Science.gov

Sample records for aortic arch evaluation

  1. Double aortic arch

    MedlinePlus

    ... double aortic arch may press on the windpipe (trachea) and esophagus, leading to trouble breathing and swallowing. ... to relieve pressure on the esophagus and windpipe (trachea). The surgeon ties off the smaller branch and ...

  2. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  3. Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch with Coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sue Hyun; Choi, Eun-Suk; Cho, Sungkyu; Kim, Woong-Han

    2016-01-01

    Persistent fifth aortic arch (PFAA) is a rare congenital anomaly of the aortic arch frequently associated with other cardiovascular anomalies, such as tetralogy of Fallot and aortic arch coarctation or interruption. We report the case of a neonate with PFAA with coarctation who successfully underwent surgical repair. PMID:26889445

  4. Cervical aortic arch and a new type of double aortic arch. Report of a case.

    PubMed Central

    Cornali, M; Reginato, E; Azzolina, G

    1976-01-01

    A case of cervical aortic arch is reported. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first to be associated with a serious intracardiac anomaly. In addition, it is part of a new type of double aortic arch, caused by failure of reabsorption of both dorsal aortic roots and persistence of the fourth right and second (or third) left branchial arches. PMID:971387

  5. Hydatid cyst involving the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Apaydin, Anil Z; Oguz, Emrah; Zoghi, Mehdi

    2007-03-01

    We report a very rare case of primary mediastinal hydatid cyst which invaded the ascending aorta and the aortic arch which initially presented as a cranial mass. Aortic wall is a very unusual site for the hydatid cysts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of hydatid cyst located within the aortic arch lumen. Patient underwent ascending aortic and hemiarch replacement under hypothermic circulatory arrest and removal of the cyst. Patient had an uneventful recovery and has been on follow-up. Although the literature data are very limited, we believe that the aortic procedure of choice should be graft interpositon rather than patch repair. PMID:17215134

  6. Techniques for aortic arch endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    kHONGKU, Kiattisak; Dias, Nuno; Sonesson, Bjorn; Resch, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews endovascular strategies for aortic arch repair. Open repair remains the gold standard particularly for good risk patients. Endovascular treatment potentially offers a less invasive repair. Principles, technical considerations, devices and outcomes of each technique are discussed and summarized. Hybrid repair combines less invasive revascularization options, instead of arch replacement while extending stent-graft into the arch. Outcomes vary with regard to extent of repair and aortic arch pathologies treated. Results of arch chimney and other parallel graft techniques perhaps make it a less preferable choice for elective cases. However, they are very appealing options for urgent or bailout situations. Fenestrated stent-grafting is subjected to many technical challenges in aortic arch due to difficulties in stent-graft orientation and fenestration positioning. In situ fenestration techniques emerge to avoid these problems, but durability of stent-grafts after fenestration and ischemic consequences of temporary carotid arteries coverage raises some concern total arch repair using this technique. Arch branched graft is a new technology. Early outcomes did not meet the expectation; however the results have been improving after its learning curve period. Refining stent-graft technologies and implantation techniques positively impact outcomes of endovascular approaches. PMID:26940011

  7. Ascending Aortic Slide for Interrupted Aortic Arch Repair.

    PubMed

    Urencio, Miguel; Dodge-Khatami, Ali; Greenleaf, Chris E; Aru, Giorgio; Salazar, Jorge D

    2016-09-01

    For repair of interrupted aortic arch, unfavorable anatomy challenges a tension-free anastomosis. We describe a useful alternative surgical technique used in five neonates/infants, involving splitting the ascending aorta from the sinotubular junction to the arch origin, leftward and posterior "sliding" of the flap with anastomosis to the distal arch creating a native tissue bridge, and reconstruction with a patch. With wide interruption gaps between proximal and distal aortic portions, the ascending aortic slide is a safe and reproducible technique, providing a tension-free native tissue bridge with potential for growth, and a scaffold for patch augmentation in biventricular hearts, or for Norwood stage I in univentricular palliation. PMID:27587504

  8. Hybrid treatment of aortic arch disease

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Patrick Bastos; Rossi, Fabio Henrique; Moreira, Samuel Martins; Issa, Mario; Izukawa, Nilo Mitsuru; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas J.; Spina Neto, Domingos; Kambara, Antônio Massamitsu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The management of thoracic aortic disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta are technically challenging and is an area in constant development and innovation. Objective To analyze early and midterm results of hybrid treatment of arch aortic disease. Methods Retrospective study of procedures performed from January 2010 to December 2012. The end points were the technical success, therapeutic success, morbidity and mortality, neurologic outcomes, the rate of endoleaks and reinterventions. Results A total of 95 patients treated for thoracic aortic diseases in this period, 18 underwent hybrid treatment and entered in this study. The average ages were 62.3 years. The male was present in 66.7%. The technical and therapeutic success was 94.5% e 83.3%. The perioperative mortality rate of 11.1%. There is any death during one-year follow- up. The reoperation rates were 16.6% due 2 cases of endoleak Ia and one case of endoleak II. There is any occlusion of anatomic or extra anatomic bypass during follow up. Conclusion In our study, the hybrid treatment of aortic arch disease proved to be a feasible alternative of conventional surgery. The therapeutic success rates and re- interventions obtained demonstrate the necessity of thorough clinical follow-up of these patients in a long time. PMID:25714205

  9. Mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, L; Cobo, F; Miranda, C; Lara, J

    2000-01-01

    A 61-year-old diabetic woman presented with a mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch, also involving the left subclavian and vertebral arteries, caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Two months before, she had suffered from staphylococcal septic arthritis in her left knee. The patient was treated with antibiotics and an emergency operation was performed involving aneurysm excision and in situ synthetic graft replacement. She died on the fourth postoperative day from hemorrhagic shock. PMID:10961533

  10. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously. PMID:25304052

  11. Crater-Like Ulceration of Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Simon, Caterina; Calabrese, Alice; Canu, Gianluca; Merlo, Maurizio; Galletti, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old female who presented to our hospital with signs of hemorrhagic shock and breathlessness. A transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated pericardial effusion. Computed tomography of the chest showed a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch with an intramural hematoma of the ascending and descending aorta. Endovascular repair with stent-grafting was urgently performed and a pericardial window placement was done to reduce mediastinal bleeding. PMID:26798748

  12. Saccular Aneurysms of the Transverse Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the aortic arch, whether single or multiple, are uncommon. The choice of repair technique is influenced by patients' comorbidities and age. Repairing saccular aneurysms with traditional open techniques can be technically demanding; therefore, endovascular technology and a variety of hybrid approaches have been developed to facilitate such repairs and, potentially, to improve clinical outcomes, especially in high-risk patients. There have been no large, randomized studies to compare the outcomes of these different treatment options in patients with single or multiple saccular aneurysms of the arch. In this review, we outline the etiology and common locations of these aneurysms, the different open, completely endovascular, and hybrid techniques used to treat them, and the treatment selection process. PMID:26798759

  13. Aortic arch vessel anomalies associated with persistent trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Mehrzad; Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Foroughi, Amin Abolhasani

    2012-01-01

    Developmental anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and persistent trigeminal artery that is the most common of the four anomalous carotid-basilar anastomoses are repeatedly reported in the literature as separate entities. Herein we report a previously undescribed variant including the coexistence of persistent trigeminal artery, truncus bicaroticus and direct origin of left vertebral artery from aortic arch. PMID:22542381

  14. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William J.; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. We here combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alters as a result of local interventions to obstruct individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy guided femtosecond laser based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 hours. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes however were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  15. Blood flow characteristics in the aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Mihaiescu, Mihai; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2012-11-01

    The purpose with this study is to investigate the flow characteristics of blood in the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with specific locations in the arterial tree. Considering atherogenesis, it is claimed that the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) along with its temporal and spatial gradients play an important role in the development of the disease. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics, that in turn depends on the geometry as well as the rheological properties of blood. In this numerical work, the time dependent fluid flow during the entire cardiac cycle is fully resolved. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different Red Blood Cell loading. Data obtained through Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging have been used in order to reconstruct geometries of the the aortic arch. Here, three different geometries are studied out of which two display malformations that can be found in patients having the genetic disorder Turner's syndrome. The simulations show a highly complex flow with regions of secondary flow that is enhanced for the diseased aortas. The financial support from the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Sweden-America Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. Critical Transitions in Early Embryonic Aortic Arch Patterning and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, William J.; Dur, Onur; Wang, Yajuan; Patrick, Michael J.; Tinney, Joseph P.; Keller, Bradley B.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from the bilaterally symmetric embryonic aortic arches to the mature great vessels is a complex morphogenetic process, requiring both vasculogenic and angiogenic mechanisms. Early aortic arch development occurs simultaneously with rapid changes in pulsatile blood flow, ventricular function, and downstream impedance in both invertebrate and vertebrate species. These dynamic biomechanical environmental landscapes provide critical epigenetic cues for vascular growth and remodeling. In our previous work, we examined hemodynamic loading and aortic arch growth in the chick embryo at Hamburger-Hamilton stages 18 and 24. We provided the first quantitative correlation between wall shear stress (WSS) and aortic arch diameter in the developing embryo, and observed that these two stages contained different aortic arch patterns with no inter-embryo variation. In the present study, we investigate these biomechanical events in the intermediate stage 21 to determine insights into this critical transition. We performed fluorescent dye microinjections to identify aortic arch patterns and measured diameters using both injection recordings and high-resolution optical coherence tomography. Flow and WSS were quantified with 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Dye injections revealed that the transition in aortic arch pattern is not a uniform process and multiple configurations were documented at stage 21. CFD analysis showed that WSS is substantially elevated compared to both the previous (stage 18) and subsequent (stage 24) developmental time-points. These results demonstrate that acute increases in WSS are followed by a period of vascular remodeling to restore normative hemodynamic loading. Fluctuations in blood flow are one possible mechanism that impacts the timing of events such as aortic arch regression and generation, leading to the variable configurations at stage 21. Aortic arch variations noted during normal rapid vascular remodeling at stage 21 identify a

  17. Minimally Invasive Techniques for Total Aortic Arch Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Faulds, Jason; Sandhu, Harleen K.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Safi, Hazim J.

    2016-01-01

    The cumulative experience with endovascular aortic repair in the descending thoracic and infrarenal aorta has led to increased interest in endovascular aortic arch reconstruction. Open total arch replacement is a robust operation that can be performed with excellent results. However, it requires cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest and, therefore, may not be tolerated by all patients. Minimally invasive techniques have been considered as an alternative and include hybrid arch debranching, parallel stent graft deployment in the chimney and snorkel configurations, and complete endovascular branched reconstruction with multi-branched devices. This review discusses the evolving use of endovascular techniques in the management of aortic arch pathology and considers their relevance in an era of safe and durable open aortic arch reconstruction. PMID:27127562

  18. Minimally Invasive Techniques for Total Aortic Arch Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Faulds, Jason; Sandhu, Harleen K; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J

    2016-01-01

    The cumulative experience with endovascular aortic repair in the descending thoracic and infrarenal aorta has led to increased interest in endovascular aortic arch reconstruction. Open total arch replacement is a robust operation that can be performed with excellent results. However, it requires cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest and, therefore, may not be tolerated by all patients. Minimally invasive techniques have been considered as an alternative and include hybrid arch debranching, parallel stent graft deployment in the chimney and snorkel configurations, and complete endovascular branched reconstruction with multi-branched devices. This review discusses the evolving use of endovascular techniques in the management of aortic arch pathology and considers their relevance in an era of safe and durable open aortic arch reconstruction. PMID:27127562

  19. A case of neonatal arterial thrombosis mimicking interrupted aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Gürsu, Hazım Alper; Varan, Birgül; Oktay, Ayla; Özkan, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal arterial thrombosis is a very rare entity with clinical findings resembling coarctation of aorta or interrupted aortic arch. A two day-old male newborn was admitted to a different hospital with difficulty in sucking and sleepiness. On echocardiographic examination, a diagnosis of interrupted aortic arch was made and he was treated with prostoglandin E2. When the patient presented to our center, physical examination revealed that his feet were bilaterally cold. The pulses were not palpable and there were ecchymotic regions in the lower extremities. Echocardiography ruled out interrupted aortic arch. Computerized tomographic angiography revealed a large thrombosis and total occlusion of the abdominal aorta. Since there was no response to treatment with tissue plasminogen activator, we performed thrombectomy. Homozygous Factor V Leiden and Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations were found in this patient. Neonatal aortic thrombosis which is observed very rarely and fatal should be considered in the differential diagnosis of coarctation of aorta and interrupted aortic arch. PMID:26265897

  20. Aortic arch repair today: open repair is best for most arch lesions.

    PubMed

    Coselli, J S; Green, S Y

    2015-08-01

    The transverse aortic arch is challenging to repair by either evolving open or emerging endovascular approaches. Contemporary experience in aortic arch repair can be difficult to assess because clinical practice varies substantially among centers with regard to temperature targets for hypothermic circulatory arrest, temperature monitoring sites, circulating perfusate temperatures, cerebral perfusion monitoring techniques, perfusion catheter flow rates, cannulation sites, pH management, and protective pharmacologic agents. Repair of the aortic arch has changed substantially over the last decade; these changes appear to have substantially reduced patient risk. In general, contemporary outcomes of open aortic arch repair are good to excellent. When acute aortic dissection is absent, many centers report early mortality rates below 5%; when acute aortic dissection is present, these rates are doubled or tripled. Not unexpectedly, mortality rates for total transverse aortic arch repair with elephant trunk or frozen elephant trunk approaches are greater than those for hemiarch repair (7-17% vs. 3-4%). In contemporary reports of mixed hemiarch and total arch repairs for aortic aneurysm, several authors report early mortality rates and stroke rates below 5%. Surprisingly, mortality rates for reoperation are not unlike those for primary repair and range from 8% to 9%; however, the risk of stroke appears somewhat greater and ranges from 5% to 6%. PMID:25752255

  1. Vascular airway compression management in a case of aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Dutta, Vikas; Negi, Sunder; Puri, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Airway compression due to distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair has been documented. This case of tracheal and left main stem bronchus compression due to aortic aneurysm occurred in a 42-year-old man. The airway compression poses a challenge for the anesthesiologist in airway management during aortic aneurysm repair surgery. The fiber-optic bronchoscope is very helpful in decision-making both preoperatively and postoperatively in such cases. We report a case of airway compression in a 42-year-old patient who underwent elective distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair. PMID:27397474

  2. Vascular airway compression management in a case of aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Alok; Dutta, Vikas; Negi, Sunder; Puri, G D

    2016-01-01

    Airway compression due to distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair has been documented. This case of tracheal and left main stem bronchus compression due to aortic aneurysm occurred in a 42-year-old man. The airway compression poses a challenge for the anesthesiologist in airway management during aortic aneurysm repair surgery. The fiber-optic bronchoscope is very helpful in decision-making both preoperatively and postoperatively in such cases. We report a case of airway compression in a 42-year-old patient who underwent elective distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair. PMID:27397474

  3. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M.

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  4. Computed tomography angiography of hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair of the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Nila J; Oderich, Gustavo S; Vrtiska, Terri J; Williamson, Eric E; Araoz, Philip A

    2013-05-01

    Endovascular repair of the aorta has traditionally been limited to the abdominal aorta and, more recently, the descending thoracic aorta. However, recently hybrid repairs (a combination of open surgical and endovascular repair) have made endovascular repair of the aortic arch possible. Hybrid repair of the aortic arch typically involves an open surgical debranching procedure that allows for revascularization of the aortic arch vessels and subsequent endovascular stent placement. These approaches avoid the deep hypothermic circulatory arrest required for full, open surgical repair of the aortic arch. In hybrid repairs, the stent landing zone determines which branch vessels will be covered and therefore need revascularization. This article will review the preprocedure assessment with computed tomography angiography, techniques for revascularization and postprocedure complications. PMID:23621141

  5. Persistent right aortic arch in a yearling horse.

    PubMed Central

    Butt, T D; MacDonald, D G; Crawford, W H; Dechant, J E

    1998-01-01

    A 14-month-old filly with chronic pharyngitis was diagnosed with incomplete esophageal constriction and megaesophagus due to a persistent right aortic arch. This report is unusual because clinical signs of respiratory dysfunction secondary to chronic regurgitation occurred prior to the recognition of dysphagia. PMID:9818140

  6. Branched and fenestrated options to treat aortic arch aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Maurel, Blandine; Mastracci, Tara M; Spear, Rafaelle; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Conventional surgical repair of aortic arch aneurysms using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest remains the gold standard, however it is associated with a substantial mortality and morbidity rate, especially in the elderly. Hybrid techniques avoid aortic cross-clamping and circulatory arrest, but are of limited use and are only applicable to selected patients. The development of new devices to treat aortic arch aneurysms endovascularly has the potential to offer a treatment modality to patients unfit for an open repair. We present the challenges specific to endovascular arch repair based on our experience and the literature available from the first experience in 1999 to the third generation graft currently commonly used. Following an initial learning curve associated with the use of the third generation arch branch device, along with careful patient selection and operator experience, early results are promising. Technical success was achieved in all cases, there was no early mortality and strokes were noted in 11%. As with branched and fenestrated technology for thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, the use of total endovascular repair for arch pathology will require an evolution in endovascular practice and device design. However, at present, the early use of the latest generation device offers a novel approach to patients who previously had no surgical options. PMID:27332680

  7. Low Density Lipoprotein transport in the normal human aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Soulis, JV; Dimitrakopoulou, M; Giannoglou, GD

    2014-01-01

    Background: To understand the genesis and progression of atherosclerosis is essential to elucidate the blood flow and the transport of molecules in the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this computational study is to elucidate the relationship between low wall shear stress (WSS) - high site concentration of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and atherosclerotic sites in the normal human aortic arch under physiological flow and mass transport conditions. Methods: The numerical simulation couples the flow equations with the transport equation applying realistic boundary conditions at the wall in terms of blood-side concentration. The blood is considered to be non-Newtonian fluid obeying to the power law. Suitable mass transport conditions are specified at the wall. Results: Aortic arch walls are exposed to cholesterolemic environment although the applied mass and flow conditions refer to normal human geometry and normal mass-flow conditions. The luminal surface LDL concentration varies inversely with the WSS. Regions of high LDL luminal surface concentration do not necessarily co-locate to the sites of lowest WSS. Concave sides of the aortic arch exhibit, relatively to the convex sides, elevated concentration of the LDL. The area averaged normalized LDL concentration over the entire normal aortic arch is 1.267. The daughter aortic arch vessels exhibit, relatively to the main aorta, elevated LDL concentrations. Conclusions: The near wall paths of the velocities might be the most important factor for the elevated LDL concentration at areas located either at the vicinity of bifurcations regions or at high curvature regions. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (3): 221-225. PMID:25694755

  8. Total Aortic Arch Replacement: Superior Ventriculo-Arterial Coupling with Decellularized Allografts Compared with Conventional Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Schmack, Bastian; Korkmaz, Sevil; Li, Shiliang; Chaimow, Nicole; Pätzold, Ines; Becher, Peter Moritz; Hartyánszky, István; Soós, Pál; Merkely, Gergő; Németh, Balázs Tamás; Istók, Roland; Veres, Gábor; Merkely, Béla; Terytze, Konstantin; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, no experimental or clinical study provides detailed analysis of vascular impedance changes after total aortic arch replacement. This study investigated ventriculoarterial coupling and vascular impedance after replacement of the aortic arch with conventional prostheses vs. decellularized allografts. Methods After preparing decellularized aortic arch allografts, their mechanical, histological and biochemical properties were evaluated and compared to native aortic arches and conventional prostheses in vitro. In open-chest dogs, total aortic arch replacement was performed with conventional prostheses and compared to decellularized allografts (n = 5/group). Aortic flow and pressure were recorded continuously, left ventricular pressure-volume relations were measured by using a pressure-conductance catheter. From the hemodynamic variables end-systolic elastance (Ees), arterial elastance (Ea) and ventriculoarterial coupling were calculated. Characteristic impedance (Z) was assessed by Fourier analysis. Results While Ees did not differ between the groups and over time (4.1±1.19 vs. 4.58±1.39 mmHg/mL and 3.21±0.97 vs. 3.96±1.16 mmHg/mL), Ea showed a higher increase in the prosthesis group (4.01±0.67 vs. 6.18±0.20 mmHg/mL, P<0.05) in comparison to decellularized allografts (5.03±0.35 vs. 5.99±1.09 mmHg/mL). This led to impaired ventriculoarterial coupling in the prosthesis group, while it remained unchanged in the allograft group (62.5±50.9 vs. 3.9±23.4%). Z showed a strong increasing tendency in the prosthesis group and it was markedly higher after replacement when compared to decellularized allografts (44.6±8.3dyn·sec·cm−5 vs. 32.4±2.0dyn·sec·cm−5, P<0.05). Conclusions Total aortic arch replacement leads to contractility-afterload mismatch by means of increased impedance and invert ventriculoarterial coupling ratio after implantation of conventional prostheses. Implantation of decellularized allografts preserves vascular impedance

  9. Endovascular repair of a type B aortic dissection with a right-sided aortic arch: case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Right-sided aortic arch is a rare anomaly, and aortic dissection involving a right-sided aortic arch is extremely rare. We report the case of a 65-year-old man with a right-sided aortic arch and a right descending aortic dissection and a stent-graft was accurately deployed without perioperative complications. There were no any complaints and complications after 18 months follow-up. The CTA demonstrated that the false lumen was largely thrombosed only with a mild type II endoleak and a mild descending aortic expansion. We feel that endovascular repair is feasible to patient of type B aortic dissection with a right-sided aortic arch. However, long-term clinical efficacy and safety have yet to be confirmed. PMID:23343010

  10. Computational Study of Growth and Remodeling in the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Patrick W.; Taber, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    Opening angles (OAs) are associated with growth and remodeling in arteries. One curiosity has been the relatively large OAs found in the aortic arch of some animals. Here, we use computational models to explore the reasons behind this phenomenon. The artery is assumed to contain a smooth muscle/collagen phase and an elastin phase. In the models, growth and remodeling of smooth muscle/collagen depends on wall stress and fluid shear stress. Remodeling of elastin, which normally turns over very slowly, is neglected. The results indicate that OAs generally increase with longitudinal curvature (torus model), earlier elastin production during development, and decreased wall stiffness. Correlating these results with available experimental data suggests that all of these effects may contribute to the large OAs in the aortic arch. The models also suggest that the slow turnover rate of elastin limits longitudinal growth. These results should promote increased understanding of the causes of residual stress in arteries. PMID:18792831

  11. Left cervical aortic arch: diagnosis by radioisotope and ultrasound techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Camiel, M.R.; Glanz, S.; Gordon, D.H.; Weiner, R.

    1982-01-01

    Two case histories are presented of patients with a developmental variant of the heart. The condition is usually innocuous but its appearance is confusing and incorrect diagnoses are possible. Although the abnormality is usually first detected by routine chest X-ray, radionuclide angiography and sonography are more appropriate diagnostic measures. The two methods can differentiate between the cervical aortic arch and aneurysm or lung tumor. (JMT)

  12. Aneurysm of an Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery Successfully Excluded by a Thoracic Aortic Stent Graft with Supra-aortic Bypass of Three Arch Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Munneke, Graham J. Loosemore, Thomas M.; Belli, Anna-Maria; Thompson, Matt M.; Morgan, Robert A.

    2005-06-15

    An aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) arising from a left-sided aortic arch is the fourth most common aortic arch anomaly. Aneurysmal dilatation of the ARSA requires treatment because of the associated risk of rupture. We present a case where supra-aortic bypass of the arch vessels was performed to facilitate exclusion of the aneurysm by a thoracic aortic stent graft.

  13. Haemodynamics in the mouse aortic arch computed from MRI-derived velocities at the aortic root.

    PubMed

    Van Doormaal, Mark A; Kazakidi, Asimina; Wylezinska, Marzena; Hunt, Anthony; Tremoleda, Jordi L; Protti, Andrea; Bohraus, Yvette; Gsell, Willy; Weinberg, Peter D; Ethier, C Ross

    2012-11-01

    Mice are widely used to investigate atherogenesis, which is known to be influenced by stresses related to blood flow. However, numerical characterization of the haemodynamic environment in the commonly studied aortic arch has hitherto been based on idealizations of inflow into the aorta. Our purpose in this work was to numerically characterize the haemodynamic environment in the mouse aortic arch using measured inflow velocities, and to relate the resulting shear stress patterns to known locations of high- and low-lesion prevalence. Blood flow velocities were measured in the aortic root of C57/BL6 mice using phase-contrast MRI. Arterial geometries were obtained by micro-CT of corrosion casts. These data were used to compute blood flow and wall shear stress (WSS) patterns in the arch. WSS profiles computed using realistic and idealized aortic root velocities differed significantly. An unexpected finding was that average WSS in the high-lesion-probability region on the inner wall was actually higher than the WSS in the low-probability region on the outer wall. Future studies of mouse aortic arch haemodynamics should avoid the use of idealized inflow velocity profiles. Lesion formation does not seem to uniquely associate with low or oscillating WSS in this segment, suggesting that other factors may also play a role in lesion localization. PMID:22764131

  14. Complex aortic arch anomaly: Right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery, fenestrated proximal right and duplicated proximal left vertebral arteries—CT angiography findings and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Elizabeth; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2015-01-01

    Congenital aortic arch and vertebral artery anomalies are a relatively rare finding discovered on imaging either incidentally or for evaluation of entities like dysphagia or subclavian steal. Right aortic arch is an uncommon anatomical anomaly that occurs in less than 0.1% of the population, and in half of these cases the left subclavian artery is also aberrant.1 Unilateral vertebral artery (VA) duplication is rare with an observed prevalence of 0.72% in cadavers.2 Fenestration of the VA is more common than duplication, with a prevalence of approximately 0.23%–1.95%.3,4 We describe the case of a 25-year-old female who was found to have a right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery, duplicated left vertebral artery and a fenestrated right vertebral artery on CT angiography performed for evaluation of dysphagia. This combination of findings has not been reported before, to the best of our knowledge. We review the embryologic mechanism for the development of the normal aortic arch, right aortic arch, vertebral artery duplication and vertebral artery fenestration. The incidence of these entities, resultant symptoms and clinical implications are also reviewed. The increased associated incidence of aneurysm formation, dissection, arteriovenous malformations and thromboembolic events with fenestration is also discussed. PMID:26306929

  15. Results and challenges for the endovascular repair of aortic arch aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Lioupis, Christos; Abraham, Cherrie Z

    2011-09-01

    Endovascular aortic arch reconstruction provides an attractive alternative to treat aortic arch disease in high-risk patients who would otherwise be unsuitable for open repair. Success with multibranched stent grafts in the thoracoabdominal aorta along with recent advances in design such as the precurved inner nitinol cannula have simplified the endovascular reconstruction of aortic arch aneurysms with multibranched stent grafts. These devices allow for greater flexibility in conforming to difficult anatomy and preserving important side branches. During the first surgical stage, a left carotid -subclavian bypass or left subclavian artery transposition is performed. The second stage is the endovascular procedure. The device is inserted through a transfemoral approach, and crossing of the aortic valve with the device is necessary. The stent graft is deployed during brief periods of rapid pacing. Bridging from the branches to the innominate and left common carotid arteries requires a suitable covered stent. In the case of a large-diameter innominate artery, a custom-made bridging limb has to be used to ensure that adequate length and size are available. Direct flow to the innominate and left common carotid arteries do not cease for any significant time during the procedure. Initial experience with mean follow up more than 6 months is encouraging. The method is not suitable for patients with extensive atheromatous involvement of the aortic arch. Careful preoperative planning (preoperative imaging, device construction, and access issues), high endovascular skills, and appropriate imaging equipment are imperative for a successful result. Long-term follow-up is necessary to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these new devices. PMID:21821619

  16. Impending rupture in an aortic arch aneurysm by Candida infection.

    PubMed

    Minami, H; Wakita, N; Kawanishi, Y; Kitano, I; Sakata, M

    2001-03-01

    A 68-year-old man was hospitalized with the complaints of left back pain and fever. He had a history of using steroids to treat uveitis for about thirty years. Computed tomography on the chest demonstrated an impending rupture in an aortic arch aneurysm, which was consequently surgically excised. Candida albicans was identified in the wall of the aneurysm, so fluconazole and itraconazole were administered. The patient was discharged at 120 days after surgery without recrudescence of the candida. To our knowledge, this is the fifteenth case of a successfully treated aneurysm caused by candida infection. PMID:11305059

  17. Mycotic aneurysm of the distal aortic arch caused by Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Mitsuharu; Hattori, Koji; Shibata, Toshihiko; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Hirai, Hidekazu; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2006-04-01

    We describe an unusual case of a thoracic aortic aneurysm caused by Aspergillus. A 70-year-old man underwent prednisolone and Ara-C treatments for a myelodysplastic syndrome. Blood examination revealed pancytopenia. Under these treatments, an aneurysm presented at the distal aortic arch. He underwent resection of the aneurysm with a graft repair covered by a pedicled omentum flap, followed by prolonged administration of micafungin and itraconazole for a mycotic aneurysm. The postoperative course was favorable without complications. Serum C-reactive protein became negative and he was discharged 2 months after the surgery. However, 4 months after the surgery, he died from worsening of the myelodysplastic syndrome. The prognosis for patients with mycotic aneurysms is poor due to their immunocompetent condition arising from underlying diseases. Therefore, in addition to prompt treatment with antifungal agents combined with surgical debridement, control of the underlying disease is essential for improving the outcome. PMID:16642922

  18. Arch to Descending Aorta Extra-anatomic Aortic Repair for Thoracic Stent Graft Infection.

    PubMed

    Gagné-Loranger, Maude; Dumont, Éric; Voisine, Pierre; Mohammadi, Siamak; Dagenais, François

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a pedunculated mass of the aortic isthmus. The patient was treated with bilateral carotid-subclavian bypass and a stent graft to cover the thrombus within the distal arch. The postoperative course was complicated by a stent graft infection. The patient underwent graft explantation with aortic continuity using extra-anatomic bypass from the aortic arch to the distal descending aorta. PMID:26481087

  19. Aortic Arch Aneurysms: Treatment with Extra anatomical Bypass and Endovascular Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Noriyuki; Shimono, Takatsugu; Hirano, Tadanori; Mizumoto, Toru; Ishida, Masaki; Fujii, Hideki; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-10-15

    Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is emerging as an attractive alternative to surgical graft replacement. However,patients with aortic arch aneurysms are often excluded from the target of endovascular repair because of lack of suitable landing zones, especially at the proximal ones. In this paper we describe our method for treating patients with aortic arch aneurysms using a combination of extra anatomical bypass surgery and endovascular stent-grafting.

  20. Closed injury of the aortic arch and subsequent formation of a false aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Janevski, B

    1983-01-01

    The case history of a 25-year-old man who sustained a blunt trauma to the chest in a car accident and developed a false aneurysm of the aortic isthmus is reported. The injury of the aortic arch was not initially recognized. The diagnosis was established on the chest X-rays and arteriograms obtained 1 year after the trauma. The clinical and radiological signs of closed injuries of the aortic arch are reviewed. PMID:6617430

  1. Aortic Arch Mycotic Aneurysm Due to Scedosporium Apiospermum Reconstructed With Homografts.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Lucas, Arnau; Reyes-Juárez, José Luis; Nazarena Pizzi, María; Permanyer, Eduard; Evangelista, Arturo; Galiñanes, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    A 39-year-old female, active parenteral drug user was diagnosed of spondylodiscitis. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed an extensive aortic arch aneurysm. A positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scan, showing significant aortic wall uptake of the tracer through the whole aortic arch and the D8-D9 intervertebral disc, allowed us to suspect an aortitis despite negative blood cultures. The aneurysm was resected and reconstructed with 2 aortic homografts. Cultures of specimens from the aortic wall were positive to the fungi Scedosporium apiospermum. A new PET-CT scan 4 months after surgery showed absence of tracer uptake both at the homografts site and intervertebral disc. PMID:26046885

  2. Long-Term Changes in the Distal Aorta after Aortic Arch Replacement in Acute DeBakey Type I Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwangjo; Jeong, Jeahwa; Park, Jongyoon; Yun, Sungsil; Woo, Jongsu

    2016-01-01

    Background We analyzed the long-term results of ascending aortic replacement and arch aortic replacement in acute DeBakey type I aortic dissections to measure the differences in the distal aortic changes with extension of the aortic replacement. Methods We reviewed 142 cases of acute DeBakey type I aortic dissections (1996–2015). Seventy percent of the cases were ascending aortic replacements, and 30% of the cases underwent total arch aortic replacement, which includes the aorta from the root to the beginning of the descending aorta with the 3 arch branches. Fourteen percent (20 cases) resulted in surgical mortality and 86% of cases that survived had a mean follow-up period of 6.6±4.6 years. Among these cases, 64% of the patients were followed up with computed tomography (CT) angiograms with the duration of the final CT check period of 4.9±2.9 years. Results There were 15 cases of reoperation in 13 patients. Of these 15 cases, 13 cases were in the ascending aortic replacement group and 2 cases were in the total arch aortic replacement group. Late mortality occurred in 13 cases; 10 cases were in the ascending aortic replacement group and 3 cases were in the total arch aortic replacement group. Eight patients died of a distal aortic problem in the ascending aortic replacement group, and 1 patient died of distal aortic rupture in the total arch aortic replacement group. The follow-up CT angiogram showed that 69.8% of the ascending aortic replacement group and 35.7% of the total arch aortic replacement group developed distal aortic dilatation (p=0.0022). Conclusion The total arch aortic replacement procedure developed fewer distal remnant aortic problems from dilatation than the ascending aortic replacement procedure in acute type I aortic dissections. PMID:27525235

  3. Safety profile of decellularized, cryopreserved pulmonary allografts when used in the aortic position for neonatal arch reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Knepp, Marc D; Ohye, Richard G; Gajarski, Robert J

    2011-08-01

    Cryopreserved pulmonary allograft is frequently used to reconstruct the hypoplastic aortic arch. A decellularized graft preparation is available as an alternative reconstructive material. This case series profiles our experience using this material for neonatal aortic arch reconstruction. Data from 14 patients who received decellularized pulmonary allograft (DCPA) from 2001 to 2003 included the following: diagnosis; age at implantation; perioperative complications (graft bleeding or dehiscence); intermediate-term results, including infection, recurrent arch gradient (>10 mmHg), graft calcification, or aneurysm; need for graft removal; and cause of death. Eleven (79%) patients survived their initial procedure. Median follow-up was 26 (range: 1-110) months. No early graft dehiscence was reported. No child developed aortic arch obstruction or graft calcification. Twelve patients (86%) underwent postoperative cardiac catheterizations with no measurable arch gradient. No intermediate-term aneurysm, dehiscence, or graft removal occurred. Three early deaths were due to arrhythmia, non-shunt-related hypoxia, and renal failure, and one, intermediate-term death was respiratory syncytial virus related. This series found that DCPA reconstructed arches have a low adverse event profile. No complications occurred. Because this graft material, which may be less immunogenic, has important implications for this subgroup, who are at increased future transplant risk, larger trials evaluating longer-term safety and immunogenicity are warranted. PMID:21479906

  4. Sun's procedure for complex aortic arch repair: total arch replacement using a tetrafurcate graft with stented elephant trunk implantation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei-Guo; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Yong-Min; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2013-09-01

    The Sun's procedure is a surgical technique proposed by Dr. Li-Zhong Sun in 2002 that integrates total aortic arch replacement using a tetrafurcated graft with implantation of a specially designed frozen elephant trunk (Cronus(®)) in the descending aorta. It is used as a treatment option for extensive aortic dissections or aneurysms involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and the descending aorta. The technical essentials of Sun's procedure include implantation of the special open stented graft into the descending aorta, total arch replacement with a 4-branched vascular graft, right axillary artery cannulation, selective antegrade cerebral perfusion for brain protection, moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest at 25 °C, a special anastomotic sequence for aortic reconstruction (i.e., proximal descending aorta → left carotid artery → ascending aorta → left subclavian artery → innominate artery), and early rewarming and reperfusion after distal anastomosis to minimize cerebral and cardiac ischemia. The core advantage of Sun's procedure lies in the use of a unique stented graft, which has superior technical simplicity, flexibility, inherent mechanical durability and an extra centimeter of attached regular vascular graft at both ends. Since its introduction in 2003, the Sun's procedure has produced satisfactory early and long-term results in over 8,000 patients in China and more than 200 patients in South American countries. In a series of 1,092 patients, the authors have achieved an in-hospital mortality rate of 6.27% (7.98% in emergent or urgent vs. 3.98% in elective cases). Given the accumulating clinical experience and the consequent, continual evolution of surgical indications, the Sun's procedure is becoming increasingly applied/used worldwide as an innovative and imaginative enhancement of surgical options for the dissected (or aneurysmal) ascending aorta, aortic arch and proximal descending aorta, and may become the next standard treatment for type

  5. Equine pericardial roll graft replacement of infected pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Resection of the infected aorta, debridement of the surrounding tissue, in situ graft replacement, and omentopexy is the standard procedure for treating infected aortic aneurysms, but the question of which graft material is optimal is still a matter of controversy. We recently treated a patient with an infected thoracic aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm was located in the proximal aortic arch. Because the patients had previously undergone abdominal surgery, the aortic arch were replaced in situ with a branched equine pericardial roll grafts. The patient is alive and well 23 months after the operation. PMID:22583570

  6. Prenatal diagnosis of tetralogy of Fallot with a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Andrew L; Pruetz, Jay D; Kung, Grace C

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we present a case of prenatally diagnosed tetralogy of Fallot with a double aortic arch, correlating images from fetal echocardiography, transthoracic echocardiography, and cardiac MRI. PMID:26983561

  7. Endovascular repair of an aortic arch pseudoaneurysm with double chimney stent grafts: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aortic arch pseudoaneurysm is a rare condition but carries a high risk of rupture. We report a case of a 45-year-old man with aortic arch pseudoaneurysm between left common carotid artery (LCCA) and left subclavian artery (LSA), in which a endovascular stent graft combined with double chimneys covered stents were successfully placed. There were no any complaints and complications after 12 months follow-up. The CTA demonstrated thrombus formation in the pseudoaneurysm lumen, no endoleak and the aortic arch, LCCA and LSA were all patent. We feel that the combined endovascular and double chimneys may be a valuable therapeutic alternative when treating aortic arch lesion. However, long-term clinical efficacy and safety have yet to be confirmed. PMID:23577875

  8. Imaging a boa constrictor--the incomplete double aortic arch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rajeev L; Kanwar, Anubhav; Jacobi, Adam; Sanz, Javier

    2012-11-01

    Incomplete double aortic arch is a rare anomaly resulting from atresia rather than complete involution in the distal left arch resulting in a non-patent fibrous cord between the left arch and descending thoracic aorta. This anatomic anomaly may cause symptomatic vascular rings, leading to stridor, wheezing, or dysphagia, requiring surgical transection of the fibrous cord. Herein, we describe an asymptomatic 59 year-old man presenting for contrast-enhanced CT angiography to assess cardiac anatomy prior to radiofrequency ablation, who was incidentally found to have an incomplete double aortic arch with hypoplasia of the left arch segment and an aortic diverticulum. Recognition of this abnormality by imaging is important to inform both corrective surgery in symptomatic patients, as well as assist in the planning of percutaneous coronary and vascular interventions. PMID:22542042

  9. Resection of the Aortic Arch with Moderate Hypothermia and Temporary Circulatory Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Speir, Alan M.; Grey, Douglas P.; Cooley, Denton A.

    1982-01-01

    Resection of the aortic arch with the use of moderate hypothermia and temporary circulatory arrest was performed in a 63-year-old woman. The simplified technique is described, along with a brief review of the literature. The patient recovered uneventfully. After this manuscript was prepared, two other patients underwent successful replacement of the aortic arch for aneurysm. These cases are also summarized briefly in an illustrated table. PMID:15226933

  10. Neonatal magnetic resonance imaging in double aortic arch diagnosed prenatally by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Trobo Marina, Duna; Bravo, Coral; Lancharro, Ángel; Gámez Alderete, Francisco; Marín, Carlos; de León-Luis, Juan

    2016-05-01

    Congenital double aortic arch (DAA) is an uncommon vascular anomaly; however, its prenatal detection is associated with congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities, including 22q11 deletion. We present a case of DAA diagnosed prenatally. DAA can be diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound in the transverse three vessel-trachea view, which shows a trident image formed by a complete vascular ring and the ductus arteriosus. Postnatal magnetic resonance images in this view correlate well with prenatal ultrasound images and help in confirmation of diagnosis, evaluation of the risk of airway or esophageal compression, and planning of surgery. PMID:26979672

  11. Hybrid intervention for type A aortic arch interruption and a giant subclavian artery aneurysm in an adult.

    PubMed

    Oz, Kursad; Erek, Ersin; Yildirim, Aydin

    2016-06-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a very rare but well-described congenital anomaly. Concomitant presentation of interrupted aortic arch and giant subclavian artery aneurysm is an unusual event in adulthood. To the best of our knowledge, hybrid intervention for type A aortic arch interruption with a giant aneurysm of the subclavian artery is an alternative approach for the management of these concomitant pathologies in adults. PMID:27071339

  12. Some mice feature 5th pharyngeal arch arteries and double-lumen aortic arch malformations.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Stefan H; Weninger, Wolfgang J

    2012-01-01

    A 5th pair of pharyngeal arch arteries (PAAs) has never been identified with certainty in mice. Murines in general are considered to not develop a 5th pair. If true, the significance of the mouse as a model for researching the genesis of malformations of the great intrathoracic arteries is limited. We aimed to investigate whether mouse embryos develop a 5th pair of PAAs and to identify malformations known to be caused by defective remodelling of the 5th PAAs. We employed the high-resolution episcopic microscopy method for creating digital volume data and three-dimensional (3D) computer models of the great intrathoracic arteries of 30 mouse embryos from days 12-12.5 post conception and 180 mouse fetuses from days 14.5 and 15.5 post conception. The 3D models of the fetuses were screened for the presence of a double-lumen aortic arch malformation. We identified such a malformation in 1 fetus. The 3D models of the embryos were analysed for the presence of 5th PAAs. Six of the 30 embryos (20%) showed a 5th PAA bilaterally, and an additional 9 (30%) showed a 5th PAA unilaterally. Our results prove that some mice do develop a 5th pair of PAAs. They also show that malformations which occur rarely in humans and result from defective remodelling of the left 5th PAA can be identified in mice as well. Thus, the mouse does represent an excellent model for researching the mechanisms driving PAA remodelling and the genesis of malformations of the great intrathoracic arteries. PMID:22287557

  13. The influence of aortic dimensions on calculated wall shear stress in the mouse aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Trachet, Bram; Swillens, Abigail; Van Loo, Denis; Casteleyn, Christophe; De Paepe, Anne; Loeys, Bart; Segers, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, the influence of the aortic dimensions of an investigated mouse on its resulting wall shear stress (WSS) was studied. A numerical model of a mouse aortic arch was created based on a micro-CT scan of a vascular corrosion cast of an 8-week-old wild type mouse. This model was then rescaled to obtain five models with aortic root diameters corresponding to five different stages in the mouse life cycle varying from late fetal (0.7 mm) to old adult (1.5 mm). Consistent with literature, WSS values much higher than those normally encountered in humans were found. WSS was found to decrease rapidly in early life stages and to reach a plateau in adulthood, thus supporting a mediating role for WSS in arterial growth. Our results show that WSS values for mice should be interpreted very cautiously, and if possible an animal-specific geometry with animal-specific boundary conditions should be used. PMID:19221921

  14. Endovascular repair of traumatic aortic injury using a modified, commercially available endograft to preserve aortic arch branches.

    PubMed

    Kawajiri, Hidetake; Oka, Katsuhiko; Sakai, Osamu; Watanabe, Taiji; Kanda, Keiichi; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    A 25-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital after being involved in a high-speed motorcycle accident. Computed tomography angiography revealed a blunt traumatic aortic injury of the lesser curvature of the distal aortic arch accompanied by splintered fractures of the seventh thoracic vertebra and left clavicle. If the pseudoaneurysm had been treated with open surgical repair, then arch replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass, which was considered to be too invasive, would have been necessary. Therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was preferred as a first-line treatment to prevent pulmonary complications and hemorrhaging. Because the proximal landing zone for TEVAR was insufficient, we used a modified (fenestrated) commercially available endograft to preserve the branches of the aortic arch. Postoperative computed tomography scans confirmed that the pseudoaneurysm had been excluded without the endoleaks, and the aortic arch branches were patent. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and she was discharged from the hospital to have surgery for a vertebral fracture on postoperative day 6. PMID:24184496

  15. Hydrodynamic evaluation of a new dispersive aortic cannula (Stealthflow).

    PubMed

    Goto, Takeshi; Inamura, Takao; Shirota, Minori; Fukuda, Wakako; Fukuda, Ikuo; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Ito, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate flow from a new dispersive aortic cannula (Stealthflow) in the aortic arch using flow visualization methods. Particle image velocimetry was used to analyze flow dynamics in the mock aortic model. Flow patterns, velocity distribution, and streamlines with different shape cannulas were evaluated in a glass aortic arch model. We compared flow parameters in two different dispersive type cannulas: the Stealthflow and the Soft-flow cannula. A large vortex and regurgitant flow were observed in the aortic arch with both cannulas. With the Stealthflow cannula, a high-velocity area with a maximum velocity of 0.68 m/s appeared on the ostium of the cannula in the longitudinal plane. With the Soft-flow cannula, 'multiple jet streams, each with a velocity less than 0.60 m/s, were observed at the cannula outlet. Regurgitant flow from the cannula to the brachiocephalic artery and to the ascending aorta on the greater curvature was specific to the Soft-flow cannula. The degree of regurgitation on the same site was lower with the Stealthflow cannula than with the Soft-flow cannula. The Stealthflow cannula has similar flow properties to those of the Soft-flow cannula according to glass aortic model analysis. It generates gentle flow in the aortic arch and slow flow around the ostia of the aortic arch vessels. The Stealthflow cannula is as effective as the Soft-flow cannula. Care must be taken when the patient has thick atheromatous plaque or frail atheroma on the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. PMID:26526561

  16. [Total aortic arch replacement in Stanford type A aortic dissection using a new method of implanting the stented graft].

    PubMed

    Kiyama, Hiroshi; Kaki, Nobuaki; Shiomi, Daisuke; Shimada, Naohiro

    2012-07-01

    In surgery for Stanford type A aortic dissection (SAAD) with intimal tear in the arch or proximal descending aorta, we performed total arch replacement with frozen elephant trunk technique for the purpose of achieving complete exclusion of the entry. To reduce the circulatory arrest time, we developed a quick stent graft placement method in the proximal descending aorta. We reported the early results and assessed the efficacy of our new method. Between March 2006 and February 2010, 52 consecutive patients with SAAD were divided into 2 groups:group A consisted of 17 patients who received total arch replacement with our new method;group B consisted of 35 patients who received ascending aorta or partial arch replacement. The duration of operation and cardiopulmonary bypass were significantly longer in group A. However, the duration of circulatory arrest time and postoperative factors including hospital mortality did not differ in both groups. In group A, thrombus obliteration of the residual false lumen in the descending aorta was observed in 75% at 19.2±13.1 months postoperatively. Shrinkage of false lumen in the aortic arch occurred in 15 patients( 93.8%). There was no reoperation for the residual false lumen and late death. Total aortic arch replacement with our new method for SAAD is technically feasible without increasing the operative risk and might reduce the necessity for further operations. PMID:22750824

  17. Relay NBS Graft with the Plus Delivery System to Improve Deployment in Aortic Arch with Small Radius Curve

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Guastavino, Andrea; Scarano, Flavio; Passerone, Gian Carlo

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this report is to describe deployment of the Relay NBS Thoracic Stent Graft with the Plus Delivery System (Bolton Medical, Sunrise, FL) in a flexible resin arch model with a 15-mm radius curve as well as our preliminary clinical results. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System was evaluated by way of bench testing, which was performed with stent grafts with diameters ranging from 24 to 46 mm and lengths ranging from 100 to 250 mm in flexible resin arch models with a 15-mm arch radius of curvature. The deployment sequence was analyzed. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System was deployed in two patients, respectively, having a 6.5-cm penetrating aortic ulcer of the proximal third of the descending thoracic aorta and a DeBakey type-I aortic dissection with chronic false lumen dilatation after surgery due to an entry site at the distal thoracic aorta. Bench tests showed proper conformation and apposition of the Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System in the flexible resin model. This stent graft was deployed successfully into the two patients with a correct orientation of the first stent and without early or late complications. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System ensures an optimal conformation and apposition of the first stent in the aortic arch with a small radius of curvature.

  18. A Novel Surgical Technique for Right-Sided Interrupted Aortic Arch by Interposition of a Pulmonary Autograft Tube.

    PubMed

    Kato, Nobuyasu; Yamagishi, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Takako; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Asada, Satoshi; Hongu, Hisayuki; Yamashita, Eijiro; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2016-08-01

    Right-sided interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare cardiac anomaly. In general, the right bronchus sits higher than the left bronchus, so aortic arch reconstruction with a direct anastomosis has a risk of tracheal and bronchial obstruction. This report describes the successful definitive repair of a right-sided IAA in a 2.5-kg neonate by aortic arch reconstruction with a pulmonary autograft tube (PA tube). Postoperative three-dimensional multidetector computed tomography showed the reconstructed aortic arch without airway obstruction or aortic stenosis. The use of a PA tube is a simple and useful technique for aortic arch reconstruction in patients with a high risk of tracheal andbronchial obstruction, such as right-sided IAA. PMID:27449446

  19. Role of aortic arch vascular mechanics in cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Stephen A; Chirico, Daniele; Dempster, Kylie S; Shoemaker, J Kevin; O'Leary, Deborah D

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (cvBRS) measures the efficiency of the cardiovagal baroreflex to modulate heart rate in response to increases or decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP). Given that baroreceptors are located in the walls of the carotid sinuses (CS) and aortic arch (AA), the arterial mechanics of these sites are important contributors to cvBRS. However, the relative contribution of CS and AA mechanics to cvBRS remains unclear. This study employed sex differences as a model to test the hypothesis that differences in cvBRS between groups would be explained by the vascular mechanics of the AA but not the CS. Thirty-six young, healthy, normotensive individuals (18 females; 24 ± 2 yr) were recruited. cvBRS was measured using transfer function analysis of the low-frequency region (0.04-0.15 Hz). Ultrasonography was performed at the CS and AA to obtain arterial diameters for the measurement of distensibility. Local pulse pressure (PP) was taken at the CS using a hand-held tonometer, whereas AA PP was estimated using a transfer function of brachial PP. Both cvBRS (25 ± 11 vs. 19 ± 7 ms/mmHg, P = 0.04) and AA distensibility (16.5 ± 6.0 vs. 10.5 ± 3.8 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.02) were greater in females than males. Sex differences in cvBRS were eliminated after controlling for AA distensibility (P = 0.19). There were no sex differences in CS distensibility (5.32 ± 2.3 vs. 4.63 ± 1.3 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.32). The present data demonstrate that AA mechanics are an important contributor to differences in cvBRS. PMID:27122371

  20. Elephant trunk technique for hybrid aortic arch repair.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji

    2014-03-01

    The original elephant trunk technique was developed by Borst in 1983 for the treatment of aortic arch aneurysms. This technique reduced operative risks, but was associated with cumulative mortality rates of 6.9 % for the first stage and 7.5 % for the second stage. Patients also waited a long time between two major surgical procedures. Only 50.4 % of patients underwent the second-stage surgery, and there was a significant interval mortality rate of 10.7 %. With the advent of stent-graft techniques, two different hybrid elephant trunk techniques were developed. One technique is first-stage elephant trunk graft placement followed by second-stage endovascular completion. The conventional elephant trunk graft provides a good landing zone for the stent-graft, and endovascular completion is a useful alternative to conventional second-stage surgery. This method has few major complications, and a postoperative paraplegia rate of 1.1 %. The other technique is the frozen elephant trunk technique. This technique eliminates the need for subsequent endovascular completion, and is particularly useful for the treatment of acute type A dissection because it can achieve a secure seal. However, it is associated with a higher rate of spinal cord ischemia than other methods such as the original elephant trunk technique. The left subclavian artery (LSA) is often lost when performing a hybrid elephant trunk procedure. Revascularization of the LSA should be performed to prevent arm ischemia and neurological complications such as paraplegia or stroke, although the level of evidence for this recommendation is low. PMID:23943042

  1. Feasibility study on the application of fenestrated stent grafts in canine aortic arches

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Er-Ping; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Shui-Bo; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Gui-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To validate the feasibility and effectiveness of applying fenestrated stent grafts in canine aortic arches. Methods: According to the anatomic characteristics of the aortic arches from four adult beagle dogs, a straight-type aortic coated vascular stent system from Lifetech Scientific (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. was released in vitro, after which a square window was burnt out at the back tendon of the coated vascular stent with an electrocautery pen, and the fenestrated stent grafts were then returned in the catheter and delivery sheath, following the original release path. Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) was then performed in the canine aorta. Immediately after surgery, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and computed tomography (CT) angiography were conducted. On day 3, the dressing was changed, and on day 7, the stitches were removed and CT angiography was reviewed. Animal autopsies were performed 2 weeks after surgery. Results: DSA and CT angiography were conducted in 4 beagles immediately after the experiments. The CT angiography reviewed on day 7 after surgery and the animal autopsy performed two weeks after surgery both revealed that the fenestrated stent grafts were anchored in the canine aortic arch, the openings were aligned against the branch vessels above the aortic arch, and in each branch vessel, the blood flow was smooth, without any obvious internal leakage phenomena. Conclusion: An ordinary straight-type coated vascular stent, fenestrated in vitro, followed by the performance of EVAR in the canine aortic arch for in vivo stent implantation, was technically feasible. When a branch coated vascular stent cannot meet the individual needs of the wound, this technology may provide a valuable strategy for clinical thoracic aortic trauma emergencies. PMID:25785052

  2. Influences on Early and Medium-Term Survival Following Surgical Repair of the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamad; Field, Mark; Shaw, Matthew; Fok, Matthew; Harrington, Deborah; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Oo, Aung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: It is now well established by many groups that surgery on the aortic arch may be achieved with consistently low morbidity and mortality along with relatively good survival compared to estimated natural history for a number of aortic arch pathologies. The objectives of this study were to: 1) report, compare, and analyze our morbidity and mortality outcomes for hemiarch and total aortic arch surgery; 2) examine the survival benefit of hemiarch and total aortic arch surgery compared to age- and sex-matched controls; and 3) define factors which influence survival in these two groups and, in particular, identify those that are modifiable and potentially actionable. Methods: Outcomes from patients undergoing surgical resection of both hemiarch and total aortic arch at the Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital between June 1999 and December 2012 were examined in a retrospective analysis of data collected for The Society for Cardiothoracic Surgeons (UK). Results: Over the period studied, a total of 1240 patients underwent aortic surgery, from which 287 were identified as having undergone hemi to total aortic arch surgery under deep or moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest. Twenty three percent of patients' surgeries were nonelective. The median age at the time of patients undergoing elective hemiarch was 64.3 years and total arch was 65.3 years (P = 0.25), with 40.1% being female in the entire group. A total of 140 patients underwent elective hemiarch replacement, while 81 underwent elective total arch replacement. Etiology of the aortic pathology was degenerative in 51.2% of the two groups, with 87.1% requiring aortic valve repair in the elective hemiarch group and 64.2% in the elective total arch group (P < 0.001). Elective in-hospital mortality was 2.1% in the hemiarch group and 6.2% (P = 0.15) in the total arch group with corresponding rates of stroke (2.9% versus 4.9%, P = 0.47), renal failure (4.3% versus 6.2%, P = 0.54), reexploration for bleeding (4

  3. ``Smart'' baroreception along the aortic arch, with reference to essential hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kember, G. C.; Zamir, M.; Armour, J. A.

    2004-11-01

    Beat-to-beat regulation of heart rate is dependent upon sensing of local stretching or local “disortion” by aortic baroreceptors. Distortions of the aortic wall are due mainly to left ventricular output and to reflected waves arising from the arterial tree. Distortions are generally believed to be useful in cardiac control since stretch receptors or aortic baroreceptors embedded in the adventitia of the aortic wall, transduce the distortions to cardiovascular neural reflex pathways responsible for beat-to-beat regulation of heart rate. Aortic neuroanatomy studies have also found a continuous strip of mechanosensory neurites spread along the aortic inner arch. Although their purpose is now unknown, such a combined sensing capacity would allow measurement of the space and time dependence of inner arch wall distortions due, among other things, to traveling waves associated with pulsatile flow in an elastic tube. We call this sensing capability-“smart baroreception.” In this paper we use an arterial tree model to show that the cumulative effects of wave reflections, from many sites far downstream, have a surprisingly pronounced effect on the pressure distribution in the root segment of the tree. By this mechanism global hemodynamics can be focused by wave reflections back to the aortic arch, where they can rapidly impact cardiac control via smart baroreception. Such sensing is likely important to maintain efficient heart function. However, alterations in the arterial tree due to aging and other natural processes can lead in such a system to altered cardiac control and essential hypertension.

  4. The macroanatomical investigations on the aortic arch in porcupines (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Atalar, O; Yilmaz, S; Burma, O; Ilkay, E

    2003-12-01

    The anatomy of aortic arch in porcupine was studied. Angiography was applied to each of the three adult porcupines (two males, one female) following the injection of latex from the abdominal aorta for the examination of aortic arch. The results indicated that three arteries arose from aortic arch in porcupine. These were truncus brachiocephalicus, arteria carotis communis sinistra and arteria subclavia sinistra. The truncus brachiocephalicus in porcupine yielded arteria subclavia dextra and arteria carotis communis dextra. Truncus bicaroticus was absent. The origin of truncus costocervicalis (right) and arteria vertebralis (right) arose from a common root. Left or right axillary arteries seemed to be a continuation of subclavian arteries. The results of this study may contribute to the data in this area of science. PMID:14651485

  5. Subgross and macroscopic investigation of blood vessels originating from aortic arch in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, V; Cevik-Demirkan, A; Türkmenoğlu, I

    2008-04-01

    A total of 10 adult, healthy, male chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) were used to investigate the vessels originating from aortic arch. Coloured latex was injected into the carotid arteries following conventional anatomical applications in all the chinchillas examined. The brachiocephalic trunk and the left subclavian artery arose from the aortic arch at the level of the second intercostal region in the thoracic cavity. The right and left subclavian arteries detached branches at the level of first intercostal region and divided into the following vessels: internal thoracic artery, dorsal scapular artery, vertebral artery, superficial cervical artery and axillar artery. The vessels originating from the aortic arch displayed some significant differences in chinchillas compared to rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, porcupines and other laboratory rodents. PMID:18005370

  6. Open aortic arch repair: state-of-the-art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ouzounian, Maral; LeMaire, Scott A; Coselli, Joseph S

    2013-01-01

    Surgical procedures for the treatment of complex aortic arch pathology remain among the most challenging cardiovascular operations, incurring considerable risk for death and stroke. The purpose of this article is to describe the evolution of our approach to open repair of the aortic arch. Our arterial cannulation strategy has shifted from femoral and direct aortic to right axillary and more recently innominate artery cannulation. This transition has facilitated the administration of continuous antegrade cerebral perfusion and more moderate levels of hypothermia during complex repairs. Modifications in surgical technique, including arch reconstruction with the trifurcated graft, and the classical and frozen elephant trunk techniques have simplified the conduct of the operation. Experimental and clinical research supporting the evolution of our approach is discussed in this paper. PMID:24216527

  7. Management of an elderly patient with respiratory failure due to double aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Changwan; Puchalski, Jonathan; Perkins, Michael; Honiden, Shyoko

    2015-01-01

    Vascular rings are congenital malformations of the aortic arch. A double aortic arch (DAA), the most common type of vascular ring, results from the failure of the fourth embryonic branchial arch to regress, leading to an ascending aorta that divides into a left and right arch that fuse together to completely encircle the trachea and esophagus. The subsequent DAA causes compressive effects on the trachea and esophagus that typically manifests in infancy or early childhood. Adult presentations, particularly in the elderly, are exceedingly rare. Historically such patients have a long-standing history of dyspnea on exertion and dysphagia, with many assumed to have obstructive lung or intrinsic cardiac disease. We describe a case of an elderly woman who presented with respiratory failure due to DAA. In her case, surgery was not feasible and we describe our experience with airway stenting.

  8. Successful repair of a syphilitic aortic arch aneurysm accompanied by serious cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Koizumi, Nobusato; Ogino, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    We present a 52-year-old male with a syphilitic aortic arch aneurysm accompanied by relevant extensive cerebral infarction. He was admitted to a local hospital for sudden loss of consciousness, where he was diagnosed with serious cerebral infarction. During his treatment, a multilocular aortic arch aneurysm involving the arch vessels was found incidentally. He was transferred to our hospital for surgical treatment. A preoperative routine laboratory test for syphilis was highly positive, which suggested that the aneurysm was likely caused by syphilis and the cerebral infarction was also induced by the involvement of syphilitic aortitis or arteritis. After 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy for syphilis, total arch replacement was performed successfully using meticulous brain protection with antegrade selective cerebral perfusion and deep hypothermia. He recovered without any further cerebral deficits. The pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed some characteristic changes of syphilitic aortitis. PMID:24492165

  9. Dependence of aortic arch morphogenesis on intracardiac blood flow in the left atrial ligated chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Hu, Norman; Christensen, Douglas A; Agrawal, Amit K; Beaumont, Charity; Clark, Edward B; Hawkins, John A

    2009-05-01

    Partial left atrial ligation before cardiac septation redistributes intracardiac blood flow and produces left ventricular hypoplasia in the chick. We hypothesized that redistributed intracardiac blood flow adversely alters aortic arch development. We ligated the left atrial appendage with a 10-0 nylon suture at stage 21 chick embryos, then reincubated up to stage 34. Sham embryos had a suture tied adjacent to the atrial wall, and normal controls were unoperated. We measured simultaneous atrioventricular (AV) and dorsal aortic (DAo) blood velocities from stage 24 embryos with an ultrasound pulsed-Doppler flow meter; and the left and right third and fourth aortic arch blood flow with a laser-Doppler flow meter. Ventricular and atrial cross-sectional areas were measured from sequential video fields for planimetry. Intracardiac flow patterns were imaged on video by injecting India ink into the vitelline vein. In separate embryos, radiopaque microfil was injected into the cardiovascular system for micro-CT scanning. We analyzed the morphologic characteristics of the heart at stage 34. Active AV and DAo stroke volume (mm(3)), right third and fourth aortic arch blood flow (mm(3)/s) were all decreased in ligated embryos (P < 0.05) when compared with normal and sham embryos. Ventricular end-diastolic volume versus normal and sham embryos decreased by 45% and 46%, respectively (P < 0.05). India ink injection revealed altered right aortic arch flow patterns in the ligated embryos compared with normal embryos. micro-CT imaging confirmed altered arch morphogenesis. Alterations in intracardiac blood flow disrupt both early cardiac morphogenesis and aortic arch selection. PMID:19322826

  10. Complex Cervical Aortic Arch With Hypoplasia: A Simple Solution to a Complex Problem.

    PubMed

    Rajbanshi, Bijoy G; Gautam, Navin C; Pradhan, Sidhartha; Sharma, Apurb; Ghimire, Ram K; Joyce, Lyle D

    2016-07-01

    We report a rare case of a 6-year-old boy with a complex right-sided cervical aortic arch, with retroesophageal hypoplastic transverse arch, left subclavian artery arising from the Kommerell diverticulum of the descending aorta, and a vascular ring formed by the ductus ligament. An extraanatomic ascending-to-descending aorta bypass was done through a median sternotomy along with division of the ductus ligament, without any complications and good results. PMID:27343523

  11. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  12. The branching pattern of the aortic arch in the long-legged buzzard (Buteo rufinus Cretzschmar 1829).

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Serkan; Kılınç, Mehmet

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the vascular branching morphology of the aortic arch in the long-legged buzzard. For this purpose, two long-legged buzzards were evaluated in this study. The latex injection method was used to investigate the branching of the aortic arch. Two innominate brachiocephalic trunks branched continually from aortic arch caudoventral to the primary bronchi and ventral to the syrinx. The left subclavian artery gave rise to sternoclavicular, thoracic, axillary and intercostal arteries in this region. On the right side, it was observed that the right subclavian artery gave off thoracic, sternoclavicular and intercostal arteries, and the axillary artery was the branch of thoracic artery differently from the left one. Each carotid artery was continued to the middle of the neck and soon disappeared, becoming covered by the muscles of the anterior part of the neck, and entering the canal formed by the inferior spinous processes of the cervical vertebrae, within which it ran hidden, and in close contact with its fellow of the other lateral side, to near the head. This morphological study in the long-legged buzzard will elucidate the vascular organization for regional blood supply, and provide specific anatomical data. PMID:24136451

  13. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with multivessel cervical artery dissections and a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Amre; Ruland, Sean; Schneck, Michael J; Pasquale, David; Biller, José

    2014-02-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) has been associated with exposure to vasoactive substances and few reports with cervical arterial dissections (CADs). We evaluated a 32-year-old woman with history of depression, migraines without aura, and cannabis use who presented with a thunderclap headache unresponsive to triptans. She was found to have bilateral occipital infarcts, bilateral extracranial vertebral artery dissections, bilateral internal carotid artery dissecting aneurysms, and extensive distal multifocal segmental narrowing of the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation with a "sausage on a string-like appearance" suggestive of RCVS. Subsequently, she was found to have a distal thrombus of the basilar artery, was anticoagulated, and discharged home with no residual deficits. We highlight the potential association of CADs and RCVS. The association of RCVS and a double aortic arch has not been previously reported. PMID:24103665

  14. When and how to replace the aortic arch for type A dissection

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Alessandro; Di Marco, Luca; Pacini, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AAAD) remains one of the most challenging diseases in cardiothoracic surgery and despite numerous innovations in medical and surgical management, early mortality remains high. The standard treatment of AAAD requires emergency surgery of the proximal aorta, preventing rupture and consequent cardiac tamponade. Resection of the primary intimal tear and repair of the aortic root and aortic valve are well-established surgical principles. However, the dissection in the aortic arch and descending untreated aorta remains. This injury is associated with the risk of subsequent false lumen dilatation potentially progressing to rupture, true lumen compression and distal malperfusion. Additionally, the dilatation of the aortic arch, the presence of a tear and retrograde dissection can all be considered indication for a total arch replacement in AAAD. In such cases a more aggressive strategy may be used, from the classic aortic arch operation to a single stage frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique or a two-stage approach such as the classical elephant trunk (ET) or the recent Lupiae technique. Although these are all feasible solutions, they are also complex and time demanding techniques requiring experience and expertise, with an in the length of cardiopulmonary bypass and both myocardial and visceral ischemia. Effective methods of cerebral, myocardial as well visceral protection are necessary to obtain acceptable results in terms of hospital mortality and morbidity. Moreover, a correct assessment of the anatomy of the dissection, through the preoperative angio CT scan, in addition to the clinical condition of the patients, remain the decision points for the best arch repair strategy to use in AAAD. PMID:27563552

  15. When and how to replace the aortic arch for type A dissection.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Leone, Alessandro; Di Marco, Luca; Pacini, Davide

    2016-07-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AAAD) remains one of the most challenging diseases in cardiothoracic surgery and despite numerous innovations in medical and surgical management, early mortality remains high. The standard treatment of AAAD requires emergency surgery of the proximal aorta, preventing rupture and consequent cardiac tamponade. Resection of the primary intimal tear and repair of the aortic root and aortic valve are well-established surgical principles. However, the dissection in the aortic arch and descending untreated aorta remains. This injury is associated with the risk of subsequent false lumen dilatation potentially progressing to rupture, true lumen compression and distal malperfusion. Additionally, the dilatation of the aortic arch, the presence of a tear and retrograde dissection can all be considered indication for a total arch replacement in AAAD. In such cases a more aggressive strategy may be used, from the classic aortic arch operation to a single stage frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique or a two-stage approach such as the classical elephant trunk (ET) or the recent Lupiae technique. Although these are all feasible solutions, they are also complex and time demanding techniques requiring experience and expertise, with an in the length of cardiopulmonary bypass and both myocardial and visceral ischemia. Effective methods of cerebral, myocardial as well visceral protection are necessary to obtain acceptable results in terms of hospital mortality and morbidity. Moreover, a correct assessment of the anatomy of the dissection, through the preoperative angio CT scan, in addition to the clinical condition of the patients, remain the decision points for the best arch repair strategy to use in AAAD. PMID:27563552

  16. In Vitro Hemodynamic Investigation of the Embryonic Aortic Arch at Late Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Pekkan, Kerem; Dasi, Lakshmi P.; Nourparvar, Paymon; Yerneni, Srinivasu; Tobita, Kimimasa; Fogel, Mark A.; Keller, Bradley; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the dynamic flow through the fetal aortic arch driven by the concurrent action of right and left ventricles. We created a parametric pulsatile computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the fetal aortic junction with physiologic vessel geometries. To gain a better biophysical understanding an in vitro experimental fetal flow loop for flow visualization was constructed for identical CFD conditions. CFD and in vitro experimental results were comparable. Swirling flow during the acceleration phase of the cardiac cycle and unidirectional flow following mid-deceleration phase were observed in pulmonary arteries (PA), head-neck vessels, and descending aorta. Right-to-left (oxygenated) blood flowed through the ductus arteriosus (DA) posterior relative to the antegrade left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) stream and resembled jet flow. LVOT and right ventricular outflow tract flow mixing had not completed until ~3.5 descending aorta diameters downstream of the DA insertion into the aortic arch. Normal arch model flow patterns were then compared to flow patterns of four common congenital heart malformations that include aortic arch anomalies. Weak oscillatory reversing flow through the DA junction was observed only for the Tetralogy of Fallot configuration. Pulmonary Atresia and Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome configurations demonstrated complex, abnormal flow patterns in the PAs and head-neck vessels. Aortic Coarctation resulted in large scale recirculating flow in the aortic arch proximal to the DA. Intravascular flow patterns spatially correlated with abnormal vascular structures consistent with the paradigm that abnormal intravascular flow patterns associated with congenital heart disease influence vascular growth and function. PMID:18466908

  17. [Antegrade unilateral perfusion of the brain through the brachiocephalic trunk in operations on the aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, B N; Panfilov, D S; Kuznetsov, M S; Ponomarenko, I V; Nasrashvili, G G; Shipulin, V M

    2016-01-01

    Presented herein is a technique of unilateral antegrade perfusion of the brain in operations on the aortic arch. The method makes it possible to perform both systemic artificial circulation and adequate physiological perfusion of the brain, promoting minimization of the number of neurological complications. PMID:27100557

  18. Double aortic arch as a source of airway obstruction in a child

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sambhunath; Nair, Vinitha V.; Airan, Balram

    2015-01-01

    Double aortic arch (DAA) is a congenital vascular anomaly. The diagnosis was difficult till the child was symptomatic, and other causes were ruled out. We present the interesting images of a child of respiratory distress because of tracheal compression from DAA. PMID:25566726

  19. Application of the Bolton Relay Device for Thoracic Endografting In or Near the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Riambau, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular correction of aortic arch pathology remains a challenge, with a variety of techniques proposed over the years to minimize complications and enhance the probability of a successful result. A variety of approaches have been developed in order to deal with the aortic arch pathology and its idiosyncrasies. We review potential interventional techniques for the repair of aortic arch pathologies, beginning with conventional aortic arch surgery, followed by hybrid treatments and those along the endovascular spectrum (parallel and fenestrated endografts, scalloped endografts, and ascending and new branched endografts). We finish with an overview of all the Bolton Medical (Barcelona, Spain and Sunrise, FL, USA) thoracic platforms. Endovascular techniques show acceptable results in selected cases. Both proximal Bolton Relay configurations (with and without a bare stent) offer conformability and accuracy on deployment with very low rates of stroke. Fenestrated and scalloped designs are also useful for selected cases. Ascending and branched Bolton devices are very promising platforms for a serious, full endovascular approach to the aorta. PMID:26798752

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of the rare association of common arterial trunk and double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Rock, Andrea; Eltayeb, Osama; Camarda, Joseph; Gotteiner, Nina

    2016-07-01

    Common arterial trunk with associated double aortic arch is a very rare constellation of congenital heart disease. Prenatal diagnosis allows for surgical repair prior to development of respiratory morbidity, which is otherwise described in all cases with this association. PMID:27386125

  1. [Complete repair of the interrupted aortic arch by an anterior approach. Apropos of 9 cases].

    PubMed

    Chambran, P; Planché, C; Bruniaux, J; Lacour-Gayet, F; Binet, J P

    1988-05-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a duct-dependent heart disease, and this is why the use of prostaglandins E, which keep the ductus arteriosus open to feed the descending aorta, has transformed its formerly sombre prognosis. The authors report the cases of 9 neonates and infants presenting with interrupted aortic arch associated with ventricular septal defect who underwent total repair of the malformations under extracorporeal circulation. Five children were less than 10 years' old. The aortic lesions were of type A in 2 cases (interruption distal to the left subclavian artery) and of type B in 7 cases (interruption between the left carotid and subclavian arteries). In the second group the lesions were of type B1 in 5 cases (without retro-oesophageal right subclavian artery) and of type B2 in 2 cases (right retro-oesophageal artery distal to the interruption). There was one death (11 p. 100). So far, no child has been reoperated upon for residual aortic obstruction or reopened ventricular septal defect. This technique of total repair in one stage, with closure of the ventricular septal defect, seems to be preferable to the two-stage technique in which stage one includes, in addition to aortic arch repair, cerclage of the pulmonary artery, a procedure with numerous disadvantages and a higher overall mortality rate. PMID:3136722

  2. Open Aortic Arch Reconstruction After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: Worth the Effort?

    PubMed

    Quintana, Eduard; Bajona, Pietro; Schaff, Hartzell V; Dearani, Joseph A; Daly, Richard; Greason, Kevin; Pochettino, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Open aortic arch surgery after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is considered a high-risk operation. We reviewed our surgical approach and outcomes to establish the risk profile for this patient population. In methods, from 2000-2014, 650 patients underwent aortic arch surgery with circulatory arrest. Of these, 45 (7%) had previous CABG. Complete medical record was available for review including all preoperative coronary angiograms and detailed management of myocardial protection. In results, the mean interval from previous CABG to aortic arch surgery was 6.8 ± 7.1 years. At reoperation, 33 (73%) patients had hemiarch replacement and 12 (27%) had a total arch replacement. The following were the indications for surgery: fusiform aneurysm in 20 (44%), pseudoaneurysm in 6 (13%), endocarditis in 4 (9%), valvular disease in 5 (11%), and acute aortic dissection in 10 (22%). There were 6 perioperative deaths (13%) and 1 stroke (2.2%). Selective antegrade cerebral perfusion was used in 13 patients (28.9%) and retrograde perfusion in 6 (13.3%). Survival was 74%, 65%, and 52% at 1, 3, and 5-year follow-up, respectively. Only predictors of early mortality were age (odds ratio = 1.20, CI: 1.01-1.44; P = 0.04) and nonuse of retrograde cardioplegia for myocardial protection (odds ratio = 6.80, CI: 1.06-43.48; P = 0.04). Intermediate survival of these patients was significantly lower than those of a sex-matched and age-matched population (P < 0.001). In conclusion, aortic arch surgery after previous CABG can be performed with acceptable early and midterm results and low risk of stroke. Perfusion strategies and myocardial protection contribute to successful outcomes. PMID:27568130

  3. A review of the surgical management of right-sided aortic arch aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Barr, James G; Sepehripour, Amir H; Jarral, Omar A; Tsipas, Pantelis; Kokotsakis, John; Kourliouros, Antonios; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms and dissections of the right-sided aortic arch are rare and published data are limited to a few case reports and small series. The optimal treatment strategy of this entity and the challenges associated with their management are not yet fully investigated and conclusive. We performed a systematic review of the literature to identify all patients who underwent surgical or endovascular intervention for right aortic arch aneurysms or dissections. The search was limited to the articles published only in English. We focused on presentation and critically assessed different management strategies and outcomes. We identified 74 studies that reported 99 patients undergoing surgical or endovascular intervention for a right aortic arch aneurysm or dissection. The median age was 61 years. The commonest presenting symptoms were chest or back pain and dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients had an aberrant left subclavian artery with only 11 patients having the mirror image variant of a right aortic arch. The commonest pathology was aneurysm arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum occurring in over 50% of the patients. Twenty-eight patients had dissections, 19 of these were Type B and 9 were Type A. Eighty-one patients had elective operations while 18 had emergency procedures. Sixty-seven patients underwent surgical treatment, 20 patients had hybrid surgical and endovascular procedures and 12 had totally endovascular procedure. There were 5 deaths, 4 of which were in patients undergoing emergency surgery and none in the endovascular repair group. Aneurysms and dissections of a right-sided aortic arch are rare. Advances in endovascular treatment and hybrid surgical and endovascular management are making this rare pathology amenable to these approaches and may confer improved outcomes compared with conventional extensive repair techniques. PMID:27001673

  4. Externalized Guidewires to Facilitate Fenestrated Endograft Deployment in the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, George; Premkumar, Prabhu; Thomson, Viji; Varghese, Mithun; Selvaraj, Dheepak; Sahajanandan, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a precannulated fenestrated endograft system utilizing externalized guidewires to facilitate aortic arch endovascular repair and to report its use in 2 patients with challenging anatomy. Technique: For distal arch repair, a fenestration for the left subclavian artery (LSA) is made onsite in a standard thoracic endograft tailored to the patient anatomy; it is precannulated with a nitinol guidewire (NGw), which is passed from the femoral artery and externalized from the left brachial artery prior to endograft delivery system introduction over a parallel stiff guidewire. Steps are then taken to remove guidewire intertwining, prevent NGw wrapping around the delivery system, and orient the LSA fenestration superiorly when the delivery system moves into the arch. Gentle traction on the ends of the NGw during endograft deployment facilitates proper fenestration alignment. A covered stent is deployed in the LSA fenestration. The technique is illustrated in a patient with congenital coarctation of the aorta and descending aortic aneurysm. For total arch repair, endograft fenestrations are made for all 3 arch branches; the left common carotid artery (LCCA) and LSA fenestrations are each cannulated with NGws, which travel together from the femoral artery, pass through a LSA snare loop, and are exteriorized from the LCCA. After endograft deployment, the innominate artery fenestration is separately cannulated using right brachial access. Placement of a parallel externalized hydrophilic guidewire passing through the LCCA fenestration (but not the LSA snare loop) and removal of the LCCA fenestration NGw allows exteriorization of the LSA fenestration NGw from the left brachial artery by pulling the LSA snare. Covered stents are deployed in all 3 fenestrations. The technique is presented in a patient with type B aortic dissection. Conclusion: Use of the precannulated fenestrated endograft system described is feasible and has the potential to make aortic arch

  5. Surgical management of acute type A aortic dissection: branch-first arch replacement with total aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Sean D.; Perera, Nisal K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A dissection (ATAAD) remains a morbid condition with reported surgical mortality as high as 25%. We describe our surgical approach to ATAAD and discuss the indications for adjunct techniques such as the frozen elephant trunk or complete aortic repair with endovascular methods. Arch replacement using the “branch-first technique” allows for complete root, ascending aorta, and arch replacement. A long landing zone is created for proximal endografting with a covered stent. Balloon-assisted intimal disruption and bare metal stenting of all residual dissected aorta to the level of the aortic bifurcation is then performed to obliterate the false lumen (FL) and achieve single true lumen (TL) flow. Additional branch vessel stenting is performed as required. PMID:27386413

  6. Right axillary and femoral artery perfusion with mild hypothermia for aortic arch replacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Aortic arch replacement is associated with increased mortality and morbidity especially in acute type-A aortic dissection. Although hypothermic circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion has been widely used because of its excellent cerebral protection, its optimal perfusion characteristics are unknown. The present study investigates clinical results obtained after perfusion method modification and temperature management during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods Between July 2010 and August 2012, 16 consecutive adult patients (mean age 50.0 yr ± 14.1 yr, range 25 yr to 73 yr, 12 males, 4 females) who presented with acute Stanford type-A aortic dissection underwent aortic arch replacement (total arch, n = 11; hemiarch, n = 5) under mild hypothermia (31.1°C ± 1.5°C) with right axillary and femoral artery perfusion. Results The mean CPB time was 201 min ± 53 min, and the mean myocardial ischemic time was 140 min ± 42 min. The mean selective cerebral perfusion time was 80 min ± 16 min, and the mean lower-body circulatory arrest time was 20 min ± 13 min. No patient death occurred within 30 post-operative days. The following details were observed: new post-operative permanent neurologic deficit in 1 patient (6.3%), temporary neurologic deficit in 2 patients (12.5%), acute renal dysfunction (creatinine level > 230 umol/L) in 3 patients (18.8%) and mechanical ventilation > 72 h in 5 patients (31.2%). Conclusions Aortic arch replacement for acute type-A aortic dissection under mild hypothermia with right axillary and femoral artery perfusion could be safely performed in the patient cohort. PMID:24885031

  7. Direct Tracheobronchopexy and Posterior Descending Aortopexy for Severe Left Mainstem Bronchomalacia Associated With Congenital Pulmonary Airway Malformation and Left Circumflex Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Baird, Christopher W; Prabhu, Sanjay; Buchmiller, Terry L; Smithers, Charles; Jennings, Russell

    2016-07-01

    Complex tracheobronchial obstruction and malacia can be associated with conotruncal and aortic arch anomalies. A circumflex aortic arch composed of a left aortic arch and right descending aorta is an extremely rare anomaly that can severely affect the distal trachea and mainstem bronchi, resulting in severe respiratory symptoms. We report the case of a patient with circumflex aortic arch and severe left mainstem bronchial obstruction and malacia in which the external aortic compression and residual bronchomalacia were addressed with direct bronchial and tracheal intervention. PMID:27343517

  8. Modelling and numerical simulation of the human aortic arch under in vivo conditions.

    PubMed

    García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J

    2013-11-01

    This work presents the modelling and simulation of the mechanical behaviour of the human aortic arch under in vivo conditions with pressure levels within the normal and hypertension physiological range. The cases studied correspond to young and aged arteries without cardiovascular pathologies. First, the tissue of these two groups is characterised via in vitro tensile test measurements that make it possible to derive the material parameters of a hyperelastic isotropic constitutive model. Then, these material parameters are used in the simulation of young and aged aortic arches subjected to in vivo normal and hypertension conditions. Overall, the numerical results were found not only to provide a realistic description of the mechanical behaviour of the vessel but also to be useful data that allow the adequate definition of stress/stretch-based criteria to predict its failure. PMID:23371524

  9. Mycotic aortic arch aneurysm coexistent with constrictive pericarditis: is surgery a dangerous resort?

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter S Y; Yu, Simon C H; Chu, Cheuk-Man; Kwok, Micky W T; Lam, Yuk-Hoi; Underwood, Malcolm J; Wong, Randolph H L

    2016-08-01

    An elderly man presented with fever and evidence of Salmonella infection, and was diagnosed to have coexisting constrictive pericarditis and mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch. Pericardiectomy was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass with good result. To avoid deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, an aorto-brachiocephalic bypass, instead of total arch replacement, was performed. This was followed by a staged carotid-carotid bypass, thoracic endovascular stent graft placement. He was subsequently treated with prolonged antibiotics, and inflammatory marker normalized afterwards. He was last seen well 2 years after the operation. Follow-up computer tomography (CT) scan at 18 months post-op showed no evidence of endoleak or fistulation. Our case demonstrated that a hybrid treatment of open pericardiectomy and aortic debranching followed by thoracic endovascular stent graft placement is feasible and associated with satisfactory mid-term outcome. PMID:27621905

  10. [A case of a syndrome resembling PSP after aortic arch replacement under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Yusuke; Michizono, Kumiko; Tomari, Shinya; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakahara, Keiichi; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    A 57-year-old man presented with acute signs and symptoms mimicking PSP (bradykinesia, supranuclear ocular palsy, dysphagia, neck dystonia, and apraxic gait) on the day after a graft replacement surgery, which was performed for aortic arch aneurysm under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (rectal temperature, 18 degrees C). Dysphagia improved temporarily, but relapsed after a few months. Symptoms did not change during 2 years of antiparkinsonian drug administration. Brain images obtained before the surgery revealed slight atrophy of the midbrain tegmentum and frontal lobes, but the patient was asymptomatic. No findings of cerebral vascular disease and hypoxic encephalopathy were observed on brain images after the surgery. These clinical features resembling PSP might have been caused by deep hypothermia and the patient's predisposition for PSP. This is the first case report in Japan of a syndrome resembling PSP that occurred after aortic arch replacement under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. PMID:21387699

  11. Mycotic aortic arch aneurysm coexistent with constrictive pericarditis: is surgery a dangerous resort?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Peter S. Y.; Yu, Simon C. H.; Chu, Cheuk-Man; Kwok, Micky W. T.; Lam, Yuk-Hoi; Underwood, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    An elderly man presented with fever and evidence of Salmonella infection, and was diagnosed to have coexisting constrictive pericarditis and mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch. Pericardiectomy was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass with good result. To avoid deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, an aorto-brachiocephalic bypass, instead of total arch replacement, was performed. This was followed by a staged carotid-carotid bypass, thoracic endovascular stent graft placement. He was subsequently treated with prolonged antibiotics, and inflammatory marker normalized afterwards. He was last seen well 2 years after the operation. Follow-up computer tomography (CT) scan at 18 months post-op showed no evidence of endoleak or fistulation. Our case demonstrated that a hybrid treatment of open pericardiectomy and aortic debranching followed by thoracic endovascular stent graft placement is feasible and associated with satisfactory mid-term outcome. PMID:27621905

  12. Results with an Algorithmic Approach to Hybrid Repair of the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nicholas D.; Williams, Judson B.; Hanna, Jennifer M.; Shah, Asad A.; McCann, Richard L.; Hughes, G. Chad

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hybrid repair of the transverse aortic arch may allow for aortic arch repair with reduced morbidity in patients who are suboptimal candidates for conventional open surgery. Here, we present our results with an algorithmic approach to hybrid arch repair, based upon the extent of aortic disease and patient comorbidities. Methods Between August 2005 and January 2012, 87 patients underwent hybrid arch repair by three principal procedures: zone 1 endograft coverage with extra-anatomic left carotid revascularization (zone 1, n=19), zone 0 endograft coverage with aortic arch debranching (zone 0, n=48), or total arch replacement with staged stented elephant trunk completion (stented elephant trunk, n=20). Results The mean patient age was 64 years and the mean expected in-hospital mortality rate was 16.3% as calculated by the EuroSCORE II. 22% (n=19) of operations were non-elective. Sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass, and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest were required in 78% (n=68), 45% (n=39), and 31% (n=27) of patients, respectively, to allow for total arch replacement, arch debranching, or other concomitant cardiac procedures, including ascending ± hemi-arch replacement in 17% (n=8) of patients undergoing zone 0 repair. All stented elephant trunk procedures (n=20) and 19% (n=9) of zone 0 procedures were staged, with 41% (n=12) of patients undergoing staged repair during a single hospitalization. The 30-day/in-hospital rates of stroke and permanent paraplegia/paraparesis were 4.6% (n=4) and 1.2% (n=1), respectively. Three of 27 (11.1%) patients with native ascending aorta zone 0 proximal landing zone experienced retrograde type A dissection following endograft placement. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 5.7% (n=5), however, 30-day/in-hospital mortality increased to 14.9% (n=13) due to eight 30-day out-of-hospital deaths. Native ascending aorta zone 0 endograft placement was found to be the only univariate predictor of 30-day/in-hospital mortality

  13. [Interruption of the aortic arch with no patent ductus arteriosus: is survival possible?].

    PubMed

    Boukhris, M; Hakim, K; Ouarda, F; M'saad, H; Boussaada, R

    2014-03-01

    Interruption of the aortic arch is a rare congenital disease. It is defined by the complete interruption between the ascending and descending aorta. A patent ductus arteriosus is necessary to maintain flow from the pulmonary to the descending aorta. Its closure leads to a cardiovascular collapse and this malformation is therefore duct-dependent. However, in rare cases, survival remains possible even after ductus arteriosus closure. We report such a case. PMID:24457106

  14. Left-Sided Patent Ductus Arteriosus in a Right-Sided Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present a 31-year-old female with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and right-sided aortic arch (RAA) with left-sided patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) originating from the left brachiocephalic artery. This is a rare finding but most common site for a PDA in TOF and a RAA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of this rare finding on MRI in the literature. PMID:25478277

  15. Interrupted Aortic Arch Associated with Absence of Left Common Carotid Artery: Imaging with MDCT

    SciTech Connect

    Onbas, Omer Olgun, Hasim; Ceviz, Naci; Ors, Rahmi; Okur, Adnan

    2006-06-15

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare severe congenital heart defect defined as complete luminal and anatomic discontinuity between ascending and descending aorta. Although its association with various congenital heart defects has been reported, absence of left common carotid artery (CCA) in patients with IAA has not been reported previously. We report a case of IAA associated with the absence of left CCA which was clearly shown on multidetector-row spiral CT.

  16. Thoracoscopic correction of a congenital persistent right aortic arch in a young cat

    PubMed Central

    Plesman, Rhea; Johnson, Matthew; Rurak, Sarah; Ambrose, Barbara; Shmon, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    A 9-week-old kitten was diagnosed with a congenital vascular ring anomaly by means of an esophageal contrast study. At 6 mo of age, a non-selective vascular study was used to diagnose a persistent right aortic arch (PRAA). Left-sided thoracoscopic surgery was performed, using a Liga-Sure vessel sealant device to seal and transect the ligamentum arteriosum. PMID:22467970

  17. [Successful management of ruptured aortic arch aneurysm infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Kawahira, T; Tsukube, T; Hayashi, T; Kozawa, S; Ogawa, K

    2008-09-01

    A 64-year-old woman was admitted due to back pain and dyspnea. She was suffering from fever of unknown origin for a few weeks without aortic aneurysm by enhanced chest computed tomography (CT). Chest CT taken 1 month later revealed rupture of aortic arch aneurysm. Total arch replacement was performed with in situ grafting under selective cerebral perfusion combined with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Rifampicin (RFP) was sprinkled on the graft at operation and omentopexy was done 5 days after the 1st operation. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated on the culture of the aneurysmal wall, therefore, polymyxin B immobilized fiber with direct hemoperfusion (PMX-DHP) was also conducted with antibiotic therapy. Her clinical course after the 2nd operation was uneventful with no infective complication. We report a successful case of ruptured aneurysm of aortic arch infected with MRSA and review our strategy as one of feasible options without using homograft or preparative RFP-bonded vascular prosthesis. PMID:18788376

  18. Carbon Dioxide in the Aortic Arch: Coronary Effects and Implications in a Swine Study

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, William C. Porter, Thomas R.; Culp, William C.; Vonk, Brian N.

    2003-04-15

    Purpose: CO{sub 2} angiography is considered dangerous in the aortic arch where bubbles may cause critical cerebral and cardiac ischemia. We investigated CO{sub 2}distribution, physiologic effects in the heart, methods of detection and treatments. Methods: Eight pigs had CO{sub 2}and iodinated contrast arch angiograms in supine and both lateral decubitus positions. An electrocardiogram, physiologic data and cardiac ultrasound were obtained. Therapies included precordial thumps and rolls to lateral decubitus positions. Results: Supine high descending aorta CO{sub 2} injections floated retrograde up the arch during diastole and preferentially filled the right coronary artery (RCA): mean score 3.5 (of 4), in nominate artery 2.4, left coronary artery 1.2; n = 17; p = 0.0001. Aortic root injections preferentially filled the RCA when the animal was supine, left coronary in the right decubitus position, and showed a diffuse pattern in the left decubitus position. Right decubitus rolls filled both coronaries causing several lethal arrhythmias. Precordialthumps successfully cleared CO{sub 2}. Ultrasound is a sensitive detector of myocardial CO{sub 2}. Conclusion: Arch distribution of CO{sub 2} primarily involves the RCA. Diagnostic ultrasound detects cardiac CO{sub 2} well. Precordial thumps are an effective treatment.

  19. Multimodal optical measurement in vitro of surface deformations and wall thickness of the pressurized aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Katia; Humphrey, Jay D

    2015-04-01

    Computational modeling of arterial mechanics continues to progress, even to the point of allowing the study of complex regions such as the aortic arch. Nevertheless, most prior studies assign homogeneous and isotropic material properties and constant wall thickness even when implementing patient-specific luminal geometries obtained from medical imaging. These assumptions are not due to computational limitations, but rather to the lack of spatially dense sets of experimental data that describe regional variations in mechanical properties and wall thickness in such complex arterial regions. In this work, we addressed technical challenges associated with in vitro measurement of overall geometry, full-field surface deformations, and regional wall thickness of the porcine aortic arch in its native anatomical configuration. Specifically, we combined two digital image correlation-based approaches, standard and panoramic, to track surface geometry and finite deformations during pressurization, with a 360-deg fringe projection system to contour the outer and inner geometry. The latter provided, for the first time, information on heterogeneous distributions of wall thickness of the arch and associated branches in the unloaded state. Results showed that mechanical responses vary significantly with orientation and location (e.g., less extensible in the circumferential direction and with increasing distance from the heart) and that the arch exhibits a nearly linear increase in pressure-induced strain up to 40%, consistent with other findings on proximal porcine aortas. Thickness measurements revealed strong regional differences, thus emphasizing the need to include nonuniform thicknesses in theoretical and computational studies of complex arterial geometries. PMID:25867620

  20. Current management of aortic arch lesions with hybrid procedures: a tailored approach to a progressive disease.

    PubMed

    Plichta, Ryan P; Aftab, Muhammad; Roselli, Eric E

    2016-06-01

    In the current era of cardiac and aortic surgery lines between open and endovascular approaches are becoming blurred. Hybrid techniques emerged with the availability of endovascular devices and the idea that combining open operations with a stent graft might provide a treatment option to those patients deemed too high-risk for conventional surgery. As these procedures evolved, it became clear that they still carried significant risk especially for the "inoperable" or "high-risk" patients, but they also offered new options for treating complex pathologies involving multiple segments of the aorta. Hybrid techniques not only provide the potential for less invasive aortic repair, but must be considered as an important complementary treatment option for patients with aortic disease, allowing for a potentially more effective and complete repair. The objective of this article is to review the current options for hybrid arch repair and the indications for choosing the various techniques based on pathologic presentation. PMID:26939046

  1. Aortic Arch Calcification Predicts Patency Loss of Arteriovenous Fistula in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Yit-Sheung; Ting, Kai-Ting; Chi, Wen-Che; Lin, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Yi-Chun; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2016-01-01

    Aortic arch calcification (AAC) is recognized as an important cardiovascular risk factor in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of AAC grade on patency rates of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) in this specific population. The data of 286 ESRD patients who had an initial AVF placed were reviewed. The extent of AAC identified on chest radiography was divided into four grades (0–3). The association between AAC grade, other clinical factors, and primary patency of AVF was then analyzed by Cox proportional hazard analysis. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of AAC grade 2 (hazard ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.80 (1.15–2.84); p = 0.011) and grade 3 (3.03 (1.88–4.91); p < 0.001), and higher level of intact-parathyroid hormone (p = 0.047) were associated with primary patency loss of AVF. In subgroup analysis, which included AVF created by a surgeon assisted with preoperative vascular mapping, only AAC grade 3 (2.41 (1.45–4.00); p = 0.001), and higher intact-parathyroid hormone (p = 0.025) level were correlated with AVF patency loss. In conclusion, higher AAC grade and intact-parathyroid hormone level predicted primary patency loss of AVF in an ESRD population. PMID:27101807

  2. Endovascular Repair of a Right-Sided Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Associated with a Right Aortic Arch and a Left Subclavian Artery Arising from a Kommerell's Diverticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Avgerinos, Efthimios D.; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Psarros, Vasileios; Bastounis, Elias

    2009-07-15

    This case report describes the endovascular repair of a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with a right aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. A 76-year-old male with multiple comorbidities was incidentally found to have a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 6.2 cm. Additionally, there was a right aortic arch with a retroesophageal segment and separate arch branches arising in the following order: left common carotid artery, right common carotid artery, right subclavian artery, and left subclavian artery that was aberrant, arising from a Kommerrell's diverticulum. The aneurysm was successfully excluded by deployment of a Zenith TX1 36 x 32 x 20-mm stent-graft using wire traction technique via the left femoral and right brachial arteries in order to deal with two severe aortic angulations. At 18-month follow-up the patient was doing well, with aneurysm sac shrinkage to 5.9 cm and no signs of endoleak or migration. Endovascular repair of right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with a right arch and aberrant left subclavian artery is feasible, safe, and effective. In such rare configurations, which demand considerably increased technical dexterity and center experience, endovascular repair emerges as an attractive therapeutic option.

  3. [Hybrid surgical intervention in a patient with an aortic arch aneurysm and coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Charchan, E R; Abugov, S A; Puretsky, M V; Kim, S Yu; Skvortsov, A A; Khachatryan, Z R

    2015-01-01

    Presented herein is a clinical case report regarding the use of hybrid technology in surgical treatment of a patient with an aneurysm of the distal portion of the aortic arch and coronary artery disease. The patient underwent a hybrid operation, i.e. debranching of the aortic arch branches, exoprosthetic repair of the ascending aorta, autovenous prosthetic coronary bypass grafting of the branch of the blunt edge of the anterior interventricular artery, stenting of the ascending portion, arch and descending portion of the aorta (stent graft "Medtronic Valiant"). In doing so, we used a non-standard approach to connecting the artificial circulation unit and to choosing the place for establishing proximal anastomoses of autovenous coronary bypass grafts. The early postoperative period was complicated by the development of respiratory insufficiency requiring continuation artificial pulmonary ventilation. The duration of the hospital stay of the patient amounted to 15 days. The check-up multispiral computed tomography showed normal functioning of the reconstruction zones, the stent graft is expanded, with no leak observed. The conclusion was made that hybrid interventions may be considered as an alternative to the classical surgical treatment associated in patients of older age group with a severe course of the postoperative period and high lethality. PMID:26035581

  4. Clinical value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction in the diagnosis of double aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XIN; QU, YANJUAN; PENG, ZHI-YUAN; LU, JINGGUO; MA, XIAOJING; HU, WENJUAN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clincal value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) in the diagnosis of double aortic arch (DAA) and analyze the associated angiography and 3D reconstruction imaging to increase the accuracy of DAA diagnosis. Clinical and imaging data from 15 patients diagnosed with DAA by MSCT were summarized and compared with the corresponding surgical observations. The DAA diagnosis by MSCT for the 15 patients was confirmed by the surgical observations. A total of 13 cases were categorized as type I (double arches are open), including nine with a larger right arch, two with a larger left arch and two with balanced arches. Two cases were categorized as type II (one atretic arch), characterized by left atretic arch. Among the 15 patients, ultrasound diagnosis succeeded in nine cases and failed in the rest. A single malformation was identified in only two cases, whereas the rest had single or multiple combination(s) of intracardiac and extracardiac malformations, including seven with different levels of tracheobronchial stenosis. MSCT was demonstrated to precisely diagnose DAA complicated by malformation and tracheobronchial stenosis. MSCT is an essential therapeutic strategy and serves as a primary method in DAA diagnosis. PMID:25009630

  5. Central retinal artery occlusion following laser treatment for ocular ischemic aortic arch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Payal J.; Ellis, Brian; DiGiovine, Lauren R.; Hogg, Jeffery P.; Leys, Monique J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Ocular ischemic syndrome is a rare blinding condition generally caused by disease of the carotid artery. We describe a 69-year-old female with a 50 pack-year smoking history with aortic arch syndrome causing bilateral ocular ischemic syndrome. Methods: The patient presented with progressive visual loss and temple pain. Slit lamp biomicroscopy revealed bilateral iris neovascularization. This finding prompted a cardiovascular work up. Panretinal photocoagulation with retrobulbar block was performed in the right eye. Results: A temporal artery biopsy was negative. The carotid duplex ultrasound showed only a 1–39% stenosis. MRA revealed a more proximal occlusion of the aortic branch for which she underwent subclavian carotid bypass surgery. At the one month follow up, the right eye suffered profound vision loss secondary to a central retinal artery occlusion. Conclusion: Ocular neovascularization may be one of the clinical manifestations of aortic arch syndrome. This case also illustrates the limitations of relying solely on carotid duplex ultrasound testing. We caution against overly aggressive panretinal photocoagulation utilizing retrobulbar anesthesia.

  6. [A case of tracheo-bronchial stenosis after extended end-to-end aortic arch anastomosis for interrupted aortic arch treated with suspension of the ascending artery and pulmonary artery].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Hoshino, S; Iwaya, F; Igari, T; Ono, T; Takahashi, K

    2001-02-01

    A 9-day-old boy had pulmonary artery banding and extended end-to-end aortic arch anastomosis for ventricular septal defect (VSD) and type A interrupted aortic arch. Severe dyspnea gradually developed. At 3 months of age, intracardiac repair of VSD was performed. Weaning from the ventilator was difficult. Endoscopic examination and chest CT revealed stenosis of the right and left main bronchi and compression of tracheal bifurcation and the right and left main bronchi by the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery. Suspension of the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery was performed 15 days after VSD closure. Nine days after this procedure, the patient was weaned from respirator. Postoperative course was uneventful. Bronchial stenosis may be caused from extended end-to-end aortic arch anastomosis. PMID:11211771

  7. Successful bovine arch replacement for a type A acute aortic dissection in a pregnant woman with severe haemodynamic compromise

    PubMed Central

    Nonga, Bernadette Ngo; Pasquet, Agnès; Noirhomme, Philippe; El–Khoury, Gebrine

    2012-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is very uncommon in pregnant women and the acute type A aortic dissection carries a high mortality rate outside specialized centres. There are a few cases reported with successful outcomes for the mother and the foetus from major cardiac centres. We are reporting our first experience of acute aortic dissection during the third trimester of pregnancy in a patient with Marfan features, profound haemodynamic compromise on arrival and a bovine aortic arch. Both the mother and the baby are doing well two years postoperatively. PMID:22547559

  8. Blood flow in the rabbit aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Vincent, P E; Plata, A M; Hunt, A A E; Weinberg, P D; Sherwin, S J

    2011-12-01

    The distribution of atherosclerotic lesions within the rabbit vasculature, particularly within the descending thoracic aorta, has been mapped in numerous studies. The patchy nature of such lesions has been attributed to local variation in the pattern of blood flow. However, there have been few attempts to model and characterize the flow. In this study, a high-order continuous Galerkin finite-element method was used to simulate blood flow within a realistic representation of the rabbit aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. The geometry, which was obtained from computed tomography of a resin corrosion cast, included all vessels originating from the aortic arch (followed to at least their second generation) and five pairs of intercostal arteries originating from the proximal descending thoracic aorta. The simulations showed that small geometrical undulations associated with the ductus arteriosus scar cause significant deviations in wall shear stress (WSS). This finding highlights the importance of geometrical accuracy when analysing WSS or related metrics. It was also observed that two Dean-type vortices form in the aortic arch and propagate down the descending thoracic aorta (along with an associated skewed axial velocity profile). This leads to the occurrence of axial streaks in WSS, similar in nature to the axial streaks of lipid deposition found in the descending aorta of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Finally, it was observed that WSS patterns within the vicinity of intercostal branch ostia depend not only on local flow features caused by the branches themselves, but also on larger-scale flow features within the descending aorta, which vary between branches at different locations. This result implies that disease and WSS patterns in the vicinity of intercostal ostia are best compared on a branch-by-branch basis. PMID:21593030

  9. The retrieval of atrial septal defect closure device embolized into aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Hamur, Hikmet; Onk, Oruc Alper; Degirmenci, Husnu; Kahraman, Umit; Bakirci, Eftal Murat; Tuncer, Osman Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Summary Percutaneous atrial septal defect (ASD) closure has become an increasingly simplified procedure over the past decade. The device embolization is seen rarely but it can be fatal. Although percutaneous retrieval is feasible, surgical removal might be preferred when the endothelialization status of the device is unknown. We report a comlication of such closure in a 43-year-old woman: embolization of the ASD occluder device into aortic arch 12 months after implantation. We removed the device surgically and closed the ASD. PMID:27195195

  10. Novel temporary endovascular shunt technique to assist in situ fenestration for endovascular reconstruction of the distal aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jiang; Guo, Wei; Liu, Xiaoping; Jia, Xin; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Lijun

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) of arch pathology presents special challenges for revascularization. To obtain an anatomic reconstruction of the arch arteries, in situ fenestration with extra-anatomic bypass has been increasingly used in TEVAR. We report a case involving TEVAR for a pseudoaneurysm at zone 2 of the thoracic aorta in a 37-year-old man with the use of in situ fenestration assisted by a temporary endovascular shunt technique. PMID:24560242

  11. Right Aortic Arch with Aplasia of the Left Brachiocephalic Trunk Presented as Systolic Blood Pressure Difference Between Upper Extremities

    PubMed Central

    Babińska, Anna; Wawrzynek, Wojciech; Kukawska-Sysio, Karolina; Skupiński, Jarosław; Nowak, Patrycja

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The right aortic arch with mirror-image of branching arteries without coexisting congenital heart disease is a very rare anomaly. Case Report We report a case of the right-sided aortic arch with aplasia of the left brachiocephalic trunk in a 64-year-old women, presenting difference in systolic blood pressure between upper extremities. The history of the patient and angio-CT findings were described and visualized with images. Conclusions The knowledge of vascular variations is important for the clinical and therapeutic aspects. PMID:26966474

  12. One-Stage Repair of an Interrupted Aortic Arch with an Aortopulmonary Window in a Premature Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Bobos, Dimitrios; Kanakis, Meletios A.; Koulouri, Sofia; Giannopoulos, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Interrupted aortic arch with an aortopulmonary window is a rare congenital entity that is associated with high morbidity and mortality, especially in premature low-birth-weight infants, and the proper timing of surgical correction remains a matter of debate. We present the case of a premature infant weighing 1.6 kg who successfully underwent one stage surgical repair to treat interrupted aortic arch with an aortopulmonary window. The therapeutic management of this patient is described below, and a review of the literature is presented. PMID:26665109

  13. [Hybrid operation for a posttraumatic saccular aneurysm of the aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Ignat'ev, I M; Volodiukhin, M Iu; Zanochkin, A V; Terekhin, S V

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with a case report of successful hybrid surgical treatment of a patient presenting with a posttraumatic large false saccular aneurysm of the aortic arch with mediastinal displacement and compression of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve and trachea. The patient was subjected to a hybrid operation, i. e., bypass grafting of the brachiocephalic trunk and the left common carotid artery with a bifurcation prosthesis from the ascending aorta through sternotomy, carotid-vertebral and carotid-subclavian bypass grafting on the left in a combination with endoprosthetic repair of the aortic arch with the stent graft Valiant Thoracic 40 × 224 mm (VAMF 4040c200TE) manufactured by the Medtronic Company. The postoperative period was uneventful followed by rather rapid rehabilitation of the patient. One month after the operation, the clinical state improved considerably. His voice restored virtually completely, and breathlessness disappeared. According to the findings of MSCT angiography, the aneurysmatic cavity is thrombosed, with the stent graft showing no evidence of either dislocation or endoleak. The bifurcation bypass graft is functioning. According to the data of duplex scanning, the anastomoses established on the neck are patent. PMID:23531669

  14. Right aortic arch with isolation of the left innominate artery in a case of double chamber right ventricle and ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Mangukia, Chirantan; Sethi, Sonali; Agarwal, Saket; Mishra, Smita; Satsangi, Deepak Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Herein, we report an unusual case of right aortic arch with isolation of the left innominate artery in a case of double chamber right ventricle with ventricular septal defect. The blood supply to the innominate artery was by a collateral arising from the descending aorta. The embryological development of this anomaly can be explained by the hypothetical double aortic arch model proposed by Edwards with interruption of the arch at two levels. PMID:24987265

  15. Normothermic total arch replacement without hypothermic circulatory arrest to treat aortic distal arch aneurysm in a patient with cold agglutinin disease.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Narihiro; Takemura, Hirofumi; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Matsuno, Yukihiro

    2011-10-01

    Cold agglutinin disease although rare, can lead to serious complications for patients undergoing cardio-thoracic surgery, especially when cardiopulmonary bypass is applied under hypothermic circulatory arrest. We describe normothermic total arch replacement without hypothermic circulatory arrest in a patient with cold agglutinin disease. The patient tolerated all procedures well and did not develop cerebral ischemia due to surgical maneuvers or thrombotic or haemolytic complications due to cold agglutinin disease. Although endovascular aortic repair is the first choice under such complex conditions, this method could also serve as an alternative strategy when endovascular aortic repair is precluded. PMID:21788303

  16. Hemiarch versus total aortic arch replacement in acute type A dissection: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Shi Sum; Theologou, Thomas; Harrington, Deborah; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Oo, Aung

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in aortic surgery, acute type A aortic dissection remains a surgical emergency associated with high mortality and morbidity. Appropriate management is crucial to achieve satisfactory outcomes but the optimal surgical approach is controversial. The present systematic review and meta-analysis sought to access cumulative data from comparative studies between hemiarch and total aortic arch replacement in patients with acute type A aortic dissection. Methods A systematic review of the literature using six databases. Eligible studies include comparative studies on hemiarch versus total arch replacement reporting short, medium and long term outcomes. A meta-analysis was performed on eligible studies reporting outcome of interest to quantify the effects of hemiarch replacement on mortality and morbidity risk compared to total arch replacement. Result Fourteen retrospective studies met the inclusion criteria and 2,221 patients were included in the final analysis. Pooled analysis showed that hemiarch replacement was associated with a lower risk of post-operative renal dialysis [risk ratio (RR) =0.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56–0.94; P=0.02; I2=0%]. There was no significant difference in terms of in-hospital mortality between the two groups (RR =0.84; 95% CI: 0.65–1.09; P=0.20; I2=0%). Cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic cross clamp and circulatory arrest times were significantly longer in total arch replacement. During follow up, no significant difference was reported from current studies between the two operative approaches in terms of aortic re-intervention and freedom from aortic reoperation. Conclusions Within the context of publication bias by high volume aortic centres and non-randomized data sets, there was no difference in mortality outcomes between the two groups. This analysis serves to demonstrate that for those centers doing sufficient total aortic arch activity to allow for publication, excellent and equivalent outcomes

  17. Interruption of aortic arch in adults: surgical experience with extra-anatomic bypass.

    PubMed

    Sai Krishna, C; Bhan, Anil; Sharma, Sanjeev; Kiran, Usha; Venugopal, Panangipalli

    2005-01-01

    We reviewed our 3-year experience in treating interruption of the aorta in adult patients. Clinical profiles, surgical management, and results of early and mid-term follow-up are presented. From August 2001 through June 2003, 7 adult patients underwent an extra-anatomic bypass procedure to repair interruption of the aortic arch. Five patients underwent ventral aortic repair through a mid-sternotomy and an upper midline laparotomy, and 2 patients underwent repair through a left posterolateral thoracotomy. A bovine collagen-impregnated polyester fiber graft was used in 6 patients, and a Gore-Tex graft was interposed in 1 patient. All repairs were performed without cardiopulmonary bypass. Follow-up was complete in all patients. The mean follow-up was 1728 +/- 1 months (range, 9-31 months). No neurologic, renal, or gastrointestinal complications were noted in any patient. There was no in-hospital or late mortality or need for re-intervention. All patients were asymptomatic; however, 5 patients had mild residual hypertension. Graft patency in all the patients was confirmed by computed tomographic angiography. Interruption of the aorta is rare in adults. Ventral aortic repair through a midline approach is our preferred technique for surgical repair of this entity, because it avoids the extensive network of collateral vessels on the chest wall, enables simultaneous treatment of associated lesions, and in all likelihood reduces morbidity and mortality. PMID:16107103

  18. Use of through-and-through guidewire for delivering large stent-grafts into the distal aortic arch

    SciTech Connect

    Shammari, Muhammad Al; Taylor, Peter; Reidy, John F.

    2000-05-15

    The availability of large diameter stent-grafts is now allowing the endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Most aneurysms are closely related to the distal arch and it is thus necessary to pass the delivery systems into the arch to effectively cover the proximal neck. Even with extra-stiff guidewires in position, it may still be difficult to achieve this, as a result of tortuosity at the iliac arteries and the aorta. We detail a technique where a stiff guidewire is passed from a brachial entry point through the aorta and out at the femoral arteriotomy site. This allows extra-support and may enable the delivery system to be passed further into the aortic arch than it could with just the regular guidewire position.

  19. Transposition Complex with Aortic Arch Obstruction: Outcomes of One-Stage Repair Over 10 Years.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang Ho; Sung, Si Chan; Kim, Hyungtae; Lee, Hyung Doo; Ban, Gil Ho; Kim, Geena; Kim, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    The surgical management of transposition complex with aortic arch obstruction remains technically demanding due to anatomic complexity. Even in the recent surgical era, there are centers that address this anomaly with a staged strategy. This report presents our experiences with a one-stage repair of transposition complexes with aortic arch obstructions more than the last 10 years. Since 2003, 19 patients with a transposition of the great arteries (TGA, 2 patients) or a double outlet of the right ventricle (DORV, 17 patients) and aortic arch obstruction have undergone one-stage repair of their anomalies. The mean age was 6.7 ± 2.3 days, and the mean body weight was 3.4 ± 0.3 kg. The 2 patients with TGA exhibited coarctation of the aorta. The 17 patients with DORV all exhibited the Taussig-Bing type. The great artery relationships were anteroposterior in 4 patients (21.1 %). The coronary artery anatomies were usual (1LCx; 2R) in 8 patients (42.1 %). There were 2 early deaths (10.5 %). Seven patients (36.8 %) required percutaneous interventions. One patient required re-operation for pulmonary valvar stenosis and left pulmonary artery patch angioplasty. The overall survival was 84.2 %. The freedom from mortality was 83.5 % at 5 years, and the freedom from intervention was 54.4 % at 5 years. The one-stage repair of transposition complexes with aortic arch obstructions resulted in an acceptable survival rate and a relatively high incidence of postoperative catheter interventions. Postoperative catheter interventions are highly effective. Transposition complexes combined with aortic arch obstructions can be managed by one-stage repair with good early and midterm results. PMID:26358472

  20. [Total Aortic Arch Replacement by Minimally Invasive Approach in a Patient with Permanent Tracheostomy;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Yuri, Koichi; Matsumoto, Harunobu; Kimura, Naoyuki; Okamura, Homare; Shiraishi, Manabu; Hori, Daijirou; Adachi, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Standard full median sternotomy for total aortic arch replacement in patients with tracheostomy has higher risks for mediastinitis and graft infection. To avoid surgical site infection, it is necessary to keep a sufficient distance between the tracheostomy and the site of surgical skin incision. We herein report a case of a 74-year-old man with permanent tracheostomy after total laryngectomy, who underwent total aortic arch replacement for an aneurysm. Antero-lateral thoracotomy in the 2nd intercostal space with lower partial sternotomy( ALPS approach) provided an enough distance between the tracheostomy and the surgical field. It also provided a good view for surgical procedure and enabled the standard setup of cardiopulmonary bypass with ascending aortic cannulation, venous drainage from the right atrium and the left ventricular venting through the upper right pulmonary vein. The operation was completed in 345 minutes and the patient was discharged on the 11th postoperative day without any complications. PMID:27246136

  1. Fatal aortotracheal fistula combined with aortoesophageal fistula in an infant with double aortic arch: a warning.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Naotaka; Matsubara, Muneaki; Kimura, Naritaka; Terada, Masatsugu

    2015-10-01

    This report describes a 2-month-old male infant with a double aortic arch (DAA) complicated by aortoesophageal fistula (AEF) and aortotracheal fistula (ATF). He was intubated with an endotracheal tube at birth because of neonatal asphyxia. A nasogastric tube was also placed for gastric decompression and milk feeding. On the 74th day of birth, he had massive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage associated with shock, and was referred to our hospital. Although emergent surgery controlled the bleeding from AEF, he suffered cardiac arrest due to massive bleeding from ATF 5 h after surgery, and died on the 9th postoperative day. Physicians should be aware that prolonged endotracheal and nasogastric intubation predispose to the development of not only esophageal erosion but also more lethal tracheal erosion. In addition to the importance of early diagnosis and prompt surgery for DAA, appropriate preoperative respiratory management is emphasized to prevent similar occurrences in the future. PMID:24057599

  2. Hemodynamics in the mouse aortic arch as assessed by MRI, ultrasound, and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Feintuch, Akiva; Ruengsakulrach, Permyos; Lin, Amy; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Yu-Qing; Bishop, Jonathon; Davidson, Lorinda; Courtman, David; Foster, F Stuart; Steinman, David A; Henkelman, R Mark; Ethier, C Ross

    2007-02-01

    Mice are widely used to study arterial disease in humans, and the pathogenesis of arterial diseases is known to be strongly influenced by hemodynamic factors. It is, therefore, of interest to characterize the hemodynamic environment in the mouse arterial tree. Previous measurements have suggested that many relevant hemodynamic variables are similar between the mouse and the human. Here we use a combination of Doppler ultrasound and MRI measurements, coupled with numerical modeling techniques, to characterize the hemodynamic environment in the mouse aortic arch at high spatial resolution. We find that the hemodynamically induced stresses on arterial endothelial cells are much larger in magnitude and more spatially uniform in the mouse than in the human, an effect that can be explained by fluid mechanical scaling principles. This surprising finding seems to be at variance with currently accepted models of the role of hemodynamics in atherogenesis and the known distribution of atheromatous lesions in mice. PMID:17012350

  3. [Multiple brain abscesses in the territory of the vertebral-basilar artery resulting from an infected aortic arch graft].

    PubMed

    Otani, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawauchi, Satoshi; Uneda, Atsuhito; Kajitani, Takumi; Watanabe, Kyoichi; Deguchi, Kentaro; Kiriyama, Hideki; Tokunaga, Koji; Matsumoto, Kengo

    2015-03-01

    A 62-year-old man with high fever and in a state of disorientation was transferred to our hospital. One year before this transfer, he had undergone total arch replacement surgery for thoracic aortic dissection. On admission to our hospital, head MRI revealed multiple brain abscesses in the territory of the vertebral-basilar artery, and chest CT showed gas around the aortic graft, in particular, at the origin of the left subclavian artery. We diagnosed him with brain abscesses in the left vertebral-basilar artery resulting from an infected aortic graft. We immediately began administration of intravenous antibiotics. Although his blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid cultures were negative, fortunately, the brain abscesses and ectopic gas disappeared. Since reports of only antibiotic use for treating brain abscesses due to aortic graft infection are rare, the appropriate duration of antibiotic administration has not been established yet. Therefore, careful observation is required in this case. PMID:25748809

  4. Direct distal aortic arch graft cannulation after the elephant trunk procedure: technique for central cannulation during second-stage repair.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Eduard; Pochettino, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Arterial cannulation after the elephant trunk (ET) procedure at the time of second-stage distal repair can be achieved through multiple routes. Common strategies for arterial perfusion at the time of second-stage aortic repair include retrograde perfusion (femoral/iliac vessels), transapical or left subclavian artery cannulation. In the event these cannulation options are not practical or advisable, we offer an alternative approach through cannulation of the distal aortic arch Dacron graft through the left thorax. Advantages include forward distal perfusion, minimal proximal ischaemic time, prevention of thromboembolic events from thrombus attached to the ET and avoidance of malperfusion syndromes. PMID:25281849

  5. Results of "elephant trunk" total aortic arch replacement using a multi-branched, collared graft prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan R B; Dell'Aquila, Angelo M; Akil, Ali; Schlarb, Dominik; Panuccio, Guiseppe; Martens, Sven; Rukosujew, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We report on our experience with a simplified elephant trunk (ET) procedure with a multi-branched prosthesis (Vascutek(®) Siena™ Collared Graft). It consists of a proximal portion (20 cm) with prefabricated side branches, a collar and a distal portion (30 cm). The collar, which can be trimmed into any desired diameter, constitutes the suture portion to the descending aorta. Radiopaque markers in the distal portion indicate the landing zone. Between January 2011 and June 2013, 20 consecutive patients (10 women; mean age, 66 ± 9.3 years) underwent ET procedure, including 6 re-do cases. Underlying aortic diseases were acute dissection (n = 6), chronic dissection (n = 4), aneurysm (n = 8) and PAU (n = 2). Mean preoperative diameter of the descending aorta was 49.1 ± 12.9 mm (range 74.7-29.7 mm). Concomitant procedures included ascending aortic replacement in 16 patients; root replacement in 2; AVR in 2, CABG in 3 and mitral repair in 1 patient. CPB time was 263 ± 94 min; mean duration of ACP was 65 ± 14 min. Two patients died on POD 8 and 78, respectively. Major adverse events included stroke (n = 1), resternotomy for bleeding (n = 2), renal failure requiring temporary dialysis (n = 1) and recurrent nerve paresis (n = 2). After a mean follow-up of 10 ± 8 months, all discharged patients were alive. Seven patients underwent stent-graft implantation of the descending aorta and one patient underwent open descending aortic replacement. The last generation of multi-branched arch prosthesis and especially the Vascutek(®) Siena™ Collared Graft make ET procedure a reasonable treatment option even in patients with acute aortic dissection. PMID:25491933

  6. Clinical Evaluation of Efficacy of CIA and CNA Intrusion Arches

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Sambhav; Pandey, Vinisha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Excessive overbite is one of the most common problems that confront the orthodontist. Deep bite can be due to infraocclusion of posterior teeth, supraocclusion of anterior teeth or a combination of the two. Correction of same can be carried out by extrusion of molars, intrusion of incisors or by a combination of both respectively. Various intrusion arches are recommended for correcting deep bite by true intrusion of anterior teeth, Utility arches, Segmental arch, Connecticut Intrusion Arch (CIA) and Connecticut New Arch (CNA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of CIA and CNA intrusion arches. Materials and Methods Tracings recorded from pre and post-treatment lateral cephalograms of 25 patients treated by CIA (Group I) and another 25 patients treated by CNA (Group II) intrusion arches in deep bite cases after four months of treatment were analysed and findings were recorded. Statistical Analysis Paired t-test was used to compare pre and post-treatment changes within Groups I and II and unpaired t-test was used to compare treatment changes between Group I and Group II. A P-value of < 0.05 was set for statistical significance. Results Findings of this study demonstrate that an average of 1mm of intrusion takes place with CIA intrusion arch and 1.3mm with CNA intrusion arch in a period of 4 months. Both intrusion arches do not affect the position of molar in vertical or anteroposterior plane. Interpretation & Conclusion Both CIA and CNA intrusion arches are effective in bringing about intrusion of lower incisors. PMID:26501008

  7. Evaluation of the fit of preformed nickel titanium arch wires on normal occlusion dental arches

    PubMed Central

    Al-Barakati, Rakhn G.; Alqahtani, Nasser D.; AlMadi, Abdulaziz; Albarakati, Sahar F.; ALKofide, Eman A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the fits of preformed nickel titanium (NiTi) archwires on dental arches with normal occlusion. Methods Forty sets of upper and lower plaster models were obtained from men and women with Class I occlusions. Preformed 0.016″ × 0.022″ NiTi archwires from Rocky Mountain Orthodontics (RMO), 3 M Unitek, Ormco, and Dentaurum were evaluated in terms of their fits on dental arches from male, female, and combined cases. Data were analyzed by using fourth- and sixth-order polynomial equations, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the Duncan post hoc test. Results In the upper arches, the best fit and least error were obtained with RMO Ovoid and Ormco Orthos Large archwires for male cases, but with 3 M Orthoform LA archwires for female and combined cases. In the lower arches, the best fit and least error were obtained with Ormco Orthos Large for male cases, with 3 M Orthoform LA and RMO Normal for female cases, and with 3 M Orthoform LA, RMO Normal, Ormco Orthos Large, and Ormco Orthos Small for combined cases. When both dental arches were matched, Ormco Orthos Large was the best wire for male cases. 3 M Orthoform LA was the best wire for female and combined cases. Conclusions Using an archwire form with the best fit to the dental arch should produce minimal changes in the dental arch form when NiTi wires are used and require less customization when stainless-steel wires are used. PMID:26792965

  8. Pulmonary artery stenosis caused by a large aortic arch pseudoaneurysm detected 10 years after a minor trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Jalal; Aghasadeghi, Kamran; Zarrabi, Khalil; Abdi Ardekani, Alireza; Zolghadrasli, Abdolali

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of aorta is a rare condition usually seen after aortic surgeries or serious accidents. Here we report a 60 years old man without any previous medical condition who presented with non-specific symptoms and underwent different investigations for more than 1 year, until the presence of a continuous murmur raised suspicion toward his cardiovascular system. In echocardiographic and computed tomography (CT) angiographic studies a large pseudoaneurysm of aortic arch with compression effect on pulmonary artery was detected. At this stage he remembered having suffered a minor trauma 10 years ago. He finally underwent operation and his aortic wall was repaired successfully with a patch. This case highlights the importance of thorough history taking and physical examination in patients irrespective of symptoms and high index of suspicion to detect this life-threatening condition. PMID:27069568

  9. Life-Threatening Postpneumonectomy Syndrome Complicated with Right Aortic Arch after Left Pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Tanaka, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old man with right aortic arch underwent left lower lobectomy and lingular segmentectomy, followed by complete pneumonectomy, for refractory nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. Three months after the pneumonectomy, he developed acute respiratory distress. Computed tomography showed an excessive mediastinal shift with an extremely narrowed bronchus intermedius and right lower bronchus compressed between the right pulmonary artery and the right descending aorta. Soon after the nearly obstructed bronchus intermedius was observed by bronchoscopy, he began to exhibit frequent hypoxic attacks, perhaps due to mucosal edema. Emergent surgical repositioning of the mediastinum and decompression of the bronchus was indicated. After complete adhesiolysis of the left thoracic cavity was performed, to maintain the proper mediastinal position, considering the emergent setting, an open wound thoracostomy was created and piles of gauze were inserted, mildly compressing the heart and the mediastinum to the right side. Thoracoplasty was performed three months later, and he was eventually discharged without any dressings needed. Mediastinal repositioning under thoracostomy should be avoided in elective cases because of its extremely high invasiveness. However, in the case of life-threatening postpneumonectomy syndrome in an emergent setting, mediastinal repositioning under thoracostomy may be an option to save life, which every thoracic surgeon could attempt. PMID:26106501

  10. Life-Threatening Postpneumonectomy Syndrome Complicated with Right Aortic Arch after Left Pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Tanaka, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old man with right aortic arch underwent left lower lobectomy and lingular segmentectomy, followed by complete pneumonectomy, for refractory nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. Three months after the pneumonectomy, he developed acute respiratory distress. Computed tomography showed an excessive mediastinal shift with an extremely narrowed bronchus intermedius and right lower bronchus compressed between the right pulmonary artery and the right descending aorta. Soon after the nearly obstructed bronchus intermedius was observed by bronchoscopy, he began to exhibit frequent hypoxic attacks, perhaps due to mucosal edema. Emergent surgical repositioning of the mediastinum and decompression of the bronchus was indicated. After complete adhesiolysis of the left thoracic cavity was performed, to maintain the proper mediastinal position, considering the emergent setting, an open wound thoracostomy was created and piles of gauze were inserted, mildly compressing the heart and the mediastinum to the right side. Thoracoplasty was performed three months later, and he was eventually discharged without any dressings needed. Mediastinal repositioning under thoracostomy should be avoided in elective cases because of its extremely high invasiveness. However, in the case of life-threatening postpneumonectomy syndrome in an emergent setting, mediastinal repositioning under thoracostomy may be an option to save life, which every thoracic surgeon could attempt. PMID:26106501

  11. Moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest in total arch repair for acute type A aortic dissection: clinical safety and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ming; Ma, Wei-Guo; Guan, Xin-Liang; Wang, Long-Fei; Li, Jia-Chen; Lan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Continued debates exist regarding the optimal temperature during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) in aortic arch repair for patients with type A aortic dissection (TAAD). This study seeks to examine whether the use of moderate HCA in emergency aortic arch surgery provides comparable operative outcomes to deep HCA for patients with acute TAAD. Methods We prospectively enrolled 74 consecutive patients (mean age 47.7±9.8 years, 54 males) with acute TAAD, who underwent emergency total arch replacement and frozen elephant trunk implantation under HCA (18–28 °C) with unilateral selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (uSACP). Patients were divided into two groups based on the nasopharyngeal temperature at the initiation of HCA: deep HCA (DHCA, <20 °C) in 35 (47.3%) and moderate HCA (MHCA, 20–28 °C) in 39 (52.7%). Operative outcomes including mortality, morbidity and visceral organ functions were compared between the two groups. Results The mean times of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and aortic cross-clamp were 211±54 and 238±62 minutes (P=0.053) and 118±27 and 142±45 minutes (P=0.005) in the MHCA and DHCA groups, respectively. Operative mortality did not differ between two groups (10.2% in MHCA vs. 14.3% in DHCA groups, P=0.862). Nor did the incidence of morbidities differ between the two groups (P>0.05). The temporal trend in the changes of postoperative levels of creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin and lactate did not differ between two groups (P>0.05). Multivariate analysis found that the temperature during HCA (MHCA vs. DHCA) did not affect operative mortality, morbidities and neurologic complications. Instead, CPB time (in minutes) was the risk factor for operative mortality (odds ratio, 1.032; 95% confidence interval, 1.004–1.061; P=0.023). Conclusions: Moderate HCA is associated with equivalent operative mortality and morbidity and visceral organ functions compared to deep HCA in patients with acute TAAD undergoing

  12. [Mycotic Aneurysm of Distal Aortic Arch, after Total Arch Replacement with Open-stent Graft;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kotaro; Kawahara, Yu; Masaki, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Takahara, Shingo; Nakamura, Ken; Toyama, Shuji; Fukasawa, Manabu

    2015-05-01

    The patient was a 72-year-old man, who had undergone total arch replacement with an open-stent graft due to saccular aneurysm of distal arch, 2 years before. He was admitted to a local hospital with the complaint of high fever, and was diagnosed as having pyothorax, after computed tomography (CT) scanning. After transferred to our hospital, he was treated by drainage, and antibiotic therapy. But CT scans showed the enlargement of distal arch aneurysm, and migration of the stent graft. Urgent operation was performed. We approached to the site by a full sternotomy, and left anterolateral thoracotomy. Segment 1+2 of the left lung was resected to avoid bleeding and lung injury. Graft replacement of distal arch and descending aorta was performed on cardiopulmonary bypass, with hypothermia, selective brain perfusion and systemic circulatory arrest. To protect from recurrence of infection, the omental flap was transposed to the graft site. Until now, there is no recurrence of infection. PMID:25963790

  13. Atherosclerosis differentially affects calcium signalling in endothelial cells from aortic arch and thoracic aorta in Apolipoprotein E knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Clodagh; Quayle, John; Burdyga, Theodor; Wray, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Apolipoprotein‐E knockout (ApoE−/−) mice develop hypercholesterolemia and are a useful model of atherosclerosis. Hypercholesterolemia alters intracellular Ca2+ signalling in vascular endothelial cells but our understanding of these changes, especially in the early stages of the disease process, is limited. We therefore determined whether carbachol‐mediated endothelial Ca2+ signals differ in plaque‐prone aortic arch compared to plaque‐resistant thoracic aorta, of wild‐type and ApoE−/− mice, and how this is affected by age and the presence of hypercholesterolemia. The extent of plaque development was determined using en‐face staining with Sudan IV. Tissues were obtained from wild‐type and ApoE−/− mice at 10 weeks (pre‐plaques) and 24 weeks (established plaques). We found that even before development of plaques, significantly increased Ca2+ responses were observed in arch endothelial cells. Even with aging and plaque formation, ApoE−/− thoracic responses were little changed, however a significantly enhanced Ca2+ response was observed in arch, both adjacent to and away from lesions. In wild‐type mice of any age, 1–2% of cells had oscillatory Ca2+ responses. In young ApoE−/− and plaque‐free regions of older ApoE−/−, this is unchanged. However a significant increase in oscillations (~13–15%) occurred in thoracic and arch cells adjacent to lesions in older mice. Our data suggest that Ca2+ signals in endothelial cells show specific changes both before and with plaque formation, that these changes are greatest in plaque‐prone aortic arch cells, and that these changes will contribute to the reported deterioration of endothelium in atherosclerosis. PMID:25344475

  14. Gelsolin and Progression of Aortic Arch Calcification in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Terry Ting-Yu; Liao, Shang-Chih; Kao, Yu-Yin; Lee, Wen-Chin; Lee, Yueh-Ting; Ng, Hwee-Yeong; Lee, Po-Shun; Lee, Chien-Te

    2016-01-01

    Background:Vascular calcification (VC) is a key process associated with cardiovascular mortality in dialysis patients. Gelsolin is an actin-binding protein that can modulate inflammation, correlated inversely with hemodialysis (HD) mortality and involved in bone calcification homeostasis. In this report, we aim to characterize progression in aortic arch calcification (AAC) and investigate its association with gelsolin. Methods: 184 HD patients were enrolled and their annual posterior-anterior chest X-ray films (CXR) in 2009 and 2013 were examined. The severity of AAC was classified as grade 0 to 3. Blood levels of gelsolin were measured by ELISA kits. Biographic and biochemical data at baseline were analyzed with status of AAC at baseline and changes after 4 years. Results: At baseline, 60% of the patients had detectable AAC on CXR. After 4 years, 77% had AAC. Patients with grade 1 and 2 AAC had increased risk of progression (Odds ratio [OR] 2~3, P=0.001) compared to those with grade 0 at baseline. Compared to those with no AAC, patients with AAC progression had older age, lower gelsolin, higher waist circumference and prevalence of vascular disease. Regression analysis confirmed baseline gelsolin (odds ratio 0.845, 95% confidence interval [0.734-0.974]) and waist circumference as the independent factors associated with AAC progression. Gelsolin is positively correlated with serum albumin and negatively with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that HD patients with grades 1 or 2 baseline AAC are at increased risk of further progression compared to those with grade 0. We also found lower blood levels of gelsolin associated with progressive AAC. Further investigation into the mechanistic roles of gelsolin in vascular calcification may provide new understanding of this key process. PMID:26941566

  15. Hybrid Repair of Complex Thoracic Aortic Arch Pathology: Long-Term Outcomes of Extra-anatomic Bypass Grafting of the Supra-aortic Trunk

    SciTech Connect

    Lotfi, S. Clough, R. E.; Ali, T.; Salter, R.; Young, C. P.; Bell, R.; Modarai, B.; Taylor, P.

    2013-02-15

    Hybrid repair constitutes supra-aortic debranching before thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). It offers improved short-term outcome compared with open surgery; however, longer-term studies are required to assess patient outcomes and patency of the extra-anatomic bypass grafts. A prospectively maintained database of 380 elective and urgent patients who had undergone TEVAR (1997-2011) was analyzed retrospectively. Fifty-one patients (34 males; 17 females) underwent hybrid repair. Median age was 71 (range, 18-90) years with mean follow-up of 15 (range, 0-61) months. Perioperative complications included death: 10 % (5/51), stroke: 12 % (6/51), paraplegia: 6 % (3/51), endoleak: 16 % (8/51), rupture: 4 % (2/51), upper-limb ischemia: 2 % (1/51), bypass graft occlusion: 4 % (2/51), and cardiopulmonary complications in 14 % (7/51). Three patients (6 %) required emergency intervention for retrograde dissection: (2 aortic root repairs; 2 innominate stents). Early reintervention was performed for type 1 endoleak in two patients (2 proximal cuff extensions). One patient underwent innominate stenting and revision of their bypass for symptomatic restenosis. At 48 months, survival was 73 %. Endoleak was detected in three (6 %) patients (type 1 = 2; type 2 = 1) requiring debranching with proximal stent graft (n = 2) and proximal extension cuff (n = 1). One patient had a fatal rupture of a mycotic aneurysm and two arch aneurysms expanded. No bypass graft occluded after the perioperative period. Hybrid operations to treat aortic arch disease can be performed with results comparable to open surgery. The longer-term outcomes demonstrate low rates of reintervention and high rates of graft patency.

  16. Trade in the hammer for a power driver—perspectives on the frozen elephant trunk repair for aortic arch disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Like a power driver for which the bit can be changed for each screw that is turned, improvement of brain protection strategies and the development of hybrid techniques have provided us with the ability to offer tailored repair options for patients with complex thoracic disease involving the arch. Variations of the frozen elephant trunk operation have been the most versatile of the newer hybrid approaches to repair complex thoracic aortic pathology. The frozen elephant trunk procedure includes the use of circulatory arrest in combination with suturing a stentgraft into the arch, and may reduce the risk of stroke and endoleaks. This article describes various methods of performing the frozen elephant trunk procedure with a focus on preoperative considerations including the etiology of disease, the time and urgency of presentation, and the indications to operate. PMID:24109573

  17. Senile Calcification of the Trachea, Aortic Arch, and Mitral Annulus: An Incidental Finding on Chest X-Ray.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Maleki, Mahmood; Kazemi, Toba; Davoody, Navid

    2015-10-27

    A 94-year-old woman presented with dizziness and hypotension of 2 days' duration. She denied any syncope, presyncope, or angina. She had received a permanent pacemaker 12 years previously for the management of complete heart block (CHB), but she failed to program it. Twelve-lead electrocardiography revealed CHB with ventricular escape rhythm (40/min), so we inserted a temporary pacemaker. Anteroposterior chest X-ray showed trachea, aortic arch, and severe mitral valve calcification. Tracheal calcification is usually seen after 40 years old without clinical importance. However, it is seen in patients with renal failure, metastases, and prolonged use of warfarin as well as in pregnancy.(1) (-) (3). PMID:26985213

  18. Right Cervical Aortic Arch and Pseudocoarctation of the Aorta Associated with Aneurysms and Steal Phenomena: US, CTA, and MRA Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Tanju, Sumru Ustuner, Evren; Erden, Ilhan; Aytac, Suat Kemal

    2007-02-15

    A 55-year-old woman presented with right cervical aortic arch with pseudocoarctation of the aorta further complicated by the presence of multiple aneurysms and a high-grade stenosis at the origin of the left subclavian trunk from the aorta causing a discrepancy in blood pressure between the right and left arms. The branching pattern and the resulting complex steal syndromes involving the left carotid and the subclavian system are unique. The computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and Doppler ultrasound findings are described.

  19. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiomegaly With Aortic Arch Calcification in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortic arch calcification (AoAC) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in end-stage renal disease population. AoAC can be simply estimated with an AoAC score using plain chest radiography. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of AoAC with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiomegaly in patients who have undergoing hemodialysis (HD). We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) by chest x-ray in 220 HD patients who underwent the measurement of baPWV. The values of baPWV were measured by an ankle-brachial index-form device. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with AoAC score >4. Compared patients with AoAC score ≦4, patients with AoAC score >4 had older age, higher prevalence of diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, lower diastolic blood pressure, higher baPWV, higher CTR, higher prevalence of CTR ≧50%, lower total cholesterol, and lower creatinine level. After the multivariate stepwise logistic analysis, old age, cerebrovascular disease, high baPWV (per 100 cm/s, odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003–1.129, P = 0.038), CTR (per 1%, OR 1.116, 95% CI 1.046–1.191, P = 0.001), and low total cholesterol level were independently associated with AoAC score >4. Our study demonstrated AoAC severity was associated with high baPWV and high CTR in patients with HD. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating AoAC on plain chest radiography may be a simple and inexpensive method for detecting arterial stiffness in HD patients. PMID:27175684

  20. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiomegaly With Aortic Arch Calcification in Patients on Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-05-01

    Aortic arch calcification (AoAC) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in end-stage renal disease population. AoAC can be simply estimated with an AoAC score using plain chest radiography. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of AoAC with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiomegaly in patients who have undergoing hemodialysis (HD).We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) by chest x-ray in 220 HD patients who underwent the measurement of baPWV. The values of baPWV were measured by an ankle-brachial index-form device. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with AoAC score >4.Compared patients with AoAC score ≦4, patients with AoAC score >4 had older age, higher prevalence of diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, lower diastolic blood pressure, higher baPWV, higher CTR, higher prevalence of CTR ≧50%, lower total cholesterol, and lower creatinine level. After the multivariate stepwise logistic analysis, old age, cerebrovascular disease, high baPWV (per 100 cm/s, odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003-1.129, P = 0.038), CTR (per 1%, OR 1.116, 95% CI 1.046-1.191, P = 0.001), and low total cholesterol level were independently associated with AoAC score >4.Our study demonstrated AoAC severity was associated with high baPWV and high CTR in patients with HD. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating AoAC on plain chest radiography may be a simple and inexpensive method for detecting arterial stiffness in HD patients. PMID:27175684

  1. Aortic arch/elephant trunk procedure with Sienna(TM) graft and endovascular stenting of thoraco-abdominal aorta for treatment of complex chronic dissection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Randolph H L; Baghai, Max; Yu, Simon C H; Underwood, Malcolm J

    2013-05-01

    Aneurismal dilatation of the remaining thoracic aorta after ascending aortic interposition grafting for type 'A' aortic dissection is not uncommon. For such complex cases, one treatment option is total arch replacement and elephant trunk procedure with the Sienna(TM) collared graft (Vascutek, Inchinnan, UK) technique followed by a staged thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). The video illustrates our technique in a 56-year-old man with an extensive aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic dissecting aneurysm. For the 'open' procedure femoral arterial and venous cannulation was used along with systemic cooling and circulatory arrest at 22 °C. Upon circulatory arrest, the aortic arch was incised and antegrade cerebral perfusion achieved via selective cannulation to the right brachiocephalic and left common carotid artery, keeping flow rates at 10-15 mL/kg/min and perfusion pressure at 50-60 mmHg. Arch replacement with an elephant trunk component was then performed and after completion of the distal aortic anastomosis antegrade perfusion via a side-arm in the graft was started and the operation completed using a variation of the 'sequential' clamping technique to maximize cerebral perfusion. The second endovascular stage was performed two weeks after discharge. Two covered stents were landing from the elephant trunk to the distal descending thoracic aorta, to secure the distal landing a bare stent of was placed to cover the aorta just distal to the origin of the celiac axis. The left subclavian artery was embolised with fibre coils. Post TEVAR angiogram showed no endoleak Although re-operative total arch replacement and elephant trunk procedure and subsequent TEVAR remained a challenging procedure, we believe excellent surgical outcome can be achieved with carefully planned operative strategy. PMID:23977606

  2. Cardiac Surgical Repair Should Be Offered to Infants with Trisomy 18, Interrupted Aortic Arch and Ventricular Septal Defect.

    PubMed

    Kavarana, Minoo N

    2016-06-01

    The management of children born with trisomy 18 is controversial, and both providers and parents often have differing opinions. Many parents choose to terminate the pregnancy while others go forward, making decisions based on their beliefs, understanding, and physician recommendations. Physicians are similarly divided regarding treatment of these children, as some feel that aggressive treatments are futile while others defer to the parents' wishes.Interrupted aortic arch with ventricular septal defect in children with trisomy 18 presents an ethical dilemma that highlights the kinds of controversies in medical decision making facing physicians on a daily basis. Repair of interrupted aortic arch with ventricular septal defect poses a high risk to newborns with or without trisomy 18. Therefore, the option for surgery should be treated as with any routine informed consent process. Parents should be counseled about the risks, benefits, alternatives, and the likelihood of success both short and long term and be should offered a choice between surgery and palliative care. PMID:27338603

  3. Association of Ankle-Brachial Index and Aortic Arch Calcification with Overall and Cardiovascular Mortality in Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Shih, Ming-Chen Paul; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery occlusive disease and vascular calcification are highly prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients, however the association of the combination of ankle-brachial index (ABI) and aortic arch calcification (AoAC) with clinical outcomes in patients undergoing HD is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of ABI and AoAC is independently associated with overall and cardiovascular mortality in HD patients. The median follow-up period was 5.7 years. Calcification of the aortic arch was assessed by chest X-ray. Forty-seven patients died including 24 due to cardiovascular causes during the follow-up period. The study patients were stratified into four groups according to an ABI < 0.95 or ≥0.95 and an AoAC score of >4 or ≤4 according to receiver operating characteristic curve. Those with an ABI < 0.95 and AoAC > 4 (vs. ABI ≥ 0.95 and AoAC score ≤ 4) were associated with overall (hazard ratio [HR], 4.913; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.932 to 12.497; p = 0.001) and cardiovascular (HR, 3.531; 95% CI, 1.070 to 11.652; p = 0.038) mortality in multivariable analysis. The combination of a low ABI and increased AoAC was associated with increased overall and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing HD. PMID:27608939

  4. Endovascular repair of a ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with an ascending aortic aneurysm: hybrid open arch reconstruction with simultaneous thoracic stent-graft deployment within elephant trunk.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zamzam, Ahmed M; Zhang, Wayne; Wang, Nan; Razzouk, Anees

    2008-03-01

    Endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta is now widely practiced. The extension of this technique to emergent settings is in evolution. Pathology of the ascending and transverse aortic arch may preclude thoracic aortic stent grafting due to the lack of a proximal seal zone. Several hybrid open/endovascular approaches have been described. We recently encountered the difficult case of a contained rupture of a 6.8 cm descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a 60-year-old patient with aneurysmal degeneration of the ascending and transverse aortic arch. This patient was treated with a hybrid approach of open ascending and transverse arch reconstruction along with simultaneous stent-graft repair of the descending thoracic aorta. The open repair established an excellent proximal landing zone by use of the "elephant trunk" technique. This technique also allowed direct suture fixation of the stent graft to the arch graft to prevent stent-graft migration. This hybrid surgical approach was successful and avoided the cumulative morbidity that a left thoracoabdominal approach would have added to the sternotomy. Further creative uses of these hybrid techniques will undoubtedly serve a larger role in the treatment of thoracic aortic pathology. PMID:18346569

  5. Left-ventricular mechanical activation and aortic-arch orientation recovered from Magneto-hydrodynamic Voltages observed in 12-lead ECGs obtained inside MRIs: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, T. Stan; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Zhang, Shelley Hualei; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Stevenson, William G.; Murrow, Jonathan R.; Ho Tse, Zion Tsz

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To explore use of the Magnetohydrodynamic Voltage (VMHD), observed in intra-MRI 12-lead Electrocardiograms (ECG), to indicate the timing of the onset of left-ventricular mechanical activation (LVMA) and the orientation of the aortic-arch (AAO). Theory Blood flow through the aortic arch during systole, in the presence of the MRI magnetic field (B0), generates VMHD. Since the magnitude and direction of VMHD are determined by the timing and directionality of blood flow relative to B0, we hypothesized that clinically useful measures, LVMA and AAO, could be extracted from temporal and vectorial VMHD characteristics. Methods VMHD signals were extracted from 12-lead ECG traces by comparing traces obtained inside and outside the MRI scanner. VMHD was converted into the Vectorcardiogram frame of reference. LVMA was quantified in 1 subject at 1.5T and 3 subjects at 3T, and the result compared to CINE MRI. AAO was inferred for 4 subjects at 3T and compared to anatomical imaging of the aortic arch orientation in the transverse plane. Results and Conclusions A <10% error was observed in LVMA measurements, while a <3° error was observed in aortic arch orientation measurements. The temporal and vectorial nature of VMHD is useful in estimating these clinically relevant parameters. PMID:25224074

  6. Anomalous origin of the left innominate (brachiocephalic) artery in the right aortic arch: How can it be anomalous when the left innominate artery is absent?

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Francesca; Bonnet, Damien; Geva, Tal; Sanders, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    An unusual case of a rare vascular ring, which has been called right aortic arch with aberrant left innominate artery, is presented. The appearance of this case led to the realization that there is really no innominate artery present in this anomaly but only the left dorsal aorta. We present a clarification of the nature and likely development of the vessels present. PMID:27212855

  7. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  8. Digital-image analysis of the aortic arch's development and its variations.

    PubMed

    Gielecki, Jerzy St; Wilk, Renata; Syc, Bozena; Musiał-Kopiejka, Magdalena; Piwowarczyk-Nowak, Aneta

    2004-11-01

    The study was performed on 103 human foetuses (58 female, 45 male) spontaneously aborted at between 14 and 30 weeks of gestation. The arteries were filled with latex, preserved in formalin and then dissected under the microscope and digitalised using a camera system. The following measurements were taken with the use of special computer software: the external diameter, the length and the volume of the arch of the aorta. The increase in diameter and length in relation to age corresponded to a linear function with values ranging from 1.77 mm to 4.09 mm for the diameter and from 4.94 mm to 13.31 mm for the length. The increase in volume corresponded to a square root function with values ranging from 13.42 mm3 to 173.96 mm3. Analysis of arch of the aorta variations revealed 11 cases of a common trunk for the brachiocephalic trunk and the left common carotid artery and 7 cases with the left vertebral artery arising directly from the arch of the aorta. In 2 cases the brachiocephalic trunk was absent, the right subclavian artery branching directly from the arch of the aorta at the level of the left subclavian artery or from the descending aorta just below the arterial duct ostium. PMID:15712142

  9. A new concentric double prosthesis for sutureless, magnetic-assisted aortic arch inclusion.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Acute dissection of the ascending aorta is a life-threatening condition in which the aortic wall develops one or more tears of the intima associated with intramural rupture of the media layer with subsequent formation of a two lumina vessel. The remaining outer layer is just the adventitia, with high risk of complete rupture. Vital organs may be under-perfused. Mortality rate in this acute event is about 50% if an emergent surgical procedure is not performed as soon as possible to replace the tract affected by the primary rupture. Nevertheless, the emergent surgical procedure is affected by high risk of mortality or severe neurologic sequelae, due to the need for deep hypothermia and cardiocirculatory arrest and different methods of cerebral protection. If the patient survives the acute event, a frequent outcome is the establishment of a chronic aortic dissection in the remaining aorta and late chronic dissecting aneurysm, usually starting from the surgical suture itself. Traumatism of surgical stitches and of direct blood flow pressure on weak aortic wall can be important contributing factors of the chronic disease. In conclusions, the majority of these patients undergoes a high risk operation without a complete solution of the disease. We hypothesize that excluding the aortic layers from the blood direct flow and using an anastomotic technique which does not include surgical stitches could help to significantly reduce the recurrence of aortic dissection after the acute event and shorten hypothermic arrest duration. We devised a double tubular prosthesis consisting of two concentric artificial tubes between which the aortic wall is confined and excluded from direct blood flow. We also devised a magnetic assisted sutureless anastomotic technique that seals the aortic tissue between the two prostheses and avoids the perforation of the fragile aortic wall with surgical stitches. We are presenting here this new prototype and draw a few different models. Both acute and

  10. Evaluation of dental arch width and form changes after orthodontic treatment and retention with a new computerized method.

    PubMed

    Taner, Tülin Ugur; Ciger, Semra; El, Hakan; Germeç, Derya; Es, Alphan

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate longitudinal arch width and form changes and to define arch form types with a new computerized method. Maxillary and mandibular models of 21 Class II Division 1 patients were examined before treatment (T(0)), after treatment (T(1)), and an average of 3 years after retention (T(2)). Arch width measurements were made directly on scanned images of maxillary and mandibular models. Arch form changes at T(0)-T(1) and T(1)-T(2) were evaluated by superimposing the computer-generated Bezier arch curves with a computer program. Types of dental arch forms were defined by superimposing them with the pentamorphic arch system, which included 5 different types of arch forms: normal, ovoid, tapered, narrow ovoid, and narrow tapered. Maxillary arch widths were increased during orthodontic treatment. Mandibular posterior arch widths were also increased. The expansion of the mandibular arch forms was less than in the maxillary arch forms. Arch width changes were generally stable, except for reduction in maxillary and mandibular interlateral, inter-first premolar, and mandibular intercanine widths. Pretreatment maxillary arch forms were mostly tapered; mandibular arch forms were tapered and narrow tapered. In maxillary arch forms, 76% of the treatment changes were maintained. Mandibular arch form was maintained in 67% of the sample, both during treatment and after retention. In mandibular arches, 71% of orthodontically induced arch form changes were maintained. PMID:15470349

  11. Endovascular Embolization of Bronchial Artery Originating from the Upper Portion of Aortic Arch in Patients with Massive Hemoptysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Sen Sun, Xi-Wen Yu, Dong Jie, Bing

    2013-05-15

    PurposeOur experience with endovascular embolization (EVE) of the bronchial artery (BA) originating from the upper portion of the aortic arch (AA) in six patients is described.MethodsAltogether, 818 patients with hemoptysis underwent multidetector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) before EVE or AA angiography during EVE. Aberrant BAs originating from the upper portion of the AA were the source of massive hemoptysis in six patients (0.73 %). MDCT angiograms and/or Digital subtraction angiograms were retrospectively reviewed. Selective catheterization and embolization were performed.ResultsThe ostia of the BAs were located on the superior surface of the AA between the brachiocephalic trunk and left common carotid artery in three patients, the junction of the aorta and medial surface of the left subclavian artery in two, and the posterior wall of the upper portion of the AA in one. The six BAs comprised two common trunks, three single right sides, and one single left side. The targeted vessels were successfully catheterized and embolized by a coaxial microcatheter system using polyvinyl alcohol particles. Other pathologic BAs and nonbronchial systemic arteries also were embolized. Bleeding was immediately controlled in all patients with no recurrence of hemoptysis. No procedure-related complications occurred.ConclusionsApplication of EVE of anomalous origin of BAs in patients with hemoptysis is important, as demonstrated in the six reported patients. MDCTA before EVE or AA angiography during EVE is critical to avoid missing a rare aberrant BA originating from the upper portion of the AA.

  12. Abnormal bisubclavian trunk arising from the aortic arch determined by cadaver dissection of a native dog: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Younes; Tadjalli, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the great thoracic vessels have been reported in 20% of dogs and cats. In some cases, the vascular ring anomalies remain unrecognized throughout the lifetime of an animal. This report describes a case with an unusual vascular ring anomaly (VRA) that was detected during dissection on a cadaver of an approximately two-year-old male native mixed breed dog. No history of the animal’s life was available. But, good physical condition and age of the animal based on dentition indicated the anomaly was perhaps asymptomatic. Two main branches of the aorta were identified with the initial branch being a bicarotid trunk followed by a bisubclavian trunk. The left subclavian and aberrant right subclavian arteries formed a very short trunk and arose directly from the aortic arch. No dilatation cranial to the esophageal sulcus was found. To the authors' knowledge, our case is the first report of such anomalies perhaps without any clinical signs in a native dog in Iran. PMID:26893819

  13. Abnormal bisubclavian trunk arising from the aortic arch determined by cadaver dissection of a native dog: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Younes; Tadjalli, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the great thoracic vessels have been reported in 20% of dogs and cats. In some cases, the vascular ring anomalies remain unrecognized throughout the lifetime of an animal. This report describes a case with an unusual vascular ring anomaly (VRA) that was detected during dissection on a cadaver of an approximately two-year-old male native mixed breed dog. No history of the animal's life was available. But, good physical condition and age of the animal based on dentition indicated the anomaly was perhaps asymptomatic. Two main branches of the aorta were identified with the initial branch being a bicarotid trunk followed by a bisubclavian trunk. The left subclavian and aberrant right subclavian arteries formed a very short trunk and arose directly from the aortic arch. No dilatation cranial to the esophageal sulcus was found. To the authors' knowledge, our case is the first report of such anomalies perhaps without any clinical signs in a native dog in Iran. PMID:26893819

  14. Aortic Arch Calcification Predicts the Renal Function Progression in Patients with Stage 3 to 5 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yueh-Ting; Chou, Chia-An; Lee, Chien-Te

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The presence of aortic arch calcification (AoAC) and cardiomegaly on chest radiography has been demonstrated as important risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the interrelationship among AoAC, cardiomegaly, and renal function progression remains unclear. The aim of this study is to assess whether AoAC and cardiomegaly are independently associated with the renal function progression in patients with stages 3–5 CKD. Methods. We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiomegaly by chest X-ray in 237 patients, followed up for at least three years without entering dialysis and classified into 4 groups according to the presence or absence of AoAC and cardiomegaly. The change in renal function was measured by the slope of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results. Of the 237 patients, the rate of eGFR decline was significantly higher in the group with coexistence of AoAC and cardiomegaly than any other groups. Baseline AoAC and proteinuria were independently associated with eGFR decline. AoAC were independently determined by age, eGFR slope, and cardiomegaly. Conclusions. The coexistence of AoAC and cardiomegaly is associated with faster eGFR decline. AoAC is an independent determinant of renal outcomes in patients with CKD stages 3–5. PMID:25695046

  15. Aortic arch calcification on chest X-ray combined with coronary calcium score show additional benefit for diagnosis and outcome in patients with angina

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jong Shin; Kim, Weon; Kwon, Se Hwan; Youn, Hyo Chul; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Bae; Kim, Soo Joong; Kim, Woo-Shik; Kim, Kwon Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background The coronary artery calcium (CAC) and aortic arch calcification (AoAC) are individually associated with cardiovascular disease and outcome. This study investigated the predictive value of AoAC combined with CAC for cardiovascular diagnosis and outcome in patients with angina. Methods A total of 2018 stable angina patients who underwent chest X-ray and cardiac multi-detector computed tomography were followed up for four years to assess adverse events, which were categorized as cardiac death, stroke, myocardial infarction, or repeated revascularization. The extent of AoAC on chest X-ray was graded on a scale from 0 to 3. Results During the four years of follow-up, 620 patients were treated by coronary stenting and 153 (7%) adverse events occurred. A higher grade of AoAC was associated with a higher CAC score. Cox regression showed that the CAC score, but not AoAC, were associated with adverse events. In patients with CAC score < 400, AoAC showed an additive predictive value in detecting significant coronary artery disease (CAD). A gradual increases in the risk of adverse events were noted if AoAC was present in patients with similar CAC score. Conclusions As AoAC is strongly correlated with the CAC score regardless of age or gender, careful evaluation of CAD would be required in patients with AoAC on conventional chest X-rays. PMID:27103916

  16. CT and MRI in the Evaluation of Thoracic Aortic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most commonly used imaging examinations to evaluate thoracic aortic diseases because of their high spatial and temporal resolutions, large fields of view, and multiplanar imaging reconstruction capabilities. CT and MRI play an important role not only in the diagnosis of thoracic aortic disease but also in the preoperative assessment and followup after treatment. In this review, the CT and MRI appearances of various acquired thoracic aortic conditions are described and illustrated. PMID:24396601

  17. MDCT evaluation of acute aortic syndrome (AAS).

    PubMed

    Valente, Tullio; Rossi, Giovanni; Lassandro, Francesco; Rea, Gaetano; Marino, Maurizio; Muto, Maurizio; Molino, Antonio; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-05-01

    Non-traumatic acute thoracic aortic syndromes (AAS) describe a spectrum of life-threatening aortic pathologies with significant implications on diagnosis, therapy and management. There is a common pathway for the various manifestations of AAS that eventually leads to a breakdown of the aortic intima and media. Improvements in biology and health policy and diffusion of technology into the community resulted in an associated decrease in mortality and morbidity related to aortic therapeutic interventions. Hybrid procedures, branched and fenestrated endografts, and percutaneous aortic valves have emerged as potent and viable alternatives to traditional surgeries. In this context, current state-of-the art multidetector CT (MDCT) is actually the gold standard in the emergency setting because of its intrinsic diagnostic value. Management of acute aortic disease has changed with the increasing realization that endovascular therapies may offer distinct advantages in these situations. This article provides a summary of AAS, focusing especially on the MDCT technique, typical and atypical findings and common pitfalls of AAS, as well as recent concepts regarding the subtypes of AAS, consisting of aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable aortic aneurysm or contained aortic rupture. MDCT findings will be related to pathophysiology, timing and management options to achieve a definite and timely diagnostic and therapeutic definition. In the present article, we review the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, outcomes and therapeutic approaches to acute aortic syndromes. PMID:27033344

  18. Preoperative evaluation of a patient for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed Central

    Chonchubhair, A. N.; Cunningham, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Coexistent cardiovascular disease is common in patients presenting for repair of aortic aneurysms. However, preoperative cardiac evaluation prior to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery remains contentious with significant variations in practice between countries, institutions and individual anesthetists. The following case report raises some everyday issues confronting clinical anesthetists. PMID:10604782

  19. Three-dimensional printed prototypes refine the anatomy of post-modified Norwood-1 complex aortic arch obstruction and allow presurgical simulation of the repair.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Laszlo; Tofeig, Magdi; Jha, Neerod Kumar; Talo, Haitham

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printed prototypes of malformed hearts have been used for education, communication, presurgical planning and simulation. We present a case of a 5-month old infant with complex obstruction at the neoaortic to transverse arch and descending aortic junction following the neonatal modified Norwood-1 procedure for hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Digital 3D models were created from a routine 64-slice CT dataset; then life-size solid and magnified hollow models were printed with a 3D printer. The solid model provided further insights into details of the anatomy, whereas the surgical approach and steps of the operation were simulated on the hollow model. Intraoperative assessment confirmed the anatomical accuracy of the 3D models. The operation was performed in accordance with preoperative simulation: sliding autologous flaps achieved relief of the obstruction without additional patching. Knowledge gained from the models fundamentally contributed to successful outcome and improved patient safety. This case study presents an effective use of 3D models in exploring complex spatial relationship at the aortic arch and in simulation-based planning of the operative procedure. PMID:26590304

  20. Full dimensional computer simulations to study pulsatile blood flow in vessels, aortic arch and bifurcated veins: Investigation of blood viscosity and turbulent effects.

    PubMed

    Sultanov, Renat A; Guster, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    We report computational results of blood flow through a model of the human aortic arch and a vessel of actual diameter and length. A realistic pulsatile flow is used in all simulations. Calculations for bifurcation type vessels are also carried out and presented. Different mathematical methods for numerical solution of the fluid dynamics equations have been considered. The non-Newtonian behaviour of the human blood is investigated together with turbulence effects. A detailed time-dependent mathematical convergence test has been carried out. The results of computer simulations of the blood flow in vessels of three different geometries are presented: for pressure, strain rate and velocity component distributions we found significant disagreements between our results obtained with realistic non-Newtonian treatment of human blood and the widely used method in the literature: a simple Newtonian approximation. A significant increase of the strain rate and, as a result, the wall shear stress distribution, is found in the region of the aortic arch. Turbulent effects are found to be important, particularly in the case of bifurcation vessels. PMID:19964834

  1. Aortic arch syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries Update Date 5/20/2014 Updated by: Larry A. Weinrauch MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard ... Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: 07 July 2016

  2. Hybrid procedure for a traumatic aortic rupture consisting of endovascular repair and minimally invasive arch vessel transposition without sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yang Gi; Choo, Suk Jung; Lim, Ju Yong; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chung, Cheol Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Emergency surgical repair for acute traumatic aortic ruptures has been associated with a high peri-procedural mortality rate. Endovascular stent-grafting, as a less invasive procedure, has shown encouraging results. This report describes a patient with a short landing zone, who was treated by transposing the supra-aortic branch without sternotomy, followed by covered stent-grafting with an extended proximal bare portion to enhance fixation. PMID:20052360

  3. Impact of methodology and the use of allometric scaling on the echocardiographic assessment of the aortic root and arch: a study by the Research and Audit Sub-Committee of the British Society of Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Oxborough, David; Ghani, Saqib; Harkness, Allan; Lloyd, Guy; Moody, William; Ring, Liam; Sandoval, Julie; Senior, Roxy; Sheikh, Nabeel; Stout, Martin; Utomi, Victor; Willis, James; Zaidi, Abbas; Steeds, Richard

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study is to establish the impact of 2D echocardiographic methods on absolute values for aortic root dimensions and to describe any allometric relationship to body size. We adopted a nationwide cross-sectional prospective multicentre design using images obtained from studies utilising control groups or where specific normality was being assessed. A total of 248 participants were enrolled with no history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension or abnormal findings on echocardiography. Aortic root dimensions were measured at the annulus, the sinus of Valsalva, the sinotubular junction, the proximal ascending aorta and the aortic arch using the inner edge and leading edge methods in both diastole and systole by 2D echocardiography. All dimensions were scaled allometrically to body surface area (BSA), height and pulmonary artery diameter. For all parameters with the exception of the aortic annulus, dimensions were significantly larger in systole (P<0.05). All aortic root and arch measurements were significantly larger when measured using the leading edge method compared with the inner edge method (P<0.05). Allometric scaling provided a b exponent of BSA(0.6) in order to achieve size independence. Similarly, ratio scaling to height in subjects under the age of 40 years also produced size independence. In conclusion, the largest aortic dimensions occur in systole while using the leading edge method. Reproducibility of measurement, however, is better when assessing aortic dimensions in diastole. There is an allometric relationship to BSA and, therefore, allometric scaling in the order of BSA(0.6) provides a size-independent index that is not influenced by the age or gender. PMID:26693286

  4. Hemodynamic evaluation of suspected severe aortic stenosis leads to a diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lake, Mikhailia; Tanawuttiwat, Tanyanan; Bilsker, Martin; De Marchena, Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    The evaluation of aortic stenosis is not always straightforward. When symptoms of severe aortic stenosis are present with supporting Doppler echocardiographic or cardiac catheterization data, replacement of the aortic valve is recommended. Occasionally, Doppler- and catheter-derived data are discordant; appropriate treatment in such cases becomes less clear. We report a case in which a 66-year-old man's symptoms and Doppler data suggested severe aortic stenosis. However, heart catheterization data suggested otherwise, and ultimately it led to the diagnosis of a highly vascular renal tumor. Shunting within the tumor resulted in high cardiac output, which, in combination with a small aortic root, masqueraded as severe aortic stenosis. PMID:25873807

  5. Rhinometric evaluation of nasal cavity geometry and its relation to the upper arch transverse distance.

    PubMed

    Paiva, João Batista; Alves, Adriana Silva; Ribeiro, Annelise Nazareth Cunha; Rino Neto, José; Fantini, Solange Mongeli de

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate children's respiratory patterns in the mixed dentition, by means of acoustic rhinometry, and its relation to the upper arch width development. Fifty patients were examined, 25 females and 25 males with mean age of eight years and seven months. All of them were submitted to acoustic rhinometry and upper and lower arch impressions to obtain plaster models. The upper arch analysis was accomplished by measuring the interdental transverse distance of the upper teeth, deciduous canines (measurement 1), deciduous first molars (measurement 2), deciduous second molars (measurement 3) and the first molars (measurement 4). The results showed that an increased left nasal cavity area in females means an increased interdental distance of the deciduous first molars and deciduous second molars and an increased interdental distance of the deciduous canines, deciduous first and second molars in males. It was concluded that there is a correlation between the nasal cavity area and the upper arch transverse distance in the anterior and mid maxillary regions for both genders. PMID:20027450

  6. Importance of dynamic aortic evaluation in planning TEVAR

    PubMed Central

    van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Conti, Michele; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Rampoldi, Vincenzo; Trimarchi, Santi; Moll, Frans L.

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic aortic evaluation in planning thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is important to provide optimal stent graft sizing. Static imaging protocols do not consider normal aortic dynamics and may lead to stent graft to aorta mismatch, causing stent graft related complications, such as type I endoleak and stent graft migration. Dynamic imaging can assist in accurate stent graft selection and sizing preoperatively, and evaluate stent graft performance during follow-up. To create new imaging technologies, integration of knowledge between diverse scientific fields is essential (i.e., engineering, informatics and medicine). Different dynamic imaging modalities, such as electrocardiographic-gated computed tomography angiography (ECG-gated CTA) and four-dimensional phase-contrast MRI (4D PC-MRI), are progressively investigated and implemented into clinical practice as important instruments in preoperative planning for TEVAR. In time, further application of dynamic imaging tools for preoperative screening and follow-up after TEVAR might lead to better outcomes for patients. The advances in dynamic imaging for evaluation of the thoracic aorta using new imaging modalities and their future perspectives are addressed in this manuscript. PMID:24967170

  7. Catheterization-Doppler discrepancies in nonsimultaneous evaluations of aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Aghassi, Payam; Aurigemma, Gerard P; Folland, Edward D; Tighe, Dennis A

    2005-05-01

    Prior validation studies have established that simultaneously measured catheter (cath) and Doppler mean pressure gradients (MPG) correlate closely in evaluation of aortic stenosis (AS). In clinical practice, however, cath and Doppler are rarely performed simultaneously; which may lead to discrepant results. Accordingly, our aim was to ascertain agreement between these methods and investigate factors associated with discrepant results. We reviewed findings in 100 consecutive evaluations for AS performed in 97 patients (mean age 72 +/- 10 yr) in which cath and Doppler were performed within 6 weeks. We recorded MPG, aortic valve area (AVA), cardiac output, and ejection fraction (EF) by both methods. Aortic root diameter, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension (LVIDd) and posterior wall thickness (PWT) were measured by echocardiography and gender, heart rate, and heart rhythm were also recorded. An MPG discrepancy was defined as an intrapatient difference > 10 mmHg. Mean pressure gradients by cath and Doppler were 36 +/- 22 mmHg and 37 +/- 20 mmHg, respectively (P = 0.73). Linear regression showed good correlation (r = 0.82) between the techniques. An MPG discrepancy was found in 36 (36%) of 100 evaluations; in 19 (53%) of 36 evaluations MPG by Doppler was higher than cath, and in 17 (47%) of 36, it was lower. In 33 evaluations, EF differed by >10% between techniques. Linear regression analyses revealed that EF difference between studies was a significant predictor of MPG discrepancy (P = 0.004). Women had significantly higher MPG than men by both cath and Doppler (43 +/- 25 mmHg versus 29 +/- 15 mmHg [P = 0.001]; 42 +/- 23 mmHg versus 32 +/- 15 mmHg [P = 0.014], respectively). Women exhibited discrepant results in 23 (47%) of 49 evaluations versus 13 (25%) of 51 evaluations in men (P = 0.037). After adjustment for women's higher MPG, there was no statistically significant difference in MPG discrepancy between genders (P = 0.22). No significant interactions between

  8. Diagnostic Value of Prospective Electrocardiogram-triggered Dual-source Computed Tomography Angiography for Infants and Children with Interrupted Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Ou; Wang, Xi-Ming; Nie, Pei; Ji, Xiao-Peng; Cheng, Zhao-Ping; Chen, Jiu-Hong; Xu, Zhuo-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate assessment of intra- as well as extra-cardiac malformations and radiation dosage concerns are especially crucial to infants and children with interrupted aortic arch (IAA). The purpose of this study is to investigate the value of prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) angiography with low-dosage techniques in the diagnosis of IAA. Methods: Thirteen patients with suspected IAA underwent prospective ECG-triggered DSCT scan and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Surgery was performed on all the patients. A five-point scale was used to assess image quality. The diagnostic accuracy of DSCT angiography and TTE was compared with the surgical findings as the reference standard. A nonparametric Chi-square test was used for comparative analysis. P <0.05 was considered as a significant difference. The mean effective radiation dose (ED) was calculated. Results: Diagnostic DSCT images were obtained for all the patients. Thirteen IAA cases with 60 separate cardiovascular anomalies were confirmed by surgical findings. The diagnostic accuracy of TTE and DSCT for total cardiovascular malformations was 93.7% and 97.9% (P > 0.05), and that for extra-cardiac vascular malformations was 92.3% and 99.0% (P < 0.05), respectively. The mean score of image quality was 3.77 ± 0.83. The mean ED was 0.30 ± 0.04 mSv (range from 0.23 mSv to 0.39 mSv). Conclusions: In infants and children with IAA, prospective ECG-triggered DSCT with low radiation exposure and high diagnostic efficiency has higher accuracy compared to TTE in detection of extra-cardiac vascular anomalies. PMID:25947401

  9. Saccular Aneurysms of the Transverse Aortic Arch: Treatment Options Available in the Endovascular EraBased on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19-23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA).

    PubMed

    Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S

    2015-04-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the aortic arch, whether single or multiple, are uncommon. The choice of repair technique is influenced by patients' comorbidities and age. Repairing saccular aneurysms with traditional open techniques can be technically demanding; therefore, endovascular technology and a variety of hybrid approaches have been developed to facilitate such repairs and, potentially, to improve clinical outcomes, especially in high-risk patients. There have been no large, randomized studies to compare the outcomes of these different treatment options in patients with single or multiple saccular aneurysms of the arch. In this review, we outline the etiology and common locations of these aneurysms, the different open, completely endovascular, and hybrid techniques used to treat them, and the treatment selection process. PMID:26798759

  10. Noninvasive evaluation of the severity of aortic stenosis in adults.

    PubMed

    Nitta, M; Nakamura, T; Hultgren, H N; Bilisoly, J; Marquess, B

    1987-05-01

    A noninvasive point score system for the evaluation of severity of aortic stenosis (AS) was employed in a prospective study of 153 patients (mean age 64.8 +/- 0.8 years) referred from invasive studies or for the evaluation of a systolic murmur. Seven variables were recorded and scored as follows: LVH by ECG (0-2); aortic valve calcium by chest x-ray film (0-2); loudness of A2 (0-2); Q-peak of murmur (0-3); T-time of carotid pulse (0-3); ejection time (0-3); and LVH by echo (0-1). Range of the total score was 0-16. All patients had the aortic valve area (AVA) determined by cardiac catheterization. Data analysis revealed that the relation between the total score and the AVA was curvilinear with a score greater than or equal to 5 correctly identifying 100/107 (93 percent) of patients with a valve area of less than or equal to 1.0 cm2. If the patients with an AVA of less than or equal to 1.0 cm2 were considered severe and patients with a total score less than 5 were considered mild-moderate, the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive accuracy for a score greater than or equal to 5 were 93 percent, 96 percent, and 98 percent, respectively. The relation between the score and aortic valve gradient (AVG) was linear with a score of greater than or equal to 5 correctly identifying 84/88 (95 percent) with an AVG greater than or equal to 40 mm Hg. If the patients with a pressure gradient over 40 mm Hg were considered severe, the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive accuracy for a score greater than or equal to 5 were 95 percent, 72 percent, and 82 percent, respectively. It is concluded that a point score system employing seven noninvasive variables is simple and accurate in identifying patients with severe AS and would be a valuable addition to a Doppler determined gradient. PMID:3568771

  11. Outcomes of single-stage total arch replacement via clamshell incision

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Treatment of complex aortic pathologies involving the transverse arch with extensive involvement of the descending aorta remains a surgical challenge. Since clamshell incision provides superior exposure of the entire thoracic aorta, we evaluated the use of this technique for single-stage total arch replacement by arch vessel reconstruction. Methods The arch-first technique combined with clamshell incision was used in 38 cases of aneurysm and aortic disease in 2008 and 2009. Extensive total arch replacement was used with clamshell incision for reconstruction of arch vessels under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Results Overall 30-day mortality was 13%. The mean operating time was approximately 8 hours. Deep hypothermia resulted in mean CPB time exceeding 4.5 hours and mean duration of circulatory arrest was 25 minutes. The overall postoperative temporary and permanent neurologic dysfunction rates were 3% and 3% for elective and 3% and 0% for emergency surgery, respectively. All patients except the five who died in hospital were discharged without nursing care after an average post-operative hospital stay of 35 days. Conclusions The arch-first technique, combined with clamshell incision, provides expeditious replacement of the thoracic aorta with an acceptable duration of hypothermic circulatory arrest and minimizes the risk of retrograde atheroembolism by using antegrade perfusion. PMID:21933402

  12. Syphilitic aortic aneurysm presenting with upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Waikittipong, Somchai

    2012-10-01

    Syphilitic aortic aneurysms are uncommon today. A rare case of syphilitic aortic arch aneurysm with successful surgical treatment is reported. A 42-year-old man presented with upper airway obstruction. Chest radiography showed a superior mediastinal mass, and computed tomography revealed a large saccular aortic arch aneurysm that compressed the trachea. Dacron graft replacement of the aortic arch was successfully performed under circulatory arrest with antegrade cerebral perfusion. PMID:23087303

  13. Pericarditis as initial manifestation of proximal aortic dissection in young patients.

    PubMed

    Bains, Suchdeep Raj; Kedia, Anita; Roldan, Carlos A

    2008-03-01

    Pericarditis was the primary manifestation of aortic dissection in these 2 young men. Both patients had no phenotypic characteristics of Marfan or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. These patients had pleuritic chest pain and characteristic electrocardiographic changes consistent with pericarditis. However, timely performed transthoracic echocardiograms revealed proximal aortic dissection with hemopericardium noted at surgery in both cases. Although the sensitivity of transthoracic echocardiogram for proximal aortic dissection is approximately 60%, certain findings can alert the physician to the possibility of aortic dissection. Therefore, in young patients with suspected pericarditis, a timely performed transthoracic echocardiogram should include a careful evaluation of the ascending aorta and arch to rule out this lethal diagnosis. PMID:18358965

  14. Midterm follow-up dynamic echocardiography evaluation after aortic valve repair for aortic valve insufficiency.

    PubMed

    D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Amaducci, Andrea; Prodromo, John; Pirone, Francesco; Follis, Marco; Falletta, Calogero; Pilato, Michele

    2012-06-01

    We prospectively evaluated 46 patients who underwent aortic valve repair (AVR) for AV regurgitation. Rest/stress echocardiography follow-up was performed. Follow-up duration was 30.7 months, age 56 ± 14 years, ejection fraction% 57.5 ± 10.5%. Preoperative bicuspid AV was present in 14 (30.4%), leaflets calcifications in 8 (17.4%), thickening in 17 (37.0%) and prolapse in 22 (47.8%). Surgical technique included commissuroplasty (22, 47.8%), leaflet remodelling (17, 37.0%), decalcification (7, 15.2%) and raphe removal (14, 30.4%). At follow-up, rest/stress echocardiography median AV regurgitation (rest 1.0 vs. stress 1.0) and mean indexed AV area (IAVA) (rest 2.6 ± 0.74 cm(2)/m(2) vs. stress 2.8 ± 0.4 cm(2)/m(2)) were unchanged (P = ns). Mean (rest 4.7 ± 3.9 mmHg vs. stress 9.7 ± 5.8 mmHg) and peak (rest 9.5 ± 7.2 mmHg vs. stress 19.0 ± 10.5 mmHg) transvalvular gradients were significantly increased (P < 0.0001). At linear regression, there was an independent inverse correlation between commissuroplasty and AV gradients during stress (B = -9.9, P = 0.01, confidence interval= -17.7 to -2.1). Although follow-up haemodynamics of repaired AVs are satisfactory, there was a fixed IAVA and significant increase in AV gradients. We were not able to identify any pre-existing anatomical condition independently related to this non-physiological behaviour under stress. Moreover, commissuroplasty seems to prevent abnormal increase of the AV gradients. PMID:22368109

  15. Aortic stenting.

    PubMed

    Droc, Ionel; Calinescu, Francisca Blanca; Droc, Gabriela; Blaj, Catalin; Dammrau, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The approach to aortic pathology is nowadays more and more endovascular at both thoracic and abdominal levels. Thoracic stenting has gained worldwide acceptance as first intention to treat pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta. Indications have been extended to aortic arch aneurysms and also to diseases of the ascending aorta. The current devices in use for thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR) are Medtronic Valiant, Gore TAG, Cook Tx2 and Jotec. The choice of the endograft depends on the thoracic aortic pathology and the anatomical suitability. The technological evolution of the abdominal aortic endografts was very rapid, arriving now at the fourth generation. We report the results of 55 elective cases of endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) performed in two vascular surgical centers in Romania and Germany. The prostheses used were 16 E-vita Abdominal XT, 12 Excluder, eight Talent, seven PowerLink, three Endurant and nine custom-made, fenestrated or branched from Jotec. The mean follow-up was 18 months with CT-scan, duplex ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. The mortality was 2%. EVAR tends to become the gold standard for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Technological development of the devices with lowest profile introduction systems will permit to extend the anatomical indications to new frontiers. PMID:26200430

  16. Aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A; Clough, Rachel E; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Suzuki, Toru; Gibbs, Richard; Mussa, Firas; Jenkins, Michael T; Thompson, Matt M; Evangelista, Arturo; Yeh, James S M; Cheshire, Nicholas; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Pepper, John

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition caused by a tear in the intimal layer of the aorta or bleeding within the aortic wall, resulting in the separation (dissection) of the layers of the aortic wall. Aortic dissection is most common in those 65-75 years of age, with an incidence of 35 cases per 100,000 people per year in this population. Other risk factors include hypertension, dyslipidaemia and genetic disorders that involve the connective tissue, such as Marfan syndrome. Swift diagnostic confirmation and adequate treatment are crucial in managing affected patients. Contemporary management is multidisciplinary and includes serial non-invasive imaging, biomarker testing and genetic risk profiling for aortopathy. The choice of approach for repairing or replacing the damaged region of the aorta depends on the severity and the location of the dissection and the risks of complication from surgery. Open surgical repair is most commonly used for dissections involving the ascending aorta and the aortic arch, whereas minimally invasive endovascular intervention is appropriate for descending aorta dissections that are complicated by rupture, malperfusion, ongoing pain, hypotension or imaging features of high risk. Recent advances in the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of aortic dissection have led to more patients being considered at substantial risk of complications and, therefore, in need of endovascular intervention rather than only medical or surgical intervention. PMID:27440162

  17. Radionuclide angiography in evaluation of left ventricular function following aortic valve replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Santinga, J.T.; Kirsh, M.M.; Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.; Pitt, B.

    1981-05-01

    Congestive heart failure in patients surviving aortic valve replacement has been associated with a high late mortality. To determine whether myocardial dysfunction in these patients occurred preoperatively, perioperatively, or during the early postoperative period, 19 consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement using cardioplegia and hypothermia were studied by multiple-gated cardiac blood pool imaging. The resting ejection fractions for 8 patients with aortic stenosis did not show significant changes following operation. The 11 patients with aortic insufficiency has resting preoperative values of 58 +/- 15%, which fell to 38 +/- 18% immediately postoperatively (p less than 0.01), with the late values being 51 +/- 16%. Eight of 18 patients (44%) showed deterioration of regional wall motion immediately after operation, which persisted in 3 during the late evaluation. The occurrence of new perioperative regional wall motion abnormalities and persistent perioperative depression in left ventricular function in some patients suggest the need for further improvement in myocardial protection during cardiopulmonary bypass for aortic valve replacement.

  18. Computerized tomographic evaluation of aortic prosthetic graft complications

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, D.; Kalmar, J.A.

    1985-03-01

    Computerized tomography has been found to be an accurate and sensitive method of diagnosing complications of synthetic aortic grafts. Complications in this series of four cases included aortoesophageal fistula, aortoduodenal fistula, pseudoaneurysm, and retroperitoneal hematoma. 6 references, 5 figures.

  19. Evaluation of Reinforcement and Analysis of Stability of a High-Arch Dam Based on Geomechanical Model Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Liu, Y. R.; Yang, Q.

    2015-03-01

    Reinforcement measures are often used in high-arch dams with complicated geological foundations. The geomechanical model test is an effective method to study the global stability of arch dams and to evaluate the reinforcement effects of foundation treatments. The block masonry technique was developed to simulate the jointed rock mass, tectonic discontinuities, and reinforcement measures. A tailor-made low-strength binder and small blocks were developed to simulate the strength and deformation of the jointed rock mass and discontinuities, respectively. We applied this technique to geomechanical model tests of the Dagangshan arch dam with and without foundation reinforcements. A rupture test was conducted, and the stress and displacement distribution of the dam and abutments were recorded; the failure mechanisms and processes were explored. The reinforcement effects of the foundation treatment were evaluated by comparing the test results of the models with and without foundation reinforcements. Our analysis indicates that foundation reinforcements can improve the stress distribution, decrease deformation, prevent slides, reduce fault movement, and improve the global stability of high-arch dams.

  20. High arch

    MedlinePlus

    Pes cavus; High foot arch ... High foot arches are much less common than flat feet. They are more likely to be caused by a ... stress is placed on the section of the foot between the ankle and toes (metatarsals). This condition ...

  1. A Simple Device for Morphofunctional Evaluation During Aortic Valve-Sparing Surgery.

    PubMed

    Leone, Alessandro; Bruno, Piergiorgio; Cammertoni, Federico; Massetti, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    Valve-sparing operations for the treatment of aortic root disease with a structurally normal aortic valve are increasingly performed as they avoid prosthesis-related complications. Short- and long-term results are critically dependent on perfect intraoperative restoration of valve anatomy and function. Residual aortic regurgitation is the main cause of early failure, and it is the most common motive for reoperation. However, intraoperative morphofunctional valve assessment requires expertise, and only transesophageal echocardiography can provide reliable information. We describe a simple, economic, reproducible hydrostatic test to intraoperatively evaluate valve competency under direct visualization. PMID:26140788

  2. Echocardiographic evaluation of systolic left-ventricular function in infants with critical aortic stenosis before and after aortic valvotomy.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, R; Zeike, B; Messmer, B J; von Bernuth, G

    1990-08-01

    Infants with critical aortic stenosis may have global or regional left ventricular contraction abnormalities. In order to evaluate the clinical significance of these contraction abnormalities, we examined the systolic left ventricular function before and after aortic valvotomy in 16 infants operated on between 1980 and 1987. Left ventricular free wall and septal motion were studied by cross sectional echocardiography using the apical 4-chamber view. Enddiastolic and endsystolic left ventricular frames were digitized. The relative systolic reduction of the total left ventricular area (reflecting ejection fraction) as well as of 5 left ventricular sectors (reflecting regional wall motion) was calculated and compared to previously established normal values. Before valvotomy, 8 infants had normal and the other 8 impaired left ventricular systolic wall motion. These latter infants showed hypokinesia of the apex and/or the posterolateral left ventricular wall resulting in a decreased systolic reduction of the total left ventricular area. Four of these infants had evidence of myocardial infarction on intraoperative inspection. Early after operation, the systolic reduction of the total left ventricular area was normal in all infants, and the left ventricular apex and poster-lateral wall were either normo- or hyperkinetic. Follow-up studies of all infants more than 10 months and of 7 infants more than 3 years after operation showed that the left ventricular systolic wall motion remained normal in all, irrespective of whether it was normal or abnormal preoperatively. This study suggests that left ventricular contraction abnormalities in infants with critical aortic stenosis may be reversible and thus do not constitute a contraindication against aortic valvotomy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2237884

  3. Evaluation of aortic cannula jet lesions in a porcine cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) model.

    PubMed

    Schnürer, C; Hager, M; Györi, G; Velik-Salchner, C; Moser, P L; Laufer, G; Lorenz, I H; Kolbitsch, C

    2011-02-01

    In cardiosurgery patients atherosclerotic debris displaced from the cannulation site but also from the opposite aortic wall by the "sandblast-like" effect of the high-pressure jet emanating from the cannula is a potential source of intraoperative arterial embolization and consequently postoperative neurologic dysfunction. The present study examined the extent to which shear stress exerted on the intact aortic intima by an aortic cannula jet stream can cause endothelial lesions that promote thrombogenesis and consequently thrombembolism. A single-stream, straight-tip aortic cannula was used in a porcine cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) model. Following a 120-minute CPB pump run, a 60-minute stabilization period was allowed before sacrificing the pigs (N.=40) for histological evaluation of the ascending aorta and the brain. Opposite the cannulation site endothelial lesions (diameter: 3.81±1.3 mm; depth: 0.017±0.003 mm) were present in 22.5% (9/40) of aortic specimens. Cerebral thrombembolic lesions were not found. The present study showed that single-stream, straight-tip aortic cannulas caused jet lesions of the formerly intact aortic endothelium opposite the cannulation site in 22.5% of cases in a porcine CPB model. PMID:21224818

  4. Aortic Blood Flow Reversal Determines Renal Function: Potential Explanation for Renal Dysfunction Caused by Aortic Stiffening in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Aortic stiffness determines the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and predicts the progressive decline of the GFR. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanism remains obscure. Recent evidence has shown a close link between aortic stiffness and the bidirectional (systolic forward and early diastolic reverse) flow characteristics. We hypothesized that the aortic stiffening-induced renal dysfunction is attributable to altered central flow dynamics. In 222 patients with hypertension, Doppler velocity waveforms were recorded at the proximal descending aorta to calculate the reverse/forward flow ratio. Tonometric waveforms were recorded to measure the carotid-femoral (aortic) and carotid-radial (peripheral) pulse wave velocities, to estimate the aortic pressure from the radial waveforms, and to compute the aortic characteristic impedance. In addition, renal hemodynamics was evaluated by duplex ultrasound. The estimated GFR was inversely correlated with the aortic pulse wave velocity, reverse/forward flow ratio, pulse pressure, and characteristic impedance, whereas it was not correlated with the peripheral pulse wave velocity or mean arterial pressure. The association between aortic pulse wave velocity and estimated GFR was independent of age, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and antihypertensive medication. However, further adjustment for the aortic reverse/forward flow ratio and pulse pressure substantially weakened this association, and instead, the reverse/forward flow ratio emerged as the strongest determinant of estimated GFR (P=0.001). A higher aortic reverse/forward flow ratio was also associated with lower intrarenal forward flow velocities. These results suggest that an increase in aortic flow reversal (ie, retrograde flow from the descending thoracic aorta toward the aortic arch), caused by aortic stiffening and impedance mismatch, reduces antegrade flow into the kidney and thereby deteriorates renal function. PMID:25916721

  5. Distant downstream steady-state flow studies of a mechanical heart valve: PIV study of secondary flow in a model aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Brandon R.; Popma, Christopher J.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Each year, hundreds of thousands of aortic and mitral heart valves are replaced with prosthetic valves. In efforts to develop a valve that does not require lifelong anticoagulation therapy, previous experimental research has been devoted to analyzing the hemodynamics of various heart valve designs, limited to the flow up to only 2 diameters downstream of the valve. Two-component, two-dimensional (2C-2D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used in this study to examine secondary flow velocity fields in a curved tube modeling an aorta at five locations (0-, 45-, 90-, 135-, 180-degrees). A bileaflet valve, opened to 30-, 45-, and 59-degrees, and one (no-valve) baseline condition were examined under three steady flow inflows (Re = 218, 429, 634). In particular, variations in the two-dimensional turbulent shear stresses at each cross sectional plane were analyzed. The results suggest that bileaflet valves in the aortic model produce significant turbulence and vorticity up to 5.5 downstream diameters, i.e. up to the 90-degrees location. Expanding this research towards aortic heart valve hemodynamics highlights a need for additional studies extending beyond the typical few diameters downstream to fully characterize valvular function. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  6. High arch

    MedlinePlus

    ... is on the back and balls of the foot (metatarsals head). Your health care provider will check to see if the high ... Call your health care provider if you suspect you are having foot pain related to high arches.

  7. MRI evaluation prior to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI): When to acquire and how to interpret.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Abhishek; Hobbs, Susan K; Ling, Fred S; Chaturvedi, Apeksha; Knight, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) is increasingly being used in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not candidates for surgery. ECG-gated CT angiography (CTA) plays an important role in the preoperative planning for these devices. As the number of patients undergoing these procedures increases, a subset of patients is being recognized who have contraindications to iodinated contrast medium, either due to a prior severe allergic type reaction or poor renal function. Another subgroup of patients with low flow and low gradient aortic stenosis is being recognized that are usually assessed for severity of aortic stenosis by stress echocardiography. There are contraindications to stress echocardiography and some of these patients may not be able to undergo this test. Non-contrast MRI can be a useful emerging modality for evaluating these patients. In this article, we discuss the emerging indications of non-contrast MRI in preoperative assessment for TAVI and describe the commonly used MRI sequences. A comparison of the most important measurements obtained for TAVI assessment on CTA and MRI from same subjects is included. Teaching Points • MRI can be used for preoperative assessment of aortic annulus. • MRI is an alternate to CTA when iodinated contrast is contraindicated. • Measurements obtained by non-contrast MRI are similar to contrast enhanced CTA. • MRI can be used to assess severity of aortic stenosis. PMID:26911969

  8. Macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of a new implant design supporting immediately loaded full arch rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Tetè, Stefano; Zizzari, Vincenzo; De Carlo, Alessandro; Sinjari, Bruna; Gherlone, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study is to evaluate macroscopic and microscopic appearance of a new implant design, with particular emphasis given to the type of prosthesis connection. Two dental implants of the same type (Torque Type®, WinSix®, BioSAFin. S.r.l. - Ancona, Italy), with sandblasted and acid etched surfaces (Micro Rough Surface®), but differing from each other for the prosthesis connection system, were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis at different magnifications: TTI implant, with a hexagonal internal connection, and TTX implant, with a hexagonal external connection. SEM analysis showed that the Torque Type® implant is characterized by a truncated cone shape with tapered tips. The implant body showed a double loop thread and double pitch with blunt tips. For both types of connection, the implant neck was 0.7 mm in height with a 3% taper. This implant design may be able to guarantee osteotomic properties at the time of insertion in a surgical site suitably prepared, a facilitated screwing, thanks to the thread pitch and to the broad and deep draining grooves, thereby ensuring a good primary stability. The different connection design appears defined and precise, in order to ensure a good interface between the fixture and the prosthetic components. Therefore, this design appears to be particularly suitable in cases where a good primary stability is necessary and a precise coupling between endosseous and prosthetic components, as it allows an easy insertion of the fixture even in conditions of reduced bone availability, and in cases of immediately loaded full-arch rehabilitations. PMID:23087785

  9. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the aorta or its branches, including: Aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Congenital (present from birth) problems AV ... Abnormal results may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present ...

  10. Clinical Variability in Arch Wires: A Preliminary Study Evaluating Mechanical and Surface Characteristics of Two Different Sized Rectangular Stainless Steel Wires

    PubMed Central

    Vena, Alessandro; Carey, Jason; Badawi, Hisham

    2007-01-01

    Experimental characterization of arch wires has been performed in many previous studies; however with the advent of new arch wire materials being introduced, some new experimental methods and characterization are required. Since literature is available for comparison, this paper examines mechanical and physical characteristics of steel arch wires to quantify their variability in engineering terms. Furthermore, the effect of wire size on properties was evaluated using two of the most common wire sizes. Finally, manufacturing consistency was verified by testing samples from different lots. PMID:19662123

  11. Complex aortic disease: changes in perception, evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Mastracci, Tara M; Greenberg, Roy K

    2008-12-01

    Complex aortic disease continues to have a high mortality and morbidity despite advances in medical and surgical treatment. Repair of thoracoabdominal aneurysms, treatment of patients with connective tissue disorders, and the approach to dissections of the ascending and descending aorta have evolved over time; however, the results of intervention in all but highly specialized centers remain poor. As vascular surgeons, our role must extend beyond that of the pure technician; we have been vested with the life-long care of these patients and, therefore, have a responsibility to the patient in addition the scientific community and society at large to create a strategy for management that serves all three interests justly. We will outline some of the changes in the conceptual approach that we consider important to the treatment of complex aortic disease. PMID:19084731

  12. Comparison of Commercially Available Arch Wires with Normal Dental Arch in a Group of Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, Zohreh; Fakhri, Farnaz; Moshkel Gosha, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The stability of orthodontic treatment depends on preserving the patient’s pretreatment arch form and arch size during and after treatment. Purpose This investigation was aimed to study the size and shape of Iranian mandibular dental arch and evaluate the correlation of their average dental arch with commercially available preformed rectangular nickel-titanium arch wires. Materials and Method In this study, 148 subjects were selected among students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The inclusion criteria were having Angle class I in molar and canine relationships, and normal growth pattern. Intercanine and intermolar widths were measured after scanning their mandibular dental casts. Three main arch form templates; square, ovoid and tapered (Orthoform TM; 3M, Unitek, CA, USA) and 12 commercially available preformed mandibular nickel-titanium arch wires were scanned. Intercanine and intermolar widths of arch wires were compared with dental arch widths of the study samples. Arch width, arch form and the most appropriate arch wire were determined for each cast. Student’s t-test was used to compare arch widths and arch depths of male and female subjects. Coefficient of variance was used to determine the variability of indices in the study samples. Results Most preformed arch wires were wider than the average width of the normal Iranian dental arch. The most frequent arch form in Iranian population was tapered. Inter molar width was the only statistically significant variable between males and females. Conclusion Variation in available preformed arch wires does not entirely cover the range of diversity of the normal dental arch of our population. Narrow arch wires with a tapered shape are better consistent with the Iranian lower arch. PMID:26046106

  13. [DISORDERS OF LUNG FUNCTION IN THE EARLY POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD IN PATIENTS OPERATED ON THE ASCENDING AORTA WITH THE EXPANSION OF INTERVENTION ON THE AORTIC ARCH].

    PubMed

    Bokeria, L A; Nikitin, E S; Mironenko, V A; Rychin, S V; Vyganovskaya, N B; Makrushin, I M; Gordeev, S L

    2015-01-01

    Precapillary artery--arterial (bronchial artery--pulmonay artery) anastomoses, come into play in cases where the locking artery open and alveoli washed arterialized blood. Normally, these anastomoses are closed. Intrapulmonary shunts carry blood supply acinar hinder extraordinary circumstances (chronic pulmonary embolism, surgery, occurring in cardiopulmonary bypass, when the flaw of blood through the Iungs is suspended for the duration of cardiopulmonary bypass). Patients operated on the ascending aorta with the expansion of intervention on the nortic arch during the correction of pathology carry blood supply only the central nervous system. All other organs and systems at this time were protected by mild hypothermia. However, during circulatory arrest, required for correction of pathology acinar damage as a result of hypoxia, probably because there is no blood flow in the pulmonary artery and there is no blood flow in the bronchial arteries. Last, in the ordinary course of artificial circulation, capable due to arterio-arterial pulmonary anastomoses prevent hypoxic damage to acinar, not lead to persistent hypoxemia in the immediate postoperative period in these patients, as a result of violations of lung diffusion capacity. PMID:27019884

  14. [Evaluation of the timing of orthodontic arch expansion and graft in cleft lip and palate].

    PubMed

    Chang, Le; Wang, Yingnan; Liu, Hongyan

    2016-04-01

    Maxillary transverse growth is inhibited by congenital cleft, early surgical scar strain, and oppression of lipmuscles in patients with cleft lip and palate. Clinical manifestations have shown severely constricted maxilla, insufficientmaxillary width, mismatch of upper and lower dental arches, and crossbite. Alveolar bone graft and arch expansion can effectively correct the deficiency in maxillary width. This paper discusses the timing and success rate of alveolar bone graft, as wellas the relationship between alveolar bone graft and arch expansion. Secondary alveolar bone graft is optimally performed beforepermanent canine eruption, especially when the teeth have formed between half and three quarters of their roots. Rapid maxillaryexpansion prior to alveolar bone graft is beneficial because this process increases the gap of the cleft, expands bone graft, andreduces the difficulty. However, the stability of this process remains controversial. Small-scale studies have reported that rapidmaxillary expansion after alveolar bone graft can open the midpalatal suture without bone graft loss. Slow maxillary expansioncan provide continuous light forces to reconstruct the bone. However, these studies are coordinated with fixed orthodontictreatment. Further research is necessary to determine the effects of maxillary expansion on long-term stability of teeth. PMID:27337934

  15. Occlusive ascending aorta and arch atheroma treated with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and thromboendarterectomy.

    PubMed

    O' Sullivan, Katie E; Early, Sarah A; Lawler, Leo; Hurley, John

    2013-12-01

    We describe an uncommon presentation of severely advanced aortic atherosclerosis in a 48-year old man with a history of hypertension and heavy smoking. Initial presentation with upper limb ischaemia led to the diagnosis of an aortic arch atheroma occluding 90% of the aortic lumen, managed with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and aortic thromboendarterectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of atherosclerotic plaque resulting in aortic occlusion and requiring emergent operative intervention. PMID:23956265

  16. Occlusive ascending aorta and arch atheroma treated with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and thromboendarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    O’ Sullivan, Katie E.; Early, Sarah A.; Lawler, Leo; Hurley, John

    2013-01-01

    We describe an uncommon presentation of severely advanced aortic atherosclerosis in a 48-year old man with a history of hypertension and heavy smoking. Initial presentation with upper limb ischaemia led to the diagnosis of an aortic arch atheroma occluding 90% of the aortic lumen, managed with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and aortic thromboendarterectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of atherosclerotic plaque resulting in aortic occlusion and requiring emergent operative intervention. PMID:23956265

  17. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the assessment of severe aortic stenosis and in post-procedural evaluation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Tarique Al; Plein, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease in the western world with a prevalence expected to double within the next 50 years. International guidelines advocate the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative tool, both to guide diagnosis and to direct optimal treatment. CMR is the reference standard for quantifying both left and right ventricular volumes and mass, which is essential to assess the impact of AS upon global cardiac function. Given the ability to image any structure in any plane, CMR offers many other diagnostic strengths including full visualisation of valvular morphology, direct planimetry of orifice area, the quantification of stenotic jets and in particular, accurate quantification of valvular regurgitation. In addition, CMR permits reliable and accurate measurements of the aortic root and arch which can be fundamental to appropriate patient management. There is a growing evidence base to indicate tissue characterisation using CMR provides prognostic information, both in asymptomatic AS patients and those undergoing intervention. Furthermore, a number of current clinical trials will likely raise the importance of CMR in routine patient management. This article will focus on the incremental value of CMR in the assessment of severe AS and the insights it offers following valve replacement. PMID:27429910

  18. The role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in the assessment of severe aortic stenosis and in post-procedural evaluation following transcatheter aortic valve implantation and surgical aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Musa, Tarique Al; Plein, Sven; Greenwood, John P

    2016-06-01

    Degenerative aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease in the western world with a prevalence expected to double within the next 50 years. International guidelines advocate the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) as an investigative tool, both to guide diagnosis and to direct optimal treatment. CMR is the reference standard for quantifying both left and right ventricular volumes and mass, which is essential to assess the impact of AS upon global cardiac function. Given the ability to image any structure in any plane, CMR offers many other diagnostic strengths including full visualisation of valvular morphology, direct planimetry of orifice area, the quantification of stenotic jets and in particular, accurate quantification of valvular regurgitation. In addition, CMR permits reliable and accurate measurements of the aortic root and arch which can be fundamental to appropriate patient management. There is a growing evidence base to indicate tissue characterisation using CMR provides prognostic information, both in asymptomatic AS patients and those undergoing intervention. Furthermore, a number of current clinical trials will likely raise the importance of CMR in routine patient management. This article will focus on the incremental value of CMR in the assessment of severe AS and the insights it offers following valve replacement. PMID:27429910

  19. Evaluation of facial morphology and sagittal relationship between dental arches in primary and mixed dentition

    PubMed Central

    Traldi, Aline; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; de Souza, Luciane Zanin; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess facial morphology (Pattern) and sagittal relationship between dental arches (Class), and establish a potential association between them and the variables sex, age and ethnicity, among schoolchildren aged between 4 and 9 years old (mean age of 6.7 years) in primary and mixed dentitions. METHODS: The sample comprised 875 children (457 males and 418 females) attending schools in Descalvado, São Paulo, Brazil. An attempt was made with a view to establish a potential association between children's morphological features with sex, age and ethnicity. RESULTS: Descriptive analysis revealed a predominance of facial Pattern I (69.9 %) and Class I (67.4 %). Statistical tests (p < 0.001) showed that Class I was more frequent among Pattern I children, whereas Class II prevailed among Pattern II, and Class III was frequent among Pattern I and III children. Ethnicity was the only variable associated with facial pattern. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that facial pattern and sagittal relationship between dental arches tend to be correlated. Ethnicity was associated with facial pattern, with Pattern I being the most recurrent among Caucasians and facial Pattern II being recurrent among Afro-descendant subjects. PMID:26352847

  20. Maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width groups

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Fazal; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups. Materials and Methods: The calculated sample size was 128 subjects. The crown width/height, arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width of the maxilla and mandible were obtained via digital calliper (Mitutoyo, Japan). A total of 4325 variables were measured. The sex differences in the crown width and height were evaluated. Analysis of variance was applied to evaluate the differences between arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups. Results: Males had significantly larger mean values for crown width and height than females (P ≤ 0.05) for maxillary and mandibular arches, both. There were no significant differences observed for the crown width/height ratio in various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups (P ≤ 0.05) in maxilla and mandible, both. Conclusions: Our results indicate sexual disparities in the crown width and height. Crown width and height has no significant relation to various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups of maxilla and mandible. Thus, it may be helpful for orthodontic and prosthodontic case investigations and comprehensive management. PMID:26929686

  1. Beveled reversed elephant trunk procedure for complex aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Takuya; Yamamoto, Shin; Sekine, Yuji; Oshima, Susumu; Kasai, Reo; Sasaguri, Shiro

    2016-03-01

    The reversed elephant trunk procedure uses an inverted graft for distal aortic replacement before aortic arch replacement in patients with mega aorta, to reduce the risk in the second stage. However, the conventional technique restricts the maximum diameter of the inverted graft to the aortic graft diameter. We employed a beveled reversed elephant trunk procedure to overcome the discrepancy between graft diameters in a 54-year-old woman with a severely twisted ascending aortic graft and enlarging chronic dissection of the aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. The patient was discharged with a satisfactory repair and no neurologic deficit. PMID:25406402

  2. Surgical Management of Aorto-Esophageal Fistula as a Late Complication after Graft Replacement for Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hong; Na, Bubse; Hwang, Yoohwa; Kim, Yong Han; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Kyung-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    A 49-year-old male presented with chills and a fever. Five years previously, he underwent ascending aorta and aortic arch replacement using the elephant trunk technique for DeBakey type 1 aortic dissection. The preoperative evaluation found an esophago-paraprosthetic fistula between the prosthetic graft and the esophagus. Multiple-stage surgery was performed with appropriate antibiotic and antifungal management. First, we performed esophageal exclusion and drainage of the perigraft abscess. Second, we removed the previous graft, debrided the abscess, and performed an in situ re-replacement of the ascending aorta, aortic arch, and proximal descending thoracic aorta, with separate replacement of the innominate artery, left common carotid artery, and extra-anatomical bypass of the left subclavian artery. Finally, staged esophageal reconstruction was performed via transthoracic anastomosis. The patient's postoperative course was unremarkable and the patient has done well without dietary problems or recurrent infections over one and a half years of follow-up. PMID:26889449

  3. An in vitro evaluation of the impact of eccentric deployment on transcatheter aortic valve hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Gunning, Paul S; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; McNamara, Laoise M; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2014-06-01

    Patients with aortic stenosis present with calcium deposits on the native aortic valve, which can result in non-concentric expansion of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) stents. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether eccentric deployment of TAVRs lead to turbulent blood flow and blood cell damage. Particle Image Velocimetry was used to quantitatively characterize fluid velocity fields, shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy downstream of TAVRs deployed in circular and eccentric orifices representative of deployed TAVRs in vivo. Effective orifice area (EOA) and mean transvalvular pressure gradient (TVG) values did not differ substantially in circular and eccentric deployed valves, with only a minor decrease in EOA observed in the eccentric valve (2.0 cm(2) for circular, 1.9 cm(2) for eccentric). Eccentric deployed TAVR lead to asymmetric systolic jet formation, with increased shear stresses (circular = 97 N/m(2) vs. eccentric = 119 N/m(2)) and regions of turbulence intensity (circular = 180 N/m(2) vs. eccentric = 230 N/m(2)) downstream that was not present in the circular deployed TAVR. The results of this study indicate that eccentric deployment of TAVRs can lead to altered flow characteristics and may potentially increase the hemolytic potential of the valve, which were not captured through hemodynamic evaluation alone. PMID:24719050

  4. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons/Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery Joint Position Statement on Open and Endovascular Surgery for Thoracic Aortic Disease.

    PubMed

    Appoo, Jehangir J; Bozinovski, John; Chu, Michael W A; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Forbes, Thomas L; Moon, Michael; Ouzounian, Maral; Peterson, Mark D; Tittley, Jacques; Boodhwani, Munir

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) published a position statement on the management of thoracic aortic disease addressing size thresholds for surgery, imaging modalities, medical therapy, and genetics. It did not address issues related to surgical intervention. This joint Position Statement on behalf of the CCS, Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons, and the Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery provides recommendations about thoracic aortic disease interventions, including: aortic valve repair, perfusion strategies for arch repair, extended arch hybrid reconstruction for acute type A dissection, endovascular management of arch and descending aortic aneurysms, and type B dissection. The position statement is constructed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, and has been approved by the primary panel, an international secondary panel, and the CCS Guidelines Committee. Advent of endovascular technology has improved aortic surgery safety and extended the indications of minimally invasive thoracic aortic surgery. The combination of safer open surgery with endovascular treatment has improved patient outcomes in this rapidly evolving subspecialty field of cardiovascular surgery. PMID:27233892

  5. Evaluation of aortic stenosis by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging: comparison with established routine clinical techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kupfahl, C; Honold, M; Meinhardt, G; Vogelsberg, H; Wagner, A; Mahrholdt, H; Sechtem, U

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether direct planimetry of aortic valve area (AVA) by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a reliable tool for determining the severity of aortic stenosis compared with transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE), and cardiac catheterisation. Methods: 44 symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis were studied. By cardiac catheterisation AVA was calculated by the Gorlin equation. AVA was measured with CMR from steady state free precession (true fast imaging with steady state precession) by planimetry. AVA was also determined from TOE images by planimetry and from TTE images by the continuity equation. Results: Bland-Altman analysis evaluating intraobserver and interobserver variability showed a very small bias for both (−0.016 and 0.019, respectively; n  =  20). Bias and limits of agreement between CMR and TTE were 0.05 (−0.35, 0.44) cm2 (n  =  37), between CMR and TOE 0.02 (−0.39, 0.42) cm2 (n  =  32), and between CMR and cardiac catheterisation 0.09 (−0.30, 0.47) cm2 (n  =  36). The sensitivity and specificity of CMR to detect AVA ⩽ 0.80 cm2 measured by cardiac catheterisation was 78% and 89%, of TOE 70% and 70%, and of TTE 74% and 67%, respectively. Conclusion: CMR planimetry is highly reliable and reproducible. Further, CMR planimetry had the best sensitivity and specificity of all non-invasive methods for detecting severe aortic stenosis in comparison with cardiac catheterisation. Therefore, CMR planimetry of AVA with steady state free precession is a new powerful diagnostic tool, particularly for patients with uncertain or discrepant findings by other modalities. PMID:15253962

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for failing surgical aortic bioprosthetic valve: from concept to clinical application and evaluation (part 1).

    PubMed

    Piazza, Nicolo; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Brockmann, Gernot; Hendrick, Ruge; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Opitz, Anke; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Tassani-Prell, Peter; Schreiber, Christian; Lange, Rüdiger

    2011-07-01

    With an aging population, improvement in life expectancy, and significant increase in the use of bioprosthetic valves, structural valve deterioration will become more and more prevalent. The operative mortality for an elective redo aortic valve surgery is reported to range from 2% to 7%, but this percentage can increase to more than 30% in high-risk and nonelective patients. Because transcatheter aortic valve (TAV)-in-surgical aortic valve (SAV) implantation represents a minimally invasive alternative to conventional redo surgery, it may prove to be safer and just as effective as redo surgery. Of course, prospective comparisons with a large number of patients and long-term follow-up are required to confirm these potential advantages. It is axiomatic that knowledge of the basic construction and dimensions, radiographic identification, and potential failure modes of SAV bioprostheses is fundamental in understanding key principles involved in TAV-in-SAV implantation. The goals of this paper are: 1) to review the classification, physical characteristics, and potential failure modes of surgical bioprosthetic aortic valves; and 2) to discuss patient selection and procedural techniques relevant to TAV-in-SAV implantation. PMID:21777879

  7. Evaluation of aortic regurgitation by using PC MRI: A comparison of the accuracies at different image plane locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong-Gull; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soon-Bae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Park, Yong-Soon

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study is to determine which imaging location on phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC MRI) best correlates with echocardiography to enable the severity of aortic regurgitation to be accurately evaluated by using PC MRI. The subjects were 34 patients with aortic regurgitation confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac MRI. Two velocity distribution images were obtained by positioning image planes above and below the aortic valve in the PC MRI. Using the acquired images, regurgitation fractions were calculated by calculating the average forward and reverse blood flows. The severity of aortic regurgitation was then evaluated and compared with the severity as determined by using echocardiography. When image planes were positioned above the aortic valve, the regurgitation fraction obtained by using PC MRI was 44.5 ± 18.7%, and when planes were positioned below the valve, the regurgitation fraction was 34.8 ± 15.9%. Regarding agreement with echocardiographic findings, concurrence was shown to be 50% when image planes sections were positioned above the valve and 85.3% when they were positioned below the valve. The present study shows that if image planes are positioned below the valve rather than above the valve, provides as accurate evaluation of the severity of aortic regurgitation.

  8. Clinical Evaluation of Different Pre-impression Preparation Procedures of Dental Arch

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nitin; Arora, Monika; Gupta, Naveen; Agarwal, Manisha; Verma, Rohit; Rathod, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bubbles and voids on the occlusal surface impede the actual intercuspation and pre-impression preparation aims to reduce the incidence of air bubbles and voids as well as influences the quality of occlusal reproduction and actual clinical intercuspation in the articulator. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of different pre-impression preparation procedures of antagonistic dental arch on the quality of the occlusal reproduction of the teeth in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and to determine most reliable pre-impression preparation method to reduce the incidence of air bubbles. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects were selected having full complement of mandibular teeth from second molar to second molar with well demarcated cusp height. 200 impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid material. The impressions were divided into five groups of 40 impressions each and each group had one specific type of pre-impression preparation. All the impressions were poured in die stone. A stereomicroscope with graduated eyepiece was used to count the number of bubbles on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars. The mean and standard deviations were calculated for each group. Mann–Whitney U-test was applied to find the significant difference between different groups. Results: Least bubbles were found in the group in which oral cavity was dried by saliva ejector and fluid hydrocolloid was finger painted onto the occlusal surfaces immediately before the placement of impression tray in the mouth. Conclusion: It was found that finger painting the tooth surfaces with fluid hydrocolloid immediately before the placement of loaded impression tray in the mouth was the most reliable method. The oral cavity can be cleared more easily of excess saliva by vacuum suction rather than by use of an astringent solution. PMID:26229376

  9. Multimodality imaging assessment for Thoraflex hybrid total arch replacement.

    PubMed

    Wong, Randolph Hl; Ho, Jacky Yk; Underwood, Malcolm J

    2016-06-01

    Conventionally, aortic pathologies involving the ascending, arch, and descending thoracic aorta are treated by a staged operation. The Thoraflex device is a composite 4-branched graft with a distal endovascular stent, which allows one-stage treatment of these pathologies. We describe our multimodality hybrid approach for total arch replacement using the Thoraflex device with the adjunct of intraoperative 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography, Endo-EYE endoscopy, and on-table aortography in a hybrid operating room. These multimodality assessments can ascertain adequate sealing of a distal aortic tear and proper opening of the endograft, and provide on-table functional assessment of false lumen hemodynamics. Early results are promising. PMID:27072867

  10. Reliability performance of titanium sputter coated Ni-Ti arch wires: mechanical performance and nickel release evaluation.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, P; Varma, N K Sapna; Balakrishnan, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The present research was aimed at developing surface coatings on NiTi archwires capable of protection against nickel release and to investigate the stability, mechanical performance and prevention of nickel release of titanium sputter coated NiTi arch wires. Coated and uncoated specimens immersed in artificial saliva were subjected to critical evaluation of parameters such as surface analysis, mechanical testing, element release, friction coefficient and adhesion of the coating. Titanium coatings exhibited high reliability on exposure even for a prolonged period of 30 days in artificial saliva. The coatings were found to be relatively stable on linear scratch test with reduced frictional coefficient compared to uncoated samples. Titanium sputtering adhered well with the Ni-Ti substrates at the molecular level, this was further confirmed by Inductive coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPE) analysis which showed no dissolution of nickel in the artificial saliva. Titanium sputter coatings seem to be promising for nickel sensitive patients. The study confirmed the superior nature of the coating, evident as reduced surface roughness, friction coefficient, good adhesion and minimal hardness and elastic modulus variations in artificial saliva over a given time period. PMID:26484557

  11. Type B Aortic Dissection with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture 1 Year after Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Guillaume; Ben Ahmed, Sabrina; Warein, Edouard; Gallon, Arnaud; Rosset, Eugenio

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient who developed a type B aortic dissection and ruptured his aneurysmal sac 1 year after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), despite standard follow-up. This 79-year-old man was presented to emergency room with acute abdominal pain and an acute lower limb ischemia. Computed tomography scan showed an acute type B aortic dissection feeding the aneurysmal sac of the EVAR. The aneurysm rupture occurred during imaging. Type B aortic dissection is a rare cause of aneurysmal rupture after EVAR. The first postoperative computed tomography scan should maybe include the arch and the descending thoracic aorta to rule out an iatrogenic dissection after EVAR. PMID:26902937

  12. Three-Dimensional Evaluation of Aortic Valve Annular Shape in Children With Bicuspid Aortic Valves and/or Aortic Coarctation Compared With Controls.

    PubMed

    Chamberland, Christen R; Sugeng, Lissa; Abraham, Sharon; Li, Fangyong; Weismann, Constance G

    2015-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most common congenital cardiac abnormality, occurring in 1% to 2% of the general population. Adults with degenerative aortic valve (AV) disease have been shown to have an elliptical shaped AV annulus. The goal of this study was to investigate the shape of the aortic annulus in children with BAV, coarctation of the aorta (CoA) with or without BAV, and normal controls with trileaflet AVs using 3-dimensional echocardiography (3DE). We reviewed echocardiograms of children with isolated BAV (n = 40), CoA (n = 26), and controls (n = 40) that included 3DE of the AV. Eccentricity index (EI) was defined as the ratio between the smaller and larger annular dimension. ΔD was defined as the difference between the larger and smaller annular dimension. Patients with BAV had an eccentric AV annulus compared with controls (BAV EI 0.85 ± 0.05 and control EI 0.96 ± 0.03; p <0.001). Subjects with CoA also had a more eccentric annulus than controls regardless of AV morphology (CoA 0.84 ± 0.06; p <0.001). EI was not associated with somatic growth parameters or gender. Among all patients with BAV, AV dysfunction was associated with fusion of the right and noncoronary (R-N) cusps (p <0.001), but there was no association between valve dysfunction and EI. ΔD was higher in both the BAV and CoA groups compared with the control group (BAV 3.4 ± 1.9 mm, CoA 2.8 ± 1.8 mm, and control 0.6 ± 0.4 mm; p <0.001 each). Although there was no significant correlation of ΔD with age in the control group during childhood, ΔD increased with age in the BAV and CoA groups. In conclusion, children with BAV and/or CoA have an elliptical shaped AV annulus by 3DE, which is independent of age, gender, or body surface area. AV annular eccentricity may lead to inaccurate measurement of AV annular size if measured by 2DE alone. Considering AV annular eccentricity when balloon sizing the annulus before valvuloplasty may help improve interventional results in some

  13. Evaluation of the CritiView in pig model of abdominal aortic occlusion and graded hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayevsky, A.; Preisman, S.; Willenz, P. E.; Castel, D.; Perel, A.; Givony, D.; Dekel, N.; Oren, L.; Pewzner, E.

    2009-02-01

    We hypothesize that in the presence of reduced oxygen delivery and extraction, blood flow will be redistributed in order to protect the most vital organs (e.g., brain and heart) by increasing their regional blood flow, while O2 delivery to the less vital organs (e.g., GI tract or urethral wall) will diminish. Evaluation of mitochondrial function in vivo could be done by monitoring the oxidation reduction state of the respiratory chain. Thus, the NADH redox state of less vital organs could serve as an indicator of overall O2 imbalance as well as an endpoint of resuscitation. We have therefore tested, in a pig model, a new medical device providing real time data on NADH redox state and tissue blood flow- TBF This device contains a modified three way Foley catheter with a fiber optic probe which connects the measurement unit to the tested tissue. Female pigs underwent graded hemorrhage (GH) or Aortic clamping (AC). The main effects of GH started when blood volume decreased by 30%. At 40% blood loss, minimal levels of TBF were correlated to the maximal NADH levels. The values of the 2 parameters returned to baseline after retransfusion of the shed blood. Aortic clamping led to significant decrease in TBF while NADH levels increased. After aortic declamping the parameters recovered to normal values. Due to the short length of the urethra in female pigs and the instable contact between the probe and the tissue, inconsistency of the responses was observed. Our preliminary results show that the CritiView may be a useful tool for the detection of body O2 imbalance.

  14. Aortic insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart valve - aortic regurgitation; Valvular disease - aortic regurgitation; AI - aortic insufficiency ... BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  15. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta ...

  16. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the ...

  17. Aortic insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic valve prolapse; Aortic regurgitation ... Any condition that prevents the aortic valve from closing completely can cause this problem. When the valve doesn't close all the way, a small amount of blood comes ...

  18. Impact of Endografting on the Thoracic Aortic Anatomy: Comparative Analysis of the Aortic Geometry before and after the Endograft Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Midulla, Marco; Moreno, Ramiro; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Nicoud, Franc; Pruvo, Jean Pierre; Haulon, Stephan; Rousseau, Hervé

    2013-03-13

    PurposeAlthough the widespread acceptance of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) as a first-line treatment option for a multitude of thoracic aortic diseases, little is known about the consequences of the device implantation on the native aortic anatomy. We propose a comparative analysis of the pre- and postoperative geometry on a clinical series of patients and discuss the potential clinical implicationsMethodsCT pre- and postoperative acquisitions of 30 consecutive patients treated by TEVAR for different pathologies (20 thoracic aortic aneurysms, 6 false aneurysms, 3 penetrating ulcers, 1 traumatic rupture) were used to model the vascular geometry. Pre- and postoperative geometries were compared for each patient by pairing and matching the 3D models. An implantation site was identified, and focal differences were detected and described.ResultsSegmentation of the data sets was successfully performed for all 30 subjects. Geometry differences between the pre- and postoperative meshes were depicted in 23 patients (76 %). Modifications at the upper implantation site were detected in 14 patients (47 %), and among them, the implantation site involved the arch (Z0–3) in 11 (78 %).ConclusionModeling the vascular geometry on the basis of imaging data offers an effective tool to perform patient-specific analysis of the vascular geometry before and after the treatment. Future studies will evaluate the consequences of these changes on the aortic function.

  19. Comparative evaluation of border molding, using two different techniques in maxillary edentulous arches - An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Yarapatineni, Rameshbabu; Vilekar, Abhishek; Kumar, J Phani; Kumar, G Ajay; Aravind, Prasad; Kumar, P Anil

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study was undertaken to compare the retention between sectional border molding using low fusing greenstick compound and single step border molding using condensation silicone (putty) impression material in three stages- A. Immediately following border molding, B. After final impression and C. With the finished permanent denture base. Materials & Methods: In this study evaluation of retentive values of sectional border molding (Group I) (custom impression trays border molded with green stick compound ) and single step border molding (Group II) ( border molding with condensation silicone (putty) impression material ). In both techniques definitive wash impression were made with light body condensation silicone and permanent denture base with heat cure polymerization resin. Results: Group II was significantly higher (mean=8011.43) than Group I (mean=5777.43) in test-A. The t-value (1.5883) infers that there was significant difference between Group I and Group II (p =0.15). Group I was significantly higher (mean=6718.57) than Group II (mean=5224.29) in test -B. The t-value (1.6909) infers that there was significant difference between Group I and Group II (p=0.17). Group II was higher (mean=4025.14) than Group I (mean=3835.07) in test -C. The t-value was 0.1239. But it was found to be statistically insignificant (p=0.005). Conclusion: Within the limitation of this clinical study border molding custom tray with low fusing green stick compound provided similar retention as compared to custom impression tray with condensation silicone in permanent denture base. How to cite this article: Yarapatineni R, Vilekar A, Kumar JP, Kumar GA, Aravind P, Kumar PA. Comparative evaluation of border molding, using two different techniques in maxillary edentulous arches - An in vivo study. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(6):82-7 . PMID:24453450

  20. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  1. [Evaluation of tissue perfusion by simultaneous monitoring of aortic flow rate and capnography].

    PubMed

    Brunel, D; Muchada, R

    1991-10-26

    Ten patients under general anaesthesia were subjected to non-invasive haemodynamic monitoring, together with arterial gasometry and capnography. When enflurane was administered for maintenance anaesthesia, a 33 percent fall in aortic flow rate was observed (P less than 0.01), together with prolongation of the pre-ejection period and left ventricular pre-ejection/ejection ratio, an increase of central venous pressure and total vascular systemic resistances. The end-expiratory CO2 (Pet CO2) was reduced by 13 percent (P less than 0.05). There was no significant variation in arteriolo-alveolar CO2 difference (P(a-A)CO2). Under dobutamine (mean dose: 3.4 +/- 0.5 micrograms/kg/min), the haemodynamic parameters returned to their initial values. Pet CO2 rose above its initial level (+ 12 percent; P less than 0.05), but P(a-A)CO2 was not significantly modified. The variations of Pet CO2 were parallel with those of aortic flow rate. It is concluded that the changes in Pet CO2 observed during haemodynamic modifications could be used as markers for qualitative evaluation of tissue perfusion. PMID:1836570

  2. Combined Interventional and Surgical Treatment for Acute Aortic Type A Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jincheng; Zhang Jinzhou Yang Jian; Zuo Jian; Zhang Jinbao; Yu Shiqiang; Chen Tao; Xu Xuezeng; Wei Xufeng; Yi Dinghua

    2008-07-15

    Surgical repair and endovascular stent-graft placement are both therapies for thoracic aortic dissection. A combination of these two approaches may be effective in patients with type A dissection. In this study, we evaluated the prognosis of this combined technique. From December 2003 to December 2006, 15 patients with type A dissection were admitted to our institute; clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up was performed at discharge and approximately 12 months after operation. Endovascular stent-graft placement by interventional radiology and surgical repair for reconstruction of aortic arch was performed in all patients. Total arch replacement for distal arch aneurysm was carried out under deep hypothermia with circulatory arrest; antegrade-selected cerebral perfusion was used for brain protection. Four patients concomitantly received a coronary artery bypass graft. Hospital mortality rate was 6.7%; the patient died of cerebral infarction. Neurological complications developed in two patients. Multi-detector-row computed tomography scans performed before discharge revealed complete thrombosis of the false lumen in six patients and partial thrombosis in eight patients. At the follow-up examination, complete thrombosis was found in another three patients, aortic rupture, endoleaks, or migration of the stent-graft was not observed and injuries of peripheral organs or anastomotic endoleaks did not occur. For patients with aortic type A dissection, combining intervention and surgical procedures is feasible, and complete or at least partial thrombosis of the false lumen in the descending aorta can be achieved. This combined approach simplified the surgical procedures and shortened the circulatory arrest time, minimizing the necessity for further aortic operation.

  3. Utility of cardiac computed tomography for evaluation of pannus in mechanical aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Suh, Young Joo; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Sak; Hong, Yoo Jin; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Hur, Jin; Choi, Byoung Wook; Chang, Byung-Chul

    2015-08-01

    The clinical significance of pannus detected on computed tomography (CT) has not yet been investigated. The purposes of this study were to investigate the clinical significance of pannus detected on cardiac CT in patients who underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) with mechanical valves, and to determine predictors for pannus severity. A total of 92 patients who underwent cardiac CT and TTE and who had undergone mechanical AVR were included. The geometric orifice area (GOA), the presence of limitation of motion (LOM) and pannus were evaluated on CT. The GOA, presence of LOM, and presence and severity of pannus were compared with echocardiographic parameters. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the predictors for pannus severity. The GOA on CT positively correlated with effective orifice area on TTE (r = 0.733, P < 0.0001). Pannus was found in 77.2% and LOM in 14.0%. With increasing pannus severity, mean transvalvular pressure gradient (PG) was significantly higher (P < 0.0001). Patients with elevated PG showed a smaller GOA, a higher incidence of pannus, more severe pannus and LOM than patients with normal PG (P < 0.05). Small valve size (≤19 mm), Carbomedics valve, rheumatic etiology, and young age at AVR (<48.8 years) were independent predictors of moderate to severe pannus (P < 0.05). Cardiac CT is helpful in the evaluation of pannus formation in patients with mechanical aortic valves. Moderate to severe pannus formation frequently occurred in patients with small mechanical valve size, Carbomedics valves, rheumatic heart disease and young age at AVR. PMID:25990093

  4. Ambient resonance of rock arches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Alison Margaret

    Resonant frequencies of structural elements are related to fundamental material properties of mass and stiffness, and monitoring over time can thus serve as an indirect indictor of internal mechanical change. Until now, however, this methodology has not been applied to natural rock structures such as arches and towers. We evaluated the resonance characteristics of four rock arches in southeastern Utah, combining in-situ ambient vibration measurements with numerical modal analysis. At each location, we measured the spectral and polarization attributes of ambient vibrations using up to two broadband seismometers. Ambient vibration spectra measured on the arches showed clear peaks at distinct frequencies (typically between 1-10 Hz), which we interpret as resonant frequencies, as opposed to the relatively flat spectra recorded on nearby bedrock. Polarization analysis helped us identify the orientations of vibration and explore resonant mode shapes. We then verified the measured resonant frequencies through 3D finite-element numerical modal analysis, and in most cases we were able to match the fundamental along with several higher-order modes. Repeat occupation and short-term continuous ambient vibration monitoring were aimed at assessing daily and seasonal changes in resonant frequencies, which in turn may provide evidence of internal mechanical change; Mesa Arch in Canyonlands National Park served as the main focus for our repeat measurements. Results revealed that minor, reversible changes in resonant frequencies can be created by thermal effects, i.e., changes in bulk material stiffness as the arch expands and contracts on daily and seasonal time scales. No irreversible change in the resonant frequency of Mesa Arch was detected over the period of this study. Our research provides the first step towards monitoring the long-term structural health of natural rock arches as they change through time or in the wake of a damaging event. We have shown that the resonance

  5. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  6. Expandable device type III for easy and reliable approximation of dissection layers in sutureless aortic anastomosis. Ex vivo experimental study.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Stefano

    2010-02-01

    In past years, we developed expandable devices (type I and II) for sutureless aortic anastomosis. We have now further modified the device (type III) incorporating a second expandable ring, external to the main one, which can be operated contrariwise in such a way that the aortic wall (i.e. the dissection layers) is compressed between the two expandable rings, providing full control on both the layers compression pressure and the anastomosis final diameter. The device was evaluated in ex vivo experimental models of swine aortic arch fresh samples; air-tight sealing at increasing endovascular pressures was also evaluated and compared with sealing achieved by standard suturing. Ex vivo data suggest that the present version of the device can be used easily and quickly also in elliptical, asymmetric 'oblique' anastomosis as when concavity arch is involved. Perfect air-tight sealing of the anastomosis was verified at endovascular pressures up to 150 mmHg, while standard suture cannot withstand even minimal endovascular air pressure. Compared to the previous versions, the present device is less bulky and softer, can be used also for concavity arch resection and provides full and standardizable control on dissection layers stable and sealed approximation. PMID:19933306

  7. Type A aortic dissection with cold agglutinin disease.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hiroaki; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Nagasawa, Atsushi; Ogino, Hitoshi

    2011-08-01

    Cold agglutinin disease is an uncommon condition characterized by hemagglutination and microvascular thrombosis of red blood cells at low temperatures during cardiopulmonary bypass. We report the rare case of an ambulatory 74-year-old woman with a relatively high thermal amplitude for antibody activation. We performed aortic arch repair for type A aortic dissection using moderately hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass and warm blood cardioplegia in a retrograde manner. This case report provides evidence that these are safe and suitable techniques for selected aortic arch repair patients with cold agglutinin disease. PMID:21801929

  8. 14-3-3 in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Swain, Mamuni; Willard, Belinda; Scholtz, Jaclyn; Svensson, Lars G.; Roselli, Eric E.; Pettersson, Gosta; Johnston, Douglas R.; Soltesz, Edward G.; Yamashita, Michifumi; Stuehr, Dennis; Daly, Thomas M.; Hoffman, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Large vessel vasculitides (LVV) are a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by injury to and anatomic modifications of large vessels, including the aorta and its branch vessels. Disease etiology is unknown. This study was undertaken to identify antigen targets within affected vessel walls in aortic root, ascending aorta, and aortic arch surgical specimens from patients with LVV, including giant cell arteritis, Takayasu arteritis, and isolated focal aortitis. Methods Thoracic aortic aneurysm specimens and autologous blood were acquired from consenting patients who underwent aorta reconstruction procedures. Aorta proteins were extracted from both patients with LVV and age-, race-, and sex-matched disease controls with noninflammatory aneurysms. A total of 108 serum samples from patients with LVV, matched controls, and controls with antinuclear antibodies, different forms of vasculitis, or sepsis were tested. Results Evaluation of 108 serum samples and 22 aortic tissue specimens showed that 78% of patients with LVV produced antibodies to 14-3-3 proteins in the aortic wall (93.7% specificity), whereas controls were less likely to do so (6.7% produced antibodies). LVV patient sera contained autoantibody sufficient to immunoprecipitate 14-3-3 protein(s) from aortic lysates. Three of 7 isoforms of 14-3-3 were found to be up-regulated in aorta specimens from patients with LVV, and 2 isoforms (ε and ζ) were found to be antigenic in LVV. Conclusion This is the first study to use sterile, snap-frozen thoracic aorta biopsy specimens to identify autoantigens in LVV. Our findings indicate that 78% of patients with LVV have antibody reactivity to 14-3-3 protein(s). The precise role of these antibodies and 14-3-3 proteins in LVV pathogenesis deserves further study. PMID:25917817

  9. [Surgical aspects of acute aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Laas, J; Heinemann, M; Jurmann, M; Borst, H G

    1992-12-01

    This paper highlights some of the surgical aspects of acute aortic dissections such as: emergency diagnosis, indications for surgery, reconstructive operative techniques, malperfusion phenomena and necessity for follow-up. Aortic dissection is caused by an intimal tear, called the "entry", and subsequent splitting of the media by the stream of blood. Two lumina are thus created, which may communicate through "re-entries". As this creates severe weakness of the aortic wall, rupture and/or dilatation are the imminent dangers of acute aortic dissection. Acute aortic dissection type A, by definition involving the ascending aorta (Figures 1 and 2), is an absolute indication for emergency surgical treatment, because its natural history shows an extremely poor outcome (Figure 3). Due to impending (intrapericardial) aortic rupture, it may be necessary to limit diagnostic procedures to a minimum. Transesophageal echocardiography is the method of choice for establishing a quick, precise and reliable diagnosis (Figure 4). In stable patients, computed tomography gives additional information about aortic diameters or sites of extrapericardial perforation. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) shows perfusion of the lumina and dependent organs. The surgical strategy in acute aortic dissection type A aims at replacement of the ascending aorta. Reconstructive techniques have to be considered, especially in aortic valve regurgitation without annuloectasia (Figures 5 and 6). In recent times, the use of GRF tissue glue has reduced the need for teflon felt. Involvement of the aortic arch should be treated aggressively up to the point of total arch replacement in deep hypothermic circulatory arrest as part of the primary procedure (Figure 7). Malperfusion phenomena of aortic branches remain risk-factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1483624

  10. Quantitation of aortic and mitral regurgitation in the pediatric population: evaluation by radionuclide angiocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, R.A.; Treves, S.; Freed, M.; Girod, D.A.; Caldwell, R.L.

    1983-01-15

    The ability to quantitate aortic (AR) or mitral regurgitation (MR), or both, by radionuclide angiocardiography was evaluated in children and young adults at rest and during isometric exercise. Regurgitation was estimated by determining the ratio of left ventricular stroke volume to right ventricular stroke volume obtained during equilibrium ventriculography. The radionuclide measurement was compared with results of cineangiography, with good correlation between both studies in 47 of 48 patients. Radionuclide stroke volume ratio was used to classify severity: the group with equivocal regurgitation differed from the group with mild regurgitation (p less than 0.02); patients with mild regurgitation differed from those with moderate regurgitation (p less than 0.001); and those with moderate regurgitation differed from those with severe regurgitation (p less than 0.01). The stroke volume ratio was responsive to isometric exercise, remaining constant or increasing in 16 of 18 patients. After surgery to correct regurgitation, the stroke volume ratio significantly decreased from preoperative measurements in all 7 patients evaluated. Results from the present study demonstrate that a stroke volume ratio greater than 2.0 is compatible with moderately severe regurgitation and that a ratio greater than 3.0 suggests the presence of severe regurgitation. Thus, radionuclide angiocardiography should be useful for noninvasive quantitation of AR or MR, or both, helping define the course of young patients with left-side valvular regurgitation.

  11. 3D evaluation of maxillary arches in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients treated with nasoalveolar moulding vs. Hotz's plate.

    PubMed

    Cerón-Zapata, A M; López-Palacio, A M; Rodriguez-Ardila, M J; Berrio-Gutiérrez, L M; De Menezes, M; Sforza, C

    2016-02-01

    To compare the three-dimensional changes occurring in the maxillary arch during the use of modified pre-surgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNAM) and Hotz's plate. A clinical trial including 32 children with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), 16 treated with Hotz's plate and 16 with PNAM, was performed. Impressions of the maxillary arches were taken: A. prior to pre-surgical orthopaedics, B. before cheiloplasty and C. after cheiloplasty. Models were digitised using a stereophotogrammetric instrument, and geodesic distances were calculated: anterior, canine and posterior widths of the arch, and lengths and cleft depths of the larger and shorter segments. The time and treatment effects were assessed by two-factor anova. A significant effect of treatment was found for cleft depth at the larger segment: children treated with Hotz's plate had significantly deeper cleft than children treated with PNAM. All distances significantly changed during time: the anterior and canine widths decreased, while the posterior width, the lengths and depths of the cleft segments increased. Significant treatment per time interactions was found. The anterior and canine widths reduced more with PNAM between time points A and B while Hotz's treatment was more effective between B and C. The shorter segment depth increased more between B and C with PNAM, and between A and B with Hotz's plate. During pre-surgical orthopaedics, therapy with PNAM obtained the best results in reducing the width at the anterior segment of the cleft. This treatment gave a lower increase in cleft depth than treatment with Hotz's plate. PMID:26404105

  12. Effectiveness of the Use of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy to Treat Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Complicated with Limb Ischemia: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kousuke; Chikazawa, Genta; Hiraoka, Arudo; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Yoshitaka, Hidenori

    2015-01-01

    We report an effectiveness of the use of near-infrared spectroscopy to evaluate the limb perfusion, which helps to continuously measure the tissue oxygen index of bilateral legs in treating acute type A aortic dissection complicated with limb ischemia. A 62-year-old man underwent total arch replacement for acute type A aortic dissection with limb ischemia. Intraoperative retrograde true lumen perfusion via bilateral femoral arteries during cardiopulmonary bypass improved ischemic condition of bilateral legs before the resection of primary intimal tear, and the use of near-infrared spectroscopy made it possible to assess additional revascularizations to the lower limbs were required or not. PMID:26421076

  13. Uncluttered single-image visualization of the abdominal aortic vessel tree: Method and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Won, Joong-Ho; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Napel, Sandy

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The authors develop a method to visualize the abdominal aorta and its branches, obtained by CT or MR angiography, in a single 2D stylistic image without overlap among branches. Methods: The abdominal aortic vasculature is modeled as an articulated object whose underlying topology is a rooted tree. The inputs to the algorithm are the 3D centerlines of the abdominal aorta, its branches, and their associated diameter information. The visualization problem is formulated as an optimization problem that finds a spatial configuration of the bounding boxes of the centerlines most similar to the projection of the input into a given viewing direction (e.g., anteroposterior), while not introducing intersections among the boxes. The optimization algorithm minimizes a score function regarding the overlap of the bounding boxes and the deviation from the input. The output of the algorithm is used to produce a stylistic visualization, made of the 2D centerlines modulated by the associated diameter information, on a plane. The authors performed a preliminary evaluation by asking three radiologists to label 366 arterial branches from the 30 visualizations of five cases produced by the method. Each of the five patients was presented in six different variant images, selected from ten variants with the three lowest and three highest scores. For each label, they assigned confidence and distortion ratings (low/medium/high). They studied the association between the quantitative metrics measured from the visualization and the subjective ratings by the radiologists. Results: All resulting visualizations were free from branch overlaps. Labeling accuracies of the three readers were 93.4%, 94.5%, and 95.4%, respectively. For the total of 1098 samples, the distortion ratings were low: 77.39%, medium: 10.48%, and high: 12.12%. The confidence ratings were low: 5.56%, medium: 16.50%, and high: 77.94%. The association study shows that the proposed quantitative metrics can predict a reader

  14. Uncluttered single-image visualization of the abdominal aortic vessel tree: Method and evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Won, Joong-Ho; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Rubin, Geoffrey D.; Napel, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The authors develop a method to visualize the abdominal aorta and its branches, obtained by CT or MR angiography, in a single 2D stylistic image without overlap among branches. Methods: The abdominal aortic vasculature is modeled as an articulated object whose underlying topology is a rooted tree. The inputs to the algorithm are the 3D centerlines of the abdominal aorta, its branches, and their associated diameter information. The visualization problem is formulated as an optimization problem that finds a spatial configuration of the bounding boxes of the centerlines most similar to the projection of the input into a given viewing direction (e.g., anteroposterior), while not introducing intersections among the boxes. The optimization algorithm minimizes a score function regarding the overlap of the bounding boxes and the deviation from the input. The output of the algorithm is used to produce a stylistic visualization, made of the 2D centerlines modulated by the associated diameter information, on a plane. The authors performed a preliminary evaluation by asking three radiologists to label 366 arterial branches from the 30 visualizations of five cases produced by the method. Each of the five patients was presented in six different variant images, selected from ten variants with the three lowest and three highest scores. For each label, they assigned confidence and distortion ratings (low∕medium∕high). They studied the association between the quantitative metrics measured from the visualization and the subjective ratings by the radiologists. Results: All resulting visualizations were free from branch overlaps. Labeling accuracies of the three readers were 93.4%, 94.5%, and 95.4%, respectively. For the total of 1098 samples, the distortion ratings were low: 77.39%, medium: 10.48%, and high: 12.12%. The confidence ratings were low: 5.56%, medium: 16.50%, and high: 77.94%. The association study shows that the proposed quantitative metrics can predict a

  15. [Emergency Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Ruptured Kommerell's Diverticulum with an Acute Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Seguchi, Ryuta; Ohtake, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Takahiro; Shintani, Yoshiko; Nishida, Yuji; Kiuchi, Ryuta; Yamaguchi, Shojiro; Tomita, Shigeyuki; Sanada, Junichiro; Matsui, Osamu; Watanabe, Go

    2016-06-01

    This case report describes emergency thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) of a ruptured Kommerell's diverticulum associated with a type B acute aortic dissection in a patient with a right aortic arch. A 64-year-old male was admitted with symptoms of sudden paraplegia and shock. The computed tomography imaging showed right aortic arch anomaly, with mirror image branching of the major arteries. The aorta was dissected from the origin of the right subclavian artery to the terminal aorta, with a thrombosed false lumen. Rupture was found in a 6.3 cm aneurysm located in the distal arch, which was diagnosed as Kommerell's diverticulum. We performed emergency TEVAR, and the aneurysm was successfully excluded using deployment of a Gore Tag stent-graft. At 3 months' follow-up, the patient was doing well and showed shrinkage of the aneurysm was confirmed. TEVAR is considered to be a suitable procedure for an emergency aortic catastrophe even in patients with aortic anomaly. PMID:27246128

  16. A patient-specific study of type-B aortic dissection: evaluation of true-false lumen blood exchange

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aortic dissection is a severe pathological condition in which blood penetrates between layers of the aortic wall and creates a duplicate channel – the false lumen. This considerable change on the aortic morphology alters hemodynamic features dramatically and, in the case of rupture, induces markedly high rates of morbidity and mortality. Methods In this study, we establish a patient-specific computational model and simulate the pulsatile blood flow within the dissected aorta. The k-ω SST turbulence model is employed to represent the flow and finite volume method is applied for numerical solutions. Our emphasis is on flow exchange between true and false lumen during the cardiac cycle and on quantifying the flow across specific passages. Loading distributions including pressure and wall shear stress have also been investigated and results of direct simulations are compared with solutions employing appropriate turbulence models. Results Our results indicate that (i) high velocities occur at the periphery of the entries; (ii) for the case studied, approximately 40% of the blood flow passes the false lumen during a heartbeat cycle; (iii) higher pressures are found at the outer wall of the dissection, which may induce further dilation of the pseudo-lumen; (iv) highest wall shear stresses occur around the entries, perhaps indicating the vulnerability of this region to further splitting; and (v) laminar simulations with adequately fine mesh resolutions, especially refined near the walls, can capture similar flow patterns to the (coarser mesh) turbulent results, although the absolute magnitudes computed are in general smaller. Conclusions The patient-specific model of aortic dissection provides detailed flow information of blood transport within the true and false lumen and quantifies the loading distributions over the aorta and dissection walls. This contributes to evaluating potential thrombotic behavior in the false lumen and is pivotal in guiding

  17. Tracheo-Bronchial Obstruction and Esophageal Perforation after TEVAR for Thoracic Aortic Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Daisuke; Tanaka, Haruki; Komatsu, Kazunori; Ohtsu, Yoshinori; Terasaki, Takamitsu; Wada, Yuko; Takano, Tamaki; Koike, Shoichiro; Amano, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A 67-year-old man was referred to our hospital for an ascending aortic aneurysm, thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm and aortic regurgitation. Graft repair of the thoracic aortic arch and aortic valve replacement was given priority and completed, however he developed descending aortic rupture before the second scheduled surgery, and endovascular stent grafting was performed. He subsequently developed tracheobronchial obstruction and esophageal perforation. The patient underwent urgent esophagectomy and enterostomy with continuity later reestablished. However, he died of sepsis 5 months after surgery. Despite the less invasive nature of endovascular treatment, esophageal perforation can nevertheless occur and postoperative vigilance is well warranted. PMID:25593630

  18. Arching Solar Prominence

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s STEREO (Ahead) spacecraft watched as an eruptive prominence rose up and arched out in a horseshoe shape far above the Sun’s surface (Aug. 25, 2010). The image and movie show the action in a...

  19. Single-Stage Total Arch Replacement Including Resection of Kommerell Diverticulum in a Patient With Loeys-Dietz Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chin Siang; Kasai, Yuhei; Fukushima, Souta; Hibino, Narutoshi; Magruder, Trent; Suarez-Pierre, Alejandro; Cameron, Duke; Vricella, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is an autosomal dominant genetic connective tissue disorder associated with aortic aneurysmal disease. Kommerell diverticulum (KD) is a rare aortic diverticulum, for which the indication for surgery and the surgical techniques remain subjects of debate. We describe our experience with a successful total aortic arch replacement including KD resection through a median sternotomy for a pediatric patient with LDS. PMID:27521346

  20. The cytotoxicity evaluation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles on human aortic endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Gaoyuan; Wu, Hengfang; Xiong, Fei; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhirui; Bian, Zhiping; Xu, Jindan; Gu, Chunrong; Gu, Ning; Chen, Xiangjian; Yang, Di

    2013-05-01

    One major obstacle for successful application of nanoparticles in medicine is its potential nanotoxicity on the environment and human health. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxicity effect of dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated iron oxide (DMSA-Fe2O3) using cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Our results showed that DMSA-Fe2O3 in the culture medium could be absorbed into HAECs, and dispersed in the cytoplasm. The cytotoxicity effect of DMSA-Fe2O3 on HAECs was dose-dependent, and the concentrations no more than 0.02 mg/ml had little toxic effect which were revealed by tetrazolium dye assay. Meanwhile, the cell injury biomarker, lactate dehydrogenase, was not significantly higher than that from control cells (without DMSA-Fe2O3). However, the endocrine function for endothelin-1 and prostacyclin I-2, as well as the urea transporter function, was altered even without obvious evidence of cell injury in this context. We also showed by real-time PCR analysis that DMSA-Fe2O3 exposure resulted in differential effects on the expressions of pro- and anti-apoptosis genes of HAECs. Meanwhile, it was noted that DMSA-Fe2O3 exposure could activate the expression of genes related to oxidative stress and adhesion molecules, which suggested that inflammatory response might be evoked. Moreover, we demonstrated by in vitro endothelial tube formation that even a small amount of DMSA-Fe2O3 (0.01 and 0.02 mg/ml) could inhibit angiogenesis by the HAECs. Altogether, these results indicate that DMSA-Fe2O3 have some cytotoxicity that may cause side effects on normal endothelial cells.

  1. Single-blind randomized clinical trial to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes after one year of immediate versus delayed implant placement supporting full-arch prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Pellicer-Chover, Hilario; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Bagán, Leticia; Fichy-Fernandez, Antonio J.; Canullo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare peri-implant health, marginal bone loss and success of immediate and delayed implant placement for rehabilitation with full-arch fixed prostheses. Material and Methods: The present study was a prospective, randomized, single-blind, clinical preliminary trial. Patients were randomized into two treatment groups. In Group A implants were placed immediately post-extraction and in Group B six months after extraction. The following control time-points were established: one week, six months and twelve months after loading. Measurements were taken of peri-implant crevicular fluid volume, plaque index, gingival retraction, keratinized mucosa, probing depth, modified gingival index and presence of mucositis. Implant success rates were evaluated for the two groups. The study sample included fifteen patients (nine women and six men) with a mean average age of 63.7 years. One hundred and forty-four implants were placed: 76 placed in healed sites and 68 placed immediately. Results: At the moment of prosthetic loading, keratinized mucosa width and probing depth were higher in immediate implants than delayed implants, with statistically significant differences. However, after six and twelve months, differences between groups had disappeared. Bone loss was 0.54 ± 0.39 mm for immediate implants and 0.66 ± 0.25 mm for delayed implants (p=0.201). No implants failed in either group. Conclusions: The present study with a short follow-up and a small sample yielded no statistically significant differences in implant success and peri-implant marginal bone loss between immediate and delayed implants with fixed full-arch prostheses. Peri-implant health showed no statistically significant differences for any of the studied parameters (crevicular fluid volume, plaque index, gingival retraction, keratinized mucosa, probing depth, modified gingival index and presence of mucositis) at the twelve-month follow-up. Key words:Immediate implants, delayed implants

  2. Morphological and Functional Evaluation of Quadricuspid Aortic Valves Using Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inyoung; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. Results All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Conclusion Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV. PMID:27390538

  3. Aortic Disease Presentation and Outcome Associated with ACTA2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen S.; Guo, Dongchuan; Prakash, Siddharth; Bensend, Tracy A.; Flynn, Kelly; Estrera, Anthony; Safi, Hazim; Liang, David; Hyland, James; Child, Anne; Arno, Gavin; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Braverman, Alan; Moran, Rocio; Morisaki, Takayuki; Morisaki, Hiroko; Consortium, Montalcino Aortic; Pyeritz, Reed; Coselli, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background ACTA2 mutations are the major cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. We sought to characterize these aortic diseases in a large case series of individuals with ACTA2 mutations. Methods and Results Aortic disease, management, and outcome associated with the first aortic event (aortic dissection or aneurysm repair) were abstracted from the medical records of 277 individuals with 41 various ACTA2 mutations. Aortic events occurred in 48% of these individuals, with the vast majority presenting with thoracic aortic dissections (88%) associated with 25% mortality. Type A dissections were more common than type B dissections (54% versus 21%), but the median age of onset of type B dissections was significantly younger than type A dissections (27 years, IQR 18–41 versus 36 years, IQR 26–45). Only 12% of aortic events were repair of ascending aortic aneurysms, which variably involved the aortic root, ascending aorta and aortic arch. Overall cumulative risk of an aortic event at age 85 years was 0.76 (95% CI 0.64, 0.86). After adjustment for intra-familial correlation, gender and race, mutations disrupting p.R179 and p.R258 were associated with significantly increased risk for aortic events, whereas p.R185Q and p.R118Q mutations showed significantly lower risk of aortic events compared to other mutations. Conclusions ACTA2 mutations are associated with high risk of presentation with an acute aortic dissection. The lifetime risk for an aortic event is only 76%, suggesting that additional environmental or genetic factors play a role in expression of aortic disease in individuals with ACTA2 mutations. PMID:25759435

  4. Endovascular Treatment for Proximal Anastomotic Pseudoaneurysm after Total Arch Replacement in Behcet's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Tomoki; Ueda, Hideki; Watanabe, Michiko; Kohno, Hiroki; Tamura, Yusaku; Abe, Shinichiro; Inage, Yuichi; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Kanda, Tomoyoshi; Fujii, Masahiko; Matsumiya, Goro

    2016-07-01

    A 17-year-old patient underwent total arch replacement for aortic arch aneurysm due to vascular Behcet's disease (BD). Follow-up computed tomography, performed 6 months after the operation, demonstrated pseudoaneurysm formation at the proximal anastomotic site. We performed endovascular treatment and used a short stent graft that was originally designed for abdominal aortic aneurysm. To avoid the occlusion of the coronary or brachiocephalic artery (BCA) due to stent graft migration, we used right ventricular rapid pacing and BCA ballooning. Thus, we believe that endovascular treatment can be used for anastomotic complications in the ascending aorta after open surgery for connective tissue disorders including BD. PMID:27174345

  5. The hemostatic disturbance in patients with acute aortic dissection: A prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xinliang; Li, Jiachen; Gong, Ming; Lan, Feng; Zhang, Hongjia

    2016-09-01

    Coagulopathy is still a frequent complication in the surgical treatment of acute aortic dissection. However, the physiopathology of surgically induced coagulopathy has never been systematically and comprehensively studied in patients with acute aortic dissection. The aim of the present study was to describe the perioperative hemostatic system in patients with acute aortic dissection.The 87 patients who underwent aortic arch surgery for acute Stanford type A aortic dissection from January 2013 to September 2015 were enrolled in this study. The perioperative biomarkers of hemostatic system were evaluated using standard laboratory tests and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) at 5 time points: anesthesia induction (T1), lowest nasopharyngeal temperature (T2), protamine reversal (T3), 4 hours after surgery (T4), and 24 hours after surgery (T5).The ELISAs biomarkers revealed activation of coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin III complex [TAT] and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 [F1 + 2] were elevated), suppression of anticoagulation (antithrombin III [AT III] levels were depressed), and activation of fibrinolysis (plasminogen was decreased and plasmin-antiplasmin complex [PAP] was elevated). The standard laboratory tests also demonstrated that surgery resulted in a significant reduction in platelet counts and fibrinogen concentration.Systemic activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis, and inhibition of anticoagulation were observed during the perioperative period in patients with acute aortic dissection. Indeed, these patients exhibited consumption coagulopathy and procoagulant state perioperatively. Therefore, we believe that this remarkable disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)-like coagulopathy has a high risk of bleeding and may influence postoperative outcome of patients with acute aortic dissection. PMID:27603366

  6. Aortic Relative Pressure Components Derived from Four-Dimensional Flow Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Lamata, Pablo; Pitcher, Alex; Krittian, Sebastian; Nordsletten, David; Bissell, Malenka M; Cassar, Thomas; Barker, Alex J; Markl, Michael; Neubauer, Stefan; Smith, Nicolas P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the assessment of the spatiotemporal distribution of relative aortic pressure quantifying the magnitude of its three major components. Methods Nine healthy volunteers and three patients with aortic disease (bicuspid aortic valve, dissection, and Marfan syndrome) underwent 4D-flow CMR. Spatiotemporal pressure maps were computed from the CMR flow fields solving the pressure Poisson equation. The individual components of pressure were separated into time-varying inertial (“transient”), spatially varying inertial (“convective”), and viscous components. Results Relative aortic pressure is primarily caused by transient effects followed by the convective and small viscous contributions (64.5, 13.6, and 0.3 mmHg/m, respectively, in healthy subjects), although regional analysis revealed prevalent convective effects in specific contexts, e.g., Sinus of Valsalva and aortic arch at instants of peak velocity. Patients showed differences in peak transient values and duration, and localized abrupt convective changes explained by abnormalities in aortic geometry, including the presence of an aneurysm, a pseudo-coarctation, the inlet of a dissection, or by complex flow patterns. Conclusion The evaluation of the three components of relative pressure enables the quantification of mechanistic information for understanding and stratifying aortic disease, with potential future implications for guiding therapy. Magn Reson Med 72:1162–1169, 2014. © 2013 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:24243444

  7. How to Perfuse: Concepts of Cerebral Protection during Arch Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Habertheuer, Andreas; Wiedemann, Dominik; Kocher, Alfred; Laufer, Guenther; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth

    2015-01-01

    Arch surgery remains undoubtedly among the most technically and strategically challenging endeavors in cardiovascular surgery. Surgical interventions of thoracic aneurysms involving the aortic arch require complete circulatory arrest in deep hypothermia (DHCA) or elaborate cerebral perfusion strategies with varying degrees of hypothermia to achieve satisfactory protection of the brain from ischemic insults, that is, unilateral/bilateral antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) and retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). Despite sophisticated and increasingly individualized surgical approaches for complex aortic pathologies, there remains a lack of consensus regarding the optimal method of cerebral protection and circulatory management during the time of arch exclusion. Many recent studies argue in favor of ACP with various degrees of hypothermic arrest during arch reconstruction and its advantages have been widely demonstrated. In fact ACP with more moderate degrees of hypothermia represents a paradigm shift in the cardiac surgery community and is widely adopted as an emergent strategy; however, many centers continue to report good results using other perfusion strategies. Amidst this important discussion we review currently available surgical strategies of cerebral protection management and compare the results of recent European multicenter and single-center data. PMID:26713319

  8. Consistency of aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity estimates with respect to the Bramwell-Hill theoretical model: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is considered as an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality, and is increasingly used in clinical practice. This study aimed at evaluating the consistency of the automated estimation of regional and local aortic stiffness indices from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) data. Results Forty-six healthy subjects underwent carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements (CF_PWV) by applanation tonometry and CMR with steady-state free-precession and phase contrast acquisitions at the level of the aortic arch. These data were used for the automated evaluation of the aortic arch pulse wave velocity (Arch_PWV), and the ascending aorta distensibility (AA_Distc, AA_Distb), which were estimated from ascending aorta strain (AA_Strain) combined with either carotid or brachial pulse pressure. The local ascending aorta pulse wave velocity AA_PWVc and AA_PWVb were estimated respectively from these carotid and brachial derived distensibility indices according to the Bramwell-Hill theoretical model, and were compared with the Arch_PWV. In addition, a reproducibility analysis of AA_PWV measurement and its comparison with the standard CF_PWV was performed. Characterization according to the Bramwell-Hill equation resulted in good correlations between Arch_PWV and both local distensibility indices AA_Distc (r = 0.71, p < 0.001) and AA_Distb (r = 0.60, p < 0.001); and between Arch_PWV and both theoretical local indices AA_PWVc (r = 0.78, p < 0.001) and AA_PWVb (r = 0.78, p < 0.001). Furthermore, the Arch_PWV was well related to CF_PWV (r = 0.69, p < 0.001) and its estimation was highly reproducible (inter-operator variability: 7.1%). Conclusions The present work confirmed the consistency and robustness of the regional index Arch_PWV and the local indices AA_Distc and AA_Distb according to the theoretical model, as well as to the well established measurement of CF_PWV, demonstrating the relevance of the regional and local CMR indices. PMID

  9. BRIDGE ABUTMENTS WITH ARCH SEGMENTS ON RIVER BOTTOM. ARCHES COLLAPSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BRIDGE ABUTMENTS WITH ARCH SEGMENTS ON RIVER BOTTOM. ARCHES COLLAPSED AROUND EIGHT YEARS BEFORE THIS DATE. - Whittlesey Road Bridge, Spanning Black River at Whittlesey Road, Lyons Falls, Lewis County, NY

  10. 18. Understructure, view of south arch abutment showing arch ribs, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Understructure, view of south arch abutment showing arch ribs, columns, sway bracing, floor beams, deck cantilever, railing; view to southwest. - Parks Bar Bridge, Spanning Yuba River at State Highway 20, Smartville, Yuba County, CA