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Sample records for ao tempo da

  1. Tempo, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Michael, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the four issues of "Tempo," the newsletter of the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented (TAGT), published during 1999. Each issue focuses on a specific theme, including distinguished achievement programs, Hispanic issues in gifted education, creativity, and gifted children in the new millennium. Articles include:…

  2. TEMPO machine

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.; Lancaster, K.T.; Lawson, R.N.

    1986-06-01

    TEMPO is a transformer powered megavolt pulse generator with an output pulse of 100 ns duration. The machine was designed for burst mode operation at pulse repetition rates up to 10 Hz with minimum pulse-to-pulse voltage variations. To meet the requirement for pulse duration a nd a 20-..omega.. output impedance within reasonable size constraints, the pulse forming transmission line was designed as two parallel water-insulated, strip-type Blumleins. Stray capacitance and electric fields along the edges of the line elements were controlled by lining the tank with plastic sheet.

  3. Determinação de regiões de órbitas diretas estáveis ao redor da Lua

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, C. F.; Winter, O. C.; Vieira Neto, E.

    2003-08-01

    Neste Trabalho estamos investigando regiões do sistema Terra-Lua que contêm órbitas diretas estáveis ao redor da Lua visando a utilização destas órbitas em futuras missões de veículos espaciais como alternativas de trajetórias com baixo custo de manutenção. Adotando-se o problema restrito de três corpos, Terra-Lua-partícula, a localização e a extensão destas regiões de estabilidade foram investigadas numericamente considerando como estável toda órbita que permanece ao redor a Lua por, no mínimo, 1000 dias com energia de dois corpos da partícula em relação à Lua negativa. A estabilidade de tais regiões está associada a duas famílias de órbitas periódicas simples H1 e H2 e a órbitas quase-periódicas associadas a elas. Uma vez identificadas as regiões de estabilidade passamos a analisá-las introduzindo, paulatinamente, outras interações relevantes ao sistema como as perturbações do Sol (via problema restrito de quatro corpos), das marés, da pressão de radiação e do achatamento terrestre. Os resultados encontrados até o momento mostram que a perturbação do Sol é a única que reduz significativamente o tamanho das regiões de estabilidade. Também estamos investigando o comportamento de tais regiões quando características intrínsecas do sistema como as excentricidades das órbitas da Terra e da Lua e a inclinação da órbita Lua são consideradas. Com este estudo estamos reunindo informações que nos permitirão compreender a evolução das regiões de estabilidade no sistema Terra-Lua, bem como estabelecer parâmetros adequados para a utilização das trajetórias estáveis em futuras missões espaciais. Agradecimentos: Este projeto conta com o apoio do CNPq, da Capes e da Fapesp.

  4. Tempo2: Pulsar Timing Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Edwards, Russell

    2012-10-01

    Tempo2 is a pulsar timing package developed to be used both for general pulsar timing applications and also for pulsar timing array research in which data-sets from multiple pulsars need to be processed simultaneously. It was initially developed by George Hobbs and Russell Edwards as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project. Tempo2 is based on the original Tempo (ascl:1509.002) code and can be used (from the command-line) in a similar fashion. It is very versatile and can be extended by plugins.

  5. TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isogai, Akira; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Fukuzumi, Hayaka

    2011-01-01

    Native wood celluloses can be converted to individual nanofibers 3-4 nm wide that are at least several microns in length, i.e. with aspect ratios >100, by TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and successive mild disintegration in water. Preparation methods and fundamental characteristics of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCN) are reviewed in this paper. Significant amounts of C6 carboxylate groups are selectively formed on each cellulose microfibril surface by TEMPO-mediated oxidation without any changes to the original crystallinity (~74%) or crystal width of wood celluloses. Electrostatic repulsion and/or osmotic effects working between anionically-charged cellulose microfibrils, the ζ-potentials of which are approximately -75 mV in water, cause the formation of completely individualized TOCN dispersed in water by gentle mechanical disintegration treatment of TEMPO-oxidized wood cellulose fibers. Self-standing TOCN films are transparent and flexible, with high tensile strengths of 200-300 MPa and elastic moduli of 6-7 GPa. Moreover, TOCN-coated poly(lactic acid) films have extremely low oxygen permeability. The new cellulose-based nanofibers formed by size reduction process of native cellulose fibers by TEMPO-mediated oxidation have potential application as environmentally friendly and new bio-based nanomaterials in high-tech fields.

  6. Effects of Tempo, Musical Experience, and Listening Modes on Tempo Modulation Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Deborah A.

    1994-01-01

    Reports on the effects of tempo direction, listening mode, and level of musical experience on speed and accuracy in tempo change among 160 music majors and nonmajors. Finds that music majors more accurately detected tempo changes than did nonmajors. (CFR)

  7. Personality Correlates of Conceptual Tempo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bomba, Anne K.; And Others

    Temperament characteristics of 63 4- and 5-year-olds were assessed for the purpose of investigating the relationship between classifications of conceptual tempo and underlying personality factors. Subjects were classified as impulsive, reflective, fast accurate, and slow accurate on the basis of performance on Form A of Wright's (1971) Kansas…

  8. AO Camelopardalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, E. F.; Piggott, D. H.; Morris, S. L.

    1982-04-01

    The first UBV light curves of the system AO Cam are presented, and reveal a W UMa light curve with a period of 0.329917 days. Fourier coefficients for the full B and V light curves were used to place approximate empirical limits on the 75-80 deg inclination, fill-out parameter of approximately 0.8, and mass-ratio in the 0.7-0.8 range, following the methods of Rucinski (1973, 1974). The spectral type of the system is about G5.

  9. Operation of the TEMPO machine

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.; Lawson, R.N.; Lancaster, K.T.

    1987-01-01

    The TEMPO machine is a repetitively pulsed, high-voltage driver for experimental microwave generating devices. Three units have been built. TEMPO has a transformer-charged, water-insulated Blumlein directly coupled to the vacuum diode. The Blumlein has a relatively high impedance (20-..cap omega..) strip-type, pulse-forming transmission line (PFL) designed to minimize size. Stray capacitance and enhanced electric fields along the edges of the PFL are controlled by lining the tank in which the Blumlein is housed with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic sheet. During the initial stage of operation, problems with breakdowns in the plastic occurred that necessitated replacing the liner with either polyethylene or polypropylene. During the same period, problems with the power supplies and high voltage switch performance were addressed. These modifications and their results are discussed in the following sections.

  10. Modeling the perception of tempo.

    PubMed

    Elowsson, Anders; Friberg, Anders

    2015-06-01

    A system is proposed in which rhythmic representations are used to model the perception of tempo in music. The system can be understood as a five-layered model, where representations are transformed into higher-level abstractions in each layer. First, source separation is applied (Audio Level), onsets are detected (Onset Level), and interonset relationships are analyzed (Interonset Level). Then, several high-level representations of rhythm are computed (Rhythm Level). The periodicity of the music is modeled by the cepstroid vector-the periodicity of an interonset interval (IOI)-histogram. The pulse strength for plausible beat length candidates is defined by computing the magnitudes in different IOI histograms. The speed of the music is modeled as a continuous function on the basis of the idea that such a function corresponds to the underlying perceptual phenomena, and it seems to effectively reduce octave errors. By combining the rhythmic representations in a logistic regression framework, the tempo of the music is finally computed (Tempo Level). The results are the highest reported in a formal benchmarking test (2006-2013), with a P-Score of 0.857. Furthermore, the highest results so far are reported for two widely adopted test sets, with an Acc1 of 77.3% and 93.0% for the Songs and Ballroom datasets. PMID:26093407

  11. Tempo Preferences of Different Age Music Listeners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Albert; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Measures the effect of four levels of tempo on the self-reported preferences of six different age-groups for traditional jazz music listening examples. Stated that listener age exerted a strong influence on overall preference scores. Reported an analysis of variance showing that there is a significant preference for increasingly faster tempo at…

  12. Effect of Tempo on Pitch Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Robert A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents a study which investigated the perception of music majors and nonmusic majors concerning their ability to discriminate the way in which altered musical excerpts differed in pitch or tempo (or both) from preceding presentations. Concludes that both groups responded similarly across conditions and replications, and that tempo changes were…

  13. Observações simultâneas no óptico e infravermelho próximo dos BL Lacs PKS 2005-489 e PKS 2155-304 em diversas escalas de tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominici, T. P.; Abraham, Z.; Galo, A. L.

    2003-08-01

    A existência de variações rápidas de brilho em alguns blazares é um fenômeno bem comprovado, mas até agora não sabemos ao certo quais são os mecanismos físicos envolvidos. A maior dificuldade é a ausência de observações multibanda simultâneas que poderiam fornecer vínculos aos modelos. Buscando colaborar com a discussão estudamos o comportamento de dois BL Lacs, PKS 2005-489 e PKS 2155-304, em relação à variabilidade em diversas escalas de tempo, de poucos minutos até vários meses, com observações simultâneas em seis bandas espectrais (óptico e infravermelho próximo). Para tanto dois telescópios do LNA foram utilizados em conjunto nas campanhas observacionais realizadas em 2001 e 2002, cujos resultados são apresentados aqui. As duas fontes apresentaram características bastante diferentes, inclusive em relação à existência de variabilidade nos índices espectrais. Particularmente, registramos a primeira detecção de variações em escalas de tempo da ordem de poucos minutos em PKS 2005-489, com evidências da presença de um atraso entre as curvas de luz nas bandas V e R e a variação em R ocorrendo antes (o contrário do esperado no modelo de shock-in-jet). Em PKS 2155-304 detectamos pela primeira vez variabilidade em escalas de tempo de poucos minutos no infravermelho em um AGN. As observações indicam que as variações de brilho em blazares são o resultado da ação de mais de um fenômeno, especialmente em escalas de tempo muito curtas. Alguns cenários físicos são sugeridos para explicar os resultados observacionais.

  14. Cardiovascular response to punching tempo.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Len; Greene, Larry; Burkett, Zachary; Wongsathikun, Jataporn

    2003-02-01

    Eighteen trained volunteers (12 men and 6 women: age = 22.0 +/- 2.8 years, height = 170.79 +/- 7.67 cm, weight = 71.54 +/- 12.63 kg) participated in 2-minute, randomized fitness boxing trials, wearing 0.34-kg punching gloves, at various tempos (60, 72, 84, 96, 108, and 120 b.min(-1)). During each trial, oxygen uptake (VO(2)), heart rate (HR), and ventilation (VE) were measured continuously. A rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was attained at the conclusion of each trial. Subjects were able to attain VO(2) values ranging from 26.83 to 29.75 ml.kg(-1).min(-1), which correspond to 67.7-72.5% of VO(2)max. The HR responses yielded results ranging from 167.4 to 182.2 b.min(-1), or 85 to 93% of HRmax. No significant difference (p > 0.05) was seen with VO(2) between trials, although a significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed with HR, VE, and RPE. It appears that boxing speed is associated with increased VE, HR response, and perceived effort but not with VO(2). Energy expenditure values ranged from 9.8 to 11.2 kcal.min(-1) for the boxing trials. These results suggest that fitness boxing programs compare favorably with other exercise modalities in cardiovascular response and caloric expenditure. PMID:12580664

  15. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David E.; Al-Saadi, Jassim; Janz, Scott J.

    2014-06-01

    TEMPO, selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest-cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50 %. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well-proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement

  16. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Janz, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    TEMPO is a proposed concept to measure pollution for greater North America using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar/oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (9 km2). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007

  17. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.; Tempo Science Team

    2013-05-01

    TEMPO has been selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar/oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (Mexico City is measured at 1.6 km N/S by 4.5 km E/W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary

  18. Effects of Some Aspects of Rhythm on Tempo Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cecilia Chu

    1984-01-01

    Results indicated that significantly more time is needed to perceive tempo increase than tempo decrease, uneven rhythm then even rhythm, and melody alone than melody with accompaniment. Furthermore, significant interaction effects involving beat locations of tempo change suggest that differential groupings may be a factor in tempo discrimination.…

  19. Cometas: Das Lendas aos Fatos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, M. R.

    O descobrimento de cometas, devido ao seu aparecimento espetacular, tem registro nas mais antigas culturas humanas. A primeira referência situa-se no ano de 1095 antes de Cristo [a.C.; HO; HO, 1962]. A quantidade de registros de descobrimentos cometários, principalmente provenientes do território chinês em particular e do oriente em geral, aumentou gradualmente a partir do quarto século depois de Cristo (d.C.). É de origem chinesa a primeira referência ao cometa P/Halley no ano de 240 a.C. [VOELZKE, 1993]. Com o desenvolvimento da astronomia relativamente às técnicas observacionais os descobrimentos bem como as observações cometárias aumentaram sensivelmente a partir do século XVII, sendo que a partir do século XIX um novo incremento ocorreu devido ao emprego da fotografia e a resultante melhora de sensibilidade na observação.

  20. Fractal Tempo Fluctuation and Pulse Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Summer K.; Large, Edward W.; Fink, Philip W.

    2010-01-01

    WE INVESTIGATED PEOPLES’ ABILITY TO ADAPT TO THE fluctuating tempi of music performance. In Experiment 1, four pieces from different musical styles were chosen, and performances were recorded from a skilled pianist who was instructed to play with natural expression. Spectral and rescaled range analyses on interbeat interval time-series revealed long-range (1/f type) serial correlations and fractal scaling in each piece. Stimuli for Experiment 2 included two of the performances from Experiment 1, with mechanical versions serving as controls. Participants tapped the beat at ¼- and ⅛-note metrical levels, successfully adapting to large tempo fluctuations in both performances. Participants predicted the structured tempo fluctuations, with superior performance at the ¼-note level. Thus, listeners may exploit long-range correlations and fractal scaling to predict tempo changes in music. PMID:25190901

  1. The TEMPO Instrument: It's About Time!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicks, D. K., Jr.; Baker, B.; Hale, L.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Rosenbaum, D. M.; Pennington, W. F.; Janz, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument is part of NASA's Earth Venture Instrument (EVI) program, and will be the first hosted payload sensor to make tropospheric gas observations from geostationary (GEO) orbit using an ultraviolet/visible spectrometer. The instrument is designed to provide key trace gas measurements important to understanding tropospheric air pollution chemistry. The baseline data products are ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and formaldehyde (H2CO). The TEMPO instrument will provide hourly daylight measurements of these trace gases on urban-regional spatial scales. These remote sensing measurements augment current ground-based air quality measurements and enable improvements in air quality modeling and prediction. The TEMPO project recently completed its Preliminary Design Review (PDR). Current design parameters, instrument performance estimates and technical challenges will be presented.

  2. The Effect of Repetition on Tempo Preferences of Elementary Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskovitz, Elisa M.

    1992-01-01

    Reports on a study of children's preferences between slow and fast tempo classical music excerpts. Finds that students preferred music with a slow tempo. Concludes that repetition had a positive effect on children's preferences. (CFR)

  3. The Effect of Speed Alterations on Tempo Note Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Clifford K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated the tempo note preferences of 100 randomly selected college-level musicians using familiar orchestral music as stimuli. Subjects heard selections at increased, decreased, and unaltered tempi. Results showed musicians were not accurate in estimating original tempo and showed consistent preference for faster than actual tempo.…

  4. Discrimination of Modulated Music Tempo by String Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cecilia Chu; Salzberg, Rita S.

    1984-01-01

    Both musical training and age were found to influence the ability of string students to discriminate tempo change. The musical variables of speed, style, and direction also affected tempo perception. However, the music variables explained less than one-third of the total variance. Tempo perception is an extremely complex phenomenon. (Author/RM)

  5. Effects of Tempo and Context on Transfer of Performance Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Robert A.; Pierce, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses research that examined the effects of melodic content and performance tempo on the ability of university music majors to perform previously learned music passages in new settings. Finds tempo accuracy and pitch accuracy were adversely affected by differences between originally learned tempo and tempi at which works were later performed.…

  6. Nonhuman Primates Prefer Slow Tempos but Dislike Music Overall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Josh; Hauser, Marc D.

    2007-01-01

    Human adults generally find fast tempos more arousing than slow tempos, with tempo frequently manipulated in music to alter tension and emotion. We used a previously published method [McDermott, J., & Hauser, M. (2004). Are consonant intervals music to their ears? Spontaneous acoustic preferences in a nonhuman primate. Cognition, 94(2), B11-B21]…

  7. The Effect of Melodic Activity, Tempo Change, and Audible Beat on Tempo Perception of Elementary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Terry Lee; Booth, Gregory D.

    1988-01-01

    Investigated the influence of melodic activity (ornamented and plain) on students' perception of tempo. Third, fifth, and sixth graders indicated whether the tempo of the second example in each paired comparison item was faster, slower, or stayed the same. Suggests that tempo perception lessons be preceded by instruction on melodic activity and…

  8. Retinal AO OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Miller, Donald T.

    The last two decades have witnessed extraordinary advances in optical technology to image noninvasively and at high resolution the posterior segment of the eye. Two of the most impactful technological advancements over this period have arguably been optical coherence tomography (OCT) and adaptive optics (AO). The strengths of these technologies complement each other and when combined have been shown to provide unprecedented, micron-scale resolution (<3 μm) in all three dimensions and sensitivity to image the cellular retina in the living eye. This powerful extension of OCT, that is AO-OCT, is the focus of this chapter. It presents key aspects of designing and implementing AO-OCT systems. Particular attention is devoted to the relevant optical properties of the eye that ultimately define these systems, AO componentry and operation tailored for ophthalmic use, and of course use of the latest technologies and methods in OCT for ocular imaging. It surveys the wide range of AO-OCT designs that have been developed for retinal imaging, with AO integrated into every major OCT design configuration. Finally, it reviews the scientific and clinical studies reported to date that show the exciting potential of AO-OCT to image the microscopic retina and fundus in ways not previously possible with other noninvasive methods and a look to future developments in this rapidly growing field.

  9. Longitudinal trends in speech tempo: the case of Queen Beatrix.

    PubMed

    Quené, Hugo

    2013-06-01

    Older talkers speak slower than young ones, but speech tempo has increased in the last decades. Have present-day older talkers slowed down with age or have they sped up with their community? This study investigates longitudinal patterns in articulation rate in formal speeches presented annually by Queen Beatrix between her ages 42 and 74. Her tempo decreased first and then increased in the last decade. Within a speech, acceleration and shortening increased longitudinally. These results suggest that this talker's preferred tempo has not decreased but increased longitudinally, presumably in accommodation to an increasing tempo in the Dutch language community. PMID:23742439

  10. Cognitive tempo and cognitive level relationships among mentally retarded children.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, L; Waldron, P; Miller, T L

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to ascertain predictive relationships between and within cognitive tempo and cognitive level characteristics of 33 moderately retarded junior high school children. The Matching Familiar Figures Test was used to establish cognitive tempo characteristics and the Essential Math and Language Skills Inventory was used to determine cognitive level characteristics. A multiple regression analysis indicated no significant predictive relationship from elements of cognitive tempo to elements of cognitive level. Elements of cognitive level, however, could predict elements of cognitive tempo. Implications for future research were discussed. Cross-validation on a larger sample is required. PMID:7155745

  11. The currency and tempo of extinction.

    PubMed

    Regan, H M; Lupia, R; Drinnan, A N; Burgman, M A

    2001-01-01

    This study examines estimates of extinction rates for the current purported biotic crisis and from the fossil record. Studies that compare current and geological extinctions sometimes use metrics that confound different sources of error and reflect different features of extinction processes. The per taxon extinction rate is a standard measure in paleontology that avoids some of the pitfalls of alternative approaches. Extinction rates reported in the conservation literature are rarely accompanied by measures of uncertainty, despite many elements of the calculations being subject to considerable error. We quantify some of the most important sources of uncertainty and carry them through the arithmetic of extinction rate calculations using fuzzy numbers. The results emphasize that estimates of current and future rates rely heavily on assumptions about the tempo of extinction and on extrapolations among taxa. Available data are unlikely to be useful in measuring magnitudes or trends in current extinction rates. PMID:18707231

  12. Sympathetic Tone Induced by High Acoustic Tempo Requires Fast Respiration.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ken; Ooishi, Yuuki; Kashino, Makio

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have revealed the influences of music, and particularly its tempo, on the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and respiration patterns. Since there is the interaction between the ANS and the respiratory system, namely sympatho-respiratory coupling, it is possible that the effect of musical tempo on the ANS is modulated by the respiratory system. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the relationship between musical tempo and respiratory rate on the ANS. Fifty-two healthy people aged 18-35 years participated in this study. Their respiratory rates were controlled by using a silent electronic metronome and they listened to simple drum sounds with a constant tempo. We varied the respiratory rate-acoustic tempo combination. The respiratory rate was controlled at 15 or 20 cycles per minute (CPM) and the acoustic tempo was 60 or 80 beats per minute (BPM) or the environment was silent. Electrocardiograms and an elastic chest band were used to measure the heart rate and respiratory rate, respectively. The mean heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) were regarded as indices of ANS activity. We observed a significant increase in the mean heart rate and the low (0.04-0.15 Hz) to high (0.15-0.40 Hz) frequency ratio of HRV, only when the respiratory rate was controlled at 20 CPM and the acoustic tempo was 80 BPM. We suggest that the effect of acoustic tempo on the sympathetic tone is modulated by the respiratory system. PMID:26284521

  13. Discrimination of Modulated Music Tempo by Music Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cecilia Chu

    1983-01-01

    The ability of university music majors to aurally perceive sudden and gradual tempo changes of various magnitudes was investigated. Subjects detected tempo changes better when the change was increased rather than decreased for one composition, sudden rather than gradual, greater rather than smaller in magnitude, and one-directional rather than…

  14. Sympathetic Tone Induced by High Acoustic Tempo Requires Fast Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ken; Ooishi, Yuuki; Kashino, Makio

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have revealed the influences of music, and particularly its tempo, on the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and respiration patterns. Since there is the interaction between the ANS and the respiratory system, namely sympatho-respiratory coupling, it is possible that the effect of musical tempo on the ANS is modulated by the respiratory system. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the relationship between musical tempo and respiratory rate on the ANS. Fifty-two healthy people aged 18–35 years participated in this study. Their respiratory rates were controlled by using a silent electronic metronome and they listened to simple drum sounds with a constant tempo. We varied the respiratory rate—acoustic tempo combination. The respiratory rate was controlled at 15 or 20 cycles per minute (CPM) and the acoustic tempo was 60 or 80 beats per minute (BPM) or the environment was silent. Electrocardiograms and an elastic chest band were used to measure the heart rate and respiratory rate, respectively. The mean heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) were regarded as indices of ANS activity. We observed a significant increase in the mean heart rate and the low (0.04–0.15 Hz) to high (0.15–0.40 Hz) frequency ratio of HRV, only when the respiratory rate was controlled at 20 CPM and the acoustic tempo was 80 BPM. We suggest that the effect of acoustic tempo on the sympathetic tone is modulated by the respiratory system. PMID:26284521

  15. Implementation of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The updated status of TEMPO, as it proceeds from formulation phase into implementation phase is presented. TEMPO, the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument, will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. GEO-CAPE is not planned for implementation this decade. However, instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will form parts of a global GEO constellation for pollution monitoring later this decade, with a major focus on intercontinental

  16. Effect of music tempo on task performance.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, C; Moss, S

    1989-12-01

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of music tempo on task performance. In Study 1, 44 undergraduate business students were asked to be "workers" in a stock market project by collecting closing stock prices and calculating the percentage of change in the price from week to week. Subjects were randomly divided into groups such that they either listened to fast-paced music while they worked, to slow-paced music, or to no music. Analyses of variance and covariance were conducted on both the quantity and quality of the subjects' work, using music listening habits as a covariate. There were no differences in either the quantity or quality of the work produced by the groups. There were some methodological concerns regarding Study 1, so a second study was conducted. The 70 undergraduate business students in Study 2 completed the same task under the same music conditions as in Study 1. Analyses of variance indicated women performed significantly better than men, performance was significantly higher in the rock condition than in the heartbeat condition, and subjects in the rock condition had a significantly higher perceived level of distraction by the music. PMID:2623126

  17. AO Group Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2005-10-04

    The Adaptive Optics (AO) Group in I Division develops and tests a broad range of advanced wavefront control technologies. Current applications focus on: Remote sensing, High power lasers, Astronomy, and Human vision. In the area of remote sensing, the AO Group leads a collaborative effort with LLNL's Nonproliferation, Arms Control & International Security (NAI) Directorate on Enhanced Surveillance Imaging. The ability to detect and identify individual people or vehicles from long-range is an important requirement for proliferation detection and homeland security. High-resolution imaging along horizontal paths through the atmosphere is limited by turbulence, which blurs and distorts the image. For ranges over {approx}one km, visible image resolution can be reduced by over an order of magnitude. We have developed an approach based on speckle imaging that can correct the turbulence-induced blurring and provide high resolution imagery. The system records a series of short exposure images which freeze the atmospheric effects. We can then estimate the image magnitude and phase using a bispectral estimation algorithm which cancels the atmospheric effects while maintaining object information at the diffraction limit of the imaging system.

  18. Pubertal Timing and Tempo: Associations With Childhood Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Negriff, Sonya; Blankson, A. Nayena; Trickett, Penelope K.

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined pubertal timing and tempo in a sample of 445 adolescents (53% male), using both variable-centered (latent growth curve) and person-centered (latent class) approaches, to discern the pubertal development trajectories associated with the experience of maltreatment. Results from the variable-centered analyses indicated a slower initial tempo that increased later for boys who had experienced neglect. The person-centered results indicated three classes for boys that mainly differentiated tempo effects and two classes for girls primarily distinguishing timing differences. For girls, sexual abuse predicted membership in an earlier pubertal timing class. These findings enhance our knowledge of the variability in pubertal development as well as gender differences in maltreatment types that may alter pubertal timing and tempo. PMID:26146470

  19. Toy Play, Play Tempo, and Reaction to Frustration in Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Josephine; And Others

    1982-01-01

    In two sessions, the duration and tempo of toy play of infants and reaction of frustration were measured. Correlations indicated a general relationship between response persistence during play and attempts to escape frustrating situations. (Author/CM)

  20. Effects of Tempo and Performing Medium on Children's Music Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Albert; Cote, Richard

    1983-01-01

    This study measured the effect of three levels of tempo and two levels of performing medium, vocal and instrumental, on the expressed preference of fifth- and sixth-grade students for traditional jazz music listening examples. (Author/SR)

  1. A fast electrochromic polymer based on TEMPO substituted polytriphenylamine.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lvlv; Dai, Yuyu; Yan, Shuanma; Lv, Xiaojing; Su, Chang; Xu, Lihuan; Lv, Yaokang; Ouyang, Mi; Chen, Zuofeng; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy to obtain rapid electrochromic switching response by introducing 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) moiety into polytriphenylamine backbone has been developed. The electrochromic properties of the integrated polymer film are investigated and a possible mechanism is proposed with TEMPO as a counterion-reservoir group to rapidly balance the charges during electrochromic switching, which leads to significantly improved electrochromism performance. PMID:27444398

  2. A fast electrochromic polymer based on TEMPO substituted polytriphenylamine

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lvlv; Dai, Yuyu; Yan, Shuanma; Lv, Xiaojing; Su, Chang; Xu, Lihuan; Lv, Yaokang; Ouyang, Mi; Chen, Zuofeng; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy to obtain rapid electrochromic switching response by introducing 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) moiety into polytriphenylamine backbone has been developed. The electrochromic properties of the integrated polymer film are investigated and a possible mechanism is proposed with TEMPO as a counterion-reservoir group to rapidly balance the charges during electrochromic switching, which leads to significantly improved electrochromism performance. PMID:27444398

  3. Passive listening to preferred motor tempo modulates corticospinal excitability.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Kelly; Wiener, Martin; Thompson, James C

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms are an essential characteristic of our lives, and auditory-motor coupling affects a variety of behaviors. Previous research has shown that the neural regions associated with motor system processing are coupled to perceptual rhythmic and melodic processing such that the perception of rhythmic stimuli can entrain motor system responses. However, the degree to which individual preference modulates the motor system is unknown. Recent work has shown that passively listening to metrically strong rhythms increases corticospinal excitability, as indicated by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Furthermore, this effect is modulated by high-groove music, or music that inspires movement, while neuroimaging evidence suggests that premotor activity increases with tempos occurring within a preferred tempo (PT) category. PT refers to the rate of a hypothetical endogenous oscillator that may be indicated by spontaneous motor tempo (SMT) and preferred perceptual tempo (PPT) measurements. The present study investigated whether listening to a rhythm at an individual's PT preferentially modulates motor system excitability. SMT was obtained in human participants through a tapping task in which subjects were asked to tap a response key at their most comfortable rate. Subjects listened a 10-beat tone sequence at 11 log-spaced tempos and rated their preference for each (PPT). We found that SMT and PPT measurements were correlated, indicating that preferred and produced tempos occurred at a similar rate. Crucially, single-pulse TMS delivered to left M1 during PPT judgments revealed that corticospinal excitability, measured by motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), was modulated by tempos traveling closer to individual PT. However, the specific nature of this modulation differed across individuals, with some exhibiting an increase in excitability around PT and others exhibiting a decrease. These findings suggest that auditory-motor coupling induced by rhythms is preferentially

  4. Status of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, R. M.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    TEMPO is now well into its implementation phase, having passed both its Key Decision Point C and the Critical Design Review (CDR) for the instrument. The CDR for the ground systems will occur in March 2016 and the CDR for the Mission component at a later date, after the host spacecraft has been selected. TEMPO is on schedule to measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies.TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available.TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. Instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will form

  5. Remembering the melody and timbre, forgetting the key and tempo.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Habashi, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The identity of a melody is independent of surface features such as key (pitch level), tempo (speed), and timbre (musical instrument). We examined the duration of memory for melodies (tunes) and whether such memory is affected by changes in key, tempo, or timbre. After listening to previously unfamiliar melodies twice, participants provided recognition ratings for the same (old) melodies as well as for an equal number of new melodies. The delay between initial exposure and test was 10 min, 1 day, or 1 week. In Experiment 1, half of the old melodies were transposed by six semitones or shifted in tempo by 64 beats per minute. In Experiment 2, half of the old melodies were changed in timbre (piano to saxophone, or vice versa). In both experiments, listeners remembered the melodies, and there was no forgetting over the course of a week. Changing the key or tempo from exposure to test had a detrimental impact on recognition after 10 min and 1 day, but not after 1 week. Changing the timbre affected recognition negatively after all three delays. Mental representations of unfamiliar melodies appear to be consolidated after only two presentations. These representations include surface information unrelated to a melody's identity, although information about key and tempo fades at a faster rate than information about timbre. PMID:25802029

  6. Effects of timbre and tempo change on memory for music.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Andrea R; Müllensiefen, Daniel

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effects of different encoding tasks and of manipulations of two supposedly surface parameters of music on implicit and explicit memory for tunes. In two experiments, participants were first asked to either categorize instrument or judge familiarity of 40 unfamiliar short tunes. Subsequently, participants were asked to give explicit and implicit memory ratings for a list of 80 tunes, which included 40 previously heard. Half of the 40 previously heard tunes differed in timbre (Experiment 1) or tempo (Experiment 2) in comparison with the first exposure. A third experiment compared similarity ratings of the tunes that varied in timbre or tempo. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results suggest first that the encoding task made no difference for either memory mode. Secondly, timbre and tempo change both impaired explicit memory, whereas tempo change additionally made implicit tune recognition worse. Results are discussed in the context of implicit memory for nonsemantic materials and the possible differences in timbre and tempo in musical representations. PMID:19086302

  7. Mechanism of copper(I)/TEMPO-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jessica M; Ryland, Bradford L; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-02-13

    Homogeneous Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) have emerged as some of the most versatile and practical catalysts for aerobic alcohol oxidation. Recently, we disclosed a (bpy)Cu(I)/TEMPO/NMI catalyst system (NMI = N-methylimidazole) that exhibits fast rates and high selectivities, even with unactivated aliphatic alcohols. Here, we present a mechanistic investigation of this catalyst system, in which we compare the reactivity of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols. This work includes analysis of catalytic rates by gas-uptake and in situ IR kinetic methods and characterization of the catalyst speciation during the reaction by EPR and UV-visible spectroscopic methods. The data support a two-stage catalytic mechanism consisting of (1) "catalyst oxidation" in which Cu(I) and TEMPO-H are oxidized by O(2) via a binuclear Cu(2)O(2) intermediate and (2) "substrate oxidation" mediated by Cu(II) and the nitroxyl radical of TEMPO via a Cu(II)-alkoxide intermediate. Catalytic rate laws, kinetic isotope effects, and spectroscopic data show that reactions of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols have different turnover-limiting steps. Catalyst oxidation by O(2) is turnover limiting with benzylic alcohols, while numerous steps contribute to the turnover rate in the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols. PMID:23317450

  8. Spontaneous tempo and rhythmic entrainment in a bonobo (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Large, Edward W; Gray, Patricia M

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of speech and music in the human species represent major evolutionary transitions that enabled the use of complex, temporally structured acoustic signals to coordinate social interaction. While the fundamental capacity for temporal coordination with complex acoustic signals has been shown in a few distantly related species, the extent to which nonhuman primates exhibit sensitivity to auditory rhythms remains controversial. In Experiment 1, we assessed spontaneous motor tempo and tempo matching in a bonobo (Pan paniscus), in the context of a social drumming interaction. In Experiment 2, the bonobo spontaneously entrained and synchronized her drum strikes within a range around her spontaneous motor tempo. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the evolution of acoustic communication builds upon fundamental neurodynamic mechanisms that can be found in a wide range of species, and are recruited for social interactions. PMID:26147705

  9. La relatività debole. La fisica dello spazio e del tempo senza paradossi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selleri, Franco

    2011-06-01

    Secondo Einstein e Poincaré la simultaneità di eventi che hanno luogo in punti diversi dello spazio può essere definita solo per convenzione. Dal punto di vista matematico si dimostra, quindi, che due diverse definizioni di simultaneità corrispondono a due diversi valori del coefficiente e1 della variabile spaziale x presente nelle trasformazioni di Lorentz. A partire da premesse normalmente accettate otterremo diverse dimostrazioni della necessità di reintrodurre il concetto di simultaneità assoluta. Le conseguenze cosmologiche della nuova struttura dello spazio e del tempo andranno contro la cosmologia del Big Bang. Inoltre, dopo questi risultati, il relativismo sopravviverà in una forma meno aspra ("relatività debole") perché risulter privo di quel campionario di paradossi portato dalla teoria della Relatività Speciale.

  10. Relationship between Exercise Heart Rate and Music Tempo Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karageorghis, Costas I.; Jones, Leighton; Low, Daniel C.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the predicted positive and linear relationship (Iwanaga, 1995a, 1995b) between exercise heart rate and music tempo preference. Initially, 128 undergraduate students (M age = 20.0 years, SD = 0.9) were surveyed to establish their three favorite music artists. A separate experimental group of 29 undergraduates (M age =…

  11. A Developmental Study of Conceptual Tempo, Concept Learning, and Abstraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juliano, Daniel

    1977-01-01

    Shows that age or conceptual tempo are not related to the number of trials needed to reach the criteria for a learning task. Impulsive responders performed more poorly than groups of slow-inaccurate, fast-accurate, and reflective responders on the transfer of learning task. (RL)

  12. Relationship of Children's Conceptual Tempo to Problem Solving and Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfield, Sylvia

    The present study examines the role of conceptual tempo on creativity and problem solving. It was hypothesized that reflective children would do well on tasks involving an evaluation component, while impulsive children would do well on typical creativity tasks. Measures of creativity, assessing fluency, flexibility, and originality, as well as…

  13. The Tempo of Sexual Activity and Later Relationship Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassler, Sharon; Addo, Fenaba R.; Lichter, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid sexual involvement may have adverse long-term implications for relationship quality. This study examined the tempo of sexual intimacy and subsequent relationship quality in a sample of married and cohabiting men and women. Data come from the Marital and Relationship Survey, which provides information on nearly 600 low- to moderate-income…

  14. The Effect of Articulation Style on Perception of Modulated Tempo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geringer, John M.; Madsen, Clifford K.; MacLeod, Rebecca B.; Kevin Droe

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of legato and staccato articulation styles on the perception of modulated tempos. Ninety music majors served as participants. Listeners heard music examples that had been selected from two pieces, each of which included staccato and legato passages. Excerpts were presented to listeners in three conditions of tempo…

  15. Examining infants' preferences for tempo in lullabies and playsongs.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Nicole J; Walsh, Jennifer; Allen, Jennifer M; Tsang, Christine D

    2011-09-01

    Caregivers around the world sing to their infants. Infants not only prefer to listen to infant-directed singing over adult-directed singing, but infant-directed singing also serves a function, communicating affective information to preverbal infants to aid in adjusting arousal levels. Pitch variation has previously been identified as one performance feature that may help to convey the message. Earlier research has indicated that infants' pitch preferences are context dependent, suggesting that infants are tuned in to the communicative intent of infant-directed singing. However, there are several other performance-based features present in infant-directed singing that may also contribute to the affective message. The current study examined the role of context on infants' tempo preferences in sung playsongs and lullabies. Using a head-turn preference procedure, we measured 24 preverbal infants' natural preferences for foreign language playsongs and lullabies as a function of tempo. Infants showed a preference for fast over slow tempo playsongs, but no such context dependent preference was found within lullabies. Results partially support the role of tempo as a communicative feature of infant directed singing. PMID:21639609

  16. Changes in music tempo entrain movement related brain activity.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ian; Hallowell, James; Hwang, Faustina; Kirke, Alexis; Malik, Asad; Roesch, Etienne; Weaver, James; Williams, Duncan; Miranda, Eduardo; Nasuto, Slawomir J

    2014-01-01

    The neural mechanisms of music listening and appreciation are not yet completely understood. Based on the apparent relationship between the beats per minute (tempo) of music and the desire to move (for example feet tapping) induced while listening to that music it is hypothesised that musical tempo may evoke movement related activity in the brain. Participants are instructed to listen, without moving, to a large range of musical pieces spanning a range of styles and tempos during an electroencephalogram (EEG) experiment. Event-related desynchronisation (ERD) in the EEG is observed to correlate significantly with the variance of the tempo of the musical stimuli. This suggests that the dynamics of the beat of the music may induce movement related brain activity in the motor cortex. Furthermore, significant correlations are observed between EEG activity in the alpha band over the motor cortex and the bandpower of the music in the same frequency band over time. This relationship is observed to correlate with the strength of the ERD, suggesting entrainment of motor cortical activity relates to increased ERD strength. PMID:25571015

  17. Mechanism of Copper(I)/TEMPO-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Jessica M.; Ryland, Bradford L.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2013-01-01

    Homogeneous Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) have emerged as some of the most versatile and practical catalysts for aerobic alcohol oxidation. Recently, we disclosed a (bpy)CuI/TEMPO/NMI catalyst system (NMI = N-methylimidazole) that exhibits fast rates and high selectivities, even with unactivated aliphatic alcohols. Here, we present a mechanistic investigation of this catalyst system, in which we compare the reactivity of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols. This work includes analysis of catalytic rates by gas-uptake and in situ IR kinetic methods and characterization of the catalyst speciation during the reaction by EPR and UV–visible spectroscopic methods. The data support a two-stage catalytic mechanism consisting of (1) “catalyst oxidation” in which CuI and TEMPO–H are oxidized by O2 via a binuclear Cu2O2 intermediate and (2) “substrate oxidation” mediated by CuII and the nitroxyl radical of TEMPO via a CuII-alkoxide intermediate. Catalytic rate laws, kinetic isotope effects, and spectroscopic data show that reactions of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols have different turnover-limiting steps. Catalyst oxidation by O2 is turnover limiting with benzylic alcohols, while numerous steps contribute to the turnover rate in the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols. PMID:23317450

  18. TEMPO: a mobile catalyst for rechargeable Li-O₂ batteries.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Benjamin J; Schürmann, Adrian; Peppler, Klaus; Garsuch, Arnd; Janek, Jürgen

    2014-10-22

    Nonaqueous Li-O2 batteries are an intensively studied future energy storage technology because of their high theoretical energy density. However, a number of barriers prevent a practical application, and one of the major challenges is the reduction of the high charge overpotential: Whereas lithium peroxide (Li2O2) is formed during discharge at around 2.7 V (vs Li(+)/Li), its electrochemical decomposition during the charge process requires potentials up to 4.5 V. This high potential gap leads to a low round-trip efficiency of the cell, and more importantly, the high charge potential causes electrochemical decomposition of other cell constituents. Dissolved oxidation catalysts can act as mobile redox mediators (RM), which enable the oxidation of Li2O2 particles even without a direct electric contact to the positive electrode. Herein we show that the addition of 10 mM TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxyl), homogeneously dissolved in the electrolyte, provides a distinct reduction of the charging potentials by 500 mV. Moreover, TEMPO enables a significant enhancement of the cycling stability leading to a doubling of the cycle life. The efficiency of the TEMPO mediated catalysis was further investigated by a parallel monitoring of the cell pressure, which excludes a considerable contribution of a parasitic shuttle (i.e., internal ionic short circuit) to the anode during cycling. We prove the suitability of TEMPO by a systematic study of the relevant physical and chemical properties, i.e., its (electro)chemical stability, redox potential, diffusion coefficient and the influence on the oxygen solubility. Furthermore, the charging mechanisms of Li-O2 cells with and without TEMPO were compared by combining different electrochemical and analytical techniques. PMID:25255228

  19. Pitch and Tempo Discrimination in Recorded Orchestral Music among Musicians and Nonmusicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geringer, John M.; Madsen, Clifford K.

    1984-01-01

    Both musicians and nonmusicians identified correctly the examples of decreased pitch levels significantly more than pitch increase examples. However, tempo increase examples were identified more accurately than tempo decreases by each group. (Author/RM)

  20. The impact of basal ganglia lesions on sensorimotor synchronization, spontaneous motor tempo, and the detection of tempo changes.

    PubMed

    Schwartze, Michael; Keller, Peter E; Patel, Aniruddh D; Kotz, Sonja A

    2011-01-20

    The basal ganglia (BG) are part of extensive subcortico-cortical circuits that are involved in a variety of motor and non-motor cognitive functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that one specific function that engages the BG and associated cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuitry is temporal processing, i.e., the mechanisms that underlie the encoding, decoding and evaluation of temporal relations or temporal structure. In the current study we investigated the interplay of two processes that require precise representations of temporal structure, namely the perception of an auditory pacing signal and manual motor production by means of finger tapping in a sensorimotor synchronization task. Patients with focal lesions of the BG and healthy control participants were asked to align finger taps to tone sequences that either did or did not contain a tempo acceleration or tempo deceleration at a predefined position, and to continue tapping at the final tempo after the pacing sequence had ceased. Performance in this adaptive synchronization-continuation paradigm differed between the two groups. Selective damage to the BG affected the abilities to detect tempo changes and to perform attention-dependent error correction, particularly in response to tempo decelerations. An additional assessment of preferred spontaneous, i.e., unpaced but regular, production rates yielded more heterogeneous results in the patient group. Together these findings provide evidence for less efficient processing in the perception and the production of temporal structure in patients with focal BG lesions. The results also support the functional role of the BG system in attention-dependent temporal processing. PMID:20883725

  1. The Effect of Concurrent Music Reading and Performance on the Ability to Detect Tempo Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark Carlton

    1989-01-01

    Measures the ability of three groups of musicians to detect tempo change while reading and performing music. Compares this ability with that of the same musicians to detect tempo change while listening only. Found that for all groups the ability to detect tempo changes was inhibited by the playing task, although to different degrees for each…

  2. Movement amplitude and tempo change in piano performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Caroline

    2001-05-01

    Music performance places stringent temporal and cognitive demands on individuals that should yield large speed/accuracy tradeoffs. Skilled piano performance, however, shows consistently high accuracy across a wide variety of rates. Movement amplitude may affect the speed/accuracy tradeoff, so that high accuracy can be obtained even at very fast tempi. The contribution of movement amplitude changes in rate (tempo) is investigated with motion capture. Cameras recorded pianists with passive markers on hands and fingers, who performed on an electronic (MIDI) keyboard. Pianists performed short melodies at faster and faster tempi until they made errors (altering the speed/accuracy function). Variability of finger movements in the three motion planes indicated most change in the plane perpendicular to the keyboard across tempi. Surprisingly, peak amplitudes of motion before striking the keys increased as tempo increased. Increased movement amplitudes at faster rates may reduce or compensate for speed/accuracy tradeoffs. [Work supported by Canada Research Chairs program, HIMH R01 45764.

  3. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context

    PubMed Central

    Franěk, Marek; van Noorden, Leon; Režný, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al., 1999) on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route that was 1.8 km in length through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the world pop music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of

  4. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context.

    PubMed

    Franěk, Marek; van Noorden, Leon; Režný, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al., 1999) on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route that was 1.8 km in length through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the world pop music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of

  5. Testing meter, rhythm, and tempo discriminations in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Carl Erick; Cook, Robert G

    2010-10-01

    Rhythmic grouping and discrimination is fundamental to music. When compared to the perception of pitch, rhythmic abilities in animals have received scant attention until recently. In this experiment, four pigeons were tested with three types of auditory rhythmic discriminations to investigate their processing of this aspect of sound and music. Two experiments examined a meter discrimination in which successively presented idiophonic sounds were repeated in meters of different lengths in a go/no-go discrimination task. With difficulty, the birds eventually learned to discriminate between 8/4 and 3/4 meters constructed from cymbal and tom drum sounds at 180 beats per minute. This discrimination subsequently transferred to faster tempos, but not to different drum sounds or their combination. Experiment 3 tested rhythmic and arrhythmic patterns of sounds. After 40 sessions of training, these same pigeons showed no discrimination. Experiment 4 tested repetitions of a piano sound at fast and slow tempos. This discrimination was readily learned and showed transfer to novel tempos. The pattern of results suggests that pigeons can time periodic auditory events, but their capacity to understand generalized rhythmic groupings appears limited. PMID:20600695

  6. Testing the absolute-tempo hypothesis: context effects for familiar and unfamiliar songs.

    PubMed

    Rashotte, Matthew A; Wedell, Douglas H

    2014-11-01

    In two experiments, we investigated context effects on tempo judgments for familiar and unfamiliar songs performed by popular artists. In Experiment 1, participants made comparative tempo judgments to a remembered standard for song clips drawn from either a slow or a fast context, created by manipulating the tempos of the same songs. Although both familiar and unfamiliar songs showed significant shifts in their points of subjective equality toward the tempo context values, more-familiar songs showed significantly reduced contextual bias. In Experiment 2, tempo pleasantness ratings showed significant context effects in which the ordering of tempos on the pleasantness scale differed across contexts, with the most pleasant tempo shifting toward the contextual values, an assimilation of ideal points. Once again, these effects were significant but reduced for the more-familiar songs. The moderating effects of song familiarity support a weak version of the absolute-tempo hypothesis, in which long-term memory for tempo reduces but does not eliminate contextual effects. Thus, although both relative and absolute tempo information appear to be encoded in memory, the absolute representation may be subject to rapid revision by recently experienced tempo-altered versions of the same song. PMID:24972559

  7. MEMS AO for Planet Finding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti; Wallace, J. Kent; Shao, Mike; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Levine, B. Martin; Samuele, Rocco; Lane, Benjamin; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy; Hicks, Brian; Jung, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for planet finding using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) Adaptive Optics (AO). The use of a deformable mirror (DM) is described as a part of the instrument that was designed with a nulling interferometer. The strategy that is used is described in detail.

  8. Aperture masking behind AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Michael J.

    2012-07-01

    Sparse Aperture-Mask Interferometry (SAM or NRM) behind Adaptive Optics (AO) has now come of age, with more than a dozen astronomy papers published from several 5-10m class telescopes around the world. I will describe the reasons behind its success in achieving relatively high contrasts ( 1000:1 at lambda/ D) and repeatable binary astronomy at the diffraction limit, even when used behind laser-guide star adaptive optics. Placed within the context of AO calibration, the information in an image can be split into pupil-plane phase, Fourier amplitude and closure-phase. It is the closure-phase observable, or its generalisation to Kernel phase, that is immune to pupil-plane phase errors at first and second-order and has been the reason for the technique's success. I will outline the limitations of the technique and the prospects for aperture-masking and related techniques in the future.

  9. Effects of music tempo upon submaximal cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, J; Hudson, P; Edwards, B

    2010-08-01

    In an in vivo laboratory controlled study, 12 healthy male students cycled at self-chosen work-rates while listening to a program of six popular music tracks of different tempi. The program lasted about 25 min and was performed on three occasions--unknown to the participants, its tempo was normal, increased by 10% or decreased by 10%. Work done, distance covered and cadence were measured at the end of each track, as were heart rate and subjective measures of exertion, thermal comfort and how much the music was liked. Speeding up the music program increased distance covered/unit time, power and pedal cadence by 2.1%, 3.5% and 0.7%, respectively; slowing the program produced falls of 3.8%, 9.8% and 5.9%. Average heart rate changes were +0.1% (faster program) and -2.2% (slower program). Perceived exertion and how much the music was liked increased (faster program) by 2.4% and 1.3%, respectively, and decreased (slower program) by 3.6% and 35.4%. That is, healthy individuals performing submaximal exercise not only worked harder with faster music but also chose to do so and enjoyed the music more when it was played at a faster tempo. Implications of these findings for improving training regimens are discussed. PMID:19793214

  10. Multi-scale Characterization of Cellulose TEMPO-Nanofiber Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yimin; Liu, Kai; Hsiao, Benjamin

    Cellulose nanofiber (CNF) suspensions were characterized at multiple length scales. CNF suspension was prepared by applying 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1- piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) oxidation method to dry wood pulp. TEMPO method was able to produce fine fibers with a cross section dimension being in the order of magnitude of several nanometers, and length being several hundred nanometers. The surface was negatively charged. Charge density was characterized by Zeta-potential measurement. Both small-angle X-ray (SAXS) and small-angle neutron (SANS) methods were employed to examine fiber dimensions in solution. Data fitting indicated that newly-developed ribbon model was able to capture the essence of CNF's geometry, which is also computationally economic. The rectangular-shaped cross section was consistent to cellulose's crystal structure; and was able to provide insights into how cellulose crystals were biologically synthesized and packed in nature. Multi-angle dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to study CNF's diffusion properties. A strong scattering-angle dependence of auto-correlation function was observed. The characterization is useful to understanding suspension quality of CNF, and can provide guideline for follow-up research aimed for a variety of applications.

  11. Accurate tempo estimation based on harmonic + noise decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Miguel; Richard, Gael; David, Bertrand

    2006-12-01

    We present an innovative tempo estimation system that processes acoustic audio signals and does not use any high-level musical knowledge. Our proposal relies on a harmonic + noise decomposition of the audio signal by means of a subspace analysis method. Then, a technique to measure the degree of musical accentuation as a function of time is developed and separately applied to the harmonic and noise parts of the input signal. This is followed by a periodicity estimation block that calculates the salience of musical accents for a large number of potential periods. Next, a multipath dynamic programming searches among all the potential periodicities for the most consistent prospects through time, and finally the most energetic candidate is selected as tempo. Our proposal is validated using a manually annotated test-base containing 961 music signals from various musical genres. In addition, the performance of the algorithm under different configurations is compared. The robustness of the algorithm when processing signals of degraded quality is also measured.

  12. Tempo and Mode in Evolution of Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Kacy L.; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2012-01-01

    Perennial questions of evolutionary biology can be applied to gene regulatory systems using the abundance of experimental data addressing gene regulation in a comparative context. What is the tempo (frequency, rate) and mode (way, mechanism) of transcriptional regulatory evolution? Here we synthesize the results of 230 experiments performed on insects and nematodes in which regulatory DNA from one species was used to drive gene expression in another species. General principles of regulatory evolution emerge. Gene regulatory evolution is widespread and accumulates with genetic divergence in both insects and nematodes. Divergence in cis is more common than divergence in trans. Coevolution between cis and trans shows a particular increase over greater evolutionary timespans, especially in sex-specific gene regulation. Despite these generalities, the evolution of gene regulation is gene- and taxon-specific. The congruence of these conclusions with evidence from other types of experiments suggests that general principles are discoverable, and a unified view of the tempo and mode of regulatory evolution may be achievable. PMID:22291600

  13. Nitroxide TEMPO: a genotoxic and oxidative stress inducer in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Guo, Lei; Shaddock, Joseph G; Heflich, Robert H; Bigger, Anita H; Moore, Martha M; Mei, Nan

    2013-08-01

    2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) is a low molecular weight nitroxide and stable free radical. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of TEMPO in mammalian cells using the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and in vitro micronucleus assay. In the absence of metabolic activation (S9), 3mM TEMPO produced significant cytotoxicity and marginal mutagenicity in the MLA; in the presence of S9, treatment of mouse lymphoma cells with 1-2mM TEMPO resulted in dose-dependent decreases of the relative total growth and increases in mutant frequency. Treatment of TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells with 0.9-2.3mM TEMPO increased the frequency of both micronuclei (a marker for clastogenicity) and hypodiploid nuclei (a marker of aneugenicity) in a dose-dependent manner; greater responses were produced in the presence of S9. Within the dose range tested, TEMPO induced reactive oxygen species and decreased glutathione levels in mouse lymphoma cells. In addition, the majority of TEMPO-induced mutants had loss of heterozygosity at the Tk locus, with allele loss of ⩽34Mbp. These results indicate that TEMPO is mutagenic in the MLA and induces micronuclei and hypodiploid nuclei in TK6 cells. Oxidative stress may account for part of the genotoxicity induced by TEMPO in both cell lines. PMID:23517621

  14. MUSIC TEMPO'S EFFECT ON EXERCISE PERFORMANCE: COMMENT ON DYER AND McKUNE.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Priscila Missaki

    2015-06-01

    Dyer and McKune (2013) stated that music tempo has no influence on performance, physiological, and psychophysical variables in well-trained cyclists during high intensity endurance tasks. However, there are important limitations in the methodology of the study. The participants' music preferences and tempo change were not well measured. It is not possible to affirm that music tempo does not influence athletes' performance. Potential areas of future research include: (a) use of instruments to assess the qualities of music; (b) standardizing music of tempo according to exercise type (e.g., running, cycling, etc.); PMID:26057422

  15. Difficulties of First Years Elementary School Teachers with the Teaching of Astronomy. (Breton Title: Dificuldades de Professores dos Anos Iniciais do Ensino Fundamental em Relação ao Ensino da Astronomia. ) Dificultades de LOS Profesores de los Primeros Años de la Escuela Primaria en Relación a la Enseñanza de la Astronomía

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhi, Rodolfo; Nardi, Roberto

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports Primary School teachers' discourses analysis about their difficulties related to the teaching of Astronomy. It reports partial data of a master's level research carried out in the last two years, named "An exploratory study for inserting Astronomy in primary school teachers' education" (LANGHI, 2004). The study took into consideration students' and teachers' common sense conceptions about astronomical phenomena, conceptual mistakes in textbooks, and Astronomy's suggestions given by the PCN (Parâmetros Curriculares Nacionais - The Brazilian National Curriculum Standards). The paper aims to characterize teachers' difficulties, in order to provide subsides to the implementation of an initial or continuing education program. This study is justified by the fact that courses plans like these only will be adapted to the teacher's (and students') reality, if there is a primary investigation about what the teachers really need to know about Astronomy. This fact was possible here by the enunciations interpretation of a teachers' sample using semi-structured interviews, according to discourse analysis procedures. The research outcomes show difficulties related to factors like: those of personal order, methodological, on teacher's formation, educational infrastructure and other related to information sources for educators. Este artigo, que relata as dificuldades de professores em relação ao ensino da Astronomia, faz parte de um estudo exploratório para a inserção da Astronomia na formação de professores dos anos iniciais do Ensino Fundamental. Esse estudo leva em consideração as concepções alternativas de alunos e professores sobre fenômenos astronômicos, os erros conceituais em livros didáticos e as sugestões de conteúdos de Astronomia constantes nos PCN (Parâmetros Curriculares Nacionais). Caracterizar as dificuldades dos professores é a questão central deste texto, apontando para o objetivo de contribuir com subsídios para um futuro

  16. Difficulties of First Years Elementary School Teachers with the Teaching of Astronomy. (Breton Title: Dificuldades de Professores dos Anos Iniciais do Ensino Fundamental em Relação ao Ensino da Astronomia. ) Dificultades de LOS Profesores de los Primeros Años de la Escuela Primaria en Relación a la Enseñanza de la Astronomía

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhi, Rodolfo; Nardi, Roberto

    2005-12-01

    This paper reports Primary School teachers' discourses analysis about their difficulties related to the teaching of Astronomy. It reports partial data of a master's level research carried out in the last two years, named "An exploratory study for inserting Astronomy in primary school teachers' education" (LANGHI, 2004). The study took into consideration students' and teachers' common sense conceptions about astronomical phenomena, conceptual mistakes in textbooks, and Astronomy's suggestions given by the PCN (Parâmetros Curriculares Nacionais - The Brazilian National Curriculum Standards). The paper aims to characterize teachers' difficulties, in order to provide subsides to the implementation of an initial or continuing education program. This study is justified by the fact that courses plans like these only will be adapted to the teacher's (and students') reality, if there is a primary investigation about what the teachers really need to know about Astronomy. This fact was possible here by the enunciations interpretation of a teachers' sample using semi-structured interviews, according to discourse analysis procedures. The research outcomes show difficulties related to factors like: those of personal order, methodological, on teacher's formation, educational infrastructure and other related to information sources for educators. Este artigo, que relata as dificuldades de professores em relação ao ensino da Astronomia, faz parte de um estudo exploratório para a inserção da Astronomia na formação de professores dos anos iniciais do Ensino Fundamental. Esse estudo leva em consideração as concepções alternativas de alunos e professores sobre fenômenos astronômicos, os erros conceituais em livros didáticos e as sugestões de conteúdos de Astronomia constantes nos PCN (Parâmetros Curriculares Nacionais). Caracterizar as dificuldades dos professores é a questão central deste texto, apontando para o objetivo de contribuir com subsídios para um futuro

  17. Action observation: mirroring across our spontaneous movement tempo

    PubMed Central

    Avanzino, Laura; Lagravinese, Giovanna; Bisio, Ambra; Perasso, Luisa; Ruggeri, Piero; Bove, Marco

    2015-01-01

    During action observation (AO), the activity of the “mirror system” is influenced by the viewer’s expertise in the observed action. A question that remains open is whether the temporal aspects of the subjective motor repertoire can influence the “mirror system” activation. PMID:25989029

  18. Cellulose nanowhiskers extracted from TEMPO-oxidized jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinwang; Ding, Bin; Yu, Jianyong; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2012-10-01

    Cellulose nanowhiskers is a kind of renewable and biocompatible nanomaterials evoke much interest because of its versatility in various applications. Here, for the first time, a novel controllable fabrication of cellulose nanowhiskers from jute fibers with a high yield (over 80%) via a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)/NaBr/NaClO system selective oxidization combined with mechanical homogenization is reported. The versatile jute cellulose nanowhiskers with ultrathin diameters (3-10 nm) and high crystallinity (69.72%), contains C6 carboxylate groups converted from C6 primary hydroxyls, which would be particularly useful for applications in the nanocomposites as reinforcing phase, as well as in tissue engineering, pharmaceutical and optical industries as additives. PMID:22840042

  19. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  20. Reaction time to changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. P.; Warm, J. S.; Westendorf, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the ability of human observers to detect accelerations and decelerations in the rate of presentation of pulsed stimuli, i.e., changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains. Response times to accelerations in tempo were faster than to decelerations. Overall speed of response was inversely related to the pulse repetition rate.

  1. Musicians' Preferences for Tempo and Pitch Levels in Recorded Orchestral Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geringer, John M.

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to ascertain musicians' tempo and pitch level preferences when listening to orchestral music. Ninety graduate and undergraduate music major students were assigned randomly to one of three groups. Participants listened individually to recorded symphonic excerpts, 5 with relatively fast and 5 with relatively slow tempos.…

  2. Effects of Modeling and Tempo Patterns as Practice Techniques on the Performance of High School Instrumentalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Paul T.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the effect of modeling conditions and tempo patterns on high school instrumentalists' performance. Focuses on high school students (n=60) who play wind instruments. Reports that the with-model condition was superior in rhythm and tempo percentage gain when compared to the no-model condition. Includes references. (CMK)

  3. Should Sluggish Cognitive Tempo Symptoms Be Included in the Diagnosis of Attention-Deficit/hyperactivity Disorder?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Richard D.; Rasmussen, Erik R.; Wood, Catherine; Levy, Florence; Hay, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of including sluggish cognitive tempo items on the factor and latent class structure of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtypes in boys and girls. Method: Parent report of two sluggish cognitive tempo items on a population-based sample of 1,430 female twins and 1,414 male twins were analyzed…

  4. Control Over the Time Course of Cognition in the Tempo-Naming Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kello, Christopher T.

    2004-01-01

    Five experiments are reported in which standard naming and tempo-naming tasks were used to investigate mechanisms of control over the time course of lexical processing. The time course of processing was manipulated by asking participants to time their responses with an audiovisual metronome. As the tempo of the metronome increased, results showed…

  5. Children's Preference for Sequenced Accompaniments: The Influence of Style and Perceived Tempo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittin, Ruth V.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the influence of tempo on musical preference for students in grades 2-6, focusing on the effects of various styles using a MIDI keyboard. Explains that the students listened to 10 musical selections identifying their preferences and perceptions of tempo. Reveals that the preferred styles were Hip-Hop, Heavy Rock Shuffle, Samba, and Funk2.…

  6. Development's Tortoise and Hare: Pubertal Timing, Pubertal Tempo, and Depressive Symptoms in Boys and Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendle, Jane; Harden, K. Paige; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Graber, Julia A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the sequence of pubertal maturation remains consistent across most individuals, the timing and tempo of development fluctuate widely. While past research has largely focused on the sequelae of pubertal timing, a faster tempo of maturation might also present special challenges to children for acclimating to new biological and social…

  7. Perception of Tempo Modulation by Listeners of Different Levels of Educational Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Deborah A.; Gregory, Diane

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the similarities and differences in how listeners with different levels of education experience demonstrate perception of tempo modulation in music. Reports that level of education may affect how listeners demonstrate differences and that responses depended on the direction of tempo change. Notes importance of the music education of…

  8. Does Listening to Slow Tempo Classical Music During Independent Writing Affect Children's On-Task Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Rosemary

    This project explored the effects of slow tempo classical music on children's on-task performance during independent writing. The project sample consisted of 24 students from a first grade classroom in the New York City Public School System. The students' on-task behavior was observed with and without use of slow tempo classical music playing, and…

  9. Cu-NHC-TEMPO catalyzed aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaolong; Xia, Qinqin; Zhang, Yuejiao; Chen, Congyan; Chen, Wanzhi

    2013-09-01

    Imidazolium salts bearing TEMPO groups react with commercially available copper powder affording Cu-NHC complexes. The in situ generated Cu-NHC-TEMPO complexes are quite efficient catalysts for aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols into aldehydes. The catalyst is easily available, and various primary alcohols were selectively converted to aldehydes in excellent yields. PMID:23944937

  10. The Universe in a Box: Introduction to the Study of Astronomy in the Initial Formation of Physics Teachers. (Spanish Title: El Universo Representado en Una Caja: Introducción al Estudio de la Astronomía en la Formación Inicial de Profesores de Física.) O Universo Representado em Uma Caixa: Introdução ao Estudo da Astronomia NA Formação Inicial de Professores de Física

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhini, Marcos Daniel

    2009-07-01

    This is a report of an activity of introduction to the study of Astronomy developed with a group of future Physics teachers at a Brazilian public university. Such activity had the goal of giving privileged emphasis to notions of spatiality, alternative conceptions of the participants and the process of interaction among peers, and consisted of the representation, in a three dimensional space, of the models of the universe that the participants had. The results, which were categorized as miscellaneous, geocentric, heliocentric and acentric models of the universe, were qualitatively analyzed. Analyses of the activity in the perspective of the participants are indicated and additional considerations are made regarding its use as a resource for teaching Astronomy and for teacher training. Este es el informe de una actividad para presentar un estudio introductorio de la Astronomía, desarrollado con una clase de futuros profesores de física en una universidad pública brasileña. Esta actividad tuvo como objetivo centrar las nociones de espacialidad, las concepciones alternativas de los participantes y el proceso de interacción entre pares, y consistió en la representación en un espacio tridimensional, de los modelos del universo que los participantes habían. Los resultados, que se clasificaron en universo miscelania, geocéntrico, heliocéntrico y acentrico, se analizaron cualitativamente. Son identificadas análisis de la actividad por los participantes, e hizo observaciones sobre su uso como recurso para la enseñanza de la astronomía y la formación de docentes. Trata-se do relato de uma atividade de introdução ao estudo da Astronomia, desenvolvida com uma turma de futuros professores de Física, em uma universidade pública brasileira. Tal atividade teve como meta privilegiar noções de espacialidade, as concepções alternativas dos participantes e o processo de interação entre pares e constou da representação, em um espaço tridimensional, dos

  11. Status of the first NASA EV-I Project, Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    TEMPO is the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (2 km N/S × 4.5 km E/W at the center of its field of regard). The status of TEMPO including progress in instrument definition and implementation of the ground system will be presented. TEMPO provides a minimally-redundant measurement suite that includes all key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO will be delivered in 2017 for integration onto a NASA-selected GEO host spacecraft for launch as early as 2018. It will provide the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. Additional gases not central to air quality, including BrO, OClO, and IO will also be measured. TEMPO and its Asian (GEMS) and European (Sentinel-4) constellation partners make the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, building on the heritage of six spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed

  12. Tempo and mode in the macroevolutionary reconstruction of Darwinism.

    PubMed Central

    Gould, S J

    1994-01-01

    Among the several central meanings of Darwinism, his version of Lyellian uniformitarianism--the extrapolationist commitment to viewing causes of small-scale, observable change in modern populations as the complete source, by smooth extension through geological time, of all magnitudes and sequences in evolution--has most contributed to the causal hegemony of microevolution and the assumption that paleontology can document the contingent history of life but cannot act as a domain of novel evolutionary theory. G. G. Simpson tried to combat this view of paleontology as theoretically inert in his classic work, Tempo and Mode in Evolution (1944), with a brilliant argument that the two subjects of his title fall into a unique paleontological domain and that modes (processes and causes) can be inferred from the quantitative study of tempos (pattern). Nonetheless, Simpson did not cash out his insight to paleontology's theoretical benefit because he followed the strict doctrine of the Modern Synthesis. He studied his domain of potential theory and concluded that no actual theory could be found--and that a full account of causes could therefore be located in the microevolutionary realm after all. I argue that Simpson was unduly pessimistic and that modernism's belief in reductionistic unification (the conventional view of Western intellectuals from the 1920s to the 1950s) needs to be supplanted by a postmodernist commitment to pluralism and multiple levels of causation. Macro- and microevolution should not be viewed as opposed, but as truly complementary. I describe the two major domains where a helpful macroevolutionary theory may be sought--unsmooth causal boundaries between levels (as illustrated by punctuated equilibrium and mass extinction) and hierarchical expansion of the theory of natural selection to levels both below (gene and cell-line) and above organisms (demes, species, and clades). Problems remain in operationally defining selection at non-organismic levels

  13. Tempo and mode in the macroevolutionary reconstruction of Darwinism.

    PubMed

    Gould, S J

    1994-07-19

    Among the several central meanings of Darwinism, his version of Lyellian uniformitarianism--the extrapolationist commitment to viewing causes of small-scale, observable change in modern populations as the complete source, by smooth extension through geological time, of all magnitudes and sequences in evolution--has most contributed to the causal hegemony of microevolution and the assumption that paleontology can document the contingent history of life but cannot act as a domain of novel evolutionary theory. G. G. Simpson tried to combat this view of paleontology as theoretically inert in his classic work, Tempo and Mode in Evolution (1944), with a brilliant argument that the two subjects of his title fall into a unique paleontological domain and that modes (processes and causes) can be inferred from the quantitative study of tempos (pattern). Nonetheless, Simpson did not cash out his insight to paleontology's theoretical benefit because he followed the strict doctrine of the Modern Synthesis. He studied his domain of potential theory and concluded that no actual theory could be found--and that a full account of causes could therefore be located in the microevolutionary realm after all. I argue that Simpson was unduly pessimistic and that modernism's belief in reductionistic unification (the conventional view of Western intellectuals from the 1920s to the 1950s) needs to be supplanted by a postmodernist commitment to pluralism and multiple levels of causation. Macro- and microevolution should not be viewed as opposed, but as truly complementary. I describe the two major domains where a helpful macroevolutionary theory may be sought--unsmooth causal boundaries between levels (as illustrated by punctuated equilibrium and mass extinction) and hierarchical expansion of the theory of natural selection to levels both below (gene and cell-line) and above organisms (demes, species, and clades). Problems remain in operationally defining selection at non-organismic levels

  14. The triple system AO Monocerotis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Kučáková, H.; Hynek, T.; Melcer, L. Å.

    2010-05-01

    The variable star AO Mon is a relatively bright but seldom investigated early-type eccentric eclipsing binary. Thirty new eclipses were measured as a part of our long-term observational project or derived from previous measurements. Based on a new solution of the current O-C diagram, we found for the first time a rapid apsidal advance superimposed with a light-time effect caused by a third unseen body in the system. Their short periods are 33.8 years and 3.6 years for the apsidal motion and the third-body circular orbit, respectively. The observed internal structure constant was derived to be log k2, obs = -2.23, which is close to the theoretically expected value. The relativistic as well as the third-body effects on the apsidal advance are negligible, as they are only about 3% of the total apsidal motion rate. Partly based on observations secured at the South African Astronomical Observatory, Sutherland, South Africa, in April 2004.

  15. Thermosetting polymer for dynamic nuclear polarization: Solidification of an epoxy resin mixture including TEMPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yohei; Kumada, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Shamoto, Shin-ichi

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of typical thermosetting polymers (two-component type epoxy resins; Araldite® Standard or Araldite® Rapid) doped with a (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yl)oxy (TEMPO) radical. The doping process was developed by carefully considering the decomposition of TEMPO during the solidification of the epoxy resin. The TEMPO electron spin in each two-component paste decayed slowly, which was favorable for our study. Furthermore, despite the dissolved TEMPO, the mixture of the two-component paste successfully solidified. With the resulting TEMPO-doped epoxy-resin samples, DNP experiments at 1.2 K and 3.35 T indicated a magnitude of a proton-spin polarization up to 39%. This polarization is similar to that (35%) obtained for TEMPO-doped polystyrene (PS), which is often used as a standard sample for DNP. To combine this solidification of TEMPO-including mixture with a resin-casting technique enables a creation of polymeric target materials with a precise and complex structure.

  16. Paramagnetic carbon-13 shifts induced by the free radical tempo. 2. Nitrogen heterocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Qui, Z.W.; Grant, D.M.; Pugmire, R.J.

    1984-02-08

    With use of the free radical Tempo as a shift and relaxation reagent, both paramagnetic shifts and spin-lattice relaxation rates of nitrogen heterocycles are reported. Paramagnetic shifts of these compounds are larger than the corresponding shifts of the aromatic hydrocarbons, indicating a stronger interaction between nitrogen heterocyclic compounds and Tempo. Paramagnetic shifts increase with the number of nitrogen atoms per molecule. For pyridine type compounds, both shift and relaxation data show that the stronger interaction is not at the adjacent positions to the nitrogen atoms. It would appear in these heterocyclic complexes with Tempo that the nitrogen atoms tend to orient away from the N-O group in Tempo. In contrast, imidazole and indole exhibit a much stronger interaction with the Tempo due to hydrogen bond formation, and the positions near the N-H group exhibit larger paramagnetic shifts and relaxation rates. An approximate static model involving an indole-Tempo, hydrogen-bond complex accounts for the relaxation data from which both an equilibrium constant of complexation and a hydrogen-bond distance in the indole-Tempo complex could be estimated.

  17. Memory for surface features of unfamiliar melodies: independent effects of changes in pitch and tempo.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Stalinski, Stephanie M; Marks, Bradley M

    2014-01-01

    A melody's identity is determined by relations between consecutive tones in terms of pitch and duration, whereas surface features (i.e., pitch level or key, tempo, and timbre) are irrelevant. Although surface features of highly familiar recordings are encoded into memory, little is known about listeners' mental representations of melodies heard once or twice. It is also unknown whether musical pitch is represented additively or interactively with temporal information. In two experiments, listeners heard unfamiliar melodies twice in an initial exposure phase. In a subsequent test phase, they heard the same (old) melodies interspersed with new melodies. Some of the old melodies were shifted in key, tempo, or key and tempo. Listeners' task was to rate how well they recognized each melody from the exposure phase while ignoring changes in key and tempo. Recognition ratings were higher for old melodies that stayed the same compared to those that were shifted in key or tempo, and detrimental effects of key and tempo changes were additive in between-subjects (Experiment 1) and within-subjects (Experiment 2) designs. The results confirm that surface features are remembered for melodies heard only twice. They also imply that key and tempo are processed and stored independently. PMID:23385775

  18. Compilação de dados atômicos e moleculares do UV ao IV próximo para uso em síntese espectral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, P.; Barbuy, B.; Melendez, J.; Allen, D. M.; Castilho, B.

    2003-08-01

    Espectros sintéticos são utéis em uma grande variedade de aplicações, desde análise de abundâncias em espectros estelares de alta resolução ao estudo de populações estelares em espectros integrados. A confiabilidade de um espectro sintético depende do modelo de atmosfera adotado, do código de formação de linhas e da qualidade dos dados atômicos e moleculares que são determinantes no cálculo das opacidades da fotosfera. O nosso grupo no departamento de Astronomia no IAG tem utilizado espectros sintéticos há mais de 15 anos, em aplicações voltadas principalmente para a análise de abundâncias de estrelas G, K e M e populações estelares velhas. Ao longo desse tempo, as listas de linhas vieram sendo construídas e atualizadas continuamente, e alguns acréscimos recentes podem ser citados: Castilho (1999, átomos e moléculas no UV), Schiavon (1998, bandas moleculares de TiO) e Melendez (2001, átomos e moléculas no IV próximo). Com o intuito de calcular uma grade de espectros do UV ao IV próximo para uso no estudo de populações estelares velhas, se fazia necessário compilar e homogeneizar as diversas listas em apenas uma lista atômica e uma molecular. Nesse processo, a nova lista compilada foi correlacionada com outras bases de dados (NIST, Kurucz Database, O' Brian et al. 1991) para atualização dos parâmetros que caracterizam a transição atômica (comprimento de onda, log gf e potencial de excitação). Adicionalmente as constantes de interação C6 foram calculadas segundo a teoria de Anstee & O'Mara (1995) e artigos posteriores. As bandas moleculares de CH e CN foram recalculadas com o programa LIFBASE (Luque & Crosley 1999). Nesse poster estão detalhados os procedimentos citados acima, as comparações entre espectros calculados com as novas listas e espectros observados em alta resolução do Sol e de Arcturus, e uma análise do impacto decorrente da utilização de diferentes modelos de atmosfera no espectro sintético. Ao

  19. Influence of Tempo and Rhythmic Unit in Musical Emotion Regulation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sotos, Alicia; Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; Latorre, José M

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on the assumption of musical power to change the listener's mood. The paper studies the outcome of two experiments on the regulation of emotional states in a series of participants who listen to different auditions. The present research focuses on note value, an important musical cue related to rhythm. The influence of two concepts linked to note value is analyzed separately and discussed together. The two musical cues under investigation are tempo and rhythmic unit. The participants are asked to label music fragments by using opposite meaningful words belonging to four semantic scales, namely "Tension" (ranging from Relaxing to Stressing), "Expressiveness" (Expressionless to Expressive), "Amusement" (Boring to Amusing) and "Attractiveness" (Pleasant to Unpleasant). The participants also have to indicate how much they feel certain basic emotions while listening to each music excerpt. The rated emotions are "Happiness," "Surprise," and "Sadness." This study makes it possible to draw some interesting conclusions about the associations between note value and emotions. PMID:27536232

  20. Tempo and mode of climatic niche evolution in Primates.

    PubMed

    Duran, Andressa; Pie, Marcio R

    2015-09-01

    Climatic niches have increasingly become a nexus in our understanding of a variety of ecological and evolutionary phenomena, from species distributions to latitudinal diversity gradients. Despite the increasing availability of comprehensive datasets on species ranges, phylogenetic histories, and georeferenced environmental conditions, studies on the evolution of climate niches have only begun to understand how niches evolve over evolutionary timescales. Here, using primates as a model system, we integrate recently developed phylogenetic comparative methods, species distribution patterns, and climatic data to explore primate climatic niche evolution, both among clades and over time. In general, we found that simple, constant-rate models provide a poor representation of how climatic niches evolve. For instance, there have been shifts in the rate of climatic niche evolution in several independent clades, particularly in response to the increasingly cooler climates of the past 10 My. Interestingly, rate accelerations greatly outnumbered rate decelerations. These results highlight the importance of considering more realistic evolutionary models that allow for the detection of heterogeneity in the tempo and mode of climatic niche evolution, as well as to infer possible constraining factors for species distributions in geographical space. PMID:26178157

  1. Influence of Tempo and Rhythmic Unit in Musical Emotion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sotos, Alicia; Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; Latorre, José M.

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on the assumption of musical power to change the listener's mood. The paper studies the outcome of two experiments on the regulation of emotional states in a series of participants who listen to different auditions. The present research focuses on note value, an important musical cue related to rhythm. The influence of two concepts linked to note value is analyzed separately and discussed together. The two musical cues under investigation are tempo and rhythmic unit. The participants are asked to label music fragments by using opposite meaningful words belonging to four semantic scales, namely “Tension” (ranging from Relaxing to Stressing), “Expressiveness” (Expressionless to Expressive), “Amusement” (Boring to Amusing) and “Attractiveness” (Pleasant to Unpleasant). The participants also have to indicate how much they feel certain basic emotions while listening to each music excerpt. The rated emotions are “Happiness,” “Surprise,” and “Sadness.” This study makes it possible to draw some interesting conclusions about the associations between note value and emotions. PMID:27536232

  2. Heliospheric Magnetic Field: The Bashful Ballerina dancing in Waltz Tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mursula, K.

    The recent developments in the long-term observations of the heliospheric magnetic field HMF observed at 1 AU have shown that the HMF sector coming from the northern solar hemisphere systematically dominates in the late declining to minimum phase of the solar cycle This leads to a persistent southward shift or coning of the heliospheric current sheet at these times that can be picturesquely described by the concept of the Bashful Ballerina This result has recently been verified by direct measurements of the solar magnetic field The average field intensity is smaller and the corresponding area is larger in the northern hemisphere Also ground-based observations of the HMF sector structure extend these results to 1920s Moreover it has been shown that the global HMF has persistent active longitudes whose dominance depicts an oscillation with a period of about 3 2 years Accordingly the Bashful Ballerina takes three such steps per activity cycle thus dancing in waltz tempo We discuss the implications of this behaviour

  3. TEMPO-functionalized zinc phthalocyanine: synthesis, magnetic properties, and its utility for electrochemical sensing of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Sibel Eken; Akyüz, Duygu; Özdoğan, Kemal; Yerli, Yusuf; Koca, Atıf; Şener, M Kasım

    2016-02-21

    Zinc(ii) phthalocyanine (TEMPO-ZnPc), peripherally functionalized with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) radicals is synthesized and its magneto structural and electrochemical behaviors are investigated. TEMPO-ZnPc shows multi-electron ring based reduction reactions and a TEMPO based oxidation reaction. Spectroelectrochemical measurements support these peak assignments. TEMPO-ZnPc is tested as a homogeneous and heterogeneous ascorbic acid (AA) sensor. Disappearance of TEMPO-ZnPc based reduction processes and the observation of new waves at around 0 and 1.20 V with respect to increasing AA concentration indicate the interaction of TEMPO-ZnPc with AA and usability of the complex as an electrochemical AA sensor. For practical usage as heterogeneous electrocatalysts for AA sensing, a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is coated with TEMPO-ZnPc (GCE/TEMPO-ZnPc) and this modified electrode is tested as a heterogeneous AA sensor. The redox peak of GCE/TEMPO-ZnPc at 0.81 V decreases the peak current while a new wave is observed at 0.65 V during the titration of the electrolyte with AA. GCE/TEMPO-ZnPc sense AA with 1.75 × 10(-6) mol dm(-3) LOD with a sensitivity of 1.89 × 10(3) A cm mol(-1). PMID:26766137

  4. Electrocatalytic Alcohol Oxidation with TEMPO and Bicyclic Nitroxyl Derivatives: Driving Force Trumps Steric Effects.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Mohammad; Miles, Kelsey C; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-11-25

    Bicyclic nitroxyl derivatives, such as 2-azaadamantane N-oxyl (AZADO) and 9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane N-oxyl (ABNO), have emerged as highly effective alternatives to TEMPO-based catalysts for selective oxidation reactions (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidine N-oxyl). Their efficacy is widely attributed to their smaller steric profile; however, electrocatalysis studies described herein show that the catalytic activity of nitroxyls is more strongly affected by the nitroxyl/oxoammonium redox potential than by steric effects. The inexpensive, high-potential TEMPO derivative, 4-acetamido-TEMPO (ACT), exhibits higher electrocatalytic activity than AZADO and ABNO for the oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols. Mechanistic studies provide insights into the origin of these unexpected reactivity trends. The superior activity of ACT is especially noteworthy at high pH, where bicyclic nitroxyls are inhibited by formation of an oxoammonium hydroxide adduct. PMID:26505317

  5. TEMPO-based Catholyte for High Energy Density Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Vijayakumar, M.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2014-12-03

    We will present a novel design lithium-organic non-aqueous redox flow battery based on a TEMPO catholyte. This RFB produced desired electrochemical performance exceeding most of the currently reported nonaqueous RFB systems.

  6. Natural Changes in Brain Temperature Underlie Variations in Song Tempo during a Mating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Aronov, Dmitriy; Fee, Michale S.

    2012-01-01

    The song of a male zebra finch is a stereotyped motor sequence whose tempo varies with social context – whether or not the song is directed at a female bird – as well as with the time of day. The neural mechanisms underlying these changes in tempo are unknown. Here we show that brain temperature recorded in freely behaving male finches exhibits a global increase in response to the presentation of a female bird. This increase strongly correlates with, and largely explains, the faster tempo of songs directed at a female compared to songs produced in social isolation. Furthermore, we find that the observed diurnal variations in song tempo are also explained by natural variations in brain temperature. Our findings suggest that brain temperature is an important variable that can influence the dynamics of activity in neural circuits, as well as the temporal features of behaviors that some of these circuits generate. PMID:23112858

  7. Studies on the Synergy of TEMPO/GEO-CAPE with GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciren, P.; Kondragunta, S.

    2015-12-01

    TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) is a space-borne UV-spectral radiometer to be flown in a geostationary orbit as part of NASA's Earth Venture program. NASA also is planning a decadal survey mission-The GEOstationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE). However, NASA has initiated scientific studies to determine if TEMPO can meet both its and GEO-CAPE's requirements by synergistically retrieving aerosol properties using TEMPO and GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) measurements. Because TEMPO does not have a cloud camera or needed spectral channels to identify clouds and a Shortwave IR band to characterize the surface that are essential for aerosol retrievals, GOES-R ABI can supplement those measurements. GOES-R aerosol team conducted a study to determine idealistic position of TEMPO and GOES-R (in its both east and west location) for scene overlap and projection of ABI Shortwave IR (2.25 um) reflectance and cloud mask to TEMPO pixels. The BRDF effect was taken into consideration in determining the spatial coverage of pixels ideal for aerosol retrievals using ABI shortwave IR reflectance in TEMPO pixels to extrapolate reflectance at visible spectral bands. Analysis shows that GOES-R (in its west location, 135W) and TEMPO do not overlap over eastern part of the United States (US) and Atlantic Ocean, while GOES-R (in its east location, 75W) overlaps with TEMPO over most part of the United States (US) except for small part of Pacific Ocean. In addition, retrievals in the early morning and late afternoon are not possible due to BRDF effects rendering the surface reflectance too bright. Cloud mask information from GOES-R observations in both its east and west location seems to be sufficient for TEMPO. In summary, GOES-R ABI Shortwave IR radiances and cloud mask information are adequate to be used with TEMPO measurements to retrieve aerosol optical depth product several times during the sunlit portion of the continental US.

  8. TEMPO-Mediated Aza-Diels-Alder Reaction: Synthesis of Tetrahydropyridazines Using Ketohydrazones and Olefins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiu-Long; Peng, Xie-Xue; Chen, Fei; Han, Bing

    2016-05-01

    A novel, facile, and efficient method for the synthesis of tetrahydropyridazines by a one-pot tandem reaction of easily accessible ketohydrazones and olefins in the presence of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) has been successfully developed. The reaction involves the initial generation of azoalkenes from direct oxidative dehydrogenation of ketohydrazones using TEMPO as the commercially available oxidant, followed by a subsequent aza-Diels-Alder reaction with olefins. PMID:27120574

  9. ESR study of molecular orientation and dynamics of TEMPO derivatives in CLPOT 1D nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Furuhashi, Yuta; Nakagawa, Haruka; Asaji, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    The molecular orientations and dynamics of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl (TEMPO) radical derivatives with large substituent groups at the 4-position (4-X-TEMPO) in the organic one-dimensional nanochannels within the nanosized molecular template 2,4,6-tris(4-chlorophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (CLPOT) were examined using ESR. The concentrations of guest radicals, including 4-methoxy-TEMPO (MeO-TEMPO) or 4-oxo-TEMPO (TEMPONE), in the CLPOT nanochannels in each inclusion compound (IC) were reduced by co-including 4-substituted-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (4-R-TEMP) compounds at a ratio of 1 : 30-1 : 600. At higher temperatures, the guest radicals in each IC underwent anisotropic rotational diffusion in the CLPOT nanochannels. The rotational diffusion activation energy, Ea , associated with MeO-TEMPO or TEMPONE in the CLPOT nanochannels (6-7 kJ mol(-1) ), was independent of the size and type of substituent group and was similar to the Ea values obtained for TEMPO and 4- hydroxy-TEMPO (TEMPOL) in our previous study. However, in the case in which TEMP was used as a guest compound for dilution (spacer), the tilt of the rotational axis to the principal axis system of the g-tensor, and the rotational diffusion correlation time, τR , of each guest radical in the CLPOT nanochannels were different from the case with other 4-R-TEMP. These results indicate the possibility of controlling molecular orientation and dynamics of guest radicals in CLPOT ICs through the appropriate choice of spacer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27001507

  10. Fluorescence quenching of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin by different TEMPO derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wiczk, Wiesław; Zaborowski, Bartłomiej; Jacewicz, Dagmara; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2015-02-01

    The fluorescence quenching of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin by different TEMPO derivatives was studied in aqueous solutions with the use of steady-state, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy as well as UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy methods. In order to distinguish each TEMPO derivative from the others and to understand the mechanism of quenching, the absorption and fluorescence emission spectra as well as decays of the fluorescence of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin were registered as a function of each TEMPO derivative concentration. There were no deviations from a linearity in the Stern-Volmer plots (determined from both, steady-state and time-resolved measurements). The fluorescence quenching mechanism was found to be entirely collisional, what was additionally confirmed by the registration of Stern-Volmer plots at 5 temperatures ranging from 15 to 55 °C. Based on theoretical calculations of molecular radii and ionization potentials of all TEMPO derivatives the mechanism of electron transfer was rejected. The fluorescence quenching which was being studied seems to be diffusion-limited and caused by the increase of non-radiative processes, such as an internal conversion and an intersystem crossing. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants and bimolecular quenching constants were determined at the room temperature for all TEMPO derivatives studied. Among all TEMPO derivatives studied TEMPO-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid (TOAC) was found to be the most effective quencher of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin fluorescence (kq for TOAC was approximately 1.5 higher than kq for other TEMPO compounds studied). The findings demonstrate the possibility of developing an analytical method for the quantitative determination of TOAC, which incorporation into membrane proteins may provide a direct detection of peptide backbone dynamics.

  11. A cosmologia no ensino da geografia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, S. C.; Chiaradia, A. P. M.

    2003-08-01

    O principal objetivo deste trabalho é auxiliar o professor de Geografia em sala de aula no ensino de tópicos relacionados com a Cosmologia. A idéia deste trabalho surgiu quando foi constatado que o professor de Geografia tem dificuldades de ensinar este tópico. Esta constatação foi feita por uma das autoras ao lecionar este tópico no ensino fundamental e em discussões com outros professores de Geografia. Da mesma maneira que ocorria desde os tempos mais antigos, os alunos têm muito interesse em conhecer os fenômenos que ocorrem no Cosmo, porém os livros didáticos de Geografia utilizados em sala de aula não são ricos em informações sobre este assunto. Assim, o professor de Geografia tem poucas informações para discutir este assunto em sala de aula e não dá a devida importância para este tópico. Então, foi desenvolvido um material de apoio para professores de Geografia sobre a origem do Universo, sua evolução e seu possível futuro evolutivo segundo as mais recentes teorias, com base em perguntas feitas pelos alunos de ensino fundamental e as informações trazidas nos livros didáticos Não cabe a este material inovar e tão pouco trazer uma metodologia de ensino de Cosmologia. Neste material o professor de Geografia pode encontrará um banco de informações, que constitui no estabelecimento de conceitos, teorias e hipóteses, sobre a Cosmologia, em linguagem simples e de fácil entendimento. Para desenvolvê-lo, foram feitas pesquisas não exaustivas em livros e revistas científicas, compilação e discussão em forma cronológica das teorias aceitas sobre modelos cosmológicos. Portanto, este material será apresentado neste trabalho.

  12. Predicting the similarity between expressive performances of music from measurements of tempo and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmers, Renee

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of tempo and dynamics from audio files or MIDI data are frequently used to get insight into a performer's contribution to music. The measured variations in tempo and dynamics are often represented in different formats by different authors. Few systematic comparisons have been made between these representations. Moreover, it is unknown what data representation comes closest to subjective perception. The reported study tests the perceptual validity of existing data representations by comparing their ability to explain the subjective similarity between pairs of performances. In two experiments, 40 participants rated the similarity between performances of a Chopin prelude and a Mozart sonata. Models based on different representations of the tempo and dynamics of the performances were fitted to these similarity ratings. The results favor other data representations of performances than generally used, and imply that comparisons between performances are made perceptually in a different way than often assumed. For example, the best fit was obtained with models based on absolute tempo and absolute tempo times loudness, while conventional models based on normalized variations, or on correlations between tempo profiles and loudness profiles, did not explain the similarity ratings well. .

  13. Role of tempo entrainment in psychophysiological differentiation of happy and sad music?

    PubMed

    Khalfa, Stéphanie; Roy, Mathieu; Rainville, Pierre; Dalla Bella, Simone; Peretz, Isabelle

    2008-04-01

    Respiration rate allows to differentiate between happy and sad excerpts which may be attributable to entrainment of respiration to the rhythm or the tempo rather than to emotions [Etzel, J.A., Johnsen, E.L., Dickerson, J., Tranel, D., Adolphs, R., 2006. Cardiovascular and respiratory responses during musical mood induction. Int. J. Psychophysiol. 61(1), 57-69]. In order to test for this hypothesis, this study intended to verify whether fast and slow rhythm, and/or tempo alone are sufficient to induce differential physiological effects. Psychophysiological responses (electrodermal responses, facial muscles activity, blood pressure, heart and respiration rate) were then measured in fifty young adults listening to fast/happy and slow/sad music, and to two control versions of these excerpts created by removing pitch variations (rhythmic version) and both pitch and temporal variations (beat-alone). The results indicate that happy and sad music are significantly differentiated (happy>sad) by diastolic blood pressure, electrodermal activity, and zygomatic activity, while the fast and slow rhythmic and tempo control versions did not elicit such differentiations. In contrast, respiration rate was faster with stimuli presented at fast tempi relative to slow stimuli in the beat-alone condition. It was thus demonstrated that the psychophysiological happy/sad distinction requires the tonal variations and cannot be explained solely by entrainment to tempo and rhythm. The tempo entrainment exists in the tempo alone condition but our results suggest this effect may disappear when embedded in music or with rhythm. PMID:18234381

  14. The Magellan Telescope adaptive secondary AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird M.; Gasho, Victor; Kopon, Derek; Hinz, Phil M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Uomoto, Alan; Hare, Tyson

    2008-07-01

    The Magellan Clay telescope is a 6.5m Gregorian telescope located in southern Chile at Las Campanas Observatory. The Gregorian design allows for an adaptive secondary mirror that can be tested off-sky in a straight-forward manner. We have fabricated a 85 cm diameter aspheric adaptive secondary with our subcontractors and partners. This secondary has 585 actuators with <1 msec response times. The chopping adaptive secondary will allow low emissivity AO science. We will achieve very high Strehls (~98%) in the Mid-IR AO (8-26 microns) with the BLINC/MIRAC4 Mid-IR science camera. This will allow the first "super-resolution" and nulling Mid-IR studies of dusty southern objects. We will employ a high order (585 mode) pyramid wavefront sensor similar to that used in the Large Binocular Telescope AO systems. The relatively high actuator count will allow modest Strehls to be obtained in the visible (~0.8μm). Our visible light AO (Vis AO) science camera is fed by an advanced ADC and beamsplitter piggy-backed on the WFS optical table. The system science and performance requirements, and an overview the design, interface and schedule for the Magellan AO system are presented here.

  15. Sensorimotor synchronization with tempo-changing auditory sequences: Modeling temporal adaptation and anticipation.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, M C Marieke; Jacoby, Nori; Fairhurst, Merle T; Keller, Peter E

    2015-11-11

    The current study investigated the human ability to synchronize movements with event sequences containing continuous tempo changes. This capacity is evident, for example, in ensemble musicians who maintain precise interpersonal coordination while modulating the performance tempo for expressive purposes. Here we tested an ADaptation and Anticipation Model (ADAM) that was developed to account for such behavior by combining error correction processes (adaptation) with a predictive temporal extrapolation process (anticipation). While previous computational models of synchronization incorporate error correction, they do not account for prediction during tempo-changing behavior. The fit between behavioral data and computer simulations based on four versions of ADAM was assessed. These versions included a model with adaptation only, one in which adaptation and anticipation act in combination (error correction is applied on the basis of predicted tempo changes), and two models in which adaptation and anticipation were linked in a joint module that corrects for predicted discrepancies between the outcomes of adaptive and anticipatory processes. The behavioral experiment required participants to tap their finger in time with three auditory pacing sequences containing tempo changes that differed in the rate of change and the number of turning points. Behavioral results indicated that sensorimotor synchronization accuracy and precision, while generally high, decreased with increases in the rate of tempo change and number of turning points. Simulations and model-based parameter estimates showed that adaptation mechanisms alone could not fully explain the observed precision of sensorimotor synchronization. Including anticipation in the model increased the precision of simulated sensorimotor synchronization and improved the fit of model to behavioral data, especially when adaptation and anticipation mechanisms were linked via a joint module based on the notion of joint internal

  16. Into the blue: AO science with MagAO in the visible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared R.; Follette, Katherine B.; Hinz, Phil; Morzinski, Katie; Wu, Ya-Lin; Kopon, Derek; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone; Puglisi, Alfio; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando

    2014-08-01

    We review astronomical results in the visible (λ<1μm) with adaptive optics. Other than a brief period in the early 1990s, there has been little astronomical science done in the visible with AO until recently. The most productive visible AO system to date is our 6.5m Magellan telescope AO system (MagAO). MagAO is an advanced Adaptive Secondary system at the Magellan 6.5m in Chile. This secondary has 585 actuators with < 1 msec response times (0.7 ms typically). We use a pyramid wavefront sensor. The relatively small actuator pitch (~23 cm/subap) allows moderate Strehls to be obtained in the visible (0.63-1.05 microns). We use a CCD AO science camera called "VisAO". On-sky long exposures (60s) achieve <30mas resolutions, 30% Strehls at 0.62 microns (r') with the VisAO camera in 0.5" seeing with bright R < 8 mag stars. These relatively high visible wavelength Strehls are made possible by our powerful combination of a next generation ASM and a Pyramid WFS with 378 controlled modes and 1000 Hz loop frequency. We'll review the key steps to having good performance in the visible and review the exciting new AO visible science opportunities and refereed publications in both broad-band (r,i,z,Y) and at Halpha for exoplanets, protoplanetary disks, young stars, and emission line jets. These examples highlight the power of visible AO to probe circumstellar regions/spatial resolutions that would otherwise require much larger diameter telescopes with classical infrared AO cameras.

  17. The appropriate or optimal tempo for music: a comparison between non-musicians and musicians.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Sandra; Watt, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Musicians have enhanced skills that result from intensive training. Whilst musicians show enhanced auditory capabilities (Kraus and Chandrasekaran, 2010 Nature Reviews Neuroscience 11 599-605), non-musicians demonstrate an ability to perform musical tasks (eg listening, dancing, and singing). Non-musicians can also undertake tasks that would normally be reserved for musicians. For example, non-musicians can perceive optimal tempi (ie an appropriate speed) for music (Quinn and Watt, 2006 Perception 35 267-280; Quinn and Watt, 2012 Perception 41 236-238; Quinn et al, 2012 Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 131 3595-3598). This suggests that formalised musical training is not a prerequisite for developing a sense of the tempo that sounds right for a melody. The current studies examine this issue and compare the tempo that musicians choose to perform unfamiliar melodies with the tempo that non-musicians perceive to be optimal for the same melodies. The results demonstrate that the perceived optimal tempo is similar to the performed tempo. PMID:24422251

  18. Modeling Pubertal Timing and Tempo and Examining Links to Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Adriene M.; Corley, Robin P.; Bricker, Josh B.; Wadsworth, Sally J.; Berenbaum, Sheri A.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the role of puberty in adolescent psychological development requires attention to the meaning and measurement of pubertal development. Particular questions concern the utility of self report, the need for complex models to describe pubertal development, the psychological significance of pubertal timing versus tempo, and sex differences in the nature and psychological significance of pubertal development. We used longitudinal self-report data to model linear and logistic trajectories of pubertal development, and used timing and tempo estimates from these models, and from traditional approaches (age at menarche and time from onset of breast development to menarche), to predict psychological outcomes of internalizing and externalizing behavior problems, and early sexual activity. Participants (738 girls, 781 boys) reported annually from ages 9 through 15 on their pubertal development, and they and their parents reported on their behavior in mid-to-late adolescence and early adulthood. Self reports of pubertal development provided meaningful data for both boys and girls, producing good trajectories, and estimates of individuals’ pubertal timing and tempo. A logistic model best fit the group data. Pubertal timing was estimated to be earlier in the logistic compared to linear model, but linear, logistic, and traditional estimates of pubertal timing correlated highly with each other and similarly with psychological outcomes. Pubertal tempo was not consistently estimated, and associations of tempo with timing and with behavior were model dependent. Advances in modeling facilitate the study of some questions about pubertal development, but assumptions of the models affect their utility in psychological studies. PMID:25437757

  19. Synthesis of Isoxazoline/Cyclic Nitrone-Featured Methylenes Using Unsaturated Ketoximes: A Dual Role of TEMPO.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Yang, Xiu-Long; Wu, Zhi-Wei; Han, Bing

    2016-04-01

    A novel, metal-free, and regioselective approach for the synthesis of isoxazoline/cyclic nitrone-featured methylenes has been developed by the reaction of readily accessible β,γ- and γ,δ-unsaturated ketoximes with TEMPO via tandem iminoxyl radical-promoted cyclization/TEMPO-mediated Cope-like elimination, respectively. This protocol utilizes commercially available TEMPO as the iminoxyl radical initiator as well as the β-hydrogen acceptor in the Cope-like elimination. PMID:26954339

  20. A Influência da Escola e da Mídia na Obtenção dos Conhecimentos Astronômicos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Cunha, W. S.; Voelzke, M. R.; Amaral, L. H.

    2006-08-01

    O universo em que vivemos possui segredos jamais imaginados pelo homem, fruto da pequena proporção que ocupamos diante de um cosmos infinito. A astronomia funciona como um instrumento que sacia a sede humana em desvendar esses segredos, estudando as galáxias, quasares, pulsares além da existência de todos os elementos que preenchem o espaço cósmico, o vácuo, não mais vazio como se pensou em outros tempos. A mídia explora esse campo de forma mística e também científica. A difusão adequada e dentro dos padrões educacionais vigentes, de conceitos astronômicos, se faz necessária, devido sua presença nos conteúdos escolares, centros de ciência e na mídia, de modo geral. A reforma do Currículo Básico da Escola Pública da maioria dos Estados brasileiros introduziu conceitos astronômicos desde a pré-escola até o Ensino Médio. Num estudo realizado com 1.032 alunos do Ensino Médio de seis escolas estaduais, revelou-se através da aplicação de um questionário que abordava conheciment os básicos em astronomia, como estes foram adquiridos e qual era a infra-estrutura oferecida pela escola: para 66,2% dos entrevistados o professor já fez alguma apresentação a respeito de astronomia. O presente estudo revelou também que 44,5% dos alunos entrevistados adquiriram seus conhecimentos astronômicos na escola, 28,1% através da televisão e 27,4% afirmaram que seus conhecimentos foram obtidos através de outros tipos de mídia (internet, filmes e revistas). Embora o estudo revele claramente que há certo equilíbrio na forma em que os alunos obtiveram seus conhecimentos astronômicos, a mídia ainda explora e muitas vezes desperta o interesse pela astronomia com assuntos que não fazem parte de nosso cotidiano como, por exemplo, o homem na Lua, os projetos espaciais e a primeira viagem de um astronauta brasileiro no espaço. Porém, em certos casos, a mídia pode promover conhecimentos incompletos ou mesmo equivocados sobre os conceitos que envolvam

  1. Practical Aerobic Oxidations of Alcohols and Amines with Homogeneous Cu/TEMPO and Related Catalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ryland, Bradford L.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and amine oxidations are common reactions in laboratory and industrial synthesis of organic molecules. Aerobic oxidation methods have long been sought for these transformations, but few practical methods exist that offer advantages over traditional oxidation methods. Recently developed homogeneous Cu/TEMPO (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-N-oxyl) and related catalyst systems appear to fill this void. The reactions exhibit high levels of chemoselectivity and broad functional-group tolerance, and they often operate efficiently at room temperature with ambient air as the oxidant. These advances, together with their historical context and recent applications, are highlighted in this minireview. PMID:25044821

  2. Copper/TEMPO-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation: Mechanistic Assessment of Different Catalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Jessica M.; Ryland, Bradford L.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2013-01-01

    Combinations of homogeneous Cu salts and TEMPO have emerged as practical and efficient catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of alcohols. Several closely related catalyst systems have been reported, which differ in the identity of the solvent, the presence of 2,2′-bipyridine as a ligand, the identity of basic additives, and the oxidation state of the Cu source. These changes have a significant influence on the reaction rates, yields, and substrate scope. In this report, we probe the mechanistic basis for differences among four different Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems and elucidate the features that contribute to efficient oxidation of aliphatic alcohols. PMID:24558634

  3. Speed on the dance floor: Auditory and visual cues for musical tempo.

    PubMed

    London, Justin; Burger, Birgitta; Thompson, Marc; Toiviainen, Petri

    2016-02-01

    Musical tempo is most strongly associated with the rate of the beat or "tactus," which may be defined as the most prominent rhythmic periodicity present in the music, typically in a range of 1.67-2 Hz. However, other factors such as rhythmic density, mean rhythmic inter-onset interval, metrical (accentual) structure, and rhythmic complexity can affect perceived tempo (Drake, Gros, & Penel, 1999; London, 2011 Drake, Gros, & Penel, 1999; London, 2011). Visual information can also give rise to a perceived beat/tempo (Iversen, et al., 2015), and auditory and visual temporal cues can interact and mutually influence each other (Soto-Faraco & Kingstone, 2004; Spence, 2015). A five-part experiment was performed to assess the integration of auditory and visual information in judgments of musical tempo. Participants rated the speed of six classic R&B songs on a seven point scale while observing an animated figure dancing to them. Participants were presented with original and time-stretched (±5%) versions of each song in audio-only, audio+video (A+V), and video-only conditions. In some videos the animations were of spontaneous movements to the different time-stretched versions of each song, and in other videos the animations were of "vigorous" versus "relaxed" interpretations of the same auditory stimulus. Two main results were observed. First, in all conditions with audio, even though participants were able to correctly rank the original vs. time-stretched versions of each song, a song-specific tempo-anchoring effect was observed, such that sped-up versions of slower songs were judged to be faster than slowed-down versions of faster songs, even when their objective beat rates were the same. Second, when viewing a vigorous dancing figure in the A+V condition, participants gave faster tempo ratings than from the audio alone or when viewing the same audio with a relaxed dancing figure. The implications of this illusory tempo percept for cross-modal sensory integration and

  4. Copper/TEMPO-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation: Mechanistic Assessment of Different Catalyst Systems.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jessica M; Ryland, Bradford L; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-11-01

    Combinations of homogeneous Cu salts and TEMPO have emerged as practical and efficient catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of alcohols. Several closely related catalyst systems have been reported, which differ in the identity of the solvent, the presence of 2,2'-bipyridine as a ligand, the identity of basic additives, and the oxidation state of the Cu source. These changes have a significant influence on the reaction rates, yields, and substrate scope. In this report, we probe the mechanistic basis for differences among four different Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems and elucidate the features that contribute to efficient oxidation of aliphatic alcohols. PMID:24558634

  5. Characterization of an AO-OCT system

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Jones, S; Olivier, S; Werner, J S

    2007-07-26

    Adaptive optics (AO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are powerful imaging modalities that, when combined, can provide high-volumetric-resolution, images of the retina. The AO-OCT system at UC Davis has been under development for 2 years and has demonstrated the utility of this technology for microscopic, volumetric, in vivo retinal imaging [1]. The current system uses an AOptix bimorph deformable mirror (DM) for low-order, high-stroke correction [2] and a 140-actuator Boston Micromachines DM for high-order correction [3]. We are beginning to investigate the potential for increasing the image contrast in this system using higher-order wavefront correction. The first step in this analysis is to quantify the residual wavefront error (WFE) in the current system. Developing an error budget is a common tool for improved performance and system design in astronomical AO systems [4, 5]. The process for vision science systems is also discussed in several texts e.g. [6], but results from this type of analysis have rarely been included in journal articles on AO for vision science. Careful characterization of the AO system will lead to improved performance and inform the design of a future high-contrast system. In general, an AO system error budget must include an analysis of three categories of residual WFE: errors in measuring the phase, errors caused by limitations of the DM(s), and errors introduced by temporal variation. Understanding the mechanisms and relative size of these errors is critical to improving system performance. In this paper we discuss the techniques for characterizing these error sources in the AO-OCT system. It is useful to first calculate an error budget for the simpler case using a model eye, and then add the additional errors introduced for the case of a human subject. Measurement error includes calibration error, wavefront sensor (WFS) CCD noise, and sampling errors. Calibration errors must be measured by an external system. Typically this

  6. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinache, Frantz; Guyon, O.; Lozi, J.; Tamura, M.; Hodapp, K.; Suzuki, R.; Hayano, Y.; McElwain, M. W.

    2009-01-01

    While the existence of large numbers of extrasolar planets around solar type stars has been unambiguously demonstrated by radial velocity, transit and microlensing surveys, attempts at direct imaging with AO-equipped large telescopes remain unsuccessful. Because they supposedly offer more favorable contrast ratios, young systems consitute prime targets for imaging. Such observations will provide key insights on the formation and early evolution of planets and disks. Current surveys are limited by modest AO performance which limits inner working angle to 0.2", and only reach maximum sensitivity outside 1". This translates into orbital distances greater than 10 AU even on most nearby systems, while only 5 % of the known exoplanets have a semimajor axis greater than 10 AU. This calls for a major change of approach in the techniques used for direct imaging of the direct vicinity of stars. A sensible way to do the job is to combine coronagraphy and Extreme AO. Only accurate and fast control of the wavefront will permit the detection of high contrast planetary companions within 10 AU. The SCExAO system, currently under assembly, is an upgrade of the HiCIAO coronagraphic differential imaging camera, mounted behind the 188-actuator curvature AO system on Subaru Telescope. This platform includes a 1000-actuator MEMS deformable mirror for high accuracy wavefront correction and a PIAA coronagraph which delivers high contrast at 0.05" from the star (5 AU at 100 pc). Key technologies have been validated in the laboratory: high performance wavefront sensing schemes, spider vanes and central obstruction removal, and lossless beam apodization. The project is designed to be highly flexible to continuously integrate new technologies with high scientific payoff. Planned upgrades include an integral field unit for spectral characterization of planets/disks and a non-redundant aperture mask to push the performance of the system toward separations less than lambda/D.

  7. Timing and tempo: Exploring the complex association between pubertal development and depression in African American and European American girls.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Kate; Culbert, Kristen M; Grimm, Kevin J; Hipwell, Alison E; Stepp, Stephanie D

    2014-11-01

    The relative contribution of pubertal timing and tempo to the development of depression has not been tested in a large, representative sample, nor has the interface among pubertal maturation, depression, and race been tested. Participants were a community-based sample of 2,450 girls from the Pittsburgh Girls Study who were interviewed annually from ages 9 to 17 years. Pubertal timing and tempo were characterized as a unitary construct and also separately for pubic hair and breast development using child and maternal report. Depression symptoms were assessed annually. African American girls had higher depression symptoms and progressed through puberty earlier, but at a slower tempo than European American girls. Girls with earlier timing had higher levels of depression symptoms at age 10 years. Slower tempo was associated with higher depression symptoms at age 10, and faster tempo was associated with increases in depression from ages 10 to 13. As well, race moderated the associations among timing, tempo, and depression symptoms, and the association between race and depression was partially mediated by pubertal timing and tempo. Pubertal timing and tempo and race contribute to the developmental course of depression from early to late adolescence. The pattern of association varies as a function of the developmental window within which depression is assessed. Thus, repeated measures of depression symptoms and puberty across the span of pubertal development are necessary for exploring the relative importance of dimensions of pubertal development to depression etiology. PMID:25314262

  8. Metal-ligand synergistic effects in the complex Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)2: synthesis, structures, and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Isrow, Derek; DeYonker, Nathan J; Koppaka, Anjaneyulu; Pellechia, Perry J; Webster, Charles Edwin; Captain, Burjor

    2013-12-16

    In the current investigation, reactions of the "bow-tie" Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)2 complex with an assortment of donor ligands have been characterized experimentally and computationally. While the Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)2 complex has trans-disposed TEMPO ligands, proton transfer from the C-H bond of alkyne substrates (phenylacetylene, acetylene, trimethylsilyl acetylene, and 1,4-diethynylbenzene) produce cis-disposed ligands of the form Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)(κ(1)-TEMPOH)(κ(1)-R). In the case of 1,4-diethynylbenzene, a two-stage reaction occurs. The initial product Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)(κ(1)-TEMPOH)[κ(1)-CC(C6H4)CCH] is formed first but can react further with another equivalent of Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)2 to form the bridged complex Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)(κ(1)-TEMPOH)[κ(1)-κ(1)-CC(C6H4)CC]Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)(κ(1)-TEMPOH). The corresponding reaction with acetylene, which could conceivably also yield a bridging complex, does not occur. Via density functional theory (DFT), addition mechanisms are proposed in order to rationalize thermodynamic and kinetic selectivity. Computations have also been used to probe the relative thermodynamic stabilities of the cis and trans addition products and are in accord with experimental results. Based upon the computational results and the geometry of the experimentally observed product, a trans-cis isomerization must occur. PMID:24262003

  9. Timing and tempo: Exploring the complex association between pubertal development and depression in African American and European American girls

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Kate; Culbert, Kristen; Grimm, Kevin J.; Hipwell, Alison; Stepp, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The relative contribution of pubertal timing and tempo to the development of depression has not been tested in a large, representative sample, nor has the interface among pubertal maturation, depression, and race. Participants were a community-based sample of 2,450 girls from the Pittsburgh Girls Study (PGS) who were interviewed annually from ages 9 to 17 years. Pubertal timing and tempo were characterized as a unitary construct and also separately for pubic hair and breast development using child and maternal report. Depression symptoms were assessed annually. African-American females had higher depression symptoms and progressed through puberty earlier, but at a slower tempo than European American girls. Girls with earlier timing had higher levels of depression symptoms at age 10 years. Slower tempo was associated with higher depression symptoms at age 10, and faster tempo was associated with increases in depression from ages 10 to 13. As well, race moderated the associations among timing, tempo, and depression symptoms, and the association between race and depression was partially mediated by pubertal timing and tempo. Pubertal timing and tempo and race contribute to the developmental course of depression from early to late adolescence. The pattern of association varies as a function of the developmental window within which depression is assessed. Thus, repeated measures of depression symptoms and puberty across the span of pubertal development are necessary for exploring the relative importance of dimensions of pubertal development to depression etiology. PMID:25314262

  10. Structured and Unstructured Musical Contexts and Children's Ability to Demonstrate Tempo and Dynamic Contrasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Patricia J.; Wapnick, Joel; Ramsey, LaShell

    1997-01-01

    Tested 5- through 9-year-old children in structured and unstructured contexts to determine their ability to demonstrate contrasts in tempo and dynamics using a synthesizer keyboard. Shows that they were able to demonstrate contrasts in loudness and duration. Reports further results based on varied environmental situations. (DSK)

  11. Effects of Excerpt Tempo and Duration on Musicians' Ratings of High-Level Piano Performances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wapnick, Joel; Ryan, Charlene; Campbell, Louise; Deek, Patricia; Lemire, Renata; Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how judgments of solo performances recorded at an international piano competition might be affected by excerpt duration (20 versus 60 seconds) and tempo (slow versus fast). Musicians rated performances on six test items. Results indicated that piano majors rated slow excerpts higher than they rated fast…

  12. Sluggish Cognitive Tempo among Young Adolescents with ADHD: Relations to Mental Health, Academic, and Social Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Stephen P.; Langberg, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the role of sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) in relation to externalizing and internalizing mental health problems, academic functioning, and social functioning among young adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: In all, 57 youth ages 10 to 14 participated in the study. Parents…

  13. Revealing spatio-spectral electroencephalographic dynamics of musical mode and tempo perception by independent component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Music conveys emotion by manipulating musical structures, particularly musical mode- and tempo-impact. The neural correlates of musical mode and tempo perception revealed by electroencephalography (EEG) have not been adequately addressed in the literature. Method This study used independent component analysis (ICA) to systematically assess spatio-spectral EEG dynamics associated with the changes of musical mode and tempo. Results Empirical results showed that music with major mode augmented delta-band activity over the right sensorimotor cortex, suppressed theta activity over the superior parietal cortex, and moderately suppressed beta activity over the medial frontal cortex, compared to minor-mode music, whereas fast-tempo music engaged significant alpha suppression over the right sensorimotor cortex. Conclusion The resultant EEG brain sources were comparable with previous studies obtained by other neuroimaging modalities, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). In conjunction with advanced dry and mobile EEG technology, the EEG results might facilitate the translation from laboratory-oriented research to real-life applications for music therapy, training and entertainment in naturalistic environments. PMID:24581119

  14. Why Should Speech Rate (Tempo) Be Integrated into Pronunciation Teaching Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurtbasi, Meti

    2015-01-01

    The pace of speech i.e. tempo can be varied to our mood of the moment. Fast speech can convey urgency, whereas slower speech can be used for emphasis. In public speaking, orators produce powerful effects by varying the loudness and pace of their speech. The juxtaposition of very loud and very quiet utterances is a device often used by those trying…

  15. Do Symptoms of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo in Children with ADHD Symptoms Represent Comorbid Internalizing Difficulties?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Annie A.; Mrug, Sylvie; Hodgens, Bart; Patterson, Cryshelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Symptoms of sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) are correlated with inattention and internalizing difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether symptoms of SCT reflect comorbid internalizing disorder with ADHD or a separate syndrome. Method: Using a clinical sample of youth evaluated for behavioral and learning…

  16. Factor Structure of a Sluggish Cognitive Tempo Scale in Clinically-Referred Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Lisa A.; Murphy-Bowman, Sarah C.; Pritchard, Alison E.; Tart-Zelvin, Ariana; Zabel, T. Andrew; Mahone, E. Mark

    2012-01-01

    "Sluggish cognitive tempo" (SCT) is a construct hypothesized to describe a constellation of behaviors that includes daydreaming, lethargy, drowsiness, difficulty sustaining attention, and underactivity. Although the construct has been inconsistently defined, measures of SCT have shown associations with symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity…

  17. Dimensions and Correlates of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Sluggish Cognitive Tempo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Annie A.; Marceaux, Janice; Mrug, Sylvie; Patterson, Cryshelle; Hodgens, Bart

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) in relation to ADHD symptoms, clinical diagnosis, and multiple aspects of adjustment in a clinical sample. Parent and teacher reports were gathered for 322 children and adolescents evaluated for behavioral, emotional, and/or learning problems at a university clinic. Confirmatory factor…

  18. The Relationship between Sluggish Cognitive Tempo, Subtypes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, and Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirbekk, Benedicte; Hansen, Berit Hjelde; Oerbeck, Beate; Kristensen, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT), subtypes of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and anxiety disorders (AnxDs). One hundred and forty-one children (90 males, 51 females) aged 7-13 years were assigned to four groups, i.e., referred children with comorbid AnxDs…

  19. Evaluating the Utility of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo in Discriminating among "DSM-IV" ADHD Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Kelly M.; Waldman, Irwin D.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate how the inclusion of 3 Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) symptoms in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) diagnostic criteria influences the external validity of the ADHD subtypes. The sample comprised 228 children (166 boys, 62 girls) ranging in age from 5-18 years who were referred to…

  20. Developing a Measure of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo for Children: Content Validity, Factor Structure, and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penny, Ann Marie; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Klein, Raymond M.; Corkum, Penny; Eskes, Gail

    2009-01-01

    Sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) is a construct that some researchers believe may be extremely useful in understanding the inattentive subtype of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and may even help define a completely new disorder. However, the construct of SCT is as yet inadequately operationally or theoretically defined. The authors took…

  1. Validity of the Sluggish Cognitive Tempo, Inattention, and Hyperactivity Symptom Dimensions: Neuropsychological and Psychosocial Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauermeister, Jose J.; Barkley, Russell A.; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Martinez, Jose V.; McBurnett, Keith

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the latent structure and validity of inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptomatology. We evaluated mother and teacher ratings of ADHD and SCT symptoms in 140 Puerto Rican children (55.7% males), ages 6 to 11 years, via factor and regression analyses. A three-factor model (inattention,…

  2. Distinguishing Sluggish Cognitive Tempo from ADHD in Children and Adolescents: Executive Functioning, Impairment, and Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.

    2013-01-01

    Controversy continues as to whether sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) is a subtype of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or a distinct disorder. This study examined differences between these disorders in demographics, executive functioning (EF), impairment, and prior professional diagnoses to address the issue. There were 1,800 children…

  3. Effects of Movement, Tempo, and Gender on Steady Beat Performance of Kindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Paige

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to discover the effects of manual (hand) and pedal (foot) movements, tempo, and gender on steady beat accuracy. Participants (N = 119) consisted of male (n = 63) and female (n = 56) kindergarten students randomly divided into two groups, counterbalanced with regard to school, homeroom, and gender. Participants…

  4. Revisiting the Relationship between Exercise Heart Rate and Music Tempo Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karageorghis, Costas I.; Jones, Leighton; Priest, David-Lee; Akers, Rose I.; Clarke, Adam; Perry, Jennifer M.; Reddick, Benjamin T.; Bishop, Daniel T.; Lim, Harry B. T.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated a hypothesized quartic relationship (meaning three inflection points) between exercise heart rate (HR) and preferred music tempo. Initial theoretical predictions suggested a positive linear relationship (Iwanaga, 1995a, 1995b); however, recent experimental work has shown that as exercise HR increases, step…

  5. Modeling Pubertal Timing and Tempo and Examining Links to Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beltz, Adriene M.; Corley, Robin P.; Bricker, Josh B.; Wadsworth, Sally J.; Berenbaum, Sheri A.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the role of puberty in adolescent psychological development requires attention to the meaning and measurement of pubertal development. Particular questions concern the utility of self-report, the need for complex models to describe pubertal development, the psychological significance of pubertal timing vs. tempo, and sex differences in…

  6. Effects of Style, Tempo, and Performing Medium on Children's Music Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Albert

    1981-01-01

    Fifth-graders listened to a tape incorporating fast and slow vocal and instrumental excerpts within the generic styles of rock/pop, country, older jazz, newer jazz, art music, and band music. A preference hierarchy emerged favoring the popular styles. Across pooled styles, faster tempos and instrumentals were slightly preferred. (Author/SJL)

  7. The speed of our mental soundtracks: Tracking the tempo of involuntary musical imagery in everyday life.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Farrugia, Nicolas; Halpern, Andrea R; Sankarpandi, Sathish K; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    The study of spontaneous and everyday cognitions is an area of rapidly growing interest. One of the most ubiquitous forms of spontaneous cognition is involuntary musical imagery (INMI), the involuntarily retrieved and repetitive mental replay of music. The present study introduced a novel method for capturing temporal features of INMI within a naturalistic setting. This method allowed for the investigation of two questions of interest to INMI researchers in a more objective way than previously possible, concerning (1) the precision of memory representations within INMI and (2) the interactions between INMI and concurrent affective state. Over the course of 4 days, INMI tempo was measured by asking participants to tap to the beat of their INMI with a wrist-worn accelerometer. Participants documented additional details regarding their INMI in a diary. Overall, the tempo of music within INMI was recalled from long-term memory in a highly veridical form, although with a regression to the mean for recalled tempo that parallels previous findings on voluntary musical imagery. A significant positive relationship was found between INMI tempo and subjective arousal, suggesting that INMI interacts with concurrent mood in a similar manner to perceived music. The results suggest several parallels between INMI and voluntary imagery, music perceptual processes, and other types of involuntary memories. PMID:26122757

  8. Long-Term Memory for Music: Infants Remember Tempo and Timbre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trainor, Laurel J.; Wu, Luann; Tsang, Christine D.

    2004-01-01

    We show that infants' long-term memory representations for melodies are not just reduced to the structural features of relative pitches and durations, but contain surface or performance tempo- and timbre-specific information. Using a head turn preference procedure, we found that after a one week exposure to an old English folk song, infants…

  9. Effects of Articulation Styles on Perception of Modulated Tempos in Violin Excerpts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geringer, John M.; Madsen, Clifford K.; Macleod, Rebecca B.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated effects of legato, staccato and pizzicato articulation styles on the perception of modulated tempos. Seventy-two music majors served as participants. Two solo violin excerpts were chosen with contrasting rhythmic rates and were recorded in all three articulation styles. Examples were presented to listeners in three conditions of…

  10. Novel UNC-44 AO13 ankyrin is required for axonal guidance in C. elegans, contains six highly repetitive STEP blocks separated by seven potential transmembrane domains, and is localized to neuronal processes and the periphery of neural cell bodies.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Anthony J; Boontrakulpoontawee, Pratumtip; Rebeiz, Natalie; Domanus, Marc; Otsuka, Dawn; Velamparampil, Nena; Chan, Sabrina; Vande Wyngaerde, Marshall; Campagna, Sarah; Cox, Andrea

    2002-03-01

    Conventional ankyrins are cortical cytoskeletal proteins that form an ankyrin-spectrin meshwork underlying the plasma membrane. We report here the unusual structure of a novel ankyrin (AO13 ankyrin, 775,369 Da, 6994 aa, pI = 4.45) that is required for proper axonal guidance in Caenorhabditis elegans. AO13 ankyrin contains the ANK repeat and spectrin-binding domains found in other ankyrins, but differs from all others in that the acidic carboxyl region contains six blocks of serine/threonine/glutamic acid/proline rich (STEP) repeats separated by seven hydrophobic domains. The STEP repeat blocks are composed primarily of sequences related to ETTTTTTVTREHFEPED(E/D)X(n)VVESEEYSASGSPVPSE (E/K)DVE(H/R)VI, and the hydrophobic domains contain sequences related to PESGEESDGEGFGSKVLGFAKK[AGMVAGGVVAAPVALAAVGA]KAAYDALKKDDDEE, which includes a potential transmembrane domain (in brackets). Recombinant protein fragments of AO13 ankyrin were used to prepare polyclonal antisera against the spectrin-binding domain (AO271 Ab), the conventional ankyrin regulatory domain (AO280 Ab), the AO13 ankyrin STEP domain (AO346 Ab), the AO13 ankyrin STEP + hydrophobic domain (AO289 Ab), and against two carboxyl terminal domain fragments (AO263 Ab and AO327 Ab). Western blot analysis with these Ab probes demonstrated multiple protein isoforms. By immunofluorescence microscopy, the antispectrin-binding and regulatory domain (AO271 and AO280) antibodies recognized many cell types, including neurons, and stained the junctions between cells. The AO13 ankyrin-specific (AO289 and AO346) antibodies showed a neurally restricted pattern, staining nerve processes and the periphery of neural cell bodies. These results are consistent with a role for AO13 ankyrin in neural development. PMID:11891667

  11. Experimental comparison of Wide Field AO control schemes using the Homer AO bench.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisot, Amélie; Petit, Cyril; Fusco, Thierry

    2011-09-01

    Wide Field Adaptive Optics (WFAO) concepts, such as Laser Tomography AO (LTAO) or Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO) have been developed in order to overcome the anisoplanatism limit of classical AO. Most of the future AO-assisted instruments of ELTs rely on such concepts which have raised critical challenges such as tomographic estimation and from laser and natural guide star combined with efficient DM(s) control. In that context, the experimental validation of the various clever control solutions proposed by several teams in the past years is now essential to reach a level of maturity compatible with their implementation in future WFAO developments for ELT. The ONERA wide field AO facility (HOMER bench) has been developed for these very issues. Gathering a 3D turbulence generator, laser and natural guide stars, two deformable mirrors with variable altitude positions and a PC-based flexible and user-friendly RTC , HOMER allows the implementation and comparison of control schemes from the simplest least-square to the optimal Linear Quadratic Gaussian solutions including Virtual DM and Pseudo-closed loop approaches. After a description of the bench internal calibrations and ultimate performance, all the control schemes are compared experimentally. Their evolutions as a function of wavefront sensors SNR as well as their robustness to calibration / model errors are particularly emphasised. Finally, we derive from the previous works some specific calibrations and identifications procedures ensuring both robustness and efficiency of WFAO systems and we extrapolate their applications to the future ELT AO systems.

  12. A estabilidade dos PAHS em função da energia da radiação interestelar nas faixas UV e raios-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, R.; Costa, R. K.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.; Lago, A.; Souza, G. B.

    2003-08-01

    A nebulosa CRL 618, uma proto-nebulosa planetária cuja nuvem molecular espessa envolve uma estrela B0, contém uma grande quantidade de C2H2 e CH4. Estas moléculas são consideradas os tijolos da criação de grandes moléculas carbonadas como os Hidrocarbonetos Policíclicos Aromáticos (PAHs). Esta nebulosa, por estar exposta a intensos campos de UV e Raios-X, é uma região de fotodissociação molecular que propicia a formação de novas moléculas, confirmada pela presença de C4H2 e C6H6 (Benzeno), que é a unidade básica dos PAHs. Atribui-se a esta família de moléculas orgânicas duas propriedades fundamentais, a resistência para sobreviver ao campo de radiação UV interestelar e a geração das bandas de emissão não identificadas (UIR) observadas no infravermelho. No entanto, alguns autores questionam a resistência dos PAHs ao campo de radiação UV interestelar. Empregando a técnica de Espectrometria de Massas por Tempo de Vôo, no modo de coincidência fotoelétron-fotoíon, estudamos a ionização e fragmentação das seguintes moléculas: Benzeno, Benzeno deuterado, Naftaleno, Antraceno e Fenantreno. Utilizamos uma fonte de Hélio monocromática em 21,21 eV (584,5 Å) e a radiação Síncroton do Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncroton (LNLS) em diferentes energias nas proximidades da borda do C 1s ( 290 eV). Comprovamos a estabilidade dos PAHs sob ação de UV (21,21 eV), onde eles apresentam um baixo nível de fotodissociação, produzindo fragmentos ionizados com rendimento total na ordem de 5 por cento em relação ao íon molecular pai. Entretanto, em altas energias, na faixa de Raios-X, a quebra destas moléculas torna-se mais intensa, com a produção de muitos fragmentos. Como uma das rotas de fragmentação do Naftaleno é [(C10H8) = > (C6H6+) + (C4H2) + (e-)], e como temos as evidências observacionais da existência do C4H2 e C6H6 na nebulosa CRL 618, sugerimos que este ambiente também possui o Naftaleno.

  13. MEMS DM development at Iris AO, Inc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmbrecht, Michael A.; He, Min; Kempf, Carl J.; Besse, Marc

    2011-03-01

    Iris AO is actively developing piston-tip-tilt (PTT) segmented MEMS deformable mirrors (DM) and adaptive optics (AO) controllers for these DMs. This paper discusses ongoing research at Iris AO that has advanced the state-of-the-art of these devices and systems over the past year. Improvements made to open-loop operation and mirror fabrication enables mirrors to open-loop flatten to 4 nm rms. Additional testing of an anti snap-in technology was conducted and demonstrates that the technology can withstand 100 million snap-in events without failure. Deformable mirrors with dielectric coatings are shown that are capable of handling 630 W/cm2 of incident laser power. Over a localized region on the segment, the dielectric coatings can withstand 100kW/cm2 incident laser power for 30 minutes. Results from the first-ever batch of PTT489 DMs that were shipped to pilot customers are reported. Optimizations made to the open-loop PTT controller are shown to have latencies of 157.5 μs and synchronous array update rates of nearly 6.5 kHz. Finally, plans for the design and fabrication of the next-generation PTT939 DM are presented.

  14. Into the Blue: AO Science in the Visible with MagAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird; Males, Jared; Morzinski, Katie; Kopon, Derek; Follette, Kate; Rodigas, Timothy; Hinz, Philip; Wu, Ya-Lin; Puglisi, Alfio; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Uomoto, Alan; Hare, Tison

    2013-12-01

    The Magellan Clay telescope is a 6.5m Gregorian telescope located in Chile at Las Campanas Observatory. We have fabricated an 85 cm diameter aspheric adaptive secondary with our subcontractors and partners, MagAO passed acceptance tests in spring 2012, and the entire System was commissioned from Nov 17 to Dec 7, 2012. This secondary has 585 actuators with < 1 msec response times (0.7 ms typically). We fabricated a high order (585 mode) pyramid wavefront sensor (similar to that of LBT's FLAO). The relatively high actuator count allows moderate Strehls to be obtained in the visible (0.63-1.05 microns). We have built an CCD science camera called "jVisAO". On-sky long exposures (60s) achieve 30% Strehls at 0.62 microns (r') with the VisAO camera in 0.5" seeing with bright R < 8 mag stars. These relatively high optical wavelength Strehls are made possible by our powerful combination of a next generation ASM and a Pyramid WFS with 200-400 controlled modes and 1000 Hz loop frequencies. To minimize non-common path errors and enable visible AO the VisAO science camera is fed by an advanced triplet ADC and is piggy-backed on the WFS optical board itself. Despite the ability to make 25 mas images we still have ~4 mas of resolution loss to residual vibrations. We will discuss what the most difficult aspects are for visible AO on ELTs scaling from our experience with MagAO.

  15. Structural, thermal and photo-physical data of azo-aromatic TEMPO derivatives before and after their grafting to polyolefins.

    PubMed

    Cicogna, Francesca; Domenichelli, Ilaria; Coiai, Serena; Bellina, Fabio; Lessi, Marco; Spiniello, Roberto; Passaglia, Elisa

    2016-03-01

    The data reported in this paper are complementary to the characterization of 4-(phenylazo)-benzoyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (AzO-TEMPO) and of the 4-(2-thienylazo)-benzoyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (ThiO-TEMPO) before and after their grafting to two polyethylene matrices (a copolymer ethylene/α-olefin (co-EO) and a high density polyethylene (HDPE)). Particularly the data reported in this paper confirm the structure (FT-IR analysis), the thermal (TGA and EPR) and the photo-physical (UV-vis) properties of the RO-TEMPO derivatives before and after their grafting. Herein, the FT-IR spectrum and TGA thermogram of ThiO-TEMPO were compared with those of AzO-TEMPO. Moreover, the superimposition of UV-vis spectra collected during the irradiation under 366 or 254 nm emitting lamp of AzO-TEMPO and ThiO-TEMPO in acetonitrile solution are reported. Finally, a complete DSC characterization of the functionalized POs is shown. DOI of original article: 〈http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.polymer.2015.11.018〉 [1]. PMID:26909368

  16. The first VisAO-fed integral field spectrograph: VisAO IFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follette, Katherine B.; Close, Laird M.; Kopon, Derek; Males, Jared R.; Gasho, Victor; Brutlag, Kevin M.; Uomoto, Alan

    2010-07-01

    We present the optomechanical design of the Magellan VisAO Integral Field Spectrograph (VisAO IFS), designed to take advantage of Magellan's AO system and its 85.1cm concave ellipsoidal Adaptive Secondary Mirror (ASM). With 585 actuators and an equal number of actively-controlled modes, this revolutionary second generation ASM will be the first to achieve moderate Strehl ratios into the visible wavelength regime. We have designed the VisAO IFS to be coupled to either Magellan's LDSS-3 spectrograph or to the planned facility M2FS fiber spectrograph and to optimize VisAO science. Designed for narrow field-of-view, high spatial resolution science, this lenslet-coupled fiberfed IFS will offer exciting opportunities for scientific advancement in a variety of fields, including protoplanetary disk morphology and chemistry, resolution and spectral classification of tight astrometric binaries, seasonal changes in the upper atmosphere of Titan, and a better understanding of the black hole M-sigma relation.

  17. Cellulose nanocrystals prepared via formic acid hydrolysis followed by TEMPO-mediated oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Xu, Wenyang; Kronlund, Dennis; Määttänen, Anni; Liu, Jun; Smått, Jan-Henrik; Peltonen, Jouko; Willför, Stefan; Mu, Xindong; Xu, Chunlin

    2015-11-20

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as a renewable and biodegradable nanomaterial have wide application value. In this work, CNCs were extracted from bleached chemical pulp using two stages of isolation (i.e. formic acid (FA) hydrolysis and 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) mediated oxidation) under mild conditions. In the first stage, FA was used to remove hemicellulose, swell cellulose fibers, and release CNCs. The FA could be readily recovered and reused. In the second stage, the CNCs isolated by FA were further modified by TEMPO-mediated oxidation to increase the surface charge of CNCs. It was found that the modified CNCs with more ordered crystal structure and higher surface charge had better redispersibility and higher viscosity in aqueous phase. Therefore, the modified CNCs could be more effective when used as rheology modifier in the fields of water based coating, paint, food etc. PMID:26344319

  18. Location of TEMPO derivatives in micelles: subtle effect of the probe orientation.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Carolina; Bravo-Moraga, Felipe; Gonzalez-Nilo, Danilo; Márquez, Sebastián; Lühr, Susan; Mena, Geraldine; Rezende, Marcos Caroli

    2016-02-01

    Partition coefficients for six 4-substituted derivatives of the 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPO) derivatives in aqueous solutions of reduced Triton X-100 (RTX-100) were determined by measurements of the probe EPR g-factor and of the fluorescence quenching of pyrene by the radical in the micelle. The partition constant attained a maximum value and then decreased with increasing probe hydrophobicity. Simulation of the probes inside the micelle showed that this trend could be rationalized by a change in the orientation of the 4-substituted TEMPO derivatives with the increasing substituent chain-length. The use of the EPR g-factor for the determination of partition constants of radicals in micellar systems was thus validated as a reliable and sensitive method, capable of describing the probe orientation in its microenvironment. PMID:26304365

  19. The effects of tempo and familiarity on children's affective interpretation of music.

    PubMed

    Mote, Jasmine

    2011-06-01

    When and how does one learn to associate emotion with music? This study attempted to address this issue by examining whether preschool children use tempo as a cue in determining whether a song is happy or sad. Instrumental versions of children's songs were played at different tempos to adults and children ages 3 to 5 years. Familiar and unfamiliar songs were used to examine whether familiarity affected children's identification of emotion in music. The results indicated that adults, 4 year olds and 5 year olds rated fast songs as significantly happier than slow songs. However, 3 year olds failed to rate fast songs differently than slow songs at above-chance levels. Familiarity did not significantly affect children's identification of happiness and sadness in music. PMID:21668112

  20. A novel approach for grafting of β-cyclodextrin onto wool via laccase/TEMPO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qiang; Yuan, Jiugang; Fan, Xuerong; Wang, Ping

    2016-11-20

    This study demonstrated a new enzymatic methodology to graft β-cyclodextrin onto wool. The primary hydroxyl groups in β-cyclodextrin were oxidized to aldehyde groups using laccase/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO), which reacted with the amino groups of wool to form Schiff bases. The effects of treatment conditions (treatment temperature, laccase dosage, TEMPO dosage, treatment time) on the aldehyde and carboxyl contents in β-cyclodextrin were studied. FTIR spectrum of oxidized β-cyclodextrin showed the presence of aldehyde and carboxyl groups. Results of MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy confirmed the coupling of β-cyclodextrin to tyrosine, which was used as a model compound for wool. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy of the grafted wool confirmed the presence of β-cyclodextrin in grafted wool and the formation of a Schiff base between β-cyclodextrin and wool. PMID:27561518

  1. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) - Status and Potential Science Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly

    2016-05-01

    TEMPO is the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument, to launch between 2019 and 2021. It measures atmospheric pollution from Mexico City and Cuba to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly at high spatial resolution, ~ 10 km2. It measures the key elements of air pollution chemistry. Geostationary (GEO) measurements capture the variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry at sub-urban scale to improve emission inventories, monitor population exposure, and enable emission-control strategies. TEMPO measures the UV/visible spectra to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2 CO, C2 H2 O2, H2 O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. It tracks aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products. TEMPO is the North American component of the global geostationary constellation for pollution monitoring, with the European Sentinel-4 and the Korean GEMS. TEMPO studies may include: Solar-induced fluorescence from chlorophyll over land and in the ocean to study tropical dynamics, primary productivity, carbon uptake, to detect red tides, and to study phytoplankton; Measurements of stratospheric intrusions that cause air quality exceedances; Measurements at peaks in vehicle travel to capture the variability in emissions from mobile sources; Measurements of thunderstorm activity, including outflow regions to better quantify lightning NOx and O3 production; Cropland measurements follow the temporal evolution of emissions after fertilizer application and from rain-induced emissions from semi-arid soils; Measurements investigate the chemical processing of primary fire emissions and the secondary formation of VOCs and ozone; Measurements examine ocean halogen emissions and their impact on the oxidizing capacity of coastal environments; Spectra of nighttime lights are markers for human activity, energy conservation, and compliance with outdoor lighting standards intended to reduce light pollution.

  2. Description and operating instructions: TEMPO high-voltage microwave driver, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.

    1988-06-01

    This manual describes the TEMPO high-voltage (HV) microwave driver and provides operating procedures and general maintenance requirements. It is intended as a guide for experienced personnel familiar with operating HV pulsed power equipment and not as a detailed instruction for inexperienced operators. For safety reasons, inexperienced personnel should never attempt to charge and fire HV pulsed power equipment. Serious personnel injury and damage to the machine can result from improper operation. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  3. One-sided surface modification of cellulose fabric by printing a modified TEMPO-mediated oxidant.

    PubMed

    Fitz-Binder, Christa; Bechtold, Thomas

    2014-06-15

    One-sided surface oxidation of lyocell type cellulose fabric can be achieved by use of a modified TEMPO-mediated oxidation system. A borate-based buffer was used to maintain stable pH conditions and screen printing was applied to achieve oxidation on the fabric surface only. To formulate an applicable procedure, the TEMPO/NaBr/NaOCl system was split into two treatment steps: firstly, the fabric was impregnated with a buffered TEMPO/NaBr solution and dried, then a thickened NaOCl paste was printed on the fabric. FTIR-ATR spectra and methylene blue sorption experiments demonstrated successful modification on the printed side of the fabric. Substantial increases in carboxylic group content and water retention value were observed. The higher concentration of carboxylic groups on the fabric surface also led to a localised increase in binding capacity for Ca(2+)-ions. This new concept permits controlled oxidation of cellulose surfaces by printing techniques. PMID:24721061

  4. Analysis of fluorescence quenching of coumarin derivatives by 4-hydroxy-TEMPO in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wiczk, Wiesław; Zaborowski, Bartłomiej; Jacewicz, Dagmara; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2014-05-01

    The fluorescence quenching of different coumarin derivatives (7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin, 7-amino-4-methyl-3-coumarinylacetic acid, 7-ethoxy-4-methylcoumarin, 7-methoxycoumarin, 7-hydroxycoumarin, 7-hydroxy-4-methyl-3-coumarinylacetic acid and 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin) by 4-hydroxy-TEMPO in aqueous solutions at the room temperature was studied with the use of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy as well as a steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. In order to understand the mechanism of quenching the absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of all coumarins along with fluorescence decays were recorded under the action of 4-hydroxy-TEMPO. The Stern-Volmer plots (both from time-averaged and time-resolved measurements) displayed no positive (upward) deviation from a linearity. The fluorescence quenching mechanism was found to be entirely dynamic, what was additionally confirmed by the registration of Stern-Volmer plots at different temperatures. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants and bimolecular quenching rate constants were obtained for all coumarins studied at the room temperature. The findings demonstrate the possibility of developing an analytical method for the quantitative determination of the free radicals' scavenger, 4-hydroxy-TEMPO. PMID:24337873

  5. Tempo and mode in fossil molluscs: Investigating organism-environment interactions, species, and speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Geary, D.H. )

    1992-01-01

    After 20 years of investigation into the tempo and mode of species-level change in the fossil record, it is clear that both punctuated equilibrium and phyletic gradualism occur, as do a variety of intermediate patterns. Important questions regarding the maintenance and diversification of species remain, however. The author documents a variety of evolutionary patterns from gastropods and bivalves, and uses these to discuss two basic issues: environment-organism interactions over time, and the importance of information on geographic variation. The tempo of morphological change is an expression of the interaction of organisms and their environment. The initial over which new species appear may be a geologic instant'' (Melanopsis gastropods), or may last 10[sup 4]--10[sup 5] years (Prunum gastropods), or 10[sup 6] years (Melanopsis). This wide range of intervals indicates a variety of tempos of environmental change, and/or different kinds of organismal responses. Analysis of geographic variation is of critical importance in understanding species and speciation, yet is lacking in many paleontological studies. An example of the utility of geographic information is a study of the muricid gastropod Acanthina, which demonstrates how a geographically localized form may spread through a species range. Another example involves a species of Pleuriocardia in stasis: geographic variation among roughly correlative samples greatly exceeds long-term temporal variation. Considerations of the mechanisms for stasis and change must take into account such intraspecific variation.

  6. Photodissociation of TEMPO-modified peptides: new approaches to radical-directed dissociation of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David L; Hansen, Christopher S; Trevitt, Adam J; Oh, Han Bin; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2014-03-14

    Radical-directed dissociation of gas phase ions is emerging as a powerful and complementary alternative to traditional tandem mass spectrometric techniques for biomolecular structural analysis. Previous studies have identified that coupling of 2-[(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl)methyl]benzoic acid (TEMPO-Bz) to the N-terminus of a peptide introduces a labile oxygen-carbon bond that can be selectively activated upon collisional activation to produce a radical ion. Here we demonstrate that structurally-defined peptide radical ions can also be generated upon UV laser photodissociation of the same TEMPO-Bz derivatives in a linear ion-trap mass spectrometer. When subjected to further mass spectrometric analyses, the radical ions formed by a single laser pulse undergo identical dissociations as those formed by collisional activation of the same precursor ion, and can thus be used to derive molecular structure. Mapping the initial radical formation process as a function of photon energy by photodissociation action spectroscopy reveals that photoproduct formation is selective but occurs only in modest yield across the wavelength range (300-220 nm), with the photoproduct yield maximised between 235 and 225 nm. Based on the analysis of a set of model compounds, structural modifications to the TEMPO-Bz derivative are suggested to optimise radical photoproduct yield. Future development of such probes offers the advantage of increased sensitivity and selectivity for radical-directed dissociation. PMID:24473158

  7. Testing the VLT AO facility with ASSIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuik, Remko; Arsenault, Robin; Boland, Wilfried; Deep, Atul; Delabre, Bernard; Hubin, Norbert; Kolb, Johann; La Penna, Paolo; Molster, Frank; Wiegers, Emiel

    2010-07-01

    The testing and verification of ESO Very Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Facility (VLT-AOF) requires new and innovative techniques to deal with the absence of an intermediate focus on the telescope. ASSIST, The Adaptive Secondary Setup and Instrument STimulator, was developed to provide a testing facility for the ESO AOF and will allow off-telescope testing of three elements of the VLT Adaptive Optics Facility; the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM) and the AO systems for MUSE and HAWK-I (GALACSI and GRAAL). ASSIST will provide a full testing environment which includes an interferometric testing mode for the DSM, an on-axis testing mode with a single wavefront sensor and full operation testing modes for both the AO systems. Both natural as well as laser guide stars will be simulated under various asterisms and a realistic turbulent atmosphere will be provided for varying atmospheric conditions. ASSIST passed its final design review and is now being manufactured, integrated and tested and will be operational in mid 2011, in time for first testing with the DSM.

  8. AO Observations of Three Powerful Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W; van Bruegel, W; Quirrenbach, A

    2002-08-01

    The host galaxies of powerful radio sources are ideal laboratories to study active galactic nuclei (AGN). The galaxies themselves are among the most massive systems in the universe, and are believed to harbor supermassive black holes (SMBH). If large galaxies are formed in a hierarchical way by multiple merger events, radio galaxies at low redshift represent the end-products of this process. However, it is not clear why some of these massive ellipticals have associated radio emission, while others do not. Both are thought to contain SMBHs, with masses proportional to the total luminous mass in the bulge. It either implies every SMBH has recurrent radio-loud phases, and the radio-quiet galaxies happen to be in the ''low'' state, or that the radio galaxy nuclei are physically different from radio-quiet ones, i.e. by having a more massive SMBH for a given bulge mass. Here we present the first results from our adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy pilot program on three nearby powerful radio galaxies. Initiating a larger, more systematic AO survey of radio galaxies (preferentially with Laser Guide Star equipped AO systems) has the potential of furthering our understanding of the physical properties of radio sources, their triggering, and their subsequent evolution.

  9. Resposta do detector de ondas gravitacionais Mario Schenberg ao "ringdown" de buraco negros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, C. A.; Aguiar, O. D.; Magalhães, N. S.

    2003-08-01

    Acredita-se que quando duas estrelas de nêutrons coalescem, elas, eventualmente, formam um buraco negro com massa igual a soma das massas dos objetos originais. Durante a formação do buraco negro, o espaço-tempo em torno do sistema sofre perturbações que se propagam na forma de radiação gravitacional. A forma de onda associada a radiação gravitacional, durante este estágio, aproxima-se a uma senóide exponencialmente amortecida. Este tipo de sinal é conhecido como "ringdown", e seu comportamento e parametrização são muito bem conhecidos. Neste trabalho, simulamos computacionalmente sinais provenientes do "ringdown" de buracos negros, com a finalidade de testar o desempenho do detector de ondas gravitacionais Mario Schenberg em observá-los, quando entrar em funcionamento. Este primeiro teste teórico ajudou-nos a criar estratégias de detecção de sinais imersos no ruído instrumental. Calculamos a relação sinal-ruído como uma função da frequência, bem como sua integral dentro da faixa de sensibilidade do detector. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que o detector Schenberg terá sensibilidade suficiente para detectar este tipo de sinal, proveniente de fontes astrofísicas localizadas dentro de um raio de ~100kpc.

  10. Patient safety and the control of time in primary care: A review of the French tempos framework by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Brami, Jean; Amalberti, René; Wensing, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The tempos framework provides GPs with a flexible and practical guide to reflect on their organization and practices in the analysis of adverse events and supplement existing classification systems. The tempos framework specifies five timescales that need to be managed by physicians: the disease's tempo (unexpected rapid changes, slow reaction to treatment); the office's tempo (day-to-day agenda and interruptions); the patient's tempo (time to express symptoms, compliance, and emotion); the system's tempo (time for appointments, exams, and feedback); and the time to access to knowledge. Objective: This paper reviews the tempos framework and two studies that underpin its conceptual development. Methods: Two databases were used. Results: The use of the framework as a mechanism for analysing insurance claims is described. A comparison of using the tempos framework and standard patient safety classifications for analysing insurance claims is also described and showed that the concordance among coders was better for the tempos framework. The tempos framework fits closely with key principles of general practice and has potentially high relevance for analysing a patient's journey and continuity of care. The tempos framework seems most useful for GPs when analysing adverse events in their practice. Conclusion: Further work needs to be done to assess its generalizability and to formally assess its validity and reliability. PMID:26339836

  11. Tempo, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Michael, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Each of the four issues of the newsletter of the Texas Association for the Gifted focuses on a theme: leadership, evaluation and assessment, curriculum issues, and accountability issues. Issues usually contain theme-related major articles, columns by the Association's president and executive director, a column examining related research, answers…

  12. Tempo, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Michael, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents four issues of the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented's quarterly publication, each of which focused on a particular theme: (1) instructional grouping options; (2) humanities and gifted students; (3) math and science; and (4) a 25th anniversary issue, "Silver Legacy: Shining on the Future for Gifted Youth." Each…

  13. Tempo, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Michael, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Each of the four issues of the newsletter of the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented focus on a theme: guidance and counseling, continuing options for gifted learners, early childhood gifted, and gifted students in the global community. Issues usually contain theme-related major articles, columns by the Association's president and…

  14. Measuring Atmospheric Dynamics on Titan with AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamkovics, Mate; de Pater, I.; Hartung, M.

    2009-05-01

    The cycling of fluid methane between Titan's atmosphere and surface, via seemingly familiar meteorological phenomena, is often compared to Earth's hydrology. Near-IR observations with AO resolve the moon's 1" disk, measure spatial variation in both the surface reflectivity and scattering in the atmosphere, and constrain the methane cycle. Forward models of the atmosphere are compared to observations and used to identify and quantify sources and altitudes of atmospheric opacity; including aerosols, clouds, and precipitation. The ubiquitous submicron aerosol hazes are tracers of global stratospheric dynamics over yearly timescales. Cloud properties may constrain the tropospheric circulation and are observed to change on hourly, daily, and seasonal timescales. Here we present observations of the daily life-cycle of a cloud system, a signature of tropospheric precipitation, seasonal changes in aerosol, and discuss the models that are used to quantify the observed meteorology.

  15. The Magellan Telescope Adaptive Secondary AO System: a visible and mid-IR AO facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird M.; Gasho, Victor; Kopon, Derek; Males, Jared; Follette, Katherine B.; Brutlag, Kevin; Uomoto, Alan; Hare, Tyson

    2010-07-01

    The Magellan Clay telescope is a 6.5m Gregorian telescope located in Chile at Las Campanas Observatory. The Gregorian design allows for an adaptive secondary mirror that can be tested off-sky in a straightforward manner. We have fabricated a 85 cm diameter aspheric adaptive secondary with our subcontractors and partners, the ASM passed acceptance tests in July 2010. This secondary has 585 actuators with <1 msec response times (0.7 ms typically). This adaptive secondary will allow low emissivity AO science. We will achieve very high Strehls (~98%) in the Mid-IR (3-26 microns) with the BLINC/MIRAC4 Mid-IR science camera. This will allow the first "super-resolution" and nulling Mid-IR studies of dusty southern objects. We will employ a high order (585 mode) pyramid wavefront sensor similar to that now successfully used at the Large Binocular Telescope. The relatively high actuator count will allow modest Strehls to be obtained in the visible (0.63-1.05 μm). Moderate (~20%) Strehls have already been obtained at 0.8 μm at the LBT with the same powerful combination of a next generation ASM and Pyramid WFS as we are providing for Magellan. Our visible light AO (VisAO) science camera is fed by an advanced triplet ADC and is piggy-backed on the WFS optical board. We have designed an additional "clean-up" very fast (2 kHz) tilt stabilization system for VisAO. Also a high-speed shutter will be used to block periods of poor correction. The VisAO facility can be reconfigured to feed an optical IFU spectrograph with 20 mas spaxels. The entire system passed CDR in June 2009, and is now finished the fabrication phase and is entering the integration phase. The system science and performance requirements, and an overview the design, interface and schedule for the Magellan AO system are presented here.

  16. LGS-AO Imaging of Every Kepler Planet Candidate: the Robo-AO KOI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas; Morton, Timothy; Ziegler, Carl; Nofi, Larissa; Atkinson, Dani; Riddle, Reed

    2015-12-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging, to search for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. We will present the results from searching for companions around over 3,000 Kepler planet hosts in 2012-2015. We will describe our first data release covering 715 planet candidate hosts, and give a preview of ongoing results including improved statistics on the likelihood of false positive planet detections in the Kepler dataset, many new planets in multiple star systems, and new exotic multiple star systems containing Kepler planets. We will also describe the automated Robo-AO survey data reduction methods, including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for extremely large adaptive optics surveys. Our first data release covered 715 objects, searching for companions from 0.15” to 2.5” separation with contrast up to 6 magnitudes. We measured the overall nearby-star-probability for Kepler planet candidates to be 7.4+/-1.0%, and we will detail the variations in this number with stellar host parameters. We will also discuss plans to extend the survey to other transiting planet missions such as K2 and TESS as Robo-AO is in the process of being re-deployed to the 2.1-m telescope at Kitt Peak for 3 years and a higher-contrast Robo-AO system is being developed for the 2.2-m UH telescope on Maunakea.

  17. Nap environment control considering respiration rate and music tempo by using sensor agent robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaso, Sayaka; Mita, Akira

    2015-03-01

    We propose a system that controls a nap environment considering respiration rates and music tempo by using a sensor agent robot. The proposed system consists of two sub-systems. The first sub-system measures respiration rates using optical flow. We conducted preparatory experiments to verify the accuracy of this sub-system. The experimental results showed that this sub-system can measure the respiration rates accurately despite several positional relationships. It was also shown that the accuracy could be affected by clothes, movements and light. The second sub-system we constructed was the music play sub-system that chooses music with the certain tempo corresponding to the respiration rates measured by the first sub-system. We conducted verification experiments to verify the effectiveness of this music play sub-system. The experimental results showed the effectiveness of varying music tempo based on the respiration rates in taking a nap. We also demonstrated this system in a real environment; a subject entered into the room being followed by ebioNα. When the subject was considered sleeping, ebioNα started measuring respiration rates, controlling music based on the respiration rates. As a result, we showed that this system could be realized. As a next step, we would like to improve this system to a nap environment control system to be used in offices. To realize this, we need to update the first sub-system measuring respiration rates by removing disturbances. We also need to upgrade music play sub-system considering the numbers of tunes, the kinds of music and time to change music.

  18. Specific oxidation pattern of soluble starch with TEMPO-NaBr-NaClO system.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jie; Lu, Jiaojiao; Xu, Naiyu; Linhardt, Robert J; Zhang, Zhenqing

    2016-08-01

    Oxidized starch, one of the most important starch derivatives, has many different properties and applications. Currently, there are two ways to produce oxidized starch, through specific and nonspecific oxidation. Specific oxidation using the stable nitroxyl radical, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl preparidinloxy (TEMPO), with NaBr and NaClO can produce oxidized starches with different properties under good quality control. In the current study, we examine the products of specifically oxidized starch. As the amount of oxidant and the temperature, two critical factors impacting the oxidation of starch were thoroughly investigated. Analysis of the molecular weight (MW), degree of oxidization (DO) and the detailed structures of corresponding products was accomplished using gel permeation chromatography with multi-angle laser light scattering (GPC-MALLS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and quadrapole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q/TOF-MS). According to the analytical results, the oxidation patterns of starch treated with specific oxidant TEMPO-NaBr-NaClO were established. When high amounts of oxidant was applied, more glucose residues within starch were oxidized to glucuronic acids (higher DO) and substantial degradation to starch oligosaccharides was observed. By selecting a reaction temperature of 25°C a high DO could be obtained for a given amount of oxidant. The reducing end sugar residue within oxidized starch was itself oxidized and ring opened in all TEMPO-NaBr-NaClO reactions. Furthermore, extra oxidant generated additional novel structures in the reducing end residues of some products, particularly in low temperature reactions. PMID:27112871

  19. Transparent bionanocomposite films based on chitosan and TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers with enhanced mechanical and barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Soni, Bhawna; Hassan, El Barbary; Schilling, M Wes; Mahmoud, Barakat

    2016-10-20

    The development of biobased active films for use in food packaging is increasing due to low cost, environmental appeal, renewability and availability. The objective of this research was to develop an effective and complete green approach for the production of bionanocomposite films with enhanced mechanical and barrier properties. This was accomplished by incorporating TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical) into a chitosan matrix. An aqueous suspension of chitosan (100-75wt%), sorbitol (25wt%) and TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TEMPO-CNFs, 0-25wt%) were cast in an oven at 40°C for 2-4days. Films were preconditioned at 25°C and 50% RH for characterization. The surface morphology of the films was revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The thermal properties and crystal structure of the films were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA-DTG) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Incorporation of TEMPO-CNFs enhanced the mechanical strength of the films due to the high aspect ratio (3-20nm width, and 10-100nm length) of TEMPO-CNFs and strong interactions with the chitosan matrix. Oxygen and water vapor transmission rates for films that are prepared with chitosan and TEMPO-CNFs (15-25wt%) were significantly reduced. Furthermore, these bionanocomposite films had good thermal stability. Use of TEMPO-CNFs in this method makes it possible to produce bionanocomposite films that are flexible, transparent, and thus have potential in food packaging applications. PMID:27474625

  20. Resection of sphenoidal crest, orbit and infratemporal fossa communicative meningioma through fronto-tempo-preauricular approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Song, Xueming; An, Yihua; Hu, Shaoshan; Shi, Huaizhang; Wu, Huailan; Yang, Guoming; Cao, Xiangyi

    1999-09-01

    We reported our experience using diode laser under microscope to resect a sphenoidal crest, orbit and infratemporal fossa communicative meningioma through fronto-tempo-preauricular approach. We used contacting, un-contacting and inserting methods and the power was in the range of 5 - 30 watt. The tumor was totally removed and the patient received radiotherapy post- operation. Follow up showed that the patient survived for two years after operation. The result showed that combination of laser application during surgery and radiotherapy post-operation was an effective method to delay or prevent tumor recurrence.

  1. Investigation of Method for Changing Impression of Musical Piece by Changing its Tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Makoto; Okamatsu, Keita; Matsuo, Kazuhisa

    We propose a simple method that changes impression of musical piece by changing its tempo and investigate psycho-physiological effects of the method with listening experiment. In the experiment, 8 subjects listened same musical pieces with various tempi, and analysis of heartbeat and Semantic-Differential method were used. In 6 out of 10 adjective pairs, inverted-U shapes were observed, and peak tempi of them were different. Moreover, “relaxed” evaluation might be related to listener's heart rate in rest. These results suggest possibility of constructing novel media player that changes impression of musical piece.

  2. An exploration of heart rate response to differing music rhythm and tempos.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ariany G; Guida, Heraldo L; Antônio, Ana Márcia Dos S; Marcomini, Renata S; Fontes, Anne M G G; Carlos de Abreu, Luiz; Roque, Adriano L; Silva, Sidney B; Raimundo, Rodrigo D; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate acute cardiac response and heart rate variability (HRV) when listening to differing forms of music. Eleven healthy men aged between 18 and 25 years old were included in the study. HRV was recorded at rest for ten minutes with no music, then were asked to listen to classical baroque or heavy metal music for a period of 20 min. It was noted that heart rate variability did not affect HRV indices for time and frequency. In conclusion, music with different tempos does not influence cardiac autonomic regulation in men. However more studies are suggested to explore this topic in greater detail. PMID:24767959

  3. Electromagnetic DM technology meets future AO demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Steinbuch, Maarten; Doelman, Niek

    New deformable mirror technology is developed by the Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Delft University of Technology and TNO Science and Industry. Several prototype adaptive deformable mirrors are realized mirrors, up to 427 actuators and ∅150mm diameter, with characteristics suitable for future AO systems. The prototypes consist of a 100µm thick, continuous facesheet on which low voltage, electromagnetic, push-pull actuators impose out-of-plane displacements. The variable reluctance actuators with ±10µm stroke and nanometer resolution are located in a standard actuator module. Each module with 61 actuators connects to a single PCB with dedicated, 16 bit, PWM based, drivers. A LVDS multi-drop cable connects up to 32 actuator modules. With the actuator module, accompanying PCB and multi-drop system the deformable mirror technology is made modular in its mechanics and electronics. An Ethernet-LVDS bridge enables any commercial PC to control the mirror using the UDP standard. Latest results of the deformable mirror technology development are presented.

  4. Low-order AO system in LAMOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiangyan; Cui, Xiangqun; Liu, Genrong; Zhang, Yong; Qi, Yongjun

    2006-06-01

    The large sky area multi-object fiber spectroscopic telescope (LAMOST) is a special reflecting Schmidt telescope with its main optical axis on the meridian plane tilted by an angle of 25° to the horizontal. The clear aperture is 4m, working in optical band. The light path is 60m long when working in observing mode and it will be doubled if work in auto-collimation mode. So the image quality is affected clearly by the ground seeing and the dome seeing. In order to improve the seeing condition of the long light path, we enclosed the spherical primary and the focus unit in a tunnel enclosure and cooled the tunnel. This is an effective but passive method. Corresponding experiments and simulations show the main part of the aberrations caused by the ground seeing and dome seeing is slowly changed low order items such as tip-tilt, defocus, astigmatism, coma and spherical aberration. Thus we plan to develop the low-order AO system based on the low-cost 37-channel OKO deformable mirror for the telescope to better the ground seeing and the dome seeing, not aimed to reach diffraction limited image. This work is being carried on now.

  5. Individual differences in the biomechanical effect of loudness and tempo on upper-limb movements during repetitive piano keystrokes.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shinichi; Aoki, Tomoko; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    The present study addressed the effect of loudness and tempo on kinematics and muscular activities of the upper extremity during repetitive piano keystrokes. Eighteen pianists with professional music education struck two keys simultaneously and repetitively with a combination of four loudness levels and four tempi. The results demonstrated a significant interaction effect of loudness and tempo on peak angular velocity for the shoulder, elbow, wrist and finger joints, mean muscular activity for the corresponding flexors and extensors, and their co-activation level. The interaction effect indicated greater increases with tempo when eliciting louder tones for all joints and muscles except for the elbow velocity showing a greater decrease with tempo. Multiple-regression analysis and K-means clustering further revealed that 18 pianists were categorized into three clusters with different interaction effects on joint kinematics. These clusters were characterized by either an elbow-velocity decrease and a finger-velocity increase, a finger-velocity decrease with increases in shoulder and wrist velocities, or a large elbow-velocity decrease with a shoulder-velocity increase when increasing both loudness and tempo. Furthermore, the muscular load considerably differed across the clusters. These findings provide information to determine muscles with the greatest potential risk of playing-related disorders based on movement characteristics of individual pianists. PMID:21816497

  6. Unidirectional adaptation in tempo in pairs of chimpanzees during simultaneous tapping movement: an examination under face-to-face setup.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lira; Tomonaga, Masaki

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have reported a spontaneous nature to synchronized movement in humans and in non-human primates. However, it is not yet clear whether individuals mutually adapt their movement to each other or whether one individual significantly changes to synchronize with the other. In the current study, we examined a directionality of the tempo adaptation to understand an introductive process of interactional synchrony in pairs of chimpanzees. Four pairs, consisting of five female chimpanzees, produced a finger-tapping movement under a face-to-face experimental setup where both auditory and visual cues of the partner's movement were available. Two test conditions were prepared: alone and paired. An analysis of the tapping tempo depending on condition showed that only one chimpanzee in each pair significantly changed their tapping tempo in the direction of the partner's tapping tempo in the paired condition compared with the alone condition. The current study demonstrated that unidirectional adaptation in tempo occurs in pairs of chimpanzees when they simultaneously produce the tapping movement under auditory and visual interaction. PMID:26795540

  7. Human brain basis of musical rhythm perception: common and distinct neural substrates for meter, tempo, and pattern.

    PubMed

    Thaut, Michael H; Trimarchi, Pietro Davide; Parsons, Lawrence M

    2014-01-01

    Rhythm as the time structure of music is composed of distinct temporal components such as pattern, meter, and tempo. Each feature requires different computational processes: meter involves representing repeating cycles of strong and weak beats; pattern involves representing intervals at each local time point which vary in length across segments and are linked hierarchically; and tempo requires representing frequency rates of underlying pulse structures. We explored whether distinct rhythmic elements engage different neural mechanisms by recording brain activity of adult musicians and non-musicians with positron emission tomography (PET) as they made covert same-different discriminations of (a) pairs of rhythmic, monotonic tone sequences representing changes in pattern, tempo, and meter, and (b) pairs of isochronous melodies. Common to pattern, meter, and tempo tasks were focal activities in right, or bilateral, areas of frontal, cingulate, parietal, prefrontal, temporal, and cerebellar cortices. Meter processing alone activated areas in right prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex associated with more cognitive and abstract representations. Pattern processing alone recruited right cortical areas involved in different kinds of auditory processing. Tempo processing alone engaged mechanisms subserving somatosensory and premotor information (e.g., posterior insula, postcentral gyrus). Melody produced activity different from the rhythm conditions (e.g., right anterior insula and various cerebellar areas). These exploratory findings suggest the outlines of some distinct neural components underlying the components of rhythmic structure. PMID:24961770

  8. Human Brain Basis of Musical Rhythm Perception: Common and Distinct Neural Substrates for Meter, Tempo, and Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Thaut, Michael H.; Trimarchi, Pietro Davide; Parsons, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    Rhythm as the time structure of music is composed of distinct temporal components such as pattern, meter, and tempo. Each feature requires different computational processes: meter involves representing repeating cycles of strong and weak beats; pattern involves representing intervals at each local time point which vary in length across segments and are linked hierarchically; and tempo requires representing frequency rates of underlying pulse structures. We explored whether distinct rhythmic elements engage different neural mechanisms by recording brain activity of adult musicians and non-musicians with positron emission tomography (PET) as they made covert same-different discriminations of (a) pairs of rhythmic, monotonic tone sequences representing changes in pattern, tempo, and meter, and (b) pairs of isochronous melodies. Common to pattern, meter, and tempo tasks were focal activities in right, or bilateral, areas of frontal, cingulate, parietal, prefrontal, temporal, and cerebellar cortices. Meter processing alone activated areas in right prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex associated with more cognitive and abstract representations. Pattern processing alone recruited right cortical areas involved in different kinds of auditory processing. Tempo processing alone engaged mechanisms subserving somatosensory and premotor information (e.g., posterior insula, postcentral gyrus). Melody produced activity different from the rhythm conditions (e.g., right anterior insula and various cerebellar areas). These exploratory findings suggest the outlines of some distinct neural components underlying the components of rhythmic structure. PMID:24961770

  9. Disparate rates, differing fates: tempo and mode of evolution changed from the Precambrian to the Phanerozoic.

    PubMed Central

    Schopf, J W

    1994-01-01

    Over the past quarter century, detailed genus- and species-level similarities in cellular morphology between described taxa of Precambrian microfossils and extant cyanobacteria have been noted and regarded as biologically and taxonomically significant by numerous workers world-wide. Such similarities are particularly well documented for members of the Oscillatoriaceae and Chroococcaceae, the two most abundant and widespread Precambrian cyanobacterial families. For species of two additional families, the Entophysalidaceae and Pleurocapsaceae, species-level morphologic similarities are supported by in-depth fossil-modern comparisons of environment, taphonomy, development, and behavior. Morphologically and probably physiologically as well, such cyanobacterial "living fossils" have exhibited an extraordinarily slow (hypobradytelic) rate of evolutionary change, evidently a result of the broad ecologic tolerance characteristic of many members of the group and a striking example of G. G. Simpson's [Simpson, G.G. (1944) Tempo and Mode in Evolution (Columbia Univ. Press, New York)] "rule of the survival of the relatively unspecialized." In both tempo and mode of evolution, much of the Precambrian history of life--that dominated by microscopic cyanobacteria and related prokaryotes--appears to have differed markedly from the more recent Phanerozoic evolution megascopic, horotelic, adaptationally specialized eukaryotes. Images PMID:8041691

  10. Intrasensory Redundancy Facilitates Infant Detection of Tempo: Extending Predictions of the Intersensory Redundancy Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bahrick, Lorraine E.; Lickliter, Robert; Castellanos, Irina; Todd, James Torrence

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that intersensory redundancy (stimulation synchronized across multiple senses) is highly salient and facilitates processing of amodal properties in multimodal events, bootstrapping early perceptual development. The present study is the first to extend this central principle of the intersensory redundancy hypothesis (IRH) to certain types of intrasensory redundancy (stimulation synchronized within a single sense). Infants were habituated to videos of a toy hammer tapping silently (unimodal control), depicting intersensory redundancy (synchronized with a soundtrack) or intrasensory redundancy (synchronized with another visual event; light flashing or bat tapping). In Experiment 1, 2-month-olds showed both intersensory and intrasensory facilitation (with respect to the unimodal control) for detecting a change in tempo. However, intrasensory facilitation was found when the hammer was synchronized with the light flashing (different motion) but not with the bat tapping (same motion). Experiment 2 tested 3-month-olds using a somewhat easier tempo contrast. Results supported a similarity hypothesis: intrasensory redundancy between two dissimilar events was more effective than that between two similar events for promoting processing of amodal properties. These findings extend the IRH and indicate that in addition to intersensory redundancy, intrasensory redundancy between two synchronized dissimilar visual events is also effective in promoting perceptual processing of amodal event properties. PMID:26207101

  11. TEMPO-mediated oxidation on galactomannan: Gal/Man ratio and chain flexibility dependence.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Caroline Novak; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Lucyszyn, Neoli; de Freitas, Rilton Alves

    2016-11-20

    Guar (GG) and locust bean (LBG) galactomannans (GMs) oxidation at C-6 was performed with catalyst TEMPO, in which the reaction progress was monitored by consume of NaOH solution. The products were characterized by spectroscopic analysis, infrared, and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance, confirming the presence of aldehydes groups as intermediate of reaction to carboxylic acid. From high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection Man/Gal molar ratio was determined and demonstrated a preference to oxidize Man during the reaction on both GMs, following a first order kinetics of oxidation. The comparative macromolecular behavior of native and oxidized GMs was obtained through the analysis by high performance size exclusion chromatography, and the persistence length (Lp) was 6nm and 4nm to native LBG and GG, respectively. A more accessible OH-6 at mannose residue in LBG could be related with a two times faster reaction than GG. The selective oxidation with catalyst TEMPO proved to be efficient to increase the flexibility of the GMs during oxidation. Short reaction time and β-elimination process were mainly observed to LBG, probably due to a more favorable oxidation access to the polysaccharide main chain. PMID:27561508

  12. EPR spectroscopy applied to the study of the TEMPO mediated oxidation of nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    Buffa, Juan M; Grela, María Alejandra; Aranguren, Mirta I; Mucci, Verónica

    2016-01-20

    Two different methods of pH control were used in the synthesis of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) oxidized cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and the reaction kinetics and degree of oxidation were investigated. In method I the media pH was controlled by addition of NaOH solution. The effect of the oxidant concentration (sodium hypochloride, NaClO) on the final degree of oxidation and crystallinity of the samples was investigated. Conditions for obtaining an optimum balance between high crystallinity and degree of oxidation were selected from those results. In method II, pH was fixed by using a buffer solution. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy offered direct information of the decay of TEMPO concentration under these conditions. The kinetics of the reaction was determined, finding a direct correlation between these results and those corresponding to the decay of the NaClO concentration and the advance of the CNC degree of oxidation. Differences found between the two methods were analyzed. PMID:26572408

  13. Distribution of tempo-dichlorotriazine spin label on immunoglobulin molecule. Interpretation of ESR spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Nezlin, R.

    1986-03-05

    Spin label TEMPO-dichlorotriazine (DT) has been used previously for determination of the rotational relaxation times of immunoglobulin (Ig) molecules and evaluation of their flexibility. Well defined outer wide extrema as well as sharp inner extrema are characteristic for ESR spectra of spin labeled Ig molecules. Such patterns of the spectrum can be accounted for either by the existence of the spin label in two states, one corresponding to its rapid and another to its restricted rotation or by varying environments of the spin label located in different areas of the Ig molecule. To choose between these possibilities, the distribution of /sup 14/C-TEMPO-DT on human IgG1(k) was studied. The same amount of the label per mg of protein was found in H and L chains as well as in the Fab fragment, and a smaller amount in the pFc'. The label was detected in most of the L chain tryptic peptides. Thus, the spin label is distributed nearly uniformly on IgG molecule, which is due to the regular distribution of amino acid residues reacted with the spin label. ESR spectra can be interpreted as a sum of individual spectra.

  14. When music tempo affects the temporal congruence between physical practice and motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Debarnot, Ursula; Guillot, Aymeric

    2014-06-01

    When people listen to music, they hear beat and a metrical structure in the rhythm; these perceived patterns enable coordination with the music. A clear correspondence between the tempo of actual movement (e.g., walking) and that of music has been demonstrated, but whether similar coordination occurs during motor imagery is unknown. Twenty participants walked naturally for 8m, either physically or mentally, while listening to slow and fast music, or not listening to anything at all (control condition). Executed and imagined walking times were recorded to assess the temporal congruence between physical practice (PP) and motor imagery (MI). Results showed a difference when comparing slow and fast time conditions, but each of these durations did not differ from soundless condition times, hence showing that body movement may not necessarily change in order to synchronize with music. However, the main finding revealed that the ability to achieve temporal congruence between PP and MI times was altered when listening to either slow or fast music. These data suggest that when physical movement is modulated with respect to the musical tempo, the MI efficacy of the corresponding movement may be affected by the rhythm of the music. Practical applications in sport are discussed as athletes frequently listen to music before competing while they mentally practice their movements to be performed. PMID:24681309

  15. TEMPO-oxidized Konjac glucomannan as appliance for the preparation of hard capsules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuying; Zhao, Huiying; Liu, Xianwu; Li, Zusen; Liu, Bin; Wu, Jiande; Shi, Mengxuan; Norde, Willem; Li, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    TEMPO-oxidized Konjac glucomannan (OKGM) was developed as new material for preparing vegetarian hard capsules. OKGM of different degrees of oxidation: DO30%, DO50%, and DO80% were prepared to select optimum DO for capsule formation. FT-IR results proved that the primary alcohol groups on KGM were oxidized into carboxyl groups. XRD analysis suggested that TEMPO-oxidation decreased the crystallinity of KGM. DO80% was considered as the optimum candidate for capsule preparation owing to its superior solubility, transparency and reduced viscosity. The hydrophilicity of OKGM films, measured by contact angle measurement, increased with increasing DO. The elongation at break and tensile strength of the OKGM films enhanced with increasing DO. In vitro drug dissolution profile of OKGM capsules showed that the shell rupture time of DO80% capsule is about 5-10min, and 80% of the drugs were released within 30-45min. Thus DO80% OKGM was qualified to be used for gastric soluble hard capsules. PMID:27083368

  16. Immediate Effects of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation with Tempo Changes on Gait in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yuri; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of tempo changes in rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) on gait in stroke patients. [Subjects] Forty-one chronic stroke patients who had had a stroke with more than 6 months previously were recruited for this study. [Methods] All participants were asked to walk under 5 different conditions in random order: (1) no RAS (baseline); (2) baseline-matched RAS (0%); and (3) −10%, (4) +10%, and (5) +20% of the baseline. A GAITRite system was used to evaluate the spatial and temporal parameters of gait. [Results] Compared with under the RAS 0% conditions, the gait velocity, cadence, and stride length on the affected side were significantly decreased under the RAS −10% conditions. Gait velocity and cadence were significantly improved, but gait symmetry was significantly decreased under the RAS +10% and +20% conditions compared with under the RAS 0% conditions. [Conclusion] A faster RAS tempo significantly improved gait velocity and cadence, and applying RAS significantly improved the gait symmetry of stroke patients. PMID:24764615

  17. Disparate rates, differing fates: tempo and mode of evolution changed from the Precambrian to the Phanerozoic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopf, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past quarter century, detailed genus- and species-level similarities in cellular morphology between described taxa of Precambrian microfossils and extant cyanobacteria have been noted and regarded as biologically and taxonomically significant by numerous workers world-wide. Such similarities are particularly well documented for members of the Oscillatoriaceae and Chroococcaceae, the two most abundant and widespread Precambrian cyanobacterial families. For species of two additional families, the Entophysalidaceae and Pleurocapsaceae, species-level morphologic similarities are supported by in-depth fossil-modern comparisons of environment, taphonomy, development, and behavior. Morphologically and probably physiologically as well, such cyanobacterial "living fossils" have exhibited an extraordinarily slow (hypobradytelic) rate of evolutionary change, evidently a result of the broad ecologic tolerance characteristic of many members of the group and a striking example of G. G. Simpson's [Simpson, G.G. (1944) Tempo and Mode in Evolution (Columbia Univ. Press, New York)] "rule of the survival of the relatively unspecialized." In both tempo and mode of evolution, much of the Precambrian history of life--that dominated by microscopic cyanobacteria and related prokaryotes--appears to have differed markedly from the more recent Phanerozoic evolution megascopic, horotelic, adaptationally specialized eukaryotes.

  18. DFT studies on the mechanism of alcohol oxidation by the (bpy)Cu(I)-TEMPO/NMI catalytic system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Li, Jie; Zhang, Qiancheng; Ma, Lisha; Yang, Jucai

    2015-04-28

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to investigate the oxidation of alcohol to acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the (bpy)Cu(I)-TEMPO/NMI catalytic system. Three pathways (path A, path B and path C) are presented. Our calculations indicate that path B is the favourable pathway. In path B, the alcohol coordinating to the Cu(I) center provides a H atom to TEMPO to form TEMPOH. Another TEMPO then replaces TEMPOH to abstract the H atom from the Cα-H of the alcoholate (RCH2O(-)) to generate the aldehyde product. On the basis of the studied pathway, a possible mechanism is presented to explain the experimental observations. PMID:25799480

  19. Análise Temporal da Coma de CO+ no Cometa P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, M. R.; Schlosser, W.; Schmidt-Kaler, Th.

    1995-08-01

    Observações fotográficas e fotoelétricas da coma de gás ionizado do cometa P/Halley a nível de CO+ em 4250 angstroms fizeram parte do programa de Monitoramento do Halley desenvolvido pela Universidade de Bochum (Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum) na Alemanha, realizado de 17 de fevereiro a 17 de abril de 1986 no European Southern Observatory (ESO) em La Silla (Chile). Nesta faixa espectral é possível observar a contínua formação, bem como o movimento e expansão das estruturas de plasma. Para observar a morfologia destas estruturas foram analisadas 32 placas fotográficas de CO+ (placas de vidro) do cometa P/Halley. Tais placas possuem um campo de visão de 28,6 por 28,6 graus sendo obtidas entre 29 de março e 17 de abril de 1986 com tempos de exposição entre 20 e 120 minutos. Todas as placas foram digitadas com o auxílio de um microdensitômetro PDS 2020 GM (Photometric Data System) do Instituto Astronómico da Westfaelischen Wilhelms-Universitaet em Muenster, Alemanha (um pixel = 25 por 25 micrômetros correspondendo aproximadamente a 46,88 por 46,88 segundos de arco). Após a digitação os dados foram reduzidos à intensidades relativas, sendo que os posssíveis de calibração também foram reduzidos à intensidades absolutas, expressas em termos de densidade colunar utilizando-se dos sistemas de tratamento de imagens MIDAS (Munich Image Data Analysis System; ESO - Image Processing Group, 1988) e IHAP (Image Handling And Processing; Middleburg, 1983). Com o auxílio do método de teta mínimo de Stellingwerf (Stellingwerf, 1978) obteve-se um período de 2,22 +/- 0,09 dias a partir da análise de estruturas na coma de plasma através da subtração de imagens subsequentes. Este método foi comparado com o método de Fourier. Provavelmente exista um segundo ciclo com período aproximado de 3,6 dias. A idéia de subtrair imagens subsequentes é devido ao fato de que os efeitos de rotação são apenas 10% dos fenômenos de distribuição gasosa. Portanto as

  20. First closed-loop visible AO test results for the advanced adaptive secondary AO system for the Magellan Telescope: MagAO's performance and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared R.; Kopon, Derek A.; Gasho, Victor; Follette, Katherine B.; Hinz, Phil; Morzinski, Katie; Uomoto, Alan; Hare, Tyson; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone; Puglisi, Alfio; Pinna, Enrico; Busoni, Lorenzo; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando; Argomedo, Javier

    2012-07-01

    The heart of the 6.5 Magellan AO system (MagAO) is a 585 actuator adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) with <1 msec response times (0.7 ms typically). This adaptive secondary will allow low emissivity and high-contrast AO science. We fabricated a high order (561 mode) pyramid wavefront sensor (similar to that now successfully used at the Large Binocular Telescope). The relatively high actuator count (and small projected ~23 cm pitch) allows moderate Strehls to be obtained by MagAO in the “visible” (0.63-1.05 μm). To take advantage of this we have fabricated an AO CCD science camera called "VisAO". Complete “end-to-end” closed-loop lab tests of MagAO achieve a solid, broad-band, 37% Strehl (122 nm rms) at 0.76 μm (i’) with the VisAO camera in 0.8” simulated seeing (13 cm ro at V) with fast 33 mph winds and a 40 m Lo locked on R=8 mag artificial star. These relatively high visible wavelength Strehls are enabled by our powerful combination of a next generation ASM and a Pyramid WFS with 400 controlled modes and 1000 Hz sample speeds (similar to that used successfully on-sky at the LBT). Currently only the VisAO science camera is used for lab testing of MagAO, but this high level of measured performance (122 nm rms) promises even higher Strehls with our IR science cameras. On bright (R=8 mag) stars we should achieve very high Strehls (>70% at H) in the IR with the existing MagAO Clio2 (λ=1-5.3 μm) science camera/coronagraph or even higher (~98% Strehl) the Mid-IR (8-26 microns) with the existing BLINC/MIRAC4 science camera in the future. To eliminate non-common path vibrations, dispersions, and optical errors the VisAO science camera is fed by a common path advanced triplet ADC and is piggy-backed on the Pyramid WFS optical board itself. Also a high-speed shutter can be used to block periods of poor correction. The entire system passed CDR in June 2009, and we finished the closed-loop system level testing phase in December 2011. Final system acceptance (

  1. AO 0235+164 and Surrounding Field: Surprising HST Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbidge, E. M.; Beaver, E. A.; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, V. T.; Lyons, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    Results obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope on the highly variable radio, x-ray, and gamma-ray emitting QSO (or BL Lac object) AO 0235 + 164 are presented and analyzed. WFPC2 images were obtained in 1994 June, when AO 0235 + 164 was bright (m approx. 17), and the results are described in Sec. 3. After subtraction of the PSF of the QSO, hereafter called AO following the nomenclature of Yanny et al. (1989), the companion object named A, 2 sec south of AO, is discovered not to be an elliptical galaxy as hypothesized earlier, but to be an AGN object, with a central UV-bright point-source nucleus and faint surrounding nebulosity extending to AO. The second companion object 1.3 sec east of AO discovered by Yanny et al. (1989) and named object Al, appears more like a normal spiral galaxy. We have measured the positions, luminosities, and colors of some 30 faint objects in the field around AO 0235 + 16; most are extended and may be star-forming galaxies in a loose group or cluster. Our most surprising result of the HST observations comes from FOS spectra obtained in 1995 July, discussed in Sec. 4. Because of a positioning error of the telescope and AO's faintness at that time (m approx. 20), object A was observed instead of the intended target AO. Serendipitously, we discovered A to have broad deep BALQSO-type absorptions of C IV, Si IV, N V shortward of broad emissions. A is thus ejecting high velocity, highly ionized gas into the surrounding IGM. We discuss in Sec. 5 the relationship of the objects in the central 10 sec X 1O sec region around AO, where redshifts z(sub e) = 0.94, z(sub a) = 0.524, 0.851 in AO, (sub e) = 0.524 and Z(sub BAL)=0.511 in A, are found. We hypothesize that some of the 30 faint objects in the 77 sec. x 77 sec. field may be part of a large star-forming region at z approx. 0.5, as suggested for a few objects by Yanny et al. (1989). The proximity of two highly active extragalactic objects, AO 0235+164 and its AGN companion A, is remarkable and

  2. Stable TEMPO and ABNO Catalyst Solutions for User-Friendly (bpy)Cu/Nitroxyl-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Steves, Janelle E; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-11-01

    Two solutions, one consisting of bpy/TEMPO/NMI and the other bpy/ABNO/NMI (bpy =2,2'-bipyridyl; TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxyl, ABNO = 9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane N-oxyl; NMI = N-methylimidazole), in acetonitrile are shown to have good long-term stability (≥1 year) under air at 5 °C. The solutions may be combined in appropriate quantities with commercially available [Cu(MeCN)4]OTf to provide a convenient catalyst system for the aerobic oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols. PMID:26457658

  3. Sequential proteolysis and high-field FTICR MS to determine disulfide connectivity and 4-maleimide TEMPO spin-label location in L126C GM2 activator protein.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Jeremiah D; Carter, Jeffrey D; Mathias, Jordan D; Emmett, Mark R; Fanucci, Gail E; Marshall, Alan G

    2009-09-15

    The GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) is an 18 kDa nonenzymatic accessory protein involved in the degradation of neuronal gangliosides. Genetic mutations of GM2AP can disrupt ganglioside catabolism and lead to deadly lysosomal storage disorders. Crystallography of wild-type GM2AP reveals 4 disulfide bonds and multiple conformations of a flexible loop region that is thought to be involved in lipid binding. To extend the crystallography results, a cysteine construct (L126C) was expressed and modified with 4-maleimide TEMPO for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies. However, because a ninth cysteine has been added by site-directed mutagenesis and the protein was expressed in E. coli in the form of inclusion bodies, the protein could misfold during expression. To verify correct protein folding and labeling, a sequential multiple-protease digestion, nano-liquid chromatograph (LC) electrospray ionization 14.5 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry assay was developed. High-magnetic field and robust automatic gain control results in subppm mass accuracy for location of the spin-labeled cysteine and verification of proper connectivity of the four disulfide bonds. The sequential multiple protease digestion strategy and ultrahigh mass accuracy provided by FTICR MS allow for rapid and unequivocal assignment of relevant peptides and provide a simple pipeline for analyzing other GM2AP constructs. PMID:19689113

  4. Continuous loudness response to acoustic intensity dynamics in melodies: effects of melodic contour, tempo, and tonality.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Kirk N; Stevens, Catherine J; Dean, Roger T; Bailes, Freya

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate perceived loudness change in response to melodies that increase (up-ramp) or decrease (down-ramp) in acoustic intensity, and the interaction with other musical factors such as melodic contour, tempo, and tonality (tonal/atonal). A within-subjects design manipulated direction of linear intensity change (up-ramp, down-ramp), melodic contour (ascending, descending), tempo, and tonality, using single ramp trials and paired ramp trials, where single up-ramps and down-ramps were assembled to create continuous up-ramp/down-ramp or down-ramp/up-ramp pairs. Twenty-nine (Exp 1) and thirty-six (Exp 2) participants rated loudness continuously in response to trials with monophonic 13-note piano melodies lasting either 6.4s or 12s. Linear correlation coefficients >.89 between loudness and time show that time-series loudness responses to dynamic up-ramp and down-ramp melodies are essentially linear across all melodies. Therefore, 'indirect' loudness change derived from the difference in loudness at the beginning and end points of the continuous response was calculated. Down-ramps were perceived to change significantly more in loudness than up-ramps in both tonalities and at a relatively slow tempo. Loudness change was also greater for down-ramps presented with a congruent descending melodic contour, relative to an incongruent pairing (down-ramp and ascending melodic contour). No differential effect of intensity ramp/melodic contour congruency was observed for up-ramps. In paired ramp trials assessing the possible impact of ramp context, loudness change in response to up-ramps was significantly greater when preceded by down-ramps, than when not preceded by another ramp. Ramp context did not affect down-ramp perception. The contribution to the fields of music perception and psychoacoustics are discussed in the context of real-time perception of music, principles of music composition, and performance of musical dynamics. PMID:24809252

  5. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO Project: Progress and Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Nemanja; Martinache, F.; Guyon, O.; Clergeon, C.; Garrel, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) instrument consists of a high performance Phase Induced Amplitude Apodisation (PIAA) coronagraph combined with an extreme Adaptive Optics (AO) system operating in the near-infrared (H band). The extreme AO system driven by the 2000 element deformable mirror will allow for Strehl ratios>90% to be achieved in the H-band when it goes closed loop. This makes the SCExAO instrument a powerful platform for high contrast imaging down to angular separations of the order of 1 λ/D. In this paper we report on the recent progress in regards to the development of the instrument, which includes the addition of a visible bench that makes use of the light at shorter wavelengths not currently utilized by SCExAO and closing the loop on the tip/tilt wavefront sensor. We will also discuss two exciting guest instruments which will expand the capabilities of SCExAO over the next few years; namely CHARIS which is a integral field spectrograph as well as VAMPIRES, a visible aperture masking experiment based on polarimetric analysis of circumstellar disks.

  6. SCExAO: First Results and On-Sky Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; McElwain, Michael; Thalmann, Christian; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present new on-sky results for the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics imager (SCExAO) verifying and quantifying the contrast gain enabled by key components: the closed-loop coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor (CLOWFS) and focal plane wavefront control ("speckle nulling"). SCExAO will soon be coupled with a high-order, Pyramid wavefront sensor which will yield greater than 90% Strehl ratio and enable 10(exp 6) -10(exp 7) contrast at small angular separations allowing us to image gas giant planets at solar system scales. Upcoming instruments like VAMPIRES, FIRST, and CHARIS will expand SCExAO's science capabilities.

  7. SCExAO: First Results and On-Sky Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; McElwain, Michael; Thalmann, Christian; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    We present new on-sky results for the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics imager (SCExAO) verifying and quantifying the contrast gain enabled by key components: the closed-loop coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor (CLOWFS) and focal plane wavefront control (``speckle nulling''). SCExAO will soon be coupled with a high-order, Pyramid wavefront sensor which will yield > 90% Strehl ratio and enable 106-107 contrast at small angular separations allowing us to image gas giant planets at solar system scales. Upcoming instruments like VAMPIRES, FIRST, and CHARIS will expand SCExAO's science capabilities.

  8. Simulation of existing gas-fuelled conventional steam power plant using Cycle Tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamel, M. S.; Abd Rahman, A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    Simulation of a 200 MW gas-fuelled conventional steam power plant located in Basra, Iraq was carried out. The thermodynamic performance of the considered power plant is estimated by a system simulation. A flow-sheet computer program, "Cycle-Tempo" is used for the study. The plant components and piping systems were considered and described in detail. The simulation results were verified against data gathered from the log sheet obtained from the station during its operation hours and good results were obtained. Operational factors like the stack exhaust temperature and excess air percentage were studied and discussed, as were environmental factors, such as ambient air temperature and water inlet temperature. In addition, detailed exergy losses were illustrated and describe the temperature profiles for the main plant components. The results prompted many suggestions for improvement of the plant performance.

  9. In situ growth of silver nanoparticles on TEMPO-oxidized jute fibers by microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinwang; Ding, Bin; Yu, Jianyong; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2013-01-30

    Cellulose fibers deposited with metallic nanoparticles as one kind of renewable, biocompatible and antimicrobial nanomaterials evoke much interest because of their versatility in various applications. Herein, for the first time, a facile, simple and rapid method was developed to fabricate TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical) selectively oxidized jute fibers in situ deposited with silver nanoparticles in the absence of reducing reagents. The average size of silver nanoparticles deposited on the fibers is 50.0 ± 2.0 nm by microwave heating for 5 min and 90.0 ± 4.7 nm for 10 min heating sample, respectively. The versatile jute-silver nanoparticles nanocomposites with superior thermal stability and high crystallinity would be particularly useful for applications in the public health care and biomedical fields. PMID:23218337

  10. Transparent, conductive, and printable composites consisting of TEMPO-oxidized nanocellulose and carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Koga, Hirotaka; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Kitaoka, Takuya; Nogi, Masaya; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Isogai, Akira

    2013-04-01

    Ultrastrong, transparent, conductive and printable nanocomposites were successfully prepared by mixing single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNs) with abundant sodium carboxyl groups on the crystalline nanocellulose surfaces. The surface-anionic cellulose nanofibrils had reinforcing and nanodispersing effects on the CNTs both in water used as the dispersed medium and in the dried composite film, providing highly conductive and printable nanocomposites with a small amount of CNTs. TOCNs are therefore expected as an effective flexible matrix that can be used as an alternative to conventional polymers for various electrical materials, when nanocomposited with CNTs and also graphene. Our findings provide a promising route to realize green and flexible electronics. PMID:23428212

  11. Melody recognition at fast and slow tempos: effects of age, experience, and familiarity.

    PubMed

    Dowling, W Jay; Bartlett, James C; Halpern, Andrea R; Andrews, W Melinda

    2008-04-01

    Eighty-one listeners defined by three age ranges (18-30, 31-59, and over 60 years) and three levels of musical experience performed an immediate recognition task requiring the detection of alterations in melodies. On each trial, a brief melody was presented, followed 5 sec later by a test stimulus that either was identical to the target or had two pitches changed, for a same-different judgment. Each melody pair was presented at 0.6 note/sec, 3.0 notes/sec, or 6.0 notes/sec. Performance was better with familiar melodies than with unfamiliar melodies. Overall performance declined slightly with age and improved substantially with increasing experience, in agreement with earlier results in an identification task. Tempo affected performance on familiar tunes (moderate was best), but not on unfamiliar tunes. We discuss these results in terms of theories of dynamic attending, cognitive slowing, and working memory in aging. PMID:18459260

  12. Highly practical copper(I)/TEMPO catalyst system for chemoselective aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jessica M; Stahl, Shannon S

    2011-10-26

    Aerobic oxidation reactions have been the focus of considerable attention, but their use in mainstream organic chemistry has been constrained by limitations in their synthetic scope and by practical factors, such as the use of pure O(2) as the oxidant or complex catalyst synthesis. Here, we report a new (bpy)Cu(I)/TEMPO catalyst system that enables efficient and selective aerobic oxidation of a broad range of primary alcohols, including allylic, benzylic, and aliphatic derivatives, to the corresponding aldehydes using readily available reagents, at room temperature with ambient air as the oxidant. The catalyst system is compatible with a wide range of functional groups and the high selectivity for 1° alcohols enables selective oxidation of diols that lack protecting groups. PMID:21861488

  13. The road from Santa Rosalia: A faster tempo of evolution in tropical climates

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Shane; Keeling, Jeannette; Gillman, Len

    2006-01-01

    Using an appropriately designed and replicated study of a latitudinal influence on rates of evolution, we test the prediction by K. Rohde [(1992) Oikos 65, 514–527] that the tempo of molecular evolution in the tropics is greater than at higher latitudes. Consistent with this prediction we found tropical plant species had more than twice the rate of molecular evolution as closely related temperate congeners. Rohde’s climate-speciation hypothesis constitutes one explanation for the cause of that relationship. This hypothesis suggests that mutagenesis occurs more frequently as productivity and metabolic rates increase toward the equator. More rapid mutagenesis was then proposed as the mechanism that increases evolutionary tempo and rates of speciation. A second possible explanation is that faster rates of molecular evolution result from higher tropical speciation rates [e.g., Bromham, L. & Cardillo, M. (2003) J. Evol. Biol. 16, 200–207]. However, we found the relationship continued to hold for genera with the same number of, or more, species in temperate latitudes. This finding suggests that greater rates of speciation in the tropics do not cause higher rates of molecular evolution. A third explanation is that more rapid genetic drift might have occurred in smaller tropical species populations [Stevens, G. C. (1989) Am. Nat. 133, 240–256]. However, we targeted common species to limit the influence of genetic drift, and many of the tropical species we used, despite occurring in abundant populations, had much higher rates of molecular evolution. Nonetheless, this issue is not completely resolved by that precaution and requires further examination. PMID:16672371

  14. Surfactant-free emulsions stabilized by tempo-oxidized bacterial cellulose.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuanyuan; Zhai, Xiaoli; Fu, Wei; Liu, Yang; Li, Fei; Zhong, Cheng

    2016-10-20

    In order to seek a safe, biodegradable, and sustainable solid stabilizer for food, topical and pharmaceutical emulsions, individualized cellulose nanofibers were prepared by oxidizing bacterial cellulose (BC) in a Tempo-mediated system; their ability to stabilize oil/water interface was investigated. Significant amounts of C6 carboxylate groups were selectively formed on each cellulose microfibril surface, so that the hydrophilicity was strengthened, leading to lower contact angles. Meanwhile, both the length and width of fibrils were decreased significantly, by partial cleavage of numerous numbers of inter- and intra-fibrillar hydrogen bonds. Tempo-oxidized BC (TOBC) was more effective than BC in stabilizing oil-water interface, attributing to the much smaller size. Fibril dosage and oxidation degree exerted a great influence on the stability and particle size distribution of emulsion samples. When the fibril dosage was 0.7wt.%, the sample was so stable that it did not experience creaming and coalescence over 8 months. The 2-TOBC coated droplets showed the greatest stability, although both the zeta potential and the electric repulsion were the largest for the 10-TOBC analogue, which was manipulated by the wettability of fibrils. In addition, the stability of samples was analyzed from the viewpoint of particle size distribution. Consequently, fibril size and wettability are two counterbalanced factors influencing the stability of TOBC-stabilized emulsions; a combination of suitable wettability and size imparts TOBC-stabilized emulsion high stability. As a kind of biomass-based particle stabilizer, TOBC showed great potential applications in food, topical and pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:27474639

  15. Selective Exposure to and Acquisition of Information from Educational Television Programs as a Function of Appeal and Tempo of Background Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakshlag, Jacob J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The effect of educational television background music on selective exposure and information acquisition was studied. Background music of slow tempo, regardless of its appeal, had negligible effects on attention and information acquisition. Rhythmic, fast-tempo background music, especially when appealing, significantly reduced visual attention to…

  16. Reproducibility of the Tronzo and AO classifications for transtrochanteric fractures☆

    PubMed Central

    Mattos, Carlos Augusto; Jesus, Alexandre Atsushi Koza; Floter, Michelle dos Santos; Nunes, Luccas Franco Bettencourt; Sanches, Bárbara de Baptista; Zabeu, José Luís Amim

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the reproducibility of the Tronzo and AO classifications for transtrochanteric fractures. Method This was a cross-sectional study in which the intraobserver and interobserver concordance between two readings made by 11 observers was analyzed. The analysis of the variations used the kappa statistical method. Results Moderate concordance was found in relation to the AO classification, while slight concordance was found for the Tronzo classification. Conclusion This study found that the AO/Asif classification for transtrochanteric presented greater intra and interobserver reproducibility and that greater concordance was correlated with greater experience of the observers. Without division into subgroups, the AO/Asif classification was shown, as described in the literature, to be acceptable for clinical use in relation to transtrochanteric fractures of the femur, although it did not show absolute concordance, given that its concordance level was only moderate. Nonetheless, its concordance was better than that of the Tronzo classification. PMID:26535193

  17. A filled duration illusion in music: Effects of metrical subdivision on the perception and production of beat tempo.

    PubMed Central

    Repp, Bruno H.; Bruttomesso, Meijin

    2010-01-01

    This study replicates and extends previous findings suggesting that metrical subdivision slows the perceived beat tempo (Repp, 2008). Here, musically trained participants produced the subdivisions themselves and were found to speed up, thus compensating for the perceived slowing. This was shown in a synchronization-continuation paradigm (Experiment 1) and in a reproduction task (Experiment 2a). Participants also judged the tempo of a subdivided sequence as being slower than that of a preceding simple beat sequence (Experiment 2b). Experiment 2 also included nonmusician participants, with similar results. Tempo measurements of famous pianists’ recordings of two variation movements from Beethoven sonatas revealed a strong tendency to play the first variation (subdivided beats) faster than the theme (mostly simple beats). A similar tendency was found in musicians’ laboratory performances of a simple theme and variations, despite instruc-tions to keep the tempo constant (Experiment 3a). When playing melodic sequences in which only one of three beats per measure was subdivided, musicians tended to play these beats faster and to perceive them as longer than adjacent beats, and they played the whole sequence faster than a sequence without any subdivisions (Experiments 3b and 3c). The results amply demonstrate a filled duration illusion in rhythm perception and music performance: Intervals containing events seem longer than empty intervals and thus must be shortened to be perceived as equal in duration. PMID:20689669

  18. A Study of Music Students' Tempo Changes of a Soloist's Performance of Mozart's 1st Horn Concerto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher M.; Madsen, Clifford K.; Geringer, John M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to investigate music students' tempo changes of a soloist's performance in an excerpt from Mozart's "Concerto No. 1 in D Major for Horn and Orchestra." We then compared the composite rubato pattern to tendencies found in a previous investigation using Mozart's "Concerto No. 2 in E[flat] Major for Horn…

  19. The Relationship between Music Preferences of Different Mode and Tempo and Personality Traits--Implications for Music Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrota, Snježana; Reic Ercegovac, Ina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between music preferences of different mode and tempo and personality traits. The survey included 323 students who had to fill out the following tests: questionnaire of music preferences, scale of optimism and pessimism and International Personality Item Pool for measuring Big Five…

  20. LGS-AO Imaging of Every Kepler Planet Candidate: the Robo-AO KOI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas Michael; Baranec, Christoph; Morton, Timothy; Ziegler, Carl; Atkinson, Dani; Riddle, Reed

    2015-08-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging, to search for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. We will present the results from searching for companions around over 3,000 Kepler planet hosts in 2012-2015. We will describe our first data release covering 715 planet candidate hosts, and give a preview of ongoing results including improved statistics on the likelihood of false positive planet detections in the Kepler dataset, many new planets in multiple star systems, and new exotic multiple star systems containing Kepler planets.We will also describe the automated Robo-AO survey data reduction methods, including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for extremely large adaptive optics surveys.Our first data release covered 715 objects, searching for companions from 0.15” to 2.5” separation with contrast up to 6 magnitudes. We measured the overall nearby-star-probability for Kepler planet candidates to be 7.4+/-1.0%, and we will detail the variations in this number with stellar host parameters. We will also discuss several KOIs of particular interest, including KOI-191 and KOI-1151, which are both multi-planet systems with detected stellar companions whose unusual planetary system architecture might be best explained if they are ``coincident multiple'' systems, with several transiting planets shared between the two stars. Finally, we will discuss and update the 98%-confidence evidence from our survey that third bodies in star/planet systems produce an excess of close-in giant planets.

  1. M S MOLECULARES Rumo aos limites da miniaturiza o - (Molecular Magnets - towards the limits of miniaturization)

    SciTech Connect

    Reis, Mario S; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F

    2010-01-01

    Por s culos, acreditou-se que o magnetismo s se manifestava em metais, como aqueles contendo ferro; hoje, a imagem mais comum de um m talvez seja a daquelas plaquinhas flex veis coladas geladeira com propagandas dos mais diversos tipos. O leitor conseguiria imaginar um material puramente org nico daqueles que formam os seres vivos como magn tico? E m s do tamanho de mol culas? fato: ambos existem. Esses novos materiais, conhecidos como magnetos moleculares, descobertos e desenvolvidos em v rios laborat rios do mundo, j re nem longa lista de aplica es, do tratamento do c ncer a refrigeradores ecol gicos, passando pela transmiss o de eletricidade sem perda de calor e a fabrica o de computadores extremamente velozes.

  2. A Large-Telescope Natural Guide Star AO System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redding, David; Milman, Mark; Needels, Laura

    1994-01-01

    None given. From overview and conclusion:Keck Telescope case study. Objectives-low cost, good sky coverage. Approach--natural guide star at 0.8um, correcting at 2.2um.Concl- Good performance is possible for Keck with natural guide star AO system (SR>0.2 to mag 17+).AO-optimized CCD should b every effective. Optimizing td is very effective.Spatial Coadding is not effective except perhaps at extreme low light levels.

  3. Selective Alcohol Oxidation by a Copper TEMPO Catalyst: Mechanistic Insights by Simultaneously Coupled Operando EPR/UV-Vis/ATR-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rabeah, Jabor; Bentrup, Ursula; Stößer, Reinhard; Brückner, Angelika

    2015-09-28

    The first coupled operando EPR/UV-Vis/ATR-IR spectroscopy setup for mechanistic studies of gas-liquid phase reactions is presented and exemplarily applied to the well-known copper/TEMPO-catalyzed (TEMPO=(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl) oxidation of benzyl alcohol. In contrast to previous proposals, no direct redox reaction between TEMPO and Cu(I) /Cu(II) has been detected. Instead, the role of TEMPO is postulated to be the stabilization of a (bpy)(NMI)Cu(II) -O2 (⋅-) -TEMPO (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, NMI=N-methylimidazole) intermediate formed by electron transfer from Cu(I) to molecular O2 . PMID:26174141

  4. Analysis of surface EMG activation in hand percussion playing depending on the grasping type and the tempo

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hyun Ju; Kim, Soo Ji; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Yoo, Ga Eul

    2015-01-01

    Although instrument playing-based training has been repeatedly reported to improve functional hand movements including grasping, the attempts to present quantitative information on physiological mechanism of grasping have been relatively insufficient to determine the type and the intensity of the exercises involved. This study aimed to examine the muscle activation during hand percussion playing depending on the grasping type and the playing tempo. A total of twelve healthy older adults with a mean age of 71.5 years participated in this study. Surface electrodes were placed on three grasping-related muscles: Flexor digitorum superficialis, extensor digitorum, and flexor pollicis brevis. Participants were instructed to play with the egg shaker, paddle drum mallet and clave involving different types of grasp at three different tempi (i.e., 80, 100, and 120 bpm) and sEMG data were collected during each playing. Significantly greater muscle activation was generated with the small sphere type of egg shaker, compared to the handle type of paddle drum mallet and the small cylinder type of clave. Playing at faster tempo also elicited significantly greater muscle activation than at slower tempo. With regard to the rise time of muscle activation, while tempo significantly affected the rise time, the time to peak muscle did not significantly change depending on the grasping type. This study confirmed that grasping pattern and the tempo of movement significantly influence the muscular activation of grasping involved in instrument playing. Based on these results, clinical implication for instrument selection and structured instrument playing would be suggested. PMID:26331139

  5. Analysis of surface EMG activation in hand percussion playing depending on the grasping type and the tempo.

    PubMed

    Chong, Hyun Ju; Kim, Soo Ji; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Yoo, Ga Eul

    2015-08-01

    Although instrument playing-based training has been repeatedly reported to improve functional hand movements including grasping, the attempts to present quantitative information on physiological mechanism of grasping have been relatively insufficient to determine the type and the intensity of the exercises involved. This study aimed to examine the muscle activation during hand percussion playing depending on the grasping type and the playing tempo. A total of twelve healthy older adults with a mean age of 71.5 years participated in this study. Surface electrodes were placed on three grasping-related muscles: Flexor digitorum superficialis, extensor digitorum, and flexor pollicis brevis. Participants were instructed to play with the egg shaker, paddle drum mallet and clave involving different types of grasp at three different tempi (i.e., 80, 100, and 120 bpm) and sEMG data were collected during each playing. Significantly greater muscle activation was generated with the small sphere type of egg shaker, compared to the handle type of paddle drum mallet and the small cylinder type of clave. Playing at faster tempo also elicited significantly greater muscle activation than at slower tempo. With regard to the rise time of muscle activation, while tempo significantly affected the rise time, the time to peak muscle did not significantly change depending on the grasping type. This study confirmed that grasping pattern and the tempo of movement significantly influence the muscular activation of grasping involved in instrument playing. Based on these results, clinical implication for instrument selection and structured instrument playing would be suggested. PMID:26331139

  6. Musicians are more consistent: Gestural cross-modal mappings of pitch, loudness and tempo in real-time.

    PubMed

    Küssner, Mats B; Tidhar, Dan; Prior, Helen M; Leech-Wilkinson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Cross-modal mappings of auditory stimuli reveal valuable insights into how humans make sense of sound and music. Whereas researchers have investigated cross-modal mappings of sound features varied in isolation within paradigms such as speeded classification and forced-choice matching tasks, investigations of representations of concurrently varied sound features (e.g., pitch, loudness and tempo) with overt gestures-accounting for the intrinsic link between movement and sound-are scant. To explore the role of bodily gestures in cross-modal mappings of auditory stimuli we asked 64 musically trained and untrained participants to represent pure tones-continually sounding and concurrently varied in pitch, loudness and tempo-with gestures while the sound stimuli were played. We hypothesized musical training to lead to more consistent mappings between pitch and height, loudness and distance/height, and tempo and speed of hand movement and muscular energy. Our results corroborate previously reported pitch vs. height (higher pitch leading to higher elevation in space) and tempo vs. speed (increasing tempo leading to increasing speed of hand movement) associations, but also reveal novel findings pertaining to musical training which influenced consistency of pitch mappings, annulling a commonly observed bias for convex (i.e., rising-falling) pitch contours. Moreover, we reveal effects of interactions between musical parameters on cross-modal mappings (e.g., pitch and loudness on speed of hand movement), highlighting the importance of studying auditory stimuli concurrently varied in different musical parameters. Results are discussed in light of cross-modal cognition, with particular emphasis on studies within (embodied) music cognition. Implications for theoretical refinements and potential clinical applications are provided. PMID:25120506

  7. Tempo of the Deccan Traps eruptions in relation to events at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, Paul; Sprain, Courtney; Pande, Kanchan; Richards, Mark; Vanderkluysen, Loyc; Self, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    It has been known for decades that the Deccan Traps (DT) continental flood basalts were erupted over an interval spanning the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (KPB). Paleomagnetic data clearly show that the volumetric majority of preserved DT lavas were erupted during geomagnetic polarity chron 29r, hence over an interval <1 Ma. Until recently, radioisotope geochronology has failed to clarify the tempo of the eruptions or to delineate where the KPB age-equivalent horizon occurs within the eruptive sequence. An ongoing high-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic study is providing the first indications of variable time-averaged eruption rates in the important Western Ghats region, in addition to providing the first precise location of the KPB within the Deccan pile. One to three samples from each of the ten geochemically-defined Jawhar through Mahabaleshwar Formations [Beane et al., 1986], sampled in seven stratigraphic sections, have been analyzed. Replicate analyses of plagioclase separates were conducted in as many as five incremental-heating experiments for each sample, yielding weighted mean plateau ages as precise as ±0.035 Ma with fully propagated systematic uncertainties as low as ±0.055 Ma. The accumulating data require abandoning several misconceptions about Deccan magmatism. Most importantly, the notion of several temporally discrete pulses of volcanism in the Western Ghats is unsupported by our data and should be abandoned. Despite changes in mean extrusion rates, volcanism was essentially continuous for 0.91 ±0.1 Ma, from 66.38 ±0.05 to 65.47 ±0.1 Ma, with no regional hiatuses >100 ka. A sharp increase in mean volumetric eruption rate commencing within the Poladpur or uppermost Bushe Fm., near the base of the laterally extensive Wai Subgroup, is now well-documented. Based on recent area-weighted volume estimates [Richards et al., 2015], the eruption rate tripled from 0.2 to 0.6 km^3/year at this transition. The transition coincided with increased mantle

  8. Supercritical carbon dioxide, a new medium for aerobic alcohol oxidations catalysed by copper-TEMPO.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Matthew; Montilla, Francisco; Galindo, Agustín

    2010-01-21

    The copper catalysed aerobic oxidation of selected alcohol substrates in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)), employing a range of simple copper(II) catalyst compounds, is here described. The copper acetate complex of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) functionalised pyridine (1), compound 2, has previously been synthesised and characterised by us and its solubility in scCO(2) demonstrated. Due to this solubility we anticipated that the selective aerobic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes could be homogeneously catalysed by this compound in scCO(2) in combination with the co-catalyst 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yloxy free radical (TEMPO). Our initial results showed that complete oxidation of 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol was achieved within 4 h of reaction. However, the activities of analogous copper derivatives containing simpler pyridine substituents, [Cu(AcO)(2)(py)](2) and [Cu(AcO)(2)(4VP)](2) (4VP = 4-vinylpyridine), were shown to be similar, in spite of their negligible solubility in scCO(2). When we repeated the reactions in highly non-polar hexane rather than scCO(2) similar observations were made. In both cases, as 2 is soluble and the pyridine analogues are not, a much higher reaction rate was anticipated for 2 as it is the only compound capable of homogeneous catalysis. However, in some cases slightly better activities were observed for [Cu(AcO)(2)(py)](2) rather than for the PDMS functionalised analogue, 2. Thus, despite poor catalyst solubility typically being very inhibitory in this type of catalytic process, in this system solubilisation of the catalyst is not necessary. In continuation the activity of silica supported copper complexes was therefore investigated. Employing such catalysts the 4-nitrobenzyl and benzyl alcohol substrates were completely oxidised to the corresponding aldehydes in scCO(2), this time employing lower catalyst loadings. Other types of alcohol substrate showed more limited conversions however. To conclude, alcohol oxidation in the non

  9. Beyond the Blur: Construction and Characterization of the First Autonomous AO System, and, An AO Survey of Magnetar Proper Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh Prakash

    Adaptive optics (AO) corrects distortions created by atmospheric turbulence and delivers diffraction-limited images on ground-based telescopes. The vastly improved spatial resolution and sensitivity has been utilized for studying everything from the magnetic fields of sunspots upto the internal dynamics of high-redshift galaxies. This thesis about AO science from small and large telescopes is divided into two parts: Robo-AO and magnetar kinematics. In the first part, I discuss the construction and performance of the world's first fully autonomous visible light AO system, Robo-AO, at the Palomar 60-inch telescope. Robo-AO operates extremely efficiently with an overhead < 50s, typically observing about 22 targets every hour. We have performed large AO programs observing a total of over 7,500 targets since May 2012. In the visible band, the images have a Strehl ratio of about 10% and achieve a contrast of upto 6 magnitudes at a separation of 1‧‧. The full-width at half maximum achieved is 110-130 milli-arcsecond. I describe how Robo-AO is used to constrain the evolutionary models of low-mass pre-main-sequence stars by measuring resolved spectral energy distributions of stellar multiples in the visible band, more than doubling the current sample. I conclude this part with a discussion of possible future improvements to the Robo-AO system. In the second part, I describe a study of magnetar kinematics using high-resolution near-infrared (NIR) AO imaging from the 10-meter Keck II telescope. Measuring the proper motions of five magnetars with a precision of upto 0.7 milli-arcsecond/yr -1, we have more than tripled the previously known sample of magnetar proper motions and proved that magnetar kinematics are equivalent to those of radio pulsars. We conclusively showed that SGR 1900+14 and SGR 1806-20 were ejected from the stellar clusters with which they were traditionally associated. The inferred kinematic ages of these two magnetars are 6 +/- 1.8 kyr and 650 +/-3 00

  10. What distinguishes successful from unsuccessful tobacco smoking cessation? Data from a study of young adults (TEMPO)

    PubMed Central

    Khati, Inès; Menvielle, Gwenn; Chollet, Aude; Younès, Nadia; Metadieu, Brigitte; Melchior, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Smoking prevalence rates among young people are high in many countries. Although attempts to quit smoking increasingly occur in young adulthood, many former smokers relapse. We compared individuals who successfully quit smoking from those who relapsed on socio-demographic, psychological and health factors. Methods Data come from telephone interviews conducted in 2011 with participants of the TEMPO community-based study (ages 18–37 years, France). To study the likelihood of successful cessation vs. smoking relapse, we restricted the study sample to current or former smokers (n = 600) and conducted multinomial logistic regression analyses. Results 43% of participants were current smokers who never quit for an extended period and, 33% former smokers and 24% current smokers who relapsed after extended cessation. In multivariate analyses female sex, parental status and illegal drug use were associated with both successful and unsuccessful smoking cessation. Factors specifically associated with a low probability of smoking cessation were job strain and symptoms of hyperactivity/inattention, while occupational grade was associated with smoking relapse. Conclusions Work and family circumstances, co-occurring substance use and psychological difficulties may influence smoking cessation in young adults. These characteristics should be considered by individual and collective interventions aiming to help young smokers quit successfully. PMID:26844137

  11. Phylogeny and tempo of diversification in the superradiation of spiny-rayed fishes.

    PubMed

    Near, Thomas J; Dornburg, Alex; Eytan, Ron I; Keck, Benjamin P; Smith, W Leo; Kuhn, Kristen L; Moore, Jon A; Price, Samantha A; Burbrink, Frank T; Friedman, Matt; Wainwright, Peter C

    2013-07-30

    Spiny-rayed fishes, or acanthomorphs, comprise nearly one-third of all living vertebrates. Despite their dominant role in aquatic ecosystems, the evolutionary history and tempo of acanthomorph diversification is poorly understood. We investigate the pattern of lineage diversification in acanthomorphs by using a well-resolved time-calibrated phylogeny inferred from a nuclear gene supermatrix that includes 520 acanthomorph species and 37 fossil age constraints. This phylogeny provides resolution for what has been classically referred to as the "bush at the top" of the teleost tree, and indicates acanthomorphs originated in the Early Cretaceous. Paleontological evidence suggests acanthomorphs exhibit a pulse of morphological diversification following the end Cretaceous mass extinction; however, the role of this event on the accumulation of living acanthomorph diversity remains unclear. Lineage diversification rates through time exhibit no shifts associated with the end Cretaceous mass extinction, but there is a global decrease in lineage diversification rates 50 Ma that occurs during a period when morphological disparity among fossil acanthomorphs increases sharply. Analysis of clade-specific shifts in diversification rates reveal that the hyperdiversity of living acanthomorphs is highlighted by several rapidly radiating lineages including tunas, gobies, blennies, snailfishes, and Afro-American cichlids. These lineages with high diversification rates are not associated with a single habitat type, such as coral reefs, indicating there is no single explanation for the success of acanthomorphs, as exceptional bouts of diversification have occurred across a wide array of marine and freshwater habitats. PMID:23858462

  12. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  13. On the morphology of cellulose nanofibrils obtained by TEMPO-mediated oxidation and mechanical treatment.

    PubMed

    Gamelas, José A F; Pedrosa, Jorge; Lourenço, Ana F; Mutjé, Peré; González, Israel; Chinga-Carrasco, Gary; Singh, Gurvinder; Ferreira, Paulo J T

    2015-05-01

    The morphological properties of cellulose nanofibrils obtained from eucalyptus pulp fibres were assessed. Two samples were produced with the same chemical treatment (NaClO/NaBr/TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical) oxidation), but distinct mechanical treatment intensities during homogenization. It was shown that the nanofibrils production yield increases with the mechanical energy. The effect of mechanical treatment on the yield was confirmed by laser profilometry of air-dried nanocellulose films. However, no significant differences were detected regarding the nanofibrils width as measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) of air-dried films. On the other hand, differences in size were found either by laser diffraction spectroscopy or by dynamic light scattering (DLS) of the cellulose nanofibrils suspensions as a consequence of the differences in the length distribution of both samples. The nanofibrils length of the more nanofibrillated sample was calculated based on the width measured by AFM and the hydrodynamic diameter obtained by DLS. A length value of ca. 600 nm was estimated. The DLS hydrodynamic diameter, as an equivalent spherical diameter, was used to estimate the nanofibrils length assuming a cylinder with the same volume and with the diameter (width) assessed by AFM. A simple method is thus proposed to evaluate the cellulose nanofibrils length combining microscopy and light scattering methods. PMID:25768897

  14. TEMPO: a contemporary model for police education and training about mental illness.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Terry; Cotton, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    Given the increasing number of interactions between police and people with mental illnesses (PMI), there has been widespread interest in the development of education for police about how best to interact with PMI. This paper reflects the review of current practice in a variety of jurisdictions across Canada as well as in the United States (U.S.), the United Kingdom (U.K.) and Australia; it proposes a comprehensive model of learning based on the literature that addresses not only the content in the narrow sense but also the importance of broader contextual knowledge and understanding in developing effective education and training. Embedded in the principles articulated in the Mental Health Strategy for Canada, the TEMPO (Training and Education about Mental illness for Police Organizations) model is a multilevel learning strategy for Canadian police personnel. Learning objectives and key principles are articulated in order to ensure the model is applicable to a wide range of police agencies and individual jurisdictional needs. In addition to providing a firm basis of factual knowledge for police personnel, the resultant model embraces a human rights/anti-stigma philosophy, provides for a range of education appropriate to diverse police audiences, emphasizes a systems approach to police/mental health liaison activities and addresses issues related to the delivery and implementation of police education and training. PMID:24720915

  15. TEMPO-mediated oxidation of oat β-D-glucan and its influences on paper properties.

    PubMed

    Song, Xianliang; Hubbe, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    An enhanced bonding agent for papermaking was prepared by selective oxidation of a hemicellulose-rich byproduct of oat processing, which will be identified here by its primary component, β-D-glucan. The β-D-glucan was treated sequentially with (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) and sodium hypochlorite, or alternatively just with sodium hydroxide. When added to a slurry of unbleached softwood kraft fibers, in combination with an optimal dosage of aluminum sulfate, the oxidized β-D-glucan yielded greater increases in tensile strength and folding endurance in comparison to untreated β-D-glucan. NaOH treatment also improved dry-strength performance of the β-D-glucan, except for folding endurance. The improvements were attributed to increased charge density of the treated polyelectrolytes, leading to better distribution and retention on fibers prior to sheet formation. Modified β-D-glucan also enhanced the strength of recycled sheets when the treated paper was repulped and formed into recycled paper with no further chemical addition. PMID:24274551

  16. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  17. Slow sluggish cognitive tempo symptoms are associated with poorer academic performance in children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Tamm, Leanne; Garner, Annie A; Loren, Richard E A; Epstein, Jeffery N; Vaughn, Aaron J; Ciesielski, Heather A; Becker, Stephen P

    2016-08-30

    Sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptoms may confer risk for academic impairment in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We investigated SCT in relation to academic performance and impairment in 252 children (ages 6-12, 67% boys) with ADHD. Parents and teachers completed SCT and academic impairment ratings, and achievement in reading, math, and spelling was assessed. Simultaneous regressions controlling for IQ, ADHD, and comorbidities were conducted. Total SCT predicted parent-rated impairments in writing, mathematics, and overall school but not reading. Parent-rated SCT Slow predicted poorer reading and spelling, but not math achievement. Teacher-rated SCT Slow predicted poorer spelling and math, but not reading achievement. Parent-rated SCT Slow predicted greater academic impairment ratings across all domains, whereas teacher-rated SCT Slow predicted greater impairment in writing only. Age and gender did not moderate these relationships with the exception of math impairment; SCT slow predicted math impairment for younger but not older children. Parent and teacher SCT Sleepy and Daydreamy ratings were not significant predictors. SCT Slow appears to be uniquely related to academic problems in ADHD, and may be important to assess and potentially target in intervention. More work is needed to better understand the nature of SCT Slow symptoms in relation to inattention and amotivation. PMID:27294799

  18. Phylogeny and tempo of diversification in the superradiation of spiny-rayed fishes

    PubMed Central

    Near, Thomas J.; Dornburg, Alex; Eytan, Ron I.; Keck, Benjamin P.; Smith, W. Leo; Kuhn, Kristen L.; Moore, Jon A.; Price, Samantha A.; Burbrink, Frank T.; Friedman, Matt; Wainwright, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Spiny-rayed fishes, or acanthomorphs, comprise nearly one-third of all living vertebrates. Despite their dominant role in aquatic ecosystems, the evolutionary history and tempo of acanthomorph diversification is poorly understood. We investigate the pattern of lineage diversification in acanthomorphs by using a well-resolved time-calibrated phylogeny inferred from a nuclear gene supermatrix that includes 520 acanthomorph species and 37 fossil age constraints. This phylogeny provides resolution for what has been classically referred to as the “bush at the top” of the teleost tree, and indicates acanthomorphs originated in the Early Cretaceous. Paleontological evidence suggests acanthomorphs exhibit a pulse of morphological diversification following the end Cretaceous mass extinction; however, the role of this event on the accumulation of living acanthomorph diversity remains unclear. Lineage diversification rates through time exhibit no shifts associated with the end Cretaceous mass extinction, but there is a global decrease in lineage diversification rates 50 Ma that occurs during a period when morphological disparity among fossil acanthomorphs increases sharply. Analysis of clade-specific shifts in diversification rates reveal that the hyperdiversity of living acanthomorphs is highlighted by several rapidly radiating lineages including tunas, gobies, blennies, snailfishes, and Afro-American cichlids. These lineages with high diversification rates are not associated with a single habitat type, such as coral reefs, indicating there is no single explanation for the success of acanthomorphs, as exceptional bouts of diversification have occurred across a wide array of marine and freshwater habitats. PMID:23858462

  19. Thermo-responsive and compression properties of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofiber-modified PNIPAm hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinguang; Chen, Yufei; Liu, Hongzhi; Du, Chungui; Yu, Huilong; Zhou, Zhongxi

    2016-08-20

    In this study, TEMPO-oxidized bamboo cellulose nanofibers (TO-CNF) with anionic carboxylate groups on the surfaces were in-situ incorporated into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) matrix to improve its thermo-responsive and mechanical properties during the polymerization. The microstructure, swelling behaviors, and compressive strength of resultant PNIPAm composite hydrogels with varying contents of TO-CNFs (0-10wt%) were then examined, respectively. Modified hydrogels exhibited the similar light transparency to pure PNIPAm one due to the formation of semi-IPN structure between PNIPAm and TO-CNF. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the presence of TO-CNF did not alter the position of characteristic peaks associated with PNIPAm. SEM observation suggested that the pore size of PNIPAm hydrogels was markedly increased after the incorporation of TO-CNF. Also, the composite hydrogels showed superior swelling behavior and much improved compression properties with respect to pure PNIPAm one. Thus, TO-CNF appeared to be a "green" nanofiller that can simultaneously improve swelling and mechanical properties of PNIPAm hydrogel. PMID:27178925

  20. Effects of instructed timing and tempo on snare drum sound in drum kit performance.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Anne; Waadeland, Carl Haakon; Sundt, Henrik G; Witek, Maria A G

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports on an experiment investigating the expressive means with which performers of groove-based musics signal the intended timing of a rhythmic event. Ten expert drummers were instructed to perform a rock pattern in three different tempi and three different timing styles: "laid-back," "on-the-beat," and "pushed." The results show that there were systematic differences in the intensity and timbre (i.e., sound-pressure level, temporal centroid, and spectral centroid) of series of snare strokes played with these different timing styles at the individual level. A common pattern was found across subjects concerning the effect of instructed timing on sound-pressure level: a majority of the drummers played laid-back strokes louder than on-the-beat strokes. Furthermore, when the tempo increased, there was a general increase in sound-pressure level and a decrease in spectral centroid across subjects. The results show that both temporal and sound-related features are important in order to indicate that a rhythmic event has been played intentionally early, late, or on-the-beat, and provide insight into the ways in which musicians communicate at the microrhythmic level in groove-based musics. PMID:26520311

  1. Left hand finger force in violin playing: tempo, loudness, and finger differences.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2009-07-01

    A three-dimensional force transducer was installed in the neck of a violin under the A string at the D5 position in order to study the force with which the violinist clamps the string against the fingerboard under normal playing conditions. Violinists performed repetitive sequences of open A- and fingered D-tones using the ring finger at tempi of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 notes/s at mezzo-forte. At selected tempi, the effects of dynamic level and the use of different fingers were investigated as well. The force profiles were clearly dependent on tempo and dynamic level. At slow tempi, the force profiles were characterized by an initial pulse followed by a level force to the end of the finger contact period. At tempi higher than 2 Hz, only pulsed profiles were observed. The peak force exceeded 4.5 N at 1 and 2 Hz and decreased to 1.7 N at 16 Hz. All force and impulse values were lower at softer dynamic levels, and when using the ring or little finger compared to the index finger. PMID:19603895

  2. Preparation of completely C6-carboxylated curdlan by catalytic oxidation with 4-acetamido-TEMPO.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Erika; Tamura, Naoyuki; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Habu, Naoto; Isogai, Akira

    2014-01-16

    Pure (1→3)-β-polyglucuronic acid sodium salt was prepared from curdlan by oxidation with 4-acetamido-TEMPO/NaClO/NaClO₂ in water at pH 4.7 and 35°C. The oxidation conditions, including the reaction time and amounts of reagents added, were optimized for the preparation of (1→3)-β-polyglucuronic acids with high molecular weights. The primary C6 hydroxyl groups of curdlan were completely oxidized to the corresponding C6-carboxylates using a one- or two-step reaction process by controlling the oxidation conditions, thus providing pure (1→3)-β-polyglucuronic acids consisting only of D-glucuronosyl units. Unfortunately, however, the increased amounts of reagents and long reaction time led to significant depolymerization of the curdlan during the oxidation process, and the resulting (1→3)-β-polyglucuronic acids had weight-average degrees of polymerization of 340-360. The (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the products were successfully assigned using pure (1→3)-β-polyglucuronic acid. PMID:24188840

  3. Tempo and Mode of Gene Duplication in Mammalian Ribosomal Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gajdosik, Matthew D.; Simon, Amanda; Nelson, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication has been widely recognized as a major driver of evolutionary change and organismal complexity through the generation of multi-gene families. Therefore, understanding the forces that govern the evolution of gene families through the retention or loss of duplicated genes is fundamentally important in our efforts to study genome evolution. Previous work from our lab has shown that ribosomal protein (RP) genes constitute one of the largest classes of conserved duplicated genes in mammals. This result was surprising due to the fact that ribosomal protein genes evolve slowly and transcript levels are very tightly regulated. In our present study, we identified and characterized all RP duplicates in eight mammalian genomes in order to investigate the tempo and mode of ribosomal protein family evolution. We show that a sizable number of duplicates are transcriptionally active and are very highly conserved. Furthermore, we conclude that existing gene duplication models do not readily account for the preservation of a very large number of intact retroduplicated ribosomal protein (RT-RP) genes observed in mammalian genomes. We suggest that selection against dominant-negative mutations may underlie the unexpected retention and conservation of duplicated RP genes, and may shape the fate of newly duplicated genes, regardless of duplication mechanism. PMID:25369106

  4. TEMPO: an ESA-funded project for uncovering significant features of the South Atlantic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavón-Carrasco, F. Javier; De Santis, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    In this work we provide the last results of the ESA (European Space Agency) funded project TEMPO ("Is The Earth's Magnetic field POtentially reversing? New insights from Swarm mission"). The mail goal of this project is to analyse the time and spatial evolution of one of the most important features of the present geomagnetic field, i.e. the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The region covered by this anomaly is characterized by values of geomagnetic field intensity around 30% lower than expected for those latitudes and extends over a large area in the South Atlantic Ocean, South America, South Africa and the Eastern Pacific Ocean. This large depression of the geomagnetic field strength has its origin in a prominent patch of reversed polarity flux in the Earth's outer core. The study of the SAA is an important challenge nowadays not only for the geomagnetic and paleomagnetic community, but also for other areas focused on the Earth Observation due to the protective role of this potential field against the charged particles forming the solar wind. A further increase of the SAA surface extent could have dramatic consequences for human health and technologies because a larger number of solar charged particles could reach the Earth's surface.

  5. The tempo and mode of molecular evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at patient-to-patient scale.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Anita C; Kremer, Kristin; Kiers, Albert; Daviena, Olaf; Boeree, Martin J; Siezen, Roland J; Smith, Noel H; van Soolingen, Dick

    2010-01-01

    A total of six polymorphisms were identified by comparing the genomes of the first and the last isolate of a well-characterized transmission chain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis involving five patients over a 12 and a half year period. The six polymorphisms consisted of four single nucleotide changes (SNPs), a tandem repeat polymorphism (TRP) and a previously identified IS6110 transposition event. These polymorphic sites were surveyed in each of the isolates from the five patients in the transmission chain. Surprisingly, five of the six polymorphisms accumulated in a single patient in the transmission chain; this patient had been non-compliant to tuberculosis treatment. This first insight into the tempo and mode of molecular evolution in M. tuberculosis at the patient-to-patient level suggests that the molecular evolution of the pathogen in vivo is characterized by periods of relative genomic stability followed by bursts of mutation. Whatever the mechanism for the accumulation of mutations, this observation may have profound consequences for the application of vaccines and therapeutic drugs, the management and treatment of disease outbreaks of M. tuberculosis, the most important bacterial pathogen of humans. PMID:19835997

  6. Binding energies and 19F nuclear magnetic deshielding in paramagnetic halogen-bonded complexes of TEMPO with haloperfluorocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cavallotti, Carlo; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Meyer, Franck; Recupero, Francesco; Resnati, Giuseppe

    2008-10-01

    19F NMR measurements and theoretical calculations were performed to study paramagnetic complexes of iodoperfluorocarbons with stable nitroxide radicals. Contrary to what is usually measured for diamagnetic halogen-bonded complexes involving iodoperfluorocarbons, it was found that the formation of complexes with the 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl(piperidin-1-yloxyl) (TEMPO) radical determines downfield shifts in the 19F NMR spectra. The experimental finding was confirmed by calculating nuclear shielding using density functional theory and correcting the isotropic diamagnetic (19)F chemical shift with contact interactions evaluated from the hyperfine coupling tensor. The computational analysis of the interaction between CF3I and TEMPO, by using DFT and MP2 theories, showed that the occurrence of the halogen bond between the interacting partners is associated with a significant charge transfer to CF3I and that the measured downfield shift is due to the occurring spin transfer. PMID:18795762

  7. Initial Performance of the Keck AO Wavefront Controller System

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E M; Acton, D S; An, J R; Avicola, K; Beeman, B V; Brase, J M; Carrano, C J; Gathright, J; Gavel, D T; Hurd, R L; Lai, O; Lupton, W; Macintosh, B A; Max, C E; Olivier, S S; Shelton, J C; Stomski, P J; Tsubota, K; Waltjen, K E; Watson, J A; Wizinowich, P L

    2001-03-01

    The wavefront controller for the Keck Observatory AO system consists of two separate real-time control loops: a tip-tilt control loop to remove tilt from the incoming wavefront, and a deformable mirror control loop to remove higher-order aberrations. In this paper, we describe these control loops and analyze their performance using diagnostic data acquired during the integration and testing of the AO system on the telescope. Disturbance rejection curves for the controllers are calculated from the experimental data and compared to theory. The residual wavefront errors due to control loop bandwidth are also calculated from the data, and possible improvements to the controller performance are discussed.

  8. High-Performance CCSDS AOS Protocol Implementation in FPGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clare, Loren P.; Torgerson, Jordan L.; Pang, Jackson

    2010-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS) space data link protocol provides a framing layer between channel coding such as LDPC (low-density parity-check) and higher-layer link multiplexing protocols such as CCSDS Encapsulation Service, which is described in the following article. Recent advancement in RF modem technology has allowed multi-megabit transmission over space links. With this increase in data rate, the CCSDS AOS protocol implementation needs to be optimized to both reduce energy consumption and operate at a high rate.

  9. TEMPO-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes and ketones in ionic liquid [bmim][PF6].

    PubMed

    Ansari, Imtiaz A; Gree, Rene

    2002-05-01

    [reaction: see text]. A simple and mild TEMPO-CuCl catalyzed aerobic oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones in ionic liquid [bmim][PF6] with no trace of overoxidation to carboxylic acids has been developed. The product can be isolated by a simple extraction with organic solvent, and the ionic liquid can be recycled or reused. PMID:11975615

  10. Poly(TEMPO)/Zinc Hybrid-Flow Battery: A Novel, "Green," High Voltage, and Safe Energy Storage System.

    PubMed

    Winsberg, Jan; Janoschka, Tobias; Morgenstern, Sabine; Hagemann, Tino; Muench, Simon; Hauffman, Guillaume; Gohy, Jean-François; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2016-03-16

    The combination of a polymer-based 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-N-oxyl (TEMPO) catholyte and a zinc anode, together with a cost-efficient size-exclusion membrane, builds a new type of semi-organic, "green," hybrid-flow battery, which features a high potential range of up to 2 V, high efficiencies, and a long life time. PMID:26810789