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Sample records for aortic arch repair

  1. Techniques for aortic arch endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    kHONGKU, Kiattisak; Dias, Nuno; Sonesson, Bjorn; Resch, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews endovascular strategies for aortic arch repair. Open repair remains the gold standard particularly for good risk patients. Endovascular treatment potentially offers a less invasive repair. Principles, technical considerations, devices and outcomes of each technique are discussed and summarized. Hybrid repair combines less invasive revascularization options, instead of arch replacement while extending stent-graft into the arch. Outcomes vary with regard to extent of repair and aortic arch pathologies treated. Results of arch chimney and other parallel graft techniques perhaps make it a less preferable choice for elective cases. However, they are very appealing options for urgent or bailout situations. Fenestrated stent-grafting is subjected to many technical challenges in aortic arch due to difficulties in stent-graft orientation and fenestration positioning. In situ fenestration techniques emerge to avoid these problems, but durability of stent-grafts after fenestration and ischemic consequences of temporary carotid arteries coverage raises some concern total arch repair using this technique. Arch branched graft is a new technology. Early outcomes did not meet the expectation; however the results have been improving after its learning curve period. Refining stent-graft technologies and implantation techniques positively impact outcomes of endovascular approaches. PMID:26940011

  2. Ascending Aortic Slide for Interrupted Aortic Arch Repair.

    PubMed

    Urencio, Miguel; Dodge-Khatami, Ali; Greenleaf, Chris E; Aru, Giorgio; Salazar, Jorge D

    2016-09-01

    For repair of interrupted aortic arch, unfavorable anatomy challenges a tension-free anastomosis. We describe a useful alternative surgical technique used in five neonates/infants, involving splitting the ascending aorta from the sinotubular junction to the arch origin, leftward and posterior "sliding" of the flap with anastomosis to the distal arch creating a native tissue bridge, and reconstruction with a patch. With wide interruption gaps between proximal and distal aortic portions, the ascending aortic slide is a safe and reproducible technique, providing a tension-free native tissue bridge with potential for growth, and a scaffold for patch augmentation in biventricular hearts, or for Norwood stage I in univentricular palliation. PMID:27587504

  3. Aortic arch repair today: open repair is best for most arch lesions.

    PubMed

    Coselli, J S; Green, S Y

    2015-08-01

    The transverse aortic arch is challenging to repair by either evolving open or emerging endovascular approaches. Contemporary experience in aortic arch repair can be difficult to assess because clinical practice varies substantially among centers with regard to temperature targets for hypothermic circulatory arrest, temperature monitoring sites, circulating perfusate temperatures, cerebral perfusion monitoring techniques, perfusion catheter flow rates, cannulation sites, pH management, and protective pharmacologic agents. Repair of the aortic arch has changed substantially over the last decade; these changes appear to have substantially reduced patient risk. In general, contemporary outcomes of open aortic arch repair are good to excellent. When acute aortic dissection is absent, many centers report early mortality rates below 5%; when acute aortic dissection is present, these rates are doubled or tripled. Not unexpectedly, mortality rates for total transverse aortic arch repair with elephant trunk or frozen elephant trunk approaches are greater than those for hemiarch repair (7-17% vs. 3-4%). In contemporary reports of mixed hemiarch and total arch repairs for aortic aneurysm, several authors report early mortality rates and stroke rates below 5%. Surprisingly, mortality rates for reoperation are not unlike those for primary repair and range from 8% to 9%; however, the risk of stroke appears somewhat greater and ranges from 5% to 6%. PMID:25752255

  4. Computed tomography angiography of hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair of the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Nila J; Oderich, Gustavo S; Vrtiska, Terri J; Williamson, Eric E; Araoz, Philip A

    2013-05-01

    Endovascular repair of the aorta has traditionally been limited to the abdominal aorta and, more recently, the descending thoracic aorta. However, recently hybrid repairs (a combination of open surgical and endovascular repair) have made endovascular repair of the aortic arch possible. Hybrid repair of the aortic arch typically involves an open surgical debranching procedure that allows for revascularization of the aortic arch vessels and subsequent endovascular stent placement. These approaches avoid the deep hypothermic circulatory arrest required for full, open surgical repair of the aortic arch. In hybrid repairs, the stent landing zone determines which branch vessels will be covered and therefore need revascularization. This article will review the preprocedure assessment with computed tomography angiography, techniques for revascularization and postprocedure complications. PMID:23621141

  5. Endovascular repair of a type B aortic dissection with a right-sided aortic arch: case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Right-sided aortic arch is a rare anomaly, and aortic dissection involving a right-sided aortic arch is extremely rare. We report the case of a 65-year-old man with a right-sided aortic arch and a right descending aortic dissection and a stent-graft was accurately deployed without perioperative complications. There were no any complaints and complications after 18 months follow-up. The CTA demonstrated that the false lumen was largely thrombosed only with a mild type II endoleak and a mild descending aortic expansion. We feel that endovascular repair is feasible to patient of type B aortic dissection with a right-sided aortic arch. However, long-term clinical efficacy and safety have yet to be confirmed. PMID:23343010

  6. Open aortic arch repair: state-of-the-art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ouzounian, Maral; LeMaire, Scott A; Coselli, Joseph S

    2013-01-01

    Surgical procedures for the treatment of complex aortic arch pathology remain among the most challenging cardiovascular operations, incurring considerable risk for death and stroke. The purpose of this article is to describe the evolution of our approach to open repair of the aortic arch. Our arterial cannulation strategy has shifted from femoral and direct aortic to right axillary and more recently innominate artery cannulation. This transition has facilitated the administration of continuous antegrade cerebral perfusion and more moderate levels of hypothermia during complex repairs. Modifications in surgical technique, including arch reconstruction with the trifurcated graft, and the classical and frozen elephant trunk techniques have simplified the conduct of the operation. Experimental and clinical research supporting the evolution of our approach is discussed in this paper. PMID:24216527

  7. Sun's procedure for complex aortic arch repair: total arch replacement using a tetrafurcate graft with stented elephant trunk implantation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei-Guo; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Yong-Min; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2013-09-01

    A aortic dissections requiring repair of the aortic arch. PMID:24109575

  8. [Complete repair of the interrupted aortic arch by an anterior approach. Apropos of 9 cases].

    PubMed

    Chambran, P; Planché, C; Bruniaux, J; Lacour-Gayet, F; Binet, J P

    1988-05-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a duct-dependent heart disease, and this is why the use of prostaglandins E, which keep the ductus arteriosus open to feed the descending aorta, has transformed its formerly sombre prognosis. The authors report the cases of 9 neonates and infants presenting with interrupted aortic arch associated with ventricular septal defect who underwent total repair of the malformations under extracorporeal circulation. Five children were less than 10 years' old. The aortic lesions were of type A in 2 cases (interruption distal to the left subclavian artery) and of type B in 7 cases (interruption between the left carotid and subclavian arteries). In the second group the lesions were of type B1 in 5 cases (without retro-oesophageal right subclavian artery) and of type B2 in 2 cases (right retro-oesophageal artery distal to the interruption). There was one death (11 p. 100). So far, no child has been reoperated upon for residual aortic obstruction or reopened ventricular septal defect. This technique of total repair in one stage, with closure of the ventricular septal defect, seems to be preferable to the two-stage technique in which stage one includes, in addition to aortic arch repair, cerclage of the pulmonary artery, a procedure with numerous disadvantages and a higher overall mortality rate. PMID:3136722

  9. Endovascular repair of traumatic aortic injury using a modified, commercially available endograft to preserve aortic arch branches.

    PubMed

    Kawajiri, Hidetake; Oka, Katsuhiko; Sakai, Osamu; Watanabe, Taiji; Kanda, Keiichi; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    A 25-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital after being involved in a high-speed motorcycle accident. Computed tomography angiography revealed a blunt traumatic aortic injury of the lesser curvature of the distal aortic arch accompanied by splintered fractures of the seventh thoracic vertebra and left clavicle. If the pseudoaneurysm had been treated with open surgical repair, then arch replacement under cardiopulmonary bypass, which was considered to be too invasive, would have been necessary. Therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was preferred as a first-line treatment to prevent pulmonary complications and hemorrhaging. Because the proximal landing zone for TEVAR was insufficient, we used a modified (fenestrated) commercially available endograft to preserve the branches of the aortic arch. Postoperative computed tomography scans confirmed that the pseudoaneurysm had been excluded without the endoleaks, and the aortic arch branches were patent. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and she was discharged from the hospital to have surgery for a vertebral fracture on postoperative day 6. PMID:24184496

  10. Elephant trunk technique for hybrid aortic arch repair.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji

    2014-03-01

    The original elephant trunk technique was developed by Borst in 1983 for the treatment of aortic arch aneurysms. This technique reduced operative risks, but was associated with cumulative mortality rates of 6.9 % for the first stage and 7.5 % for the second stage. Patients also waited a long time between two major surgical procedures. Only 50.4 % of patients underwent the second-stage surgery, and there was a significant interval mortality rate of 10.7 %. With the advent of stent-graft techniques, two different hybrid elephant trunk techniques were developed. One technique is first-stage elephant trunk graft placement followed by second-stage endovascular completion. The conventional elephant trunk graft provides a good landing zone for the stent-graft, and endovascular completion is a useful alternative to conventional second-stage surgery. This method has few major complications, and a postoperative paraplegia rate of 1.1 %. The other technique is the frozen elephant trunk technique. This technique eliminates the need for subsequent endovascular completion, and is particularly useful for the treatment of acute type A dissection because it can achieve a secure seal. However, it is associated with a higher rate of spinal cord ischemia than other methods such as the original elephant trunk technique. The left subclavian artery (LSA) is often lost when performing a hybrid elephant trunk procedure. Revascularization of the LSA should be performed to prevent arm ischemia and neurological complications such as paraplegia or stroke, although the level of evidence for this recommendation is low. PMID:23943042

  11. Influences on Early and Medium-Term Survival Following Surgical Repair of the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamad; Field, Mark; Shaw, Matthew; Fok, Matthew; Harrington, Deborah; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Oo, Aung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: It is now well established by many groups that surgery on the aortic arch may be achieved with consistently low morbidity and mortality along with relatively good survival compared to estimated natural history for a number of aortic arch pathologies. The objectives of this study were to: 1) report, compare, and analyze our morbidity and mortality outcomes for hemiarch and total aortic arch surgery; 2) examine the survival benefit of hemiarch and total aortic arch surgery compared to age- and sex-matched controls; and 3) define factors which influence survival in these two groups and, in particular, identify those that are modifiable and potentially actionable. Methods: Outcomes from patients undergoing surgical resection of both hemiarch and total aortic arch at the Liverpool Heart and Chest Hospital between June 1999 and December 2012 were examined in a retrospective analysis of data collected for The Society for Cardiothoracic Surgeons (UK). Results: Over the period studied, a total of 1240 patients underwent aortic surgery, from which 287 were identified as having undergone hemi to total aortic arch surgery under deep or moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest. Twenty three percent of patients' surgeries were nonelective. The median age at the time of patients undergoing elective hemiarch was 64.3 years and total arch was 65.3 years (P = 0.25), with 40.1% being female in the entire group. A total of 140 patients underwent elective hemiarch replacement, while 81 underwent elective total arch replacement. Etiology of the aortic pathology was degenerative in 51.2% of the two groups, with 87.1% requiring aortic valve repair in the elective hemiarch group and 64.2% in the elective total arch group (P < 0.001). Elective in-hospital mortality was 2.1% in the hemiarch group and 6.2% (P = 0.15) in the total arch group with corresponding rates of stroke (2.9% versus 4.9%, P = 0.47), renal failure (4.3% versus 6.2%, P = 0.54), reexploration for bleeding (4

  12. Results with an Algorithmic Approach to Hybrid Repair of the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nicholas D.; Williams, Judson B.; Hanna, Jennifer M.; Shah, Asad A.; McCann, Richard L.; Hughes, G. Chad

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hybrid repair of the transverse aortic arch may allow for aortic arch repair with reduced morbidity in patients who are suboptimal candidates for conventional open surgery. Here, we present our results with an algorithmic approach to hybrid arch repair, based upon the extent of aortic disease and patient comorbidities. Methods Between August 2005 and January 2012, 87 patients underwent hybrid arch repair by three principal procedures: zone 1 endograft coverage with extra-anatomic left carotid revascularization (zone 1, n=19), zone 0 endograft coverage with aortic arch debranching (zone 0, n=48), or total arch replacement with staged stented elephant trunk completion (stented elephant trunk, n=20). Results The mean patient age was 64 years and the mean expected in-hospital mortality rate was 16.3% as calculated by the EuroSCORE II. 22% (n=19) of operations were non-elective. Sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass, and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest were required in 78% (n=68), 45% (n=39), and 31% (n=27) of patients, respectively, to allow for total arch replacement, arch debranching, or other concomitant cardiac procedures, including ascending ± hemi-arch replacement in 17% (n=8) of patients undergoing zone 0 repair. All stented elephant trunk procedures (n=20) and 19% (n=9) of zone 0 procedures were staged, with 41% (n=12) of patients undergoing staged repair during a single hospitalization. The 30-day/in-hospital rates of stroke and permanent paraplegia/paraparesis were 4.6% (n=4) and 1.2% (n=1), respectively. Three of 27 (11.1%) patients with native ascending aorta zone 0 proximal landing zone experienced retrograde type A dissection following endograft placement. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 5.7% (n=5), however, 30-day/in-hospital mortality increased to 14.9% (n=13) due to eight 30-day out-of-hospital deaths. Native ascending aorta zone 0 endograft placement was found to be the only univariate predictor of 30-day/in-hospital mortality

  13. Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch with Coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sue Hyun; Choi, Eun-Suk; Cho, Sungkyu; Kim, Woong-Han

    2016-01-01

    Persistent fifth aortic arch (PFAA) is a rare congenital anomaly of the aortic arch frequently associated with other cardiovascular anomalies, such as tetralogy of Fallot and aortic arch coarctation or interruption. We report the case of a neonate with PFAA with coarctation who successfully underwent surgical repair. PMID:26889445

  14. Results and challenges for the endovascular repair of aortic arch aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Lioupis, Christos; Abraham, Cherrie Z

    2011-09-01

    Endovascular aortic arch reconstruction provides an attractive alternative to treat aortic arch disease in high-risk patients who would otherwise be unsuitable for open repair. Success with multibranched stent grafts in the thoracoabdominal aorta along with recent advances in design such as the precurved inner nitinol cannula have simplified the endovascular reconstruction of aortic arch aneurysms with multibranched stent grafts. These devices allow for greater flexibility in conforming to difficult anatomy and preserving important side branches. During the first surgical stage, a left carotid -subclavian bypass or left subclavian artery transposition is performed. The second stage is the endovascular procedure. The device is inserted through a transfemoral approach, and crossing of the aortic valve with the device is necessary. The stent graft is deployed during brief periods of rapid pacing. Bridging from the branches to the innominate and left common carotid arteries requires a suitable covered stent. In the case of a large-diameter innominate artery, a custom-made bridging limb has to be used to ensure that adequate length and size are available. Direct flow to the innominate and left common carotid arteries do not cease for any significant time during the procedure. Initial experience with mean follow up more than 6 months is encouraging. The method is not suitable for patients with extensive atheromatous involvement of the aortic arch. Careful preoperative planning (preoperative imaging, device construction, and access issues), high endovascular skills, and appropriate imaging equipment are imperative for a successful result. Long-term follow-up is necessary to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these new devices. PMID:21821619

  15. Surgical management of acute type A aortic dissection: branch-first arch replacement with total aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Sean D.; Perera, Nisal K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A dissection (ATAAD) remains a morbid condition with reported surgical mortality as high as 25%. We describe our surgical approach to ATAAD and discuss the indications for adjunct techniques such as the frozen elephant trunk or complete aortic repair with endovascular methods. Arch replacement using the “branch-first technique” allows for complete root, ascending aorta, and arch replacement. A long landing zone is created for proximal endografting with a covered stent. Balloon-assisted intimal disruption and bare metal stenting of all residual dissected aorta to the level of the aortic bifurcation is then performed to obliterate the false lumen (FL) and achieve single true lumen (TL) flow. Additional branch vessel stenting is performed as required. PMID:27386413

  16. Arch to Descending Aorta Extra-anatomic Aortic Repair for Thoracic Stent Graft Infection.

    PubMed

    Gagné-Loranger, Maude; Dumont, Éric; Voisine, Pierre; Mohammadi, Siamak; Dagenais, François

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a pedunculated mass of the aortic isthmus. The patient was treated with bilateral carotid-subclavian bypass and a stent graft to cover the thrombus within the distal arch. The postoperative course was complicated by a stent graft infection. The patient underwent graft explantation with aortic continuity using extra-anatomic bypass from the aortic arch to the distal descending aorta. PMID:26481087

  17. One-Stage Repair of an Interrupted Aortic Arch with an Aortopulmonary Window in a Premature Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Bobos, Dimitrios; Kanakis, Meletios A.; Koulouri, Sofia; Giannopoulos, Nicholas M.

    2015-01-01

    Interrupted aortic arch with an aortopulmonary window is a rare congenital entity that is associated with high morbidity and mortality, especially in premature low-birth-weight infants, and the proper timing of surgical correction remains a matter of debate. We present the case of a premature infant weighing 1.6 kg who successfully underwent one stage surgical repair to treat interrupted aortic arch with an aortopulmonary window. The therapeutic management of this patient is described below, and a review of the literature is presented. PMID:26665109

  18. Endovascular repair of an aortic arch pseudoaneurysm with double chimney stent grafts: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aortic arch pseudoaneurysm is a rare condition but carries a high risk of rupture. We report a case of a 45-year-old man with aortic arch pseudoaneurysm between left common carotid artery (LCCA) and left subclavian artery (LSA), in which a endovascular stent graft combined with double chimneys covered stents were successfully placed. There were no any complaints and complications after 12 months follow-up. The CTA demonstrated thrombus formation in the pseudoaneurysm lumen, no endoleak and the aortic arch, LCCA and LSA were all patent. We feel that the combined endovascular and double chimneys may be a valuable therapeutic alternative when treating aortic arch lesion. However, long-term clinical efficacy and safety have yet to be confirmed. PMID:23577875

  19. Endovascular Repair of a Right-Sided Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Associated with a Right Aortic Arch and a Left Subclavian Artery Arising from a Kommerell's Diverticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Avgerinos, Efthimios D.; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Psarros, Vasileios; Bastounis, Elias

    2009-07-15

    This case report describes the endovascular repair of a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with a right aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. A 76-year-old male with multiple comorbidities was incidentally found to have a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 6.2 cm. Additionally, there was a right aortic arch with a retroesophageal segment and separate arch branches arising in the following order: left common carotid artery, right common carotid artery, right subclavian artery, and left subclavian artery that was aberrant, arising from a Kommerrell's diverticulum. The aneurysm was successfully excluded by deployment of a Zenith TX1 36 x 32 x 20-mm stent-graft using wire traction technique via the left femoral and right brachial arteries in order to deal with two severe aortic angulations. At 18-month follow-up the patient was doing well, with aneurysm sac shrinkage to 5.9 cm and no signs of endoleak or migration. Endovascular repair of right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with a right arch and aberrant left subclavian artery is feasible, safe, and effective. In such rare configurations, which demand considerably increased technical dexterity and center experience, endovascular repair emerges as an attractive therapeutic option.

  20. Double aortic arch

    MedlinePlus

    ... double aortic arch may press on the windpipe (trachea) and esophagus, leading to trouble breathing and swallowing. ... to relieve pressure on the esophagus and windpipe (trachea). The surgeon ties off the smaller branch and ...

  1. Transposition Complex with Aortic Arch Obstruction: Outcomes of One-Stage Repair Over 10 Years.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang Ho; Sung, Si Chan; Kim, Hyungtae; Lee, Hyung Doo; Ban, Gil Ho; Kim, Geena; Kim, Hee Young

    2016-01-01

    The surgical management of transposition complex with aortic arch obstruction remains technically demanding due to anatomic complexity. Even in the recent surgical era, there are centers that address this anomaly with a staged strategy. This report presents our experiences with a one-stage repair of transposition complexes with aortic arch obstructions more than the last 10 years. Since 2003, 19 patients with a transposition of the great arteries (TGA, 2 patients) or a double outlet of the right ventricle (DORV, 17 patients) and aortic arch obstruction have undergone one-stage repair of their anomalies. The mean age was 6.7 ± 2.3 days, and the mean body weight was 3.4 ± 0.3 kg. The 2 patients with TGA exhibited coarctation of the aorta. The 17 patients with DORV all exhibited the Taussig-Bing type. The great artery relationships were anteroposterior in 4 patients (21.1 %). The coronary artery anatomies were usual (1LCx; 2R) in 8 patients (42.1 %). There were 2 early deaths (10.5 %). Seven patients (36.8 %) required percutaneous interventions. One patient required re-operation for pulmonary valvar stenosis and left pulmonary artery patch angioplasty. The overall survival was 84.2 %. The freedom from mortality was 83.5 % at 5 years, and the freedom from intervention was 54.4 % at 5 years. The one-stage repair of transposition complexes with aortic arch obstructions resulted in an acceptable survival rate and a relatively high incidence of postoperative catheter interventions. Postoperative catheter interventions are highly effective. Transposition complexes combined with aortic arch obstructions can be managed by one-stage repair with good early and midterm results. PMID:26358472

  2. Direct distal aortic arch graft cannulation after the elephant trunk procedure: technique for central cannulation during second-stage repair.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Eduard; Pochettino, Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Arterial cannulation after the elephant trunk (ET) procedure at the time of second-stage distal repair can be achieved through multiple routes. Common strategies for arterial perfusion at the time of second-stage aortic repair include retrograde perfusion (femoral/iliac vessels), transapical or left subclavian artery cannulation. In the event these cannulation options are not practical or advisable, we offer an alternative approach through cannulation of the distal aortic arch Dacron graft through the left thorax. Advantages include forward distal perfusion, minimal proximal ischaemic time, prevention of thromboembolic events from thrombus attached to the ET and avoidance of malperfusion syndromes. PMID:25281849

  3. Successful repair of a syphilitic aortic arch aneurysm accompanied by serious cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Koizumi, Nobusato; Ogino, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    We present a 52-year-old male with a syphilitic aortic arch aneurysm accompanied by relevant extensive cerebral infarction. He was admitted to a local hospital for sudden loss of consciousness, where he was diagnosed with serious cerebral infarction. During his treatment, a multilocular aortic arch aneurysm involving the arch vessels was found incidentally. He was transferred to our hospital for surgical treatment. A preoperative routine laboratory test for syphilis was highly positive, which suggested that the aneurysm was likely caused by syphilis and the cerebral infarction was also induced by the involvement of syphilitic aortitis or arteritis. After 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy for syphilis, total arch replacement was performed successfully using meticulous brain protection with antegrade selective cerebral perfusion and deep hypothermia. He recovered without any further cerebral deficits. The pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed some characteristic changes of syphilitic aortitis. PMID:24492165

  4. Hydatid cyst involving the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Apaydin, Anil Z; Oguz, Emrah; Zoghi, Mehdi

    2007-03-01

    We report a very rare case of primary mediastinal hydatid cyst which invaded the ascending aorta and the aortic arch which initially presented as a cranial mass. Aortic wall is a very unusual site for the hydatid cysts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of hydatid cyst located within the aortic arch lumen. Patient underwent ascending aortic and hemiarch replacement under hypothermic circulatory arrest and removal of the cyst. Patient had an uneventful recovery and has been on follow-up. Although the literature data are very limited, we believe that the aortic procedure of choice should be graft interpositon rather than patch repair. PMID:17215134

  5. Trade in the hammer for a power driver—perspectives on the frozen elephant trunk repair for aortic arch disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Like a power driver for which the bit can be changed for each screw that is turned, improvement of brain protection strategies and the development of hybrid techniques have provided us with the ability to offer tailored repair options for patients with complex thoracic disease involving the arch. Variations of the frozen elephant trunk operation have been the most versatile of the newer hybrid approaches to repair complex thoracic aortic pathology. The frozen elephant trunk procedure includes the use of circulatory arrest in combination with suturing a stentgraft into the arch, and may reduce the risk of stroke and endoleaks. This article describes various methods of performing the frozen elephant trunk procedure with a focus on preoperative considerations including the etiology of disease, the time and urgency of presentation, and the indications to operate. PMID:24109573

  6. Moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest in total arch repair for acute type A aortic dissection: clinical safety and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ming; Ma, Wei-Guo; Guan, Xin-Liang; Wang, Long-Fei; Li, Jia-Chen; Lan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Continued debates exist regarding the optimal temperature during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) in aortic arch repair for patients with type A aortic dissection (TAAD). This study seeks to examine whether the use of moderate HCA in emergency aortic arch surgery provides comparable operative outcomes to deep HCA for patients with acute TAAD. Methods We prospectively enrolled 74 consecutive patients (mean age 47.7±9.8 years, 54 males) with acute TAAD, who underwent emergency total arch replacement and frozen elephant trunk implantation under HCA (18–28 °C) with unilateral selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (uSACP). Patients were divided into two groups based on the nasopharyngeal temperature at the initiation of HCA: deep HCA (DHCA, <20 °C) in 35 (47.3%) and moderate HCA (MHCA, 20–28 °C) in 39 (52.7%). Operative outcomes including mortality, morbidity and visceral organ functions were compared between the two groups. Results The mean times of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and aortic cross-clamp were 211±54 and 238±62 minutes (P=0.053) and 118±27 and 142±45 minutes (P=0.005) in the MHCA and DHCA groups, respectively. Operative mortality did not differ between two groups (10.2% in MHCA vs. 14.3% in DHCA groups, P=0.862). Nor did the incidence of morbidities differ between the two groups (P>0.05). The temporal trend in the changes of postoperative levels of creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin and lactate did not differ between two groups (P>0.05). Multivariate analysis found that the temperature during HCA (MHCA vs. DHCA) did not affect operative mortality, morbidities and neurologic complications. Instead, CPB time (in minutes) was the risk factor for operative mortality (odds ratio, 1.032; 95% confidence interval, 1.004–1.061; P=0.023). Conclusions: Moderate HCA is associated with equivalent operative mortality and morbidity and visceral organ functions compared to deep HCA in patients with acute TAAD undergoing

  7. Hybrid Repair of Complex Thoracic Aortic Arch Pathology: Long-Term Outcomes of Extra-anatomic Bypass Grafting of the Supra-aortic Trunk

    SciTech Connect

    Lotfi, S. Clough, R. E.; Ali, T.; Salter, R.; Young, C. P.; Bell, R.; Modarai, B.; Taylor, P.

    2013-02-15

    Hybrid repair constitutes supra-aortic debranching before thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). It offers improved short-term outcome compared with open surgery; however, longer-term studies are required to assess patient outcomes and patency of the extra-anatomic bypass grafts. A prospectively maintained database of 380 elective and urgent patients who had undergone TEVAR (1997-2011) was analyzed retrospectively. Fifty-one patients (34 males; 17 females) underwent hybrid repair. Median age was 71 (range, 18-90) years with mean follow-up of 15 (range, 0-61) months. Perioperative complications included death: 10 % (5/51), stroke: 12 % (6/51), paraplegia: 6 % (3/51), endoleak: 16 % (8/51), rupture: 4 % (2/51), upper-limb ischemia: 2 % (1/51), bypass graft occlusion: 4 % (2/51), and cardiopulmonary complications in 14 % (7/51). Three patients (6 %) required emergency intervention for retrograde dissection: (2 aortic root repairs; 2 innominate stents). Early reintervention was performed for type 1 endoleak in two patients (2 proximal cuff extensions). One patient underwent innominate stenting and revision of their bypass for symptomatic restenosis. At 48 months, survival was 73 %. Endoleak was detected in three (6 %) patients (type 1 = 2; type 2 = 1) requiring debranching with proximal stent graft (n = 2) and proximal extension cuff (n = 1). One patient had a fatal rupture of a mycotic aneurysm and two arch aneurysms expanded. No bypass graft occluded after the perioperative period. Hybrid operations to treat aortic arch disease can be performed with results comparable to open surgery. The longer-term outcomes demonstrate low rates of reintervention and high rates of graft patency.

  8. Cardiac Surgical Repair Should Be Offered to Infants with Trisomy 18, Interrupted Aortic Arch and Ventricular Septal Defect.

    PubMed

    Kavarana, Minoo N

    2016-06-01

    The management of children born with trisomy 18 is controversial, and both providers and parents often have differing opinions. Many parents choose to terminate the pregnancy while others go forward, making decisions based on their beliefs, understanding, and physician recommendations. Physicians are similarly divided regarding treatment of these children, as some feel that aggressive treatments are futile while others defer to the parents' wishes.Interrupted aortic arch with ventricular septal defect in children with trisomy 18 presents an ethical dilemma that highlights the kinds of controversies in medical decision making facing physicians on a daily basis. Repair of interrupted aortic arch with ventricular septal defect poses a high risk to newborns with or without trisomy 18. Therefore, the option for surgery should be treated as with any routine informed consent process. Parents should be counseled about the risks, benefits, alternatives, and the likelihood of success both short and long term and be should offered a choice between surgery and palliative care. PMID:27338603

  9. Vascular airway compression management in a case of aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Dutta, Vikas; Negi, Sunder; Puri, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Airway compression due to distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair has been documented. This case of tracheal and left main stem bronchus compression due to aortic aneurysm occurred in a 42-year-old man. The airway compression poses a challenge for the anesthesiologist in airway management during aortic aneurysm repair surgery. The fiber-optic bronchoscope is very helpful in decision-making both preoperatively and postoperatively in such cases. We report a case of airway compression in a 42-year-old patient who underwent elective distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair. PMID:27397474

  10. Vascular airway compression management in a case of aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Alok; Dutta, Vikas; Negi, Sunder; Puri, G D

    2016-01-01

    Airway compression due to distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair has been documented. This case of tracheal and left main stem bronchus compression due to aortic aneurysm occurred in a 42-year-old man. The airway compression poses a challenge for the anesthesiologist in airway management during aortic aneurysm repair surgery. The fiber-optic bronchoscope is very helpful in decision-making both preoperatively and postoperatively in such cases. We report a case of airway compression in a 42-year-old patient who underwent elective distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair. PMID:27397474

  11. Endovascular repair of a ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with an ascending aortic aneurysm: hybrid open arch reconstruction with simultaneous thoracic stent-graft deployment within elephant trunk.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zamzam, Ahmed M; Zhang, Wayne; Wang, Nan; Razzouk, Anees

    2008-03-01

    Endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta is now widely practiced. The extension of this technique to emergent settings is in evolution. Pathology of the ascending and transverse aortic arch may preclude thoracic aortic stent grafting due to the lack of a proximal seal zone. Several hybrid open/endovascular approaches have been described. We recently encountered the difficult case of a contained rupture of a 6.8 cm descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a 60-year-old patient with aneurysmal degeneration of the ascending and transverse aortic arch. This patient was treated with a hybrid approach of open ascending and transverse arch reconstruction along with simultaneous stent-graft repair of the descending thoracic aorta. The open repair established an excellent proximal landing zone by use of the "elephant trunk" technique. This technique also allowed direct suture fixation of the stent graft to the arch graft to prevent stent-graft migration. This hybrid surgical approach was successful and avoided the cumulative morbidity that a left thoracoabdominal approach would have added to the sternotomy. Further creative uses of these hybrid techniques will undoubtedly serve a larger role in the treatment of thoracic aortic pathology. PMID:18346569

  12. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  13. Crater-Like Ulceration of Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Simon, Caterina; Calabrese, Alice; Canu, Gianluca; Merlo, Maurizio; Galletti, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old female who presented to our hospital with signs of hemorrhagic shock and breathlessness. A transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated pericardial effusion. Computed tomography of the chest showed a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch with an intramural hematoma of the ascending and descending aorta. Endovascular repair with stent-grafting was urgently performed and a pericardial window placement was done to reduce mediastinal bleeding. PMID:26798748

  14. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  15. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    EVAR; Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  16. Saccular Aneurysms of the Transverse Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the aortic arch, whether single or multiple, are uncommon. The choice of repair technique is influenced by patients' comorbidities and age. Repairing saccular aneurysms with traditional open techniques can be technically demanding; therefore, endovascular technology and a variety of hybrid approaches have been developed to facilitate such repairs and, potentially, to improve clinical outcomes, especially in high-risk patients. There have been no large, randomized studies to compare the outcomes of these different treatment options in patients with single or multiple saccular aneurysms of the arch. In this review, we outline the etiology and common locations of these aneurysms, the different open, completely endovascular, and hybrid techniques used to treat them, and the treatment selection process. PMID:26798759

  17. Minimally Invasive Techniques for Total Aortic Arch Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Faulds, Jason; Sandhu, Harleen K.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Safi, Hazim J.

    2016-01-01

    The cumulative experience with endovascular aortic repair in the descending thoracic and infrarenal aorta has led to increased interest in endovascular aortic arch reconstruction. Open total arch replacement is a robust operation that can be performed with excellent results. However, it requires cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest and, therefore, may not be tolerated by all patients. Minimally invasive techniques have been considered as an alternative and include hybrid arch debranching, parallel stent graft deployment in the chimney and snorkel configurations, and complete endovascular branched reconstruction with multi-branched devices. This review discusses the evolving use of endovascular techniques in the management of aortic arch pathology and considers their relevance in an era of safe and durable open aortic arch reconstruction. PMID:27127562

  18. Minimally Invasive Techniques for Total Aortic Arch Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Faulds, Jason; Sandhu, Harleen K; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J

    2016-01-01

    The cumulative experience with endovascular aortic repair in the descending thoracic and infrarenal aorta has led to increased interest in endovascular aortic arch reconstruction. Open total arch replacement is a robust operation that can be performed with excellent results. However, it requires cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest and, therefore, may not be tolerated by all patients. Minimally invasive techniques have been considered as an alternative and include hybrid arch debranching, parallel stent graft deployment in the chimney and snorkel configurations, and complete endovascular branched reconstruction with multi-branched devices. This review discusses the evolving use of endovascular techniques in the management of aortic arch pathology and considers their relevance in an era of safe and durable open aortic arch reconstruction. PMID:27127562

  19. Hybrid procedure for a traumatic aortic rupture consisting of endovascular repair and minimally invasive arch vessel transposition without sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yang Gi; Choo, Suk Jung; Lim, Ju Yong; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chung, Cheol Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Emergency surgical repair for acute traumatic aortic ruptures has been associated with a high peri-procedural mortality rate. Endovascular stent-grafting, as a less invasive procedure, has shown encouraging results. This report describes a patient with a short landing zone, who was treated by transposing the supra-aortic branch without sternotomy, followed by covered stent-grafting with an extended proximal bare portion to enhance fixation. PMID:20052360

  20. Cervical aortic arch and a new type of double aortic arch. Report of a case.

    PubMed Central

    Cornali, M; Reginato, E; Azzolina, G

    1976-01-01

    A case of cervical aortic arch is reported. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first to be associated with a serious intracardiac anomaly. In addition, it is part of a new type of double aortic arch, caused by failure of reabsorption of both dorsal aortic roots and persistence of the fourth right and second (or third) left branchial arches. PMID:971387

  1. Branched and fenestrated options to treat aortic arch aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Maurel, Blandine; Mastracci, Tara M; Spear, Rafaelle; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Conventional surgical repair of aortic arch aneurysms using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest remains the gold standard, however it is associated with a substantial mortality and morbidity rate, especially in the elderly. Hybrid techniques avoid aortic cross-clamping and circulatory arrest, but are of limited use and are only applicable to selected patients. The development of new devices to treat aortic arch aneurysms endovascularly has the potential to offer a treatment modality to patients unfit for an open repair. We present the challenges specific to endovascular arch repair based on our experience and the literature available from the first experience in 1999 to the third generation graft currently commonly used. Following an initial learning curve associated with the use of the third generation arch branch device, along with careful patient selection and operator experience, early results are promising. Technical success was achieved in all cases, there was no early mortality and strokes were noted in 11%. As with branched and fenestrated technology for thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, the use of total endovascular repair for arch pathology will require an evolution in endovascular practice and device design. However, at present, the early use of the latest generation device offers a novel approach to patients who previously had no surgical options. PMID:27332680

  2. Aortic Arch Aneurysms: Treatment with Extra anatomical Bypass and Endovascular Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Noriyuki; Shimono, Takatsugu; Hirano, Tadanori; Mizumoto, Toru; Ishida, Masaki; Fujii, Hideki; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-10-15

    Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is emerging as an attractive alternative to surgical graft replacement. However,patients with aortic arch aneurysms are often excluded from the target of endovascular repair because of lack of suitable landing zones, especially at the proximal ones. In this paper we describe our method for treating patients with aortic arch aneurysms using a combination of extra anatomical bypass surgery and endovascular stent-grafting.

  3. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000236.htm Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular - discharge To use the sharing features ... enable JavaScript. AAA repair - endovascular - discharge; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular - discharge; EVAR - discharge; Endovascular aneurysm repair - discharge ...

  4. Hybrid treatment of aortic arch disease

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Patrick Bastos; Rossi, Fabio Henrique; Moreira, Samuel Martins; Issa, Mario; Izukawa, Nilo Mitsuru; Dinkhuysen, Jarbas J.; Spina Neto, Domingos; Kambara, Antônio Massamitsu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The management of thoracic aortic disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta are technically challenging and is an area in constant development and innovation. Objective To analyze early and midterm results of hybrid treatment of arch aortic disease. Methods Retrospective study of procedures performed from January 2010 to December 2012. The end points were the technical success, therapeutic success, morbidity and mortality, neurologic outcomes, the rate of endoleaks and reinterventions. Results A total of 95 patients treated for thoracic aortic diseases in this period, 18 underwent hybrid treatment and entered in this study. The average ages were 62.3 years. The male was present in 66.7%. The technical and therapeutic success was 94.5% e 83.3%. The perioperative mortality rate of 11.1%. There is any death during one-year follow- up. The reoperation rates were 16.6% due 2 cases of endoleak Ia and one case of endoleak II. There is any occlusion of anatomic or extra anatomic bypass during follow up. Conclusion In our study, the hybrid treatment of aortic arch disease proved to be a feasible alternative of conventional surgery. The therapeutic success rates and re- interventions obtained demonstrate the necessity of thorough clinical follow-up of these patients in a long time. PMID:25714205

  5. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously. PMID:25304052

  6. Mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, L; Cobo, F; Miranda, C; Lara, J

    2000-01-01

    A 61-year-old diabetic woman presented with a mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch, also involving the left subclavian and vertebral arteries, caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Two months before, she had suffered from staphylococcal septic arthritis in her left knee. The patient was treated with antibiotics and an emergency operation was performed involving aneurysm excision and in situ synthetic graft replacement. She died on the fourth postoperative day from hemorrhagic shock. PMID:10961533

  7. A Novel Surgical Technique for Right-Sided Interrupted Aortic Arch by Interposition of a Pulmonary Autograft Tube.

    PubMed

    Kato, Nobuyasu; Yamagishi, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Takako; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Asada, Satoshi; Hongu, Hisayuki; Yamashita, Eijiro; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2016-08-01

    Right-sided interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare cardiac anomaly. In general, the right bronchus sits higher than the left bronchus, so aortic arch reconstruction with a direct anastomosis has a risk of tracheal and bronchial obstruction. This report describes the successful definitive repair of a right-sided IAA in a 2.5-kg neonate by aortic arch reconstruction with a pulmonary autograft tube (PA tube). Postoperative three-dimensional multidetector computed tomography showed the reconstructed aortic arch without airway obstruction or aortic stenosis. The use of a PA tube is a simple and useful technique for aortic arch reconstruction in patients with a high risk of tracheal andbronchial obstruction, such as right-sided IAA. PMID:27449446

  8. Aortic arch vessel anomalies associated with persistent trigeminal artery.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Mehrzad; Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Foroughi, Amin Abolhasani

    2012-01-01

    Developmental anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and persistent trigeminal artery that is the most common of the four anomalous carotid-basilar anastomoses are repeatedly reported in the literature as separate entities. Herein we report a previously undescribed variant including the coexistence of persistent trigeminal artery, truncus bicaroticus and direct origin of left vertebral artery from aortic arch. PMID:22542381

  9. Mycotic aneurysm of the distal aortic arch caused by Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Mitsuharu; Hattori, Koji; Shibata, Toshihiko; Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Hirai, Hidekazu; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2006-04-01

    We describe an unusual case of a thoracic aortic aneurysm caused by Aspergillus. A 70-year-old man underwent prednisolone and Ara-C treatments for a myelodysplastic syndrome. Blood examination revealed pancytopenia. Under these treatments, an aneurysm presented at the distal aortic arch. He underwent resection of the aneurysm with a graft repair covered by a pedicled omentum flap, followed by prolonged administration of micafungin and itraconazole for a mycotic aneurysm. The postoperative course was favorable without complications. Serum C-reactive protein became negative and he was discharged 2 months after the surgery. However, 4 months after the surgery, he died from worsening of the myelodysplastic syndrome. The prognosis for patients with mycotic aneurysms is poor due to their immunocompetent condition arising from underlying diseases. Therefore, in addition to prompt treatment with antifungal agents combined with surgical debridement, control of the underlying disease is essential for improving the outcome. PMID:16642922

  10. Three-dimensional printed prototypes refine the anatomy of post-modified Norwood-1 complex aortic arch obstruction and allow presurgical simulation of the repair.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Laszlo; Tofeig, Magdi; Jha, Neerod Kumar; Talo, Haitham

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printed prototypes of malformed hearts have been used for education, communication, presurgical planning and simulation. We present a case of a 5-month old infant with complex obstruction at the neoaortic to transverse arch and descending aortic junction following the neonatal modified Norwood-1 procedure for hypoplastic left heart syndrome. Digital 3D models were created from a routine 64-slice CT dataset; then life-size solid and magnified hollow models were printed with a 3D printer. The solid model provided further insights into details of the anatomy, whereas the surgical approach and steps of the operation were simulated on the hollow model. Intraoperative assessment confirmed the anatomical accuracy of the 3D models. The operation was performed in accordance with preoperative simulation: sliding autologous flaps achieved relief of the obstruction without additional patching. Knowledge gained from the models fundamentally contributed to successful outcome and improved patient safety. This case study presents an effective use of 3D models in exploring complex spatial relationship at the aortic arch and in simulation-based planning of the operative procedure. PMID:26590304

  11. Blood flow characteristics in the aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Mihaiescu, Mihai; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2012-11-01

    The purpose with this study is to investigate the flow characteristics of blood in the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with specific locations in the arterial tree. Considering atherogenesis, it is claimed that the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) along with its temporal and spatial gradients play an important role in the development of the disease. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics, that in turn depends on the geometry as well as the rheological properties of blood. In this numerical work, the time dependent fluid flow during the entire cardiac cycle is fully resolved. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different Red Blood Cell loading. Data obtained through Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging have been used in order to reconstruct geometries of the the aortic arch. Here, three different geometries are studied out of which two display malformations that can be found in patients having the genetic disorder Turner's syndrome. The simulations show a highly complex flow with regions of secondary flow that is enhanced for the diseased aortas. The financial support from the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Sweden-America Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Critical Transitions in Early Embryonic Aortic Arch Patterning and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, William J.; Dur, Onur; Wang, Yajuan; Patrick, Michael J.; Tinney, Joseph P.; Keller, Bradley B.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from the bilaterally symmetric embryonic aortic arches to the mature great vessels is a complex morphogenetic process, requiring both vasculogenic and angiogenic mechanisms. Early aortic arch development occurs simultaneously with rapid changes in pulsatile blood flow, ventricular function, and downstream impedance in both invertebrate and vertebrate species. These dynamic biomechanical environmental landscapes provide critical epigenetic cues for vascular growth and remodeling. In our previous work, we examined hemodynamic loading and aortic arch growth in the chick embryo at Hamburger-Hamilton stages 18 and 24. We provided the first quantitative correlation between wall shear stress (WSS) and aortic arch diameter in the developing embryo, and observed that these two stages contained different aortic arch patterns with no inter-embryo variation. In the present study, we investigate these biomechanical events in the intermediate stage 21 to determine insights into this critical transition. We performed fluorescent dye microinjections to identify aortic arch patterns and measured diameters using both injection recordings and high-resolution optical coherence tomography. Flow and WSS were quantified with 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Dye injections revealed that the transition in aortic arch pattern is not a uniform process and multiple configurations were documented at stage 21. CFD analysis showed that WSS is substantially elevated compared to both the previous (stage 18) and subsequent (stage 24) developmental time-points. These results demonstrate that acute increases in WSS are followed by a period of vascular remodeling to restore normative hemodynamic loading. Fluctuations in blood flow are one possible mechanism that impacts the timing of events such as aortic arch regression and generation, leading to the variable configurations at stage 21. Aortic arch variations noted during normal rapid vascular remodeling at stage 21 identify a

  13. A case of neonatal arterial thrombosis mimicking interrupted aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Gürsu, Hazım Alper; Varan, Birgül; Oktay, Ayla; Özkan, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal arterial thrombosis is a very rare entity with clinical findings resembling coarctation of aorta or interrupted aortic arch. A two day-old male newborn was admitted to a different hospital with difficulty in sucking and sleepiness. On echocardiographic examination, a diagnosis of interrupted aortic arch was made and he was treated with prostoglandin E2. When the patient presented to our center, physical examination revealed that his feet were bilaterally cold. The pulses were not palpable and there were ecchymotic regions in the lower extremities. Echocardiography ruled out interrupted aortic arch. Computerized tomographic angiography revealed a large thrombosis and total occlusion of the abdominal aorta. Since there was no response to treatment with tissue plasminogen activator, we performed thrombectomy. Homozygous Factor V Leiden and Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations were found in this patient. Neonatal aortic thrombosis which is observed very rarely and fatal should be considered in the differential diagnosis of coarctation of aorta and interrupted aortic arch. PMID:26265897

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of the rare association of common arterial trunk and double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Rock, Andrea; Eltayeb, Osama; Camarda, Joseph; Gotteiner, Nina

    2016-07-01

    Common arterial trunk with associated double aortic arch is a very rare constellation of congenital heart disease. Prenatal diagnosis allows for surgical repair prior to development of respiratory morbidity, which is otherwise described in all cases with this association. PMID:27386125

  15. Type B Aortic Dissection with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture 1 Year after Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Guillaume; Ben Ahmed, Sabrina; Warein, Edouard; Gallon, Arnaud; Rosset, Eugenio

    2016-05-01

    We report a patient who developed a type B aortic dissection and ruptured his aneurysmal sac 1 year after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), despite standard follow-up. This 79-year-old man was presented to emergency room with acute abdominal pain and an acute lower limb ischemia. Computed tomography scan showed an acute type B aortic dissection feeding the aneurysmal sac of the EVAR. The aneurysm rupture occurred during imaging. Type B aortic dissection is a rare cause of aneurysmal rupture after EVAR. The first postoperative computed tomography scan should maybe include the arch and the descending thoracic aorta to rule out an iatrogenic dissection after EVAR. PMID:26902937

  16. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  17. Externalized Guidewires to Facilitate Fenestrated Endograft Deployment in the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, George; Premkumar, Prabhu; Thomson, Viji; Varghese, Mithun; Selvaraj, Dheepak; Sahajanandan, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a precannulated fenestrated endograft system utilizing externalized guidewires to facilitate aortic arch endovascular repair and to report its use in 2 patients with challenging anatomy. Technique: For distal arch repair, a fenestration for the left subclavian artery (LSA) is made onsite in a standard thoracic endograft tailored to the patient anatomy; it is precannulated with a nitinol guidewire (NGw), which is passed from the femoral artery and externalized from the left brachial artery prior to endograft delivery system introduction over a parallel stiff guidewire. Steps are then taken to remove guidewire intertwining, prevent NGw wrapping around the delivery system, and orient the LSA fenestration superiorly when the delivery system moves into the arch. Gentle traction on the ends of the NGw during endograft deployment facilitates proper fenestration alignment. A covered stent is deployed in the LSA fenestration. The technique is illustrated in a patient with congenital coarctation of the aorta and descending aortic aneurysm. For total arch repair, endograft fenestrations are made for all 3 arch branches; the left common carotid artery (LCCA) and LSA fenestrations are each cannulated with NGws, which travel together from the femoral artery, pass through a LSA snare loop, and are exteriorized from the LCCA. After endograft deployment, the innominate artery fenestration is separately cannulated using right brachial access. Placement of a parallel externalized hydrophilic guidewire passing through the LCCA fenestration (but not the LSA snare loop) and removal of the LCCA fenestration NGw allows exteriorization of the LSA fenestration NGw from the left brachial artery by pulling the LSA snare. Covered stents are deployed in all 3 fenestrations. The technique is presented in a patient with type B aortic dissection. Conclusion: Use of the precannulated fenestrated endograft system described is feasible and has the potential to make aortic arch

  18. Feasibility study on the application of fenestrated stent grafts in canine aortic arches

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Er-Ping; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Shui-Bo; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Gui-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To validate the feasibility and effectiveness of applying fenestrated stent grafts in canine aortic arches. Methods: According to the anatomic characteristics of the aortic arches from four adult beagle dogs, a straight-type aortic coated vascular stent system from Lifetech Scientific (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. was released in vitro, after which a square window was burnt out at the back tendon of the coated vascular stent with an electrocautery pen, and the fenestrated stent grafts were then returned in the catheter and delivery sheath, following the original release path. Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) was then performed in the canine aorta. Immediately after surgery, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and computed tomography (CT) angiography were conducted. On day 3, the dressing was changed, and on day 7, the stitches were removed and CT angiography was reviewed. Animal autopsies were performed 2 weeks after surgery. Results: DSA and CT angiography were conducted in 4 beagles immediately after the experiments. The CT angiography reviewed on day 7 after surgery and the animal autopsy performed two weeks after surgery both revealed that the fenestrated stent grafts were anchored in the canine aortic arch, the openings were aligned against the branch vessels above the aortic arch, and in each branch vessel, the blood flow was smooth, without any obvious internal leakage phenomena. Conclusion: An ordinary straight-type coated vascular stent, fenestrated in vitro, followed by the performance of EVAR in the canine aortic arch for in vivo stent implantation, was technically feasible. When a branch coated vascular stent cannot meet the individual needs of the wound, this technology may provide a valuable strategy for clinical thoracic aortic trauma emergencies. PMID:25785052

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    AAA - open - discharge; Repair - aortic aneurysm - open - discharge ... You had open aortic aneurysm surgery to repair an aneurysm (a widened part) in your aorta, the large artery that carries blood to your ...

  20. When and how to replace the aortic arch for type A dissection.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Leone, Alessandro; Di Marco, Luca; Pacini, Davide

    2016-07-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AAAD) remains one of the most challenging diseases in cardiothoracic surgery and despite numerous innovations in medical and surgical management, early mortality remains high. The standard treatment of AAAD requires emergency surgery of the proximal aorta, preventing rupture and consequent cardiac tamponade. Resection of the primary intimal tear and repair of the aortic root and aortic valve are well-established surgical principles. However, the dissection in the aortic arch and descending untreated aorta remains. This injury is associated with the risk of subsequent false lumen dilatation potentially progressing to rupture, true lumen compression and distal malperfusion. Additionally, the dilatation of the aortic arch, the presence of a tear and retrograde dissection can all be considered indication for a total arch replacement in AAAD. In such cases a more aggressive strategy may be used, from the classic aortic arch operation to a single stage frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique or a two-stage approach such as the classical elephant trunk (ET) or the recent Lupiae technique. Although these are all feasible solutions, they are also complex and time demanding techniques requiring experience and expertise, with an in the length of cardiopulmonary bypass and both myocardial and visceral ischemia. Effective methods of cerebral, myocardial as well visceral protection are necessary to obtain acceptable results in terms of hospital mortality and morbidity. Moreover, a correct assessment of the anatomy of the dissection, through the preoperative angio CT scan, in addition to the clinical condition of the patients, remain the decision points for the best arch repair strategy to use in AAAD. PMID:27563552

  1. When and how to replace the aortic arch for type A dissection

    PubMed Central

    Leone, Alessandro; Di Marco, Luca; Pacini, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AAAD) remains one of the most challenging diseases in cardiothoracic surgery and despite numerous innovations in medical and surgical management, early mortality remains high. The standard treatment of AAAD requires emergency surgery of the proximal aorta, preventing rupture and consequent cardiac tamponade. Resection of the primary intimal tear and repair of the aortic root and aortic valve are well-established surgical principles. However, the dissection in the aortic arch and descending untreated aorta remains. This injury is associated with the risk of subsequent false lumen dilatation potentially progressing to rupture, true lumen compression and distal malperfusion. Additionally, the dilatation of the aortic arch, the presence of a tear and retrograde dissection can all be considered indication for a total arch replacement in AAAD. In such cases a more aggressive strategy may be used, from the classic aortic arch operation to a single stage frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique or a two-stage approach such as the classical elephant trunk (ET) or the recent Lupiae technique. Although these are all feasible solutions, they are also complex and time demanding techniques requiring experience and expertise, with an in the length of cardiopulmonary bypass and both myocardial and visceral ischemia. Effective methods of cerebral, myocardial as well visceral protection are necessary to obtain acceptable results in terms of hospital mortality and morbidity. Moreover, a correct assessment of the anatomy of the dissection, through the preoperative angio CT scan, in addition to the clinical condition of the patients, remain the decision points for the best arch repair strategy to use in AAAD. PMID:27563552

  2. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M.

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  3. Current management of aortic arch lesions with hybrid procedures: a tailored approach to a progressive disease.

    PubMed

    Plichta, Ryan P; Aftab, Muhammad; Roselli, Eric E

    2016-06-01

    In the current era of cardiac and aortic surgery lines between open and endovascular approaches are becoming blurred. Hybrid techniques emerged with the availability of endovascular devices and the idea that combining open operations with a stent graft might provide a treatment option to those patients deemed too high-risk for conventional surgery. As these procedures evolved, it became clear that they still carried significant risk especially for the "inoperable" or "high-risk" patients, but they also offered new options for treating complex pathologies involving multiple segments of the aorta. Hybrid techniques not only provide the potential for less invasive aortic repair, but must be considered as an important complementary treatment option for patients with aortic disease, allowing for a potentially more effective and complete repair. The objective of this article is to review the current options for hybrid arch repair and the indications for choosing the various techniques based on pathologic presentation. PMID:26939046

  4. A review of the surgical management of right-sided aortic arch aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Barr, James G; Sepehripour, Amir H; Jarral, Omar A; Tsipas, Pantelis; Kokotsakis, John; Kourliouros, Antonios; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2016-07-01

    Aneurysms and dissections of the right-sided aortic arch are rare and published data are limited to a few case reports and small series. The optimal treatment strategy of this entity and the challenges associated with their management are not yet fully investigated and conclusive. We performed a systematic review of the literature to identify all patients who underwent surgical or endovascular intervention for right aortic arch aneurysms or dissections. The search was limited to the articles published only in English. We focused on presentation and critically assessed different management strategies and outcomes. We identified 74 studies that reported 99 patients undergoing surgical or endovascular intervention for a right aortic arch aneurysm or dissection. The median age was 61 years. The commonest presenting symptoms were chest or back pain and dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients had an aberrant left subclavian artery with only 11 patients having the mirror image variant of a right aortic arch. The commonest pathology was aneurysm arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum occurring in over 50% of the patients. Twenty-eight patients had dissections, 19 of these were Type B and 9 were Type A. Eighty-one patients had elective operations while 18 had emergency procedures. Sixty-seven patients underwent surgical treatment, 20 patients had hybrid surgical and endovascular procedures and 12 had totally endovascular procedure. There were 5 deaths, 4 of which were in patients undergoing emergency surgery and none in the endovascular repair group. Aneurysms and dissections of a right-sided aortic arch are rare. Advances in endovascular treatment and hybrid surgical and endovascular management are making this rare pathology amenable to these approaches and may confer improved outcomes compared with conventional extensive repair techniques. PMID:27001673

  5. Application of the Bolton Relay Device for Thoracic Endografting In or Near the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Riambau, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular correction of aortic arch pathology remains a challenge, with a variety of techniques proposed over the years to minimize complications and enhance the probability of a successful result. A variety of approaches have been developed in order to deal with the aortic arch pathology and its idiosyncrasies. We review potential interventional techniques for the repair of aortic arch pathologies, beginning with conventional aortic arch surgery, followed by hybrid treatments and those along the endovascular spectrum (parallel and fenestrated endografts, scalloped endografts, and ascending and new branched endografts). We finish with an overview of all the Bolton Medical (Barcelona, Spain and Sunrise, FL, USA) thoracic platforms. Endovascular techniques show acceptable results in selected cases. Both proximal Bolton Relay configurations (with and without a bare stent) offer conformability and accuracy on deployment with very low rates of stroke. Fenestrated and scalloped designs are also useful for selected cases. Ascending and branched Bolton devices are very promising platforms for a serious, full endovascular approach to the aorta. PMID:26798752

  6. Left-Sided Patent Ductus Arteriosus in a Right-Sided Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present a 31-year-old female with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and right-sided aortic arch (RAA) with left-sided patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) originating from the left brachiocephalic artery. This is a rare finding but most common site for a PDA in TOF and a RAA. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of this rare finding on MRI in the literature. PMID:25478277

  7. Persistent right aortic arch in a yearling horse.

    PubMed Central

    Butt, T D; MacDonald, D G; Crawford, W H; Dechant, J E

    1998-01-01

    A 14-month-old filly with chronic pharyngitis was diagnosed with incomplete esophageal constriction and megaesophagus due to a persistent right aortic arch. This report is unusual because clinical signs of respiratory dysfunction secondary to chronic regurgitation occurred prior to the recognition of dysphagia. PMID:9818140

  8. [Emergency Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair of Ruptured Kommerell's Diverticulum with an Acute Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Seguchi, Ryuta; Ohtake, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Takahiro; Shintani, Yoshiko; Nishida, Yuji; Kiuchi, Ryuta; Yamaguchi, Shojiro; Tomita, Shigeyuki; Sanada, Junichiro; Matsui, Osamu; Watanabe, Go

    2016-06-01

    This case report describes emergency thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) of a ruptured Kommerell's diverticulum associated with a type B acute aortic dissection in a patient with a right aortic arch. A 64-year-old male was admitted with symptoms of sudden paraplegia and shock. The computed tomography imaging showed right aortic arch anomaly, with mirror image branching of the major arteries. The aorta was dissected from the origin of the right subclavian artery to the terminal aorta, with a thrombosed false lumen. Rupture was found in a 6.3 cm aneurysm located in the distal arch, which was diagnosed as Kommerell's diverticulum. We performed emergency TEVAR, and the aneurysm was successfully excluded using deployment of a Gore Tag stent-graft. At 3 months' follow-up, the patient was doing well and showed shrinkage of the aneurysm was confirmed. TEVAR is considered to be a suitable procedure for an emergency aortic catastrophe even in patients with aortic anomaly. PMID:27246128

  9. Novel temporary endovascular shunt technique to assist in situ fenestration for endovascular reconstruction of the distal aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jiang; Guo, Wei; Liu, Xiaoping; Jia, Xin; Ma, Xiaohui; Wang, Lijun

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) of arch pathology presents special challenges for revascularization. To obtain an anatomic reconstruction of the arch arteries, in situ fenestration with extra-anatomic bypass has been increasingly used in TEVAR. We report a case involving TEVAR for a pseudoaneurysm at zone 2 of the thoracic aorta in a 37-year-old man with the use of in situ fenestration assisted by a temporary endovascular shunt technique. PMID:24560242

  10. Low Density Lipoprotein transport in the normal human aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Soulis, JV; Dimitrakopoulou, M; Giannoglou, GD

    2014-01-01

    Background: To understand the genesis and progression of atherosclerosis is essential to elucidate the blood flow and the transport of molecules in the cardiovascular system. The purpose of this computational study is to elucidate the relationship between low wall shear stress (WSS) - high site concentration of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and atherosclerotic sites in the normal human aortic arch under physiological flow and mass transport conditions. Methods: The numerical simulation couples the flow equations with the transport equation applying realistic boundary conditions at the wall in terms of blood-side concentration. The blood is considered to be non-Newtonian fluid obeying to the power law. Suitable mass transport conditions are specified at the wall. Results: Aortic arch walls are exposed to cholesterolemic environment although the applied mass and flow conditions refer to normal human geometry and normal mass-flow conditions. The luminal surface LDL concentration varies inversely with the WSS. Regions of high LDL luminal surface concentration do not necessarily co-locate to the sites of lowest WSS. Concave sides of the aortic arch exhibit, relatively to the convex sides, elevated concentration of the LDL. The area averaged normalized LDL concentration over the entire normal aortic arch is 1.267. The daughter aortic arch vessels exhibit, relatively to the main aorta, elevated LDL concentrations. Conclusions: The near wall paths of the velocities might be the most important factor for the elevated LDL concentration at areas located either at the vicinity of bifurcations regions or at high curvature regions. Hippokratia 2014; 18 (3): 221-225. PMID:25694755

  11. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  12. Normothermic total arch replacement without hypothermic circulatory arrest to treat aortic distal arch aneurysm in a patient with cold agglutinin disease.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Narihiro; Takemura, Hirofumi; Shimabukuro, Katsuya; Matsuno, Yukihiro

    2011-10-01

    Cold agglutinin disease although rare, can lead to serious complications for patients undergoing cardio-thoracic surgery, especially when cardiopulmonary bypass is applied under hypothermic circulatory arrest. We describe normothermic total arch replacement without hypothermic circulatory arrest in a patient with cold agglutinin disease. The patient tolerated all procedures well and did not develop cerebral ischemia due to surgical maneuvers or thrombotic or haemolytic complications due to cold agglutinin disease. Although endovascular aortic repair is the first choice under such complex conditions, this method could also serve as an alternative strategy when endovascular aortic repair is precluded. PMID:21788303

  13. [A case of tracheo-bronchial stenosis after extended end-to-end aortic arch anastomosis for interrupted aortic arch treated with suspension of the ascending artery and pulmonary artery].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Hoshino, S; Iwaya, F; Igari, T; Ono, T; Takahashi, K

    2001-02-01

    A 9-day-old boy had pulmonary artery banding and extended end-to-end aortic arch anastomosis for ventricular septal defect (VSD) and type A interrupted aortic arch. Severe dyspnea gradually developed. At 3 months of age, intracardiac repair of VSD was performed. Weaning from the ventilator was difficult. Endoscopic examination and chest CT revealed stenosis of the right and left main bronchi and compression of tracheal bifurcation and the right and left main bronchi by the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery. Suspension of the ascending aorta and pulmonary artery was performed 15 days after VSD closure. Nine days after this procedure, the patient was weaned from respirator. Postoperative course was uneventful. Bronchial stenosis may be caused from extended end-to-end aortic arch anastomosis. PMID:11211771

  14. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William J.; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. We here combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alters as a result of local interventions to obstruct individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy guided femtosecond laser based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 hours. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes however were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  15. Interruption of aortic arch in adults: surgical experience with extra-anatomic bypass.

    PubMed

    Sai Krishna, C; Bhan, Anil; Sharma, Sanjeev; Kiran, Usha; Venugopal, Panangipalli

    2005-01-01

    We reviewed our 3-year experience in treating interruption of the aorta in adult patients. Clinical profiles, surgical management, and results of early and mid-term follow-up are presented. From August 2001 through June 2003, 7 adult patients underwent an extra-anatomic bypass procedure to repair interruption of the aortic arch. Five patients underwent ventral aortic repair through a mid-sternotomy and an upper midline laparotomy, and 2 patients underwent repair through a left posterolateral thoracotomy. A bovine collagen-impregnated polyester fiber graft was used in 6 patients, and a Gore-Tex graft was interposed in 1 patient. All repairs were performed without cardiopulmonary bypass. Follow-up was complete in all patients. The mean follow-up was 1728 +/- 1 months (range, 9-31 months). No neurologic, renal, or gastrointestinal complications were noted in any patient. There was no in-hospital or late mortality or need for re-intervention. All patients were asymptomatic; however, 5 patients had mild residual hypertension. Graft patency in all the patients was confirmed by computed tomographic angiography. Interruption of the aorta is rare in adults. Ventral aortic repair through a midline approach is our preferred technique for surgical repair of this entity, because it avoids the extensive network of collateral vessels on the chest wall, enables simultaneous treatment of associated lesions, and in all likelihood reduces morbidity and mortality. PMID:16107103

  16. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  17. Computational Study of Growth and Remodeling in the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Patrick W.; Taber, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    Opening angles (OAs) are associated with growth and remodeling in arteries. One curiosity has been the relatively large OAs found in the aortic arch of some animals. Here, we use computational models to explore the reasons behind this phenomenon. The artery is assumed to contain a smooth muscle/collagen phase and an elastin phase. In the models, growth and remodeling of smooth muscle/collagen depends on wall stress and fluid shear stress. Remodeling of elastin, which normally turns over very slowly, is neglected. The results indicate that OAs generally increase with longitudinal curvature (torus model), earlier elastin production during development, and decreased wall stiffness. Correlating these results with available experimental data suggests that all of these effects may contribute to the large OAs in the aortic arch. The models also suggest that the slow turnover rate of elastin limits longitudinal growth. These results should promote increased understanding of the causes of residual stress in arteries. PMID:18792831

  18. Left cervical aortic arch: diagnosis by radioisotope and ultrasound techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Camiel, M.R.; Glanz, S.; Gordon, D.H.; Weiner, R.

    1982-01-01

    Two case histories are presented of patients with a developmental variant of the heart. The condition is usually innocuous but its appearance is confusing and incorrect diagnoses are possible. Although the abnormality is usually first detected by routine chest X-ray, radionuclide angiography and sonography are more appropriate diagnostic measures. The two methods can differentiate between the cervical aortic arch and aneurysm or lung tumor. (JMT)

  19. Aneurysm of an Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery Successfully Excluded by a Thoracic Aortic Stent Graft with Supra-aortic Bypass of Three Arch Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Munneke, Graham J. Loosemore, Thomas M.; Belli, Anna-Maria; Thompson, Matt M.; Morgan, Robert A.

    2005-06-15

    An aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) arising from a left-sided aortic arch is the fourth most common aortic arch anomaly. Aneurysmal dilatation of the ARSA requires treatment because of the associated risk of rupture. We present a case where supra-aortic bypass of the arch vessels was performed to facilitate exclusion of the aneurysm by a thoracic aortic stent graft.

  20. Haemodynamics in the mouse aortic arch computed from MRI-derived velocities at the aortic root.

    PubMed

    Van Doormaal, Mark A; Kazakidi, Asimina; Wylezinska, Marzena; Hunt, Anthony; Tremoleda, Jordi L; Protti, Andrea; Bohraus, Yvette; Gsell, Willy; Weinberg, Peter D; Ethier, C Ross

    2012-11-01

    Mice are widely used to investigate atherogenesis, which is known to be influenced by stresses related to blood flow. However, numerical characterization of the haemodynamic environment in the commonly studied aortic arch has hitherto been based on idealizations of inflow into the aorta. Our purpose in this work was to numerically characterize the haemodynamic environment in the mouse aortic arch using measured inflow velocities, and to relate the resulting shear stress patterns to known locations of high- and low-lesion prevalence. Blood flow velocities were measured in the aortic root of C57/BL6 mice using phase-contrast MRI. Arterial geometries were obtained by micro-CT of corrosion casts. These data were used to compute blood flow and wall shear stress (WSS) patterns in the arch. WSS profiles computed using realistic and idealized aortic root velocities differed significantly. An unexpected finding was that average WSS in the high-lesion-probability region on the inner wall was actually higher than the WSS in the low-probability region on the outer wall. Future studies of mouse aortic arch haemodynamics should avoid the use of idealized inflow velocity profiles. Lesion formation does not seem to uniquely associate with low or oscillating WSS in this segment, suggesting that other factors may also play a role in lesion localization. PMID:22764131

  1. Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair with chimney and snorkel grafts: indications, techniques and results.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rakesh P; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Verhoeven, Eric L G; Adam, Donald J; Hardman, John A

    2013-12-01

    The chimney technique in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) involves placement of a stent or stent-graft parallel to the main aortic stent-graft to extend the proximal or distal sealing zone while maintaining side branch patency. Ch-EVAR can facilitate endovascular repair of juxtarenal and aortic arch pathology using available standard aortic stent-grafts, therefore, eliminating the manufacturing delays required for customised fenestrated and branched stent-grafts. Several case series have demonstrated the feasibility of Ch-EVAR both in acute and elective cases with good early results. This review discusses indications, technique, and the current available clinical data on Ch-EVAR. PMID:23674274

  2. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Chimney and Snorkel Grafts: Indications, Techniques and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh P.; Katsargyris, Athanasios Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Adam, Donald J.; Hardman, John A.

    2013-12-15

    The chimney technique in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) involves placement of a stent or stent-graft parallel to the main aortic stent-graft to extend the proximal or distal sealing zone while maintaining side branch patency. Ch-EVAR can facilitate endovascular repair of juxtarenal and aortic arch pathology using available standard aortic stent-grafts, therefore, eliminating the manufacturing delays required for customised fenestrated and branched stent-grafts. Several case series have demonstrated the feasibility of Ch-EVAR both in acute and elective cases with good early results. This review discusses indications, technique, and the current available clinical data on Ch-EVAR.

  3. Open aortic surgery after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Coselli, Joseph S; Spiliotopoulos, Konstantinos; Preventza, Ourania; de la Cruz, Kim I; Amarasekara, Hiruni; Green, Susan Y

    2016-08-01

    In the last decade, thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has emerged as an appealing alternative to the traditional open aortic aneurysm repair. This is largely due to generally improved early outcomes associated with TEVAR, including lower perioperative mortality and morbidity. However, it is relatively common for patients who undergo TEVAR to need a secondary intervention. In select circumstances, these secondary interventions are performed as an open procedure. Although it is difficult to assess the rate of open repairs after TEVAR, the rates in large series of TEVAR cases (>300) have ranged from 0.4 to 7.9 %. Major complications of TEVAR that typically necessitates open distal aortic repair (i.e., repair of the descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aorta) include endoleak (especially type I), aortic fistula, endograft infection, device collapse or migration, and continued expansion of the aneurysm sac. Conversion to open repair of the distal aorta may be either elective (as for many endoleaks) or emergent (as for rupture, retrograde complicated dissection, malperfusion, and endograft infection). In addition, in select patients (e.g., those with a chronic aortic dissection), unrepaired sections of the aorta may progressively dilate, resulting in the need for multiple distal aortic repairs. Open repairs after TEVAR can be broadly classified as full extraction, partial extraction, or full salvage of the stent-graft. Although full and partial stent-graft extraction imply failure of TEVAR, such failure is generally absent in cases where the stent-graft can be fully salvaged. We review the literature regarding open repair after TEVAR and highlight operative strategies. PMID:27314956

  4. Impending rupture in an aortic arch aneurysm by Candida infection.

    PubMed

    Minami, H; Wakita, N; Kawanishi, Y; Kitano, I; Sakata, M

    2001-03-01

    A 68-year-old man was hospitalized with the complaints of left back pain and fever. He had a history of using steroids to treat uveitis for about thirty years. Computed tomography on the chest demonstrated an impending rupture in an aortic arch aneurysm, which was consequently surgically excised. Candida albicans was identified in the wall of the aneurysm, so fluconazole and itraconazole were administered. The patient was discharged at 120 days after surgery without recrudescence of the candida. To our knowledge, this is the fifteenth case of a successfully treated aneurysm caused by candida infection. PMID:11305059

  5. [Hybrid surgical intervention in a patient with an aortic arch aneurysm and coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Charchan, E R; Abugov, S A; Puretsky, M V; Kim, S Yu; Skvortsov, A A; Khachatryan, Z R

    2015-01-01

    Presented herein is a clinical case report regarding the use of hybrid technology in surgical treatment of a patient with an aneurysm of the distal portion of the aortic arch and coronary artery disease. The patient underwent a hybrid operation, i.e. debranching of the aortic arch branches, exoprosthetic repair of the ascending aorta, autovenous prosthetic coronary bypass grafting of the branch of the blunt edge of the anterior interventricular artery, stenting of the ascending portion, arch and descending portion of the aorta (stent graft "Medtronic Valiant"). In doing so, we used a non-standard approach to connecting the artificial circulation unit and to choosing the place for establishing proximal anastomoses of autovenous coronary bypass grafts. The early postoperative period was complicated by the development of respiratory insufficiency requiring continuation artificial pulmonary ventilation. The duration of the hospital stay of the patient amounted to 15 days. The check-up multispiral computed tomography showed normal functioning of the reconstruction zones, the stent graft is expanded, with no leak observed. The conclusion was made that hybrid interventions may be considered as an alternative to the classical surgical treatment associated in patients of older age group with a severe course of the postoperative period and high lethality. PMID:26035581

  6. Closed injury of the aortic arch and subsequent formation of a false aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Janevski, B

    1983-01-01

    The case history of a 25-year-old man who sustained a blunt trauma to the chest in a car accident and developed a false aneurysm of the aortic isthmus is reported. The injury of the aortic arch was not initially recognized. The diagnosis was established on the chest X-rays and arteriograms obtained 1 year after the trauma. The clinical and radiological signs of closed injuries of the aortic arch are reviewed. PMID:6617430

  7. Aortic Arch Mycotic Aneurysm Due to Scedosporium Apiospermum Reconstructed With Homografts.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Lucas, Arnau; Reyes-Juárez, José Luis; Nazarena Pizzi, María; Permanyer, Eduard; Evangelista, Arturo; Galiñanes, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    A 39-year-old female, active parenteral drug user was diagnosed of spondylodiscitis. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed an extensive aortic arch aneurysm. A positron emission tomography (PET)-CT scan, showing significant aortic wall uptake of the tracer through the whole aortic arch and the D8-D9 intervertebral disc, allowed us to suspect an aortitis despite negative blood cultures. The aneurysm was resected and reconstructed with 2 aortic homografts. Cultures of specimens from the aortic wall were positive to the fungi Scedosporium apiospermum. A new PET-CT scan 4 months after surgery showed absence of tracer uptake both at the homografts site and intervertebral disc. PMID:26046885

  8. Long-Term Changes in the Distal Aorta after Aortic Arch Replacement in Acute DeBakey Type I Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwangjo; Jeong, Jeahwa; Park, Jongyoon; Yun, Sungsil; Woo, Jongsu

    2016-01-01

    Background We analyzed the long-term results of ascending aortic replacement and arch aortic replacement in acute DeBakey type I aortic dissections to measure the differences in the distal aortic changes with extension of the aortic replacement. Methods We reviewed 142 cases of acute DeBakey type I aortic dissections (1996–2015). Seventy percent of the cases were ascending aortic replacements, and 30% of the cases underwent total arch aortic replacement, which includes the aorta from the root to the beginning of the descending aorta with the 3 arch branches. Fourteen percent (20 cases) resulted in surgical mortality and 86% of cases that survived had a mean follow-up period of 6.6±4.6 years. Among these cases, 64% of the patients were followed up with computed tomography (CT) angiograms with the duration of the final CT check period of 4.9±2.9 years. Results There were 15 cases of reoperation in 13 patients. Of these 15 cases, 13 cases were in the ascending aortic replacement group and 2 cases were in the total arch aortic replacement group. Late mortality occurred in 13 cases; 10 cases were in the ascending aortic replacement group and 3 cases were in the total arch aortic replacement group. Eight patients died of a distal aortic problem in the ascending aortic replacement group, and 1 patient died of distal aortic rupture in the total arch aortic replacement group. The follow-up CT angiogram showed that 69.8% of the ascending aortic replacement group and 35.7% of the total arch aortic replacement group developed distal aortic dilatation (p=0.0022). Conclusion The total arch aortic replacement procedure developed fewer distal remnant aortic problems from dilatation than the ascending aortic replacement procedure in acute type I aortic dissections. PMID:27525235

  9. [Hybrid operation for a posttraumatic saccular aneurysm of the aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Ignat'ev, I M; Volodiukhin, M Iu; Zanochkin, A V; Terekhin, S V

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with a case report of successful hybrid surgical treatment of a patient presenting with a posttraumatic large false saccular aneurysm of the aortic arch with mediastinal displacement and compression of the left recurrent laryngeal nerve and trachea. The patient was subjected to a hybrid operation, i. e., bypass grafting of the brachiocephalic trunk and the left common carotid artery with a bifurcation prosthesis from the ascending aorta through sternotomy, carotid-vertebral and carotid-subclavian bypass grafting on the left in a combination with endoprosthetic repair of the aortic arch with the stent graft Valiant Thoracic 40 × 224 mm (VAMF 4040c200TE) manufactured by the Medtronic Company. The postoperative period was uneventful followed by rather rapid rehabilitation of the patient. One month after the operation, the clinical state improved considerably. His voice restored virtually completely, and breathlessness disappeared. According to the findings of MSCT angiography, the aneurysmatic cavity is thrombosed, with the stent graft showing no evidence of either dislocation or endoleak. The bifurcation bypass graft is functioning. According to the data of duplex scanning, the anastomoses established on the neck are patent. PMID:23531669

  10. Combined open proximal and stent-graft distal repair for distal arch aneurysms: an alternative to total debranching.

    PubMed

    Zierer, Andreas; Sanchez, Luis A; Moon, Marc R

    2009-07-01

    We present herein a novel, combined, simultaneous open proximal and stent-graft distal repair for complex distal aortic arch aneurysms involving the descending aorta. In the first surgical step, the transverse arch is opened during selective antegrade cerebral perfusion, and a Dacron graft (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) is positioned down the descending aorta in an elephant trunk-like fashion with its proximal free margin sutured circumferentially to the aorta just distal to the left subclavian or left common carotid artery. With the graft serving as the new proximal landing zone, subsequent endovascular repair is performed antegrade during rewarming through the ascending aorta. PMID:19559261

  11. Equine pericardial roll graft replacement of infected pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Resection of the infected aorta, debridement of the surrounding tissue, in situ graft replacement, and omentopexy is the standard procedure for treating infected aortic aneurysms, but the question of which graft material is optimal is still a matter of controversy. We recently treated a patient with an infected thoracic aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm was located in the proximal aortic arch. Because the patients had previously undergone abdominal surgery, the aortic arch were replaced in situ with a branched equine pericardial roll grafts. The patient is alive and well 23 months after the operation. PMID:22583570

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of tetralogy of Fallot with a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Andrew L; Pruetz, Jay D; Kung, Grace C

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we present a case of prenatally diagnosed tetralogy of Fallot with a double aortic arch, correlating images from fetal echocardiography, transthoracic echocardiography, and cardiac MRI. PMID:26983561

  13. Imaging a boa constrictor--the incomplete double aortic arch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rajeev L; Kanwar, Anubhav; Jacobi, Adam; Sanz, Javier

    2012-11-01

    Incomplete double aortic arch is a rare anomaly resulting from atresia rather than complete involution in the distal left arch resulting in a non-patent fibrous cord between the left arch and descending thoracic aorta. This anatomic anomaly may cause symptomatic vascular rings, leading to stridor, wheezing, or dysphagia, requiring surgical transection of the fibrous cord. Herein, we describe an asymptomatic 59 year-old man presenting for contrast-enhanced CT angiography to assess cardiac anatomy prior to radiofrequency ablation, who was incidentally found to have an incomplete double aortic arch with hypoplasia of the left arch segment and an aortic diverticulum. Recognition of this abnormality by imaging is important to inform both corrective surgery in symptomatic patients, as well as assist in the planning of percutaneous coronary and vascular interventions. PMID:22542042

  14. Resection of the Aortic Arch with Moderate Hypothermia and Temporary Circulatory Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Speir, Alan M.; Grey, Douglas P.; Cooley, Denton A.

    1982-01-01

    Resection of the aortic arch with the use of moderate hypothermia and temporary circulatory arrest was performed in a 63-year-old woman. The simplified technique is described, along with a brief review of the literature. The patient recovered uneventfully. After this manuscript was prepared, two other patients underwent successful replacement of the aortic arch for aneurysm. These cases are also summarized briefly in an illustrated table. PMID:15226933

  15. Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Cartes-Zumelzu, F; Lammer, J; Kretschmer, G; Hoelzenbein, T; Grabenwöger, M; Thurnher, S

    2000-03-01

    The standard technique for the treatment of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is elective open surgical repair with graft interposition. This standard approach, although steadily improving, is associated with high morbidity and substantial mortality rates and implies a major surgical procedure with lateral thoracotomy, use of cardiopulmonary bypass, long operation times and a variety of peri- and postoperative complications. This and the success of the first endoluminal treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms by Parodi et al. prompted the attention to be thrown on the treatment of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with endoluminal stent-grafts in many large centres. The aim of this new minimally invasive technique is to exclude the aneurysm from blood flow and in consequence to avoid pressure stress on the aneurysmatic aortic wall, by avoiding a large open operation with significant perioperative morbidity. The potentially beneficial effect of this new treatment approach was evaluated in the course of this study. PMID:10875224

  16. Total aortic repair: the new paradigm in the treatment of acute type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Matalanis, George; Perera, Nisal K; Galvin, Sean D

    2016-05-01

    The surgical management of acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) is in a period of rapid evolution. Understanding the complex physiology and anatomy of both acute and chronic dissection has been enhanced by the ready availability of state of the art imaging techniques. Technical advances in the intraoperative monitoring of organ perfusion, together with adjuncts to limit organ injury and increasing sophistication in open and endovascular surgery have led to a major reduction in both perioperative morbidity and mortality. In many centers, there has been a transition in mindset and surgical approach away from a purely central aortic operation focusing on the ascending aorta and a 'live to fight another day' philosophy. The current more global perspective recognizes the importance of aortic valve function, malperfusion, false lumen (FL) patency and the potential for future complex aneurysm development. The time is now right to transition into the next phase of sophistication in the management of ATAAD with the aim of achieving not only a safe acute operation, but to either entirely prevent chronic complications or to greatly simplify their management by the creation of an anatomical situation that facilitates future endovascular intervention in place of complex re-do surgery. We present our view on the evolution of surgery for ATAAD leading to our current technique of Branch First Arch replacement and Total Aortic Repair, which not only provides a safe immediate operation, but also offers the hope of a simplified future management if not a total cure for the pathology. PMID:27386409

  17. Total aortic repair: the new paradigm in the treatment of acute type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Nisal K.; Galvin, Sean D.

    2016-01-01

    The surgical management of acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) is in a period of rapid evolution. Understanding the complex physiology and anatomy of both acute and chronic dissection has been enhanced by the ready availability of state of the art imaging techniques. Technical advances in the intraoperative monitoring of organ perfusion, together with adjuncts to limit organ injury and increasing sophistication in open and endovascular surgery have led to a major reduction in both perioperative morbidity and mortality. In many centers, there has been a transition in mindset and surgical approach away from a purely central aortic operation focusing on the ascending aorta and a ‘live to fight another day’ philosophy. The current more global perspective recognizes the importance of aortic valve function, malperfusion, false lumen (FL) patency and the potential for future complex aneurysm development. The time is now right to transition into the next phase of sophistication in the management of ATAAD with the aim of achieving not only a safe acute operation, but to either entirely prevent chronic complications or to greatly simplify their management by the creation of an anatomical situation that facilitates future endovascular intervention in place of complex re-do surgery. We present our view on the evolution of surgery for ATAAD leading to our current technique of Branch First Arch replacement and Total Aortic Repair, which not only provides a safe immediate operation, but also offers the hope of a simplified future management if not a total cure for the pathology. PMID:27386409

  18. Pulmonary artery stenosis caused by a large aortic arch pseudoaneurysm detected 10 years after a minor trauma

    PubMed Central

    Zamani, Jalal; Aghasadeghi, Kamran; Zarrabi, Khalil; Abdi Ardekani, Alireza; Zolghadrasli, Abdolali

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm of aorta is a rare condition usually seen after aortic surgeries or serious accidents. Here we report a 60 years old man without any previous medical condition who presented with non-specific symptoms and underwent different investigations for more than 1 year, until the presence of a continuous murmur raised suspicion toward his cardiovascular system. In echocardiographic and computed tomography (CT) angiographic studies a large pseudoaneurysm of aortic arch with compression effect on pulmonary artery was detected. At this stage he remembered having suffered a minor trauma 10 years ago. He finally underwent operation and his aortic wall was repaired successfully with a patch. This case highlights the importance of thorough history taking and physical examination in patients irrespective of symptoms and high index of suspicion to detect this life-threatening condition. PMID:27069568

  19. Endovascular aortic repair: first twenty years.

    PubMed

    Koncar, Igor; Tolić, Momcilo; Ilić, Nikola; Cvetković, Slobodan; Dragas, Marko; Cinara, Ilijas; Kostić, Dusan; Davidović, Lazar

    2012-01-01

    Endovascular aortic/aneurysm repair (EVAR) was introduced into clinical practice at the beginning of the nineties. Its fast development had a great influence on clinicians, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists, educational curriculums, patients, industry and medical insurance. The aim of this paper is to present the contribution of clinicians and industry to the development and advancement of endovascular aortic repair over the last 20 years. This review article presents the development of EVAR by focusing on the contribution of physicians, surgeons and interventional radiologists in the creation of the new field of vascular surgery termed hybrid vascular surgery, and also the contribution of technological advancement by a significant help of industrial representatives--engineers and their counselors. This article also analyzes studies conducted in order to compare the successfulness of EVAR with up-to-now applied open surgical repair of aortic aneurysms, and some treatment techniques of other aortic diseases. During the first two decades of its development the EVAR method was rapidly progressing and was adopted concurrently with the expansion of technology. Owing to large randomized studies, early and long-term results indicate specific complications of this method, thus influencing further technological improvement and defining risk patients groups in whom the use of the technique should be avoided. Good results are insured only in centers, specialized in vascular surgery, which have on their disposal adequate conditions for solving all complications associated with this method. PMID:23350259

  20. Hybrid intervention for type A aortic arch interruption and a giant subclavian artery aneurysm in an adult.

    PubMed

    Oz, Kursad; Erek, Ersin; Yildirim, Aydin

    2016-06-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a very rare but well-described congenital anomaly. Concomitant presentation of interrupted aortic arch and giant subclavian artery aneurysm is an unusual event in adulthood. To the best of our knowledge, hybrid intervention for type A aortic arch interruption with a giant aneurysm of the subclavian artery is an alternative approach for the management of these concomitant pathologies in adults. PMID:27071339

  1. Some mice feature 5th pharyngeal arch arteries and double-lumen aortic arch malformations.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Stefan H; Weninger, Wolfgang J

    2012-01-01

    A 5th pair of pharyngeal arch arteries (PAAs) has never been identified with certainty in mice. Murines in general are considered to not develop a 5th pair. If true, the significance of the mouse as a model for researching the genesis of malformations of the great intrathoracic arteries is limited. We aimed to investigate whether mouse embryos develop a 5th pair of PAAs and to identify malformations known to be caused by defective remodelling of the 5th PAAs. We employed the high-resolution episcopic microscopy method for creating digital volume data and three-dimensional (3D) computer models of the great intrathoracic arteries of 30 mouse embryos from days 12-12.5 post conception and 180 mouse fetuses from days 14.5 and 15.5 post conception. The 3D models of the fetuses were screened for the presence of a double-lumen aortic arch malformation. We identified such a malformation in 1 fetus. The 3D models of the embryos were analysed for the presence of 5th PAAs. Six of the 30 embryos (20%) showed a 5th PAA bilaterally, and an additional 9 (30%) showed a 5th PAA unilaterally. Our results prove that some mice do develop a 5th pair of PAAs. They also show that malformations which occur rarely in humans and result from defective remodelling of the left 5th PAA can be identified in mice as well. Thus, the mouse does represent an excellent model for researching the mechanisms driving PAA remodelling and the genesis of malformations of the great intrathoracic arteries. PMID:22287557

  2. The influence of aortic dimensions on calculated wall shear stress in the mouse aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Trachet, Bram; Swillens, Abigail; Van Loo, Denis; Casteleyn, Christophe; De Paepe, Anne; Loeys, Bart; Segers, Patrick

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, the influence of the aortic dimensions of an investigated mouse on its resulting wall shear stress (WSS) was studied. A numerical model of a mouse aortic arch was created based on a micro-CT scan of a vascular corrosion cast of an 8-week-old wild type mouse. This model was then rescaled to obtain five models with aortic root diameters corresponding to five different stages in the mouse life cycle varying from late fetal (0.7 mm) to old adult (1.5 mm). Consistent with literature, WSS values much higher than those normally encountered in humans were found. WSS was found to decrease rapidly in early life stages and to reach a plateau in adulthood, thus supporting a mediating role for WSS in arterial growth. Our results show that WSS values for mice should be interpreted very cautiously, and if possible an animal-specific geometry with animal-specific boundary conditions should be used. PMID:19221921

  3. Aortic valve repair for papillary fibroelastoma.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Luca; Al-Basheer, Amin; Glineur, David; Oppido, Guido; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; El-Khoury, Gebrine

    2006-05-01

    We report the case of aortic valve-papillary fibroelastoma in a 66-year-old Belgian woman with a previous single episode of cerebral transient ischemic attack. Transthoracic two-dimensional echocardiography revealed a small mass adherent to the noncoronary cusp of the valve, which was confirmed by transesophageal echocardiography. Indication for surgery was performed because of a previous cerebral transient ischemic attack and for its potential risk of cerebral and coronary embolization. Surgical excision of the mass was performed with the need for glutaraldehyde-treated autologous pericardial patch repair of the aortic cusp. Intraoperative and postoperative transesophageal echocardiography both showed the valve to be competent. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. After a review of the literature, we conclude that, even if asymptomatic, and independent of their size, aortic valve papillary fibroelastomas justify surgical excision for their potential to systemic embolization. Moreover, we believe that a valve-sparing approach might be feasible with no recurrence after complete excision. PMID:16645416

  4. [Total aortic arch replacement in Stanford type A aortic dissection using a new method of implanting the stented graft].

    PubMed

    Kiyama, Hiroshi; Kaki, Nobuaki; Shiomi, Daisuke; Shimada, Naohiro

    2012-07-01

    In surgery for Stanford type A aortic dissection (SAAD) with intimal tear in the arch or proximal descending aorta, we performed total arch replacement with frozen elephant trunk technique for the purpose of achieving complete exclusion of the entry. To reduce the circulatory arrest time, we developed a quick stent graft placement method in the proximal descending aorta. We reported the early results and assessed the efficacy of our new method. Between March 2006 and February 2010, 52 consecutive patients with SAAD were divided into 2 groups:group A consisted of 17 patients who received total arch replacement with our new method;group B consisted of 35 patients who received ascending aorta or partial arch replacement. The duration of operation and cardiopulmonary bypass were significantly longer in group A. However, the duration of circulatory arrest time and postoperative factors including hospital mortality did not differ in both groups. In group A, thrombus obliteration of the residual false lumen in the descending aorta was observed in 75% at 19.2±13.1 months postoperatively. Shrinkage of false lumen in the aortic arch occurred in 15 patients( 93.8%). There was no reoperation for the residual false lumen and late death. Total aortic arch replacement with our new method for SAAD is technically feasible without increasing the operative risk and might reduce the necessity for further operations. PMID:22750824

  5. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare L. Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 {+-} 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 {+-} 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  6. Aortic arch/elephant trunk procedure with Sienna(TM) graft and endovascular stenting of thoraco-abdominal aorta for treatment of complex chronic dissection.

    PubMed

    Wong, Randolph H L; Baghai, Max; Yu, Simon C H; Underwood, Malcolm J

    2013-05-01

    Aneurismal dilatation of the remaining thoracic aorta after ascending aortic interposition grafting for type 'A' aortic dissection is not uncommon. For such complex cases, one treatment option is total arch replacement and elephant trunk procedure with the Sienna(TM) collared graft (Vascutek, Inchinnan, UK) technique followed by a staged thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). The video illustrates our technique in a 56-year-old man with an extensive aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic dissecting aneurysm. For the 'open' procedure femoral arterial and venous cannulation was used along with systemic cooling and circulatory arrest at 22 °C. Upon circulatory arrest, the aortic arch was incised and antegrade cerebral perfusion achieved via selective cannulation to the right brachiocephalic and left common carotid artery, keeping flow rates at 10-15 mL/kg/min and perfusion pressure at 50-60 mmHg. Arch replacement with an elephant trunk component was then performed and after completion of the distal aortic anastomosis antegrade perfusion via a side-arm in the graft was started and the operation completed using a variation of the 'sequential' clamping technique to maximize cerebral perfusion. The second endovascular stage was performed two weeks after discharge. Two covered stents were landing from the elephant trunk to the distal descending thoracic aorta, to secure the distal landing a bare stent of was placed to cover the aorta just distal to the origin of the celiac axis. The left subclavian artery was embolised with fibre coils. Post TEVAR angiogram showed no endoleak Although re-operative total arch replacement and elephant trunk procedure and subsequent TEVAR remained a challenging procedure, we believe excellent surgical outcome can be achieved with carefully planned operative strategy. PMID:23977606

  7. Transapical Endovascular Repair of an Ascending Aortic Pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Howell, Eric; Sweet, Matthew P; Pal, Jay D

    2016-07-01

    Proximal aortic pathology provides a technical challenge for endovascular repair. We present a case of successful transapical endovascular aortic repair in a patient with a proximal suture line pseudoaneurysm who was not a candidate for open surgical repair. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12766 (J Card Surg 2016;31:456-460). PMID:27183897

  8. Role of aortic arch vascular mechanics in cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Stephen A; Chirico, Daniele; Dempster, Kylie S; Shoemaker, J Kevin; O'Leary, Deborah D

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (cvBRS) measures the efficiency of the cardiovagal baroreflex to modulate heart rate in response to increases or decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP). Given that baroreceptors are located in the walls of the carotid sinuses (CS) and aortic arch (AA), the arterial mechanics of these sites are important contributors to cvBRS. However, the relative contribution of CS and AA mechanics to cvBRS remains unclear. This study employed sex differences as a model to test the hypothesis that differences in cvBRS between groups would be explained by the vascular mechanics of the AA but not the CS. Thirty-six young, healthy, normotensive individuals (18 females; 24 ± 2 yr) were recruited. cvBRS was measured using transfer function analysis of the low-frequency region (0.04-0.15 Hz). Ultrasonography was performed at the CS and AA to obtain arterial diameters for the measurement of distensibility. Local pulse pressure (PP) was taken at the CS using a hand-held tonometer, whereas AA PP was estimated using a transfer function of brachial PP. Both cvBRS (25 ± 11 vs. 19 ± 7 ms/mmHg, P = 0.04) and AA distensibility (16.5 ± 6.0 vs. 10.5 ± 3.8 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.02) were greater in females than males. Sex differences in cvBRS were eliminated after controlling for AA distensibility (P = 0.19). There were no sex differences in CS distensibility (5.32 ± 2.3 vs. 4.63 ± 1.3 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.32). The present data demonstrate that AA mechanics are an important contributor to differences in cvBRS. PMID:27122371

  9. ``Smart'' baroreception along the aortic arch, with reference to essential hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kember, G. C.; Zamir, M.; Armour, J. A.

    2004-11-01

    Beat-to-beat regulation of heart rate is dependent upon sensing of local stretching or local “disortion” by aortic baroreceptors. Distortions of the aortic wall are due mainly to left ventricular output and to reflected waves arising from the arterial tree. Distortions are generally believed to be useful in cardiac control since stretch receptors or aortic baroreceptors embedded in the adventitia of the aortic wall, transduce the distortions to cardiovascular neural reflex pathways responsible for beat-to-beat regulation of heart rate. Aortic neuroanatomy studies have also found a continuous strip of mechanosensory neurites spread along the aortic inner arch. Although their purpose is now unknown, such a combined sensing capacity would allow measurement of the space and time dependence of inner arch wall distortions due, among other things, to traveling waves associated with pulsatile flow in an elastic tube. We call this sensing capability-“smart baroreception.” In this paper we use an arterial tree model to show that the cumulative effects of wave reflections, from many sites far downstream, have a surprisingly pronounced effect on the pressure distribution in the root segment of the tree. By this mechanism global hemodynamics can be focused by wave reflections back to the aortic arch, where they can rapidly impact cardiac control via smart baroreception. Such sensing is likely important to maintain efficient heart function. However, alterations in the arterial tree due to aging and other natural processes can lead in such a system to altered cardiac control and essential hypertension.

  10. The macroanatomical investigations on the aortic arch in porcupines (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Atalar, O; Yilmaz, S; Burma, O; Ilkay, E

    2003-12-01

    The anatomy of aortic arch in porcupine was studied. Angiography was applied to each of the three adult porcupines (two males, one female) following the injection of latex from the abdominal aorta for the examination of aortic arch. The results indicated that three arteries arose from aortic arch in porcupine. These were truncus brachiocephalicus, arteria carotis communis sinistra and arteria subclavia sinistra. The truncus brachiocephalicus in porcupine yielded arteria subclavia dextra and arteria carotis communis dextra. Truncus bicaroticus was absent. The origin of truncus costocervicalis (right) and arteria vertebralis (right) arose from a common root. Left or right axillary arteries seemed to be a continuation of subclavian arteries. The results of this study may contribute to the data in this area of science. PMID:14651485

  11. Subgross and macroscopic investigation of blood vessels originating from aortic arch in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, V; Cevik-Demirkan, A; Türkmenoğlu, I

    2008-04-01

    A total of 10 adult, healthy, male chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) were used to investigate the vessels originating from aortic arch. Coloured latex was injected into the carotid arteries following conventional anatomical applications in all the chinchillas examined. The brachiocephalic trunk and the left subclavian artery arose from the aortic arch at the level of the second intercostal region in the thoracic cavity. The right and left subclavian arteries detached branches at the level of first intercostal region and divided into the following vessels: internal thoracic artery, dorsal scapular artery, vertebral artery, superficial cervical artery and axillar artery. The vessels originating from the aortic arch displayed some significant differences in chinchillas compared to rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, porcupines and other laboratory rodents. PMID:18005370

  12. Management of an elderly patient with respiratory failure due to double aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Changwan; Puchalski, Jonathan; Perkins, Michael; Honiden, Shyoko

    2015-01-01

    Vascular rings are congenital malformations of the aortic arch. A double aortic arch (DAA), the most common type of vascular ring, results from the failure of the fourth embryonic branchial arch to regress, leading to an ascending aorta that divides into a left and right arch that fuse together to completely encircle the trachea and esophagus. The subsequent DAA causes compressive effects on the trachea and esophagus that typically manifests in infancy or early childhood. Adult presentations, particularly in the elderly, are exceedingly rare. Historically such patients have a long-standing history of dyspnea on exertion and dysphagia, with many assumed to have obstructive lung or intrinsic cardiac disease. We describe a case of an elderly woman who presented with respiratory failure due to DAA. In her case, surgery was not feasible and we describe our experience with airway stenting.

  13. Dependence of aortic arch morphogenesis on intracardiac blood flow in the left atrial ligated chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Hu, Norman; Christensen, Douglas A; Agrawal, Amit K; Beaumont, Charity; Clark, Edward B; Hawkins, John A

    2009-05-01

    Partial left atrial ligation before cardiac septation redistributes intracardiac blood flow and produces left ventricular hypoplasia in the chick. We hypothesized that redistributed intracardiac blood flow adversely alters aortic arch development. We ligated the left atrial appendage with a 10-0 nylon suture at stage 21 chick embryos, then reincubated up to stage 34. Sham embryos had a suture tied adjacent to the atrial wall, and normal controls were unoperated. We measured simultaneous atrioventricular (AV) and dorsal aortic (DAo) blood velocities from stage 24 embryos with an ultrasound pulsed-Doppler flow meter; and the left and right third and fourth aortic arch blood flow with a laser-Doppler flow meter. Ventricular and atrial cross-sectional areas were measured from sequential video fields for planimetry. Intracardiac flow patterns were imaged on video by injecting India ink into the vitelline vein. In separate embryos, radiopaque microfil was injected into the cardiovascular system for micro-CT scanning. We analyzed the morphologic characteristics of the heart at stage 34. Active AV and DAo stroke volume (mm(3)), right third and fourth aortic arch blood flow (mm(3)/s) were all decreased in ligated embryos (P < 0.05) when compared with normal and sham embryos. Ventricular end-diastolic volume versus normal and sham embryos decreased by 45% and 46%, respectively (P < 0.05). India ink injection revealed altered right aortic arch flow patterns in the ligated embryos compared with normal embryos. micro-CT imaging confirmed altered arch morphogenesis. Alterations in intracardiac blood flow disrupt both early cardiac morphogenesis and aortic arch selection. PMID:19322826

  14. Complex Cervical Aortic Arch With Hypoplasia: A Simple Solution to a Complex Problem.

    PubMed

    Rajbanshi, Bijoy G; Gautam, Navin C; Pradhan, Sidhartha; Sharma, Apurb; Ghimire, Ram K; Joyce, Lyle D

    2016-07-01

    We report a rare case of a 6-year-old boy with a complex right-sided cervical aortic arch, with retroesophageal hypoplastic transverse arch, left subclavian artery arising from the Kommerell diverticulum of the descending aorta, and a vascular ring formed by the ductus ligament. An extraanatomic ascending-to-descending aorta bypass was done through a median sternotomy along with division of the ductus ligament, without any complications and good results. PMID:27343523

  15. Occupational Radiation Exposure During Endovascular Aortic Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, Anna M.; Schurink, Geert Willem H.; Bol, Martine E. Haan, Michiel W. de Zwam, Willem H. van Wildberger, Joachim E. Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe aim of the study was to evaluate the radiation exposure to operating room personnel and to assess determinants for high personal doses during endovascular aortic repair.Materials and MethodsOccupational radiation exposure was prospectively evaluated during 22 infra-renal aortic repair procedures (EVAR), 11 thoracic aortic repair procedures (TEVAR), and 11 fenestrated or branched aortic repair procedures (FEVAR). Real-time over-lead dosimeters attached to the left breast pocket measured personal doses for the first operators (FO) and second operators (SO), radiology technicians (RT), scrub nurses (SN), anesthesiologists (AN), and non-sterile nurses (NSN). Besides protective apron and thyroid collar, no additional radiation shielding was used. Procedural dose area product (DAP), iodinated contrast volume, fluoroscopy time, patient’s body weight, and C-arm angulation were documented.ResultsAverage procedural FO dose was significantly higher during FEVAR (0.34 ± 0.28 mSv) compared to EVAR (0.11 ± 0.21 mSv) and TEVAR (0.06 ± 0.05 mSv; p = 0.003). Average personnel doses were 0.17 ± 0.21 mSv (FO), 0.042 ± 0.045 mSv (SO), 0.019 ± 0.042 mSv (RT), 0.017 ± 0.031 mSv (SN), 0.006 ± 0.007 mSv (AN), and 0.004 ± 0.009 mSv (NSN). SO and AN doses were strongly correlated with FO dose (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between FO dose and procedural DAP (R = 0.69, p < 0.001), iodinated contrast volume (R = 0.67, p < 0.001) and left-anterior C-arm projections >60° (p = 0.02), and a weak correlation with fluoroscopy time (R = 0.40, p = 0.049).ConclusionAverage FO dose was a factor four higher than SO dose. Predictors for high personal doses are procedural DAP, iodinated contrast volume, and left-anterior C-arm projections greater than 60°.

  16. Total Aortic Arch Replacement: Superior Ventriculo-Arterial Coupling with Decellularized Allografts Compared with Conventional Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Schmack, Bastian; Korkmaz, Sevil; Li, Shiliang; Chaimow, Nicole; Pätzold, Ines; Becher, Peter Moritz; Hartyánszky, István; Soós, Pál; Merkely, Gergő; Németh, Balázs Tamás; Istók, Roland; Veres, Gábor; Merkely, Béla; Terytze, Konstantin; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, no experimental or clinical study provides detailed analysis of vascular impedance changes after total aortic arch replacement. This study investigated ventriculoarterial coupling and vascular impedance after replacement of the aortic arch with conventional prostheses vs. decellularized allografts. Methods After preparing decellularized aortic arch allografts, their mechanical, histological and biochemical properties were evaluated and compared to native aortic arches and conventional prostheses in vitro. In open-chest dogs, total aortic arch replacement was performed with conventional prostheses and compared to decellularized allografts (n = 5/group). Aortic flow and pressure were recorded continuously, left ventricular pressure-volume relations were measured by using a pressure-conductance catheter. From the hemodynamic variables end-systolic elastance (Ees), arterial elastance (Ea) and ventriculoarterial coupling were calculated. Characteristic impedance (Z) was assessed by Fourier analysis. Results While Ees did not differ between the groups and over time (4.1±1.19 vs. 4.58±1.39 mmHg/mL and 3.21±0.97 vs. 3.96±1.16 mmHg/mL), Ea showed a higher increase in the prosthesis group (4.01±0.67 vs. 6.18±0.20 mmHg/mL, P<0.05) in comparison to decellularized allografts (5.03±0.35 vs. 5.99±1.09 mmHg/mL). This led to impaired ventriculoarterial coupling in the prosthesis group, while it remained unchanged in the allograft group (62.5±50.9 vs. 3.9±23.4%). Z showed a strong increasing tendency in the prosthesis group and it was markedly higher after replacement when compared to decellularized allografts (44.6±8.3dyn·sec·cm−5 vs. 32.4±2.0dyn·sec·cm−5, P<0.05). Conclusions Total aortic arch replacement leads to contractility-afterload mismatch by means of increased impedance and invert ventriculoarterial coupling ratio after implantation of conventional prostheses. Implantation of decellularized allografts preserves vascular impedance

  17. In Vitro Hemodynamic Investigation of the Embryonic Aortic Arch at Late Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Pekkan, Kerem; Dasi, Lakshmi P.; Nourparvar, Paymon; Yerneni, Srinivasu; Tobita, Kimimasa; Fogel, Mark A.; Keller, Bradley; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the dynamic flow through the fetal aortic arch driven by the concurrent action of right and left ventricles. We created a parametric pulsatile computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the fetal aortic junction with physiologic vessel geometries. To gain a better biophysical understanding an in vitro experimental fetal flow loop for flow visualization was constructed for identical CFD conditions. CFD and in vitro experimental results were comparable. Swirling flow during the acceleration phase of the cardiac cycle and unidirectional flow following mid-deceleration phase were observed in pulmonary arteries (PA), head-neck vessels, and descending aorta. Right-to-left (oxygenated) blood flowed through the ductus arteriosus (DA) posterior relative to the antegrade left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) stream and resembled jet flow. LVOT and right ventricular outflow tract flow mixing had not completed until ~3.5 descending aorta diameters downstream of the DA insertion into the aortic arch. Normal arch model flow patterns were then compared to flow patterns of four common congenital heart malformations that include aortic arch anomalies. Weak oscillatory reversing flow through the DA junction was observed only for the Tetralogy of Fallot configuration. Pulmonary Atresia and Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome configurations demonstrated complex, abnormal flow patterns in the PAs and head-neck vessels. Aortic Coarctation resulted in large scale recirculating flow in the aortic arch proximal to the DA. Intravascular flow patterns spatially correlated with abnormal vascular structures consistent with the paradigm that abnormal intravascular flow patterns associated with congenital heart disease influence vascular growth and function. PMID:18466908

  18. Thoracic Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Middle Aortic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung Taek; Lee, Mina; Kim, Young Sam; Yoon, Yong Han; Baek, Wan Ki

    2016-09-01

    Middle aortic syndrome is a rare disease defined as a segmental narrowing of the distal descending thoracic or abdominal aorta. A thoracoabdominal bypass or endovascular treatment is the choice of treatment. Endovascular therapy consists of a balloon dilatation and stent implantation. Recently, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has been widely used in a variety of aortic diseases. We report a case of middle aortic syndrome treated with a thoracic endovascular stent graft. PMID:27549552

  19. Results of "elephant trunk" total aortic arch replacement using a multi-branched, collared graft prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan R B; Dell'Aquila, Angelo M; Akil, Ali; Schlarb, Dominik; Panuccio, Guiseppe; Martens, Sven; Rukosujew, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We report on our experience with a simplified elephant trunk (ET) procedure with a multi-branched prosthesis (Vascutek(®) Siena™ Collared Graft). It consists of a proximal portion (20 cm) with prefabricated side branches, a collar and a distal portion (30 cm). The collar, which can be trimmed into any desired diameter, constitutes the suture portion to the descending aorta. Radiopaque markers in the distal portion indicate the landing zone. Between January 2011 and June 2013, 20 consecutive patients (10 women; mean age, 66 ± 9.3 years) underwent ET procedure, including 6 re-do cases. Underlying aortic diseases were acute dissection (n = 6), chronic dissection (n = 4), aneurysm (n = 8) and PAU (n = 2). Mean preoperative diameter of the descending aorta was 49.1 ± 12.9 mm (range 74.7-29.7 mm). Concomitant procedures included ascending aortic replacement in 16 patients; root replacement in 2; AVR in 2, CABG in 3 and mitral repair in 1 patient. CPB time was 263 ± 94 min; mean duration of ACP was 65 ± 14 min. Two patients died on POD 8 and 78, respectively. Major adverse events included stroke (n = 1), resternotomy for bleeding (n = 2), renal failure requiring temporary dialysis (n = 1) and recurrent nerve paresis (n = 2). After a mean follow-up of 10 ± 8 months, all discharged patients were alive. Seven patients underwent stent-graft implantation of the descending aorta and one patient underwent open descending aortic replacement. The last generation of multi-branched arch prosthesis and especially the Vascutek(®) Siena™ Collared Graft make ET procedure a reasonable treatment option even in patients with acute aortic dissection. PMID:25491933

  20. Double aortic arch as a source of airway obstruction in a child

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sambhunath; Nair, Vinitha V.; Airan, Balram

    2015-01-01

    Double aortic arch (DAA) is a congenital vascular anomaly. The diagnosis was difficult till the child was symptomatic, and other causes were ruled out. We present the interesting images of a child of respiratory distress because of tracheal compression from DAA. PMID:25566726

  1. [Antegrade unilateral perfusion of the brain through the brachiocephalic trunk in operations on the aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, B N; Panfilov, D S; Kuznetsov, M S; Ponomarenko, I V; Nasrashvili, G G; Shipulin, V M

    2016-01-01

    Presented herein is a technique of unilateral antegrade perfusion of the brain in operations on the aortic arch. The method makes it possible to perform both systemic artificial circulation and adequate physiological perfusion of the brain, promoting minimization of the number of neurological complications. PMID:27100557

  2. Open Aortic Arch Reconstruction After Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: Worth the Effort?

    PubMed

    Quintana, Eduard; Bajona, Pietro; Schaff, Hartzell V; Dearani, Joseph A; Daly, Richard; Greason, Kevin; Pochettino, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Open aortic arch surgery after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is considered a high-risk operation. We reviewed our surgical approach and outcomes to establish the risk profile for this patient population. In methods, from 2000-2014, 650 patients underwent aortic arch surgery with circulatory arrest. Of these, 45 (7%) had previous CABG. Complete medical record was available for review including all preoperative coronary angiograms and detailed management of myocardial protection. In results, the mean interval from previous CABG to aortic arch surgery was 6.8 ± 7.1 years. At reoperation, 33 (73%) patients had hemiarch replacement and 12 (27%) had a total arch replacement. The following were the indications for surgery: fusiform aneurysm in 20 (44%), pseudoaneurysm in 6 (13%), endocarditis in 4 (9%), valvular disease in 5 (11%), and acute aortic dissection in 10 (22%). There were 6 perioperative deaths (13%) and 1 stroke (2.2%). Selective antegrade cerebral perfusion was used in 13 patients (28.9%) and retrograde perfusion in 6 (13.3%). Survival was 74%, 65%, and 52% at 1, 3, and 5-year follow-up, respectively. Only predictors of early mortality were age (odds ratio = 1.20, CI: 1.01-1.44; P = 0.04) and nonuse of retrograde cardioplegia for myocardial protection (odds ratio = 6.80, CI: 1.06-43.48; P = 0.04). Intermediate survival of these patients was significantly lower than those of a sex-matched and age-matched population (P < 0.001). In conclusion, aortic arch surgery after previous CABG can be performed with acceptable early and midterm results and low risk of stroke. Perfusion strategies and myocardial protection contribute to successful outcomes. PMID:27568130

  3. Right axillary and femoral artery perfusion with mild hypothermia for aortic arch replacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Aortic arch replacement is associated with increased mortality and morbidity especially in acute type-A aortic dissection. Although hypothermic circulatory arrest with selective antegrade cerebral perfusion has been widely used because of its excellent cerebral protection, its optimal perfusion characteristics are unknown. The present study investigates clinical results obtained after perfusion method modification and temperature management during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods Between July 2010 and August 2012, 16 consecutive adult patients (mean age 50.0 yr ± 14.1 yr, range 25 yr to 73 yr, 12 males, 4 females) who presented with acute Stanford type-A aortic dissection underwent aortic arch replacement (total arch, n = 11; hemiarch, n = 5) under mild hypothermia (31.1°C ± 1.5°C) with right axillary and femoral artery perfusion. Results The mean CPB time was 201 min ± 53 min, and the mean myocardial ischemic time was 140 min ± 42 min. The mean selective cerebral perfusion time was 80 min ± 16 min, and the mean lower-body circulatory arrest time was 20 min ± 13 min. No patient death occurred within 30 post-operative days. The following details were observed: new post-operative permanent neurologic deficit in 1 patient (6.3%), temporary neurologic deficit in 2 patients (12.5%), acute renal dysfunction (creatinine level > 230 umol/L) in 3 patients (18.8%) and mechanical ventilation > 72 h in 5 patients (31.2%). Conclusions Aortic arch replacement for acute type-A aortic dissection under mild hypothermia with right axillary and femoral artery perfusion could be safely performed in the patient cohort. PMID:24885031

  4. Endovascular Repair of an Anastomotic Leak Following Open Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Mofidi, R. Flett, M.; Milne, A.; Chakraverty, S.

    2007-09-15

    This report describes the case of an early postoperative anastomotic leak following elective open repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm which was successfully treated by endovascular stent-grafting. A 71-year-old man underwent open tube graft repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Twelve days later he presented with a contained leak from the distal anastomosis, which was confirmed on CT scan. This was successfully treated with a bifurcated aortic stent-graft. This case illustrates the usefulness of the endovascular approach for resolving this rare surgical complication of open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and the challenges associated with the deployment of such a device within an aortic tube graft.

  5. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for complicated chronic type B aortic dissection in a patient on hemodialysis with recurrent ischemic colitis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yuko; Furuyama, Tadashi; Matsubara, Yutaka; Yoshiya, Keiji; Yoshiga, Ryosuke; Inoue, Kentaro; Matsuda, Daisuke; Aoyagi, Yukihiko; Kato, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    We present a successful case of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for chronic Stanford type B aortic dissection (B-AD) with recurrent ischemic colitis. The patient was a 56-year-old woman with abdominal pain as the main complaint who had two operations previously: the total arch replacement 8 years ago and the Bentall 7 years ago for acute Stanford type A aortic dissection. Her abdominal pain worsened as her blood pressure became low during her hemodialysis treatment. An enhanced computed tomography scan was performed on the patient and showed chronic B-AD that occurred from the distal anastomotic part of the total arch graft to the bilateral common iliac arteries. The celiac artery and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) arose from the true lumen, and these were compressed by the expanded false lumen. Her complicated chronic B-AD was treated with the Zenith Dissection Endovascular System, and its procedure was performed as her proximal entry tear was covered by a proximal tapered Zenith TX2 stent graft, supplemented by a noncovered aortic stent extending across both renal arteries, the SMA, and the celiac artery. Seven days after this operation, enhanced computed tomography showed that the patient's true lumen was expanded and her blood flow to the true lumen and SMA was improved. On the other hand, her false lumen tended to be thrombosed. Consequently, she was discharged 10 days after the operation without any postoperative complications as she had no abdominal complaints even though she underwent hemodialysis three times per week after the operation. We believe that TEVAR supplemented by a noncovered aortic stent is an effective treatment, even for highly chronic B-AD in dialysis patients. PMID:27090121

  6. [Combined Open and Endovascular Repair of Multiple Aortic Aneurysms due to Syphilitic Aortitis].

    PubMed

    Shima, Shotaro; Okamura, Kennichi; Morizumi, Sei; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Suematsu, Yoshihiro

    2015-06-01

    The patient was a 69-year-old man who presented with low-grade fever and appetite loss. Thoracoabdominal computed tomography revealed multiple aneurysms in the distal arch and descending thoracic and infrarenal aortic regions combined with a right common iliac artery aneurysm. After endovascular stent grafting for a right iliac artery aneurysm, he underwent total arch replacement and open stent grafting for the descending thoracic aneurysms. Pathological microscopic examination revealed an inflammatory infiltrate within the adventitia and destruction of the elastic fibers in the media, which are classical features of syphilitic aortitis. Endovascular aneurysm repair is contraindicated in mycotic infected aneurysms. However, endovascular repair is useful for treating mycotic infected aneurysm, if multiple aneurysms have the possibility of rupture and a high risk of surgery. PMID:26066872

  7. Hybrid Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair for Intercostal Patch Aneurysm after Thoracoabdominal Aortic Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Akihiro; Hachiya, Takashi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Hirano, Akinori; Kasai, Mio; Akamatsu, Yuta; Oka, Hidetoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair for intercostal patch aneurysm after thoracoabdominal aortic replacement. Eighteen years ago, a 63-year-old woman with Marfan syndrome had undergone thoracoabdominal aortic replacement with reimplantation of the intercostal artery in an island fashion. Follow-up computed tomography (CT) revealed a remaining intercostal patch aneurysm of diameter 60 mm 17 years after the last operation. Hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair for exclusion of this intercostal patch aneurysm was successfully performed, with visceral artery bypasses. Postoperative CT showed no anastomotic stenosis or endoleak. PMID:26730265

  8. Direct Tracheobronchopexy and Posterior Descending Aortopexy for Severe Left Mainstem Bronchomalacia Associated With Congenital Pulmonary Airway Malformation and Left Circumflex Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Baird, Christopher W; Prabhu, Sanjay; Buchmiller, Terry L; Smithers, Charles; Jennings, Russell

    2016-07-01

    Complex tracheobronchial obstruction and malacia can be associated with conotruncal and aortic arch anomalies. A circumflex aortic arch composed of a left aortic arch and right descending aorta is an extremely rare anomaly that can severely affect the distal trachea and mainstem bronchi, resulting in severe respiratory symptoms. We report the case of a patient with circumflex aortic arch and severe left mainstem bronchial obstruction and malacia in which the external aortic compression and residual bronchomalacia were addressed with direct bronchial and tracheal intervention. PMID:27343517

  9. Preoperative evaluation of a patient for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed Central

    Chonchubhair, A. N.; Cunningham, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Coexistent cardiovascular disease is common in patients presenting for repair of aortic aneurysms. However, preoperative cardiac evaluation prior to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery remains contentious with significant variations in practice between countries, institutions and individual anesthetists. The following case report raises some everyday issues confronting clinical anesthetists. PMID:10604782

  10. Modelling and numerical simulation of the human aortic arch under in vivo conditions.

    PubMed

    García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J

    2013-11-01

    This work presents the modelling and simulation of the mechanical behaviour of the human aortic arch under in vivo conditions with pressure levels within the normal and hypertension physiological range. The cases studied correspond to young and aged arteries without cardiovascular pathologies. First, the tissue of these two groups is characterised via in vitro tensile test measurements that make it possible to derive the material parameters of a hyperelastic isotropic constitutive model. Then, these material parameters are used in the simulation of young and aged aortic arches subjected to in vivo normal and hypertension conditions. Overall, the numerical results were found not only to provide a realistic description of the mechanical behaviour of the vessel but also to be useful data that allow the adequate definition of stress/stretch-based criteria to predict its failure. PMID:23371524

  11. [A case of a syndrome resembling PSP after aortic arch replacement under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Yusuke; Michizono, Kumiko; Tomari, Shinya; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakahara, Keiichi; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    A 57-year-old man presented with acute signs and symptoms mimicking PSP (bradykinesia, supranuclear ocular palsy, dysphagia, neck dystonia, and apraxic gait) on the day after a graft replacement surgery, which was performed for aortic arch aneurysm under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (rectal temperature, 18 degrees C). Dysphagia improved temporarily, but relapsed after a few months. Symptoms did not change during 2 years of antiparkinsonian drug administration. Brain images obtained before the surgery revealed slight atrophy of the midbrain tegmentum and frontal lobes, but the patient was asymptomatic. No findings of cerebral vascular disease and hypoxic encephalopathy were observed on brain images after the surgery. These clinical features resembling PSP might have been caused by deep hypothermia and the patient's predisposition for PSP. This is the first case report in Japan of a syndrome resembling PSP that occurred after aortic arch replacement under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. PMID:21387699

  12. Mycotic aortic arch aneurysm coexistent with constrictive pericarditis: is surgery a dangerous resort?

    PubMed

    Yu, Peter S Y; Yu, Simon C H; Chu, Cheuk-Man; Kwok, Micky W T; Lam, Yuk-Hoi; Underwood, Malcolm J; Wong, Randolph H L

    2016-08-01

    An elderly man presented with fever and evidence of Salmonella infection, and was diagnosed to have coexisting constrictive pericarditis and mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch. Pericardiectomy was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass with good result. To avoid deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, an aorto-brachiocephalic bypass, instead of total arch replacement, was performed. This was followed by a staged carotid-carotid bypass, thoracic endovascular stent graft placement. He was subsequently treated with prolonged antibiotics, and inflammatory marker normalized afterwards. He was last seen well 2 years after the operation. Follow-up computer tomography (CT) scan at 18 months post-op showed no evidence of endoleak or fistulation. Our case demonstrated that a hybrid treatment of open pericardiectomy and aortic debranching followed by thoracic endovascular stent graft placement is feasible and associated with satisfactory mid-term outcome. PMID:27621905

  13. Mycotic aortic arch aneurysm coexistent with constrictive pericarditis: is surgery a dangerous resort?

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Peter S. Y.; Yu, Simon C. H.; Chu, Cheuk-Man; Kwok, Micky W. T.; Lam, Yuk-Hoi; Underwood, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    An elderly man presented with fever and evidence of Salmonella infection, and was diagnosed to have coexisting constrictive pericarditis and mycotic aneurysm of the aortic arch. Pericardiectomy was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass with good result. To avoid deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, an aorto-brachiocephalic bypass, instead of total arch replacement, was performed. This was followed by a staged carotid-carotid bypass, thoracic endovascular stent graft placement. He was subsequently treated with prolonged antibiotics, and inflammatory marker normalized afterwards. He was last seen well 2 years after the operation. Follow-up computer tomography (CT) scan at 18 months post-op showed no evidence of endoleak or fistulation. Our case demonstrated that a hybrid treatment of open pericardiectomy and aortic debranching followed by thoracic endovascular stent graft placement is feasible and associated with satisfactory mid-term outcome. PMID:27621905

  14. Thoracoscopic correction of a congenital persistent right aortic arch in a young cat

    PubMed Central

    Plesman, Rhea; Johnson, Matthew; Rurak, Sarah; Ambrose, Barbara; Shmon, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    A 9-week-old kitten was diagnosed with a congenital vascular ring anomaly by means of an esophageal contrast study. At 6 mo of age, a non-selective vascular study was used to diagnose a persistent right aortic arch (PRAA). Left-sided thoracoscopic surgery was performed, using a Liga-Sure vessel sealant device to seal and transect the ligamentum arteriosum. PMID:22467970

  15. Interrupted Aortic Arch Associated with Absence of Left Common Carotid Artery: Imaging with MDCT

    SciTech Connect

    Onbas, Omer Olgun, Hasim; Ceviz, Naci; Ors, Rahmi; Okur, Adnan

    2006-06-15

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare severe congenital heart defect defined as complete luminal and anatomic discontinuity between ascending and descending aorta. Although its association with various congenital heart defects has been reported, absence of left common carotid artery (CCA) in patients with IAA has not been reported previously. We report a case of IAA associated with the absence of left CCA which was clearly shown on multidetector-row spiral CT.

  16. [Interruption of the aortic arch with no patent ductus arteriosus: is survival possible?].

    PubMed

    Boukhris, M; Hakim, K; Ouarda, F; M'saad, H; Boussaada, R

    2014-03-01

    Interruption of the aortic arch is a rare congenital disease. It is defined by the complete interruption between the ascending and descending aorta. A patent ductus arteriosus is necessary to maintain flow from the pulmonary to the descending aorta. Its closure leads to a cardiovascular collapse and this malformation is therefore duct-dependent. However, in rare cases, survival remains possible even after ductus arteriosus closure. We report such a case. PMID:24457106

  17. [Successful management of ruptured aortic arch aneurysm infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Kawahira, T; Tsukube, T; Hayashi, T; Kozawa, S; Ogawa, K

    2008-09-01

    A 64-year-old woman was admitted due to back pain and dyspnea. She was suffering from fever of unknown origin for a few weeks without aortic aneurysm by enhanced chest computed tomography (CT). Chest CT taken 1 month later revealed rupture of aortic arch aneurysm. Total arch replacement was performed with in situ grafting under selective cerebral perfusion combined with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Rifampicin (RFP) was sprinkled on the graft at operation and omentopexy was done 5 days after the 1st operation. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated on the culture of the aneurysmal wall, therefore, polymyxin B immobilized fiber with direct hemoperfusion (PMX-DHP) was also conducted with antibiotic therapy. Her clinical course after the 2nd operation was uneventful with no infective complication. We report a successful case of ruptured aneurysm of aortic arch infected with MRSA and review our strategy as one of feasible options without using homograft or preparative RFP-bonded vascular prosthesis. PMID:18788376

  18. Carbon Dioxide in the Aortic Arch: Coronary Effects and Implications in a Swine Study

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, William C. Porter, Thomas R.; Culp, William C.; Vonk, Brian N.

    2003-04-15

    Purpose: CO{sub 2} angiography is considered dangerous in the aortic arch where bubbles may cause critical cerebral and cardiac ischemia. We investigated CO{sub 2}distribution, physiologic effects in the heart, methods of detection and treatments. Methods: Eight pigs had CO{sub 2}and iodinated contrast arch angiograms in supine and both lateral decubitus positions. An electrocardiogram, physiologic data and cardiac ultrasound were obtained. Therapies included precordial thumps and rolls to lateral decubitus positions. Results: Supine high descending aorta CO{sub 2} injections floated retrograde up the arch during diastole and preferentially filled the right coronary artery (RCA): mean score 3.5 (of 4), in nominate artery 2.4, left coronary artery 1.2; n = 17; p = 0.0001. Aortic root injections preferentially filled the RCA when the animal was supine, left coronary in the right decubitus position, and showed a diffuse pattern in the left decubitus position. Right decubitus rolls filled both coronaries causing several lethal arrhythmias. Precordialthumps successfully cleared CO{sub 2}. Ultrasound is a sensitive detector of myocardial CO{sub 2}. Conclusion: Arch distribution of CO{sub 2} primarily involves the RCA. Diagnostic ultrasound detects cardiac CO{sub 2} well. Precordial thumps are an effective treatment.

  19. Multimodal optical measurement in vitro of surface deformations and wall thickness of the pressurized aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Katia; Humphrey, Jay D

    2015-04-01

    Computational modeling of arterial mechanics continues to progress, even to the point of allowing the study of complex regions such as the aortic arch. Nevertheless, most prior studies assign homogeneous and isotropic material properties and constant wall thickness even when implementing patient-specific luminal geometries obtained from medical imaging. These assumptions are not due to computational limitations, but rather to the lack of spatially dense sets of experimental data that describe regional variations in mechanical properties and wall thickness in such complex arterial regions. In this work, we addressed technical challenges associated with in vitro measurement of overall geometry, full-field surface deformations, and regional wall thickness of the porcine aortic arch in its native anatomical configuration. Specifically, we combined two digital image correlation-based approaches, standard and panoramic, to track surface geometry and finite deformations during pressurization, with a 360-deg fringe projection system to contour the outer and inner geometry. The latter provided, for the first time, information on heterogeneous distributions of wall thickness of the arch and associated branches in the unloaded state. Results showed that mechanical responses vary significantly with orientation and location (e.g., less extensible in the circumferential direction and with increasing distance from the heart) and that the arch exhibits a nearly linear increase in pressure-induced strain up to 40%, consistent with other findings on proximal porcine aortas. Thickness measurements revealed strong regional differences, thus emphasizing the need to include nonuniform thicknesses in theoretical and computational studies of complex arterial geometries. PMID:25867620

  20. Limitation of imaging in identifying iatrogenic aortic coarctation following thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Rajiv N; Thomaier, Lauren; Qazi, Umair; Verde, Franco; Malas, Mahmoud B

    2015-04-01

    A 21-year-old male suffered blunt trauma from a motor vehicle accident causing thoracic aorta tear. The smallest available stent graft was deployed. Definitive repair was later performed using a 22 × 22 × 116 mm Talent Thoracic Stent Graft. The postoperative course was uneventful. Seventeen months later, he presented with dizziness, chest pain, acute renal failure, malignant hypertension, and troponin elevation. Computed tomography (CT) angiogram and transesophageal echocardiogram did not reveal any dissection, stent stenosis or collapse. Cardiac catheterization showed normal coronary arteries but a 117 mm Hg gradient across the stent graft. Iatrogenic coarctation of the aorta was confirmed with a second measurement during arch angiogram. A Palmaz stent was deployed over the distal end of the previous stent graft with complete resolution of symptoms and gradual normalization of kidney function. This case report demonstrates a need for wider availability and selecting appropriate stent graft in treating traumatic aortic injuries in young patients. It is the first case report of the inability of current imaging modalities in confirming stent collapse. Pressure gradient is a useful tool in confirming stent collapse when clinical scenario does not match CT findings. PMID:25637574

  1. Endograft collapse following endovascular repair of traumatic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Ganesan; Cook, Richard; Martin, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The advent of endovascular treatment of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries offers a valuable, minimally invasive alternative to open surgical repair. However, there are limitations of the current endovascular stent graft technology for this group of patients. After endovascular repair meticulous follow-up is required with a high index of suspicion for potential complications including the lethal complication of endograft collapse. PMID:19784919

  2. Complex aortic arch anomaly: Right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery, fenestrated proximal right and duplicated proximal left vertebral arteries—CT angiography findings and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Elizabeth; Hagspiel, Klaus D

    2015-01-01

    Congenital aortic arch and vertebral artery anomalies are a relatively rare finding discovered on imaging either incidentally or for evaluation of entities like dysphagia or subclavian steal. Right aortic arch is an uncommon anatomical anomaly that occurs in less than 0.1% of the population, and in half of these cases the left subclavian artery is also aberrant.1 Unilateral vertebral artery (VA) duplication is rare with an observed prevalence of 0.72% in cadavers.2 Fenestration of the VA is more common than duplication, with a prevalence of approximately 0.23%–1.95%.3,4 We describe the case of a 25-year-old female who was found to have a right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery, duplicated left vertebral artery and a fenestrated right vertebral artery on CT angiography performed for evaluation of dysphagia. This combination of findings has not been reported before, to the best of our knowledge. We review the embryologic mechanism for the development of the normal aortic arch, right aortic arch, vertebral artery duplication and vertebral artery fenestration. The incidence of these entities, resultant symptoms and clinical implications are also reviewed. The increased associated incidence of aneurysm formation, dissection, arteriovenous malformations and thromboembolic events with fenestration is also discussed. PMID:26306929

  3. Central retinal artery occlusion following laser treatment for ocular ischemic aortic arch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Payal J.; Ellis, Brian; DiGiovine, Lauren R.; Hogg, Jeffery P.; Leys, Monique J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Ocular ischemic syndrome is a rare blinding condition generally caused by disease of the carotid artery. We describe a 69-year-old female with a 50 pack-year smoking history with aortic arch syndrome causing bilateral ocular ischemic syndrome. Methods: The patient presented with progressive visual loss and temple pain. Slit lamp biomicroscopy revealed bilateral iris neovascularization. This finding prompted a cardiovascular work up. Panretinal photocoagulation with retrobulbar block was performed in the right eye. Results: A temporal artery biopsy was negative. The carotid duplex ultrasound showed only a 1–39% stenosis. MRA revealed a more proximal occlusion of the aortic branch for which she underwent subclavian carotid bypass surgery. At the one month follow up, the right eye suffered profound vision loss secondary to a central retinal artery occlusion. Conclusion: Ocular neovascularization may be one of the clinical manifestations of aortic arch syndrome. This case also illustrates the limitations of relying solely on carotid duplex ultrasound testing. We caution against overly aggressive panretinal photocoagulation utilizing retrobulbar anesthesia.

  4. Endovascular Repair of Complex Aortic Aneurysms: Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance with an Intracardiac Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Zanchetta, Mario Rigatelli, Gianluca; Pedon, Luigi; Zennaro, Marco; Ronsivalle, Salvatore; Maiolino, Pietro

    2003-09-15

    To assess the accuracy and efficacy of intravascular ultrasound guidance obtained by an intracardiac ultrasound probe during complex aortic endografting. Between November 1999 and July 2002, 19 patients (5 female, 14 male; mean age 73.5 {+-} 2.1 years) underwent endovascular repair of thoracic (n = 10), complex abdominal (n = 6) and concomitant thoraco-abdominal (n = 3) aortic aneurysm. The most suitable size and configuration of the stent-graft were chosen on the basis of preoperative computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Intraoperative intravascular ultrasound imaging was obtained using a 9 Fr, 9 MHz intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) probe, 110 cm in length, inserted through a 10 Fr precurved long sheath. The endografts were deployed as planned by CTA or MRA. Before stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to view the posterior aortic arch and descending thoraco-abdominal aorta without position-related artifacts, and to identify both sites of stent-graft positioning. After stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to detect the need for additional modular components to internally reline the aorta in 11 patients, and to discover 2 incomplete graft expansions subsequently treated with adjunctive balloon angioplasty. In 1 patient, the ICE probe supported the decision that the patient was ineligible for the endovascular exclusion procedure. The ICE probe provides accurate information on the anatomy of the posterior aortic arch and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and a rapid identification of attachment sites and stent-graft pathology, allowing refinement and improvement of the endovascular strategy.

  5. Successful bovine arch replacement for a type A acute aortic dissection in a pregnant woman with severe haemodynamic compromise

    PubMed Central

    Nonga, Bernadette Ngo; Pasquet, Agnès; Noirhomme, Philippe; El–Khoury, Gebrine

    2012-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is very uncommon in pregnant women and the acute type A aortic dissection carries a high mortality rate outside specialized centres. There are a few cases reported with successful outcomes for the mother and the foetus from major cardiac centres. We are reporting our first experience of acute aortic dissection during the third trimester of pregnancy in a patient with Marfan features, profound haemodynamic compromise on arrival and a bovine aortic arch. Both the mother and the baby are doing well two years postoperatively. PMID:22547559

  6. External aortic wrap for repair of type 1 endoleak☆

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Anastasia; Yap, Swee Leong; Bhamidipaty, Venu; Pond, Franklin

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Type 1 endoleak is a rare complication after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) with a reported frequency up to 2.88%. It is a major risk factor for aneurysmal enlargement and rupture. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of a 68 year old gentleman who was found to have a proximal type 1 endoleak with loss of graft wall apposition on routine surveillance imaging post-EVAR. An initial attempt at endovascular repair was unsuccessful. Given the patient's multiple medical co-morbidities, which precluded the possibility of conventional graft explantation and open repair, we performed a novel surgical technique which did not require aortic cross-clamping. A double-layered Dacron wrap was secured around the infra-renal aorta with Prolene sutures, effectively hoisting the posterior bulge to allow wall to graft apposition and excluding the endoleak. Post-operative CT angiogram showed resolution of the endoleak and a stable sac size. DISCUSSION Several anatomical factors need to be considered when this technique is proposed including aortic neck angulation, position of lumbar arteries and peri-aortic venous anatomy. While an external wrap technique has been investigated sporadically for vascular aneurysms, to our knowledge there is only one similar case in the literature. CONCLUSION Provided certain anatomical features are present, an external aortic wrap is a useful and successful option to manage type 1 endoleak in high-risk patients who are unsuitable for aortic clamping. PMID:25217878

  7. Blood flow in the rabbit aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Vincent, P E; Plata, A M; Hunt, A A E; Weinberg, P D; Sherwin, S J

    2011-12-01

    The distribution of atherosclerotic lesions within the rabbit vasculature, particularly within the descending thoracic aorta, has been mapped in numerous studies. The patchy nature of such lesions has been attributed to local variation in the pattern of blood flow. However, there have been few attempts to model and characterize the flow. In this study, a high-order continuous Galerkin finite-element method was used to simulate blood flow within a realistic representation of the rabbit aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. The geometry, which was obtained from computed tomography of a resin corrosion cast, included all vessels originating from the aortic arch (followed to at least their second generation) and five pairs of intercostal arteries originating from the proximal descending thoracic aorta. The simulations showed that small geometrical undulations associated with the ductus arteriosus scar cause significant deviations in wall shear stress (WSS). This finding highlights the importance of geometrical accuracy when analysing WSS or related metrics. It was also observed that two Dean-type vortices form in the aortic arch and propagate down the descending thoracic aorta (along with an associated skewed axial velocity profile). This leads to the occurrence of axial streaks in WSS, similar in nature to the axial streaks of lipid deposition found in the descending aorta of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Finally, it was observed that WSS patterns within the vicinity of intercostal branch ostia depend not only on local flow features caused by the branches themselves, but also on larger-scale flow features within the descending aorta, which vary between branches at different locations. This result implies that disease and WSS patterns in the vicinity of intercostal ostia are best compared on a branch-by-branch basis. PMID:21593030

  8. Salmonella aortitis treated with endovascular aortic repair: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Salmonella is a typical cause of aortitis, which is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In infrarenal disease, besides open surgery, endovascular aortic repair as an alternative treatment has been reported. To the best of our knowledge, we report the first successful endovascular aortic repair documented by necropsy to date. Case presentation A 67-year-old Caucasian man presented with low back pain, fever and positive blood cultures for Salmonella Enteritidis. A computed tomography scan showed an enlargement and intramural hematoma of the infrarenal aortic wall; a Salmonella aortitis was suspected and antimicrobial therapy initiated. Because of substantial comorbidities, endovascular aortic repair was favored over open surgery; postoperatively the antibiotic treatment was continued for 12 months. Post-mortem there were neither macroscopic nor microscopic signs of aortitis or graft infection. Conclusions We could demonstrate by necropsy that endovascular aortic repair of infrarenal aortitis with prolonged pre- and postinterventional antibiotic therapy for 12 months was a minimally invasive alternative and should be considered in selected clinically stable patients with substantial co-morbidities. PMID:22894684

  9. Neonatal magnetic resonance imaging in double aortic arch diagnosed prenatally by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Trobo Marina, Duna; Bravo, Coral; Lancharro, Ángel; Gámez Alderete, Francisco; Marín, Carlos; de León-Luis, Juan

    2016-05-01

    Congenital double aortic arch (DAA) is an uncommon vascular anomaly; however, its prenatal detection is associated with congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities, including 22q11 deletion. We present a case of DAA diagnosed prenatally. DAA can be diagnosed by prenatal ultrasound in the transverse three vessel-trachea view, which shows a trident image formed by a complete vascular ring and the ductus arteriosus. Postnatal magnetic resonance images in this view correlate well with prenatal ultrasound images and help in confirmation of diagnosis, evaluation of the risk of airway or esophageal compression, and planning of surgery. PMID:26979672

  10. The retrieval of atrial septal defect closure device embolized into aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Hamur, Hikmet; Onk, Oruc Alper; Degirmenci, Husnu; Kahraman, Umit; Bakirci, Eftal Murat; Tuncer, Osman Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Summary Percutaneous atrial septal defect (ASD) closure has become an increasingly simplified procedure over the past decade. The device embolization is seen rarely but it can be fatal. Although percutaneous retrieval is feasible, surgical removal might be preferred when the endothelialization status of the device is unknown. We report a comlication of such closure in a 43-year-old woman: embolization of the ASD occluder device into aortic arch 12 months after implantation. We removed the device surgically and closed the ASD. PMID:27195195

  11. Aneurysm growth after late conversion of thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Ichiro; Haijima, Norimasa

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a descending aortic aneurysm. Three years later, he developed impending rupture due to aneurysmal expansion that included the proximal landing zone. Urgent open surgery was performed via lateral thoracotomy, and a Dacron graft was sewn to the previous stent graft distally with Teflon felt reinforcement. Postoperatively, four sequential computed tomography scans demonstrated that the aneurysm was additionally increasing in size probably due to continuous hematoma production, suggesting a possibility of endoleaks. This case demonstrates the importance of careful radiologic surveillance after endovascular repair, and also after partial open conversion. PMID:27489673

  12. Fenestrated endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a less invasive option for the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Bryan A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair has become the predominant surgical therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Whereas anatomical limitations had become the major contraindication to endovascular treatment, fenestrated stent grafts were developed to overcome such obstacles. Fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair now provides an additional treatment option for patients felt to be unsuitable for an invasive open repair whose anatomy is not compatible with more traditional stent grafts. We review the evolution of fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and compare its safety and efficacy to other endovascular options. PMID:27092859

  13. Right Aortic Arch with Aplasia of the Left Brachiocephalic Trunk Presented as Systolic Blood Pressure Difference Between Upper Extremities

    PubMed Central

    Babińska, Anna; Wawrzynek, Wojciech; Kukawska-Sysio, Karolina; Skupiński, Jarosław; Nowak, Patrycja

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background The right aortic arch with mirror-image of branching arteries without coexisting congenital heart disease is a very rare anomaly. Case Report We report a case of the right-sided aortic arch with aplasia of the left brachiocephalic trunk in a 64-year-old women, presenting difference in systolic blood pressure between upper extremities. The history of the patient and angio-CT findings were described and visualized with images. Conclusions The knowledge of vascular variations is important for the clinical and therapeutic aspects. PMID:26966474

  14. Safety profile of decellularized, cryopreserved pulmonary allografts when used in the aortic position for neonatal arch reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Knepp, Marc D; Ohye, Richard G; Gajarski, Robert J

    2011-08-01

    Cryopreserved pulmonary allograft is frequently used to reconstruct the hypoplastic aortic arch. A decellularized graft preparation is available as an alternative reconstructive material. This case series profiles our experience using this material for neonatal aortic arch reconstruction. Data from 14 patients who received decellularized pulmonary allograft (DCPA) from 2001 to 2003 included the following: diagnosis; age at implantation; perioperative complications (graft bleeding or dehiscence); intermediate-term results, including infection, recurrent arch gradient (>10 mmHg), graft calcification, or aneurysm; need for graft removal; and cause of death. Eleven (79%) patients survived their initial procedure. Median follow-up was 26 (range: 1-110) months. No early graft dehiscence was reported. No child developed aortic arch obstruction or graft calcification. Twelve patients (86%) underwent postoperative cardiac catheterizations with no measurable arch gradient. No intermediate-term aneurysm, dehiscence, or graft removal occurred. Three early deaths were due to arrhythmia, non-shunt-related hypoxia, and renal failure, and one, intermediate-term death was respiratory syncytial virus related. This series found that DCPA reconstructed arches have a low adverse event profile. No complications occurred. Because this graft material, which may be less immunogenic, has important implications for this subgroup, who are at increased future transplant risk, larger trials evaluating longer-term safety and immunogenicity are warranted. PMID:21479906

  15. Aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty: repair with an extracellular patch

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak, Szymon; Śliwka, Joanna; Urlik, Maciej; Maruszewski, Marcin; Kukulski, Tomasz; Nożyński, Jerzy; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The proportion of valve repair procedures is increasing in experienced centers. The aim of the study was to assess the clinical and echocardiographic outcomes after aortic valve reconstruction with a novel surgical technique. Material and methods The study group consisted of 30 patients (23 male and 7 female) at a mean age of 35 ± 14 years. In patients with aortic root aneurysm the reimplantation or Florida sleeve technique was used. A sub-commissural annuloplasty, plication of the free edge of the cusp, shaving, and commissurotomy were performed. At this stage of surgery aortic repair was then attempted by cusp extension. Since 2013 the strips have been tailored from extracellular matrix. Results The mean aortic cross-clamp time was 90 ± 32 min. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 126 ± 38 min. There was no in-hospital death. Re-exploration for bleeding was required in 1 patient. During follow-up, 1 patient needed reoperation at 1 year due to endocarditis. All patients remained alive in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class I. The echocardiographic findings remained unchanged in all cases during follow-up. Conclusions Our modification of aortic valve repair results in a good outcome. PMID:26855646

  16. Right aortic arch with isolation of the left innominate artery in a case of double chamber right ventricle and ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Mangukia, Chirantan; Sethi, Sonali; Agarwal, Saket; Mishra, Smita; Satsangi, Deepak Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Herein, we report an unusual case of right aortic arch with isolation of the left innominate artery in a case of double chamber right ventricle with ventricular septal defect. The blood supply to the innominate artery was by a collateral arising from the descending aorta. The embryological development of this anomaly can be explained by the hypothetical double aortic arch model proposed by Edwards with interruption of the arch at two levels. PMID:24987265

  17. Long-term survival following emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Milner, Q J; Burchett, K R

    2000-05-01

    Survival following emergency surgery for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm remains poor and is in stark contrast to that for elective repair. We have carried out a 5-year retrospective observational study to determine the long-term (5-year) survival of patients following emergency surgery for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm at a district general hospital in East Anglia. A total of 99 patients presented to the operating theatre for emergency repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in this 5-year study period. In-hospital mortality was 70% and was unchanged over the 5 years. Overall long-term survival in those patients discharged from hospital was good. The ICU cost per long-term survivor was calculated to be pound sterling 36750. PMID:10792133

  18. Endovascular repair of aortic disease: a venture capital perspective.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Lucas W; Stavropoulos, S William; Resnick, Joshua B; Solomon, Jeffrey

    2009-03-01

    Endovascular devices for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic disease are poised to become the next $1 billion medical device market. A shift from open repair to endovascular repair, advances in technology, screening initiatives, and new indications are driving this growth. Although billion-dollar medical device markets are rare, this field is fraught with risk and uncertainty for startups and their venture capital investors. Technological hurdles, daunting clinical and regulatory timelines, market adoption issues, and entrenched competitors pose significant barriers to successful new venture creation. In fact, the number of aortic endografts that have failed to reach commercialization or have been pulled from the market exceeds the number of Food and Drug Administration-approved endografts in the United States. This article will shed some light on the venture capital mind-set and decision-making paradigm in the context of aortic disease. PMID:21326532

  19. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  20. Endovascular stent graft repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms: the history and the present in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Shimazaki, Taro; Iwahashi, Toru; Ogino, Hitoshi; Ishimaru, Shin; Shigematsu, Hiroshi; Yozu, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    Stent-grafts for endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms have been commercially available for more than ten years in the West, whereas, in Japan, a manufactured stent-graft was not approved for the use until March 2008. Nevertheless, endovascular thoracic intervention began to be performed in Japan in the early 1990s, with homemade devices used in most cases. Many researchers have continued to develop their homemade devices. We have participated in joint design and assessment efforts with a stent-graft manufacturer, focusing primarily on fenestrated stent-grafts used in repairs at the distal arch, a site especially prone to aneurysm. In March 2008, TAG (W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Flagstaff, Arizona, USA) was approved as a stent graft for the thoracic area first in Japan, which was major turning point in treatment for thoracic aortic aneurysms. Subsequently, TALENT (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA) was approved in May 2009, and TX2 (COOK MEDICAL Inc., Bloomington, Indiana, USA) in March 2011. Valiant as an improved version of TALENT was approved in November 2011, and TX2 Proform as an improved version of TX2 began to be supplied in October 2012. These stent grafts are excellent devices that showed good results in Western countries, and marked effectiveness can be expected by making the most of the characteristics of each device. A clinical trial in Japan on Najuta (tentative name) (Kawasumi Labo., Inc., Tokyo, Japan) as a line-up of fenestrated stent grafts that can be applied to distal arch aneurysms showing a high incidence, and allow maintenance of blood flow to the arch vessel was initiated. This trial was completed, and Najuta has just been approved in January of 2013 in Japan, and further development is expected. In the U.S., great efforts have recently been made to develop and manufacture excellent stent grafts for thoracic aneurysms, and rapid progress has been achieved. In particular, in the area of the aortic arch, in which we

  1. State-of-the-art aortic imaging: Part II - applications in transcatheter aortic valve replacement and endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Rengier, Fabian; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Schoenhagen, Paul; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Vosshenrich, Rolf; Karmonik, Christof; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Partovi, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) as well as thoracic and abdominal endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR and EVAR) rely on accurate pre- and postprocedural imaging. This review article discusses the application of imaging, including preprocedural assessment and measurements as well as postprocedural imaging of complications. Furthermore, the exciting perspective of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based on cross-sectional imaging is presented. TAVR is a minimally invasive alternative for treatment of aortic valve stenosis in patients with high age and multiple comorbidities who cannot undergo traditional open surgical repair. Given the lack of direct visualization during the procedure, pre- and peri-procedural imaging forms an essential part of the intervention. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for preprocedural planning. Routine postprocedural follow-up is performed by echocardiography to confirm treatment success and detect complications. EVAR and TEVAR are minimally invasive alternatives to open surgical repair of aortic pathologies. CTA constitutes the preferred imaging modality for both preoperative planning and postoperative follow-up including detection of endoleaks. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent alternative to CT for postoperative follow-up, and is especially beneficial for younger patients given the lack of radiation. Ultrasound is applied in screening and postoperative follow-up of abdominal aortic aneurysms, but cross-sectional imaging is required once abnormalities are detected. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound may be as sensitive as CTA in detecting endoleaks. PMID:24429327

  2. Hemiarch versus total aortic arch replacement in acute type A dissection: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Shi Sum; Theologou, Thomas; Harrington, Deborah; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Oo, Aung

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in aortic surgery, acute type A aortic dissection remains a surgical emergency associated with high mortality and morbidity. Appropriate management is crucial to achieve satisfactory outcomes but the optimal surgical approach is controversial. The present systematic review and meta-analysis sought to access cumulative data from comparative studies between hemiarch and total aortic arch replacement in patients with acute type A aortic dissection. Methods A systematic review of the literature using six databases. Eligible studies include comparative studies on hemiarch versus total arch replacement reporting short, medium and long term outcomes. A meta-analysis was performed on eligible studies reporting outcome of interest to quantify the effects of hemiarch replacement on mortality and morbidity risk compared to total arch replacement. Result Fourteen retrospective studies met the inclusion criteria and 2,221 patients were included in the final analysis. Pooled analysis showed that hemiarch replacement was associated with a lower risk of post-operative renal dialysis [risk ratio (RR) =0.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56–0.94; P=0.02; I2=0%]. There was no significant difference in terms of in-hospital mortality between the two groups (RR =0.84; 95% CI: 0.65–1.09; P=0.20; I2=0%). Cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic cross clamp and circulatory arrest times were significantly longer in total arch replacement. During follow up, no significant difference was reported from current studies between the two operative approaches in terms of aortic re-intervention and freedom from aortic reoperation. Conclusions Within the context of publication bias by high volume aortic centres and non-randomized data sets, there was no difference in mortality outcomes between the two groups. This analysis serves to demonstrate that for those centers doing sufficient total aortic arch activity to allow for publication, excellent and equivalent outcomes

  3. Total Aortic Repair for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Complicated by Malperfusion or Symptomatic Branch Vessel Malalignment.

    PubMed

    Perera, Nisal K; Galvin, Sean D; Brooks, Mark; Seevanayagam, Siven; Matalanis, George

    2016-06-01

    Malperfusion or persistent perfusion of the false lumen with acute type A aortic dissections is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. We describe our experience with total aortic repair in patients with acute type A dissection with recurrent or ongoing branch ischemia, true lumen collapse, or rapid dilatation of a false lumen after initial surgical repair. PMID:27211962

  4. Hybrid two-stage repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Murana, Giacomo; Cefarelli, Mariano; Alfonsi, Jacopo; Di Marco, Luca; Francesco, Buia; Lovato, Luigi; Pacini, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm is a challenging disease that often requires an invasive surgical repair. Recently, a less invasive hybrid approach has been proposed to improve postoperative outcomes in high-risk patients. It consists of an open first stage where arterial visceral rerouting is obtained, using a vascular graft followed by a second stage where the remaining thoracoabdominal aorta is covered with a stent graft. Initial results using this approach seem promising. Here, we sought to describe the hybrid two-stage technique that is most frequently used in this extensive aortic pathology. PMID:27188444

  5. Reversal of acute monoparesis following thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Naoto; Yuzaki, Mitsuru; Nasu, Michihiro; Okada, Yukikatsu

    2014-05-01

    A 67-year-old man underwent surgical repair for a Crawford extent V thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm under cerebrospinal fluid drainage and motor evoked potential monitor on distal aortic perfusion. Postoperatively, weakness of right-sided leg graded 2/5 and bladder disorder were recognized. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintensity between Th11 and L1 on T2-weighted image. Intravenous glycerin and edaravone for spinal cord ischemia had been administered. The strength of right leg resolved completely with disappearance of hyperintensity on magnetic resonance image. Finally, he could walk on foot with bladder disorder. PMID:23609482

  6. Use of through-and-through guidewire for delivering large stent-grafts into the distal aortic arch

    SciTech Connect

    Shammari, Muhammad Al; Taylor, Peter; Reidy, John F.

    2000-05-15

    The availability of large diameter stent-grafts is now allowing the endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Most aneurysms are closely related to the distal arch and it is thus necessary to pass the delivery systems into the arch to effectively cover the proximal neck. Even with extra-stiff guidewires in position, it may still be difficult to achieve this, as a result of tortuosity at the iliac arteries and the aorta. We detail a technique where a stiff guidewire is passed from a brachial entry point through the aorta and out at the femoral arteriotomy site. This allows extra-support and may enable the delivery system to be passed further into the aortic arch than it could with just the regular guidewire position.

  7. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair Following Axillo-femoral Bypass in a Patient with Stanford B Acute Aortic Dissection Accompanied by Abdominal Visceral Ischemia;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Takayuki; Bonkohara, Yukihiro; Azuma, Takashi; Iijima, Masaki; Higashidate, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    A 60-year-old woman was transfer-red to the emergency department of our medical center with worsening chest and back pain. Computed tomography revealed Stanford type B aortic dissection. There was a false lumen from the distal arch to the abdominal aorta just above the celiac artery. Although she was at 1st treated conservatively, she abruptly developed acute renal failure and lower limb ischemia because of an enlarged false lumen, and emergency axillo-femoral bypass surgery was performed with an 8 mm tube graft. However, renal failure gradually worsened, which necessitated continuous hemodiafiltration was performed. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair was then performed, and her renal function recovered. PMID:27586321

  8. [Total Aortic Arch Replacement by Minimally Invasive Approach in a Patient with Permanent Tracheostomy;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Yuri, Koichi; Matsumoto, Harunobu; Kimura, Naoyuki; Okamura, Homare; Shiraishi, Manabu; Hori, Daijirou; Adachi, Hideo

    2016-06-01

    Standard full median sternotomy for total aortic arch replacement in patients with tracheostomy has higher risks for mediastinitis and graft infection. To avoid surgical site infection, it is necessary to keep a sufficient distance between the tracheostomy and the site of surgical skin incision. We herein report a case of a 74-year-old man with permanent tracheostomy after total laryngectomy, who underwent total aortic arch replacement for an aneurysm. Antero-lateral thoracotomy in the 2nd intercostal space with lower partial sternotomy( ALPS approach) provided an enough distance between the tracheostomy and the surgical field. It also provided a good view for surgical procedure and enabled the standard setup of cardiopulmonary bypass with ascending aortic cannulation, venous drainage from the right atrium and the left ventricular venting through the upper right pulmonary vein. The operation was completed in 345 minutes and the patient was discharged on the 11th postoperative day without any complications. PMID:27246136

  9. Fatal aortotracheal fistula combined with aortoesophageal fistula in an infant with double aortic arch: a warning.

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Naotaka; Matsubara, Muneaki; Kimura, Naritaka; Terada, Masatsugu

    2015-10-01

    This report describes a 2-month-old male infant with a double aortic arch (DAA) complicated by aortoesophageal fistula (AEF) and aortotracheal fistula (ATF). He was intubated with an endotracheal tube at birth because of neonatal asphyxia. A nasogastric tube was also placed for gastric decompression and milk feeding. On the 74th day of birth, he had massive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage associated with shock, and was referred to our hospital. Although emergent surgery controlled the bleeding from AEF, he suffered cardiac arrest due to massive bleeding from ATF 5 h after surgery, and died on the 9th postoperative day. Physicians should be aware that prolonged endotracheal and nasogastric intubation predispose to the development of not only esophageal erosion but also more lethal tracheal erosion. In addition to the importance of early diagnosis and prompt surgery for DAA, appropriate preoperative respiratory management is emphasized to prevent similar occurrences in the future. PMID:24057599

  10. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with multivessel cervical artery dissections and a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Amre; Ruland, Sean; Schneck, Michael J; Pasquale, David; Biller, José

    2014-02-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) has been associated with exposure to vasoactive substances and few reports with cervical arterial dissections (CADs). We evaluated a 32-year-old woman with history of depression, migraines without aura, and cannabis use who presented with a thunderclap headache unresponsive to triptans. She was found to have bilateral occipital infarcts, bilateral extracranial vertebral artery dissections, bilateral internal carotid artery dissecting aneurysms, and extensive distal multifocal segmental narrowing of the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation with a "sausage on a string-like appearance" suggestive of RCVS. Subsequently, she was found to have a distal thrombus of the basilar artery, was anticoagulated, and discharged home with no residual deficits. We highlight the potential association of CADs and RCVS. The association of RCVS and a double aortic arch has not been previously reported. PMID:24103665

  11. Hemodynamics in the mouse aortic arch as assessed by MRI, ultrasound, and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Feintuch, Akiva; Ruengsakulrach, Permyos; Lin, Amy; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Yu-Qing; Bishop, Jonathon; Davidson, Lorinda; Courtman, David; Foster, F Stuart; Steinman, David A; Henkelman, R Mark; Ethier, C Ross

    2007-02-01

    Mice are widely used to study arterial disease in humans, and the pathogenesis of arterial diseases is known to be strongly influenced by hemodynamic factors. It is, therefore, of interest to characterize the hemodynamic environment in the mouse arterial tree. Previous measurements have suggested that many relevant hemodynamic variables are similar between the mouse and the human. Here we use a combination of Doppler ultrasound and MRI measurements, coupled with numerical modeling techniques, to characterize the hemodynamic environment in the mouse aortic arch at high spatial resolution. We find that the hemodynamically induced stresses on arterial endothelial cells are much larger in magnitude and more spatially uniform in the mouse than in the human, an effect that can be explained by fluid mechanical scaling principles. This surprising finding seems to be at variance with currently accepted models of the role of hemodynamics in atherogenesis and the known distribution of atheromatous lesions in mice. PMID:17012350

  12. Saccular Aneurysms of the Transverse Aortic Arch: Treatment Options Available in the Endovascular EraBased on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19-23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA).

    PubMed

    Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S

    2015-04-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the aortic arch, whether single or multiple, are uncommon. The choice of repair technique is influenced by patients' comorbidities and age. Repairing saccular aneurysms with traditional open techniques can be technically demanding; therefore, endovascular technology and a variety of hybrid approaches have been developed to facilitate such repairs and, potentially, to improve clinical outcomes, especially in high-risk patients. There have been no large, randomized studies to compare the outcomes of these different treatment options in patients with single or multiple saccular aneurysms of the arch. In this review, we outline the etiology and common locations of these aneurysms, the different open, completely endovascular, and hybrid techniques used to treat them, and the treatment selection process. PMID:26798759

  13. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  14. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  15. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Young Patient with Descending Aortic Injury;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    No, Hironari; Nishida, Satoru; Takagi, Takeshi; Mohri, Ryosuke

    2016-08-01

    A 15-year-old boy was referred to our emergency room due to a penetrating injury of the back. Computed tomography( CT) demonstrated a descending aortic injury at the Th9/10 level, bilateral hemothorax, and spinal cord injury. Although surgical treatment was indicated, multiple organ injury complicated open surgical repair, which required cardiopulmonary bypass with full heparinization. Therefore, the patient was scheduled to undergo thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A 23×33-mm Excluder aortic extension cuff was chosen for the small, 15-mm diameter aorta. The aortic extension was delivered and deployed in the descending aorta. Postoperative CT demonstrated neither endoleak nor collapse of the stent-graft. TEVAR for traumatic aortic aneurysm appears to be safe and effective, and an aortic extension for an abdominal aortic aneurysm may be utilized as an alternative device if the patient is young and the aorta is small. PMID:27476569

  16. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair Via Internal Iliac Artery Conduit].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Taro; Tobe, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Hironobu; Ijyuin, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Masato; Oka, Takanori; Misato, Takuya; Tsunemi, Kotaro; Tanimura, Nobuhiro

    2016-09-01

    A 77-year-old man with a history of stent implantation in the right common iliac artery(CIA) and the left external iliac artery(EIA) was admitted to our hospital for a rapid growth of an aneurysm( max 53 mm) at Th11 level of the descending aorta. Although thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was required, there were many problems about access rout. The infrarenal abdominal aorta and the left EIA were severely calcified, and the lumens of the right CIA stent(5.3 mm) and the left EIA stent( 4.3 mm) were small in size. Besides, the left CIA was short(13 mm). Therefore, TEVAR was performed by retrograde approach from the left internal iliac artery( IIA) with a tube graft conduit in the hybrid operation room. IIA is a useful option for an access rout in endovascular aortic repair. PMID:27586313

  17. Relay NBS Graft with the Plus Delivery System to Improve Deployment in Aortic Arch with Small Radius Curve

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Guastavino, Andrea; Scarano, Flavio; Passerone, Gian Carlo

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this report is to describe deployment of the Relay NBS Thoracic Stent Graft with the Plus Delivery System (Bolton Medical, Sunrise, FL) in a flexible resin arch model with a 15-mm radius curve as well as our preliminary clinical results. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System was evaluated by way of bench testing, which was performed with stent grafts with diameters ranging from 24 to 46 mm and lengths ranging from 100 to 250 mm in flexible resin arch models with a 15-mm arch radius of curvature. The deployment sequence was analyzed. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System was deployed in two patients, respectively, having a 6.5-cm penetrating aortic ulcer of the proximal third of the descending thoracic aorta and a DeBakey type-I aortic dissection with chronic false lumen dilatation after surgery due to an entry site at the distal thoracic aorta. Bench tests showed proper conformation and apposition of the Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System in the flexible resin model. This stent graft was deployed successfully into the two patients with a correct orientation of the first stent and without early or late complications. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System ensures an optimal conformation and apposition of the first stent in the aortic arch with a small radius of curvature.

  18. Aortoesophageal fistula after thoracic endovascular aortic repair and transthoracic embolization.

    PubMed

    Riesenman, Paul J; Farber, Mark A; Mauro, Matthew A; Selzman, Craig H; Feins, Richard H

    2007-10-01

    Endografts are more commonly being used to treat thoracic aortic aneurysms and other vascular lesions. Endoleaks are a potential complication of this treatment modality and can be associated with aneurysmal sac expansion and rupture. This case report presents a patient who developed a type IA endoleak after endograft repair of a descending thoracic aneurysm. The endoleak was successfully treated through computed tomographic-guided transthoracic embolization, although the patient experienced lower extremity paraparesis postprocedurally. The patient's endovascular repair was complicated by the development of an aortoesophageal fistula and endograft infection necessitating operative débridement and endograft explantation. PMID:17903656

  19. De novo periaortic fibrosis after endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Alomran, Faris; de Blic, Romain; Mallios, Alexandros; Costanzo, Alessandro; Boura, Benoit; Combes, Myriam

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of a 63-year-old man presenting with abdominal pain and hydronephrosis secondary to periaortic fibrosis (PAF) 8 months after an endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) using a woven polyester bifurcated graft. De novo delayed PAF after open repair is rare and even more infrequent after EVAR. All 3 previously reported cases occurred after woven polyester grafts and no reported cases after polytetrafluorethylene grafts. Management included steroidal anti-inflammatory treatment and bilateral double J tube placement. Satisfactory results were obtained. PMID:24275428

  20. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair: current endovascular perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nathan; Minion, David; Bobadilla, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoabdominal aneurysms account for roughly 3% of identified aneurysms annually in the United States. Advancements in endovascular techniques and devices have broadened their application to these complex surgical problems. This paper will focus on the current state of endovascular thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, including specific considerations in patient selection, operative planning, and perioperative complications. Both total endovascular and hybrid options will be considered. PMID:25170271

  1. Transcaval Aortic Access for Percutaneous Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Initial Human Experience

    PubMed Central

    Uflacker, Andre; Lim, Scott; Ragosta, Michael; Haskal, Ziv J; Lederman, Robert J.; Kern, John; Upchurch, Gilbert; Huber, Timothy; Angle, John F.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2015-01-01

    Transcaval aortic access has been used for deployment of transcatheter aortic valves in patients in whom conventional arterial approaches are not feasible. The present report describes its use for thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in a 61-year-old man with a descending thoracic aneurysm. Transcaval access was performed in lieu of a surgical iliac conduit in view of small atherosclerotic pelvic arteries. TEVAR was successfully performed, followed by intervascular tract occlusion with the use of a ventricular septal occluder. Computed tomography 2 d later demonstrated no extravasation. At 1 mo, the aneurysm was free of endoleaks, the aortocaval tract had healed, and the patient had returned to baseline functional status. PMID:26408210

  2. A Case of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    I report a hemorrhagic complication due to disseminated intravascular coagulation after thoracic endovascular aortic repair for a dissecting aortic aneurysm. A 74-year-old man underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair and carotid-carotid artery bypass to close the primary entry site of the dissecting aortic aneurysm. Postoperatively, he developed a gradually expanding cervical hematoma. Laboratory data showed disseminated intravascular coagulation. He could not extubated until postoperative day 6 because of the risk of airway obstruction. He was treated with transfusion to replenish the coagulation factor. Disseminated intravascular coagulation may occur secondary to thrombus formation in the false lumen after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:26730263

  3. [Multiple brain abscesses in the territory of the vertebral-basilar artery resulting from an infected aortic arch graft].

    PubMed

    Otani, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Satoshi; Kawauchi, Satoshi; Uneda, Atsuhito; Kajitani, Takumi; Watanabe, Kyoichi; Deguchi, Kentaro; Kiriyama, Hideki; Tokunaga, Koji; Matsumoto, Kengo

    2015-03-01

    A 62-year-old man with high fever and in a state of disorientation was transferred to our hospital. One year before this transfer, he had undergone total arch replacement surgery for thoracic aortic dissection. On admission to our hospital, head MRI revealed multiple brain abscesses in the territory of the vertebral-basilar artery, and chest CT showed gas around the aortic graft, in particular, at the origin of the left subclavian artery. We diagnosed him with brain abscesses in the left vertebral-basilar artery resulting from an infected aortic graft. We immediately began administration of intravenous antibiotics. Although his blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid cultures were negative, fortunately, the brain abscesses and ectopic gas disappeared. Since reports of only antibiotic use for treating brain abscesses due to aortic graft infection are rare, the appropriate duration of antibiotic administration has not been established yet. Therefore, careful observation is required in this case. PMID:25748809

  4. Endovascular Stent-Graft Repair as a Late Secondary Procedure After Previous Aortic Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Matsagas, Miltiadis I. Anagnostopoulos, Constantine E.; Papakostas, John C.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Siminelakis, Stavros; Katsouras, Christos S.; Toumpoulis, Ioannis K.; Drossos, George E.; Michalis, Lampros K.

    2006-08-15

    Thoracic and abdominal aortic endovascular procedures as alternatives to aortic reoperations were studied in three different cases. An anastomotic aneurysm after previous thoracic aortic graft for coarctation, a second-stage elephant trunk repair (descending thoracic aortic aneurysm), and a secondary aneurysm proximal to a previous abdominal aortic graft were successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts. During the follow-up period no lethal events or major aortic or graft-related complications were observed, except a type II endoleak in the anastomotic aortic aneurysm case. An endovascular stent-graft can be safely deployed into a previously implanted vascular graft, avoiding repeat surgery.

  5. Techniques for preserving vertebral artery perfusion during thoracic aortic stent grafting requiring aortic arch landing.

    PubMed

    Woo, Edward Y; Bavaria, Joseph E; Pochettino, Alberto; Gleason, Thomas G; Woo, Y Joseph; Velazquez, Omaida C; Carpenter, Jeffrey P; Cheung, Albert T; Fairman, Ronald M

    2006-01-01

    Thoracic endografting offers many advantages over open repair. However, delivery of the device can be difficult and may necessitate adjunctive procedures. We describe our techniques for preserving perfusion to the left subclavian artery despite endograft coverage to obtain a proximal seal zone. We reviewed our experience with the Talent thoracic stent graft (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA). From 1999 to 2003, 49 patients received this device (29 men, 20 women). Seventeen patients required adjunctive procedures to facilitate proximal graft placement. We performed left subclavian-to-left common carotid artery transposition (6), left common carotid-to-left subclavian artery bypass with ligation proximal to the vertebral artery (7), and left common carotid-to-left subclavian artery bypass with proximal coil embolization (4). Patients who had anatomy unfavorable to transposition or bypass with proximal ligation (large aneurysms or proximal vertebral artery origin) were treated with coil embolization of the proximal left subclavian artery in order to prevent subsequent type II endoleaks. Technical success rate of the carotid subclavian bypass was 100%. Patient follow-up ranged from 3 to 48 months with a mean of 12 months. Six patients had follow-up <6 months owing to recent graft placement. Primary patency was 100%. No neurologic events occurred during the procedure or upon follow-up. One patient had a transient chyle leak that spontaneously resolved in 24 hours. Another patient had a phrenic nerve paresis that resolved after 3 weeks. We believe that it is important to maintain patency of the vertebral artery specifically when a patent right vertebral system and an intact basilar artery is not demonstrated. Furthermore, we describe a novel technique of coil embolization of the proximal left subclavian artery in conjunction with left common carotid-to-left subclavian artery bypass. This circumvents the need for potentially hazardous mediastinal dissection and ligation of the

  6. Video-atlas of open thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Melissano, Germano; Civilini, Efrem; Bertoglio, Luca; Rinaldi, Enrico; Marone, Enrico Maria; Tshomba, Yamume

    2012-01-01

    Open surgical repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms has evolved significantly over the last decades thanks to technical improvements, especially in the area of organ protection. However, despite adjunctive strategies, morbidity and mortality rates are still not negligible. Repair of the thoracoabdominal aorta represents a formidable challenge for surgeons, anesthesiologists and patients alike. While operative repair is generally carried out in specialized institutions, knowledge of the state-of-the-art diagnostic, anesthesiologic, surgical and endovascular aspects will certainly be of great value to all physicians involved in the care of these patients at any level. This “How to” video will explain all of these diagnostic, anesthesiologic and surgical aspects in our daily practice. PMID:23977526

  7. Multimodality Imaging Approach towards Primary Aortic Sarcomas Arising after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Case Series Report.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Mudassar; Fowler, Kathryn J; Mellnick, Vincent M; Sicard, Gregorio A; Narra, Vamsi R

    2016-06-01

    Primary aortic neoplasms are rare. Aortic sarcoma arising after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a scarce subset of primary aortic malignancies, reports of which are infrequent in the published literature. The diagnosis of aortic sarcoma is challenging due to its non-specific clinical presentation, and the prognosis is poor due to delayed diagnosis, rapid proliferation, and propensity for metastasis. Post-EVAR, aortic sarcomas may mimic other more common aortic processes on surveillance imaging. Radiologists are rarely knowledgeable about this rare entity for which multimodality imaging and awareness are invaluable in early diagnosis. A series of three pathologically confirmed cases are presented to display the multimodality imaging features and clinical presentations of aortic sarcoma arising after EVAR. PMID:26721588

  8. Thrombus Volume Change Visualization after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiora, Josu; García, Guillermo; Macía, Iván; Legarreta, Jon Haitz; Boto, Fernando; Paloc, Céline; Graña, Manuel; Abuín, Javier Sanchez

    A surgical technique currently used in the treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) is the Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR). This minimally invasive procedure involves inserting a prosthesis in the aortic vessel that excludes the aneurysm from the bloodstream. The stent, once in place acts as a false lumen for the blood current to travel down, and not into the surrounding aneurysm sac. This procedure, therefore, immediately takes the pressure off the aneurysm, which thromboses itself after some time. Nevertheless, in a long term perspective, different complications such as prosthesis displacement or bloodstream leaks into or from the aneurysmatic bulge (endoleaks) could appear causing a pressure elevation and, as a result, increasing the danger of rupture. The purpose of this work is to explore the application of image registration techniques to the visual detection of changes in the thrombus in order to assess the evolution of the aneurysm. Prior to registration, both the lumen and the thrombus are segmented

  9. Custom fenestration templates for endovascular repair of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Daniel F; Starnes, Benjamin W

    2015-06-01

    Physician-modified endovascular grafts, with fenestrations added to accommodate major branch vessels, provide a means for endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms that are adjacent to the renal arteries. Manual measurements of vessel origin locations from computed tomography images, however, take time and can lead to errors in the positions of the fenestrations. To make the fenestration process faster and more accurate, we have developed a procedure to create custom templates that serve as patient-specific guides for graft fenestration. We use a three-dimensional printer to create a clear rigid sleeve that replicates the patient's aorta and includes holes placed precisely at the locations of the branch vessels. The sleeve is slipped over the graft, the locations of the openings are marked with a pen, and the fenestrations are created after the sleeve is removed. Custom fenestration templates can potentially save procedural costs and make minimally invasive aortic aneurysm repair available to more patients. PMID:25864045

  10. The branching pattern of the aortic arch in the long-legged buzzard (Buteo rufinus Cretzschmar 1829).

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, Serkan; Kılınç, Mehmet

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the vascular branching morphology of the aortic arch in the long-legged buzzard. For this purpose, two long-legged buzzards were evaluated in this study. The latex injection method was used to investigate the branching of the aortic arch. Two innominate brachiocephalic trunks branched continually from aortic arch caudoventral to the primary bronchi and ventral to the syrinx. The left subclavian artery gave rise to sternoclavicular, thoracic, axillary and intercostal arteries in this region. On the right side, it was observed that the right subclavian artery gave off thoracic, sternoclavicular and intercostal arteries, and the axillary artery was the branch of thoracic artery differently from the left one. Each carotid artery was continued to the middle of the neck and soon disappeared, becoming covered by the muscles of the anterior part of the neck, and entering the canal formed by the inferior spinous processes of the cervical vertebrae, within which it ran hidden, and in close contact with its fellow of the other lateral side, to near the head. This morphological study in the long-legged buzzard will elucidate the vascular organization for regional blood supply, and provide specific anatomical data. PMID:24136451

  11. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Renal Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.; Arya, N. Lee, B.; Hannon, R.J.; Loan, W.; Soong, C.V.

    2004-09-15

    Patients with functioning renal transplant who develop abdominal aortic aneurysm can safely be treated with endovascular repair. Endovascular repair of aneurysm avoids renal ischemia associated with cross-clamping of aorta.

  12. Endovascular thoracic aortic repair and risk of spinal cord ischemia: the role of previous or concomitant treatment for aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Setacci, F; Sirignano, P; De Donato, G; Chisci, E; Galzerano, G; Massaroni, R; Setacci, C

    2010-04-01

    Spinal cord ischemia (SCI) is one of the most devastating complications undergoing surgical or endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta. The incidence of SCI after thoracic aorta open repair varies from 2% to 21%, depending on the extent of the descending thoracic aorta replacement compared with as high as 12% of cases after endovascular aortic repair. Endoluminal repair allows the avoidance of aortic cross clamping and its sequelae; however, the intercostal arteries covered by the stent graft cannot be reimplanted. Perioperative risk factors contributing to SCI have been reported to include length of aortic coverage, prior abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair, hypotension, and left subclavian artery coverage. Although the putative mechanism of loss of lumbar collateral perfusion in those who had prior aortic repairs appears reasonable, occurrence of SCI in this subset of patients has not been consistent. Spinal cord perfusion is dependent on the net pressure of the mean arterial pressure minus the mean intrathecal pressure. Systemic pressure can be maximized by volume resuscitation and vasopressors. Intrathecal spinal pressure can be minimized by drainage of the spinal cord, although this is not without its potential risks. More recently, there have been attempts at attenuating the cellular damage caused by SCI, either with systemic or intrathecal administration of pharmacologic agents, which attempt to mitigate the inflammatory response of cellular reperfusion. This is a review of the risk factors for SCI during TEVAR in patients with previous or concomitant treatment for aortic aneurysm. PMID:20354486

  13. Efficacy of thoracic endovascular stent repair for chronic type B aortic dissection with aneurysmal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Scali, Salvatore T.; Feezor, Robert J.; Chang, Catherine K.; Stone, David H.; Hess, Philip J.; Martin, Tomas D.; Huber, Thomas S.; Beck, Adam W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Food and Drug Administration has approved devices for endovascular management of thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR); however, limited data exist describing the outcomes of TEVAR for aneurysms attributable to chronic type B aortic dissection (cTBAD). This study was undertaken to determine the results of endovascular treatment of cTBAD with aneurysmal degeneration. Methods A retrospective analysis of all patients treated for cTBAD with aneurysmal degeneration at the University of Florida from 2004 to 2011 was performed. Computed tomograms with centerline reconstruction were analyzed to determine change in aortic diameter, relative proportions of aortic treatment lengths, and false lumen perfusion status. Reintervention and mortality were estimated using life-tables. Cox regression analysis was completed to predict mortality. Results Eighty patients underwent TEVAR for aneurysm due to cTBAD (mean age [± standard deviation], 60 ± 13 years [male, 87.5%; n = 70]; median follow-up, 26 [range, 1–74] months). Median time from diagnosis of TBAD to TEVAR was 16 (range, 1–72) months. Prior aortic root/arch replacement had been performed in 29% (n = 23) at a median interval of 28.5 (range, 0.5–312) months. Mean preoperative aneurysm diameter was 62.0 ± 9.9 mm. In 75% (n = 60) of cases, coverage was proximal to zone 3, and 24% (n = 19) underwent carotid-subclavian bypass or other arch debranching procedure. Spinal drains were used in 78% (pre-op 71%, n = 57; post-op 6%, n = 5). Length of stay was 6.5 ± 4.7 days with a composite morbidity of 26% and in-hospital mortality of 2.5% (n = 2). Overall neurologic event rate was 17% (spinal cord ischemia 10% [n = 8], with a permanent deficit observed in 6.2% [n = 5]; stroke 7.5%). Aneurysm diameter reduced or stabilized in 65%. The false lumen thrombosed completely within the thoracic aorta in 52%, and reintervention within the treated aortic segment was required in 16% (n = 13). One- and 3-year

  14. New technique for retrograde cerebral perfusion during arch aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Bartoccioni, S; Lanzillo, G; deJong, A A; Fiaschini, P; Martinelli, G; Fedeli, C; Di Lazarro, D; Mercati, U

    1995-09-01

    Many techniques are used to reduce brain damage during surgery for dissecting aneurysms of the ascending aorta and arch. Recently, new techniques of protection were proposed, consistent with hypothermic circulatory arrest in association with retrograde cerebral perfusion via superior vena cava. We propose a simple, time-saving method, which does not require any manipulation of the heart. We use a multilumen cannula for cardioplegia (D 860-DIDECO FUNDARO') with pressure transducer. This cannula is inserted in superior vena cava by means of a simple purse-string, and linked to the arterial line with a "Y" derivation, allowing retrograde perfusion of the brain and monitoring the perfusion pressure at every moment. The superior vena cava placed downstream from the cannula is closed by a small vascular clamp, to avoid blood reflux in the right atrium. This method is time- and money-saving, is readily available, and can be prepared whenever necessary, also in the middle of the surgical procedure. PMID:7488786

  15. Endovascular vs. Open Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Patelis, Nikolaos; Moris, Demetrios; Karaolanis, Georgios; Georgopoulos, Sotiris

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients presenting with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms are most often treated with open repair despite the fact that endovascular aneurysm repair is a less invasive and widely accepted method with clear benefits for elective aortic aneurysm patients. A debate exists regarding the definitive benefit in endovascular repair for patients with a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. The aim of this literature review was to determine if any trends exist in favor of either open or endovascular repair. Material/Methods A literature search was performed using PUBMED, OVID, and Google Scholar databases. The search yielded 64 publications. Results Out of 64 publications, 25 were retrospective studies, 12 were population-based, 21 were prospective, 5 were the results of RCTs, and 1 was a case-series. Sixty-one studies reported on early mortality and provided data comparing endovascular repair (rEVAR) and open repair (rOR) for ruptured abdominal aneurysm groups. Twenty-nine of these studies reported that rEVAR has a lower early mortality rate. Late mortality after rEVAR compared to that of rOR was reported in 21 studies for a period of 3 to 60 months. Results of 61.9% of the studies found no difference in late mortality rates between these 2 groups. Thirty-nine publications reported on the incidence of complications. Approximately half of these publications support that the rEVAR group has a lower complication rate and the other half found no difference between the groups. Length of hospital stay has been reported to be shorter for rEVAR in most studies. Blood loss and need for transfusion of either red cells or fresh frozen plasma was consistently lower in the rEVAR group. Conclusions Differences between the included publications affect the outcomes. Randomized control trials have not been able to provide clear conclusions. rEVAR can now be considered a safe method of treating rAAA, and is at least equal to the well-established rOR method. PMID:27090791

  16. Aortic Arch Calcification Predicts Patency Loss of Arteriovenous Fistula in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Yit-Sheung; Ting, Kai-Ting; Chi, Wen-Che; Lin, Cheng-Hao; Liu, Yi-Chun; Chuang, Wan-Long

    2016-01-01

    Aortic arch calcification (AAC) is recognized as an important cardiovascular risk factor in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of AAC grade on patency rates of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) in this specific population. The data of 286 ESRD patients who had an initial AVF placed were reviewed. The extent of AAC identified on chest radiography was divided into four grades (0–3). The association between AAC grade, other clinical factors, and primary patency of AVF was then analyzed by Cox proportional hazard analysis. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that the presence of AAC grade 2 (hazard ratio (95% confidence interval): 1.80 (1.15–2.84); p = 0.011) and grade 3 (3.03 (1.88–4.91); p < 0.001), and higher level of intact-parathyroid hormone (p = 0.047) were associated with primary patency loss of AVF. In subgroup analysis, which included AVF created by a surgeon assisted with preoperative vascular mapping, only AAC grade 3 (2.41 (1.45–4.00); p = 0.001), and higher intact-parathyroid hormone (p = 0.025) level were correlated with AVF patency loss. In conclusion, higher AAC grade and intact-parathyroid hormone level predicted primary patency loss of AVF in an ESRD population. PMID:27101807

  17. Life-Threatening Postpneumonectomy Syndrome Complicated with Right Aortic Arch after Left Pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Tanaka, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old man with right aortic arch underwent left lower lobectomy and lingular segmentectomy, followed by complete pneumonectomy, for refractory nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. Three months after the pneumonectomy, he developed acute respiratory distress. Computed tomography showed an excessive mediastinal shift with an extremely narrowed bronchus intermedius and right lower bronchus compressed between the right pulmonary artery and the right descending aorta. Soon after the nearly obstructed bronchus intermedius was observed by bronchoscopy, he began to exhibit frequent hypoxic attacks, perhaps due to mucosal edema. Emergent surgical repositioning of the mediastinum and decompression of the bronchus was indicated. After complete adhesiolysis of the left thoracic cavity was performed, to maintain the proper mediastinal position, considering the emergent setting, an open wound thoracostomy was created and piles of gauze were inserted, mildly compressing the heart and the mediastinum to the right side. Thoracoplasty was performed three months later, and he was eventually discharged without any dressings needed. Mediastinal repositioning under thoracostomy should be avoided in elective cases because of its extremely high invasiveness. However, in the case of life-threatening postpneumonectomy syndrome in an emergent setting, mediastinal repositioning under thoracostomy may be an option to save life, which every thoracic surgeon could attempt. PMID:26106501

  18. Life-Threatening Postpneumonectomy Syndrome Complicated with Right Aortic Arch after Left Pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Karasaki, Takahiro; Tanaka, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old man with right aortic arch underwent left lower lobectomy and lingular segmentectomy, followed by complete pneumonectomy, for refractory nontuberculous mycobacterial infection. Three months after the pneumonectomy, he developed acute respiratory distress. Computed tomography showed an excessive mediastinal shift with an extremely narrowed bronchus intermedius and right lower bronchus compressed between the right pulmonary artery and the right descending aorta. Soon after the nearly obstructed bronchus intermedius was observed by bronchoscopy, he began to exhibit frequent hypoxic attacks, perhaps due to mucosal edema. Emergent surgical repositioning of the mediastinum and decompression of the bronchus was indicated. After complete adhesiolysis of the left thoracic cavity was performed, to maintain the proper mediastinal position, considering the emergent setting, an open wound thoracostomy was created and piles of gauze were inserted, mildly compressing the heart and the mediastinum to the right side. Thoracoplasty was performed three months later, and he was eventually discharged without any dressings needed. Mediastinal repositioning under thoracostomy should be avoided in elective cases because of its extremely high invasiveness. However, in the case of life-threatening postpneumonectomy syndrome in an emergent setting, mediastinal repositioning under thoracostomy may be an option to save life, which every thoracic surgeon could attempt. PMID:26106501

  19. Anesthetic considerations for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Kothandan, Harikrishnan; Haw Chieh, Geoffrey Liew; Khan, Shariq Ali; Karthekeyan, Ranjith Baskar; Sharad, Shah Shitalkumar

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysm is defined as a localized and permanent dilatation with an increase in normal diameter by more than 50%. It is more common in males and can affect up to 8% of elderly men. Smoking is the greatest risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and other risk factors include hypertension, hyperlipidemia, family history of aneurysms, inflammatory vasculitis, and trauma. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair [EVAR] is a common procedure performed for AAA, because of its minimal invasiveness as compared with open surgical repair. Patients undergoing EVAR have a greater incidence of major co-morbidities and should undergo comprehensive preoperative assessment and optimization within the multidisciplinary settings. In majority of cases, EVAR is extremely well-tolerated. The aim of this article is to outline the Anesthetic considerations related to EVAR. PMID:26750684

  20. Thoracic endovascular repair for acute type A aortic dissection: operative technique

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection is a potentially lethal condition which requires immediate diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. Open surgical repair remains the standard of care as survival rates continue to improve in the modern surgical era. Unfortunately, up to twenty percent of patients are denied surgical therapy because they are deemed medically unfit to undergo open repair. The application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has changed the treatment paradigm for aortic disease involving the descending thoracic aorta and may be a viable rescue option for patients with type A dissection who are not eligible for open surgical repair. New endovascular devices and advanced image-guided procedures are continually evolving. This article summarizes the pathology of aortic dissection and focuses on currently available endovascular solutions for transapical and transfemoral stent graft deployment for acute aortic dissection involving the ascending aorta for selected patients who are ineligible for open surgical repair. PMID:27563553

  1. Thoracic endovascular repair for acute type A aortic dissection: operative technique.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aamir; Khoynezhad, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection is a potentially lethal condition which requires immediate diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. Open surgical repair remains the standard of care as survival rates continue to improve in the modern surgical era. Unfortunately, up to twenty percent of patients are denied surgical therapy because they are deemed medically unfit to undergo open repair. The application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has changed the treatment paradigm for aortic disease involving the descending thoracic aorta and may be a viable rescue option for patients with type A dissection who are not eligible for open surgical repair. New endovascular devices and advanced image-guided procedures are continually evolving. This article summarizes the pathology of aortic dissection and focuses on currently available endovascular solutions for transapical and transfemoral stent graft deployment for acute aortic dissection involving the ascending aorta for selected patients who are ineligible for open surgical repair. PMID:27563553

  2. [Mycotic Aneurysm of Distal Aortic Arch, after Total Arch Replacement with Open-stent Graft;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kotaro; Kawahara, Yu; Masaki, Naoki; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Takahara, Shingo; Nakamura, Ken; Toyama, Shuji; Fukasawa, Manabu

    2015-05-01

    The patient was a 72-year-old man, who had undergone total arch replacement with an open-stent graft due to saccular aneurysm of distal arch, 2 years before. He was admitted to a local hospital with the complaint of high fever, and was diagnosed as having pyothorax, after computed tomography (CT) scanning. After transferred to our hospital, he was treated by drainage, and antibiotic therapy. But CT scans showed the enlargement of distal arch aneurysm, and migration of the stent graft. Urgent operation was performed. We approached to the site by a full sternotomy, and left anterolateral thoracotomy. Segment 1+2 of the left lung was resected to avoid bleeding and lung injury. Graft replacement of distal arch and descending aorta was performed on cardiopulmonary bypass, with hypothermia, selective brain perfusion and systemic circulatory arrest. To protect from recurrence of infection, the omental flap was transposed to the graft site. Until now, there is no recurrence of infection. PMID:25963790

  3. Atherosclerosis differentially affects calcium signalling in endothelial cells from aortic arch and thoracic aorta in Apolipoprotein E knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Clodagh; Quayle, John; Burdyga, Theodor; Wray, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Apolipoprotein‐E knockout (ApoE−/−) mice develop hypercholesterolemia and are a useful model of atherosclerosis. Hypercholesterolemia alters intracellular Ca2+ signalling in vascular endothelial cells but our understanding of these changes, especially in the early stages of the disease process, is limited. We therefore determined whether carbachol‐mediated endothelial Ca2+ signals differ in plaque‐prone aortic arch compared to plaque‐resistant thoracic aorta, of wild‐type and ApoE−/− mice, and how this is affected by age and the presence of hypercholesterolemia. The extent of plaque development was determined using en‐face staining with Sudan IV. Tissues were obtained from wild‐type and ApoE−/− mice at 10 weeks (pre‐plaques) and 24 weeks (established plaques). We found that even before development of plaques, significantly increased Ca2+ responses were observed in arch endothelial cells. Even with aging and plaque formation, ApoE−/− thoracic responses were little changed, however a significantly enhanced Ca2+ response was observed in arch, both adjacent to and away from lesions. In wild‐type mice of any age, 1–2% of cells had oscillatory Ca2+ responses. In young ApoE−/− and plaque‐free regions of older ApoE−/−, this is unchanged. However a significant increase in oscillations (~13–15%) occurred in thoracic and arch cells adjacent to lesions in older mice. Our data suggest that Ca2+ signals in endothelial cells show specific changes both before and with plaque formation, that these changes are greatest in plaque‐prone aortic arch cells, and that these changes will contribute to the reported deterioration of endothelium in atherosclerosis. PMID:25344475

  4. Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with Mobile Aortic Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lohrmann, Graham M.; Peters, Ferande

    2014-01-01

    A 58-year-old female presented with acute arterial insufficiency to her left leg. Following cardiovascular evaluation using multimodality imaging, it was discovered that she had mobile thoracic thrombi overlying a normal descending thoracic aorta which had also caused a splenic infarction. This patient was treated with unfractionated heparin for three days and underwent subsequent thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) uneventfully with no subsequent complications at one-year followup. This case highlights the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in treating patients with this uncommon challenging clinical scenario. PMID:24716094

  5. Intraoperative Sac Pressure Measurement During Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Ohta, Takashi; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Iwata, Hirohide; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tadakoshi, Masao; Hida, Noriyuki; Orimoto, Yuki; Kamei, Seiji

    2010-10-15

    PurposeIntraoperative sac pressure was measured during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) to evaluate the clinical significance of sac pressure measurement.MethodsA microcatheter was placed in an aneurysm sac from the contralateral femoral artery, and sac pressure was measured during EVAR procedures in 47 patients. Aortic blood pressure was measured as a control by a catheter from the left brachial artery.ResultsThe systolic sac pressure index (SPI) was 0.87 {+-} 0.10 after main-body deployment, 0.63 {+-} 0.12 after leg deployment (P < 0.01), and 0.56 {+-} 0.12 after completion of the procedure (P < 0.01). Pulse pressure was 55 {+-} 21 mmHg, 23 {+-} 15 mmHg (P < 0.01), and 16 {+-} 12 mmHg (P < 0.01), respectively. SPI showed no significant differences between the Zenith and Excluder stent grafts (0.56 {+-} 0.13 vs. 0.54 {+-} 0.10, NS). Type I endoleak was found in seven patients (15%), and the SPI decreased from 0.62 {+-} 0.10 to 0.55 {+-} 0.10 (P = 0.10) after fixing procedures. Type II endoleak was found in 12 patients (26%) by completion angiography. The SPI showed no difference between type II endoleak positive and negative (0.58 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.55 {+-} 0.12, NS). There were no significant differences between the final SPI of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter decreased in the follow-up and that of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter did not change (0.53 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.57 {+-} 0.12, NS).ConclusionsSac pressure measurement was useful for instant hemodynamic evaluation of the EVAR procedure, especially in type I endoleaks. However, on the basis of this small study, the SPI cannot be used to reliably predict sac growth or regression.

  6. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-09-15

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

  7. Atheroembolization and potential air embolization during aortic declamping in open repair of a pararenal aortic aneurysm: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Dregelid, Einar Børre; Lilleng, Peer Kåre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction When ischemic events ascribable to microembolization occur during open repair of proximal abdominal aortic aneurysms, a likely origin of atheroembolism is not always found. Presentation of case A 78-year old man with enlargement of the entire aorta underwent open repair for a pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm using supraceliac aortic clamping for 20 min. Then the graft was clamped, the supraceliac clamp was removed, and the distal and right renal anastomoses were also completed. The patient was stable throughout the operation with only transient drop in blood pressure on reperfusion. Postoperatively the patient developed ischemia, attributable to microembolization, in legs, small intestine, gall bladder and kidneys. He underwent fasciotomy, small bowel and gall bladder resections. Intestinal absorptive function did not recover adequately and he died after 4 months. Microscopic examination of hundreds of intestinal, juxtaintestinal mesenteric, and gall bladder arteries showed a few ones containing cholesterol emboli. Discussion It is unsure whether a few occluded small arteries out of several hundred could have caused the ischemic injury alone. There had been only moderate backbleeding from aortic branches above the proximal anastomosis while it was sutured. Inadvertently, remaining air in the graft, aorta, and aortic branches may have been whipped into the pulsating blood, resulting in air microbubbles, when the aortic clamp was removed. Conclusion Although both atheromatous particles and air microbubbles are well-known causes of iatrogenic microembolization, the importance of air microembolization in open repair of pararenal aortic aneurysms is not known and need to be studied. PMID:27100956

  8. Endovascular Repair versus Open Repair for Isolated Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung Chae; Joo, Hyun-Chel; Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Sak; Chang, Byung-Chul; Yoo, Kyung-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) with those of open repair for descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAA). Materials and Methods We compared the outcomes of 114 patients with DTAA and proximal landing zones 3 or 4 after TEVAR to those of 53 patients after conventional open repairs. Thirty-day and late mortality were the primary endpoints, and early morbidities, aneurysm-related death, and re-intervention were the secondary endpoints. Results The TEVAR group was older and had more incidences of dissecting aneurysm. The mean follow-up was 36±26 months (follow-up rate, 97.8%). The 30-day mortality in the TEVAR and open repair groups were 3.5% and 9.4% (p=0.11). Perioperative stroke and paraplegia incidences were similar between the groups [5.3% vs. 7.5% (p=0.56) and 7.5% vs. 3.5% (p=0.26), respectively]. Respiratory failure occurred more in the open repair group (1.8% vs. 26.4%, p<0.01). The incidence of acute kidney injury requiring dialysis was higher in the open repair group (1.8% vs. 9.4%, p<0.01). The cumulative survival rate was higher in the TEVAR group at 2 to 5 years (79.6% vs. 58.3%, p=0.03). The free from re-intervention was lower in the TEVAR group (65.3% vs. 100%, p=0.02), and the free from aneurysm-related death in the TEVAR and open repair groups were 88.5% and 86.1% (p=0.45). Conclusion TEVAR is safe and effective for treating DTAAs with improved perioperative and long-term outcomes compared with open repair. PMID:26069110

  9. Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair for Chronic DeBakey IIIb Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, G. Chad; Ganapathi, Asvin M.; Keenan, Jeffrey E.; Englum, Brian R.; Hanna, Jennifer M.; Schechter, Matthew A.; Wang, Hanghang; McCann, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for chronic DeBakey IIIb dissection with associated descending aneurysm remains controversial. This study examines long-term results of TEVAR for this disorder including examination of anatomic features associated with TEVAR outcomes. Methods Between July 2005 and January 2013, 32 patients underwent TEVAR for chronic (>30 days) DeBakey IIIb dissection involving the descending thoracic aorta at a single institution and constituted the study cohort. Results The mean interval from dissection to TEVAR was 32 ± 44 months (range, 1 to 146 months). There were no 30-day or in-hospital deaths, strokes, or paraplegia. During a 54-month median follow-up, there were no aortic-related deaths. Significant thoracic aneurysm sac regression (>1 cm) in the intervened segment was observed in 89%. Thoracic remodeling was not correlated with the number of visceral vessels arising from the true lumen or the number or size of residual distal fenestrations; failure of thoracic remodeling was associated with fenestrations distal to the endograft(s) in the descending thoracic aorta, most often stent graft-induced new entry tears. Complete resolution of the thoracic and abdominal false lumen after TEVAR was observed in 15.6% (n = 5). All patients in this group had all visceral vessels arising from the true lumen and fewer than three residual distal fenestrations. Conclusions Thoracic endovascular aortic repair is effective for chronic DeBakey IIIb dissection with associated descending aneurysm, with excellent 30-day and long-term outcomes and significant aortic remodeling in the vast majority of patients. Thoracic remodeling does not appear dependent on distal anatomic characteristics of the true and false lumens, although care should be taken to cover all thoracic fenestrations and avoid creation of stent graft-induced new entry tears to ensure clinical success. Complete aortic remodeling was observed only in the setting of all

  10. Gelsolin and Progression of Aortic Arch Calcification in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Terry Ting-Yu; Liao, Shang-Chih; Kao, Yu-Yin; Lee, Wen-Chin; Lee, Yueh-Ting; Ng, Hwee-Yeong; Lee, Po-Shun; Lee, Chien-Te

    2016-01-01

    Background:Vascular calcification (VC) is a key process associated with cardiovascular mortality in dialysis patients. Gelsolin is an actin-binding protein that can modulate inflammation, correlated inversely with hemodialysis (HD) mortality and involved in bone calcification homeostasis. In this report, we aim to characterize progression in aortic arch calcification (AAC) and investigate its association with gelsolin. Methods: 184 HD patients were enrolled and their annual posterior-anterior chest X-ray films (CXR) in 2009 and 2013 were examined. The severity of AAC was classified as grade 0 to 3. Blood levels of gelsolin were measured by ELISA kits. Biographic and biochemical data at baseline were analyzed with status of AAC at baseline and changes after 4 years. Results: At baseline, 60% of the patients had detectable AAC on CXR. After 4 years, 77% had AAC. Patients with grade 1 and 2 AAC had increased risk of progression (Odds ratio [OR] 2~3, P=0.001) compared to those with grade 0 at baseline. Compared to those with no AAC, patients with AAC progression had older age, lower gelsolin, higher waist circumference and prevalence of vascular disease. Regression analysis confirmed baseline gelsolin (odds ratio 0.845, 95% confidence interval [0.734-0.974]) and waist circumference as the independent factors associated with AAC progression. Gelsolin is positively correlated with serum albumin and negatively with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that HD patients with grades 1 or 2 baseline AAC are at increased risk of further progression compared to those with grade 0. We also found lower blood levels of gelsolin associated with progressive AAC. Further investigation into the mechanistic roles of gelsolin in vascular calcification may provide new understanding of this key process. PMID:26941566

  11. Multiple endovascular aortic aneurysm repair graft failures and re-interventions over 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Belchos, Jessica; Wheatcroft, Mark; Moloney, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Re-intervention on abdominal aortic aneurysm treated by endovascular aortic aneurysm repair for complications such as endoleak, graft migration, and graft failure is relatively common. However, re-do endovascular aortic aneurysm repair can be complex, as the failed graft still resides within the vessel. In addition, some re-do endovascular aortic aneurysm repairs call for an advanced custom graft, which can further increase the complexity and technical skill required. We describe a case of a 15-year-old endovascular aortic aneurysm repair originally implanted in a 71-year-old man, followed by three separate complications requiring intervention. We describe important procedural decisions taken into consideration when presented with failure of an older graft. PMID:27489701

  12. Aortic stenting.

    PubMed

    Droc, Ionel; Calinescu, Francisca Blanca; Droc, Gabriela; Blaj, Catalin; Dammrau, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The approach to aortic pathology is nowadays more and more endovascular at both thoracic and abdominal levels. Thoracic stenting has gained worldwide acceptance as first intention to treat pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta. Indications have been extended to aortic arch aneurysms and also to diseases of the ascending aorta. The current devices in use for thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR) are Medtronic Valiant, Gore TAG, Cook Tx2 and Jotec. The choice of the endograft depends on the thoracic aortic pathology and the anatomical suitability. The technological evolution of the abdominal aortic endografts was very rapid, arriving now at the fourth generation. We report the results of 55 elective cases of endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) performed in two vascular surgical centers in Romania and Germany. The prostheses used were 16 E-vita Abdominal XT, 12 Excluder, eight Talent, seven PowerLink, three Endurant and nine custom-made, fenestrated or branched from Jotec. The mean follow-up was 18 months with CT-scan, duplex ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. The mortality was 2%. EVAR tends to become the gold standard for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Technological development of the devices with lowest profile introduction systems will permit to extend the anatomical indications to new frontiers. PMID:26200430

  13. Management of severe asymmetric pectus excavatum complicating aortic repair in a patient with Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Marcuzzi, Danny; Peterson, Mark D; Ko, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a 28-year old man with Marfan's syndrome and severe pectus excavatum who required an aortic root replacement for an ascending aortic aneurysm. There was a near-vertical angulation of the sternum that presented challenges with opening and exposure of the heart during aortic surgery. Furthermore, removal of the sternal retractor after aortic repair resulted in sudden loss of cardiac output. A Ravitch procedure was then performed to successfully close the chest without further cardiovascular compromise. We propose that patients with a severe pectus excavatum and mediastinal displacement seen on preoperative CT scanning should be considered for simultaneous, elective repair. PMID:26874148

  14. Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Kurzencwyg, David; Filion, Kristian B; Pilote, Louise; Nault, Patrice; Platt, Robert W; Rahme, Elham; Steinmetz, Oren; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2006-09-01

    Open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is a common surgical procedure associated with high mortality rates. Our objective was to describe the use of in-hospital cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing open AAA repair and to examine the effect of perioperative cardiac medical therapy on in-hospital mortality. We examined clinical data and in-hospital medication use among 223 patients who underwent open AAA repair at three North American hospitals, all of which used the Transition resource and cost accounting system. Medication use was described [angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, aspirin, ss-blockers, and statins] within the cohort at five specific periods of time: presurgery, day of surgery, 1 day after surgery, postsurgery, and discharge. We then performed a matched case-control study where cases were defined as patients who died in-hospital. We compared medication use between cases and controls to assess its impact on in-hospital mortality. Most patients were elderly (mean age 72.5 +/- 9.8 years), 70.4% were male, and in-hospital mortality within the cohort was 10.8%. Medication use in all periods of administration was low. ss-Blocker use was highest among all classes on the day of surgery, with 20.6% of patients undergoing AAA repair receiving the medication. Less than 50% of patients received any of the medications at discharge. After adjusting for baseline differences, perioperative ACE inhibitor use showed a trend toward a protective effect [odds ratio (OR) = 0.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01-1.31, p = 0.08], and perioperative ss-blocker use was significantly associated with a decrease in mortality (OR = 0.07, 95% CI 0.01-0.87, p = 0.04). Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing AAA repair is low throughout all periods of hospitalization. ACE inhibitor and ss-blocker use may be associated with decreased in-hospital mortality. PMID:16794911

  15. Senile Calcification of the Trachea, Aortic Arch, and Mitral Annulus: An Incidental Finding on Chest X-Ray.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh Maleki, Mahmood; Kazemi, Toba; Davoody, Navid

    2015-10-27

    A 94-year-old woman presented with dizziness and hypotension of 2 days' duration. She denied any syncope, presyncope, or angina. She had received a permanent pacemaker 12 years previously for the management of complete heart block (CHB), but she failed to program it. Twelve-lead electrocardiography revealed CHB with ventricular escape rhythm (40/min), so we inserted a temporary pacemaker. Anteroposterior chest X-ray showed trachea, aortic arch, and severe mitral valve calcification. Tracheal calcification is usually seen after 40 years old without clinical importance. However, it is seen in patients with renal failure, metastases, and prolonged use of warfarin as well as in pregnancy.(1) (-) (3). PMID:26985213

  16. Right Cervical Aortic Arch and Pseudocoarctation of the Aorta Associated with Aneurysms and Steal Phenomena: US, CTA, and MRA Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Tanju, Sumru Ustuner, Evren; Erden, Ilhan; Aytac, Suat Kemal

    2007-02-15

    A 55-year-old woman presented with right cervical aortic arch with pseudocoarctation of the aorta further complicated by the presence of multiple aneurysms and a high-grade stenosis at the origin of the left subclavian trunk from the aorta causing a discrepancy in blood pressure between the right and left arms. The branching pattern and the resulting complex steal syndromes involving the left carotid and the subclavian system are unique. The computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and Doppler ultrasound findings are described.

  17. Beveled reversed elephant trunk procedure for complex aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Takuya; Yamamoto, Shin; Sekine, Yuji; Oshima, Susumu; Kasai, Reo; Sasaguri, Shiro

    2016-03-01

    The reversed elephant trunk procedure uses an inverted graft for distal aortic replacement before aortic arch replacement in patients with mega aorta, to reduce the risk in the second stage. However, the conventional technique restricts the maximum diameter of the inverted graft to the aortic graft diameter. We employed a beveled reversed elephant trunk procedure to overcome the discrepancy between graft diameters in a 54-year-old woman with a severely twisted ascending aortic graft and enlarging chronic dissection of the aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. The patient was discharged with a satisfactory repair and no neurologic deficit. PMID:25406402

  18. Endovascular vs open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nedeau, April E.; Pomposelli, Frank B.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark C.; Hsu, Richard; Sachs, Teviah; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Schermerhorn, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) has become first-line therapy at our institution and is performed under a standardized protocol. We compare perioperative mortality, midterm survival, and morbidity after EVAR and open surgical repair (OSR). Methods Records were retrospectively reviewed from May 2000 to September 2010 for repair of infrarenal rAAAs. Primary end points included perioperative mortality and midterm survival. Secondary end points included acute limb ischemia, length of stay, ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, myocardial infarction, renal failure, abdominal compartment syndrome, and secondary intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using the t-test,X2 test, the Fisher exact test, and logistic regression calculations. Midterm survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. Results Seventy-four infrarenal rAAAs were repaired, 19 by EVAR and 55 by OSR. Despite increased age and comorbidity in the EVAR patients, perioperative mortality was 15.7% for EVAR, which was significantly lower than the 49% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.74; P = .008). Midterm survival also favored EVAR (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21-0.77; P = .028, adjusted for age and sex). Mean follow-up was 20 months, and 1-year survival was 60% for EVAR vs 45% for OSR. Mean length of stay for patients surviving >1 day was 10 days for EVAR and 21 days for OSR (P = .004). Ventilator-dependent respiratory failure was 5% in the EVAR group vs 42% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.62; P = .001). Conclusions EVAR of rAAA has a superior perioperative survival advantage and decreased morbidity vs OSR. Although not statistically significant, overall survival favors EVAR. We recommend that EVAR be considered as the first-line treatment of rAAAs and practiced as the standard of care. PMID:22626871

  19. Surgical repair for giant ascending aortic aneurysm to superior vena cava fistula with positive syphilitic test.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yuji; Yamamoto, Shin; Fujikawa, Takuya; Oshima, Susumu; Ono, Makoto; Sasaguri, Shiro

    2015-10-01

    Syphilitic aortitis is usually associated with thoracic aortic saccular aneurysm, aortic regurgitation and coronary ostial stenosis. However, syphilitic aneurysms have rarely been reported today. Here, we report a patient with ascending aortic aneurysm with aorta-superior vena cava (SVC) fistula with positive syphilitic test. A 52-year-old man was admitted to our institution with a giant ascending aortic aneurysm complicated with SVC syndrome. Computed tomography revealed a giant ascending aneurysm 79 mm in diameter. The result of serodiagnostic tests for syphilis had not been judged yet preoperatively. Total arch replacement concomitant with elephant trunk was performed. Intraoperatively, we detected the ascending aorta to SVC fistula. Postoperatively, we suspected the syphilitic aneurysm strongly, because preoperative serodiagnostic test was concluded to be positive. However, histological examination did not show typical syphilitic features. The patient remains asymptomatic 1 year later. Although extremely rarely today, syphilitic aneurysm should be still considered in the differential diagnosis of ascending aortic aneurysm. PMID:24000069

  20. Fenestrated Endovascular Grafts for the Repair of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) allows the exclusion of the dilated aneurismal segment of the aorta from the systematic circulation. The procedure requires, however, that the endograft extends to the healthy parts of the aorta above and below the aneurysm, yet the neck of a juxtarenal aortic aneurysm (JRA) is too short for a standard endovascular repair. Fenestrated endovascular aortic repair (f—EVAR) provides a solution to overcome this problem by enabling the continuation of blood flow to the renal and visceral arteries through holes or ‘fenestrations’ in the graft. These fenestrations are designed to match the ostial diameter of the renal and visceral arteries. There are three varieties fenestration, small, large, and scallop, and their location needs to be customized to fit the anatomy of the patient. If the device is not properly designed, if the alignment is inaccurate, or if the catheterization of the visceral arteries is not possible, the procedure may fail. In such cases, conversion to open surgery may become the only option as fenestrated endografts are not retrievable. It is recommended that a stent be placed within each small fenestration to the target artery to prevent shuttering of the artery or occlusion. Many authors have noted an increased risk of vessel occlusion in unstented fenestrations and scallops. Once placed in a patient, life-long follow-up at regular intervals is necessary to ensure the graft remains in its intended location, and that the components have adequate overlap. Should the need arise, routine follow-up allows the performance of timely and appropriate intervention through detection of events that could impact the long-term outcomes. Alternative Technology The technique of fenestrated endovascular grafting is still in evolution and few studies have been with published mid-term outcome data. As the technique become more common in vascular surgery practices, it will be important to

  1. Association of Ankle-Brachial Index and Aortic Arch Calcification with Overall and Cardiovascular Mortality in Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Shih, Ming-Chen Paul; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery occlusive disease and vascular calcification are highly prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients, however the association of the combination of ankle-brachial index (ABI) and aortic arch calcification (AoAC) with clinical outcomes in patients undergoing HD is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of ABI and AoAC is independently associated with overall and cardiovascular mortality in HD patients. The median follow-up period was 5.7 years. Calcification of the aortic arch was assessed by chest X-ray. Forty-seven patients died including 24 due to cardiovascular causes during the follow-up period. The study patients were stratified into four groups according to an ABI < 0.95 or ≥0.95 and an AoAC score of >4 or ≤4 according to receiver operating characteristic curve. Those with an ABI < 0.95 and AoAC > 4 (vs. ABI ≥ 0.95 and AoAC score ≤ 4) were associated with overall (hazard ratio [HR], 4.913; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.932 to 12.497; p = 0.001) and cardiovascular (HR, 3.531; 95% CI, 1.070 to 11.652; p = 0.038) mortality in multivariable analysis. The combination of a low ABI and increased AoAC was associated with increased overall and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing HD. PMID:27608939

  2. External transabdominal manipulation of vessels: a useful adjunct with endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Sternbergh, W C; Money, S R; Yoselevitz, M

    2001-04-01

    During endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, a severely angulated aortic neck or tortuous iliac arteries can make delivery of endografts difficult. We describe a simple adjunct in which transabdominal manipulation of vessels is used, which can greatly facilitate delivery of these devices in patients with challenging anatomy. PMID:11296348

  3. Open repair of chronic complicated type B aortic dissection using the open distal technique

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Harleen; Afifi, Rana O.; Azizzadeh, Ali; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer; Miller, Charles C.; Safi, Hazim J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim The present study aimed to analyze early and late outcomes after open repair of chronic type B aortic dissection. Methods We retrospectively reviewed our cases of open descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA) with chronic dissection from 1991-2013. Long-term survival and aortic reinterventions were analyzed and patient comorbidities were evaluated in order to determine the risk of adverse outcomes. Furthermore, the technique for “distal first approach” is described. Results Between 1991 and 2013, 240 (40%) descending thoracic aortic repairs with associated chronic dissection were performed. Mean age is 59 years and 178 (74%) are men. The majority of patients (218, 91%) underwent repair using the adjunct of distal aortic perfusion with cerebral spinal fluid drainage. Early mortality was 8.3% (20/240). Permanent neurologic deficit occurred in 1.3% (3/240). Stroke occurred in 2.9% (7/240), and dialysis on discharge in 6% (12/240). 5-, 10-, 15-, and 20-year survival was 72%, 60%, 45%, and 39%, respectively. Freedom from reoperation on the operated segment was 97%, 94%, 94% and 94% at 5, 10, 15 and 20 years. Conclusions Open repairs of chronic descending thoracic dissections can be performed with respectable morbidity and mortality. Risk of neurologic deficit remains low with use of adjuncts, and risk of reintervention on the involved aortic segment is also low. These results allow comparison with endovascular repair for chronic aortic dissection. PMID:25133100

  4. Aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A; Clough, Rachel E; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Suzuki, Toru; Gibbs, Richard; Mussa, Firas; Jenkins, Michael T; Thompson, Matt M; Evangelista, Arturo; Yeh, James S M; Cheshire, Nicholas; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Pepper, John

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition caused by a tear in the intimal layer of the aorta or bleeding within the aortic wall, resulting in the separation (dissection) of the layers of the aortic wall. Aortic dissection is most common in those 65-75 years of age, with an incidence of 35 cases per 100,000 people per year in this population. Other risk factors include hypertension, dyslipidaemia and genetic disorders that involve the connective tissue, such as Marfan syndrome. Swift diagnostic confirmation and adequate treatment are crucial in managing affected patients. Contemporary management is multidisciplinary and includes serial non-invasive imaging, biomarker testing and genetic risk profiling for aortopathy. The choice of approach for repairing or replacing the damaged region of the aorta depends on the severity and the location of the dissection and the risks of complication from surgery. Open surgical repair is most commonly used for dissections involving the ascending aorta and the aortic arch, whereas minimally invasive endovascular intervention is appropriate for descending aorta dissections that are complicated by rupture, malperfusion, ongoing pain, hypotension or imaging features of high risk. Recent advances in the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of aortic dissection have led to more patients being considered at substantial risk of complications and, therefore, in need of endovascular intervention rather than only medical or surgical intervention. PMID:27440162

  5. Protective effect of angulated aorta for saving coronary artery during endovascular repair for ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myeong Gun; Oh, Pyung Chun; Jeon, Yang Bin; Lee, Ji Yeon; Shin, Eak Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication after cardiothoracic surgery and the open surgical repair for this complication is challenging. We report on a patient who developed an ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm after aortic valve replacement (AVR), which was treated successfully with endovascular therapy. Our case showed that angulation of the ascending aorta is one of factors for consideration in application of endovascular therapy and endovascular therapy might be an option for management of ascending aortic pathology in patients with high surgical risk, particularly patients with a severely angulated proximal ascending aorta. PMID:27621896

  6. Aortic Valve Repair: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Published Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Sancho, Elena; Abello, David; Bashir, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is widely accepted that aortic valve disease is surgically managed with aortic valve replacement (AVR) using different available prostheses. The long-term survival, durability of the valve, and freedom from reoperation after AVR are well established in published literature. Over the past two decades, aortic valve repair (AVr) has evolved into an accepted surgical option for patients with aortic valve disease. We review and analyze the published literature on AVr. Methods: A systematic review of the current literature was performed through three electronic databases from inception to August 2013 to identify all relevant studies relating to aortic valve repair. Articles selected were chosen by two reviewers. Articles were excluded if they contained a pediatric population or if the patient number was less than 50. Results: Twenty-four studies conformed to the inclusion criteria for inclusion in the systematic review. In total, 4986 patients underwent aortic valve repair. 7 studies represented bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) repair, 5 studies represented cusp prolapse, and 3 studies represented valve repair with root dilation or aneurysm. Overall weighted in-hospital mortality for all studies was low (1.46% ± 1.21). Preoperative aortic insufficiency (AI) ≥ 2+ did not correlate to reoperation for valve failure (Pearson's Rs 0.2705, P = 0.2585). AI at discharge was reported in 9 studies with a mean AI ≥ 2+ in 6.1% of patients. Weighted average percentage for valve reoperation following BAV repair was 10.23% ± 3.2. Weighted average reoperation following cusp prolapse repair was 3.83 ± 1.96. Weighted average reoperation in aortic valve sparing procedures with root replacement was 4.25% ± 2.46. Although there are limitations and complications of prosthetic valves, especially for younger individuals, there is ample published literature that confers strong evidence for AVR. On the contrary, aortic valve repair may be a useful option for selected patients

  7. Technical adjunct for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in patient with renal transplant.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Anna R; Sirignano, Pasqualino; Capoccia, Laura; Menna, Danilo; Ippoliti, Francesco; Speziale, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    One of the most discussed issues in abdominal aortic surgery in kidney-transplanted patients is represented by organ protection during aortic cross-clamping. We report the case of a kidney-transplanted woman who underwent surgical correction for an abdominal aortic aneurysm after she refused any endovascular approach. To maintain kidney perfusion, during surgical aortic reconstruction, a biopump was chosen. Nowadays, abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair, when feasible, allows avoiding cross-clamping-related renal ischemia, although a potential risk for contrast-induced nephrotoxicity still exists. When open surgical repair is chosen, several different techniques to protect the transplanted organ have been proposed, with different potential advantages and results. In the case we reported, the use of biopump allowed an effective protection from ischemia, minimizing perioperative stress and complications. PMID:24531028

  8. Anomalous origin of the left innominate (brachiocephalic) artery in the right aortic arch: How can it be anomalous when the left innominate artery is absent?

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Francesca; Bonnet, Damien; Geva, Tal; Sanders, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    An unusual case of a rare vascular ring, which has been called right aortic arch with aberrant left innominate artery, is presented. The appearance of this case led to the realization that there is really no innominate artery present in this anomaly but only the left dorsal aorta. We present a clarification of the nature and likely development of the vessels present. PMID:27212855

  9. Left-ventricular mechanical activation and aortic-arch orientation recovered from Magneto-hydrodynamic Voltages observed in 12-lead ECGs obtained inside MRIs: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, T. Stan; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Zhang, Shelley Hualei; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Stevenson, William G.; Murrow, Jonathan R.; Ho Tse, Zion Tsz

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To explore use of the Magnetohydrodynamic Voltage (VMHD), observed in intra-MRI 12-lead Electrocardiograms (ECG), to indicate the timing of the onset of left-ventricular mechanical activation (LVMA) and the orientation of the aortic-arch (AAO). Theory Blood flow through the aortic arch during systole, in the presence of the MRI magnetic field (B0), generates VMHD. Since the magnitude and direction of VMHD are determined by the timing and directionality of blood flow relative to B0, we hypothesized that clinically useful measures, LVMA and AAO, could be extracted from temporal and vectorial VMHD characteristics. Methods VMHD signals were extracted from 12-lead ECG traces by comparing traces obtained inside and outside the MRI scanner. VMHD was converted into the Vectorcardiogram frame of reference. LVMA was quantified in 1 subject at 1.5T and 3 subjects at 3T, and the result compared to CINE MRI. AAO was inferred for 4 subjects at 3T and compared to anatomical imaging of the aortic arch orientation in the transverse plane. Results and Conclusions A <10% error was observed in LVMA measurements, while a <3° error was observed in aortic arch orientation measurements. The temporal and vectorial nature of VMHD is useful in estimating these clinically relevant parameters. PMID:25224074

  10. Repair of anastomotic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm utilizing sequential AneuRx aortic cuffs in an overlapping configuration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Bush, Ruth L; Bhama, Jay K; Lin, Peter H; Safaya, Rakesh; Lumsden, Alan B

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic aortic pseudoaneurysm is a known late complication following aortic repair and presents a considerable surgical challenge. We herein evaluate the endovascular alternative of using sequential AneuRx aortic cuffs to bridge the degenerative anastomotic pseudoaneurysms as a definitive treatment. Over a 3-year period, six patients with a mean age of 68.7 years (range 58-75) were identified who had proximal anastomotic aortic pseudoaneurysms secondary to previously implanted bifurcated aortic grafts (mean 15, range 12-20 years) following open surgical correction of aortoiliac occlusive disease. Five patients (83%) presented with concomitant palpable femoral anastomotic pseudoaneurysms and one patient (16%) had a pulsatile abdominal mass. All patients had computed tomographic (CT) scans confirming proximal anastomotic pseudoaneuryms without evidence of infection. The mean diameter of the pseudoaneurysms was 5.3 cm (range 4.0-7.0). Five patients were treated with endovascular methods, while one patient was not suitable for endovascular repair due to the diameter of the native aorta as seen on imaging study at the time of the procedure. AneuRx aortic extender cuffs (3.75 cm length) were deployed sequentially in five patients via a femoral approach. Devices were overlapped approximately 1.5 cm in order to achieve total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysms, and all concomitant femoral aneurysms were repaired surgically at the same time. Successful exclusion of the anastomotic pseudoaneurysm was achieved in four patients (80%) using a combination of two or three overlapping aortic cuffs. One patient had a small residual endoleak that had sealed by 1 month, evidenced by follow-up CT. The renal arteries were preserved in all patients. The average estimated blood loss and operative time were 355 +/- 25 cc and 84 +/- 21 min, respectively. The average length of hospital stay was 2.1 days, and there was no mortality or major morbidity. All patients underwent CT scanning

  11. Aortic Root Enlargement with Ascending-to-Descending Aortic Bypass in Repair of Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Perry, Paul A; Young, Nilas

    2015-07-01

    Ascending-to-descending aortic bypass is a valuable technique for addressing coarctation of the aorta when additional cardiac procedures are indicated in adults. Among these, aortic valve replacement is one of the most commonly performed concomitant procedures, and there are instances in which aortic root enlargement is required. Herein, a novel technique is described for performing simultaneous ascending-to-descending aortic bypass in conjunction with aortic root enlargement which incorporates the bypass graft as part of the aortic root enlargement. PMID:26897826

  12. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  13. Midterm follow-up dynamic echocardiography evaluation after aortic valve repair for aortic valve insufficiency.

    PubMed

    D'Ancona, Giuseppe; Amaducci, Andrea; Prodromo, John; Pirone, Francesco; Follis, Marco; Falletta, Calogero; Pilato, Michele

    2012-06-01

    We prospectively evaluated 46 patients who underwent aortic valve repair (AVR) for AV regurgitation. Rest/stress echocardiography follow-up was performed. Follow-up duration was 30.7 months, age 56 ± 14 years, ejection fraction% 57.5 ± 10.5%. Preoperative bicuspid AV was present in 14 (30.4%), leaflets calcifications in 8 (17.4%), thickening in 17 (37.0%) and prolapse in 22 (47.8%). Surgical technique included commissuroplasty (22, 47.8%), leaflet remodelling (17, 37.0%), decalcification (7, 15.2%) and raphe removal (14, 30.4%). At follow-up, rest/stress echocardiography median AV regurgitation (rest 1.0 vs. stress 1.0) and mean indexed AV area (IAVA) (rest 2.6 ± 0.74 cm(2)/m(2) vs. stress 2.8 ± 0.4 cm(2)/m(2)) were unchanged (P = ns). Mean (rest 4.7 ± 3.9 mmHg vs. stress 9.7 ± 5.8 mmHg) and peak (rest 9.5 ± 7.2 mmHg vs. stress 19.0 ± 10.5 mmHg) transvalvular gradients were significantly increased (P < 0.0001). At linear regression, there was an independent inverse correlation between commissuroplasty and AV gradients during stress (B = -9.9, P = 0.01, confidence interval= -17.7 to -2.1). Although follow-up haemodynamics of repaired AVs are satisfactory, there was a fixed IAVA and significant increase in AV gradients. We were not able to identify any pre-existing anatomical condition independently related to this non-physiological behaviour under stress. Moreover, commissuroplasty seems to prevent abnormal increase of the AV gradients. PMID:22368109

  14. Endovascular repair or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: a Cochrane systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Badger, S A; Harkin, D W; Blair, P H; Ellis, P K; Kee, F; Forster, R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (eEVAR) may improve outcomes for patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA). The study aim was to compare the outcomes for eEVAR with conventional open surgical repair for the treatment of RAAA. Setting A systematic review of relevant publications was performed. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing eEVAR with open surgical repair for RAAA were included. Participants 3 RCTs were included, with a total of 761 patients with RAAA. Interventions Meta-analysis was performed with fixed-effects models with ORs and 95% CIs for dichotomous data and mean differences with 95% CIs for continuous data. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome was short-term mortality. Secondary outcome measures included aneurysm-specific and general complication rates, quality of life and economic analysis. Results Overall risk of bias was low. There was no difference between the 2 interventions on 30-day (or in-hospital) mortality, OR 0.91 (95% CI 0.67 to 1.22; p=0.52). 30-day complications included myocardial infarction, stroke, composite cardiac complications, renal complications, severe bowel ischaemia, spinal cord ischaemia, reoperation, amputation and respiratory failure. Reporting was incomplete, and no robust conclusion was drawn. For complication outcomes that did include at least 2 studies in the meta-analysis, there was no clear evidence to support a difference between eEVAR and open repair. Longer term outcomes and cost per patient were evaluated in only a single study, thus precluding definite conclusions. Conclusions Outcomes between eEVAR and open repair, specifically 30-day mortality, are similar. However, further high-quality trials are required, as the paucity of data currently limits the conclusions. PMID:26873043

  15. Functional annulus remodelling using a prosthetic ring in tricuspid aortic valve repair: mid-term results†

    PubMed Central

    Fattouch, Khalil; Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Murana, Giacomo; Nasso, Giuseppe; Guccione, Francesco; Dioguardi, Pietro; Salardino, Massimo; Bianco, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The functional aortic valve annulus (FAVA) is a complex unit with proximal (aorto-ventricular junction) and distal (sinotubular junction) components. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of the total FAVA remodelling, using a prosthetic ring, on mid-term clinical and echocardiographic results after aortic valve repair. METHODS Since February 2003, 250 patients with tricuspid aortic valve insufficiency (AI) underwent aortic valve repair. FAVA dilatation was treated by prosthetic ring in 52 patients, by isolated subcommissural plasty in 62, by subcommissural plasty plus ascending aortic replacement in 57 and by David's reimplantation procedure in 79. Survival rate and freedom from recurrent AI greater than or equal to moderate were evaluated by Kaplan–Meier. RESULTS Overall late survival was 90.4%. Late cardiac-related deaths occurred in 15 patients. At follow-up, 36 (16%) patients had recurrent AI greater than or equal to moderate because of cusp reprolapse and/or FAVA redilatation. Freedom from recurrent AI was significantly higher for patients who underwent David's procedure or FAVA remodelling by prosthetic ring than those who underwent isolated subcommissural plasty (P < 0.01) or subcommissural plasty plus ascending aortic replacement (P = 0.02). There was no statistical difference between David's procedure and prosthetic ring annuloplasty (P = 0.26). CONCLUSION FAVA remodelling using a prosthetic ring is a safe procedure in aortic valve repair surgery thanks to long-term annulus stabilization and it is a pliable alternative to David's procedure in selected patients. This technique may be used in all patients with slight root dilatation to avoid aggressive root reimplantation. We also recommended total FAVA annuloplasty in all patients who underwent aortic valve repair to improve long-term repair results. PMID:24065345

  16. Type A aortic dissection with cold agglutinin disease.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hiroaki; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Nagasawa, Atsushi; Ogino, Hitoshi

    2011-08-01

    Cold agglutinin disease is an uncommon condition characterized by hemagglutination and microvascular thrombosis of red blood cells at low temperatures during cardiopulmonary bypass. We report the rare case of an ambulatory 74-year-old woman with a relatively high thermal amplitude for antibody activation. We performed aortic arch repair for type A aortic dissection using moderately hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass and warm blood cardioplegia in a retrograde manner. This case report provides evidence that these are safe and suitable techniques for selected aortic arch repair patients with cold agglutinin disease. PMID:21801929

  17. Digital-image analysis of the aortic arch's development and its variations.

    PubMed

    Gielecki, Jerzy St; Wilk, Renata; Syc, Bozena; Musiał-Kopiejka, Magdalena; Piwowarczyk-Nowak, Aneta

    2004-11-01

    The study was performed on 103 human foetuses (58 female, 45 male) spontaneously aborted at between 14 and 30 weeks of gestation. The arteries were filled with latex, preserved in formalin and then dissected under the microscope and digitalised using a camera system. The following measurements were taken with the use of special computer software: the external diameter, the length and the volume of the arch of the aorta. The increase in diameter and length in relation to age corresponded to a linear function with values ranging from 1.77 mm to 4.09 mm for the diameter and from 4.94 mm to 13.31 mm for the length. The increase in volume corresponded to a square root function with values ranging from 13.42 mm3 to 173.96 mm3. Analysis of arch of the aorta variations revealed 11 cases of a common trunk for the brachiocephalic trunk and the left common carotid artery and 7 cases with the left vertebral artery arising directly from the arch of the aorta. In 2 cases the brachiocephalic trunk was absent, the right subclavian artery branching directly from the arch of the aorta at the level of the left subclavian artery or from the descending aorta just below the arterial duct ostium. PMID:15712142

  18. Outcomes of Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair and Subclavian Revascularization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zamor, Kimberly C; Eskandari, Mark K; Rodriguez, Heron E; Ho, Karen J; Morasch, Mark D; Hoel, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    Background Practice guidelines regarding management of the left subclavian artery (LSA) during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) are based on low quality evidence and there is limited literature that addresses optimal revascularization techniques. The purpose of this study is to compare outcomes of LSA coverage during TEVAR and revascularization techniques. Study Design We performed a single-center retrospective cohort study from 2001–2013. Patients were categorized by LSA revascularization and by revascularization technique, carotid-subclavian bypass (CSB) or subclavian-carotid transposition (SCT). Thirty-day and mid-term stroke, spinal cord ischemia, vocal cord paralysis, upper extremity ischemia, primary patency of revascularization, and mortality were compared. Results Eighty patients underwent TEVAR with LSA coverage, 25% (n=20) were unrevascularized and the remaining patients underwent CSB (n=22, 27.5%) or SCT (n=38, 47.5%). Mean follow-up time was 24.9 months. Comparisons between unrevascularized and revascularized patients were significant for a higher rate of 30-day stroke (25% vs. 2%, p=0.003) and upper extremity ischemia (15% vs. 0%, p=0.014). However, there was no difference in 30-day or mid-term rates of spinal cord ischemia, vocal cord paralysis, or mortality. There were no statistically significant differences in 30-day or midterm outcomes for CSB vs. SCT. Primary patency of revascularizations was 100%. Survival analysis comparing unrevascularized vs. revascularized LSA, was statistically significant for freedom from stroke and upper extremity ischemia, p=0.02 and p=0.003, respectively. After adjustment for advanced age, urgency and coronary artery disease, LSA revascularization was associated with lower rates of peri-operative adverse events (OR 0.23, p=0.034). Conclusions During TEVAR, LSA coverage without revascularization is associated with an increased risk of stroke and upper extremity ischemia. When LSA coverage is required during

  19. Clinical value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction in the diagnosis of double aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XIN; QU, YANJUAN; PENG, ZHI-YUAN; LU, JINGGUO; MA, XIAOJING; HU, WENJUAN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clincal value of multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) in the diagnosis of double aortic arch (DAA) and analyze the associated angiography and 3D reconstruction imaging to increase the accuracy of DAA diagnosis. Clinical and imaging data from 15 patients diagnosed with DAA by MSCT were summarized and compared with the corresponding surgical observations. The DAA diagnosis by MSCT for the 15 patients was confirmed by the surgical observations. A total of 13 cases were categorized as type I (double arches are open), including nine with a larger right arch, two with a larger left arch and two with balanced arches. Two cases were categorized as type II (one atretic arch), characterized by left atretic arch. Among the 15 patients, ultrasound diagnosis succeeded in nine cases and failed in the rest. A single malformation was identified in only two cases, whereas the rest had single or multiple combination(s) of intracardiac and extracardiac malformations, including seven with different levels of tracheobronchial stenosis. MSCT was demonstrated to precisely diagnose DAA complicated by malformation and tracheobronchial stenosis. MSCT is an essential therapeutic strategy and serves as a primary method in DAA diagnosis. PMID:25009630

  20. A new concentric double prosthesis for sutureless, magnetic-assisted aortic arch inclusion.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Acute dissection of the ascending aorta is a life-threatening condition in which the aortic wall develops one or more tears of the intima associated with intramural rupture of the media layer with subsequent formation of a two lumina vessel. The remaining outer layer is just the adventitia, with high risk of complete rupture. Vital organs may be under-perfused. Mortality rate in this acute event is about 50% if an emergent surgical procedure is not performed as soon as possible to replace the tract affected by the primary rupture. Nevertheless, the emergent surgical procedure is affected by high risk of mortality or severe neurologic sequelae, due to the need for deep hypothermia and cardiocirculatory arrest and different methods of cerebral protection. If the patient survives the acute event, a frequent outcome is the establishment of a chronic aortic dissection in the remaining aorta and late chronic dissecting aneurysm, usually starting from the surgical suture itself. Traumatism of surgical stitches and of direct blood flow pressure on weak aortic wall can be important contributing factors of the chronic disease. In conclusions, the majority of these patients undergoes a high risk operation without a complete solution of the disease. We hypothesize that excluding the aortic layers from the blood direct flow and using an anastomotic technique which does not include surgical stitches could help to significantly reduce the recurrence of aortic dissection after the acute event and shorten hypothermic arrest duration. We devised a double tubular prosthesis consisting of two concentric artificial tubes between which the aortic wall is confined and excluded from direct blood flow. We also devised a magnetic assisted sutureless anastomotic technique that seals the aortic tissue between the two prostheses and avoids the perforation of the fragile aortic wall with surgical stitches. We are presenting here this new prototype and draw a few different models. Both acute and

  1. Complete regression of a symptomatic, mycotic juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm after treatment with fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Durgin, Jonathan M; Arous, Edward J; Kumar, Shivani; Robinson, William P; Simons, Jessica P; Schanzer, Andres

    2016-09-01

    Mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysms are rare and present unique challenges when potential treatment options are considered. Although aortic resection with in situ grafting techniques or extra-anatomic reconstruction are the treatments of choice, endovascular aortic repair has emerged as a suitable alternative in critically ill patients. We report the successful endovascular repair of a symptomatic, mycotic juxtarenal aortic aneurysm using a physician-modified fenestrated endograft. In this patient, with >6 months of follow-up, the aneurysm has completely regressed, illustrating that in select patients with complex mycotic aneurysms, endovascular repair combined with appropriate medical management is a viable treatment strategy. PMID:26747681

  2. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection Repair (EVAR) in Iran: Descriptive Midterm Follow-up Results

    PubMed Central

    Haji Zeinali, Ali Mohammad; Marzban, Mehrab; Zafarghandi, Mohammadreza; Shirzad, Mahmood; Shirani, Shapour; Mahmoodian, Roshanak; Sheikhvatan, Mehrdad; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endovascular repair of aorta in comparison to open surgery has a low early operative mortality rate, but its long-term results are uncertain. Objectives: The current study describes for the first time our initial four-year experience of elective endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) at Tehran heart center, the first and a major referral heart center in Iran, as a pioneer of EVAR in Iran. Patients and Methods: A total of 51 patients (46 men) who had the diagnosis of either an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) (n = 36), thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) (n = 7), or thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) (n = 8) who had undergone EVAR by Medtronic stent grafts by our team between December 2006 and June 2009 were reviewed. Results: The rate of in-hospital aneurysm-related deaths in the group with AAA stood at 2.8% (one case), while there was no in-hospital mortality in the other groups. All patients were followed up for 13-18 months. The cumulative death rate in follow-up was nine cases from the total 51 cases (18%), out of which six cases were in the AAA group (four patients due to non-cardiac causes and two patients due to aneurysm-related causes), one case in the TAA group (following a severe hemoptysis), and two cases in the TAD group (following an expansion of dissection from re-entrance). The major event-free survival rate was 80.7% for endovascular repair of AAA, 85.7% for endovascular repair of TAA, and 65.6% for endovascular repair of TAD. Conclusion: The endovascular stent-graft repair of the abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection had high technical success rates in tandem with low-rate early mortality and morbidity, short hospital stay, and acceptable mid-term free symptom survival among Iranian patients. PMID:27110330

  3. [Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a patient with transplanted kidney].

    PubMed

    Khabazov, R I; Chupin, A V; Kolosov, R V; Deriabin, S V

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular repair of the abdominal aorta is a method of choice in pronounced concomitant pathology and high risk of open surgical treatment. The article deals with a clinical case report of successful surgical management of a patient with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm, transplanted kidney, chronic renal insufficiency, secondary diabetes mellitus, multifocal atherosclerosis with predominant involvement of coronary arteries and lower-limb arteries, in whom open surgical treatment was associated with high risk. Endoprosthetic repair of the abdominal aortic aneurysm was performed with a good postoperative outcome. PMID:27626264

  4. Axillofemoral bypass for kidney transplant protection during open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Monnot, Antoine; Rouer, Martin; Horion, Julien; Plissonnier, Didier

    2015-08-01

    The need to treat an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in kidney transplanted patient is a rare event. To date, no method to protect the kidney during the aneurysm treatment has been identified as undeniably relevant. On the other hand, the advantage of endovascular treatment of the aneurysm (EVAR) is to avoid transplanted kidney injury. Unfortunately, EVAR is not always available leading to open repair and then aortic cross clamping. We report here 3 cases of AAA open repair in kidney transplanted patients using a temporary axillofemoral bypass to protect the renal function. PMID:25958120

  5. Extra-anatomic endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a horseshoe kidney supplied by the aneurysmal aorta.

    PubMed

    Rey, Jorge; Golpanian, Samuel; Yang, Jane K; Moreno, Enrique; Velazquez, Omaida C; Goldstein, Lee J; Chahwala, Veer

    2015-07-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by a horseshoe kidney (HSK, fused kidney) represents a unique challenge for repair. Renal arteries arising from the aneurysmal aorta can further complicate intervention. Reports exist describing the repair of these complex anatomies using fenestrated endografts, hybrid open repairs (debranching), and open aneurysmorrhaphy with preservation of renal circulation. We describe an extra-anatomic, fully endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a HSK partially supplied by a renal artery arising from the aneurysm. We successfully applied aortouni-iliac endografting, femorofemoral bypass, and retrograde renal artery perfusion via the contralateral femoral artery to exclude the abdominal aortic aneurysm and preserve circulation to the HSK. PMID:25770382

  6. Successful repair of aortic annulus rupture during transcatheter aortic valve replacement using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support.

    PubMed

    Negi, Smita I; Patel, Jay; Patel, Manish; Loyalka, Pranav; Kar, Biswajit; Gregoric, Igor

    2015-09-01

    Aortic annular rupture is a rare and much dreaded complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Device oversizing to prevent post-procedural paravalvular leak is the most commonly identified cause of this complication. However, mechanical stress in a heavily calcified non-compliant vessel can also lead to annular rupture in this older population. We describe a case of aortic annular rupture with involvement of right coronary artery ostium leading to cardiac tamponade and cardiac arrest, successfully managed by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support, open drainage of the pericardial space, pericardial patching of the defect and bypass of the affected vessel with excellent post-procedural results. PMID:23990118

  7. Embolization with Histoacryl Glue of an Anastomotic Pseudoaneurysm following Surgical Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Walid, Ayesha; Ul Haq, Tanveer; Ur Rehman, Zia

    2013-01-01

    We report a 62-year-old female who had surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm with a bifurcated graft 2 years ago. She presented with a distal anastomotic pseudoaneurysm which was successfully embolized with histoacryl glue. Only one such similar case has been reported in the literature so far (Yamagami et al. (2006)). PMID:23476883

  8. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Sac Rupture for Type IIIa Endoleak in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Mangini, Monica Bracchi, Elena Recaldini, Chiara; Cocozza, Eugenio; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Pellegrino, Carlo Lagana, Domenico Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    Elective endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pathology has been applied in a variety of conditions. The complications of thoracic aortic stenting are also well recognized. Endoleak after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is the most frequent complication; among them, type III is the least frequent. Endovascular treatment of type III endoleak is generally performed under elective conditions; less frequently, in emergency. We report a successful emergency endovascular management of post-thoracic endovascular repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture due to type IIIa endoleak.

  9. Endovascular Embolization of Bronchial Artery Originating from the Upper Portion of Aortic Arch in Patients with Massive Hemoptysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Sen Sun, Xi-Wen Yu, Dong Jie, Bing

    2013-05-15

    PurposeOur experience with endovascular embolization (EVE) of the bronchial artery (BA) originating from the upper portion of the aortic arch (AA) in six patients is described.MethodsAltogether, 818 patients with hemoptysis underwent multidetector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) before EVE or AA angiography during EVE. Aberrant BAs originating from the upper portion of the AA were the source of massive hemoptysis in six patients (0.73 %). MDCT angiograms and/or Digital subtraction angiograms were retrospectively reviewed. Selective catheterization and embolization were performed.ResultsThe ostia of the BAs were located on the superior surface of the AA between the brachiocephalic trunk and left common carotid artery in three patients, the junction of the aorta and medial surface of the left subclavian artery in two, and the posterior wall of the upper portion of the AA in one. The six BAs comprised two common trunks, three single right sides, and one single left side. The targeted vessels were successfully catheterized and embolized by a coaxial microcatheter system using polyvinyl alcohol particles. Other pathologic BAs and nonbronchial systemic arteries also were embolized. Bleeding was immediately controlled in all patients with no recurrence of hemoptysis. No procedure-related complications occurred.ConclusionsApplication of EVE of anomalous origin of BAs in patients with hemoptysis is important, as demonstrated in the six reported patients. MDCTA before EVE or AA angiography during EVE is critical to avoid missing a rare aberrant BA originating from the upper portion of the AA.

  10. Abnormal bisubclavian trunk arising from the aortic arch determined by cadaver dissection of a native dog: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Younes; Tadjalli, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the great thoracic vessels have been reported in 20% of dogs and cats. In some cases, the vascular ring anomalies remain unrecognized throughout the lifetime of an animal. This report describes a case with an unusual vascular ring anomaly (VRA) that was detected during dissection on a cadaver of an approximately two-year-old male native mixed breed dog. No history of the animal’s life was available. But, good physical condition and age of the animal based on dentition indicated the anomaly was perhaps asymptomatic. Two main branches of the aorta were identified with the initial branch being a bicarotid trunk followed by a bisubclavian trunk. The left subclavian and aberrant right subclavian arteries formed a very short trunk and arose directly from the aortic arch. No dilatation cranial to the esophageal sulcus was found. To the authors' knowledge, our case is the first report of such anomalies perhaps without any clinical signs in a native dog in Iran. PMID:26893819

  11. Abnormal bisubclavian trunk arising from the aortic arch determined by cadaver dissection of a native dog: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kamali, Younes; Tadjalli, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the great thoracic vessels have been reported in 20% of dogs and cats. In some cases, the vascular ring anomalies remain unrecognized throughout the lifetime of an animal. This report describes a case with an unusual vascular ring anomaly (VRA) that was detected during dissection on a cadaver of an approximately two-year-old male native mixed breed dog. No history of the animal's life was available. But, good physical condition and age of the animal based on dentition indicated the anomaly was perhaps asymptomatic. Two main branches of the aorta were identified with the initial branch being a bicarotid trunk followed by a bisubclavian trunk. The left subclavian and aberrant right subclavian arteries formed a very short trunk and arose directly from the aortic arch. No dilatation cranial to the esophageal sulcus was found. To the authors' knowledge, our case is the first report of such anomalies perhaps without any clinical signs in a native dog in Iran. PMID:26893819

  12. Aortic Arch Calcification Predicts the Renal Function Progression in Patients with Stage 3 to 5 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yueh-Ting; Chou, Chia-An; Lee, Chien-Te

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The presence of aortic arch calcification (AoAC) and cardiomegaly on chest radiography has been demonstrated as important risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the interrelationship among AoAC, cardiomegaly, and renal function progression remains unclear. The aim of this study is to assess whether AoAC and cardiomegaly are independently associated with the renal function progression in patients with stages 3–5 CKD. Methods. We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiomegaly by chest X-ray in 237 patients, followed up for at least three years without entering dialysis and classified into 4 groups according to the presence or absence of AoAC and cardiomegaly. The change in renal function was measured by the slope of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results. Of the 237 patients, the rate of eGFR decline was significantly higher in the group with coexistence of AoAC and cardiomegaly than any other groups. Baseline AoAC and proteinuria were independently associated with eGFR decline. AoAC were independently determined by age, eGFR slope, and cardiomegaly. Conclusions. The coexistence of AoAC and cardiomegaly is associated with faster eGFR decline. AoAC is an independent determinant of renal outcomes in patients with CKD stages 3–5. PMID:25695046

  13. Endovascular aortic injury repair after thoracic pedicle screw placement.

    PubMed

    Pesenti, S; Bartoli, M A; Blondel, B; Peltier, E; Adetchessi, T; Fuentes, S

    2014-09-01

    Our objective was to describe the management and prevention of thoracic aortic injuries caused by a malposition of pedicle screws in corrective surgery of major spine deformities. Positioning pedicle screws in thoracic vertebras by posterior approach exposes to the risk of injury of the elements placed ahead of the thoracic spine, as the descending thoracic aorta. This complication can result in a cataclysmic bleeding, needing urgent vascular care, but it can also be totally asymptomatic, resulting in the long run in a pseudoaneurysm, justifying the systematic removal of the hardware. We report the case of a 76-year-old woman who underwent spinal correction surgery for thoraco-lumbar degenerative kypho-scoliosis. Immediately after the surgery, a thoracic aortic injury caused by the left T7 pedicle screw was diagnosed. The patient underwent a two-step surgery. The first step was realized by vascular surgeons and aimed to secure the aortic wall by short endovascular aortic grafting. During the second step, spine surgeons removed the responsible screw by posterior approach. The patient was discharged in a rehabilitation center 7 days after the second surgery. When such a complication occurs, a co-management by vascular and spine surgeons is necessary to avoid major complications. Endovascular management of this kind of vascular injuries permits to avoid an open surgery that have a great rate of morbi-mortality in frail patients. Nowadays, technologies exist to prevent this kind of event and may improve the security when positioning pedicle screws. PMID:25023930

  14. Successful Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    SciTech Connect

    Kaskarelis, Ioannis S. Koukoulaki, Maria; Lappas, Ioannis; Karkatzia, Fani; Dimopoulos, Nikitas; Filias, Vasilios; Bellenis, Ion; Vougas, Vasilios; Drakopoulos, Spiros

    2006-04-15

    A renal transplant recipient presented in the early post-transplantation period with rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The high mortality rate of the surgical repair of ruptured aneurysm in addition to the concern of preserving the renal graft prompted us to seek alternative approaches, such as repairing the aneurysm by means of endovascular techniques. The ruptured aneurysm was confirmed by performing computed tomography and digital angiography and thereafter was successfully repaired by endovascular stenting technique (Talent stent-graft), which seems to be a safe and effective method of preserving a renal graft.

  15. The usefulness of near-infrared spectroscopy in the anesthetic management of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Wakimoto, Masahiro M; Kadosaki, Mamoru; Nagata, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Kenji S

    2012-12-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) may be a useful method for monitoring the regional oxygen saturation (rSO(2)) of the lower extremity during endovascular aortic repair. Eighteen patients with thoracic descending and/or abdominal aortic aneurysm were enrolled in this study. NIRS probes were placed bilaterally on the calves. Muscular rSO(2) (mrSO(2)) was monitored every 30 s throughout the operation. In the leg in which the femoral artery was clamped, mrSO(2) values were selected at 3 or 4 points-just before clamping (control value), 30 min after clamping, 10 min after the first declamping, and 10 min after the second declamping following repair of the femoral artery, if necessary. In all patients, mrSO(2) decreased significantly during clamping, from 64 ± 11 % (mean ± SD) of the control value to 32 ± 15 %. After declamping, mrSO(2) recovered to 69 ± 14 % of the control value in 16 patients. In the 2 other patients, however, mrSO(2) did not recover after the first declamping, because of femoral artery dissection. After additional repair, mrSO(2) recovered quickly to the control value. These data suggested NIRS may objectively and quantitatively reflect oxygenation of the lower extremities, and may indicate an ischemic event that needs additional repair during endovascular aortic repair. PMID:22733429

  16. Innovative chimney-graft technique for endovascular repair of a pararenal abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2015-02-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta. PMID:25873796

  17. Innovative Chimney-Graft Technique for Endovascular Repair of a Pararenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta. PMID:25873796

  18. Blunt traumatic aortic rupture of the proximal ascending aorta repaired by resection and direct anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Harmouche, Majid; Slimani, Eric Karim; Heraudeau, Adeline; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe

    2013-10-01

    Traumatic aortic injury represents 15% of motor vehicle related deaths with death occurring at the scene in 85% of the cases. Aortic disruptions usually occur at the isthmus in a transverse fashion with all three of the aortic layers being involved. Herein, we report the case of a 68-year old man with no prior medical history who was struck by a vehicle while riding his bicycle. The ruptured segment of aorta was resected circumferentially and interrupted horizontal mattress pledgeted prolene sutures were used to ensure full thickness aortic integrity of the proximal and distal aortic segments. The aorta was closed with a single-layer technique using 4/0 prolene suture. There were no postoperative complications and patient was discharged on Day 44. The case here discussed demonstrates a rare presentation of blunt aortic injury. The proximal ascending aorta is an unusual site of transection following blunt trauma with few reports in the literature. We were able to repair the aorta with direct suture, thus avoiding the use of artificial material. PMID:23838337

  19. Suprarenal fixation resulting in intestinal malperfusion after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Siani, Andrea; Accrocca, Federico; De Vivo, Gennaro; Marcucci, Giustino

    2016-05-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and coeliac axis (CA) occlusion after endovascular abdominal aneurysm aortic repair (EVAR-AAA), using endograft with suprarenal fixation, are uncommon. However, we are reporting a case of visceral malperfusion, which occurred 7 days after successful EVAR with suprarenal fixation for symptomatic AAA. Endograft metal stent barbs caused severe stenosis of SMA and CA. A successful recovery of SMA was carried out by means of a balloon-expandable stent released through bare metal stent barbs. We believe that an unfavourable anatomy of a proximal aortic neck and visceral aorta may have caused a wrong stent strut deployment with the coverage of CA and SMA. PMID:26826712

  20. Tracheo-Bronchial Obstruction and Esophageal Perforation after TEVAR for Thoracic Aortic Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Daisuke; Tanaka, Haruki; Komatsu, Kazunori; Ohtsu, Yoshinori; Terasaki, Takamitsu; Wada, Yuko; Takano, Tamaki; Koike, Shoichiro; Amano, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A 67-year-old man was referred to our hospital for an ascending aortic aneurysm, thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm and aortic regurgitation. Graft repair of the thoracic aortic arch and aortic valve replacement was given priority and completed, however he developed descending aortic rupture before the second scheduled surgery, and endovascular stent grafting was performed. He subsequently developed tracheobronchial obstruction and esophageal perforation. The patient underwent urgent esophagectomy and enterostomy with continuity later reestablished. However, he died of sepsis 5 months after surgery. Despite the less invasive nature of endovascular treatment, esophageal perforation can nevertheless occur and postoperative vigilance is well warranted. PMID:25593630

  1. A New Murine Model of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rouer, Martin; Meilhac, Olivier; Delbosc, Sandrine; Louedec, Liliane; Pavon-Djavid, Graciela; Cross, Jane; Legagneux, Josette; Bouilliant-Linet, Maxime; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Alsac, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm exclusion is a validated technique to prevent aneurysm rupture. Long-term results highlight technique limitations and new aspects of Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pathophysiology. There is no abdominal aortic aneurysm endograft exclusion model cheap and reproducible, which would allow deep investigations of AAA before and after treatment. We hereby describe how to induce, and then to exclude with a covered coronary stentgraft an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a rat. The well known elastase induced AAA model was first reported in 19901 in a rat, then described in mice2. Elastin degradation leads to dilation of the aorta with inflammatory infiltration of the abdominal wall and intra luminal thrombus, matching with human AAA. Endovascular exclusion with small covered stentgraft is then performed, excluding any interactions between circulating blood and the aneurysm thrombus. Appropriate exclusion and stentgraft patency is confirmed before euthanasia by an angiography thought the left carotid artery. Partial control of elastase diffusion makes aneurysm shape different for each animal. It is difficult to create an aneurysm, which will allow an appropriate length of aorta below the aneurysm for an easy stentgraft introduction, and with adequate proximal and distal neck to prevent endoleaks. Lots of failure can result to stentgraft introduction which sometimes lead to aorta tear with pain and troubles to stitch it, and endothelial damage with post op aorta thrombosis. Giving aspirin to rats before stentgraft implantation decreases failure rate without major hemorrhage. Clamping time activates neutrophils, endothelium and platelets, and may interfere with biological analysis. PMID:23851958

  2. Suprarenal fixation barbs can induce renal artery occlusion in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Shree K; Lee, Andy M; Landis, Gregg S

    2010-01-01

    Renal artery occlusion following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with suprarenal fixation is uncommon. We report one patient who was found to develop renal artery occlusion and parenchymal infarction 6 months after repair using an endovascular graft with suprarenal fixation. Our patient underwent emergent endovascular repair of a symptomatic 6 cm abdominal aortic aneurysm. The covered portion of the endograft was inadvertently deployed well below the renal artery orifices. At the completion of the procedure both renal arteries were confirmed to be patent. One month postoperatively, a computed tomographic (CT) scan showed exclusion of the aortic sac and normal enhancement of both kidneys. At 6 months, the patient was found to have elevated serum creatinine levels despite having no clinical symptoms. CT scanning revealed a nonenhancing left kidney, and angiography demonstrated an occlusion of the left renal artery. A barb welded to the bare metal stent appeared to be impinging on the renal artery. We believe that renal artery occlusion after endovascular repair can occur due to repetitive injury to the renal artery orifice from barbs welded to the bare metal stent. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of renal artery occlusion caused by repetitive injury from transrenal fixation systems. PMID:19540715

  3. Impairment of erectile function after elective repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Majd, P; Ahmad, W; Luebke, Th; Gawenda, M; Brunkwall, J

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the functional change of erectile dysfunction after endovascular repair (EVAR) and open repair (OR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm.Between April 2009 and December 2011, male patients admitted for elective treatment of an asymptomatic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm were included. The erectile function was evaluated by using a validated KEED questionnaire. All patients filled out the questionnaire preoperatively and postoperatively after one year.The number of patients with an increase of erectile dysfunction was 8 (26.6%) to 16 (53.3%) in open repair group vs. 30 (42.6%) to 40 (58.8%) in endovascular aneurysm repair. There was no statistically significant difference between open repair and endovascular aneurysm repair groups in order of new incidence of erectile dysfunction (p = 0.412). The study showed an increase in the mean value of Erectile Dysfunction -Score postoperatively in both the groups as well.The present study showed an increase of erectile dysfunction postoperatively, but the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. PMID:25761855

  4. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiomegaly With Aortic Arch Calcification in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortic arch calcification (AoAC) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in end-stage renal disease population. AoAC can be simply estimated with an AoAC score using plain chest radiography. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of AoAC with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiomegaly in patients who have undergoing hemodialysis (HD). We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) by chest x-ray in 220 HD patients who underwent the measurement of baPWV. The values of baPWV were measured by an ankle-brachial index-form device. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with AoAC score >4. Compared patients with AoAC score ≦4, patients with AoAC score >4 had older age, higher prevalence of diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, lower diastolic blood pressure, higher baPWV, higher CTR, higher prevalence of CTR ≧50%, lower total cholesterol, and lower creatinine level. After the multivariate stepwise logistic analysis, old age, cerebrovascular disease, high baPWV (per 100 cm/s, odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003–1.129, P = 0.038), CTR (per 1%, OR 1.116, 95% CI 1.046–1.191, P = 0.001), and low total cholesterol level were independently associated with AoAC score >4. Our study demonstrated AoAC severity was associated with high baPWV and high CTR in patients with HD. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating AoAC on plain chest radiography may be a simple and inexpensive method for detecting arterial stiffness in HD patients. PMID:27175684

  5. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiomegaly With Aortic Arch Calcification in Patients on Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-05-01

    Aortic arch calcification (AoAC) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in end-stage renal disease population. AoAC can be simply estimated with an AoAC score using plain chest radiography. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of AoAC with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiomegaly in patients who have undergoing hemodialysis (HD).We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) by chest x-ray in 220 HD patients who underwent the measurement of baPWV. The values of baPWV were measured by an ankle-brachial index-form device. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with AoAC score >4.Compared patients with AoAC score ≦4, patients with AoAC score >4 had older age, higher prevalence of diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, lower diastolic blood pressure, higher baPWV, higher CTR, higher prevalence of CTR ≧50%, lower total cholesterol, and lower creatinine level. After the multivariate stepwise logistic analysis, old age, cerebrovascular disease, high baPWV (per 100 cm/s, odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003-1.129, P = 0.038), CTR (per 1%, OR 1.116, 95% CI 1.046-1.191, P = 0.001), and low total cholesterol level were independently associated with AoAC score >4.Our study demonstrated AoAC severity was associated with high baPWV and high CTR in patients with HD. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating AoAC on plain chest radiography may be a simple and inexpensive method for detecting arterial stiffness in HD patients. PMID:27175684

  6. Management of an aorto-esophageal fistula, complicating a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascularly repaired.

    PubMed

    Georvasili, Vaia K; Bali, Christina; Peroulis, Michalis; Kouvelos, George; Avgos, Stavros; Godevenos, Dimitris; Liakakos, Theodoros; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2016-04-01

    Aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF) is a rare but devastating complication of thoracic aorta endovascular repair (TEVAR). We report a case of a 64-year-old male who presented with chest pain and high CRP levels 10 months after TEVAR for a 9 cm diameter descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. The diagnosis of an AEF was confirmed and the patient was treated conservatively with broad spectrum antibiotics and total parental alimentation. After control of sepsis was achieved, esophagectomy with gastric tube reconstruction was performed and an omental pedicle was used to cover the aortic wall. No intervention to the aorta was made at that time due to the potentially infected mediastinum. The patient's recovery was uneventful and 2 years postoperatively he is in good condition and lives a normal life. Esophagectomy seems to be a mandatory stage of treatment in the setting of AEF. In cases where signs of graft infection are persistent, aortic surgery might be also necessary. PMID:24838140

  7. Aortocaval Fistula Resulting From Rupture of Abdominal Aortic Dissecting Aneurysm Treated by Delayed Endovascular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiehao; Huang, Bin; Zhao, Jichun; Yang, Yi; Yuan, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortocaval fistula (ACF) after rupture of an abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm is a rare emergency situation, which has a high mortality. However, the diagnosis is usually delayed, which increases the difficulties of treatment. We describe a case that successfully delayed use of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for ACF resulting from rupture of abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm. We describe a special case of a 70-year-old male with an abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm rupturing into inferior vena cava (IVC). On account of his atypical presentation, the diagnosis had been delayed for half a year. Due to severe metabolic sequelaes of the ACF and preexisting conditions, the traditional open repair was too risky. Minimally invasive EVAR was performed with a successful result. There were no endoleak or fistula at the follow-up of 9th month. EVAR is the most suitable method in patients with ACF from rupture of abdominal aortic dissecting aneurysm. Further educational programs should be developed, which may give rise to earlier diagnosis and treatment with better outcomes. PMID:27149481

  8. An Update on the Inflammatory Response after Endovascular Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Arnaoutoglou, Eleni; Kouvelos, George; Koutsoumpelis, Andreas; Patelis, Nikolaos; Lazaris, Andreas; Matsagkas, Miltiadis

    2015-01-01

    Postimplantation syndrome (PIS) is the clinical and biochemical expression of an inflammatory response following endovascular repair of an aortic aneurysm (EVAR). The goal of this review is to provide an update on the inflammatory response after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm, discussing its causes and effects on the clinical outcome of the patient. PIS concerns nearly one-third of patients after EVAR. It is generally a benign condition, although in some patients it may negatively affect outcome. The different definitions and conclusions drawn from several studies reveal that PIS needs to be redefined with standardized diagnostic criteria. The type of the endograft's material seems to play a role in the inflammatory response. Future studies should focus on a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiology, predictors, and risk factors as well as determining whether effective preventive strategies are necessary. PMID:26166953

  9. Secondary aorto-esophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair treated by covered esophageal stenting

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Mary; Shlomovitz, Eran; Darling, Gail; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms is an accepted alternative to open surgery, especially in patients with significant comorbidities. The procedure itself has a low risk of complications and fistulas to surrounding organs are rarely reported. An 86-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding and a suspected aortoesophageal fistula. Eight months prior, the patient had undergone a stent graft repair of a mycotic thoracic aneurysm. Computerized tomography angiography and upper GI endoscopy confirmed an aortoesophageal fistula, which was treated by esophageal stenting. With early recognition, esophageal stenting may have a role in the initial emergency control of bleeding from and palliation of aortoesophageal fistula. PMID:27574612

  10. Secondary aorto-esophageal fistula after thoracic aortic aneurysm endovascular repair treated by covered esophageal stenting.

    PubMed

    Tao, Mary; Shlomovitz, Eran; Darling, Gail; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-08-16

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for thoracic aortic aneurysms is an accepted alternative to open surgery, especially in patients with significant comorbidities. The procedure itself has a low risk of complications and fistulas to surrounding organs are rarely reported. An 86-year-old patient was admitted to our hospital with gastro intestinal (GI) bleeding and a suspected aortoesophageal fistula. Eight months prior, the patient had undergone a stent graft repair of a mycotic thoracic aneurysm. Computerized tomography angiography and upper GI endoscopy confirmed an aortoesophageal fistula, which was treated by esophageal stenting. With early recognition, esophageal stenting may have a role in the initial emergency control of bleeding from and palliation of aortoesophageal fistula. PMID:27574612

  11. Branched endograft repair of mycotic ascending aortic aneurysm using the snorkel technique.

    PubMed

    Quinney, Brenton Ellisor; Jordan, William

    2011-07-01

    Mycotic aneurysms are difficult clinical cases that can be approached by several methods. Debridement of infected tissue with in situ or extra-anatomic bypass is the traditional treatment. In poor operative candidates or reoperative cases, endovascular therapies can be an alternative. We present a 9-year-old with an ascending aortic mycotic aneurysm temporized with an endovascular repair as a bridge to definitive open surgery. PMID:21719552

  12. Open Repair Versus Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair in Multiple-Injured Patients: Observations From a Level-1 Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Stephan; Breitenbach, Ingo; Bolzen, Philipp; Petri, Maximilian; Krettek, Christian; Teebken, Omke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blunt trauma of the thoracic aorta is a rare but potentially life-threatening entity. Intimal tears are a domain of non-operative management, whereas all other types of lesions should be repaired urgently. There is now a clear trend favoring minimally invasive stent grafting over open surgical repair. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the mortality and morbidity with either treatment option. Therefore, a retrospective observational study was performed to compare two different treatment methods at two different time periods at one trauma center. Patients and Methods: Between 1977 and 2012, all severely injured patients referred to our level 1 trauma center were screened for blunt aortic injuries. We compared baseline characteristics, 30-day and overall mortality, morbidity, duration of intensive care treatment, procedure time, and transfusion of packed red blood between patients who underwent open surgical or stent repair. Results: During the observation period, 45 blunt aortic injuries were recorded. The average Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 41.8 (range 29 - 68). Twenty-five patients underwent Open Repair (OR), and another 20 patients were scheduled to emergency stent grafting. The 30-day mortality in the surgical and stent groups were 5/25 (20%) and 2/20 (10%), respectively. The average time for open surgery was 151 minutes; the mean time for stent grafting was 67 minutes (P = 0.001). Postoperative stay on the intensive care unit was between one and 59 days (median 10) in group one and between four and 50 days in group two (median 26)(P = 0.03). Patients undergoing OR required transfusion of 6.0 units of packed red cells in median; patients undergoing stent grafting required a median of 2.0 units of packed red cells (P < 0.001). In the stent grafting group, 30-day mortality was 10% (2/20). Conclusions: Due to more sophisticated diagnostic tools and surgical approaches, mortality and morbidity of blunt aortic

  13. Cervical Mass Following Carotid Attempt at Interventional Repair of Aortic Coarctation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dabbagh, Ali; Hekmat, Manuchehr; Ghanavati, Arash; Ghasemi, Abdolrahim

    2010-01-01

    A 4-month-old boy was admitted to our hospital following an unsuccessful attempt at interventional repair of aortic coarctation via the right carotid artery, which seemed to have given rise to the formation and growth of a cervical mass overlying the entry site. Despite the initial anticipation of difficulty during intubation due to the pressure effect of the mass, anesthesia progressed uneventfully, the mass, which was a hematoma, was evacuated, and the coarctation was repaired. The patient was discharged after the operation. At three weeks’ follow-up, there was no significant lesion in the neck and transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated no residual coarctation. PMID:23074567

  14. How to prevent spinal cord injury during endovascular repair of thoracic aortic disease.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2014-07-01

    The incidence of spinal cord injury in thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has been 3-5 % from recent major papers where sacrifice of the critical intercostal arteries is inevitable by a stent graft. Hemodynamic stability, which depends on a network of blood vessels around the cord is most important not only during but also after stent-graft deployment. High risk factors of spinal cord injury during endovascular aortic repair are (1) coverage of the left subclavian artery, (2) extensive coverage of long segments of the thoracic aorta, (3) prior downstream aortic repair, (4) compromising important intercostal (T8-L1), vertebral, pelvic and hypogastric collaterals, and (5) shaggy aorta. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative managements have been required to prevent spinal cord injury with TEVAR. For imaging assessment of blood supply to spinal cord including Adamkiewicz artery, prophylactic cerebrospinal fluid drainage is mandatory, and monitoring motor-evoked potential is recommended for high risk factors of spinal cord injury. Mean arterial pressure should be maintained over 90 mmHg after stent-graft placement for a while to prevent delayed spinal cord ischemia in high-risk patients of spinal cord ischemia. Finally, because spinal cord injury during TEVAR is not rare and negligible, perioperative care during TEVAR should be strictly performed according to the protocol proposed by each cardiovascular team. PMID:24696427

  15. Effect of Intravascular Ultrasound-assisted Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair for “Complicated” Type B Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bao-Lei; Shi, Zhen-Yu; Guo, Da-Qiao; Wang, Li-Xin; Tang, Xiao; Li, Wei-Miao; Fu, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) examination can provide useful information during endovascular stent graft repair. However, its actual clinical utility in thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for type B aortic dissection (type B-AD) remains unclear, especially in complicated aortic dissection. We evaluated the effect of IVUS as a complementary tool during TEVAR. Methods: From September 2011 to April 2012, we conducted a prospective cohort study of 47 consecutive patients with “complicated” type B-AD diagnosed. We divided the patients into two groups: IVUS-assisted TEVAR group and TEVAR using angiography alone group. The general procedure of TEVAR was performed. We evaluated the perioperative and follow-up events. Patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative images, dissection morphology, details of operative strategy, intraoperative events, and postoperative course were recorded. Results: A total of 47 patients receiving TEVAR were enrolled. Among them (females, 8.51%; mean age, 57.38 ± 13.02 years), 13 cases (27.66%) were selected in the IVUS-assisted TEVAR group, and 34 were selected in the TEVAR group. All patients were symptomatic. The average diameter values of IVUS measurements in the landing zone were greater than those estimated by computed tomography angiography (31.82 ± 4.21 mm vs. 30.64 ± 4.13 mm, P < 0.001). The technique success rate was 100%. Among the postoperative outcomes, statistical differences were only observed between the IVUS-assisted TEVAR group and TEVAR group for total operative time and the amount of contrast used (P = 0.013 and P < 0.001, respectively). The follow-up ranged from 15 to 36 months for the IVUS-assisted TEVAR group and from 10 to 35 months for the TEVAR group (P = 0.646). The primary endpoints were no statistical difference in the two groups. Conclusions: Intraoperative IVUS-assisted TEVAR is clinically feasible and safe. For the endovascular repair of “complicated” type B-AD, IVUS may be

  16. Experience of endovascular repair of thoracic aortic dissection after blunt trauma injury in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Hsien; Huang, Jau-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic thoracic aortic dissection is uncommon in clinical practice; however, it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thoracic aortic dissection is usually caused by sudden deceleration resulting from a traffic accident or fall. Aortic injury after blunt trauma is a critical condition. This study reported the outcomes of endovascular repair of acute traumatic aortic dissection in patients at a district general hospital. Methods In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of eight patients with acute traumatic aortic dissection after a blunt trauma who had undergone thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) between January 2012 and December 2015 at a district general hospital in Taiwan. Results The median age of the patients was 49±22 years (range, 20–77 years), and 6 of the 8 (75%) patients were men. Five patients were involved in traffic accidents, and 3 patients had fallen from heights. The injury severity score (ISS) of the patients ranged from 17 to 66. In all patients, the aortic injury was located near the origin of the left subclavian artery (LSA). Four patients had seal ostium of subclavian artery, left. None of the patients developed paraplegia or lower extremity ischemia. Moreover, all patients had concomitant injuries, and no patients died postoperatively. Conclusions Endovascular repair is a rapid and minimally invasive therapy for patients with traumatic aortic injury and is associated with favorable technical results. PMID:27293831

  17. Considerations for patients undergoing endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Brant W; Lee, Jason T

    2014-09-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has taken over open surgery as the primary strategy for treatment of patients with abdominal and thoracic aneurysms. The minimally invasive nature of these techniques requires alterations in preoperative workup, intraoperative management, and familiarity with unique complications that can occur. Familiarity from the anesthetic standpoint of endovascular techniques, including treatment of patients with fenestrated, chimney, snorkel, and periscope grafts, is necessary for the contemporary cardiac anesthesiologist. PMID:25113729

  18. Outcomes of Acute Type A Dissection Repair Before and After Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Thoracic Aortic Surgery Program

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nicholas D.; Ganapathi, Asvin M.; Hanna, Jennifer M.; Williams, Judson B.; Gaca, Jeffrey G.; Hughes, G. Chad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the results of acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) repair before and after implementation of a multidisciplinary thoracic aortic surgery program (TASP) at our institution, with dedicated high-volume thoracic aortic surgeons, a multidisciplinary approach to thoracic aortic disease management, and a standardized protocol for ATAAD repair. Background Outcomes of ATAAD repair may be improved when operations are performed at specialized high-volume thoracic aortic surgical centers. Methods Between 1999 and 2011, 128 patients underwent ATAAD repair at our institution. Records of patients who underwent ATAAD repair 6 years before (n = 56) and 6 years after (n = 72) implementation of the TASP were retrospectively compared. Expected operative mortality rates were calculated using the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection pre-operative prediction model. Results Baseline risk profiles and expected operative mortality rates were comparable between patients who underwent surgery before and after implementation of the TASP. Operative mortality before TASP implementation was 33.9% and was statistically equivalent to the expected operative mortality rate of 26.0% (observed-to-expected mortality ratio 1.30; p = 0.54). Operative mortality after TASP implementation fell to 2.8% and was statistically improved compared with the expected operative mortality rate of 18.2% (observed-to-expected mortality ratio 0.15; p = 0.005). Differences in survival persisted over long-term follow-up, with 5-year survival rates of 85% observed for TASP patients compared with 55% for pre-TASP patients (p = 0.002). Conclusions ATAAD repair can be performed with results approximating those of elective proximal aortic surgery when operations are performed by a high-volume multidisciplinary thoracic aortic surgery team. Efforts to standardize or centralize care of patients undergoing ATAAD are warranted. PMID:24412454

  19. Staged surgical repair for extensive cardiovascular damage by syphilis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Toshiro; Yagi, Takeshi; Murakami, Masanori; Jinbo, Mitsutaka; Saito, Satoshi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Takahiro; Kunichika, Hideki; Gohra, Hidenori

    2011-10-01

    A 45-year-old man had aortic regurgitation with a syphilitic true aneurysm of the ascending to transverse arch aorta and a descending aortic aneurysm from chronic Stanford type B aortic dissection. After antibiotic therapy, two-staged surgical repair was performed and there has been no evidence of recurrence in 12 months since the second stage. We describe the successful management of extensive cardiovascular syphilitic damage. PMID:21958803

  20. Full dimensional computer simulations to study pulsatile blood flow in vessels, aortic arch and bifurcated veins: Investigation of blood viscosity and turbulent effects.

    PubMed

    Sultanov, Renat A; Guster, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    We report computational results of blood flow through a model of the human aortic arch and a vessel of actual diameter and length. A realistic pulsatile flow is used in all simulations. Calculations for bifurcation type vessels are also carried out and presented. Different mathematical methods for numerical solution of the fluid dynamics equations have been considered. The non-Newtonian behaviour of the human blood is investigated together with turbulence effects. A detailed time-dependent mathematical convergence test has been carried out. The results of computer simulations of the blood flow in vessels of three different geometries are presented: for pressure, strain rate and velocity component distributions we found significant disagreements between our results obtained with realistic non-Newtonian treatment of human blood and the widely used method in the literature: a simple Newtonian approximation. A significant increase of the strain rate and, as a result, the wall shear stress distribution, is found in the region of the aortic arch. Turbulent effects are found to be important, particularly in the case of bifurcation vessels. PMID:19964834

  1. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair by Means of the Chimney Technique in a Patient with Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Elias; Almanfi, Abdelkader; Dougherty, Kathryn G.

    2016-01-01

    Crossed fused renal ectopia, a congenital anomaly in 1 of 7,000 individuals, presents a challenge during endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Most treatment approaches in these patients have involved open surgical repair of the aneurysm or endovascular repair with coverage of the ectopic renal artery. We present what we think is the first case of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with use of the chimney technique (parallel stent-grafting) to preserve an ectopic renal artery, in an 88-year-old man who was at high risk for open surgery. In addition to the patient's case, we discuss the relevant medical literature. PMID:27303239

  2. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair by Means of the Chimney Technique in a Patient with Crossed Fused Renal Ectopia.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Elias; Almanfi, Abdelkader; Dougherty, Kathryn G; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2016-06-01

    Crossed fused renal ectopia, a congenital anomaly in 1 of 7,000 individuals, presents a challenge during endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Most treatment approaches in these patients have involved open surgical repair of the aneurysm or endovascular repair with coverage of the ectopic renal artery. We present what we think is the first case of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with use of the chimney technique (parallel stent-grafting) to preserve an ectopic renal artery, in an 88-year-old man who was at high risk for open surgery. In addition to the patient's case, we discuss the relevant medical literature. PMID:27303239

  3. [Endovascular repair for an acute traumatic aortic transection: a case report].

    PubMed

    Sanioğlu, Soner; Sahin, Sinan; Aydoğan, Hakki; Barutça, Hakan; Eren, Ergin

    2012-03-01

    A thirty-eight-year-old male patient who suffered from 10th and 11th thoracal vertebrae fractures, paraplegia and acute traumatic aortic transection because of accidental fall was referred to our hospital. Open surgical repair carried a very high risk due to severe coexisting injuries. Transection was treated with 30x100 mm Valiant thoracic endograft, which was deployed just distal to the ostium of the left carotid artery. The patient was transferred to the neurosurgery clinic for treatment of paraplegia after an uneventful recovery. Endovascular repair of acute transection confers substantial advantages in mortality and morbidity compared to surgical repair. However, the long-term durability of thoracic endografts remains unknown. If the long-term results are as satisfactory as the promising mid-term results, this technique may become the gold standard approach for the treatment of acute transection. PMID:22792827

  4. Endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in the presence of a hydronephrotic horseshoe kidney.

    PubMed

    Krivoshei, Lian; Akin-Olugbade, Yemi; McWilliams, Glen; Halak, Moshe; Silverberg, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to report an unusual case of a patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and a hydronephrotic horseshoe kidney (HSK) that was repaired by endovascular means. An 81-year-old male patient with a known HSK was found to have hydronephrosis and an AAA. The patient's aneurysm was treated with an endovascular stent graft which required the covering of accessory renal arteries. He had an uneventful recovery with complete resolution of the hydronephrosis evident on a computed tomography scan performed seven months after the surgery. In conclusion, endovascular aneurysm repair is a feasible therapeutic option for an AAA coexisting with an HSK and may be considered as a valid alternative to open repair when concomitant hydronephrosis is present. PMID:22328622

  5. Contemporary management of the demanding infra-renal neck in abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Mees, B M; Peppelenbosch, A G; De Haan, M W; Jacobs, M J; Schurink, G W

    2015-04-01

    Proximal infrarenal neck anatomy is a crucial factor in determining outcome of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Unfavorable or demanding infrarenal neck anatomy significantly increases the complexity of both standard endovascular and open repair resulting in increased rates of morbidity and mortality. While technological improvements and expanding institutional experience have resulted in an increased proportion of patients with an AAA with unfavorable infrarenal neck treated by (fenestrated) endovascular techniques, open repair has also remained a valid technique. The purpose of this manuscript was to describe the wide array of endovascular and open techniques in use to treat patients with an AAA with a demanding infrarenal neck and discuss their results and indications. PMID:25592277

  6. Experimental Study of a Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Prior to and After Surgical Repair Hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerlo, Anna-Elodie; Frankel, Steven; Chen, Jun; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2014-11-01

    Once a Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm (TAA) is detected, the risk of rupture is estimated based on the TAA diameter compared to the normal aortic diameter and its expansion rate. However, there are no reliable predictors that can provide accurate prognosis, and each aneurysm may progress differently. This work aims to assess the hemodynamic characteristics and flow structures associated with TAAs. The flow in a patient specific thoracic aortic aneurysm is compared to the same patient after treatment, in order to quantify the differences in the hydrodynamic forces acting on the aneurysm. Flow visualization with dye and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are used to study flow features within both geometries. Local flow patterns are visualized to predict potential areas of recirculation and low shear stresses as they are associated with thrombogenicity. Understanding the differences in flow features between a thoracic aortic aneurysm and a normal aorta (or a TAA after surgical repair) may lead to a better understanding of disease mechanisms that will enable clinicians to better estimate the risk of rupture.

  7. Aseptic lysis L2-L3 as complication of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Federico; Ascoli-Marchetti, Andrea; Garro, Luca; Caterini, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    Osteolytic vertebral erosion is usually related to tumours, spondylitis or spondylodiscitis. Few reports in the literature describe lytic lesions of anterior lumbar vertebral bodies resulting from abdominal aortic aneurysm or false aneurysm. We report a case of abdominal aortic false aneurysm that caused lytic lesions of the second and third vertebral bodies in an 80-year-old man who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair. Fluoroscopy guided biopsy excluded infection or tumour. We performed a posterior spinal fusion and decompression because of bone loss of the second and third lumbar vertebral bodies and central stenosis. Postoperatively the patient showed satisfactory relief in low-back and thigh pain but, unfortunately, he died 1 month after surgery because of respiratory complications. This case suggests that when a lytic lesion of a lumbar vertebral body is discovered in a patient who has undergone endovascular aneurysm repair, an abdominal aortic false aneurysm may be the cause of the vertebral erosion even in cases without infective pathogenesis. PMID:25017025

  8. Early Experiences with the Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Sung; Oh, Se Jin; Sung, Yong Won; Moon, Hyun Jong; Lee, Jung Sang

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to report our early experiences with the endovascular repair of ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (rDTAAs), which are a rare and life-threatening condition. Methods Among 42 patients who underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) between October 2010 and September 2015, five patients (11.9%) suffered an rDTAA. Results The mean age was 72.4±5.1 years, and all patients were male. Hemoptysis and hemothorax were present in three (60%) and two (40%) patients, respectively. Hypovolemic shock was noted in three patients who underwent emergency operations. A hybrid operation was performed in three patients. The mean operative time was 269.8±72.3 minutes. The mean total length of aortic coverage was 186.0±49.2 mm. No 30-day mortality occurred. Stroke, delirium, and atrial fibrillation were observed in one patient each. Paraplegia did not occur. Endoleak was found in two patients (40%), one of whom underwent an early and successful reintervention. During the mean follow-up period of 16.8±14.8 months, two patients died; one cause of death was a persistent type 1 endoleak and the other cause was unknown. Conclusion TEVAR for rDTAA was associated with favorable early mortality and morbidity outcomes. However, early reintervention should be considered if persistent endoleak occurs. PMID:27064672

  9. A cost-effectiveness analysis of standard versus endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Thomas L.; DeRose, Guy; Kribs, Stewart; Harris, Kenneth A.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To compare endovascular and standard open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in terms of initial in-hospital costs and the costs of secondary interventions and surveillance. Design A retrospective study. Setting A university-affiliated tertiary care medical centre. Patients Seven patients who underwent elective endovascular (EV) repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm in 1998 and 31 patients anatomically suitable for endovascular repair who underwent standard (STAN) elective repair. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 14 months. Interventions Elective repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with use of the standard technique or endovascular technology. Outcome measures Costs common to both groups were not determined. Costs were determined for total hospital stay, preoperative or postoperative embolization, grafts, additional endovascular equipment, and follow-up computed tomography. Results Groups were similar with respect to demographic data and aneurysm size (EV = 6.23 cm v. STAN = 6.05 cm). All patients were in American Society of Anesthesiologists class III or IV. Vanguard bifurcated grafts and extensions were used in the EV group. The total cost for both groups in Canadian dollars included: cost of stay (EV, 5.6 d, $2092.63 v. STAN, 10.7 d, $4449.19; p = 0.009); cost of embolization (EV, n = 3; $900/procedure); cost of follow-up CT (EV, 5.4 per patient; $450/CT); cost of grafts (EV = $8571.43, STAN = $374); additional radiologic equipment costs (EV = $1475). The mean total cost differed significantly between the 2 groups (EV = $14 967.63 v. STAN = $4823.19; p = 0.004). The additional cost associated with a reduction in hospital stay was calculated by determining the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER: difference in mean costs/difference in mean length of stay = $1604.51). Conclusions Endovascular repair continues to be more expensive than standard open repair determined according to procedural and follow-up costs. The technology is still in the

  10. Towards individualized follow-up protocols after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Laturnus, Johanna; Oliveira, Nelson; Basto Gonçalves, Frederico; Schurink, Geert W; Verhagen, Hence; Jacobs, Michael J; Mees, Barend M E

    2016-04-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has become the primary treatment option for elective abdominal aortic aneurysms. However, a significant number of patients require secondary interventions to maintain adequate aneurysm exclusion and ultimately prevent death from abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture. To maintain success and offer timely secondary intervention, intensive image surveillance has been recommended. These rigorous surveillance regimens are costly and may have deleterious effects from radiation and contrast exposure. Improvements in patient selection, operative technique and devices have caused a decline in complications after EVAR. Therefore, there is a need to reduce surveillance after EVAR for patients at lower risk of complications and install individualized follow-up protocols. This review describes the current strategies for surveillance and clarification of risk factors and predictors for late complications and discusses proposed risk-adapted strategies for postoperative surveillance after EVAR. PMID:26745264

  11. Aortic arch syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries Update Date 5/20/2014 Updated by: Larry A. Weinrauch MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard ... Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: 07 July 2016

  12. Aortic coarctation, aneurysm, and ventricular dysfunction in an asymptomatic infant.

    PubMed

    García, Ana I; Aguilar, Juan M; García, Enrique

    2016-06-01

    Aortic arch coarctation with post-coarctation aneurysm is rare in infants. We present the case of an asymptomatic 3-month-old infant with severe left ventricular dysfunction in this setting. The patient underwent surgical repair, and the left ventricular ejection fraction improved to recovery the 4th post-operative month. PMID:26980403

  13. Technical tips for successful outcomes using adjunctive procedures during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Kasirajan, Karthikeshwar; Gupta, Naren

    2012-09-01

    The inability to obtain proximal or distal seal continues to remain one of the main challenges of endovascular aneurysm repair. This is particularly relevant when endografts are used in patients with unsuitable proximal or distal landing zones. A variety of techniques can be used to achieve a seal in these difficult situations. Two specific techniques that can help intraoperatively to resolve the lack of adequate graft to aortic wall opposition are discussed in this article. These include the use of Palmaz stents for proximal seal and hypogastric snorkel for distal seal with internal iliac flow preservation. PMID:23062496

  14. Use of spiral computed tomographic angiography in monitoring abdominal aortic aneurysms after transfemoral endovascular repair.

    PubMed Central

    Balm, R; Jacobs, M J

    1997-01-01

    Transfemoral endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has proved to be technically feasible in a selected group of patients. However, long-term efficacy has not been proved. Graft performance after implantation can be monitored by a single imaging technique: spiral computed tomographic angiography. With this technique, the parameters for continuing clinical success of the procedure-graft patency, endoleaks, graft migration, attachment site diameter, attachment system failure, and aneurysm diameter-can be monitored. Only in selected cases will an additional imaging technique be necessary. PMID:9339508

  15. Chylous Ascites Following Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: An Unusual Complication

    PubMed Central

    Galanopoulos, Georgios; Konstantopoulos, Theofanis; Theodorou, Stavros; Tsoutsas, Ioannis; Xanthopoulos, Dimitrios; Kaperonis, Elias; Papavassiliou, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    Chylous ascites is a rare complication after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Accumulation of chyle within the close space of the peritoneal cavity may cause severe discomfort to the patient, complicating the postoperative course. Prompt diagnosis is needed to adopt measures for reducing lymph leakage and contributing to lymphatic fistula closure. Fortunately, conservative treatment is successful in the majority of cases. In the rare cases that do not respond to conservative treatment, surgery becomes mandatory. Accurate preoperative localization of lymph leakage is a prerequisite for a successful outcome. Postoperative chyloperitoneum has a benign course and an excellent prognosis. PMID:27486496

  16. Surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm with non-bleeding aortocaval fistula.

    PubMed

    Unosawa, Satoshi; Kimura, Haruka; Niino, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of an aortocaval fistula (ACF) without bleeding because a clot was covering the fistula. A 60-year-old man was diagnosed as having a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and an aortocaval fistula, by enhanced computed tomography (CT). After the aneurysm had been opened, the fistula was detected, but there was no bleeding because it was covered with clot. After graft repair, bleeding from the fistula occurred when the clot was removed by suction. Direct closure of the fistula was achieved after bleeding was controlled by digital compression. PMID:23825505

  17. JAG Tearing Technique with Radiofrequency Guide Wire for Aortic Fenestration in Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Carmelo; Ceccherini, Claudio Leonini, Sara; Cini, Marco; Vigni, Francesco; Neri, Eugenio; Tucci, Enrico; Benvenuti, Antonio; Tommasino, Giulio; Sassi, Carlo

    2012-02-15

    An innovative approach, the JAG tearing technique, was performed during thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair in a patient with previous surgical replacement of the ascending aorta with a residual uncomplicated type B aortic dissection who developed an aneurysm of the descending thoracic aorta with its lumen divided in two parts by an intimal flap. The proximal landing zone was suitable to place a thoracic stent graft. The distal landing zone was created by cutting the intimal flap in the distal third of the descending thoracic aorta with a radiofrequency guide wire and intravascular ultrasound catheter.

  18. Near complete aortic transection and its successful repair using a novel cardiopulmonary bypass technique.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dania Aijaz; Shah, Adil Aijaz; Shah, Syed Jawad; Khan, Muhammad Naseer; Fatimi, Saulat Hasnain

    2015-09-01

    The case of a 38-year old female, victim of a road traffic accident who presented with a near complete aortic transection is presented. An emergent repair employing cardiopulmonary bypass was attempted in the operating room. Anticipating a high-risk of compromise to cerebral perfusion from air micro-emboli, the bypass was attempted with an innovative approach involving the successful cannulation of the pulmonary artery and descending aorta. The patient survived and was found to be doing well on subsequent post-operative visits. PMID:26338761

  19. Comparison of risk-scoring systems in predicting hospital mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Supsamutchai, Chaiyarat; Wilasrusmee, Chumpon; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Proprom, Napaphat; Kittur, Dilip S

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the Physiological and Operative Severity Score for the enUmeration of Mortality and Morbidity, Portsmouth adjustment (P-POSSUM), the Hardman index and the Glasgow aneurysm score (GAS) in the prediction of hospital mortality after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. METHODS: Medical charts of 146 AAA patients treated between January 1996 and January 2007 were reviewed. The P-POSSUM, Hardman index and GAS were calculated for each patient. The scores were tested and compared for their discriminatory ability to predict hospital death. RESULTS: Of the 146 patients with ruptured and unruptured AAAs (133 underwent open repair, five underwent extra-anatomical bypass and eight underwent endovascular aneurysm repair), 18 died (12%) after AAA repair. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the GAS, Hardman index and P-POSSUM for predicting hospital mortality were 0.740, 0.730 and 0.886, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the P-POSSUM was significantly higher than those of other scores. CONCLUSION: In the present study, the P-POSSUM was the best predictor of hospital mortality for patients undergoing AAA repair. PMID:22477446

  20. Meningeal haemorrhage secondary to cerebrospinal fluid drainage during thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Mancio, Jennifer; Pires-Morais, Gustavo; Bettencourt, Nuno; Oliveira, Marco; Santos, Lino; Melica, Bruno; Rodrigues, Alberto; Braga, José Pedro; Ribeiro, Vasco Gama

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has shown lower mortality compared with open surgical repair (OSR). However, the risk of spinal cord ischaemia (SCI) remains similar than OSR. As a prophylactic measure to reduce the risk of SCI, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage has been widely used in OSR. In TEVAR, the utility of this adjunct is still controversial. We report a case of a 56-year-old man referred for TEVAR for a descending thoracic aneurysm that previously underwent an abdominal aneurysmectomy with aortobifemoral bypass graft. On the day before, a lumbar cerebrospinal drain was placed prophylactically. Forty-eight hours after the procedure, meningeal symptoms without neurological deficits developed. Clinical investigation revealed meningeal haemorrhage. Therapy with nimodipine was initiated with symptomatic relief. Evidence from randomized controlled trials supporting the role of CSF drainage in TEVAR is still lacking. We discuss the current recommendations, potential benefits and risks and cautions associated with CSF drainage in TEVAR. PMID:25988028

  1. Three-dimensional aortic aneurysm model and endovascular repair: An educational tool for surgical trainees

    PubMed Central

    Wilasrusmee, Chumpon; Suvikrom, Jesada; Suthakorn, Jackrit; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Sitthiseriprapip, Kriskrai; Proprom, Napaphat; Kittur, Dilip S

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a current valid treatment option for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). The success of EVAR depends on the selection of appropriate patients, which requires detailed knowledge of the patient’s vascular anatomy and preoperative planning. Three-dimensional (3D) models of AAA using a rapid prototyping technique were developed to help surgical trainees learn how to plan for EVAR more effectively. METHOD: Four cases of AAA were used as prototypes for the models. Nine questions associated with preoperative planning for EVAR were developed by a group of experts in the field of endovascular surgery. Forty-three postgraduate trainees in general surgery participated in the present study. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups. The ‘intervention’ group was provided with the rapid prototyping AAA models along with 3D computed tomography (CT) corresponding to the cases of the test, while the control group was provided with 3D CTs only. RESULTS: Differences in the scores between the groups were tested using the unpaired t test. The mean test scores were consistently and significantly higher in the 3D CT group with models compared with the 3D CT group without models for all four cases. Age, year of training, sex and previous EVAR experience had no effect on the scores. CONCLUSION: The 3D aortic aneurysm model constructed using the rapid prototype technique may significantly improve the ability of trainees to properly plan for EVAR. PMID:22477415

  2. [Successful endovascular repair of a ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm with severe mural thrombus].

    PubMed

    Nakao, Yoshihisa; Akagi, Haruhiko; Irie, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Sakai, Kei

    2014-11-01

    A 51-year-old man was transferred to our hospital on an emergency basis complaining of a sudden onset of severe left lumbar back pain. An emergency contrasted computed tomography showed a ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm( rTAAA:Crawford classification type III). The ruptured site was near the aortic bifurcation, and the aneurysm had a relatively narrow segment with an extensive mural thrombus just below the renal arteries. Considering the high mortality of open surgery for the rTAAA and the poor general condition of the patient, we decided to perform endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) as a rescue procedure using the narrowed segment by the thrombus for a proximal landing zone. The abdominal part of the thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) was successfully excluded with a stent graft to obtain complete hemostasis. The postoperative course was uneventful except for the need for hemodialysis. Even though there is a risk of developing late type 1 endoleak, this procedure can be a feasible option as a rescue procedure or a bridge to radical open surgery for ruptured TAAA in a specially anatomical setting like this case. PMID:25391465

  3. Celiac Trunk Embolization, as a Means of Elongating Short Distal Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Necks, Prior to Endovascular Aortic Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Belenky, Alexander; Haddad, Menashe; Idov, Igor; Knizhnik, Michael; Litvin, Sergey; Bachar, Gil N.; Atar, Eli

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in elongating short distal necks of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (DTAAs) by coil embolization of the celiac trunk prior to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). During 6 years seven patients (five men and two women; mean age, 74) who had DTAAs with short distal necks unsuitable for conventional EVAR, and well patent superior and inferior mesenteric arteries based on CT, were treated in one session with EVAR after the celiac trunk was coil embolized to elongate the neck. All patients were followed by CT every 3 months in the first year and every 6 months thereafter. Technical success was achieved in all patients, and no early or late ischemic complications were noted. No procedural complications occurred and good aneurysm sealing was obtained in all patients. Three endoleaks were identified after 3 months (one patient) and 6 months (two patients); all were treated successfully with insertion of an additional stent-graft. In patients with DTAAs who are candidates for EVAR but have short aneurysm distal necks, celiac trunk embolization-only if the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries are patent-is a good and safe way to elongate the neck and enable EVAR.

  4. Hemoptysis as a first symptom of endoleak after thoracic endovascular aortic repair, which caused aortic rupture and required complex management

    PubMed Central

    Warot, Marcin; Burchard, Paweł; Paschke, Łukasz; Łysiak, Zuzanna; Chęciński, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has become the most common procedure in the treatment of thoracic aorta aneurysms. However, potential long-term complications of this technique could be life-threatening. Hemoptysis is a common symptom of lung tumor, especially cancer. On the other hand, hemoptysis can also be caused by bronchitis, tuberculosis, mycosis, and trauma. In this case report, we present a patient with hemoptysis and lung tumor suggesting lung cancer, which was a unique symptom of type IA endoleak after TEVAR and led to rupture of the thoracic aneurysm. It was decided to perform next an endovascular procedure due to the severe state of the patient. Next the thoracotomy was performed because drainage of the left pleural cavity was unsuccessful. In the last stage bronchoscopy was needed to remove the thrombus, which occluded the left main bronchi. Successful management has led to the patient's full recovery. Despite justified popularity of endovascular procedures in the treatment of thoracic aorta aneurysms, we should remember about potential long-term complications. Hemoptysis could be a unique symptom of the endoleak after TEVAR and treatment of such complications could be complex and demanding. PMID:23837105

  5. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms in the Presence of a Transplanted Kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Silverberg, Daniel Yalon, Tal; Halak, Moshe

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo present our experience performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms in kidney transplanted patients.MethodsA retrospective review of all patients who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) performed at our institution from 2007 to 2014. We identified all patients who had previously undergone a kidney transplant. Data collected included: comorbidities, preoperative imaging modalities, indication for surgery, stent graft configurations, pre- and postoperative renal function, perioperative complications, and survival rates.ResultsA total of 267 EVARs were performed. Six (2 %) had a transplanted kidney. Mean age was 74 (range, 64–82) years; five were males. Mean time from transplantation to EVAR was 7.5 (range, 2–12) years. Five underwent preoperative planning with noncontrast modalities only. Devices used included bifurcated (n = 3), aortouniiliac (n = 2), and tube (n = 1) stent grafts. Technical success was achieved in all patients. None experienced deterioration in renal function. Median follow-up was 39 (range, 6–51) months. Four patients were alive at the time of the study. Two patients expired during the period of follow-up from unrelated causes.ConclusionsEVAR is an effective modality for the management of AAAs in the coexistence of a transplanted kidney. It can be performed with minimal morbidity and mortality without harming the transplanted kidney. Special consideration should be given to device configuration to minimize damage to the renal graft.

  6. The Effect of Perioperative Ischemia and Reperfusion on Multiorgan Dysfunction following Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Katseni, Konstantina; Kotsis, Thomas; Dafnios, Nikolaos; Arapoglou, Vassilis; Kaparos, Georgios; Logothetis, Emmanuel; Karvouni, Eleni; Katsenis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are relatively common and are potentially life-threatening medical problems. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of I/R injury on multiorgan failure following AAA repair. The PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane Review, and Scopus databases were comprehensively searched for articles concerning the pathophysiology of I/R and its systemic effects. Cross-referencing was performed using the bibliographies from the articles obtained. Articles retrieved were restricted to those published in English. One of the most prominent characteristics of AAA open repair is the double physiological phenomenon of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) that happens either at the time of clamping or following the aortic clamp removal. Ischemia-reperfusion injury causes significant pathophysiological disturbances to distant organs, increasing the possibility for postoperative multiorgan failure. Although tissue injury is mediated by diverse mechanisms, microvascular dysfunction seems to be the final outcome of I/R. PMID:26798637

  7. The Effect of Perioperative Ischemia and Reperfusion on Multiorgan Dysfunction following Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Katseni, Konstantina; Chalkias, Athanasios; Kotsis, Thomas; Dafnios, Nikolaos; Arapoglou, Vassilis; Kaparos, Georgios; Logothetis, Emmanuel; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Karvouni, Eleni; Katsenis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are relatively common and are potentially life-threatening medical problems. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of I/R injury on multiorgan failure following AAA repair. The PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, Medline, Cochrane Review, and Scopus databases were comprehensively searched for articles concerning the pathophysiology of I/R and its systemic effects. Cross-referencing was performed using the bibliographies from the articles obtained. Articles retrieved were restricted to those published in English. One of the most prominent characteristics of AAA open repair is the double physiological phenomenon of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) that happens either at the time of clamping or following the aortic clamp removal. Ischemia-reperfusion injury causes significant pathophysiological disturbances to distant organs, increasing the possibility for postoperative multiorgan failure. Although tissue injury is mediated by diverse mechanisms, microvascular dysfunction seems to be the final outcome of I/R. PMID:26798637

  8. Endograft Sizing for Endovascular Aortic Repair and Incidence of Endoleak Type 1A

    PubMed Central

    Zeebregts, Clark J.; Willems, Tineke P.; Vainas, Tryfon; Tielliu, Ignace F. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective In endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), proximal type 1A endoleaks can occur as a result of hostile neck anatomy or over- or undersizing of the endograft. As the current standard is based on the diameter or average of the short and long axes in a central lumen reconstruction image, it can falter in irregularly shaped aortic necks. An alternative method is circumference-based, therefore minimizing the measurement error. In this study we aimed to assess the degree of discrepancy between both methods and the association of this discrepancy with the occurrence of endoleak type 1A. Methods All patients with early (<30 days post-operative) endoleak type 1A after elective EVAR at our center between 2004 and 2016 were identified for a retrospective case-control study. Control patients were matched based on hostile neck anatomy, such as calcification, thrombus, reverse taper, and β-angulation. The aortic neck diameter was measured using the traditional, diameter-based method as well as an alternative method, based on the circumference of the aortic neck. Results In 482 EVAR patients, 18 early endoleak type 1A cases were found (3.9%). After exclusion, 12 cases remained and 48 matching controls were found. No significant differences were found between the two measuring methods at any level below the renal arteries. The inter-observer variability was significant for the D(mean) (0.4 ± 1.69 mm, P = .02) and was larger than the D(circ) method (-0.1 ± 1.03 mm, P = .35). In only four out of 12 cases the endograft size was 10–20% larger than the D(mean) and D(circ) measurements. The differences between the diameter of the D(mean) and D(circ) and the chosen endograft were smaller for the case group (-8 ± 25.6% and -7 ± 24%) than for the control group. (-12.4 ± 12.4% and -11 ± 10.7%). Conclusion The difference between the D(mean) and D(circ) methods for aortic neck measurement was not large enough to play a significant role in the incidence of endoleak type

  9. Different techniques for aortic valve repair and the associated root reconstruction – prospective long-term follow-up of the first 100 patients

    PubMed Central

    Gocol, Radosław; Malinowski, Marcin; Hudziak, Damian; Duraj, Piotr; Frackiewicz, Joanna; Kargul, Tomasz; Deja, Marek A.; Woś, Stanisław

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The advantages of aortic valve and aortic root reconstructive surgery include the provision of natural postoperative valve hemodynamics and the avoidance of prosthetic valve-related complications. A systematic approach based on functional classification of aortic regurgitation allows standardization and reproducibility. Its potential applicability, however, is limited by the relative lack of long-term follow-up data. Aim To achieve the long term results of aortic valve and root repair in prospectively recruited group of 100 patients operated on during first seven years. Material and methods Between the years 2003 and 2013, 225 consecutive patients (175 male, 50 female, mean age 51.3 years) with severe aortic regurgitation and aortic root enlargement underwent aortic valve repair or sparing surgery. The first 100 patients operated between 2003 and 2009 were prospectively enrolled in the study in order to achieve a 105-month follow-up. They underwent aortic valve repair and associated aortic root reconstruction. This prospective study is aimed at assessing the major endpoints of overall survival and freedom from reoperation. Additionally, log-rank testing for the risk factors associated with overall mortality, reoperation, and aortic valve repair failure was performed. Results Among 225 patients, early mortality occurred in the case of 5 patients (2.2%), while 6 (2.5%) patients experienced early valve failure. In a prospective analysis performed on the first 100 patients, long-term results achieved with Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a survival rate of 93% and freedom from reoperation at the level of 91.3%. The risk factors for overall mortality included NYHA class, creatinine level, and perioperative root replacement as reimplantation. Redo operation was associated with bicuspid aortic valve and perioperative leaflet resection with pericardial patch repair. Conclusions One hundred and five month follow-up data from this prospectively analyzed cohort of

  10. Aortic Disease Presentation and Outcome Associated with ACTA2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen S.; Guo, Dongchuan; Prakash, Siddharth; Bensend, Tracy A.; Flynn, Kelly; Estrera, Anthony; Safi, Hazim; Liang, David; Hyland, James; Child, Anne; Arno, Gavin; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Braverman, Alan; Moran, Rocio; Morisaki, Takayuki; Morisaki, Hiroko; Consortium, Montalcino Aortic; Pyeritz, Reed; Coselli, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background ACTA2 mutations are the major cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. We sought to characterize these aortic diseases in a large case series of individuals with ACTA2 mutations. Methods and Results Aortic disease, management, and outcome associated with the first aortic event (aortic dissection or aneurysm repair) were abstracted from the medical records of 277 individuals with 41 various ACTA2 mutations. Aortic events occurred in 48% of these individuals, with the vast majority presenting with thoracic aortic dissections (88%) associated with 25% mortality. Type A dissections were more common than type B dissections (54% versus 21%), but the median age of onset of type B dissections was significantly younger than type A dissections (27 years, IQR 18–41 versus 36 years, IQR 26–45). Only 12% of aortic events were repair of ascending aortic aneurysms, which variably involved the aortic root, ascending aorta and aortic arch. Overall cumulative risk of an aortic event at age 85 years was 0.76 (95% CI 0.64, 0.86). After adjustment for intra-familial correlation, gender and race, mutations disrupting p.R179 and p.R258 were associated with significantly increased risk for aortic events, whereas p.R185Q and p.R118Q mutations showed significantly lower risk of aortic events compared to other mutations. Conclusions ACTA2 mutations are associated with high risk of presentation with an acute aortic dissection. The lifetime risk for an aortic event is only 76%, suggesting that additional environmental or genetic factors play a role in expression of aortic disease in individuals with ACTA2 mutations. PMID:25759435

  11. The imaging assessment and specific endograft design for the endovascular repair of ascending aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yepeng; Tang, Hanfei; Zhou, JianPing; Liu, Zhao; Liu, Changjian; Qiao, Tong; Zhou, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Endovascular option has been proposed for a very limited and selected number of Stanford type A aortic dissection (TAAD) patients. We have performed a computed tomography (CT)-based TAAD study to explore appropriate endograft configurations for the ascending aortic pathology. Methods TAAD patients treated with optimal CT scans were retrospectively reviewed, and their entry tears (ETs) were identified using three-dimensional and multiplanar reconstructions in an EndoSize workstation. After generating a centerline of flow, measurements, including numerous morphologic characteristics of anatomy, were evaluated and a selected subset of patients were determined to be suitable for endovascular treatments. Proximal diameter and distal diameter of endograft were selected based on diameters measured at the ET level and at the innominate artery (IA) level, with 10% oversizing with respect to the true lumen, but not exceeding the original aortic diameter. The length of the endograft was determined by the distance from the sinotubular junction to IA. Results This study covered 126 TAAD patients with primary ET in ascending aorta, among which, according to the assumed criteria, 48 (38.1%) patients were deemed to be suitable for endovascular treatment. The diameters of ascending aorta from the sinotubular junction to the IA level presented a downward trend, and the proximal diameters differed significantly from distal diameters of the endograft for TAAD (39.9 versus 36.2 mm, P<0.01), implying that the conical endograft might be compatible with the ascending pathology. In the ascending aorta, lengths of the endograft should be 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 mm in five (10.4%), 22 (45.9%), 13 (27.1%), six (12.5%), and two (4.2%) patients, respectively. Conclusion In this selected number of Chinese patients, the suitability of endovascular repair has been demonstrated based on the CT imaging. Shorter, larger, and bare spring-free conical endografts were preferred in the

  12. The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural analgesia in open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, David; Bright, Elizabeth; London, N J M

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Complications of epidural catheterisation can cause significant morbidity. Epidural abscess following epidural catheterisation is rare and the reported incidence is variable. The purpose of this study was to review the incidence of epidural abscess in patients undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. PATIENTS AND METHODS A retrospective case note review of all patients having open AAA repair over a 5-year period. RESULTS A total of 415 patients underwent open AAA repair between January 2003 and March 2008. Of these, 290 were elective procedures and 125 were for ruptured aneurysms. Six patients underwent postoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the spine for clinical suspicion of an epidural abscess. Two of these (0.48%) had confirmed epidural abscess and two superficial infection at the epidural site. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural analgesia in patients undergoing open AAA repair within our department was 0.48%. Although a rare complication, epidural abscess can cause significant morbidity. Epidural abscesses rarely develop before the third postoperative day. PMID:19887020

  13. Preoperative prediction of spinal cord ischemia after thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Scali, Salvatore T.; Wang, S. Keisin; Feezor, Robert J.; Huber, Thomas S.; Martin, Tomas D.; Klodell, Charles T.; Beaver, Thomas M.; Beck, Adam W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Spinal cord ischemia (SCI) is a devastating, but potentially preventable, complication of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). The purpose of this analysis was to determine what factors predict SCI after TEVAR. Methods All TEVAR procedures at a single institution were reviewed for patient characteristics, prior aortic repair history, aortic centerline of flow analysis, and procedural characteristics. SCI was defined as any lower extremity neurologic deficit that was not attributable to an intracranial process or peripheral neuropathy. Forty-three patient and procedural variables were evaluated individually for association with SCI. Those with the strongest relationships to SCI (P < .1) were included in a multivariable logistic regression model, and a stepwise variable elimination algorithm was bootstrapped to derive a best subset of predictors from this model. Results From 2002–13, 741 patients underwent TEVAR for various indications and 68 (9.2%) developed SCI (permanent: N = 38; 5.1%). Due to lack of adequate imaging for centerline analysis, 586 patients (any SCI, N = 43; 7.4%) were subsequently analyzed. Patients experiencing SCI after TEVAR were older (SCI 72±11 vs. No SCI, 65±15 years; P < .0001) and had significantly higher rates of multiple cardiovascular risk factors. The stepwise selection procedure identified five variables as the most important predictors of SCI: age (odds ratio, OR, multiplies by 1.3 per 10 years; 95% CI 0.9–1.8, P = .06), aortic coverage length (OR multiplies by 1.3 per 5cm; CI 1.1–1.6, P = .002), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR, 1.9; CI .9–4.1, P = .1), chronic renal insufficiency(creatinine ≥ 1.6; OR, 1.9; CI .8–4.2, P = .1), and hypertension (defined as chart history and/or medication; OR, 6.4; CI 2.6–18, P < .0001). A logistic regression model with just these five covariates had excellent discrimination (AUC = .83) and calibration (χ2 = 9.8; P = .28). Conclusion This analysis generated a

  14. Informed consent for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: Assessing variations in surgeon opinion through a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Dardik, Alan; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Gusberg, Richard J.; Fraenkel, Liana

    2009-01-01

    Objective Informed consent discussions for elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair should reflect appropriate risks of the open or endovascular repair (EVAR), but few guidelines exist describing what surgeons should discuss. This study examines expert opinion regarding what constitutes informed consent. Methods Design We conducted an anonymous, web-based, national survey of vascular surgeons. Associations between surgeon characteristics and opinions regarding informed consent were measured using bivariate statistics; multivariable logistic regression was performed to estimate effects adjusted for covariates. Setting Academic and private practice surgeons were surveyed. Subjects United States members of the International Society for Vascular Surgery membership. Main Outcome Measure. Surgeons' self-reported opinions regarding the content of informed consent for AAA repair. Results A total of 199 surgeons completed the survey (response rate 51%). More than 90% of respondents reported that it was essential to discuss mortality risk for both procedures. However, only 60% and 30% of respondents reported that it was essential to discuss the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke, respectively. Opinions varied by procedure regarding the risks of impotence (32% vs 62%; EVAR vs open repair), reintervention (78% vs 17%), and rupture during long-term follow-up (57% vs 17%). Younger and private practice surgeons were more likely to discuss complications compared with older surgeons and those in academic practice. Surgeons who perform predominantly EVAR were more likely to quote higher mortality rates for open repair (odds ration [OR] = 3.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4-6.4) and lower reintervention rates for EVAR (OR = 0.3, 95% CI = 0.1-0.7) compared with other surgeons. Conclusions This is the first study of the practice of informed consent for AAA repair. The only risk that the vast majority of surgeons agreed should be included in informed consent for AAA

  15. Successful surgical repair of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm in a nonagenarian.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, M; Coratti, A; Tani, F

    2001-12-01

    Mortality due to the surgical treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (RAAA) is high, more than 40%, especially in elderly patients. The literature concerning RAAA in very elderly patients is analyzed by Internet research (Medline). Only rare examples of emergency surgical management in nonagenarian patients are reported, and even fewer reports of successfully operated patients. A case report of a successful surgical repair of RAAA in a nonagenarian is presented. After ultrasound (US) and CT scans, the patient (in good condition as regards blood pressure, respiratory, cardiac and renal function) underwent uneventful aneurysmectomy and reconstruction of the aorta and common iliac arteries by means of a bifurcated prosthesis. The length of hospitalization was 30 days and the patient is still alive and in good condition four years and two months after the operation. The advisability of emergency surgical repair in these patients, questionable because of the excessive surgical risk and poor survival benefit, is discussed. However many other factors affect the outcome of emergency repair (mainly cardiac, respiratory and renal function), independently of age. The authors conclude that age per se does not limit the indication for or success of surgery in very elderly patients. PMID:11782704

  16. Role of preoperative radionuclide ejection fraction in direct abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmers, A.; Cerqueira, M.D.; Zierler, R.E.

    1988-08-01

    Preoperative radionuclide ventriculography was performed in 60 patients to assess whether such testing could define those at increased risk after direct abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. None of the patients had prophylactic coronary artery reconstruction to reduce the risk of AAA repair despite angina in 27% and previous myocardial infarction (MI) in 42%. The mean ejection fraction (EF) was 52% +/- 15% (range 14% to 78%). Low EF (normal greater than 50%) was present in 40%, whereas ventricular wall motion abnormalities were present in 39% of patients. The overall perioperative (30-day) mortality rate was 5%. MI occurred in 7% within 30 postoperative days; none was fatal. Life-table analysis revealed that overall survival after AAA repair was significantly lower in patients with an EF of 50% or less (p less than 0.025, Mantel-Cox) during a follow-up of 20.1 +/- 11.9 months. Overall survival differences were even more striking for those with an EF of 35% or less (p = 0.003, Mantel-Cox). There was a marked difference in the cumulative mortality rate during follow-up, being 50% in those patients with an EF of 35% or less (n = 10) compared with 14% in those with an EF greater than 35% (n = 50, p = 0.036, Fisher exact test). There was no statistical difference in the incidence of perioperative MI or perioperative death for those with an EF of 35% or less vs EF greater than 35%. 50 references.

  17. Midterm results of endovascular infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, A David; Forbes, Thomas L; Novick, Teresa V; Lovell, Marge B; Kribs, Stewart W; Lawlor, D Kirk; Harris, Kenneth A; DeRose, Guy

    2007-01-01

    Short-term and midterm clinical outcomes after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) have been well documented. Evaluation of longer term outcomes is now possible. Here we describe our initial 100 high-risk patients treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), all with a minimum of 5 years of follow-up. A retrospective review of prospectively recorded data in a departmental database was undertaken for the first 100 consecutive EVAR patients with a minimum of 5 years (range, 60-105 months) of follow-up performed between December 1997 and June 2001. Information was obtained from surgical follow-up visits and family doctors' offices. Endovascular repair of AAA in high-risk patients can be achieved with acceptably low postoperative mortality and morbidity. Longer term results in this high-risk cohort suggest that EVAR is effective in preventing aneurysm-related deaths at 5 years and beyond. All late mortalities were due to patients' comorbid diseases. PMID:17704332

  18. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  19. Successful Repair of Type I Endoleak Using the Frozen Elephant Trunk Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seon Hee; Song, Seunghwan; Kim, Sang-pil; Lee, Chung Won; Son, Joohyung

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has emerged as an effective therapy for a variety of thoracic aortic pathologies. However, various types of endoleak remain a major concern, and its treatment is often challenging. We report a case of type I endoleak occurring 19 months after zone II hybrid TEVAR. The endoleak was successfully repaired by the frozen elephant trunk technique, without removal of a previous stent graft, combined with ascending aorta and total arch replacement. PMID:27525241

  20. Ascending aortitis: a clinicopathological study of 21 cases in a series of 300 aortic repairs.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lauren; Heath, Jonathon; Burke, Allen

    2014-06-01

    There are few single-institution clinicopathological series of aortitis. In this study, all ascending aneurysms were prospectively evaluated pathologically with ≥6 aortic sections over a 6-year period.Of 300 ascending aortic resections, there were 21 cases of aortitis (7%), in 11 women and 10 men (mean 67, range 41-88 years). There were 19 patients with aneurysms, and two patients with sclerosing periaortitis, clinically suspected to have intramural haematoma. Of the 19 patients with aneurysms (11 women), two had prior temporal arteritis, one ankylosing spondylitis, one IgA nephropathy, one undifferentiated autoimmune disease, one Lyme disease, and one fibromyalgia. In only two patients was aortitis suspected before surgery as the cause of aneurysm. Four patients developed distal aortic aneurysm requiring repeat surgery. Valve replacement or repair was necessary in nine patients, and two patients died after surgery. There were no significant differences between patients with and without autoimmune disease. The histological features were necrotising aortitis in 18 of 19 patients with aneurysmal aortitis, and there was one case of non-necrotising aortitis. One valve showed autoimmune valvulitis, congenitally bicuspid associated with ankylosing spondylitis. Necrotising aortitis was classified as acute (n = 5), healing (n = 9), and healed (n = 4). Acute necrotising aortitis was associated with need for valve replacement (p = 0.01) and younger age (p = 0.01). The healed phase had subtle histological features, sparse medial inflammation, marked medial attenuation, and chronic adventitial inflammation. Two patients with periaortitis demonstrated marked fibroinflammatory thickening of the adventitia with histological features typical of IgG4-related disease; neither had systemic symptoms. Ascending aortitis is histologically diverse, most frequently of the medial necrotising type, and is usually not suspected pre-operatively. Awareness of the

  1. Outcomes of Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Patients with Hostile Neck Anatomy

    SciTech Connect

    Choke, Edward; Munneke, Graham; Morgan, Robert; Belli, Anna-Maria; Loftus, Ian; McFarland, Robert; Loosemore, Thomas; Thompson, Matthew M.

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. The principal anatomic contraindication to endovascular aneurysm repair (EVR) is an unfavorable proximal aortic neck. With increasing experience, a greater proportion of patients with unfavorable neck anatomy are being offered EVR. This study aimed to evaluate outcomes in patients with challenging proximal aortic neck anatomy. Methods. Prospectively collected data from 147 consecutive patients who underwent EVR between December 1997 and April 2005 were supplemented with a retrospective review of medical records and radiological images. Unfavorable anatomic features were defined as neck diameter >28 mm, angulation >60 deg., circumferential thrombus >50%, and length <10 mm. Eighty-seven patients with 0 adverse features (good necks) were compared with 60 patients with one or more adverse features (hostile necks). Results. Comparing the good neck with the hostile neck group, there were no significant differences in the incidence of primary technical success (p = 0.15), intraoperative adjunctive procedures (p = 0.22), early proximal type I endoleak (<30 days) (p = 1.0), late proximal type I endoleak (>30 days) (p = 0.57), distal type I endoleak (p = 0.40), type III endoleak (p 0.51), secondary interventions (p = 1.0), aneurysm sac expansion (p = 0.44), or 30 day mortality (p = 0.70). The good neck group had a significantly increased incidence of type II endoleak (p = 0.023). By multivariate analysis, the incidence of intraoperative adjunctive procedures was significantly increased in the presence of severe angulation (p = 0.041, OR 3.08, 95% CI 1.05-9.04). Conclusion. Patients with severely hostile proximal aortic neck anatomy may be treated with EVR, although severely angulated necks require additional intraoperative procedures. Early outcomes are encouraging and suggest that indications for EVR may be expanded to include patients with hostile neck anatomy.

  2. Clinical outcomes of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms that underwent endovascular repair in a district general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Hsien; Chang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Jau-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of elective endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) in patients at a district general hospital. Methods A retrospective clinical study was conducted using data on 16 patients with elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and nine patients with consecutive rAAA treated with EVAR from January 2010 to December 2014 in a district general hospital in Taiwan. Results The preoperative characteristics of the two groups are listed. Thirty-six percent (9/25) of the patients were referred from other hospitals that did not offer surgical services. The percentage of patients with rAAA that were transferred from other hospitals was 55.5% (5/9). The stay durations in the intensive care unit for elective EVAR cases were shorter than those for emergent EVAR (1.75±1 d elective vs. 10±13.37 d emergent; P<0.019). The hospitalization days (11.06±4.07 d elective vs. 21.89±18.36 d emergent; P<0.031), operative time (183.63±57.24 min elective vs. 227.11±59.92 min emergent; P<0.009), and blood loss volumes (115.63±80.41 mL elective vs. 422.22±276.26 mL emergent; P<0.005) are shown; statistics for use of Perclose ProGlide® (7 cases elective vs. 0 case emergent; P<0.024) are compared. The overall 30-d mortality rate was 11.11% (1/9). Conclusions The results confirm that EVAR surgery can be safely performed in a district general hospital with an integrated health care system. Using Perclose ProGlide® for selected cases may reduce blood loss and operative time. PMID:27499945

  3. Renal replacement therapies after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair--a review.

    PubMed

    Hudorović, Narcis; Lovricević, Ivo; Brkić, Petar; Ahel, Zaky; Vicić-Hudorović, Visnja

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the incidence of postoperative acute renal failure that necessitates the application of hemofiltration and to determine the factors that influence the outcome in patients undergoing surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. In addition, the review aims to assess the outcomes of postoperative early hemofiltration as compared to late intensive hemofiltration. Different forms of renal replacement therapies for use in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery patients are discussed. Electronic literature searches were performed using Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Sumsearch, Cinahil, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Excerpta Medica. The search identified 419 potentially eligible studies, of which 119 were excluded based on the title and abstract. Of the remaining 300 studies, full articles were collected and re-evaluated. Forty-five articles satisfied our inclusion criteria, of which only 12 were of the IA Level of evidence. The search results indicated that the underlying disease, its severity and stage, the etiology of acute renal failure, clinical and hemodynamic status of the patient, the resources available, and different costs of therapy might all influence the choice of the renal replacement therapy strategy. However, clear guidelines on renal replacement therapy duration are still lacking. Moreover, it is not known whether in acute renal failure patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery, renal replacement therapy modalities can eliminate significant amounts of clinically relevant inflammatory mediators. This review gives current information available in the literature on the possible mechanisms underlying acute renal failure and recent developments in continuous renal replacement treatment modalities. PMID:22384777

  4. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a severely angulated aorta using a double-wire technique

    PubMed Central

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Yujiro; Taneichi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Yujiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2016-01-01

    When endovascular treatment is performed, angulation of the access route for a device can make the operative procedure difficult. We encountered a case in which we successfully completed thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in a patient with severely angulated aorta by applying ‘double-wire technique’. The patient was an 80-year-old woman. An aneurysm with a 71-mm diameter was observed in the descending aorta. We performed TEVAR. Device delivery could not be achieved by a conventional procedure using one guide wire since the peripheral aorta was severely angulated. Therefore, in addition to a guide wire for main body, a stiff wire and a stiff sheath were introduced to straighten the angulation. The device was successfully introduced and TEVAR was completed. We used the Relay Plus® that facilitates tracking through the angulation. The device has a dual structure consisting of a hard sheath and a flexible sheath. We performed TEVAR successfully. PMID:27421301

  5. Emergency endovascular aortic repair of a ruptured mycotic aorto-iliac aneurysm presenting with lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ting-Ying; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Lin, Yi-Chanag; Hsu, Po-Shun

    2014-01-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is life-threatening without immediate management. The initial clinical presentation is non-specific and impending rupture is easily missed, especially without a CT scan. We present a case of a 56-year-old man with low-back pain and left lower-extremity numbness, which was diagnosed as a herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) with left acute sciatica syndrome. He also complained of persistent fever and abdominal discomfort. Routine blood work-up revealed leukocytosis and decreasing haemoglobin levels. CT angiography (CTA) showed impending rupture of the left aorto-iliac aneurysm. We therefore performed endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Blood culture revealed Salmonella enterica, for which he received antibiotics. No acute sciatica syndrome was present immediately after the EVAR. No EVAR-related complications were noted in the one-year CTA follow up. PMID:25000523

  6. Treatment of Type II Endoleaks After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Transcaval Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mansueto, Giancarlo Cenzi, Daniela; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Petrella, Enrico; Gumbs, Andrew A.; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2005-06-15

    The purpose of the note is to describe a new technique for type II endoleak treatment, using an alternative approach through femoral venous access. Three patients who developed type II endoleak after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm were treated with direct transcaval puncture and embolization inside the aneurysm sac. The detailed technique is described. All patients were treated without any complications and discharged 48 hours after the treatment. At 1 month follow-up the computed tomograph scan did not show a recurrence of a type II endoleak. The management of patients with type II endoleak is a controversial issue and different techniques have been proposed. We suggest an alternative technique for type II endoleak treatment. The feasibility and the advantages of this approach can offer new possibilities for the diagnosis as well as for the treatment of this complication.

  7. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair of a severely angulated aorta using a double-wire technique.

    PubMed

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Yujiro; Taneichi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Yujiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2016-01-01

    When endovascular treatment is performed, angulation of the access route for a device can make the operative procedure difficult. We encountered a case in which we successfully completed thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in a patient with severely angulated aorta by applying 'double-wire technique'. The patient was an 80-year-old woman. An aneurysm with a 71-mm diameter was observed in the descending aorta. We performed TEVAR. Device delivery could not be achieved by a conventional procedure using one guide wire since the peripheral aorta was severely angulated. Therefore, in addition to a guide wire for main body, a stiff wire and a stiff sheath were introduced to straighten the angulation. The device was successfully introduced and TEVAR was completed. We used the Relay Plus(®) that facilitates tracking through the angulation. The device has a dual structure consisting of a hard sheath and a flexible sheath. We performed TEVAR successfully. PMID:27421301

  8. Synchronous colorectal malignancy and abdominal aortic aneurysm treated with endovascular aneurysm repair followed by laparoscopic colectomy.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kazushige; Sunami, Eiji; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Kanazawa, Takamitsu; Hosaka, Akihiro; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-04-01

    Although the incidence of synchronous abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and malignancies is increasing, there has been no clear consensus in the surgical treatment of such patients. The focus on surgical treatments with minimal invasiveness, such as endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for AAA and laparoscopic colectomy for colorectal cancer, has increased; however, the clinical applicability of combination treatment with EVAR and laparoscopic colectomy has not been established. A 61-year-old man was diagnosed with AAA, advanced sigmoid colon cancer, and coronary artery stenosis. Because the patient also had chronic renal failure with nephrotic syndrome, among several other comorbidities, surgery was considered to be associated with high risks in this patent. Sequential treatments with percutaneous coronary intervention, EVAR, and laparoscopic colectomy were successfully performed. Staged treatment of EVAR followed by laparoscopic colectomy may be a promising strategy for high-risk patients with AAA associated with malignancy. PMID:25875539

  9. Feasibility of Three-Dimensional MR Angiography Image Fusion Guidance for Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Tacher, Vania; Desgranges, Pascal; You, Ketsakin; Ridouani, Fourat; Marzelle, Jean; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) angiography image fusion (IF) with live fluoroscopy guidance was used while performing endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (EVAR) in five patients with a history of chronic renal disease or severe contrast allergy. Intraprocedural technical success was 100%. Median procedure time was 120 minutes (range, 60-180 min), fluoroscopy time was 40 minutes (range, 17-65 min), dose-area product was 245,867 mGy × cm(2) (range, 68,435-690,053 mGy × cm(2)), and iodinated contrast volume injected was 15 mL (range, 0-40 mL). Technical success was achieved in four of five patients (80%); one case was complicated by a type 1 endoleak on follow-up MR angiography, which was successfully treated. EVAR with MR angiography IF guidance was technically feasible and safe in five patients and reduced or eliminated the use of iodinated contrast media. PMID:26830935

  10. Synchronous Colorectal Malignancy and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Treated With Endovascular Aneurysm Repair Followed by Laparoscopic Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Kazushige; Sunami, Eiji; Tanaka, Junichiro; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Kanazawa, Takamitsu; Hosaka, Akihiro; Ishihara, Soichiro; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Although the incidence of synchronous abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and malignancies is increasing, there has been no clear consensus in the surgical treatment of such patients. The focus on surgical treatments with minimal invasiveness, such as endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for AAA and laparoscopic colectomy for colorectal cancer, has increased; however, the clinical applicability of combination treatment with EVAR and laparoscopic colectomy has not been established. A 61-year-old man was diagnosed with AAA, advanced sigmoid colon cancer, and coronary artery stenosis. Because the patient also had chronic renal failure with nephrotic syndrome, among several other comorbidities, surgery was considered to be associated with high risks in this patent. Sequential treatments with percutaneous coronary intervention, EVAR, and laparoscopic colectomy were successfully performed. Staged treatment of EVAR followed by laparoscopic colectomy may be a promising strategy for high-risk patients with AAA associated with malignancy. PMID:25875539

  11. Rehospitalization to Primary Versus Different Facilities Following Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Richard S.; Fernandes-Taylor, Sara; Kind, Amy J.H.; Engelbert, Travis L.; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Smith, Maureen A.; Matsumura, Jon S.; Kent, K. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Objective Reducing readmissions represents a unique opportunity to improve care and reduce health care costs and is the focus of major payers. A large number of surgical patients are readmitted to hospitals other than where the primary surgery was performed, resulting in clinical decisions that do not incorporate the primary surgeon and potentially alter outcomes. This study characterizes readmission to primary versus different hospitals after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and examines the implications with regard to mortality and cost. Methods Patients who underwent open or endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for AAA were identified from the CMS Chronic Conditions Warehouse (CCW), a random 5% national sample of Medicare beneficiaries from 2005-2009. Outcomes for patients who underwent AAA repair and were readmitted within 30 days of initial discharge were compared based on readmission location (primary vs. different hospital). Results 885 patients underwent AAA repair and were readmitted within 30 days. 626 (70.7%) returned to the primary facility, and 259 (29.3%) returned to a different facility. Greater distance from patient residence to the primary hospital was the strongest predictor of readmission to a different facility. Patients living 50-100 miles from the primary hospital were more likely to be readmitted to a different hospital compared to patients living <10 miles away (OR = 8.50, P <.001). Patients with diagnoses directly related to the surgery (e.g. wound infection) were more likely to be readmitted to the primary hospital whereas medical diagnoses (e.g. pneumonia and congestive heart failure) were more likely to be treated at a different hospital. There was no statistically significant difference in mortality between patients readmitted to a different or the primary hospital. Median total 30-day payments were significantly lower at different versus primary hospitals ($11,978, primary vs. $11,168, different, P = .04). Conclusion Readmission

  12. Real-Time Magnetic Resonance-Guided Endovascular Repair of Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Venkatesh K.; Karmarkar, Parag V.; Guttman, Michael A.; Dick, Alexander J.; Peters, Dana C.; Ozturk, Cengizhan; Pessanha, Breno S. S.; Thompson, Richard B.; Raval, Amish N.; DeSilva, Ranil; Aviles, Ronnier J.; Atalar, Ergin; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study tested the hypotheses that endografts can be visualized and navigated in vivo solely under real-time magnetic resonance imaging (rtMRI) guidance to repair experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in swine, and that MRI can provide immediate assessment of endograft apposition and aneurysm exclusion. BACKGROUND Endovascular repair for AAA is limited by endoleak caused by inflow or outflow malapposition. The ability of rtMRI to image soft tissue and flow may improve on X-ray guidance of this procedure. METHODS Infrarenal AAA was created in swine by balloon overstretch. We used one passive commercial endograft, imaged based on metal-induced MRI artifacts, and several types of homemade active endografts, incorporating MRI receiver coils (antennae). Custom interactive rtMRI features included color coding the catheter-antenna signals individually, simultaneous multislice imaging, and real-time three-dimensional rendering. RESULTS Eleven repairs were performed solely using rtMRI, simultaneously depicting the device and soft-tissue pathology during endograft deployment. Active devices proved most useful. Intraprocedural MRI provided anatomic confirmation of stent strut apposition and functional corroboration of aneurysm exclusion and restoration of laminar flow in successful cases. In two cases, there was clear evidence of contrast accumulation in the aneurysm sac, denoting endoleak. CONCLUSIONS Endovascular AAA repair is feasible under rtMRI guidance. Active endografts facilitate device visualization and complement the soft tissue contrast afforded by MRI for precise positioning and deployment. Magnetic resonance imaging also permits immediate post-procedural anatomic and functional evaluation of successful aneurysm exclusion. PMID:15963411

  13. An unusual duplication of the inferior vena cava in a patient with endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Polguj, Michał; Szubert, Wojciech; Topol, Mirosław; Stefańczyk, Ludomir

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old Caucasian male, with sensation of abdominal pulsation was admitted to our hospital. In multidetector 64-row computed tomography (CT) angiography, an abdominal aortic aneurysm was observed. Endovascular aortic repair was performed. Control CT confirmed prosperity with stent graft fixation and absence of any vascular complications. Investigation also showed asymmetrical duplication of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Right (RIVC) and left (LIVC) inferior vena cava arose from the confluence of the right and left iliac veins. The LIVC continued as left renal vein. PMID:26429190

  14. Impact of methodology and the use of allometric scaling on the echocardiographic assessment of the aortic root and arch: a study by the Research and Audit Sub-Committee of the British Society of Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Oxborough, David; Ghani, Saqib; Harkness, Allan; Lloyd, Guy; Moody, William; Ring, Liam; Sandoval, Julie; Senior, Roxy; Sheikh, Nabeel; Stout, Martin; Utomi, Victor; Willis, James; Zaidi, Abbas; Steeds, Richard

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study is to establish the impact of 2D echocardiographic methods on absolute values for aortic root dimensions and to describe any allometric relationship to body size. We adopted a nationwide cross-sectional prospective multicentre design using images obtained from studies utilising control groups or where specific normality was being assessed. A total of 248 participants were enrolled with no history of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension or abnormal findings on echocardiography. Aortic root dimensions were measured at the annulus, the sinus of Valsalva, the sinotubular junction, the proximal ascending aorta and the aortic arch using the inner edge and leading edge methods in both diastole and systole by 2D echocardiography. All dimensions were scaled allometrically to body surface area (BSA), height and pulmonary artery diameter. For all parameters with the exception of the aortic annulus, dimensions were significantly larger in systole (P<0.05). All aortic root and arch measurements were significantly larger when measured using the leading edge method compared with the inner edge method (P<0.05). Allometric scaling provided a b exponent of BSA(0.6) in order to achieve size independence. Similarly, ratio scaling to height in subjects under the age of 40 years also produced size independence. In conclusion, the largest aortic dimensions occur in systole while using the leading edge method. Reproducibility of measurement, however, is better when assessing aortic dimensions in diastole. There is an allometric relationship to BSA and, therefore, allometric scaling in the order of BSA(0.6) provides a size-independent index that is not influenced by the age or gender. PMID:26693286

  15. Early and delayed rupture after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in a 10-year multicenter registry

    PubMed Central

    Candell, Leah; Tucker, Lue-Yen; Goodney, Philip; Walker, Joy; Okuhn, Steven; Hill, Bradley; Chang, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objective Rupture after abdominal endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a function of graft maintenance of the seal and fixation. We describe our 10-year experience with rupture after EVAR. Methods From 2000 to 2010, 1736 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) from 17 medical centers underwent EVAR in a large, regional integrated health care system. Preoperative demographic and clinical data of interest were collected and stored in our registry. We retrospectively identified patients with postoperative rupture, characterized as “early” and “delayed” rupture (≤30 days and >30 days after the initial EVAR, respectively), and identified predictors associated with delayed rupture. Results The overall follow-up rate was 92%, and the median follow-up was 2.7 years (interquartile range, 1.2–4.4 years) in these 1736 EVAR patients. We identified 20 patients with ruptures; 70% were male, the mean age was 79 years, and mean AAA size at the initial EVAR was 6.3 cm. Six patients underwent initial EVAR for rupture (n = 2) or symptomatic presentation (n = 4). Of the 20 post-EVAR ruptures, 25% (five of 20) were early, all occurring within 2 days after the initial EVAR. Of these five patients, four had intraoperative adverse events leading directly to rupture, with one type I and one type III endoleak. Of the five early ruptures, four patients underwent endovascular repair and one received repair with open surgery, resulting in two perioperative deaths. Among the remaining 15 patients, the median time from initial EVAR to rupture was 31.1 months (interquartile range, 13.8–57.3 months). Most of these delayed ruptures (10 of 15) were preceded by AAA sac increases, including three patients with known endoleaks who underwent reintervention. At the time of delayed rupture, nine of 15 patients had new endoleaks. Among all 20 patients, six patients did not undergo repair (all delayed patients) and died, nine underwent repeated EVAR, and five had open repair

  16. Lower Extremity Microembolism in Open vs. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Toursavadkohi, Shahab; Kakkos, Stavros K.; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Shepard, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have documented the occurrence of microembolization during abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair by both open and endovascular approaches, no study has compared the downstream effects of these two repair techniques on lower extremity hemodynamics. In this prospective cohort study, 20 patients were treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) (11 Zenith, 8 Excluder, and 1 Medtronic) and 18 patients with open repair (OR) (16 bifurcated grafts, 2 tube grafts). Pre- and postoperative ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and toe-brachial indices (TBIs) were measured preoperatively and on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 5. Demographics and preoperative ABIs/TBIs were identical in EVAR (0.97/0.63) and OR (0.96/0.63) patients (p = 0.21). There was a significant decrease in ABIs/TBIs following both EVAR (0.83/0.52, p = 0.01) and OR (0.73/0.39, p = 0.003) on POD #1, although this decrease was greater following OR than EVAR (p = 0.002). This difference largely resolved by POD #5 (p = 0.41). In the OR group, TBIs in the limb in which flow was restored first was significantly reduced compared to the contralateral limb (0.50 vs. 0.61, p = 0.03). In the EVAR group, there was also a difference in TBIs between the main body insertion side and the contralateral side (0.50 vs. 0.59, p = 0.02). Deterioration of lower extremity perfusion pressures occurs commonly after AAA repair regardless of repair technique. Toe perfusion is worse in the limb opened first during OR and on the main body insertion side following EVAR, suggesting that microembolization plays a major role in this deterioration. The derangement following OR is more profound than after EVAR on POD #1, but recovers rapidly. This finding suggests that microembolizarion may be worse with OR or alternatively that other factors associated with OR (e.g., the hemodynamic response to surgery with redistribution of flow to vital organs peri-operatively) may play a role. PMID

  17. Direct and indirect measurement of patient radiation exposure during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Dustin J; Pipinos, Iraklis I; Longo, G Mathew; Lynch, Thomas G; Rutar, Frank J; Johanning, Jason M

    2008-11-01

    With the increasing complexity of endovascular procedures, concern has grown regarding patient radiation exposure. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair represents the most common complex endovascular procedure currently performed by vascular specialists. Our study evaluates the patient radiation dose received during endovascular AAA repair. Over a 3-month period we prospectively monitored the radiation dose in a series of consecutive patients undergoing endovascular AAA repair. All patients underwent standard endovascular AAA repair with one of two commercially available grafts using the GE OEC 9800 unit. Direct measurement of maximum radiation dose at skin level (peak skin dose, PSD) was recorded using GAFCHROMIC radiographic dosimetry film. Indirect measurements of radiation dose (fluoroscopy time and dose-area-product [DAP]) were recorded with the C-arm dosimeter. A total of 12 consecutive patients undergoing standard endovascular AAA repair were evaluated. Mean PSD was 0.75 Gy (range 0.27-1.25). Mean total fluoroscopy time was 20.6 min (range 12.6-34.2) with an average of 92% spent in standard fluoroscopy and 8% spent in cinefluoroscopy. Regarding total fluoroscopy time, 49% was spent in normal field of view and 51% in magnified view. Mean DAP was 15,166 cGy x cm(2) (range 5,207-24,536). PSD correlated with DAP (r = 0.9, p < 0.05) but not total fluoroscopy time (r = 0.18, p > 0.05). PSD also correlated with body mass index (BMI; r = 0.82, p < 0.05). Obese patients had a mean PSD of 1.1 Gy compared to 0.5 Gy in nonobese patients. PSD of all patients was well below the accepted 2.0 Gy threshold for skin injury. PSD correlated with DAP but not total fluoroscopy time. PSD also correlated with BMI, and the mean PSD was significantly increased in obese compared to nonobese patients. Despite the complexity and duration of endovascular AAA repair, the procedure can be performed safely without excessive radiation exposure. PMID:18992664

  18. Lower Extremity Microembolism in Open vs. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Toursavadkohi, Shahab; Kakkos, Stavros K; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Shepard, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have documented the occurrence of microembolization during abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair by both open and endovascular approaches, no study has compared the downstream effects of these two repair techniques on lower extremity hemodynamics. In this prospective cohort study, 20 patients were treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) (11 Zenith, 8 Excluder, and 1 Medtronic) and 18 patients with open repair (OR) (16 bifurcated grafts, 2 tube grafts). Pre- and postoperative ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and toe-brachial indices (TBIs) were measured preoperatively and on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 5. Demographics and preoperative ABIs/TBIs were identical in EVAR (0.97/0.63) and OR (0.96/0.63) patients (p = 0.21). There was a significant decrease in ABIs/TBIs following both EVAR (0.83/0.52, p = 0.01) and OR (0.73/0.39, p = 0.003) on POD #1, although this decrease was greater following OR than EVAR (p = 0.002). This difference largely resolved by POD #5 (p = 0.41). In the OR group, TBIs in the limb in which flow was restored first was significantly reduced compared to the contralateral limb (0.50 vs. 0.61, p = 0.03). In the EVAR group, there was also a difference in TBIs between the main body insertion side and the contralateral side (0.50 vs. 0.59, p = 0.02). Deterioration of lower extremity perfusion pressures occurs commonly after AAA repair regardless of repair technique. Toe perfusion is worse in the limb opened first during OR and on the main body insertion side following EVAR, suggesting that microembolization plays a major role in this deterioration. The derangement following OR is more profound than after EVAR on POD #1, but recovers rapidly. This finding suggests that microembolizarion may be worse with OR or alternatively that other factors associated with OR (e.g., the hemodynamic response to surgery with redistribution of flow to vital organs peri-operatively) may play a role. PMID

  19. In-Graft Endovascular Stenting Repair for Supravalvular Stenosis From Aortic Rupture After Balloon-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Nobuyuki; Scholtz, Werner; Haas, Nikolaus; Ensminger, Stephan; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old man with high-grade aortic valve stenosis and status post-coronary artery bypass grafting and supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta was referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. He was in New York Heart Association class III and had dyspnea. After appropriate screening, we implanted a 29-mm SAPIEN XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA USA) through a transapical approach because of severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Postinterventional aortography revealed correct positioning and function of the valve and free coronary ostia but contrast extravasation in the vicinity of the interposed vascular prosthesis, resulting in severe luminal narrowing. We chose to manage the stenosis with an endovascular stent. After stenting, extravascular compression was markedly reduced, and the pressure gradient disappeared. The patient was discharged home on the 20th postoperative day. Three months later, computed tomography depicted correct positioning of both grafts. The patient's general health is good, and he is now in New York Heart Association class II. This case illustrates a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation specific for patients with an ascending aortic graft. Although stenting may be a good solution, as depicted by this case, self-expanding transcatheter aortic valves should be preferred in patients with ascending aortic grafts to avoid the described complication. PMID:26355692

  20. A rare cause of recurrent aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Gupta, Vishal

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old man with a history of Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), which was diagnosed when he had a Stanford type A aortic dissection. He also had multiple aneurysms including ones in the innominate, right common carotid, and right internal mammary arteries. He had had multiple procedures including Bentall's procedure, repeat sternotomy with complete arch and valve replacement, and coil embolization of internal mammary artery aneurysm in the past. His LDS was characterized by gene mutation for transforming growth factor-β receptor 1. He presented to our facility with sudden onset of back pain, radiating to the right shoulder and chest. He was diagnosed with Stanford type B aortic dissection and underwent thoracic aorta endovascular repair for his aortic dissection. This case represents the broad spectrum of pathology associated with LDS where even with regular surveillance and aggressive medical management the patient developed Stanford B aortic dissection. PMID:27358537

  1. Association of race and socioeconomic status with the use of endovascular repair to treat thoracic aortic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, William F.; LaPar, Damien J.; Newhook, Timothy E.; Stone, Matthew L.; Upchurch, Gilbert R.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2014-01-01

    Objective Descending thoracic aortic diseases may be treated with either open thoracic aortic repair or thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Previous studies have demonstrated that race and socioeconomic status (SES) affect access to care and treatment allocation in vascular surgery. We hypothesized that racial minorities and lower SES patients have decreased propensity to have their thoracic aortic disease treated with TEVAR. Methods Weighted discharge records for patients who underwent either open thoracic aortic repair or TEVAR between 2005 and 2008 were evaluated using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Patient records were stratified by therapeutic intervention (open repair vs TEVAR). Differences in baseline comorbidities, race, and SES were compared. To account for the effects of comorbidities and other factors, hierarchical logistic regression modeling was used to determine the likelihood for TEVAR performance based on differences in patients’ race and SES. Results A total of 60,784 thoracic repairs were analyzed, the majority (79.4%) of which were open repairs. The most common race was white (78.2%), followed by black (9.1%), Hispanic (5.7%), Asian or Pacific Islander (2.9%), and Native American (0.7%). Patients were divided into quartiles according to SES with 20.6% of patients in the lowest SES quartile, 24.3% in the second quartile, 26.4% in the third quartile, and 28.8% in the highest SES quartile. Indications for treatment were similar for both treatment groups. After adjusting for multiple patient and hospital factors, race and SES were significantly associated with treatment modality for thoracic aortic disease. Black, Hispanic, and Native American populations had increased adjusted odds ratios of TEVAR performance compared with white patients. Similarly, lower SES correlated with increased use of TEVAR. Conclusions Contrary to our initial hypothesis, racial minorities (Black, Hispanic, and Native American) and patients with lower median

  2. Pre- and Intraoperative Predictors of Delirium after Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Akio; Narita, Hiroshi; Banno, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Komori, Kimihiro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We reviewed our series of patients who underwent open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair and constructed a prediction model for postoperative delirium. Methods: 397 patients who underwent open AAA repair at our institution between April 2005 and June 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Postoperative delirium was diagnosed from the patients’ medical records according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition (DSM-IV) criteria. Mental alterations resulting from postoperative cerebrovascular events or preexisting mental disorders were excluded. Parameters with significant differences on univariate analysis were subjected to a logistic regression analysis. Results: There were 46 patients (11.5%) diagnosed with postoperative delirium. The following parameters were significant in the univariate analysis: age, history of stroke, hyperlipidemia, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), percent vital capacity (%VC), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level. A logistic regression analysis revealed that an age ≥70 years (odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 3.342 [1.437–7.774]), blood loss ≥1517 mL (2.707 [1.359–5.391]), and the absence of hyperlipidemia (2.154 [1.060–4.374]) were significant risk factors. Conclusions: Older patients with substantial intraoperative blood loss require highly vigilant postoperative care. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the relationship between cholesterol and delirium. PMID:26421070

  3. Surgical repair of aortic dissection 16 years post-Ross procedure

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mollie R.; Magruder, J. Trent; Crawford, Todd C.; Grimm, Joshua C.; Halushka, Marc K.; Baumgartner, William A.; Cameron, Duke E.

    2016-01-01

    The Ross procedure is an excellent choice for younger patients in need of aortic valve replacement. While patients have benefited from superior survival rates associated with this procedure, complications related to aortic root dilatation and degeneration of the autograft may be encountered later in life. These challenges may be exacerbated in those with underlying connective tissue abnormalities, a phenomenon commonly observed in the bicuspid aortic valve population. In this report, we present the case of a patient who presented with an aortic dissection 16 years after a Ross procedure for aortic insufficiency in the setting of a bicuspid aortic valve, and review the existing literature related to this adverse event. PMID:27141044

  4. Surgical repair of aortic dissection 16 years post-Ross procedure.

    PubMed

    Myers, Mollie R; Magruder, J Trent; Crawford, Todd C; Grimm, Joshua C; Halushka, Marc K; Baumgartner, William A; Cameron, Duke E

    2016-01-01

    The Ross procedure is an excellent choice for younger patients in need of aortic valve replacement. While patients have benefited from superior survival rates associated with this procedure, complications related to aortic root dilatation and degeneration of the autograft may be encountered later in life. These challenges may be exacerbated in those with underlying connective tissue abnormalities, a phenomenon commonly observed in the bicuspid aortic valve population. In this report, we present the case of a patient who presented with an aortic dissection 16 years after a Ross procedure for aortic insufficiency in the setting of a bicuspid aortic valve, and review the existing literature related to this adverse event. PMID:27141044

  5. Aortic arch calcification on chest X-ray combined with coronary calcium score show additional benefit for diagnosis and outcome in patients with angina

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jong Shin; Kim, Weon; Kwon, Se Hwan; Youn, Hyo Chul; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Bae; Kim, Soo Joong; Kim, Woo-Shik; Kim, Kwon Sam

    2016-01-01

    Background The coronary artery calcium (CAC) and aortic arch calcification (AoAC) are individually associated with cardiovascular disease and outcome. This study investigated the predictive value of AoAC combined with CAC for cardiovascular diagnosis and outcome in patients with angina. Methods A total of 2018 stable angina patients who underwent chest X-ray and cardiac multi-detector computed tomography were followed up for four years to assess adverse events, which were categorized as cardiac death, stroke, myocardial infarction, or repeated revascularization. The extent of AoAC on chest X-ray was graded on a scale from 0 to 3. Results During the four years of follow-up, 620 patients were treated by coronary stenting and 153 (7%) adverse events occurred. A higher grade of AoAC was associated with a higher CAC score. Cox regression showed that the CAC score, but not AoAC, were associated with adverse events. In patients with CAC score < 400, AoAC showed an additive predictive value in detecting significant coronary artery disease (CAD). A gradual increases in the risk of adverse events were noted if AoAC was present in patients with similar CAC score. Conclusions As AoAC is strongly correlated with the CAC score regardless of age or gender, careful evaluation of CAD would be required in patients with AoAC on conventional chest X-rays. PMID:27103916

  6. Gene Expression in Experimental Aortic Coarctation and Repair: Candidate Genes for Therapeutic Intervention?

    PubMed Central

    LaDisa, John F.; Bozdag, Serdar; Olson, Jessica; Ramchandran, Ramani; Kersten, Judy R.; Eddinger, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta (CoA) is a constriction of the proximal descending thoracic aorta and is one of the most common congenital cardiovascular defects. Treatments for CoA improve life expectancy, but morbidity persists, particularly due to the development of chronic hypertension (HTN). Identifying the mechanisms of morbidity is difficult in humans due to confounding variables such as age at repair, follow-up duration, coarctation severity and concurrent anomalies. We previously developed an experimental model that replicates aortic pathology in humans with CoA without these confounding variables, and mimics correction at various times using dissolvable suture. Here we present the most comprehensive description of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) to date from the pathology of CoA, which were obtained using this model. Aortic samples (n=4/group) from the ascending aorta that experiences elevated blood pressure (BP) from induction of CoA, and restoration of normal BP after its correction, were analyzed by gene expression microarray, and enriched genes were converted to human orthologues. 51 DEGs with >6 fold-change (FC) were used to determine enriched Gene Ontology terms, altered pathways, and association with National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headers (MeSH) IDs for HTN, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CoA. The results generated 18 pathways, 4 of which (cell cycle, immune system, hemostasis and metabolism) were shared with MeSH ID’s for HTN and CVD, and individual genes were associated with the CoA MeSH ID. A thorough literature search further uncovered association with contractile, cytoskeletal and regulatory proteins related to excitation-contraction coupling and metabolism that may explain the structural and functional changes observed in our experimental model, and ultimately help to unravel the mechanisms responsible for persistent morbidity after treatment for CoA. PMID:26207811

  7. Endovascular repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm using the off-the-shelf multibranched t-Branch stent graft.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Bernardo C; Oderich, Gustavo S

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular repair has been increasingly used to treat thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms using patient-specific or off-the-shelf fenestrated and branched stent grafts. Device customization limits the application of patient-specific devices in patients who need urgent or emergency repair because of ruptured or large, rapidly expanding aneurysms. For these patients, an off-the-shelf multibranched stent graft, the t-Branch stent graft (Cook Medical, Bjaeverskov, Denmark) has been developed based on the relative predictability of visceral vessel anatomy, allowing incorporation and intraoperative customization of target vessels with four down-going directional branches. We used the t-Branch stent graft in a 66-year-old woman with a rapidly enlarging type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. Completion angiography and follow-up computed tomography angiography demonstrated successful exclusion of the aneurysm sac, patent target vessels, and nearly complete sac shrinkage at the 12-month follow-up. PMID:27109801

  8. Early prediction of acute kidney injury biomarkers after endovascular stent graft repair of aortic aneurysm: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious condition usually detected some time after onset by changes in serum creatinine (sCr). Although stent grafting to repair aortic aneurysms is associated with AKI caused by surgical procedures or the use of contrast agents, early biomarkers for AKI have not been adequately examined in stent graft recipients. We studied biomarkers including urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), blood NGAL, N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG), microalbumin (Alb), and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) as prospective early biomarkers for AKI in patients who had received stent graft repairs of aortic aneurysms. Methods In addition to pre-surgical sampling, at 2 to 6 h and at 1, 3 to 4, and 5 days or later (until stable) after surgery, urine and serum biomarkers were sampled from 47 patients who underwent stent graft repair of aortic aneurysms. Results Using Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, 6 (14%) of 42 retained patients developed AKI. NGAL corrected with urine Cr (NGAL/Cr) values demonstrated the best predictive value for AKI (97% specificity, 83% sensitivity at a 65.1 μg/gCr cutoff). The area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve of NGAL/Cr value 2 h after surgery was 0.9. Although NGAL/Cr, L-FABP corrected with urine Cr (L-FABP/Cr), L-FABP, NAG, and Alb corrected by urine Cr (Alb/Cr) all reached peak values before AKI detection by sCr in AKI patients, all biomarkers reached the cutoff value before AKI detection after adaption of cutoff value. Conclusions After stent graft repair of aortic aneurysm, NGAL/Cr is a potentially useful early biomarker for AKI. PMID:25960881

  9. Transfemoral Valve-in-Valve Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) in a Patient With Previous Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR).

    PubMed

    Ruparelia, Neil; Panoulas, Vasileios F; Frame, Angela; Nathan, Anthony W; Ariff, Ben; Jaffer, Usman; Sutaria, Nilesh; Chukwuemeka, Andrew; Mikhail, Ghada W; Malik, Iqbal S

    2016-07-01

    A 90-year-old man presented with increasing exertional breathlessness. He had previous implantation of a Perimount bioprosthetic aortic valve (Edwards Lifesciences) and coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Due to severe transvalvular bioprosthetic regurgitation with preserved left ventricular dimensions and ejection fraction, the heart team decided on valve-in- valve transcatheter aortic valve implantation via the transfemoral route in view of the patient's prohibitively high surgical and anesthetic risk. The patient had an uncomplicated recovery and was symptomatically much improved at 3-month follow-up. PMID:27342209

  10. Hybrid repair of ruptured type B aortic dissection extending into an aberrant right subclavian artery in a patient with Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hamidian-Jahromi, Alireza; Carroll, Jonathan D; Doucet, Linda D; Zhang, Wayne W

    2013-11-01

    Turner's syndrome (TS) has been documented as the most common cause of aortic dissection in young women. However, little attention from vascular surgery has been paid to these patients. We report the first case of ruptured type B aortic dissection with aberrant right subclavian artery treated successfully with hybrid endovascular and open procedures in a patient with TS. Left carotid to subclavian artery bypass, thoracic endovascular aortic repair, and coil embolization of the aberrant right subclavian and left subclavian arteries were performed in an emergency setting. Literature on epidemiology, causes, and management options of acute aortic dissection in TS patients are reviewed and discussed. PMID:24011806

  11. Clinical, Microbiologic, and Outcome Analysis of Mycotic Aortic Aneurysm: The Role of Endovascular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yao-Kuang; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Lu, Ming-Shian; Tsai, Feng-Chun; Lin, Pyng-Ling; Wu, Chih-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mycotic aortic aneurysm (MAA) is an infrequent but devastating form of vascular disease. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study at a major medical center to identify independent risk factors for MAA and to provide opinions about treating it. The study population consisted of 43 patients who had had 44 MAAs over a period of 15 y. Results: All of the patients had positive blood cultures, radiologic findings typical of MAA, and clinical signs of infection (leukocytosis, fever, and elevated C-reactive protein). The mean age of the patients was 63.8±10.6 y and the mean period of their follow up was 35.7±39.3 mo. Twenty-nine patients with MAAs underwent traditional open surgery, 11 others received endovascular stent grafts, and four MAAs were managed conservatively. The most frequent causative pathogens were Salmonella (36/44 patients [81.8%]), in whom organisms of Salmonella serogroup C (consisting mainly of S. choleraesuis) were identified in 14 patients, organisms of Salmonella serogroup D were identified in 13 patients, and species without serogroup information were identified in nine patients. The overall mortality in the study population was 43.2% (with an aneurysm-related mortality of 18.2%, surgically related mortality of 13.6%, and in-hospital mortality of 22.7%). Conclusions: Shock is a risk factor for operative mortality. Misdiagnosis and treatment of MAA as low back pain, co-existing connective-tissue disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis, and Salmonella serogroup C-associated bacteremia are risk factors for aneurysm-related death. Endovascular repair should be considered as an alternative option to the open repair of MAA. PMID:24800865

  12. Automatic detection of selective arterial devices for advanced visualization during abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Simon; Kauffmann, Claude; Pfister, Marcus; Cloutier, Guy; Thérasse, Éric; de Guise, Jacques A; Soulez, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    Here we address the automatic segmentation of endovascular devices used in the endovascular repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) that deform vascular tissues. Using this approach, the vascular structure is automatically reshaped solving the issue of misregistration observed on 2D/3D image fusion for EVAR guidance. The endovascular devices we considered are the graduated pigtail catheter (PC) used for contrast injection and the stent-graft delivery device (DD). The segmentation of the DD was enhanced using an asymmetric Frangi filter. The segmented geometries were then analysed using their specific features to remove artefacts. The radiopaque markers of the PC were enhanced using a fusion of Hessian and newly introduced gradient norm shift filters. Extensive experiments were performed using a database of images taken during 28 AAA-EVAR interventions. This dataset was divided into two parts: the first half was used to optimize parameters and the second to compile performances using optimal values obtained. The radiopaque markers of the PC were detected with a sensitivity of 88.3% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 96%. The PC can therefore be positioned with a majority of its markers localized while the artefacts were all located inside the vessel lumen. The major parts of the DD, the dilatator tip and the pusher surfaces, were detected accurately with a sensitivity of 85.9% and a PPV of 88.7%. The less visible part of the DD, the stent enclosed within the sheath, was segmented with a sensitivity of 63.4% because the radiopacity of this region is low and uneven. The centreline of the DD in this stent region was alternatively traced within a 0.74 mm mean error. The automatic segmentation of endovascular devices during EVAR is feasible and accurate; it could be useful to perform elastic registration of the vascular lumen during endovascular repair. PMID:26362721

  13. Late Sac Behavior after Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Masahiro; Onohara, Toshihiro; Okamoto, Minoru; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Shimoe, Yasushi; Yamashita, Masafumi; Takahashi, Toshiki; Kishimoto, Jyunji; Mizuno, Akihiro; Kei, Junichi; Nakai, Mikizou; Sakaki, Masayuki; Suhara, Hitoshi; Kasashima, Fuminori; Endo, Masamitsu; Nishina, Takeshi; Furuyama, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Masakazu; Iwata, Keiji; Marumoto, Akira; Urata, Yasuhisa; Sato, Katsutoshi; Ryugo, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sac behavior after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is considered as a surrogate for the risk of late rupture. The purpose of the study is to assess the sac behavior of AAAs after EVAR. Methods and Results: Late sac enlargement (LSE) (≥5 mm) and late sac shrinkage (LSS) (≥5 mm) were analyzed in 589 consecutive patients who were registered at 14 national centers in Japan. The proportions of patients who had LSE at 1, 3 and 5 years were 2.6% ± 0.7%, 10.0% ± 1.6% and 19.0% ± 2.9%. The proportions of patients who had LSS at 1, 3 and 5 years were 50.1% ± 0.7%, 59.2% ± 2.3% and 61.7% ± 2.7%. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified two variables as a risk factor for LSE; persistent endoleak (Odds ratio 9.56 (4.84–19.49), P <0.001) and low platelet count (Odds ratio 0.92 (0.86–0.99), P = 0.0224). The leading cause of endoleak in patients with LSE was type II. Conclusions: The incidence of LSE is not negligible over 5 year period. Patients with persistent endoleak and/or low platelet count should carefully be observed for LSE. Clinical Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR (UMIN000008345). PMID:27375803

  14. The Preclose Technique in Percutaneous Endovascular Aortic Repair: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffan, Abdel Aziz A.; Prince, Ethan A.; Hampson, Christopher O.; Murphy, Timothy P.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To establish the efficacy and safety of the preclose technique in total percutaneous endovascular aortic repair (PEVAR).MethodsA systematic literature search of Medline database was conducted for series on PEVAR published between January 1999 and January 2012.ResultsThirty-six articles comprising 2,257 patients and 3,606 arterial accesses were included. Anatomical criteria used to exclude patients from undergoing PEVAR were not uniform across all series. The technical success rate was 94 % per arterial access. Failure was unilateral in the majority (93 %) of the 133 failed PEVAR cases. The groin complication rate in PEVAR was 3.6 %; a minority (1.6 %) of these groin complications required open surgery. The groin complication rate in failed PEVAR cases converted to groin cutdown was 6.1 %. A significantly higher technical success rate was achieved when arterial access was performed via ultrasound guidance. Technical failure rate was significantly higher with larger sheath size ({>=}20F). Conclusion. The preclose technique in PEVAR has a high technical success rate and a low groin complication rate. Technical success tends to increase with ultrasound-guided arterial access and decrease with larger access. When failure occurs, it is unilateral in the majority of cases, and conversion to surgical cutdown does not appear to increase the operative risk.

  15. Percutaneous Treatment of Sac Rupture in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagana, Domenico Mangini, Monica Fontana, Federico; Nicotera, Paolo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of percutaneous endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) previously treated by EVAR. In the last year, two male patients with AAAs, treated 8 and 23 months ago with bifurcated stent-graft, were observed because of lumbar pain and hemorragic shock. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) showed a retroperitoneal hematoma; in both cases a type III endoleak was detected, in one case associated with a type II endoleak from the iliolumbar artery. The procedures were performed in the theater, in emergency. Type II endoleak was treated with transcatheter superselective glue injection; type III endoleaks were excluded by a stent-graft extension. The procedures were successful in both patients, with immediate hemodynamic stabilization. MDCT after the procedure showed complete exclusion of the aneurysms. In conclusion, endovascular treatment is a safe and feasible option for the treatment of ruptured AAAs previously treated by EVAR; this approach allows avoidance of surgical conversion, which is technical very challenging, with a high morbidity and mortality rate.

  16. Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Effectiveness of Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Nevala, Terhi; Biancari, Fausto; Manninen, Hannu; Aho, Pekka-Sakari; Matsi, Pekka; Maekinen, Kimmo; Roth, Wolf-Dieter; Yloenen, Kari; Lepaentalo, Mauri; Peraelae, Jukka

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to report our experience in treating type II endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Two hundred eighteen patients underwent EVAR with a Zenith stent-graft from January 2000 to December 2005. During a follow-up period of 4.5 {+-} 2.3 years, solely type II endoleak was detected in 47 patients (22%), and 14 of them underwent secondary interventions to correct this condition. Ten patients had transarterial embolization, and four patients had translumbar/transabdominal embolization. The embolization materials used were coils, thrombin, gelatin, Onyx (ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer), and glue. Disappearance of the endoleak without enlargement of the aneurysm sac after the first secondary intervention was achieved in only five of these patients (5/13). One patient without surveillance imaging was excluded from analyses of clinical success. After additional interventions in four patients and the spontaneous disappearance of type II endoleak in two patients, overall clinical success was achieved in eight patients (8/12). One patient did not have surveillance imaging after the second secondary intervention. Clinical success after the first secondary intervention was achieved in two patients (2/9) in the transarterial embolization group and three patients (3/4) in the translumbar embolization group. The results of secondary interventions for type II endoleak are unsatisfactory. Although the small number of patients included in this study prevents reliable comparisons between groups, the results seem to favor direct translumbar embolization in comparison to transarterial embolization.

  17. Preoperative Predictors of Long-Term Mortality after Elective Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Saya; Kudo, Toshifumi; Inoue, Yoshinori; Akaza, Miho; Sasano, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to clarify long-term mortality and its predictors in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Materials and Methods: Patients with AAA who underwent elective EVAR at Tokyo Medical and Dental University hospital between 2008 and 2011 were reviewed. The patients’ data were retrospectively collected from medical records. Results: Sixty-four patients were identified for this study. In long-term follow-up, the survival rate was significantly lower in patients with high preoperative C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Patients with obstructive lung disease (FEV1/FVC <70%) or anemia tended to have a poorer prognosis but the association was not statistically significant. Age, concurrent hyperlipidemia, and blood pressure levels were not predictors of mortality rates. Discussion: High CRP level, COPD, and anemia reflect inflammation, which is associated with the pathogenesis of AAA. These inflammatory markers are predictors of long-term mortality after EVAR for AAA as well as for other diseases. Conclusions: A high preoperative CRP level was a predictor of increased long-term mortality in patients with AAA who underwent EVAR. No specific leading causes of death were identified for this increase in the mortality rate. PMID:27087872

  18. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Yuya Nishimura, Jun-ichi Hase, Soichiro Yamasaki, Motoshige

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  19. Endovascular strategy or open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: one-year outcomes from the IMPROVE randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Bruce; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hassan, Tajek B.; Hinchliffe, Robert; Howell, Simon; Moore, Fionna; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Soong, Chee V.; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Heatley, Francine; Anjum, Aisha; Kalinowska, Gosia; Sweeting, Michael J.; Thompson, Simon G.; Gomes, Manuel; Grieve, Richard; Powell, Janet T.; Ashleigh, Ray; Gomes, Manuel; Greenhalgh, Roger M.; Grieve, Richard; Hinchliffe, Robert; Sweeting, Michael; Thompson, Matt M.; Thompson, Simon G.; Ulug, Pinar; Roberts, Ian; Bell, Peter R. F.; Cheetham, Anne; Stephany, Jenny; Warlow, Charles; Lamont, Peter; Moss, Jonathan; Tijssen, Jan; Braithwaite, Bruce; Nicholson, Anthony A.; Thompson, Matthew; Ashleigh, Ray; Thompson, Luke; Cheshire, Nicholas J.; Boyle, Jonathan R.; Serracino-Inglott, Ferdinand; Thompson, Matt M.; Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Bell, Rachel; Wilson, Noel; Bown, Matt; Dennis, Martin; Davis, Meryl; Ashleigh, Ray; Howell, Simon; Wyatt, Michael G.; Valenti, Domenico; Bachoo, Paul; Walker, Paul; MacSweeney, Shane; Davies, Jonathan N.; Rittoo, Dynesh; Parvin, Simon D.; Yusuf, Waquar; Nice, Colin; Chetter, Ian; Howard, Adam; Chong, Patrick; Bhat, Raj; McLain, David; Gordon, Andrew; Lane, Ian; Hobbs, Simon; Pillay, Woolagasen; Rowlands, Timothy; El-Tahir, Amin; Asquith, John; Cavanagh, Steve; Dubois, Luc; Forbes, Thomas L.; Ashworth, Emily; Baker, Sara; Barakat, Hashem; Brady, Claire; Brown, Joanne; Bufton, Christine; Chance, Tina; Chrisopoulou, Angela; Cockell, Marie; Croucher, Andrea; Dabee, Leela; Dewhirst, Nikki; Evans, Jo; Gibson, Andy; Gorst, Siobhan; Gough, Moira; Graves, Lynne; Griffin, Michelle; Hatfield, Josie; Hogg, Florence; Howard, Susannah; Hughes, Cían; Metcalfe, David; Lapworth, Michelle; Massey, Ian; Novick, Teresa; Owen, Gareth; Parr, Noala; Pintar, David; Spencer, Sarah; Thomson, Claire; Thunder, Orla; Wallace, Tom; Ward, Sue; Wealleans, Vera; Wilson, Lesley; Woods, Janet; Zheng, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Aims To report the longer term outcomes following either a strategy of endovascular repair first or open repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, which are necessary for both patient and clinical decision-making. Methods and results This pragmatic multicentre (29 UK and 1 Canada) trial randomized 613 patients with a clinical diagnosis of ruptured aneurysm; 316 to an endovascular first strategy (if aortic morphology is suitable, open repair if not) and 297 to open repair. The principal 1-year outcome was mortality; secondary outcomes were re-interventions, hospital discharge, health-related quality-of-life (QoL) (EQ-5D), costs, Quality-Adjusted-Life-Years (QALYs), and cost-effectiveness [incremental net benefit (INB)]. At 1 year, all-cause mortality was 41.1% for the endovascular strategy group and 45.1% for the open repair group, odds ratio 0.85 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.62, 1.17], P = 0.325, with similar re-intervention rates in each group. The endovascular strategy group and open repair groups had average total hospital stays of 17 and 26 days, respectively, P < 0.001. Patients surviving rupture had higher average EQ-5D utility scores in the endovascular strategy vs. open repair groups, mean differences 0.087 (95% CI 0.017, 0.158), 0.068 (95% CI −0.004, 0.140) at 3 and 12 months, respectively. There were indications that QALYs were higher and costs lower for the endovascular first strategy, combining to give an INB of £3877 (95% CI £253, £7408) or €4356 (95% CI €284, €8323). Conclusion An endovascular first strategy for management of ruptured aneurysms does not offer a survival benefit over 1 year but offers patients faster discharge with better QoL and is cost-effective. Clinical trial registration ISRCTN 48334791. PMID:25855369

  20. Restrictive versus Standard Fluid Regimen in Elective Minilaparotomy Abdominal Aortic Repair-Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Piljic, Dragan; Petricevic, Mate; Piljic, Dilista; Ksela, Jus; Robic, Boris; Klokocovnik, Tomislav

    2016-06-01

    Objective Elective minilaparotomy abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is associated with a significant number of complications involving respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems, with mortality ranging up to 5%. In our study, we tested the hypothesis that intra- and postoperative intravenous restrictive fluid regimen reduces postoperative morbidity and mortality, and improves the outcome of minilaparotomy AAA repair. Methods From March 2009 to July 2013, 60 patients operated due to AAA were included in a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT). About the administration of fluid during the operation and in the early postoperative period, all the patients were randomized into two groups: the group of standard fluid administration (S-group, 30 patients) and the group of reduced fluid administration (R-group, 30 patients). The verification of the treatment success was measured by the length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, duration of hospitalization after the procedure, as well as the number and type of postoperative complications and mortality. This prospective RCT was registered in a publicly accessible database ClinicalTrials.gov with unique Identifier ID: NTC01939652. Results Total fluid administration and administration of blood products were significantly lower in R-group as compared with S-group (2,445.5 mL vs. 3308.7 mL, p = 0.004). Though the number of nonlethal complications was significantly lower in R-group (2 vs. 9 patients, p = 0.042), the difference in lethal complications remained nonsignificant (0 vs. 1 patient, p = ns). The average ICU stay (1.2 vs. 1.97 days, p = 0.003) and duration of postoperative hospital stay (4.33 vs. 6.20 days, p = 0.035 for R-group and S-group, respectively) were found to be significantly shorter in R-group. Conclusion Intra- and postoperative restrictive intravenous fluid regimen in patients undergoing minilaparotomy AAA repair significantly reduces

  1. Diagnostic Value of Prospective Electrocardiogram-triggered Dual-source Computed Tomography Angiography for Infants and Children with Interrupted Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Ou; Wang, Xi-Ming; Nie, Pei; Ji, Xiao-Peng; Cheng, Zhao-Ping; Chen, Jiu-Hong; Xu, Zhuo-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate assessment of intra- as well as extra-cardiac malformations and radiation dosage concerns are especially crucial to infants and children with interrupted aortic arch (IAA). The purpose of this study is to investigate the value of prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) angiography with low-dosage techniques in the diagnosis of IAA. Methods: Thirteen patients with suspected IAA underwent prospective ECG-triggered DSCT scan and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). Surgery was performed on all the patients. A five-point scale was used to assess image quality. The diagnostic accuracy of DSCT angiography and TTE was compared with the surgical findings as the reference standard. A nonparametric Chi-square test was used for comparative analysis. P <0.05 was considered as a significant difference. The mean effective radiation dose (ED) was calculated. Results: Diagnostic DSCT images were obtained for all the patients. Thirteen IAA cases with 60 separate cardiovascular anomalies were confirmed by surgical findings. The diagnostic accuracy of TTE and DSCT for total cardiovascular malformations was 93.7% and 97.9% (P > 0.05), and that for extra-cardiac vascular malformations was 92.3% and 99.0% (P < 0.05), respectively. The mean score of image quality was 3.77 ± 0.83. The mean ED was 0.30 ± 0.04 mSv (range from 0.23 mSv to 0.39 mSv). Conclusions: In infants and children with IAA, prospective ECG-triggered DSCT with low radiation exposure and high diagnostic efficiency has higher accuracy compared to TTE in detection of extra-cardiac vascular anomalies. PMID:25947401

  2. Arterial Stiffness Alterations and Inflammatory Response Following Endovascular Aortic Repair: Based on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19-23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA).

    PubMed

    Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Mylonas, Spyridon N; Kakisis, John; Kadoglou, Nikolaos P E; Papadakis, Ioannis; Sfyroeras, George S; Antonopoulos, Constantine C N; Mantas, George; Ikonomidis, Ignatios; Liapis, Christos D

    2015-04-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and thoracic aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) have been widely incorporated into clinical practice. However, changes in arterial stiffness and post-implantation syndrome after aortic endografting remain important issues under investigation. The aneurysm sac wall motion after successful EVAR and TEVAR reflects complex interactions between all the components of the excluded aneurysm, including true compliance of the aneurysm wall itself, intra-aneurysm sac pressure, remodeling of the thrombus, and mechanical characteristics of the endograft. Experimental and clinical studies have shown that aortic endografting results in increased arterial stiffness in animal models. It can be assumed that the alterations of aortic mechanical properties can have a direct impact on heart output. The long-term impact of these mechanical changes on cardiovascular outcomes and the potential effects of different endografts on hemodynamics are important issues under investigation. Post-implantation syndrome (PIS) is a systemic inflammatory response frequently observed after endovascular treatment of aortic pathologies. The main features of PIS include fever, leukocytosis, elevated C-reactive protein levels, and coagulation disturbances. Endograft design appears to influence this inflammatory response following aortic endografting; woven polyester endografts have been shown to be associated with greater inflammatory response compared to PTFE stent grafts. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature to elucidate arterial stiffness alterations and inflammatory response after EVAR and TEVAR and the impact of endograft design on aortic stiffness and the post-inflammatory response. PMID:26798761

  3. [The staged approach--an overview on a strategy to reduce spinal cord injury in thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair].

    PubMed

    Kari, F A; Brenner, R M; Müller, C S; Griepp, R B; Bischoff, M S

    2013-10-01

    The spinal cord is particularly susceptible to ischaemic injury following repair of extensive descending thoracic and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA). For the past decade, the Mount Sinai group in New York has intensively studied the anatomy of the extensive vascular network surrounding the spinal cord, as well as its dynamic morphology in response to decreased blood pressure and flow. Along with clinical data, experimental findings gave rise to the Collateral Network Concept, by which spinal cord injury in open TAAA repair can be significantly reduced. With the more recent widespread use of endovascular repair, strategies to prevent ischaemic spinal cord damage after extensive segmental artery sacrifice/occlusion are still evolving. The hypothesis that dividing extensive aneurysm repair into two steps may mitigate the impact of diminished blood flow to the collateral network has led to a recently conducted series of staged repair experiments. By exploiting the resources of the collateral network, spinal cord injury could be minimised in staged open, as well as in staged hybrid repair and seems equally adoptable for endovascular procedures. The contribution presented herein provides an overview of clinical and experimental studies on the staged approach. Furthermore, it briefly assesses the anatomic rationale for the collateral network concept. PMID:23460105

  4. Intraoperative Treatment of Fetal Asystole After Endovascular Repair of Aortic Coarctation in a Pregnant Woman with Mitral Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Laleh; Delgado Upegui, Carlos; Ferreira, Renata; Simmons, Lavonne; Ciliberto, Christopher

    2016-03-15

    A G1P0 woman with aortic coarctation and mitral valve stenosis underwent endovascular aortic repair with continuous fetal monitoring during the 20th week of pregnancy. On tracheal extubation, an episode of fetal asystole followed by fetal bradycardia was identified. Ephedrine, nitroglycerin, and terbutaline were administered for intrauterine fetal resuscitation. Subsequently, the patient developed hypertension and pulmonary edema, which were treated with furosemide and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. The fetal heart rate normalized. We conclude that intraoperative monitoring of a previable fetus may aid in optimizing maternal hemodynamics. Before performing interventional procedures in pregnant women, a multidisciplinary team should discuss the goals of neonatal care should adverse fetal events be detected. PMID:26669649

  5. Clinical safety and efficacy of a next-generation stent-graft device for thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Eggebrecht, Holger; Schmermund, Axel; Voigtländer, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair has significantly improved the treatment of patients with acute and chronic diseases of the descending thoracic aorta. Retrograde transarterial implantation of a membrane-covered stent graft aims at excluding the aortic pathology at risk for complications (e.g., aneurysm, dissection) from the circulation to prevent expansion and ultimately rupture. Today, several stent grafts from different manufacturers are approved by the respective authorities and thus commercially available. The Medtronic Talent® stent graft used to be one of the initially available devices and has been broadly used to become the world-wide market leader at its time. In 2005, it has been replaced by the second-generation Medtronic Valiant® device, which features several technical improvements. In this article, we evaluate a recent publication investigating the clinical performance of this second-generation stent graft device, and discuss the results in the view of the current literature and developments. PMID:23259442

  6. Risk Factor Analysis for Buttock Claudication after Internal Iliac Artery Embolization with Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hye Ryeon; Park, Ki Hyuk; Lee, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) involving the common iliac artery requires extension of the stent-graft limb into the external iliac artery. For this procedure, internal iliac artery (IIA) embolization is performed to prevent type II endoleak. In this study, we investigated the frequency and risk factor of buttock claudication (BC) in patients having interventional embolization of the IIA. Materials and Methods: From January 2010 to December 2013, a total of 110 patients with AAA were treated with EVAR in our institution. This study included 27 patients (24.5%) who had undergone unilateral IIA coil embolization with EVAR. We examined hospital charts retrospectively and interviewed by telephone for the occurrence of BC. Results: Mean age of total patients was 71.9±7.0 years and 88.9% were males. During a mean follow-up of 8.65±9.04 months, the incidence of BC was 40.7% (11 of 27 patients). In 8 patients with claudication, the symptoms had resolved within 1 month of IIA embolization, but the symptoms persisted for more than 6 months in the remaining 3 patients. In univariate and multivariate analysis, risk factors such as age, sex, comorbidity, patency of collateral arteries, and anatomical characteristics of AAA were not significantly related with BC. Conclusion: In this study, BC was a frequent complication of IIA embolization during EVAR and there was no associated risk factor. Certain principles such as checking preoperative angiogram, proximal and unilateral IIA embolization may have contributed to reducing the incidence of BC. PMID:27386451

  7. Outcomes of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair in Kidney Transplant Recipients: Results From a National Quality Initiative.

    PubMed

    Bostock, I C; Zarkowsky, D S; Hicks, C W; Stone, D H; Eslami, M H; Malas, M B; Goodney, P P

    2016-08-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) can have devastating consequences. The Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) database was queried to select all KTRs who underwent EVAR between January 2003 and December 2014. Our primary outcome was renal dysfunction, defined as acute kidney injury (AKI; elevation of serum creatinine >0.5 mg/dL from baseline) or new postoperative hemodialysis requirement. Within the EVAR VQI dataset, 40 patients were KTRs (40 of 17 213, or 0.2%). Renal dysfunction occurred in five of 40 patients in the KTR group in comparison to 779 of 17 173 patients in the nontransplanted group (12.5% versus 4.5%, p < 0.01). Emergent EVAR was required in 2 (5%) patients, one of whom required dialysis after surgery and subsequently died. One-year survival after EVAR was similar in the two groups (92.9% versus 93.1%, p = 0.73). KTRs who developed renal dysfunction had significantly lower preoperative estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) (29.5 versus 54.7, p = 0.007) and a significantly higher iodine:eGFR ratio (0.78 versus 0.39, p = 0.02) despite receiving a similar volume of contrast (70.0 versus 68.8, p = 0.97). Renal dysfunction is 3 times more frequent in KTRs treated with EVAR, though overall survival did not differ between the groups. Decreased preoperative eGFR and a higher iodine:eGFR ratio are associated with postoperative renal dysfunction. PMID:26813253

  8. Endovascular Repair of a Type III Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Occlusion of Visceral Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Katsargyris, Athanasios; Giannopoulos, Athanasios; Georgopoulos, Sotiris; Tsigris, Chris; Michail, Othon; Marinos, George; Bastounis, Elias

    2007-07-15

    The successful endovascular repair of a type III thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) with the use of a tube endograft is reported. A 56-year-old male with a 6.4-cm type III TAAA, a 4.2-cm infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm, and chronic renal insufficiency presented with flank pain, nausea, acute anuria, and serum creatinine of 6.1 mg/dl. Acute occlusion of the left solitary renal artery was diagnosed and emergent recanalization with percutaneus transluminal angioplasty and stenting was performed successfully, with reversal of the serum creatinine level at 1.6 mg/dl. Further imaging studies for TAAA management revealed ostial occlusion of both the celiac artery (CA) and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) but a hypertrophic inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) providing retrograde flow to the aforementioned vessels. This rare anatomic serendipity allowed us to repair the TAAA simply by using a two-component tube endograft without fenestrations (Zenith; William Cook, Bjaeverskov, Denmark) that covered the entire length of the aneurysm, including the CA and SMA origins, since a natural arterial bypass from the IMA to the CA and SMA already existed, affording protection from gastrointestinal ischemic complications. The patient had a fast and uneventful recovery and is currently doing well 6 months after the procedure. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the English literature of successful endovascular repair of a TAAA involving visceral arteries with the simple use of a tube endograft.

  9. Reduction of aneurysm pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Marston, W A; Criado, E; Baird, C A; Keagy, B A

    1996-03-01

    A canine model was designed to evaluate the changes in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pressure and wall stress after endovascular repair. Eight canines underwent laparotomy and creation of an AAA. The aneurysm was then excluded with a transluminally placed endovascular graft (TPEG) inserted through the right femoral artery and deployed across the AAA to exclude the infrarenal aortic branches from aortic perfusion. Blood pressure and flow data were recorded for 6 hours. The AAA blood pressure decreased from 135 +/- 9.3 mm Hg before exclusion to 45 +/- 17.6 mm Hg at 10 minutes after exclusion (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, AAA blood pressure had declined further to 26 +/- 12.5 mm Hg. Blood flow in the excluded iliac artery decreased from a baseline of 242 +/- 58 ml/min to 41 +/- 29 ml/min 10 minutes after TPEG placement (p < 0.001). At 6 hours, flow was reduced to 12 +/- 3.5 ml/min (p < 0.05 compared with that at 10 minutes). Aortic wall stress was significantly reduced by TPEG placement but was only slightly lower than baseline aortic wall stress before AAA creation. The lumbar arteries were patent with retrograde flow in all cases and were found to be the major contributors to postexclusion aneurysm pressure. Endovascular AAA exclusion results in an immediate decrease in blood pressure and wall stress within the excluded aneurysm, but the aneurysm remains perfused by retrograde flow through the lumbar arteries, which resulted in near-baseline levels of aneurysm wall stress in this canine model. Embolization of patient lumbar vessels at prosthesis placement may further reduce the risk of late rupture. PMID:8733869

  10. Iatrogenic ascending aortic dissection following cannulation for arterial return and for infusion of cardioplegic solution: Prevention and repair

    PubMed Central

    Ugorji, Clement C.; Cooley, Denton A.; Norman, John C.

    1980-01-01

    Two patients are presented in whom dissection of the ascending aorta resulted from cannulation for arterial return and from the infusion of cardioplegic solution. The dissections were recognized promptly. Following dissection in the first patient, the femoral artery was used to reestablish systemic perfusion. The aortic valve and dissected ascending aorta were replaced, and three vessels were grafted. In the second patient, the dissected anterior wall of the ascending aorta was excised and replaced with a low-porosity Dacron patch into which the proximal aortocoronary anastomoses were inserted. Predisposing factors are discussed, along with preventive measures and methods of repair. PMID:15216287

  11. Three Dimensional Fusion CT Decreases Radiation Exposure, Procedure Time and Contrast Use during Fenestrated Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Michael M.; Scali, Salvatore T.; Feezor, Robert J.; Neal, Daniel; Huber, Thomas S.; Beck, Adam W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Endovascular surgery has revolutionized the treatment of aortic aneurysms; however these improvements have come at the cost of increased radiation and contrast exposure, particularly for more complex procedures. Three dimensional (3D) fusion computed tomographic (CT) imaging is a new technology that may facilitate these repairs. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the impact of utilizing intraoperative 3D fusion CT on performance of fenestrated endovascular aortic repair. Methods A review of our institutional database was performed to identify patients undergoing fenestrated/branched endovascular aortic repair (FEVAR). Subjects treated using 3D fusion CT were compared to patients treated in the immediate 12-month period prior to implementation of this technology when procedures were performed in a standard hybrid operating room without CT fusion capabilities. Primary endpoints included patient radiation exposure (air kerma area product: milliGray; mGy*cm2), fluoroscopy time (minutes; min), contrast usage (mL) and procedure time (min). Patients were grouped by number of aortic graft fenestrations revascularized with a stentgraft and operative outcomes were compared. Results A total of 72 patients (N = 41 before vs. N = 31 after 3D fusion CT implementation) underwent FEVAR from September 2012 through March 2014. For 2-vessel fenestrated endografts, there was a significant decrease in radiation exposure (3400±1900 vs. 1380±520 mGy*cm2; P=.001), fluoroscopy time (63±29 vs. 41±11min; P=.02), and contrast usage (69±16 vs. 26±8 mL; P=.0002) with intraoperative 3D fusion CT. Similarly, for combined 3 and 4-vessel FEVAR, significantly decreased radiation exposure (5400±2225 vs. 2700±1400 mGy*cm2; P<.0001), fluoroscopy time (89±36 vs 6±21min; P=.02), contrast usage (90±25 vs. 39±17mL; P<.0001), as well as procedure time (330±100 vs. 230±50min; P=.002) was noted. Estimated blood loss was significantly less (P<.0001) and length of stay had a

  12. Using machine learning methods for predicting inhospital mortality in patients undergoing open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Monsalve-Torra, Ana; Ruiz-Fernandez, Daniel; Marin-Alonso, Oscar; Soriano-Payá, Antonio; Camacho-Mackenzie, Jaime; Carreño-Jaimes, Marisol

    2016-08-01

    An abdominal aortic aneurysm is an abnormal dilatation of the aortic vessel at abdominal level. This disease presents high rate of mortality and complications causing a decrease in the quality of life and increasing the cost of treatment. To estimate the mortality risk of patients undergoing surgery is complex due to the variables associated. The use of clinical decision support systems based on machine learning could help medical staff to improve the results of surgery and get a better understanding of the disease. In this work, the authors present a predictive system of inhospital mortality in patients who were undergoing to open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Different methods as multilayer perceptron, radial basis function and Bayesian networks are used. Results are measured in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the classifiers, achieving an accuracy higher than 95%. The developing of a system based on the algorithms tested can be useful for medical staff in order to make a better planning of care and reducing undesirable surgery results and the cost of the post-surgical treatments. PMID:27395372

  13. Update in the management of type B aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Foeke Jh; Trimarchi, Santi; Kamman, Arnoud V; Moll, Frans L; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Patel, Himanshu J; Figueroa, C Alberto; Eagle, Kim A; Froehlich, James B

    2016-06-01

    Stanford type B aortic dissection (TBAD) is a life-threatening aortic disease. The initial management goal is to prevent aortic rupture, propagation of the dissection, and symptoms by reducing the heart rate and blood pressure. Uncomplicated TBAD patients require prompt medical management to prevent aortic dilatation or rupture during subsequent follow-up. Complicated TBAD patients require immediate invasive management to prevent death or injury caused by rupture or malperfusion. Recent developments in diagnosis and management have reduced mortality related to TBAD considerably. In particular, the introduction of thoracic stent-grafts has shifted the management from surgical to endovascular repair, contributing to a fourfold increase in early survival in complicated TBAD. Furthermore, endovascular repair is now considered in some uncomplicated TBAD patients in addition to optimal medical therapy. For more challenging aortic dissection patients with involvement of the aortic arch, hybrid approaches, combining open and endovascular repair, have had promising results. Regardless of the chosen management strategy, strict antihypertensive control should be administered to all TBAD patients in addition to close imaging surveillance. Future developments in stent-graft design, medical therapy, surgical and hybrid techniques, imaging, and genetic screening may improve the outcomes of TBAD patients even further. We present a comprehensive review of the recommended management strategy based on current evidence in the literature. PMID:27067136

  14. Early sac shrinkage predicts a low risk of late complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Bastos Gonçalves, F; Baderkhan, H; Verhagen, H J M; Wanhainen, A; Björck, M; Stolker, R J; Hoeks, S E; Mani, K

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysm shrinkage has been proposed as a marker of successful endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Patients with early postoperative shrinkage may experience fewer subsequent complications, and consequently require less intensive surveillance. Methods Patients undergoing EVAR from 2000 to 2011 at three vascular centres (in 2 countries), who had two imaging examinations (postoperative and after 6–18 months), were included. Maximum diameter, complications and secondary interventions during follow-up were registered. Patients were categorized according to early sac dynamics. The primary endpoint was freedom from late complications. Secondary endpoints were freedom from secondary intervention, postimplant rupture and direct (type I/III) endoleaks. Results Some 597 EVARs (71·1 per cent of all EVARs) were included. No shrinkage was observed in 284 patients (47·6 per cent), moderate shrinkage (5–9 mm) in 142 (23·8 per cent) and major shrinkage (at least 10 mm) in 171 patients (28·6 per cent). Four years after the index imaging, the rate of freedom from complications was 84·3 (95 per cent confidence interval 78·7 to 89·8), 88·1 (80·6 to 95·5) and 94·4 (90·1 to 98·7) per cent respectively. No shrinkage was an independent risk factor for late complications compared with major shrinkage (hazard ratio (HR) 3·11; P < 0·001). Moderate compared with major shrinkage (HR 2·10; P = 0·022), early postoperative complications (HR 3·34; P < 0·001) and increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm baseline diameter (HR 1·02; P = 0·001) were also risk factors for late complications. Freedom from secondary interventions and direct endoleaks was greater for patients with major sac shrinkage. Conclusion Early change in aneurysm sac diameter is a strong predictor of late complications after EVAR. Patients with major sac shrinkage have a very low risk of complications for up to 5 years. This parameter may be used to tailor postoperative surveillance. PMID:24752772

  15. Atenolol vs enalapril in young hypertensive patients after successful repair of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, G; Castaldi, B; Gala, S; Baldini, L; Del Gaizo, F; D'Aiello, F A; Mormile, A; Rea, A; Scognamiglio, G; Pacileo, G; Keating, S; Fadel, B M; Berrino, L; Perna, A; Russo, M G; Calabrò, R

    2016-06-01

    Late arterial hypertension has been identified as a major predictor for morbidity and mortality in aortic coarctation (AoC) patients. Few data are available about efficacy and tolerability of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors vs beta-blockers in young AoC patients. This study aimed to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy on 24-h blood pressure (BP) and left ventricular mass/height(2.7) (LVMI), of atenolol vs enalapril. We enrolled consecutive AoC hypertensive patients with (a) no history of BP treatment or after >48 h of withdrawn, (b) aged 6-20 years, (c) body mass index (BMI) <90th percentile for age and sex, (d) >12 months from a successful AoC repair and (e) no major associated cardiovascular abnormalities. All patient were evaluated with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring, standard echocardiography, strain-strain rate imaging, at enrolment, 3, 6 and 12 months of treatment. We studied 51 AoC patients (13±3.9 years, BMI: 21.4±4.3 kg m(-2)). Patients were randomly assigned at atenolol treatment (n=26), or enalapril treatment (n=25). The mean follow-up duration was 11±2 months. Both drugs were able to significantly reduce 24-systolic BP (SBP; atenolol: 133±11 mm Hg vs 124±16 mm Hg, P=0.016; enalapril: 135±6 mm Hg vs 127±7 mm Hg, P=0.001). Only enalapril was able to significantly reduce LVMI (47±12  vs 39.6±10 g m(-)(2.7), P=0.016). Only in atenolol group in two cases (7.7%) drug withdrawal was needed because of adverse events. Enalapril and atenolol are similarly effective in reducing SBP. However, only enalapril demonstrated a significant reduction of LVMI. In no case, enalapril was stopped because of adverse events. PMID:26290275

  16. Outcome of Renal Stenting for Renal Artery Coverage During Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Hiramoto, Jade S.; Chang, Catherine K.; Reilly, Linda M.; Schneider, Darren B.; Rapp, Joseph H.; Chuter, Timothy A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the outcome of adjunctive renal artery stenting for renal artery coverage at the time of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR). Methods Between 8/2000 to 8/2008, 29 patients underwent elective EVAR using bifurcated Zenith stent-grafts and simultaneous renal artery stenting. Renal artery stenting during EVAR was performed with endograft “encroachment” on the renal artery ostium (n = 23) or placement of a renal stent parallel to the main body of the endograft (“snorkel”, n = 8). Follow-up included routine contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT), multi-view abdominal x-rays, and creatinine measurement at 1, 6, and 12 months, and then yearly thereafter. Results 31 renal arteries were stented successfully in 29 patients. All patients with planned renal artery stent placement (n=18) had a proximal neck length < 15mm. Mean proximal neck length was shorter in patients who underwent the “snorkel” technique (6.9 ± 3.1 mm) compared to those with planned endograft encroachment (9.9 ± 2.6 mm). None of the patients with unplanned endograft encroachment had neck lengths < 15mm (mean length: 26.3±10.2 mm). Mean proximal neck angulation was 42.8 ± 24.0 degrees and did not differ between the groups. One patient had a type I endoleak on completion angiography, and 2 additional patients had a type I endoleak on the first postoperative CT scan. All type I endoleaks resolved by the one-month postoperative CT scan. Primary-assisted patency of renal artery stents was 100% at a median follow-up of 12.5 months (range 2 days to 77.4 months). One patient had near occlusion of a renal artery stent noted on follow-up CT scan at 9 months; patency was restored by placement of an additional stent. One patient required dialysis following sustained hypotension from a right external iliac artery injury which resulted in prolonged post-operative bleeding. Mean creatinine at baseline was 1.1 ± 0.3 mg/dl, 1.2 ± 0.5 mg/dl at 1 month follow

  17. Endovascular stent-graft repair of spontaneous aorto-caval fistula secondary to a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: An emergency management of hostile anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingyuan; Wang, Haofu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Although endovascular aneurysm repair of aorto-caval fistula offers a safe and efficient approach compared to traditional open repair, endovascular techniques for the treatment of aorto-caval fistula with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms in emergency circumstance are not well established. This study aims to evaluate the effect of endovascular repair of aorto-caval fistula of a patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and hostile anatomy. Methods: we report a case of an aorto-caval fistula endovascular repaired in a 78-year-old male using a hybrid stent-graft technique. Results: The patient had an uneventful recovery and CTA follow up showed no sign of ACF or any endoleak. Conclusion: This case highlights ACF might be managed by composite endograft implantation with careful and solid sealing of anchoring zones on the two sides. PMID:27489717

  18. Syphilitic aortic aneurysm presenting with upper airway obstruction.

    PubMed

    Waikittipong, Somchai

    2012-10-01

    Syphilitic aortic aneurysms are uncommon today. A rare case of syphilitic aortic arch aneurysm with successful surgical treatment is reported. A 42-year-old man presented with upper airway obstruction. Chest radiography showed a superior mediastinal mass, and computed tomography revealed a large saccular aortic arch aneurysm that compressed the trachea. Dacron graft replacement of the aortic arch was successfully performed under circulatory arrest with antegrade cerebral perfusion. PMID:23087303

  19. Seventeen Years’ Experience of Late Open Surgical Conversion after Failed Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair with 13 Variant Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ziheng; Xu, Liang; Qu, Lefeng; Raithel, Dieter

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo investigate the causes and results of late open surgical conversion (LOSC) after failed abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to summarize our 17 years’ experience with 13 various endografts.MethodsRetrospective data from August 1994 to January 2011 were analyzed at our center. The various devices’ implant time, the types of devices, the rates and causes of LOSC, and the procedures and results of LOSC were analyzed and evaluated.ResultsA total of 1729 endovascular aneurysm repairs were performed in our single center (Nuremberg South Hospital) with 13 various devices within 17 years. The median follow-up period was 51 months (range 9–119 months). Among them, 77 patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms received LOSC. The LOSC rate was 4.5 % (77 of 1729). The LOSC rates were significantly different before and after January 2002 (p < 0.001). The reasons of LOSC were mainly large type I endoleaks (n = 51) that were hard to repair by endovascular techniques. For the LOSC procedure, 71 cases were elective and 6 were emergent. The perioperative mortality was 5.2 % (4 of 77): 1 was elective (due to septic shock) and 3 were urgent (due to hemorrhagic shock).ConclusionLarge type I endoleaks were the main reasons for LOSC. The improvement of devices and operators’ experience may decrease the LOSC rate. Urgent LOSC resulted in a high mortality rate, while selective LOSC was relatively safe with significantly lower mortality rate. Early intervention, full preparation, and timely LOSC are important for patients who require LOSC.

  20. Study Design of PROCEDURE Study. A Randomized Comparison of the Dose-Dependent Effects of Pitavastatin in Patients with Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Massive Aortic Atheroma: Prevention of Cholesterol Embolization during Endovascular and Open Aneurysm Repair with Pitavastatin (PROCEDURE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Masaru; Hashimoto, Takuya; Miura, Sumio; Urabe, Go; Nakazawa, Tatsu; Hosaka, Akihiro; Kato, Masaaki; Ohkubo, Nobukazu; Miyairi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Miyata, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair have improved in the 2 decades since the emergence of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). However, EVAR is considered a contraindication for shaggy aorta because of the high risk of shower embolization. Recently, statins have been implicated in preventing embolization in patients with shaggy aorta via its pleiotropic effects, including atheroma reduction and coronary artery stabilization. We selected pitavastatin, a statin with potent effects, discovered and developed by a Japanese company because it has shown excellent pleiotropic effects on atheromatous arteries in the Japanese population. A randomized comparison study of dose-dependent effects of pitavastatin in patients with AAA with massive atheromatous aortic thrombus (PROCEDURE study) has begun. PROCEDURE has an enrollment goal of up to 80 patients with AAA with massive aortic atheroma (excluding intrasac atheroma), randomly allocated into 2 groups receiving pitavastatin at a dose of 1 or 4 mg/day. The endpoints of the PROCEDURE study include change in atheroma volume, major adverse events related to shower embolization after aneurysm repair, and lipid-lowering effects. When complete, results of the PROCEDURE study should provide objective evidence to use statins preoperatively for AAA with massive aortic atheroma. PMID:23641286

  1. Embolisation of a Proximal Type I Endoleak Post-Nellix Aortic Aneurysm Repair Complicated by Reflux of Onyx into the Nellix Endograft Limb

    SciTech Connect

    Ameli-Renani, S. Das, R. Weller, A. Chung, R. Morgan, R. A.

    2015-06-15

    We report the first case of intervention for a proximal type 1 endoleak following Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing repair of an aortic aneurysm. This was complicated by migration of Onyx into one of the Nellix graft limbs causing significant stenosis. Subsequent placement of a covered stent to affix the Onyx between the stent and the wall of the Nellix endograft successfully restored stent patency.

  2. Quantitative assessment of systolic left ventricular function with speckle-tracking echocardiography in adult patients with repaired aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Menting, Myrthe E; van Grootel, Roderick W J; van den Bosch, Annemien E; Eindhoven, Jannet A; McGhie, Jackie S; Cuypers, Judith A A E; Witsenburg, Maarten; Helbing, Willem A; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W

    2016-05-01

    Despite successful aortic coarctation (CoA) repair, systemic hypertension often recurs which may influence left ventricular (LV) function. We aimed to detect early LV dysfunction using LV global longitudinal strain (GLS) in adults with repaired CoA, and to identify associations with patient and echocardiographic characteristics. In this cross-sectional study, patients with repaired CoA and healthy controls were recruited prospectively. All subjects underwent echocardiography, ECG and blood sampling within 1 day. With speckle-tracking echocardiography, we assessed LV GLS on the apical four-, three- and two-chamber views. We included 150 subjects: 75 patients (57 % male, age 33.4 ± 12.8 years, age at repair 2.5 [IQR: 0.1-11.1] years) and 75 healthy controls of similar sex and age. LV GLS was lower in patients than in controls (-17.1 ± 2.3 vs. -20.2 ± 1.6 %, P < 0.001). Eighty percent of the patients had a normal LV ejection fraction, but GLS was still lower than in controls (P < 0.001). In patients, GLS correlated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.32, P = 0.009; r = 0.31, P = 0.009), QRS duration (r = 0.34, P = 0.005), left atrial dimension (r = 0.27, P = 0.029), LV mass (r = 0.30, P = 0.014) and LV ejection fraction (r = -0.48, P < 0.001). Patients with either associated cardiac lesions, multiple cardiac interventions or aortic valve replacement had lower GLS than patients without. Although the majority of adults with repaired CoA seem to have a normal systolic LV function, LV GLS was decreased. Higher blood pressure, associated cardiac lesions, and larger left atrial dimension are related with lower GLS. Therefore, LV GLS may be used as objective criterion for early detection of ventricular dysfunction. PMID:26780661

  3. Trans-Serosal Leakage of Proinflammatory Mediators during Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Role of Phospholipase A2 in Activating Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Gut barrier failure and the resultant translocation of luminal bacteria and bacterial products into the systemic circulation have been proposed as pathogenic mechanisms of multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Our study aimed to demonstrate the direct release of gut-derived inflammatory mediators via the trans-serosal route in humans. Fifteen patients who underwent elective infrarenal open repair of AAA were randomized into two groups. In Group I patients (n = 10), the small intestine was exteriorized into a bowel bag. In Group II patients (n = 5), the small intestine was packed within the peritoneal cavity using large gauzes. We collected the bowel bag fluid in Group I and the ascites fluid, squeezed out from the gauzes at the end of surgery, in Group II. Leukocytes were collected from patients' blood samples. Incubation with the bowel bag fluid and ascites fluid caused a significant increase in both granulocyte pseudopod formation and CD11b expression compared to that with control fluid (p < 0.01). The addition of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor quinacrine abolished leukocyte activation by the bowel bag fluid. Based on these results, we consider that trasns-serosal leakage of gut-derived mediators occurred during the open repair of AAA; further, sPLA2 may be the most potent mediator in the activation of leukocytes among such gut-derived mediators in AAA surgery. PMID:23555400

  4. Maximum Diameter Measurements of Aortic Aneurysms on Axial CT Images After Endovascular Aneurysm Repair: Sufficient for Follow-up?

    SciTech Connect

    Baumueller, Stephan Nguyen, Thi Dan Linh Goetti, Robert Paul; Lachat, Mario; Seifert, Burkhardt; Pfammatter, Thomas Frauenfelder, Thomas

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum diameter measurements of aortic aneurysms after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on axial computed tomographic (CT) images in comparison to maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the intravascular centerline for follow-up by using three-dimensional (3D) volume measurements as the reference standard. Materials and Methods: Forty-nine consecutive patients (73 {+-} 7.5 years, range 51-88 years), who underwent EVAR of an infrarenal aortic aneurysm were retrospectively included. Two blinded readers twice independently measured the maximum aneurysm diameter on axial CT images performed at discharge, and at 1 and 2 years after intervention. The maximum diameter perpendicular to the centerline was automatically measured. Volumes of the aortic aneurysms were calculated by dedicated semiautomated 3D segmentation software (3surgery, 3mensio, the Netherlands). Changes in diameter of 0.5 cm and in volume of 10% were considered clinically significant. Intra- and interobserver agreements were calculated by intraclass correlations (ICC) in a random effects analysis of variance. The two unidimensional measurement methods were correlated to the reference standard. Results: Intra- and interobserver agreements for maximum aneurysm diameter measurements were excellent (ICC = 0.98 and ICC = 0.96, respectively). There was an excellent correlation between maximum aneurysm diameters measured on axial CT images and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001) as well as between maximum diameter measurements perpendicular to the centerline and 3D volume measurements (r = 0.93, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Measurements of maximum aneurysm diameters on axial CT images are an accurate, reliable, and robust method for follow-up after EVAR and can be used in daily routine.

  5. Use of Aortic Endograft for Repair of Intraoperative Iliocaval Injury during Anterior Spine Exposure.

    PubMed

    Chou, Elizabeth L; Colvard, Benjamin D; Lee, Jason T

    2016-02-01

    Vascular injury during anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a well-documented occurrence. Most vascular injuries continue to be managed with direct open repair. We report the outcome of a 61-year-old woman who experienced inferior vena cava and left common iliac vein injury during a difficult exposure for multilevel ALIF. The distal cava and common iliac vein were repaired with a Gore Excluder cuff and limb. The endovascular repair permitted control of the injury without more morbid maneuvers such as iliac artery transection. Thus endovascular repair of intraoperative caval injury is a valuable option in emergent situations with low morbidity and good durability. PMID:26597236

  6. Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons/Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery Joint Position Statement on Open and Endovascular Surgery for Thoracic Aortic Disease.

    PubMed

    Appoo, Jehangir J; Bozinovski, John; Chu, Michael W A; El-Hamamsy, Ismail; Forbes, Thomas L; Moon, Michael; Ouzounian, Maral; Peterson, Mark D; Tittley, Jacques; Boodhwani, Munir

    2016-06-01

    In 2014, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) published a position statement on the management of thoracic aortic disease addressing size thresholds for surgery, imaging modalities, medical therapy, and genetics. It did not address issues related to surgical intervention. This joint Position Statement on behalf of the CCS, Canadian Society of Cardiac Surgeons, and the Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery provides recommendations about thoracic aortic disease interventions, including: aortic valve repair, perfusion strategies for arch repair, extended arch hybrid reconstruction for acute type A dissection, endovascular management of arch and descending aortic aneurysms, and type B dissection. The position statement is constructed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology, and has been approved by the primary panel, an international secondary panel, and the CCS Guidelines Committee. Advent of endovascular technology has improved aortic surgery safety and extended the indications of minimally invasive thoracic aortic surgery. The combination of safer open surgery with endovascular treatment has improved patient outcomes in this rapidly evolving subspecialty field of cardiovascular surgery. PMID:27233892

  7. Comparative effect of propofol versus sevoflurane on renal ischemia/reperfusion injury after elective open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Ammar, AS; Mahmoud, KM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal injury is a common cause of morbidity and mortality after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Propofol has been reported to protect several organs from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced injury. We performed a randomized clinical trial to compare propofol and sevoflurane for their effects on renal I/R injury in patients undergoing elective AAA repair. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients scheduled for elective AAA repair were randomized to receive propofol anesthesia in group I or sevoflurane anesthesia in group II. Urinary specific kidney proteins (N-acetyl-beta-glucosamidase, alpha-1-microglobulin, glutathione transferase [GST]-pi, GST-alpha) were measured within 5 min of starting anesthesia as a base line (T0), at the end of surgery (T1), 8 h after surgery (T2), 16 h after surgery (T3), and 24 h postoperatively (T4). Serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin 1-β) were measured at the same time points. In addition, serum creatinine and cystatin C were measured before starting surgery as a baseline and at days 1, 3, and 6 after surgery. Results: Postoperative urinary concentrations of all measured kidney specific proteins and serum pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly lower in the propofol group. In addition, the serum creatinine and cystatin C were significantly lower in the propofol group compared with the sevoflurane group. Conclusion: Propofol significantly reduced renal injury after elective open AAA repair and this could have clinical implications in situations of expected renal I/R injury. PMID:27375385

  8. A Case of Severe Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis: Valve Repair With Tricuspidization in an Adult.

    PubMed

    Tokue, Masahide; Hara, Hidehiko; Sahara, Naohiko; Yamazaki, Kenji; Yamashita, Hiromasa; Takahashi, Kei; Ozaki, Shigeyuki; Sugi, Kaoru; Nakamura, Masato

    2015-10-01

    A 33-year-old male was referred to our institute with acute heart failure. The patient was found to have a unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) and severe aortic stenosis. He had been followed at a local university hospital during childhood. However, he stopped visiting the outpatient clinic after becoming an adult. His condition subsequently worsened, and he ultimately presented to our hospital with cardiogenic shock. In Japan, some adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients continue to be followed by pediatric cardiologists, though the patterns of practice are variable. This report describes the case of a patient who became lost to follow-up in early adulthood. We thus focus on this ACHD case as an example of the effects of inadequate communication among doctors and the need to establish better ACHD management protocols for treating this patient population. PMID:26467883

  9. Recommendations for Haemodynamic and Neurological Monitoring in Repair of Acute Type A Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Deborah K.; Ranasinghe, Aaron M.; Shah, Anwar; Oelofse, Tessa; Bonser, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    During treatment of acute type A aortic dissection there is potential for both pre- and intra-operative malperfusion. There are a number of monitoring strategies that may allow for earlier detection of potentially catastrophic malperfusion (particularly cerebral malperfusion) phenomena available for the anaesthetist and surgeon. This review article sets out to discuss the benefits of the current standard monitoring techniques available as well as desirable/experimental techniques which may serve as adjuncts in the monitoring of these complex patients. PMID:21776255

  10. Outcomes of surgery for patients with Behcet’s disease causing aortic pseudoaneurysm: a shift from open surgery to endovascular repair

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chenyang; Li, Weihao; Zhang, Yongbao; Li, Qingle; Jiao, Yang; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Behcet’s disease is a form of systematic vasculitis that affects vessels of various sizes. Aortic pseudoaneurysm is one of the most important causes of death among patients with Behcet’s disease due to its high risk of rupture and associated mortality. Our study aimed to investigate the outcomes of Behcet’s disease patients with aortic pseudoaneurysms undergoing open surgery and endovascular aortic repair. METHODS: From January 2003 to September 2014, ten consecutive patients undergoing surgery for aortic pseudoaneurysm met the diagnostic criteria for Behcet’s disease. Endovascular repair was the preferred modality and open surgery was performed as an alternative. Systemic immunosuppressive medication was administered after Behcet’s disease was definitively diagnosed. RESULTS: Eight patients initially underwent endovascular repair and two patients initially underwent open surgery. The overall success rate was 90% and the only failed case involved the use of the chimney technique to reach a suprarenal location. The median follow-up duration was 23 months. There were 7 recurrences in 5 patients. The median interval between operation and recurrence was 13 months. No significant risk factors for recurrence were identified, but a difference in recurrence between treatment and non-treatment with preoperative immunosuppressive medication preoperatively was notable. Four aneurysm-related deaths occurred within the follow-up period. The overall 1-year, 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 80%, 64% and 48%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Both open surgery and endovascular repair are safe and effective for treating aortic pseudoaneurysm in Behcet’s disease patients. The results from our retrospective study indicated that immunosuppressive medication was essential to defer the occurrence and development of recurrent aneurysms. PMID:27438562

  11. An analysis of the influence of intra-operative blood salvage and autologous transfusion on reducing the need for allogeneic transfusion in elective infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Janko; Nikolic, Dragan; Milosevic, Djordje; Popovic, Vladan; Markovic, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Background An intra-operative cell salvage machine, commonly known as a “cell saver”, aspirates, washes, and filters patient’s blood during an operation so that the blood can be returned to the patient’s circulation instead of being discarded. This procedure could significantly reduce the risks related to the use of allogeneic blood and blood products in surgery. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of intra-operative cell salvage on reducing the need for allogeneic blood in patients with asymptomatic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm undergoing elective repair of the aneurysm. Material and methods We retrospectively collected data from the clinical records of patients who underwent elective infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Two groups were formed: the “cell saver” group, in which intra-operative cell salvage was used, and the control group, in which a cell saver was not used. Results Thirty patients underwent abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with the use of a cell saver, while 32 underwent the same operation without cell salvage. We found a significant association between use of the cell saver and a reduced need for allogeneic blood in these patients. Operations performed with the use of a cell saver lasted, on average, less time than those performed without it. The difference between pre-operative and post-operative haemoglobin levels was significantly greater in the group of patients who underwent repair with the use of a cell saver than in the control group. Conclusion The use of a cell saver in elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair significantly reduces the need for intra-operative use of allogeneic blood. PMID:23114525

  12. Aortic Valve Sparing in Different Aortic Valve and Aortic Root Conditions.

    PubMed

    David, Tirone E

    2016-08-01

    The development of aortic valve-sparing operations (reimplantation of the aortic valve and remodeling of the aortic root) expanded the surgical armamentarium for treating patients with aortic root dilation caused by a variety of disorders. Young adults with aortic root aneurysms associated with genetic syndromes are ideal candidates for reimplantation of the aortic valve, and the long-term results have been excellent. Incompetent bicuspid aortic valves with dilated aortic annuli are also satisfactorily treated with the same type of operation. Older patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic insufficiency secondary to dilated sinotubular junction and a normal aortic annulus can be treated with remodeling of the aortic root or with reimplantation of the aortic valve. The first procedure is simpler, and both procedures are likely equally effective. As with any heart valve-preserving procedure, patient selection and surgical expertise are keys to successful and durable repairs. PMID:27491910

  13. High arch

    MedlinePlus

    Pes cavus; High foot arch ... High foot arches are much less common than flat feet. They are more likely to be caused by a ... stress is placed on the section of the foot between the ankle and toes (metatarsals). This condition ...

  14. Current role of the minimally invasive direct aortic surgery for 3-A repair (MIDAS-3A).

    PubMed

    de Donato, Gaetano; Sarradon, Pierre; Weber, George; de Donato, Gianmarco

    2003-01-01

    Open aneurysmectomy and aortic graft is still associated with a relatively high morbidity and mortality. To decrease this surgical stress, less invasive procedure, MIDAS-3A technique (Minimally Invasive Direct Aortic Surgery for AAA) was developed, utilizing a 5 cm abdominal incision and a video-laparoscopic assistance (gas-less) to reach the AAA retroperitoneally. From Nov. 1999 to Dec. 2002, 80 patients underwent surgery. This technique provides all the benefits of an open surgical approach, to be combined with the advantages derived from minimized tissue trauma. A comparison between MIDAS-3A and CL (Conventional Laparotomy) was performed, monitorizing-nasogastric drainage;--initial feeding;--pulmonary functions (Vital Capacity, and Forced Expiration Volume);--Intensive Care Unit recovery (long stay);--length of hospital stay;--operative time;--blood loss. The perioperative (30 days) mortality (2.5%), and the morbidity (7.5%) was equal in both groups. No conversion to conventional laparotomy occurred. MIDAS-3A has significantly reduced length of hospital stay (3.5 days), and pulmonary dysfunctions. This technique provides all the benefits of open surgical approach, to be combined with the advantages derived from minimized tissue trauma. MIDAS-3A reduced trauma and pain, which resulted in a shorter hospital stay, and so lower expense and better financial consequences. PMID:14587105

  15. Extensive thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair using deep hypothermic bypass and circulatory arrest.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Satoru; Minamimura, Hirokazu; Ishikawa, Takumi; Kato, Yasuyuki; Arimoto, Hideki; Ohue, Kensuke; Shimizu, Yoshihiro

    2004-03-01

    We sought to evaluate the safety and usefulness of deep hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass with intervals of circulatory arrest for extensive thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms. Between March 1994 and December 2002, 17 patients with Crawford type I and II were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups: group H (hypothermic circulatory arrest, n = 8) and group N (normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, n = 9). In group H, in-hospital mortality was 12.5%, and that in group N was 11.1%. Operation times were similar between the two groups though the cardiopulmonary bypass time was significantly shorter in group N than in group H (p < 0.05). Postoperative paraplegia occurred in 1 patient of group N. Postoperative renal dysfunction occurred in none of group H except in 1 preoperative dialysis case, whilst it occurred in 6 patients of group N. Postoperative creatinine levels were significantly higher in group N than in group H. Three cases in group H required tracheostomy. Our experience with hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest for diffuse type thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm confirms the safety and efficacy of this technique. Although respiratory complications remain a problem, the technique is considered to be effective for renal protection. PMID:14977747

  16. Single Stage Repair for Aortic Coarctation associated with Intracardiac Defects Using Extra-Anatomic Bypass Graft in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ates, Mehmet Sanser; Onuk, Burak Emre; Bakkaloglu, Beyhan; Sungur, Umit Pinar; Kurtoglu, Murat; Karagoz, Yahya Halidun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Coarctation of the aorta in adulthood is generally associated with other cardiovascular disorders requiring surgical management. An extra anatomic bypass grafting from the ascending to descending aorta by posterior pericardial approach via median sternotomy could be a reasonable single stage surgical strategy for these patients. Subjects and Methods Seven male patients aged between 14-41 years underwent an extra anatomic bypass grafting for coarctation repair concomitantly with the surgical management of the associated cardiovascular disorders via median sternotomy. Preoperative mean systolic arterial blood pressure was 161.8±24.5 mmHg, although the patients were under treatment of different combinations of antihypertensive agents. Additional surgical procedures were: aortic valve replacement (n=4), ventricular septal defect (VSD) closure (n=2), ascending aortic replacement (n=3) and Bentall procedure (n=1). None of our patients have been previously diagnosed or operated on for coarctation. Data were evaluated during their hospital stay and in post-operative follow-up. Results The post-operative course was uneventful in all but one patient was re-operated on due to bleeding. There was neither mortality nor significant morbidity during the in-hospital period and all patients were discharged within 5-9 (mean: 6.3±1.5) days. The mean follow up period was 71.83±23 months (range: 23-95 months). Unfortunately one of our patients could not be contacted for a follow up period because of invalid personal data. Conclusion Coarctation of the aorta in adulthood associated with other cardiovascular disorders can be operated on simultaneously via an extra anatomic bypass grafting technique with low morbidity and mortality. PMID:27482266

  17. Surgical repair of Stanford type A aortic dissection in elderly patients: a contemporary systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chivasso, Pierpaolo; Guida, Gustavo; Vohra, Hunaid A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The results of surgical treatment of type A aortic dissection (AAD) in the elderly are controversial and aggravated by a higher operative mortality rate. The studies published in this subset of patients are mainly retrospective analyses or small samples from international registries. We sought to investigate this topic by conducting a contemporary meta-analysis of the most recent observational studies. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted for any study published in the last five years on aortic dissection treated surgically in patients 70 years and older. A pooled risk-ratio meta-analysis has been conducted three main post-operative outcomes: short-term mortality, stroke and acute kidney injury. Results A total of 11 retrospective observational studies have been included in the quantitative meta-analysis. Pooled meta-analysis showed an increased risk of short term mortality for the elderly population [relative risk (RR) =2.25; 95% CI, 1.79–2.83; I2=0%; P<0.0001], and this has been confirmed in a sub-analysis of patients 80 years and older. The risk of having stroke (RR =1.15; 95% CI, 0.89–1.5; I2=0%; P=0.28) and acute kidney injury (RR =0.79; 95% CI, 0.5–1.25, I2=14%, P=0.31) after surgery were comparable to the younger cohort of patients. Conclusions Although affected by an increased risk of short-term mortality in the elderly, surgical repair remains the treatment of choice for AAD. The main post-operative outcomes are comparable to younger patients and the mid-term survival rates are acceptable. PMID:27563539

  18. Sealing zones have a greater influence than iliac anatomy on the occurrence of limb occlusion following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Daoudal, Anne; Cardon, Alain; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe; Clochard, Elodie; Lucas, Antoine; Kaladji, Adrien

    2016-06-01

    Limb occlusion is a well-known complication following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR), and it very often leads to reoperation. The aim of this study is to identify predictive factors for limb occlusion following EVAR. Two hundred and twenty-four patients undergoing EVAR between 2004 and 2012 were included in this retrospective study. Demographics, anatomic, and follow-up data were compared between two groups (with or without thrombosis). Preoperative anatomy was analyzed with a dedicated workstation, using the Society of Vascular Surgery reporting standards. Eleven (4.9%) patients presented with a limb occlusion during follow-up (46 ± 12 months). Univariate analyses were first performed to investigate the influence of preoperative variables on limb occlusion. Then, variables with a p value <0.1 were included in the multivariate analysis and showed that in the occlusion group there was a greater rate of chronic renal failure (18.2% vs. 3.8%, p = 0.012), a more frequent occurrence of distal landing zones in the external iliac artery (15.4% vs. 2.1%, p = 0.006), and a smaller aortic neck diameter (21.0 ± 2.9 mm vs. 23.6 ± 3.3 mm, p = 0.014). Although iliac anatomy does not appear to have a significant influence on limb occlusion rate in the multivariate analysis, proximal and distal sealing zones appear to be involved in this complication. PMID:26084467

  19. Comparison between antegrade and retrograde cerebral perfusion or profound hypothermia as brain protection strategies during repair of type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Laura A.; Kouchoukos, Nicholas T.; Lobdell, Kevin W.; Khabbaz, Kamal; Murphy, Edward; Hagberg, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare early postoperative outcomes and actuarial-free survival between patients who underwent repair of acute type A aortic dissection by the method of cerebral perfusion used. Methods A total of 324 patients from five academic medical centers underwent repair of acute type A aortic dissection between January 2000 and December 2010. Of those, antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) was used for 84 patients, retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) was used for 55 patients, and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) was used for 184 patients during repair. Major morbidity, operative mortality, and 5-year actuarial survival were compared between groups. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of operative mortality and Cox Regression hazard ratios were calculated to determine the predictors of long term mortality. Results Operative mortality was not influenced by the type of cerebral protection (19% for ACP, 14.5% for RCP and 19.1% for DHCA, P=0.729). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, hemodynamic instability [odds ratio (OR) =19.6, 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.102–0.414, P<0.001] and CPB time >200 min(OR =4.7, 95% CI, 1.962–1.072, P=0.029) emerged as independent predictors of operative mortality. Actuarial 5-year survival was unchanged by cerebral protection modality (48.8% for ACP, 61.8% for RCP and 66.8% for no cerebral protection, log-rank P=0.844). Conclusions During surgical repair of type A aortic dissection, ACP, RCP or DHCA are safe strategies for cerebral protection in selected patients with type A aortic dissection. PMID:27563545

  20. Surgical Aortic Valvuloplasty Versus Balloon Aortic Valve Dilatation in Children.

    PubMed

    Donald, Julia S; Konstantinov, Igor E

    2016-09-01

    Balloon aortic valve dilatation (BAD : is assumed to provide the same outcomes as surgical aortic valvuloplasty (SAV). However, the development of precise modern surgical valvuloplasty techniques may result in better long-term durability of the aortic valve repair. This review of the recent literature suggests that current SAV provides a safe and durable repair. Furthermore, primary SAV appears to have greater freedom from reintervention and aortic valve replacement when compared to BAD. PMID:27587493

  1. "Kissing stents" as an adjunct to thoracic endovascular aortic repair: warts and all.

    PubMed

    Karmy-Jones, Riyad; Nicholls, Stephen C

    2012-01-01

    A 75-year-old man presented with symptomatic thoracic aneurysm involving the origin of the left subclavian artery. To obtain an adequate landing zone, a simultaneous stent was placed in the left common carotid artery. Until fenestrated and branch graft technology is more available, snorkel approaches may be an acceptable approach for patients with contraindications to open repair. PMID:23123998

  2. Distant downstream steady-state flow studies of a mechanical heart valve: PIV study of secondary flow in a model aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Brandon R.; Popma, Christopher J.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Each year, hundreds of thousands of aortic and mitral heart valves are replaced with prosthetic valves. In efforts to develop a valve that does not require lifelong anticoagulation therapy, previous experimental research has been devoted to analyzing the hemodynamics of various heart valve designs, limited to the flow up to only 2 diameters downstream of the valve. Two-component, two-dimensional (2C-2D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used in this study to examine secondary flow velocity fields in a curved tube modeling an aorta at five locations (0-, 45-, 90-, 135-, 180-degrees). A bileaflet valve, opened to 30-, 45-, and 59-degrees, and one (no-valve) baseline condition were examined under three steady flow inflows (Re = 218, 429, 634). In particular, variations in the two-dimensional turbulent shear stresses at each cross sectional plane were analyzed. The results suggest that bileaflet valves in the aortic model produce significant turbulence and vorticity up to 5.5 downstream diameters, i.e. up to the 90-degrees location. Expanding this research towards aortic heart valve hemodynamics highlights a need for additional studies extending beyond the typical few diameters downstream to fully characterize valvular function. Supported by the NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  3. High arch

    MedlinePlus

    ... is on the back and balls of the foot (metatarsals head). Your health care provider will check to see if the high ... Call your health care provider if you suspect you are having foot pain related to high arches.

  4. Hospital mortality of patients aged 80 and older after surgical repair for type A acute aortic dissection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Tetsu; Shinjo, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate whether patients aged 80 and older have higher risk of hospital mortality after repair of type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD).Emergency surgery for TAAAD in patients aged 80 and older remains a controversial issue because of its high surgical risk.Data from patients who underwent surgical repair of TAAAD between April 2011 and March 2013 were retrospectively extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The effect of age on hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis.A total of 5175 patients were enrolled. The mean age of patients was 67.1 ± 13.0 years, and the male:female ratio was 51:49. Patients aged 80 and older more frequently received tracheostomy than their younger counterparts (9.5% vs 5.4%, P <0.001). Intensive care unit and hospital stays were significantly longer in the elderly cohort versus the younger cohort (7.6 vs 6.7 days, P <0.001, and 42.2 vs 35.8 days, P <0.001, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that age ≥80 years was significantly associated with a higher risk of hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-2.06; P <0.001). In linear regression analysis, age ≥80 years was also significantly associated with longer hospital stay (P = 0.007).In a large, nationwide, Japanese database, patients aged 80 and older were at increased risk of hospital mortality and length of hospital stay. PMID:27495057

  5. Risk Factors for Survival following Open Surgical Repair of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A 13-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ozen, Anil; Hanedan, Muhammet Onur; Songur, Çetin Murat; Boysan, Emre; Unal, Ertekin Utku; Mola, Serkan; Erkengel, Halil Ibrahim; Kubat, Emre; Iscan, Zafer; Tutun, Ufuk; Sarıtas, Ahmet; Birincioglu, Cemal Levent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment of a ruptured abdominal aorta aneurysm (RAAA) continues to present a significant challenge to surgeons. There are some patient factors such as age and gender that cannot be changed, and comorbid conditions can be optimized but not eliminated. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors affecting high mortality after the surgical repair of an RAAA. Methods: Data on 121 patients who underwent surgical repair for RAAAs between January 1997 and June 2011 in our institution were collected retrospectively. All the patients had been diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) scans, and intraoperative extra-luminal blood was visualized intraoperatively. Variables studied comprised demographic data; preoperative, operative, and postoperative data; and the causes of mortality. Multivariate regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of mortality. Results: One hundred eight (89.2%) patients were male and 13 (10.7%) were female at an average age of 68.9 ± 10.5 years. Totally, 121 patients underwent surgery for RAAAs. Fifty-four patients had aortic tube grafts, 32 aortobiiliac grafts, 20 aortobifemoral grafts, 1 aortoiliac graft, and 1 aortofemoral graft for the replacement of the RAAAs. Seven patients had only surgical exploration. Operative mortality was 41.3% (50 patients). The factors associated with mortality were preoperative shock, free blood, positive inotropic agent, hematocrit value, and need for blood and plasma. In the multivariate analysis, preoperative shock and positive inotropic agents were found to be significant as the predictors of death (OR: 19.8, 95%CI: 3.2-122.8 and OR: 8.6, 95% CI: 2.9-26.3, respectively). Conclusion: This study revealed that the preoperative clinical findings affected the mortality associated with RAAAs. PMID:26697083

  6. Hospital mortality of patients aged 80 and older after surgical repair for type A acute aortic dissection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, Tetsu; Shinjo, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate whether patients aged 80 and older have higher risk of hospital mortality after repair of type A acute aortic dissection (TAAAD). Emergency surgery for TAAAD in patients aged 80 and older remains a controversial issue because of its high surgical risk. Data from patients who underwent surgical repair of TAAAD between April 2011 and March 2013 were retrospectively extracted from the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. The effect of age on hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 5175 patients were enrolled. The mean age of patients was 67.1 ± 13.0 years, and the male:female ratio was 51:49. Patients aged 80 and older more frequently received tracheostomy than their younger counterparts (9.5% vs 5.4%, P <0.001). Intensive care unit and hospital stays were significantly longer in the elderly cohort versus the younger cohort (7.6 vs 6.7 days, P <0.001, and 42.2 vs 35.8 days, P <0.001, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that age ≥80 years was significantly associated with a higher risk of hospital mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.28–2.06; P <0.001). In linear regression analysis, age ≥80 years was also significantly associated with longer hospital stay (P = 0.007). In a large, nationwide, Japanese database, patients aged 80 and older were at increased risk of hospital mortality and length of hospital stay. PMID:27495057

  7. Clinical outcomes of endovascular aneurysm repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated with hypertension: A 5-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xi-Tao; Yuan, Qi-Dong; Cui, Ming-Zhe; Fang, Hong-Chao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) complicated with hypertension. Methods: Fifty-two patients with AAA complicated with hypertension treated in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into an observation group (34 cases) and a control group (18 cases). The control group was treated by incision of AAA and artificial blood vessel replacement, and the observation group was treated by EVAR. Results: All surgeries were performed successfully. However, compared with the control group, the observation group had significantly less surgical time, intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusion, as well as significantly higher total hospitalization expense (P<0.05). During the one-month follow-up, the observation group was significantly less prone to pulmonary infection, surgical site infection, lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis and lower extremity weakness than the control group (P<0.05). The observation group enjoyed significantly better quality of life than the control group did one and three months after surgery (P<0.05). Conclusion: Given sufficient funding, EVAR should be preferentially selected in the treatment of AAA complicated with hypertension due to minimal invasion, safety, stable postoperative vital signs and improved quality of life. PMID:27022336

  8. Can Surgeons Assess CT Suitability for Endovascular Repair (EVAR) in Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm? Implications for a Ruptured EVAR Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Rayt, Harjeet Lambert, Kelly; Bown, Matthew; Fishwick, Guy; Morgan, Robert; McCarthy, Mark; London, Nick; Sayers, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgeons without formal radiological training are able to assess suitability of patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) for EVAR. The CT scans of 20 patients with AAA were reviewed under timed conditions by six vascular surgeons. Twenty minutes was allocated per scan. They were asked to determine if each aneurysm would be treatable by EVAR in the emergency setting and, if so, to measure for device selection. The results were then compared with those of a vascular radiologist. Six surgeons agreed on the suitability of endovascular repair in 45% of cases (95% CI, 23.1-68.5%; 9/20 scans; {kappa} = 0.41 [p = 0.01]) and concurred with the radiologist in eight of these. Individually, agreement ranged from 13 to 16 of the 20 scans, 65-80% between surgeons. The kappa value for agreement between all the surgeons and the radiologist was 0.47 (p = 0.01, moderate agreement). For the individual surgeons, this ranged from 0.3 to 0.6 (p = 0.01). In conclusion, while overall agreement was moderate between the surgeons and the radiologist, it is clear that if surgeons are to assess patients for ruptured EVAR in the future, focused training of surgical trainees is required.

  9. Patient-specific analysis of post-operative aortic hemodynamics: a focus on thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auricchio, F.; Conti, M.; Lefieux, A.; Morganti, S.; Reali, A.; Sardanelli, F.; Secchi, F.; Trimarchi, S.; Veneziani, A.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the impact of endovascular repair on aortic hemodynamics. The study addresses the assessment of post-operative hemodynamic conditions of a real clinical case through patient-specific analysis, combining accurate medical image analysis and advanced computational fluid-dynamics (CFD). Although the main clinical concern was firstly directed to the endoluminal protrusion of the prosthesis, the CFD simulations have demonstrated that there are two other important areas where the local hemodynamics is impaired and a disturbed blood flow is present: the first one is the ostium of the subclavian artery, which is partially closed by the graft; the second one is the stenosis of the distal thoracic aorta. Besides the clinical relevance of these specific findings, this study highlights how CFD analyses allow to observe important flow effects resulting from the specific features of patient vessel geometries. Consequently, our results demonstrate the potential impact of computational biomechanics not only on the basic knowledge of physiopathology, but also on the clinical practice, thanks to a quantitative extraction of knowledge made possible by merging medical data and mathematical models.

  10. Differential impact of local stiffening and narrowing on hemodynamics in repaired aortic coarctation: an FSI study.

    PubMed

    Taelman, Liesbeth; Bols, Joris; Degroote, Joris; Muthurangu, Vivek; Panzer, Joseph; Vierendeels, Jan; Segers, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Even after successful treatment of aortic coarctation, a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality remains. Uncertainty exists on the factors contributing to this increased risk among which are the presence of (1) a residual narrowing leading to an additional resistance and (2) a less distensible zone disturbing the buffer function of the aorta. As the many interfering factors and adaptive physiological mechanisms present in vivo prohibit the study of the isolated impact of these individual factors, a numerical fluid-structure interaction model is developed to predict central hemodynamics in coarctation treatment. The overall impact of a stiffening on the hemodynamics is limited, with a small increase in systolic pressure (up to 8 mmHg) proximal to the stiffening which is amplified with increasing stiffening and length. A residual narrowing, on the other hand, affects the hemodynamics significantly. For a short segment (10 mm), the combination of a stiffening and narrowing (coarctation index 0.5) causes an increase in systolic pressure of 58 mmHg, with 31 mmHg due to narrowing and an additional 27 mmHg due to stiffening. For a longer segment (25 mm), an increase in systolic pressure of 50 mmHg is found, of which only 9 mmHg is due to stiffening. PMID:26142885

  11. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the aorta or its branches, including: Aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Congenital (present from birth) problems AV ... Abnormal results may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present ...

  12. Technical and Clinical Outcome of Talent versus Endurant Endografts for Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mensel, Birger; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Träger, Tobias; Dührkoop, Martin; v. Bernstorff, Wolfram; Rosenberg, Christian; Hoene, Andreas; Puls, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Objective The technical evolution of endografts for the interventional management of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) has allowed a continuous expansion of indications. This study compares the established Talent endograft with its successor, the Endurant endograft, taking individual aortoiliac anatomy into account. Methods From June 2007 to December 2010, 35 patients with AAA were treated with a Talent endograft (33 men) and 36 patients with an Endurant endograft (34 men). Aortoiliac anatomy was evaluated in detail using preinterventional computed tomography angiography. The 30-day outcome of both groups were compared regarding technical and clinical success as well as complications including endoleaks. Results The Endurant group included more patients with unfavorable anatomy (kinking of pelvic arteries, p = 0.017; shorter proximal neck, p = 0.084). Primary technical success was 91.4% in the Talent group and 100% in the Endurant group (p = 0.115). Type 1 endoleaks occurred in 5.7% of patients in the Talent group and in 2.8% of those in the Endurant group (p = 0.614). Type 3 endoleaks only occurred in the Talent group (2.9% of patients; p = 0.493). Type 2 endoleaks were significantly less common in the Endurant group than in the Talent group (8.3% versus 28.6%; p = 0.035). Rates of major and minor complications were not significantly different between both groups. Primary clinical success was significantly better in the Endurant group (97.2%) than in the Talent group (80.0%) (p = 0.028). Conclusion Endurant endografts appear to have better technical and clinical outcome in patients with difficult aortoiliac anatomy, significantly reducing the occurrence of type 2 endoleaks. PMID:22715384

  13. [Novel strategy for thoracoabdomianl aortic aneurysm repair; intraoperative selective perfusion of the Adamkiewicz artery].

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, S; Furukawa, K; Rikitake, K; Okazaki, Y; Sato, M; Natsuaki, M; Matsumoto, K; Kato, A; Kudo, S; Itoh, T

    2004-04-01

    We report our method for delineating the Adamkiewicz artery using multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) with selective perfusion using a distal perfusion cannula that is clinically available for off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB). The tip of a distal perfusion catheter (Medtronic Quickflow, Minneapolis) designed for OPCAB was applicable for selective perfusion of the segmental arteries. The femoro-femoral venoarterial bypass was branched off into selective perfusion of the segmental arteries, using an independent roller pump and heat exchanger. Our method of visualization of the Adamkiewicz artery was MDCT scanning with injection of contrast medium directly into the proximal descending aorta: namely, "CT during aortography". Lower descending aorta to abdominal aorta (the range involving the aneurysm) was scanned in a cephalad-to-caudal direction using a detector collimation of 4 x 1.25 mm with a table speed of 9.4 mm/sec, pitch of 6, and image thickness of 1.25 mm. All images were reviewed on a workstation to investigate the continuity between the Adamkiewicz artery and its proximal segmental artery with paging, mulitplanar reformation and curved planar reformation. Distal perfusion cannulae of 2.0 mm in diameter were inserted into the respective intercostal arteries. 4-0 polyethylene sutures were placed to tourniquet the catheters. Segmental arteries were perfused with total flow of approximately 80 ml/min at a circuit pressure of 120 mmHg. Reattachment of the ninth intercostal arteries related to the Adamkiewicz artery was carried out. A total of 6 consecutive 6 patients with thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) have undergone graft replacement by the methods described, since April 2002. All patients survived surgery without any neurological complications. This method is expected to minimize the ischemic time of the spinal cord and attenuate the reperfusion injury. PMID:15071861

  14. Medium-Term Outcomes Following Endovascular Repair of Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms with an Unfavourable Proximal Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Prakash Hughes, John Patel, Ashish S. Donati, Tommaso Sallam, Morad Patel, Sanjay D. Bell, Rachel E.; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Modarai, Bijan Zayed, Hany A.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate medium-term outcomes following endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) with unfavourable neck anatomy using stent grafts with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter.Materials and MethodsA retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent elective EVAR between 2006 and 2008 using a stent graft with a 36 mm or larger proximal diameter was carried out. All patients had computed tomography angiography (CTA) for procedure planning, and detailed assessment of the aneurysm neck was performed using a three-dimensional CTA workstation. Patients were followed up with CTA at 3 and 12 months and annual duplex thereafter.ResultsThe median aneurysm diameter was 7 cm, and the median aneurysm neck diameter was 31 mm. Cook Zenith stent grafts were used in all patients, with a proximal diameter of 36 mm (n = 25) and 40 mm (n = 2). Primary and assisted primary technical success rates were 74 and 93 %, respectively. The follow-up period ranged from 62 to 84 months, with a median of 72 months. 15 patients died during follow-up. Two patients died from aortic rupture, and the remaining patients died from cardiac disease (n = 4), chest sepsis (n = 6), cancer (n = 2) and renal failure (n = 1). Complications included type I endoleak (n = 5), limb occlusion (n = 2), limb stenosis (n = 2), limb kinking (n = 1), dissection of an artery (n = 1), occlusion of a femorofemoral cross-over graft (n = 1) and poor attachment of a distal limb (n = 1).ConclusionsEVAR using stent grafts in the presence of an unfavourable neck has a high risk of complications. Medium-term survival in this group is low but mainly due to patient co-morbidities.

  15. Risk factors for distal stent graft-induced new entry following endovascular repair of type B aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Wang, Long-Fei; Ma, Wei-Guo; Xu, Shang-Dong; Zheng, Jun; Xing, Xiao-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Distal stent graft-induced new entry (DSINE) has been increasingly observed following thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for type B aortic dissection (TBAD). We seek to identify the risk factors for DSINE following TEVAR in patients with TBAD. Methods Between January 2009 and January 2013, we performed TEVAR for 579 patients with TBAD. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed with univariate and multivariate analyses to identify the risk factors for DSINE. Results Two patients (0.3%) died after the initial TEVAR. Morbidity included spinal cord injury in 2 (0.3%), stroke in 3 (0.5%) and endoleak in 12 (2.1%) patients. Clinical and radiological follow-up was complete in 100% (577/577) averaging 47±16 months. Late death occurred in 6 patients. DSINE occurred in 39 patients (6.7%) at mean 22±17 months after the initial TEVAR, which was managed with re-TEVAR in 25 and medically in 14. At 33±18 months after DSINE, 11 of patients managed medically (11/14) and all patients managed with re-TEVAR (25/25) survived (P=0.048). Freedom from DSINE was 92.7% at 5 years (95% CI: 90.0-94.7%). Using tapered stent grafts with a proximal end 4-8 mm larger than the distal end, TEVAR performed in the acute phase (≤14 days from onset) was associated with a significantly lower incidence of DSINE than TEVAR performed in the chronic phase (4.3%, 7/185 vs. 13.9%, 15/108; P=0.003). Risk factors for DSINE were stent grafts less than 145 mm in length [odds ratio (OR) 2.268; 95% CI: 1.121-4.587; P=0.023] and TEVAR performed in the chronic phase (OR 1.935; 95% CI: 1.004-3.731; P=0.049). Conclusions Our results show that TEVAR performed during the acute phase and using stent grafts longer than 145 mm could decrease the incidence of DSINE in patients with TBAD. Tapered stent grafts with a proximal end 4-8 mm larger than the distal end may be helpful in preventing DSINE after TEVAR performed in the acute phase than TEVAR performed in the chronic phase, due to the

  16. Percutaneous stenting of a dissected superior mesenteric artery in a patient with previous surgical repair of Stanford type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed Central

    Hatzidakis, A; Krokidis, M; Androulakakis, Z; Rossi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim We report a case of a 54-year-old male patient with background history of hypertension, which suffered a Stanford type A thoraco-abdominal aortic dissection with extension to the visceral arteries. Description of case The patient initially underwent surgical repair with replacement of the ascending aorta and of the hemiarch in the acute phase of the dissection. Postoperatively, he developed non-specific abdominal pain that was not related to meals but led to weight loss of 20 kg within the first five post-operative months. Follow-up computerized tomography scan revealed a chronic subphrenic aortic dissection extending to the celiac axis (with involvement of the left gastric and the splenic artery), the left renal artery and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The hepatic artery took origin from the SMA and received blood from the true lumen of the vessel, and the right renal artery was entirely supplied from the true aortic lumen. After exclusion of other causes of abdominal pain, the patient was treated with percutaneous stent placement in the dissected SMA with significant improvement of his symptoms. Conclusion This case report emphasizes the role of visceral artery endovascular techniques in the management of patients with complicated chronic aortic dissection. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (3): 270-273. PMID:27418791

  17. “Open” repair of ruptured thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (experience of 51 cases)

    PubMed Central

    Zanetti, Piero Paolo; Walas, Ryszard; Cebotaru, Theodor; Popa, Calin; Vintila, Bogdan; Steiu, Flaviu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical treatment of toracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) represents a difficult problem for the vascular surgeon and may become a formidable challenge in an emergency procedure. In patient with hemodynamic instability, protective measures as cerebral spinal fluid drainage and bio-pump against spinal cord, visceral and renal ischemia, may be ineffective or impracticable. Material and methods We report our experience of 51 emergency-operated patients with TAAA out of 660 treated between 1994 and 2014; 48 patients (94%) were hemodynamically unstable, 3 (6%) were hemodynamically stable. The TAAA patients were evaluated, according to Crawford classification, as: 18 type I, 13 type II, 15 type III, 5 type IV. Results Overall mortality was 23 cases out of 51 (43.1%); 8 deaths occurred during the surgical procedure and 14 in the postoperative period. Early deaths, subdivided by Crawford TAAA classification, were: type I 9/18 (50%), type II 9/13 (69.2%), type III 7/15 (46.6%), type IV 3/5 (60%). Paraplegia-paraparesis developed in 6 cases out of 43 (16.2%), excluding 8 deaths during the operative procedure. Acute renal failure was observed in 8 out of 43 patients (18.6%). Dialysis was found to be a risk factor for hospital mortality (p = 0.03). Pulmonary insufficiency was diagnosed in 15 patients out of 43 (34.8%), and 5 patients (15.5%) needed tracheostomy, out of whom 3 died (p = 0.04%). Postoperative bleeding was present in 8 cases out of 43 (18.6%). Inferior laryngeal nerve palsy was present in 6 cases out of 43 (13.5%). The follow-up period comprised 1-3-5-10 years postoperative follow-up. The actuarial survival rate of patients discharged from hospital was respectively 75%, 63%, 48%, 35%. Conclusions In the literature there are very few studies published on emergency treatment for TAAA. Having usually low numbers of patients in the groups wider experiences are still needed to give more light on the pathophysiology and surgical treatment of this type

  18. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Follow-up with Noninvasive Vascular Elastography in a Canine Model.

    PubMed

    Salloum, Eli; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Lerouge, Sophie; Kauffman, Claude; Héon, Hélène; Therasse, Eric; Salazkin, Igor; Roy Cardinal, Marie-Hélène; Cloutier, Guy; Soulez, Gilles

    2016-05-01

    Purpose To assess the ability of noninvasive vascular elastography (NIVE) to help characterize endoleaks and thrombus organization in a canine model of abdominal aortic aneurysm after endovascular aneurysm repair with stent-grafts, in comparison with computed tomography (CT) and pathologic examination findings. Materials and Methods All protocols were approved by the Animal Care Committee in accordance with the guidelines of the Canadian Council of Animal Care. Stent-grafts were implanted in a group of 18 dogs with aneurysms created in the abdominal aorta. Type I endoleak was created in four aneurysms; type II endoleak, in 13 aneurysms; and no endoleak, in one aneurysm. Doppler ultrasonography and NIVE examinations were performed at baseline and at 1-week, 1-month, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up. Angiography, CT, and macroscopic tissue examination were performed at sacrifice. Strain values were computed by using the Lagrangian speckle model estimator. Areas of endoleak, solid organized thrombus, and fresh thrombus were identified and segmented by comparing the results of CT and macroscopic tissue examination. Strain values were compared by using the Wilcoxon rank-sum and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results All stent-grafts were successfully deployed, and endoleaks were clearly depicted in the last follow-up elastography examinations. Maximal axial strains over consecutive heart cycles in endoleak, organized thrombus, and fresh thrombus areas were 0.78% ± 0.22, 0.23% ± 0.02, 0.10% ± 0.04, respectively. Strain values were significantly different between endoleak and organized or fresh thrombus areas (P < .000) and between organized and fresh thrombus areas (P < .0002). No correlation was found between strain values and type of endoleak, sac pressure, endoleak size, and aneurysm size. Conclusion NIVE may be able to help characterize endoleak and thrombus organization, regardless of the size, pressure, and type of endoleak. (©) RSNA, 2015. PMID:26690905

  19. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Talent Stent-Graft: Outcomes in Patients with Large Iliac Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    England, Andrew; Butterfield, John S.; McCollum, Charles N.; Ashleigh, Raymond J.

    2008-07-15

    The purpose of this study is to report outcomes following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in patients with ectatic common iliac arteries (CIAs). Of 117 AAA patients treated by EVAR between 1998 and 2005, 87 (74%) had CIAs diameters <18 mm and 30 (26%) patients had one or more CIA diameters >18 but <25 mm. All patients were treated with Talent stent-grafts, 114 bifurcated and 3 AUI devices. Departmental databases and patient records were reviewed to assess outcomes. Technical success, iliac-related outcome, and iliac-related reintervention (IRSI) were analyzed. Patients with EVAR extending into the external iliac artery were excluded. Median (range) follow-up for the study group was 24 (1-84) months. Initial technical success was 98% for CIAs <18 mm and 100% for CIAs {>=}18 mm (p = 0.551). There were three distal type I endoleaks (two in the ectatic group) and six iliac limb occlusions (one in an ectatic patient); there were no statistically significant differences between groups (p = 0.4). There were nine IRSIs (three stent-graft extensions, six femorofemoral crossover grafts); three of these patients had one or both CIAs {>=}18 mm (p = 0.232). One-year freedom from IRSI was 92% {+-} 3% and 84% {+-} 9% for the <18-mm and {>=}18-mm CIA groups, respectively (p = 0.232). We conclude that the treatment of AAA by EVAR in patients with CIAs 18-24 mm appears to be safe and effective, however, it may be associated with more frequent reinterventions.

  20. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Analysis of Aneurysm Volumetric Changes at Mid-Term Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Bargellini, Irene Cioni, Roberto; Petruzzi, Pasquale; Pratali, Alessandro; Napoli, Vinicio; Vignali, Claudio; Ferrari, Mauro; Bartolozzi, Carlo

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the volumetric changes in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) after endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) in 24 months of follow-up. Methods. We evaluated the volume modifications in 63 consecutive patients after EVAR. All patients underwent strict duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography (CTA) follow-up; when complications were suspected, digital subtraction angiography was also performed. CTA datasets at 1, 6, 12, and 24 months were post-processed through semiautomatic segmentation, to isolate the aneurysmal sac and calculate its volume. Maximum transverse diameters (Dmax) were also obtained in the true axial plane, Presence and type of endoleak (EL) were recorded. A statistical analysis was performed to assess the degree of volume change, correlation with diameter modifications, and significance of the volume increase with respect to ELs. Results. Mean reconstruction time was 7 min. Mean volume reduction rates were 6.5%, 8%, and 9.6% at 6, 12, and 24 months follow-up, respectively. Mean Dmax reduction rates were 4.2%, 6.7%, and 12%; correlation with volumes was poor (r = 0.73-0.81). ELs were found in 19 patients and were more frequent (p = 0.04) in patients with higher preprocedural Dmax, The accuracies of volume changes in predicting ELs ranged between 74.6% and 84.1% and were higher than those of Dmax modifications. The strongest independent predictor of EL was a volume change at 6 months {<=}0.3% (p = 0.005), although 6 of 19 (32%) patients with EL showed no significant AAA enlargement, whereas in 6 of 44 (14%) patients without EL the aneurysm enlarged. Conclusion. The lack of volume decrease in the aneurysm of at least 0.3% at 6 months follow-up indicates the need for closer surveillance, and has a higher predictive accuracy for an endoleak than Dmax.

  1. Embolization for type 2 endoleak with sac expansion after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm: safety and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Kenji; Yamagami, Takuji; Urashima, Masaki; Tomiyoshi, Hideki; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Ishikawa, Masaki; Awai, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and outcome of embolization as treatment for persistent type 2 endoleak (T2EL) occurring after abdominal aortic stent graft implantation. This retrospective study included seven consecutive patients (one female, six males, mean age 72 years, range 66-88 years) with T2EL between January 2011 and September 2012. In all, T2EL was associated with an increase more than 5 mm in the aneurysm. The endoleak cavity or feeding artery was embolized with coils and/or n-butyl cyanoacrylate. Clinical success was defined as regression or stabilization of the aneurysm sac irrespective of residual endoleaks on follow-up CT studies. At the time of T2EL intervention, mean aneurysm sac diameter was 63 mm (range 52-72 mm), and mean increase size of aneurysm sac diameter was 7 mm (range 5-13). Mean follow-up period was 6.0 ± 6.2 months (range 3-18 months). Our technical success rate was 100 %. Clinical success was obtained in 5 (71.4 %) of the seven patients. One patient was embolized three times due to sac expansion. T2EL was treated by transarterial embolization in eight procedures, and one procedure was performed by direct puncture embolization. There were no major complications; two procedures elicited minor complications: transient back pain and muscle weakness of the left lower leg. We suggest embolization was safe and effective treatment, a less invasive treatment option comparison to open repair, as one choice to address T2EL. PMID:27006871

  2. Novel endovascular procedures and new developments in aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S W K

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular repair has evolved to become a viable mainstream treatment for aortic pathology in both acute and elective settings. As technology advanced, traditional anatomical barriers were progressively tackled using new devices and novel procedures, and there are now multiple options available to the vascular surgeon. In the abdominal aorta, advances in endovascular aneurysm repair have been in the treatment of hostile aortic necks using new sealing concepts and ancillary procedures, and in branch preservation using fenestrations and snorkels. Access challenges have been met with a percutaneous approach and low-profile devices, and standard protocols have improved mortality for ruptured aneurysms. In the thoracic aorta, more invasive hybrid procedures have given way gradually to branched endografts. Particular challenges to the anaesthetist include blood pressure control and the prevention of stroke and paraplegia. Current focus in the thoracic aorta is in treating aortic arch pathology and in optimal management of acute and chronic dissections. This review describes the latest trends in the endovascular treatment of aortic diseases and examines the current evidence for different modalities of management. PMID:27566806

  3. Usefulness of intraoperative bronchoscopy during surgical repair of a congenital cardiac anomaly with possible airway obstruction: three cases report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, JongEun; Kim, Jung-won; Shin, Won-Jung; Park, Pyung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Compression of the airway is relatively common in pediatric patients, although it is often an unrecognized complication of congenital cardiac and aortic arch anomalies. Aortopexy has been established as a surgical treatment for tracheobronchial obstruction associated with vascular anomaly, aortic arch anomaly, esophageal atresia, and tracheoesophageal fistula. The tissue-to-tissue arch repair technique could result in severe airway complication such as compression of the left main bronchus which was not a problem before the correction. We report three cases of corrective open heart surgery monitored by intraoperative bronchoscopy performed during prebypass, and performed immediately before weaning from bypass, to evaluate tracheobronchial obstruction caused by congenital, complex cardiac anomalies in the operating room. PMID:26885306

  4. Combined Interventional and Surgical Treatment for Acute Aortic Type A Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jincheng; Zhang Jinzhou Yang Jian; Zuo Jian; Zhang Jinbao; Yu Shiqiang; Chen Tao; Xu Xuezeng; Wei Xufeng; Yi Dinghua

    2008-07-15

    Surgical repair and endovascular stent-graft placement are both therapies for thoracic aortic dissection. A combination of these two approaches may be effective in patients with type A dissection. In this study, we evaluated the prognosis of this combined technique. From December 2003 to December 2006, 15 patients with type A dissection were admitted to our institute; clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up was performed at discharge and approximately 12 months after operation. Endovascular stent-graft placement by interventional radiology and surgical repair for reconstruction of aortic arch was performed in all patients. Total arch replacement for distal arch aneurysm was carried out under deep hypothermia with circulatory arrest; antegrade-selected cerebral perfusion was used for brain protection. Four patients concomitantly received a coronary artery bypass graft. Hospital mortality rate was 6.7%; the patient died of cerebral infarction. Neurological complications developed in two patients. Multi-detector-row computed tomography scans performed before discharge revealed complete thrombosis of the false lumen in six patients and partial thrombosis in eight patients. At the follow-up examination, complete thrombosis was found in another three patients, aortic rupture, endoleaks, or migration of the stent-graft was not observed and injuries of peripheral organs or anastomotic endoleaks did not occur. For patients with aortic type A dissection, combining intervention and surgical procedures is feasible, and complete or at least partial thrombosis of the false lumen in the descending aorta can be achieved. This combined approach simplified the surgical procedures and shortened the circulatory arrest time, minimizing the necessity for further aortic operation.

  5. [DISORDERS OF LUNG FUNCTION IN THE EARLY POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD IN PATIENTS OPERATED ON THE ASCENDING AORTA WITH THE EXPANSION OF INTERVENTION ON THE AORTIC ARCH].

    PubMed

    Bokeria, L A; Nikitin, E S; Mironenko, V A; Rychin, S V; Vyganovskaya, N B; Makrushin, I M; Gordeev, S L

    2015-01-01

    Precapillary artery--arterial (bronchial artery--pulmonay artery) anastomoses, come into play in cases where the locking artery open and alveoli washed arterialized blood. Normally, these anastomoses are closed. Intrapulmonary shunts carry blood supply acinar hinder extraordinary circumstances (chronic pulmonary embolism, surgery, occurring in cardiopulmonary bypass, when the flaw of blood through the Iungs is suspended for the duration of cardiopulmonary bypass). Patients operated on the ascending aorta with the expansion of intervention on the nortic arch during the correction of pathology carry blood supply only the central nervous system. All other organs and systems at this time were protected by mild hypothermia. However, during circulatory arrest, required for correction of pathology acinar damage as a result of hypoxia, probably because there is no blood flow in the pulmonary artery and there is no blood flow in the bronchial arteries. Last, in the ordinary course of artificial circulation, capable due to arterio-arterial pulmonary anastomoses prevent hypoxic damage to acinar, not lead to persistent hypoxemia in the immediate postoperative period in these patients, as a result of violations of lung diffusion capacity. PMID:27019884

  6. Biomechanical properties of the Marfan's aortic root and ascending aorta before and after personalised external aortic root support surgery.

    PubMed

    Singh, S D; Xu, X Y; Pepper, J R; Treasure, T; Mohiaddin, R H

    2015-08-01

    Marfan syndrome is an inherited systemic connective tissue disease which may lead to aortic root disease causing dilatation, dissection and rupture of the aorta. The standard treatment is a major operation involving either an artificial valve and aorta or a complex valve repair. More recently, a personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) has been used to strengthen the aorta at an earlier stage of the disease avoiding risk of both rupture and major surgery. The aim of this study was to compare the stress and strain fields of the Marfan aortic root and ascending aorta before and after insertion of PEARS in order to understand its biomechanical implications. Finite element (FE) models were developed using patient-specific aortic geometries reconstructed from pre and post-PEARS magnetic resonance images in three Marfan patients. For the post-PEARS model, two scenarios were investigated-a bilayer model where PEARS and the aortic wall were treated as separate layers, and a single-layer model where PEARS was incorporated into the aortic wall. The wall and PEARS materials were assumed to be isotropic, incompressible and linearly elastic. A static load on the inner wall corresponding to the patients' pulse pressure was applied. Results from our FE models with patient-specific geometries show that peak aortic stresses and displacements before PEARS were located at the sinuses of Valsalva but following PEARS surgery, these peak values were shifted to the aortic arch, particularly at the interface between the supported and unsupported aorta. Further studies are required to assess the statistical significance of these findings and how PEARS compares with the standard treatment. PMID:26054807

  7. Impact of Endografting on the Thoracic Aortic Anatomy: Comparative Analysis of the Aortic Geometry before and after the Endograft Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Midulla, Marco; Moreno, Ramiro; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Nicoud, Franc; Pruvo, Jean Pierre; Haulon, Stephan; Rousseau, Hervé

    2013-03-13

    PurposeAlthough the widespread acceptance of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) as a first-line treatment option for a multitude of thoracic aortic diseases, little is known about the consequences of the device implantation on the native aortic anatomy. We propose a comparative analysis of the pre- and postoperative geometry on a clinical series of patients and discuss the potential clinical implicationsMethodsCT pre- and postoperative acquisitions of 30 consecutive patients treated by TEVAR for different pathologies (20 thoracic aortic aneurysms, 6 false aneurysms, 3 penetrating ulcers, 1 traumatic rupture) were used to model the vascular geometry. Pre- and postoperative geometries were compared for each patient by pairing and matching the 3D models. An implantation site was identified, and focal differences were detected and described.ResultsSegmentation of the data sets was successfully performed for all 30 subjects. Geometry differences between the pre- and postoperative meshes were depicted in 23 patients (76 %). Modifications at the upper implantation site were detected in 14 patients (47 %), and among them, the implantation site involved the arch (Z0–3) in 11 (78 %).ConclusionModeling the vascular geometry on the basis of imaging data offers an effective tool to perform patient-specific analysis of the vascular geometry before and after the treatment. Future studies will evaluate the consequences of these changes on the aortic function.

  8. Occlusive ascending aorta and arch atheroma treated with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and thromboendarterectomy.

    PubMed

    O' Sullivan, Katie E; Early, Sarah A; Lawler, Leo; Hurley, John

    2013-12-01

    We describe an uncommon presentation of severely advanced aortic atherosclerosis in a 48-year old man with a history of hypertension and heavy smoking. Initial presentation with upper limb ischaemia led to the diagnosis of an aortic arch atheroma occluding 90% of the aortic lumen, managed with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and aortic thromboendarterectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of atherosclerotic plaque resulting in aortic occlusion and requiring emergent operative intervention. PMID:23956265

  9. Occlusive ascending aorta and arch atheroma treated with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and thromboendarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    O’ Sullivan, Katie E.; Early, Sarah A.; Lawler, Leo; Hurley, John

    2013-01-01

    We describe an uncommon presentation of severely advanced aortic atherosclerosis in a 48-year old man with a history of hypertension and heavy smoking. Initial presentation with upper limb ischaemia led to the diagnosis of an aortic arch atheroma occluding 90% of the aortic lumen, managed with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and aortic thromboendarterectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of atherosclerotic plaque resulting in aortic occlusion and requiring emergent operative intervention. PMID:23956265

  10. Intraoperative DynaCT Detection and Immediate Correction of a Type 1a Endoleak Following Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Biasi, Lukla; Ali, Tahir; Hinchliffe, Robert; Morgan, Rob; Loftus, Ian; Thompson, Matt

    2009-05-15

    Reintervention following endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is required in up to 10% of patients at 30 days and is associated with a demonstrable risk of increased mortality. Completion angiography cannot detect all graft-related anomalies and computed tomographic angiography is therefore mandatory to ensure clinical success. Intraoperative angiographic computed tomography (DynaCT; Siemens, Germany) utilizes cone beam reconstruction software and flat-panel detectors to generate CT-like images from rotational angiographic acquisitions. We report the intraoperative use of this novel technology in detecting and immediately treating a proximal anterior type Ia endoleak, following an endovascular abdominal aortic repair, which was not seen on completion angiography. Immediate evaluation of cross-sectional imaging following endograft deployment may allow for on-table correction of clinically significant stent-related complications. This should both improve technical success and minimize the need for early secondary intervention following EVAR.

  11. In situ repair of a primary Brucella-infected abdominal aortic aneurysm: long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Goudard, Yvain; Pierret, Charles; de La Villéon, Bruno; Mlynski, Amélie; de Kerangal, Xavier

    2013-02-01

    Infected aortic aneurysms represent 0.85 to 1.3% of aortic aneurysms. Most often, the implicated bacteria species are Salmonella sp., Staphylococcus sp. and Streptococcus sp. Brucella-related infected aortic aneurysms are very rare. Most often, they result from endocarditis or from a local septic focus. Combined treatment by antibiotics and surgery is the standard for infectious aneurysms. In the absence of formal factual data, the surgical treatment is still discussed in the literature, especially since endovascular treatments have been in full expansion. We are reporting the case of a female patient presenting with a Brucella-related infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm, without primitive infectious source (area) or identified endocarditis. Surgical treatment with in situ prosthetic replacement and omentoplasty in association with adapted antibiotics allowed a favorable outcome with an excellent result after an 8-year follow up. PMID:23380562

  12. Current technology for the treatment of infection following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) fixation by endovascular repair (EVAR).

    PubMed

    Capoccia, L; Mestres, G; Riambau, V

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, in parallel with the increase of endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) procedures performances, a rise of late open surgical removal of EVAR implants has been observed, due to non-endovascularly correctable graft complications. Among them endograft infection is a rare but devastating occurrence, accounting for an incidence ranging from 0.2% to 0.7% in major series, and almost 1% of all causes of endograft explantations. However, a real estimation of the incidence of the problem respect to the number of EVAR implantations is difficult to obtain. Time to infection is usually defined as the period between EVAR and presentation of symptoms that leads to the infection diagnosis. It can be extremely variable, depending on bacterial virulence and host conditions. The diagnosis of an endograft infection is usually based on a combination of clinical symptoms, imaging studies and microbial cultures whenever possible. If computed tomography (CT) scan is employed in almost 100% of infection diagnosis, a combination of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and CT scan is nowadays used with increasing frequency in order to rise the likelihood of detecting a graft infection, since even cultures of blood or samples collected from the infected field can sometimes be negative. Complete graft excision seems the best approach whenever a surgical reconstruction could be attempted. In situ reconstruction can be performed by the interposition of an autologous vein, a cryopreserved allograft or a rifampin-soaked Dacron graft. The so-called conventional treatment contemplates the re-establishment of vascularization through extranatomical routes, thus preserving the new graft material from possible contamination by the surgical field just cleaned. When severe comorbid conditions did not allow graft excision, a conservative treatment should be taken into account. It is mainly based on broad-spectrum or culture-specific antibiotic therapy combined, whenever

  13. Treating patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm with endovascular repair and the crossover chimney technique in the internal iliac artery to protect the unilateral internal iliac artery

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xi; Li, Peng; Liu, Guang-Rui; Huang, Xiao-Yong; Huang, Lian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore the treatment methods for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) that required occlusion of the openings of the bilateral internal iliac arteries (IIAs) in endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and to evaluate the efficacy of these treatments. Four patients with AAA were treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) and the crossover chimney technique in the bilateral internal iliac arteries (IIAs). We inserted and released the abdominal aortic stent as usual and implanted the bypass stent graft simultaneously. The intraoperative immediate angiography showed complete isolation of the AAA and patency of the bypass. One month after surgery, it showed contrast engorgement in the bypass stent in three patients. The IIA on the bypass side and its branches had good developing. Another case in which we utilized a COOK stent, occlusion started at the opening of the bypass stent, with no occurrence of other complications. For patients in whom AAAs involve bilateral iliac arteries and the openings of the bilateral IIAs need to be occluded, EVAR and a crossover chimney technique can protect the unilateral IIA. PMID:26885136

  14. Long-term efficacy of endovascular vs open surgical repair for complicated type-B aortic dissection: a single-center retrospective study and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Y.; Wang, B.; Meng, Q.; Liu, J.; Zhai, S.; He, J.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the long-term survival and risk factors of traditional open surgical repair (OSR) vs thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) for complicated type-B aortic dissection (TBAD). A total of 118 inpatients (45 OSR vs 73 TEVAR) with TBAD were enrolled from January 2004 to January 2015. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards analysis were performed to identify the long-term survival rate and independent predictors of survival, respectively. Meta-analysis was used to further explore the long-term efficacy of OSR and TEVAR in the eight included studies using Review Manager 5.2 software. An overall 10-year survival rate of 41.9% was found, and it was similar in the two groups (56.7% OSR vs 26.1% TEVAR; log-rank P=0.953). The risk factors of long-term survival were refractory hypertension (OR=11.1; 95%CI=1.428-86.372; P=0.021] and preoperative aortic diameter >55 mm (OR=4.5; 95%CI=1.842-11.346; P=0.001). Long-term survival rate did not differ significantly between OSR and TEVAR (hazard ratio=0.87; 95%CI=0.52-1.47; P=0.61). Compared with OSR, TEVAR did not show long-term advantages for patients with TBAD. Refractory hypertension and total aortic diameter >55 mm can be used to predict the long-term survival of TBAD in the Chinese Han population. PMID:27254661

  15. Image Guidance for Endovascular Repair of Complex Aortic Aneurysms: Comparison of Two-dimensional and Three-dimensional Angiography and Image Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Tacher, Vania; Lin, MingDe; Desgranges, Pascal; Deux, Jean-Francois; Grünhagen, Thijs; Becquemin, Jean-Pierre; Luciani, Alain; Rahmouni, Alain; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of image fusion (IF) of preprocedural arterial-phase computed tomography with intraprocedural fluoroscopy for roadmapping in endovascular repair of complex aortic aneurysms, and to compare this approach versus current roadmapping methods (ie, two-dimensional [2D] and three-dimensional [3D] angiography). Materials and Methods Thirty-seven consecutive patients with complex aortic aneurysms treated with endovascular techniques were retrospectively reviewed; these included aneurysms of digestive and/or renal arteries and pararenal and juxtarenal aortic aneurysms. All interventions were performed with the same angiographic system. According to the availability of different roadmapping software, patients were successively placed into three intraprocedural image guidance groups: (i) 2D angiography (n = 9), (ii) 3D rotational angiography (n = 14), and (iii) IF (n = 14). X-ray exposure (dose–area product [DAP]), injected contrast medium volume, and procedure time were recorded. Results Patient characteristics were similar among groups, with no statistically significant differences (P ≥ .05). There was no statistical difference in endograft deployment success between groups (2D angiography, eight of nine patients [89%]; 3D angiography and IF, 14 of 14 patients each [100%]). The IF group showed significant reduction (P < .0001) in injected contrast medium volume versus other groups (2D, 235 mL ± 145; 3D, 225 mL ± 119; IF, 65 mL ± 28). Mean DAP values showed no significant difference between groups (2D, 1,188 Gy · cm2 ± 1,067; 3D, 984 Gy · cm2 ± 581; IF, 655 Gy · cm2 ± 457; P = .18); nor did procedure times (2D, 233 min ± 123; 3D, 181 min ± 53; IF, 189 min ± 60; P = .59). Conclusions The use of IF-based roadmapping is a feasible technique for endovascular complex aneurysm repair associated with significant reduction of injected contrast agent volume and similar x-ray exposure and procedure time. PMID:24035418

  16. Frequency of concomitant ischemic heart disease and risk factor analysis for an early postoperative myocardial infarction after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Rim; Heo, Seon-Hee; Woo, Shin-Young; Park, Yang Jin; Kim, Dong Ik; Yang, Jeonghoon; Choi, Seung-Hyuk; Kim, Duk-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to see the frequency of concomitant ischemic heart disease (IHD) in Korean patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and to determine risk factors for an early postoperative acute myocardial infarction (PAMI) after elective open or endovascular AAA repair. Methods We retrospectively reviewed a database of patients who underwent elective AAA repair over the past 11 years. Patients were classified into 3 groups: control group; group I, medical IHD treatment; group II, invasive IHD treatment. Rates of PAMI and mortality at 30 days were compiled and compared between groups according to the type of AAA repair. Results Six hundred two elective repairs of infrarenal or juxtarenal AAAs were enrolled in this study. The patients were classified into control group (n = 398, 66.1%), group I (n = 73, 12.1%) and group II (n = 131, 21.8%). PAMI developed more frequently after open surgical repair (OSR) than after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) (5.4% vs. 1.3%, P = 0.012). In OSR patients (n = 373), PAMI developed 2.1% in control group, 18.0% in group I and 7.1% in group II (P < 0.001). In EVAR group (n = 229), PAMI developed 0.6% in control group, 4.3% in group I and 2.2% in group II (P = 0.211). On the multivariable analysis of risk factors of PAMI, PAMI developed more frequently in patients with positive functional stress test. Conclusion The prevalence of concomitant IHD was 34% in Korean AAA patients. The risk of PAMI was significantly higher after OSR compared to EVAR and in patients with IHD compared to control group. Though we found some risk factors for PAMI, these were not applied to postoperative mortality rate. PMID:26942161

  17. Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... can offer patients a very, very good integrated care with surgery and radiology together. Okay. Okay. Jim. ... seek the least invasive therapy for your own care as long as you’re an appropriate patient. ...

  18. Repair of an acute Type A aortic dissection with LVAD patient after failed mitral and tricuspid operation.

    PubMed

    Schmitto, Jan Dieter; Fleissner, Felix; Hanke, Jasmin; Rojas, Sebastian; Avsar, Murat; Martens, Andreas; Shrestha, Malakh; Haverich, Axel; Strueber, Martin

    2016-04-01

    An acute type A dissection in a patient with a left ventricular assist device was treated by replacement of the ascending aorta and the proximal arch using a prosthesis with a side branch which was connected to the left ventricular assist device outflow branch, greatly simplifying the procedure. PMID:27099734

  19. The chimney-graft technique for preserving supra-aortic branches: a review.

    PubMed

    Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Mylonas, Spyridon N; Dalainas, Ilias; Sfyroeras, George S; Markatis, Fotis; Kotsis, Thomas; Kakisis, John; Liapis, Christos D

    2013-05-01

    Evolution in the endovascular era has influenced the management of aortic arch pathologies. "Chimney" or "snorkel" graft technique has been used as an alternative in high risk patients unfit for open repair. We reviewed the published literature on the chimney graft technique for preservation of the supra-aortic branches in order to provide an extensive insight of its feasibility and efficacy and investigate its outcomes. 18 reports were identified, with a total of 124 patients and 136 chimney. Primary technical success was achieved in 123/124 patients (99.2%). The perioperative mortality rate was 4.8% and the stroke rate was 4%, while events of spinal cord ischemia were rare. The overall endoleak rate was 18.5%; 13 patients (10.5%) developed a type I endoleak and 10 (8%) patients a type II endoleak. During a median follow-up period of 11.4 months (range, 0.87-20.1 months) all implanted chimney grafts remained patent. From this, we conclude that endovascular aortic arch repair with chimney grafts is associated with a lower mortality rate compared to totally open or hybrid reconstruction. However, the stroke rate remains noteworthy, and requires longterm data to elucidate. PMID:23977603

  20. The chimney-graft technique for preserving supra-aortic branches: a review

    PubMed Central

    Mylonas, Spyridon N.; Dalainas, Ilias; Sfyroeras, George S.; Markatis, Fotis; Kotsis, Thomas; Kakisis, John; Liapis, Christos D.

    2013-01-01

    Evolution in the endovascular era has influenced the management of aortic arch pathologies. “Chimney” or “snorkel” graft technique has been used as an alternative in high risk patients unfit for open repair. We reviewed the published literature on the chimney graft technique for preservation of the supra-aortic branches in order to provide an extensive insight of its feasibility and efficacy and investigate its outcomes. 18 reports were identified, with a total of 124 patients and 136 chimney. Primary technical success was achieved in 123/124 patients (99.2%). The perioperative mortality rate was 4.8% and the stroke rate was 4%, while events of spinal cord ischemia were rare. The overall endoleak rate was 18.5%; 13 patients (10.5%) developed a type I endoleak and 10 (8%) patients a type II endoleak. During a median follow-up period of 11.4 months (range, 0.87-20.1 months) all implanted chimney grafts remained patent. From this, we conclude that endovascular aortic arch repair with chimney grafts is associated with a lower mortality rate compared to totally open or hybrid reconstruction. However, the stroke rate remains noteworthy, and requires longterm data to elucidate. PMID:23977603

  1. Overview of current surgical strategies for aortic disease in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Shunsuke; Okita, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a heritable, systemic disorder of the connective tissue with a high penetrance, named after Dr. Antoine Marfan. The most clinically important manifestations of this syndrome are cardiovascular pathologies which cause life-threatening events, such as acute aortic dissections, aortic rupture and regurgitation of the aortic valve or other artrioventricular valves leading to heart failure. These events play important roles in the life expectancy of patients with this disorder, especially prior to the development of effective surgical approaches for proximal ascending aortic disease. To prevent such catastrophic aortic events, a lower threshold has been recommended for prophylactic interventions on the aortic root. After prophylactic root replacement, disease in the aorta beyond the root and distal to the arch remains a cause for concern. Multiple surgeries are required throughout a patient's lifetime that can be problematic due to distal lesions complicated by dissection. Many controversies in surgical strategies remain, such as endovascular repair, to manage such complex cases. This review examines the trends in surgical strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular disease in patients with Marfan syndrome, and current perspectives in this field. PMID:26586198

  2. Recent advances in aortic valve disease: highlights from a bicuspid aortic valve to transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Augoustides, John G T; Wolfe, Yanika; Walsh, Elizabeth K; Szeto, Wilson Y

    2009-08-01

    There have been major advances in the management of aortic valve disease. Because bicuspid aortic valve is common and predicts an increased risk of adverse aortic events, these patients merit aortic surveillance and consideration for ascending aortic replacement when its diameter exceeds 4.0 cm. Serial quantitative echocardiographic analysis, as compared with traditional clinical markers, can result in better timing of surgical intervention for aortic regurgitation. Furthermore, echocardiographic analysis of aortic regurgitation can classify the mechanism based on cusp mobility to guide aortic valve repair. In aortic root replacement, aortic valve preservation with reimplantation is a mainstream surgical option in Marfan syndrome to offer freedom from valve-related anticoagulation. Prosthetic aortic root replacement has further alternatives with the introduction of the aortic neosinus design and acceptable clinical outcomes with the porcine xenograft. Because aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) may adversely affect patient outcome, its perioperative prevention is important. Furthermore, significant functional mitral regurgitation in association with aortic stenosis often resolves after aortic valve replacement. Echocardiographic assessment of the aortic valve must include valve area because the transaortic pressure gradient may be low in severe stenosis. Aortic valve replacement with partial sternotomy is safe and offers a reasonable less invasive alternative. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement, whether transfemoral or transapical, has revolutionized aortic valve replacement; it remains a major theme in the specialty for 2009 and beyond. PMID:19497768

  3. Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm with Dissection Presenting as Flash Pulmonary Edema in a 26-Year-Old Man

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Sabry; Moore, Tyler; Payne, Drew; Momeni, Parastoo; Mulkey, Zachary; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting a case of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in a 26-year-old man with no significant past medical history and a family history of dissecting aortic aneurysm in his mother at the age of 40. The patient presented with cough, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. CT scan of the chest showed a dissection of the ascending aorta. The patient underwent aortic dissection repair and three months later he returned to our hospital with new complaints of back pain. CT angiography showed a new aortic dissection extending from the left carotid artery through the bifurcation and into the iliac arteries. The patient underwent replacement of the aortic root, ascending aorta, total aortic arch, and aortic valve. The patient recovered well postoperatively. Genetic studies of the patient and his children revealed no mutations in ACTA2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, MYH11, MYLK, SMAD3, or FBN1. This case report focuses on a patient with familial TAAD and discusses the associated genetic loci and available screening methods. It is important to recognize potential cases of familial TAAD and understand the available screening methods since early diagnosis allows appropriate management of risk factors and treatment when necessary. PMID:25104961

  4. Contemporary Management of Type B Aortic Dissection in the Endovascular Era.

    PubMed

    Bannazadeh, Mohsen; Tadros, Rami O; McKinsey, James; Chander, Rajiv; Marin, Michael L; Faries, Peter L

    2016-04-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is one of the most common catastrophic pathologies affecting the aorta. Anatomic classification is based on the origin of entry tear and its extension. Type A dissections originate in the ascending aorta, whereas the entry tear in Type B dissections starts distal to the left subclavian artery. The patients with aortic dissection who manifest complications such as rupture, malperfusion, aneurysmal degeneration, and intractable pain are classified as complicated AD. Risk factors for developing aortic dissection include age, male gender, and aortic wall structural abnormalities. The most common presenting symptom of acute aortic dissection is pain. Malperfusion occurs as a result of end-organ ischemia due to involvement of aortic branches from the dissecting process. This can happen in various locations causing mesenteric ischemia (mesenteric vessels), stroke (aortic arch vessels), renal failure (renal arteries), spinal ischemia, and limb ischemia (iliac or subclavian arteries). Aneurysmal degeneration is the most common complication of patients with chronic Type B dissection who are managed with medical therapy. Management of Type B aortic dissection (TBAD) remains controversial. Many groups recommend conservative therapy for newly diagnosed TBAD and reserve surgical management for patients who develop complications such as rupture, malperfusion, aneurysmal dilatation, and refractory pain. The mainstay of medical therapy includes antihypertensive medication to reduced ΔP/ ΔT by lowering blood pressure and heart rate. With the continued success of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR), this procedure has been extended to treat TBAD in selected patients. The outcomes of TEVAR are promising, with early mortality rates from 10% to 20%. With promising results from these series, some groups recommend early TEVAR in uncomplicated TBAD to prevent future adverse events. The goals of endovascular treatment of TBAD are to cover the entry tear

  5. Safety of Comprehensive Aortic Root and Valve Repair Surgery: A Retrospective Outcomes Research by National Evidence-Based Health Care Collaborating Agency, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eunhee; Heo, Dae Seog

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive aortic root and valve repair (CARVAR) is a recently introduced surgical technique for aortic valve disease. The National Evidence-based Health Care Collaborating Agency was offered by the ministry of Health and Welfare, Korea to perform a restrospective outcome analysis for this surgical procedure. The aims of this study were to evaluate the safety of patients who underwent CARVAR surgery and to provide a rationale for further prospective randomized study. During the period of March 2007 to November 2009, 397 patients received this procedure and enrolled in this study. Clinical events including major bleeding, endocarditis, re-operation and death were followed-up till March 2010 by medical records. During the follow-up periods, 1-year cumulative incidence of major bleeding, re-operation, endocarditis and death were 3.55, 5.65, 5.05 and 5.33%/year respectively. This study showed that the CARVAR technique is not beneficial, and is indeed even more harmful than conventional valve replacement surgery. PMID:23236329

  6. Detection of Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Aortic Repair: Comparison Between Magnetic Resonance Angiography and Blood-Pool Contrast Agent and Dual-Phase Computed Tomography Angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Wieners, Gero; Meyer, Frank; Halloul, Zuhir; Peters, Nils; Ruehl, Ricarda; Dudeck, Oliver; Tautenhahn, Joerg; Ricke, Jens; Pech, Maciej

    2010-12-15

    PurposeThis prospective study was designed to assess the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) with blood-pool contrast agent (gadofosveset) in the detection of type-II endoleak after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR).MethodsThirty-two patients with aortic aneurysms who had undergone EVAR were included in this study. All patients were examined by dual-phase computed tomography angiography (CTA) as well as MRA with gadofosveset in the first-pass and steady-state phases. Two independent readers evaluated the images of CTA and MRA in terms of endoleak type II, feeding vessel, and image quality.ResultsMedian follow-up-time after EVAR was 22 months (range 4 to 59). Endoleak type II was detected by CTA in 12 of 32 patients (37.5%); MRA detected endoleak in all of these patients as well as in another 9 patients (n = 21, 65.6%), of whom the endoleaks in 6 patients showed an increasing diameter. Most endoleaks were detected in the steady-state phase (n = 14). The decrease in diameter of the aneurysmal sac was significantly greater in the patients without a visible endoleak that was visible on MRA (P = 0.004). In the overall estimation of diagnostic accuracy, MRA was judged superior to CTA in 66% of all examinations.ConclusionMRA with gadofosveset appeared superior to CTA, and has higher diagnostic accuracy, in the detection of endoleak after EVAR.

  7. Development of Delirium in the Intensive Care Unit in Patients after Endovascular Aortic Repair: A Retrospective Evaluation of the Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Yujiro; Taneichi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Yujiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2015-01-01

    Delirium is an acute form of nervous system dysfunction often observed in patients in the intensive care unit. Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) is considered a minimally invasive surgical treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm. Although the operation method is widely used, there are few investigations of the rate and risk factors of delirium development after the operation. In this study, we retrospectively examined the rate of delirium development in the intensive care unit (ICU) after EVAR, as well as the associated preoperative risk factors and effects on the lengths of ICU and hospital stays. We examined the 81 consecutive patients who underwent elective EVAR between November 2013 and August 2014. The Intensive Care Delirium Screening Checklist was used to diagnose delirium. Twenty patients (24.7%) were diagnosed with delirium in this study. The ICU and hospital length of stays of patients with delirium were 3.3 ± 2.4 days and 14.5 ± 11.9 days, respectively, the latter of which was significantly longer than that of patients without delirium (p = 0.019). Additionally, renal dysfunction, preoperative benzodiazepine use, and intraoperative transfusion were found to be risk factors for the development of delirium after elective EVAR. PMID:26421186

  8. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided Embolization of Growing Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysm after Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Transretroperitoneal Approach with Intramuscular Lidocaine Injection Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joon Young Kim, Shin Jung Kim, Hyoung Ook; Kim, Yong Tae; Lim, Nam Yeol Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Sang Young Choi, Soo Jin Na Lee, Ho Kyun

    2015-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of CT-guided embolization of internal iliac artery aneurysm (IIAA) after repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm by transretroperitoneal approach using the lidocaine injection technique to iliacus muscle, making window for safe needle path for three patients for whom CT-guided embolization of IIAA was performed by transretroperitoneal approach with intramuscular lidocaine injection technique. Transretroperitoneal access to the IIAA was successful in all three patients. In all three patients, the IIAA was first embolized using microcoils. The aneurysmal sac was then embolized with glue and coils without complication. With a mean follow-up of 7 months, the volume of the IIAAs remained stable without residual endoleaks. Transretroperitoneal CT-guided embolization of IIAA using intramuscular lidocaine injection technique is effective, safe, and results in good outcome.

  9. [Safe and Effective Analgesia with Bilateral Continuous TAP Block for a Patient with Marfan Syndrome after Open Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair].

    PubMed

    Katakura, Yumi; Sakurai, Asako; Endo, Masaru; Hamada, Takako; Nomoto, Mayuko; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takeda, Koji

    2016-06-01

    A patient with Marfan syndrome underwent emergency open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. She was referred to our department for postoperative analgesia. Taking the risk of possible dural ectasia into consideration, we avoided epidural block. Alternatively, we performed bilateral continuous transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block with sufficient analgesia. Lumbosacral dural ectasia is frequently observed in patients with Marfan syndrome. A few reports described that their fragile dura may contribute to an increased risk of dural puncture and postdural puncture headache (PDPH). Thus, in planning neuraxial block for a patient with Marfan syndrome, the possible consequences of lumbosacral dural ectasia should be considered. A case we herein present shows bilateral continuous TAP block could be a safe and effective alternative to epidural block. PMID:27483660

  10. CT Imaging Findings and Their Relevance to the Clinical Outcomes After Stent Graft Repair of Penetrating Aortic Ulcers: Six-year, Single-center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Ji Hoon; Angle, John F.; Park, Auh Whan; Anderson, Curtis; Sabri, Saher S.; Turba, Ulku C.; Kern, John A.; Cherry, Kenneth J.; Matsumoto, Alan H.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To present the computed tomographic (CT) imaging findings and their relevance to clinical outcomes related to stent graft placement in patients with penetrating aortic ulcers (PAUs). Methods: Medical and imaging records and imaging studies were reviewed for consecutive patients who underwent stent graft repair of a PAU. The distribution and characteristics of the PAU, technical success of stent graft repair, procedure-related complications, associated aortic wall abnormalities, and outcomes of the PAUs at follow-up CT scans were evaluated. Results: Fifteen patients underwent endovascular treatment for PAU. A total of 87% of the PAUs were in the proximal (n = 8) or distal (n = 5) descending thoracic aorta. There was a broad spectrum of PAU depth (mean, 7.9 {+-} 5.6 mm; range 1.5-25.0 mm) and diameter (mean, 13.5 {+-} 9.7 mm; range 2.2-41.0 mm). Atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta and intramural hematoma were associated in 53 and 93% of the patients, respectively. Technical success was achieved in 100%. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients. Endoleaks were observed in two patients within 2 weeks of the procedure, both of which resolved spontaneously. At follow-up CT scanning, regression and thrombosis of the PAUs were observed in all patients. The average patient survival was 61.8 months, with an overall mortality of 13% (2 of 15) at follow-up. Neither death was related to the endograft device or the PAU. Conclusion: Endovascular stent graft placement was safe and effective in causing regression and thrombosis of PAUs in this small series of patients. Two or more stent grafts were used in five patients (33%) with associated long-segmental atherosclerotic changes of the thoracic aorta or intramural hematoma.

  11. New Technique for the Preservation of the Left Common Carotid Artery in Zone 2a Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert Kulesza, Jerzy; Zarzecka, Anna; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Majewski, Waclaw

    2011-02-15

    To describe a technique for the preservation of the left common carotid artery (CCA) in zone 2 endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This technique involves the placement of a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment to enable precise visualization and protection of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Of the 107 patients with thoracic endovascular aortic repair in our study, 32 (30%) had the left subclavian artery intentionally covered (landing zone 2). Eight (25%) of those 32 had landing zone 2a-the segment distally the origin of the left CCA, halfway between the origin of the left CCA and the left subclavian artery. In all patients, a guide wire was positioned into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment. It is a retrospective study in design. In seven patients, stent grafts were positioned precisely. In the remaining patient, the positioning was imprecise; the origin of the left CCA was partially covered by the graft. A stent was implanted into the left CCA to restore the flow into the vessel. All procedures were performed successfully. The technique of placing a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment is a safe and effective method that enables the precise visualization of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Moreover, in case of inadvertent complete or partial coverage of the origin of the left CCA, it supplies safe and quick access to the artery for stent implantation.

  12. Can Early Computed Tomography Angiography after Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair Predict the Need for Reintervention in Patients with Type II Endoleak?

    SciTech Connect

    Dudeck, O.; Schnapauff, D.; Herzog, L.; Löwenthal, D.; Bulla, K.; Bulla, B.; Halloul, Z.; Meyer, F.; Pech, M.; Gebauer, B.; Ricke, J.

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to identify parameters on CT angiography (CTA) of type II endoleaks following endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), which can be used to predict the subsequent need for reinterventions.MethodsWe retrospectively identified 62 patients with type II endoleak who underwent early CTA in mean 3.7 ± 1.9 days after EVAR. On the basis of follow-up examinations (mean follow-up period 911 days; range, 373–1,987 days), patients were stratified into two groups: those who did (n = 18) and those who did not (n = 44) require reintervention. CTA characteristics, such as AAA, endoleak, as well as nidus dimensions, patency of the inferior mesenteric artery, number of aortic branch vessels, and the pattern of endoleak appearance, were recorded and correlated with the clinical outcome.ResultsUnivariate and receiver operating characteristic curve regression analyses revealed significant differences between the two groups for the endoleak volume (surveillance group: 1391.6 ± 1427.9 mm{sup 3}; reintervention group: 3227.7 ± 2693.8 mm{sup 3}; cutoff value of 2,386 mm{sup 3}; p = 0.002), the endoleak diameter (13.6 ± 4.3 mm compared with 25.9 ± 9.6 mm; cutoff value of 19 mm; p < 0.0001), the number of aortic branch vessels (2.9 ± 1.2 compared with 4.2 ± 1.4 vessels; p = 0.001), as well as a “complex type” endoleak pattern (13.6 %, n = 6 compared with 44.4 %, n = 8; p = 0.02).ConclusionsEarly CTA can predict the future need for reintervention in patients with type II endoleak. Therefore, treatment decision should be based not only on aneurysm enlargement alone but also on other imaging characteristics.

  13. Blood flow dynamic improvement with aneurysm repair detected by a patient-specific model of multiple aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Takahara, Yoshiharu; Mogi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liang, Fuyou; Liu, Hao

    2014-05-01

    Aortic aneurysms may cause the turbulence of blood flow and result in the energy loss of the blood flow, while grafting of the dilated aorta may ameliorate these hemodynamic disturbances, contributing to the alleviation of the energy efficiency of blood flow delivery. However, evaluating of the energy efficiency of blood flow in an aortic aneurysm has been technically difficult to estimate and not comprehensively understood yet. We devised a multiscale computational biomechanical model, introducing novel flow indices, to investigate a single male patient with multiple aortic aneurysms. Preoperative levels of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index (OSI) were elevated but declined after staged grafting procedures: OSI decreased from 0.280 to 0.257 (first operation) and 0.221 (second operation). Graftings may strategically counter the loss of efficient blood delivery to improve hemodynamics of the aorta. The energy efficiency of blood flow also improved postoperatively. Novel indices of pulsatile pressure index (PPI) and pulsatile energy loss index (PELI) were evaluated to characterize and quantify energy loss of pulsatile blood flow. Mean PPI decreased from 0.445 to 0.423 (first operation) and 0.359 (second operation), respectively; while the preoperative PELI of 0.986 dropped to 0.820 and 0.831. Graftings contributed not only to ameliorate wall shear stress or oscillatory shear index but also to improve efficient blood flow. This patient-specific modeling will help in analyzing the mechanism of aortic aneurysm formation and may play an important role in quantifying the energy efficiency or loss in blood delivery. PMID:23852404

  14. Endovascular Repair of Acute Symptomatic Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm With Three Chimney and One Periscope Graft for Complete Visceral Artery Revascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Brechtel, Klaus Ketelsen, Dominik; Endisch, Andrea; Heller, Stephan; Heuschmid, Martin; Stock, Ulrich A.; Kalender, Guenay

    2012-04-15

    PurposeTo describe a modified endovascular technique for complete revascularization of visceral and renal arteries in symptomatic pararenal aortic aneurysm (PRAA).TechniqueArterial access was surgically established in both common femoral arteries (CFAs) and the left subclavian artery (LSA). Revascularization of the left renal artery, the celiac trunk, and the superior mesenteric artery was performed through one single sheath via the LSA. Suitable covered stents were put in the aortic branches but not deployed. The right renal artery was accessed over the left CFA. Due to the longitudinal extension of the presented aneurysm two stent-grafts were introduced via the right CFA. After deploying the aortic stent-grafts, all covered stents in the side branches were deployed consecutively with a minimum overlap of 5 mm over the cranial and caudal stent-graft edges. Simultaneous ballooning was performed to fully expand all stent-grafts and warranty patency. Conclusion: This is the first report in the literature of chimney grafting in PRAA for complete revascularization of visceral and renal branches by using more than two covered stents introduced from one side through one single sheath. However this technique is modified, it should be used only in bailout situations when branched stent-grafts are not available and/or surgery is not suitable.

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Setacci, Francesco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; De Donato, Gianmarco; Benevento, Domenico; Guerrieri, Massimiliano W; Ruzzi, Umberto; Borrelli, Maria P; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has become a milestone in the treatment of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm. Technological improvement allows treatment in more and more complex cases. This review summarizes all grafts available on the market. A complete review of most important trial on this topic is provided to the best of our knowledge, and technical tips and tricks for standard cases are also included. PMID:26771730

  16. Multimodality imaging assessment for Thoraflex hybrid total arch replacement.

    PubMed

    Wong, Randolph Hl; Ho, Jacky Yk; Underwood, Malcolm J

    2016-06-01

    Conventionally, aortic pathologies involving the ascending, arch, and descending thoracic aorta are treated by a staged operation. The Thoraflex device is a composite 4-branched graft with a distal endovascular stent, which allows one-stage treatment of these pathologies. We describe our multimodality hybrid approach for total arch replacement using the Thoraflex device with the adjunct of intraoperative 3-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography, Endo-EYE endoscopy, and on-table aortography in a hybrid operating room. These multimodality assessments can ascertain adequate sealing of a distal aortic tear and proper opening of the endograft, and provide on-table functional assessment of false lumen hemodynamics. Early results are promising. PMID:27072867

  17. Improving Results of Elective Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair at a Low-Volume Hospital by Risk-Adjusted Selection of Treatment in the Endovascular Era

    SciTech Connect

    Wibmer, Andreas; Meyer, Bernhard; Albrecht, Thomas; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Kruschewski, Martin

    2009-09-15

    Several studies have observed both higher mortality rates and lower utilization of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) at low-volume centers. This article presents the results of elective abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair at a low-volume center in the endovascular era and investigates whether postprocedural mortality can be improved by extension of EVAR application also in this setting. This is an 11.6-year retrospective cohort study of 132 patients undergoing elective surgical or endovascular AAA repair at a tertiary care academic hospital between 1997 and July 2008, i.e., a median volume of 12 cases per year. The study was divided into two periods of time according to the respective indications and contraindications for EVAR, which substantially changed in 2005. During period 1, only aneurysms with necks {>=}20 mm long and not involving the iliac arteries were treated endoluminally. Beginning in 2005, indication for EVAR was expanded to aortoiliac aneurysms with a minimum neck length of 15 mm. Preoperative risk was assessed by the SVS/AAVS comorbidity score. During the first period (1997-2004) 18.4% (16/87) of all patients received EVAR. By extending anatomical confines and indications for EVAR in 2005, the utilization rate of EVAR increased to 40.0% (18/45) during the second period (2005-July 2008; p = 0.007). Prevalence of preoperative risk factors did not change during the two observation periods. In contrast to period 1, high-risk patients were preferentially treated endoluminally during the second period, resulting in a significantly higher median SVS/AAVS score in the EVAR group (p < 0.001). A significant decrease in median length of stay at the intensive/intermediate care unit (5 vs. 2 days; p = 0.006) and length of in-hospital stay (20 vs. 12.5 days; p < 0.001) was observed during period 2. Overall perioperative mortality was reduced from 6.9% during the first period to 2.2% during the second period (p = 0.256). EVAR mortality was 0%, mortality after

  18. Impact of Pre-Existing Elastic Matrix on TGF-β1 and HA Oligomer-Induced Regenerative Repair by Rat Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gacchina, Carmen E.; Ramamurthi, Anand

    2010-01-01

    Regenerating elastic matrices lost to disease (e.g. in aneurysms) is vital to re-establishing vascular homeostasis but is challenged by poor elastogenicity of post-neonatal cells. We previously showed exogenous hyaluronan oligomers (HA-o) and TGF-β1 to synergistically enhance tropo and matrix elastin deposition by healthy adult rat aortic SMCs (RASMCs). Towards treating aortic aneurysms (AAs), which exhibit cause- and site-specific heterogeneity in matrix content/structure and contain proteolytically-injured SMCs, we investigated impact of pre-existing elastic matrix degeneration on elastogenic induction of injured RASMCs. Elastin-rich RASMC layers at 21 days of culture, were treated with 0.15 U/ml (PPE15) and 0.75 U/ml (PPE75) of porcine pancreatic elastase to degrade the elastic matrix variably, or left uninjured (control). One set of cultures was harvested at 21d, before and after injury, to quantify viable cell count, matrix elastin loss. Other injured cell layers were cultured to 42d with or without factors (0.2 μg/ml HA oligomers, 1 ng/ml TGF-β1). We showed that (a)ability of cultures to self-repair and regenerate elastic matrices following proteolysis is limited when elastolysis is severe, (b)HA oligomers and TGF-β1 elastogenically stimulate RASMCs in mildly-injured (i.e., PPE15) cultures to restore both elastic matrix amounts and elastic-fiber deposition to levels in healthy cultures, and (c) in severely injured (i.e., PPE75) cultures, the factors stimulate matrix elastin synthesis and crosslinking, though not to control levels. The outcomes underscore need to enhance elastogenic factor doses based on severity of elastin loss. This study will help customize therapies for elastin regeneration within AAs based on cause and location. PMID:20653044

  19. When and how to replace the aortic root in type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Leshnower, Bradley G.

    2016-01-01

    Management of aortic root pathology during repair of acute type A aortic dissection (TAAD) requires a comprehensive evaluation of the patient’s anatomy, demographics, comorbidities and physiologic status at the time of emergent operative intervention. Surgical options include conservative repair of the root (CRR) (with or without replacement of the aortic valve), replacement of the native valve and aortic root using a composite valve-conduit and valve sparing root replacement (VSRR). The primary objective of this review is to provide data for surgeons to aid in their decision-making process regarding management of the aortic root during repair of TAAD. No time or language restrictions were imposed and references of the selected studies were checked for additional relevant citations. Multiple retrospective reviews have demonstrated equivalent operative mortality between aortic root repair and replacement during TAAD. There is a higher incidence of aortic root reintervention with aortic root repair compared to aortic root replacement (ARR). Experienced, high-volume aortic centers have demonstrated the safety of VSRR in young, hemodynamically stable patients presenting with TAAD. In conclusion, aortic root repair can safely be performed in the vast majority of patients with TAAD. Despite the increased surgical complexity, ARR does not increase operative mortality and improves the freedom from root reintervention. VSRR can be performed in highly selected populations of patients with TAAD with durable mid-term valve function. PMID:27563551

  20. When and how to replace the aortic root in type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Leshnower, Bradley G; Chen, Edward P

    2016-07-01

    Management of aortic root pathology during repair of acute type A aortic dissection (TAAD) requires a comprehensive evaluation of the patient's anatomy, demographics, comorbidities and physiologic status at the time of emergent operative intervention. Surgical options include conservative repair of the root (CRR) (with or without replacement of the aortic valve), replacement of the native valve and aortic root using a composite valve-conduit and valve sparing root replacement (VSRR). The primary objective of this review is to provide data for surgeons to aid in their decision-making process regarding management of the aortic root during repair of TAAD. No time or language restrictions were imposed and references of the selected studies were checked for additional relevant citations. Multiple retrospective reviews have demonstrated equivalent operative mortality between aortic root repair and replacement during TAAD. There is a higher incidence of aortic root reintervention with aortic root repair compared to aortic root replacement (ARR). Experienced, high-volume aortic centers have demonstrated the safety of VSRR in young, hemodynamically stable patients presenting with TAAD. In conclusion, aortic root repair can safely be performed in the vast majority of patients with TAAD. Despite the increased surgical complexity, ARR does not increase operative mortality and improves the freedom from root reintervention. VSRR can be performed in highly selected populations of patients with TAAD with durable mid-term valve function. PMID:27563551

  1. Aortic insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart valve - aortic regurgitation; Valvular disease - aortic regurgitation; AI - aortic insufficiency ... BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  2. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms - these occur in the part of the aorta ...

  3. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the ...

  4. Aortic insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic valve prolapse; Aortic regurgitation ... Any condition that prevents the aortic valve from closing completely can cause this problem. When the valve doesn't close all the way, a small amount of blood comes ...

  5. 8. VIEW NORTHWEST OF EAST ELEVATION SOUTH BARREL ARCH. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW NORTHWEST OF EAST ELEVATION SOUTH BARREL ARCH. NOTE STONE WORK, 1920 CONCRETE REPAIRS, AND STEEL BRACES ADDED BY THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE CIRCA 1962. - Chesapeake & Ohio Canal, Conococheague Creek Aqueduct, Milepost 99.80, Williamsport, Washington County, MD

  6. Minimally invasive valve sparing aortic root replacement (David procedure) is safe

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Heike; Umminger, Julia; Koigeldiyev, Nurbol; Beckmann, Erik; Haverich, Axel; Martens, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Objective Even though minimally invasive cardiac surgery may reduce morbidity, this approach is not routinely performed for aortic root replacements. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the safety and feasibility of valve sparing aortic root replacement via an upper mini-sternotomy up to the 3rd intercostal space. Methods Between April 2011 and March 2014, 26 patients (22 males, age 47.6±13 years) underwent elective minimally invasive aortic valve sparing root replacement (David procedure, group A). Twelve patients underwent additional leaflet repair. Concomitant procedures were: four proximal aortic arch replacements and one coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) to the proximal right coronary artery (RCA). During the same time period, 14 patients (ten males, age 64.2±9.5 years) underwent elective David procedure via median full sternotomy (group B). Concomitant procedures included six proximal aortic arch replacements. Although the patient cohorts were small, the results of these two groups were compared. Results In group A, there were no intra-operative conversions to full sternotomy. The aortic cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) times were 115.6±30.3 and 175.8±41.9 min, respectively. One patient was re-opened (via same access) due to post-operative bleeding. The post-operative ventilation time and hospital stay were 0.5±0.3 and 10.4±6.8 days, respectively. There was no 30-day mortality. The patient questionnaire showed that the convalescence time was approximately two weeks. In group B: the cross-clamp and CPB times were 114.1±19.9 and 163.0±24.5 min, respectively. One patient was re-opened (7.1%) due to post-operative bleeding. The post-operative ventilation time and hospital stay were 0.6±0.7 and 14.2±16.7 days, respectively. There was no 30-day mortality. Conclusions Minimally invasive valve sparing aortic root replacement can be safely performed in selected patients. The results are comparable to those operated via a full

  7. [Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Kalder, J; Kotelis, D; Jacobs, M J

    2016-09-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) are rare events with an incidence of 5.9 cases per 100,000 persons per year. In Germany approximately 940 TAAA procedures are performed annually. The cause of TAAA is mostly degenerative but they can also occur on the basis of an aortic dissection or connective tissue disease (e. g. Marfan's syndrome). Patients often have severe comorbidities and suffer from hypertension, coronary heart disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mostly as a result of smoking. Operative treatment is indicated when the maximum aortic diameter has reached 6 cm (> 5 cm in patients with connective tissue disease) or the aortic diameter rapidly increases (> 5 mm/year). Treatment options are open surgical aortic repair with extracorporeal circulation, endovascular repair with branched/fenestrated endografts and parallel grafts (chimneys) or a combination of open and endovascular procedures (hybrid procedures). Mortality rates after both open and endovascular procedures are approximately 8 % depending on the extent of the repair. Furthermore, there are relevant risks of complications, such as paraplegia (up to 20 %) and the necessity for dialysis. In recent years several approaches to minimize these risks have been proposed. Besides cardiopulmonary risk evaluation, clinical assessment of patients by the physician with respect to the patient-specific anatomy influences the allocation of patients to one treatment option or another. Surgery of TAAA should ideally be performed in high-volume centers in order to achieve better results. PMID:27558261

  8. Five-year experience with the peri-operative goal directed management for surgical repair of traumatic aortic injury in the eastern province, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Gameel, Haytham Z.; El-Tahan, Mohamed R.; Shafi, Mohammed A.; Mowafi, Hany A.; Al-Ghamdi, Abdulmohsin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Traumatic aortic injury (TAI) accounts for 1/3 of all trauma victims. Aim: We aimed to investigate the efficacy of the adopted standardized immediate pre-operative and intra-operative hemodynamic goal directed control, anesthetic technique and organs protection on the morbidity and mortality in patients presented with TAI. Settings and Design: An observational retrospective study at a single university teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Following ethical approval, we recruited the data of 44 patients admitted to the King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia, with formal confirmation of diagnosis of blunt TAI during a 5-year period from February 2008 to April 2013 from the hospital medical records. Statistical Analysis: descriptive analysis. Results: A total of 44 victims (41 men, median (range) age 29 (22-34) years) with TAI who underwent surgical repair were recruited. Median (range) post-operative chest tube output was 700 (200-1100) ml necessitated transfusion in 5 (11.4%) of cases. Post-operative complications included transient renal failure (13.6%), pneumonia (6.8%), acute lung injury/distress syndrome (20.5%), sepsis (4.5%), wound infection (47.7%) and air leak (6.8%). No patient developed end stage renal failure or spinal cord injury. Median intensive care unit stay was 6 (4-30) days and in-hospital mortality was 9.1%. Conclusion: We found that the implementation of a standardized early goal directed hemodynamic control for the peri-operative management of patients with TAI reduces the post-operative morbidity and mortality after surgical repair. PMID:25538521

  9. Serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 is an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality following open surgical repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Wanpin; Wang, Yan; Yao, Kai; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Open surgical repair (OSR) is a conventional surgical method used in the repair a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA); however, OSR results in high perioperative mortality rates. The level of serum angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) has been reported to be an independent risk factor for postoperative in-hospital mortality following major cardiopulmonary surgery. In the present study, the association of serum ACE2 levels with postoperative in-hospital mortality was investigated in patients undergoing OSR for ruptured AAA. The study enrolled 84 consecutive patients underwent OSR for ruptured AAA and were subsequently treated in the intensive care unit. Patients who succumbed postoperatively during hospitalization were defined as non-survivors. Serum ACE2 levels were measured in all patients prior to and following the surgery using ELISA kits. The results indicated that non-survivors showed significantly lower mean preoperative and postoperative serum ACE2 levels when compared with those in survivors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis also showed that, subsequent to adjusting for potential confounders, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 showed a significant negative association with the postoperative in-hospital mortality. This was confirmed by multivariate hazard ratio analysis, which showed that, subsequent to adjusting for the various potential confounders, the risk of postoperative in-hospital mortality remained significantly higher in the two lowest serum ACE2 level quartiles compared with that in the highest quartile on preoperative day 1. In conclusion, the present study provided the first evidence supporting that the serum ACE2 level is an independent risk factor for the in-hospital mortality following OSR for ruptured AAA. Furthermore, low serum ACE2 levels on preoperative day 1 were found to be associated with increased postoperative in-hospital mortality. Therefore, the serum ACE2 level on preoperative day 1 may be a potential

  10. [Acute aortic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A

    2016-06-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is the common denominator for acute events to the aortic wall and encompasses dissection of the aorta, intramural hematoma, formation of aortic ulcers and trauma to the aorta with an annual incidence of up to 35 cases/100.000 between 65 and 75 years of age. Both, inflammation and/or microtrauma at the level of the aortic media layer, and a genetic disposition are promoting elements of AAS, while the extent and anatomic involvement of the ascending aorta call for either surgical resection/repair in the proximal part of the aorta, or an endovascular solution for pathologies in the distal aorta; in all cases of dissection (regardless of location) reconstruction/realignment has been proven to portend better long-term outcomes (in addition to medical management of blood pressure). PMID:27254622

  11. Effects of postimplantation systemic inflammatory response on long-term clinical outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Min-Ju; Han, Youngjin; Noh, Minsu; Kwon, Tae-Won; Cho, Yong-Pil

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between postimplantation syndrome (PIS) and long-term clinical outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of an abdominal aortic aneurysm.In this single-center, observational cohort study, a total of 204 consecutive patients undergoing EVAR were included. Primary outcome was long-term mortality from any cause; secondary outcomes included long-term mortality, systemic or implant-related complications, and secondary therapeutic procedures.The diagnosis of PIS was established in 64 patients (31.4%). PIS patients were more likely to receive woven polyester endografts and have a longer postoperative hospital stay and lower incidence of type II endoleaks. In multivariate analysis, PIS was significantly associated with a decreased risk of developing type II endoleaks (P = 0.044). During follow-up period of 44 months, clinical outcomes showed no significant differences in mortality (P = 0.876), systemic (P = 0.668), or implant-related complications (P = 0.847), although rates of secondary therapeutic procedure were significantly higher in non-PIS patients (P = 0.037). The groups had similar rates of overall survival (P = 0.761) and other clinical outcomes (P = 0.562).Patients with and without PIS had similar long-term overall survival rates and other clinical outcomes. PIS was beneficial in preventing type II endoleaks during postoperative period. PMID:27512875

  12. Implementation of the Continuous AutoTransfusion System (C.A.T.S) in open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: an observational comparative cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tawfick, Wael A; O'Connor, Martina; Hynes, Niamh; Sultan, Sherif

    2008-01-01

    The use of the Continuous AutoTransfusion System (C.A.T.S; Fresenius Hemotechnology, Bad Homburg v.d.H., Germany), which conserves allogenic blood, is reported in 187 patients having abdominal aortic aneurysm repair during a 9-year period. Patients were allocated to C.A.T.S if a Haemovigilance technician was available. A mean of 685 mL of retrieved blood was reinfused in 101 patients receiving C.A.T.S; 61% required 2 U or less. All control patients required 3 U or more of allogenic blood. Allogenic transfusion in C.A.T.S patients decreased significantly (P < .0001). Mean intensive care unit stay was significantly reduced in C.A.T.S patients (P = .042). Mean postoperative hospital stay was 18 days for C.A.T.S group and 25 days in control patients (P = .014). The respective 30-day mortality was 12% versus 19% (P = .199). The C.A.T.S markedly reduced the amount of blood transfused, was associated with reduced intensive care unit and postoperative hospital stay, and was cost-effective. PMID:18238865

  13. Effects of postimplantation systemic inflammatory response on long-term clinical outcomes after endovascular aneurysm repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyunwook; Ko, Gi-Young; Kim, Min-Ju; Han, Youngjin; Noh, Minsu; Kwon, Tae-Won; Cho, Yong-Pil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the association between postimplantation syndrome (PIS) and long-term clinical outcomes after elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In this single-center, observational cohort study, a total of 204 consecutive patients undergoing EVAR were included. Primary outcome was long-term mortality from any cause; secondary outcomes included long-term mortality, systemic or implant-related complications, and secondary therapeutic procedures. The diagnosis of PIS was established in 64 patients (31.4%). PIS patients were more likely to receive woven polyester endografts and have a longer postoperative hospital stay and lower incidence of type II endoleaks. In multivariate analysis, PIS was significantly associated with a decreased risk of developing type II endoleaks (P = 0.044). During follow-up period of 44 months, clinical outcomes showed no significant differences in mortality (P = 0.876), systemic (P = 0.668), or implant-related complications (P = 0.847), although rates of secondary therapeutic procedure were significantly higher in non-PIS patients (P = 0.037). The groups had similar rates of overall survival (P = 0.761) and other clinical outcomes (P = 0.562). Patients with and without PIS had similar long-term overall survival rates and other clinical outcomes. PIS was beneficial in preventing type II endoleaks during postoperative period. PMID:27512875

  14. Specificity of testing in a cardiac rehabilitation setting resulting in a patient's return to high-intensity outdoor activity following aortic dissection repair

    PubMed Central

    Bartee, Sparky; Shrestha, Sanjay; Ramos, Beatriz; Bilbrey, Tim; Carbone, Pasquale; Schussler, Jeffrey M.; Deutsch, Rick

    2016-01-01

    A 66-year-old man who had undergone aortic dissection repair a year earlier sought to assess the feasibility of returning to the high-intensity outdoor activities he had long enjoyed. In response to his inquiry, the cardiac rehabilitation staff at Baylor Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital designed a comprehensive testing plan that simulated the specific movements and anticipated cardiac requirements associated with his goal activities. The activities included 1) lifting and manipulating a 50-pound suitcase, 2) hiking to the top of Half Dome in California's Yosemite National Park, and 3) scuba diving. To illustrate our approach, we describe some of the tests that were performed and report the results. After analyzing the detailed physiological data collected during testing, we provided the patient with an exercise prescription and specific guidelines that he could use to gauge his level of physical exertion during his outdoor adventures. Within approximately 6 months of testing, he successfully performed the goal activities without adverse symptoms. PMID:27034550

  15. Specificity of testing in a cardiac rehabilitation setting resulting in a patient's return to high-intensity outdoor activity following aortic dissection repair.

    PubMed

    Bartee, Sparky; Shrestha, Sanjay; Ramos, Beatriz; Bilbrey, Tim; Carbone, Pasquale; Schussler, Jeffrey M; Deutsch, Rick; Adams, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    A 66-year-old man who had undergone aortic dissection repair a year earlier sought to assess the feasibility of returning to the high-intensity outdoor activities he had long enjoyed. In response to his inquiry, the cardiac rehabilitation staff at Baylor Hamilton Heart and Vascular Hospital designed a comprehensive testing plan that simulated the specific movements and anticipated cardiac requirements associated with his goal activities. The activities included 1) lifting and manipulating a 50-pound suitcase, 2) hiking to the top of Half Dome in California's Yosemite National Park, and 3) scuba diving. To illustrate our approach, we describe some of the tests that were performed and report the results. After analyzing the detailed physiological data collected during testing, we provided the patient with an exercise prescription and specific guidelines that he could use to gauge his level of physical exertion during his outdoor adventures. Within approximately 6 months of testing, he successfully performed the goal activities without adverse symptoms. PMID:27034550

  16. Caesarean delivery in a parturient with a femoro-femoral crossover graft and congenital aortic stenosis repaired by the Ross procedure.

    PubMed

    Richardson, P; Whittaker, S; Rajesh, U; Bonduelle, M; Morgan, J; Garry, M; Weston, C; Ferguson, C; Fligelstone, L

    2009-10-01

    We report a case of a patient with congenital aortic stenosis previously repaired using the Ross procedure, who presented to our unit for urgent caesarean delivery. Management was complicated by moderate residual cardiac disease and the presence of a suprapubic femoro-femoral crossover graft. Following application of five-lead electrocardiogram and invasive blood pressure monitoring, anaesthesia was induced via combined spinal-epidural with epidural volume extension. A high transverse surgical approach avoided the course of the vascular graft, while further precautions included the immediate availability of vascular surgeons and cell salvage. Our anaesthetic technique was tailored to minimise disruption to cardiovascular function, and in particular to limit regurgitant flow across the pulmonary valve. This case highlights the value of early identification of high-risk parturients and multidisciplinary involvement at delivery. Risk stratification in the patient with grown-up congenital heart disease is based upon timely evaluation of the underlying congenital pathology, surgical history and subsequent functional status. PMID:19703763

  17. Follow-up of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair: Preliminary validation of digital tomosynthesis and contrast enhanced ultrasound in detection of medium- to long-term complications

    PubMed Central

    Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Guerrini, Susanna; Mazzei, Francesco Giuseppe; Cioffi Squitieri, Nevada; Notaro, Dario; de Donato, Gianmarco; Galzerano, Giuseppe; Sacco, Palmino; Setacci, Francesco; Volterrani, Luca; Setacci, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To validate the feasibility of digital tomosynthesis of the abdomen (DTA) combined with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in assessing complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) by using computed tomography angiography (CTA) as the gold standard. METHODS: For this prospective study we enrolled 163 patients (123 men; mean age, 65.7 years) referred for CTA for EVAR follow-up. CTA, DTA and CEUS were performed at 1 and 12 mo in all patients, with a maximum time interval of 2 d. RESULTS: Among 163 patients 33 presented complications at CTA. DTA and CTA correlated for the presence of complications in 32/33 (96.96%) patients and for the absence of complications in 127/130 (97.69%) patients; the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of DTA were 97%, 98%, 91%, 99%, and 98%, respectively. CEUS and CTA correlated for the presence of complications in 19/33 (57.57%) patients and for the absence of complications in 129/130 (99.23%) patients; the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of CEUS were 58%, 99%, 95%, 90%, and 91%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of combining DTA and CEUS together in detecting EVAR complications were 77%, 98% and 95%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Combining DTA and CEUS in EVAR follow-up has the potential to limit the use of CTA only in doubtful cases. PMID:27247719

  18. Embolization by Direct Puncture with a Transpedicular Approach Using an Isocenter Puncture (ISOP) Method in a Patient with a Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Yukihisa Hamaguchi, Shingo; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Kon, Yuri; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Sakurai, Yuka; Murakami, Kenji; Arai, Yasunori; Miyairi, Takeshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2015-06-15

    BackgroundEndovascular aortic repair (EVAR) requires further intervention in 20-30 % of cases, often due to type II endoleak (T2EL). Management options for T2EL include transarterial embolization, direct puncture (DP), or transcaval embolization. We report the case of an 80-year-old man with T2EL who successfully underwent DP embolization.MethodsEmbolization by DP was performed with a transpedicular approach using an isocenter puncture (ISOP) method. An isocenter marker (ICM) was placed at a site corresponding to the aneurysm sac on fluoroscopy in two directions (frontal and lateral views). A vertebroplasty needle was inserted tangentially to the ICM under fluoroscopy and advanced to the anterior wall of the vertebral body. A 20 cm-length, 20-G-PTCD needle was inserted through the outer needle of the 13-G needle and advanced to the ICM. Sac embolization using 25 % N-buty-2-cyanoacrylate diluted with Lipiodol was performed. After complete embolization, rotational DA confirmed good filling of the sac with Lipiodol. The outer cannula and 13-G needle were removed and the procedure was completed.ResultsThe patient was discharged the next day. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 and 8 months later showed no Lipiodol washout in the aneurysm sac, no endoleak recurrence, and no expansion of the excluded aneurysm.ConclusionDP with a transpedicular approach using ISOP may be useful when translumbar and transabdominal approaches prove difficult.

  19. Automatic pose initialization for accurate 2D/3D registration applied to abdominal aortic aneurysm endovascular repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Shun; Lucas, Joseph; Liao, Rui

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) stenting can be greatly facilitated by overlaying the preoperative 3-D model of the abdominal aorta onto the intra-operative 2-D X-ray images. Accurate 2-D/3-D registration in 3-D space makes the 2-D/3-D overlay robust to the change of C-Arm angulations. By far, the 2-D/3-D registration methods based on simulated X-ray projection images using multiple image planes have been shown to be able to provide satisfactory 3-D registration accuracy. However, one drawback of the intensity-based 2-D/3-D registration methods is that the similarity measure is usually highly non-convex and hence the optimizer can easily be trapped into local minima. User interaction therefore is often needed in the initialization of the position of the 3-D model in order to get a successful 2-D/3-D registration. In this paper, a novel 3-D pose initialization technique is proposed, as an extension of our previously proposed bi-plane 2-D/3-D registration method for AAA intervention [4]. The proposed method detects vessel bifurcation points and spine centerline in both 2-D and 3-D images, and utilizes landmark information to bring the 3-D volume into a 15mm capture range. The proposed landmark detection method was validated on real dataset, and is shown to be able to provide a good initialization for 2-D/3-D registration in [4], thus making the workflow fully automatic.

  20. General Considerations of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung Won; Bae, Miju; Chung, Sung Woon

    2015-01-01

    Although development of surgical technique and critical care, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm still carries a high mortality. In order to obtain good results, various efforts have been attempted. This paper reviews initial management of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm and discuss the key point open surgical repair and endovascular aneurysm repair. PMID:25705591

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  2. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  3. Total endovascular repair of aberrant left subclavian artery with Kommerell's diverticulum using a customized branched device.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Pierre Galvagni; Franklin, Rafael Narciso; Cunha, Josué Rafael Ferreira; Neves, Thais Torres; Nascimento, Gilberto Galego; Bortoluzzi, Cristiano Torres

    2013-04-01

    We describe a case of Kommerell's diverticulum involving the distal portion of a right-sided aortic arch and the origin of an aberrant left subclavian artery (LSA). The patient underwent a total endovascular repair with the use of a modified Valiant endograft (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minn) to which a branch was attached to keep LSA patency. Postoperative computed tomography showed complete exclusion of the lesion, without endoleaks. The use of "customized off-label" devices to treat special conditions was feasible in this case, keeping patency of the LSA without risk of arm claudication or the requirement for a complementary surgical bypass. PMID:23312832

  4. [Twenty Years' Experience of the Surgical Treatment of Giant Ascending Aortic Aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Charchan, E R; Stepanenko, A B; Gens, A P; Skvorstov, A A; Galeev, N A; Belov, Yu V

    2015-01-01

    Giant ascending aortic aneurysm is one of the worst lesions of the cardiovascular system. Timely surgical treatment provides the only chance to prolong the lives of such patients. Life expectancy without surgery in these patients is minimal; they die from a ruptured aneurysm or decompensation of organs and systems. In this paper, based on two decades' experience of treating patients with giant aneurysms of ascending aorta and aortic arch in B.V. Petrovsky National Research Center of Surgery we have assessed evaluated immediate results of surgery and proposed measures for prevention of possible complications. Out of 53 patients with giant. ascending aortic aneurysms spontaneous rupture after sternotomy or opening of the pericardium occurred in 5 cases. Overall hospital mortality was 1.9%. Our results indicate that with the right tactics surgical repair of giant ascending aortic aneurysms can be performed with a low mortality. Preliminary cardiopulmonary bypass with peripheral cannulation and cooling prior to sternotomy for the possibility of circulatory arrest is a prerequisite of the prevention of fatal massive hemorrhage. PMID:26898093

  5. Hydrodynamic evaluation of a new dispersive aortic cannula (Stealthflow).

    PubMed

    Goto, Takeshi; Inamura, Takao; Shirota, Minori; Fukuda, Wakako; Fukuda, Ikuo; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Ito, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate flow from a new dispersive aortic cannula (Stealthflow) in the aortic arch using flow visualization methods. Particle image velocimetry was used to analyze flow dynamics in the mock aortic model. Flow patterns, velocity distribution, and streamlines with different shape cannulas were evaluated in a glass aortic arch model. We compared flow parameters in two different dispersive type cannulas: the Stealthflow and the Soft-flow cannula. A large vortex and regurgitant flow were observed in the aortic arch with both cannulas. With the Stealthflow cannula, a high-velocity area with a maximum velocity of 0.68 m/s appeared on the ostium of the cannula in the longitudinal plane. With the Soft-flow cannula, 'multiple jet streams, each with a velocity less than 0.60 m/s, were observed at the cannula outlet. Regurgitant flow from the cannula to the brachiocephalic artery and to the ascending aorta on the greater curvature was specific to the Soft-flow cannula. The degree of regurgitation on the same site was lower with the Stealthflow cannula than with the Soft-flow cannula. The Stealthflow cannula has similar flow properties to those of the Soft-flow cannula according to glass aortic model analysis. It generates gentle flow in the aortic arch and slow flow around the ostia of the aortic arch vessels. The Stealthflow cannula is as effective as the Soft-flow cannula. Care must be taken when the patient has thick atheromatous plaque or frail atheroma on the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. PMID:26526561

  6. Near-infrared spectroscopy assessed cerebral oxygenation during open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: relation to end-tidal CO2 tension.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, H; Nielsen, H B; Secher, N H

    2016-08-01

    During open abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) repair cerebral blood flow is challenged. Clamping of the aorta may lead to unintended hyperventilation as metabolism is reduced by perfusion of a smaller part of the body and reperfusion of the aorta releases vasodilatory substances including CO2. We intend to adjust ventilation according end-tidal CO2 tension (EtCO2) and here evaluated to what extent that strategy maintains frontal lobe oxygenation (ScO2) as determined by near infrared spectroscopy. For 44 patients [5 women, aged 70 (48-83) years] ScO2, mean arterial pressure (MAP), EtCO2, and ventilation were obtained retrospectively from the anesthetic charts. By clamping the aorta, ScO2 and EtCO2 were kept stable by reducing ventilation (median, -0.8 l min(-1); interquartile range, -1.1 to -0.4; P < 0.001). During reperfusion of the aorta a reduction in MAP by 8 mmHg (-15 to -1; P < 0.001) did not prevent an increase in ScO2 by 2 % (-1 to 4; P < 0.001) as EtCO2 increased 0.5 kPa (0.1-1.0; P < 0.001) despite an increase in ventilation by 1.8 l min(-1) (0.9-2.7; P < 0.001). Changes in ScO2 related to those in EtCO2 (r = 0.41; P = 0.0001) and cerebral deoxygenation (-15 %) was noted in three patients while cerebral hyperoxygenation (+15 %) manifests in one patient. Thus changes in ScO2 were kept within acceptable limits (±15 %) in 91 % of the patients. For the majority of the patients undergoing AAA repair ScO2 was kept within reasonable limits by reducing ventilation by approximately 1 l min(-1) upon clamping of the aorta and increasing ventilation by approximately 2 l min(-1) when the lower body is reperfused. PMID:26141676

  7. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Fortner, George; Johansen, Kaj

    1984-01-01

    Aneurysms are common in our increasingly elderly population, and are a major threat to life and limb. Until the advent of vascular reconstructive techniques, aneurysm patients were subject to an overwhelming risk of death from exsanguination. The first successful repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm using an interposed arterial homograft was reported by Dubost in 1952. A milestone in the evolution of vascular surgery, this event and subsequent diagnostic, operative and prosthetic graft refinements have permitted patients with an unruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm to enjoy a better prognosis than patients with almost any other form of major systemic illness. Images PMID:6702193

  8. WUnicuspid Aortic Valve- An Uncommon Anomaly With a Common Presentation.

    PubMed

    Sitwala, Puja; Abusara, Ashraf; Ladia, Vatsal; Ladia, Vatsal; Panchal, Hemang B; Raudat, Charles; Paul, Timir K

    2016-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV), which is a rare congenital anomaly, usually presents as aortic stenosis and/or aortic regurgitation. Here we present a case of UAV co-existent with an ascending aortic aneurysm. A 26-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented to the hospital after two episodes of syncope. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed an ejection fraction of 62%, severely stenotic aortic valve, and moderate aortic regurgitation. Computed tomography revealed calcification of the aortic valve, compatible with aortic stenosis and aneurysm of the ascending aorta measuring 4.3 cm in diameter. He underwent successful aortic valve replacement and repair of ascending aortic aneurysm. He recovered well without any complications. This case suggests that any young patient who presents with syncope, aortic stenosis would be a differential and further workup by any available non-invasive modality needs to be performed. PMID:27383857

  9. Buttock Claudication and Erectile Dysfunction After Internal Iliac Artery Embolization in Patients Prior to Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Rayt, H. S. Bown, M. J.; Lambert, K. V.; Fishwick, N. G.; McCarthy, M. J.; London, N. J. M.; Sayers, R. D.

    2008-07-15

    Coil embolization of the internal iliac artery (IIA) is used to extend the application of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in cases of challenging iliac anatomy. Pelvic ischemia is a complication of the technique, but reports vary as to the rate and severity. This study reports our experience with IIA embolization and compares the results to those of other published series. The vascular unit database of the Leicester Royal Infirmary was used to identify patients who had undergone IIA coil embolization prior to EVAR. Data were collected from hospital case notes and by telephone interviews. Thirty-eight patients were identified; 29 of these were contactable by telephone. A literature search was performed for other studies of IIA embolization and the results were pooled. In this series buttock claudication occurred in 55% (16 of 29 patients) overall: in 52% of unilateral embolizations (11 of 21) and 63% of bilateral embolizations (5 of 8). New erectile dysfunction occurred in 46% (6 of 13 patients) overall: in 38% of unilateral embolizations (3 of 8) and 60% of bilateral embolizations (3 of 5). The literature review identified 18 relevant studies. The results were pooled with our results, to give 634 patients in total. Buttock claudication occurred in 28% overall (178 of 634 patients): in 31% of unilateral embolizations (99 of 322) and 35% of bilateral embolizations (34 of 98) (p = 0.46, Fisher's exact test). New erectile dysfunction occurred in 17% overall (27 of 159 patients): in 17% of unilateral embolizations (16 of 97) and 24% of bilateral embolizations (9 of 38) (p = 0.33). We conclude that buttock claudication and erectile dysfunction are frequent complications of IIA embolization and patients should be counseled accordingly.

  10. [Surgical aspects of acute aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Laas, J; Heinemann, M; Jurmann, M; Borst, H G

    1992-12-01

    This paper highlights some of the surgical aspects of acute aortic dissections such as: emergency diagnosis, indications for surgery, reconstructive operative techniques, malperfusion phenomena and necessity for follow-up. Aortic dissection is caused by an intimal tear, called the "entry", and subsequent splitting of the media by the stream of blood. Two lumina are thus created, which may communicate through "re-entries". As this creates severe weakness of the aortic wall, rupture and/or dilatation are the imminent dangers of acute aortic dissection. Acute aortic dissection type A, by definition involving the ascending aorta (Figures 1 and 2), is an absolute indication for emergency surgical treatment, because its natural history shows an extremely poor outcome (Figure 3). Due to impending (intrapericardial) aortic rupture, it may be necessary to limit diagnostic procedures to a minimum. Transesophageal echocardiography is the method of choice for establishing a quick, precise and reliable diagnosis (Figure 4). In stable patients, computed tomography gives additional information about aortic diameters or sites of extrapericardial perforation. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) shows perfusion of the lumina and dependent organs. The surgical strategy in acute aortic dissection type A aims at replacement of the ascending aorta. Reconstructive techniques have to be considered, especially in aortic valve regurgitation without annuloectasia (Figures 5 and 6). In recent times, the use of GRF tissue glue has reduced the need for teflon felt. Involvement of the aortic arch should be treated aggressively up to the point of total arch replacement in deep hypothermic circulatory arrest as part of the primary procedure (Figure 7). Malperfusion phenomena of aortic branches remain risk-factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1483624

  11. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve: A Rare Congenital Cause of Aortic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Shah, Priyank; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly causing aortic regurgitation usually in the fifth to sixth decade of life. Earlier, the diagnosis was mostly during postmortem or intraoperative, but now with the advent of better imaging techniques such as transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, more cases are being diagnosed in asymptomatic patients. We present a case of a 39-year-old male who was found to have QAV, with the help of TEE, while undergoing evaluation for a diastolic murmur. The patient was found to have Type B QAV with moderate aortic regurgitation. We also present a brief review of classification, pathophysiology, and embryological basis of this rare congenital anomaly. The importance of diagnosing QAV lies in the fact that majority of these patients will require surgery for aortic regurgitation and close follow-up so that aortic valve replacement/repair is done before the left ventricular decompensation occurs. PMID:27195176

  12. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  13. Evolution of surgical therapy for Stanford acute type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AcA-AoD) is a surgical emergency associated with very high morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the early outcome of emergency surgical repair has not improved substantially over the last 20 years. Many of the same debates occur repeatedly regarding operative extent and optimal conduct of the operation. The question remains: are patients suffering from too large an operation or too small? The pendulum favoring routine aortic valve resuspension, when feasible, has swung towards frequent aortic root replacement. This already aggressive approach is now being challenged with the even more extensive valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) in selected patients. Distally, open replacement of most of the transverse arch is best in most patients. The need for late aortic re-intervention has not been shown to be affected by more extensive distal operative procedures, but the contemporary enthusiasm for a distal frozen elephant trunk (FET) only seems to build. It must be remembered that the first and foremost goal of the operation is to have an operative survivor; additional measures to reduce late morbidity are secondary aspirations. With increasing experience, true contraindications to emergency surgical operation have dwindled, but patients with advanced age, multiple comorbidities, and major neurological deficits do not fare well. The endovascular revolution, moreover, has spawned innovative options for modern practice, including ascending stent graft and adaptations of the old flap fenestration technique. Despite the increasingly complex operations and ever expanding therapies, this life-threatening disease remains a stubborn challenge for all cardiovascular surgeons. Development of specialized thoracic aortic teams and regionalization of care for patients with AcA-AoD offers the most promise to improve overall results. PMID:27563541

  14. Evolution of surgical therapy for Stanford acute type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Miller, D Craig

    2016-07-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AcA-AoD) is a surgical emergency associated with very high morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the early outcome of emergency surgical repair has not improved substantially over the last 20 years. Many of the same debates occur repeatedly regarding operative extent and optimal conduct of the operation. The question remains: are patients suffering from too large an operation or too small? The pendulum favoring routine aortic valve resuspension, when feasible, has swung towards frequent aortic root replacement. This already aggressive approach is now being challenged with the even more extensive valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) in selected patients. Distally, open replacement of most of the transverse arch is best in most patients. The need for late aortic re-intervention has not been shown to be affected by more extensive distal operative procedures, but the contemporary enthusiasm for a distal frozen elephant trunk (FET) only seems to build. It must be remembered that the first and foremost goal of the operation is to have an operative survivor; additional measures to reduce late morbidity are secondary aspirations. With increasing experience, true contraindications to emergency surgical operation have dwindled, but patients with advanced age, multiple comorbidities, and major neurological deficits do not fare well. The endovascular revolution, moreover, has spawned innovative options for modern practice, including ascending stent graft and adaptations of the old flap fenestration technique. Despite the increasingly complex operations and ever expanding therapies, this life-threatening disease remains a stubborn challenge for all cardiovascular surgeons. Development of specialized thoracic aortic teams and regionalization of care for patients with AcA-AoD offers the most promise to improve overall results. PMID:27563541

  15. Endovascular Treatment of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms with the EndoFit Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Saratzis, N.; Saratzis, Athanasios Melas, N.; Ginis, G.; Lioupis, A.; Lykopoulos, D.; Lazaridis, J.; Kiskinis, Dimitrios

    2007-04-15

    Objective. To evaluate the mid-term feasibility, efficacy, and durability of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (DTAA) exclusion using the EndoFit device (LeMaitre Vascular). Methods. Twenty-three (23) men (mean age 66 years) with a DTAA were admitted to our department for endovascular repair (21 were ASA III+ and 2 refused open repair) from January 2003 to July 2005. Results. Complete aneurysm exclusion was feasible in all subjects (100% technical success). The median follow-up was 18 months (range 8-40 months). A single stent-graft was used in 6 cases. The deployment of a second stent-graft was required in the remaining 17 patients. All endografts were attached proximally, beyond the left subclavian artery, leaving the aortic arch branches intact. No procedure-related deaths have occurred. A distal type I endoleak was detected in 2 cases on the 1 month follow-up CT scan, and was repaired with reintervention and deployment of an extension graft. A nonfatal acute myocardial infarction occurred in 1 patient in the sixth postoperative month. Graft migration, graft infection, paraplegia, cerebral or distal embolization, renal impairment or any other major complications were not observed. Conclusion. The treatment of DTAAs using the EndoFit stent-graft is technically feasible. Mid-term results in this series are promising.

  16. [Debranch Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Therapy for Extending Aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shinji

    2016-07-01

    To apply endovascular aortic repair for arch or thoracoabdominal pathology, it is essential to reconstruct the branches originating in the treatment area. In cases that a stentgraft has to reach ascending aorta we perform "in situ fenestration with squid capture technique".During the procedure cerebral circulation is maintained by percutaneous cardiopulmonary bypass. After deploying the stentgraft we stab it by a needle while squeezed by snare wire and stick a covered stentgraft eventually. Unlike chimney technique which also can be applied for zone 0 thoracic endovascular aortic therapy( TEVAR),this method has no risk of gutter leak. For now there are no fenestrated nor branched grafts in Japan so that we should perform hybrid TEVAR for throacoabdominal aneurysms if patients' conditions cannot allow graft replacement. In such a case we make bypasses between the common iliac artery( or left leg of bifurcated graft) and visceral arteries using a quadrated graft. All anastomosis can be done in a retroperitoneal single plane. TEVAR shouldn't be performed simultaneously with bypass because unstable hemodynamic increase risk of paraplegia. We have never experienced paraplegia among 50 cases except for 1 case in which TEVAR had to be done urgently under critical hypotension. PMID:27440024

  17. Arching Solar Prominence

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s STEREO (Ahead) spacecraft watched as an eruptive prominence rose up and arched out in a horseshoe shape far above the Sun’s surface (Aug. 25, 2010). The image and movie show the action in a...

  18. Single-Stage Total Arch Replacement Including Resection of Kommerell Diverticulum in a Patient With Loeys-Dietz Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ong, Chin Siang; Kasai, Yuhei; Fukushima, Souta; Hibino, Narutoshi; Magruder, Trent; Suarez-Pierre, Alejandro; Cameron, Duke; Vricella, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is an autosomal dominant genetic connective tissue disorder associated with aortic aneurysmal disease. Kommerell diverticulum (KD) is a rare aortic diverticulum, for which the indication for surgery and the surgical techniques remain subjects of debate. We describe our experience with a successful total aortic arch replacement including KD resection through a median sternotomy for a pediatric patient with LDS. PMID:27521346

  19. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... Brinssen M, Verhoeven EL, Cuypers PW, et al: DREAM Study Group. Long-term outcome of open or ... is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation ...

  20. Endovascular Treatment for Proximal Anastomotic Pseudoaneurysm after Total Arch Replacement in Behcet's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Tomoki; Ueda, Hideki; Watanabe, Michiko; Kohno, Hiroki; Tamura, Yusaku; Abe, Shinichiro; Inage, Yuichi; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Kanda, Tomoyoshi; Fujii, Masahiko; Matsumiya, Goro

    2016-07-01

    A 17-year-old patient underwent total arch replacement for aortic arch aneurysm due to vascular Behcet's disease (BD). Follow-up computed tomography, performed 6 months after the operation, demonstrated pseudoaneurysm formation at the proximal anastomotic site. We performed endovascular treatment and used a short stent graft that was originally designed for abdominal aortic aneurysm. To avoid the occlusion of the coronary or brachiocephalic artery (BCA) due to stent graft migration, we used right ventricular rapid pacing and BCA ballooning. Thus, we believe that endovascular treatment can be used for anastomotic complications in the ascending aorta after open surgery for connective tissue disorders including BD. PMID:27174345