that sexual drive (-0.15; CI: -0.28 to -0.027), ejaculation (-1.91, CI: -2.71 to -1.12), and problem assessment (-0.098, CI: -0.17 to -0.02) had significant effect on depression type. Depression was significantly correlated with poorer quality of life in all domains. Pearson’s correlation coefficients between the BMSFI and the domains of SF-36 indicated that sexual drive (r= 0.215), ejaculation (r= 0.297) and problem assessment (r= 0.213) were significantly correlated with emotional wellbeing. Conclusion: Sexual function and depression showed association with quality of life. Effective treatment of depression and sexual function may improve the quality of life of HIV-infected person. Declaration of interest: None. PMID:24644501

  4. Sexual dysfunction following proctocolectomy for benign disease of the colon and rectum.

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, J J; Gelernt, I M; Salky, B; Kreel, I

    1983-01-01

    Standard surgical therapy for the treatment of chronic ulcerative colitis is total extirpation of the colon and rectum. Since ulcerative colitis is primarily a disease of young adults affecting many people at the inception or height of their sexually active years, postoperative sexual dysfunction is an extremely disconcerting complication. Between July 1973 and May 1981, 291 proctectomies for benign disease of the colon and rectum were performed by the authors. This included 135 men and 156 women. Resection of the rectum was performed using an intrasphincteric technique with dissection kept extremely close to the wall of the rectosigmoid, rectum, and anus. Proctectomy was performed in this manner to prevent significant disruption of the nerves carrying stimuli to the genital organs. Of the 135 males undergoing a proctectomy, four (3%) had a permanent deficit in sexual function. Two men, aged 32 and 30, could sustain an erection but had retrograde ejaculation. Two patients, age 19 and 44, have remained impotent for 1 1/2 and two years, respectively. One hundred fifty-two of the 156 females are sexually active and only two (1.3%) have complained of any physical sexual dysfunction. Each had temporary dyspareunia lasting between nine months and one year after operation. PMID:6830342

  5. Sexual dysfunction in married female patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Simpson, W S; Ramberg, J A

    1992-01-01

    The immediacy of anorexia and bulimia nervosa tends to obscure the adjunct problems of eating-disordered patients. The literature records no data pertaining to the treatment of concomitant psychosexual dysfunctions. The authors report the cases of five young married women referred for psychosexual therapy from eating disorders programs. The therapists found that each of the women was suffering from at least one additional disorder. Basic issues of control, grounded in these patients' early lives, generated intense resistance to treatment. The authors emphasize the need for accelerated research to gather the data from which to develop an effective treatment program for eating-disordered patients with associated sexual dysfunctioning. PMID:1556757

  6. Targeting melanocortin receptors: an approach to treat weight disorders and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wikberg, Jarl E S; Mutulis, Felikss

    2008-04-01

    The melanocortin system has multifaceted roles in the control of body weight homeostasis, sexual behaviour and autonomic functions, and so targeting this pathway has immense promise for drug discovery across multiple therapeutic areas. In this Review, we first outline the physiological roles of the melanocortin system, then discuss the potential of targeting melanocortin receptors by using MC3 and MC4 agonists for treating weight disorders and sexual dysfunction, and MC4 antagonists to treat anorectic and cachectic conditions. Given the complexity of the melanocortin system, we also highlight the challenges and opportunities for future drug discovery in this area. PMID:18323849

  7. Dietary Fructose and GLUT5 Transporter Activity Contribute to Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain.

    PubMed

    Palavicino-Maggio, Caroline B; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2016-09-01

    Receptors for antipsychotics in the hypothalamus contribute to antipsychotics-induced weight gain; however, many of these receptors are also expressed in the intestine. The role of these intestinally-expressed receptors, and their potential modulation of nutrient absorption, have not been investigated in the context of antipsychotics-induced weight gain. Here we tested the effect of dietary fructose and intestinal fructose uptake on clozapine-induced weight gain in mice. Weight gain was determined in wild type mice and mice lacking the GLUT5 fructose transporter that were "orally-administered" 20mg/kg clozapine for 28 days. To assess the role of dietary fructose, clozapine-treated mice were fed controlled diets with different levels of fructose. Effect of clozapine treatment on intestinal fructose transport activity and expression levels of various receptors that bind clozapine, as well as several genes involved in gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis were measured using real-time RT-PCR and western blotting. Oral administration of clozapine significantly increased body weight in wild type C57BL/6 mice but not in GLUT5 null mice. The clozapine-induced weight gain was proportional to the percentage of fructose in the diet. Clozapine-treated mice increased intestinal fructose uptake without changing the intestinal expression level of GLUT5. Clozapine-treated mice expressed significantly higher levels of intestinal H1 histamine receptor in the wild type but not GLUT5 null mice. Clozapine also increased the intestinal expression of fructokinase and several genes involved in gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. Our results suggest that increased intestinal absorption and metabolism of fructose contributes to clozapine-induced weight gain. Eliminating dietary fructose might prevent antipsychotics-induced weight gain. PMID:27056716

  8. Sexual dysfunction (Kṛcchra Vyavāya) in obesity (Sthaulya): Validation by an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Geetha, Parampalli; Aravind, B.S.; Pallavi, G.; Rajendra, V.; Rao, Radhakrishna; Akhtar, Naseema

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The present study intends to evaluate the relationship between Sthaulya (obesity) and Kṛcchra Vyavāya (sexual dysfunction) with respect to different phases of sexual intercourse through a single-centered, observational study in male patients of obesity. Materials and Methods: The study involved 33 obese males from the outpatient department of the Institution whose sexual functioning was assessed using an International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire, which was meant to assess five specific areas of sexual functioning. Results: A varying degree of sexual dysfunction was observed in four out of five areas of sexual functioning viz. erectile function (P < 0.02), orgasmic function (P < 0.02), sexual desire (P < 0.08), and overall satisfaction (P < 0.000) in obese individuals. Statistically significant dysfunction was not observed in intercourse satisfaction. Conclusions: Varying degree of sexual dysfunction is present in obese males, suggesting that obesity has a possible role in reducing the quality of sexual functioning in males as indicated in the classical ayurvedic literature. PMID:24167331

  9. Which are the male factors associated with female sexual dysfunction (FSD)?

    PubMed

    Maseroli, E; Fanni, E; Mannucci, E; Fambrini, M; Jannini, E A; Maggi, M; Vignozzi, L

    2016-09-01

    It has been generally assumed that partner's erectile dysfunction, premature, and delayed ejaculation play a significant role in determining female sexual dysfunction (FSD). This study aimed to evaluate the role of the male partner's sexual function, as perceived by women, in determining FSD. A consecutive series of 156 heterosexual women consulting our clinic for FSD was retrospectively studied. All patients underwent a structured interview and completed the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). FSFI total score decreased as a function of partner's age, conflicts within the couple, relationship without cohabitation and the habit of engaging in intercourse to please the partner; FSFI total score increased as a function of frequency of intercourse, attempts to conceive and fertility-focused intercourse. FSFI total score showed a negative, stepwise correlation with partner's perceived hypoactive sexual desire (HSD) (r = -0.327; p < 0.0001), whereas no significant correlation was found between FSFI and erectile dysfunction, premature and delayed ejaculation. In an age-adjusted model, partner's HSD was negatively related to FSFI total score (Wald = 9.196, p = 0.002), arousal (Wald = 7.893, p = 0.005), lubrication (Wald = 5.042, p = 0.025), orgasm (Wald = 9.293, p = 0.002), satisfaction (Wald = 12.764, p < 0.0001), and pain (Wald = 6.492, p = 0.011) domains. Partner's HSD was also significantly associated with somatized anxiety, low frequency of intercourse, low partner's care for the patient's sexual pleasure, and with a higher frequency of masturbation, even after adjusting for age. In patients not reporting any reduction in libido, FSFI total score was significantly lower when their partner's libido was low (p = 0.041); the correlation disappeared if the patient also experienced HSD. In conclusion, the presence of erectile dysfunction, premature, and delayed ejaculation of the partner may not act as a primary contributing factor to FSD

  10. Sexual dysfunction among HIV patients: three case reports and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Lema, Valentino M

    2013-12-01

    Global efforts in addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic have focused on preventing new infections, reduction of viral loads through treatment and care and support for the patients. Hardly any attention has been given to their quality of life in particular sexual health and functioning. There is a growing body of literature indicating high prevalence of sexual problems amongst HIV-infected individuals, whose mechanisms remain unclear. This may affect individuals' quality of life, interpersonal relationships and HIV treatment. The sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) region is the epicentre of the HIV epidemic, majority of the patients being young (< 30 years old) and in long-term heterosexual relationships. With increased life expectancy due to expanded access to HAART, the prevalence and potential impact of sexual dysfunction are certain to be significant. There is urgent need for appropriate research on sexual experiences and functioning amongst HIV patients in SSA and appropriate interventions to address them. Current efforts to link HIV/AIDS and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and proposals to make SRH services integrated and comprehensive provide are a good starting point. However SRHR policies, strategic plans and programmes should be reviewed to ensure inclusion of sexual health. PMID:24689328

  11. [Nursing care in males with spinal cord injury and sexual dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Cobo-Cuenca, Ana Isabel; Martín-Espinosa, Noelia M; Píriz Campos, Rosa M

    2013-01-01

    The impact of spinal cord injury and its sequels requires important efforts of adaptation. In several studies, people with spinal cord injury claim to have covered most of their needs at physical, emotional and social level, but they are not yet fully satisfied with their sexual life. Sexual function is usually impaired in men with spinal cord injuries, and is sometimes related to problems of erection, ejaculation and/or orgasm. This issue is not a priority in the first phase, but it appears over the subsequent periods when patients often ask for a solution to this problem. A case-study is presented of a 25 year old male with chronic complete spinal cord injury (ASIA A), L4-L5 level, who reported sexual dysfunction and attended an annual review in the National Hospital for Paraplegics. After performing a nursing assessment using the functional health patterns of Gordon, the team proposed a nursing care plan according to the taxonomy of NANDA (North American Nursing Association), NOC (Nursing Outcome Classification) and NIC (Nursing Intervention Classification). Nurses are the healthcare professionals who have more direct and continuous contact with these patients. Specific programs need to be designed to provide them with the sexual education, which should contain adequate emotional and sexual information. We believe that an appropriate and systematic assessment of patient's sexuality, as well as the application of the (NANDA, NOC, NIC) nurse methodology, may be very helpful in improving the outcomes of these specific interventions. PMID:23746665

  12. Reduced melanocortin production causes sexual dysfunction in male mice with POMC neuronal insulin and leptin insensitivity.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Latrice D; Dowling, Abigail R; Stuart, Ronald C; Nillni, Eduardo A; Hill, Jennifer W

    2015-04-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides like α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) substantially improve hepatic insulin sensitivity and regulate energy expenditure. Melanocortinergic agents are also powerful inducers of sexual arousal that are being investigated for a possible therapeutic role in erectile dysfunction. It is currently unclear whether reduced melanocortin (MC) activity may contribute to the sexual dysfunction accompanying obesity and type 2 diabetes. Male rodents with leptin and insulin resistance targeted to POMC neurons (leptin receptor [LepR]/insulin receptor [IR]POMC mice) exhibit obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and systemic insulin resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that LepR/IRPOMC males are also subfertile due to dramatic alterations in sexual behavior. Remarkably, these reproductive changes are accompanied by decreased α-MSH production not present when a single receptor type is deleted. Unexpectedly, behavioral sensitivity to α-MSH and MC receptor expression are also reduced in LepR/IRPOMC males, a potential adaptation of the MC system to altered α-MSH production. Together, these results suggest that concurrent insulin and leptin resistance in POMC neurons in individuals with obesity or type 2 diabetes can reduce endogenous α-MSH levels and impair sexual function. PMID:25590244

  13. Reduced Melanocortin Production Causes Sexual Dysfunction in Male Mice With POMC Neuronal Insulin and Leptin Insensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Latrice D.; Dowling, Abigail R.; Stuart, Ronald C.; Nillni, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived peptides like α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) substantially improve hepatic insulin sensitivity and regulate energy expenditure. Melanocortinergic agents are also powerful inducers of sexual arousal that are being investigated for a possible therapeutic role in erectile dysfunction. It is currently unclear whether reduced melanocortin (MC) activity may contribute to the sexual dysfunction accompanying obesity and type 2 diabetes. Male rodents with leptin and insulin resistance targeted to POMC neurons (leptin receptor [LepR]/insulin receptor [IR]POMC mice) exhibit obesity, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and systemic insulin resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that LepR/IRPOMC males are also subfertile due to dramatic alterations in sexual behavior. Remarkably, these reproductive changes are accompanied by decreased α-MSH production not present when a single receptor type is deleted. Unexpectedly, behavioral sensitivity to α-MSH and MC receptor expression are also reduced in LepR/IRPOMC males, a potential adaptation of the MC system to altered α-MSH production. Together, these results suggest that concurrent insulin and leptin resistance in POMC neurons in individuals with obesity or type 2 diabetes can reduce endogenous α-MSH levels and impair sexual function. PMID:25590244

  14. Review of Naturopathy of Medical Mushroom, Ophiocordyceps Sinensis, in Sexual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jiraungkoorskul, Kanitta; Jiraungkoorskul, Wannee

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions including desire, arousal, orgasm, and pain disorders are increasing worldwide due to etiological factors and aging. Several types of treatment are claimed in modern medicine, but they have serious side effects and higher costs. In fact, alternative approaches, such as the intake of plants, fungi, and insects, or their extracts, have also been practiced to enhance sexuality and ameliorate illness with notable successes. However, the scientific evidence related to the mechanisms and efficacy of these alternative medicines is both scarce and all too often unconvincing. Ophiocordyceps sinensis is an Ascomycetes fungus parasitic to Lepidoptera larvae, and has long been used as medicine to treat many illnesses and promote longevity in Chinese society. Previous investigations have shown that O. sinensis has many pharmacological activities. This review has focused on illustrating that O. sinensis can enhance libido and sexual performance, and can restore impaired reproductive functions, such as impotency or infertility, in both sexes. PMID:27041868

  15. Review of Naturopathy of Medical Mushroom, Ophiocordyceps Sinensis, in Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jiraungkoorskul, Kanitta; Jiraungkoorskul, Wannee

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dysfunctions including desire, arousal, orgasm, and pain disorders are increasing worldwide due to etiological factors and aging. Several types of treatment are claimed in modern medicine, but they have serious side effects and higher costs. In fact, alternative approaches, such as the intake of plants, fungi, and insects, or their extracts, have also been practiced to enhance sexuality and ameliorate illness with notable successes. However, the scientific evidence related to the mechanisms and efficacy of these alternative medicines is both scarce and all too often unconvincing. Ophiocordyceps sinensis is an Ascomycetes fungus parasitic to Lepidoptera larvae, and has long been used as medicine to treat many illnesses and promote longevity in Chinese society. Previous investigations have shown that O. sinensis has many pharmacological activities. This review has focused on illustrating that O. sinensis can enhance libido and sexual performance, and can restore impaired reproductive functions, such as impotency or infertility, in both sexes. PMID:27041868

  16. A discordant monozygotic twin approach to testing environmental influences on sexual dysfunction in women.

    PubMed

    Burri, Andrea; Spector, Timothy; Rahman, Qazi

    2013-08-01

    The present study explored the causal role played by putative environmental factors on variation in female sexual dysfunction (FSD) by investigating FSD discordant monozygotic (MZ) twins, which permits a control over genetic confounders. In a population-based sample of female twins aged 25-69 years (M = 55 years), MZ twins discordant for recent and lifelong FSD were selected. Sample sizes varied depending on the specific sexual problem (N = 33-90 pairs). The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) score was used to discriminate cases from controls. Once genetic factors were controlled for, relationship satisfaction emerged as the strongest independent predictor for recent and lifelong FSD, being associated with FSFI dimensions measuring desire, arousal, and lubrication problems. The association with orgasm problems was especially strong (OR 7.1, 95% CI: 1.9-25.3) as was the association with sexual dissatisfaction (OR 5.1, 95% CI: 2.1-12.1). Furthermore, obsessive-compulsive symptomatology was weakly associated with desire problems (OR 1.5, 95% CI: 1.4-1.8) and anxiety-sensitivity with orgasm problems (OR 1.1, 95% CI: 0.9-1.3). Negligible effects were found for personality factors and small effects for self-reported abusive experiences. These data indicate, for the first time, that in women at identical genetic risk, relationship factors play a key role in the development of sexual problems. These findings require replication in prospective designs which can provide additional powerful tests of the direction of causality between interpersonal factors and later sexual dysfunction. PMID:23605671

  17. Differences in psychological health and family dysfunction by sexual victimization type in a clinical sample of African American adolescent women.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Heather; Matson, Steven C

    2005-08-01

    We examined levels of sexual victimization among a sample of 249 14- to 19-year-old African American adolescent women. Victimization was common: 32.1% reported having been raped, 33.7% had experienced sexual coercion, and 10.8% reported an attempted rape. Only 23.4% had never been victimized. We investigated whether levels of psychological health and family dysfunction varied as a function of the type of sexual victimization. Girls who had been raped had lower levels of self-esteem and mastery and higher levels of depression compared to girls who reported no sexual victimization. Significantly higher levels of family cohesion and significantly lower levels of family support were reported by girls who had been raped versus girls who reported no sexual victimization. These findings are a starting point for future studies by providing evidence that levels of mental health and family dysfunction vary by the type of sexual victimization experienced. PMID:19817034

  18. Sexual dysfunctions in the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards compared to other specialized wards in Isfahan, Iran, in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzadeh, Gholamhossain; Shahin, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Having pleasurable sexual intercourses plays a major role in marital life satisfaction. Many of the medical and psychiatric disorders may affect the sexual function of the patients. The present study aims to investigate the relative frequency of sexual dysfunctions in the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards and that of the patients in other specialized wards. Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive-analytical, cross-sectional one, carried out on 900 patients hospitalized in psychiatric, cardiac, orthopedic, ophthalmology, and dermatology and plastic surgery wards of 5 hospitals in Isfahan. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX). Results: Sexual dysfunction in the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards (38%) was significantly higher than in the patients in other wards (27%), (P = 0.00). Among the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards, those with bipolar disorder (37.3%) had the highest prevalence rate of sexual dysfunction. The patients with schizophrenia, major depression, substance abuse, and anxiety disorders had the following rates respectively. Among the patients in non-psychiatric wards, those in cardiac wards (37.1%) had the highest prevalence rate of sexual dysfunction. There was a significant relationship between the drug uses, mostly psychiatric drugs especially anti-psychotics, and the occurrence of sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: Considering the significant relative frequency of sexual dysfunction in psychiatric patients and undesired effects of simultaneous occurrence of both of these disorders in the patients, more emphasis is recommended to be placed on the prevention and proper treatment of these disorders in the patients. PMID:26623400

  19. Historical and Current Factors Discriminating Sexually Functional from Sexually Dysfunctional Married Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiman, Julia R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Compared clinical couples accepted for sex therapy with nonclinical couples using the Personal History Questionnaire and sex and marital defensiveness scales. The best discriminators were sexual functioning scales, historical and affective scales for women, and current and fantasy scales for men. Surprising results and conclusions are discussed.…

  20. A Longitudinal Study of Predictors of Sexual Dysfunction in Men on Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Shane M; Wang, Chi-Hsiung E; Victorson, David E; Helfand, Brian T; Novakovic, Kristian R; Brendler, Charles B; Albaugh, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between sexual dysfunction, repeat biopsies and other demographic and clinical factors in men on active surveillance (AS). Methods Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measures were administered at enrollment and every 6 months to assess quality of life (QOL), psychosocial and urological health outcomes. Using mixed-effects models, we examined the impact of repeat biopsies, total number of cores taken, anxiety, age, and comorbidity on sexual function over the first 24 months of enrolling in AS. Main Outcome Measures PROs included the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite-26 (EPIC-26) Sexual Function (SF) subscale, the American Urological Association-Symptom Index (AUA-SI), and the Memorial Anxiety Scale for Prostate Cancer (MAX-PC). Results At enrollment (n = 195), mean age was 66.5 ± 6.8 with a mean EPIC-26 SF score of 61.4 ± 30.4. EPIC-26 SF scores steadily decreased to 53.9 ± 30.7 at 24 months (P < 0.01). MAX-PC scores also progressively decreased over time (P = 0.03). Factors associated with lower EPIC-26 scores over time included age, unemployed status, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and hypertension (all P < 0.05). Higher prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was associated with a more rapid decline in EPIC-26 SF over time (P = 0.03). In multivariable analysis, age, diabetes, and PSA × time interaction remained significant predictors of diminished sexual function. Anxiety, number of biopsies, and total cores taken did not predict sexual dysfunction or change over time in our cohort. Conclusions Men on AS experienced a gradual decline in sexual function during the first 24 months of enrollment. Older age, PSA × time, and diabetes were all independent predictors of diminished sexual function over time. Anxiety, AUA-SI, the number of cores and the number of biopsies were not predictors of reduced sexual function in men in AS. PMID:26468379

  1. Clinical Assessment of Tribulus terrestris Extract in the Treatment of Female Sexual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Carlos RB; Lasmar, Ricardo; Gama, Gustavo F; Abreu, Camila S; Nunes, Carlos P; Geller, Mauro; Oliveira, Lisa; Santos, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative–quantitative study based on hospital records of female patients of reproductive age, presenting sexual dysfunction, and treated with 250 mg Tribulus terrestris extract (1 tablet thrice daily for 90 days). Safety monitoring included vital signs, physical examination, laboratory tests, and occurrence of adverse events. Efficacy analysis included results of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels together with total and free testosterone, and the patient and physician assessments. There was a statistically significant improvement in total FSFI scores (P < 0.0001) post-treatment, with improvement among 106 (88.33%) subjects. There was a statistically significant (P < 0.0001) increase in the level of DHEA, while the levels of both serum testosterone (P = 0.284) and free testosterone decreased (P < 0.0001). Most adverse events recorded were related to the gastrointestinal tract. Physical examination showed no significant changes post-treatment. Based on the results, it is concluded that the T. terrestris extract is safe and effective in the treatment of female sexual dysfunction. PMID:25574150

  2. Clinical Assessment of Tribulus terrestris Extract in the Treatment of Female Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gama, Carlos Rb; Lasmar, Ricardo; Gama, Gustavo F; Abreu, Camila S; Nunes, Carlos P; Geller, Mauro; Oliveira, Lisa; Santos, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    This is a qualitative-quantitative study based on hospital records of female patients of reproductive age, presenting sexual dysfunction, and treated with 250 mg Tribulus terrestris extract (1 tablet thrice daily for 90 days). Safety monitoring included vital signs, physical examination, laboratory tests, and occurrence of adverse events. Efficacy analysis included results of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels together with total and free testosterone, and the patient and physician assessments. There was a statistically significant improvement in total FSFI scores (P < 0.0001) post-treatment, with improvement among 106 (88.33%) subjects. There was a statistically significant (P < 0.0001) increase in the level of DHEA, while the levels of both serum testosterone (P = 0.284) and free testosterone decreased (P < 0.0001). Most adverse events recorded were related to the gastrointestinal tract. Physical examination showed no significant changes post-treatment. Based on the results, it is concluded that the T. terrestris extract is safe and effective in the treatment of female sexual dysfunction. PMID:25574150

  3. Association of Body Weight and Female Sexual Dysfunction: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Mozafari, Mosayeb; Khajavikhan, Javaher; Jaafarpour, Molouk; Khani, Ali; Direkvand-Moghadam, Ashraf; Najafi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity is rapidly increasing worldwide with negative effects on women’s health, psychosocial factors and quality of life. Female sexual dysfunction (FSD) is a major public health problem that is worrying for many women physically, emotionally and socially. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of body weight with FSD and sexual satisfaction, in Ilam, western Iran, in 2010 to 2011. Patients and Methods: This was a case-control study on 120 women aged 18–50 years [64 with FSD (case), 64 without FSD (control)] married, from Ilam-IR, who were interviewed as per the Iranian version of Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were recorded by researchers. The subjects were randomly selected from primary health centers. Results: FSFI score was significantly lower in overweight women (P < 0.05). FSFI strongly correlated with body mass index (BMI) (r = -0.68, P < 0.001) and waist-to-hip ratio (r = -0.29, P < 0.05) in women with FSD. Of sexual function parameters, there was a strong and inverse correlation between BMI and arousal (r = -0.71, P < 0.001), lubrication (r = -0.61, P < 0.001), orgasm (r = -0.52, P < 0.001) and satisfaction (r = -0.54, P < 0.001), while pain (r = -0.12, P > 0.05) and desire (r = -0.17, P > 0.05) did not correlate with BMI. There was an association between BMI and extreme satisfaction (r = -0.28, P < 0.05). Extreme physical pleasure (r = -0.19, P > 0.05) and extreme emotional satisfaction (r = -0.16, P > 0.05) were not correlated with BMI. Conclusions: Overweight and obesity negative affect sexuality in women with sexual dysfunction. A systematic evaluation of sexual function to disclose a cause and effect relationship between obesity and FSD is suggested. PMID:25763278

  4. Intelligent computer-based assessment and psychotherapy. An expert system for sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Binik, Y M; Servan-Schreiber, D; Freiwald, S; Hall, K S

    1988-07-01

    New and converging developments in the areas of artificial intelligence, intelligent tutoring systems, and cognitive therapy have made possible a new approach to computer-assisted assessment and psychotherapy. This new approach combines the capacity for intelligent therapeutic dialogue with the presentation of individualized therapeutic interventions. Previous attempts at computerized psychotherapy are reviewed to highlight a newly developed rule-based expert system, Sexpert, which assesses and treats sexual dysfunction. Preliminary observations concerning couples' reaction to and acceptance of Sexpert are presented. PMID:3045259

  5. Pharmacologic and surgical therapies for sexual dysfunction in male cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Kadıoğlu, Ateş; Ortaç, Mazhar

    2015-01-01

    The recent recognition that many men experience sexual dysfunction following their diagnosis and treatment of genitourinary cancers, has led to the development multiple varied strategies that attempt to restore or preserve that function. In this manuscript we review the understanding of why it happens, highlight novel management strategies and discuss the concept of penile rehabilitation (PR) following prostate cancer (PCa) treatment, glans preserving strategies among men diagnosed with penile cancer and address the controversial issue of testosterone therapy in men with PCa. PMID:26816821

  6. Efficacy trial of an Internet-based intervention for cancer-related female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Schover, Leslie R; Yuan, Ying; Fellman, Bryan M; Odensky, Evan; Lewis, Pamela E; Martinetti, Paul

    2013-11-01

    The recent NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship recommend systematic evaluation and multidisciplinary treatment of cancer-related sexual dysfunctions. However, most oncology professionals fail to routinely assess sexual problems and lack expertise to treat them. An Internet-based intervention was designed to educate female patients and their partners about cancer-related sexual problems, describe medical treatment options and how to find expert care, and provide self-help strategies. A randomized trial assessed efficacy of the intervention when used as self-help versus the same Web access and 3 supplemental counseling sessions. Survivors of localized breast or gynecologic cancers completed online questionnaires at baseline, posttreatment, and 3- and 6-month follow-up, including the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), the Menopausal Sexual Interest Questionnaire (MSIQ), the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18) to assess emotional distress, and the Quality of Life in Adult Cancer Survivors (QLACS) scale. Program evaluation ratings were completed posttreatment. Fifty-eight women completed baseline questionnaires (mean age, 53 ± 9 years). Drop-out rates were 22% during treatment and 34% at 6-month follow-up. Linear mixed models for each outcome across time showed improvement in total scores on the FSFI, MSIQ, and QLACS (P<.001) and BSI-18 (P=.001). The counseled group improved significantly more on sexuality measures, but changes in emotional distress and quality of life did not differ between groups. Program content and ease of use were rated positively. Research is needed on how best to integrate this intervention into routine clinical practice, and particularly how to improve uptake and adherence. PMID:24225972

  7. Genome-wide association study of SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction in a Japanese cohort with major depression.

    PubMed

    Kurose, Kouichi; Hiratsuka, Kazuyuki; Ishiwata, Kazuya; Nishikawa, Jun; Nonen, Shinpei; Azuma, Junichi; Kato, Masaki; Wakeno, Masataka; Okugawa, Gaku; Kinoshita, Toshihiko; Kurosawa, Toru; Hasegawa, Ryuichi; Saito, Yoshiro

    2012-08-15

    Sexual dysfunction is a major side effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). We conducted a genome-wide association study to identify the genetic factors contributing to the risk of SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction by testing 186 320 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in a cohort of 201 Japanese major depression patients including 36 with sexual dysfunction induced by SSRI (paroxetine or fluvoxamine) or SNRI (milnacipran). The Cochran-Armitage trend test showed that 11 SNPs, tightly clustered in a distinct region on chromosome 14q21.3, were associated with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction at a genome-wide significance level after false discovery rate (FDR) correction, and the strongest SNP association was with rs1160351 (P=3.04 × 10(-7), risk ratio=2.92, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.79-4.76). These SNPs mapped to the intronic region of the MDGA2 gene. A Manhattan plot showed that the strong association peak remained in MDGA2 after adjustment for sex and age in a multivariable logistic regression analysis although P values increased slightly and became non-significant. Replication studies with larger sample sizes are required to validate this exploratory study, but our findings may provide insights into the genetic basis of sexual dysfunction induced by SSRI/SNRI. PMID:22445761

  8. The effect of male erectile dysfunction on the psychosocial, relationship, and sexual characteristics of heterosexual women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Ann; Tomlin, Molly

    2007-01-01

    Using Internet-based survey data, this study compared the demographic, psychosocial, relationship, and sexual characteristics of three groups of U.S. women: (a) women whose partners had erectile dysfunction (ED) and were taking medication to treat ED; (b) women whose partners had ED in the previous 3 months and were not taking medication to treat ED; and (c) a control group of women whose partners did not have ED. Results indicate that women are affected by their partners' ED and that ED treatment benefits women's sexual self-efficacy, communication about sexual issues, and sexual and relationship satisfaction. PMID:17365514

  9. [Occurrence of deviant tendencies in phalloplethysmographic and vulvoplethysmographic examinations in sexually dysfunctional patients (case reports)].

    PubMed

    Tichý, P

    1994-10-01

    The author demonstrates on four case-histories the presence of sexual deviant trends as the cause of sexual dysfunctions in conventional heterosexual relations in men and women and the irreplaceable part played by vulvo- or phalloplethysmography used for their detection. In a man treated for some time on account of impaired erectile potency and in a woman who visited the surgery with her husband and presented complaints diagnosed as secondary frigidity and anorgasmy, PPG or VPG examination revealed a homosexual orientation. Both these patients knew of their homosexual orientation but did not tell anybody. The mentioned male patient intentionally dissimulated homosexuality, the woman attempted in vain to achieve heterosexual adaptation. In two young men with primary disorders of erectile potency PPG examination revealed sadomasochistic tendencies. In the first one the impaired erectility created the impression of "debutant's failure" when starting a partnership, in the second one it seemed to be due to adverse psychosocial factors. During an interview following the examination both described spontaneously and in detail erotic dreams and masturbation fantasies with sadomasochistic contents. They were not aware of the association of their specific sexual motivation structure. It was typical for all four patients that they never disclosed previously their deviant sexual tendencies and only the specific situation during the PPG or VPG examination, which they had voluntarily after previous instruction, they were motivated to confess their problems. PMID:7850913

  10. Epidemiology of Sexual Dysfunction in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Mohammad Arash; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Ghaemmaghami, Afagh; Marzabadi, Esfandiar Azad; Pardakhti, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the cumulative prevalence rate of every sexual dysfunctions (SDs) in Iranian population. Methods: We searched international database such as: PubMed/Medline, Scopus, PsychNET, and Scholar Google and Iranian database such as Iran Psych, IranDoc, IranMedex, and SID. Search duration was between 1990 and 2013. Results: From 449 articles were retrieved, then 11 articles on male with total sample size of 2142 and 8 articles on female with total sample size of 4391 were selected after critical appraisal. For quality assessment check list to evaluate a prevalence article was contained study population, sampling method, sample size, criteria for SD diagnosis, specific rates, study location, and authors list. In male, erectile dysfunction was 56.1%. In female, pooled estimation prevalence of hypoactive sexual desire disorder in complained group was 65.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 51.1-80.6%) compared to general population 35% (95% CI: 17.6-52.1%). Sexual arousal disorder in clinical patient was 59.6% (95% CI: 39-80%) against 33.8% (95% CI: 18.3-49.3%) in general population. Orgasmic disorder in complained was 35.5% (95% CI: 16-55%) and in general population was 35.3% (95% CI: 26.8-43.8%). Sexual pain disorder pooled estimation prevalence were 35.2% (95% CI: 14.5-56%) versus 20.1% (95% CI: 6.4-33.8%) in complained and general population consecutively. Conclusions: The rate of SD in Iran was approximately the same of worldwide except orgasmic disorder which was two times more than the worldwide average. PMID:26097672

  11. Levels of estradiol and testosterone are altered in Chinese men with sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wu, F; Chen, T; Mao, S; Jiang, H; Ding, Q; Xu, G

    2016-09-01

    An estimated 20-30% of adult men have at least one manifestation of sexual dysfunction, the most common of which are premature ejaculation (PE) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Emerging evidence has suggested an association between the regulation of hormones with the processes of erection and ejaculation. In this study, we aim to investigate the relationship between sexual dysfunction, namely, PE and ED, and the levels and ratios of estradiol to testosterone in Chinese men. A retrospective case-control study was performed involving 878 male patients aged from 18 to 74 years (mean: 36 years). The ratio of estradiol to testosterone was significantly higher for subjects with ED (7.45 ± 3.09 × 10(-3) ; p < 0.001), and combined PE and ED (6.66 ± 3.05 × 10(-3) ; p = 0.032) compared with that of the control group (6.01 ± 2.61 × 10(-3) ). The ratio was also significantly higher for ED patients when compared with PE patients (5.26 ± 2.18 × 10(-3) ; p < 0.001). Furthermore, compared with the control group, subjects with PE had similar levels of estradiol (95.47 ± 37.86 pmol/L vs. 94.12 ± 32.32 pmol/L; p = 0.678) but significantly higher levels of testosterone (18.66 ± 6.03 nmol/L vs. 16.82 ± 4.93 nmol/L; p < 0.001). This contrasted with the ED group, which showed similar levels of testosterone (16.96 ± 5.86 nmol/L vs. 16.82 ± 4.93 nmol/L; p = 0.773) and significantly higher levels of estradiol (116.88 ± 40.81 pmol/L vs. 94.12 ± 32.32 pmol/L; p < 0.001) compared with control. Subjects with combined ED and PE also had a significantly higher level of estradiol (104.98 ± 43.99 pmol/L vs. 94.12 ± 32.32 pmol/L; p = 0.014) and similar levels of testosterone (17.30 ± 7.23 nmol/L vs. 16.82 ± 4.93 nmol/L; p = 0.503) compared with control. In conclusion, this study involving Chinese males with sexual dysfunction reports, for the first time, that there is an association between sexual dysfunction

  12. Vitamin D deficiency exacerbates atypical antipsychotic-induced metabolic side effects in rats: involvement of the INSIG/SREBP pathway.

    PubMed

    Dang, Ruili; Jiang, Pei; Cai, Hualin; Li, Huande; Guo, Ren; Wu, Yanqin; Zhang, Lihong; Zhu, Wenye; He, Xin; Liu, Yiping; Xu, Ping

    2015-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a major concern in psychotic patients receiving atypical antipsychotics. Recent evidence suggests that sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) and insulin-induced genes (INSIGs) are implicated in the antipsychotic-induced metabolic side-effects. Vitamin D (VD) deficiency, a highly prevalent phenomenon among patients with psychosis, might also predispose individuals to metabolic syndrome Considering that VD has modulating effects on the INSIG/SREBP pathway, it is possible that VD may have a role in the antipsychotic-induced metabolic disturbances involving its effects on the INSIG/SREBP system. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the effects of VD deficiency and VD supplementation on antipsychotic-induced metabolic changes in rats. After 4-week administration, clozapine (10mg/kg/d) and risperidone (1mg/kg/d) both caused glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in VD deficient rats, but not in rats with sufficient VD status. Antipsychotic treatments, especially clozapine, elevated serum lipid levels, which were most apparent in VD deficient rats, but alleviated in VD-supplemented rats. Additionally, antipsychotic treatments down-regulated INSIGs and up-regulated SREBPs expression in VD deficient rats, and these effects were attenuated when VD status was more sufficient. Collectively, this study disclose the novel findings that antipsychotic-induced metabolic disturbances is exacerbated by VD deficiency and can be alleviated by VD supplementation, providing new evidence for the promising role of VD in prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders caused by antipsychotic medications. Furthermore, our data also suggest the involvement of INSIG/SREBP pathway in the antipsychotic-induced hyperlipidemia and beneficial effects of VD on lipid profile. PMID:26003080

  13. Flexibility in Men's Sexual Practices in Response to Iatrogenic Erectile Dysfunction after Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dowsett, Gary W; Lyons, Anthony; Duncan, Duane; Wassersug, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prostate cancer (PCa) treatments are associated with a high incidence of erectile dysfunction (ED). Interventions to help men with iatrogenic ED have largely focused on penile tumescence adequate for vaginal penetration. Less research has been undertaken on sex practices other than penile/vaginal intercourse. Aim The aim of this study was to explore forms of sexual practice engaged in by men following treatment for PCa. We focused in particular on anal intercourse (AI) as practiced by both nonheterosexual (i.e., gay-identified men and other men who have sex with men) and heterosexual men. We sought to determine how common AI was subsequent to PCa treatment and how flexible AI practitioners were in their modes (e.g., from insertive to receptive) when faced with iatrogenic ED. Methods An international online survey was conducted in 2010–2011 of men treated for PCa, where participants (N = 558) were asked explicitly about their sexual practices before and after PCa treatment. Main Outcome Measures The outcome measures were the numbers and percentages of men who practiced AI before and after PCa treatment as well as the percentage who changed AI practice after PCa treatment. Results Five hundred twenty-six men (90 nonheterosexual men; 436 heterosexual men) answered questions on AI practices. A proportion of nonheterosexual (47%) and heterosexual men (7%) practiced AI following PCa treatment, and did so in all modes (insertive, receptive, and “versatile”). Many nonheterosexual men continued to be sexually active in the face of iatrogenic ED by shifting from the insertive to receptive modes. A few men, both heterosexual and nonheterosexual, adopted AI for the first time post-PCa treatment. Conclusions Flexibility in sexual practice is possible for some men, both nonheterosexual and heterosexual, in the face of iatrogenic ED. Advising PCa patients of the possibilities of sexual strategies that include AI may help them in reestablishing a sex life that

  14. Sexual dysfunction during treatment of major depressive disorder with vilazodone, citalopram, or placebo: results from a phase IV clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gommoll, Carl; Chen, Dalei; Nunez, Rene; Mathews, Maju

    2015-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction commonly occurs with major depressive disorder (MDD). Vilazodone, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist antidepressant approved for the treatment of MDD in adults, was evaluated to determine its effects on sexual function. The primary study was a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial comparing vilazodone 20 and 40 mg/day with placebo; citalopram 40 mg/day was an active control (NCT01473381; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov). Post-hoc analyses evaluated change from baseline to week 10 on the Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (CSFQ); no inferential statistics were performed. CSFQ scores increased for women [1.2 (citalopram) to 3.0 (vilazodone 40 mg)] and men [1.2 (vilazodone 40 mg) to 3.5 (placebo)] in all treatment groups. Greater changes in CSFQ scores were seen in responders [women: 2.33 (citalopram) to 5.06 (vilazodone 40 mg); men: 2.26 (vilazodone 40 mg) to 4.35 (placebo)] versus nonresponders. CSFQ change from baseline was small for patients with normal baseline sexual function; in patients with baseline sexual dysfunction, CSFQ scores improved across groups [women: 2.35 (citalopram) to 4.52 (vilazodone 40 mg); men 2.83 (vilazodone 40 mg) to 6.43 (placebo)]. Across treatment groups, baseline sexual function improved in women and men, MDD responders, and patients with baseline sexual dysfunction. PMID:26039688

  15. Sexual dysfunction during treatment of major depressive disorder with vilazodone, citalopram, or placebo: results from a phase IV clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Gommoll, Carl; Chen, Dalei; Nunez, Rene; Mathews, Maju

    2015-07-01

    Sexual dysfunction commonly occurs with major depressive disorder (MDD). Vilazodone, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist antidepressant approved for the treatment of MDD in adults, was evaluated to determine its effects on sexual function. The primary study was a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial comparing vilazodone 20 and 40 mg/day with placebo; citalopram 40 mg/day was an active control (NCT01473381; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov). Post-hoc analyses evaluated change from baseline to week 10 on the Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (CSFQ); no inferential statistics were performed. CSFQ scores increased for women [1.2 (citalopram) to 3.0 (vilazodone 40 mg)] and men [1.2 (vilazodone 40 mg) to 3.5 (placebo)] in all treatment groups. Greater changes in CSFQ scores were seen in responders [women: 2.33 (citalopram) to 5.06 (vilazodone 40 mg); men: 2.26 (vilazodone 40 mg) to 4.35 (placebo)] versus nonresponders. CSFQ change from baseline was small for patients with normal baseline sexual function; in patients with baseline sexual dysfunction, CSFQ scores improved across groups [women: 2.35 (citalopram) to 4.52 (vilazodone 40 mg); men 2.83 (vilazodone 40 mg) to 6.43 (placebo)]. Across treatment groups, baseline sexual function improved in women and men, MDD responders, and patients with baseline sexual dysfunction. PMID:26039688

  16. Female sexual dysfunction: A comparative study in drug naive 1st episode of depression in a general hospital of South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Payel; Manohar, Shivananda; Raman, Rajesh; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.; Darshan, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Women's sexual dysfunction is found to be highly prevalent in western and Indian literature. Limited studies are available on drug naive depression in western literature and in Indian population. Aim: To determine the prevalence rate and symptom profile of female sexual dysfunctions in patients with untreated depression. Design: A cross-sectional study in the psychiatry out-patient department of general hospital in South India. Materials and Methods: Following written informed consent female sexual functioning index (FSFI) and Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) – female version and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD - 17 item) on 30 cases and 30 controls was administered. Sociodemographic data, pattern and type of sexual dysfunctions were enquired. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, contingency co-efficient analysis and stepwise multiple regression. Results: The mean score of HAMD 17 item in study group was 19.13. The study showed that female sexual dysfunction was 70.3% in study group compared to 43.3% in control FSFI scores above 16 in HAMD had dysfunction of 76% with FSFI in study group. With ASEX-F sexual dysfunction was 73.3% in study compared to 20% in control. Scores above 16 in HAMD had 80% of sexual dysfunction with ASEX-F in study group. Conclusion: The study found that ASEX-F co-related better with HAMD 17 item. Following the onset of depression, the incidence of sexual dysfunction started at an early age in women. PMID:26600576

  17. Depression and sexual dysfunction in chronic kidney disease: a narrative review of the evidence in areas of significant unmet need.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Mariacristina; Palmer, Suetonia C; Tonelli, Marcello; Johnson, David W; Strippoli, Giovanni F M

    2012-09-01

    People with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a high symptom burden and experience poorer quality of life than the general population. People with CKD frequently report fatigue, anorexia, pain, sleep disturbance, itching and restless legs. Depression and sexual dysfunction may also be common in CKD, although questions about optimal diagnosis and treatment remain unanswered. People with kidney disease identify lifestyle and the impact of CKD on family and psychosocial supports as key priorities and rate symptoms such as sexual dysfunction and psychological distress as severe. Here, we outline the current state of research underlying depression and sexual dysfunction in this population focusing on prevalence, diagnosis, screening, outcomes and interventions and suggest areas requiring additional specific research. PMID:22942174

  18. Does Bicycle Riding Impact the Development of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Sexual Dysfunction in Men?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Gon; Kim, Dae Woong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to determine whether men who engaged in recreational bicycle riding are more likely to be affected by lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and sexual dysfunction than are man who exercised by amateur marathon running with less perineal impact. Materials and Methods A total of 22 healthy male amateur bicyclists and 17 healthy male amateur marathoners were enrolled in the study. We evaluated questionnaires including the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), uroflowmetric values, postvoid residual (PVR) urine volume, and transrectal ultrasound of the prostate in all subjects. We also compared the prevalence of urination disorders (UD) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Results There were no significant differences between the two groups in age, body mass index, comorbidities, or exercise habits (p>0.05). Mean total and subscale scores of the IPSS and IIEF and the prevalence of UD (8/22 vs. 4/17, p=0.494) and ED (11/22 vs. 10/17, p=0.748) were not significantly different between the two groups. Also, there were no significant differences between the two groups in uroflowmetric parameters such as peak urinary flow rates, voided urine volume, PVR urine volume, prostate volume, or serum PSA level. Conclusions Bicycle riding seems to have no measurable hazardous effect on voiding function or sexual function in men who cycled recreationally. PMID:21687396

  19. Sexual dysfunction in men and women with chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2003-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common finding in both men and women with chronic kidney failure. Common disturbances include erectile dysfunction in men, menstrual abnormalities in women, and decreased libido and fertility in both sexes. These abnormalities are primarily organic in nature and are related to uremia as well as the other comorbid conditions that frequently occur in the chronic kidney failure patient. Fatigue and psychosocial factors related to the presence of a chronic disease are also contributory factors. Disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis can be detected before the need for dialysis but continue to worsen once dialytic therapy is initiated. Impaired gonadal function is prominent in uremic men, whereas the disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are more subtle. By contrast, central disturbances are more prominent in uremic women. Therapy is initially directed toward optimizing the delivery of dialysis, correcting anemia with recombinant erythropoietin, and controlling the degree of secondary hyperparathyroidism with vitamin D. For many practicing nephrologists, sildenafil has become the first line therapy in the treatment of impotence. In the hypogonadal man whose only complaint is decreased libido, testosterone may be of benefit. Regular gynecologic follow-up is required in uremic women to guard against potential complications of unopposed estrogen effect. Uremic women should be advised against pregnancy while on dialysis. Successful transplantation is the most effective means of restoring normal sexual function in both men and women with chronic kidney failure. PMID:12616463

  20. Sexual dysfunction in testicular cancer patients subjected to post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection: a focus beyond ejaculation disorders.

    PubMed

    Dimitropoulos, K; Karatzas, A; Papandreou, C; Daliani, D; Zachos, I; Pisters, L L; Tzortzis, V

    2016-05-01

    Post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (PC-RPLND) represents an integral part of multidisciplinary treatment of advanced germ cell cancer; however, it is associated with a high complications rate. The present study aimed to describe sexual disorders in 53 patients with testicular cancer who underwent full bilateral, non-nerve-sparing PC-RPLND in our institution, focusing beyond ejaculatory dysfunction. The International Index for Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire was used as diagnostic tool of male sexual functioning pre-operatively and three months after RPLND, while post-operatively patients were asked to describe and evaluate changes in selected sexual parameters. Study findings demonstrate mixed pattern of changes in sexual functioning, with no difference in erectile functioning before and after operation. However, orgasmic function and intercourse and overall sexual satisfaction were found significantly impaired post-operatively. Sexual desire and frequency of attempted sexual intercourses were found significantly increased post-operatively, in comparison with pre-operative levels. With regard to patients' subjective perception on sexual functioning alterations after PC-RPLND, a significant number of patients reported higher levels of sexual desire, no difference in erectile function and worse orgasmic function and satisfaction post-operatively. Thus, patients subjected to PC-RPLND should be closely and routinely evaluated due to close relationship of sexual dissatisfaction with secondary psychological disorders. PMID:26268684

  1. Examining Sexual Dysfunction in Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of Cross-Sectional Mixed-Methods Research

    PubMed Central

    Kowalkowski, Marc A; Chandrashekar, Aravind; Amiel, Gilad E; Lerner, Seth P; Wittmann, Daniela A; Latini, David M; Goltz, Heather Honoré

    2014-01-01

    Introduction More than 70,000 new cases of bladder cancer are diagnosed in the United States annually; with 75% being non-muscle-invasive (NMIBC). Research examining sexual dysfunction in bladder cancer survivors is limited, and previous studies have focused on cystectomy patients. Aims To evaluate the impact of sexual dysfunction on NMIBC survivors. Methods Mixed-methods data collection integrated a quantitative survey (Study 1; n = 117) and semi-structured qualitative interviews (Study 2; n = 26) from a non-overlapping sample of NMIBC survivors. We performed descriptive and classification and regression tree (CART) analyses of survey data and qualitative analysis of interviews. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported sexual activity, interest in sex, and physiologic symptoms (e.g., male erectile/ejaculatory difficulties, female vaginal dryness) over the previous 4 weeks; partner communication about sexuality; contamination concerns; illness intrusiveness. Results Participants in these studies averaged 65 years of age (mean and median) and were male (77%), white (91%), and married (75%). Survey (Study 1) results linked NMIBC treatment to sexual symptoms and relationship issues. Many participants reported sexual inactivity (38.8%). Sexually active participants reported erectile difficulties (60.0%), vaginal dryness (62.5%), and worry about contaminating partner with treatment agents (23.2%). While almost one-half reported the usefulness of talking with partners about sexual function, only one-fifth of participants reported sharing all concerns with their partners. CART analysis supported the importance of communication. One-half of interviewees (Study 2) reported sexual dysfunction. Two-thirds reported negative impacts on their relationships, including perceived loss of intimacy and divorce; over one-third were sexually inactive for fear of contaminating their partner or spreading NMIBC. Conclusions Survivors' sexual symptoms may result from NMIBC, comorbidities, or

  2. Fresh onion juice enhanced copulatory behavior in male rats with and without paroxetine-induced sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Allouh, Mohammed Z; Daradka, Haytham M; Al Barbarawi, Mohammed M; Mustafa, Ayman G

    2014-02-01

    Onion (Allium cepa) is one of the most commonly cultivated species of the family Liliaceae, and has long been used in dietary and therapeutic applications. Treatment with fresh onion juice has been reported to promote testosterone production in male rats. Testosterone is the male sex hormone responsible for enhancing sexual libido and potency. This study aimed to investigate the effects of onion juice on copulatory behavior of sexually potent male rats and in male rats with paroxetine-induced sexual dysfunction. Sexually experienced male rats were divided into seven groups: a control group, three onion juice-treated groups, a paroxetine-treated group, and two groups treated with paroxetine plus different doses of onion juice. At the end of the treatments, sexual behavior parameters and testosterone levels were measured and compared among the groups. Administration of onion juice significantly reduced mount frequency and latency and increased the copulatory efficacy of potent male rats. In addition, administration of onion juice attenuated the prolonged ejaculatory latency period induced by paroxetine and increased the percentage of ejaculating rats. Serum testosterone levels increased significantly by onion juice administration. However, a significant reduction in testosterone because of paroxetine therapy was observed. This reduction was restored to normal levels by administration of onion juice. This study conclusively demonstrates that fresh onion juice improves copulatory behavior in sexually potent male rats and in those with paroxetine-induced sexual dysfunction by increasing serum testosterone levels. PMID:24302558

  3. Ego Deficiencies in the Areas of Pleasure, Intimacy, and Cooperation: Guidelines in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Sexual Dysfunctions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levay, Alexander N.; Kagle, Arlene

    1977-01-01

    Psychopathology, in the form of a deficiency in ego functions of pleasure, intimacy, or cooperation, is usually associated with sexual dysfunctions that prove refractory to sex therapy techniques alone. Each deficiency forms a distinct clinical syndrome with specific treatment requirements, necessitating further diagnostic subcategorization of…

  4. Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) Guideline on Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji Kan; Cho, Kang Su; Kim, Su Jin; Oh, Kyung Jin; Kam, Sung Chul; Seo, Kyung Keun; Shin, Hong Seok

    2013-01-01

    In February 2011, the Korean Society for Sexual Medicine and Andrology (KSSMA) realized the necessity of developing a guideline on erectile dysfunction (ED) appropriate for the local context, and established a committee for the development of a guideline on ED. As many international guidelines based on objective evidence are available, the committee decided to adapt these guidelines for local needs instead of developing a new guideline. Considering the extensive research activities on ED in Korea, data with a high level of evidence among those reported by Korean researchers have been collected and included in the guideline development process. The latest KSSMA guideline on ED has been developed for urologists. The KSSMA hopes that this guideline will help urologists in clinical practice. PMID:24044105

  5. The effect of menses on standardized assessment of sexual dysfunction among women with uterine fibroids: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin-Tommaso, Shannon K.; Borah, Bijan J.; Stewart, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if assessment of sexual dysfunction by the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) is related to whether the FSFI is administered during or between menses in women with symptomatic uterine fibroids Design Prospective cohort Setting US academic medical centers Patients Premenopausal women with symptomatic uterine fibroids enrolled in fibroid treatment trials Interventions FSFI administered during and between menses Main Outcome Measures FSFI mean scores in each of 6 domains and a discordance score to report individual differences in assessment Results Thirty-three women completed the FSFI during menstruation and at a time in their cycle when they were not menstruating. The mean FSFI scores for each domain did not differ based on when in the menstrual cycle the instrument was administered. However, on an individual level, nearly half of the women reported sexual dysfunction differently during menses than between menses. Of those that differed, pain and desire domains improved; lubrication, and satisfaction worsened during menses. Conclusions Although the mean values of the domain scores were not different, women did report differences in sexual functioning between menses and non-menses reporting. Timing of the questionnaire in relation to menses should be considered in sexual dysfunction assessment for women with uterine fibroids. PMID:25989973

  6. Validation and cross-cultural adaptation of sexual dysfunction modified scale in multiple sclerosis for Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Silva, Raquel Ataíde Peres da; Olival, Guilherme Sciascia do; Stievano, Lívia Palma; Toller, Vania Balardin; Jordy, Sergio Semeraro; Eloi, Marina; Tilbery, Charles Peter

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). These patients suffer from various comorbidities, including sexual dysfunction (SD). The lesions of MS may affect regions of the CNS along the pathway of sexual response. The Multiple Sclerosis Intimacy and Sexuality Questionnaire-19 (MSISQ-19) is a scale that assesses sexual dysfunction. Adapt and validate the MSISQ-19 to Brazilian patients with MS. 204 individuals were evaluated, 134 patients with MS and 70 healthy persons for the control group. It was determined reproducibility, validity, internal consistency and sensitivity of the MSISQ-19-BR. Among patients with MS, 54.3% of male and 71.7% of female presented some kind of SD. In the control group the results were 12.5% and 19.5%, respectively. The MSISQ-19-BR is reproducible, reliable and valid for the Brazilian population and may be used as a tool for assessing the impact of sexual dysfunction in patients with MS. PMID:26222360

  7. Inflammatory Cytokines and Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain: Review and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Fonseka, Trehani M; Müller, Daniel J; Kennedy, Sidney H

    2016-05-01

    Antipsychotic medications (APs), particularly second-generation APs, are associated with significant weight gain in schizophrenia patients. Recent evidence suggests that the immune system may contribute to antipsychotic-induced weight gain (AIWG) via AP-mediated alterations of cytokine levels. Antipsychotics with a high propensity for weight gain, such as clozapine and olanzapine, influence the expression of immune genes, and induce changes in serum cytokine levels to ultimately down-regulate neuroinflammation. Since inflammatory cytokines are normally involved in anorexigenic responses, reduced inflammation has been independently shown to mediate changes in feeding behaviours and other metabolic parameters, resulting in obesity. Genetic variation in pro-inflammatory cytokines is also associated with both general obesity and weight change during AP treatment, and thus, may be implicated in the pharmacogenetics of AIWG. At this time, preliminary data support a cytokine-mediated model of AIWG which may have clinical utility in developing more effective metabolic monitoring guidelines and prevention measures. However, further research is still needed to clearly elucidate the validity of this immune model. This article reviews the evidence implicating inflammatory cytokines in AIWG and its potential clinical relevance. PMID:27606316

  8. Genome-wide association study on antipsychotic-induced weight gain in the CATIE sample.

    PubMed

    Brandl, E J; Tiwari, A K; Zai, C C; Nurmi, E L; Chowdhury, N I; Arenovich, T; Sanches, M; Goncalves, V F; Shen, J J; Lieberman, J A; Meltzer, H Y; Kennedy, J L; Müller, D J

    2016-08-01

    Antipsychotic-induced weight gain (AIWG) is a common side effect with a high genetic contribution. We reanalyzed genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) selecting a refined subset of patients most suitable for AIWG studies. The final GWAS was conducted in N=189 individuals. The top polymorphisms were analyzed in a second cohort of N=86 patients. None of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms was significant at the genome-wide threshold of 5x10(-8). We observed interesting trends for rs9346455 (P=6.49x10(-6)) upstream of OGFRL1, the intergenic variants rs7336345 (P=1.31 × 10(-5)) and rs1012650 (P=1.47 × 10(-5)), and rs1059778 (P=1.49x10(-5)) in IBA57. In the second cohort, rs9346455 showed significant association with AIWG (P=0.005). The combined meta-analysis P-value for rs9346455 was 1.09 × 10(-7). Our reanalysis of the CATIE GWAS data revealed interesting new variants associated with AIWG. As the functional relevance of these polymorphisms is yet to be determined, further studies are needed.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 1 September 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.59. PMID:26323598

  9. Management of sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal breast cancer patients taking adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Derzko, C.; Elliott, S.; Lam, W.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment with aromatase inhibitors for postmenopausal women with breast cancer has been shown to reduce or obviate invasive procedures such as hysteroscopy or curettage associated with tamoxifen-induced endometrial abnormalities. The side effect of upfront aromatase inhibitors, diminished estrogen synthesis, is similar to that seen with the natural events of aging. The consequences often include vasomotor symptoms (hot flushes) and vaginal dryness and atrophy, which in turn may result in cystitis and vaginitis. Not surprisingly, painful intercourse (dyspareunia) and loss of sexual interest (decreased libido) frequently occur as well. Various interventions, both non-hormonal and hormonal, are currently available to manage these problems. The purpose of the present review is to provide the practitioner with a wide array of management options to assist in treating the sexual consequences of aromatase inhibitors. The suggestions in this review are based on recent literature and on the recommendations set forth both by the North American Menopause Association and in the clinical practice guidelines of the Society of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians of Canada. The complexity of female sexual dysfunction necessitates a biopsychosocial approach to assessment and management alike, with interventions ranging from education and lifestyle changes to sexual counselling, pelvic floor therapies, sexual aids, medications, and dietary supplements—all of which have been reported to have a variable, but often successful, effect on symptom amelioration. Although the use of specific hormone replacement—most commonly local estrogen, and less commonly, systemic estrogen with or without an androgen, progesterone, or the additional of an androgen in an estrogenized woman (or a combination)—may be highly effective, the concern remains that in patients with estrogen-dependent breast cancer, including those receiving anti-estrogenic adjuvant therapies, the use of these hormones may be

  10. Sexual dysfunction, mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in female patients with fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Kayhan, Fatih; Küçük, Adem; Satan, Yılmaz; İlgün, Erdem; Arslan, Şevket; İlik, Faik

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the current prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD), mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in female patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods This case–control study involved 96 patients with FM and 94 healthy women. The SD diagnosis was based on a psychiatric interview in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria. Mood and anxiety disorders were diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview. Personality disorders were diagnosed according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM, Revised Third Edition Personality Disorders. Results Fifty of the 96 patients (52.1%) suffered from SD. The most common SD was lack of sexual desire (n=36, 37.5%) and arousal disorder (n=10, 10.4%). Of the 96 patients, 45 (46.9%) had a mood or anxiety disorder and 13 (13.5%) had a personality disorder. The most common mood, anxiety, and personality disorders were major depression (26%), generalized anxiety disorder (8.3%), and histrionic personality disorder (10.4%). Conclusion SD, mood, and anxiety disorders are frequently observed in female patients with FM. Pain plays a greater role in the development of SD in female patients with FM. PMID:26937190

  11. Diabetes and Quality of Life: Initial Approach to Depression, Physical Activity, and Sexual Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, M Josefina; Mociulsky, Juliana; Martinez, Esteban T; Senatore, Guido; Farias, Javier M; Sapetti, Adrian; Sanzana, M Gabriela; Gonzalez, Patricia; Cafferata, Alberto; Peloche, Andrea; Lemme, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    The different aspects that contribute to quality of life in patients with diabetes mellitus, such as mood, are of great importance for the treatment of this disease. These aspects not only influence the well-being of patients but also influence treatment adherence, therefore affecting the course of the disease. A panel of experts from Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay performed a review of the main aspects affecting quality of life in patients with diabetes: physical activity, mood disorders, and sexual activity. The consensus of the panel was that physical activity is important in the treatment of patients with diabetes because it reduces morbidity, mortality, and disease complications, and it should be performed on a regular basis, bearing in mind the patient's characteristics. Increased physical activity is associated with better glycemic control, and in individuals with glucose intolerance, it delays progression toward diabetes. In patients with diabetes, there is a high prevalence of depression, which can influence treatment adherence. Therefore, early detection of depression is essential to improve the course of diabetes. Regarding sexual activity, erectile dysfunction may be a significant sign in the case of suspected diabetes and the early diagnosis of vasculopathy in patients with diabetes. In conclusion, greater emphasis should be placed on improving patient knowledge, early detection, and multidisciplinary approaches to deal with the aspects of diabetes that affect patients' quality of life. PMID:24858335

  12. Electroencephalographic activity during sexual behavior: a novel approach to the analysis of drug effects on arousal and motivation relevant for sexual dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Hernández-González, Marisela; Guevara, Miguel Angel; Agmo, Anders

    2014-06-01

    The neurobiological bases of human sexual behavior are only partly understood. The etiology of most human sexual dysfunctions is not understood at all. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in the treatment of some male sexual disorders. The prime example should be erectile deficiency, where several efficient and safe treatments are available. Pharmacological treatment for premature ejaculation is also available, although it is still in an early stage. Disorders of sexual desire have attracted much attention when women are affected but far less so when men are concerned. Whereas animal models appropriate for testing treatments for problems with erection and premature ejaculation are available, it is questionable whether such models of the desire disorders have predictive validity. There seems to be many factors involved both in reduced and enhanced sexual desire, most of which are unknown. In this review we present some data suggesting that an electroencephalographic analysis of brain activity during exposure to sexually relevant stimuli in male rats and men and during execution of sexual behaviors in male rats may provide useful information. The effects of a commonly used drug, ethanol, on the electroencephalogram recorded during sexual events in rats and men are also described. Although this approach to the analysis of the central nervous activity associated with sexual desire, arousal and behavior is still in its infancy, the data obtained so far show a remarkable similarity between men and rats. This suggests that animal studies of electroencephalographic responses to drugs in sexual contexts may be useful for predicting effects in the human male. PMID:24534418

  13. Ameliorating antipsychotic-induced weight gain by betahistine: Mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Pai, Nagesh; Deng, Chao

    2016-04-01

    Second generation antipsychotic drugs (SGAs) cause substantial body weight gain/obesity and other metabolic side-effects such as dyslipidaemia. Their antagonistic affinity to the histaminergic H1 receptor (H1R) has been identified as one of the main contributors to weight gain/obesity side-effects. The effects and mechanisms of betahistine (a histaminergic H1R agonist and H3 receptor antagonist) have been investigated for ameliorating SGA-induced weight gain/obesity in both animal models and clinical trials. It has been demonstrated that co-treatment with betahistine is effective in reducing weight gain, associated with olanzapine in drug-naïve patients with schizophrenia, as well as in the animal models of both drug-naïve rats and rats with chronic, repeated exposure to olanzapine. Betahistine co-treatment can reduce food intake and increase the effect of thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue by modulating hypothalamic H1R-NPY-AMPKα (NPY: neuropeptide Y; AMPKα: AMP-activated protein kinase α) pathways, and ameliorate olanzapine-induced dyslipidaemia through modulation of AMPKα-SREBP-1-PPARα-dependent pathways (SREBP-1: Sterol regulatory element binding protein 1; PPARα: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α) in the liver. Although reduced locomotor activity was observed from antipsychotic treatment in rats, betahistine did not affect locomotor activity. Importantly, betahistine co-treatment did not influence the effects of antipsychotics on serotonergic receptors in the key brain regions for antipsychotic therapeutic efficacy. However, betahistine co-treatment reverses the upregulated dopamine D2 binding caused by chronic olanzapine administration, which may be beneficial in reducing D2 supersensitivity often observed in chronic antipsychotic treatment. Therefore, these results provide solid evidence supporting further clinical trials in treating antipsychotics-induced weight gain using betahistine in patients with schizophrenia and other mental

  14. Improving BPH symptoms and sexual dysfunctions with a saw palmetto preparation? Results from a pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Suter, Andreas; Saller, Reinhard; Riedi, Eugen; Heinrich, Michael

    2013-02-01

    In elderly men, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a major risk factor for sexual dysfunctions (SDys). Additionally, the standard treatments for BPH symptoms, alpha blockers and 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors, cause SDys themselves. Preparations from saw palmetto berries are an efficacious and well-tolerated symptomatic treatment for mild to moderate BPH and have traditionally been used to treat SDys. We conducted an open multicentric clinical pilot trial to investigate whether the saw palmetto berry preparation Prostasan® influenced BPH symptoms and SDys. Eighty-two patients participated in the 8-week trial, taking one capsule of 320 mg saw palmetto extract daily. At the end of the treatment, the International Prostate Symptom Score was reduced from 14.4 ± 4.7 to 6.9 ± 5.2 (p < 0.0001); SDys measured with the brief Sexual Function Inventory improved from 22.4 ± 7.2 to 31.4 ± 9.2 (p < 0.0001), and the Urolife BPH QoL-9 sex total improved from 137.3 ± 47.9 to 195.0 ± 56.3 (p < 0.0001). Investigators' and patients' assessments confirmed the good efficacy, and treatment was very well tolerated and accepted by the patients. Correlation analyses confirmed the relationship between improved BPH symptoms and reduced SDys. This was the first trial with saw palmetto to show improvement in BPH symptoms and SDys as well. [Corrections made here after initial online publication.] PMID:22522969

  15. Sexual Dysfunction in Male Iraq and Afghanistan War Veterans: Association with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Other Combat-Related Mental Health Disorders: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Benjamin N.; Cohen, Beth E.; Bertenthal, Daniel; Rosen, Raymond C.; Neylan, Thomas C.; Seal, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mental health disorders are prevalent in the United States, Iraq, and Afghanistan war veterans. Mental illness, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with or without psychiatric medications, can increase the risk for male sexual dysfunction, threatening quality of life. Aims We sought to determine the prevalence and correlates of sexual dysfunction among male Iraq and Afghanistan veterans. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of 405,275 male Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who were new users of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare from October 7, 2001 to September 30, 2009 and had 2-year follow-up. Main Outcome Measures We determined the independent association of mental health diagnoses and sexual dysfunction after adjusting for sociodemographic and military service characteristics, comorbidities, and medications. Results Veterans with PTSD were more likely to have a sexual dysfunction diagnosis, be prescribed medications for sexual dysfunction, or both (10.6%), compared with veterans having a mental diagnosis other than PTSD (7.2%), or no mental health diagnosis (2.3%). In a fully adjusted model, PTSD increased the risk of sexual dysfunction by more than threefold (adjusted risk ratio = 3.61, 95% CI = 3.48–3.75). Veterans with mental health disorders, particularly PTSD, were at the highest risk of sexual dysfunction when prescribed psychiatric medications (adjusted risk ratio = 4.59, 95% CI = 4.41–4.77). Conclusions Among U.S. combat veterans, mental health disorders, particularly PTSD, increased the risk of sexual dysfunction independent of the use of psychiatric medications. PMID:23679562

  16. MEIS1, a Promising Candidate Gene, Is Not Associated with the Core Symptoms of Antipsychotic-Induced Restless Legs Syndrome in Korean Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seung-Gul; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Leen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a distressing sleep disorder to which individuals appear to be genetically predisposed. In the present study, we assumed that antipsychotic-induced RLS symptoms were attributable to differences in individual genetic susceptibility, and investigated whether MEIS1, a promising candidate gene, was associated with antipsychotic-induced RLS symptoms in schizophrenia patients. Methods All subjects were diagnosed with schizophrenia by board-certified psychiatrists using the Korean version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. We assessed antipsychotic-induced RLS symptoms in 190 Korean schizophrenic patients using the diagnostic criteria of the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group. Genotyping was performed for the rs2300478 and rs6710341 polymorphisms of the MEIS1 gene. Results We divided subjects into RLS symptom (n=96) and non-symptom (n=94) groups. There was no significant between-group difference in the genotype or allele frequencies of the two polymorphisms investigated, nor in the frequency of the rs2300478-rs6710341 haplotype. Conclusion Our data do not suggest that the rs2300478 and rs6710341 polymorphisms of the MEIS1 gene are associated with the core symptoms of antipsychotic-induced RLS in schizophrenia; different genetic mechanisms may underlie antipsychotic-induced vs. primary RLS. PMID:25866529

  17. Antidiabetic effect of α-mangostin and its protective role in sexual dysfunction of streptozotocin induced diabetic male rats.

    PubMed

    Nelli, Giri Babu; K, Anand Solomon; Kilari, Eswar Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Sexual dysfunction is one of the diabetic complications in males. The present study aimed to evaluate the antidiabetic effect of α-mangostin and its protective role in sexual dysfunction of streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic male rats. Male Wistar rats were divided as control, diabetic control, diabetic rats administered with 25, 50 mg/kg body weight (bw) of α-mangostin and 1 mg/kg bw of gliclazide. The α-mangostin was administered once daily for a period of 55 days. On day 55 animals were sacrificed, serum was analyzed for testosterone levels, and sperm was collected from the epididymis and sperm parameters analyzed. Testis and epididymis were examined for antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels, lipidperoxidation products, and histopathological alterations. In diabetic rats, sperm count, motile sperms, viable sperms, and hypo-osmotic swelling tail coiled sperms were significantly decreased while sperm malformations increased when compared with normal rats. Serum testosterone levels and testicular 3β and 17 β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase levels were significantly decreased in diabetic rats. Significant reduction in testicular and epididymal SOD, catalase, GPx levels, and elevation in lipid peroxidation products were observed. However, α-mangostin treatment showed noteworthy recovery in all parameters towards the control levels. It may therefore be suggested that α-mangostin showed a protective effect against sexual dysfunction in STZ induced diabetic rats. PMID:23886300

  18. Depression and sexual dysfunction among HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men: mediation by use of antidepressants and recreational stimulants.

    PubMed

    Hart, Trevor A; Mustanski, Brian; Ryan, Daniel T; Gorbach, Pamina M; Stall, Ron D; Surkan, Pamela J; Plankey, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Erectile dysfunction and other forms of sexual dysfunction are highly prevalent among HIV+ men who have sex with men (MSM). Research has not previously identified the mechanisms by which depression may be associated with sexual dysfunction among HIV-positive and HIV-seronegative (HIV-negative) MSM. The present study examined the role of antidepressant use, stimulant use, and smoking as mediators of the relation between depression and sexual dysfunction among HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM. Participants enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study, an ongoing prospective study of the natural and treated histories of HIV infection among MSM in the United States, completed a modified version of the International Index of Erectile Function for MSM. The study sample included 1,363 participants, with 619 HIV-positive men and 744 HIV-negative men. A structural equation model examined depression as a predictor of subsequent sexual dysfunction, mediated by antidepressant use, stimulant use, and smoking. Depression predicted subsequent sexual function among both HIV-negative and HIV-positive MSM. This effect appeared to be both a direct effect and an indirect effect via antidepressant use. Findings suggest that antidepressant medication use may partially explain sexual dysfunction among MSM. PMID:24671728

  19. Depression and Sexual Dysfunction among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Men Who Have Sex With Men: Mediation by Use of Antidepressants and Recreational Stimulants

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Trevor A.; Mustanski, Brian; Ryan, Daniel T.; Gorbach, Pamina M.; Stall, Ron D.; Surkan, Pamela J.; Plankey, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) and other forms of sexual dysfunction are highly prevalent among HIV+ men who have sex with men (MSM). Research has not previously identified the mechanisms by which depression may be associated with sexual dysfunction among HIV-positive and HIV-seronegative (HIV-negative) MSM. The present study examined the role of antidepressant use, stimulant use, and smoking as mediators of the relation between depression and sexual dysfunction among HIV-positive and HIV-negative MSM. Participants enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS), an ongoing prospective study of the natural and treated histories of HIV infection among MSM in the United States, completed a modified version of the International Index of Erectile Function for MSM. The study sample included 1,363 participants, with 619 HIV-positive men and 744 HIV-negative men. A structural equation model examined depression as a predictor of subsequent sexual dysfunction, mediated by antidepressant use, stimulant use, and smoking. Depression predicted subsequent sexual function among both HIV-negative and HIV-positive MSM. This effect appeared to be both a direct effect and an indirect effect via antidepressant use. Findings suggest that antidepressant medication use may partially explain sexual dysfunction among MSM. PMID:24671728

  20. Concordance of sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction by self-report and those by partner's perception in young adult couples.

    PubMed

    Gungor, S; Keskin, U; Gülsün, M; Erdem, M; Ceyhan, S T; Ergün, A

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated concordance levels of young adult spouses (N=107 couples, total N=214) with regards to sexual satisfaction by using Golombock-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS). Each spouse of the couples filled out both female and male forms of the GRISS. Self- and spouse-reported scores were analyzed in terms of inter-rater correlation and agreement. The prevalence of overall sexual dissatisfaction was 10.3% and 26.2% in wives and husbands, respectively. The correlation coefficient (r) between the self-reported overall sexual satisfaction scores and those assessed by the spouses was 0.25 (P=0.014) and 0.04 (P=0.680) for wives and husbands, respectively. The sensitivity for perception of partner's sexual problems ranged 11% to 47%, and the specificity was around 64% to 100%, except for vaginismus, which had a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 25%. The prevalance-adjusted and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) value for overall sexual dissatisfaction reported by themselves and that assessed by their spouses was 0.68 and 0.16 for the wives and husbands, respectively. For specific female sexual problems, the PABAK value was the highest in female dissatisfaction (0.81) followed by anorgasmia (0.78), female avoidance (0.44), vaginismus (0.44), infrequency (0.33), non-communication (0.14) and female nonsensuality (0.14). For specific male sexual problems, the PABAK value was the highest in male nonsensuality (1.00), followed by male dissatisfaction (0.78), infrequency (0.46), non-communication (0.42), male avoidance (0.36), impotence (0.27) and premature ejaculation (-0.04). Our findings suggested that in this clinical sample the partner's perception of sexual dysfunction and dissatisfaction did not correlate well with the subject's self-reported sexual problems, and generally male sexual problems were less correctly perceived by the partners than were female sexual problems. This result may provide helpful information for clinicians who take care of patients

  1. Comparison of sexual dysfunction in women with infertility and without infertility referred to Al-Zahra Hospital in 2013-2014

    PubMed Central

    Mirblouk, Fariba; Asgharnia, Dr.Maryam; Solimani, Robabeh; Fakor, Fereshteh; Salamat, Fatemeh; Mansoori, Samaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: One of the affected aspects in infertile women that have not been given sufficient attention is sexual function. Sexual function is a key factor in physical and marital health, and sexual dysfunction could significantly lower the quality of life. Aim of this study was to assess the comparison sexual dysfunction in women with infertility and without infertility, admitted to Al- Zahra Hospital. Objective: We decided to assess the prevalence of women sexual disorders in fertile and infertile subjects, admitted to Al-Zahra Hospital. Materials and Methods: 149 fertile and 147 infertile women who referred to infertility clinic of Al-Zahra Hospital during 2013-2014 were entered this cross-sectional study and Female Sexual Function Index questionnaire (FSFI) had been filled by all the cases. Most of women were married for 6-10 years (35.5%) and mean marriage time in participants was 9.55±6.07 years. Data were analyzed using SPSS software Ver. 18 and 2 test and logistic regression model has been used for analysis. Results: Results showed significant differences between desire (p=0.004), arousal (p=0.001), satisfaction (p=0.022) and total sexual dysfunction (p=0.011) in both groups but in lubrication (p=0.266), orgasm (p=0.61) and pain (p=0.793) difference were not significant. Conclusion: Some of sexual dysfunction indices are high in all infertile women. Our findings suggest that infertility impacts on women’s sexual function in desire, arousal, satisfaction and total sexual dysfunction. Health care professional should be sensitive to impact that diagnosis of infertility can have on women’s sexuality. PMID:27200426

  2. The genetics of antipsychotic induced tremors: a genome-wide pathway analysis on the STEP-BD SCP sample.

    PubMed

    Drago, Antonio; Crisafulli, Concetta; Serretti, Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) are associated with antipsychotic treatment. The exact definition of the genetic variants that influence the antipsychotic induced EPS would dramatically increase the quality of antipsychotic prescriptions. We investigated this issue in a subsample of the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD). Four hundred nine manic patients were treated with antipsychotics and had complete clinical and genetic data. Outcome was an item of the Clinical Monitoring Form which scored tremors from 0 to 4 at each clinical visit. Visits were scheduled according to clinical issues, based on a naturalistic approach. A genomic inflation factor of 1.017 resulted after genetic quality control. Single SNPs GWAS (Plink) and molecular pathway GWAS were conducted (SNP ratio test, KEGG depository). No single SNP reached GWAS significance level of association. Molecular pathways related to cell survival events and lipid synthesis were significantly associated with antipsychotic induced EPS (P = 0.0009 for Hsa04512, Hsa01031, Hsa00230, Hsa04510, Hsa03320, Hsa04930, and Hsa04115; P = 0.0019 for Hsa04020 and Hsa00561). This finding was consistent with previous GWAS studies. PMID:21990027

  3. Sexual Excitability and Dysfunctional Coping Determine Cybersex Addiction in Homosexual Males.

    PubMed

    Laier, Christian; Pekal, Jaro; Brand, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Cybersex addiction (CA) has been mostly investigated in heterosexual males. Recent findings have demonstrated an association between CA severity and indicators of sexual excitability, and that coping by sexual behaviors mediated the relationship between sexual excitability and CA symptoms. The aim of this study was to test this mediation in a sample of homosexual males. Seventy-one homosexual males were surveyed online. Questionnaires assessed symptoms of CA, sensitivity to sexual excitation, pornography use motivation, problematic sexual behavior, psychological symptoms, and sexual behaviors in real life and online. Moreover, participants viewed pornographic videos and indicated their sexual arousal before and after the video presentation. Results showed strong correlations between CA symptoms and indicators of sexual arousal and sexual excitability, coping by sexual behaviors, and psychological symptoms. CA was not associated with offline sexual behaviors and weekly cybersex use time. Coping by sexual behaviors partially mediated the relationship between sexual excitability and CA. The results are comparable with those reported for heterosexual males and females in previous studies and are discussed against the background of theoretical assumptions of CA, which highlight the role of positive and negative reinforcement due to cybersex use. PMID:26374928

  4. Linguistic Changes in Expressive Writing Predict Psychological Outcomes in Women With History of Childhood Sexual Abuse and Adult Sexual Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pulverman, Carey S.; Lorenz, Tierney A.; Meston, Cindy M.

    2015-01-01

    An expressive writing treatment was recently reported to reduce depressive symptoms and improve sexual function and satisfaction in a sample of female survivors of childhood sexual abuse (Meston, Lorenz, & Stephenson, 2013). We conducted a linguistic analysis of this data to determine whether pre-to posttreatment changes in participants’ language use were associated with the improvements in sexuality and depression. Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC), a program that counts the use of word categories within a text, was used to evaluate the impact of several word categories, previously associated with changes in mental health (Frattaroli, 2006), and shown to differ between childhood sexual abuse survivors and nonabused women (Lorenz & Meston, 2012), on treatment outcomes. A reduction in the use of the word “I” and an increase in positive emotion words were associated with decreased depression symptoms. A reduction in the use of “I” and negative emotion words were associated with improvement in sexual function and sexual satisfaction. The findings suggest that, because language may serve as an implicit measure of depression and sexual health, monitoring language changes during treatment may provide a reliable indicator of treatment response free of the biases of traditional self-report assessments. PMID:25793593

  5. Linguistic changes in expressive writing predict psychological outcomes in women with history of childhood sexual abuse and adult sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pulverman, Carey S; Lorenz, Tierney A; Meston, Cindy M

    2015-01-01

    An expressive writing treatment was recently reported to reduce depressive symptoms and improve sexual function and satisfaction in a sample of female survivors of childhood sexual abuse (Meston, Lorenz, & Stephenson, 2013). We conducted a linguistic analysis of this data to determine whether pre- to posttreatment changes in participants' language use were associated with the improvements in sexuality and depression. Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC), a program that counts the use of word categories within a text, was used to evaluate the impact of several word categories, previously associated with changes in mental health (Frattaroli, 2006), and shown to differ between childhood sexual abuse survivors and nonabused women (Lorenz & Meston, 2012), on treatment outcomes. A reduction in the use of the word "I" and an increase in positive emotion words were associated with decreased depression symptoms. A reduction in the use of "I" and negative emotion words were associated with improvement in sexual function and sexual satisfaction. The findings suggest that, because language may serve as an implicit measure of depression and sexual health, monitoring language changes during treatment may provide a reliable indicator of treatment response free of the biases of traditional self-report assessments. PMID:25793593

  6. Prevalence and correlates of sexual dysfunction among young adult married women in rural China: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lau, J T F; Cheng, Y; Wang, Q; Yang, X

    2006-01-01

    The study investigates prevalence of sexual dysfunction (SD), sexual satisfaction and their correlates in the rural female population in China. An anonymous cross-sectional study was carried out in a random sample of 1178 married of age 20-39 years in Dengfeng County, Henan, China. The prevalence of having at least one SD was 43 and 38% of the respondents were satisfied with their sexual life; 64.0% thought that sex was not important to them; and 85.7% believed that they do not have adequate sex-related knowledge. Having SD and high sexual satisfaction were associated with high mental health or vitality quality of life scores and better perceived health status. Other independent predictors of SD included sociodemographic variables, biological variables, life style factors and masturbation. It is concluded that SD was prevalent among the studied women and were associated with mental health. The sexual health among married women needs to be improved in rural China. PMID:15944726

  7. Clinico-demographic profile, sexual dysfunction and readiness to change in male alcohol dependence syndrome inpatients in a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A K; Sapkota, N; Tambi, A; Shyangwa, P M

    2012-03-01

    Persons with prolonged and heavy alcohol use generally suffer from alcohol dependence syndrome (ADS) and develop physical, sexual as well as psychiatric co-morbidity. Successful recovery to normalcy depends on multiple factors including patient's motivation. To study clinico-demographic profile, reasons for initiating alcohol use, sexual and psychiatric disorders and eagerness for treatment and quitting alcohol in ADS inpatients. Fifty consecutive ADS inpatients with matching controls were enrolled. Clinico-demographic profile, factors for initiating alcohol use, psychiatric and sexual co-morbidity and want for treatment and being abstinent was studied applying relevant scales. All subjects were males with a mean age of 37.5 years, 80% were married, majority were Hindu (88%) and from nuclear families (56%). Fifty two percent had an education level of Graduation or more and 68% of patients reported peer pressure to be the initiating factor for alcohol use. Seventy six percent had psychiatric co-morbidity including personality Problems and other Psychiatric disorders 19(38%), delirium tremens 14 (28.00%) and Mood disorders 12(24%).Depression being most common mood disorder (14%). Nicotine was the most common other substance of use 32 (64%). Sixty eight percent of the patient reported one or another sexual dysfunction. 68% of ADS inpatients acknowledged of having problems related to their drinking, expressed desire for change and were eager to avail treatment and to remain abstinent. ADS patients commonly suffer from psychiatric co-morbidity and sexual dysfunctions. They also wish to have effective treatment and to quit alcohol. PMID:23441492

  8. Comparing the effects of treatment with sildenafil and cognitive-behavioral therapy on treatment of sexual dysfunction in women: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Abdollah; Ahmadvand, Afshin; Najarzadegan, Mohammad Reza; Mehrzad, Fateme

    2016-01-01

    Background Sexual dysfunction in women is prevalent and common in women after menopause. Many attempts to treat patients with sexual dysfunction by cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) methods. But to the best of our knowledge, there has been no study that compared these two methods. Objective The aim of this study was to assess and compare the effects of sildenafil and cognitive-behavioral therapy on treatment of sexual dysfunction in women. Methods In this randomized, controlled, clinical trial, 86 women with arousal and orgasm dysfunction were surveyed. The patients were divided into two groups, i.e., sildenafil and CBT groups. The patients in the sildenafil group were treated by 50 mg of oral sildenafil one hour before intercourse, and the other group had weekly sessions of CBT for eight weeks. Sexual dysfunctions were evaluated by the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), a sexual satisfaction questionnaire, and the Enrich marital satisfaction scale. Results The mean age of the participants was 33.14 ± 7.34 years. The mean scores for female sexual function index, sexual satisfaction, and the Enrich marital satisfaction scale were increased in both groups during treatment (p < 0.001). It was found that cognitive-behavioral therapy compared to treatment with sildenafil increased all subscales, except arousal, orgasm, and lubrication. Conclusion Cognitive-behavioral therapy is more effective than treatment with sildenafil for improving female sexual function. Clinical trial registration The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT ID: IRCT2014070318338N1. Funding The authors received no financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article. PMID:27382439

  9. Male Sexual Dysfunction, Leptin, Pituitary and Gonadal Hormones in Nigerian Males with Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Fabian, Unyime Aniekpon; Charles-Davies, Mabel Ayebatonyo; Fasanmade, Adesoji Adedipe; Olaniyi, John Ayodele; Oyewole, Oyediran Emmanuel; Owolabi, Mayowa Ojo; Adebusuyi, Jane Roli; Hassan, Olufunke Olayemi; Ajobo, Babatunde Mohammed; Ebesunun, Maria Onomhaguan; Adigun, Kehinde; Akinlade, Kehinde Sola; Arinola, Olatubosun Ganiyu; Agbedana, Emmanuel Oluyemi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pituitary and gonadal dysfunctions resulting from increased adiposity leading to disturbances of sexual and reproductive functions have been reported in males with metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The aim of this study was to evaluate sexual dysfunction, leptin, and reproductive hormones in Nigerian males with MS and DM2. Methods: Participants were 104 men (34 males with DM2, 17 men with MS and 53 men with normal body mass index (18.5–24.9 Kg/m2) without MS (controls)). The International Diabetes Federation (2005) criteria were used for MS diagnosis. Reproductive history, anthropometry, blood pressure (BP) and 10 ml fasting blood samples were obtained by standard methods. Fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and high density lipoprotein cholesterol were determined by enzymatic methods while low density lipoprotein cholesterol was calculated. Leptin, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinising hormone (LH), prolactin, testosterone and oestrogen were determined by enzyme immunoassay (leptin by Diagnostic Automation, Inc.; others by Immunometrics (UK) Ltd.) while oestrogen-testosterone ratio was calculated. Data analyzed using ANOVA, Chi square and multiple regression were statistically significant at p<0.05. Results: Testosterone was significantly lower in MS than controls while oestradiol and ETR were significantly higher in MS compared with controls and DM2 group (p<0.05). ETR significantly predicted testosterone in all groups (p<0.05). Significantly lower libido was observed in men in MS than controls and DM2 groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: Sexual and reproductive dysfunction may be related to increased conversion of testosterone to oestrogen in increased adipose mass in men with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26962479

  10. [Thyroid gland dysfunction, disorders of somatic and sexual development, disturbances of fertility after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Wędrychowicz, Anna; Starzyk, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been performed for malignant and non-malignant disorders leading to increasing numbers of long-term survivors. Some of them develop long-term posttransplantation complications, among them endocrine complications that arise many years after HSCT and demand to be treated till the end of patients´ life. In the paper "classical", observed several years after HSCT had been used as a treatment procedure, endocrine complications are discussed and the review of literature regarding this problem is presented. Thyroid dysfunction, disorders of somatic and sexual development are presented in details. Gonad dysfunction with the problem of fertility disturbances is reported. The paper presents the etiopathogenesis, methods of prevention, as well as treatment and the results of the treatment of these endocrine complications after HSCT. Moreover actual recommendations for screening and prevention of endocrine complications in long-term HCT survivors are presented. PMID:23739647

  11. An analysis of treatment preferences and sexual quality of life outcomes in female partners of Chinese men with erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Jun; Bai, Wen-Jun; Dai, Yu-Tian; Xu, Wen-Ping; Wang, Chia-Ning; Li, Han-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The impact of erectile dysfunction is distressing to both males and their female partners, but less attention has been paid to identify female partners’ preferred treatment and sexual quality of life outcomes. The present analysis explores female partners’ treatment preference for erectile dysfunction in Chinese Men. This was a phase 4, randomized, open-label, multicenter, crossover study in Chinese men with erectile dysfunction who were naïve to phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor treatments. Eligible patients were randomized to sequential 20-mg tadalafil/100-mg sildenafil or 100-mg sildenafil/20-mg tadalafil for 8 weeks each. Of 418 patients, female partners of 64 patients agreed to enter the study; of 64 patients who entered the study with female partners, 63 were randomized, and 62 completed the study. Baseline demographics and disease characteristics were comparable between treatment groups. Significantly more couples preferred tadalafil compared with sildenafil overall (75.4% vs 24.6%; P < 0.001), and irrespective of erectile dysfunction severity at baseline (P ≤ 0.005). Significant improvements in sexual quality of life scores were reported at endpoint (Visit 8) in male patients and female partners in both tadalafil and sildenafil treatment groups (P < 0.001). Significantly higher mean changes from baseline were observed for male patients in the tadalafil group compared with the sildenafil group for the erectile function (P = 0.013) and overall satisfaction (P = 0.019) International Index for Erectile Function domains and the spontaneity domain (P < 0.001) of the Psychological and Interpersonal Relationship Scale. No major safety concerns were reported during the study. Though both treatments were effective, safe, and tolerable, more couples preferred tadalafil compared with sildenafil. PMID:26459780

  12. SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction: fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and fluvoxamine in a prospective, multicenter, and descriptive clinical study of 344 patients.

    PubMed

    Montejo-González, A L; Llorca, G; Izquierdo, J A; Ledesma, A; Bousoño, M; Calcedo, A; Carrasco, J L; Ciudad, J; Daniel, E; De la Gandara, J; Derecho, J; Franco, M; Gomez, M J; Macias, J A; Martin, T; Perez, V; Sanchez, J M; Sanchez, S; Vicens, E

    1997-01-01

    The authors analyzed the incidence of sexual dysfunction (SD) with different selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline) and hence the qualitative and quantitative changes in SD throughout time in a prospective and multicenter study. Outpatients (192 women and 152 men; age = 39.6 +/- 11.4 years) under treatment with SSRIs were interviewed with an SD questionnaire designed for this purpose by the authors and that included questions about the following: decreased libido, delayed orgasm or anorgasmia, delayed ejaculation, inability to ejaculate, impotence, and general sexual satisfaction. Patients with the following criteria were included: normal sexual function before SSRI intake, exclusive treatment with SSRIs or treatment associated with benzodiazepines, previous heterosexual or self-erotic current sexual practices. Excluded were patients with previous sexual dysfunction, association of SSRIs with neuroleptics, recent hormone intake, and significant medical illnesses. There was a significant increase in the incidence of SD when physicians asked the patients direct questions (58%) versus when SD was spontaneously reported (14%). There were some significant differences among different SSRIs: paroxetine provoked more delay of orgasm or ejaculation and more impotence than fluvoxamine, fluoxetine and sertraline (chi 2, p < .05). Only 24.5% of the patients had a good tolerance of their sexual dysfunction. Twelve male patients who suffered from premature ejaculation before the treatment preferred to maintain delayed ejaculation, and their sexual satisfaction, and that of their partners, clearly improved. Sexual dysfunction was positively correlated with dose. Patients experienced substantial improvement in sexual function when the dose was diminished or the drug was withdrawn. Men showed more incidence of sexual dysfunction than women, but women's sexual dysfunction was more intense than men's. In only 5.8% of

  13. Iatrogenic sexual dysfunction and the protective withholding of information: in whose best interest?

    PubMed

    Higgins, A; Barker, P; Begley, C M

    2006-08-01

    In recent years a growing body of evidence has highlighted the impact of neuroleptics and antidepressants on sexual function. Research from a service user's perspective suggested that service users are dissatisfied with the information that they received on drugs, and would like more education, in particular, on the side effects of medication that impact on sexual function. This paper reports some of the findings of a grounded theory study that explored how psychiatric nurses responded to issues of sexuality in practice. Emphasis within the paper is given to how nursing staff addressed the side effects of drugs that impact on sexual function. Findings suggested that nurse addressed the issue of prescribed medication and sexual function in practice, using a 'Veiling Sexualities Cycle', which had three subcategories: 'Hanging the Veil', 'Lifting the Veil' and 'Re-veiling'. In the light of contemporary mental health policy, findings from the study are discussed and recommendations for practice and education made. PMID:16867128

  14. Increased hexosaminidase activity in antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side effects: possible association with higher occurrence in bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Tunca, Zeliha; Resmi, Halil; Ozkara, H Asuman; Ciliv, Gönenc; Celtikci, Basak; Alptekin, Koksal; Ozerdem, Aysegul; Akdede, Berna Kivircik; Baykara, Burak; Birsoy, Bilge; Ergor, Gul

    2008-07-01

    Dystonic movements and Parkinsonism are frequently seen in gangliosidoses and these conditions have been reported to modify dopaminergic plasticity. We investigated whether the activity of hexosaminidase, a type-two ganglioside (GM2) degrading enzyme, correlates with drug-induced extrapyramidal system (EPS) side effects in psychiatric patients. We compared hexosaminidase activity in the lymphocytes of 29 EPS-positive patients, 13 EPS-negative patients, and 30 healthy volunteers. The activities of A and B isoforms of hexosaminidase were higher in EPS-positive patients than EPS-negative patients and healthy controls. Multivariate analysis suggested an interaction with increased B isoform activity and EPS side effects in female bipolar disorder patients. Higher levels of hexosaminidase enzyme activity may explain the frequent occurrence of antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal side effects in mood disorder patients. PMID:18436361

  15. Erectile Dysfunction and Sexual Hormone Levels in Men With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Efficacy of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Qi-Chang; Zeng, Hui-Qing; Jiang, Xing-Tang; Chen, Bo; Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and serum sexual hormone levels were evaluated in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In these patients, the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was determined. The 207 men (mean age 44.0 ± 11.1 years) enrolled in the study were stratified within four groups based on their apnea-hypopnea index score: simple snoring (n = 32), mild OSA (n = 29), moderate OSA (n = 38), and severe OSA (n = 108). The International Index of Erectile Dysfunction-5 (IIEF-5) score was obtained from each patient, and blood samples for the analysis of sexual hormones (prolactin, luteotropin, follicle-stimulating hormone, estradiol, progestin, and testosterone) were drawn in the morning after polysomnography. The IIEF-5 test and serum sexual hormone measurements were repeated after 3 months of CPAP treatment in 53 men with severe OSA. The prevalence of ED was 60.6 % in OSA patients overall and 72.2 % in those with severe OSA. Compared with the simple snoring group, patients with severe OSA had significantly lower testosterone levels (14.06 ± 5.62 vs. 17.02 ± 4.68, p = .018) and lower IIEF-5 scores (16.33 ± 6.50 vs. 24.09 ± 1.94, p = .001). The differences in the other sexual hormones between groups were not significant. After 3 months of CPAP treatment, there were no significant changes in sexual hormone levels, but the IIEF-5 score had improved significantly (18.21 ± 4.05 vs. 19.21 ± 3.86, p = .001). Severe OSA patients have low testosterone concentration and high ED prevalence. IIEF-5 scores increased significantly after CPAP treatment, but there was no effect on serum testosterone levels. PMID:26370402

  16. Propionyl-L-carnitine, L-arginine and niacin in sexual medicine: a nutraceutical approach to erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gianfrilli, D; Lauretta, R; Di Dato, C; Graziadio, C; Pozza, C; De Larichaudy, J; Giannetta, E; Isidori, A M; Lenzi, A

    2012-05-01

    The application of nutraceuticals in the field of male sexual function -in particular for erectile dysfunction (ED)--remains relatively underexplored. In a group of 54 unselected men (35-75 years), consecutively presenting to our ED clinic and naive to other ED treatments, we carried out a single-blind, one-arm study to evaluate the effects of a 3-month supplementation with propionyl-L-carnitine, L-arginine and niacin on their sexual performance. All patients had the short-international index of erectile function (IIEF) questionnaire, global assessment questions (GAQs) and routine laboratory testing, at baseline and 3 months afterward. 51 (92%) patients of 54 completed the entire study period. After 3 months of treatment, a small, but statistically significant improvement in total and single items of the IIEF was found (Δ = 5.7 ± 4.1 P < 0.01). Analyses on GAQs revealed that treatment improved erections in 40% of cases, with a partial response occurring in up to 77% of subjects enrolled. These preliminary findings indicate that the favourable cardiovascular effects of nutraceuticals might also reflect on male sexual function with possible implication in the treatment and prevention of ED. This study documents a considerable patient's interest toward nutritional supplementation--as first-line or adjunctive treatment to PDE5 inhibitors--that goes beyond the measurable increment in penile rigidity. PMID:21966881

  17. Female sexual dysfunction in young adult women - Impact of age and lifestyle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoian, Dana; PAter, Liana; Pater, Flavius; Craciunescu, Mihaela

    2014-12-01

    Female sexual function is a difficult entity to be assessed. Subjective factors and interview biases can change the perception of it. Using validated questionnaires can improve the scientific approach to this matter. There is a huge difference of severity and incidence among young, apparent healthy women, which are in a harmonious relationship. We evaluated 320 healthy women, with stable sexual active relationship, with no know depressive disease, endocrinological and metabolic pathology, no premature menopause, no malignancy. We compose a mathematic model to study the impact of age, and body weight on the sexual function, with FSFI total score as surrogate marker. We observed that even in healthy women, increase in age and/or weight/body mass significantly impair general sexual function.

  18. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Trial of Maca Root as Treatment for Antidepressant-Induced Sexual Dysfunction in Women

    PubMed Central

    Dording, Christina M.; Schettler, Pamela J.; Dalton, Elizabeth D.; Parkin, Susannah R.; Walker, Rosemary S. W.; Fehling, Kara B.; Fava, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We sought to demonstrate that maca root may be an effective treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (AISD) in women. Method. We conducted a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of maca root (3.0 g/day) in 45 female outpatients (mean age of 41.5 ± 12.5 years) with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction whose depression remitted. Endpoints were improvement in sexual functioning as per the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Results. 45 of 57 consented females were randomized, and 42 (30 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal women) were eligible for a modified intent-to-treat analysis based on having had at least one postmedication visit. Remission rates by the end of treatment were higher for the maca than the placebo group, based on attainment of an ASEX total score ≤ 10 (9.5% for maca versus 4.8% for placebo), attaining an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 12 (30.0% for maca versus 20.0% for placebo) and reaching an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 8 (9.5% for maca versus 5.0% for placebo). Higher remission rates for the maca versus placebo group were associated with postmenopausal status. Maca was well tolerated. Conclusion. Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women. This trial is registered with NCT00568126. PMID:25954318

  19. A double-blind placebo-controlled trial of maca root as treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction in women.

    PubMed

    Dording, Christina M; Schettler, Pamela J; Dalton, Elizabeth D; Parkin, Susannah R; Walker, Rosemary S W; Fehling, Kara B; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We sought to demonstrate that maca root may be an effective treatment for antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (AISD) in women. Method. We conducted a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of maca root (3.0 g/day) in 45 female outpatients (mean age of 41.5 ± 12.5 years) with SSRI/SNRI-induced sexual dysfunction whose depression remitted. Endpoints were improvement in sexual functioning as per the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Results. 45 of 57 consented females were randomized, and 42 (30 premenopausal and 12 postmenopausal women) were eligible for a modified intent-to-treat analysis based on having had at least one postmedication visit. Remission rates by the end of treatment were higher for the maca than the placebo group, based on attainment of an ASEX total score ≤ 10 (9.5% for maca versus 4.8% for placebo), attaining an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 12 (30.0% for maca versus 20.0% for placebo) and reaching an MGH-SFQ score ≤ 8 (9.5% for maca versus 5.0% for placebo). Higher remission rates for the maca versus placebo group were associated with postmenopausal status. Maca was well tolerated. Conclusion. Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in postmenopausal women. This trial is registered with NCT00568126. PMID:25954318

  20. The effects of psychiatric treatment on depression, anxiety, quality of life, and sexual dysfunction in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Yanartas, O; Kani, HT; Bicakci, E; Kilic, I; Banzragch, M; Acikel, C; Atug, O; Kuscu, K; Imeryuz, N; Akin, H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Depression and anxiety are common disorders in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our aim is to prospectively determine the effect of psychiatric treatment on scores for depression, anxiety, quality of life (QoL), and sexual dysfunction in an outpatient population diagnosed with IBD and also anxiety and/or depression disorder. Patients and methods Patients who scored higher than the cutoff point on the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale were referred for further structured psychiatric evaluation and determination of the need for psychiatric drug treatment. Patients who underwent drug therapy completed Short Form-36 (SF-36) and the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale at baseline and after 6 months of follow-up. Results Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were the most common diagnoses. After 6 months, 47 patients had completely adhered to drug treatment (group A), whereas 20 were nonadherent (group B). In group A, all domains of SF-36, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale, depression/anxiety scores, and Crohn’s disease activity index were statistically improved after treatment when compared with the baseline. In group B, the three domains of SF-36, platelet count, and mean corpuscular volume were worse between baseline and at 6 months. Conclusion In IBD patients having any psychiatric disorder, 6 months of antidepressant drug treatment is associated with an improvement in depression, anxiety, QoL, and sexual functioning scores, as well as an improvement in Crohn’s disease activity index. On the other hand, insufficient psychiatric treatment seems to be related to a poor QoL. PMID:27069364

  1. Depression is correlated with the psychological and physical aspects of sexual dysfunction in men.

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, A W; Badhiwala, N; Lipshultz, L I; Khera, M

    2013-09-01

    Few studies have objectively examined the relationship between depression and various stages of sexual function. Here we associate depression and sexual function using validated questionnaires. A retrospective review of 186 men was performed; demographics and serum hormone levels were obtained. Responses to questionnaires evaluating depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9)), sexual function (International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)) and hypogonadal symptoms (quantitative Androgen Decline in the Aging Male (qADAM)) completed by each patient were correlated using Spearman's rank correlation. Mean±s.d. subject age: 52.6±12.7 years; mean serum hormone levels: TT 429.8±239.2 ng dl(-1), free testosterone 9.72±7.5 pg ml(-1) and estradiol 34.4±22.8 pg ml(-1). Negative correlations were observed between total PHQ-9 score and the sexual desire (ρ=-0.210, P=0.006), intercourse satisfaction (ρ=-0.293, P<0.0001) and overall satisfaction (ρ=-0.413, P<0.0001) domains of the IIEF and individual IIEF questions pertaining to erectile function. Men with a PHQ-9 score 10 (mild depression or worse), had lower sexual desire and sex life satisfaction. A negative correlation between PHQ-9 score and qADAM score (ρ=-0.634, P<0.0001) was observed and men with higher PHQ-9 score had lower qADAM scores. Depressive symptoms in men correlate with both psychological as well as physical aspects of sexual function. PMID:23466661

  2. Diabetes and alcohol: Double jeopardy with regard to oxidative toxicity and sexual dysfunction in adult male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Himabindu, B; Madhu, P; Reddy, P Sreenivasula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether diabetic rats exposed to alcohol demonstrate a higher degree of reproductive toxicity and suffer with elevated oxidative toxicity when compared with alcohol exposed control rats. Diabetes was induced by injecting single dose of streptozotocin and alcohol was administered through orogastric tube once daily for a period of 55 days. Daily sperm production, epididymal sperm count, motile, viable and HOS-tail coiled sperms, serum testosterone levels and testicular 3β- and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity levels were significantly decreased in diabetic rats. Significant reduction in testicular and epididymal superoxide dismutase and catalase activity levels, and elevation in lipid peroxidation products were observed in diabetic rats. Similar reproductive and oxidative toxicity was observed in alcohol treated control rats. Further, alcohol exposed diabetic rats showed additional deterioration in reproductive endpoints and noteworthy elevation in oxidative toxicity suggesting that treatment with alcohol further deteriorates sexual dysfunction in STZ-induced diabetic rats. PMID:25541261

  3. Prevalence of Sexual Dysfunction and its Associated Factors in Women Aged 40–65 Years with 11 Years or More of Formal Education: A Population-Based Household Survey

    PubMed Central

    Valadares, Ana L. R.; Pinto-Neto, Aarão M.; Osis, Maria J.; Sousa, Maria H.; Costa-Paiva, Lúcia; Conde, Délio M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the prevalence of sexual dysfunction and its associated factors in middle-aged women with 11 years or more of formal education. METHODS A cross-sectional, population-based study was carried out using an anonymous, self-response questionnaire. A total of 315 Brazilian-born women, 40–65 years of age with 11 years or more of schooling, participated in the study. The instrument used in the evaluation was based on the Short Personal Experiences Questionnaire. Sexual dysfunction was calculated from the mean score of sexual responsiveness (pleasure in sexual activities, excitation and orgasm), frequency of sexual activities and libido. Sociodemographic and clinical factors were evaluated. Poisson multiple regression analysis was carried out and the prevalence ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated. RESULTS The prevalence of sexual dysfunction was 35.9% among our study population. Multiple regression analysis showed that sexual dysfunction was positively associated with older age (prevalence ratios=1.04; 95%CI:1.01–1.07) and with the presence of hot flashes (prevalence ratios=1.37; 95%CI:1.04–1.80). Having a sexual partner (PR=0.47; 95%CI:0.34–0.65) and feeling well or excellent (prevalence ratios= 0.68; 95%CI: 0.52–0.88) were factors associated with lower sexual dysfunction scores. CONCLUSIONS Sexual dysfunction was present in more than one-third of women that were 40–65 years of age with 11 years or more of formal education. Within that age group, older age and hot flashes were associated with higher sexual dysfunction scores, whereas feeling well and having a sexual partner were associated with better sexuality. PMID:19061000

  4. The dark side of 5α-reductase inhibitors' therapy: sexual dysfunction, high Gleason grade prostate cancer and depression.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged M; Mulgaonkar, Ashwini; Giordano, Nicholas

    2014-06-01

    With aging, abnormal benign growth of the prostate results in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) with concomitant lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Because the prostate is an androgen target tissue, and transforms testosterone into 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT), a potent androgen, via 5α-reductase (5α-R) activity, inhibiting this key metabolic reaction was identified as a target for drug development to treat symptoms of BPH. Two drugs, namely finasteride and dutasteride were developed as specific 5α-reductase inhibitors (5α-RIs) and were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of BPH symptoms. These agents have proven useful in the reducing urinary retention and minimizing surgical intervention in patients with BPH symptoms and considerable literature exists describing the benefits of these agents. In this review we highlight the adverse side effects of 5α-RIs on sexual function, high grade prostate cancer incidence, central nervous system function and on depression. 5α-Rs isoforms (types 1-3) are widely distributed in many tissues including the central nervous system and inhibition of these enzymes results in blockade of synthesis of several key hormones and neuro-active steroids leading to a host of adverse effects, including loss of or reduced libido, erectile dysfunction, orgasmic dysfunction, increased high Gleason grade prostate cancer, observed heart failure and cardiovascular events in clinical trials, and depression. Considerable evidence exists from preclinical and clinical studies, which point to significant and serious adverse effects of 5α-RIs, finasteride and dutasteride, on sexual health, vascular health, psychological health and the overall quality of life. Physicians need to be aware of such potential adverse effects and communicate such information to their patients prior to commencing 5α-RIs therapy. PMID:24955220

  5. Pharmacological Strategies to Counteract Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain and Metabolic Adverse Effects in Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Yuya; Suzuki, Takefumi; Nakagawa, Atsuo; Yoshida, Kazunari; Mimura, Masaru; Fleischhacker, Walter Wolfgang; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotic-induced metabolic adversities are often difficult to manage. Using concomitant medications to counteract these adversities may be a rational option. Objective: To systematically determine the effectiveness of medications to counteract antipsychotic-induced metabolic adversities in patients with schizophrenia. Data Sources: Published articles until November 2013 were searched using 5 electronic databases. Clinical trial registries were searched for unpublished trials. Study Selection: Double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trials focusing on patients with schizophrenia were included if they evaluated the effects of concomitant medications on antipsychotic-induced metabolic adversities as a primary outcome. Data Extraction: Variables relating to participants, interventions, comparisons, outcomes, and study design were extracted. The primary outcome was change in body weight. Secondary outcomes included clinically relevant weight change, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1c, fasting insulin, insulin resistance, cholesterol, and triglycerides. Data Synthesis: Forty trials representing 19 unique interventions were included in this meta-analysis. Metformin was the most extensively studied drug in regard to body weight, the mean difference amounting to −3.17 kg (95% CI: −4.44 to −1.90 kg) compared to placebo. Pooled effects for topiramate, sibutramine, aripiprazole, and reboxetine were also different from placebo. Furthermore, metformin and rosiglitazone improved insulin resistance, while aripiprazole, metformin, and sibutramine decreased blood lipids. Conclusion: When nonpharmacological strategies alone are insufficient, and switching antipsychotics to relatively weight-neutral agents is not feasible, the literature supports the use of concomitant metformin as first choice among pharmacological interventions to counteract antipsychotic-induced weight gain and other metabolic adversities in schizophrenia. PMID:24636967

  6. Comparing the Efficacy of Bupropion and Amantadine on Sexual Dysfunction Induced by a Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zahiroddin, Alireza; Faridhosseini, Farhad; Zamani, Azar; Shahini, Najmeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant-induced sexual dysfunction (SD) is a common problem, associated with a significant risk of non-adherence. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are associated with a substantial risk of SD. Only 10 % of patients show spontaneous improvement during follow up period. Objectives: This study aimed to compare two proposed medication (bupropion vs. amantadine) in alleviating SD in patients treated with SSRIs. Patients and Methods: In a randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial in Iran, 46 patients were recruited based on DSM-IV-TR criteria and semi-structured interview. Then, they were randomized into two treatment groups using table of random numbers. Eight patients were excluded and finally 38 patients completed the study which lasted for 4 weeks. Twenty patients were given bupropion, 18 patients were randomly assigned to another group, and given amantadine. Patients were assessed with the Arizona sexual experience scale (ASEX) at baseline and 4 weeks after the treatment. Results: A total of 38 patients completed the study (18 patients in amantadine vs. 20 patients in bupropion).The mean ASEX scores gradually declined in both study groups during the trial. The reduction of ASEX score in bupropion group was more than that of amantadine group that was statistically significant. So, the addition of bupropion at higher doses appears to be more effective approach in comparison with amantadine. Conclusions: These results provide empirical support for conducting a further study on comparing different add-on strategies for treating drug-induced SD. PMID:26744632

  7. A double-blind, randomized, pilot dose-finding study of maca root (L. meyenii) for the management of SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dording, Christina M; Fisher, Lauren; Papakostas, George; Farabaugh, Amy; Sonawalla, Shamsah; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

    2008-01-01

    We sought to determine whether maca, a Peruvian plant, is effective for selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)-induced sexual dysfunction. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, parallel group dose-finding pilot study comparing a low-dose (1.5 g/day) to a high-dose (3.0 g/day) maca regimen in 20 remitted depressed outpatients (mean age 36+/-13 years; 17 women) with SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction. The Arizona Sexual Experience Scale (ASEX) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Function Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ) were used to measure sexual dysfunction. Ten subjects completed the study, and 16 subjects (9 on 3.0 g/day; 7 on 1.5 g/day) were eligible for intent-to-treat (ITT) analyses on the basis of having had at least one postbaseline visit. ITT subjects on 3.0 g/day maca had a significant improvement in ASEX (from 22.8+/-3.8 to 16.9+/-6.2; z=-2.20, P=0.028) and in MGH-SFQ scores (from 24.1+/-1.9 to 17.0+/-5.7; z=-2.39, P=0.017), but subjects on 1.5 g/day maca did not. Libido improved significantly (P<0.05) for the ITT and completer groups based on ASEX item #1, but not by dosing groups. Maca was well tolerated. Maca root may alleviate SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction, and there may be a dose-related effect. Maca may also have a beneficial effect on libido. PMID:18801111

  8. Neural correlates of antidepressant-related sexual dysfunction: a placebo-controlled fMRI study on healthy males under subchronic paroxetine and bupropion.

    PubMed

    Abler, Birgit; Seeringer, Angela; Hartmann, Antonie; Grön, Georg; Metzger, Coraline; Walter, Martin; Stingl, Julia

    2011-08-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a common side effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) like paroxetine in the treatment of depression, imposing a considerable risk on medication adherence and hence therapeutic success. Bupropion, a norepinephrine and dopamine reuptake inhibitor, is recommended as an alternative treatment without adverse effects concerning sexual arousal and libido. We investigated the neural bases of paroxetine-related subjective sexual dysfunction when compared with bupropion and placebo. We scanned 18 healthy, heterosexual males in a randomized, double-blind, within-subject design while watching video clips of erotic and nonerotic content under steady-state conditions after taking 20 mg of paroxetine, 150 mg of bupropion, and placebo for 7 days each. Under paroxetine, ratings of subjective sexual dysfunction increased compared with placebo or bupropion. Activation along the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), including subgenual, pregenual, and midcingulate cortices, in the ventral striatum and midbrain was decreased when compared with placebo. In contrast, bupropion let subjective ratings and ACC activations unchanged and increased activity of brain regions including posterior midcingulate cortex, mediodorsal thalamus, and extended amygdala relative to placebo and paroxetine. Brain regions that have been related to the processing of motivational (ventral striatum), emotional, and autonomic components of erotic stimulation (anterior cingulate) in previous studies showed reduced responsiveness under paroxetine in our study. Drug effects on these regions may be part of the mechanism underlying SSRI-related sexual dysfunction. Increased activation under bupropion may point to an opposite effect that may relate to the lack of impaired sexual functioning. PMID:21544071

  9. Prevalence and predictors of concomitant low sexual desire/interest and new-onset erectile dysfunction - a picture from the everyday clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Salonia, A; Clementi, M C; Ventimiglia, E; Colicchia, M; Capogrosso, P; Castiglione, F; Castagna, G; Boeri, L; Suardi, N; Cantiello, F; Damiano, R; Montorsi, F

    2014-09-01

    Prevalence and risk factors of concomitant primary low sexual desire/interest (LSD/I) and subsequent new-onset erectile dysfunction (ED) in men have been only partially investigated. We looked at the sociodemographic and clinical predictors of the concomitant condition of primary LSD/I - defined as the reduction in the usual level of SD/I which precedes ED or another sexual dysfunction - and new-onset ED (LSD/I + ED) in a cohort of consecutive Caucasian-European patients seeking their first medical help for sexual dysfunction at a single outpatient clinic in the everyday clinical practice setting. Data from 439 sexually active patients were analysed. Health-significant comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Patients' LSD/I were evaluated according to the findings of a comprehensive sexual history. Moreover, patients completed the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models tested the prevalence and predictors of LSD/I + ED as compared with ED only. Of the 439 men, LSD/I + ED was observed in 33 (4.2%) individuals. One of three men with LSD/I + ED was younger than 40 years. Patients complaining of LSD/I + ED or ED alone did not differ in terms of hormonal milieu. No significant differences emerged between groups in terms of sexual orientation, rates of stable sexual relationships, educational status, recreational habits and comorbid sexual dysfunctions. Patients with LSD/I + ED had significantly lower IIEF-sexual desire and IIEF-overall satisfaction scores than ED-only individuals (all p ≤ 0.003). At multivariable analysis younger age and severe CCI scores emerged as independent predictors of LSD/I + ED (all p ≤ 0.04). These findings showed that primary LSD/I is concomitant with new-onset ED in less than 5% of men seeking first medical help. Younger age and severe CCI emerged as independent predictors of LSD/I + ED. Patients with both conditions reported an impaired overall

  10. Erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yafi, Faysal A; Jenkins, Lawrence; Albersen, Maarten; Corona, Giovanni; Isidori, Andrea M; Goldfarb, Shari; Maggi, Mario; Nelson, Christian J; Parish, Sharon; Salonia, Andrea; Tan, Ronny; Mulhall, John P; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a multidimensional but common male sexual dysfunction that involves an alteration in any of the components of the erectile response, including organic, relational and psychological. Roles for nonendocrine (neurogenic, vasculogenic and iatrogenic) and endocrine pathways have been proposed. Owing to its strong association with metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, cardiac assessment may be warranted in men with symptoms of erectile dysfunction. Minimally invasive interventions to relieve the symptoms of erectile dysfunction include lifestyle modifications, oral drugs, injected vasodilator agents and vacuum erection devices. Surgical therapies are reserved for the subset of patients who have contraindications to these nonsurgical interventions, those who experience adverse effects from (or are refractory to) medical therapy and those who also have penile fibrosis or penile vascular insufficiency. Erectile dysfunction can have deleterious effects on a man's quality of life; most patients have symptoms of depression and anxiety related to sexual performance. These symptoms, in turn, affect his partner's sexual experience and the couple's quality of life. This Primer highlights numerous aspects of erectile dysfunction, summarizes new treatment targets and ongoing preclinical studies that evaluate new pharmacotherapies, and covers the topic of regenerative medicine, which represents the future of sexual medicine. PMID:27188339

  11. Frequency of sexual dysfunction and other reproductive side-effects in patients with schizophrenia treated with risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, or haloperidol: the results of the EIRE study.

    PubMed

    Bobes, J; Garc A-Portilla, M P; Rejas, J; Hern Ndez, G; Garcia-Garcia, M; Rico-Villademoros, F; Porras, A

    2003-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics seem to differ mainly in their tolerability profile. The aim of this cross-sectional study, the Estudio de Investigaci n de Resultados en Esquizofrenia (Outcomes Research Study in Schizophrenia; EIRE study), was to assess in a clinical setting the frequency of several side-effects related to haloperidol, risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine. This article addresses sexual dysfunction and other reproductive side-effects (gynecomastia, menorrhage, amenorrhea, and galactorrhea). We recruited outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994) criteria and who had received a single antipsychotic (risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, or haloperidol) for at least 4 weeks. During a single visit, we collected data, including demographic and clinical characteristics, current antipsychotic and concomitant treatment, and adverse effects listed in a modified version of the UKU Scale. We used a Chi-squared test to determine pairs comparisons of the frequency of adverse reactions between treatments. To estimate risk of a given adverse reaction with a given treatment, we used a logistic regression method. We assessed 636 evaluable patients out of 669 recruited. Frequency of sexual dysfunction was high with haloperidol (38.1%) and also with olanzapine (35.3%), quetiapine (18.2%), and risperidone (43.2%). We found the frequency of other reproductive side-effects to be relatively low with all four drugs: haloperidol (6.9%), olanzapine (6.4%), quetiapine (2.7%), and risperidone (11.7%). Sexual dysfunction appeared to be dose-related with haloperidol, risperidone, and olanzapine. Risperidone and olanzapine showed a higher risk of sexual dysfunction and other reproductive sideeffects than haloperidol. Quetiapine showed a lower risk of sexual dysfunction during short-term treatment (< 12 weeks). However, data on longer-term treatment (> 12 weeks) are lacking

  12. NETWORK POSITION AND SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION: IMPLICATIONS OF PARTNER BETWEENNESS FOR MEN*

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, Benjamin; Laumann, Edward O.

    2013-01-01

    This paper combines relational perspectives on gender identity with social network structural perspectives on health to understand men’s sexual functioning. We argue that network positions that afford independence and control over social resources are consistent with traditional masculine roles and may therefore affect men’s sexual performance. For example, when a heterosexual man’s female partner has more frequent contact with his confidants than he does–a situation that we refer to as partner betweenness – his relational autonomy, privacy, and control are constrained. Analyses of data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) show that about a quarter of men experience partner betweenness, and that these men are 92 percent more likely to report problems getting and/or maintaining an erection (95% CI: 1.274, 2.881). This association is strongest among the youngest men in the sample, which may reflect changing conceptions of masculinity in later life. We close by considering several explanations for these findings, and urge additional research on the linkages between health, gender, and network structure. PMID:22003520

  13. Physicians' attitudes towards androgen replacement therapy for male and female sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, L; Shechter, A; Porst, H; Tripodi, F; Reisman, Y

    2016-01-01

    Androgen deficiency syndrome is a commonly diagnosed condition. The aim of this study was to investigate common clinical practices of specialists in the field of sexual medicine regarding androgen replacement treatment for men and women. Attendees of the 16th Annual Congress of the European Society of Sexual Medicine held in January 2014 in Istanbul, Turkey, were asked to participate in a survey during the congress days. A 24-item self-report, closed-question questionnaire was distributed. Three sections were accessed: sociodemographic data, professional background and personal practice patterns regarding androgen substitution in men and women. A total of 133 physicians (mean age 47 years; range 25-79) completed the survey. Responses were inconsistent regarding the lab tests used for primary evaluation of male androgen deficiency. The majority of participants (62%) recommended testosterone replacement therapy for symptomatic men with testosterone levels <8 nmol l(-1) (231 ng dl(-1)). Similarly, most physicians (88%) recognized a correlation between libido and testosterone levels in women. Only 42% and 53% reported they would prescribe testosterone to women with low libido, premenopausal and postmenopausal, respectively. This survey showed discrepancies among physicians regarding testosterone replacement therapy for men and women. PMID:26865099

  14. Fluoroquinolone–macrolide combination therapy for chronic bacterial prostatitis: retrospective analysis of pathogen eradication rates, inflammatory findings and sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Vittorio; Montanari, Emanuele; Škerk, Višnja; Markotić, Alemka; Marras, Emanuela; Restelli, Antonella; Naber, Kurt G; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the safety and efficacy of fluoroquinolone–macrolide combination therapy in category II chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP). The aim of this study is to retrospectively compare the microbiological and clinical findings of two treatment schemes for CBP based on the combination of azithromycin (500 mg, thrice-weekly) with a once-daily 500- or 750-mg dose of ciprofloxacin (Cipro-500 or Cipro-750 cohort, respectively). Combined administration of azithromycin (1500 mg week−1) with ciprofloxacin at the rate of 750 mg day−1 for 4 weeks rather than at 500 mg day−1 for 6 weeks increased the eradication rates from 62.35% to 77.32% and the total bacteriological success from 71.76% to 85.57%. A significant decrease in pain and voiding signs/symptoms and a significant reduction in inflammatory leukocyte counts and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were sustained throughout an 18-month follow-up period in both groups. Ejaculatory pain, haemospermia and premature ejaculation were significantly attenuated on microbiological eradication in both groups, but the latter subsided more promptly in the Cipro-750 cohort. In total, 59 Cipro-750 patients showed mild-to-severe erectile dysfunction (ED) at baseline, while 22 patients had no ED on microbiological eradication and throughout the follow-up period. In conclusion fluoroquinolone–macrolide therapy resulted in pathogen eradication and CBP symptom attenuation, including pain, voiding disturbances and sexual dysfunction. A once-daily 750-mg dose of ciprofloxacin for 4 weeks showed enhanced eradication rates and lower inflammatory white blood cell counts compared to the 500-mg dose for 6 weeks. Our results are open to further prospective validation. PMID:21765442

  15. An approach to symptoms at the interface of medicine and psychiatry: pain, insomnia, weight loss and anorexia, fatigue and forgetfulness, and sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Freudenreich, Oliver; Kontos, Nicholas; Nejad, Shamim H; Gross, Anne F

    2010-11-01

    Primary care physicians commonly deal with patients who present with a somatic complaint for which no clear organic etiology can be found. This article discusses how a psychiatrist thinks about somatic symptoms (eg, pain, insomnia, weight loss and loss of appetite, fatigue and forgetfulness, sexual dysfunction) in a patient who might have depression. The management of a patient in whom no satisfactory medical or psychiatric diagnosis can be made is also reviewed briefly. PMID:20951279

  16. [Sexuality and urological diseases].

    PubMed

    Droupy, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    Patients with lower urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) frequently suffer from sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction and ejaculatory dysfunction). Erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation are two times more common in men with chronic pelvic pain/chronic prostatitis. All treatments of prostate cancer are responsible for sexual dysfunctions. Sexual disorders frequently appear during the management of infertile couples. Information and support should be offered to couples. Women with urinary incontinence also suffer frequently from coital incontinence. PMID:25201599

  17. Missed Opportunities in the Patient-Focused Drug Development Public Meeting and Scientific Workshop on Female Sexual Dysfunction Held at the FDA, October 2014.

    PubMed

    Tiefer, Leonore; Laan, Ellen; Basson, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    There were numerous missed opportunities at the October 2014 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) meeting on female sexual dysfunction (FSD). They included opportunities to hear from a diverse range of patients and to engage in evidence-based discussions of unmet medical needs, diagnostic instruments, trial end points, and inclusion criteria for clinical trials. Contributions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) nomenclature, based on extensive research, were dismissed in favor of language favoring a seemingly clear but scientifically unsupportable distinction between women's sexual desire and arousal. Numerous participants, including patients recruited by their physicians, acknowledged travel expenses paid for by interested pharmaceutical companies. Conflicts of interest were manifold. The meeting did not advance the FDA's understanding of women's sexual distress and represents a setback for our field. PMID:26010838

  18. Mirtazapine for antipsychotic-induced acute akathisia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Kongasseri, Sreejayan; Behere, Rishikesh V.; Sharma, Podila Satya Venkata Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials of mirtazapine for the treatment of antipsychotic-induced acute akathisia (AIAA). Methods: Studies were identified using online searches of PUBMED/MEDLINE and Cochrane database (CENTRAL), along with websites recording trial information such as www.clinicaltrials.gov, www.controlled-trials.com, and www.clinicalstudyresults.org. The study eligibility criteria were randomized, double-blind clinical trials comparing mirtazapine with placebo for AIAA with standardized rating for akathisia as outcome measure. The methodological quality of included trials was assessed using the Jadad Scale. Separate meta-analyses were undertaken for each outcome (response rate and complete remission) and treatment effects were expressed as Mantel–Haenszel risk ratio (RR). Fixed-effect meta-analysis was performed as heterogeneity was not significant. Number need to treat (NNT) as a measure of relative treatment effectiveness was calculated. Results: A systematic review of the literature revealed six studies that had assessed mirtazapine for the treatment of AIAA. Of these, two studies (n = 86) met the review inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis. A meta-analysis was performed to see the effect size of response rate and complete remission. For response rate, RR was 6.67 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.14–20.78], favoring mirtazapine compared with placebo, and the overall effect was significant (p = 0.001, NNT 4, 95% CI 2.6–8.6). For complete remission, RR was 6.20 (95% CI 1.74–22.08), favoring mirtazapine compared with placebo, and the overall effect was significant (p = 0.005, NNT 5, 95% CI 2.9–11.6). Conclusions: Although limited to only two studies and small sample, existing data support the efficacy of mirtazapine for the treatment of AIAA, with one in four patients showing partial response and one in five patients showing complete remission. PMID:26557987

  19. Erectile Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... or vascular problems, will have a more difficult time returning to pre-treatment function. Management of Erectile Dysfunction When a man is sexually aroused, the erectile nerves running alongside the penis stimulate the ... blood to rush in. At the same time, tiny valves at the base of the penis ...

  20. Women and sexual problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000663.htm Women and sexual problems To use the sharing features on this page, ... feel better about your sex life. Common Sexual Problems You may have sexual dysfunction if you are ...

  1. Efficacy of testosterone combined with a PDE5 inhibitor and testosterone combined with a serotonin (1A) receptor agonist in women with SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction. A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    van Rooij, Kim; Poels, Saskia; Worst, Petra; Bloemers, Jos; Koppeschaar, Hans; Goldstein, Andrew; Olivier, Berend; Tuiten, Adriaan

    2015-04-15

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are known to cause sexual dysfunction, such as decreased sexual motivation, desire, arousal, and orgasm difficulties. These SSRI-induced sexual complaints have a high prevalence rate, while there is no approved pharmacological treatment for SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction. It is hypothesized that a polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene, encoded by the nucleotides cysteine, adenine, and guanine (CAG), influence the effect of testosterone on sexual functioning. In an explorative, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study we investigated the possible effects of sublingual testosterone combined with a serotonin (5-HT)1A receptor agonist, and of sublingual testosterone combined with a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor (PDE5-i) on sexual functioning in women with SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction. Furthermore, we did an exploratory analysis to assess if the CAG polymorphism influences this effect. 21 pre- and postmenopausal women with SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction participated and underwent the following interventions: a combination of testosterone (0.5 mg) sublingually and the PDE5-i sildenafil (50 mg) and a combination of testosterone (0.5 mg) sublingually and the 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone (10 mg). The results show that women who use a low dose of SSRI and have relatively long CAG repeats report a marked improvement in sexual function in response to both treatments compared to placebo. This explorative study and preliminary results indicate that in women with SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction, a combination of testosterone sublingually and a PDE5-i or testosterone sublingually and a 5-HT1A receptor agonist might be promising treatments for certain subgroups of women with this condition. PMID:25460030

  2. Prevention of antipsychotic-induced hyperglycaemia by vitamin D: a data mining prediction followed by experimental exploration of the molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Takuya; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of hyperglycaemia, thus limiting their clinical use. This study focused on finding the molecular mechanism underlying antipsychotic-induced hyperglycaemia. First, we searched for drug combinations in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database wherein a coexisting drug reduced the hyperglycaemia risk of atypical antipsychotics, and found that a combination with vitamin D analogues significantly decreased the occurrence of quetiapine-induced adverse events relating diabetes mellitus in FAERS. Experimental validation using mice revealed that quetiapine acutely caused insulin resistance, which was mitigated by dietary supplementation with cholecalciferol. Further database analysis of the relevant signalling pathway and gene expression predicted quetiapine-induced downregulation of Pik3r1, a critical gene acting downstream of insulin receptor. Focusing on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signalling pathway, we found that the reduced expression of Pik3r1 mRNA was reversed by cholecalciferol supplementation in skeletal muscle, and that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into C2C12 myotube was inhibited in the presence of quetiapine, which was reversed by concomitant calcitriol in a PI3K-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that vitamin D coadministration prevents antipsychotic-induced hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance by upregulation of PI3K function. PMID:27199286

  3. Prevention of antipsychotic-induced hyperglycaemia by vitamin D: a data mining prediction followed by experimental exploration of the molecular mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Takuya; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotics are associated with an increased risk of hyperglycaemia, thus limiting their clinical use. This study focused on finding the molecular mechanism underlying antipsychotic-induced hyperglycaemia. First, we searched for drug combinations in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database wherein a coexisting drug reduced the hyperglycaemia risk of atypical antipsychotics, and found that a combination with vitamin D analogues significantly decreased the occurrence of quetiapine–induced adverse events relating diabetes mellitus in FAERS. Experimental validation using mice revealed that quetiapine acutely caused insulin resistance, which was mitigated by dietary supplementation with cholecalciferol. Further database analysis of the relevant signalling pathway and gene expression predicted quetiapine-induced downregulation of Pik3r1, a critical gene acting downstream of insulin receptor. Focusing on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signalling pathway, we found that the reduced expression of Pik3r1 mRNA was reversed by cholecalciferol supplementation in skeletal muscle, and that insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into C2C12 myotube was inhibited in the presence of quetiapine, which was reversed by concomitant calcitriol in a PI3K-dependent manner. Taken together, these results suggest that vitamin D coadministration prevents antipsychotic-induced hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance by upregulation of PI3K function. PMID:27199286

  4. Rosa damascena oil improves SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction in male patients suffering from major depressive disorders: results from a double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Farnia, Vahid; Shirzadifar, Mehdi; Shakeri, Jalal; Rezaei, Mansour; Bajoghli, Hafez; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Brand, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Background A substantial disadvantage of psychopharmacological treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) with selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is the impact on sexual dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the oil of Rosa damascena can have a positive influence on SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction (SSRI-I SD) of male patients who are suffering from MDD and are being treated with SSRIs. Method In a double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled clinical trial, a total of 60 male patients treated with an SSRI and suffering from MDD (mean age =32 years) and SSRI-I SD were randomly assigned to take either verum (R. damascena oil) or a placebo. Patients completed self-ratings of depression and sexual function at baseline, at 4 weeks later, and at the end of the study, 8 weeks after it started. Results Over time, sexual dysfunction improved more in the verum group than in the control group. Improvements were observed in the verum group from week 4 to week 8. Self-rated symptoms of depression reduced over time in both groups, but did so more so in the verum group than in the control group. Conclusion This double-blind, randomized, and placebo-controlled clinical trial showed that the administration of R. damascena oil ameliorates sexual dysfunction in male patients suffering from both MDD and SSRI-I SD. Further, the symptoms of depression reduced as sexual dysfunction improved. PMID:25834441

  5. Effects of Korean ginseng berry extract on sexual function in men with erectile dysfunction: a multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y D; Park, C W; Jang, J; Kim, S H; Jeon, H Y; Kim, W G; Lee, S J; Chung, W S

    2013-01-01

    Ginseng is beneficial for many aspects of human physiology, including sexual function. In this study, we have evaluated the efficacy and safety of an extract of ginseng berry, which has a ginsenoside profile distinct from other parts of the plant, on sexual function in men with erectile dysfunction. In all, 119 men with mild-to-moderate ED participated in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled clinical study. They were administered 4 tablets of either standardized Korean ginseng berry (SKGB, 350 mg ginseng berry extract per tablet), or placebo, daily, for 8 weeks. Efficacy was assessed with the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF)-15 and premature ejaculation diagnostic tool (PEDT) at the end of the 4th and 8th week. We observed that the total and each of the individual domain scores of IIEF-15 increased from 40.95 ± 7.05 to 46.19 ± 12.69 significantly in the SKGB by the 8th week (P<0.05). The erectile function domain of IIEF changed slightly from 17.17 ± 2.57 to 18.59 ± 5.99 in the SKGB group by the 8th week (P<0.05). In addition, PEDT scores significantly improved from 9.14 ± 4.57 to 7.97 ± 4.4 and 7.53 ± 4.26 in the SKGB group after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment (P<0.05). Safety markers including hormone and lipid in the blood were assessed at the end of the 4th and 8th week and they remained unchanged. Oral administration of the SKGB extract improved all domains of sexual function. It can be used as an alternative medicine to improve sexual life in men with sexual dysfunction. PMID:23254461

  6. Genitourinary dysfunction in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Ryuji; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Kishi, Masahiko

    2010-01-15

    Bladder dysfunction (urinary urgency/frequency) and sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction) are common nonmotor disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD). In contrast to motor disorders, genitourinary autonomic dysfunctions are often nonresponsive to levodopa treatment. The brain pathology causing the bladder dysfunction (appearance of overactivity) involves an altered dopamine-basal ganglia circuit, which normally suppresses the micturition reflex. By contrast, hypothalamic dysfunction is mostly responsible for the sexual dysfunction (decrease in libido and erection) in PD, via altered dopamine-oxytocin pathways, which normally promote libido and erection. The pathophysiology of the genitourinary dysfunction in PD differs from that in multiple system atrophy; therefore, it might aid in differential diagnosis. Anticholinergic agents are used to treat bladder dysfunction in PD, although these drugs should be used with caution particularly in elderly patients who have cognitive decline. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors are used to treat sexual dysfunction in PD. These treatments might be beneficial in maximizing the patients' quality of life. PMID:20077468

  7. Female Sexual Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetes, heart disease, cancer, arthritis, multiple sclerosis, or alcohol abuse Medicines to treat high blood pressure, depression, pain; oral contraceptives Gynecological issues: Medical conditions such ...

  8. Current Issues in the Evaluation and Treatment of Sexual Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses causes of sexual disturbance, assessment of sexual dysfunction, treatment of sexual dysfunction, psychological issues associated with chronic physical illness and sexual behavior, theory and treatment in child molestation, and the psychosocial outcomes of sex reassignment surgery. (BL)

  9. An Update on Female Sexual Function and Dysfunction in Old Age and Its Relevance to Old Age Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Alison; Runciman, Ross; Wylie, Kevan R.; McManus, Ross

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have now demonstrated that many older women retain an interest in their sexual lives. Yet, how many old age psychiatrists commonly check with older women about whether the depression they are treating, or the SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors) they have prescribed, have adversely affected their patient’s sexual lives? We consider the latest evidence regarding cultural, social and medical influences on older women’s sexual lives and some specific issues which affect lesbian and transsexual people. We examine how mental illness and psychotropic medication in particular can adversely affect older women’s sexual functioning and at how difficult it often proves to be for women to seek help. We also focus on why doctors and in particular psychiatrists may not take a sexual history, look for sexual side effects or refer for appropriate treatment, especially when interviewing older women patients. Most published information about psychiatric training and sexual issues focuses on the younger male patient. We therefore aimed to provide a broad-ranging review of the literature regarding female sexual functioning in old age, the difficulties that can arise and the role that old age psychiatrists have an opportunity to fulfil, in this often neglected aspect of their patients’ treatment. From our review it was clear that, in the light of the increasing cultural acceptability of discussions regarding sexuality and older women, the training of student doctors and trainee psychiatrists needs to reflect this change so that old age psychiatrists can enhance the quality of their patient care. PMID:23185718

  10. [Neurogenic erectile dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Ramos, Antonio Sánchez; Durán, Juan Antonio Godino; Oliviero, Antonio

    2010-10-01

    Neurogenic erectile dysfunction is a consequence of alterations in neural pathways, autonomic, somatic, the combination of both or brain components that induce erection. This review aims to explain the physiopathological mechanisms of the most frequent neurological alterations causing erectile dysfunction and sexual disorders. PMID:20978292

  11. 18β-Glycyrrhetinic Acid, a Novel Naturally Derived Agent, Suppresses Prolactin Hyperactivity and Reduces Antipsychotic-Induced Hyperprolactinemia in In Vitro and In Vivo Models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Zhang, Yongfeng; Wang, Chunyue; Jia, Dongxu; Cai, Guangsheng; Lu, Jiahui; Wang, Di; Zhang, Zhang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), a novel naturally derived agent, in suppressing prolactin (PRL) hyperactivity and reducing antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia (hyperPRL) and the underlying mechanisms in in vitro and in vivo models. GA treatment for 24 h inhibited PRL synthesis and secretion in MMQ cells and cultured pituitary cells in a dose-dependent fashion; but this effect was not reproduced in GH3 cells that lack the expression of functional dopamine D2 receptors. GA suppressed elevated PRL level and growth hormone, and normalized several sex hormones in a rat model of hyperPRL, produced by repeated injection of the dopamine blocker metoclopramide. GA also modulated the expression 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in both in vivo and in vitro models. These results indicate that GA is effective in suppressing PRL hyperactivity caused by the blockade of dopamine D2 receptors. This suppressive effect of GA may be related to its modulation of the serotonergic system. This study provides additional evidence in support of GA as an adjunct for the treatment of hyperPRL. PMID:27161375

  12. A Streetcar Named "Derousal"? A Psychophysiological Examination of the Desire-Arousal Distinction in Sexually Functional and Dysfunctional Women.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Sabina; Amsel, Rhonda; Binik, Yitzchak M

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates that desire and arousal problems are highly interrelated in women. Therefore, hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) and female sexual arousal disorder (FSAD) were removed from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), and a new diagnostic category, female sexual interest/arousal disorder (FSIAD), was created to include both arousal and desire difficulties. However, no research has tried to distinguish these problems based on psychosocial-physiological patterns to identify whether unique profiles exist. This study compared psychosocial-physiological patterns in a community sample of 84 women meeting DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association, 2000 ) criteria for HSDD (n = 22), FSAD (n = 18), both disorders (FSAD/HSDD; n = 25), and healthy controls (n = 19). Women completed self-report measures and watched neutral and erotic films while genital arousal (GA) and subjective arousal (SA) were measured. Results indicated that GA increased equally for all groups during the erotic condition, whereas women with HSDD and FSAD/HSDD reported less SA than controls or FSAD women. Women in the clinical groups also showed lower concordance and greater impairment on psychosocial variables as compared to controls, with women with FSAD/HSDD showing lowest functioning. Results have important implications for the classification and treatment of these difficulties. PMID:26457746

  13. Risk stratification using gated stress myocardial perfusion imaging: comparison between patients with and without sexual dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yusuf Ziya; Ozdemir, Semra; Bekler, Adem; Akbas, Alpaslan; Gencer, Meryem; Celik, Fatmanur

    2016-01-01

    Sexuality is an indispensable part of life. When a problem is encountered related to this topic, the quality of life is negatively affected. Therefore, every problem related to sexuality is extremely private and important to an individual. This study aims to investigate the use of myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) for advanced assessment of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease, cardiovascular disease, and in the intermediate risk group for SD. The study included 250 patients (150 male, 100 female, mean age 54±12.10) sent by the Cardiology Clinic to the Nuclear Medicine Clinic for MPS due to suspected cardiovascular disease (CVD). The questionnaire study was applied by two methods as face-to-face interviews or online. Data on sociodemographic characteristics and cardiovascular diseases together with risk factors for sexual activity were collected using a general information form. Patients were divided into three categories of risk depending on major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases: low, intermediate, and high risk. On comparing the risk scores between the groups, it was seen that there was a statistically clear reduction in the intermediate risk group of patients with SD according to MPS scoring. MPS is a cost-effective, reliable, and accurate non-invasive diagnostic method necessary for routine use to assess cardiovascular disease and in the intermediate risk group for SD. PMID:26755812

  14. Sexual Abuse and Sexual Functioning in a Chronic Pelvic Pain Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Mary E.; Reddy, Diane M.

    2006-01-01

    Sexual abuse, particularly childhood sexual abuse, has been linked to chronic pelvic pain and to sexual dysfunction, though the sexual functioning of survivors of sexual abuse has not been studied in a chronic pain population. Sixty-three women with chronic pelvic pain completed measures of sexual function, sexual abuse, and pain. Using an index…

  15. Subjective effects of Lepidium meyenii (Maca) extract on well-being and sexual performances in patients with mild erectile dysfunction: a randomised, double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zenico, T; Cicero, A F G; Valmorri, L; Mercuriali, M; Bercovich, E

    2009-04-01

    Lepidium meyenii (Maca) is a cultivated root belonging to the brassica family used in the Andean region for its supposed aphrodisiac properties. We carried out a double-blind clinical trial on 50 Caucasian men affected by mild erectile dysfunction (ED), randomised to treatment with Maca dry extract, 2400 mg, or placebo. The treatment effect on ED and subjective well-being was tested administrating before and after 12 weeks the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) and the Satisfaction Profile (SAT-P). After 12 weeks of treatment, both Maca- and placebo-treated patients experienced a significant increase in IIEF-5 score (P < 0.05 for both). However, patients taking Maca experienced a more significant increase than those taking placebo (1.6 +/- 1.1 versus 0.5 +/- 0.6, P < 0.001). Both Maca- and placebo-treated subjects experienced a significant improvement in psychological performance-related SAT-P score, but the Maca group higher than that of placebo group (+9 +/- 6 versus +6 +/- 5, P < 0.05). However, only Maca-treated patients experienced a significant improvement in physical and social performance-related SAT-P score compared with the baseline (+7 +/- 6 and +7 +/- 6, both P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data support a small but significant effect of Maca supplementation on subjective perception of general and sexual well-being in adult patients with mild ED. PMID:19260845

  16. Sexual and Urologic Problems of Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection ... sustain an erection. Estimates of the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes vary widely, ranging from ...

  17. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. PMID:25108498

  18. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder caused by antiepileptic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M.; Bathla, Manish; Martin, A.; Aneja, J.

    2015-01-01

    Female sexual dysfunction is common but poorly understood sexual problem in women. Sexual dysfunction in female is multi-factorial in origin and also observed with intake of drug acting on central nervous system. This case report describes a female epileptic patient who developed sexual dysfunction with intake of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:26157303

  19. [Brain mechanisms of male sexual function].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Dou, Xin; Li, Jun-Fa; Luo, Yan-Lin

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we reviewed the brain imaging studies of male sexual function in recent years from three aspects: the brain mechanism of normal sexual function, the brain mechanism of sexual dysfunction, and the mechanism of drug therapy for sexual dysfunction. Studies show that the development stages of male sexual activities, such as the excitement phase, plateau phase and orgasm phase, are controlled by different neural networks. The mesodiencephalic transition zone may play an important role in the start up of male ejaculation. There are significant differences between sexual dysfunction males and normal males in activation patterns of the brain in sexual arousal. The medial orbitofrontal cortex and inferior frontal gyrus in the abnormal activation pattern are correlated with sexual dysfunction males in sexual arousal. Serum testosterone and morphine are commonly used drugs for male sexual dysfunction, whose mechanisms are to alter the activating levels of the medial orbitofrontal cortex, insula, claustrum and inferior temporal gyrus. PMID:21899000

  20. Urinary Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Urinary Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... dysfunction is normal following initial therapy for localized prostate cancer. But it’s important to realize that not all ...

  1. Alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide improve erectile function, sexual quality of life, and ejaculation function in patients with moderate mild-moderate erectile dysfunction: a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, single-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Salvatore; Leonardi, Rosario; Antonini, Gabriele; Vitarelli, Antonio; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Basic, Dragoslav; Morgia, Giuseppe; Cimino, Sebastiano; Russo, Giorgio Ivan

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of oral therapy with alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide (Tradamix TX1000) in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) at 3 months of follow-up. From January 2013 to September 2013, 177 patients diagnosed with mild-moderate ED (IIEF-EF < 26) were enrolled in this multicenter, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study and randomized in Group A (Tradamix, n = 87) and Group B (placebo, n = 90). Penile color Doppler ultrasound measures, IIEF-15 questionnaire, male sexual health questionnaire-ejaculation disorder (MSHQ-EjD), and sexual quality of life (SQoL-M) were collected. We observed significant changes of the IIEF-15 in Group A (mean difference: 11.54; P < 0.05) at 3 months versus Group B (P < 0.05). PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-intercourse satisfaction (P < 0.05), IIEF-orgasmic function (mean P < 0.05), IIEF-sexual desire (P < 0.05), IIEF-overall satisfaction (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (mean difference: 1.21; P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (mean difference: 10.2; P < 0.05) were significantly changed in Group A versus baseline and Group B. Patients with moderate arterial dysfunction showed significant increase of PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-EF (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (P < 0.05) in Group A. Therapy with Tradamix improves erectile and ejaculation function and sexual quality of life in patients with mild-moderate ED and in particular for those with moderate arterial dysfunction. PMID:25136552

  2. Alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and Glucosamine Oligosaccharide Improve Erectile Function, Sexual Quality of Life, and Ejaculation Function in Patients with Moderate Mild-Moderate Erectile Dysfunction: A Prospective, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Single-Blinded Study

    PubMed Central

    Sansalone, Salvatore; Leonardi, Rosario; Antonini, Gabriele; Vitarelli, Antonio; Vespasiani, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of oral therapy with alga Ecklonia bicyclis, Tribulus terrestris, and glucosamine oligosaccharide (Tradamix TX1000) in patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) at 3 months of follow-up. From January 2013 to September 2013, 177 patients diagnosed with mild-moderate ED (IIEF-EF < 26) were enrolled in this multicenter, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study and randomized in Group A (Tradamix, n = 87) and Group B (placebo, n = 90). Penile color Doppler ultrasound measures, IIEF-15 questionnaire, male sexual health questionnaire-ejaculation disorder (MSHQ-EjD), and sexual quality of life (SQoL-M) were collected. We observed significant changes of the IIEF-15 in Group A (mean difference: 11.54; P < 0.05) at 3 months versus Group B (P < 0.05). PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-intercourse satisfaction (P < 0.05), IIEF-orgasmic function (mean P < 0.05), IIEF-sexual desire (P < 0.05), IIEF-overall satisfaction (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (mean difference: 1.21; P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (mean difference: 10.2; P < 0.05) were significantly changed in Group A versus baseline and Group B. Patients with moderate arterial dysfunction showed significant increase of PSV (P < 0.05), IIEF-EF (P < 0.05), MSHQ-EjD (P < 0.05), and SQoL-M (P < 0.05) in Group A. Therapy with Tradamix improves erectile and ejaculation function and sexual quality of life in patients with mild-moderate ED and in particular for those with moderate arterial dysfunction. PMID:25136552

  3. Human Sexual Desire Disorder: Do We Have a Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNab, Warren L.; Henry, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD), loss of sexual desire for sexual activity, is one of the most common sexual dysfunctions of men and women in the United States. This article presents an overview of this specific sexual dysfunction including incidence, possible causes, treatment options, and the role of the health educator in addressing…

  4. Female Genital Dialogues: Female Genital Self-Image, Sexual Dysfunction, and Quality of Life in Patients With Vitiligo With and Without Genital Affection.

    PubMed

    Sarhan, Deena; Mohammed, Ghada F A; Gomaa, Amal H A; Eyada, Moustafa M K

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo has a major effect on sexual health because of the disfiguring skin lesions affecting self-image and self-esteem. However, this topic has not explored. This article aimed to assess the effect of vitiligo on genital self-image, sexual function, and quality of life in female patients. This cross-sectional study included 50 sexually active women with vitiligo and 25 women without vitiligo. All participants subjected to full history taking and examination. Extent of vitiligo was assessed with the Vitiligo Area Scoring Index score, sexual function with the Female Sexual Function Index, genital self-image with Female Genital Self-Image Score and quality of life with the Dermatology Life Quality Index questionnaires. The main outcome measures were correlation between Vitiligo Area Scoring Index, Female Genital Self-Image Score, Female Sexual Function Index, and Dermatology Life Quality Index domains was determined using t test and Pearson correlation. This study revealed a negative correlation between the Vitiligo Area Scoring Index score and sexual satisfaction. Vitiligo Area Scoring Index and Dermatology Life Quality Index score was significantly correlated with Arabic Version of the Female Genital Self-Image Score alone and with Arabic Version of the Female Sexual Functioning Index alone and with both the Arabic Version of the Female Genital Self-Image Score and the Arabic Version of the Female Sexual Functioning Index (p <.05). Sexual and psychological assessment of patients with vitiligo is imperative to improve outcomes and increase patients' compliance with treatment. PMID:25650731

  5. Comparison of the Effects of Elaeagnus angustifolia Flower Capsule and Sildenafil Citrate Tablet on Anxiety Resulting From Sexual Dysfunction in Women Referring to the Selected Clinics of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Zeinalzadeh, Sanaz; Akbarzadeh, Marzieh; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali; Faridi, Pouya; Sayadi, Mehrab

    2016-07-01

    Dissatisfaction from sexual relationships can result in deprivation as well as problems, such as depression, anxiety, and destruction of family's mental health. One hundred twenty-five women (18 to 40 years) who suffered from hypoactive sexual desire disorder were divided into Elaeagnus angustifolia flower (4.5 g g daily for 35 days), sildenafil citrate tablet (50 mg for 4 weeks), and control groups. The study data were collected using the Female Sexual Function Index and Spielberger's questionnaire and measurement of thyroid-stimulating hormone and prolactin hormone. In the Elaeagnus angustifolia group, the mean score of state and trait anxiety decreased after the intervention. In the sildenafil citrate group also, the mean score of state anxiety decreased from 22.15 ± 4.98 to 20.1 ± 5.15 (P = .001) and that of trait anxiety decreased from 23.07 ± 4.44 to 21.55 ± 4.82 (P = .002) after the intervention. Consumption of sildenafil citrate tablet was effective in reduction of the mean score of anxiety resulting from sexual dysfunction. PMID:26224722

  6. Bowel Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Living with Prostate Cancer Bowel Dysfunction Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction ... rectal worse. Back to Side Effects Print | Understanding Prostate Cancer Research Faces of Prostate Cancer About PCF Take ...

  7. The Sexual Functioning of Adult Women Molested as Children: A Review of Empirical Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Julie Lynn

    This paper reviews the research literature from 1978 to 1991 that addresses long-term effects of childhood sexual abuse on adult women's sexual functioning. Frequently reported long-term effects of childhood sexual abuse are noted, including both sexual dissatisfaction and sexual dysfunction. In terms of sexual dysfunction, it is noted that adult…

  8. Orgasmic dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... They include: A history of sexual abuse or rape Boredom in sexual activity Certain prescription drugs, including ... eating disorders, substance abuse, "difficult" patients, sexual function, rape intimate partner violence, and grief. In: Lentz GM, ...

  9. Inhibited Sexual Desire and Sexual Avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Morse, William I.

    1985-01-01

    Inhibited sexual desire (ISD) is one of the most common sexual dysfunctions, especially in women. Family physicians have an opportunity to recognize ISD before the associated problems become entrenched, and to guide couples toward satisfactory resolution. A summary is presented of current thinking on ISD and its causes. Case reports and observations about frequency of and treatment for ISD are included. Much less has been written about sexual avoidance in the presence of desire. A definition is offered of simple sexual avoidance in the absence of genital dysfunction. Frequency, treatment response, and specific cases are described. A newly identified entity—mutual unwillingness to importune for sex—is discussed briefly. Counselling which focuses on communication, self responsibility, and sex education is very helpful to patients with sexual problems. PMID:21274060

  10. Sexual Function Across Aging.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Harsh, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    Women experience multiple changes in social and reproductive statuses across the life span which can affect sexual functioning. Various phases of the sexual response cycle may be impacted and can lead to sexual dysfunction. Screening for sexual problems and consideration of contributing factors such as neurobiology, reproductive life events, medical problems, medication use, and depression can help guide appropriate treatment and thereby improve the sexual functioning and quality of life of affected women. Treatment options include psychotropic medications, hormone therapy, and psychotherapy. PMID:26830886