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Sample records for antiretroviral therapy art

  1. Antiretroviral therapy: 'the state of the art'.

    PubMed

    Montaner, J S; Montessori, V; Harrigan, R; O'Shaughnessy, M; Hogg, R

    1999-03-01

    The field of antiretroviral therapy is evolving at a very rapid pace. At this time, the initiation and optimization of antiretroviral therapy is based on serial plasma viral load determinations which aim to suppress viral replication to as low as possible for as long as possible, thus preventing disease progression. Currently available antiretrovirals require combination therapy with at least three agents to achieve this goal. Increasing availability of newer and more potent antiretroviral regimens will continue to enhance and simplify the number of therapeutic options available in the not too distant future. PMID:10337460

  2. Cohort Profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    PubMed Central

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan AC

    2014-01-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70 000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). PMID:23599235

  3. The Influence of Medication Attitudes on Utilization of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Indonesian Prisons.

    PubMed

    Culbert, Gabriel J; Bazazi, Alexander R; Waluyo, Agung; Murni, Astia; Muchransyah, Azalia P; Iriyanti, Mariska; Finnahari; Polonsky, Maxim; Levy, Judith; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-05-01

    Negative attitudes toward HIV medications may restrict utilization of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Indonesian prisons where many people living with HIV (PLH) are diagnosed and first offered ART. This mixed-method study examines the influence of medication attitudes on ART utilization among HIV-infected Indonesian prisoners. Randomly-selected HIV-infected male prisoners (n = 102) completed face-to-face in-depth interviews and structured surveys assessing ART attitudes. Results show that although half of participants utilized ART, a quarter of those meeting ART eligibility guidelines did not. Participants not utilizing ART endorsed greater concerns about ART efficacy, safety, and adverse effects, and more certainty that ART should be deferred in PLH who feel healthy. In multivariate analyses, ART utilization was independently associated with more positive ART attitudes (AOR = 1.09, 95 % CI 1.03-1.16, p = 0.002) and higher internalized HIV stigma (AOR = 1.03, 95 % CI 1.00-1.07, p = 0.016). Social marketing of ART is needed to counteract negative ART attitudes that limit ART utilization among Indonesian prisoners. PMID:26400080

  4. Evaluation of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-related counselling in a workplace-based ART implementation programme, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Stenson, A L; Charalambous, S; Dwadwa, T; Pemba, L; Du Toit, J D; Baggaley, R; Grant, A D; Churchyard, G J

    2005-11-01

    Counselling about antiretroviral therapy (ART) is thought important to prepare patients for treatment and enhance adherence. A workplace-based HIV care programme in South Africa instituted a three-step ART counselling protocol with guidelines prompting issues to be covered at each step. We carried out an early evaluation of ART counselling to determine whether patients understood key information about ART, and the perceptions that patients and health care professionals (HCP) had of the process. Among 40 patients (median time on ART 83 days), over 90% answered 6/7 HIV/ART knowledge-related questions correctly. 95% thought counselling sessions were good. 93% thought ongoing counselling was important. Recommendations included the need for continuing education about HIV/ART, being respectful, promoting HIV testing and addressing the issues of infected partners and stigma. 24 participating HCP identified additional training needs including counselling of family and friends, family planning, sexually transmitted infections and running support groups. 90% of HCP thought that counselling guidelines were helpful. The programme appears to be preparing patients well for ART. Counselling should be offered at every clinic visit. Counselling guidelines were a valuable tool and may be useful elsewhere. The evaluation helped to assess the quality of the programme and to suggest areas for improvement. PMID:16176891

  5. The Impact of Non-Antiretroviral Polypharmacy on the Continuity of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Among HIV Patients.

    PubMed

    Krentz, Hartmut B; Gill, M John

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival achieved by many patients with HIV/AIDS has complicated their medical care as increasing numbers of co-morbidities leads to polypharmacy, increased pill burdens, and greater risks of drug-drug interactions potentially compromising antiretroviral treatment (ART). We examined the impact of non-antiretroviral polypharmacy on ART for all adults followed at the Southern Alberta Clinic, Calgary, Canada. Polypharmacy was defined as ≥5 daily medications. We compared the impact of polypharmacy on continuous (i.e., remaining on same ART for ≥6 months) vs. non-continuous (i.e., discontinuing or switching ART) ART dosing frequency, number of ART pills, number of non-ART medications, and age. Of 1190 (89.5%) patients on ART, 95% were on three-drug regimens, 63.9% on QD ART, and 62% ≥3 ART pills daily; 32.2% were experiencing polypharmacy. Polypharmacy was associated with lower CD4, AIDS, >180 months living with HIV, higher numbers of ART pills, and older age (all p < 0.01); 32.1% stopped or switched ART. Polypharmacy increased the risk for non-continuous ART (36.8% vs. 30.0%; p < 0.01). Non-continuous ART increased with daily ART pill count but not increased age. Non-adherence and adverse effects accounted for the majority of non-continuous ART. We found a strong association between polypharmacy and non-continuous ART, potentially leading to effective ART being compromised. Collaborative approaches are needed to anticipate the negative impacts of polypharmacy. PMID:26544766

  6. Follow-Up Visit Patterns in an Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Programme in Zomba, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Rachlis, Beth; Cole, Donald C.; van Lettow, Monique; Escobar, Michael; Muula, Adamson S.; Ahmad, Farah; Orbinski, James; Chan, Adrienne K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying follow-up (FU) visit patterns, and exploring which factors influence them are likely to be useful in determining which patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) may become Lost to Follow-Up (LTFU). Using an operation and implementation research approach, we sought 1) to describe the timing of FU visits amongst patients who have been on ART for shorter and longer periods of time; and 2) to determine the median time to late visits, and 3) to identify specific factors that may be associated with these patterns in Zomba, Malawi. Methods and Findings Using routinely collected programme monitoring data from Zomba District, we performed descriptive analyses on all ART visits among patients who initiated ART between Jan. 1, 2007–June 30, 2010. Based on an expected FU date, each FU visit was classified as early (≥4 day before an expected FU date), on time (3 days before an expected FU date/up to 6 days after an expected FU date), or late (≥7 days after an expected FU date). In total, 7,815 patients with 76417 FU visits were included. Ninety-two percent of patients had ≥2 FU visits. At the majority of visits, patients were either on time or late. The median time to a first late visit among those with 2 or more visits was 216 days (IQR: 128–359). Various patient- and visit-level factors differed significantly across Early, On Time, and Late visit groups including ART adherence and frequency of, and type of side effects. Discussion The majority of patients do not demonstrate consistent FU visit patterns. Individuals were generally on ART for at least 6 months before experiencing their first late visit. Our findings have implications for the development of effective interventions that meet patient needs when they present early and can reduce patient losses to follow-up when they are late. In particular, time-varying visit characteristics need further research. PMID:25033285

  7. Interventions for Enhancing Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART): A Systematic Review of High Quality Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sivaramalingam, Bhairavi; Navarro, Tamara; Hobson, Nicholas; Keepanasseril, Arun; Wilczynski, Nancy J.; Haynes, R. Brian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We sought to review the effectiveness of interventions designed to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) from studies included in a recent Cochrane review that reported a clinical and an adherence outcome, with at least 80% follow-up for 6 months or more. Data were extracted independently and in duplicate, with an adjudicator for disagreements. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Of 182 relevant studies in the Cochrane review, 49 were related to ART. Statistical pooling was not warranted due to heterogeneity in interventions, participants, treatments, adherence measures and outcomes. Many studies had high risk of bias in elements of design and outcome ascertainment. Only 10 studies improved both adherence and clinical outcomes. These used the following interventions: adherence counselling (two studies); a once-daily regimen (compared to twice daily); text messaging; web-based cognitive behavioral intervention; face-to-face multi-session intensive behavioral interventions (two studies); contingency management; modified directly observed therapy; and nurse-delivered home visits combined with telephone calls. Patient-related adherence interventions were the most frequently tested. Uniform adherence measures and higher quality studies of younger populations are encouraged. PMID:25825938

  8. Antiretroviral therapy: Shifting sands.

    PubMed

    Sashindran, V K; Chauhan, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has been an extremely difficult pandemic to control. However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV has now been transformed into a chronic illness in patients who have continued treatment access and excellent long-term adherence. Existing indications for ART initiation in asymptomatic patients were based on CD4 levels; however, recent evidence has broken the shackles of CD4 levels. Early initiation of ART in HIV patients irrespective of CD4 counts can have profound positive impact on morbidity and mortality. Early initiation of ART has been found not only beneficial for patients but also to community as it reduces the risk of transmission. There have been few financial concerns about providing ART to all HIV-positive people but various studies have proven that early initiation of ART not only proves to be cost-effective but also contributes to economic and social growth of community. A novel multidisciplinary approach with early initiation and availability of ART at its heart can turn the tide in our favor in future. Effective preexposure prophylaxis and postexposure prophylaxis can also lower transmission risk of HIV in community. New understanding of HIV pathogenesis is opening new vistas to cure and prevention. Various promising candidate vaccines and drugs are undergoing aggressive clinical trials, raising optimism for an ever-elusive cure for HIV. This review describes various facets of tectonic shift in management of HIV. PMID:26900224

  9. Antiretroviral therapy: current drugs.

    PubMed

    Pau, Alice K; George, Jomy M

    2014-09-01

    The rapid advances in drug discovery and the development of antiretroviral therapy is unprecedented in the history of modern medicine. The administration of chronic combination antiretroviral therapy targeting different stages of the human immunodeficiency virus' replicative life cycle allows for durable and maximal suppression of plasma viremia. This suppression has resulted in dramatic improvement of patient survival. This article reviews the history of antiretroviral drug development and discusses the clinical pharmacology, efficacy, and toxicities of the antiretroviral agents most commonly used in clinical practice to date. PMID:25151562

  10. Psychosocial and behavioural correlates of attitudes towards antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a sample of South African mineworkers.

    PubMed

    Govender, Kaymarlin; Akintola, Olagoke; George, Gavin; Petersen, Inge; Bhagwanjee, Anil; Reardon, Candice

    2011-01-01

    Despite being one of the worst affected sectors in South Africa, the mining sector has proven to be one of the most active in intervention efforts in the fight against HIV and AIDS (Ellis, 2007). Owing to low uptake rates of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in mining companies in recent years (Connelly & Rosen, 2006) and the positive relationship between attitudes towards ART and ART uptake (Cooper et al., 2002; Horne, Cooper, Gellaitry, Leake, & Fisher, 2007), this study sought to describe and investigate the psychosocial and behavioural correlates of attitudes towards ART in a sample of South African mineworkers. A total of 806 mineworkers from a large South African mine participated in this quantitative study. Despite a high rate of HIV testing behaviour (83.0%) as well as favourable attitudes towards ART, analysis indicated that temporary employees and contractors were more vulnerable in terms of HIV risk, HIV testing behaviours and ART knowledge and attitudes. Employees who had more positive attitudes towards ART were more knowledgeable of ART and, importantly, had a more favourable attitude towards the mine's HIV/AIDS treatment programme. These findings are discussed in relation to the low ART uptake rates in this context and recommendations for the improvement of ART uptake amongst employees at this mining site. PMID:23237682

  11. Effects of HIV and Combination Antiretroviral Therapy (cART) on Cortico-Striatal Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Mario; Brier, Matthew R.; Ances, Beau M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Determine whether HIV and cART affect resting state functional connectivity (rs-fc) between the striatum and cortical regions. Methods 49 HIV uninfected (HIV−) and 132 HIV infected (HIV+) (65% receiving combination anti-retroviral treatment [cART]) had laboratory studies (current and nadir CD4 T-cell counts, and plasma HIV viral load), neuropsychological performance (NP) testing, and neuroimaging. Rs-fc, which examines the coordination of neural activity in distant brain regions, was used to investigate cortico-striatal functional connections. The effect of cART was assessed comparing HIV+ individuals on cART (HIV+/cART+), and HIV+ individuals not currently receiving cART (HIV+/cART−). Relationships between laboratory tests, cognitive performance, and cART on subcortical-cortical rs-fc were assessed by an analysis of variance. Results HIV+ individuals had lower cortico-striatal functional connectivity than HIV− controls, specifically between the striatum and default mode network (DMN; p <0.001) and ventral attention network (VATT; p <0.001). HIV+/cART+ individuals had higher functional connectivity between the striatum and DMN (p=0.02) and VATT (p = 0.01) compared to HIV+/cART− subjects. Laboratory (current and nadir CD4 T-cell counts, plasma viral load) and NP were not correlated with cortico-striatal rs-fc. Conclusions HIV was associated with disrupted cortico-striatal networks, consistent with HIV’s known impact on subcortical areas. Interestingly, within certain networks HIV+/cART+ individuals had similar rs-fc compared to HIV− controls, suggesting possible improvements in HIV related neural dysfunction due to medications. Rs-fc may be a sensitive biomarker of neural insult and its recovery following cART. Additional studies may show rs-fc has utility in measuring acute inflammation caused by HIV. PMID:25849834

  12. Antiretroviral therapy with heart.

    PubMed

    Randell, Paul; Moyle, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in a substantial improvement in the morbidity and mortality associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. As this population ages, cardiovascular disease is becoming an increasingly important health burden. It is clear that many factors are involved in the development of this problem, with traditional risk factors (smoking, dyslipidemia, diabetes, family history, hypertension) the main contributors. ART and HIV infection itself can modify the risk of cardiovascular disease. Not only does this increased risk seem to be mediated through effects on traditional cardiovascular risk factors, namely dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, but there is also some evidence that HIV and ART may be associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction. Current data are conflicting and further investigation into this area is needed. Drugs from both nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor classes have been demonstrated to increase cardiovascular risk; however these effects are variable not only between classes but also between drugs in the same class. As newer therapies become available (in existing and new drug classes), the cardiovascular impact of these will need careful evaluation. Currently published guidelines suggest regular monitoring of cardiovascular risks (both before and after commencing ART) and pre-emptive treatment. Existing risk assessment tools have not been fully validated in an HIV setting and need to be used with caution. Lifestyle modification, in the first instance, and pharmacological intervention to reduce traditional risk factors are important management strategies. Initiating, or switching to, ART with a lower potential for metabolic derangement should also be considered. PMID:19940610

  13. Impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) timing on chronic immune activation/inflammation and end-organ damage

    PubMed Central

    Rajasuriar, Reena; Wright, Edwina; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review was to summarize recent studies on the effect of early antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients on markers of immune activation/inflammation, viral persistence and serious non-AIDS events. Recent findings Early ART, initiated within days to months of HIV infection, was associated with marked reduction in T-cell activation often reaching levels observed in HIV-uninfected individuals. However, the impact of early ART on markers of innate immune activation, microbial translocation and inflammation/coagulation was less clear. Early ART has also been associated with a significant reduction in the frequency of latently infected cells, which was greater if ART was initiated within days to weeks rather than months following infection. However, few studies have evaluated the relationship between immune activation and viral reservoirs, specifically following early ART. Early ART may potentially reduce serious non-AIDS events and associated mortality, but most of these studies have extrapolated from changes in surrogate markers, such as CD4 : CD8 ratio. Summary Early ART was associated with beneficial effects on multiple markers of immune activation, inflammation and viral persistence. Longer term prospective studies are still needed to determine whether early ART translates to a significant reduction in serious non-AIDS events and mortality. PMID:25415420

  14. Late Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Initiation Is Associated with Long-Term Persistence of Systemic Inflammation and Metabolic Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Ghislain, Mathilde; Bastard, Jean-Philippe; Meyer, Laurence; Capeau, Jacqueline; Fellahi, Soraya; Gérard, Laurence; May, Thierry; Simon, Anne; Vigouroux, Corinne; Goujard, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Objectives HIV-induced immunodeficiency is associated with metabolic abnormalities and systemic inflammation. We investigated the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on restoration of insulin sensitivity, markers of immune activation and inflammation. Methods Immunological, metabolic and inflammatory status was assessed at antiretroviral therapy initiation and three years later in 208 patients from the ANRS-COPANA cohort. Patients were compared according to their pre-ART CD4+ cell count (group 1: ≤ 200/mm3, n = 66 vs. group 2: > 200/mm3, n = 142). Results Median CD4+ cell count increased in both groups after 3 years of successful ART but remained significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2 (404 vs 572 cells/mm3). Triglyceride and insulin levels were higher or tended to be higher in group 1 than in group 2 at ART initiation (median: 1.32 vs 0.97 mmol/l, p = 0.04 and 7.6 vs 6.8 IU, p = 0.09, respectively) and remained higher after three years of ART (1.42 vs 1.16 mmol/L, p = 0.0009 and 8.9 vs 7.2 IU, p = 0.01). After adjustment for individual characteristics and antiretroviral therapy regimens (protease inhibitor (PI), zidovudine), insulin levels remained significantly higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count. Baseline IL-6, sCD14 and sTNFR2 levels were higher in group 1 than in group 2. Most biomarkers of immune activation/inflammation declined during ART, but IL-6 and hsCRP levels remained higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count than in the other patients (median are respectively 1.4 vs 1.1 pg/ml, p = 0.03 and 2.1 vs 1.3 mg/ml, p = 0.07). Conclusion After three years of successful ART, low pretreatment CD4+ T cell count remained associated with elevated insulin, triglyceride, IL-6 and hsCRP levels. These persistent metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities could contribute to an increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease. PMID:26636578

  15. Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Side Effect Impacted on Quality of Life, and Depressive Symptomatology: A Mixed-Method Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Ti; Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Yang, Joyce P; Simoni, Jane M; Fredriksen-Goldsen, karen I; Lee, Tony Szu-Hsien; Zhao, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is known for its side effects. In this paper, we describe ART side effects as experienced by Chinese HIV+ individuals. This study presents two stages of a research project, combining qualitative in-depth interviews (29 HIV+ participants) with quantitative statistical data analysis (N = 120). All data was collected between July 2005 to March 2008 at Beijing's Ditan Hospital. Consent was obtained from each participant for the qualitative interview and again for the quantitative survey. During in-depth interviews, Chinese HIV+ patients reported experiencing digestive discomfort, skin rashes, numbness, memory loss, nightmares, and dizziness, which not only brought them physical discomfort, but also interrupted different dimensions of their social lives. Furthermore, multiple regression analyses revealed that those who reported more severe side effects also experienced greater depressive mood after controlling for other clinical and psychosocial factors. ART side effects are one of the primary reasons causing HIV+ individuals to delay or stop taking life-saving medication; therefore, clinical interventions are critically needed to assist HIV+ individuals in managing ART side effects. ART side effects reinforced existing negative attitudes toward ART and lead to lower ART adherence. Future research should focus on developing culturally sensitive interventions to enhance HIV+ self-management, to alleviate physical and psychological burden from ART and HIV. PMID:24083060

  16. Response to antiretroviral therapy (ART): comparing women with previous use of zidovudine monotherapy (ZDVm) in pregnancy with ART naïve women

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Short-term zidovudine monotherapy (ZDVm) remains an option for some pregnant HIV-positive women not requiring treatment for their own health but may affect treatment responses once antiretroviral therapy (ART) is subsequently started. Methods Data were obtained by linking two UK studies: the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (UK CHIC) study and the National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC). Treatment responses were assessed for 2028 women initiating ART at least one year after HIV-diagnosis. Outcomes were compared using logistic regression, proportional hazards regression or linear regression. Results In adjusted analyses, ART-naïve (n = 1937) and ZDVm-experienced (n = 91) women had similar increases in CD4 count and a similar proportion achieving virological suppression; both groups had a low risk of AIDS. Conclusions In this setting, antenatal ZDVm exposure did not adversely impact on outcomes once ART was initiated for the woman’s health. PMID:24593018

  17. Contraceptive practices amongst HIV-positive women on antiretroviral therapy attending an ART clinic in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Andrew; van der Linde, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Effective contraceptive practices amongst HIV-positive women of reproductive age have been shown to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV by preventing unplanned pregnancies. However, most antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes focus on treatment, neglecting comprehensive contraceptive services. This results in a high frequency of pregnancies amongst HIV-positive women attending the ART clinic of a regional hospital north of Durban. Objectives This research aimed to explore contraceptive use amongst HIV-positive women attending an ART clinic by determining, (1) prevalence of contraceptive use, (2) pregnancy rate, (3) contraceptive preferences and (4) factors associated with contraceptive use. Methods In this observational, analytical, cross-sectional study of 420 women, aged 15 to 49 years, participants were selected by systematic random sampling. They completed standardised questionnaires. Results Of all participants, 95% of the participants used contraception. Factors associated with contraceptive practice were knowledge of HIV status 292 (72.8%), health worker advice 84 (20.9%), and spousal insistence 33 (8.2%). Of the 130 women (31%) who had fallen pregnant whilst on ART, 73 (56.2%) said that the pregnancy had been unplanned, whilst 57 (43.8%) had wanted to fall pregnant because of: partner's insistence (45.6%), desire for a child (36.8%), desire to conceal HIV status (15.8%), not wanting to die childless (5.3%), and death of a previous child (1.8%). Conclusion Contraceptive use amongst these women was high but the number of pregnancies is a cause for concern. Information regarding contraceptive use should therefore be provided at all ART clinics.

  18. Association of Blood Biomarkers of Bone Turnover in HIV-1 Infected Individuals Receiving Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART)

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Najib; Butch, Anthony W; Quint, Joshua J; Detels, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of bone turnover biomarkers with blood levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), osteocalcin (OC), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and other blood markers in HIV-1 infected men receiving anti-retroviral therapy (ART). Advances in the treatment of HIV-1 infection have extended the life span of HIV-1 infected individuals. However, these advances may come at the price of metabolic side effects and bone disorders, including premature osteopenia, osteoporosis and osteonecrosis. Methods Analyses of Ostase BAP, osteocalcin, and TRAP in blood were measured in three groups of MACS participants: 35 HIV-1 infected men on ART (A); 35 HIV-1- infected men not on ART (B); and 34 HIV-1 uninfected men (C). Results The mean and standard deviation results for groups A, B, and C were 19.7 ± 6.56, 17.2 ± 3.96, and 16.9 ± 5.78 for ostase BAP; 7.9 ± 9.53, 8.5 ± 8.30, and 5.5 ± 1.65 for osteocalcin; and 3.9 ± 1.04, 3.1 ± 0.81, and 2.5 ± 0.59 for TRAP, respectively. Simple and multivariate analyses showed significant differences in mean TRAP and BAP concentrations between the three groups. In addition strong correlations between blood levels of Ostase BAP and TRAP (r=0.570, p=0.0004), and between blood levels of Ostase BAP and PTH (r=0.436, P=0.0098) for HIV-1 infected men on ART were observed. Conclusion New strategies for measurement of blood and urine biochemical markers of bone formation and resorption during bone turnover can be useful for clinical monitoring of treatment of HIV-1 infected patients. Recently developed methods for measuring serum levels of TRAP and Ostase BAP represent superior laboratory tools for assessing the hyperactivity of osteoclasts, osteoblasts and bone loss in HIV-1 infected individuals receiving ART. Measurements of TRAP and BAP as bone turnover biomarkers are economical and are important for monitoring bone metabolism during ART and

  19. API consensus guidelines for use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (API-ART guidelines). Endorsed by the AIDS Society of India.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S B; Pujari, S N; Joshi, S R; Patel, A K

    2006-01-01

    With rational use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been transformed into a chronic manageable illness like diabetes and hypertension. These guidelines provide information on state of art, evidence based approach for use of ART in Indian context. When to initiate ART? Antiretroviral therapy is indicated for all symptomatic HIV infected persons regardless of CD4 counts and plasma viral load (PVL) levels. In asymptomatic patients, ART should be offered when the CD4 counts < 200/mm3 and should be considered in patients with CD4 counts between 200-250/mm3. Therapy is not recommended for patients with CD4 count more than 350/ mm3. Involvement of patient in all treatment decisions and assessing readiness is critical before initiating ART. What to start with? A non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) based regimen is recommended for antiretroviral naïve patients. The choice between nevirapine and efavirenz is based on differences in adverse events profiles; cost and availability of convenient fixed dose combinations and need for concomitant use of rifampicin. A backbone of 2-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) is combined with the NNRTI. Various combinations and ART strategies not to be used in clinical practice has been enlisted. How to follow up? Recommendations have been made for baseline evaluation and monitoring of patients on ART. These include guidelines on laboratory and clinical evaluation. A plasma viral load at 6 months after initiation of first-line ART is strongly recommended. Yearly estimation of lipid profile has been recommended. How to identify and manage ART failure? The guidelines recognize the issue of identifying ART failure late if only CD4 counts are used for monitoring. In the absence of resistance testing various second-line regimens have been enlisted. A boosted protease inhibitor based regimen is recommended in this situation to be combined with 2-NRTIs. Special

  20. HIV Status Disclosure Among People Living with HIV in the Era of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy (cART)

    PubMed Central

    Madi, Deepak; Gupta, Parul; Bhaskaran, Unnikrishnan; Ramapuram, John T.; Rao, Satish; Mahalingam, Soundarya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As patients with HIV live longer due to Combination Anti-Retroviral Therapy (cART) serostatus disclosure becomes an important issue. Disclosure can have both positive and negative outcomes. Disclosure of HIV status has been associated with better adherence to medication and reduction in levels of psychological distress. Stigma and disruption of family relationships are barriers for disclosure. Most studies regarding disclosure status have been conducted in West. There are many cultural differences in Indian society when compared to west. There is a dearth of research in the field of disclosure of HIV infection in India. Aim To determine the prevalence of HIV status disclosure among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in South India. Materials and Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was done in the hospital attached to Kasturba Medical College (KMC), Mangalore, India from May–June 2013. PLHIV of age more than 18 years were included. During the study period 111 consecutive patients who consented for the study were enrolled. Statistical Analysis Data was collected using a pre-tested interviewer administered semi structured questionnaire. Data collected was analysed using SPSS Version 11.5 statistical software. Descriptive statistics were done and the results are presented as proportions and mean. Results The mean age of the study population was 44.86 ± 10.8 years. Majority of the study subjects were men 76 (68.4%). Out of 111 study subjects, 102 (91.9%) had disclosed their HIV status to at least one person while 9 (8.1%) had not disclosed their HIV status to anyone. Disclosure on doctor’s advice was the main reason for 56 (54.9%) participants to disclose their HIV status. The main reason for non-disclosure was fear of shame in family. Conclusion Disclosure rate was high in our study in the era of cART. Society must stop discriminating against PLHIV so that they can disclose their serostatus and gain access to care and treatment services without

  1. Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Use, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 RNA Suppression, and Medical Causes of Hospitalization Among HIV-Infected Intravenous Drug Users in the Late ART Era

    PubMed Central

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Mojal, Sergio; Torrens, Marta; Muga, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background.  Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has reduced the rates and changed the causes of hospital admission. However, human immunodeficiency virus-positive intravenous drug users (HIV-IDU) continue to have increased hospitalizations and discharge diagnosis are less defined in the late ART era. Our aim was to examine ART use, HIV-1 RNA suppression, and hospital discharge diagnoses among HIV-IDU admitted to an urban hospital. Methods.  A retrospective analysis was made of HIV-IDU admitted for medical causes for the first time (2006–2010). Surgical, obstetric, or mental (except HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder) diagnoses were excluded. Clinical characteristics, number of admissions, and primary discharge diagnoses were determined for each patient. Results.  Three hundred and seventy-five admissions were recorded among 197 hospitalized HIV-IDU. Lifetime prevalence of ART use was 83.2% (164 of 197) and the rate of HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL was 38.1% (75 of 197). Primary discharge diagnosis groups were as follows: bacterial infections (59.2%), chronic end-organ damage (16.8%), complications derived from injected drug use (16.8%), malignancies (9.1%), and opportunistic infections (6.6%). Chronic end-organ damage was diagnosed more frequently in patients with HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/mL (36% vs 4.9%; P < .000), and complications derived from injected drug use (23.8% vs 5.3%; P < .0008) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) opportunistic infections (19.8% vs 1.3% P < .019) were usually diagnosed in patients with HIV-1 RNA detectable viral load. Conclusions.  Human immunodeficiency virus-positive intravenous drug users are admitted to hospitals mainly for non-AIDS-related illnesses; however, sustained HIV-1 RNA viral load suppression is poor and determines hospital discharge diagnoses. Providers need to be aware of the management of HIV-related comorbidities and reinforce strategies to improve ART retention in this population. PMID:25734084

  2. Trends in and correlates of CD4+ cell count at antiretroviral therapy initiation after changes in national ART guidelines in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Mutimura, Eugene; Addison, Diane; Anastos, Kathryn; Hoover, Donald; Dusingize, Jean Claude; Karenzie, Ben; Izimukwiye, Isabelle; Mutesa, Leo; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Nashi, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Background Initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the advanced stages of HIV infection remains a major challenge in sub-Saharan Africa. This study was conducted to better understand barriers and enablers to timely ART initiation in Rwanda where ART coverage is high and national ART eligibility guidelines first expanded in 2007–2008. Methods Using data on 6326 patients (≥15 years) at five Rwandan clinics, we assessed trends and correlates of CD4+ cell count at ART initiation and the proportion initiating ART with advanced HIV disease (CD4+ <200 cells/µl or WHO stage IV). Results Out of 6326 patients, 4486 enrolling in HIV care initiated ART with median CD4+ cell count of 211 cells/µl [interquartile range: 131–300]. Median CD4+ cell counts at ART initiation increased from 183 cells/µl in 2007 to 293 cells/µl in 2011–2012, and the proportion with advanced HIV disease decreased from 66.2 to 29.4%. Factors associated with a higher odds of advanced HIV disease at ART initiation were male sex [adjusted odds ratios (AOR) = 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3–2.1] and older age (AOR46–55+ vs. <25 = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.2–4.3). Among those initiating ART more than 1 year after enrollment in care, those who had a gap in care of 12 or more months prior to ART initiation had higher odds of advanced HIV disease (AOR = 5.2; 95% CI: 1.2–21.1). Conclusion Marked improvements in the median CD4+ cell count at ART initiation and proportion initiating ART with advanced HIV disease were observed following the expansion of ART eligibility criteria in Rwanda. However, sex disparities in late treatment initiation persisted through 2011–2012, and appeared to be driven by later diagnosis and/or delayed linkage to care among men. PMID:25562492

  3. HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) -Mediating Antibodies Decline while NK Cell Function Increases during Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Sanne Skov; Fomsgaard, Anders; Borggren, Marie; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Rasmussen, Line Dahlerup; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Understanding alterations in HIV-specific immune responses during antiretroviral therapy (ART), such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is important in the development of novel strategies to control HIV-1 infection. This study included 53 HIV-1 positive individuals. We evaluated the ability of effector cells and antibodies to mediate ADCC separately and in combination using the ADCC-PanToxiLux assay. The ability of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mediate ADCC was significantly higher in individuals who had been treated with ART before seroconversion, compared to the individuals initiating ART at a low CD4+ T cell count (<350 cells/μl blood) and the ART-naïve individuals. The frequency of CD16 expressing natural killer (NK) cells correlated with both the duration of ART and Granzyme B (GzB) activity. In contrast, the plasma titer of antibodies mediating ADCC declined during ART. These findings suggest improved cytotoxic function of the NK cells if initiating ART early during infection, while the levels of ADCC mediating antibodies declined during ART. PMID:26696395

  4. A Systematic Review of Health System Barriers and Enablers for Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) for HIV-Infected Pregnant and Postpartum Women

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Christopher J.; Konopka, Sarah; Chalker, John C.; Jonas, Edna; Albertini, Jennifer; Amzel, Anouk; Fogg, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite global progress in the fight to reduce maternal mortality, HIV-related maternal deaths remain persistently high, particularly in much of Africa. Lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) appears to be the most effective way to prevent these deaths, but the rates of three key outcomes—ART initiation, retention in care, and long-term ART adherence—remain low. This systematic review synthesized evidence on health systems factors affecting these outcomes in pregnant and postpartum women living with HIV. Methods Searches were conducted for studies addressing the population of interest (HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women), the intervention of interest (ART), and the outcomes of interest (initiation, adherence, and retention). Quantitative and qualitative studies published in English since January 2008 were included. A four-stage narrative synthesis design was used to analyze findings. Review findings from 42 included studies were categorized according to five themes: 1) models of care, 2) service delivery, 3) resource constraints and governance challenges, 4) patient-health system engagement, and 5) maternal ART interventions. Results Low prioritization of maternal ART and persistent dropout along the maternal ART cascade were key findings. Service delivery barriers included poor communication and coordination among health system actors, poor clinical practices, and gaps in provider training. The few studies that assessed maternal ART interventions demonstrated the importance of multi-pronged, multi-leveled interventions. Conclusions There has been a lack of emphasis on the experiences, needs and vulnerabilities particular to HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women. Supporting these women to successfully traverse the maternal ART cascade requires carefully designed and targeted interventions throughout the steps. Careful design of integrated service delivery models is of critical importance in this effort. Key knowledge gaps and research

  5. Recommendations in pediatric antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takehisa; Ch'ng, Tong Wei; Oleske, James M

    2007-02-01

    The pathogenesis of HIV infection and the general principles of therapy are the same for HIV-infected adults, adolescents, children and infants. However, antiretroviral treatment of HIV infection in pediatrics requires the consideration of a number of factors specific to its population, including differences in drug pharmacokinetics and the use of virologic and immunologic markers, as well as age-related adherence issues. This review summarizes the text of the Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Agents in Pediatric HIV Infection, which was updated in October 2006. The guidelines are the work of the Working Group on Antiretroviral Therapy and Medical Management of HIV-Infected Children, a group of the Office of AIDS Research Advisory Council of the National Institutes of Health, which reviews new data on an ongoing basis and provides regular updates to the guidelines. As these guidelines were developed for the US, they may not be applicable in other countries. This summary does not attempt to place the Working Group guidelines in the context of international guidelines, nor does it attempt to detail the use of antiretroviral medication in the prevention of perinatal transmission of HIV, such as addressing the use of zidovudine versus single-dose nevirapine. PMID:17257086

  6. Adherence to Early Antiretroviral Therapy: Results from HPTN 052, A Phase III, Multinational Randomized Trial of ART to Prevent HIV-1 Sexual Transmission in Serodiscordant Couples

    PubMed Central

    Safren, Steven A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Ou, San-San; McCauley, Marybeth; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Gamble, Theresa; Hoffman, Irving; Celentano, David; Chen, Ying Qing; Cohen, Myron S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV-1 infected individuals prevents sexual transmission if viral load is suppressed. Methods Participants were HIV-1 infected partners randomized to early ART (CD4 350-550) in HPTN052 (n=886, median follow-up = 2.1 years), a clinical trial of early ART to prevent sexual transmission of HIV-1 in serodiscordant couples at 13 sites in 9 countries. Adherence was assessed via pill-count (dichotomized at <95%) and via self-report items. Predictors of adherence were mental health and general health perceptions, substance use, binge drinking, social support, sexual behaviors, and demographics. Viral suppression was defined as HIV plasma viral load <400 copies/ml. Adherence counseling and couples counseling about safer sex was provided. Logistic and linear regression models using generalized estimating equation for repeated measurements were employed. Findings Via pill-count, 82% of participants were adherent at 1 month and 83.3% at 1 year. Mental health was the only psychosocial variable associated with adherence (pill-count OR=1.05: 95% CI: 1.00 – 1.11; self-report parameter estimate (b)=0.02, 95% CI: 0.01 –0.04), though regional differences emerged. Pill-count (OR=1.19, 95% CI: 1.10-1.30) and self-report (OR=1.42, 95% CI: 1.14-1.77) adherence were associated with viral suppression. Interpretation While adherence was high among individuals in stable relationships taking ART for prevention, mental health and adherence co-varied. Assessing and intervening on mental health in the context of promoting adherence to ART as prevention should be explored. Adherence and couples counseling, feedback about viral suppression, and/or altruism may also help explain the magnitude of adherence observed. PMID:26009832

  7. Social meanings of adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Julian; Phlong, Pisith; Saphon, Vonthanak; Kaldor, John; Mean, Chhivun; Maher, Lisa

    2011-06-01

    Global expansion of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes for people living with HIV is the largest public health undertaking to date. Antiretroviral therapy adherence drives individual and programme outcomes, yet little is known regarding the determinants of these behaviours. We investigated beliefs and practices associated with ART use in Cambodia. In-depth interviews were conducted during 2005 with 27 people living with HIV who were recruited using a theoretical sampling strategy and analysed in Khmer and English using an inductive approach to code data and identify themes. Limited access to ART generated a sense of ART as rare and precious, with access granted by doctors once patients proved themselves dependable. The social construction of ART use was strict, precise and modern with ritualistic preparation and dosing procedures. Experiences of life-saving efficacy in self and others built a deep sense of trust. For many, ART was simply equated to life. Antiretroviral therapy dosing was prioritized and supported by an ever-present sense of remembering, reminder devices and social networks. Healthcare workers set norms and provided various forms of adherence support. Antiretroviral therapy use in Cambodia is shaped by the relationship between individuals and social and healthcare networks that set, encourage and enforce precise norms of ART use. PMID:21516534

  8. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) during the early months of treatment in rural Zambia: influence of demographic characteristics and social surroundings of patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Around 70% of those living with HIV in need of treatment accessed antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Zambia by 2009. However, sustaining high levels of adherence to ART is a challenge. This study aimed to identify the predictive factors associated with ART adherence during the early months of treatment in rural Zambia. Methods This is a field based observational longitudinal study in Mumbwa district, which is located 150 km west of Lusaka, the capital of Zambia. Treatment naive patients aged over 15 years, who initiated treatment during September-November 2010, were enrolled. Patients were interviewed at the initiation and six weeks later. The treatment adherence was measured according to self-reporting by the patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictive factors associated with the adherence. Results Of 157 patients, 59.9% were fully adherent to the treatment six weeks after starting ART. According to the multivariable analysis, full adherence was associated with being female [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR), 3.3; 95% Confidence interval (CI), 1.2-8.9], having a spouse who were also on ART (AOR, 4.4; 95% CI, 1.5-13.1), and experience of food insufficiency in the previous 30 days (AOR, 5.0; 95% CI, 1.8-13.8). Some of the most common reasons for missed doses were long distance to health facilities (n = 21, 53.8%), food insufficiency (n = 20, 51.3%), and being busy with other activities such as work (n = 15, 38.5%). Conclusions The treatment adherence continues to be a significant challenge in rural Zambia. Social supports from spouses and people on ART could facilitate their treatment adherence. This is likely to require attention by ART services in the future, focusing on different social influences on male and female in rural Zambia. In addition, poverty reduction strategies may help to reinforce adherence to ART and could mitigate the influence of HIV infection for poor patients and those who fall into poverty after

  9. Optimal time for initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected, treatment-naive children aged 2 to 5 years old

    PubMed Central

    Siegfried, Nandi; Davies, Mary-Ann; Penazzato, Martina; Muhe, Lulu M; Egger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) comprising three antiretroviral medications from at least two classes of drugs is the current standard treatment for HIV infection in adults and children. Current World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for antiretroviral therapy recommend early treatment regardless of immunologic thresholds or the clinical condition for all infants (less than one years of age) and children under the age of two years. For children aged two to five years current WHO guidelines recommend (based on low quality evidence) that clinical and immunological thresholds be used to identify those who need to start cART (advanced clinical stage or CD4 counts ≤ 750 cells/mm3 or per cent CD4 ≤ 25%). This Cochrane review will inform the current available evidence regarding the optimal time for treatment initiation in children aged two to five years with the goal of informing the revision of WHO 2013 recommendations on when to initiate cART in children. Objectives To assess the evidence for the optimal time to initiate cART in treatment-naive, HIV-infected children aged 2 to 5 years. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the AEGIS conference database, specific relevant conferences, www.clinicaltrials.gov, the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform and reference lists of articles. The date of the most recent search was 30 September 2012. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared immediate with deferred initiation of cART, and prospective cohort studies which followed children from enrolment to start of cART and on cART. Data collection and analysis Two review authors considered studies for inclusion in the review, assessed the risk of bias, and extracted data on the primary outcome of death from all causes and several secondary outcomes, including incidence of CDC category C and B clinical events and

  10. Causes of Death among AIDS Patients after Introduction of Free Combination Antiretroviral Therapy (cART) in Three Chinese Provinces, 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyan; Ge, Lin; Wang, Lu; Morano, Jamie P.; Guo, Wei; Khoshnood, Kaveh; Qin, Qianqian; Ding, Zhengwei; Sun, Dingyong; Liu, Xiaoyan; Luo, Hongbing; Tillman, Jonas; Cui, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although AIDS-related deaths have had significant economic and social impact following an increased disease burden internationally, few studies have evaluated the cause of AIDS-related deaths among patients with AIDS on combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) in China. This study examines the causes of death among AIDS-patients in China and uses a methodology to increase data accuracy compared to the previous studies on AIDS-related mortality in China, that have taken the reported cause of death in the National HIV Registry at face-value. Methods Death certificates/medical records were examined and a cross-sectional survey was conducted in three provinces to verify the causes of death among AIDS patients who died between January 1, 2010 and June 30, 2011. Chi-square analysis was conducted to examine the categorical variables by causes of death and by ART status. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to evaluate factors associated with AIDS-related death versus non-AIDS related death. Results This study used a sample of 1,109 subjects. The average age at death was 44.5 years. AIDS-related deaths were significantly higher than non-AIDS and injury-related deaths. In the sample, 41.9% (465/1109) were deceased within a year of HIV diagnosis and 52.7% (584/1109) of the deceased AIDS patients were not on cART. For AIDS-related deaths (n = 798), statistically significant factors included CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 at the time of cART initiation (AOR 1.94, 95%CI 1.24–3.05), ART naïve (AOR 1.69, 95%CI 1.09–2.61; p = 0.019) and age <39 years (AOR 2.96, 95%CI 1.77–4.96). Conclusion For the AIDS patients that were deceased, only those who initiated cART while at a CD4 count ≥200 cells/mm3 were less likely to die from AIDS-related causes compared to those who didn’t initiate ART at all. PMID:26506621

  11. Integration of Antiretroviral Therapy with Tuberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Abdool Karim, Salim S.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Grobler, Anneke; Padayatchi, Nesri; Baxter, Cheryl; Gray, Andrew L.; Gengiah, Tanuja; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Naidoo, Anushka; Jithoo, Niraksha; Nair, Gonasagrie; El-Sadr, Wafaa M.; Friedland, Gerald; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha

    2011-01-01

    Background We previously reported that integrating antiretroviral therapy (ART) with tuberculosis treatment reduces mortality. However, optimal time to initiate ART during tuberculosis treatment remains contentious. Methods To address this, we conducted a 3-arm, open-label randomized controlled trial in South Africa in acid-fast bacilli smear positive patients (n=642) with HIV and CD4+ counts <500 cells/mm3. Findings on the early therapy group (ART initiated within 4 weeks of tuberculosis treatment initiation, n=214) and late therapy group (ART initiated within the first 4 weeks of the continuation phase of tuberculosis treatment, n=215) are presented here. Results Median CD4+ count and viral load at baseline was 150 cells/mm3 and 161000 copies/ml, being similar in both groups. Incidence rate of AIDS or death was 6.9 (18/259.4) and 7.8 (19/244.2) per 100 person-years in the early and late therapy groups respectively (Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR)=0.89; 95%Confidence Interval (95%CI): 0.44,1.79; P=0.73). However, in patients with CD4+ counts <50 cells/mm3, the incidence rates of AIDS or death were 8.5 (early) and 26.3 (late) per 100 person-years (IRR=0.32; 95%CI: 0.07,1.13; P=0.06). Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) incidence rates were 20.2 (early) and 7.7 (late) per 100 person-years (IRR=2.62; 95%CI: 1.48,4.82; P<0.001). Adverse events requiring antiretroviral drug switches occurred in 10 (early) and 1 (late) patients (P=0.006). Conclusions The benefits of AIDS-free survival balanced against the risks of IRIS and ART-related adverse events, support early ART initiation in patients with CD4+ counts <50 cells/mm3 and deferred ART initiation to the continuation phase of tuberculosis treatment when CD4+ counts are higher. PMID:22010915

  12. Early Mortality in Adults Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMIC): A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amita; Nadkarni, Girish; Yang, Wei-Teng; Chandrasekhar, Aditya; Gupte, Nikhil; Bisson, Gregory P.; Hosseinipour, Mina; Gummadi, Naveen

    2011-01-01

    Background We systematically reviewed observational studies of early mortality post-antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America, as defined by the World Bank, to summarize what is known. Methods and Findings Studies published in English between January 1996 and December 2010 were searched in Medline and EMBASE. Three independent reviewers examined studies of mortality within one year post-ART. An article was included if the study was conducted in a LMIC, participants were initiating ART in a non-clinical trial setting and were ≥15 years. Fifty studies were included; 38 (76%) from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), 5 (10%) from Asia, 2 (4%) from the Americas, and 5 (10%) were multi-regional. Median follow-up time and pre-ART CD4 cell count ranged from 3–55 months and 11–192 cells/mm3, respectively. Loss-to-follow-up, reported in 40 (80%) studies, ranged from 0.3%–27%. Overall, SSA had the highest pooled 12-month mortality probability of 0.17 (95% CI 0.11–0.24) versus 0.11 (95% CI 0.10–0.13) for Asia, and 0.07 (95% CI 0.007–0.20) for the Americas. Of 14 (28%) studies reporting cause-specific mortality, tuberculosis (TB) (5%–44%), wasting (5%–53%), advanced HIV (20%–37%), and chronic diarrhea (10%–25%) were most common. Independent factors associated with early mortality in 30 (60%) studies included: low baseline CD4 cell count, male sex, advanced World Health Organization clinical stage, low body mass index, anemia, age greater than 40 years, and pre-ART quantitative HIV RNA. Conclusions Significant heterogeneity in outcomes and in methods of reporting outcomes exist among published studies evaluating mortality in the first year after ART initiation in LMIC. Early mortality rates are highest in SSA, and opportunistic illnesses such as TB and wasting syndrome are the most common reported causes of death. Strategies addressing modifiable risk factors associated with early

  13. Art Education/Art Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, John R., Ed.

    1978-01-01

    The special issue presents 13 articles dealing with art education and art therapy for special groups. Included are the following titles and authors: "Art Education for Special Groups: The Emotionally Disturbed" (E. Ulman); "You Are The Early Warning System" (C. Stember); "School Art Therapist Rationale for DPI Certification" (V. Minar); "Art…

  14. American Art Therapy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educational Standards Approved Art Therapy Master’s Programs Professional Development Job Board ...Read more Approved Art Therapy Master’s ... Public Policy Insurance Reimbursement Licensure Public Policy Professional Development Annual Conference Approved Art Therapy Master's Programs Awards & ...

  15. Persistent HIV-1 replication during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Picado, Javier; Deeks, Steven G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review will highlight some of the recent findings regarding the capacity of HIV-1 to replicate during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Recent findings Although ART is highly effective at inhibiting HIV replication, it is not curative. Several mechanisms contribute to HIV persistence during ART, including HIV latency, immune dysfunction, and perhaps persistent low-level spread of the virus to uninfected cells (replication). The success in curing HIV will depend on efficiently targeting these three aspects. The degree to which HIV replicates during ART remains controversial. Most studies have failed to find any evidence of HIV evolution in blood, even with samples collected over many years, although a recent very intensive study of three individuals suggested that the virus population does shift, at least during the first few months of therapy. Stronger but still not definitive evidence for replication comes from a series of studies in which standard regimens were intensified with an integration inhibitor, resulting in changes in episomal DNA (blood) and cell-associated RNA (tissue). Limited drug penetration within tissues and the presence of immune sanctuaries have been argued as potential mechanisms allowing HIV to spread during ART. Mathematical models suggest that HIV replication and evolution is possible even without the selection of fully drug-resistant variants. As persistent HIV replication could have clinical consequences and might limit the efficacy of curative interventions, determining if HIV replicates during ART and why, should remain a key focus of the HIV research community. Summary Residual viral replication likely persists in lymphoid tissues, at least in a subset of individuals. Abnormal levels of immune activation might contribute to sustain virus replication. PMID:27078619

  16. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  17. Antiretroviral Therapy for Prevention of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Kalapila, Aley G; Marrazzo, Jeanne

    2016-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is considered a chronic medical condition. Several new drugs are available, including fixed-dose combination tablets, that have greatly simplified combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens to treat HIV, while increasing the life-expectancy of infected individuals. In the last decade, multiple well-regarded studies have established the benefits of using ART in high-risk, HIV-negative persons to prevent HIV acquisition. The primary care provider must not only understand commonly encountered issues pertaining to ART, such as toxicities and drug interactions, but also needs to be aware of using ART for HIV prevention. PMID:27235622

  18. Antiretroviral therapy and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Christina M

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are more common in the HIV-infected population than in the general population. AKI is associated with an increased risk of heart failure, cardiovascular disease, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and mortality. Tenofovir is associated with severe AKI in a small percentage of patients and with subclinical abnormalities in many more. HIV-associated nephropathy is now a relatively rare form of CKD, because of the widespread use of potent antiretroviral therapy. The CKD spectrum in HIV-infected patients has become more frequently characterized by comorbid CKD, with an increased frequency of CKD related to diabetes or hypertension being observed. Kidney transplantation is a therapeutic option for HIV-infected patients with ESRD if their HIV infection is controlled, although rates of acute graft rejection and drug-drug interactions are high. This article summarizes a presentation by Christina M. Wyatt, MD, at the IAS-USA continuing education program held in Washington, DC, in June 2013. PMID:25101531

  19. Antiretroviral therapy and demand for HIV testing: Evidence from Zambia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nicholas

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on demand for HIV testing and of ART-induced testing on demand for risky sexual behavior. I provide a model of sexual behavior decision-making under uncertainty and estimate the structural parameters of the model using nationally representative survey data from Zambia on HIV testing decisions before and after the introduction of ART. The empirical results indicate that although the introduction of ART appears to have increased HIV testing rates by upwards of 50 percent, the ART allocation process may have limited the prevention benefit of ART-induced testing. Simulation results show that eliminating this prevention inefficiency while holding the supply of ART constant would increase the prevention impact of ART-induced testing more than four-fold. More generally, the analysis indicates that existing studies which examine "universal" testing or quasi-experimental testing programs understate the efficacy of standard voluntary counseling and testing programs. PMID:26970992

  20. Determinants of antiretroviral therapy coverage in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Mohammad Zahirul

    2015-01-01

    Among 35 million people living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in 2013, only 37% had access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Despite global concerted efforts to provide the universal access to the ART treatment, the ART coverage varies among countries and regions. At present, there is a lack of systematic empirical analyses on factors that determine the ART coverage. Therefore, the current study aimed to identify the determinants of the ART coverage in 41 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa. It employed statistical analyses for this purpose. Four elements, namely, the HIV prevalence, the level of national income, the level of medical expenditure and the number of nurses, were hypothesised to determine the ART coverage. The findings revealed that among the four proposed determinants only the HIV prevalence had a statistically significant impact on the ART coverage. In other words, the HIV prevalence was the sole determinant of the ART coverage in Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:26664812

  1. Improving Monitoring and Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) in HIV positive patients on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Agu, Kenneth Anene; Oparah, Azuka Cyriacus; Ochei, Uche M.

    2012-01-01

    Under-reporting of ADR may be associated with poor knowledge, attitudes and practices to pharmacovigilance. This study evaluated knowledge, attitudes and practices of healthcare professionals about ADR monitoring and reporting following interventions. This longitudinal study included 36 healthcare professionals participating in ART program in a tertiary hospital. Interventions included group training on pharmacovigilance (PV) and provision of ADR reporting forms amongst others. Assessments were conducted at months 0 and 6 post-interventions using study-specific Likert-type instruments. Mean attitude scores above midpoint of 3.6 on 5-point scale were regarded as positive and below as negative. P<0.05 used to determine statistical significance. Mean age of participants was 36.6 (95%CI, 34.5–38.7) years; 61.1% males; 44.4% doctors, 13.9% pharmacists, 19.4% nurses, 8.3% laboratory scientists, 8.3% record officers and 5.6% welfare officers. None had received training on PV previously. Mean knowledge test score increased from 53.6% (95%CI, 44.6–63.6) at pre-intervention to 77.1% (95%CI, 72.8–81.4) at post-intervention with a mean change of 146.9% (95%CI, 60.5–233.3; p=0.000). Mean rated attitude scores increased from 3.6 (95%CI, 3.4–3.8) at pre-intervention to 4.2 (95%CI, 4.0–4.4) at post-intervention; the difference was statistically significant (p=0.000). 75.8% reported that ADR reporting forms were not readily available at pre-intervention compared to 18.2% at postintervention; 15.2% had reported ADR previously at pre-intervention compared to 69.7% at post-intervention; 12.1% reported providing information regarding ADRs and its management always at pre-intervention compared to 45.5% at post-intervention; these differences were statistically significant (p<0.05). Lack/inadequate knowledge, unavailability of reporting forms and negative attitudes were barriers identified; and addressing them resulted in significant improvement in this setting. Scaling up

  2. METHADONE MAINTENANCE THERAPY PROMOTES INITIATION OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY AMONG INJECTION DRUG USERS

    PubMed Central

    Uhlmann, Sasha; Milloy, M-J; Kerr, Thomas; Zhang, Ruth; Guillemi, Silvia; Marsh, David; Hogg, Robert S.; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Wood, Evan

    2010-01-01

    Aims Despite proven benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), many HIV-infected injection drug users (IDU) do not access treatment even in settings with free health care. We examined whether methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) increased initiation and adherence to ART among an IDU population with free health care. Design We prospectively examined a cohort of opioid-using antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected IDU and investigated factors associated with initiation of antiretroviral therapy as well as subsequent adherence. Factors independently associated with time to first initiation of antiretroviral therapy were modelled using Cox proportional hazards regression. Findings Between May 1996 and April 2008, 231 antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected opioid using IDU were enrolled, among whom 152 (65.8%) initiated ART, for an incidence density of 30.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 25.9–35.6) per 100 person-years. After adjustment for time-updated clinical characteristics and other potential confounders, use of MMT was independently associated with more rapid uptake of antiretroviral therapy (relative hazard = 1.62 [95% CI: 1.15–2.28]; p = 0.006). Those prescribed methadone also had higher rates of ART adherence after first antiretroviral initiation (odds ratio = 1.49 [95% CI: 1.07–2.08]; p = 0.019). Conclusion These results demonstrate that MMT contributes to more rapid initiation and subsequent adherence to ART among opioid-using HIV-infected IDU. Addressing international barriers to the use and availability of methadone may dramatically increase uptake of HIV treatment among this population. PMID:20331553

  3. When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... away. What conditions increase the need to start ART? HIV-infected people with the following conditions should ... consider starting ART immediately. Once a person starts ART, why is medication adherence important? ART is a ...

  4. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy and Virologic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The often cited need to achieve ≥95% (nearly perfect) adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for successful virologic outcomes in HIV may present a barrier to initiation of therapy in the early stages of HIV. This meta-analysis synthesized 43 studies (27,905 participants) performed across >26 countries, to determine the relationship between cut-off point for optimal adherence to ART and virologic outcomes. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model to calculate pooled odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. The mean rate of patients reporting optimal adherence was 63.4%. Compared with suboptimal adherence, optimal adherence was associated with a lower risk of virologic failure (0.34; 95% CI: 0.26–0.44). There were no significant differences in the pooled odds ratios among different optimal adherence thresholds (≥98–100%, ≥95%, ≥80–90%). Study design (randomized controlled trial vs observational study) (regression coefficient 0.74, 95% CI: 0.04–1.43, P < 0.05) and study region (developing vs developed countries; regression coefficient 0.56, 95% CI: 0.01–1.12, P < 0.05) remained as independent predictors of between-study heterogeneity, with more patients with optimal adherence from developing countries or randomized controlled trials experiencing virologic failure. The threshold for optimal adherence to achieve better virologic outcomes appears to be wider than the commonly used cut-off point (≥95% adherence). The cut-off point for optimal adherence could be redefined to a slightly lower level to encourage the prescribing ART at an early stage of HIV infection. PMID:27082595

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV Escape from Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gisslen, Magnus; Cinque, Paola; Price, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    CNS infection is a nearly constant facet of systemic CNS infection and is generally well controlled by suppressive systemic antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there are instances when HIV can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma viruses below the clinical limits of measurement. We review three types of CSF viral escape: asymptomatic, neuro-symptomatic, and secondary. The first, asymptomatic CSF escape, is seemingly benign and characterized by lack of discernable neurological deterioration or subsequent CNS disease progression. Neuro-symptomatic CSF escape is an uncommon, but important, entity characterized by new or progressive CNS disease that is critical to recognize clinically because of its management implications. Finally, secondary CSF escape, which may be even more uncommon, is defined by an increase of CSF HIV replication in association with a concomitant non-HIV infection, as a consequence of the local inflammatory response. Understanding these CSF escape settings not only is important for clinical diagnosis and management but also may provide insight into the CNS HIV reservoir. PMID:25860317

  6. Antiretroviral drug resistance and routine therapy, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Christian; Kouanfack, Charles; Vergne, Laurence; Tardy, Michèle; Zekeng, Léopold; Noumsi, Nathalie; Butel, Christelle; Bourgeois, Anke; Mpoudi-Ngolé, Eitel; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata; Peeters, Martine; Delaporte, Eric

    2006-06-01

    Among 128 patients routinely receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy in an HIV/AIDS outpatient clinic in Cameroon, 16.4% had drug resistance after a median of 10 months. Of these, 12.5% had resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), 10.2% to non-NRTIs, and 2.3% to protease inhibitors. PMID:16707062

  7. CROI 2016: Advances in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Barbara S; Olender, Susan A; Tieu, Hong-Van; Wilkin, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections highlighted exciting advances in antiretroviral therapy, including important data on investigational antiretroviral drugs and clinical trials. Clinical trials demonstrated benefits from a long-acting injectable coformulation given as maintenance therapy, examined intravenous and subcutaneous administration of a monoclonal antibody directed at the CD4 binding site of HIV-1, and provided novel data on tenofovir alafenamide. Several studies focused on the role of HIV drug resistance, including the significance of minority variants, transmitted drug resistance, use of resistance testing, and drug class-related resistance. Novel data on the HIV care continuum in low- and middle-income settings concentrated on differentiated HIV care delivery models and outcomes. Data on progress toward reaching World Health Organization 90-90-90 targets as well as outcomes related to expedited initiation of HIV treatment and adherence strategies were presented. Results from a trial in Malawi showed reduced rates of mother-to-child transmission among HIV-infected women who initiated antiretroviral therapy prior to pregnancy, and several studies highlighted the effect of antiretroviral therapy in pediatric populations. A special session was dedicated to the findings of studies of Ebola virus disease and treatment during the outbreak in West Africa. PMID:27398863

  8. Social Action Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golub, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores intersections among art, action, and community. It describes sociopolitical aspects of the author's art therapy work with survivors of repressive regimes living in Brazil, China, and Denmark and considers ways that unique historical and social processes influenced her conceptualization and practice of social action art therapy.

  9. Free HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Enhances Adherence among Individuals on Stable Treatment: Implications for Potential Shortfalls in Free Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Byakika-Tusiime, Jayne; Polley, Eric C.; Oyugi, Jessica H.; Bangsberg, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate the population-level causal effect of source of payment for HIV medication on treatment adherence using Marginal Structural Models. Methods Data were obtained from an observational cohort of 76 HIV-infected individuals with at least 24 weeks of antiretroviral therapy treatment from 2002 to 2007 in Kampala, Uganda. Adherence was the primary outcome and it was measured using the 30-day visual analogue scale. Marginal structural models (MSM) were used to estimate the effect of source of payment for HIV medication on adherence, adjusting for confounding by income, duration on antiretroviral therapy (ART), timing of visit, prior adherence, prior CD4+ T cell count and prior plasma HIV RNA. Traditional association models were also examined and the results compared. Results Free HIV treatment was associated with a 3.8% improvement in adherence in the marginal structural model, while the traditional statistical models showed a 3.1–3.3% improvement in adherence associated with free HIV treatment. Conclusion Removing a financial barrier to treatment with ART by providing free HIV treatment appears to significantly improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy. With sufficient information on confounders, MSMs can be used to make robust inferences about causal effects in epidemiologic research. PMID:24039704

  10. Individualization of antiretroviral therapy - Pharmacogenomic aspect

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Bhavik; Shankarkumar, Aruna; Ghosh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Combination therapy with three drug regimens for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection significantly suppresses the viral replication. However, this therapeutic impact is restricted by adverse drug events and response in terms of short and long term efficacy. There are multiple factors involved in different responses to antiretrovirals (ARVs) such as age, body weight, disease status, diet and heredity. Pharmacogenomics deals with individual genetic make-up and its role in drug efficacy and toxicity. In depth genetic research has provided evidence to predict the risk of developing certain toxicities for which personalized screening and surveillance protocols may be developed to prevent side effects. Here we describe the use of pharmacogenomics for optimal use of HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy). PMID:26831415

  11. Optimizing adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sahay, Seema; Reddy, K. Srikanth; Dhayarkar, Sampada

    2011-01-01

    HIV has now become a manageable chronic disease. However, the treatment outcomes may get hampered by suboptimal adherence to ART. Adherence optimization is a concrete reality in the wake of ‘universal access’ and it is imperative to learn lessons from various studies and programmes. This review examines current literature on ART scale up, treatment outcomes of the large scale programmes and the role of adherence therein. Social, behavioural, biological and programme related factors arise in the context of ART adherence optimization. While emphasis is laid on adherence, retention of patients under the care umbrella emerges as a major challenge. An in-depth understanding of patients’ health seeking behaviour and health care delivery system may be useful in improving adherence and retention of patients in care continuum and programme. A theoretical framework to address the barriers and facilitators has been articulated to identify problematic areas in order to intervene with specific strategies. Empirically tested objective adherence measurement tools and approaches to assess adherence in clinical/ programme settings are required. Strengthening of ART programmes would include appropriate policies for manpower and task sharing, integrating traditional health sector, innovations in counselling and community support. Implications for the use of theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, community involvement and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is suggested. PMID:22310817

  12. Christian identity and men's attitudes to antiretroviral therapy in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Anthony

    2010-12-01

    Increasing access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), especially in urban areas in Zambia, has transformed the landscape of the HIV epidemic to include hope. Drawing upon long-term ethnographic research, this article briefly describes the religious ideas of a cohort of former students of a Catholic mission boarding school for boys. The discussion outlines their understanding of masculinity and charts their responses, first to voluntary counselling and testing for HIV, and, more recently, to the 'miraculous' returns to health they have experienced or witnessed as a result of ART. The article examines the problems of self-disclosure among self-identified Catholics who are aware of their HIV-positive status and their reluctance to publically acknowledge that they are receiving ART. The research locates the source of this reluctance within existing associations of Christianity with 'civilisation' and 'respectability.' The article concludes that the Catholic Church in Zambia needs to do more to combat negative responses to people living with HIV, which cause both shame and loss of respect and militate against Zambians coming forward to access ART as well as against good antiretroviral adherence. One way in which this might be achieved is for the Catholic Church to be more open about priests and other members of the religious community who are receiving ART. PMID:25875888

  13. Art Therapy Teaching as Performance Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint asserts that art therapy education is a form of performance art. By designing class sessions as performance artworks, art therapy educators can help their students become more fully immersed in their studies. This view also can be extended to conceptualizing each semester--and the entire art therapy curriculum--as a complex and…

  14. Art Therapy: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gantt, Linda, Comp.; Schmal, Marilyn Strauss, Comp.

    The bibliography on art therapy presents 1175 citations (1940-1973) drawn from searches of the medical indexes, computer systems of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institute of Mental Health, other bibliographies, Centre International de Documentation Concernant les Expressions Plastiques, and the American Journal of Art Therapy.…

  15. Transpersonal Art Therapy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Michael; Farrelly-Hansen, Mimi; Marek, Bernie; Swan-Foster, Nora; Wallingford, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the task of training future art therapists through a unique branch of transpersonal psychology referred to as "contemplative education." Discusses contemplative practices, such as meditation, and their relationship to creating art. Offers a definition of transpersonal art therapy as well as a literature review. (Contains 80 references.)…

  16. Clinical management of dyslipidaemia associated with combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Calza, Leonardo; Colangeli, Vincenzo; Manfredi, Roberto; Bon, Isabella; Re, Maria Carla; Viale, Pierluigi

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of potent combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has had a remarkable impact on the natural history of HIV infection, leading to a dramatic decline in the mortality rate and a considerable increase in the life expectancy of HIV-positive people. However, cART use is frequently associated with several metabolic complications, mostly represented by lipid metabolism alterations, which are reported very frequently among persons treated with antiretroviral agents. In particular, hyperlipidaemia occurs in up to 70%-80% of HIV-positive subjects receiving cART and is mainly associated with specific antiretroviral drugs belonging to three classes of antiretroviral agents: NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs. The potential long-term consequences of cART-associated dyslipidaemia are not completely understood, but an increased risk of premature coronary heart disease has been reported in HIV-infected patients on cART, so prompt correction of lipid metabolism abnormalities is mandatory in this population. Dietary changes, regular aerobic exercise and switching to a different antiretroviral regimen associated with a more favourable metabolic profile are the first steps in clinical management, but lipid-lowering therapy with fibrates or statins is often required. In this case, the choice of hypolipidaemic drugs should take into account the potential pharmacokinetic interactions with many antiretroviral agents. PMID:26846208

  17. The Survival Benefits of Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    April, Michael D.; Wood, Robin; Berkowitz, Bethany K.; Paltiel, A. David; Anglaret, Xavier; Losina, Elena; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. We sought to quantify the survival benefits attributable to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in South Africa since 2004. Methods. We used the Cost-Effectiveness of Preventing AIDS Complications–International model (CEPAC) to simulate 8 cohorts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients initiating ART each year during 2004–2011. Model inputs included cohort-specific mean CD4+ T-cell count at ART initiation (112–178 cells/µL), 24-week ART suppressive efficacy (78%), second-line ART availability (2.4% of ART recipients), and cohort-specific 36-month retention rate (55%–71%). CEPAC simulated survival twice for each cohort, once with and once without ART. The sum of the products of per capita survival differences and the total numbers of persons initiating ART for each cohort yielded the total survival benefits. Results. Lifetime per capita survival benefits ranged from 9.3 to 10.2 life-years across the 8 cohorts. Total estimated population lifetime survival benefit for all persons starting ART during 2004–2011 was 21.7 million life-years, of which 2.8 million life-years (12.7%) had been realized by December 2012. By 2030, benefits reached 17.9 million life-years under current policies, 21.7 million life-years with universal second-line ART, 23.3 million life-years with increased linkage to care of eligible untreated patients, and 28.0 million life-years with both linkage to care and universal second-line ART. Conclusions. We found dramatic past and potential future survival benefits attributable to ART, justifying international support of ART rollout in South Africa. PMID:24307741

  18. HIV Care and Treatment Beliefs among Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tymejczyk, Olga; Hoffman, Susie; Kulkarni, Sarah Gorrell; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Lahuerta, Maria; Remien, Robert H; Elul, Batya; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Melaku, Zenebe; Nash, Denis

    2016-05-01

    To better understand patient beliefs, which may influence adherence to HIV care and treatment, we examined three dimensions of beliefs among Ethiopian adults (n = 1177) initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Beliefs about benefits of ART/HIV clinical care were largely accurate, but few patients believed in the ability of ART to prevent sexual transmission and many thought Holy Water could cure HIV. Factors associated with lower odds of accurate beliefs included advanced HIV, lack of formal education, and Muslim religion (benefits of ART/clinical care); secondary or university education and more clinic visits (ART to prevent sexual transmission); and pregnancy and Orthodox Christian religion (Holy Water). Assessment of patient beliefs may help providers identify areas needing reinforcement. In this setting, counselors also need to stress the benefits of ART as prevention and that Holy Water should not be used to the exclusion of HIV care and ART. PMID:26346333

  19. Predicting virological decay in patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Model trajectories of viral load measurements from time of starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), and use the model to predict whether patients will achieve suppressed viral load (≤200 copies/ml) within 6-months of starting cART. Design: Prospective cohort study including HIV-positive adults (UK Collaborative HIV Cohort Study). Methods: Eligible patients were antiretroviral naive and started cART after 1997. Random effects models were used to estimate viral load trends. Patients were randomly selected to form a validation dataset with those remaining used to fit the model. We evaluated predictions of suppression using indices of diagnostic test performance. Results: Of 9562 eligible patients 6435 were used to fit the model and 3127 for validation. Mean log10 viral load trajectories declined rapidly during the first 2 weeks post-cART, moderately between 2 weeks and 3 months, and more slowly thereafter. Higher pretreatment viral load predicted steeper declines, whereas older age, white ethnicity, and boosted protease inhibitor/non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors based cART-regimen predicted a steeper decline from 3 months onwards. Specificity of predictions and the diagnostic odds ratio substantially improved when predictions were based on viral load measurements up to the 4-month visit compared with the 2 or 3-month visits. Diagnostic performance improved when suppression was defined by two consecutive suppressed viral loads compared with one. Conclusions: Viral load measurements can be used to predict if a patient will be suppressed by 6-month post-cART. Graphical presentations of this information could help clinicians decide the optimum time to switch treatment regimen during the first months of cART. PMID:27124894

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of Antiretroviral Therapy for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, James G; Marseille, Elliot A; Bennett, Rod; Williams, Brian G; Granich, Reuben

    2011-01-01

    Recent empirical studies and analyses have heightened interest in the use of expanded antiretroviral therapy (ART) for prevention of HIV transmission. However, ART is expensive, approximately $600 per person per year, raising issues of the cost and cost-effectiveness of ambitious ART expansion. The goal of this review is to equip the reader with the conceptual tools and substantive background needed to understand and evaluate the policy and programmatic implications of cost-effectiveness assessments of ART for prevention. We provide this review in six sections. We start by introducing and explaining basic concepts of health economics as they relate to this issue, including resources, costs, health metrics (such as Disability-Adjusted Life Years), and different types of economic analysis. We then review research on the cost and cost-effectiveness of ART as treatment, and on the cost-effectiveness of traditional HIV prevention. We describe critical issues in the epidemic impact of ART, such as suppression of transmission and the role of the acute phase of infection. We then present a conceptual model for conducting and interpreting cost-effectiveness analyses of ART as prevention, and review the existing preliminary estimates in this area. We end with a discussion of future directions for programmatic demonstrations and evaluation. PMID:21999776

  1. Antiretroviral Therapy for the Prevention of HIV-1 Transmission.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Myron S; Chen, Ying Q; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James G; Kumwenda, Johnstone; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Pilotto, Jose H S; Godbole, Sheela V; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Santos, Breno R; Mayer, Kenneth H; Hoffman, Irving F; Eshleman, Susan H; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Cottle, Leslie; Zhang, Xinyi C; Makhema, Joseph; Mills, Lisa A; Panchia, Ravindre; Faesen, Sharlaa; Eron, Joseph; Gallant, Joel; Havlir, Diane; Swindells, Susan; Elharrar, Vanessa; Burns, David; Taha, Taha E; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Celentano, David D; Essex, Max; Hudelson, Sarah E; Redd, Andrew D; Fleming, Thomas R

    2016-09-01

    Background An interim analysis of data from the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 trial showed that antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevented more than 96% of genetically linked infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in serodiscordant couples. ART was then offered to all patients with HIV-1 infection (index participants). The study included more than 5 years of follow-up to assess the durability of such therapy for the prevention of HIV-1 transmission. Methods We randomly assigned 1763 index participants to receive either early or delayed ART. In the early-ART group, 886 participants started therapy at enrollment (CD4+ count, 350 to 550 cells per cubic millimeter). In the delayed-ART group, 877 participants started therapy after two consecutive CD4+ counts fell below 250 cells per cubic millimeter or if an illness indicative of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (i.e., an AIDS-defining illness) developed. The primary study end point was the diagnosis of genetically linked HIV-1 infection in the previously HIV-1-negative partner in an intention-to-treat analysis. Results Index participants were followed for 10,031 person-years; partners were followed for 8509 person-years. Among partners, 78 HIV-1 infections were observed during the trial (annual incidence, 0.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.7 to 1.1). Viral-linkage status was determined for 72 (92%) of the partner infections. Of these infections, 46 were linked (3 in the early-ART group and 43 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0.4 to 0.7) and 26 were unlinked (14 in the early-ART group and 12 in the delayed-ART group; incidence, 0.3%; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.4). Early ART was associated with a 93% lower risk of linked partner infection than was delayed ART (hazard ratio, 0.07; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.22). No linked infections were observed when HIV-1 infection was stably suppressed by ART in the index participant. Conclusions The early initiation of ART led to a sustained

  2. The Impact of Antiretroviral Therapy on Lung Immunology.

    PubMed

    Cribbs, Sushma K; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2016-04-01

    Despite the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART), human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) continues to cause a major impact worldwide. HIV-induced lung disease continues to represent a significant source of morbidity and mortality, although the spectrum of pulmonary diseases has changed. HIV significantly affects the lung, causing acute and chronic cellular changes in the alveolar space. The impact of ART on lung immunology still needs to be fully elucidated. Similar to the periphery, ART affects HIV viral load and reconstitutes CD4(+) T cells in the lung. ART has been associated with significant decreases in bronchoalveolar lavage lymphocytes and increases in B-cell numbers and functionality, resulting in improved immune responses to vaccinations. There are substantial clinical implications of these ART-induced alterations, including the emergence of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and the increased incidences of noninfectious lung diseases, such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive lung disease. There continues to be many unanswered questions regarding the effects of ART on lung health and, in particular, the immune system. Growing knowledge in this area will hopefully diminish the incidence of these noninfectious lung diseases and further improve the health of individuals living with HIV. PMID:26974295

  3. Sex Differences in Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation in Pediatric HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiko; Adland, Emily; Paioni, Paolo; Swordy, Alice; Mori, Luisa; Laker, Leana; Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Matthews, Philippa C; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Lavandier, Nora; van Zyl, Anriette; Hurst, Jacob; Walker, Bruce D; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Prendergast, Andrew; Goulder, Philip; Jooste, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and severity of infections in childhood is typically greater in males. The basis for these observed sex differences is not well understood, and potentially may facilitate novel approaches to reducing disease from a range of conditions. We here investigated sex differences in HIV-infected children in relation to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and post-treatment outcome. In a South African cohort of 2,101 HIV-infected children, we observed that absolute CD4+ count and CD4% were significantly higher in ART-naïve female, compared to age-matched male, HIV-infected children. Absolute CD4 count and CD4% were also significantly higher in HIV-uninfected female versus male neonates. We next showed that significantly more male than female children were initiated on ART (47% female); and children not meeting criteria to start ART by >5 yrs were more frequently female (59%; p<0.001). Among ART-treated children, immune reconstitution of CD4 T-cells was more rapid and more complete in female children, even after adjustment for pre-ART absolute CD4 count or CD4% (p=0.011, p=0.030, respectively). However, while ART was initiated as a result of meeting CD4 criteria less often in females (45%), ART initiation as a result of clinical disease in children whose CD4 counts were above treatment thresholds occurred more often in females (57%, p<0.001). The main sex difference in morbidity observed in children initiating ART above CD4 thresholds, above that of TB disease, was as a result of wasting and stunting observed in females with above-threshold CD4 counts (p=0.002). These findings suggest the possibility that optimal treatment of HIV-infected children might incorporate differential CD4 treatment thresholds for ART initiation according to sex. PMID:26151555

  4. Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy after Diagnosis of Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, David R.; Meya, David B.; Muzoora, Conrad; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Huppler Hullsiek, Katherine; Musubire, Abdu; Taseera, Kabanda; Nabeta, Henry W.; Schutz, Charlotte; Williams, Darlisha A.; Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Thienemann, Friedrich; Lo, Melanie W.; Nielsen, Kirsten; Bergemann, Tracy L.; Kambugu, Andrew; Manabe, Yukari C.; Janoff, Edward N.; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Meintjes, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryptococcal meningitis accounts for 20 to 25% of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome–related deaths in Africa. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is essential for survival; however, the question of when ART should be initiated after diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis remains unanswered. Methods We assessed survival at 26 weeks among 177 human immunodeficiency virus–infected adults in Uganda and South Africa who had cryptococcal meningitis and had not previously received ART. We randomly assigned study participants to undergo either earlier ART initiation (1 to 2 weeks after diagnosis) or deferred ART initiation (5 weeks after diagnosis). Participants received amphotericin B (0.7 to 1.0 mg per kilogram of body weight per day) and fluconazole (800 mg per day) for 14 days, followed by consolidation therapy with fluconazole. Results The 26-week mortality with earlier ART initiation was significantly higher than with deferred ART initiation (45% [40 of 88 patients] vs. 30% [27 of 89 patients]; hazard ratio for death, 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 2.82; P = 0.03). The excess deaths associated with earlier ART initiation occurred 2 to 5 weeks after diagnosis (P = 0.007 for the comparison between groups); mortality was similar in the two groups thereafter. Among patients with few white cells in their cerebrospinal fluid (<5 per cubic millimeter) at randomization, mortality was particularly elevated with earlier ART as compared with deferred ART (hazard ratio, 3.87; 95% CI, 1.41 to 10.58; P = 0.008). The incidence of recognized cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome did not differ significantly between the earlier-ART group and the deferred-ART group (20% and 13%, respectively; P = 0.32). All other clinical, immunologic, virologic, and microbiologic outcomes, as well as adverse events, were similar between the groups. Conclusions Deferring ART for 5 weeks after the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was associated with

  5. Accessibility of antiretroviral therapy in Ghana: convenience of access.

    PubMed

    Addo-Atuah, Joyce; Gourley, Dick; Gourley, Greta; White-Means, Shelley I; Womeodu, Robin J; Faris, Richard J; Addo, Nii Akwei

    2012-01-01

    The convenience of accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) is important for initial access to care and subsequent adherence to ART. We conducted a qualitative study of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and ART healthcare providers in Ghana in 2005. The objective of this study was to explore the participants' perceived convenience of accessing ART by PLWHA in Ghana. The convenience of accessing ART was evaluated from the reported travel and waiting times to receive care, the availability, or otherwise, of special considerations, with respect to the waiting time to receive care, for those PLWHA who were in active employment in the formal sector, the frequency of clinic visits before and after initiating ART, and whether the PLWHA saw the same or different providers at each clinic visit (continuity of care). This qualitative study used in-depth interviews based on Yin's case-study research design to collect data from 20 PLWHA and 24 ART healthcare providers as study participants. • Reported travel time to receive ART services ranged from 2 to 12 h for 30% of the PLWHA. • Waiting time to receive care was from 4 to 9 h. • While known government workers, such as teachers, were attended to earlier in some of the centres, this was not a consistent practice in all the four ART centres studied. • The PLWHA corroborated the providers' description of the procedure for initiating and monitoring ART in Ghana. • PLWHA did not see the same provider every time, but they were assured that this did not compromise the continuity of their care. Our study suggests that convenience of accessing ART is important to both PLWHA and ART healthcare providers, but the participants alluded to other factors, including open provider-patient communication, which might explain the PLWHA's understanding of the constraints under which they were receiving care. The current nation-wide coverage of the ART programme in Ghana, however, calls for the replication of this study to identify

  6. Therapy planning as constraint satisfaction: a computer-based antiretroviral therapy advisor for the management of HIV.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D. S.; Park, J. Y.; Musen, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We applied the Protégé methodology for building knowledge-based systems to the domain of antiretroviral therapy. We modeled the task of prescribing drug therapy for HIV, abstracting the essential characteristics of the problem solving. We mapped our model of the antiretroviral-therapy domain to the class of constraint-satisfaction problems, and reused the propose-and-revise problem-solving method, from the Protégé library of methods, to build an antiretroviral therapy advisor, ART Critic. Careful modeling and using Protégé allowed us to build a useful and extensible knowledge-based application rapidly. PMID:9929295

  7. Attitudes and perceived impact of antiretroviral therapy on sexual risk behaviour among young people in Kahe, Moshi Rural District, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ezekiel, M J; Talle, A; Juma, J M; Mnyika, K S; Klepp, K-I

    2008-10-01

    Free antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been provided through the public health system in Tanzania since 2004. The success of national ART roll out programme is premised upon collaborative efforts of health systems, communities and policy environment. However, community perceptions of ART and its implications on sexual behaviours and HIV/AIDS prevention remain largely unknown. Drawing on focus group discussions with young people, this paper examines perception about ART and the potential impact of antiretroviral therapy on risk sexual behaviour in rural Tanzania. Participants included a purposively selected sample of males and females aged 14-24 years. Results show that young people were both optimistic and concerned regarding availability of ART. Positive attitudes toward ART were associated with public health significance of therapy in managing opportunistic infections and extending lives of HIV infected persons. However, the positive outcomes of therapy were considered to be short lived, unsustainable and potentially threatening to the sexual health and wellbeing of HIV negative members in the community. ART was considered to empower infected persons to intentionally spread HIV to uninfected individuals in the community through deliberate unprotected sexual activities. The study highlights the significance of reinforcing HIV prevention while underscoring the need to provide appropriate information and increasing access to ART in rural areas of Tanzania. In conclusion, creating a therapy friendly atmosphere through information delivery is crucial in promoting social acceptability of antiretroviral therapy among youths. Efforts to improve access to antiretroviral drugs should re-emphasize prevention counselling to minimize sexual transmission of HIV. PMID:19402581

  8. The Effect of HIV and the Modifying Effect of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) on Body Mass Index (BMI) and Blood Pressure Levels in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Feigl, Andrea B.; Bloom, David E.; Danaei, Goodarz; Pillay, Deenan; Salomon, Joshua A.; Tanser, Frank; Bärnighausen, Till W.

    2016-01-01

    Background High BMI and blood pressure are leading chronic disease risk factors in South Africa. Longterm effects of HIV and ART on adiposity and blood pressure are poorly understood, and direct comparisons of risk factor trajectories in HIV- versus HIV+ populations are rare. Methods In 2003 and 2010, height, weight, and blood pressure were recorded in a study population (n = 505) in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (30% adult HIV prevalence). We modeled change in BMI and BP longitudinally in HIV- individuals (n = 315), seroconverters (n = 32), HIV+ patients not on ART (HIV+ART−; n = 52), HIV+ patients on ART for 0–<2 years as of 2010 (HIV+ART0–<2 yrs; n = 18), patients on ART for 2–5 years (HIV+ART2–5yrs; n = 44), and a subgroup with unknown HIV status (n = 44). Difference-in-differences were assessed in reference to the HIV- population. Results Between 2003 and 2010, BMI increased significantly in the HIV- group, by 0.874 (95% CI 0.339, 1.41; p = 0.001), to 30.4. BMI drop was significantly greater in HIV+ART0-<2yrs than in HIV+ART2–5yrs (p = 0.005). DID in BMI in HIV+ART0-<2yrs versus the reference was -5.21 (95% CI -7.53, -2.90; p = 0.001), and DID in HIV+ART2–5yrs versus reference was -1.35 (95% CI -2.89, 0.189; p = 0.086). DID in SBP in HIV+ART−vs HIV- DID was -7.55 mmHg (95% CI -13.2 to -1.90; p = 0.009). Conclusion Short-term ART (0–<2 years) was associated with larger weight loss than either no ART or long-term ART. Once on ART for 2+ years, individuals ‘caught up’ on weight gain with the HIV- population. Our results showcase the importance of health system readiness to address the burgeoning double burden of disease in South Africa. PMID:27552195

  9. Self-reported adverse reactions among patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pádua, Cristiane A Menezes de; César, Cibele C; Bonolo, Palmira F; Acurcio, Francisco A; Guimarães, Mark Drew C

    2007-02-01

    A cross-sectional analysis was carried out to describe adverse reactions to antiretroviral therapy (ART) reported by HIV-infected patients initiating treatment at two public health AIDS referral centers in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 2001-2003 and to verify their association with selected variables. Adverse reactions were obtained through interview at the first follow-up visit (first month) after the antiretroviral prescription. Socio-demographic and behavioral variables related to ART were obtained from baseline and follow-up interviews and clinical variables from medical charts. Patients with four or more reactions were compared to those with less than four. Odds ratio with 95% confidence interval were estimated using logistic regression model for both univariate and multivariate analyses. At least one adverse reaction was reported by 92.2% of the participants while 56.2% reported four or more different reactions. Antiretroviral regimens including indinavir/ritonavir, irregular use of antiretrovirals and switch in regimens were independently associated with four or more adverse reactions (OR=7.92, 5.73 and 2.03, respectively). The initial period of ARV treatment is crucial and patients' perception of adverse reactions should be carefully taken into account. Strategies for monitoring and management of adverse reactions including the choice of regimens and the prevention of irregular ART should be developed in AIDS/HIV referral centers in Brazil to promote better adherence to antiretroviral therapy. PMID:17625721

  10. Quality of life of people living with HIV and AIDS and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Oguntibeju, Oluwafemi O

    2012-01-01

    The development of antiretroviral drugs has significantly changed the perception of HIV/AIDS from a very fatal to a chronic and potentially manageable disease, and the availability and administration of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significantly reduced mortality and morbidity associated with HIV and AIDS. There is a relationship between ART and quality of life of people living with HIV and AIDS, and several studies have reported a strong positive association between ART and improved quality of life in different domains among people living with HIV and AIDS in both developed and developing countries. However, a few studies have reported on the negative effects of ART, which directly or indirectly relate to the quality of life and longevity of HIV-infected persons. In this review, the effects and benefits of ART on people living with HIV and AIDS based on studies done in developed and developing countries is examined. PMID:22893751

  11. Alcohol use disorders and antiretroviral therapy among prisoners in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Alpert, Michael; Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Vázquez, Mariana; Altice, Frederick L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose While Argentina has significantly improved access to HIV care and antiretroviral therapy (ART) for both the general population and prisoners, the prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) among HIV-infected prisoners and their relationship to accessing ART in Argentina is currently unknown. This study aims to characterize the substance abuse patterns of HIV-infected prisoners in Argentina and to assess the independent correlates of receipt of pre-incarceration ART. Design/methodology/approach An anonymous, cross-sectional survey of 100 HIV-infected federal prisoners was conducted in the Buenos Aires municipality from July–December 2010. AUDs were assessed using the AUDIT scale. Findings A majority (63 per cent) of participants met criteria for AUDs, 45 per cent of subjects were diagnosed with HIV in prison and one-quarter had initiated ART during the current incarceration. In addition, over one-third (35 per cent) of participants did not receive ART during the pre-incarceration period despite receiving it upon incarceration. This correlated significantly with the presence of having an AUD (AOR 0.20, 95 per cent CI 0.06–0.74, p = 0.016). Practical implications AUDs are prevalent among HIV-infected prisoners in Argentina and are significantly related to negative secondary HIV prevention and treatment outcomes. While Argentina has provided an exemplary model of HIV-related health care reform within its prisons, future efforts to provide screening and treatment for AUDs are needed to improve the health of the nation’s incarcerated population. Originality/value This paper is the first to describe pre-incarceration drug and alcohol use disorders and issues related to access to ART among prisoners in Argentina. PMID:24772187

  12. No evidence of posttreatment control after early initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Gianella, Sara; Anderson, Christy M; Richman, Douglas D; Smith, Davey M; Little, Susan J

    2015-10-23

    As part of a retrospective analysis of 616 individuals followed from incident HIV infection for up to 18 years as part of the San Diego Primary Infection Cohort, we found 16 individuals who started antiretroviral therapy (ART) within the first 4 months of infection and subsequently interrupted ART after being virologically suppressed for a median of 1.75 years. No individual maintained sustained virologic control after interruption of ART, even when treatment was started during the earliest stages of HIV infection. Median time to HIV-RNA rebound after ART interruption was 0.9 months (range: 0.2-6.4 months). PMID:26544575

  13. Delayed initiation of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-discordant couples in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Talia R; Desmond, Michelle; Rao, Deepa; Marx, Grace E; Guthrie, Brandon L; Bosire, Rose; Choi, Robert Y; Kiarie, James N; Farquhar, Carey

    2013-01-01

    Timely initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is particularly important for HIV-discordant couples because viral suppression greatly reduces the risk of transmission to the uninfected partner. To identify issues and concerns related to ART initiation among HIV-discordant couples, we recruited a subset of discordant couples participating in a longitudinal study in Nairobi to participate in in-depth interviews and focus group discussions about ART. Our results suggest that partners in HIV-discordant relationships discuss starting ART, yet most are not aware that ART can decrease the risk of HIV transmission. In addition, their concerns about ART initiation include side effects, sustaining an appropriate level of drug treatment, HIV/AIDS-related stigma, medical/biological issues, psychological barriers, misconceptions about the medications, the inconvenience of being on therapy, and lack of social support. Understanding and addressing these barriers to ART initiation among discordant couples is critical to advancing the HIV "treatment as prevention" agenda. PMID:22866934

  14. Namibian prisoners describe barriers to HIV antiretroviral therapy adherence.

    PubMed

    Shalihu, Nauyele; Pretorius, Louise; van Dyk, Agnes; Vander Stoep, Ann; Hagopian, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Little is available in scholarly literature about how HIV-positive prisoners, especially in low-income countries, access antiretroviral therapy (ART) medication. We interviewed 18 prisoners at a large prison in Namibia to identify barriers to medication adherence. The lead nurse researcher was a long-standing clinic employee at the prison, which afforded her access to the population. We identified six significant barriers to adherence, including (1) the desire for privacy and anonymity in a setting where HIV is strongly stigmatized; (2) the lack of simple supports for adherence, such as availability of clocks; (3) insufficient access to food to support the toll on the body of ingesting taxing ART medications; (4) commodification of ART medication; (5) the brutality and despair in the prison setting, generally leading to discouragement and a lack of motivation to strive for optimum health; and (6) the lack of understanding about HIV, how it is transmitted, and how it is best managed. Because most prisoners eventually transition back to communitysettings when their sentences are served, investments in prison health represent important investments in public health. PMID:24499371

  15. Exposure to Antiretroviral Therapy and Risk of Cancer in HIV-infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    CHAO, Chun; LEYDEN, Wendy A.; XU, Lanfang; HORBERG, Michael A.; KLEIN, Daniel; TOWNER, William J.; QUESENBERRY, Charles P.; ABRAMS, Donald I.; SILVERBERG, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of certain non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADC) in HIV patients has been reported to have increased in the combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) era. Studies are needed to directly evaluate the effect of ART use on cancer risk. Design We followed 12,872 HIV+ Kaiser Permanente members whose complete ART history was known for incident cancers between 1996-2008. Methods Cancers, identified from SEER-based cancer registries, were grouped as AIDS-defining cancers (ADC), infection-related NADC or infection-unrelated NADC. We also evaluated the most common individual cancer types. Rate ratios (RR) for ART use (yes/no) and cumulative duration of any ART, PI and NNRTI therapy were obtained from Poisson models adjusting for demographics, pre-treatment or recent CD4 count and HIV RNA levels, years known HIV-infected, prior antiretroviral use, HIV risk, smoking, alcohol/drug abuse, overweight/obesity, and calendar year. Results The cohort experienced 32,368 person-yrs (py) of ART, 21,249 py of PI therapy, and 15,643 py of NNRTI therapy. The mean follow-up duration was 4.5 years. ADC rates decrease with increased duration of ART use [RR/year=0.61, 95% CI (0.56-0.66)]; the effect was similar by therapy class. ART, PI or NNRTI therapy duration was not associated with infection-related or infection-unrelated NADC [RR/year ART=1.00 (0.91-1.11) and 0.96 (0.90-1.01), respectively], except a higher anal cancer risk with longer PI therapy [RR/year=1.16 (1.02-1.31)]. Conclusions No therapy class-specific effect was found for ADC. ART exposure was generally not associated with NADC risk, except for long term use of PI, which might be associated with increased anal cancer risk. PMID:22951631

  16. Integrating antiretroviral therapy in methadone maintenance therapy clinics: Service provider perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chunqing; Cao, Xiaobin; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    Background Using methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) clinics to deliver antiretroviral therapy (ART) is an effective strategy to promote treatment initiation and adherence for HIV-positive drug users. This paper describes the implementation barriers perceived by service providers for an intervention pilot designed to integrate ART services in MMT clinics. Methods The study was conducted in six MMT clinics in Sichuan province, China. Two service providers selected from each of the six clinics underwent training in administering ART. The trained providers delivered ART-related services in their clinics. A focus group was conducted among the service providers to assess their experiences and perceived challenges in delivering integrated services. Results Barriers at policy, institutional, provider, and client levels were identified. Policy level barriers included household registration restrictions and a lack of insurance coverage for testing expenses. Inefficient coordination between treatment sites and MMT clinics was an obstacle at the institutional level. Insufficient training and added workload were barriers at the provider level. Finally, conflict with daily dosing habits was identified as the primary reason that clients did not accept ART. Conclusion Although integrating ART into MMT clinics is beneficial, multilevel barriers to implementation need to be addressed. This study documents the need for treatment transferability and insurance coverage, protection of client confidentiality, proper provider training, coordination with treatment sites, and individualized ART service for MMT clients. PMID:24939555

  17. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy: are we doing enough?

    PubMed

    Read, T; Mijch, A; Fairley, C K

    2003-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is a powerful predictor of response to therapy. For optimal antiretroviral therapy response, individuals need to take more than 95% of their prescribed medication. The most widely used method for measuring adherence is self-report of the number of missed doses and this should be done at every clinic visit. There are several well-recognized predictors of poor adherence, such as illicit drug use, depression, limited knowledge or ambivalence about starting treatment. Adherence can be improved by addressing these issues or through other means such as pill boxes or electronic reminders. PMID:12752896

  18. Art Therapy in Theory & Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulman, Elinor, Ed.; Dachinger, Penny, Ed.

    The essays in this collection are grounded in theoretical underpinnings which range from Freud to Montessori. The focus encompasses educational and psychiatric concerns. Essays are organized in 4 parts. Part 1, "Theory of Art Therapy," includes: (1) "Art Therapy: Problems of Definition" (Elinor Ulman); (2) "Therapy is Not Enough: The Contribution…

  19. Complexities of Gut Microbiome Dysbiosis in the Context of HIV Infection and Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, S X; Armstrong, Ajs; Neff, C P; Shaffer, M; Lozupone, C A; Palmer, B E

    2016-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with an altered gut microbiome that is not consistently restored with effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). Interpretation of the specific microbiome changes observed during HIV infection is complicated by factors like population, sample type, and ART-each of which may have dramatic effects on gut bacteria. Understanding how these factors shape the microbiome during HIV infection (which we refer to as the HIV-associated microbiome) is critical for defining its role in HIV disease, and for developing therapies that restore gut health during infection. PMID:26940481

  20. Artemether-Lumefantrine Exposure in HIV-Infected Nigerian Subjects on Nevirapine-Containing Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Sunil; Fehintola, Fatai; Huang, Liusheng; Olson, Alexander; Adedeji, Waheed A; Darin, Kristin M; Morse, Gene D; Murphy, Robert L; Taiwo, Babafemi O; Akinyinka, Olusegun O; Adewole, Isaac F; Aweeka, Francesca T; Scarsi, Kimberly K

    2015-12-01

    Coadministration of nevirapine-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) and artemether-lumefantrine is reported to result in variable changes in lumefantrine exposure. We conducted an intensive pharmacokinetic study with 11 HIV-infected adults who were receiving artemether-lumefantrine plus nevirapine-based ART, and we compared the results with those for 16 HIV-negative adult historical controls. Exposure to artemether and lumefantrine was significantly lower and dihydroartemisinin exposure was unchanged in subjects receiving nevirapine-based ART, compared with controls. Nevirapine exposure was unchanged before and after artemether-lumefantrine administration. PMID:26392500

  1. Clinician Perspectives on Delaying Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy for Clinically Eligible HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, Eduardo E.; Raiford, Jerris L.; Weiser, John; White, Becky L.; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Guidelines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation have evolved, but consistently note that adherence problems should be considered and addressed. Little is known regarding the reasons providers delay ART initiation in clinically eligible patients. Methods: In 2009, we surveyed a probability sample of HIV care providers in 582 outpatient facilities in the United States and Puerto Rico with an open-ended question about nonclinical reasons for delaying ART initiation in otherwise clinically eligible patients. Results: Very few providers (2%) reported never delaying ART. Reasons for delaying ART were concerns about patient adherence (68%), patient acceptance (60%), and structural barriers (33%). Provider and practice characteristics were associated with reasons for delaying ART. Conclusion: Reasons for delaying ART were consistent with clinical guidelines and were both patient level and structural. Providers may benefit from training and access to referrals for ancillary services to enhance their ability to monitor and address these issues with their patients. PMID:25394912

  2. INJECTION DRUG USE AND HIV ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY DISCONTINUATION IN A CANADIAN SETTING

    PubMed Central

    Werb, Dan; Milloy, M-J; Kerr, Thomas; Zhang, Ruth; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether drug-related behaviors predicted antiretroviral therapy (ART) discontinuation among a cohort of injection drug users (IDU) in a Canadian setting. Cox regression analyses were used to investigate the impact of drug use patterns on rates of ART discontinuation among a sample of HIV-positive IDU in Vancouver, Canada between May 1996 and April 2008. In total, 408 HIV-positive IDU initiated ART during the study period, among whom 257 (63.0%) discontinued ART at least once. Rates of ART discontinuation were not significantly elevated among those who reported ongoing injection of heroin, cocaine, or other illicit drugs in comparison to those who reported not injecting drugs. However, public drug use was significantly predictive of ART discontinuation. Our findings may contribute to a reconsideration of the role of active drug use in determining retention in ART programs among IDU. PMID:22249956

  3. Virological Response and Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Emerging during Antiretroviral Therapy at Three Treatment Centers in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kaleebu, Pontiano; Kirungi, Wilford; Watera, Christine; Asio, Juliet; Lyagoba, Fred; Lutalo, Tom; Kapaata, Anne A.; Nanyonga, Faith; Parry, Chris M.; Magambo, Brian; Nazziwa, Jamirah; Nannyonjo, Maria; Hughes, Peter; Hladik, Wolfgang; Ruberantwari, Anthony; Namuwenge, Norah; Musinguzi, Joshua; Downing, Robert; Katongole-Mbidde, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Background With the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART), monitoring programme performance is needed to maximize ART efficacy and limit HIV drug resistance (HIVDR). Methods We implemented a WHO HIVDR prospective survey protocol at three treatment centers between 2012 and 2013. Data were abstracted from patient records at ART start (T1) and after 12 months (T2). Genotyping was performed in the HIV pol region at the two time points. Results Of the 425 patients enrolled, at T2, 20 (4.7%) had died, 66 (15.5%) were lost to follow-up, 313 (73.6%) were still on first-line, 8 (1.9%) had switched to second-line, 17 (4.0%) had transferred out and 1 (0.2%) had stopped treatment. At T2, 272 out of 321 on first and second line (84.7%) suppressed below 1000 copies/ml and the HIV DR prevention rate was 70.1%, just within the WHO threshold of ≥70%. The proportion of participants with potential HIVDR was 20.9%, which is higher than the 18.8% based on pooled analyses from African studies. Of the 35 patients with mutations at T2, 80% had M184V/I, 65.7% Y181C, and 48.6% (54.8% excluding those not on Tenofovir) had K65R mutations. 22.9% had Thymidine Analogue Mutations (TAMs). Factors significantly associated with HIVDR prevention at T2 were: baseline viral load (VL) <100,000 copies/ml [Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 3.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.36–7.19] and facility. Independent baseline predictors for HIVDR mutations at T2 were: CD4 count <250 cells/μl (AOR 2.80, 95% CI: 1.08–7.29) and viral load ≥100,000 copies/ml (AOR 2.48, 95% CI: 1.00–6.14). Conclusion Strengthening defaulter tracing, intensified follow-up for patients with low CD4 counts and/or high VL at ART initiation together with early treatment initiation above 250 CD4 cells/ul and adequate patient counselling would improve ART efficacy and HIVDR prevention. The high rate of K65R and TAMs could compromise second line regimens including NRTIs. PMID:26700639

  4. Glucose Metabolism Disorders, HIV and Antiretroviral Therapy among Tanzanian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Maganga, Emmanuel; Smart, Luke R.; Kalluvya, Samuel; Kataraihya, Johannes B.; Saleh, Ahmed M.; Obeid, Lama; Downs, Jennifer A.; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; Peck, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Millions of HIV-infected Africans are living longer due to long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART), yet little is known about glucose metabolism disorders in this group. We aimed to compare the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders among HIV-infected adults on long-term ART to ART-naïve adults and HIV-negative controls, hypothesizing that the odds of glucose metabolism disorders would be 2-fold greater even after adjusting for possible confounders. Methods In this cross-sectional study conducted between October 2012 and April 2013, consecutive adults (>18 years) attending an HIV clinic in Tanzania were enrolled in 3 groups: 153 HIV-negative controls, 151 HIV-infected, ART-naïve, and 150 HIV-infected on ART for ≥ 2 years. The primary outcome was the prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders as determined by oral glucose tolerance testing. We compared glucose metabolism disorder prevalence between each HIV group vs. the control group by Fisher’s exact test and used multivariable logistic regression to determine factors associated with glucose metabolism disorders. Results HIV-infected adults on ART had a higher prevalence of glucose metabolism disorders (49/150 (32.7%) vs.11/153 (7.2%), p<0.001) and frank diabetes mellitus (27/150 (18.0%) vs. 8/153 (5.2%), p = 0.001) than HIV-negative adults, which remained highly significant even after adjusting for age, gender, adiposity and socioeconomic status (OR = 5.72 (2.78–11.77), p<0.001). Glucose metabolism disorders were significantly associated with higher CD4+ T-cell counts. Awareness of diabetes mellitus was <25%. Conclusions HIV-infected adults on long-term ART had 5-fold greater odds of glucose metabolism disorders than HIV-negative controls but were rarely aware of their diagnosis. Intensive glucose metabolism disorder screening and education are needed in HIV clinics in sub-Saharan Africa. Further research should determine how glucose metabolism disorders might be related to immune

  5. Early antiretroviral therapy initiation in west Africa has no adverse social consequences: a 24-month prospective study.

    PubMed

    Jean, Kévin; Niangoran, Serge; Danel, Christine; Moh, Raoul; Kouamé, Gérard Menan; Badjé, Anani; Gabillard, Delphine; Eholié, Serge; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Lert, France; Anglaret, Xavier; Desgrées-Du-LoÛ, Annabel

    2016-06-19

    Based on social indicators collected within the TEMPRANO-ANRS12136 trial, we assessed the social consequences of early antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in west Africa. We did not observe any significant differences in the levels or the time trends of various social indicators, including union status, HIV disclosure and HIV-related discrimination, between early and deferred ART initiation. Early ART does not carry detectable adverse social consequences that could impair its clinical and preventive benefits. PMID:27003034

  6. Neuropathic and neurocongnitive complications of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Suvada, Jose

    2013-09-01

    The neurologic events related to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected ART-naive patients are relatively common. Side effects of ART and complications of HIV infection may overlap significantly. Establishing etiology of neurologic (neuropathy and neuropathic pain, changes in cognition, dementia, and myelopathy) and psychiatric (neurocognitive disorders, depression, anxiety, substance abuse and dependence, and others) complications can present a significant challenge. It has long been documented that neurologic and psychological side effects can occur with many of the agents used to treat HIV infection. Particularly, efavirenz from the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) has been associated with neurologic and psychological complaints that may be difficult to differentiate from pre-existing mental illness, substance abuse, and HIV-related neuropsychiatric symptoms. Peripheral neuropathy (PN) of at least 6 different types is a well-known adverse effect of treatment with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in HIV-infected patients. Lack of dealing with early stages of neurologic and psychological side effects of HIV infection and Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy (HAART) are observed in daily practice. The purpose of this article is to identify the neurologic, neuropsychiatric and psychiatric complications related to HIV and anti-retroviral therapy, to discuss current knowledge about these disorders, and to suggest strategies for their diagnosis and management. PMID:24013599

  7. Cellular Responses and Tissue Depots for Nanoformulated Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Skinner, Andrea L.; Araínga, Mariluz A.; Puligujja, Pavan; Palandri, Diana L.; Baldridge, Hannah M.; Edagwa, Benson J.; McMillan, JoEllyn M.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2015-01-01

    Long-acting nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) induces a range of innate immune migratory, phagocytic and secretory cell functions that perpetuate drug depots. While recycling endosomes serve as the macrophage subcellular depots, little is known of the dynamics of nanoART-cell interactions. To this end, we assessed temporal leukocyte responses, drug uptake and distribution following both intraperitoneal and intramuscular injection of nanoformulated atazanavir (nanoATV). Local inflammatory responses heralded drug distribution to peritoneal cell populations, regional lymph nodes, spleen and liver. This proceeded for three days in male Balb/c mice. NanoATV-induced changes in myeloid populations were assessed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) with CD45, CD3, CD11b, F4/80, and GR-1 antibodies. The localization of nanoATV within leukocyte cell subsets was determined by confocal microscopy. Combined FACS and ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry assays determined nanoATV carriages by cell-based vehicles. A robust granulocyte, but not peritoneal macrophage nanoATV response paralleled zymosan A treatment. ATV levels were highest at sites of injection in peritoneal or muscle macrophages, dependent on the injection site. The spleen and liver served as nanoATV tissue depots while drug levels in lymph nodes were higher than those recorded in plasma. Dual polymer and cell labeling demonstrated a nearly exclusive drug reservoir in macrophages within the liver and spleen. Overall, nanoART induces innate immune responses coincident with rapid tissue macrophage distribution. Taken together, these works provide avenues for therapeutic development designed towards chemical eradication of human immunodeficiency viral infection. PMID:26716700

  8. Timing of Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)–Associated Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Török, M. Estee; Yen, Nguyen Thi Bich; Chau, Tran Thi Hong; Mai, Nguyen Thi Hoang; Phu, Nguyen Hoan; Mai, Pham Phuong; Dung, Nguyen Thi; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Bang, Nguyen Duc; Tien, Nguyen Anh; Minh, N. H.; Hien, Nguyen Quang; Thai, Phan Vuong Khac; Dong, Doan The; Anh, Do Thi Tuong; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Cam; Hai, Nguyen Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Ngoc; Lan, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Quy, Hoang Thi; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Hien, Tran Tinh; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Simmons, Cameron Paul; de Jong, Menno; Wolbers, Marcel; Farrar, Jeremy James

    2015-01-01

    Background The optimal time to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–associated tuberculous meningitis is unknown. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of immediate versus deferred ART in patients with HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis to determine whether immediate ART reduced the risk of death. Antiretroviral drugs (zidovudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz) were started either at study entry or 2 months after randomization. All patients were treated with standard antituberculosis treatment, adjunctive dexamethasone, and prophylactic co-trimoxazole and were followed up for 12 months. We conducted intention-to-treat, per-protocol, and prespecified subgroup analyses. Results A total of 253 patients were randomized, 127 in the immediate ART group and 126 in the deferred ART group; 76 and 70 patients died within 9 months in the immediate and deferred ART groups, respectively. Immediate ART was not significantly associated with 9-month mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], .81–1.55; P = .50) or the time to new AIDS events or death (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, .87–1.55; P = .31). The percentage of patients with severe (grade 3 or 4) adverse events was high in both arms (90% in the immediate ART group and 89% in the deferred ART group; P = .84), but there were significantly more grade 4 adverse events in the immediate ART arm (102 in the immediate ART group vs 87 in the deferred ART group; P = .04). Conclusions Immediate ART initiation does not improve outcome in patients presenting with HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis. There were significantly more grade 4 adverse events in the immediate ART arm, supporting delayed initiation of ART in HIV-associated tuberculous meningitis. Clinical Trials Registration ISRCTN63659091. PMID:21596680

  9. Art Therapy with Laryngectomy Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anand, Susan Ainlay; Anand, Vinod K.

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the experiences of patients with laryngeal cancer who used art therapy. Drawing on 14 years of experience and 109 laryngeal cancer patients, describes treatment results and the case material substantiating the distinct role of art therapy. Provides an overview of the special medical and therapeutic needs of this group. (RJM)

  10. Art, dance, and music therapy.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Rosalie Rebollo

    2004-11-01

    Art, dance, and music therapy are a significant part of complementary medicine in the twenty-first century. These creative arts therapies contribute to all areas of health care and are present in treatments for most psychologic and physiologic illnesses. Although the current body of solid research is small compared with that of more traditional medical specialties, the arts therapies are now validating their research through more controlled experimental and descriptive studies. The arts therapies also contribute significantly to the humanization and comfort of modern health care institutions by relieving stress, anxiety, and pain of patients and caregivers. Arts therapies will greatly expand their role in the health care practices of this country in the twenty-first century. PMID:15458755

  11. Has the time come to abandon efavirenz for first-line antiretroviral therapy?

    PubMed

    Raffi, Francois; Pozniak, Anton L; Wainberg, Mark A

    2014-07-01

    Efavirenz has been recommended as a preferred third agent together with two nucleos(t)ides for first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for >15 years. The availability of efavirenz in a fixed-dose combination makes it very attractive. However, because of (i) adverse events associated with efavirenz, (ii) a poorer overall efficacy of efavirenz compared with newer antiretrovirals, (iii) the ranking of efavirenz as FDA Pregnancy Category D and (iv) the relatively high prevalence of transmitted drug-resistance mutations, there is a need to reconsider the role of efavirenz in first-line ART. We review the available evidence that challenges efavirenz's current position in first-line HIV treatment guidelines. Apart from its animal teratogenic potential, and moderate neuropsychiatric adverse events associated with its use, efavirenz has recently been associated with an increased risk of suicidality when compared with other antiretroviral drugs. Most importantly, efavirenz has demonstrated overall inferior efficacy to various comparator drugs, which include rilpivirine, raltegravir and dolutegravir, in antiretroviral-naive patients. Furthermore, epidemiological data indicate that the prevalence of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance has reached 5%-8% in various parts of the world, and minority transmitted non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance-associated mutations can have a negative impact on the outcome of first-line efavirenz-based ART. Based on considerations of efficacy, toxicity and resistance, it is time to reconsider the routine use of efavirenz in ART. This, of course, presupposes that other antiretrovirals will be available in place of efavirenz, and may not be applicable in certain developing country settings where this is not the case. PMID:24603962

  12. Brief Exposure to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Reduces Side-Effect Symptoms in Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Doerfler, R Eric; Goodfellow, Linda

    2016-01-01

    No study has tested the effectiveness of individualized cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions to reduce persistent nausea, pain, anxiety, and fatigue in patients on continuous antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our objective was to determine if CBT could reduce nausea, pain, anxiety, and fatigue in patients with HIV on ART. Men ages 40 to 56 years on ART (n = 18) at a suburban HIV clinic were randomly assigned to a control group or the CBT intervention. Usual adherence education and side-effect management were provided to both groups. Symptoms, health perception, medication adherence, and side-effect-reducing medication use were measured at four time points over 3 months. Participants in the intervention group rated usual fatigue and worst fatigue at 60 days, and nausea duration at 90 days significantly lower than controls (p < .05). Brief CBT training may reduce fatigue and nausea in patients with HIV undergoing ART. PMID:26996984

  13. Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection: When to Initiate Therapy, Which Regimen to Use, and How to Monitor Patients on Therapy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven C

    Antiretroviral therapy is recommended for all patients with HIV infection. The benefit of immediate antiretroviral therapy was confirmed by results from the START (Strategic Timing of Antiretroviral Treatment) trial, which showed a 57% reduction in risk for the composite end point of AIDS-related events, serious non-AIDS-related events, or death from any cause with immediate treatment in antiretroviral therapy-naive participants with CD4+ cell counts above 500/µL. Other changes in HIV care include the widespread adoption of integrase strand transfer inhibitor-based regimens. Considerations regarding when to initiate antiretroviral therapy, which initial regimens to use, and appropriate monitoring of individuals taking antiretroviral therapy are discussed. This article summarizes an IAS-USA continuing education webinar presented by Steven C. Johnson, MD, in July 2015. PMID:27398769

  14. Dermatologic adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy: recognition and management.

    PubMed

    Luther, Jay; Glesby, Marshall J

    2007-01-01

    Despite the decrease in opportunistic infections associated with HIV in the highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) era, a significant number of patients still present with skin pathology, some of which can be attributed directly or indirectly to antiretroviral therapy. The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors exhibit a class effect with regard to skin adverse manifestations, and the spectrum of disease can vary from a mild morbilliform rash to Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Certain protease inhibitors are associated with rash, and indinavir causes retinoid-like manifestations such as paronychia, alopecia, ingrown toe-nails, and curling of straight hair. Abacavir, a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, is notorious for causing a hypersensitivity reaction in select patients. The fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide causes injection-site reactions in the overwhelming majority of patients, although a new method of delivery has decreased the rate and severity of these reactions. A syndrome of lipoatrophy with or without lipohypertrophy, often termed lipodystrophy, has been described in patients receiving HAART. Potential management of lipoatrophy includes switching antiretrovirals and surgical treatment with facial fillers. Lastly, skin manifestations of the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, including herpes zoster and warts, must be recognized and treated accordingly. In the evaluation of the individual HIV-infected patient receiving antiretroviral therapy who presents with a skin disorder, clinicians should consider the CD4 cell count as a marker of the degree of immunodeficiency, the specific antiretrovirals used, and the timing of the initiation of antiretroviral therapy in order to formulate a rational differential diagnosis. Management should be individualized based on the specific drug that is implicated and the severity of the reaction. PMID:17645377

  15. Duration of Anti-Tuberculosis Therapy and Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation: Association with Mortality in HIV-Related Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Claudia P.; Wehbe, Firas H.; McGowan, Catherine C.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Duda, Stephany N.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Gonzalez, Elsa; Carriquiry, Gabriela; Schechter, Mauro; Padgett, Denis; Cesar, Carina; Madero, Juan Sierra; Pape, Jean W.; Masys, Daniel R.; Sterling, Timothy R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) decreases mortality risk in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients, but the effect of the duration of anti-tuberculosis therapy and timing of anti-tuberculosis therapy initiation in relation to ART initiation on mortality, is unclear. Methods We conducted a retrospective observational multi-center cohort study among HIV-infected persons concomitantly treated with Rifamycin-based anti-tuberculosis therapy and ART in Latin America. The study population included persons for whom 6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy is recommended. Results Of 253 patients who met inclusion criteria, median CD4+ lymphocyte count at ART initiation was 64 cells/mm3, 171 (68%) received >180 days of anti-tuberculosis therapy, 168 (66%) initiated anti-tuberculosis therapy before ART, and 43 (17%) died. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model that adjusted for CD4+ lymphocytes and HIV-1 RNA, tuberculosis diagnosed after ART initiation was associated with an increased risk of death compared to tuberculosis diagnosis before ART initiation (HR 2.40; 95% CI 1.15, 5.02; P = 0.02). In a separate model among patients surviving >6 months after tuberculosis diagnosis, after adjusting for CD4+ lymphocytes, HIV-1 RNA, and timing of ART initiation relative to tuberculosis diagnosis, receipt of >6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy was associated with a decreased risk of death (HR 0.23; 95% CI 0.08, 0.66; P=0.007). Conclusions The increased risk of death among persons diagnosed with tuberculosis after ART initiation highlights the importance of screening for tuberculosis before ART initiation. The decreased risk of death among persons receiving > 6 months of anti-tuberculosis therapy suggests that current anti-tuberculosis treatment duration guidelines should be re-evaluated. PMID:24066096

  16. Comparative efficacy versus effectiveness of initial antiretroviral therapy in clinical trials versus routine care

    PubMed Central

    Routman, Justin S.; Willig, James H.; Westfall, Andrew O.; Abroms, Sarah R.; Varshney, Mohit; Adusumilli, Sunil; Allison, Jeroan J.; Savage, Karen G.; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The generalizability of clinical trial findings (efficacy) to routine care (effectiveness) may be limited. The present study found similar first year virologic and CD4 outcomes among antiretroviral-naïve patients treated through routine care vs. those participating in clinical trials. Background The generalizability of clinical trial findings (efficacy) to routine care (effectiveness) may be limited due to study eligibility criteria and volunteer bias. While well chronicled in many conditions, the efficacy vs. effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains understudied. Methods A retrospective study of the UAB 1917 Clinic Cohort evaluated naïve patients starting ART between 1/1/00–12/31/06. Patients received ART through clinical trials or routine care. Multivariable logistic and linear regression models were fit to evaluate factors associated with virologic failure (VF=VL>50 copies/mL) and change from baseline CD4 count 6 and 12 months after ART initiation. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the impact of missing data on outcomes. Results Among 570 patients starting ART during the study period, 121 (21%) enrolled in clinical trials vs. 449 (79%) receiving ART via routine care. ART receipt through routine care was not associated with VF at either 6 (OR=1.00;95%CI=0.54–1.86) or 12 (OR=1.56;95%CI=0.80–3.05) months in primary analyses. No significant differences in CD4 count responses at 6 and 12 months were observed. Conclusions Though marked differences in efficacy vs. effectiveness have been observed in the therapeutic outcomes of other conditions, our analyses found no evidence of such divergence among our patients initiating antiretroviral therapy for HIV. PMID:20067423

  17. Low bone mass in behaviorally HIV-infected young men on antiretroviral therapy: adolescent trials network (ATN) study 021B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peak bone mass is achieved in adolescence/early adulthood and is the key determinant of bone mass in adulthood. We evaluated the association of bone mass with HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) during this critical period among behaviorally HIV infected young men and seronegative control...

  18. Antiretroviral therapy management and rationalisation of available resources.

    PubMed

    Cirioni, Oscar; Castelletti, Sefora; Ucciferri, Claudio; Falasca, Katia; Orsetti, Elena; Mazzocato, Susanna; Valeriani, Chiara; Di Campli, Francesco Maria; Barchiesi, Francesco; Vecchiet, Jacopo; Giacometti, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The treatment of HIV disease has led to a new division of management costs by shifting most of the necessary resources from inpatient treatment to outpatient management. Among the initiatives aimed at rationalising the resources available, we compared efficacy, tolerability and pharmacoeconomic impact of different regimes of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The survey covered the first 50 patients, clinically stable and with good viro-immunological response, who switched in June 2012 from an ART based on the triple combination of tenofovir (TDF), emtricitabine (FTC) and a protease inhibitor boosted with ritonavir (PI/r) or a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), to a treatment based on abacavir (ABC), lamivudine (3TC) and a PI/r or NNRTI. Of the 50 patients who operated the switch, 39 replaced a PI with nevirapine (NVP), for which the largest group of patients was treated with ABC + 3TC + NVP. On 31 May 2015, all patients completed the observation period of 96 weeks, with a mean observation period of 132 weeks and clinical-laboratory checks every four months. Laboratory analysis revealed an optimal maintenance of viral suppression and absolute and relative number of CD4 + lymphocytes and improving trend of creatinine, proteinuria, serum phosphate and bone alkaline phosphatase. There was a variable effect on lipids, with a drop in triglycerides associated with a modest increase in total cholesterol. Much of the HIV-positive population reporting to our hospitals (>50%) comprises individuals who have for years been in stable viraemic suppression, making a satisfactory immune recovery while in good overall clinical condition. This type of patient was the target of the present survey. At the end of 96 weeks of observation the new regimes were well tolerated and did not lead to viro-immunological or clinical deterioration. Pharmacoeconomic analysis showed better containment of the overall costs. No patient needed to be hospitalised during the observation

  19. Contagiousness under antiretroviral therapy and stigmatization toward people with HIV.

    PubMed

    Drewes, Jochen; Kleiber, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Perceived contagiousness is a major dimension underlying HIV-related stigmatization. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) can diminish contagiousness by reducing viral load levels in HIV-infected individuals. To test the assumption that reductions in contagiousness can lead to a decrease in stigmatizing reactions, we conducted an experimental online study. A sample of 752 participants (50.9% female) read a short vignette depicting an HIV-positive individual with either a high or a low viral load and were either given or not given information about the association between viral load and contagiousness. Subsequently, participants were asked to rate their willingness to stigmatize this individual by responding to two measures of social and physical distance. Differences between the low and the high viral load information groups and the combined no-information groups (forming a quasi-control group) were analyzed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), controlling for gender and baseline perceptions of contagiousness. The covariates, perceived contagiousness at baseline and gender, were associated with social and physical distancing, but the viral load/information factor was only significant in physical distancing. Planned contrast analyses confirmed that physical distancing in the informed group was lower in the low viral load condition compared to the high viral load condition and to the control group. We thus found evidence for the significant role of perceived contagiousness in the HIV-related stigma and were able to experimentally demonstrate the potential of ART to reduce HIV-related stigmatization by lowering viral load and contagiousness, when these changes are accompanied by a decreased perception of contagiousness. PMID:24779483

  20. Antiretroviral therapy adherence: testing a social context model among Black men who use illicit drugs.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J Craig

    2011-01-01

    Individuals living with HIV who receive treatment and optimal care live longer and healthier lives. The purpose of this study was to develop a theoretical model to understand the effects of social context factors (individual, interpersonal, and social capital) that influence antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among a sample of HIV-infected Black men who use illicit drugs (N = 160). Ecosocial theory and social epidemiology provided the theoretical framework for this study. Multiple regression techniques and path analysis were used to test the model for these subjects. Homelessness among the subjects significantly affected adherence to ART. Tolerability of ART was observed to have a greater indirect effect on ART adherence than a direct effect. A positive state of mind and current illicit drug use indirectly affected ART adherence; however, significance was not achieved. Implications for the use of this theoretical model to guide research, clinical practice, and policy as part of a human rights approach to HIV disease is articulated. PMID:21123085

  1. The indirect impact of antiretroviral therapy: Mortality risk, mental health, and HIV-negative labor supply.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Victoria; Bennett, Daniel; Kohler, Hans-Peter

    2015-12-01

    To reduce the burden of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, international donors recently began providing free antiretroviral therapy (ART) in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa. ART dramatically prolongs life and reduces infectiousness for people with HIV. This paper shows that ART availability increases work time for HIV-negative people without caretaker obligations, who do not directly benefit from the medicine. A difference-in-difference design compares people living near and far from ART, before and after treatment becomes available. Next we explore the possible reasons for this pattern. Although we cannot pinpoint the mechanism, we find that ART availability substantially reduces subjective mortality risk and improves mental health. These results show an undocumented economic consequence of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and an important externality of medical innovation. They also provide the first evidence of a link between the disease environment and mental health. PMID:26516983

  2. Vaginal Cytomegalovirus Shedding Before and After Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Rakai, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Gianella, Sara; Redd, Andrew D; Grabowski, Mary K; Tobian, Aaron A R; Serwadda, David; Newell, Kevin; Patel, Eshan U; Kalibbala, Sarah; Ssebbowa, Paschal; Gray, Ronald H; Quinn, Thomas C; Reynolds, Steven J

    2015-09-15

    Vaginal shedding of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA was determined longitudinally among 96 women coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus 2, and CMV starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) during a placebo-controlled trial of HSV-2 suppression with acyclovir in Rakai, Uganda. Vaginal CMV was detected in 75 of 96 women (78.0%) and 379 of 1080 individual visits (35.1%). ART status, higher HIV RNA viral load before ART initiation, and younger age were significantly associated with increased frequency of CMV shedding (P < .01). Compared to pre-ART, CMV shedding peaked from month 2 to month 4 after ART initiation, suggesting possible immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Further studies need to determine the clinical significance of asymptomatic CMV shedding. PMID:25743428

  3. The Complexity of HIV Persistence and Pathogenesis in the Lung Under Antiretroviral Therapy: Challenges Beyond AIDS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Antiretroviral therapy (ART) represents a significant milestone in the battle against AIDS. However, we continue learning about HIV and confronting challenges 30 years after its discovery. HIV has cleverly tricked both the host immune system and ART. First, the many HIV subtypes and recombinant forms have different susceptibilities to antiretroviral drugs, which may represent an issue in countries where ART is just being introduced. Second, even under the suppressive pressures of ART, HIV still increases inflammatory mediators, deregulates apoptosis and proliferation, and induces oxidative stress in the host. Third, the preference of HIV for CXCR4 as a co-receptor may also have noxious outcomes, including potential malignancies. Furthermore, HIV still replicates cryptically in anatomical reservoirs, including the lung. HIV impairs bronchoalveolar T-lymphocyte and macrophage immune responses, rendering the lung susceptible to comorbidities. In addition, HIV-infected individuals are significantly more susceptible to long-term HIV-associated complications. This review focuses on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary arterial hypertension, and lung cancer. Almost two decades after the advent of highly active ART, we now know that HIV-infected individuals on ART live as long as the uninfected population. Fortunately, its availability is rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries. Nevertheless, ART is not risk-free: the developed world is facing issues with antiretroviral drug toxicity, resistance, and drug–drug interactions, while developing countries are confronting issues with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Several aspects of the complexity of HIV persistence and challenges with ART are discussed, as well as suggestions for new avenues of research. PMID:24797368

  4. Antiretroviral therapy CNS penetration and HIV-1–associated CNS disease

    PubMed Central

    Winston, A.; Walsh, J.; Post, F.; Porter, K.; Gazzard, B.; Fisher, M.; Leen, C.; Pillay, D.; Hill, T.; Johnson, M.; Gilson, R.; Anderson, J.; Easterbrook, P.; Bansi, L.; Orkin, C.; Ainsworth, J.; Palfreeman, A.; Gompels, M.; Phillips, A.N.; Sabin, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The impact of different antiretroviral agents on the risk of developing or surviving CNS disease remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether using antiretroviral regimens with higher CNS penetration effectiveness (CPE) scores was associated with reduced incidence of CNS disease and improved survival in the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (CHIC) Study. Methods: Adults without previous CNS disease, who commenced combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) between 1996 and 2008, were included (n = 22,356). Initial and most recent cART CPE scores were calculated. CNS diseases were HIV encephalopathy (HIVe), progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), cerebral toxoplasmosis (TOXO), and cryptococcal meningitis (CRYPTO). Incidence rates and overall survival were stratified by CPE score. A multivariable Poisson regression model was used to identify independent associations. Results: The median (interquartile range) CPE score for initial cART regimen increased from 7 (5–8) in 1996–1997 to 9 (8–10) in 2000–2001 and subsequently declined to 6 (7–8) in 2006–2008. Differences in gender, HIV acquisition risk group, and ethnicity existed between CPE score strata. A total of 251 subjects were diagnosed with a CNS disease (HIVe 80; TOXO 59; CRYPTO 56; PML 54). CNS diseases occurred more frequently in subjects prescribed regimens with CPE scores ≤4, and less frequently in those with scores ≥10; however, these differences were nonsignificant. Initial and most recent cART CPE scores ≤4 were independently associated with increased risk of death. Conclusion: Clinical status at time of commencing cART influences antiretroviral selection and CPE score. This information should be considered when utilizing CPE scores for retrospective analyses. PMID:21339496

  5. START or SMART? Timing of Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation and Cardiovascular Risk for People With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Siedner, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Early Asymptomatic HIV Infection (START) study has reinforced the benefits of early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, a notable secondary finding from that study was that immediate initiation of ART did not prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events (0.17 vs 0.20 events/1000 person-years, P = .65). This result appears to contradict a body of evidence, most notably from the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study, which reported a 70% increased hazard of cardiovascular events for those deferring or interrupting treatment. Thus, an important unresolved question is whether the timing of ART impacts CVD risk. In this review, published data on relationships between timing of ART and CVD risk are reviewed. The data support a role for ART in mitigating CVD risk at lower CD4 counts, but data also suggests that, among those initiating therapy early, ART alone appears to suboptimally mitigate CVD risk. Additional interventions to address CVD risk among human immunodeficiency virus-infected populations are likely to be needed. PMID:26989755

  6. Infant peripheral blood repetitive element hypomethylation associated with antiretroviral therapy in utero.

    PubMed

    Marsit, Carmen J; Brummel, Sean S; Kacanek, Deborah; Seage, George R; Spector, Stephen A; Armstrong, David A; Lester, Barry M; Rich, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to prevent HIV mother-to-child transmission during pregnancy and delivery is generally considered safe. However, vigilant assessment of potential risks of these agents remains warranted. Epigenetic changes including DNA methylation are considered potential mechanisms linking the in utero environment with long-term health outcomes. Few studies have examined the epigenetic effects of prenatal exposure to pharmaceutical agents, including antiretroviral therapies, on children. In this study, we examined the methylation status of the LINE-1 and ALU-Yb8 repetitive elements as markers of global DNA methylation alteration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from newborns participating in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study SMARTT cohort of HIV-exposed, cART-exposed uninfected infants compared to a historical cohort of HIV-exposed, antiretroviral-unexposed infants from the Women and Infants Transmission Study Cohort. In linear regression models controlling for potential confounders, we found the adjusted mean difference of AluYb8 methylation of the cART-exposed compared to the -unexposed was -0.568 (95% CI: -1.023, -0.149) and for LINE-1 methylation was -1.359 (95% CI: -1.860, -0.857). Among those exposed to cART, subjects treated with atazanavir (ATV), compared to those on other treatments, had less AluYb8 methylation (-0.524, 95% CI: -0.025, -1.024). Overall, these results suggest a small but statistically significant reduction in the methylation of these repetitive elements in an HIV-exposed, cART-exposed cohort compared to an HIV-exposed, cART-unexposed historic cohort. The potential long-term implications of these differences are worthy of further examination. PMID:26067216

  7. Infant peripheral blood repetitive element hypomethylation associated with antiretroviral therapy in utero

    PubMed Central

    Marsit, Carmen J; Brummel, Sean S; Kacanek, Deborah; Seage, George R; Spector, Stephen A; Armstrong, David A; Lester, Barry M; Rich, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    The use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to prevent HIV mother-to-child transmission during pregnancy and delivery is generally considered safe. However, vigilant assessment of potential risks of these agents remains warranted. Epigenetic changes including DNA methylation are considered potential mechanisms linking the in utero environment with long-term health outcomes. Few studies have examined the epigenetic effects of prenatal exposure to pharmaceutical agents, including antiretroviral therapies, on children. In this study, we examined the methylation status of the LINE-1 and ALU-Yb8 repetitive elements as markers of global DNA methylation alteration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from newborns participating in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study SMARTT cohort of HIV-exposed, cART-exposed uninfected infants compared to a historical cohort of HIV-exposed, antiretroviral-unexposed infants from the Women and Infants Transmission Study Cohort. In linear regression models controlling for potential confounders, we found the adjusted mean difference of AluYb8 methylation of the cART-exposed compared to the -unexposed was −0.568 (95% CI: −1.023, −0.149) and for LINE-1 methylation was −1.359 (95% CI: −1.860, −0.857). Among those exposed to cART, subjects treated with atazanavir (ATV), compared to those on other treatments, had less AluYb8 methylation (−0.524, 95% CI: −0.025, −1.024). Overall, these results suggest a small but statistically significant reduction in the methylation of these repetitive elements in an HIV-exposed, cART-exposed cohort compared to an HIV-exposed, cART-unexposed historic cohort. The potential long-term implications of these differences are worthy of further examination. PMID:26067216

  8. Comics as Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulholland, Matthew J.

    2004-01-01

    Spider Man and the Green Lantern are not the first images that most people conjure up when someone mentions "important art." In the world of fine art, comic books are often viewed as the bottom rung of the artistic ladder. In the early half of the 1900s, such an assessment would not have been unreasonable. With their rudimentary visuals and…

  9. Cause-Specific Mortality in HIV-Positive Patients Who Survived Ten Years after Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    May, Margaret T.; Vehreschild, Janne; Obel, Niels; Gill, Michael John; Crane, Heidi; Boesecke, Christoph; Samji, Hasina; Grabar, Sophie; Cazanave, Charles; Cavassini, Matthias; Shepherd, Leah; d’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Smit, Colette; Saag, Michael; Lampe, Fiona; Hernando, Vicky; Montero, Marta; Zangerle, Robert; Justice, Amy C.; Sterling, Timothy; Miro, Jose; Ingle, Suzanne; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate mortality rates and prognostic factors in HIV-positive patients who started combination antiretroviral therapy between 1996–1999 and survived for more than ten years. Methods We used data from 18 European and North American HIV cohort studies contributing to the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration. We followed up patients from ten years after start of combination antiretroviral therapy. We estimated overall and cause-specific mortality rate ratios for age, sex, transmission through injection drug use, AIDS, CD4 count and HIV-1 RNA. Results During 50,593 person years 656/13,011 (5%) patients died. Older age, male sex, injecting drug use transmission, AIDS, and low CD4 count and detectable viral replication ten years after starting combination antiretroviral therapy were associated with higher subsequent mortality. CD4 count at ART start did not predict mortality in models adjusted for patient characteristics ten years after start of antiretroviral therapy. The most frequent causes of death (among 340 classified) were non-AIDS cancer, AIDS, cardiovascular, and liver-related disease. Older age was strongly associated with cardiovascular mortality, injecting drug use transmission with non-AIDS infection and liver-related mortality, and low CD4 and detectable viral replication ten years after starting antiretroviral therapy with AIDS mortality. Five-year mortality risk was <5% in 60% of all patients, and in 30% of those aged over 60 years. Conclusions Viral replication, lower CD4 count, prior AIDS, and transmission via injecting drug use continue to predict higher all-cause and AIDS-related mortality in patients treated with combination antiretroviral therapy for over a decade. Deaths from AIDS and non-AIDS infection are less frequent than deaths from other non-AIDS causes. PMID:27525413

  10. Patient attrition from the HIV antiretroviral therapy program at two hospitals in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Puttkammer, Nancy H.; Zeliadt, Steven B.; Baseman, Janet G.; Destiné, Rodney; Domerçant, Jean Wysler; Coq, Nancy Rachel Labbé; Raphael, Nernst Atwood; Sherr, Kenneth; Tegger, Mary; Yuhas, Krista; Barnhart, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify factors associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) attrition among patients initiating therapy in 2005–2011 at two large, public-sector department-level hospitals, and to inform interventions to improve ART retention. Methods This retrospective cohort study used data from the iSanté electronic medical record (EMR) system. The study characterized ART attrition levels and explored the patient demographic, clinical, temporal, and service utilization factors associated with ART attrition, using time-to-event analysis methods. Results Among the 2 023 patients in the study, ART attrition on average was 17.0 per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI): 15.8–18.3). In adjusted analyses, risk of ART attrition was up to 89% higher for patients living in distant communes compared to patients living in the same commune as the hospital (hazard ratio: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.54–2.33; P < 0.001). Hospital site, earlier year of ART start, spending less time enrolled in HIV care prior to ART initiation, receiving a non-standard ART regimen, lacking counseling prior to ART initiation, and having a higher body mass index were also associated with attrition risk. Conclusions The findings suggest quality improvement interventions at the two hospitals, including: enhanced retention support and transportation subsidies for patients accessing care from remote areas; counseling for all patients prior to ART initiation; timely outreach to patients who miss ART pick-ups; “bridging services” for patients transferring care to alternative facilities; routine screening for anticipated interruptions in future ART pick-ups; and medical case review for patients placed on non-standard ART regimens. The findings are also relevant for policymaking on decentralization of ART services in Haiti. PMID:25563149

  11. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Ditangco, Rossana; Li, Patrick CK; Phanuphak, Praphan; Sirisanthana, Thira; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher KC; Mustafa, Mahiran; Merati, Tuti; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Singtoroj, Thida; Law, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) plays an important role in treatment outcomes. It is crucial to identify factors influencing adherence in order to optimize treatment responses. The aim of this study was to assess the rates of, and factors associated with, suboptimal adherence (SubAdh) in the first 24 months of ART in an Asian HIV cohort. Methods As part of a prospective resistance monitoring study, the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance Monitoring Study (TASER-M) collected patients’ adherence based on the World Health Organization-validated Adherence Visual Analogue Scale. SubAdh was defined in two ways: (i) <100% and (ii) <95%. Follow-up time started from ART initiation and was censored at 24 months, loss to follow-up, death, treatment switch, or treatment cessation for >14 days. Time was divided into four intervals: 0–6, 6–12, 12–18 and 18–24 months. Factors associated with SubAdh were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Results Out of 1316 patients, 32% ever reported <100% adherence and 17% ever reported <95%. Defining the outcome as SubAdh <100%, the rates of SubAdh for the four time intervals were 26%, 17%, 12% and 10%. Sites with an average of >2 assessments per patient per year had an odds ratio (OR)=0.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) (0.55 to 0.90), p=0.006), compared to sites with ≤2 assessments per patient per year. Compared to heterosexual exposure, SubAdh was higher in injecting drug users (IDUs) (OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.23 to 3.00), p=0.004) and lower in homosexual exposure (OR=0.52, 95% CI (0.38 to 0.71), p<0.001). Patients taking a nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor (NRTI+PI) combination were less likely to report adherence <100% (OR=0.36, 95% CI (0.20 to 0.67), p=0.001) compared to patients taking an NRTI and non-nucleoside transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI+NNRTI) combination. SubAdh decreased with increasing time on ART (all p<0.001). Similar associations were found with adherence

  12. Enhancing the benefits of antiretroviral therapy in Vietnam: towards ending AIDS.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masaya; Long, Nguyen Hoang; Duong, Bui Duc; Nhan, Do Thi; Nguyen, Thi Thuy Van; Hai, Nguyen Huu; Giang, Le Minh; Hoa, Do Mai; Van, Nguyen Thanh; Suthar, Amitabh B; Fontaine, Chris; Nadol, Patrick; Lo, Ying-Ru; McConnell, Michelle S

    2014-12-01

    Vietnam has a concentrated HIV epidemic, with the highest HIV prevalence being observed among people who inject drugs (PWID). Based on its experience scaling-up robust HIV interventions, Vietnam aims to further strengthen its response by harnessing the preventive benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Mathematical modelling suggests that prioritizing key populations for earlier access to ART, combined with other prevention interventions, may have significant impact on the epidemic, cost-effectively reducing new HIV infections and deaths. Pilot studies are being conducted to assess feasibility and acceptability of expansion of HIV testing and counselling (HTC) and early ART among key populations and to demonstrate innovative service delivery models to address challenges in uptake of services across the care cascade. Earlier access of key populations to combination prevention interventions, combined with sustained political commitment and supportive environment for key populations, are essential for maximum impact of ART on the HIV epidemic in Vietnam. PMID:25472886

  13. Viral dynamics model with CTL immune response incorporating antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Yicang; Brauer, Fred; Heffernan, Jane M

    2013-10-01

    We present two HIV models that include the CTL immune response, antiretroviral therapy and a full logistic growth term for uninfected CD4+ T-cells. The difference between the two models lies in the inclusion or omission of a loss term in the free virus equation. We obtain critical conditions for the existence of one, two or three steady states, and analyze the stability of these steady states. Through numerical simulation we find substantial differences in the reproduction numbers and the behaviour at the infected steady state between the two models, for certain parameter sets. We explore the effect of varying the combination drug efficacy on model behaviour, and the possibility of reconstituting the CTL immune response through antiretroviral therapy. Furthermore, we employ Latin hypercube sampling to investigate the existence of multiple infected equilibria. PMID:22930342

  14. Social, Cultural, and Environmental Challenges Faced by Children on Antiretroviral Therapy in Zimbabwe: a Mixed-Method Study

    PubMed Central

    Macherera, Margaret; Moyo, Lindani; Ncube, Mkhanyiseli; Gumbi, Angella

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Despite the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), many children, particularly in the rural communities of Zimbabwe, remain vulnerable. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors and challenges facing children on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Brunapeg area of Mangwe District, Zimbabwe. Methods A mixed-method approach involving interviewer-guided focus group discussions and piloted semi-structured questionnaires was utilized to collect data from different key population groups. The data obtained were analyzed through content coding procedures based on a set of predetermined themes of interest. Results A number of challenges emerged as barriers to the success of antiretroviral therapy for children. Primary care givers were less informed about HIV and AIDS issues for people having direct impact on the success of antiretroviral therapy in children whilst some were found to be taking the antiretroviral drugs meant for the children. It also emerged that some primary care givers were either too young or too old to care for the children while others had failed to disclose to the children why they frequently visited the Opportunistic Infections (OI) clinic. Most primary care givers were not the biological parents of the affected children. Other challenges included inadequate access to health services, inadequate food and nutrition and lack of access to clean water, good hygiene and sanitation. The lack of community support and stigma and discrimination affected their school attendance and hospital visits. All these factors contributed to non-adherence to antiretroviral drugs. Conclusions and Public Health Implications Children on ART in rural communities in Zimbabwe remain severely compromised and have unique problems that need multi-intervention strategies both at policy and programmatic levels. Effective mitigating measures must be fully established and implemented in rural communities of developing countries in the fight for universal

  15. Antiretroviral therapy, labor productivity, and gender: a longitudinal cohort study of tea pluckers in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    LARSON, Bruce. A.; FOX, Matthew P.; BII, Margaret; ROSEN, Sydney; ROHR, Julia; SHAFFER, Douglas; SAWE, Fredrick; WASUNNA, Monique; SIMON, Jonathon L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on labor productivity and income using detailed employment data from two large tea plantations in western Kenya for HIV-infected tea pluckers who initiated ART. Design Longitudinal study using primary data on key employment outcomes for a group of HIV-infected workers receiving anti-retroviral therapy (ART) and workers in the general workforce. Methods We used nearest-neighbor matching methods to estimate the impacts of HIV/AIDS and ART among 237 HIV-positive pluckers on ART (index group) over a four year period (2 years pre- and post-ART) on four monthly employment outcomes—days plucking tea, total kilograms harvested, total days working, and total labor income. Outcomes for the index group were compared to those for a matched reference group from the general workforce. Results We observed a rapid deterioration in all four outcomes for HIV-infected subjects in the period before ART initiation and then a rapid improvement after treatment initiation. By 18–24 months after treatment initiation, the index group harvested 8% (males) and 19% (females) less tea than reference subjects. The index group earned 6% (males) and 9% (females) less income from labor than reference subjects. Women’s income would have dropped further if they had not been able to offset their decline in tea plucking by spending more time on non-plucking assignments. Conclusions HIV-infected workers experienced long-term income reductions before and after initiating ART. The implications of such long-term impacts in low-income countries have not been adequately addressed. PMID:23014516

  16. Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Youth with HIV: A U.S.-Based Provider Survey

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Meghan; Saiman, Lisa; Neu, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In 2009, the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) recommended initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) for youth with HIV at higher CD4 counts (≤500 cells/mm3) than previously recommended (≤350 cells/mm3). Barriers experienced by providers regarding ART initiation in this population have not been assessed. From 12/2011–01/2012, we asked providers from the HIV Medicine Association listserv who prescribed ART to youth (ages 13–25 years) with behaviorally-acquired HIV to complete a web-based survey. We presented a clinical vignette to explore potential barriers for initiating ART. Overall, 274/290 (94%) respondents completed the survey. Most felt confident that evidence supported initiating ART at higher CD4 counts (94%), and that benefits outweighed the risks of long-term toxicity (98%) or developing resistance (88%). Most (96%) initiated ART in the patient vignette (age 19 years, CD4 count ∼400). Patient characteristics (e.g., unstable housing or drug use) were perceived as large barriers to ART initiation. Low response rate (13%) was a limitation. Respondents were knowledgeable about relevant DHHS guidelines, believed sufficient evidence supported ART initiation at higher CD4 counts, and would provide treatment to those with CD4 counts ≤500cells/mm3. Understanding and overcoming barriers to initiation of ART perceived by providers is important to ensure implementation of ART treatment guidelines. PMID:23937549

  17. Access to antiretroviral therapy during excess black-water flooding in central Thailand.

    PubMed

    Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Chunloy, Krongtip; Mundy, Linda M

    2013-01-01

    Excess black-water flooding in central Thailand resulted in closure of several healthcare facilities in the Fall of 2011. Persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were presumably at risk for interruption of antiretroviral therapy (ART), with consequent treatment failure. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of ART use among patients in care at a Thai HIV clinic that closed due to excess flood water. Among 217 patients on ART who had clinic appointments within the one-month interval before the floods through the one-month interval after the clinic re-opened, seven (3%) reported non-sustained ART access. Non-sustained ART access was independently associated with prior low self-reported ART adherence (P<0.001) and less than six-months duration on the ART regimen (P=0.03). Advanced ART receipt or procurement at other flood-free healthcare facilities were strategies associated with ART access. During a flood disaster, identification and close monitoring of at-risk patients, patient-staff communication, flood preparedness plans, "HIV care access for all" policies, and collaboration among patients, healthcare providers and the government are relevant issues within preparedness plans to optimize ART access. PMID:23428255

  18. Suboptimal antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected adults in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Muessig, Kathryn E; McLaughlin, Megan M; Nie, Jing Min; Cai, Weiping; Zheng, Heping; Yang, Ligang; Tucker, Joseph D

    2014-01-01

    Despite China's free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program, there are high rates of treatment failure, large sociodemographic disparities in care outcomes and emerging medication resistance. Understanding patient medication adherence behaviors and challenges could inform adherence interventions to maximize the individual and prevention benefits of ART. This study assessed recent nonadherence and treatment interruption among 813 HIV-infected adult outpatients in Guangzhou, China. Participants completed a behavioral survey, underwent chart review, and were tested for syphilis, gonorrhea, and chlamydia. Factors associated with suboptimal adherence were identified using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among 721 HIV-infected adults receiving ART, 18.9% reported recent nonadherence (any missed ART in the past four weeks) and 6.8% reported treatment interruption (four or more weeks of missed ART in the past year). Lower education, living alone, alcohol use, and being on ART one to three years were associated with recent nonadherence. Male gender, lower education, and being on ART one to three years were associated with treatment interruption. ART medication adherence interventions are needed in China that include individualized, long-term adherence plans sensitive to patients' educational and economic situations. These interventions should also consider possible gender disparities in treatment outcomes and address the use of alcohol during ART. Successful ART medication adherence interventions in China can inform other international settings that face similar adherence challenges and disparities. PMID:24666239

  19. Art-Based Learning Strategies in Art Therapy Graduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaver, Sarah P.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed methods research study examined the use of art-based teaching methods in master's level art therapy graduate education in North America. A survey of program directors yielded information regarding in which courses and how frequently art-based methods (individual in-class art making, dyad or group art making, student art projects as…

  20. Clinically Relevant Pharmacokinetic Herb-drug Interactions in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fasinu, Pius S; Gurley, Bill J; Walker, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    For healthcare professionals, the volume of literature available on herb-drug interactions often makes it difficult to separate experimental/potential interactions from those deemed clinically relevant. There is a need for concise and conclusive information to guide pharmacotherapy in HIV/AIDS. In this review, the bases for potential interaction of medicinal herbs with specific antiretroviral drugs are presented, and several botanicals are discussed for which clinically relevant interactions in humans are established. Such studies have provided, in most cases, sufficient ground to warrant the avoidance of concurrent administration of antiretroviral (ARVs) drugs with St John's wort (Hypericum perforatum), black pepper (Piper species) and grapefruit juice. Other botanicals that require caution in the use with antiretrovirals include African potato (Hypoxis hemerocallidea), ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba), ginseng (Panax species), garlic (Allium sativum), goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and kava kava (Piper methysticum). The knowledge of clinically significant herb-drug interaction will be important in order to avoid herb-induced risk of sub-therapeutic exposure to ARVs (which can lead to viral resistance) or the precipitation of toxicity (which may lead to poor compliance and/or discontinuation of antiretroviral therapy). PMID:26526838

  1. Teaching Art Therapy Research: A Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaiser, Donna H.; St. John, Patricia; Ball, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    During the analysis of a survey of art therapy educators in 2001 (St. John, Kaiser, & Ball, 2004), issues of importance to art therapy and art therapy research education emerged. As a follow-up, the authors interviewed educators attending the 2002 Annual Conference of the American Art Therapy Association (AATA) to gain an understanding of their…

  2. Outcomes of infants starting antiretroviral therapy in Southern Africa, 2004-2012

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Mireille; Davies, Mary-Ann; Mapani, Muntanga K.; Rabie, Helena; Phiri, Sam; Nuttall, James; Fairlie, Lee; Technau, Karl-Günter; Stinson, Kathryn; Wood, Robin; Wellington, Maureen; Haas, Andreas D.; Giddy, Janet; Tanser, Frank; Eley, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited published data on the outcomes of infants starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in routine care in Southern Africa. This study aimed to examine the baseline characteristics and outcomes of infants initiating ART. Methods We analysed prospectively collected cohort data from routine ART initiation in infants from 11 cohorts contributing to the International Epidemiologic Database to Evaluate AIDS in Southern Africa. We included ART naïve HIV-infected infants <12 months of age initiating ≥ three antiretroviral drugs between 2004 and 2012. Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated for mortality, loss to follow-up (LTFU), transfer out and virological suppression. We used Cox Proportional Hazards models stratified by cohort to determine baseline characteristics associated with outcomes mortality and virological suppression. Results The median (interquartile range) age at ART initiation of 4945 infants was 5.9 months (3.7-8.7) with follow-up of 11.2 months (2.8-20.0). At ART initiation 77% had WHO clinical stage 3 or 4 disease and 87% were severely immunosuppressed. Three-year mortality probability was 16% and LTFU 29%. Severe immunosuppression, WHO stage 3 or 4, anaemia, being severely underweight and initiation of treatment before 2010 were associated with higher mortality. At 12 months after ART initiation 17% of infants were severely immunosuppressed and the probability of attaining virological suppression was 56%. Conclusion Most infants initiating ART in Southern Africa had severe disease with high probability of LTFU and mortality on ART. Although the majority of infants remaining in care showed immune recovery and virological suppression, these responses were suboptimal. PMID:26167620

  3. Survival benefits of antiretroviral therapy in Brazil: a model-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Paula M; Girouard, Michael P; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Veloso, Valdilea G; Losina, Elena; Struchiner, Claudio J; MacLean, Rachel L; Parker, Robert A; Paltiel, A David; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2016-01-01

    Objective In Brazil, universal provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been guaranteed free of charge to eligible HIV-positive patients since December 1996. We sought to quantify the survival benefits of ART attributable to this programme. Methods We used a previously published microsimulation model of HIV disease and treatment (CEPAC-International) and data from Brazil to estimate life expectancy increase for HIV-positive patients initiating ART in Brazil. We divided the period of 1997 to 2014 into six eras reflecting increased drug regimen efficacy, regimen availability and era-specific mean CD4 count at ART initiation. Patients were simulated first without ART and then with ART. The 2014-censored and lifetime survival benefits attributable to ART in each era were calculated as the product of the number of patients initiating ART in a given era and the increase in life expectancy attributable to ART in that era. Results In total, we estimated that 598,741 individuals initiated ART. Projected life expectancy increased from 2.7, 3.3, 4.1, 4.9, 5.5 and 7.1 years without ART to 11.0, 17.5, 20.7, 23.0, 25.3, and 27.0 years with ART in Eras 1 through 6, respectively. Of the total projected lifetime survival benefit of 9.3 million life-years, 16% (or 1.5 million life-years) has been realized as of December 2014. Conclusions Provision of ART through a national programme has led to dramatic survival benefits in Brazil, the majority of which are still to be realized. Improvements in initial and subsequent ART regimens and higher CD4 counts at ART initiation have contributed to these increasing benefits. PMID:27029828

  4. Correlates of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Katryna; Waldrop-Valverde, Drenna; Balderson, Benjamin H.; Mahoney, Christine; Catz, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV-infected older African Americans experience higher mortality rates compared to their white counterparts. This disparity may be partly attributable to the differences in ART adherence by different racial and gender groups. The purpose of this study was to describe demographic, psychosocial, and HIV disease-related factors that influence ART adherence and to determine whether race and gender impact ART adherence among HIV-infected adults aged 50 years and older. Methods This descriptive study involved a secondary analysis of baseline data from 426 participants in “PRIME,” a telephone-based ART adherence and quality-of-life intervention trial. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between independent variables and ART adherence. Results Higher annual income and increased self-efficacy were associated with being ≥95% ART adherent. Race and gender were not associated with ART adherence. Conclusion These findings indicated that improvements in self-efficacy for taking ART may be an effective strategy to improve adherence regardless of race or gender. PMID:27071744

  5. Dyslipidaemia associated with antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Calza, Leonardo; Manfredi, Roberto; Chiodo, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has had a significant impact on the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, leading to a remarkable decrease in its morbidity and mortality, but is frequently associated with clinical and metabolic complications. Fat redistribution or lipodystrophy, hypertriglyceridaemia, hypercholesterolaemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus have been extensively reported in subjects treated with protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral regimens. In particular, dyslipidaemia occurs in up to 70-80% of HIV-infected individuals receiving HAART and can be associated with all the available PIs, although hypertriglyceridaemia appears to be more frequent in patients treated with ritonavir, ritonavir-saquinavir, or ritonavir-lopinavir. The potential long-term consequences of HAART-associated hyperlipidaemia are not completely understood, but an increased risk of premature coronary artery disease has been reported in young HIV-positive persons receiving PIs. Dietary changes, regular aerobic exercise and switching to a PI-sparing regimen may act favourably on dyslipidaemia. Lipid-lowering therapy is often required with statins or fibrates. The choice of hypolipidaemic drugs should take into account potential pharmacological interactions with antiretroviral agents. PMID:14645323

  6. Effects of combination antiretroviral therapies on the risk for myocardial infarction among HIV patients

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Emily S.; Napravnik, Sonia; Eron, Joseph J; Stalzer, Brant; Floris-Moore, Michelle; Simpson, Ross J; Stürmer, Til

    2014-01-01

    Background Cohort studies have demonstrated greater risk of myocardial infarction (MI) associated with specific antiretroviral use, while meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials have not. These differences may be due to inherent biases in the observational study design or to the limited duration of randomized trials. We conducted a new-user, active-comparator cohort study emulating a randomized controlled trial comparing initiation of several antiretrovirals as part of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and MI. Methods We included North Carolina (NC) Medicaid beneficiaries infected with HIV between 2002 and 2008 who were previously untreated with cART. We compared hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of MI between abacavir and tenofovir recipients, and lopinavir-ritonavir or atazanavir recipients and non-nucleoside-reverse-transcriptase-inhibitor (NNRTI) recipients. We adjusted for confounding through inverse-probability-weighting methods. Results There were 3,481 NC Medicaid new cART recipients who contributed 6,399 person-years and experienced 38 MI events. Receiving abacavir compared with tenofovir as part of cART was associated with an increased rate of MI unadjusted (HR= 2.70 [95% CI= 1.24 - 5.91]; HR= 2.05 [0.72 - 5.86]). Point estimates also suggest a relationship between receipt of atazanavir or lopinavir-ritonavir compared with an NNRTI and MI, although, estimates were imprecise. Conclusions We found an increased rate of MI among patients initiating abacavir compared with tenofovir although the association was decreased after confounding adjustment. Without a very large prospective comparative clinical trial, a much larger observational study of patients initiating cART would be needed to better define this apparent association. PMID:24713880

  7. Rates and cost of hospitalisation before and after initiation of antiretroviral therapy in urban and rural settings in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Rath, Gesine; Brennan, Alana T; Fox, Matthew P; Modisenyane, Tebogo; Tshabangu, Nkeko; Mohapi, Lerato; Rosen, Sydney; Martinson, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have compared hospitalisations before and after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in the same patients. We analysed the cost of hospitalisations among 3,906 adult patients in two South African hospitals, 30% of whom initiated ART. Hospitalisations were 50% and 40% more frequent and 1.5 and 2.6 times more costly at a CD4 cell count <100 cells/mm3 when compared to 200–350 cells/mm3 in the pre-ART and ART period, respectively. Mean inpatient cost per patient year was USD 117 (95% confidence interval, CI, 85–158) for patients on ART and USD 72 (95% CI, 56–89) for pre-ART patients. Raising ART eligibility thresholds could avoid the high cost of hospitalisation before and immediately after ART initiation. PMID:23187948

  8. HIV-induced alteration in gut microbiota: driving factors, consequences, and effects of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Lozupone, Catherine A; Rhodes, Matthew E; Neff, Charles P; Fontenot, Andrew P; Campbell, Thomas B; Palmer, Brent E

    2014-07-01

    Consistent with an important role for adaptive immunity in modulating interactions between intestinal bacteria and host, dramatic alteration in the composition of gut microbes during chronic HIV infection was recently reported by ourselves and independently by four other research groups. Here we evaluate our results in the context of these other studies and delve into the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Although gut microbiota of HIV-positive individuals on ART usually does not resemble that of HIV-negative individuals, the degree to which ART restores health-associated prevalence varies across bacterial taxa. Finally, we discuss potential drivers and health consequences of gut microbiota alterations. We propose that understanding the mechanism of HIV-associated gut microbiota changes will elucidate the role of adaptive immunity in shaping gut microbiota composition, and lay the foundation for therapeutics targeting the microbiota to attenuate HIV disease progression and reduce the risk of gut-linked disease in people with HIV. PMID:25078714

  9. Sequencing paediatric antiretroviral therapy in the context of a public health approach

    PubMed Central

    Boerma, Ragna S; Boender, T Sonia; van Hensbroek, Michael Boele; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Sigaloff, Kim CE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As access to prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) efforts has increased, the total number of children being born with HIV has significantly decreased. However, those children who do become infected after PMTCT failure are at particular risk of HIV drug resistance, selected by exposure to maternal or paediatric antiretroviral drugs used before, during or after birth. As a consequence, the response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in these children may be compromised, particularly when non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are used as part of the first-line regimen. We review evidence guiding choices of first- and second-line ART. Discussion Children generally respond relatively well to ART. Clinical trials show the superiority of protease inhibitor (PI)- over NNRTI-based treatment in young children, but observational reports of NNRTI-containing regimens are usually favourable as well. This is reassuring as national guidelines often still recommend the use of NNRTI-based treatment for PMTCT-unexposed young children, due to the higher costs of PIs. After failure of NNRTI-based, first-line treatment, the rate of acquired drug resistance is high, but HIV may well be suppressed by PIs in second-line ART. By contrast, there are currently no adequate alternatives in resource-limited settings (RLS) for children failing either first- or second-line, PI-containing regimens. Conclusions Affordable salvage treatment options for children in RLS are urgently needed. PMID:26639116

  10. Endosomal Trafficking of Nanoformulated Antiretroviral Therapy Facilitates Drug Particle Carriage and HIV Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dongwei; Zhang, Gang; Wysocki, Tadeusz A.; Wysocki, Beata J.; Gelbard, Harris A.; Liu, Xin-Ming; McMillan, JoEllyn M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Limitations of antiretroviral therapy (ART) include poor patient adherence, drug toxicities, viral resistance, and failure to penetrate viral reservoirs. Recent developments in nanoformulated ART (nanoART) could overcome such limitations. To this end, we now report a novel effect of nanoART that facilitates drug depots within intracellular compartments at or adjacent to the sites of the viral replication cycle. Poloxamer 407-coated nanocrystals containing the protease inhibitor atazanavir (ATV) were prepared by high-pressure homogenization. These drug particles readily accumulated in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). NanoATV concentrations were ∼1,000 times higher in cells than those that could be achieved by the native drug. ATV particles in late and recycling endosome compartments were seen following pulldown by immunoaffinity chromatography with Rab-specific antibodies conjugated to magnetic beads. Confocal microscopy provided cross validation by immunofluorescent staining of the compartments. Mathematical modeling validated drug-endosomal interactions. Measures of reverse transcriptase activity and HIV-1 p24 levels in culture media and cells showed that such endosomal drug concentrations enhanced antiviral responses up to 1,000-fold. We conclude that late and recycling endosomes can serve as depots for nanoATV. The colocalization of nanoATV at endosomal sites of viral assembly and its slow release sped antiretroviral activities. Long-acting nanoART can serve as a drug carrier in both cells and subcellular compartments and, as such, can facilitate viral clearance. IMPORTANCE The need for long-acting ART is significant and highlighted by limitations in drug access, toxicity, adherence, and reservoir penetrance. We propose that targeting nanoformulated drugs to infected tissues, cells, and subcellular sites of viral replication may improve clinical outcomes. Endosomes are sites for human immunodeficiency virus assembly, and increasing ART

  11. Adjunctive and Long-Acting Nanoformulated Antiretroviral Therapies for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gendelman, Howard E.; Gelbard, Harris A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review focuses on current and future strategies to modulate neuroinflammation while reducing residual viral burden in the central nervous system (CNS). This has been realized by targeted long acting antiretroviral nano- and adjunctive therapies being developed for HIV infected people. Our ultimate goal is to eliminate virus from its CNS reservoirs and, in so doing, reverse the cognitive and motor dysfunctions seen in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Recent findings Herein, we highlight our laboratories development of adjunctive and nanomedicine therapies for HAND. An emphasis is placed on drug-drug interactions that target both the viral life cycle and secretory pro-inflammatory neurotoxic factors and signaling pathways. Summary Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has improved the quality and duration of life for people living with HIV-1. A significant long-term comorbid illness is HAND. Symptoms, while reduced in severity, are common. Disease occurs, in part, through continued low-level viral replication inducing secondary glial neuroinflammatory activities. Our recent works and those of others have seen disease attenuated in animal models through the use of adjunctive and long-acting reservoir targeted nanoformulated ART. The translation of these inventions from animals to humans is the focus of this review. PMID:25226025

  12. Piloting an Online Art Therapy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feen-Calligan, Holly

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the development and assessment of a graduate level online art therapy class. An introduction briefly defines art therapy and the need for distance learning in this field. The challenges inherent in teaching art therapy online, including working with art media and developing appropriate interpersonal skills and group…

  13. Medical Art Therapy: Defining a Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malchiodi, Cathy A.

    Although art therapy has traditionally focused on the use of art expression in psychotherapy, the practice of medical art therapy has begun to grow rapidly. This paper provides a brief overview of the emerging specialty of medical art therapy and its importance as a counseling tool with people suffering from serious health problems. The paper…

  14. Rapid HIV Viral Load Suppression in those Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy at First Visit after HIV Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoenigl, Martin; Chaillon, Antoine; Moore, David J.; Morris, Sheldon R.; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Gianella, Sara; Amico, K. Rivet; Little, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Expert guidelines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) now recommend ART as soon as possible in all HIV infected persons to reduce the risk of disease progression and prevent transmission. The goal of this observational study was to evaluate the impact of very early ART initiation and regimen type on time to viral suppression. We evaluated time to viral suppression among 86 persons with newly-diagnosed HIV infection who initiated ART within 30 days of diagnosis. A total of 36 (42%) had acute, 27 (31%) early, and 23 (27%) had established HIV infection. The median time from an offer of immediate ART to starting ART was 8 days. A total of 56/86 (65%) initiated an integrase inhibitor-based regimen and 30/86 (35%) a protease inhibitor-based regimen. The time to viral suppression was significantly shorter in those receiving an integrase inhibitor- versus a protease inhibitor-based regimen (p = 0.022). Twenty-two (26%) initiated ART at their HIV care intake visit and 79% of these participants achieved viral suppression at week 12, 82% at week 24 and 88% at week 48. ART initiated at the intake visit led to rapid and reliable viral suppression in acute, early and chronic HIV infection, in particular when integrase inhibitor-based regimens were used. PMID:27597312

  15. Rapid HIV Viral Load Suppression in those Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy at First Visit after HIV Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; Chaillon, Antoine; Moore, David J; Morris, Sheldon R; Mehta, Sanjay R; Gianella, Sara; Amico, K Rivet; Little, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    Expert guidelines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) now recommend ART as soon as possible in all HIV infected persons to reduce the risk of disease progression and prevent transmission. The goal of this observational study was to evaluate the impact of very early ART initiation and regimen type on time to viral suppression. We evaluated time to viral suppression among 86 persons with newly-diagnosed HIV infection who initiated ART within 30 days of diagnosis. A total of 36 (42%) had acute, 27 (31%) early, and 23 (27%) had established HIV infection. The median time from an offer of immediate ART to starting ART was 8 days. A total of 56/86 (65%) initiated an integrase inhibitor-based regimen and 30/86 (35%) a protease inhibitor-based regimen. The time to viral suppression was significantly shorter in those receiving an integrase inhibitor- versus a protease inhibitor-based regimen (p = 0.022). Twenty-two (26%) initiated ART at their HIV care intake visit and 79% of these participants achieved viral suppression at week 12, 82% at week 24 and 88% at week 48. ART initiated at the intake visit led to rapid and reliable viral suppression in acute, early and chronic HIV infection, in particular when integrase inhibitor-based regimens were used. PMID:27597312

  16. Pre-antiretroviral therapy serum selenium concentrations predict WHO stages 3, 4 or death but not virologic failure post-antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Gupte, Nikhil; Yang, Wei-Teng; Mwelase, Noluthando; Kanyama, Cecilia; Tang, Alice M; Pillay, Sandy; Samaneka, Wadzanai; Riviere, Cynthia; Berendes, Sima; Lama, Javier R; Cardoso, Sandra W; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Semba, Richard D; Christian, Parul; Campbell, Thomas B; Gupta, Amita

    2014-11-01

    A case-cohort study, within a multi-country trial of antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficacy (Prospective Evaluation of Antiretrovirals in Resource Limited Settings (PEARLS)), was conducted to determine if pre-ART serum selenium deficiency is independently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression after ART initiation. Cases were HIV-1 infected adults with either clinical failure (incident World Health Organization (WHO) stage 3, 4 or death by 96 weeks) or virologic failure by 24 months. Risk factors for serum selenium deficiency (<85 μg/L) pre-ART and its association with outcomes were examined. Median serum selenium concentration was 82.04 μg/L (Interquartile range (IQR): 57.28-99.89) and serum selenium deficiency was 53%, varying widely by country from 0% to 100%. In multivariable models, risk factors for serum selenium deficiency were country, previous tuberculosis, anemia, and elevated C-reactive protein. Serum selenium deficiency was not associated with either clinical failure or virologic failure in multivariable models. However, relative to people in the third quartile (74.86-95.10 μg/L) of serum selenium, we observed increased hazards (adjusted hazards ratio (HR): 3.50; 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.30-9.42) of clinical failure but not virologic failure for people in the highest quartile. If future studies confirm this relationship of high serum selenium with increased clinical failure, a cautious approach to selenium supplementation might be needed, especially in HIV-infected populations with sufficient or unknown levels of selenium. PMID:25401501

  17. Art Therapy and Dissociative Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engle, Patricia

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates how art therapy helped a woman address her identity and memory difficulties while she managed her daily activities. The process helped her validate traumatic events in her history and provided a starting point for addressing internal conflicts. The client's artwork helped the therapist learn about the client's unconscious states. (MKA)

  18. Anti-Retroviral Therapy Increases the Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in South African HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Joel A.; Levitt, Naomi S.; Ross, Ian L.; Lacerda, Miguel; Maartens, Gary; Blom, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Data on the prevalence of dyslipidaemia and associated risk factors in HIV-infected patients from sub-Saharan Africa is sparse. We performed a cross-sectional analysis in a cohort of HIV-infected South African adults. Methods We studied HIV-infected patients who were either antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive or receiving non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based or protease inhibitor (PI)-based ART. Evaluation included fasting lipograms, oral glucose tolerance tests and clinical anthropometry. Dyslipidemia was defined using the NCEP ATPIII guidelines. Results The median age of the participants was 34 years (range 19–68 years) and 78% were women. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in 406 ART-naive and 551 participants on ART was 90.0% and 85%, respectively. Low HDL-cholesterol (HDLC) was the most common abnormality [290/406 (71%) ART-naïve and 237/551 (43%) ART- participants]. Participants on ART had higher triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDLC) and HDLC than the ART-naïve group. Severe dyslipidaemia, (LDLC> 4.9 mmol/L or TG >5.0 mmol/L) was present in <5% of participants. In multivariate analyses there were complex associations between age, gender, type and duration of ART and body composition and LDLC, HDLC and TG, which differed between ART-naïve and ART-participants. Conclusion Participants on ART had higher TG, TC, LDLC and HDLC than those who were ART-naïve but severe lipid abnormalities requiring evaluation and treatment were uncommon. PMID:26986065

  19. The Use of Color in Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withrow, Rebecca L.

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the published literature on the separate fields of art therapy and color therapy, synthesizing them in a proposed use of color within art therapy. Specific techniques focusing on use of color in a nonrepresentational expressive form are suggested as a way to extend the therapeutic benefits of art therapy. The intention of this…

  20. Adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Montessori, Valentina; Press, Natasha; Harris, Marianne; Akagi, Linda; Montaner, Julio S G

    2004-01-20

    Long-term remission of HIV-1 disease can be readily achieved by combinations of antiretroviral agents. The suppression of plasma viral loads to less than the limit of quantification of the most sensitive commercially available assays (i.e., less than 50 copies/mL) and the coincident improvement in CD4 T cell counts is associated with resolution of established opportunistic infections and a decrease in the risk of new opportunistic infections. However, prolonged treatment with combination regimens can be difficult to sustain because of problems with adherence and toxic effects. All antiretroviral drugs can have both short-term and long-term adverse events. The risk of specific side effects varies from drug to drug, from drug class to drug class, and from patient to patient. A better understanding of the adverse effects of antiretroviral agents is of interest not only for HIV specialists as they try to optimize therapy, but also for other physicians who care for HIV-positive patients. PMID:14734438

  1. Sexual risk behaviors among HIV-patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Southern Thailand: roles of antiretroviral adherence and serostatus disclosure.

    PubMed

    Thanawuth, Nattasiri; Rojpibulstit, Malee

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the extent of unprotected sex among patients already established in HIV-medical care and their associated factors. Sexually active patients who were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) from five public hospitals in Trang province, Southern Thailand, were interviewed. Of 279 studied patients, 37.3% had unprotected sex in the prior 3 months and 27.2% did not disclose their serostatus to sexual partners. The median duration interquartile range (IQR) of using ART was 47 (27-60) months and 26.7% were non-adherent to ART (i.e., taking less than 95% of the prescribed doses). More than one-third had the perception that ART use would protect against HIV transmission even with unprotected sex. About 36.6% reported that they were unaware of their current CD4 counts and nearly one-third did not receive any safe sex counseling at each medical follow-up. After adjustment for potential confounders, non-adherence to ART and HIV-nondisclosure were strongly associated with an increase in the risk of unprotected sex with the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) of 5.03 (95% CI 2.68-9.44) and 3.89 (95% CI 1.57-9.61), respectively. In contrast, the risk for engaging in unprotected sex was less likely among patients having a negative-serostatus partner (aOR = 0.30; 95% CI 0.12-0.75), a longer duration of the use of ART (aOR = 0.98; 95%CI 0.97-0.99) and an unawareness of their current CD4 levels (aOR = 0.54; 95% CI 0.30-0.99). To maximize the benefits from ART, there should be a bigger emphasis on the "positive prevention" program and more efforts are needed to target the population at risk for unprotected sex. Strategies to encourage adherence to ART and for disclosure of serostatus are also required. PMID:26666292

  2. The ART of HIV therapies: dopaminergic deficits and future treatments for HIV pediatric encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Katy M; Mactutus, Charles F; Booze, Rosemarie M

    2013-01-01

    The concerted efforts of clinicians, scientists and caregivers of HIV-infected children have led to tremendous advances in our understanding of pediatric HIV/AIDS. Antiretroviral therapy (ART; formerly known as highly active antiretroviral therapy [HAART]) has significantly extended the longevity of HIV-infected children, but there are limitations to improvements in quality of life that may persist despite therapy. ART has remarkably reduced the incidence of neurologic deficits for the majority of infected children, but some patients do not experience these benefits and children living in poorer nations, who may not have access to antiretrovirals, are particularly at risk for developing neurologic deficits. This article reviews the neurologic symptoms of pediatric HIV infection that manifest as dopaminergic disruptions and explores potential future adjuvant therapies for HIV-related neurologic disorders in children. PMID:19254168

  3. Does Awareness of Status and Risks of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Impact Risky Transmission Behavior Among Infected Adolescents? A Case Study of Clients Attending an Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Clinic in Kano, Kano State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Lawan, Umar Muhammad; Envuladu, Esther Awazzi; Abubakar, Sanusi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive adolescents by virtue of their position are prone to dangerous behaviors including risk-taking for HIV transmission. Objective: To determine the awareness of HIV status and risk factors for HIV transmission among HIV-positive adolescents, and how these impact their behavior. Materials and Methods: A case study approach was used to study a random sample of 400 HIV-positive adolescent children attending an antiretroviral (ART) clinic in Kano, Kano State, Nigeria. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) 16.0 computer statistical software. Result: The mean age of the adolescents was 14.9 ± 3.15 years. The majority were females (54.8%) from a polygamous family (57.5%). About two-thirds or 251 (62.8%) patients knew their HIV status. The age of 14 years and above (z = 11.36, P = 0.0001) and having at least secondary school level of education (z = 2.78, P = 0.005) were significantly associated with awareness of HIV status on binary logistic regression. Up to 311 (77.8%) patients had good awareness of the risks of HIV transmission. Awareness of risk of HIV transmission was associated with awareness of HIV status (X2 = 166.2, P = 0.0001). There was a significant variation in the behaviors between those who were aware of their HIV status and those who were not. Paradoxically, the percentage differences in risk-taking were remarkably high in all the variables examined, and were all in the direction of the adolescents who had good knowledge of the risk factors for HIV transmission. Conclusion and Recommendation: Health ministries, development partners working in this field, and behavioral change communication experts should develop formidable strategies for addressing this menace. There is also a dire need for further research in this area. PMID:27051087

  4. Religiosity and adherence to antiretroviral therapy among patients attending a public hospital-based HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kisenyi, Rita N; Muliira, Joshua K; Ayebare, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    In Uganda, the prevalence of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) by HIV/AIDS patients remains high and sometimes this is blamed on patients' religious behavior. A descriptive design was used to examine the relationship between religiosity and ART adherence in a sample of 220 patients attending a HIV/AIDS clinic in a Ugandan public hospital. Participants who self-identified as Pentecostal and Muslim had the highest percentage of members with high religiosity scores and ART adherence. Among Muslim participants (34), 82% reported high religiosity scores and high levels of ART adherence. Of the fifty Pentecostals participants, 96% reported high religiosity scores and 80% reported high levels of ART adherence. Correlation analysis showed a significant relationship between ART adherence and religiosity (r = 0.618, P ≤ 0.01). Therefore, collaboration between religious leaders and HIV/AIDS healthcare providers should be encouraged as one of the strategies for enhancing ART adherence. PMID:21360222

  5. System-level factors as predictors of adherence to clinical appointment schedules in antiretroviral therapy in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Gary T; Jolly, Pauline E; Chamot, Eric A M; Ehiri, John; Zhang, Kui; Khan, Edward; Sou, Sanith

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to clinical appointment schedules by patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is necessary for the prevention of medication interruptions, viral rebound, and the development of drug resistance. An observational study conducted in 2010, Enablers and Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Cambodia, sought to identify factors that predict on-time clinical appointment attendance by patients on ART. Clinical data, including appointment attendance across five consecutive visits, were collected from hospital records on a random sample of ART patients at government referral hospitals (RHs) in Battambang Province, Cambodia. Interviews were conducted to obtain quantitative information from patients on their experiences of support services provided by local NGOs and RHs. This information was used to identify ART patient care and support system factors that could potentially enable patients to adhere to clinical appointment schedules. These factors included adherence counseling, support groups, home-based care (HBC) services, and support provided for transportation to ART appointments. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analysis was done to assess relationships between system variables and the ART appointment adherence outcome. Of the 289 study participants, 20.4% had missed at least one of the five appointments in the study period. The hospital source of ART services, participation in a hospital-based support group, receiving a loan from a microfinance institution, and the frequency of adherence counseling were found to be associated with ART appointment adherence. No significant associations were found between other support system factors such as HBC, transportation support, food/monetary support, and appointment adherence. PMID:25803006

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of folic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles reflects tissue biodistribution of long-acting antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tianyuzi; Gendelman, Howard E; Zhang, Gang; Puligujja, Pavan; McMillan, JoEllyn M; Bronich, Tatiana K; Edagwa, Benson; Liu, Xin-Ming; Boska, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Regimen adherence, systemic toxicities, and limited drug penetrance to viral reservoirs are obstacles limiting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our laboratory’s development of the monocyte-macrophage-targeted long-acting nanoformulated ART (nanoART) carriage provides a novel opportunity to simplify drug-dosing regimens. Progress has nonetheless been slowed by cumbersome, but required, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution testing. To this end, we developed a small magnetite ART (SMART) nanoparticle platform to assess antiretroviral drug tissue biodistribution and PK using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Herein, we have taken this technique a significant step further by determining nanoART PK with folic acid (FA) decorated magnetite (ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide [USPIO]) particles and by using SMART particles. FA nanoparticles enhanced the entry and particle retention to the reticuloendothelial system over nondecorated polymers after systemic administration into mice. These data were seen by MRI testing and validated by comparison with SMART particles and direct evaluation of tissue drug levels after nanoART. The development of alendronate (ALN)-coated magnetite thus serves as a rapid initial screen for the ability of targeting ligands to enhance nanoparticle-antiretroviral drug biodistribution, underscoring the value of decorated magnetite particles as a theranostic tool for improved drug delivery. PMID:26082630

  7. Impact of a Rural Village Women (Asha) Intervention on Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Hanson, Alecia Y.; Salem, Benissa E.; Sinha, Sanjeev; Ganguly, Kalyan K.; Leake, Barbara; Yadav, Kartik; Marfisee, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the increased prevalence of HIV in the rural female population of India, adherence to antiretroviral therapy continues to be low due to several barriers which discourage rural women. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of an intervention (Asha-Life) delivered by Accredited Social Health Activists to improve antiretroviral therapy adherence of rural women living with AIDS in India compared to that of a usual care group. Method A total of 68 rural women living with AIDS, aged 18–45 years, participated in a prospective, randomized pilot clinical trial and were assessed for several factors affecting adherence, such as sociodemographic characteristics, health history, CD4 cell count, enacted stigma, depressive symptomology, help getting antiretroviral therapy, and perceived therapy benefits. Results Findings at 6 months revealed that, while both groups improved their adherence to antiretroviral therapy, there was greater improvement in the Asha-Life group (p < .001), who reported a greater reduction in barriers to antiretroviral therapy than those in the usual care group. Discussion Antiretroviral therapy adherence showed significant increase in the Asha-Life cohort, in which basic education on HIV/AIDS, counseling on antiretroviral therapy, financial assistance, and better nutrition was provided. The Asha-Life intervention may have great potential in improving antiretroviral therapy adherence and decreasing barriers among rural women living with AIDS in India. PMID:22872107

  8. Predicting Malawian Women’s Intention to Adhere to Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Ogbochi; Modeste, Naomi N.; Lee, Jerry W.; Gleason, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Background With the increase in scaling up of antiretroviral therapy (ART), knowledge of the need for adherence to ART is pivotal for successful treatment outcomes. Design and Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out between October and December 2013. We administered theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and adherence questionnaires to 358 women aged 18-49 years, from a rural and urban ART-clinics in southern Malawi. Hierarchical linear regression models were used to predict intentions to adhere to ART. Results Regression models show that attitude (β=0.47), subjective norm (β=0.31) and perceived behavioural control (β=0.12) explain 55% of the variance in intentions to adhere to ART. The relationship between both food insecurity and perceived side effects with intentions to adhere to ART is mediated by attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioural control. Household (r=0.20) and individual (r=0.21) food insecurity were positively and significantly correlated with perceived behavioural control. Household food insecurity had a negative correlation with perceived side effects (r=-0.11). Perceived side effects were positively correlated with attitude (r=0.25). There was no statistically significant relationship between intentions to adhere to ART in the future and one month self-report of past month adherence. These interactions suggest that attitude predicted adherence only when food insecurity is high or perception of side effects is strong. Conclusions This study shows that modification might be needed when using TPB constructs in resource constraint environments. Significance for public health The knowledge of the rates of adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) could be used to evaluate planning and project, which could lead to better outcomes predicted by treatment efficacy data. In addition, knowledge of adherence behaviour could help the development of interventions focusing on collaboration between healthcare providers and Malawian government to

  9. Discordant Treatment Responses to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Rwanda: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Kayigamba, Felix R.; Franke, Molly F.; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Rodriguez, Carly A.; Bagiruwigize, Emmanuel; Wit, Ferdinand WNM; Rich, Michael L.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Some antiretroviral therapy naïve patients starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) experience a limited CD4 count rise despite virological suppression, or vice versa. We assessed the prevalence and determinants of discordant treatment responses in a Rwandan cohort. Methods A discordant immunological cART response was defined as an increase of <100 CD4 cells/mm3 at 12 months compared to baseline despite virological suppression (viral load [VL] <40 copies/mL). A discordant virological cART response was defined as detectable VL at 12 months with an increase in CD4 count ≥100 cells/mm3. The prevalence of, and independent predictors for these two types of discordant responses were analysed in two cohorts nested in a 12-month prospective study of cART-naïve HIV patients treated at nine rural health facilities in two regions in Rwanda. Results Among 382 patients with an undetectable VL at 12 months, 112 (29%) had a CD4 rise of <100 cells/mm3. Age ≥35 years and longer travel to the clinic were independent determinants of an immunological discordant response, but sex, baseline CD4 count, body mass index and WHO HIV clinical stage were not. Among 326 patients with a CD4 rise of ≥100 cells/mm3, 56 (17%) had a detectable viral load at 12 months. Male sex was associated with a virological discordant treatment response (P = 0.05), but age, baseline CD4 count, BMI, WHO HIV clinical stage, and travel time to the clinic were not. Conclusions Discordant treatment responses were common in cART-naïve HIV patients in Rwanda. Small CD4 increases could be misinterpreted as a (virological) treatment failure and lead to unnecessary treatment changes. PMID:27438000

  10. Modulation of HCV Replication After Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in HCV/HIV Coinfected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Guedj, Jeremie; Shata, Mohamed Tarek; Blackard, Jason T.; Rouster, Susan D.; Castro, Mario; Feinberg, Judith; Sterling, Richard K.; Goodman, Zachary; Aronow, Bruce J.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Coinfection results in increased HCV replication and more rapid rates of liver disease progression. The effect of HIV combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on HCV replication has not been studied in depth. To address this issue, we enrolled a small cohort of HCV/HIV coinfected patients into a cART initiation trial, and used dynamic modeling combined with evaluation of immune responses and microarray profiles to determine how effective treatment of HIV affects HCV. Treatment with cART resulted in HCV flare and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increase (2× or more increase from baseline) in a subset of treated patients. Subjects with evidence of hepatic injury (increased ALT) were more likely to have HCV-specific immune responses directed against HCV epitopes. Over time, HCV viral loads declined. Reproducible and biologically important gene expression changes occurred in patients who underwent successful cART, particularly with respect to downregulation of genes with known antiviral roles. Our findings suggest that the effective suppression of HIV by cART initiates a cascade of early and late events in treated patients with HCV. Early events involving downregulation of interferon-stimulated genes may lead to transiently increased viral replication and hepatic injury. At later time points, HCV viral load declines to levels comparable to those seen in the setting of HCV monoinfection. These findings support early antiretroviral therapy in those with HCV/HIV coinfection. PMID:25101888

  11. Public knowledge and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS and antiretroviral therapy in Kabarole district, western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Walter Eigen; Alibhai, Arif; Saunders, Duncan; Konde-Lule, Joseph; Ruhunda, Alex

    2009-01-01

    A study on knowledge about HIV/AIDS and antiretroviral therapy (ART) was conducted in the general population of a rural district in western Uganda. Three hundred seventy-two participants were selected by random cluster sampling and interviewed with an interview-administered questionnaire. Data were analyzed quantitatively with descriptive, univariate and linear multivariate statistical analysis with the knowledge score about ART as the dependent variable. The results indicate that the mean knowledge was 7.7 in a scale from 0 to 13. Predictor for better ART knowledge was a higher educational status of the participants. Older participants over 50 years were less ART knowledgeable. Only 19% of the participants have been tested for HIV. The conclusions are that the ART knowledge in this population is remarkably high which is reaffirming and important for achieving a high adherence to ART. Of concern is the low proportion of persons tested for HIV in this general population. Kabarole district seems to be receptive and capable for intensifying HIV testing which is a precondition for the ART roll-out. PMID:19085228

  12. Comorbidities associated with HIV and antiretroviral therapy (clinical sciences): a workshop report.

    PubMed

    Vernon, L T; Jayashantha, Plp; Chidzonga, M M; Komesu, M C; Nair, R G; Johnson, N W

    2016-04-01

    In the era of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), parsing out the effects of HIV vs ART on health outcomes is challenging. Nadir CD4 count, a marker of the extent of immunosuppression, has significant long-term impact on an array of disease states in HIV+ persons; however, in the dental literature, reporting of pre-ART exposure to immunosuppression has largely been ignored and this limits the validity of previous studies. In Workshop A1, we explain fully the importance of nadir CD4, pre-ART immunosuppression, and identify a need to include specific variables in future research. The questions posed herein are challenging, typically not neatly addressed by any one study and require integration of the latest evidence from the wider medical literature. We consider topics beyond the confines of the oral cavity and examine oral health in the complex context of ART era HIV immunopathophysiology. We depict how variability in geographic setting and time period (pre- and post-ART era) can impact oral conditions - influencing when HIV infection was detected (at what CD4 count), the type and timing of ART as well as social determinants such as strong stigma and limited access to care. We hope our Workshop will stir debate and energize a rigorous focus on relevant areas of future research in HIV/AIDS. PMID:27109282

  13. A Qualitative Study of Patient Motivation to Adhere to Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Debra; Gengiah, Santhanalakshmi; Kunene, Pinky; Gengiah, Tanuja N.; Naidoo, Kogieleum; Grant, Alison D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Taken as prescribed, that is, with high adherence, combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has changed HIV infection and disease from being a sure predictor of death to a manageable chronic illness. Adherence, however, is difficult to achieve and maintain. The CAPRISA 058 study was conducted between 2007 and 2009 to test the efficacy of individualized motivational counselling to enhance ART adherence in South Africa. As part of the overall trial, a qualitative sub-study was conducted, including 30 individual interviews and four focus group discussions with patients in the first 9 months of ART initiation. Data were inductively analyzed, using thematic analysis, to identify themes central to ART adherence in this context. Four themes emerged that characterize the participants' experiences and high motivation to adhere to ART. Participants in this study were highly motivated to adhere, as they acknowledged that ART was ‘life-giving’, in the face of a large amount of morbidity and mortality. They were further supported by techniques of routine remembering, and highlighted the importance of good social support and access to supportive healthcare workers, to their continued success in negotiating their treatment. Participants in the current study told us that their adherence motivation is enhanced by free accessible care, approachable and supportive healthcare workers, broad social acceptance of ART, and past first-hand experiences with AIDS-related co-morbidity and mortality. Programs that include specific attention to these aspects of care will likely be successful in the long term. PMID:25692575

  14. Cultural influences on antiretroviral therapy adherence among HIV-infected Puerto Ricans.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Reuben N; D'Aquila, Erica; Morgello, Susan; Byrd, Desiree; Remien, Robert H; Mindt, Monica Rivera

    2012-01-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is integral to the successful treatment of HIV infection. Research has indicated that HIV-infected Latinos may have difficulty adhering to ART. While studies have demonstrated strong relationships between numerous psychosocial factors and ART adherence, no research has examined if cultural factors are also involved in ART adherence among Latinos. Our study examined the relationship between acculturation to mainstream U.S. culture, bicultural self-efficacy, and ART adherence among HIV-infected Puerto Rican adults living in the United States. Participants with ≥ 95% adherence scored higher on U.S.- and Latino-involvement acculturation scales and on a measure of bicultural self-efficacy compared to those with suboptimal adherence. Among bicultural HIV-infected Puerto Ricans, both acculturation and self-efficacy to navigate between cultures were positively related to adherence. Understanding the role of an individual's sociocultural experience may help elucidate why HIV-infected Latinos have difficulties achieving optimal ART adherence and improve ART adherence interventions. PMID:22525858

  15. Barriers to and Facilitators of Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence in Nepal: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Freeman, Jennifer V; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Patient's adherence is crucial to get the best out of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study explores in-depth the barriers to and facilitators of ART adherence among Nepalese patients and service providers prescribing ART. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with 34 participants. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and translated into English before being analyzed thematically. ART-prescribed patients described a range of barriers for failing to adhere to ART. Financial difficulties, access to healthcare services, frequent transport blockades, religious/ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, and side-effects were the most-frequently discussed barriers whereas trustworthy health workers, perceived health benefits, and family support were the most-reported facilitators. Understanding barriers and facilitators can help in the design of an appropriate and targeted intervention. Healthcare providers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART whilst policy-makers should develop appropriate social policy to promote adherence among ART-prescribed patients. PMID:23304907

  16. Treatment as prevention: are Argentinean HIV care providers willing to adopt earlier antiretroviral therapy?

    PubMed

    Socías, María Eugenia; Sued, Omar; Pryluka, Daniel; Patterson, Patricia; Fink, Valeria; Cesar, Carina; Cahn, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    HIV guidelines increasingly recommend antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation at a higher CD4 levels. The extent to which these evolving standards are translated into routine clinical care has not been evaluated in Argentina. During October 2012, we conducted an online survey among Argentinean HIV clinicians to assess their attitudes and practices toward ART initiation and its potential use for HIV prevention. Of the 280 physicians included, 61% would prescribe ART at CD4 ≤ 500 cells/µL for asymptomatic patients. Although, only 11% would recommend ART irrespective of CD4 cell count, 72% would do it for serodiscordant couples, and 75% for sex workers. Most participants agreed that they would consider earlier initiation of ART if transmission risk exists, and that expansion of ART could help decrease HIV incidence. These results suggest that a large proportion of Argentinean HIV care providers are willing to adopt the recently updated Argentinean guidelines recommending earlier ART, especially when high HIV transmission risk exists. PMID:24773142

  17. Understanding and mitigating HIV-related resource-based stigma in the era of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Kathleen; Winskell, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The perception in low-resource settings that investment of resources in people living with HIV (PLHIV) is wasted because AIDS is both an incurable and deadly disease is known as resource-based stigma. In this paper, we draw on in-depth interviews (IDI), focus group discussions (FGD), and key informant interviews (KII) with 77 HIV-positive microfinance participants and nongovernmental organization leaders to examine resource-based stigma in the context of increased access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) at an individual, household, and community level in Côte d'Ivoire. The purpose of this exploratory paper is to examine: (1) resource-based stigmatization in the era of ART and (2) the relationship among microfinance, a poverty-reduction intervention, and HIV stigmatization. The frequency with which resource-based stigma was discussed by respondents suggests that it is an important component of HIV-related stigma in this setting. It affected PLHIV's access to material as well as social resources, leading to economic discrimination and social devaluation. Participation in village savings and loans groups, however, mitigated resource-based HIV stigma, suggesting that in the era of increased access to antiretroviral therapy, economic programs should be considered as one possible HIV stigma-reduction intervention. PMID:23394104

  18. Join the Art Club: Exploring Social Empowerment in Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Frances Johanna; Willis-Rauch, Mallori

    2014-01-01

    Social Empowerment Art Therapy (SEAT) aims to address the stigma of mental illness through the artistic empowerment of participants. The model was developed within an inpatient psychiatric setting from observations of a shared governance structure that empowered residents. Incorporating an open art studio approach and social action art therapy,…

  19. Maximizing the benefits of antiretroviral therapy for key affected populations

    PubMed Central

    Grubb, Ian R; Beckham, Sarah W; Kazatchkine, Michel; Thomas, Ruth M; Albers, Eliot R; Cabral, Mauro; Lange, Joep; Vella, Stefano; Kurian, Manoj; Beyrer, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Scientific research has demonstrated the clinical benefits of earlier initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART), and that ART can markedly reduce HIV transmission to sexual partners. Ensuring universal access to ART for those who need it has long been a core principle of the HIV response, and extending the benefits of ART to key populations is critical to increasing the impact of ART and the overall effectiveness of the HIV response. However, this can only be achieved through coordinated efforts to address political, social, legal and economic barriers that key populations face in accessing HIV services. Discussion Recent analyses show that HIV prevalence levels among key populations are far higher than among the general population, and they experience a range of biological and behavioural factors, and social, legal and economic barriers that increase their vulnerability to HIV and have resulted in alarmingly low ART coverage. World Health Organization 2014 consolidated guidance on HIV among key populations offers the potential for increased access to ART by key populations, following the same principles as for the general adult population. However, it should not be assumed that key populations will achieve greater access to ART unless stigma, discrimination and punitive laws, policies and practices that limit access to ART and other HIV interventions in many countries are addressed. Conclusions Rights-based approaches and investments in critical enablers, such as supportive legal and policy environments, are essential to enable wider access to ART and other HIV interventions for key populations. The primary objective of ART should always be to treat the person living with HIV; prevention is an important, additional benefit. ART should be provided only with informed consent. The preventive benefits of treatment must not be used as a pretext for failure to provide other necessary HIV programming for key populations, including comprehensive harm

  20. Successful antiretroviral therapy by using unusual antiretroviral combinations in heavily pre-treated patients: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Taramasso, Lucia; Dentone, Chiara; Alessandrini, Anna; Bruzzone, Bianca; Icardi, Giancarlo; Garraffo, Rodolphe; De Macina, Ilaria; Viscoli, Claudio; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    In the context of HIV-infected patients with several past antiretroviral therapies and multiple failures, it is possible to be faced with viruses resistant to all drug classes. We report on two HIV-1 infected patients in which the historical genotype showed mutations against all the major drug classes and in which viral suppression has been obtained by non-conventional antiretroviral therapy regimens, including the combination of darunavir at high dosage (800 mg bid), dolutegravir (50 mg bid) and a third agent, i.e. enfuvirtide in the first case and etravirine in the second one. PMID:25332227

  1. Service delivery interventions to improve adolescents' linkage, retention and adherence to antiretroviral therapy and HIV care*

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, Peter; Munthali, Chigomezgo; Ferguson, Jane; Armstrong, Alice; Kranzer, Katharina; Ferrand, Rashida A; Ross, David A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Adolescents living with HIV face substantial difficulties in accessing HIV care services and have worse treatment outcomes than other age groups. The objective of this review was to evaluate the effectiveness of service delivery interventions to improve adolescents' linkage from HIV diagnosis to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, retention in HIV care and adherence to ART. Methods We systematically searched the Medline, SCOPUS and Web of Sciences databases and conference abstracts from the International AIDS Conference and International Conference on AIDS and STIs in Africa (ICASA). Studies published in English between 1st January 2001 and 9th June 2014 were included. Two authors independently evaluated reports for eligibility, extracted data and assessed methodological quality using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. Results Eleven studies from nine countries were eligible for review. Three studies were randomised controlled trials. Interventions assessed included individual and group counselling and education; peer support; directly observed therapy; financial incentives; and interventions to improve the adolescent-friendliness of clinics. Most studies were of low to moderate methodological quality. Conclusions This review identified limited evidence on the effectiveness of service delivery interventions to support adolescents' linkage from HIV diagnosis to ART initiation, retention on ART and adherence to ART. Although recommendations are qualified because of the small numbers of studies and limited methodological quality, offering individual and group education and counselling, financial incentives, increasing clinic accessibility and provision of specific adolescent-tailored services appear promising interventions and warrant further investigation. PMID:25877007

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Diarrhea: Still an Issue in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dikman, Andrew E; Schonfeld, Emily; Srisarajivakul, Nalinee C; Poles, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Over half of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) experience diarrhea that contributes negatively to quality of life and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Opportunistic infectious agents that cause diarrhea in patients with HIV span the array of protozoa, fungi, viruses, and bacteria. With global use of ART, the incidence of diarrhea because of opportunistic infections has decreased; however, the incidence of noninfectious diarrhea has increased. The etiology of noninfectious diarrhea in patients with HIV is multifactorial and includes ART-associated diarrhea and gastrointestinal damage related to HIV infection (i.e., HIV enteropathy). A basic algorithm for the diagnosis of diarrhea in patients with HIV includes physical examination, a review of medical history, assessment of HIV viral load and CD4+ T cell count, stool microbiologic assessment, and endoscopic evaluation, if needed. For patients with negative diagnostic results, the diagnosis of noninfectious diarrhea may be considered. Pharmacologic options for the treatment of noninfectious diarrhea are primarily supportive; however, the use of many unapproved agents is based on unstudied and anecdotal information. In addition, these agents can be associated with treatment-limiting adverse events (AEs), such as drug-drug interactions with ART regimens, abuse liability, and additional gastrointestinal AEs. Currently, crofelemer, an antisecretory agent, is the only therapy approved in the USA for the symptomatic relief of noninfectious diarrhea in patients with HIV on ART. PMID:25772777

  3. Short Communication: Persistence of HIV Antibody Avidity in the Presence of Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kelly A; Price, Krystin Ambrose; Niedzwiedz, Philip; Masciotra, Silvina; Owen, Michele

    2016-06-01

    The effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the performance of HIV incidence assays have been well documented. To improve upon current assay approaches or focus the development of future assays, studies are needed to characterize the effects of ART on all candidate HIV incidence assays. In this study, we compared the performance of three antibody avidity-based HIV incidence assays, the Limiting Antigen (LAg), Bio-Rad Avidity, and HIV-1 Multiplex assays, using a well-defined cohort of recent HIV-1 seroconverters composed of ART-naive HIV-1-infected individuals and those who received ART early or delayed in the course of infection. Differences in the performance of all three avidity-based incidence assays were noted with study subjects who received ART. The LAg assay and Multiplex total antibody measurements (nMFI) exhibited similar kinetics in reactivity, as these assays tended to fluctuate with changes in viral load. In the early ART group, all seven subjects remained recent by both assays at time points >1 year postseroconversion, and assay values declined dramatically postdelayed ART initiation. In contrast, the two-well, antibody-dissociation avidity assays, Bio-Rad Avidity and Multiplex avidity index (AI) measurements, continued to mature in the early ART group, although blunted relative to the ART-naive group, and assay values remained stable after delayed ART initiation. In summary, although the HIV incidence assays evaluated in this study are all designed to measure antibody avidity, each assay is affected differently by ART-induced virus suppression, presumably because of the distinct assay formats and procedures for measuring avidity. PMID:26887862

  4. Nevirapine Resistance in Previously Nevirapine-Unexposed HIV-1-Infected Kenyan Infants Initiating Early Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Bhavna H; Tapia, Kenneth; Benki-Nugent, Sarah; Khasimwa, Brian; Ngayo, Musa; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth; Wamalwa, Dalton; Overbaugh, Julie; John-Stewart, Grace

    2015-08-01

    Nevirapine (NVP) resistance occurs frequently in infants following NVP use in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) regimens. However, among previously NVP-unexposed infants treated with NVP-antiretroviral therapy (ART), the development and impact of NVP resistance have not been well characterized. In a prospective clinical trial providing early ART to HIV-infected infants <5 months of age in Kenya (OPH03 study), we followed NVP-unexposed infants who initiated NVP-ART for 12 months. Viral loads were assessed and resistance determined using a population-based genotypic resistance assay. Of 99 infants screened, 33 had no prior NVP exposure, 22 of whom were initiated on NVP-ART. Among 19 infants with follow-up, seven (37%) infants developed resistance: one at 3 months and six at 6 months after ART initiation. The cumulative probability of NVP resistance was 5.9% at 3 months and 43.5% at 6 months. Baseline HIV RNA levels (p=0.7) and other characteristics were not associated with developing resistance. Post-ART, higher virus levels at visits preceding the detection of resistance were significantly associated with increased detection of resistance (p=0.004). Virus levels after 6 and 12 months of ART were significantly higher in infants with resistance than those without (p=0.007, p=0.030, respectively). Among infants without previous NVP exposure, development of NVP resistance was frequent and was associated with virologic failure during the first year of ART. Earlier development of NVP resistance in infants than in adults initiating NVP-ART may be due to longer viremia following ART or inadequate NVP levels resulting from NVP lead-in dosing. The development of NVP resistance may, in part, explain the superiority of protease inhibitor-based ART in infants. PMID:25819584

  5. Pattern of drug therapy problems and interventions in ambulatory patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ojeh, Victor B.; Naima, Nasir; Abah, Isaac O.; Falang, Kakjing D.; Lucy, Ogwuche; London, Ibrahim; Dady, Christiana; Agaba, Patricia; Agbaji, Oche

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We describe the frequency and types of drug therapy problems (DTPs), and interventions carried out to resolve them, among a cohort of HIV-infected patients on ART in Jos, Nigeria. Methods: A prospective pharmacists’ intervention study was conducted between January and August 2012 at the outpatient HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH). Pharmacists identified DTPs and made recommendations to resolve them. The main outcome measures were number of DTPs encountered, interventions proposed and acceptance rate of recommendations. Results: A total of 42,416 prescriptions were dispensed to 9339 patients during the eight months study. A total of 420 interventions (Intervention rate of 1 per 100 prescriptions) were made to resolve DTPs in 401 (4.3%) patients with a mean age of 41 (SD=10) years, and made up of 73% females. DTPs encountered were drug omission (n=89, 21.2%), unnecessary drug (n=55, 13.1%) and wrong drug indication (n=55, 13.1%). Recommendations offered included; Addition of another drug to the therapy (n=87, 20.7%), rectification of incomplete prescriptions (n=85, 20.2%), change of drug or dosage (n=67, 16.0%), and discontinuation of the offending drug (n=59, 14.0%). A total of 389 (93%) out of 420 of the recommendations were accepted. In all, 50.4% (212) of the problematic prescriptions were changed and dispensed, 22.2% (89) were clarified and dispensed, while wrong identities were corrected in 11.7% (49). However, 7.5% (30) prescriptions were dispensed as prescribed, 5.2% (21) were not dispensed, and 3% (12) were unresolved. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that pharmacists-initiated interventions can ameliorate DTPs in patients receiving ART given the high intervention acceptance rate recorded. The implication of this finding is that pharmacists with requisite training in HIV pharmacotherapy are an excellent resource in detecting and minimizing the effect of antiretroviral drug-related errors. PMID:26131046

  6. Discontinuation of Initial Antiretroviral Therapy in Clinical Practice: Moving Toward Individualized Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Di Biagio, Antonio; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Angarano, Gioacchino; Gori, Andrea; Quirino, Tiziana; De Luca, Andrea; Costantini, Andrea; Mussini, Cristina; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Castagna, Antonella; Antinori, Andrea; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Background: Study aim was to estimate the rate and identify predictors of discontinuation of first combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in recent years. Methods: Patients who initiated first cART between January 2008 and October 2014 were included. Discontinuation was defined as stop of at least 1 drug of the regimen, regardless of the reason. All causes of discontinuation were evaluated and 3 main endpoints were considered: toxicity, intolerance, and simplification. Predictors of discontinuation were examined separately for all 3 endpoints. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used for the outcome discontinuation of ≥1 drug regardless of the reason. Cox regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with treatment discontinuation because of the 3 reasons considered. Results: A total of 4052 patients were included. Main reason for stopping at least 1 drug were simplification (29%), intolerance (21%), toxicity (19%), other causes (18%), failure (8%), planned discontinuation (4%), and nonadherence (2%). In a multivariable Cox model, predictors of discontinuation for simplification were heterosexual transmission (P = 0.007), being immigrant (P = 0.017), higher nadir lymphocyte T CD4+ cell (P = 0.011), and higher lymphocyte T CD8+ cell count (P = 0.025); for discontinuation due to intolerance: the use of statins (P = 0.029), higher blood glucose levels (P = 0.050). About toxicity: higher blood glucose levels (P = 0.010) and the use of zidovudine/lamivudine as backbone (P = 0.044). Conclusions: In the late cART era, the main reason for stopping the initial regimen is simplification. This scenario reflects the changes in recommendations aimed to enhance adherence and quality of life, and minimize drug toxicity. PMID:26871881

  7. Effect of directly observed antiretroviral therapy compared to self-administered antiretroviral therapy on adherence and virological outcomes among HIV-infected prisoners: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    White, Becky L; Golin, Carol E; Grodensky, Catherine A; Kiziah, C Nichole; Richardson, Amy; Hudgens, Michael G; Wohl, David A; Kaplan, Andrew H

    2015-01-01

    The effect of directly observed therapy (DOT) versus self-administered therapy (SAT) on antiretroviral (ART) adherence and virological outcomes in prison has never been assessed in a randomized, controlled trial. Prisoners were randomized to receive ART by DOT or SAT. The primary outcome was medication adherence [percent of ART doses measured by the medication event monitoring system (MEMS) and pill counts] at the end of 24 weeks. The changes in the plasma viral loads from baseline and proportion of participants virological suppressed (<400 copies/mL) at the end of 24 weeks were assessed. Sixty-six percent (90/136) of eligible prisoners declined participation. Participants in the DOT arm (n = 20) had higher viral loads than participants in the SAT (n = 23) arm (p = 0.23). Participants, with complete data at 24 weeks, were analyzed as randomized. There were no significant differences in median ART adherence between the DOT (n = 16, 99% MEMS [IQR 93.9, 100], 97.1 % pill count [IQR 95.1, 99.3]) and SAT (n = 21, 98.3 % MEMS [IQR 96.0, 100], 98.5 % pill count [95.8, 100]) arms (p = 0.82 MEMS, p = 0.40 Pill Count) at 24 weeks. Participants in the DOT arm had a greater reduction in viral load of approximately -1 log 10 copies/mL [IQR -1.75, -0.05] compared to -0.05 [IQR -0.45, 0.51] in the SAT arm (p value = 0.02) at 24 weeks. The proportion of participants achieving virological suppression in the DOT vs SAT arms was not statistically different at 24 weeks (53 % vs 32 %, p = 0.21). These findings suggest that DOT ART programs in prison settings may not offer any additional benefit on adherence than SAT programs. PMID:25055766

  8. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN SMOKING, CRACK COCAINE ABUSE AND THE DISCONTINUATION OF COMBINATION ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY IN RECIFE, PERNAMBUCO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Joanna d'Arc Lyra; de Albuquerque, Maria de Fátima Pessoa Militão; Santos, Marcela Lopes; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito de Barros; Lacerda, Heloísa Ramos; Maruza, Magda; Moura, Libia Vilela; Coimbra, Isabella; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2014-01-01

    Despite the effectiveness of combination antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), nonadherence to medication has become a major threat to its effectiveness. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of self-reported irregular use of antiretroviral therapy and the factors associated with such an irregularity in PLWHA. A cross-sectional study of PLWHA who attended two referral centers in the city of Recife, in Northeastern Brazil, between June 2007 and October 2009 was carried out. The study analyzed socioeconomic factors, social service support and personal habits associated with nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy, adjusted by multivariable logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of PLWHA who reported irregular use of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) was 25.7%. In the final multivariate model, the irregular use of cART was associated with the following variables: being aged less than 40 years (OR = 1.66, 95%-CI: 1.29-2.13), current smokers (OR = 1.76, 95%-CI: 1.31-2.37) or former smokers (OR = 1.43, 95%-CI: 1.05-1.95), and crack cocaine users (OR = 2.79, 95%-CI: 1.24-6.32). Special measures should be directed towards each of the following groups: individuals aged less than 40 years, smokers, former smokers and crack cocaine users. Measures for giving up smoking and crack cocaine should be incorporated into HIV-control programs in order to promote greater adherence to antiretroviral drugs and thus improve the quality of life and prolong life expectancy. PMID:24626414

  9. Group Art Therapy with Incarcerated Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Bonnie J.; Young, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Art therapy is often thought of as an adjunct to counseling; however, because of its unique ability to bypass defenses, in some situations, art therapy may be a treatment of choice to allow clients to discover and express feelings that are often difficult to express verbally. Using art as therapy does not require that the therapist or the client…

  10. Explaining antiretroviral therapy adherence success among HIV-infected children in rural Uganda: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Olds, Peter K; Kiwanuka, Julius P; Ware, Norma C; Tsai, Alexander C; Haberer, Jessica E

    2015-04-01

    High adherence is critical for achieving clinical benefits of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) and particularly challenging for children. We conducted 35 qualitative interviews with caregivers of HIV-infected Ugandan children who were followed in a longitudinal study of real-time ART adherence monitoring; 18 participants had undetectable HIV RNA, while 17 had detectable virus. Interviews blinded to viral suppression status elicited information on adherence experiences, barriers and facilitators to adherence, and social support. Using an inductive content analytic approach, we identified 'lack of resources,' 'Lazarus effect,' 'caregiver's sense of obligation and commitment,' and 'child's personal responsibility' as categories of influence on adherence, and defined types of caregiver social support. Among children with viral suppression, high hopes for the child's future and ready access to private instrumental support appeared particularly important. These findings suggest clinical counseling should explore caregivers' views of their children's futures and ability to access support in overcoming adherence barriers. PMID:25323679

  11. Antiretroviral therapy-associated acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Capers, Kimberly N; Turnacioglu, Sinan; Leshner, Robert T; Crawford, John R

    2011-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has been reported in HIV-infected patients in association with the immune reconstitution syndrome whose symptoms can be mimicked by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-mediated mitochondrial toxicity. We report a case of a 17-year-old, HIV-infected patient on HAART with a normal CD4 count and undetectable viral load, presenting with acute lower extremity weakness associated with lactatemia. Electromyography/nerve conduction studies revealed absent sensory potentials and decreased compound muscle action potentials, consistent with a diagnosis of acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy. Lactatemia resolved following cessation of HAART; however, neurological deficits minimally improved over several months in spite of immune modulatory therapy. This case highlights the potential association between HAART, mitochondrial toxicity and acute axonal neuropathies in HIV-infected patients, distinct from the immune reconstitution syndrome. PMID:21327178

  12. Drug–drug interactions between anti-retroviral therapies and drugs of abuse in HIV systems

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Earla, Ravindra; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Substance abuse is a common problem among HIV-infected individuals. Importantly, addictions as well as moderate use of alcohol, smoking, or other illicit drugs have been identified as major reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients. The literature also suggests a decrease in the response to ART among HIV patients who use these substances, leading to failure to achieve optimal virological response and increased disease progression. Areas covered This review discusses the challenges with adherence to ART as well as observed drug interactions and known toxicities with major drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, smoking, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and opioids. The lack of adherence and drug interactions potentially lead to decreased efficacy of ART drugs and increased ART, and drugs of abuse-mediated toxicity. As CYP is the common pathway in metabolizing both ART and drugs of abuse, we discuss the possible involvement of CYP pathways in such drug interactions. Expert opinion We acknowledge that further studies focusing on common metabolic pathways involving CYP and advance research in this area would help to potentially develop novel/alternate interventions and drug dose/regimen adjustments to improve medication outcomes in HIV patients who consume drugs of abuse. PMID:25539046

  13. Antiretroviral therapy and changing patterns of HIV stigmatisation in Entebbe, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Russell, Steve; Zalwango, Flavia; Namukwaya, Stella; Katongole, Joseph; Muhumuza, Richard; Nalugya, Ruth; Seeley, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has the potential to change processes of HIV stigmatisation. In this article, changing processes of stigmatisation among a group of people living with HIV (PLWH) on ART in Wakiso District, Uganda, are analysed using qualitative data from a study of PLWH's self-management of HIV on ART. There were 38 respondents (20 women, 18 men) who had been taking ART for at least 1 year. They were purposefully selected from government and non-government ART providers. Two in-depth interviews were held with each participant. Processes of reduced self-stigmatisation were clearly evident, caused by the recovery of their physical appearance and support from health workers. However most participants continued to conceal their status because they anticipated stigma; for example, they feared gossip, rejection and their status being used against them. Anticipated stigma was gendered: women expressed greater fear of enacted forms of stigma such as rejection by their partner; in contrast men's fears focused on gossip, loss of dignity and self-stigmatisation. The evidence indicates that ART has not reduced underlying structural drivers of stigmatisation, notably gender identities and inequalities, and that interventions are still required to mitigate and tackle stigmatisation, such as counselling, peer-led education and support groups that can help PLWH reconstruct alternative and more positive identities. A video abstract of this article can be found at: https://youtu.be/WtIaZJQ3Y_8. PMID:26382288

  14. Impact of Early Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in Patients with Acute HIV Infection in Vienna, Austria

    PubMed Central

    Herout, Sandra; Mandorfer, Mattias; Breitenecker, Florian; Reiberger, Thomas; Grabmeier-Pfistershammer, Katharina; Rieger, Armin; Aichelburg, Maximilian C.

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether antiretroviral therapy (ART) should be initiated during acute HIV infection. Most recent data provides evidence of benefits of early ART. Methods We retrospectively compared the clinical and immunological course of individuals with acute HIV infection, who received ART within 3 months (group A) or not (group B) after diagnosis. Results Among the 84 individuals with acute HIV infection, 57 (68%) received ART within 3 months (A) whereas 27 (32%) did not receive ART within 3 months (B), respectively. Clinical progression to CDC stadium B or C within 5 years after the diagnosis of HIV was less common in (A) when compared to (B) (P = 0.002). After twelve months, both the mean increase in CD4+ T cell count and the mean decrease in viral load was more pronounced in (A), when compared to (B) (225 vs. 87 cells/μl; P = 0.002 and -4.19 vs. -1.14 log10 copies/mL; P<0.001). Twenty-four months after diagnosis the mean increase from baseline of CD4+ T cells was still higher in group A compared to group B (251 vs. 67 cells/μl, P = 0.004). Conclusions Initiation of ART during acute HIV infection is associated with a lower probability of clinical progression to more advanced CDC stages and significant immunological benefits. PMID:27065239

  15. "When in the body, it makes you look fat and HIV negative": the constitution of antiretroviral therapy in local discourse among youth in Kahe, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ezekiel, Mangi Job; Talle, Aud; Juma, James M; Klepp, Knut-Inge

    2009-03-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is becoming increasingly more accessible within the health care system in Tanzania. However, the impact of the increased availability of ART on local conceptions about medicines, health and physical wellbeing has not been fully explored. In this article we examine how ART is constituted within local discourses about treatment and healing. Based on 21 focus group discussions with young people aged 14-24 years in a rural area (Kahe), we examine how local terms and descriptions of antiretroviral therapy relate to wider definitions about the body, health, illness and drug efficacy. Findings illustrate how local understandings of ART draw on a wider discourse about the therapeutic functions of medicines and clinical dimensions of HIV/AIDS. Therapeutic efficacy of antiretroviral medication appeared to overlap and sometimes contradict locally shared understandings of the clinical functions of medicines in the body. Implications of ART on bodily appearance and HIV signs may influence conceptions about sick role, perpetuate stigma and affect local strategies for HIV prevention. Structural inequities in access, limited information on therapeutic efficacy of ART and perceived difficulties with status disclosure appear to inform local conceptions and possible implications of ART. Policy and programme interventions to foster public understanding and acceptability of ART should emphasize treatment education about the benefits and limitations of therapy and increased access to ART in rural areas, and should integrate voluntary status disclosure and HIV prevention. PMID:19136190

  16. CD4+ and viral load outcomes of antiretroviral therapy switch strategies after virologic failure of combination antiretroviral therapy in perinatally HIV-infected youth in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fairlie, Lee; Karalius, Brad; Patel, Kunjal; van Dyke, Russell B.; Hazra, Rohan; Hernán, Miguel A.; Siberry, George K.; Seage, George R.; Agwu, Allison; Wiznia, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study compared 12-month CD4+ and viral load outcomes in HIV-infected children and adolescents with virological failure, managed with four treatment switch strategies. Design: This observational study included perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV) children in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study (PHACS) and Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials (PACTG) Protocol 219C. Methods: Treatment strategies among children with virologic failure were compared: continue failing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART); switch to new cART; switch to drug-sparing regimen; and discontinue all ART. Mean changes in CD4+% and viral load from baseline (time of virologic failure) to 12 months follow-up in each group were evaluated using weighted linear regression models. Results: Virologic failure occurred in 939 out of 2373 (40%) children. At 12 months, children switching to new cART (16%) had a nonsignificant increase in CD4+% from baseline, 0.59 percentage points [95% confidence interval (95% CI) −1.01 to 2.19], not different than those who continued failing cART (71%) (−0.64 percentage points, P = 0.15) or switched to a drug-sparing regimen (5%) (1.40 percentage points, P = 0.64). Children discontinuing all ART (7%) experienced significant CD4+% decline −3.18 percentage points (95% CI −5.25 to −1.11) compared with those initiating new cART (P = 0.04). All treatment strategies except discontinuing ART yielded significant mean decreases in log10VL by 12 months, the new cART group having the largest drop (−1.15 log10VL). Conclusion: In PHIV children with virologic failure, switching to new cART was associated with the best virological response, while stopping all ART resulted in the worst immunologic and virologic outcomes and should be avoided. Drug-sparing regimens and continuing failing regimens may be considered with careful monitoring. PMID:26182197

  17. Select Host Restriction Factors Are Associated with HIV Persistence During Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    ABDEL-MOHSEN, Mohamed; WANG, Charlene; STRAIN, Matthew C.; LADA, Steven M.; DENG, Xutao; COCKERHAM, Leslie R.; PILCHER, Christopher D.; HECHT, Frederick M.; LIEGLER, Teri; RICHMAN, Douglas D.; DEEKS, Steven G.; PILLAI, Satish K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The eradication of HIV necessitates elimination of the HIV latent reservoir. Identifying host determinants governing latency and reservoir size in the setting of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is an important step in developing strategies to cure HIV infection. We sought to determine the impact of cell-intrinsic immunity on the HIV latent reservoir. Design We investigated the relevance of a comprehensive panel of established anti-HIV-1 host restriction factors to multiple established virologic and immunologic measures of viral persistence in HIV-1-infected, ART-suppressed individuals. Methods We measured the mRNA expression of 42 anti-HIV-1 host restriction factors, levels of cell-associated HIV-1 RNA, levels of total pol and 2-LTR circle HIV-1 DNA, and immunophenotypes of CD4+ T cells in 72 HIV-1-infected subjects on suppressive ART (23 subjects initiated ART <1 year post-infection, and 49 subjects initiated ART >1 year post-infection). Correlations were analyzed using non-parametric tests. Results The enhanced expression of a few select host restriction factors, p21, schlafen 11, and PAF1, was strongly associated with reduced CD4+ T cell-associated HIV RNA during ART (p<0.001). In addition, our data suggested that ART perturbs the regulatory relationship between CD4+ T cell activation and restriction factor expression. Lastly, cell-intrinsic immune responses were significantly enhanced in subjects who initiated ART during early versus chronic infection, and may contribute to the reduced reservoir size observed in these individuals. Conclusions Intrinsic immune responses modulate HIV persistence during suppressive ART, and may be manipulated to enhance the efficacy of ART and promote viral eradication through reversal of latency in vivo. PMID:25602681

  18. Reproductive intentions and family planning practices of pregnant HIV-infected Malawian women on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Michele S; Rosenberg, Nora E; Tang, Jennifer H; Mukuzunga, Cornelius; Kaliti, Stephen; Mwale, Mwawi; Hosseinipour, Mina C

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the pregnancy intentions of pregnant HIV-infected Malawian women on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for at least 6 months prior to the current pregnancy, and to assess whether time on ART was associated with pregnancy intention. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of HIV-infected Malawian women receiving antenatal care at a government hospital with a survey assessing ART history, reproductive history, and family planning use at conception. We used Pearson's chi-square tests and Fisher's exact tests to compare these parameters between women on ART greater than 24 months with those on ART less than 24 months. Modified Poisson regression was performed to assess the association between time on ART and pregnancy intention. Most women (75%) reported that their current pregnancy was unintended, defined as either Mistimed (21%) or Unwanted (79%). Women on ART for longer than 2 years were more likely to report an unintended pregnancy (79% versus 65%, p = .03), though there was no significant association between time on ART and pregnancy intention in multivariate analysis. Most women (79%) were using contraception at the time of conception, with condoms being most popular (91%), followed by injectables (9%) and the implant (9%). HIV-infected women on ART continue to experience high rates of unintended pregnancy in the Option B+ era. As Option B+ continues to be implemented in Malawi and increasing numbers of HIV-infected women initiate lifelong ART, ensuring that the most effective forms of contraception are accessible is necessary to decrease unintended pregnancy. PMID:26877194

  19. Random lopinavir concentrations predict resistance on lopinavir-based antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Court, Richard; Gordon, Michelle; Cohen, Karen; Stewart, Annemie; Gosnell, Bernadett; Wiesner, Lubbe; Maartens, Gary

    2016-08-01

    Considering that most patients who experience virological failure (VF) on lopinavir-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) fail due to poor adherence rather than resistance, an objective adherence measure could limit costs by rationalising the use of genotype antiretroviral resistance testing (GART) in countries with access to third-line ART. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a resource-limited setting at two large clinics in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa, in patients experiencing VF (HIV-RNA > 1000 copies/mL) on lopinavir-based ART who had undergone GART. Associations between major protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations and random plasma lopinavir concentrations were explored. A total of 134 patients, including 31 children, were included in the analysis. The prevalence of patients with major PI resistance mutations was 20.9% (n = 28). A random lopinavir concentration above the recommended minimum trough of 1 µg/mL [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 5.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.04-16.50; P = 0.001] and male sex (aOR = 3.19, 95% CI 1.22-8.33; P = 0.018) were predictive of the presence of at least one major PI resistance mutation. Random lopinavir concentrations of <1 µg/mL had a negative predictive value of 91% for major PI resistance mutations. Random lopinavir concentrations are strongly associated with the presence of major PI resistance mutations. Access to costly GART in patients experiencing VF on second-line ART could be restricted to patients with lopinavir concentrations above the recommended minimum trough of 1 µg/mL or, in areas where GART is unavailable, could be used as a criterion to empirically switch to third-line ART. PMID:27345268

  20. Trauma History and Depression Predict Incomplete Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapies in a Low Income Country

    PubMed Central

    Whetten, Kathryn; Shirey, Kristen; Pence, Brian Wells; Yao, Jia; Thielman, Nathan; Whetten, Rachel; Adams, Julie; Agala, Bernard; Ostermann, Jan; O'Donnell, Karen; Hobbie, Amy; Maro, Venance; Itemba, Dafrosa; Reddy, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Background As antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV becomes increasingly available in low and middle income countries (LMICs), understanding reasons for lack of adherence is critical to stemming the tide of infections and improving health. Understanding the effect of psychosocial experiences and mental health symptomatology on ART adherence can help maximize the benefit of expanded ART programs by indicating types of services, which could be offered in combination with HIV care. Methodology The Coping with HIV/AIDS in Tanzania (CHAT) study is a longitudinal cohort study in the Kilimanjaro Region that included randomly selected HIV-infected (HIV+) participants from two local hospital-based HIV clinics and four free-standing voluntary HIV counselling and testing sites. Baseline data were collected in 2008 and 2009; this paper used data from 36 month follow-up interviews (N = 468). Regression analyses were used to predict factors associated with incomplete self-reported adherence to ART. Results Incomplete ART adherence was significantly more likely to be reported amongst participants who experienced a greater number of childhood traumatic events: sexual abuse prior to puberty and the death in childhood of an immediate family member not from suicide or homicide were significantly more likely in the non-adherent group and other negative childhood events trended toward being more likely. Those with incomplete adherence had higher depressive symptom severity and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In multivariable analyses, childhood trauma, depression, and financial sacrifice remained associated with incomplete adherence. Discussion This is the first study to examine the effect of childhood trauma, depression and PTSD on HIV medication adherence in a low income country facing a significant burden of HIV. Allocating spending on HIV/AIDS toward integrating mental health services with HIV care is essential to the creation of systems that enhance medication adherence

  1. The mixed lineage kinase-3 inhibitor URMC-099 improves therapeutic outcomes for long-acting antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Guo, Dongwei; Dash, Prasanta K; Araínga, Mariluz; Wiederin, Jayme L; Haverland, Nicole A; Knibbe-Hollinger, Jaclyn; Martinez-Skinner, Andrea; Ciborowski, Pawel; Goodfellow, Val S; Wysocki, Tadeusz A; Wysocki, Beata J; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Liu, Xin-Ming; McMillan, JoEllyn M; Gorantla, Santhi; Gelbard, Harris A; Gendelman, Howard E

    2016-01-01

    During studies to extend the half-life of crystalline nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) the mixed lineage kinase-3 inhibitor URMC-099, developed as an adjunctive neuroprotective agent was shown to facilitate antiviral responses. Long-acting ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (nanoATV/r) nanoformulations co-administered with URMC-099 reduced viral load and the numbers of HIV-1 infected CD4+ T-cells in lymphoid tissues more than either drug alone in infected humanized NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-/- mice. The drug effects were associated with sustained ART depots. Proteomics analyses demonstrated that the antiretroviral responses were linked to affected phagolysosomal storage pathways leading to sequestration of nanoATV/r in Rab-associated recycling and late endosomes; sites associated with viral maturation. URMC-099 administered with nanoATV induced a dose-dependent reduction in HIV-1p24 and reverse transcriptase activity. This drug combination offers a unique chemical marriage for cell-based viral clearance. From the Clinical Editor: Although successful in combating HIV-1 infection, the next improvement in antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) would be to devise long acting therapy, such as intra-cellular depots. In this report, the authors described the use of nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy given together with the mixed lineage kinase-3 inhibitor URMC-099, and showed that this combination not only prolonged drug half-life, but also had better efficacy. The findings are hoped to be translated into the clinical setting in the future. PMID:26472049

  2. Antiretroviral Therapies in Women after Single-Dose Nevirapine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lockman, S.; Hughes, M.D.; McIntyre, J.; Zheng, Y.; Chipato, T.; Conradie, F.; Sawe, F.; Asmelash, A.; Hosseinipour, M.C.; Mohapi, L.; Stringer, E.; Mngqibisa, R.; Siika, A.; Atwine, D.; Hakim, J.; Shaffer, D.; Kanyama, C.; Wools-Kaloustian, K.; Salata, R.A.; Hogg, E.; Alston-Smith, B.; Walawander, A.; Purcelle-Smith, E.; Eshleman, S.; Rooney, J.; Rahim, S.; Mellors, J.W.; Schooley, R.T.; Currier, J.S.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Peripartum administration of single-dose nevirapine reduces mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) but selects for nevirapine-resistant virus. METHODS In seven African countries, women infected with HIV-1 whose CD4+ T-cell counts were below 200 per cubic millimeter and who either had or had not taken single-dose nevirapine at least 6 months before enrollment were randomly assigned to receive antiretroviral therapy with tenofovir–emtricitabine plus nevirapine or tenofovir-emtricitabine plus lopinavir boosted by a low dose of ritonavir. The primary end point was the time to confirmed virologic failure or death. RESULTS A total of 241 women who had been exposed to single-dose nevirapine began the study treatments (121 received nevirapine and 120 received ritonavir-boosted lopinavir). Significantly more women in the nevirapine group reached the primary end point than in the ritonavir-boosted lopinavir group (26% vs. 8%) (adjusted P = 0.001). Virologic failure occurred in 37 (28 in the nevirapine group and 9 in the ritonavir-boosted lopinavir group), and 5 died without prior virologic failure (4 in the nevirapine group and 1 in the ritonavir-boosted lopinavir group). The group differences appeared to decrease as the interval between single-dose nevirapine exposure and the start of antiretroviral therapy increased. Retrospective bulk sequencing of baseline plasma samples showed nevirapine resistance in 33 of 239 women tested (14%). Among 500 women without prior exposure to single-dose nevirapine, 34 of 249 in the nevirapine group (14%) and 36 of 251 in the ritonavir-boosted lopinavir group (14%) had virologic failure or died. CONCLUSIONS In women with prior exposure to peripartum single-dose nevirapine (but not in those without prior exposure), ritonavir-boosted lopinavir plus tenofovir–emtricitabine was superior to nevirapine plus tenofovir–emtricitabine for initial antiretroviral therapy. (Funded by the National

  3. Antibody Responses After Analytic Treatment Interruption in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1-Infected Individuals on Early Initiated Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Kathryn E.; Neubauer, George H.; Bricault, Christine A.; Shields, Jennifer; Bayne, Madeleine; Reimer, Ulf; Pawlowski, Nikolaus; Knaute, Tobias; Zerweck, Johannes; Seaman, Michael S.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Barouch, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    The examination of antibody responses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected individuals in the setting of antiretroviral treatment (ART) interruption can provide insight into the evolution of antibody responses during viral rebound. In this study, we assessed antibody responses in 20 subjects in AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5187, wherein subjects were treated with antiretroviral therapy during acute/early HIV-1 infection, underwent analytic treatment interruption, and subsequently demonstrated viral rebound. Our data suggest that early initiation of ART arrests the maturation of HIV-1-specific antibody responses, preventing epitope diversification of antibody binding and the development of functional neutralizing capacity. Antibody responses do not appear permanently blunted, however, because viral rebound triggered the resumption of antibody maturation in our study. We also found that antibody responses measured by these assays did not predict imminent viral rebound. These data have important implications for the HIV-1 vaccine and eradication fields. PMID:27419172

  4. Incomplete adherence among treatment-experienced adults on antiretroviral therapy in Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Denison, Julie A.; Koole, Olivier; Tsui, Sharon; Menten, Joris; Torpey, Kwasi; van Praag, Eric; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Colebunders, Robert; Auld, Andrew F.; Agolory, Simon; Kaplan, Jonathan E.; Mulenga, Modest; Kwesigabo, Gideon P.; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Bangsberg, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To characterize antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence across different programmes and examine the relationship between individual and programme characteristics and incomplete adherence among ART clients in sub-Saharan Africa. Design A cross-sectional study. Methods Systematically selected ART clients (≥18 years; on ART ≥6 months) attending 18 facilities in three countries (250 clients/facility) were interviewed. Client self-reports (3-day, 30-day, Case Index ≥48 consecutive hours of missed ART), healthcare provider estimates and the pharmacy medication possession ratio (MPR) were used to estimate ART adherence. Participants from two facilities per country underwent HIV RNA testing. Optimal adherence measures were selected on the basis of degree of association with concurrent HIV RNA dichotomized at less than or greater/equal to 1000 copies/ml. Multivariate regression analysis, adjusted for site-level clustering, assessed associations between incomplete adherence and individual and programme factors. Results A total of 4489 participants were included, of whom 1498 underwent HIV RNA testing. Nonadherence ranged from 3.2% missing at least 48 consecutive hours to 40.1% having an MPR of less than 90%. The percentage with HIV RNA at least 1000 copies/ml ranged from 7.2 to 17.2% across study sites (mean = 9.9%). Having at least 48 consecutive hours of missed ART was the adherence measure most strongly related to virologic failure. Factors significantly related to incomplete adherence included visiting a traditional healer, screening positive for alcohol abuse, experiencing more HIV symptoms, having an ART regimen without nevirapine and greater levels of internalized stigma. Conclusion Results support more in-depth investigations of the role of traditional healers, and the development of interventions to address alcohol abuse and internalized stigma among treatment-experienced adult ART patients. PMID:25686684

  5. Deterrents to HIV-patient initiation of antiretroviral therapy in urban Lusaka, Zambia: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Musheke, Maurice; Bond, Virginia; Merten, Sonja

    2013-04-01

    Some people living with HIV (PLHIV) refuse to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) despite availability. Between March 2010 and September 2011, using a social ecological framework, we investigated barriers to ART initiation in Lusaka, Zambia. In-depth interviews were conducted with PLHIV who were offered treatment but declined (n=37), ART staff (n=5), faith healers (n=5), herbal medicine providers (n=5), and home-based care providers (n=5). One focus group discussion with lay HIV counselors and observations in the community and at an ART clinic were conducted. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated, coded using Atlas ti, and analyzed using latent content analysis. Lack of self-efficacy, negative perceptions of medication, desire for normalcy, and fear of treatment-induced physical body changes, all modulated by feeling healthy, undermined treatment initiation. Social relationships generated and perpetuated these health and treatment beliefs. Long waiting times at ART clinics, concerns about long-term availability of treatment, and taking strong medication amidst livelihood insecurity also dissuaded PLHIV from initiating treatment. PLHIV opted for herbal remedies and faith healing as alternatives to ART, with the former being regarded as effective as ART, while the latter contributed to restoring normalcy through the promise of being healed. Barriers to treatment initiation were not mutually exclusive. Some coalesced to undermine treatment initiation. Ensuring patients initiate ART requires interventions at different levels, addressing, in particular, people's health and treatment beliefs, changing perceptions about effectiveness of herbal remedies and faith healing, improving ART delivery to attenuate social and economic costs and allaying concerns about future non-availability of treatment. PMID:23530573

  6. FUNCTIONAL PROTEOME OF MACROPHAGE CARRIED NANOFORMULATED ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY DEMONSTRATES ENHANCED PARTICLE CARRYING CAPACITY

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Skinner, Andrea L.; Veerubhotla, Ram S.; Liu, Han; Xiong, Huangui; Yu, Fang; McMillan, JoEllyn M.; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2013-01-01

    Our laboratory has pioneered the development of long-acting nanoformulations of antiretroviral therapy (nanoART). NanoART serves to improve drug compliance, toxicities, and access to viral reservoirs. These all function to improve treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Formulations are designed to harness the carrying capacities of mononuclear phagocytes (MP; monocytes and macrophages) and to use these cells as Trojan horses for drug delivery. Such a drug distribution system limits ART metabolism and excretion while facilitating access to viral reservoirs. Our prior works demonstrated a high degree of nanoART sequestration in macrophage recycling endosomes with broad and sustained drug tissue biodistribution and depots with limited untoward systemic toxicities. Despite such benefits, the effects of particle carriage on the cells’ functional capacities remained poorly understood. Thus, we employed pulsed stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture to elucidate the macrophage proteome and assess any alterations in cellular functions that would affect cell-drug carriage and release kinetics. NanoART-MP interactions resulted in the induction of a broad range of activation-related proteins that can enhance phagocytosis, secretory functions, and cell migration. Notably, we now demonstrate that particle-cell interactions serve to enhance drug loading while facilitating drug tissue depots and transportation. PMID:23544708

  7. Prescription medication misuse among HIV-infected individuals taking antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Newville, Howard; Roley, Jason; Sorensen, James L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV has become a highly treatable disease due to advances in antiretroviral therapy (ART). Additionally, HIV-infected individuals often take opiates, barbiturates, and benzodiazepines to treat co-occurring conditions, including pain and symptoms of HIV. We sought to examine prescription medication misuse by surveying 295 HIV-infected patients receiving ART. Participants answered questions about their demographics, alcohol and other drug use, psychiatric diagnoses, ART adherence and side effects, and quality of life. 11% of our sample acknowledged prescription medication misuse. In regression analysis, prescription medication misusers were more likely to report any drinking to intoxication (OR=4.31, 95% CI: 1.35-13.76, p=0.013), reported greater severity of ART side effects (OR=1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.10, p=0.041), and demonstrated poorer cognitive functioning (OR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99, p=0.048) compared to those who did not misuse prescription medications. Special care should be taken by medical providers before prescribing medications that may be abused or diverted. Patients should also be screened for aberrant use, even if not prescribed. ART side effects, cognitive deficits, and alcohol abuse may serve as risk factors or indicators of prescription medication misuse, and should be monitored. PMID:25245428

  8. Anxiety and depression symptoms as risk factors for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Lorenza Nogueira; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland; Remien, Robert H.

    2009-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are common among HIV-infected people and rank among the strongest predictors of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This longitudinal study aimed to assess whether symptoms of anxiety and depression are predictors of non-adherence among patients initiating ART at two public referral centers (n=293) in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Prevalence of severe anxiety and depression symptoms before starting ART was 12.6% and 5.8%, respectively. Severe anxiety was a predictor of non-adherence to ART during follow-up period (RH=1.87; 95% CI=1.14–3.06) adjusted for low education, unemployment, alcohol use in the last month and symptoms of AIDS; while a history of injection drug use had borderline statistical significance with non-adherence. These findings suggest that using a brief screening procedure to assess anxiety and depression symptoms before initiating ART help identify individuals for interventions to improve adherence and quality of life. PMID:18648925

  9. The future role of CD4 cell count for monitoring antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Ford, Nathan; Meintjes, Graeme; Pozniak, Anton; Bygrave, Helen; Hill, Andrew; Peter, Trevor; Davies, Mary-Ann; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Calmy, Alexandra; Kumarasamy, N; Phanuphak, Praphan; deBeaudrap, Pierre; Vitoria, Marco; Doherty, Meg; Stevens, Wendy; Siberry, George K

    2015-02-01

    For more than two decades, CD4 cell count measurements have been central to understanding HIV disease progression, making important clinical decisions, and monitoring the response to antiretroviral therapy (ART). In well resourced settings, the monitoring of patients on ART has been supported by routine virological monitoring. Viral load monitoring was recommended by WHO in 2013 guidelines as the preferred way to monitor people on ART, and efforts are underway to scale up access in resource-limited settings. Recent studies suggest that in situations where viral load is available and patients are virologically suppressed, long-term CD4 monitoring adds little value and stopping CD4 monitoring will have major cost savings. CD4 cell counts will continue to play an important part in initial decisions around ART initiation and clinical management, particularly for patients presenting late to care, and for treatment monitoring where viral load monitoring is restricted. However, in settings where both CD4 cell counts and viral load testing are routinely available, countries should consider reducing the frequency of CD4 cell counts or not doing routine CD4 monitoring for patients who are stable on ART. PMID:25467647

  10. HIV Infection and Antiretroviral Therapy Have Divergent Effects on Mitochondria in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Caryn G.; Voss, Joachim G.; Rakocevic, Goran; McLaughlin, Mary; Vinton, Carol L.; Huber, Charles; Hu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jun; Huang, Da Wei; Logun, Carolea; Danner, Robert L.; Rangel, Zoila G.; Munson, Peter J.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Rushing, Elisabeth J.; Lempicki, Richard A.; Dalakas, Marinos C.; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) affect mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and function, comprehensive evaluations of their effects on mitochondria in muscle, adipose tissue, and blood cells are limited. Methods. Mitochondrial DNA quantification, mitochondrial genome sequencing, and gene expression analysis were performed on muscle, adipose tissue, and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples from untreated HIV-positive patients, HIV-positive patients receiving nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)–based ART, and HIV-negative controls. Results. The adipose tissue mtDNA/nuclear DNA (nDNA) ratio was increased in untreated HIV-infected patients (ratio, 353) and decreased in those receiving ART (ratio, 162) compared with controls (ratio, 255; P < .05 for both comparisons); the difference between the 2 HIV-infected groups was also significant (P = .002). In HIV-infected participants, mtDNA/nDNA in adipose tissue correlated with the level of activation (CD38+/HLA-DR+) for CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. No significant differences in mtDNA content were noted in muscle or PMBCs among groups. Exploratory DNA microarray analysis identified differential gene expression between patient groups, including a subset of adipose tissue genes. Conclusions. HIV infection and ART have opposing effects on mtDNA content in adipose tissue; immune activation may mediate the effects of HIV, whereas NRTIs likely mediate the effects of ART. PMID:22476717

  11. An empirical test of the information, motivation and behavioral skills model of antiretroviral therapy adherence.

    PubMed

    Amico, K R; Toro-Alfonso, J; Fisher, J D

    2005-08-01

    Nearly perfect adherence to demanding antiretroviral therapy (ART) is now recognized as essential for HIV-positive patients to realize its life sustaining benefits. Despite the dire consequences of non-adherence, a large number of patients do not follow their ART regimen. While many factors influence adherence, the literature is dominated by studies on only one or a small set of them. Multivariate, theory-based models of adherence behavior are of great interest. The current study tested one such model, the Information, Motivation and Behavioral Skills (IMB) model of ART adherence (Fisher et al., under review). A sample of HIV-positive patients on ART in clinical care in Puerto Rico (N=200) provided data on adherence-related information, motivation and behavioral skills as well as adherence behavior per se. Structural equation model tests used to assess the propositions of the IMB model of ART adherence provided support for the interrelations between the elements proposed by the model and extended previous work. Implications for future research and intervention development are discussed. PMID:16036253

  12. Monitoring the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy programmes: methods to estimate coverage.

    PubMed Central

    Boerma, J. Ties; Stanecki, Karen A.; Newell, Marie-Louise; Luo, Chewe; Beusenberg, Michel; Garnett, Geoff P.; Little, Kirsty; Calleja, Jesus Garcia; Crowley, Siobhan; Kim, Jim Yong; Zaniewski, Elizabeth; Walker, Neff; Stover, John; Ghys, Peter D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the data sources and methods used to estimate the number of people on, and coverage of, antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes in low- and middle-income countries and to monitor the progress towards the "3 by 5" target set by WHO and UNAIDS. We include a review of the data sources used to estimate the coverage of ART programmes as well as the efforts made to avoid double counting and over-reporting. The methods used to estimate the number of people in need of ART are described and expanded with estimates of treatment needs for children, both for ART and for cotrimoxazole prophylaxis. An estimated 6.5 million people were in need of treatment in low- and middle-income countries by the end of 2004, including 660,000 children under age 15 years. The mid-2005 estimate of 970,000 people receiving ART in low- and middle-income countries (with an uncertainty range 840,000-1,100,000) corresponds to a coverage of 15% of people in need of treatment. PMID:16501733

  13. Unmasking Granulomatous Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia with Nodular Opacity in an HIV-Infected Patient after Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung-Woo; Lee, Yong-Moon; Kim, S J; Jeong, Hye Won

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) in patients with HIV infection can, in rare cases, present with pulmonary nodules that histologically involve granulomatous inflammation. This report describes an intriguing case of granulomatous PJP with pulmonary nodules after commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in an HIV-infected patient without respiratory signs or symptoms. Diagnosis of granulomatous PJP was only achieved through thoracoscopic lung biopsy. This case suggests that granulomatous PJP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary nodules in HIV-infected patients for unmasking immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome manifestation after initiation of ART. PMID:27189304

  14. Growth and HIV-free survival of HIV-exposed infants in Malawi: A randomized trial of two complementary feeding interventions in the context of maternal antiretroviral therapy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to compare the growth of HIV-exposed children receiving 1 of 2 complementary foods after prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission through maternal lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). In rural Malawi, 280 HIV-infected pregnant women were consecutively identifi...

  15. Adherence to Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART) During Muslim Ramadan Fasting

    PubMed Central

    Habib, A. G.; Shepherd, J. C.; Eng, M. K. L.; Babashani, M.; Jumare, J.; Yakubu, U.; Gebi, U. I.; Saad, M.; Ibrahim, H.; Blattner, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    Annual fasting during the month of Ramadan is observed in Muslim countries, some of which have widespread HIV infection. We studied treatment adherence and customary practices among 142 fasting `FT' and 101 non-fasting `NFT' patients on anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in Nigeria. Adherence on ART among FT and NFT patients was similar during Ramadan, 96% and 98%, and ever since commencement of ART, 80% and 88%, respectively. FT patients altered their typical daily behaviors by advancing morning and delaying evening doses thereby prolonging dosing intervals, eating heavier meals pre-dawn and on breakfast at sunset (78%), and changing or reducing their sleeping and waking times (40%). This preliminary study suggests that adherence and drug taking frequency appear uncompromised in FT HIV infected patients on ARVs. PMID:18521736

  16. Facilitators and barriers to antiretroviral therapy adherence among adolescents in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Ankrah, Daniel NA; Koster, Ellen S; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K; Arhinful, Daniel K; Agyepong, Irene A; Lartey, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is known to be challenging among adolescents living with HIV/AIDS, notwithstanding the life-saving importance of this therapy. Of the global total number of adolescents living with HIV in 2013, 83% reside in sub-Saharan Africa. The study aimed to identify facilitators of and barriers to antiretroviral treatment adherence among adolescents in Ghana. Methods A cross-sectional qualitative study using semi-structured interviews for data collection was carried out among adolescents (aged 12–19 years) at the adolescents HIV clinic at the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana. Predominantly open-ended questions relating to ART were used. Interviews were done until saturation. In total, 19 interviews were conducted. Analysis was done manually to maintain proximity with the text. Findings The main facilitators were support from health care providers, parental support, patient’s knowledge of disease and self-motivation, patient’s perceived positive outcomes, and dispensed formulation. The identified barriers were patient’s forgetfulness to take medicines, perceived stigmatization due to disclosure, financial barriers, and adverse effects of ART. Support from health care workers was the most frequently mentioned facilitator, and patient’s forgetfulness and perceived stigmatization after disclosure were the most frequently mentioned barriers. Self-motivation (knowledge induced) to adhere to treatment was a specific facilitator among older adolescents. Conclusion Continuous information provision in addition to unflinching support from health care workers and parents or guardians may improve adherence among adolescents. Also, interventions to reduce patient forgetfulness may be beneficial. A multi-sectorial approach would be needed to address adolescent disclosure of HIV/AIDS status. PMID:27042024

  17. [Lipodystrophy and metabolic disturbances as complications of antiretroviral therapy].

    PubMed

    Bociaga-Jasik, Monika; Kieć-Wilk, Beata; Kalinowska-Nowak, Anna; Mach, Tomasz; Garlicki, Aleksander

    2010-01-01

    Effective treatment of HIV infection with antiretroviral drugs significantly improve prognosis. Reduction of mortality and life prolongations in patients receiving such therapy have been also connected with the risk of side effects development. Among these complications metabolic disturbances such as lipodystrophy, dyslipidaemia, and insulin resistance which are present according some authors in up to 50% of patients receiving HAART play an important role. In spite of different investigations molecular basis of lipodystrophy development during HAART have not be fully understood, and the latest research revealed a lot of new aspects connected w adipocyte tissue pathophysiology, which were not taken up to know into consideration. In the presented publication the most important information about pathogenesis of lipodystrophy development in HIV infected patients treated with ARV drugs have been presented. PMID:21591364

  18. Dissolving the Boundaries: Postmodern Art and Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter-Muri, Simone; Klein, Linda

    2007-01-01

    This brief report discusses the relevance of postmodern art to contemporary art therapy practice. Postmodernism is defined by art that breaks or blurs the boundaries between product and process, individual and group creation, and artist and viewer. A discussion of contemporary artists who use a postmodern framework, including Anselm Kiefer, Jenny…

  19. Use of Third Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Carina; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Ghidinelli, Massimo; Castro, Jose Luis; Veloso, Valdiléa Gonçalves; Cortes, Claudia P.; Padgett, Denis; Crabtree-Ramirez, Brenda; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Fink, Valeria; Duran, Adriana; Sued, Omar; McGowan, Catherine C.; Cahn, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is expanding in Latin America. Many patients require second and third line therapy due to toxicity, tolerability, failure, or a combination of factors. The need for third line HAART, essential for program planning, is not known. Methods Antiretroviral-naïve patients ≥18 years who started first HAART after January 1, 2000 in Caribbean, Central and South America Network (CCASAnet) sites in Argentina, Brazil, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru were included. Clinical trials participants were excluded. Third line HAART was defined as use of darunavir, tipranavir, etravirine, enfuvirtide, maraviroc or raltegravir. Need for third line HAART was defined as virologic failure while on second line HAART. Results Of 5853 HAART initiators followed for a median of 3.5 years, 310 (5.3%) failed a second line regimen and 44 (0.8%) received a third line regimen. Cumulative incidence of failing a 2nd or starting a 3rd line regimen was 2.7% and 6.0% three and five years after HAART initiation, respectively. Predictors at HAART initiation for failing a second or starting a third line included female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18–2.00, p = 0.001), younger age (HR = 2.76 for 20 vs. 40 years, 95% CI 1.86–4.10, p<0.001), and prior AIDS (HR = 2.17, 95% CI 1.62–2.90, p<0.001). Conclusions Third line regimens may be needed for at least 6% of patients in Latin America within 5 years of starting HAART, a substantial proportion given the large numbers of patients on HAART in the region. Improved accessibility to third line regimens is warranted. PMID:25221931

  20. Cross-Cultural Issues in Art Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hocoy, Dan

    2002-01-01

    Examines the conditions under which art therapy might be a culturally appropriate intervention. Presents the aspects of art therapy and assessment that may be assimilationist or ethnocentric. Problems inherent in the cross-cultural interpretation of art are also discussed and methods that maximize interpretive validity and reliability are…

  1. Formative evaluation of antiretroviral therapy scale-up efficiency in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Glenn; Ryan, Gery; Taylor, Stephanie

    2007-11-01

    With millions in need of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the developing world, and scarce human and fiscal resources available, we conducted a formative evaluation of scale-up operations at clinics associated with AIDS Healthcare Foundation in Africa to identify lessons learned for improving scale-up efficiency. Site visits were made to six selected clinics in Uganda, Zambia, and South Africa, during which semistructured interviews with key stake-holders and observation of client flows and clinic operations were performed. This evaluation revealed the following lessons related to factors that are critical to efficient ART scale-up: (1) to ensure steady ART uptake, it is important to involve the community and community leaders in outreach, HIV education, and program decision-making; (2) minimizing bottlenecks to smooth patient flow requires efficient staff allocation to appropriate clinical duties, streamlined clinic visit schedule protocols, and tapping clients and the HIV community as a key source of labor; (3) to minimize clients dropping out of care, structures should be developed that enable clients to provide support and a "safety net" for helping each other remain in care; (4) computerized record management systems are essential for accurate antiretroviral inventory and dispensing records, quality assurance monitoring, and client enrollment records and visit scheduling; (5) effective organizational management and human resource policies are essential to maintain high job performance and satisfaction and limit burnout; (6) to maximize impact on social and economic health, it is important for ART programs to develop effective mechanisms for coordinating and referring clients to support service organizations. PMID:18240896

  2. Cost-effectiveness of anti-retroviral therapy at a district hospital in southern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bikilla, Asfaw Demissie; Jerene, Degu; Robberstad, Bjarne; Lindtjørn, Bernt

    2009-01-01

    Background As the resource implications of expanding anti-retroviral therapy (ART) are likely to be large, there is a need to explore its cost-effectiveness. So far, there is no such information available from Ethiopia. Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of ART for routine clinical practice in a district hospital setting in Ethiopia. Methods We estimated the unit cost of HIV-related care from the 2004/5 fiscal year expenditure of Arba Minch Hospital in southern Ethiopia. We estimated outpatient and inpatient service use from HIV-infected patients who received care and treatment at the hospital between January 2003 and March 2006. We measured the health effect as life years gained (LYG) for patients receiving ART compared with those not receiving such treatment. The study adopted a health care provider perspective and included both direct and overhead costs. We used Markov model to estimate the lifetime costs, health benefits and cost-effectiveness of ART. Findings ART yielded an undiscounted 9.4 years expected survival, and resulted in 7.1 extra LYG compared to patients not receiving ART. The lifetime incremental cost is US$2,215 and the undiscounted incremental cost per LYG is US$314. When discounted at 3%, the additional LYG decreases to 5.5 years and the incremental cost per LYG increases to US$325. Conclusion The undiscounted and discounted incremental costs per LYG from introducing ART were less than the per capita GDP threshold at the base year. Thus, ART could be regarded as cost-effective in a district hospital setting in Ethiopia. PMID:19615069

  3. Combined effect of antiretroviral therapy and blockade of IDO in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Boasso, Adriano; Vaccari, Monica; Fuchs, Dietmar; Hardy, Andrew W; Tsai, Wen-Po; Tryniszewska, Elzbieta; Shearer, Gene M; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2009-04-01

    Increased activity of IDO, which catalyzes the degradation of Trp into kynurenine (Kyn), is observed during HIV/SIV infection, and it may contribute to the persistence of HIV/SIV by suppressing antiviral T cell responses. We administered the IDO inhibitor 1-methyl-d-tryptophan (d-1mT) for 13 days to SIV-infected rhesus macaques receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). d-1mT treatment increased the plasma levels of Trp, without reducing the levels of Kyn, suggesting only a partial effect on IDO enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, d-1mT significantly reduced the virus levels in plasma and lymph nodes of ART-treated animals with incomplete responsiveness to ART. In SIV-infected animals that were not receiving ART, d-1mT was ineffective in reducing the plasma viral load and had only a marginal effect on the plasma Kyn/Trp ratio. Increased IDO and TGF-beta mRNA expression in lymph nodes of ART-treated macaques after d-1mT treatment suggested that compensatory counterregulatory mechanisms were activated by d-1mT, which may account for the lack of effect on plasma Kyn. Finally, d-1mT did not interfere with the ART-induced T cell dynamics in lymph nodes (increased frequency of total CD4 T cells, increase of CD8 T cells expressing the antiapoptotic molecule Bcl2, and reduction of regulatory T cells). Thus, d-1mT appeared to synergize with ART in inhibiting viral replication and did not interfere with the beneficial immunologic effects of ART. Further studies are required to elucidate the immunologic or virologic mechanism by which d-1mT inhibited SIV replication in vivo. PMID:19299731

  4. Antiretroviral Therapy Reduces HIV Transmission in Discordant Couples in Rural Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    He, Na; Duan, Song; Ding, Yingying; Rou, Keming; McGoogan, Jennifer M.; Jia, Manhong; Yang, Yuecheng; Wang, Jibao; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Wu, Zunyou

    2013-01-01

    Background Although HIV treatment as prevention (TasP) via early antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven to reduce transmissions among HIV-serodiscordant couples, its full implementation in developing countries remains a challenge. In this study, we determine whether China's current HIV treatment program prevents new HIV infections among discordant couples in rural China. Methods A prospective, longitudinal cohort study was conducted from June 2009 to March 2011, in rural Yunnan. A total of 1,618 HIV-discordant couples were eligible, 1,101 were enrolled, and 813 were followed for an average of 1.4 person-years (PY). Routine ART was prescribed to HIV-positive spouses according to eligibility (CD4<350 cells/µl). Seroconversion was used to determine HIV incidence. Results A total of 17 seroconversions were documented within 1,127 PY of follow-up, for an overall incidence of 1.5 per 100 PY. Epidemiological and genetic evidence confirmed that all 17 seroconverters were infected via marital secondary sexual transmission. Having an ART-experienced HIV-positive partner was associated with a lower rate of seroconvertion compared with having an ART-naïve HIV-positive partner (0.8 per 100 PY vs. 2.4 per 100 PY, HR = 0.34, 95%CI = 0.12–0.97, p = 0.0436). While we found that ART successfully suppressed plasma viral load to <400 copies/ml in the majority of cases (85.0% vs. 19.5%, p<0.0001 at baseline), we did document five seroconversions among ART-experienced subgroup. Conclusions ART is associated with a 66% reduction in HIV incidence among discordant couples in our sample, demonstrating the effectiveness of China's HIV treatment program at preventing new infections, and providing support for earlier ART initiation and TasP implementation in this region. PMID:24236010

  5. Medication-Taking Practices of Patients on Antiretroviral HIV Therapy: Control, Power, and Intentionality.

    PubMed

    Muessig, Kathryn E; Panter, Abigail T; Mouw, Mary S; Amola, Kemi; Stein, Kathryn E; Murphy, Joseph S; Maiese, Eric M; Wohl, David A

    2015-11-01

    Among people living with HIV (PLWH), adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is crucial for health, but patients face numerous challenges achieving sustained lifetime adherence. We conducted six focus groups with 56 PLWH regarding ART adherence barriers and collected sociodemographics and ART histories. Participants were recruited through clinics and AIDS service organizations in North Carolina. Dedoose software was used to support thematic analysis. Participants were 59% male, 77% black, aged 23-67 years, and living with HIV 4-20 years. Discussions reflected the fluid, complex nature of ART adherence. Maintaining adherence required participants to indefinitely assert consistent control across multiple areas including: their HIV disease, their own bodies, health care providers, and social systems (e.g., criminal justice, hospitals, drug assistance programs). Participants described limited control over treatment options, ART's impact on their body, and inconsistent access to ART and subsequent inability to take ART as prescribed. When participants felt they had more decision-making power, intentionally choosing whether and how to take ART was not exclusively a decision about best treating HIV. Instead, through these decisions, participants tried to regain some amount of power and control in their lives. Supportive provider relationships assuaged these struggles, while perceived side-effects and multiple co-morbidities further complicated adherence. Adherence interventions need to better convey adherence as a continuous, changing process, not a fixed state. A perspective shift among care providers could also help address negative consequences of the perceived power struggles and pressures that may drive patients to exert control via intentional medication taking practices. PMID:26505969

  6. Integrated Pre-Antiretroviral Therapy Screening and Treatment for Tuberculosis and Cryptococcal Antigenemia

    PubMed Central

    Pac, Lincoln; Horwitz, Mara; Namutebi, Anne Marion; Auerbach, Brandon J.; Semeere, Aggrey; Namulema, Teddy; Schwarz, Miriam; Bbosa, Robert; Muruta, Allan; Meya, David; Manabe, Yukari C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the feasibility of integrated screening for cryptococcal antigenemia and tuberculosis (TB) prior to antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and to assess disease specific and all-cause mortality in the first 6 months of follow-up. Methods We enrolled a cohort of HIV-infected, ART-naïve adults with CD4 counts ≤ 250 cells/µL in rural Uganda who were followed for 6 months after ART initiation. All subjects underwent screening for TB; those with CD4 ≤ 100 cells/µL also had cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) screening. For those who screened positive, standard treatment for TB or preemptive treatment for cryptococcal infection was initiated, followed by ART two weeks later. Results Of 540 participants enrolled, pre-ART screening detected 10.6% (57/540) with prevalent TB and 6.8% (12/177 with CD4 count ≤ 100 cells/µL) with positive serum CrAg. After ART initiation, 13 (2.4%) patients were diagnosed with TB and one patient developed cryptococcal meningitis. Overall 7.2% of participants died (incidence rate 15.6 per 100 person years at risk). Death rates were significantly higher among subjects with TB and cryptococcal antigenemia compared to subjects without these diagnoses. In multivariate analysis, significant risk factors for mortality were male sex, baseline anemia of hemoglobin ≤ 10 mg/dL, wasting defined as body mass index ≤ 15.5 kg/m2, and opportunistic infections (TB, positive serum CrAg). Conclusion Pre-ART screening for opportunistic infections detects many prevalent cases of TB and cryptococcal infection. However, severely immunosuppressed and symptomatic HIV patients continue to experience high mortality after ART initiation. PMID:25761234

  7. Socioeconomic status and response to antiretroviral therapy in high-income countries: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Burch, Lisa S; Smith, Colette J; Phillips, Andrew N; Johnson, Margaret A; Lampe, Fiona C

    2016-05-15

    It has been shown that socioeconomic factors are associated with the prognosis of several chronic diseases; however, there is no recent systematic review of their effect on HIV treatment outcomes. We aimed to review the evidence regarding the existence of an association of socioeconomic status with virological and immunological response to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We systematically searched the current literature using the database PubMed. We identified and summarized original research studies in high-income countries that assessed the association between socioeconomic factors (education, employment, income/financial status, housing, health insurance, and neighbourhood-level socioeconomic factors) and virological response, immunological response, and ART nonadherence among people with HIV-prescribed ART. A total of 48 studies met the inclusion criteria (26 from the United States, six Canadian, 13 European, and one Australian), of which 14, six, and 35 analysed virological, immunological, and ART nonadherence outcomes, respectively. Ten (71%), four (67%), and 23 (66%) of these studies found a significant association between lower socioeconomic status and poorer response, and none found a significant association with improved response. Several studies showed that adjustment for nonadherence attenuated the association between socioeconomic status and ART response. Our review provides strong support that socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with poorer response to ART. However, most studies have been conducted in settings such as the United States without universal free healthcare access. Further study in settings with free access to ART could help assess the impact of socioeconomic status on ART outcomes and the mechanisms by which it operates. PMID:26919732

  8. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy at high CD4+ cell counts is associated with positive treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Viviane D.; Reuter, Anja; Harrigan, P. Richard; Lourenço, Lillian; Chau, William; Hull, Mark; Mackenzie, Lauren; Guillemi, Silvia; Hogg, Robert S.; Barrios, Rolando; Montaner, Julio S.G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is limited research investigating the possible mechanisms of how starting combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) at a higher CD4+ cell count decreases mortality. This study investigated the association between initiating cART with short-term and long-term achievement of viral suppression; emergence of any drug resistance and of an AIDS-defining illness (ADI); long-term treatment adherence; and all-cause mortality. Methods This retrospective cohort study included 4120 naive patients who initiated cART between 2000 and 2012. Patients were followed until 2013, death or until the last contact date (varied by outcome). The main exposure was the interaction between period of cART initiation (2000–2006 and 2007–2012) and CD4+ cell count at cART initiation (<500 versus ≥500 cells/μl). We considered both baseline and longitudinal covariates. We fitted different multivariable models using cross-sectional and longitudinal statistical methods, depending on the outcome. Results Patients who initiated cART with a CD4+ cell count at least 500 cells/μl in 2007–2012 had an increased likelihood of achieving viral suppression at 9 months and of maintaining an adherence level of at least 95% over time, and the lowest probability of developing any resistance and an ADI during follow-up. These patients were not the ones with the highest likelihood of maintaining viral suppression over time, most likely due to viral load blips experienced during the follow-up. Conclusion The outcomes in this study likely play an important role in explaining the positive impact of early cART initiation on mortality. These results should alleviate some of the concerns clinicians may have when initiating cART in patients with high CD4+s as recommended by current treatment guidelines. PMID:26165354

  9. Altered Books in Art Therapy with Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilton, Gioia

    2007-01-01

    This article examines how altered books can be used in art therapy with adolescents. An altered book is a published book that has been changed into a new work of visual art through various art processes such as painting, drawing, collage, writing, and embellishment. Books are discussed as an art canvas on which to provide stimulation, structure,…

  10. Public health implications of antiretroviral therapy and HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, M A; Friedland, G

    1998-06-24

    Widespread use of antiretroviral agents and increasing occurrence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains resistant to these drugs have given rise to a number of important issues. Some of these concerns are distinct from the obvious question of the relationship between drug resistance and treatment failure and have potentially widespread public health implications. The relevant issues include but are not limited to the following: (1) frequency with which drug-resistant virus may be transmitted via sexual, intravenous, or mother-to-child routes; (2) ability of drug-resistant variants to be transmitted, a question that relates, in part, to the relative fitness of such strains; (3) effectiveness of antiviral therapy in diminishing viral burden in both blood and genital secretions, and whether this may be compromised in persons harboring resistant virus; and (4) importance of patient adherence to antiviral therapy and its relationship to sustained reduction in viral load to minimize the appearance in and transmission of drug-resistant virus from both blood and genital secretions. Thus, prevention of both development of HIV drug resistance as well as transmission of drug-resistant variants is a central issue of public health importance. Unless this topic is appropriately addressed, the likelihood is that drug-resistant variants of HIV, if able to successfully replicate, will sustain the epidemic and limit the effectiveness of antiviral therapy. PMID:9643862

  11. Annual cost of antiretroviral therapy among three service delivery models in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Lung; Waliggo, Samuel; Zieman, Brady; Jani, Nrupa; Buzaalirwa, Lydia; Okoboi, Stephen; Okal, Jerry; Borse, Nagesh N; Kalibala, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In response to the increasing burden of HIV, the Ugandan government has employed different service delivery models since 2004 that aim to reduce costs and remove barriers to accessing HIV care. These models include community-based approaches to delivering antiretroviral therapy (ART) and delegating tasks to lower-level health workers. This study aimed to provide data on annual ART cost per client among three different service delivery models in Uganda. Methods Costing data for the entire year 2012 were retrospectively collected as part of a larger task-shifting study conducted in three organizations in Uganda: Kitovu Mobile (KM), the AIDS Support Organisation (TASO) and Uganda Cares (UC). A standard cost data capture tool was developed and used to retrospectively collect cost information regarding antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and non-ARV drugs, ART-related lab tests, personnel and administrative costs. A random sample of four TASO centres (out of 11), four UC clinics (out of 29) and all KM outreach units were selected for the study. Results Cost varied across sites within each organization as well as across the three organizations. In addition, the number of annual ART visits was more frequent in rural areas and through KM (the community distribution model), which played a major part in the overall annual ART cost. The annual cost per client (in USD) was $404 for KM, $332 for TASO and $257 for UC. These estimates were lower than previous analyses in Uganda or the region compared to data from 2001 to 2009, but comparable with recent estimates using data from 2010 to 2013. ARVs accounted for the majority of the total cost, followed by personnel and operational costs. Conclusions The study provides updated data on annual cost per ART visit for three service delivery models in Uganda. These data will be vital for in-country budgetary efforts to ensure that universal access to ART, as called for in the 2015 World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, is

  12. HIV Cure Strategies: How Good Must They Be to Improve on Current Antiretroviral Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Sax, Paul E.; Sypek, Alexis; Berkowitz, Bethany K.; Morris, Bethany L.; Losina, Elena; Paltiel, A. David; Kelly, Kathleen A.; Seage, George R.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Weinstein, Milton C.; Eron, Joseph; Freedberg, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Background We examined efficacy, toxicity, relapse, cost, and quality-of-life thresholds of hypothetical HIV cure interventions that would make them cost-effective compared to life-long antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods We used a computer simulation model to assess three HIV cure strategies: Gene Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Stem Cell Transplantation (SCT), each compared to ART. Efficacy and cost parameters were varied widely in sensitivity analysis. Outcomes included quality-adjusted life expectancy, lifetime cost, and cost-effectiveness in dollars/quality-adjusted life year ($/QALY) gained. Strategies were deemed cost-effective with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios <$100,000/QALY. Results For patients on ART, discounted quality-adjusted life expectancy was 16.4 years and lifetime costs were $591,400. Gene Therapy was cost-effective with efficacy of 10%, relapse rate 0.5%/month, and cost $54,000. Chemotherapy was cost-effective with efficacy of 88%, relapse rate 0.5%/month, and cost $12,400/month for 24 months. At $150,000/procedure, SCT was cost-effective with efficacy of 79% and relapse rate 0.5%/month. Moderate efficacy increases and cost reductions made Gene Therapy cost-saving, but substantial efficacy/cost changes were needed to make Chemotherapy or SCT cost-saving. Conclusions Depending on efficacy, relapse rate, and cost, cure strategies could be cost-effective compared to current ART and potentially cost-saving. These results may help provide performance targets for developing cure strategies for HIV. PMID:25397616

  13. Immunodeficiency in children starting antiretroviral therapy in low-, middle- and high-income countries

    PubMed Central

    Koller, Manuel; Patel, Kunjal; Chi, Benjamin H.; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara; Dicko, Fatoumata; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Chimbetete, Cleophas; Avila, Dorita; Hazra, Rohan; Ayaya, Samual; Leroy, Valeriane; Trong, Huu Khanh; Egger, Matthias; Davies, Mary-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Background The CD4 cell count or percent (CD4%) at the start of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) are important prognostic factors in children starting therapy and an important indicator of program performance. We describe trends and determinants of CD4 measures at cART initiation in children from low-, middle- and high-income countries. Methods We included children aged <16 years from clinics participating in a collaborative study spanning sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, Latin America and the United States of America (USA). Missing CD4 values at cART start were estimated through multiple imputation. Severe immunodeficiency was defined according to World Health Organization criteria. Analyses used generalized additive mixed models adjusted for age, country and calendar year. Results 34,706 children from nine low-income, six lower middle-income, four upper middle-income countries and one high-income country (United States of America, USA) were included; 20,624 children (59%) had severe immunodeficiency. In low-income countries the estimated prevalence of children starting cART with severe immunodeficiency declined from 76% in 2004 to 63% in 2010. Corresponding figures for lower middle-income countries were from 77% to 66% and for upper middle-income countries from 75% to 58%. In the USA, the percentage decreased from 42% to 19% during the period 1996 to 2006. In low- and middle-income countries infants and children aged 12-15 years had the highest prevalence of severe immunodeficiency at cART initiation. Conclusions Despite progress in most low- and middle-income countries, many children continue to start cART with severe immunodeficiency. Early diagnosis and treatment of HIV-infected children to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with immunodeficiency must remain a global public health priority. PMID:25501345

  14. CD4+ T cell counts in initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected asymptomatic individuals; controversies and inconsistencies.

    PubMed

    Maina, E K; Bonney, E Y; Bukusi, E A; Sedegah, M; Lartey, M; Ampofo, W K

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal when devising strategies to define the start of therapy in HIV infected individuals is to avoid HIV disease progression and toxicity from antiretroviral therapy (ART). Intermediate goals includes, avoiding resistance by suppressing HIV replication, reducing transmission, limiting spread and diversity of HIV within the body and protecting the immune system from harm. The question of how early or late to start ART and achieve both primary and intermediate goals has dominated HIV research. The distinction between early and late treatment of HIV infection is currently a matter of CD4+ T cells count, a marker of immune status, rather than on viral load, a marker of virus replication. Discussions about respective benefits of early or delayed therapy, as well as the best CD4+ T cell threshold during the course of HIV infection at which ART is initiated remains inconclusive. Guidelines issued by various agencies, provide different initiation recommendations. This can be confusing for clinicians and policy-makers when determining the best time to initiate therapy. Optimizing ART initiation strategies are clearly complex and must be balanced between individual and broader public health needs. This review assesses available data that contributes to the debate on optimal time to initiate therapy in HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals. We also review reports on CD4+ T cell threshold to guide initiation of ART and finally discuss arguments for and against early or late initiation of ART. PMID:26475399

  15. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy and acceptability of planned treatment interruptions in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Linda; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Hamadache, Djamel; Compagnucci, Alexandra; Penazzato, Martina; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Mazza, Antonio; Ramos, Jose Tomas; Flynn, Jacquie; Rampon, Osvalda; Mellado Pena, Maria Jose; Floret, Daniel; Marczynska, Magdalena; Puga, Ana; Forcat, Silvia; Riault, Yoann; Lallemant, Marc; Castro, Hannah; Gibb, Diana M; Giaquinto, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    There have been no paediatric randomised trials describing the effect of planned treatment interruptions (PTIs) of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on adherence, or evaluating acceptability of such a strategy. In PENTA 11, HIV-infected children were randomised to CD4-guided PTIs (n = 53) or continuous therapy (CT, n = 56). Carers, and children if appropriate, completed questionnaires on adherence to ART and acceptability of PTIs. There was no difference in reported adherence on ART between CT and PTI groups; non-adherence (reporting missed doses over the last 3 days or marking <100 % adherence since the last clinical visit on a visual analogue scale) was 18 % (20/111) and 14 % (12/83) on carer questionnaires in the CT and PTI groups respectively (odds ratios, OR (95 % CI) = 1.04 (0.20, 5.41), χ(2) (1) = 0.003, p = 0.96). Carers in Europe/USA reported non-adherence more often (31/121, 26 %) than in Thailand (1/73, 1 %; OR (95 % CI) = 54.65 (3.68, 810.55), χ(2) (1) = 8.45, p = 0.004). The majority of families indicated they were happy to have further PTIs (carer: 23/36, 64 %; children: 8/13, 62 %), however many reported more clinic visits during PTI were a problem (carer: 15/36, 42 %; children: 6/12, 50 %). PMID:22584916

  16. Earlier versus Later Start of Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Adults with Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, François-Xavier; Sok, Thim; Laureillard, Didier; Borand, Laurence; Rekacewicz, Claire; Nerrienet, Eric; Madec, Yoann; Marcy, Olivier; Chan, Sarin; Prak, Narom; Kim, Chindamony; Lak, Khemarin Kim; Hak, Chanroeurn; Dim, Bunnet; Sin, Chhun Im; Sun, Sath; Guillard, Bertrand; Sar, Borann; Vong, Sirenda; Fernandez, Marcelo; Fox, Lawrence; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Goldfeld, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis remains an important cause of death among patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Robust data are lacking with regard to the timing for the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in relation to the start of antituberculosis therapy. Methods We tested the hypothesis that the timing of ART initiation would significantly affect mortality among adults not previously exposed to antiretroviral drugs who had newly diagnosed tuberculosis and CD4+ T-cell counts of 200 per cubic millimeter or lower. After beginning the standard, 6-month treatment for tuberculosis, patients were randomly assigned to either earlier treatment (2 weeks after beginning tuberculosis treatment) or later treatment (8 weeks after) with stavudine, lamivudine, and efavirenz. The primary end point was survival. Results A total of 661 patients were enrolled and were followed for a median of 25 months. The median CD4+ T-cell count was 25 per cubic millimeter, and the median viral load was 5.64 log10 copies per milliliter. The risk of death was significantly reduced in the group that received ART earlier, with 59 deaths among 332 patients (18%), as compared with 90 deaths among 329 patients (27%) in the later-ART group (hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI]; 0.44 to 0.86; P = 0.006). The risk of tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome was significantly increased in the earlier-ART group (hazard ratio, 2.51; 95% CI, 1.78 to 3.59; P<0.001). Irrespective of the study group, the median gain in the CD4+ T-cell count was 114 per cubic millimeter, and the viral load was undetectable at week 50 in 96.5% of the patients. Conclusions Initiating ART 2 weeks after the start of tuberculosis treatment significantly improved survival among HIV-infected adults with CD4+ T-cell counts of 200 per cubic millimeter or lower. (Funded by the French National Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis and the National Institutes of

  17. Shortcomings of adherence counselling provided to caregivers of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    In order to achieve optimal benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), caregivers of children receiving ART are required to attend routine clinic visits monthly and administer medication to the child as prescribed. Yet, the level of adherence to these behaviours varies considerably in many settings. As a way to achieve optimal adherence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, caregivers are required to attend routine counselling sessions at HIV treatment clinics that are centred on imparting information, motivation, and behavioural skills related to medication administration. According to the information-motivation-behavioural skills model, information related to adherence, motivation, and behavioural skills are necessary and fundamental determinants of adherence to ART. The purpose of the study was to observe and document the content of adherence counselling sessions that caregivers attending rural clinics in KwaZulu Natal receive. We observed 25 adherence counselling sessions, which lasted on average 8.1 minutes. Counselling typically consisted of counsellors recording patient attendance, reporting CD4 count and viral load results to caregivers, emphasising dose times, and asking caregivers to name their medications and dosage amounts. Patients were seldom asked to demonstrate how they measure the medication. They were also not probed for problems regarding treatment, even when an unsuppressed VL was reported to a caregiver. This paper calls attention to the sub-optimal level of counselling provided to patients on ART and the urgent need to standardise and improve the training, support, and debriefing provided to counsellors. PMID:27392000

  18. Antiretroviral Therapy in Prevention of HIV and TB: Update on Current Research Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Granich, Reuben; Gupta, Somya; Sutha, Amitabh B; Smyth, Caoimhe; Hoos, David; Vitoria, Marco; Simao, Mariangela; Hankins, Catherine; Schwartlander, Bernard; Ridzon, Renee; Bazin, Brigitte; Williams, Brian; Lo, Ying-Ru; McClure, Craig; Montaner, Julio; Hirnschall, Gottfried

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable scientific evidence supporting the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis (TB) infections. The complex nature of the HIV and TB prevention responses, resource constraints, remaining questions about cost and feasibility, and the need to use a solid evidence base to make policy decisions, and the implementation challenges to translating trial data to operational settings require a well-organised and coordinated response to research in this area. To this end, we aimed to catalogue the ongoing and planned research activities that evaluate the impact of ART plus other interventions on HIV- and/or TB-related morbidity, mortality, risk behaviour, HIV incidence and transmission. Using a limited search methodology, 50 projects were identified examining ART as prevention, representing 5 regions and 52 countries with a global distribution. There are 24 randomised controlled clinical trials with at least 12 large randomised individual or community cluster trials in resource-constrained settings that are in the planning or early implementation stages. There is considerable heterogeneity between studies in terms of methodology, interventions and geographical location. While the identified studies will undoubtedly advance our understanding of the efficacy and effectiveness of ART for prevention, some key questions may remain unanswered or only partially answered. The large number and wide variety of research projects emphasise the importance of this research issue and clearly demonstrate the potential for synergies, partnerships and coordination across funding agencies. PMID:21999779

  19. Functional proteome of macrophage carried nanoformulated antiretroviral therapy demonstrates enhanced particle carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Skinner, Andrea L; Veerubhotla, Ram S; Liu, Han; Xiong, Huangui; Yu, Fang; McMillan, JoEllyn M; Gendelman, Howard E

    2013-05-01

    Our laboratory developed long-acting nanoformulations of antiretroviral therapy (nanoART) to improve drug compliance, reduce toxicities, and facilitate access of drug to viral reservoirs. These all function to inevitably improve treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Formulations are designed to harness the carrying capacities of mononuclear phagocytes (MP; monocytes and macrophages) and to use these cells as Trojan horses for drug delivery. Such a drug distribution system limits ART metabolism and excretion while facilitating access to viral reservoirs. Our prior works demonstrated a high degree of nanoART sequestration in macrophage recycling endosomes with broad and sustained drug tissue biodistribution and depots with limited untoward systemic toxicities. Despite such benefits, the effects of particle carriage on the cells' functional capacities remained poorly understood. Thus, we employed pulsed stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture to elucidate the macrophage proteome and assess any alterations in cellular functions that would affect cell-drug carriage and release kinetics. NanoART-MP interactions resulted in the induction of a broad range of activation-related proteins that can enhance phagocytosis, secretory functions, and cell migration. Notably, we now demonstrate that particle-cell interactions serve to enhance drug loading while facilitating drug tissue depots and transportation. PMID:23544708

  20. Shortcomings of adherence counselling provided to caregivers of children receiving antiretroviral therapy in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Bland, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to achieve optimal benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), caregivers of children receiving ART are required to attend routine clinic visits monthly and administer medication to the child as prescribed. Yet, the level of adherence to these behaviours varies considerably in many settings. As a way to achieve optimal adherence in rural KwaZulu-Natal, caregivers are required to attend routine counselling sessions at HIV treatment clinics that are centred on imparting information, motivation, and behavioural skills related to medication administration. According to the information-motivation-behavioural skills model, information related to adherence, motivation, and behavioural skills are necessary and fundamental determinants of adherence to ART. The purpose of the study was to observe and document the content of adherence counselling sessions that caregivers attending rural clinics in KwaZulu Natal receive. We observed 25 adherence counselling sessions, which lasted on average 8.1 minutes. Counselling typically consisted of counsellors recording patient attendance, reporting CD4 count and viral load results to caregivers, emphasising dose times, and asking caregivers to name their medications and dosage amounts. Patients were seldom asked to demonstrate how they measure the medication. They were also not probed for problems regarding treatment, even when an unsuppressed VL was reported to a caregiver. This paper calls attention to the sub-optimal level of counselling provided to patients on ART and the urgent need to standardise and improve the training, support, and debriefing provided to counsellors. PMID:27392000

  1. Glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonists may ameliorate the metabolic adverse effect associated with antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Culha, Mehmet Gokhan; Inkaya, Ahmet Cagkan; Yildirim, Emre; Unal, Serhat; Serefoglu, Ege Can

    2016-09-01

    The number of people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA) reached to almost 40 million, half of which are under antiretroviral treatment (ART). Although the introduction of this therapy significantly improved the life span and quality of PLWHA, metabolic complications of these people remains to be an important issue. These metabolic complications include hyperlipidemia, abnormal fat redistribution and diabetes mellitus, which are defined as lipodystrophy syndrome. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a neuropeptide secreted from intestinal L cells and recently developed GLP-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) stimulate insulin secretion, improve weight control and reduce cardiovascular outcomes. This class of drugs may be a valuable medication in the treatment of HIV-associated metabolic adverse effects and extend the life expectancy of patients infected with HIV. PMID:27515222

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of Early Versus Standard Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected Adults in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Serena P.; Bang, Heejung; Severe, Patrice; Jean Juste, Marc Antoine; Ambroise, Alex; Edwards, Alison; Hippolyte, Jessica; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; McGreevy, Jolion; Riviere, Cynthia; Marcelin, Serge; Secours, Rode; Johnson, Warren D.; Pape, Jean W.; Schackman, Bruce R.

    2011-01-01

    Background In a randomized clinical trial of early versus standard antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected adults with a CD4 cell count between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 in Haiti, early ART decreased mortality by 75%. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of early versus standard ART in this trial. Methods and Findings Trial data included use of ART and other medications, laboratory tests, outpatient visits, radiographic studies, procedures, and hospital services. Medication, laboratory, radiograph, labor, and overhead costs were from the study clinic, and hospital and procedure costs were from local providers. We evaluated cost per year of life saved (YLS), including patient and caregiver costs, with a median of 21 months and maximum of 36 months of follow-up, and with costs and life expectancy discounted at 3% per annum. Between 2005 and 2008, 816 participants were enrolled and followed for a median of 21 months. Mean total costs per patient during the trial were US$1,381 for early ART and US$1,033 for standard ART. After excluding research-related laboratory tests without clinical benefit, costs were US$1,158 (early ART) and US$979 (standard ART). Early ART patients had higher mean costs for ART (US$398 versus US$81) but lower costs for non-ART medications, CD4 cell counts, clinically indicated tests, and radiographs (US$275 versus US$384). The cost-effectiveness ratio after a maximum of 3 years for early versus standard ART was US$3,975/YLS (95% CI US$2,129/YLS–US$9,979/YLS) including research-related tests, and US$2,050/YLS excluding research-related tests (95% CI US$722/YLS–US$5,537/YLS). Conclusions Initiating ART in HIV-infected adults with a CD4 cell count between 200 and 350 cells/mm3 in Haiti, consistent with World Health Organization advice, was cost-effective (US$/YLS <3 times gross domestic product per capita) after a maximum of 3 years, after excluding research-related laboratory tests. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00120510 Please see

  3. Association between antiretroviral therapy adherence and employment status: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Uthman, Olalekan A; Peltzer, Karl; Richardson, Lindsey A; Mills, Edward J; Amekudzi, Kofi; Ouédraogo, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the association between the employment status of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methods We searched the Medline, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for studies reporting ART adherence and employment status published between January 1980 and September 2014. Information from a wide range of other sources, including the grey literature, was also analysed. Two independent reviewers extracted data on treatment adherence and study characteristics. Study data on the association between being employed and adhering to ART were pooled using a random-effects model. Between-study heterogeneity and sources of bias were evaluated. Findings The meta-analysis included 28 studies published between 1996 and 2014 that together involved 8743 HIV-infected individuals from 14 countries. The overall pooled odds ratio (OR) for the association between being employed and adhering to ART was 1.27 (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.04–1.55). The association was significant for studies from low-income countries (OR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.58–2.18) and high-income countries (OR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.02–1.74) but not middle-income countries (OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.62–1.42). In addition, studies published after 2011 and larger studies showed less association between employment and adherence than earlier and small studies, respectively. Conclusion Employed HIV-infected individuals, particularly those in low- and high-income countries, were more likely to adhere to ART than unemployed individuals. Further research is needed on the mechanisms by which employment and ART adherence affect each other and on whether employment-creation interventions can positively influence ART adherence, HIV disease progression and quality of life. PMID:25558105

  4. Neuropsychological impairment in acute HIV and the effect of immediate antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kore, Idil; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Valcour, Victor; Fletcher, James LK; Chalermchai, Thep; Paul, Robert; Reynolds, Jesse; Tipsuk, Somporn; Ubolyam, Sasiwimol; Rattanamanee, Somprartthana; Jagodzinski, Linda; Kim, Jerome; Spudich, Serena

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate neuropsychological performance (NP) during acute HIV infection (AHI) before and after combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). DESIGN Prospective study of Thai AHI participants examined at 3 and 6 months following initiation of cART. METHODS 36 AHI participants were evaluated pre-cART at median 19 days since HIV exposure and 3 and 6 months after cART with the Grooved Pegboard test (GP), Color Trails 1 & 2 (CT1, CT2), and Trail Making Test A (TM). Raw scores were standardized to 251 age-and-education-matched HIV-uninfected Thais. To account for learning effects, change in NP performance was compared to that of controls at 6 months. Analyses included multivariable regression, non-parametric repeated measures ANOVA, and Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS Baseline NP scores for the AHI group were within normal range (Z scores range: −0.26 to −0.13). NP performance improved on CT1, CT2, and TM in the initial 3 months (ps <0.01) with no significant change during the last 3 months. Only improvement in CT1 was greater than that seen in controls at 6 months (p=0.018). Participants that performed >1 standard deviation below normative means on >2 tests (n=8) exhibited higher baseline cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV RNA (p=0.047) and had no improvement after cART. CONCLUSIONS Most AHI individuals had normal NP performance and early cART slightly improved their psychomotor function. However, approximately 25% had impaired NP performance which correlated with higher CSF HIV RNA, and these abnormalities were not reversed by early cART possibly indicating limited reversibility of cognitive impairment in a subset of AHI individuals. PMID:26509933

  5. Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Is Associated With Reduction in Liver Fibrosis Scores in HIV-1-Infected Subjects.

    PubMed

    Li, Yijia; Xie, Jing; Han, Yang; Wang, Huanling; Lv, Wei; Guo, Fuping; Qiu, Zhifeng; Li, Yanling; Du, Shanshan; Song, Xiaojing; Zhu, Ting; Thio, Chloe L; Li, Taisheng

    2016-02-01

    HIV increases the risk of liver disease as do two common coinfections, hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV). However, whether combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) reverses or exacerbates hepatic fibrosis remains unclear.This was an observational retrospective study. cART-naïve HIV-infected subjects without a history of substance abuse (including alcohol) had liver disease stage determined by aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio indices (APRIs) and fibrosis-4 (FIB-4) before and 24 and 48 weeks after cART. All the data were retrieved from previously established cohorts. Values before and after cART were compared using Wilcoxon test for paired samples. Regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with moderate-to-severe liver disease.Of the 1105 HIV-infected subjects, 120 were HBV coinfected and 64 were HCV coinfected. About 20% of HIV monoinfected participants had APRI and FIB-4 scores consistent with moderate-to-significant fibrosis compared to ∼36% of HIV-HBV coinfected and 67% to 77% of HIV-HCV coinfected participants. In adjusted analyses compared with HIV monoinfection, HBV coinfection was associated with 1.18-fold higher APRI (P < 0.001) and a 1.12-fold higher FIB-4 (P = 0.007) prior to cART; while HCV coinfection was associated with 1.94-fold higher APRI (P < 0.001) and a 1.43-fold higher FIB-4 (P < 0.001). After 48 weeks of cART, both fibrosis scores decreased in all subjects; however, HCV coinfection was still associated with higher fibrosis scores at week 48 compared to HIV monoinfection.cART was associated with improvement in hepatic fibrosis scores in the majority of HIV-hepatitis coinfected and HIV-monoinfected Chinese participants. PMID:26844493

  6. Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Is Associated With Reduction in Liver Fibrosis Scores in HIV-1-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijia; Xie, Jing; Han, Yang; Wang, Huanling; Lv, Wei; Guo, Fuping; Qiu, Zhifeng; Li, Yanling; Du, Shanshan; Song, Xiaojing; Zhu, Ting; Thio, Chloe L.; Li, Taisheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract HIV increases the risk of liver disease as do two common coinfections, hepatitis B and C viruses (HBV and HCV). However, whether combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) reverses or exacerbates hepatic fibrosis remains unclear. This was an observational retrospective study. cART-naïve HIV-infected subjects without a history of substance abuse (including alcohol) had liver disease stage determined by aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio indices (APRIs) and fibrosis-4 (FIB-4) before and 24 and 48 weeks after cART. All the data were retrieved from previously established cohorts. Values before and after cART were compared using Wilcoxon test for paired samples. Regression analyses were used to determine factors associated with moderate-to-severe liver disease. Of the 1105 HIV-infected subjects, 120 were HBV coinfected and 64 were HCV coinfected. About 20% of HIV monoinfected participants had APRI and FIB-4 scores consistent with moderate-to-significant fibrosis compared to ∼36% of HIV–HBV coinfected and 67% to 77% of HIV–HCV coinfected participants. In adjusted analyses compared with HIV monoinfection, HBV coinfection was associated with 1.18-fold higher APRI (P < 0.001) and a 1.12-fold higher FIB-4 (P = 0.007) prior to cART; while HCV coinfection was associated with 1.94-fold higher APRI (P < 0.001) and a 1.43-fold higher FIB-4 (P < 0.001). After 48 weeks of cART, both fibrosis scores decreased in all subjects; however, HCV coinfection was still associated with higher fibrosis scores at week 48 compared to HIV monoinfection. cART was associated with improvement in hepatic fibrosis scores in the majority of HIV-hepatitis coinfected and HIV-monoinfected Chinese participants. PMID:26844493

  7. Immunodeficiency at the start of combination antiretroviral therapy in low-, middle- and high-income countries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the CD4 cell count at the start of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in low-income (LIC), lower middle-income (LMIC), upper middle-income (UMIC) and high-income (HIC) countries. Methods Patients aged ≥16 years starting cART in a clinic participating in a multi-cohort collaboration spanning six continents (International epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS and ART Cohort Collaboration) were eligible. Multi-level linear regression models were adjusted for age, gender and calendar year; missing CD4 counts were imputed. Findings 379,865 patients from nine LIC, four LMIC, four UMIC and six HIC were included. In LIC the median CD4 cell count at cART initiation increased by 83% from 80 to 145 cells/μl between 2002 and 2009. Corresponding increases in LMIC, UMIC and HIC were from 87 to 155 cells/μl (76% increase), 88 to 135 cells/μl (53%) and 209 to 274 cells/μl (31%). In 2009, compared to LIC, median counts were 13 cells/μl (95% CI -56 to +30) lower in LMIC, 22 cells/μl (-62 to +18) lower in UMIC and 112 /μl (+75 to +149) higher in HIC. They were 23 cells/μl (95% CI +18 to +28) higher in women than men. Median counts were 88 cells/μl (95% CI +35 to +141) higher in countries with an estimated national cART coverage >80%, compared to countries with <40% coverage. Conclusions Median CD4 cell counts at start of cART increased 2000-2009 but remained below 200 cells/μl in LIC and MIC and below 300 cells/μl in HIC. Earlier start of cART will require substantial efforts and resources globally. PMID:24419071

  8. Short Communication: Hyperthyroidism in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patients on Combined Antiretroviral Therapy: Case Series and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Emory; Phadke, Varun K; Nguyen, Minh Ly T

    2016-06-01

    We describe an HIV-infected patient initiated on combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) who subsequently developed immune restoration disease (IRD) hyperthyroidism-this case represents one of five such patients seen at our center within the past year. Similar to previous reports of hyperthyroidism due to IRD, all of our patients experienced a rapid early recovery in total CD4 count, but developed symptoms of hyperthyroidism on average 3 years (38 months) after beginning cART, which represents a longer time frame than previously reported. Awareness and recognition of this potential complication of cART, which may occur years after treatment initiation, will allow patients with immune restorative hyperthyroidism to receive timely therapy and avoid the long-term complications associated with undiagnosed thyroid disease. PMID:26887978

  9. Laboratory adverse events and discontinuation of therapy according to CD4+ cell count at the start of antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Sophie; Quinn, Killian; Hill, Teresa; Leen, Clifford; Walsh, John; Hay, Phillip; Fisher, Martin; Post, Frank; Nelson, Mark; Gompels, Mark; Johnson, Margaret; Chadwick, David; Gilson, Richard; Sabin, Caroline; Fidler, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Few data describe antiretroviral treatment (ART)-related adverse events when treatment is initiated at CD4+ cell counts more than 350 cells/μl. We compared rates of laboratory-defined adverse events (LDAEs) according to CD4+ cell count at ART initiation. Design: Analysis of on-going cohort study. Methods: ART-naive persons initiating ART from 2000 to 2010 were included. Chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Kruskal–Wallis tests compared characteristics among those starting ART with a CD4+ cell count of 350 or less, 351–499 and at least 500 cells/μl. Time-updated Poisson regression compared rates of LDAE in the three CD4+ cell strata. Cox proportional hazard models compared risk of ART discontinuation. Results: Nine thousand, four hundred and six individuals were included: median age 37 years, 61% white, 80% men, median viral load 4.8 log copies/ml. Four hundred and forty-seven (4.9%) and 1099 (11.7%) started ART with a CD4+ cell count at least 500 and 351–499 cells/μl, respectively. One thousand, two hundred and eighty-three (13.6%) patients experienced at least one LDAE. The rate of LDAE did not differ between those starting ART with a CD4+ cell count 351–499 and less than 350 cells/μl [relative rate 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74–1.09)], but an increased risk of ART discontinuation was observed (hazard ratio 1.58, 95% CI 1.10–2.27). Those starting ART at CD4+ cell count at least 500 cells/μl had an increased rate of LDAE (relative rate 1.44, 95% CI 1.13–1.82) but were not more likely to discontinue ART (hazard ratio 1.15, 95% CI 0.64–2.09). Conclusion: This study demonstrates the need to consider ART-related toxicities when initiating therapy at CD4+ cell counts at least 500 cells/μl. Whilst evidence from randomized controlled trials is awaited, the timing of ART initiation in terms of benefits and risks of ART remains an important question. PMID:24583670

  10. Interactions of Papua New Guinea medicinal plant extracts with antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Erica C.; Hathaway, Laura B.; Lamb, John G.; Pond, Chris D.; Rai, Prem P.; Matainaho, Teatulohi K.; Piskaut, Pius; Barrows, Louis R.; Franklin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance A substantial proportion of the population in Papua New Guinea (PNG) lives with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Treatment requires lifelong use of antiretroviral therapy (ART). The majority of people in PNG use traditional medicines (TM) derived from plants for all types of health promotions. Consequently, there is a concern that herb-drug interactions may impact the efficacy of ART. Herb-drug, or drug-drug, interactions occur at the level of metabolism through two major mechanisms: enzyme induction or enzyme inhibition. In this study, extracts of commonly-used medicinal plants from PNG were screened for herb-drug interactions related to cytochrome P450s (CYPs). Materials and Methods Sixty nine methanol extracts of TM plants were screened for their ability to induce CYPs by human aryl hydrocarbon receptor- (hAhR-) and human pregnane X receptor- (hPXR-) dependent mechanisms, utilizing a commercially available cell-based luciferase reporter system. Inhibition of three major CYPs, CYP1A2, CYP3A4, and CYP2D6, was determined using human liver microsomes and enzyme-selective model substrates. Results Almost one third of the TM plant extracts induced the hAhR-dependent expression of CYP1A2, the hPXR-dependent expression of CYP3A4, or both. Almost two thirds inhibited CYP1A2, CYP3A4, or CYP2D6, or combinations thereof. Many plant extracts exhibited both induction and inhibition properties. Conclusions We demonstrated that the potent and selective ability of extracts from PNG medicinal plants to affect drug metabolizing enzymes through induction and/or inhibition is a common phenomenon. Use of traditional medicines concomitantly with ART could dramatically alter the concentrations of antiretroviral drugs in the body; and their efficacy. PNG healthcare providers should counsel HIV patients because of this consequence. PMID:25138353

  11. Progress of the National Pediatric Free Antiretroviral Therapy program in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Sun, Xin; He, Yun; Tang, Zhirong; Peng, Guoping; Liu, Aiwen; Qiao, Xiaochun; Li, Huiqin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Dou, Zhihui; Ma, Ye; Liu, Zhongfu; Zhang, Fujie

    2010-10-01

    In 2003, the Chinese Government initiated a free antiretroviral therapy (ART) program focusing on adult AIDS patients. Pediatric antiretroviral (ARV) formulations were yet unavailable. It was not until July 2005, with the initiation of a two-stage program implemented by the Chinese Ministry of Health, that pediatric formulations became accessible in China. Initially, the pediatric ART program was piloted in six provinces with the highest incidences of pediatric HIV/AIDS. The pilot stage allowed the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CCDC) to finalize entry criteria, treatment regimen, and patient monitoring and follow-up procedures. The second stage commenced at the end of 2006 when the program was scaled-up nationally. In order to guarantee treatment of pediatric patients, extensive training in the selection of appropriate ARV drug regimen and dosage was provided to doctors, often through on-site collaboration with domestic and international experts. The CCDC simultaneously established a pediatric ARV management system and a pediatric ART information system. CD4 count and other laboratory tests are being routinely performed on these pediatric patients. By the end of June 2009, 1529 pediatric patients had received ARV under the national program. However, challenges remain. Firstly, many children infected with HIV/AIDS live in rural areas where the treatment quality is hindered by the limited number of medical facilities and skilled medical workers. Secondly, much of the pediatric ARV drug supply depends on donation. An effort needs to be made by the Chinese Government to establish China's own drug procurement and supply system. PMID:20665285

  12. Emergence of HIV Drug Resistance During First- and Second-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Gupta, Ravindra K; Van Zyl, Gert; Eron, Joseph J.; Nachega, Jean B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings has expanded in the last decade, reaching >8 million individuals and reducing AIDS mortality and morbidity. Continued success of ART programs will require understanding the emergence of HIV drug resistance patterns among individuals in whom treatment has failed and managing ART from both an individual and public health perspective. We review data on the emergence of HIV drug resistance among individuals in whom first-line therapy has failed and clinical and resistance outcomes of those receiving second-line therapy in resource-limited settings. Results Resistance surveys among patients initiating first-line nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)–based therapy suggest that 76%–90% of living patients achieve HIV RNA suppression by 12 months after ART initiation. Among patients with detectable HIV RNA at 12 months, HIV drug resistance, primarily due to M184V and NNRTI mutations, has been identified in 60%–72%, although the antiretroviral activity of proposed second-line regimens has been preserved. Complex mutation patterns, including thymidine-analog mutations, K65R, and multinucleoside mutations, are prevalent among cases of treatment failure identified by clinical or immunologic methods. Approximately 22% of patients receiving second-line therapy do not achieve HIV RNA suppression by 6 months, with poor adherence, rather than HIV drug resistance, driving most failures. Major protease inhibitor resistance at the time of second-line failure ranges from 0% to 50%, but studies are limited. Conclusions Resistance of HIV to first-line therapy is predictable at 12 months when evaluated by means of HIV RNA monitoring and, when detected, largely preserves second-line therapy options. Optimizing adherence, performing resistance surveillance, and improving treatment monitoring are critical for long-term prevention of drug resistance. PMID:23687289

  13. Timing of antiretroviral therapy initiation after diagnosis of recent human immunodeficiency virus infection and CD4(+) T-cell recovery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Y; Duan, S; Wu, Z; Ye, R; Yang, Y; Yao, S; Wang, J; Xiang, L; Jiang, Y; Lu, L; Jia, M; Detels, R; He, N

    2016-03-01

    We retrospectively examined the timing of antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and CD4(+) T-cell recovery over 36 months among recent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections using BED (HIV-1 subtypes B, E and D) immunoglobulin G capture enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA). Regardless of baseline CD4(+) counts, individuals (n = 393) who initiated ART >2 months after diagnosis had significantly decreased probability and rate of achieving CD4(+) counts ≥900 cells/μL or ≥600 cells/μL than those individuals (n = 135) who started ART earlier (≤2 months). But the mean CD4(+) counts in two groups converged after 30 months of treatment. Early ART initiation leads to accelerated CD4(+) recovery, but does not offer a long-term advantage in CD4(+) counts. PMID:26627338

  14. Hepatic Enzyme Alterations in HIV Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy: A Case-Control Study in a Hospital Setting in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Osakunor, Derick Nii Mensah; Obirikorang, Christian; Fianu, Vincent; Asare, Isaac; Dakorah, Mavis

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnosing hepatic injury in HIV infection can be a herculean task for clinicians as several factors may be involved. In this study, we sought to determine the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and disease progression on hepatic enzymes in HIV patients. Methods A case-control study conducted from January to May 2014 at the Akwatia Government Hospital, Eastern region, Ghana, The study included 209 HIV patients on ART (designated HIV-ART) and 132 ART-naive HIV patients (designated HIV-Controls). Data gathered included demography, clinical history and results of blood tests for hepatic enzymes. We employed the Fisher’s, Chi-square, unpaired t-test and Pearson’s correlation in analysis, using GraphPad Prism and SPSS. A P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results Median CD4 lymphocyte count of HIV-ART participants (604.00 cells/mm3) was higher than that of HIV-Controls (491.50 cells/mm3; P = 0.0005). Mean values of ALP, ALT, AST and GGT did not differ between the two groups compared (P > 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between hepatic enzymes (ALP, ALT, AST and GGT) for both groups (p < 0.01 each). Duration of ART correlated positively with ALT (p < 0.05). The effect size of disease progression on hepatic enzymes for both groups was small. Conclusion Antiretroviral therapy amongst this population has minimal effects on hepatic enzymes and does not suggest modifications in therapy. Hepatic injury may occur in HIV, even in the absence of ART and other traditional factors. Monitoring of hepatic enzymes is still important in HIV patients. PMID:26247879

  15. Structural Barriers to Antiretroviral Therapy Among Sex Workers Living with HIV: Findings of a Longitudinal Study in Vancouver, Canada.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Shira M; Montaner, Julio; Duff, Putu; Nguyen, Paul; Dobrer, Sabina; Guillemi, Silvia; Shannon, Kate

    2016-05-01

    In light of limited data on structural determinants of access and retention in antiretroviral therapy (ART) among sex workers, we examined structural correlates of ART use among sex workers living with HIV over time. Longitudinal data were drawn from a cohort of 646 female sex workers in Vancouver, Canada (2010-2012) and linked pharmacy records on ART dispensation. We used logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE) to examine correlates of gaps in ART use (i.e., treatment interruptions or delayed ART initiation), among HIV seropositive participants (n = 74). Over a 2.5-year period, 37.8 % of participants experienced gaps in ART use (i.e., no ART dispensed in a 6-month period). In a multivariable GEE model, younger age, migration/mobility, incarceration, and non-injection drug use independently correlated with gaps in ART use. In spite of successes scaling-up ART in British Columbia, younger, mobile, or incarcerated sex workers face persistent gaps in access and retention irrespective of drug use. Community-based, tailored interventions to scale-up entry and retention in ART for sex workers should be further explored in this setting. PMID:26148850

  16. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy in India: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mhaskar, Rahul; Alandikar, Vaibhav; Emmanuel, Patricia; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Patel, Sangita; Patel, Atul; Naik, Eknath; Mohapatra, Shyam; Kumar, Ambuj

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population in India. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Materials and Methods: The Medline and Cochrane library database were searched. Any prospective or retrospective study enrolling a minimum of 10 subjects with a primary objective of assessing ART adherence in the HIV population in India was included. Data were extracted on adherence definition, adherence estimates, study design, study population characteristics, recall period and assessment method. For metaanalysis, the pooled proportion was calculated as a back-transform of the weighted mean of the transformed proportions (calculated according to the Freeman-Tukey variant of the arcsine square root) using the random effects model. Results: There were seven cross-sectional studies and one retrospective study enrolling 1666 participants. Publication bias was significant (P = 0.003). Pooled results showed an ART adherence rate of 70% (95% confidence interval: 59–81%, I2 = 96.3%). Sensitivity analyses based on study design, adherence assessment method and study region did not influence adherence estimates. Fifty percent (4/8) of the studies reported cost of medication as the most common obstacle for ART adherence. Twenty-five percent (2/8) reported lack of access to medication as the reason for non-adherence and 12% (1/8) cited adverse events as the most prevalent reason for non-adherence. The overall methodological quality of the included studies was poor. Conclusion: Pooled results show that overall ART adherence in India is below the required levels to have an optimal treatment effect. The quality of studies is poor and cannot be used to guide policies to improve ART adherence. PMID:23878418

  17. Violence and the perceived risks of taking antiretroviral therapy in US jails and prisons

    PubMed Central

    Culbert, Gabriel J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose About one in five men living with HIV in the USA passes through a correctional center annually. Jails and prisons are seen therefore as key intervention sites to promote HIV treatment as prevention. Almost no research, however, has examined inmates' perspectives on HIV treatment or their strategies for retaining access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) during incarceration. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of an exploratory study examining men's perceptions of and experiences with HIV care and ART during incarceration. Design/methodology/approach Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 42 HIV positive male and male-to-female transgendered persons recently released from male correctional centers in Illinois, USA. Findings Interpersonal violence, a lack of safety, and perceived threats to privacy were frequently cited barriers to one's willingness and ability to access and adhere to treatment. Over 60 percent of study participants reported missed doses or sustained treatment interruption (greater than two weeks) because of failure to disclose their HIV status, delayed prescribing, intermittent dosing and out-of-stock medications, confiscation of medications, and medication strikes. Research limitations/implications Substantial improvements in ART access and adherence are likely to follow organizational changes that make incarcerated men feel safer, facilitate HIV status disclosure, and better protect the confidentiality of inmates receiving ART. Originality/value This study identified novel causes of ART non-adherence among prisoners and provides first-hand information about how violence, stigma, and the pursuit of social support influence prisoner's decisions to disclose their HIV status or accept ART during incarceration. PMID:25764073

  18. Outcomes of antiretroviral therapy among younger versus older adolescents and adults in an urban clinic, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Takarinda, K. C.; Owiti, P.; Mutasa-Apollo, T.; Mugurungi, O.; Buruwe, L.; Reid, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: A non-governmental organisation-supported clinic offering health services including antiretroviral therapy (ART). Objective: To compare ART retention between younger (age 10–14 years) vs. older (age 15–19 years) adolescents and younger (age 20–29 years) vs. older (age ⩾30 years) adults and determine adolescent- and adult-specific attrition-associated factors among those initiated on ART between 2010 and 2011. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 110 (7%) adolescents and 1484 (93%) adults included in the study, no differences in retention were observed between younger vs. older adolescents at 6, 12 and 24 months. More younger adolescents were initiated with body mass index <16 kg/m2 compared with older adolescents (64% vs. 47%; P = 0.04). There were more females (74% vs. 52%, P < 0.001) and fewer patients initiating ART with CD4 count ⩽350 cells/mm3 (77% vs. 81%, P = 0.007) among younger vs. older adults. Younger adults demonstrated more attrition than older adults at all time-points. No attrition risk factors were observed among adolescents. Attrition-associated factors among adults included being younger, having a lower CD4 count and advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease at initiation, and initiation on a stavudine-based regimen. Conclusion: Younger adults demonstrated greater attrition and may require more attention. We were unable to demonstrate differences in attrition among younger vs. older adolescents. Loss to follow-up was the main reason for attrition across all age groups. Overall, earlier presentation for ART care appears important for improved ART retention among adults. PMID:27358802

  19. Finding Meaning: HIV Self-Management and Wellbeing among People Taking Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Russell, Steve; Martin, Faith; Zalwango, Flavia; Namukwaya, Stella; Nalugya, Ruth; Muhumuza, Richard; Katongole, Joseph; Seeley, Janet

    2016-01-01

    The health of people living with HIV (PLWH) and the sustained success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes depends on PLWH's motivation and ability to self-manage the condition over the long term, including adherence to drugs on a daily basis. PLWH's self-management of HIV and their wellbeing are likely to be interrelated. Successful self-management sustains wellbeing, and wellbeing is likely to motivate continued self-management. Detailed research is lacking on PLWH's self-management processes on ART in resource-limited settings. This paper presents findings from a study of PLWH's self-management and wellbeing in Wakiso District, Uganda. Thirty-eight PLWH (20 women, 18 men) were purposefully selected at ART facilities run by the government and by The AIDS Support Organisation in and around Entebbe. Two in-depth interviews were completed with each participant over three or four visits. Many were struggling economically, however the recovery of health and hope on ART had enhanced wellbeing and motivated self-management. The majority were managing their condition well across three broad domains of self-management. First, they had mobilised resources, notably through good relationships with health workers. Advice and counselling had helped them to reconceptualise their condition and situation more positively and see hope for the future, motivating their work to self-manage. Many had also developed a new network of support through contacts they had developed at the ART clinic. Second, they had acquired knowledge and skills to manage their health, a useful framework to manage their condition and to live their life. Third, participants were psychologically adjusting to their condition and their new 'self': they saw HIV as a normal disease, were coping with stigma and had regained self-esteem, and were finding meaning in life. Our study demonstrates the centrality of social relationships and other non-medical aspects of wellbeing for self-management which ART

  20. A Mathematical Model of Antiretroviral Therapy Evaluation for HIV Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimundo, Silvia Martorano; Venturino, Ezio; Mo Yang, Hyun

    2009-09-01

    Treating HIV-infected patients with a combination of several antiretroviral drugs can lead to emergence of the drug-resistant strain. This work proposes a mathematical model to evaluate the emergence of HIV-1 drug resistant during antiretroviral therapy. The model assumes that all susceptible individuals who can be infected by the wildtype strain (sensible to the treatment) or by drug-resistant virus receive antiretroviral therapy. Patients on treatment regimen can evolve to a state of success or failure and for the individuals in therapeutic fail the therapeutic schema is changed. The analysis of system is performed. The existence and stability of the steady states are considered. We address an analytical expression for the reproductive number in a community where antiretroviral therapy are widely used to treat HIV and where both drug sensitive and drug resistant strains are co-circulating.

  1. Broadening the use of antiretroviral therapy: the case for feline leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Greggs, Willie M; Clouser, Christine L; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2011-01-01

    Antiretroviral drugs have saved and extended the lives of millions of individuals infected with HIV. The major classes of anti-HIV drugs include reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, and entry/fusion inhibitors. While antiretroviral drug regimens are not commonly used to treat other types of retroviral infections, there are instances where there is a perceived need for re-evaluation of the benefits of antiretroviral therapy. One case in point is that of feline leukemia virus (FeLV), an infection of companion felines. While vaccines exist to prevent FeLV infection and spread, they have not eliminated FeLV infection. For FeLV-infected felines and their human companions, antiretroviral therapy would be desirable and of practical importance if good options were available. Here, we discuss FeLV biology and current treatment options, and propose that there is a need for antiretroviral treatment options for FeLV infection. The comparative use and analysis of antiretroviral therapy can provide new insights into the mechanism of antiretroviral drug action. PMID:21479142

  2. Final Paper DAT Cognitive Art Therapy System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Del Giacco Art Therapy is a cognitive art therapy process that focuses on stimulating the mental sensory systems and working to stabilize the nervous system and create new neural connections in the brain. This system was created by Maureen Del Giacco, Phd. after recovering from her own traumatic brain injury and is based on extensive research of…

  3. Ethical Issues in School Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriya, Dafna

    2006-01-01

    School art therapists face numerous ethical dilemmas, from referrals to therapy, through privacy, safety and predictability in the art therapy room, to the need to balance cooperation with the educational staff and its expectations of shared information with loyalty to the patient. Breach of confidentiality also has legal implications. The…

  4. Disclosure amongst adult HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Omunakwe, Hannah E; Okoye, Helen; Efobi, Chilota; Onodingene, Maryanne; Chinenye, Sunny; Nwauche, Chijioke A

    2015-09-01

    HIV transmission is still a public health concern in sub-Saharan Africa; disclosure is an effective tool for its prevention, contact tracing and treatment. We aimed to evaluate the disclosure behaviours of adult HIV-positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, and identify major challenges to disclosure in a bid to develop ways to improve this practice in the environment. Patients receiving ART in this centre were interviewed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. A total of 250 clients were interviewed over three months. A majority of the patients were tested on account of ill health 143 (57.2%). They commenced ART within 8 ± 15.4 SD months of presentation. The mean period before disclosure was 4.75 ± 12.8 SD months of diagnosis. Thirty-six (14.4%) of the respondents had not disclosed their HIV status; the major barrier to disclosure was stigmatisation in 19 (36%). PMID:25249594

  5. Retention in care and medication adherence: current challenges to antiretroviral therapy success.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Carol W; Brady, Kathleen A; Yehia, Baligh R

    2015-04-01

    Health behaviors such as retention in HIV medical care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) pose major challenges to reducing new HIV infections, addressing health disparities, and improving health outcomes. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use provides a conceptual framework for understanding how patient and environmental factors affect health behaviors and outcomes, which can inform the design of intervention strategies. Factors affecting retention and adherence among persons with HIV include patient predisposing factors (e.g., mental illness, substance abuse), patient-enabling factors (e.g., social support, reminder strategies, medication characteristics, transportation, housing, insurance), and healthcare environment factors (e.g., pharmacy services, clinic experiences, provider characteristics). Evidence-based recommendations for improving retention and adherence include (1) systematic monitoring of clinic attendance and ART adherence; (2) use of peer or paraprofessional navigators to re-engage patients in care and help them remain in care; (3) optimization of ART regimens and pharmaceutical supply chain management systems; (4) provision of reminder devices and tools; (5) general education and counseling; (6) engagement of peer, family, and community support groups; (7) case management; and (8) targeting patients with substance abuse and mental illness. Further research is needed on effective monitoring strategies and interventions that focus on improving retention and adherence, with specific attention to the healthcare environment. PMID:25792300

  6. Lipodystrophy among patients with HIV infection on antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lana, Lorena Gomes Cunha; Junqueira, Daniela Rezende Garcia; Perini, Edson; Menezes de Pádua, Cristiane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Lipodystrophy is a frequent and disfiguring adverse effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in patients with HIV. It affects the quality of life of the patient and adherence to treatment, and generates new needs for comprehensive healthcare services. The aim of this study will be to conduct a systematic review of the literature from observational studies and describe lipodystrophy among patients with HIV infection during current or previous use of ART. Methods and analysis A systematic review of observational studies published in MEDLINE, CINAHL, LILACS, EMBASE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts will be carried out. Citations of included studies will be checked to identify additional studies not identified in the electronic searches. It will include any observational study that considered lipodystrophy as the primary or secondary outcome and that had enrolled adolescent and adult patients with HIV infection who were on current or previous ART for at least 6 months. Data extraction and analysis will be performed independently by two reviewers. The extracted data will be discussed, decisions documented and, where necessary, the authors of the studies will be contacted for clarification. Measures of frequency, prevalence and incidence of lipodystrophy will be stratified according to definition, method of diagnosis and risk factors of the outcome. Ethics and dissemination Ethics is not required given this is a protocol for a systematic review. The findings of this study will be widely disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Updates of the review will be conducted to inform and guide healthcare practice. Protocol registration PROSPERO—42013005450. PMID:24625638

  7. Obstacles and proposed solutions to effective antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, John A; Hornberger, John; Shewade, Ashwini; Bhor, Menaka; Rajagopalan, Rukmini

    2009-01-01

    More than 3 million people were receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) at the end of 2007, but this number represents only 31% of people clinically eligible for ART in resource-limited settings. The primary objective of this study is to summarize the key obstacles that impede the goal of universal access prevention, care, and treatment. We performed a systematic literature search to review studies that reported barriers to diagnosis and access to treatment of HIV/AIDS in resource-limited countries. Persons living with HIV/ AIDS commonly face economic, sociocultural, and behavioral obstacles to access treatment and care for HIV. A variety of programs to overcome these barriers have been implemented, including efforts to destigmatize HIV/AIDS, enhance treatment literacy, provide income-generation skills, decentralize HIV services, promote gender equality, and adopt a multisectoral approach to optimize limited resources. An understanding of these obstacles and suggested methods to overcome them must be addressed by global policy makers before universal ART access can be achieved. PMID:19721103

  8. Retention in Care and Medication Adherence: Current Challenges to Antiretroviral Therapy Success

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Carol W.; Brady, Kathleen A.; Yehia, Baligh R.

    2015-01-01

    Health behaviors, such as retention in HIV medical care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART), pose major challenges to reducing new HIV infections, addressing health disparities, and improving health outcomes. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use provides a conceptual framework for understanding how patient and environmental factors affect health behaviors and outcomes, which can inform the design of intervention strategies. Factors affecting retention and adherence among persons with HIV include patient predisposing factors (e.g. mental illness, substance abuse), patient enabling factors (e.g. social support, reminder strategies, medication characteristics, transportation, housing, insurance), and health care environment factors (e.g. pharmacy services, clinic experiences, provider characteristics). Evidence-based recommendations for improving retention and adherence include 1) systematic monitoring of clinic attendance and ART adherence; 2) use of peer or paraprofessional navigators to re-engage patients in care and help them remain in care; 3) optimization of ART regimens and pharmaceutical supply chain management systems 4) provision of reminder devices and tools; 5) general education and counseling; 6) engagement of peer, family, and community support groups; 7) case management; and 8) targeting patients with substance abuse and mental illness. Further research is needed on effective monitoring strategies and interventions that focus on improving retention and adherence, with specific attention to the health care environment. PMID:25792300

  9. Current Scenario of HIV/AIDS, Treatment Options, and Major Challenges with Compliance to Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad; Kandi, Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the causative organism of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the inability of modern medicine to find a cure for it has placed HIV as one of the most dreaded pathogens of the 21st century. With millions of people infected with HIV, it was once thought to result in “medical apocalypse”. However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), it is now possible to control HIV. Adherence to ART helps to keep the viral load under control and prolong the time of progression to AIDS, resulting in near normal life expectancy. Even with the introduction of ART, a substantial number of patients fail to adhere due to a variety of reasons, including adverse side effects, drug abuse, mental disorders, socioeconomic status, literacy, and social stigma. With the availability of so many options for HIV treatment at each stage of the disease progression, physicians can switch between the treatment regimens to avoid and/or minimize the adverse effects of drugs. Close monitoring, major social reforms, and adequate counselling should also be implemented to circumvent other challenges. PMID:27054050

  10. Current Scenario of HIV/AIDS, Treatment Options, and Major Challenges with Compliance to Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Adnan Bashir; Usman, Muhammad; Kandi, Venkataramana

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as the causative organism of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the inability of modern medicine to find a cure for it has placed HIV as one of the most dreaded pathogens of the 21(st) century. With millions of people infected with HIV, it was once thought to result in "medical apocalypse". However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), it is now possible to control HIV. Adherence to ART helps to keep the viral load under control and prolong the time of progression to AIDS, resulting in near normal life expectancy. Even with the introduction of ART, a substantial number of patients fail to adhere due to a variety of reasons, including adverse side effects, drug abuse, mental disorders, socioeconomic status, literacy, and social stigma. With the availability of so many options for HIV treatment at each stage of the disease progression, physicians can switch between the treatment regimens to avoid and/or minimize the adverse effects of drugs. Close monitoring, major social reforms, and adequate counselling should also be implemented to circumvent other challenges. PMID:27054050