Science.gov

Sample records for apes

  1. Great Apes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Cerveny, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesia of great apes is often necessary to conduct diagnostic analysis, provide therapeutics, facilitate surgical procedures, and enable transport and translocation for conservation purposes. Due to the stress of remote delivery injection of anesthetic agents, recent studies have focused on oral delivery and/or transmucosal absorption of preanesthetic and anesthetic agents. Maintenance of the airway and provision of oxygen is an important aspect of anesthesia in great ape species. The provision of analgesia is an important aspect of the anesthesia protocol for any procedure involving painful stimuli. Opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often administered alone, or in combination to provide multi-modal analgesia. There is increasing conservation management of in situ great ape populations, which has resulted in the development of field anesthesia techniques for free-living great apes for the purposes of translocation, reintroduction into the wild, and clinical interventions.

  2. Aping our ancestors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennos, Roland

    2014-08-01

    Roland Ennos argues that the abilities of the great apes to cope in the dangerous mechanical environment of the forest canopy are part of the human species' intellectual inheritance and are intimately connected with our abilities as physicists.

  3. Darwin's apes and "savages".

    PubMed

    Martínez-Contreras, Jorge

    2010-02-01

    Since his visit to Tierra del Fuego in the 1830s, Darwin had been fascinated by the "savages" that succeeded in surviving on such a "broken beach", and because they were certainly similar in behaviour to our ancestors. However, he was also fascinated by baboons' behaviour, according to Brehm's accounts: hamadryas baboons showed a strong altruism to the point of risking their own lives in order to save their infants from attack by dogs. In 1871, he mentions he would rather have descended from brave baboons than from "savages", considered egoistic. We study the two sources of these ideas and try to show how Darwin's comparative reflections on apes and "savages" made him the first evolutionist anthropologist. PMID:20338533

  4. Molecular dynamics on APE100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Luciano Maria; Simonazzi, Riccardo; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    1995-09-01

    We have studied portability, efficiency and accuracy of a standard Molecular Dynamics simulation on the SIMD parallel computer APE100. Computing speed performance and physical system size range have been analyzed and compared with those of a conventional computer. Short range and long range potentials have been considered, and the comparative advantage of different simulation approaches has been assessed. For long range potentials, APE turns out to be faster than a conventional computer; large systems can be conveniently simulated using either the cloning approach (up to ˜ 10 5 particles) or a domain decomposition with the systolic method. In the case of short range potentials and systems with diffusion (like a liquid), APE is convenient only when using a large number of processors. In a special case (a crystal without diffusion), a specific domain decomposition technique with frames makes APE advantageous for intermediate and large systems. Using the latter technique we have studied in detail the effect of different numerical error sources, and compared the accuracy of APE with that of a conventional computer.

  5. Ape gestures and language evolution

    PubMed Central

    Pollick, Amy S.; de Waal, Frans B. M.

    2007-01-01

    The natural communication of apes may hold clues about language origins, especially because apes frequently gesture with limbs and hands, a mode of communication thought to have been the starting point of human language evolution. The present study aimed to contrast brachiomanual gestures with orofacial movements and vocalizations in the natural communication of our closest primate relatives, bonobos (Pan paniscus) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We tested whether gesture is the more flexible form of communication by measuring the strength of association between signals and specific behavioral contexts, comparing groups of both the same and different ape species. Subjects were two captive bonobo groups, a total of 13 individuals, and two captive chimpanzee groups, a total of 34 individuals. The study distinguished 31 manual gestures and 18 facial/vocal signals. It was found that homologous facial/vocal displays were used very similarly by both ape species, yet the same did not apply to gestures. Both within and between species gesture usage varied enormously. Moreover, bonobos showed greater flexibility in this regard than chimpanzees and were also the only species in which multimodal communication (i.e., combinations of gestures and facial/vocal signals) added to behavioral impact on the recipient. PMID:17470779

  6. Rural School APE: Are We Breaking the Law?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benham-Deal, Tami

    1995-01-01

    A study of adapted physical education (APE) practices in rural Wyoming revealed that many school districts did not offer APE programs; minimal, if any, specialization was required of APE teachers; larger districts were more likely to employ APE teachers; and there was considerable need for APE teacher training. Contains survey questionnaire and…

  7. Apes, Primitives, Children and...Translators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozulin, Alex

    1993-01-01

    Reviews two books by L. S. Vygotsky and A. R. Luria: (1) "Studies on the History of Behavior: Ape, Primitive, and Child"; and (2) "Ape, Primitive Man and Child: Essays in the History of Behavior." Both books are based on a book published in 1930 that examined the phylogenetic, historical, and ontogenetic development of human behavior and…

  8. [The Great Ape Project--human rights for the great anthropoid apes].

    PubMed

    Scharmann, W

    2000-01-01

    The Great Ape Project (GAP) is an appeal of 36 scientist from different disciplines aiming at the legal equalisation of the non-human great apes (chimpanzees, gorillas and orang-utans) with man. The appeal is expressed by a number of essays stating zoological, genetical, ethological, anthropological, ethical and psychological knowledge and, based on these arguments, demanding the abolition of the species barrier between human beings and great apes. The central point of the initiative is the "Declaration on Great Apes", claiming the inclusion of great apes in the "community of equals" and thus securing three basic rights for all great apes: 1. The Right of Life; 2. The Protection of Individual Liberty; 3. The Prohibition of Torture. Not only experiments with great apes and their capture from the wilderness will be banned, but it is also intended to enfranchise as many great apes as possible from research laboratories and zoos. As a legal basis for the achievement of basic rights most of the authors plead for the idea of conferring the moral status of "persons" on great apes. Criticism of the GAP is due to its anthropocentrism. Rejection is especially expressed by advocates of pathocentric ethics who argue that the species barrier will not be abolished but only shifted, running then between the great apes and the remaining living beings. However, the GAP resulted in a greater retention in the use of great apes for experiments in several industrial countries. Additionally, the popular literature published by ethologists in the passed decades has supported a more responsible attitude of the public towards primates. Despite of all efforts the survival of the great apes is greatly endangered within their native countries. PMID:11178555

  9. Apes in the Anthropocene: flexibility and survival.

    PubMed

    Hockings, Kimberley J; McLennan, Matthew R; Carvalho, Susana; Ancrenaz, Marc; Bobe, René; Byrne, Richard W; Dunbar, Robin I M; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; McGrew, William C; Williamson, Elizabeth A; Wilson, Michael L; Wood, Bernard; Wrangham, Richard W; Hill, Catherine M

    2015-04-01

    We are in a new epoch, the Anthropocene, and research into our closest living relatives, the great apes, must keep pace with the rate that our species is driving change. While a goal of many studies is to understand how great apes behave in natural contexts, the impact of human activities must increasingly be taken into account. This is both a challenge and an opportunity, which can importantly inform research in three diverse fields: cognition, human evolution, and conservation. No long-term great ape research site is wholly unaffected by human influence, but research at those that are especially affected by human activity is particularly important for ensuring that our great ape kin survive the Anthropocene. PMID:25766059

  10. Using APES for interferometric SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Palsetia, Marzban

    1996-06-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive FIR filtering approach, which is referred to as the APES (amplitude and phase estimation of a sinusoid) algorithm, for interferometric SAR imaging. We apply the APES algorithm on the data obtained from two vertically displaced apertures of a SAR system to obtain the complex amplitude and the phase difference estimates, which are proportional to the radar cross section and the height of the scatterer, respectively, at the frequencies of interest. We also demonstrate how the APES algorithm can be applied to data matrices with large dimensions without incurring high computational overheads. We compare the APES algorithm with other FIR filtering approaches including the Capon and FFT methods. We show via both numerical and experimental examples that the adaptive FIR filtering approaches such as Capon and APES can yield more accurate spectral estimates with much lower sidelobes and narrower spectral peaks than the FFT method. We show that although the APES algorithm yields somewhat wider spectral peaks than the Capon method, the former gives more accurate overall spectral estimates and SAR images than the latter and the FFT method.

  11. Apes produce tools for future use.

    PubMed

    Bräuer, Juliane; Call, Josep

    2015-03-01

    There is now growing evidence that some animal species are able to plan for the future. For example great apes save and exchange tools for future use. Here we raise the question whether chimpanzees, orangutans, and bonobos would produce tools for future use. Subjects only had access to a baited apparatus for a limited duration and therefore should use the time preceding this access to create the appropriate tools in order to get the rewards. The apes were tested in three conditions depending on the need for pre-prepared tools. Either eight tools, one tool or no tools were needed to retrieve the reward. The apes prepared tools in advance for future use and they produced them mainly in conditions when they were really needed. The fact that apes were able to solve this new task indicates that their planning skills are flexible. However, for the condition in which eight tools were needed, apes produced less than two tools per trial in advance. However, they used their chance to produce additional tools in the tool use phase-thus often obtaining most of the reward from the apparatus. Increased pressure to prepare more tools in advance did not have an effect on their performance. PMID:25236323

  12. Catastrophic ape decline in western equatorial Africa.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Peter D; Abernethy, Kate A; Bermejo, Magdalena; Beyers, Rene; De Wachter, Pauwel; Akou, Marc Ella; Huijbregts, Bas; Mambounga, Daniel Idiata; Toham, Andre Kamdem; Kilbourn, Annelisa M; Lahm, Sally A; Latour, Stefanie; Maisels, Fiona; Mbina, Christian; Mihindou, Yves; Obiang, Sosthène Ndong; Effa, Ernestine Ntsame; Starkey, Malcolm P; Telfer, Paul; Thibault, Marc; Tutin, Caroline E G; White, Lee J T; Wilkie, David S

    2003-04-10

    Because rapidly expanding human populations have devastated gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) and common chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) habitats in East and West Africa, the relatively intact forests of western equatorial Africa have been viewed as the last stronghold of African apes. Gabon and the Republic of Congo alone are thought to hold roughly 80% of the world's gorillas and most of the common chimpanzees. Here we present survey results conservatively indicating that ape populations in Gabon declined by more than half between 1983 and 2000. The primary cause of the decline in ape numbers during this period was commercial hunting, facilitated by the rapid expansion of mechanized logging. Furthermore, Ebola haemorrhagic fever is currently spreading through ape populations in Gabon and Congo and now rivals hunting as a threat to apes. Gorillas and common chimpanzees should be elevated immediately to 'critically endangered' status. Without aggressive investments in law enforcement, protected area management and Ebola prevention, the next decade will see our closest relatives pushed to the brink of extinction. PMID:12679788

  13. Animal communication: laughter is the shortest distance between two apes.

    PubMed

    Leavens, David A

    2009-07-14

    New acoustic analyses of the calls of great apes and humans in response to tickling reveal the probable evolutionary history of laughter in humans and our nearest living relatives, the great apes. PMID:19602411

  14. Apes have eyes to the future.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    Kano and Hirata (Current Biology, 25, 2513-2517, 2015) recently showed that apes process object and location information and anticipate the repeated presentation of such events in short film clips. Their methodology, using eyetracking, can provide a foundation for further explications of long-term prospective and episodic memory in nonverbal species. PMID:26895977

  15. Apollo Photograph Evaluation (APE) programming manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    This document describes the programming techniques used to implement the equations of the Apollo Photograph Evaluation (APE) program on the UNIVAC 1108 computer and contains detailed descriptions of the program structure, a User's Guide section to provide the necessary information for proper operation of the program, and information for the assessment of the program's adaptability to future problems.

  16. Blood groups of Barbary apes (Macaca sylvanus).

    PubMed

    Socha, W W; Merz, E; Moor-Jankowski, J

    1981-01-01

    32 Barbary macaques were all found to be secretors of the A and H blood group substances and to have an M-like agglutinogen on their red cells. Hemagglutination tests for other human-type red cell specificities were negative. In contrast, several so-called simian-type specificities were detected on the erythrocytes of Barbary apes by means of the cross-reacting rhesus and baboon antisera. Among these, only the specificities of the graded Drh blood group system were found to be polymorphic in this species of macaques. Blood groups of Barbary apes are compared with those of several other species of macaques and some taxonomic aspects of blood grouping tests are discussed. PMID:7319424

  17. Apes save tools for future use.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Nicholas J; Call, Josep

    2006-05-19

    Planning for future needs, not just current ones, is one of the most formidable human cognitive achievements. Whether this skill is a uniquely human adaptation is a controversial issue. In a study we conducted, bonobos and orangutans selected, transported, and saved appropriate tools above baseline levels to use them 1 hour later (experiment 1). Experiment 2 extended these results to a 14-hour delay between collecting and using the tools. Experiment 3 showed that seeing the apparatus during tool selection was not necessary to succeed. These findings suggest that the precursor skills for planning for the future evolved in great apes before 14 million years ago, when all extant great ape species shared a common ancestor. PMID:16709782

  18. Ebolavirus Vaccines for Humans and Apes

    PubMed Central

    Fausther-Bovendo, Hugues; Mulangu, Sabue

    2012-01-01

    Due to high case fatality proportions, person-to-person transmission, and potential use in bioterrorism, the development of a vaccine against ebolavirus remains a top priority. Although no licensed vaccine or treatment against ebolavirus is currently available, progress in preclinical testing of countermeasures has been made. Here, we will review ebolavirus vaccine candidates and considerations for their use in humans and wild apes. PMID:22560007

  19. Demographic history and genetic differentiation in apes.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Anne; Pollack, Joshua; Thalmann, Olaf; Nickel, Birgit; Pääbo, Svante

    2006-06-01

    Comparisons of genetic variation between humans and great apes are hampered by the fact that we still know little about the demographics and evolutionary history of the latter species. In addition, characterizing ape genetic variation is important because they are threatened with extinction, and knowledge about genetic differentiation among groups may guide conservation efforts. We sequenced multiple intergenic autosomal regions totaling 22,400 base pairs (bp) in ten individuals each from western, central, and eastern chimpanzee groups and in nine bonobos, and 16,000 bp in ten Bornean and six Sumatran orangutans. These regions are analyzed together with homologous information from three human populations and gorillas. We find that whereas orangutans have the highest diversity, western chimpanzees have the lowest, and that the demographic histories of most groups differ drastically. Special attention should therefore be paid to sampling strategies and the statistics chosen when comparing levels of variation within and among groups. Finally, we find that the extent of genetic differentiation among "subspecies" of chimpanzees and orangutans is comparable to that seen among human populations, calling the validity of the "subspecies" concept in apes into question. PMID:16753568

  20. Moral reasoning about great apes in research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Carol Midori

    2006-04-01

    This study explored how individuals (biomedical scientists, Great Ape Project activists, lay adults, undergraduate biology and environmental studies students, and Grade 12 and 9 biology students) morally judge and reason about using great apes in biomedical and language research. How these groups perceived great apes' mental capacities (e.g., pain, logical thinking) and how these perceptions related to their judgments were investigated through two scenarios. In addition, the kinds of informational statements (e.g., biology, economics) that may affect individuals' scenario judgments were investigated. A negative correlation was found between mental attributions and scenario judgments while no clear pattern occurred for the informational statements. For the biomedical scenario, all groups significantly differed in mean judgment ratings except for the biomedical scientists, GAP activists and Grade 9 students. For the language scenario, all groups differed except for the GAP activists, and undergraduate environmental studies and Grade 9 students. An in-depth qualitative analysis showed that although the biomedical scientists, GAP activists and Grade 9 students had similar judgments, they produced different mean percentages of justifications under four moral frameworks (virtue, utilitarianism, deontology, and welfare). The GAP activists used more virtue reasoning while the biomedical scientists and Grade 9 students used more utilitarian and welfare reasoning, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of developing environmental/humane education curricula.

  1. Why are there apes? Evidence for the co-evolution of ape and monkey ecomorphology.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kevin D

    2016-04-01

    Apes, members of the superfamily Hominoidea, possess a distinctive suite of anatomical and behavioral characters which appear to have evolved relatively late and relatively independently. The timing of paleontological events, extant cercopithecine and hominoid ecomorphology and other evidence suggests that many distinctive ape features evolved to facilitate harvesting ripe fruits among compliant terminal branches in tree edges. Precarious, unpredictably oriented, compliant supports in the canopy periphery require apes to maneuver using suspensory and non-sterotypical postures (i.e. postures with eccentric limb orientations or extreme joint excursions). Diet differences among extant species, extant species numbers and evidence of cercopithecoid diversification and expansion, in concert with a reciprocal decrease in hominoid species, suggest intense competition between monkeys and apes over the last 20 Ma. It may be that larger body masses allow great apes to succeed in contest competitions for highly desired food items, while the ability of monkeys to digest antifeedant-rich unripe fruits allows them to win scramble competitions. Evolutionary trends in morphology and inferred ecology suggest that as monkeys evolved to harvest fruit ever earlier in the fruiting cycle they broadened their niche to encompass first more fibrous, tannin- and toxin-rich unripe fruits and later, for some lineages, mature leaves. Early depletion of unripe fruit in the central core of the tree canopy by monkeys leaves a hollow sphere of ripening fruits, displacing antifeedant-intolerant, later-arriving apes to small-diameter, compliant terminal branches. Hylobatids, orangutans, Pan species, gorillas and the New World atelines may have each evolved suspensory behavior independently in response to local competition from an expanding population of monkeys. Genetic evidence of rapid evolution among chimpanzees suggests that adaptations to suspensory behavior, vertical climbing, knuckle

  2. The cognitive underpinnings of flexible tool use in great apes.

    PubMed

    Völter, Christoph J; Call, Josep

    2014-07-01

    Nonhuman primates perform poorly in trap tasks, a benchmark test of causal knowledge in nonhuman animals. However, recent evidence suggests that when the confound of tool use is avoided, great apes' performance improves dramatically. In the present study, we examined the cognitive underpinnings of tool use that contribute to apes' poor performance in trap tasks. We presented chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), bonobos (Pan paniscus), and orangutans (Pongo abelii) with different versions of a maze-like multilevel trap task. We manipulated whether the apes had to use their fingers or a stick to negotiate a reward through the maze. Furthermore, we varied whether the apes obtained visual information about the functionality of the traps (i.e., blockage of free passage) or only arbitrary color stimuli indicating the location of the traps. We found that (a) apes in the finger-maze task outperformed apes in the tool-use-maze task (and partially planned their moves multiple steps ahead), and (b) tool-using apes failed to learn to avoid the traps and performed similar to apes that did not obtain functional information about the traps. Follow-up experiments with apes that already learned to avoid the traps showed that tool use or the color cues per se did not pose a problem for experienced apes. These results suggest that simultaneously monitoring 2 spatial relations (the tool-reward and reward-surface relation) might overstrain apes' cognitive system. Thus, trap tasks involving tool use might constitute a dual task loading on the same cognitive resources; a candidate for these shared resources is the attentional system. PMID:25545978

  3. Ape malaria transmission and potential for ape-to-human transfers in Africa.

    PubMed

    Makanga, Boris; Yangari, Patrick; Rahola, Nil; Rougeron, Virginie; Elguero, Eric; Boundenga, Larson; Moukodoum, Nancy Diamella; Okouga, Alain Prince; Arnathau, Céline; Durand, Patrick; Willaume, Eric; Ayala, Diego; Fontenille, Didier; Ayala, Francisco J; Renaud, François; Ollomo, Benjamin; Prugnolle, Franck; Paupy, Christophe

    2016-05-10

    Recent studies have highlighted the large diversity of malaria parasites infecting African great apes (subgenus Laverania) and their strong host specificity. Although the existence of genetic incompatibilities preventing the cross-species transfer may explain host specificity, the existence of vectors with a high preference for a determined host represents another possibility. To test this hypothesis, we undertook a 15-mo-long longitudinal entomological survey in two forest regions of Gabon, where wild apes live, at different heights under the canopy. More than 2,400 anopheline mosquitoes belonging to 18 species were collected. Among them, only three species of Anopheles were found infected with ape Plasmodium: Anopheles vinckei, Anopheles moucheti, and Anopheles marshallii Their role in transmission was confirmed by the detection of the parasites in their salivary glands. Among these species, An. vinckei showed significantly the highest prevalence of infection and was shown to be able to transmit parasites of both chimpanzees and gorillas. Transmission was also shown to be conditioned by seasonal factors and by the heights of capture under the canopy. Moreover, human landing catches of sylvan Anopheles demonstrated the propensity of these three vector species to feed on humans when available. Our results suggest therefore that the strong host specificity observed in the Laveranias is not linked to a specific association between the vertebrate host and the vector species and highlight the potential role of these vectors as bridge between apes and humans. PMID:27071123

  4. Aquatic ape theory and fossil hominids.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, M J

    1991-06-01

    While most older palaeo-anthropological studies emphasise the similarities of the fossil hominids with modern man, recent studies often stress the unique and the apelike features of the australopithecine dentitions, skulls and postcranial bones. It is worth reconsidering the features of Australopithecus, Homo erectus and Homo neanderthalensis in the light of the so-called Aquatic Ape Theory (AAT) of Hardy and Morgan, and to compare the skeletal parts of our fossil relatives with those of (semi)aquatic animals. Possible convergences are observed with proboscis monkeys, beavers, sea-otters, hippopotamuses, seals, sea-lions, walruses, sea-cows, whales, dolphins, porpoises, penguins and crocodiles. PMID:1909768

  5. How great is great ape foresight?

    PubMed

    Suddendorf, Thomas; Corballis, Michael C; Collier-Baker, Emma

    2009-09-01

    Osvath and Osvath (Anim Cogn 11: 661-674, 2008) report innovative studies with two chimpanzees and one orangutan that suggest some capacity to select and keep a tool for use about an hour later. This is a welcome contribution to a small, but rapidly growing, field. Here we point out some of the weaknesses in the current data and caution the interpretation the authors advance. It is not clear to what extent the apes really engaged in any foresight in these studies. PMID:19565281

  6. Do Great Apes Use Emotional Expressions to Infer Desires?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttelmann, David; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although apes understand others' goals and perceptions, little is known about their understanding of others' emotional expressions. We conducted three studies following the general paradigm of Repacholi and colleagues (1997, 1998). In Study 1, a human reacted emotionally to the hidden contents of two boxes, after which the ape was allowed to…

  7. A Competitive Nonverbal False Belief Task for Children and Apes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krachun, Carla; Carpenter, Malinda; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A nonverbal false belief task was administered to children (mean age 5 years) and two great ape species: chimpanzees ("Pan troglodytes") and bonobos ("Pan paniscus"). Because apes typically perform poorly in cooperative contexts, our task was competitive. Two versions were run: in both, a human competitor witnessed an experimenter hide a reward in…

  8. Apes have culture but may not know that they do

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Thibaud; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Clément, Fabrice; van Schaik, Carel

    2015-01-01

    There is good evidence that some ape behaviors can be transmitted socially and that this can lead to group-specific traditions. However, many consider animal traditions, including those in great apes, to be fundamentally different from human cultures, largely because of lack of evidence for cumulative processes and normative conformity, but perhaps also because current research on ape culture is usually restricted to behavioral comparisons. Here, we propose to analyze ape culture not only at the surface behavioral level but also at the underlying cognitive level. To this end, we integrate empirical findings in apes with theoretical frameworks developed in developmental psychology regarding the representation of tools and the development of metarepresentational abilities, to characterize the differences between ape and human cultures at the cognitive level. Current data are consistent with the notion of apes possessing mental representations of tools that can be accessed through re-representations: apes may reorganize their knowledge of tools in the form of categories or functional schemes. However, we find no evidence for metarepresentations of cultural knowledge: apes may not understand that they or others hold beliefs about their cultures. The resulting Jourdain Hypothesis, based on Molière’s character, argues that apes express their cultures without knowing that they are cultural beings because of cognitive limitations in their ability to represent knowledge, a determining feature of modern human cultures, allowing representing and modifying the current norms of the group. Differences in metarepresentational processes may thus explain fundamental differences between human and other animals’ cultures, notably limitations in cumulative behavior and normative conformity. Future empirical work should focus on how animals mentally represent their cultural knowledge to conclusively determine the ways by which humans are unique in their cultural behavior. PMID

  9. Were Australopithecines Ape-Human Intermediates or Just Apes? A Test of Both Hypotheses Using the "Lucy" Skeleton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senter, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Mainstream scientists often claim that australopithecines such as the specimen nicknamed "Lucy" exhibit anatomy intermediate between that of apes and that of humans and use this as evidence that humans evolved from australopithecines, which evolved from apes. On the other hand, creationists reject evolution and claim that australopithecines are…

  10. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylatedmore » CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.« less

  11. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Freudenthal, Bret D; Beard, William A; Cuneo, Matthew J; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S; Wilson, Samuel H

    2015-11-01

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. We report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. These structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. These snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage. PMID:26458045

  12. Capturing Snapshots of APE1 Processing DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent non-coding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive due in part to limited structural information. We report multiple high-resolution human APE1:DNA structures that divulge novel features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal binding site, nucleophile, and arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1:DNA structures with a T:G mismatch 5′ to the AP-site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. These reveal that APE1 molds the T:G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick like geometry that distorts the active site reducing incision. These snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1, while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage. PMID:26458045

  13. Pandemic human viruses cause decline of endangered great apes.

    PubMed

    Köndgen, Sophie; Kühl, Hjalmar; N'Goran, Paul K; Walsh, Peter D; Schenk, Svenja; Ernst, Nancy; Biek, Roman; Formenty, Pierre; Mätz-Rensing, Kerstin; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Junglen, Sandra; Ellerbrok, Heinz; Nitsche, Andreas; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W Ian; Pauli, Georg; Boesch, Christophe; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2008-02-26

    Commercial hunting and habitat loss are major drivers of the rapid decline of great apes [1]. Ecotourism and research have been widely promoted as a means of providing alternative value for apes and their habitats [2]. However, close contact between humans and habituated apes during ape tourism and research has raised concerns that disease transmission risks might outweigh benefits [3-7]. To date only bacterial and parasitic infections of typically low virulence have been shown to move from humans to wild apes [8, 9]. Here, we present the first direct evidence of virus transmission from humans to wild apes. Tissue samples from habituated chimpanzees that died during three respiratory-disease outbreaks at our research site, Côte d'Ivoire, contained two common human paramyxoviruses. Viral strains sampled from chimpanzees were closely related to strains circulating in contemporaneous, worldwide human epidemics. Twenty-four years of mortality data from observed chimpanzees reveal that such respiratory outbreaks could have a long history. In contrast, survey data show that research presence has had a strong positive effect in suppressing poaching around the research site. These observations illustrate the challenge of maximizing the benefit of research and tourism to great apes while minimizing the negative side effects. PMID:18222690

  14. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.

  15. Mitochondrial translocation of APE1 relies on the MIA pathway.

    PubMed

    Barchiesi, Arianna; Wasilewski, Michal; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Tell, Gianluca; Vascotto, Carlo

    2015-06-23

    APE1 is a multifunctional protein with a fundamental role in repairing nuclear and mitochondrial DNA lesions caused by oxidative and alkylating agents. Unfortunately, comprehensions of the mechanisms regulating APE1 intracellular trafficking are still fragmentary and contrasting. Recent data demonstrate that APE1 interacts with the mitochondrial import and assembly protein Mia40 suggesting the involvement of a redox-assisted mechanism, dependent on the disulfide transfer system, to be responsible of APE1 trafficking into the mitochondria. The MIA pathway is an import machinery that uses a redox system for cysteine enriched proteins to drive them in this compartment. It is composed by two main proteins: Mia40 is the oxidoreductase that catalyzes the formation of the disulfide bonds in the substrate, while ALR reoxidizes Mia40 after the import. In this study, we demonstrated that: (i) APE1 and Mia40 interact through disulfide bond formation; and (ii) Mia40 expression levels directly affect APE1's mitochondrial translocation and, consequently, play a role in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA integrity. In summary, our data strongly support the hypothesis of a redox-assisted mechanism, dependent on Mia40, in controlling APE1 translocation into the mitochondrial inner membrane space and thus highlight the role of this protein transport pathway in the maintenance of mitochondrial DNA stability and cell survival. PMID:25956655

  16. Comparative Pathology of Aging Great Apes: Bonobos, Chimpanzees, Gorillas, and Orangutans.

    PubMed

    Lowenstine, L J; McManamon, R; Terio, K A

    2016-03-01

    The great apes (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans) are our closest relatives. Despite the many similarities, there are significant differences in aging among apes, including the human ape. Common to all are dental attrition, periodontitis, tooth loss, osteopenia, and arthritis, although gout is uniquely human and spondyloarthropathy is more prevalent in apes than humans. Humans are more prone to frailty, sarcopenia, osteoporosis, longevity past reproductive senescence, loss of brain volume, and Alzheimer dementia. Cerebral vascular disease occurs in both humans and apes. Cardiovascular disease mortality increases in aging humans and apes, but coronary atherosclerosis is the most significant type in humans. In captive apes, idiopathic myocardial fibrosis and cardiomyopathy predominate, with arteriosclerosis of intramural coronary arteries. Similar cardiac lesions are occasionally seen in wild apes. Vascular changes in heart and kidneys and aortic dissections in gorillas and bonobos suggest that hypertension may be involved in pathogenesis. Chronic kidney disease is common in elderly humans and some aging apes and is linked with cardiovascular disease in orangutans. Neoplasms common to aging humans and apes include uterine leiomyomas in chimpanzees, but other tumors of elderly humans, such as breast, prostate, lung, and colorectal cancers, are uncommon in apes. Among the apes, chimpanzees have been best studied in laboratory settings, and more comparative research is needed into the pathology of geriatric zoo-housed and wild apes. Increasing longevity of humans and apes makes understanding aging processes and diseases imperative for optimizing quality of life in all the ape species. PMID:26721908

  17. The evolution of human and ape hand proportions

    PubMed Central

    Almécija, Sergio; Smaers, Jeroen B.; Jungers, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Human hands are distinguished from apes by possessing longer thumbs relative to fingers. However, this simple ape-human dichotomy fails to provide an adequate framework for testing competing hypotheses of human evolution and for reconstructing the morphology of the last common ancestor (LCA) of humans and chimpanzees. We inspect human and ape hand-length proportions using phylogenetically informed morphometric analyses and test alternative models of evolution along the anthropoid tree of life, including fossils like the plesiomorphic ape Proconsul heseloni and the hominins Ardipithecus ramidus and Australopithecus sediba. Our results reveal high levels of hand disparity among modern hominoids, which are explained by different evolutionary processes: autapomorphic evolution in hylobatids (extreme digital and thumb elongation), convergent adaptation between chimpanzees and orangutans (digital elongation) and comparatively little change in gorillas and hominins. The human (and australopith) high thumb-to-digits ratio required little change since the LCA, and was acquired convergently with other highly dexterous anthropoids. PMID:26171589

  18. What's Special about Human Imitation? A Comparison with Enculturated Apes.

    PubMed

    Subiaul, Francys

    2016-01-01

    What, if anything, is special about human imitation? An evaluation of enculturated apes' imitation skills, a "best case scenario" of non-human apes' imitation performance, reveals important similarities and differences between this special population of apes and human children. Candidates for shared imitation mechanisms include the ability to imitate various familiar transitive responses and object-object actions that involve familiar tools. Candidates for uniquely derived imitation mechanisms include: imitating novel transitive actions and novel tool-using responses as well as imitating opaque or intransitive gestures, regardless of familiarity. While the evidence demonstrates that enculturated apes outperform non-enculturated apes and perform more like human children, all apes, regardless of rearing history, generally excel at imitating familiar, over-rehearsed responses and are poor, relative to human children, at imitating novel, opaque or intransitive responses. Given the similarities between the sensory and motor systems of preschool age human children and non-human apes, it is unlikely that differences in sensory input and/or motor-output alone explain the observed discontinuities in imitation performance. The special rearing history of enculturated apes-including imitation-specific training-further diminishes arguments suggesting that differences are experience-dependent. Here, it is argued that such differences are best explained by distinct, specialized mechanisms that have evolved for copying rules and responses in particular content domains. Uniquely derived social and imitation learning mechanisms may represent adaptations for learning novel communicative gestures and complex tool-use. Given our species' dependence on both language and tools, mechanisms that accelerated learning in these domains are likely to have faced intense selective pressures, starting with the earliest of human ancestors. PMID:27399786

  19. Do great apes use emotional expressions to infer desires?

    PubMed

    Buttelmann, David; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Although apes understand others' goals and perceptions, little is known about their understanding of others' emotional expressions. We conducted three studies following the general paradigm of Repacholi and colleagues (1997, 1998). In Study 1, a human reacted emotionally to the hidden contents of two boxes, after which the ape was allowed to choose one of the boxes. Apes distinguished between two of the expressed emotions (happiness and disgust) by choosing appropriately. In Studies 2 and 3, a human reacted either positively or negatively to the hidden contents of two containers; then the ape saw him eating something. When given a choice, apes correctly chose the container to which the human had reacted negatively, based on the inference that the human had just eaten the food to which he had reacted positively - and so the other container still had food left in it. These findings suggest that great apes understand both the directedness and the valence of some human emotional expressions, and can use this understanding to infer desires. PMID:19702761

  20. Drug-resistant human Staphylococcus aureus in sanctuary apes pose a threat to endangered wild ape populations.

    PubMed

    Schaumburg, Frieder; Mugisha, Lawrence; Peck, Bruce; Becker, Karsten; Gillespie, Thomas R; Peters, Georg; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2012-12-01

    Reintroduction of sanctuary apes to natural habitat is considered an important tool for conservation; however, reintroduction has the potential to endanger resident wild apes through the introduction of human pathogens. We found a high prevalence of drug-resistant, human-associated lineages of Staphylococcus aureus in sanctuary chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) from Zambia and Uganda. This pathogen is associated with skin and soft tissue diseases and severe invasive infections (i.e. pneumonia and septicemia). Colonization by this bacterium is difficult to clear due to frequent recolonization. In addition to its pathogenic potential, human-related S. aureus can serve as an indicator organism for the transmission of other potential pathogens like pneumococci or mycobacteria. Plans to reintroduce sanctuary apes should be reevaluated in light of the high risk of introducing human-adapted S. aureus into wild ape populations where treatment is impossible. PMID:22907634

  1. Are apes essentialists? Scope and limits of psychological essentialism in great apes.

    PubMed

    Cacchione, Trix; Hrubesch, Christine; Call, Josep; Rakoczy, Hannes

    2016-09-01

    Human reasoning is characterized by psychological essentialism (Gelman in The essential child: origins of essentialism in everyday thought. Oxford University Press, New York, 2003): when reasoning about objects, we distinguish between deep essential properties defining the object's kind and identity, and merely superficial features that can be changed without altering the object's identity. To date, it is unclear whether psychological essentialism is based on the acquisition of linguistic means (such as kind terms) and therefore uniquely human, or whether it is a more fundamental cognitive capacity which might be present also in the absence of language. In the present study, we addressed this question by testing whether, and if so, under which circumstances non-human apes also rely on psychological essentialism to identify objects. For this purpose, we adapted classical verbal transformation scenarios used in research on psychological essentialism (Keil in Concepts, kinds, and cognitive development. MIT Press, Cambridge, 1989) and implemented them in two nonverbal tasks: first, a box task, typically used to test object individuation (Experiment 1), and second, an object choice task, typically used to test object discrimination, object preferences and logical inferences (Experiments 2-4). Taken together, the results of the four experiments suggest that under suitable circumstances (when memory and other task demands are minimized), great apes engage in basic forms of essentialist reasoning. Psychological essentialism is thus possible also in the absence of language. PMID:27142417

  2. Development of APE1 enzymatic DNA repair assays: low APE1 activity is associated with increase lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sevilya, Ziv; Leitner-Dagan, Yael; Pinchev, Mila; Kremer, Ran; Elinger, Dalia; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Rennert, Hedy S; Freedman, Laurence S; Rennert, Gad; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Livneh, Zvi

    2015-09-01

    The key role of DNA repair in removing DNA damage and minimizing mutations makes it an attractive target for cancer risk assessment and prevention. Here we describe the development of a robust assay for apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1; APEX1), an essential enzyme involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. APE1 DNA repair enzymatic activity was measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cell protein extracts using a radioactivity-based assay, and its association with lung cancer was determined using conditional logistic regression with specimens from a population-based case-control study with 96 lung cancer cases and 96 matched control subjects. The mean APE1 enzyme activity in case patients was 691 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 655-727] units/ng protein, significantly lower than in control subjects (mean = 793, 95% CI = 751-834 units/ng protein, P = 0.0006). The adjusted odds ratio for lung cancer associated with 1 SD (211 units) decrease in APE1 activity was 2.0 (95% CI = 1.3-3.1; P = 0.002). Comparison of radioactivity- and fluorescence-based assays showed that the two are equivalent, indicating no interference by the fluorescent tag. The APE1Asp148Glu SNP was associated neither with APE1 enzyme activity nor with lung cancer risk. Taken together, our results indicate that low APE1 activity is associated with lung cancer risk, consistent with the hypothesis that 'bad DNA repair', rather than 'bad luck', is involved in cancer etiology. Such assays may be useful, along with additional DNA repair biomarkers, for risk assessment of lung cancer and perhaps other cancers, and for selecting individuals to undergo early detection techniques such as low-dose CT. PMID:26045303

  3. Does sympathy motivate prosocial behaviour in great apes?

    PubMed

    Liebal, Katja; Vaish, Amrisha; Haun, Daniel; Tomasello, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Prosocial behaviours such as helping, comforting, or sharing are central to human social life. Because they emerge early in ontogeny, it has been proposed that humans are prosocial by nature and that from early on empathy and sympathy motivate such behaviours. The emerging question is whether humans share these abilities to feel with and for someone with our closest relatives, the great apes. Although several studies demonstrated that great apes help others, little is known about their underlying motivations. This study addresses this issue and investigates whether four species of great apes (Pongo pygmaeus, Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus) help a conspecific more after observing the conspecific being harmed (a human experimenter steals the conspecific's food) compared to a condition where no harming occurred. Results showed that in regard to the occurrence of prosocial behaviours, only orangutans, but not the African great apes, help others when help is needed, contrasting prior findings on chimpanzees. However, with the exception of one population of orangutans that helped significantly more after a conspecific was harmed than when no harm occurred, prosocial behaviour in great apes was not motivated by concern for others. PMID:24416212

  4. Looking in apes as a source of human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Keita, Mamadou B; Hamad, Ibrahim; Bittar, Fadi

    2014-12-01

    Because of the close genetic relatedness between apes and humans, apes are susceptible to many human infectious agents and can serve as carriers of these pathogens. Consequently, they present a serious health hazard to humans. Moreover, many emerging infectious diseases originate in wildlife and continue to threaten human populations, especially vector-borne diseases described in great apes, such as malaria and rickettsiosis. These wild primates may be permanent reservoirs and important sources of human pathogens. In this special issue, we report that apes, including chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), bonobos (Pan paniscus), gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and Gorilla beringei), orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus and Pongo abelii), gibbons (Hylobates spp., Hoolock spp. and Nomascus spp) and siamangs (Symphalangus syndactylus syndactylus and Symphalangus continentis), have many bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic species that are capable of infecting humans. Serious measures should be adopted in tropical forests and sub-tropical areas where habitat overlaps are frequent to survey and prevent infectious diseases from spreading from apes to people. PMID:25220240

  5. Will oil palm's homecoming spell doom for Africa's great apes?

    PubMed

    Wich, Serge A; Garcia-Ulloa, John; Kühl, Hjalmar S; Humle, Tatanya; Lee, Janice S H; Koh, Lian Pin

    2014-07-21

    Expansion of oil palm plantations has led to extensive wildlife habitat conversion in Southeast Asia [1]. This expansion is driven by a global demand for palm oil for products ranging from foods to detergents [2], and more recently for biofuels [3]. The negative impacts of oil palm development on biodiversity [1, 4, 5], and on orangutans (Pongo spp.) in particular, have been well documented [6, 7] and publicized [8, 9]. Although the oil palm is of African origin, Africa's production historically lags behind that of Southeast Asia. Recently, significant investments have been made that will likely drive the expansion of Africa's oil palm industry [10]. There is concern that this will lead to biodiversity losses similar to those in Southeast Asia. Here, we analyze the potential impact of oil palm development on Africa's great apes. Current great ape distribution in Africa substantially overlaps with current oil palm concessions (by 58.7%) and areas suitable for oil palm production (by 42.3%). More importantly, 39.9% of the distribution of great ape species on unprotected lands overlaps with suitable oil palm areas. There is an urgent need to develop guidelines for the expansion of oil palm in Africa to minimize the negative effects on apes and other wildlife. There is also a need for research to support land use decisions to reconcile economic development, great ape conservation, and avoiding carbon emissions. PMID:25017207

  6. A New Approach for Monitoring Ebolavirus in Wild Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kenneth N.; Ondzie, Alain U.; Joly, Damien; Bermejo, Magdalena; Rouquet, Pierre; Fabozzi, Giulia; Bailey, Michael; Shen, Zhimin; Keele, Brandon F.; Hahn, Beatrice; Karesh, William B.; Sullivan, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Central Africa is a “hotspot” for emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) of global and local importance, and a current outbreak of ebolavirus is affecting multiple countries simultaneously. Ebolavirus is suspected to have caused recent declines in resident great apes. While ebolavirus vaccines have been proposed as an intervention to protect apes, their effectiveness would be improved if we could diagnostically confirm Ebola virus disease (EVD) as the cause of die-offs, establish ebolavirus geographical distribution, identify immunologically naïve populations, and determine whether apes survive virus exposure. Methodology/Principal findings Here we report the first successful noninvasive detection of antibodies against Ebola virus (EBOV) from wild ape feces. Using this method, we have been able to identify gorillas with antibodies to EBOV with an overall prevalence rate reaching 10% on average, demonstrating that EBOV exposure or infection is not uniformly lethal in this species. Furthermore, evidence of antibodies was identified in gorillas thought previously to be unexposed to EBOV (protected from exposure by rivers as topological barriers of transmission). Conclusions/Significance Our new approach will contribute to a strategy to protect apes from future EBOV infections by early detection of increased incidence of exposure, by identifying immunologically naïve at-risk populations as potential targets for vaccination, and by providing a means to track vaccine efficacy if such intervention is deemed appropriate. Finally, since human EVD is linked to contact with infected wildlife carcasses, efforts aimed at identifying great ape outbreaks could have a profound impact on public health in local communities, where EBOV causes case-fatality rates of up to 88%. PMID:25232832

  7. Human and ape: the legend, the history and the DNA

    PubMed Central

    Diamandopoulos, AA; Goudas, CP

    2007-01-01

    A vast amount of papers is published every year about species evolution, the most interesting being those recently published in the journal "Nature", concerning the human-ape relationship. The results and the new theories generated from this research are sometimes astonishing, rising not only biological, but also social, religious and cultural questions. One of the new questions concerns the role of species interbreeding as a means of evolution. In the subject of species interbreeding between human and ape we found some interesting historical and mythical information that sort of back-up this theory of interbreeding, with a historical and cultural side of view. PMID:19582186

  8. Meaning and ostension in great ape gestural communication.

    PubMed

    Moore, Richard

    2016-01-01

    It is sometimes argued that while human gestures are produced ostensively and intentionally, great ape gestures are produced only intentionally. If true, this would make the psychological mechanisms underlying the different species' communication fundamentally different, and ascriptions of meaning to chimpanzee gestures would be inappropriate. While the existence of different underlying mechanisms cannot be ruled out, in fact claims about difference are driven less by empirical data than by contested assumptions about the nature of ostensive communication. On some accounts, there are no reasons to doubt that great ape gestural communication is ostensive. If these accounts are correct, attributions of meaning to chimpanzee gestures would be justified. PMID:26223212

  9. Differences in the Nonverbal Requests of Great Apes and Human Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Goot, Marloes H.; Tomasello, Michael; Liszkowski, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how great apes and human infants use imperative pointing to request objects. In a series of three experiments (infants, N = 44; apes, N = 12), subjects were given the opportunity to either point to a desired object from a distance or else to approach closer and request it proximally. The apes always approached close to the…

  10. Comparative and Familial Analysis of Handedness in Great Apes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, William D.

    2006-01-01

    Historically, population-level handedness has been considered a hallmark of human evolution. Whether nonhuman primates exhibit population-level handedness remains a topic of considerable debate. This paper summarizes published data on handedness in great apes. Comparative analysis indicated that chimpanzees and bonobos show population-level right…

  11. Comprehension of Novel Communicative Signs by Apes and Human Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael; Call, Josep; Gluckman, Andrea

    1997-01-01

    Compared comprehension of novel communicative signs to assist 2.5- and 3-year-old humans, chimpanzees, and orangutans find hidden objects during a hiding-finding game. Found that children at both ages performed above chance with all signs. No ape performed above chance for any signs not known before the experiment despite three times as many…

  12. Phylogenetic Approach to Object Manipulation in Human and Ape Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vauclair, Jacques

    1984-01-01

    Parker and Gibson's developmental model of evolution of language and intelligence in early hominids is described and discussed; data from a comparative study of object manipulation in two apes and a human infant are reported; and, human ontogenic developmental retardation in locomotion is discussed in terms of its implications for the differential…

  13. Pointing Behaviors in Apes and Human Infants: A Balanced Interpretation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Juan-Carlos

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a tentatively "balanced" view (i.e., midway between lean and rich interpretations) of pointing behavior in infants and apes, based upon the notion of intentional reading of behavior without simultaneous attribution of unobservable mental states. This can account for the complexity of infant pointing without attributing…

  14. A gorilla-sized ape from the miocene of India.

    PubMed

    Simons, E L; Pilbeam, D

    1971-07-01

    A large ape existed in India at the close of the Miocene or the beginning of the Pliocene epochs; this ape shows a complex of anatomical structures at the opposite pole from its contemporary, Ramapithecus. Although found in the same beds, the two seldom occur at the same exact sites and levels. Considering the thickness of these beds, recovery close to Haritalyangar does not, of itself, prove sympatry of these two different kinds of Hominoidea. However, both are definitely present at one recently located site representing, most probably, a death assemblage. Observations by the authors on scores of chimpanzees suggest that, at least in this ape, wear gradients on molar crowns exist, but that the wear differential between adjacent molars is almost never raised to the degree seen in most Ramapithecus. Dryopithecus itdicus and D. fontani (from southern France), in contrast, show almost no wear gradient at all; that is, whether an individual is dentally young or old, wear on all three molars and the two premolars has proceeded to about the same degree. It is of considerable importance in understanding hominid phylogeny to be able to stress that an ape known to be contemporary with Ramapithecus shows far less differential wear than does the hominid. This, in turn, strongly suggests that the molar eruption sequence of D. indicus was rapid, while that of the hominid was delayed. The implication is that, as far back as the late Miocene, the hominid maturation period was lengthened, relative to that of apes. A further fact which emerges is that the rate of interstitial wear was faster in the Haritalyangar ape than in the hominid contemporary with it. This, together with its large size, flatness of unworn tooth crowns, and other associated characters, suggests that D. indicus is in, or close to, the ancestry of Gigantopithecus. From this emerges yet another object lesson, emphasizing the caution one has to observe in the manner and method by which ancient and modern apes are

  15. Peroxiredoxin 1 interacts with and blocks the redox factor APE1 from activating interleukin-8 expression.

    PubMed

    Nassour, Hassan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Saad, Amine; Papaluca, Arturo; Brosseau, Nicolas; Affar, El Bachir; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; Ramotar, Dindial

    2016-01-01

    APE1 is an essential DNA repair protein that also possesses the ability to regulate transcription. It has a unique cysteine residue C65, which maintains the reduce state of several transcriptional activators such as NF-κB. How APE1 is being recruited to execute the various biological functions remains unknown. Herein, we show that APE1 interacts with a novel partner PRDX1, a peroxidase that can also prevent oxidative damage to proteins by serving as a chaperone. PRDX1 knockdown did not interfere with APE1 expression level or its DNA repair activities. However, PRDX1 knockdown greatly facilitates APE1 detection within the nucleus by indirect immunofluorescence analysis, even though APE1 level was unchanged. The loss of APE1 interaction with PRDX1 promotes APE1 redox function to activate binding of the transcription factor NF-κB onto the promoter of a target gene, the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8 involved in cancer invasion and metastasis, resulting in its upregulation. Depletion of APE1 blocked the upregulation of IL-8 in the PRDX1 knockdown cells. Our findings suggest that the interaction of PRDX1 with APE1 represents a novel anti-inflammatory function of PRDX1, whereby the association safeguards APE1 from reducing transcription factors and activating superfluous gene expression, which otherwise could trigger cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27388124

  16. Histone deacetylases inhibitor trichostatin A modulates the extracellular release of APE1/Ref-1

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sunga; Lee, Yu Ran; Park, Myoung Soo; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Cho, Eun Jung; Kim, Hyo Shin; Kim, Cuk Seong; Park, Jin Bong; Irani, Kaikobad; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Trichostatin A (TSA) increased APE1/Ref-1 secretion in HEK293 cells. •Lysine-mutated APE1/Ref-1 (K6R/K7R) was not secreted by TSA. •TSA induced cytoplasmic translocation of APE1/Ref-1. •APE1/Ref-1 is a protein whose secretion is governed by lysine acetylation. -- Abstract: Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) can be acetylated via post-translational modification. We investigated the effect of an inhibitor of histone deacetylases on the extracellular release of APE1/Ref-1 in HEK293 cells. Trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, induced APE1/Ref-1 secretion without changing cell viability. In a fluorescence quantitative assay, the secreted APE1/Ref-1 was estimated to be about 10 ng/mL in response to TSA (1 μM). However, TSA did not induce the secretion of lysine-mutated APE1/Ref-1 (K6R/K7R). TSA also caused nuclear to cytoplasmic translocation of APE1/Ref-1. Taken together, these findings suggest that APE1/Ref-1 is a protein whose secretion is governed by lysine acetylation.

  17. Peroxiredoxin 1 interacts with and blocks the redox factor APE1 from activating interleukin-8 expression

    PubMed Central

    Nassour, Hassan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Saad, Amine; Papaluca, Arturo; Brosseau, Nicolas; Affar, El Bachir; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A.; Ramotar, Dindial

    2016-01-01

    APE1 is an essential DNA repair protein that also possesses the ability to regulate transcription. It has a unique cysteine residue C65, which maintains the reduce state of several transcriptional activators such as NF-κB. How APE1 is being recruited to execute the various biological functions remains unknown. Herein, we show that APE1 interacts with a novel partner PRDX1, a peroxidase that can also prevent oxidative damage to proteins by serving as a chaperone. PRDX1 knockdown did not interfere with APE1 expression level or its DNA repair activities. However, PRDX1 knockdown greatly facilitates APE1 detection within the nucleus by indirect immunofluorescence analysis, even though APE1 level was unchanged. The loss of APE1 interaction with PRDX1 promotes APE1 redox function to activate binding of the transcription factor NF-κB onto the promoter of a target gene, the proinflammatory chemokine IL-8 involved in cancer invasion and metastasis, resulting in its upregulation. Depletion of APE1 blocked the upregulation of IL-8 in the PRDX1 knockdown cells. Our findings suggest that the interaction of PRDX1 with APE1 represents a novel anti-inflammatory function of PRDX1, whereby the association safeguards APE1 from reducing transcription factors and activating superfluous gene expression, which otherwise could trigger cancer invasion and metastasis. PMID:27388124

  18. The Time Scale of Recombination Rate Evolution in Great Apes.

    PubMed

    Stevison, Laurie S; Woerner, August E; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Kelley, Joanna L; Veeramah, Krishna R; McManus, Kimberly F; Bustamante, Carlos D; Hammer, Michael F; Wall, Jeffrey D

    2016-04-01

    We present three linkage-disequilibrium (LD)-based recombination maps generated using whole-genome sequence data from 10 Nigerian chimpanzees, 13 bonobos, and 15 western gorillas, collected as part of the Great Ape Genome Project (Prado-Martinez J, et al. 2013. Great ape genetic diversity and population history. Nature 499:471-475). We also identified species-specific recombination hotspots in each group using a modified LDhot framework, which greatly improves statistical power to detect hotspots at varying strengths. We show that fewer hotspots are shared among chimpanzee subspecies than within human populations, further narrowing the time scale of complete hotspot turnover. Further, using species-specific PRDM9 sequences to predict potential binding sites (PBS), we show higher predicted PRDM9 binding in recombination hotspots as compared to matched cold spot regions in multiple great ape species, including at least one chimpanzee subspecies. We found that correlations between broad-scale recombination rates decline more rapidly than nucleotide divergence between species. We also compared the skew of recombination rates at centromeres and telomeres between species and show a skew from chromosome means extending as far as 10-15 Mb from chromosome ends. Further, we examined broad-scale recombination rate changes near a translocation in gorillas and found minimal differences as compared to other great ape species perhaps because the coordinates relative to the chromosome ends were unaffected. Finally, on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis, we found that various correlates of recombination rate persist throughout the African great apes including repeats, diversity, and divergence. Our study is the first to analyze within- and between-species genome-wide recombination rate variation in several close relatives. PMID:26671457

  19. The role of APE/Ref-1 signaling pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    YANG, ZHEN; YANG, SUN; MISNER, BOBBYE J.; LIU-SMITH, FENG; MEYSKENS, FRANK L.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is responsible for a third of the estimated cancer-caused deaths worldwide. To deeply understand the mechanisms controlling HCC progression is of primary importance to develop new approaches for treatment. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/redox effector factor 1 (APE/Ref-1) has been uncovered elevated in various types of cancer, including HCC. Additionally, HCC progression is always correlated with elevated copper (Cu). Our previous data demonstrated that Cu treatment initiated APE/Ref-1 expression and its downstream targets. Therefore, we hypothesized that APE/Ref-1 may be involved in HCC progression through mediating the effect of Cu to its signaling cascades. Following different treatments, human HCC cell line (Hep3B) and immortalized non-malignant hepatocyte cell line (THLE3) were analyzed to explore the role of APE/Ref-1 signaling pathway. Unstained human tissue microarrays (TMA) were subjected to IHC analysis to study the relationship between APE/Ref-1 expression and clinic features. APE/Ref-1 was upregulated in HCC cells consistent with the strong expression of APE/Ref-1 in HCC tissue microarray. Greater cytoplasmic accumulation of APE/Ref-1 was found in poorly differentiated and more aggressive tumors. Also we provide evidence to show that APE/Ref-1 signaling pathway stimulates cellular proliferation, enhances antiapoptosis, and facilitates metastasis through experimental knockdown of APE/Ref-1 using siRNA in Hep3B cells or overexpressing APE/Ref-1 in THLE3 cells. These results define a novel role of APE/Ref-1 in HCC progression as being an important mediating and potentiating molecule, and also provide a basis for further investigations utilizing appropriate APE/Ref-1 inhibitors in combination with chemo-drugs for HCC treatment. PMID:25109342

  20. Ape parasite origins of human malaria virulence genes.

    PubMed

    Larremore, Daniel B; Sundararaman, Sesh A; Liu, Weimin; Proto, William R; Clauset, Aaron; Loy, Dorothy E; Speede, Sheri; Plenderleith, Lindsey J; Sharp, Paul M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Rayner, Julian C; Buckee, Caroline O

    2015-01-01

    Antigens encoded by the var gene family are major virulence factors of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, exhibiting enormous intra- and interstrain diversity. Here we use network analysis to show that var architecture and mosaicism are conserved at multiple levels across the Laverania subgenus, based on var-like sequences from eight single-species and three multi-species Plasmodium infections of wild-living or sanctuary African apes. Using select whole-genome amplification, we also find evidence of multi-domain var structure and synteny in Plasmodium gaboni, one of the ape Laverania species most distantly related to P. falciparum, as well as a new class of Duffy-binding-like domains. These findings indicate that the modular genetic architecture and sequence diversity underlying var-mediated host-parasite interactions evolved before the radiation of the Laverania subgenus, long before the emergence of P. falciparum. PMID:26456841

  1. Gibbon genome and the fast karyotype evolution of small apes

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Lucia; Harris, R. Alan; Gnerre, Sante; Veeramah, Krishna R.; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Huddleston, John; Meyer, Thomas J.; Herrero, Javier; Roos, Christian; Aken, Bronwen; Anaclerio, Fabio; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Baker, Carl; Barrell, Daniel; Batzer, Mark A.; Beal, Kathryn; Blancher, Antoine; Bohrson, Craig L.; Brameier, Markus; Campbell, Michael S.; Capozzi, Oronzo; Casola, Claudio; Chiatante, Giorgia; Cree, Andrew; Damert, Annette; de Jong, Pieter J.; Dumas, Laura; Fernandez-Callejo, Marcos; Flicek, Paul; Fuchs, Nina V.; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo; Hahn, Matthew W.; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Hubley, Robert; Ianc, Bianca; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Jablonski, Nina G.; Johnstone, Laurel M.; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Konkel, Miriam K.; Kostka, Dennis; Lazar, Nathan H.; Lee, Sandra L.; Lewis, Lora R.; Liu, Yue; Locke, Devin P.; Mallick, Swapan; Mendez, Fernando L.; Muffato, Matthieu; Nazareth, Lynne V.; Nevonen, Kimberly A.; O,Bleness, Majesta; Ochis, Cornelia; Odom, Duncan T.; Pollard, Katherine S.; Quilez, Javier; Reich, David; Rocchi, Mariano; Schumann, Gerald G.; Searle, Stephen; Sikela, James M.; Skollar, Gabriella; Smit, Arian; Sonmez, Kemal; Hallers, Boudewijn ten; Terhune, Elizabeth; Thomas, Gregg W.C.; Ullmer, Brygg; Ventura, Mario; Walker, Jerilyn A.; Wall, Jeffrey D.; Walter, Lutz; Ward, Michelle C.; Wheelan, Sarah J.; Whelan, Christopher W.; White, Simon; Wilhelm, Larry J.; Woerner, August E.; Yandell, Mark; Zhu, Baoli; Hammer, Michael F.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Eichler, Evan E.; Fulton, Lucinda; Fronick, Catrina; Muzny, Donna M.; Warren, Wesley C.; Worley, Kim C.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Wilson, Richard K.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Gibbons are small arboreal apes that display an accelerated rate of evolutionary chromosomal rearrangement and occupy a key node in the primate phylogeny between Old World monkeys and great apes. Here we present the assembly and analysis of a northern white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys) genome. We describe the propensity for a gibbon-specific retrotransposon (LAVA) to insert into chromosome segregation genes and alter transcription by providing a premature termination site, suggesting a possible molecular mechanism for the genome plasticity of the gibbon lineage. We further show that the gibbon genera (Nomascus, Hylobates, Hoolock and Symphalangus) experienced a near-instantaneous radiation ~5 million years ago, coincident with major geographical changes in Southeast Asia that caused cycles of habitat compression and expansion. Finally, we identify signatures of positive selection in genes important for forelimb development (TBX5) and connective tissues (COL1A1) that may have been involved in the adaptation of gibbons to their arboreal habitat. PMID:25209798

  2. Ape parasite origins of human malaria virulence genes

    PubMed Central

    Larremore, Daniel B.; Sundararaman, Sesh A.; Liu, Weimin; Proto, William R.; Clauset, Aaron; Loy, Dorothy E.; Speede, Sheri; Plenderleith, Lindsey J.; Sharp, Paul M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Rayner, Julian C.; Buckee, Caroline O.

    2015-01-01

    Antigens encoded by the var gene family are major virulence factors of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, exhibiting enormous intra- and interstrain diversity. Here we use network analysis to show that var architecture and mosaicism are conserved at multiple levels across the Laverania subgenus, based on var-like sequences from eight single-species and three multi-species Plasmodium infections of wild-living or sanctuary African apes. Using select whole-genome amplification, we also find evidence of multi-domain var structure and synteny in Plasmodium gaboni, one of the ape Laverania species most distantly related to P. falciparum, as well as a new class of Duffy-binding-like domains. These findings indicate that the modular genetic architecture and sequence diversity underlying var-mediated host-parasite interactions evolved before the radiation of the Laverania subgenus, long before the emergence of P. falciparum. PMID:26456841

  3. Gibbon genome and the fast karyotype evolution of small apes.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Lucia; Harris, R Alan; Gnerre, Sante; Veeramah, Krishna R; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Huddleston, John; Meyer, Thomas J; Herrero, Javier; Roos, Christian; Aken, Bronwen; Anaclerio, Fabio; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Baker, Carl; Barrell, Daniel; Batzer, Mark A; Beal, Kathryn; Blancher, Antoine; Bohrson, Craig L; Brameier, Markus; Campbell, Michael S; Capozzi, Oronzo; Casola, Claudio; Chiatante, Giorgia; Cree, Andrew; Damert, Annette; de Jong, Pieter J; Dumas, Laura; Fernandez-Callejo, Marcos; Flicek, Paul; Fuchs, Nina V; Gut, Ivo; Gut, Marta; Hahn, Matthew W; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Hillier, LaDeana W; Hubley, Robert; Ianc, Bianca; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Jablonski, Nina G; Johnstone, Laurel M; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Konkel, Miriam K; Kostka, Dennis; Lazar, Nathan H; Lee, Sandra L; Lewis, Lora R; Liu, Yue; Locke, Devin P; Mallick, Swapan; Mendez, Fernando L; Muffato, Matthieu; Nazareth, Lynne V; Nevonen, Kimberly A; O'Bleness, Majesta; Ochis, Cornelia; Odom, Duncan T; Pollard, Katherine S; Quilez, Javier; Reich, David; Rocchi, Mariano; Schumann, Gerald G; Searle, Stephen; Sikela, James M; Skollar, Gabriella; Smit, Arian; Sonmez, Kemal; ten Hallers, Boudewijn; Terhune, Elizabeth; Thomas, Gregg W C; Ullmer, Brygg; Ventura, Mario; Walker, Jerilyn A; Wall, Jeffrey D; Walter, Lutz; Ward, Michelle C; Wheelan, Sarah J; Whelan, Christopher W; White, Simon; Wilhelm, Larry J; Woerner, August E; Yandell, Mark; Zhu, Baoli; Hammer, Michael F; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Eichler, Evan E; Fulton, Lucinda; Fronick, Catrina; Muzny, Donna M; Warren, Wesley C; Worley, Kim C; Rogers, Jeffrey; Wilson, Richard K; Gibbs, Richard A

    2014-09-11

    Gibbons are small arboreal apes that display an accelerated rate of evolutionary chromosomal rearrangement and occupy a key node in the primate phylogeny between Old World monkeys and great apes. Here we present the assembly and analysis of a northern white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys) genome. We describe the propensity for a gibbon-specific retrotransposon (LAVA) to insert into chromosome segregation genes and alter transcription by providing a premature termination site, suggesting a possible molecular mechanism for the genome plasticity of the gibbon lineage. We further show that the gibbon genera (Nomascus, Hylobates, Hoolock and Symphalangus) experienced a near-instantaneous radiation ∼5 million years ago, coincident with major geographical changes in southeast Asia that caused cycles of habitat compression and expansion. Finally, we identify signatures of positive selection in genes important for forelimb development (TBX5) and connective tissues (COL1A1) that may have been involved in the adaptation of gibbons to their arboreal habitat. PMID:25209798

  4. Reconstructing the evolution of laughter in great apes and humans.

    PubMed

    Davila Ross, Marina; Owren, Michael J; Zimmermann, Elke

    2009-07-14

    Human emotional expressions, such as laughter, are argued to have their origins in ancestral nonhuman primate displays. To test this hypothesis, the current work examined the acoustics of tickle-induced vocalizations from infant and juvenile orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos, as well as tickle-induced laughter produced by human infants. Resulting acoustic data were then coded as character states and submitted to quantitative phylogenetic analysis. Acoustic outcomes revealed both important similarities and differences among the five species. Furthermore, phylogenetic trees reconstructed from the acoustic data matched the well-established trees based on comparative genetics. Taken together, the results provide strong evidence that tickling-induced laughter is homologous in great apes and humans and support the more general postulation of phylogenetic continuity from nonhuman displays to human emotional expressions. Findings also show that distinctively human laughter characteristics such as predominantly regular, stable voicing and consistently egressive airflow are nonetheless traceable to characteristics of shared ancestors with great apes. PMID:19500987

  5. Future Thinking: Children But Not Apes Consider Multiple Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Seed, Amanda M; Dickerson, Katherine L

    2016-07-11

    When anticipating the future, we draw on our past experience but must take uncertainty into account; for example, while preparing for a trip, we might pack a raincoat and sunglasses because of unpredictable weather. New research shows that the ability to plan for multiple future possibilities may be present in human children from as early as 3-4 years of age, but appears to be lacking in non-human apes. PMID:27404237

  6. Ontogeny of body size variation in African apes.

    PubMed

    Leigh, S R; Shea, B T

    1996-01-01

    Size variation in African apes (Gorilla gorilla [gorilla], Pan paniscus [pygmy chimpanzee], and Pan troglodytes ["common" chimpanzee]) is substantial, both within and between species. We investigate the possible evolutionary significance of this variation through an analysis of the ontogeny of size variation in this group. In addition, we highlight possible areas of future endocrinological research, and evaluate recently proposed alternative models that attempt to account for ontogenetic variation in apes. The present study shows that intergeneric variation in size is largely a consequence of differences among species in the rate of body weight growth. Interspecific size variation in Pan is a product of both rate and duration differences in growth. The ontogenetic bases of sexual dimorphism vary in this group. Dimorphism is largely a result of sex differences in the duration of body weight growth in gorillas and pygmy chimpanzees, but results from differences in the rate of growth in common chimpanzees. Ontogenetic analyses largely confirm earlier interpretations, but with better data and methods. The great degree of ontogenetic variation within and among these species, especially in the timing and magnitude of "pubertal" growth spurts, implies that studies of endocrine growth control in African apes could be a productive line of future research. We also suggest that ontogenetic variation can be understood with respect to ecological risks. Growth rates seem to be negatively correlated with ecological risk in African apes, suggesting links between ontogenetic patterns and social and ecological variables. High growth rates in gorillas compared to Pan are most consistent with this model. Variation between chimpanzees and pygmy chimpanzees (especially females) also seem to fit predictions of this model. PMID:8928723

  7. Morphological variation in great ape and modern human mandibles.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, L T; Dean, M C; Stringer, C B

    1999-11-01

    Adult mandibles of 317 modern humans and 91 great apes were selected that showed no pathology. Adult mandibles of Pan troglodytes troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus and Gorilla gorilla gorilla and from 2 modern human populations (Zulu and Europeans from Spitalfields) were reliably sexed. Thirteen measurements were defined and included mandibular height, length and breadth in representative positions. Univariate statistical techniques and multivariate (principal component analysis and discriminant analysis) statistical techniques were used to investigate interspecific variability and sexual dimorphism in human and great ape mandibles, and intraspecific variability among the modern human mandibles. Analysis of interspecific differences revealed some pairs of variables with a tight linear relationship and others where Homo and the great apes pulled apart from one another due to shape differences. Homo and Pan are least sexually dimorphic in the mandible, Pan less so than Homo sapiens, but both the magnitude of sexual dimorphism and the distribution of sexually dimorphic measurements varied both among and between modern humans and great apes. Intraspecific variation among the 10 populations of modern humans was less than that generally reported in studies of crania (74.3% of mandibles were correctly classified into 1 of 10 populations using discriminant functions based on 13 variables as compared with 93% of crania from 17 populations based on 70 variables in one extensive study of crania). A subrecent European population (Poundbury) emerged as more different from a recent European population (Spitalfields) than other more diverse modern populations were from each other, suggesting considerable morphological plasticity in the mandible through time. This study forms a sound basis on which to explore mandibular variation in Neanderthals, early Homo sapiens and other more ancient fossil hominids. PMID:10634689

  8. South to south learning in great ape conservation.

    PubMed

    Schoneveld-de Lange, Nicolien; Meijaard, Erik; Löhr, Ansje

    2016-06-01

    Despite evidence that killing of Bornean Orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in South-East Asia is a major threat to the species, few researchers and non-governmental conservationists have addressed it in management and research, and there is virtually no implementation of anti-killing strategies. In large parts of the Congo Basin, Central Africa, instead, illegal killing of great apes is acknowledged to be their largest threat, and many conservation strategies have been used to reduce killing pressure. However, since these strategies have not been subject to systematic and comprehensive review, it remains unclear which of them have been successful and why. Knowledge of the success, failure, and practices of common conservation strategies to manage great ape killing is critical to ensure adaptive conservation management in the Congo Basin. Understanding the Congo context also facilitates simultaneously highlighting great ape killing in Borneo and suggesting solutions to manage orangutan killing. Here, we compile and analyze the available literature on great ape conservation strategies for reducing killing rates in the Congo Basin. Through a systematic literature review of 198 publications, we find that the most widely employed conservation strategies in the Congo Basin are legislation and law enforcement, protected area management, community-based conservation, alternatives to bushmeat consumption and trade, ecotourism, education, and capacity building. Despite lack of rigorous post-intervention evaluation of conservation impact, we derive several recommendations for addressing the orangutan killing issue in Borneo. A critical lesson, widely applicable to developing countries for conservationists and not limited to Congo Basin realities, is the need for rigorous post-intervention evaluations compared to pre-intervention baselines and over appropriate time frames. Am. J. Primatol. 78:669-678, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26828200

  9. Interactions between zoo-housed great apes and local wildlife.

    PubMed

    Ross, S R; Holmes, A N; Lonsdorf, E V

    2009-06-01

    Although there are published reports of wild chimpanzees, bonobos, and orangutans hunting and consuming vertebrate prey, data pertaining to captive apes remain sparse. In this survey-based study, we evaluate the prevalence and nature of interactions between captive great apes and various indigenous wildlife species that range into their enclosures in North America. Our hypotheses were threefold: (a) facilities housing chimpanzees will report the most frequent and most aggressive interactions with local wildlife; (b) facilities housing orangutans and bonobos will report intermediate frequencies of these interactions with low levels of aggression and killing; and (c) facilities housing gorillas will report the lowest frequency of interactions and no reports of killing local wildlife. Chimpanzees and bonobos demonstrated the most aggressive behavior toward wildlife, which matched our predictions for chimpanzees, but not bonobos. This fits well with expectations for chimpanzees based on their natural history of hunting and consuming prey in wild settings, and also supports new field data on bonobos. Captive gorillas and orangutans were reported to be much less likely to chase, catch and kill wildlife than chimpanzees and bonobos. Gorillas were the least likely to engage in aggressive interactions with local wildlife, matching our predictions based on natural history. However unlike wild gorillas, captive gorillas were reported to kill (and in one case, eat) local wildlife. These results suggest that some behavioral patterns seen in captive groups of apes may be useful for modeling corresponding activities in the wild that may not be as easily observed and quantified. Furthermore, the data highlight the potential for disease transmission in some captive settings, and we outline the associated implications for ape health and safety. PMID:19274706

  10. Differential expression of APE1 and APE2 in germinal centers promotes error-prone repair and A:T mutations during somatic hypermutation

    PubMed Central

    Stavnezer, Janet; Linehan, Erin K.; Thompson, Mikayla R.; Habboub, Ghaith; Ucher, Anna J.; Kadungure, Tatenda; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Schrader, Carol E.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) of antibody variable region genes is initiated in germinal center B cells during an immune response by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), which converts cytosines to uracils. During accurate repair in nonmutating cells, uracil is excised by uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG), leaving abasic sites that are incised by AP endonuclease (APE) to create single-strand breaks, and the correct nucleotide is reinserted by DNA polymerase β. During SHM, for unknown reasons, repair is error prone. There are two APE homologs in mammals and, surprisingly, APE1, in contrast to its high expression in both resting and in vitro-activated splenic B cells, is expressed at very low levels in mouse germinal center B cells where SHM occurs, and APE1 haploinsufficiency has very little effect on SHM. In contrast, the less efficient homolog, APE2, is highly expressed and contributes not only to the frequency of mutations, but also to the generation of mutations at A:T base pair (bp), insertions, and deletions. In the absence of both UNG and APE2, mutations at A:T bp are dramatically reduced. Single-strand breaks generated by APE2 could provide entry points for exonuclease recruited by the mismatch repair proteins Msh2–Msh6, and the known association of APE2 with proliferating cell nuclear antigen could recruit translesion polymerases to create mutations at AID-induced lesions and also at A:T bp. Our data provide new insight into error-prone repair of AID-induced lesions, which we propose is facilitated by down-regulation of APE1 and up-regulation of APE2 expression in germinal center B cells. PMID:24927551

  11. No Evidence for Ape Plasmodium Infections in Humans in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Ollomo, Benjamin; Arnathau, Céline; Roche, Benjamin; Elguero, Eric; Moukodoum, Nancy Diamella; Okougha, Alain-Prince; Mve Ondo, Bertrand; Boundenga, Larson; Houzé, Sandrine; Galan, Maxime; Nkoghé, Dieudonné; Leroy, Eric M.; Durand, Patrick; Paupy, Christophe; Renaud, François; Prugnolle, Franck

    2015-01-01

    African great apes are naturally infected by a multitude of Plasmodium species most of them recently discovered, among which several are closely related to human malaria agents. However, it is still unknown whether these animals can serve as source of infections for humans living in their vicinity. To evaluate this possibility, we analysed the nature of Plasmodium infections from a bank of 4281 human blood samples collected in 210 villages of Gabon, Central Africa. Among them, 2255 were detected positive to Plasmodium using molecular methods (Plasmodium Cytochrome b amplification). A high throughput sequencing technology (454 GS-FLX Titanium technology, Roche) was then used to identify the Plasmodium species present within each positive sample. Overall, we identified with confidence only three species infecting humans in Gabon: P. falciparum, P. malariae and P. ovale. None of the species known to infect non-human primates in Central Africa was found. Our study shows that ape Plasmodium parasites of the subgenus Laverania do not constitute a frequent source of infection for humans. It also suggests that some strong host genetic barriers must exist to prevent the cross species transmission of ape Plasmodium in a context of ever increasing contacts between humans and wildlife. PMID:26039338

  12. Unique human orbital morphology compared with that of apes.

    PubMed

    Denion, Eric; Hitier, Martin; Guyader, Vincent; Dugué, Audrey-Emmanuelle; Mouriaux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Humans' and apes' convergent (front-facing) orbits allow a large overlap of monocular visual fields but are considered to limit the lateral visual field extent. However, humans can greatly expand their lateral visual fields using eye motion. This study aimed to assess whether the human orbital morphology was unique compared with that of apes in avoiding lateral visual field obstruction. The orbits of 100 human skulls and 120 ape skulls (30 gibbons; 30 orangutans; 30 gorillas; 30 chimpanzees and bonobos) were analyzed. The orbital width/height ratio was calculated. Two orbital angles representing orbital convergence and rearward position of the orbital margin respectively were recorded using a protractor and laser levels. Humans have the largest orbital width/height ratio (1.19; p < 0.001). Humans and gibbons have orbits which are significantly less convergent than those of chimpanzees/bonobos, gorillas and orangutans (p < 0.001). These elements suggest a morphology favoring lateral vision in humans. More specifically, the human orbit has a uniquely rearward temporal orbital margin (107.1°; p < 0.001), suitable for avoiding visual obstruction and promoting lateral visual field expansion through eye motion. Such an orbital morphology may have evolved mainly as an adaptation to open-country habitat and bipedal locomotion. PMID:26111067

  13. Making sense of behavioral irregularities of great apes.

    PubMed

    Fabrega, Horacio

    2006-01-01

    Psychopathology, mental illness, and psychiatric treatment are concepts relevant to modern medicine and medical psychology and replete with cumbersome intellectual and literary baggage. They bear the imprint of suppositions, world views, and general beliefs and values exemplified in the science, history, and general culture of Anglo European societies. The study in higher apes of phenomena addressed by such concepts raises conceptual dilemmas, usually termed speciesism and anthropomorphism, not unlike those encountered in comparative human studies of similar phenomena across cultures and historical periods, namely, ethnocentrism and anachronism. The authors' synthesis of literature and their analysis of the implications of higher ape psychopathology represent an epistemically compelling account that broadens the scope of the comparative study of behavioral irregularities, a topic that provides a different slant for examining challenging questions in evolutionary biology and primatology, such as cognition, self awareness, intentional behavior, culture and behavioral traditions, social intelligence, sickness and healing, and altruism. Theoretical and empirical study of this topic expands formulation and can help provide informative answers about human evolution as well as essential features of human psychiatric syndromes, with potential practical implications. The study of psychopathology of higher apes and other non human primates represents an appropriate focus for neuroscience and bio-behavioral sciences. PMID:17079015

  14. The evolution of laughter in great apes and humans.

    PubMed

    Ross, Marina Davila; Owren, Michael J; Zimmermann, Elke

    2010-03-01

    It has long been claimed that human emotional expressions, such as laughter, have evolved from nonhuman displays. The aim of the current study was to test this prediction by conducting acoustic and phylogenetic analyses based on the acoustics of tickle-induced vocalizations of orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos and humans. Results revealed both important similarities and differences among the various species' vocalizations, with the phylogenetic tree reconstructed based on these acoustic data matching the well-established genetic relationships of great apes and humans. These outcomes provide evidence of a common phylogenetic origin of tickle-induced vocalizations in these taxa, which can therefore be termed "laughter" across all five species. Results are consistent with the claims of phylogenetic continuity of emotional expressions. Together with observations made on the use of laughter in great apes and humans, findings of this study further indicate that there were two main periods of selection-driven evolutionary change in laughter within the Hominidae, to a smaller degree, among the great apes and, most distinctively, after the separation of hominins from the last common ancestor with chimpanzees and bonobos. PMID:20585520

  15. Differences in the early cognitive development of children and great apes.

    PubMed

    Wobber, Victoria; Herrmann, Esther; Hare, Brian; Wrangham, Richard; Tomasello, Michael

    2014-04-01

    There is very little research comparing great ape and human cognition developmentally. In the current studies we compared a cross-sectional sample of 2- to 4-year-old human children (n=48) with a large sample of chimpanzees and bonobos in the same age range (n=42, hereafter: apes) on a broad array of cognitive tasks. We then followed a group of juvenile apes (n=44) longitudinally over 3 years to track their cognitive development in greater detail. In skills of physical cognition (space, causality, quantities), children and apes performed comparably at 2 years of age, but by 4 years of age children were more advanced (whereas apes stayed at their 2-year-old performance levels). In skills of social cognition (communication, social learning, theory of mind), children out-performed apes already at 2 years, and increased this difference even more by 4 years. Patterns of development differed more between children and apes in the social domain than the physical domain, with support for these patterns present in both the cross-sectional and longitudinal ape data sets. These results indicate key differences in the pattern and pace of cognitive development between humans and other apes, particularly in the early emergence of specific social cognitive capacities in humans. PMID:23765870

  16. Effect of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) Polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 Expression in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Juliana C.; Funck, Alexandre; Silva-Fernandes, Isabelle J. L.; Rabenhorst, Silvia H. B.; Martinez, Carlos A. R.; Ribeiro, Marcelo L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that genetic variation in base excision repair (BER) might modify colorectal adenoma risk. Thus, we evaluated the influence of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 expression in normal and tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer. The results indicate a downregulation of OGG1 and an upregulation of XRCC1 expression in tumor tissue. Regarding the anatomical location of APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1, a decrease in gene expression was observed among patients with cancer in the rectum. In patients with or without some degree of tumor invasion, a significant downregulation in OGG1 was observed in tumor tissue. Interestingly, when taking into account the tumor stage, patients with more advanced grades (III and IV) showed a significant repression for APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1. XRCC1 expression levels were significantly enhanced in tumor samples and were correlated with all clinical and histopathological data. Concerning the polymorphism T2197G, GG genotype carriers exhibited a significantly reduced expression of genes of the BER repair system (APE1, XRCC1 and PARP1). In summary, our data show that patients with colorectal cancer present expression changes in several BER genes, suggesting a role for APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 and APE1 polymorphism in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25268610

  17. Effect of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 expression in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Santos, Juliana C; Funck, Alexandre; Silva-Fernandes, Isabelle J L; Rabenhorst, Silvia H B; Martinez, Carlos A R; Ribeiro, Marcelo L

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that genetic variation in base excision repair (BER) might modify colorectal adenoma risk. Thus, we evaluated the influence of APE1 T2197G (Asp148Glu) polymorphism on APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 expression in normal and tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer. The results indicate a downregulation of OGG1 and an upregulation of XRCC1 expression in tumor tissue. Regarding the anatomical location of APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1, a decrease in gene expression was observed among patients with cancer in the rectum. In patients with or without some degree of tumor invasion, a significant downregulation in OGG1 was observed in tumor tissue. Interestingly, when taking into account the tumor stage, patients with more advanced grades (III and IV) showed a significant repression for APE1, OGG1 and PARP-1. XRCC1 expression levels were significantly enhanced in tumor samples and were correlated with all clinical and histopathological data. Concerning the polymorphism T2197G, GG genotype carriers exhibited a significantly reduced expression of genes of the BER repair system (APE1, XRCC1 and PARP1). In summary, our data show that patients with colorectal cancer present expression changes in several BER genes, suggesting a role for APE1, XRCC1, PARP1 and OGG1 and APE1 polymorphism in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25268610

  18. Does confirmed pathogen transfer between sanctuary workers and great apes mean that reintroduction should not occur? Commentary on "Drug-resistant human Staphylococcus aureus findings in sanctuary apes and its threat to wild ape populations".

    PubMed

    Unwin, Steve; Robinson, Ian; Schmidt, Vanessa; Colin, Chris; Ford, Lisa; Humle, Tatyana

    2012-12-01

    This commentary discusses the findings and conclusions of the paper "Drug resistant human Staphylococcus aureus findings in sanctuary apes and its threat to wild ape populations." This paper confirms the zoonotic transfer of Staphylococcus aureus in a sanctuary setting. The assertion that this in itself is enough to reconsider the conservation potential of ape reintroduction provides an opportunity to discuss risk analysis of pathogen transmission, following IUCN guidelines, using S. aureus as an example. It is concluded that ape reintroduction projects must have disease risk mitigation strategies that include effective biosecurity protocols and pathogen surveillance. These strategies will assist with creating a well planned and executed reintroduction. This provides one way to enforce habitat protection, to minimise human encroachment and the risks from the illegal wildlife trade. Thus reintroduction must remain a useful tool in the conservation toolbox. PMID:22899168

  19. Regulation of limited N-terminal proteolysis of APE1 in tumor via acetylation and its role in cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bhakat, Kishor K.; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Adeniyi, Victor F.; Roychoudhury, Shrabasti; Nath, Somsubhra; Bellot, Larry J.; Feng, Dan; Mantha, Anil K.; Sinha, Mala; Qiu, Suimin; Luxon, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1), a ubiquitous and multifunctional protein, plays an essential role in the repair of both endogenous and drug-induced DNA damages in the genome. Unlike its E.coli counterpart Xth, mammalian APE1 has a unique N-terminal domain and possesses both DNA damage repair and transcriptional regulatory functions. Although the overexpression of APE1 in diverse cancer types and the association of APE1 expression with chemotherapy resistance and poor prognosis are well documented, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that alter APE1 functions during tumorigenesis are largely unknown. Here, we show the presence of full-length APE1 and N-terminal truncated isoforms of APE1 in tumor tissue samples of various cancer types. However, primary tumor tissue has higher levels of acetylated APE1 (AcAPE1) as well as full-length APE1 compared to adjacent non-tumor tissue. We found that APE1 is proteolytically cleaved by an unknown serine protease at its N-terminus following residue lysine (Lys) Lys6 and/or Lys7 and after Lys27 and Lys31 or Lys32. Acetylation of these Lys residues in APE1 prevents this proteolysis. The N-terminal domain of APE1 and its acetylation are required for modulation of the expression of hundreds of genes. Importantly, we found that AcAPE1 is essential for sustained cell proliferation. Together, our study demonstrates that increased acetylation levels of APE1 in tumor cells inhibit the limited N-terminal proteolysis of APE1 and thereby maintain the functions of APE1 to promote tumor cells' sustained proliferation and survival. PMID:26981776

  20. Coordination of MYH DNA glycosylase and APE1 endonuclease activities via physical interactions.

    PubMed

    Luncsford, Paz J; Manvilla, Brittney A; Patterson, Dimeka N; Malik, Shuja S; Jin, Jin; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Gunther, Randall; Kalvakolanu, Snigdha; Lipinski, Leonora J; Yuan, Weirong; Lu, Wuyuan; Drohat, Alexander C; Lu, A-Lien; Toth, Eric A

    2013-12-01

    MutY homologue (MYH) is a DNA glycosylase which excises adenine paired with the oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG, or G(o)) during base excision repair (BER). Base excision by MYH results in an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site in the DNA where the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone remains intact. A key feature of MYH activity is its physical interaction and coordination with AP endonuclease I (APE1), which subsequently nicks DNA 5' to the AP site. Because AP sites are mutagenic and cytotoxic, they must be processed by APE1 immediately after the action of MYH glycosylase. Our recent reports show that the interdomain connector (IDC) of human MYH (hMYH) maintains interactions with hAPE1 and the human checkpoint clamp Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex. In this study, we used NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments to determine hMYH-binding site on hAPE1. Chemical shift perturbations indicate that the hMYH IDC peptide binds to the DNA-binding site of hAPE1 and an additional site which is distal to the APE1 DNA-binding interface. In these two binding sites, N212 and Q137 of hAPE1 are key mediators of the MYH/APE1 interaction. Intriguingly, despite the fact that hHus1 and hAPE1 both interact with the MYH IDC, hHus1 does not compete with hAPE1 for binding to hMYH. Rather, hHus1 stabilizes the hMYH/hAPE1 complex both in vitro and in cells. This is consistent with a common theme in BER, namely that the assembly of protein-DNA complexes enhances repair by efficiently coordinating multiple enzymatic steps while simultaneously minimizing the release of harmful repair intermediates. PMID:24209961

  1. Coordination of MYH DNA glycosylase and APE1 endonuclease activities via physical interactions

    PubMed Central

    Luncsford, Paz J.; Manvilla, Brittney A.; Patterson, Dimeka N.; Malik, Shuja S.; Jin, Jin; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Gunther, Randall; Kalvakolanu, Snigdha; Lipinski, Leonora J.; Yuan, Weirong; Lu, Wuyuan; Drohat, Alexander C.; Lu-Chang, A-Lien; Toth, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    MutY homologue (MYH) is a DNA glycosylase which excises adenine paired with the oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG, or G°) during base excision repair (BER). Base excision by MYH results in an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site in the DNA where the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone remains intact. A key feature of MYH activity is its physical interaction and coordination with AP endonuclease I (APE1), which subsequently nicks DNA 5' to the AP site. Because AP sites are mutagenic and cytotoxic, they must be processed by APE1 immediately after the action of MYH glycosylase. Our recent reports show that the interdomain connector (IDC) of human MYH (hMYH) maintains interactions with hAPE1 and the human checkpoint clamp Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex. In this study, we used NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments to determine hMYH-binding site on hAPE1. Chemical shift perturbations indicate that the hMYH IDC peptide binds to the DNA-binding site of hAPE1 and an additional site which is distal to the APE1 DNA-binding interface. In these two binding sites, N212 and Q137 of hAPE1 are key mediators of the MYH/APE1 interaction. Intriguingly, despite the fact that hHus1 and hAPE1 both interact with the MYH IDC, hHus1 does not compete with hAPE1 for binding to hMYH. Rather, hHus1 stabilizes the hMYH/hAPE1 complex both in vitro and in cells. This is consistent with a common theme in BER, namely that the assembly of protein-DNA complexes enhances repair by efficiently coordinating multiple enzymatic steps while simultaneously minimizing the release of harmful repair intermediates. PMID:24209961

  2. Children's and Apes' Preparatory Responses to Two Mutually Exclusive Possibilities.

    PubMed

    Redshaw, Jonathan; Suddendorf, Thomas

    2016-07-11

    Animal brains have evolved to predict outcomes of events in the immediate environment [1-5]. Adult humans are particularly adept at dealing with environmental uncertainty, being able to mentally represent multiple, even mutually exclusive versions of the future and prepare accordingly. This capacity is fundamental to many complex future-oriented behaviors [6, 7], yet little is known about when it develops in children [8] and whether it is shared with non-human animals [9]. Here we show that children become able to insightfully prepare for two mutually exclusive versions of an undetermined future event during the middle preschool years, whereas we find no evidence for such a capacity in a sample of chimpanzees and orangutans. We gave 90 preschool children and 8 great apes the opportunity to catch an item dropped into a forked tube with two bottom openings. Children's performance improved linearly across age groups (2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, and 4 years), with none of the youngest group but most of the oldest group spontaneously covering both openings the first time they prepared to catch the item. The apes performed like 2-year-olds on the first trial, with none of them covering both openings. Some apes and 2-year-olds eventually passed the task, but only in a manner consistent with trial-and-error learning. Our results reveal the developmental trajectory of a critical cognitive ability that allows humans to prepare for future uncertainty, and they also raise the possibility that this ability is not shared with other hominids. PMID:27345164

  3. Masticatory form and function in the African apes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrea B

    2002-02-01

    This study examines variability in masticatory morphology as a function of dietary preference among the African apes. The African apes differ in the degree to which they consume leaves and other fibrous vegetation. Gorilla gorilla beringei, the eastern mountain gorilla, consumes the most restricted diet comprised of mechanically resistant foods such as leaves, pith, bark, and bamboo. Gorilla gorilla gorilla, the western lowland gorilla subspecies, consumes leaves and other terrestrial herbaceous vegetation (THV) but also consumes a fair amount of ripe, fleshy fruit. In contrast to gorillas, chimpanzees are frugivores and rely on vegetation primarily as fallback foods. However, there has been a long-standing debate regarding whether Pan paniscus, the pygmy chimpanzee (or bonobo), consumes greater quantities of THV as compared to Pan troglodytes, the common chimpanzee. Because consumption of resistant foods involves more daily chewing cycles and may require larger average bite force, the mechanical demands placed on the masticatory system are expected to be greater in folivores as compared to primates that consume large quantities of fleshy fruit. Therefore, more folivorous taxa are predicted to exhibit features that improve load-resistance capabilities and increase force production. To test this hypothesis, jaw and skull dimensions were compared in ontogenetic series of G. g. beringei, G. g. gorilla, P. t. troglodytes, and P. paniscus. Controlling for the influence of allometry, results show that compared to both chimpanzees and bonobos, gorillas exhibit some features of the jaw complex that are suggestive of improved masticatory efficiency. For example, compared to all other taxa, G. g. beringei has a significantly wider mandibular corpus and symphysis, larger area for the masseter muscle, higher mandibular ramus, and higher mandibular condyle relative to the occlusal plane of the mandible. However, the significantly wider mandibular symphysis may be an

  4. Estimation of African apes' body size from postcranial dimensions.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Markku; Junno, Juho-Antti

    2009-07-01

    We examine how African apes' postcranial skeletal dimensions and their combinations are related to body size, as represented by trunk volume, within sex-specific samples of a total of 39 central chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) and 34 western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). We examine this relationship by determining the strength of the correlation between selected skeletal dimensions and trunk volume. The findings indicate that sex should be taken into account when possible. Most two-predictor models perform better than most single-predictor models. Interspecific regressions based on log-transformed variables and sex/species-specific regression based on raw variables perform about equally well. PMID:19221857

  5. Dynamic Regulation of APE1/Ref-1 as a Therapeutic Target Protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sunga; Joo, Hee Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein that plays a central role in the cellular response to DNA damage and redox regulation against oxidative stress. APE1/Ref-1 functions in the DNA base excision repair pathway, the redox regulation of several transcription factors, and the control of intracellular redox status through the inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. APE1/Ref-1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus; however, its subcellular localization is dynamically regulated and it may be found in the mitochondria or elsewhere in the cytoplasm. Studies have identified a nuclear localization signal and a mitochondrial target sequence in APE1/Ref-1, as well as the involvement of the nuclear export system, as determinants of APE1/Ref-1 subcellular distribution. Recently, it was shown that APE1/Ref-1 is secreted in response to hyperacetylation at specific lysine residues. Additionally, post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, S-nitrosation, and ubiquitination appear to play a role in fine-tuning the activities and subcellular localization of APE1/Ref-1. In this review, we will introduce the multifunctional role of APE1/Ref-1 and its potential usefulness as a therapeutic target in cancer and cardiovascular disease. PMID:27231670

  6. The Middle Miocene Ape Pierolapithecus catalaunicus Exhibits Extant Great Ape-Like Morphometric Affinities on Its Patella: Inferences on Knee Function and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Marta; Almécija, Sergio; Alba, David M.; O'Neill, Matthew C.; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The mosaic nature of the Miocene ape postcranium hinders the reconstruction of the positional behavior and locomotion of these taxa based on isolated elements only. The fossil great ape Pierolapithecus catalaunicus (IPS 21350 skeleton; 11.9 Ma) exhibits a relatively wide and shallow thorax with moderate hand length and phalangeal curvature, dorsally-oriented metacarpophalangeal joints, and loss of ulnocarpal articulation. This evidence reveals enhanced orthograde postures without modern ape-like below-branch suspensory adaptations. Therefore, it has been proposed that natural selection enhanced vertical climbing (and not suspension per se) in Pierolapithecus catalaunicus. Although limb long bones are not available for this species, its patella (IPS 21350.37) can potentially provide insights into its knee function and thus on the complexity of its total morphological pattern. Here we provide a detailed description and morphometric analyses of IPS 21350.37, which are based on four external dimensions intended to capture the overall patellar shape. Our results reveal that the patella of Pierolapithecus is similar to that of extant great apes: proximodistally short, mediolaterally broad and anteroposteriorly thin. Previous biomechanical studies of the anthropoid knee based on the same measurements proposed that the modern great ape patella reflects a mobile knee joint while the long, narrow and thick patella of platyrrhine and especially cercopithecoid monkeys would increase the quadriceps moment arm in knee extension during walking, galloping, climbing and leaping. The patella of Pierolapithecus differs not only from that of monkeys and hylobatids, but also from that of basal hominoids (e.g., Proconsul and Nacholapithecus), which display slightly thinner patellae than extant great apes (the previously-inferred plesiomorphic hominoid condition). If patellar shape in Pierolapithecus is related to modern great ape-like knee function, our results suggest that increased

  7. The Middle Miocene ape Pierolapithecus catalaunicus exhibits extant great ape-like morphometric affinities on its patella: inferences on knee function and evolution.

    PubMed

    Pina, Marta; Almécija, Sergio; Alba, David M; O'Neill, Matthew C; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    The mosaic nature of the Miocene ape postcranium hinders the reconstruction of the positional behavior and locomotion of these taxa based on isolated elements only. The fossil great ape Pierolapithecus catalaunicus (IPS 21350 skeleton; 11.9 Ma) exhibits a relatively wide and shallow thorax with moderate hand length and phalangeal curvature, dorsally-oriented metacarpophalangeal joints, and loss of ulnocarpal articulation. This evidence reveals enhanced orthograde postures without modern ape-like below-branch suspensory adaptations. Therefore, it has been proposed that natural selection enhanced vertical climbing (and not suspension per se) in Pierolapithecus catalaunicus. Although limb long bones are not available for this species, its patella (IPS 21350.37) can potentially provide insights into its knee function and thus on the complexity of its total morphological pattern. Here we provide a detailed description and morphometric analyses of IPS 21350.37, which are based on four external dimensions intended to capture the overall patellar shape. Our results reveal that the patella of Pierolapithecus is similar to that of extant great apes: proximodistally short, mediolaterally broad and anteroposteriorly thin. Previous biomechanical studies of the anthropoid knee based on the same measurements proposed that the modern great ape patella reflects a mobile knee joint while the long, narrow and thick patella of platyrrhine and especially cercopithecoid monkeys would increase the quadriceps moment arm in knee extension during walking, galloping, climbing and leaping. The patella of Pierolapithecus differs not only from that of monkeys and hylobatids, but also from that of basal hominoids (e.g., Proconsul and Nacholapithecus), which display slightly thinner patellae than extant great apes (the previously-inferred plesiomorphic hominoid condition). If patellar shape in Pierolapithecus is related to modern great ape-like knee function, our results suggest that increased

  8. APES-based procedure for super-resolution SAR imagery with GPU parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Weiwei; Xu, Xiaojian; Xu, Guangyao

    2015-10-01

    The amplitude and phase estimation (APES) algorithm is widely used in modern spectral analysis. Compared with conventional Fourier transform (FFT), APES results in lower sidelobes and narrower spectral peaks. However, in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging with large scene, without parallel computation, it is difficult to apply APES directly to super-resolution radar image processing due to its great amount of calculation. In this paper, a procedure is proposed to achieve target extraction and parallel computing of APES for super-resolution SAR imaging. Numerical experimental are carried out on Tesla K40C with 745 MHz GPU clock rate and 2880 CUDA cores. Results of SAR image with GPU parallel computing show that the parallel APES is remarkably more efficient than that of CPU-based with the same super-resolution.

  9. Comparative mapping of human alphoid centromeric sequences in great apes

    SciTech Connect

    Archidiacono, N.; Antonacci, R.; Marzella, R.

    1994-09-01

    Metaphase spreads from chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes and Pan paniscus) and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) have been hybridized in situ with 27 alphoid DNA probes specific for the centromere of human chromosomes, to investigate the evolutionary relationship between centromeric regions of human and great apes. The results showed that most human probes do not recognize their corresponding homologs in great apes. Chromosome X is the only chromosome showing localization consistency in all the four species. Each suprachromosomal family (SCF) exhibits a distinct and peculiar evolutionary history. SCF1 (chromosomes 1, 3, 6, 7, 19, 12, 16) is very heterogeneous: some probes gave intense signals, but always on non-homologous chromosomes; others did not produce any hybridization signal. All probes localized on SCF2 (chromosomes 2, 4, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 18, 20, 21, and 22) recognize a single chromosome: chromosome 11 (phylogenetic IX) in PTR and PPA; chromosome 4 (phylogenetic V) in GGO. SCF3 subsets (chromosomes 1, 11, 17, X) are substantially conserved in PTR and PPA, but not in GGO, with the exception restricted to chromosome X. No signals have been detected on PPA chromosomes I, III, IV, V, VI and in PTR chromosomes V, suggesting that the centromeric region of some chromsomes have probably lost homology with human alphoid sequences.

  10. Unique human orbital morphology compared with that of apes

    PubMed Central

    Denion, Eric; Hitier, Martin; Guyader, Vincent; Dugué, Audrey-Emmanuelle; Mouriaux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Humans’ and apes’ convergent (front-facing) orbits allow a large overlap of monocular visual fields but are considered to limit the lateral visual field extent. However, humans can greatly expand their lateral visual fields using eye motion. This study aimed to assess whether the human orbital morphology was unique compared with that of apes in avoiding lateral visual field obstruction. The orbits of 100 human skulls and 120 ape skulls (30 gibbons; 30 orangutans; 30 gorillas; 30 chimpanzees and bonobos) were analyzed. The orbital width/height ratio was calculated. Two orbital angles representing orbital convergence and rearward position of the orbital margin respectively were recorded using a protractor and laser levels. Humans have the largest orbital width/height ratio (1.19; p < 0.001). Humans and gibbons have orbits which are significantly less convergent than those of chimpanzees / bonobos, gorillas and orangutans (p < 0.001). These elements suggest a morphology favoring lateral vision in humans. More specifically, the human orbit has a uniquely rearward temporal orbital margin (107.1°; p < 0.001), suitable for avoiding visual obstruction and promoting lateral visual field expansion through eye motion. Such an orbital morphology may have evolved mainly as an adaptation to open-country habitat and bipedal locomotion. PMID:26111067

  11. Lucanthone and its derivative hycanthone inhibit apurinic endonuclease-1 (APE1) by direct protein binding

    SciTech Connect

    Naidu, M.; Naidu, M.; Agarwal, R.; Pena, L.A.; Cunha, L.; Mezei, M.; Shen, M.; Wilson, D.M.; Liu, Y.; Sanchez, Z.; Chaudhary, P.; Wilson, S.H.; Waring, M.J.

    2011-09-15

    Lucanthone and hycanthone are thioxanthenone DNA intercalators used in the 1980s as antitumor agents. Lucanthone is in Phase I clinical trial, whereas hycanthone was pulled out of Phase II trials. Their potential mechanism of action includes DNA intercalation, inhibition of nucleic acid biosyntheses, and inhibition of enzymes like topoisomerases and the dual function base excision repair enzyme apurinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). Lucanthone inhibits the endonuclease activity of APE1, without affecting its redox activity. Our goal was to decipher the precise mechanism of APE1 inhibition as a prerequisite towards development of improved therapeutics that can counteract higher APE1 activity often seen in tumors. The IC{sub 50} values for inhibition of APE1 incision of depurinated plasmid DNA by lucanthone and hycanthone were 5 {mu}M and 80 nM, respectively. The K{sub D} values (affinity constants) for APE1, as determined by BIACORE binding studies, were 89 nM for lucanthone/10 nM for hycanthone. APE1 structures reveal a hydrophobic pocket where hydrophobic small molecules like thioxanthenones can bind, and our modeling studies confirmed such docking. Circular dichroism spectra uncovered change in the helical structure of APE1 in the presence of lucanthone/hycanthone, and notably, this effect was decreased (Phe266Ala or Phe266Cys or Trp280Leu) or abolished (Phe266Ala/Trp280Ala) when hydrophobic site mutants were employed. Reduced inhibition by lucanthone of the diminished endonuclease activity of hydrophobic mutant proteins (as compared to wild type APE1) supports that binding of lucanthone to the hydrophobic pocket dictates APE1 inhibition. The DNA binding capacity of APE1 was marginally inhibited by lucanthone, and not at all by hycanthone, supporting our hypothesis that thioxanthenones inhibit APE1, predominantly, by direct interaction. Finally, lucanthone-induced degradation was drastically reduced in the presence of short and long lived free radical scavengers, e

  12. APE/Ref-1 makes fine-tuning of CD40-induced B cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Merluzzi, Sonia; Gri, Giorgia; Gattei, Valter; Pagano, Michele; Pucillo, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/Redox factor-1, a multifunctional DNA base excision repair and redox regulation enzyme, plays an important role in oxidative signalling, transcription factor regulation, and cell cycle control. Recently, we have demonstrated that following the triggering of CD40 on B cells, APE/Ref-1 translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and regulates the activity of B cell-specific transcription factors. In the present paper we investigate whether APE/Ref-1 plays a role in controlling CD40-mediated B cell proliferation too. We demonstrate a concurrent increase in proliferation and decrease in apoptosis of primary mouse B cells activated by CD40 cross-linking and transfected with functional APE/Ref-1 antisense oligonucleotide. Moreover, we provide evidence that a redox-mediated signalling mechanism is involved in this process and we propose that APE/Ref-1, controlling the intracellular redox state, may also affect the cell cycle by inducing nucleus-cytoplasm redistribution of p21. Together, these findings suggest that APE/Ref-1 could act as a negative regulator in an adaptive response to elevated ROS levels following CD40 cross-linking. Considering the important role of ROS and APE/Ref-1 in CD40-mediated B cell proliferation, our data will contribute to understand the mechanisms of tumor escape and suggest APE/Ref-1 as a novel target for tumor therapeutic approaches. PMID:18617267

  13. Inhibition of Ape1 Redox Activity Promotes Odonto/osteogenic Differentiation of Dental Papilla Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tian; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Wenhua; Li, Jingyu; Liang, Yan; Yang, Xianrui; Xu, Yang; Yu, Mei; Tian, Weidong; Chen, Guoqing; Bai, Ding

    2015-01-01

    Dentinogenesis is the formation of dentin, a substance that forms the majority of teeth, and this process is performed by odontoblasts. Dental papilla cells (DPCs), as the progenitor cells of odontoblasts, undergo the odontogenic differentiation regulated by multiple cytokines and paracrine signal molecules. Ape1 is a perfect paradigm of the function complexity of a biological macromolecule with two major functional regions for DNA repair and redox regulation, respectively. To date, it remains unclear whether Ape1 can regulate the dentinogenesis in DPCs. In the present study, we firstly examed the spatio-temporal expression of Ape1 during tooth germ developmental process, and found the Ape1 expression was initially high and then gradually reduced along with the tooth development. Secondly, the osteo/odontogenic differentiation capacity of DPCs was up-regulated when treated with either Ape1-shRNA or E3330 (a specific inhibitor of the Ape1 redox function), respectively. Moreover, we found that the canonical Wnt signaling pathway was activated in this process, and E3330 reinforced-osteo/odontogenic differentiation capacity was suppressed by Dickkopf1 (DKK1), a potent antagonist of canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Taken together, we for the first time showed that inhibition of Ape1 redox regulation could promote the osteo/odontogenic differentiation capacity of DPCs via canonical Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:26639148

  14. Tat-APE1/ref-1 protein inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced endothelial cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yun Jeong; Lee, Ji Young; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Hyo Shin; Lee, Sang Ki; Lee, Kwon Ho; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2008-03-28

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/ref-1) is a multifunctional protein involved both in DNA base excision repair and redox regulation. In this study we evaluated the protective role of Tat-mediated APE1/ref-1 transduction on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-activated endothelial activation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. To construct Tat-APE1/ref-1 fusion protein, human full length of APE1/ref-1 was fused with Tat-protein transduction domain. Purified Tat-APE1/ref-1 fusion protein efficiently transduced cultured endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner and reached maximum expression at 1 h after incubation. Transduced Tat-APE1/ref-1 showed inhibitory activity on the TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in cultured endothelial cells. These results suggest Tat-APE1/ref-1 might be useful to reduce vascular endothelial activation or vascular inflammatory disorders.

  15. Inhibition of Ape1 Redox Activity Promotes Odonto/osteogenic Differentiation of Dental Papilla Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Wenhua; Li, Jingyu; Liang, Yan; Yang, Xianrui; Xu, Yang; Yu, Mei; Tian, Weidong; Chen, Guoqing; Bai, Ding

    2015-01-01

    Dentinogenesis is the formation of dentin, a substance that forms the majority of teeth, and this process is performed by odontoblasts. Dental papilla cells (DPCs), as the progenitor cells of odontoblasts, undergo the odontogenic differentiation regulated by multiple cytokines and paracrine signal molecules. Ape1 is a perfect paradigm of the function complexity of a biological macromolecule with two major functional regions for DNA repair and redox regulation, respectively. To date, it remains unclear whether Ape1 can regulate the dentinogenesis in DPCs. In the present study, we firstly examed the spatio-temporal expression of Ape1 during tooth germ developmental process, and found the Ape1 expression was initially high and then gradually reduced along with the tooth development. Secondly, the osteo/odontogenic differentiation capacity of DPCs was up-regulated when treated with either Ape1-shRNA or E3330 (a specific inhibitor of the Ape1 redox function), respectively. Moreover, we found that the canonical Wnt signaling pathway was activated in this process, and E3330 reinforced-osteo/odontogenic differentiation capacity was suppressed by Dickkopf1 (DKK1), a potent antagonist of canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Taken together, we for the first time showed that inhibition of Ape1 redox regulation could promote the osteo/odontogenic differentiation capacity of DPCs via canonical Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:26639148

  16. Interactions of APE1 with a redox inhibitor: Evidence for an alternate conformation of the enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Su, Dian; Delaplane, Sarah; Luo, Meihua; Rempel, Don L.; Vu, Bich; Kelley, Mark R.; Gross, Michael L.; Georgiadis, Millie M.

    2010-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) is an essential base excision repair protein that also functions as a reduction/oxidation (redox) factor in mammals. Through a thiol-based mechanism, APE1 reduces a number of important transcription factors including AP-1, p53, NF-κB, and HIF-1α. What is known about the mechanism to date is that the buried Cys residues 65 and 93 are critical for APE1’s redox activity. To further detail the redox mechanism, we developed a chemical footprinting/mass spectrometric assay using N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), an irreversible Cys modifier, to characterize the interaction of the redox inhibitor, E3330, with APE1. When incubated with E3330, two NEM-modified products were observed, one with 2 and a second with 7 added NEMs; this latter product corresponds to a fully modified APE1. In a similar control reaction without E3330, only the +2NEM product was observed in which the two solvent accessible Cys residues, C99 and C138, were modified by NEM. Through hydrogen-deuterium amide exchange with analysis by mass spectrometry, we found that the +7NEM modified species incorporates approximately 40 more deuterium atoms than the native protein, which exchanges nearly identically as the +2NEM product, suggesting that APE1 can be trapped in a partially unfolded state. E3330 was also found to increase disulfide bond formation involving redox critical Cys residues in APE1 as assessed by LC-MS/MS, suggesting a basis for its inhibitory effects on APE1’s redox activity. Collectively, our results suggest that APE1 adopts a partially unfolded state, which we propose is the redox active form of the enzyme. PMID:21117647

  17. Shape variation in the mandibular symphysis of apes: an application of a median axis method.

    PubMed

    Daegling, D J

    1993-08-01

    Symphyseal contours in a sample of living and fossil apes were assessed by application of the line skeleton, a form of median axis transformation. While the line skeleton offers novel opportunities for the analysis of shape, this study reaffirms previous observations that the shape of the symphysis is highly variable within great ape species, such that symphyseal morphology is not useful as a taxonomic marker. There is also little indication that symphyseal shape differs significantly between the sexes. The perception of what constitutes a salient superior or inferior transverse torus among living apes appears to be dependent on the expression of the genioglossal fossa. PMID:8372938

  18. Remnants of an ancient forest provide ecological context for Early Miocene fossil apes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Lauren A; Peppe, Daniel J; Lutz, James A; Driese, Steven G; Dunsworth, Holly M; Harcourt-Smith, William E H; Horner, William H; Lehmann, Thomas; Nightingale, Sheila; McNulty, Kieran P

    2014-01-01

    The lineage of apes and humans (Hominoidea) evolved and radiated across Afro-Arabia in the early Neogene during a time of global climatic changes and ongoing tectonic processes that formed the East African Rift. These changes probably created highly variable environments and introduced selective pressures influencing the diversification of early apes. However, interpreting the connection between environmental dynamics and adaptive evolution is hampered by difficulties in locating taxa within specific ecological contexts: time-averaged or reworked deposits may not faithfully represent individual palaeohabitats. Here we present multiproxy evidence from Early Miocene deposits on Rusinga Island, Kenya, which directly ties the early ape Proconsul to a widespread, dense, multistoried, closed-canopy tropical seasonal forest set in a warm and relatively wet, local climate. These results underscore the importance of forested environments in the evolution of early apes. PMID:24549336

  19. Miocene small-bodied ape from Eurasia sheds light on hominoid evolution.

    PubMed

    Alba, David M; Almécija, Sergio; DeMiguel, Daniel; Fortuny, Josep; Pérez de los Ríos, Miriam; Pina, Marta; Robles, Josep M; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2015-10-30

    Miocene small-bodied anthropoid primates from Africa and Eurasia are generally considered to precede the divergence between the two groups of extant catarrhines—hominoids (apes and humans) and Old World monkeys—and are thus viewed as more primitive than the stem ape Proconsul. Here we describe Pliobates cataloniae gen. et sp. nov., a small-bodied (4 to 5 kilograms) primate from the Iberian Miocene (11.6 million years ago) that displays a mosaic of primitive characteristics coupled with multiple cranial and postcranial shared derived features of extant hominoids. Our cladistic analyses show that Pliobates is a stem hominoid that is more derived than previously described small catarrhines and Proconsul. This forces us to reevaluate the role played by small-bodied catarrhines in ape evolution and provides key insight into the last common ancestor of hylobatids (gibbons) and hominids (great apes and humans). PMID:26516285

  20. Altered Secretory Activity of APE1/Ref-1 D148E Variants Identified in Human Patients With Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein involved in DNA repair and redox modulation. Recently, serum and urinary APE1/Ref-1 levels were reported to be increased in patients with bladder cancer. Genetic variations of APE/Ref-1 are associated with the risk of cancer. However, the effect of APE1/Ref-1 variants on its secretory activity is yet unknown. Methods: APE1/Ref-1 variants were evaluated by DNA sequencing analysis of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction products in coding DNA sequences (CDS) of APE1/Ref-1 in bladder tissue samples from patients with bladder cancer (n=10). Secretory activity of APE1/Ref-1 variants was evaluated with immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of the culture medium supernatants. Results: Four different substitution mutants (D148E, I64V/D148E, W67R/D148E, and E86G/D148E) of APE1/Ref-1 were identified in bladder cancer specimens. However, deletion mutants of APE1/Ref-1 CDS were not found. The secretory activity of the APE1/Ref-1 variants (D148E, I64V/D148E, and E86G/D148E) was increased compared to that of wild type APE1/Ref-1. Furthermore, the secretory activity in basal or hyperacetylated conditions was much higher than that in APE1/Ref-1 D148E-transfected HEK293 cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our data suggest that the increased secretory activity of D148E might contribute to increased serum levels of APE1/Ref-1 in patients with bladder cancer. PMID:27230458

  1. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of a Mortality Event among Central African Great Apes.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Kenneth N; Reed, Patricia; Morgan, David B; Ondzié, Alain I; Sanz, Crickette M; Kühl, Hjalmar S; Olson, Sarah H; Leroy, Eric; Karesh, William B; Mundry, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In 2006-2007 we observed an unusual mortality event among apes in northern Republic of Congo that, although not diagnostically confirmed, we believe to have been a disease outbreak. In 2007-2011 we conducted ape nest surveys in the region, recording 11,835 G. g. gorilla nests (2,262 groups) and 5,548 P. t. troglodytes nests (2,139 groups). We developed a statistical model to determine likely points of origin of the outbreak to help identify variables associated with disease emergence and spread. We modeled disease spread across the study area, using suitable habitat conditions for apes as proxy for local ape densities. Infectious status outputs from that spread model were then used alongside vegetation, temperature, precipitation and human impact factors as explanatory variables in a Generalized Linear Model framework to explain observed 2007-2011 ape nest trends in the region. The best models predicted emergence in the western region of Odzala-Kokoua National Park and north of the last confirmed Ebola virus disease epizootics. Roads were consistently associated with attenuation of modeled virus spread. As disease is amongst the leading threats to great apes, gaining a better understanding of disease transmission dynamics in these species is imperative. Identifying ecological drivers underpinning a disease emergence event and transmission dynamics in apes is critical to creating better predictive models to guide wildlife management, develop potential protective measures for wildlife and to reduce potential zoonotic transmission to humans. The results of our model represent an important step in understanding variables related to great ape disease ecology in Central Africa. PMID:27192424

  2. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of a Mortality Event among Central African Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kenneth N.; Reed, Patricia; Morgan, David B.; Ondzié, Alain I.; Sanz, Crickette M.; Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Olson, Sarah H.; Leroy, Eric; Karesh, William B.; Mundry, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In 2006–2007 we observed an unusual mortality event among apes in northern Republic of Congo that, although not diagnostically confirmed, we believe to have been a disease outbreak. In 2007–2011 we conducted ape nest surveys in the region, recording 11,835 G. g. gorilla nests (2,262 groups) and 5,548 P. t. troglodytes nests (2,139 groups). We developed a statistical model to determine likely points of origin of the outbreak to help identify variables associated with disease emergence and spread. We modeled disease spread across the study area, using suitable habitat conditions for apes as proxy for local ape densities. Infectious status outputs from that spread model were then used alongside vegetation, temperature, precipitation and human impact factors as explanatory variables in a Generalized Linear Model framework to explain observed 2007–2011 ape nest trends in the region. The best models predicted emergence in the western region of Odzala-Kokoua National Park and north of the last confirmed Ebola virus disease epizootics. Roads were consistently associated with attenuation of modeled virus spread. As disease is amongst the leading threats to great apes, gaining a better understanding of disease transmission dynamics in these species is imperative. Identifying ecological drivers underpinning a disease emergence event and transmission dynamics in apes is critical to creating better predictive models to guide wildlife management, develop potential protective measures for wildlife and to reduce potential zoonotic transmission to humans. The results of our model represent an important step in understanding variables related to great ape disease ecology in Central Africa. PMID:27192424

  3. Intuitions about Gravity and Solidity in Great Apes: The Tubes Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacchione, Trix; Call, Josep

    2010-01-01

    We investigated whether great apes, like human infants, monkeys and dogs, are subject to a strong gravity bias when tested with the tubes task, and--in case of mastery--what the source of competence on the tubes task is. We presented 22 apes with three versions of the tubes task, in which an object is dropped down a tube connected to one of three…

  4. APE1/Ref-1 as an emerging therapeutic target for various human diseases: phytochemical modulation of its functions

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Shweta; Sarkar, Bibekananda; Cholia, Ravi P; Gautam, Nandini; Dhiman, Monisha; Mantha, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a multifunctional enzyme involved in the base excision repair (BER) pathway, which repairs oxidative base damage caused by endogenous and exogenous agents. APE1 acts as a reductive activator of many transcription factors (TFs) and has also been named redox effector factor 1, Ref-1. For example, APE1 activates activator protein-1, nuclear factor kappa B, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, paired box gene 8, signal transducer activator of transcription 3 and p53, which are involved in apoptosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and survival pathways. APE1/Ref-1 maintains cellular homeostasis (redox) via the activation of TFs that regulate various physiological processes and that crosstalk with redox balancing agents (for example, thioredoxin, catalase and superoxide dismutase) by controlling levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The efficiency of APE1/Ref-1's function(s) depends on pairwise interaction with participant protein(s), the functions regulated by APE1/Ref-1 include the BER pathway, TFs, energy metabolism, cytoskeletal elements and stress-dependent responses. Thus, APE1/Ref-1 acts as a ‘hub-protein' that controls pathways that are important for cell survival. In this review, we will discuss APE1/Ref-1's versatile nature in various human etiologies, including neurodegeneration, cancer, cardiovascular and other diseases that have been linked with alterations in the expression, subcellular localization and activities of APE/Ref-1. APE1/Ref-1 can be targeted for therapeutic intervention using natural plant products that modulate the expression and functions of APE1/Ref-1. In addition, studies focusing on translational applications based on APE1/Ref-1-mediated therapeutic interventions are discussed. PMID:25033834

  5. Co-circulation of enteroviruses between apes and humans

    PubMed Central

    Van Nguyen, Dung; McIntyre, Chloe; Ahuka-Mundeke, Steve; Ngole, Eitel Mpoudi; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine; Simmonds, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A total of 139 stool samples from wild chimpanzees, gorillas and bonobos in Cameroon and Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) were screened for enteroviruses (EVs) by reverse transcription PCR. Enterovirus RNA was detected in 10 % of samples, comprising eight from 58 sampled chimpanzees (13.8 %), one from 40 bonobos (2.5 %) and five from 40 gorillas (12.2 %). Three viruses isolated from chimpanzees grouped with human isolate EV-A89 and four (four chimpanzees, one gorilla) represented a newly identified type, EV-A119. These species A virus types overlapped with those circulating in human populations in the same area. The remaining six strains comprised a new species D type, EV-D120, infecting one chimpanzee and four gorillas, and a single EV variant infecting a bonobo that was remarkably divergent from other EVs and potentially constitutes a new enterovirus species. The study demonstrates both the circulation of genetically divergent EV variants in apes and monkeys as well as those shared with local human populations. PMID:24189620

  6. Great apes select tools on the basis of their rigidity.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Héctor Marín; Gross, Alexandra Nam-Mi; Call, Josep

    2010-10-01

    Wild chimpanzees select tools according to their rigidity. However, little is known about whether choices are solely based on familiarity with the materials or knowledge about tool properties. Furthermore, it is unclear whether tool manipulation is required prior to selection or whether observation alone can suffice. We investigated whether chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) (n = 9), bonobos (Pan paniscus) (n = 4), orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) (n = 6), and gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) (n = 2) selected new tools on the basis of their rigidity. Subjects faced an out-of-reach reward and a choice of three tools differing in color, diameter, material, and rigidity. We used 10 different 3-tool sets (1 rigid, 2 flexible). Subjects were unfamiliar with the tools and needed to select and use the rigid tool to retrieve the reward. Experiment 1 showed that subjects chose the rigid tool from the first trial with a 90% success rate. Experiments 2a and 2b addressed the role of manipulation and observation in tool selection. Subjects performed equally well in conditions in which they could manipulate the tools themselves or saw the experimenter manipulate the tools but decreased their performance if they could only visually inspect the tools. Experiment 3 showed that subjects could select flexible tools (as opposed to rigid ones) to meet new task demands. We conclude that great apes spontaneously selected unfamiliar rigid or flexible tools even after gathering minimal observational information. PMID:20718558

  7. Spontaneous use of tools as straws in great apes.

    PubMed

    Manrique, Héctor Marín; Call, Josep

    2011-03-01

    Great apes can use multiple tools to extract food embedded in substrates and can invent new ways to exploit those resources. We tested five bonobos, five chimpanzees, and six orangutans in a task in which they had to use (and modify) a tool as a straw to drink the juice located inside a container. Experiment 1 showed that four orangutans and one chimpanzee invented the use of a piece of electric cable to get the juice. Experiment 2 investigated whether subjects could transform a non-functional hose into a functional one by removing blockages that impeded the free flow of juice. Orangutans outperformed chimpanzees and bonobos by differentially removing those blockages that prevented the flow of juice, often doing so before attempting to extract the juice. In Experiment 3, we presented chimpanzees and orangutans with four 3-tool sets (each tool set contained a single straw-like tool) and allowed them to select one tool. Unlike chimpanzees, orangutans succeeded in selecting the straw-like tool above chance levels without having to physically manipulate it. We suggest that orangutans' superior performance is related to their greater reliance on mouth actions during foraging. Experiment 4 investigated whether orangutans were also capable of selecting the suitable tool not by its appearance, but by the effects that it produced. After witnessing the experimenter blow bubbles or absorb liquid with a functional tool but fail to accomplish the same thing with the non-functional tool, orangutans failed to select the functional tool above chance levels. PMID:21132450

  8. Seasonal Effects on Great Ape Health: A Case Study of Wild Chimpanzees and Western Gorillas

    PubMed Central

    Masi, Shelly; Chauffour, Sophie; Bain, Odile; Todd, Angelique; Guillot, Jacques; Krief, Sabrina

    2012-01-01

    Among factors affecting animal health, environmental influences may directly or indirectly impact host nutritional condition, fecundity, and their degree of parasitism. Our closest relatives, the great apes, are all endangered and particularly sensitive to infectious diseases. Both chimpanzees and western gorillas experience large seasonal variations in fruit availability but only western gorillas accordingly show large changes in their degree of frugivory. The aim of this study is to investigate and compare factors affecting health (through records of clinical signs, urine, and faecal samples) of habituated wild ape populations: a community (N = 46 individuals) of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) in Kanyawara, Kibale National Park (Uganda), and a western gorilla (G. gorilla) group (N = 13) in Bai Hokou in the Dzanga-Ndoki National Park (Central African Republic). Ape health monitoring was carried out in the wet and dry seasons (chimpanzees: July–December 2006; gorillas: April–July 2008 and December 2008–February 2009). Compared to chimpanzees, western gorillas were shown to have marginally greater parasite diversity, higher prevalence and intensity of both parasite and urine infections, and lower occurrence of diarrhea and wounds. Parasite infections (prevalence and load), but not abnormal urine parameters, were significantly higher during the dry season of the study period for western gorillas, who thus appeared more affected by the large temporal changes in the environment in comparison to chimpanzees. Infant gorillas were the most susceptible among all the age/sex classes (of both apes) having much more intense infections and urine blood concentrations, again during the dry season. Long term studies are needed to confirm the influence of seasonal factors on health and parasitism of these great apes. However, this study suggest climate change and forest fragmentation leading to potentially larger seasonal fluctuations of the environment may affect

  9. Evolution of the auditory ossicles in extant hominids: metric variation in African apes and humans.

    PubMed

    Quam, Rolf M; Coleman, Mark N; Martínez, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    The auditory ossicles in primates have proven to be a reliable source of phylogenetic information. Nevertheless, to date, very little data have been published on the metric dimensions of the ear ossicles in African apes and humans. The present study relies on the largest samples of African ape ear ossicles studied to date to address questions of taxonomic differences and the evolutionary transformation of the ossicles in gorillas, chimpanzees and humans. Both African ape taxa show a malleus that is characterized by a long and slender manubrium and relatively short corpus, whereas humans show the opposite constellation of a short and thick manubrium and relatively long corpus. These changes in the manubrium are plausibly linked with changes in the size of the tympanic membrane. The main difference between the incus in African apes and humans seems to be related to changes in the functional length. Compared with chimpanzees, human incudes are larger in nearly all dimensions, except articular facet height, and show a more open angle between the axes. The gorilla incus resembles humans more closely in its metric dimensions, including functional length, perhaps as a result of the dramatically larger body size compared with chimpanzees. The differences between the stapedes of humans and African apes are primarily size-related, with humans being larger in nearly all dimensions. Nevertheless, some distinctions between the African apes were found in the obturator foramen and head height. Although correlations between metric variables in different ossicles were generally lower than those between variables in the same bone, variables of the malleus/incus complex appear to be more strongly correlated than those of the incus/stapes complex, perhaps reflecting the different embryological and evolutionary origins of the ossicles. The middle ear lever ratio for the African apes is similar to other haplorhines, but humans show the lowest lever ratio within primates. Very low levels

  10. Evolution of the auditory ossicles in extant hominids: metric variation in African apes and humans

    PubMed Central

    Quam, Rolf M; Coleman, Mark N; Martínez, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The auditory ossicles in primates have proven to be a reliable source of phylogenetic information. Nevertheless, to date, very little data have been published on the metric dimensions of the ear ossicles in African apes and humans. The present study relies on the largest samples of African ape ear ossicles studied to date to address questions of taxonomic differences and the evolutionary transformation of the ossicles in gorillas, chimpanzees and humans. Both African ape taxa show a malleus that is characterized by a long and slender manubrium and relatively short corpus, whereas humans show the opposite constellation of a short and thick manubrium and relatively long corpus. These changes in the manubrium are plausibly linked with changes in the size of the tympanic membrane. The main difference between the incus in African apes and humans seems to be related to changes in the functional length. Compared with chimpanzees, human incudes are larger in nearly all dimensions, except articular facet height, and show a more open angle between the axes. The gorilla incus resembles humans more closely in its metric dimensions, including functional length, perhaps as a result of the dramatically larger body size compared with chimpanzees. The differences between the stapedes of humans and African apes are primarily size-related, with humans being larger in nearly all dimensions. Nevertheless, some distinctions between the African apes were found in the obturator foramen and head height. Although correlations between metric variables in different ossicles were generally lower than those between variables in the same bone, variables of the malleus/incus complex appear to be more strongly correlated than those of the incus/stapes complex, perhaps reflecting the different embryological and evolutionary origins of the ossicles. The middle ear lever ratio for the African apes is similar to other haplorhines, but humans show the lowest lever ratio within primates. Very low levels

  11. Enamel hypoplasia in the deciduous teeth of great apes: variation in prevalence and timing of defects.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, J R

    2001-11-01

    The prevalence of enamel hypoplasia in the deciduous teeth of great apes has the potential to reveal episodes of physiological stress in early stages of ontogenetic development. However, little is known about enamel defects of deciduous teeth in great apes. Unresolved questions addressed in this study are: Do hypoplastic enamel defects occur with equal frequency in different groups of great apes? Are enamel hypoplasias more prevalent in the deciduous teeth of male or female apes? During what phase of dental development do enamel defects tend to form? And, what part of the dental crown is most commonly affected? To answer these questions, infant and juvenile skulls of two sympatric genera of great apes (Gorilla and Pan) were examined for dental enamel hypoplasias. Specimens from the Powell-Cotton Museum (Quex Park, UK; n = 107) are reported here, and compared with prior findings based on my examination of juvenile apes at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History (Hamman-Todd Collection; n = 100) and Smithsonian Institution (National Museum of Natural History; n = 36). All deciduous teeth were examined by the author with a x10 hand lens, in oblique incandescent light. Defects were classified using Fédération Dentaire International (FDI)/Defects of Dental Enamel (DDE) standards; defect size and location on the tooth crown were measured and marked on dental outline charts. Enamel defects of ape deciduous teeth are most common on the labial surface of canine teeth. While deciduous incisor and molar teeth consistently exhibit similar defects with prevalences of approximately 10%, canines average between 70-75%. Position of enamel defects on the canine crown was analyzed by dividing it into three zones (apical, middle, and cervical) and calculating defect prevalence by zone. Among gorillas, enamel hypoplasia prevalence increases progressively from the apical zone (low) to the middle zone to the cervical zone (highest), in both maxillary and mandibular canine teeth

  12. Sensitivity to Relational Similarity and Object Similarity in Apes and Children.

    PubMed

    Christie, Stella; Gentner, Dedre; Call, Josep; Haun, Daniel Benjamin Moritz

    2016-02-22

    Relational reasoning is a hallmark of sophisticated cognition in humans [1, 2]. Does it exist in other primates? Despite some affirmative answers [3-11], there appears to be a wide gap in relational ability between humans and other primates-even other apes [1, 2]. Here, we test one possible explanation for this gap, motivated by developmental research showing that young humans often fail at relational reasoning tasks because they focus on objects instead of relations [12-14]. When asked, "duck:duckling is like tiger:?," preschool children choose another duckling (object match) rather than a cub. If other apes share this focus on concrete objects, it could undermine their relational reasoning in similar ways. To test this, we compared great apes and 3-year-old humans' relational reasoning on the same spatial mapping task, with and without competing object matches. Without competing object matches, both children and Pan species (chimpanzees and bonobos) spontaneously used relational similarity, albeit children more so. But when object matches were present, only children responded strongly to them. We conclude that the relational gap is not due to great apes' preference for concrete objects. In fact, young humans show greater object focus than nonhuman apes. PMID:26853364

  13. Structure of yeast Ape1 and its role in autophagic vesicle formation.

    PubMed

    Su, Ming-Yuan; Peng, Wen-Hsin; Ho, Meng-Ru; Su, Shih-Chieh; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Chen, Guang-Chao; Chang, Chung-I

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a constitutive biosynthetic transport pathway, termed the cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, sequesters precursor aminopeptidase I (prApe1) dodecamers in the form of a large complex into a Cvt vesicle using autophagic machinery, targeting it into the vacuole (the yeast lysosome) where it is proteolytically processed into its mature form, Ape1, by removal of an amino-terminal 45-amino acid propeptide. prApe1 is thought to serve as a scaffolding cargo critical for the assembly of the Cvt vesicle by presenting the propeptide to mediate higher-ordered complex formation and autophagic receptor recognition. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of Ape1 at 2.5 Å resolution and reveal its dodecameric architecture consisting of dimeric and trimeric units, which associate to form a large tetrahedron. The propeptide of prApe1 exhibits concentration-dependent oligomerization and forms a stable tetramer. Structure-based mutagenesis demonstrates that disruption of the inter-subunit interface prevents dodecameric assembly and vacuolar targeting in vivo despite the presence of the propeptide. Furthermore, by examining the vacuolar import of propeptide-fused exogenous protein assemblies with different quaternary structures, we found that 3-dimensional spatial distribution of propeptides presented by a scaffolding cargo is essential for the assembly of the Cvt vesicle for vacuolar delivery. This study describes a molecular framework for understanding the mechanism of Cvt or autophagosomal biogenesis in selective macroautophagy. PMID:26208681

  14. Structure of yeast Ape1 and its role in autophagic vesicle formation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ming-Yuan; Peng, Wen-Hsin; Ho, Meng-Ru; Su, Shih-Chieh; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Chen, Guang-Chao; Chang, Chung-I

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a constitutive biosynthetic transport pathway, termed the cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, sequesters precursor aminopeptidase I (prApe1) dodecamers in the form of a large complex into a Cvt vesicle using autophagic machinery, targeting it into the vacuole (the yeast lysosome) where it is proteolytically processed into its mature form, Ape1, by removal of an amino-terminal 45-amino acid propeptide. prApe1 is thought to serve as a scaffolding cargo critical for the assembly of the Cvt vesicle by presenting the propeptide to mediate higher-ordered complex formation and autophagic receptor recognition. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of Ape1 at 2.5 Å resolution and reveal its dodecameric architecture consisting of dimeric and trimeric units, which associate to form a large tetrahedron. The propeptide of prApe1 exhibits concentration-dependent oligomerization and forms a stable tetramer. Structure-based mutagenesis demonstrates that disruption of the inter-subunit interface prevents dodecameric assembly and vacuolar targeting in vivo despite the presence of the propeptide. Furthermore, by examining the vacuolar import of propeptide-fused exogenous protein assemblies with different quaternary structures, we found that 3-dimensional spatial distribution of propeptides presented by a scaffolding cargo is essential for the assembly of the Cvt vesicle for vacuolar delivery. This study describes a molecular framework for understanding the mechanism of Cvt or autophagosomal biogenesis in selective macroautophagy. PMID:26208681

  15. Brain structure variation in great apes, with attention to the mountain gorilla (Gorilla beringei beringei).

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Chet C; Cranfield, Michael R; Mehlman, Patrick T; Lilly, Alecia A; Garbe, Jo Anne L; Whittier, Christopher A; Nutter, Felicia B; Rein, Thomas R; Bruner, Harlan J; Holloway, Ralph L; Tang, Cheuk Y; Naidich, Thomas P; Delman, Bradley N; Steklis, H Dieter; Erwin, Joseph M; Hof, Patrick R

    2004-07-01

    This report presents data regarding the brain structure of mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) in comparison with other great apes. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of three mountain gorilla brains were obtained with a 3T scanner, and the volume of major neuroanatomical structures (neocortical gray matter, hippocampus, thalamus, striatum, and cerebellum) was measured. These data were included with our existing database that includes 23 chimpanzees, three western lowland gorillas, and six orangutans. We defined a multidimensional space by calculating the principal components (PCs) from the correlation matrix of brain structure fractions in the well-represented sample of chimpanzees. We then plotted data from all of the taxa in this space to examine phyletic variation in neural organization. Most of the variance in mountain gorillas, as well as other great apes, was contained within the chimpanzee range along the first two PCs, which accounted for 61.73% of the total variance. Thus, the majority of interspecific variation in brain structure observed among these ape taxa was no greater than the within-species variation seen in chimpanzees. The loadings on PCs indicated that the brain structure of great apes differs among taxa mostly in the relative sizes of the striatum, cerebellum, and hippocampus. These findings suggest possible functional differences among taxa in terms of neural adaptations for ecological and locomotor capacities. Importantly, these results fill a critical gap in current knowledge regarding great ape neuroanatomical diversity. PMID:15258959

  16. Body orientation and face orientation: two factors controlling apes' behavior from humans.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Juliane; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2004-10-01

    A number of animal species have evolved the cognitive ability to detect when they are being watched by other individuals. Precisely what kind of information they use to make this determination is unknown. There is particular controversy in the case of the great apes because different studies report conflicting results. In experiment 1, we presented chimpanzees, orangutans, and bonobos with a situation in which they had to request food from a human observer who was in one of various attentional states. She either stared at the ape, faced the ape with her eyes closed, sat with her back towards the ape, or left the room. In experiment 2, we systematically crossed the observer's body and face orientation so that the observer could have her body and/or face oriented either towards or away from the subject. Results indicated that apes produced more behaviors when they were being watched. They did this not only on the basis of whether they could see the experimenter as a whole, but they were sensitive to her body and face orientation separately. These results suggest that body and face orientation encode two different types of information. Whereas face orientation encodes the observer's perceptual access, body orientation encodes the observer's disposition to transfer food. In contrast to the results on body and face orientation, only two of the tested subjects responded to the state of the observer's eyes. PMID:15034765

  17. The major human AP endonuclease (Ape1) is involved in the nucleotide incision repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gros, Laurent; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Ide, Hiroshi; Elder, Rhoderick H.; Saparbaev, Murat K.

    2004-01-01

    In nucleotide incision repair (NIR), an endonuclease nicks oxidatively damaged DNA in a DNA glycosylase-independent manner, providing the correct ends for DNA synthesis coupled to the repair of the remaining 5′-dangling modified nucleotide. This mechanistic feature is distinct from DNA glycosylase-mediated base excision repair. Here we report that Ape1, the major apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease in human cells, is the damage- specific endonuclease involved in NIR. We show that Ape1 incises DNA containing 5,6-dihydro-2′-deoxyuridine, 5,6-dihydrothymidine, 5-hydroxy-2′-deoxyuridine, alpha-2′-deoxyadenosine and alpha-thymidine adducts, generating 3′-hydroxyl and 5′-phosphate termini. The kinetic constants indicate that Ape1-catalysed NIR activity is highly efficient. The substrate specificity and protein conformation of Ape1 is modulated by MgCl2 concentrations, thus providing conditions under which NIR becomes a major activity in cell-free extracts. While the N-terminal region of Ape1 is not required for AP endonuclease function, we show that it regulates the NIR activity. The physiological relevance of the mammalian NIR pathway is discussed. PMID:14704345

  18. Young children spontaneously invent wild great apes' tool-use behaviours.

    PubMed

    Reindl, E; Beck, S R; Apperly, I A; Tennie, C

    2016-02-24

    The variety and complexity of human-made tools are unique in the animal kingdom. Research investigating why human tool use is special has focused on the role of social learning: while non-human great apes acquire tool-use behaviours mostly by individual (re-)inventions, modern humans use imitation and teaching to accumulate innovations over time. However, little is known about tool-use behaviours that humans can invent individually, i.e. without cultural knowledge. We presented 2- to 3.5-year-old children with 12 problem-solving tasks based on tool-use behaviours shown by great apes. Spontaneous tool use was observed in 11 tasks. Additionally, tasks which occurred more frequently in wild great apes were also solved more frequently by human children. Our results demonstrate great similarity in the spontaneous tool-use abilities of human children and great apes, indicating that the physical cognition underlying tool use shows large overlaps across the great ape species. This suggests that humans are neither born with special physical cognition skills, nor that these skills have degraded due to our species' long reliance of social learning in the tool-use domain. PMID:26911964

  19. Great apes generate goal-based action predictions: an eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Kano, Fumihiro; Call, Josep

    2014-09-01

    To examine great apes' on-line prediction of other individuals' actions, we used an eye-tracking technique and an experimental paradigm previously used to test human infants. Twenty-two great apes, including bonobos, chimpanzees, and orangutans, were familiarized to movie clips of a human hand reaching to grasp one of two objects. Then the objects' locations were swapped, and in the test event, the hand made an incomplete reach between the objects. In a control condition, a mechanical claw performed the same actions. The apes predictively looked at the familiarized goal object rather than the familiarized location when viewing the hand action in the test event. However, they made no prediction when viewing the claw action. These results are similar to those reported previously for human infants, and predictive looking did not differ among the three species of great apes. Thus, great apes make on-line goal-based predictions about the actions of other individuals; this skill is not unique to humans but is shared more widely among primates. PMID:25022278

  20. XPC deficiency is related to APE1 and OGG1 expression and function.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Julliane Tamara Araújo; de Souza Timoteo, Ana Rafaela; Lajus, Tirzah Braz Petta; Brandão, Juliana Alves; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja Cristhina; Menck, Carlos Frederico Martins; Campalans, Anna; Radicella, J Pablo; Vessoni, Alexandre Teixeira; Muotri, Alysson Renato; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara Fassarella

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is considered to be a major cause of neurodegeneration and internal tumors observed in syndromes that result from nucleotide excision repair (NER) deficiencies, such as Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne Syndrome (CS). Recent evidence has shown that NER aids in removing oxidized DNA damage and may interact with base excision repair (BER) enzymes. Here, we investigated APE1 and OGG1 expression, localization and activity after oxidative stress in XPC-deficient cells. The endogenous APE1 and OGG1 mRNA levels were lower in XPC-deficient fibroblasts. However, XPC-deficient cells did not show hypersensitivity to oxidative stress compared with NER-proficient cells. To confirm the impact of an XPC deficiency in regulating APE1 and OGG1 expression and activity, we established an XPC-complemented cell line. Although the XPC complementation was only partial and transient, the transfected cells exhibited greater OGG1 expression and activity compared with XPC-deficient cells. However, the APE1 expression and activity did not significantly change. Furthermore, we observed a physical interaction between the XPC and APE1 proteins. Together, the results indicate that the responses of XPC-deficient cells under oxidative stress may not only be associated with NER deficiency per se but may also include new XPC functions in regulating BER proteins. PMID:26811994

  1. Association of DNA Repair Gene APE1 Asp148Glu Polymorphism with Breast Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    AlMutairi, Fatima; Ali Khan Pathan, Akbar; Alanazi, Mohammed; Shalaby, Manal; Alabdulkarim, Huda A.; Alamri, Abdullah; Al Naeem, Abdulrahman; Elrobh, Moammad; Shaik, Jilani P.; Khan, Wajahatullah; Khan, Zahid; Reddy Parine, Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of APE1 Asp148Glu polymorphism in breast cancer progression in Saudi population. Methods. We examined the genetic variations (rs1130409) in the DNA base excision repair gene APE1 at codon 148 (Asp148Glu) and its association with breast cancer risk using genotypic assays and in silico structural as well as functional predictions. In silico structural analysis was performed with Asp148Glu allele and compared with the predicted native protein structure. The wild and mutant 3D structures of APE1 were compared and analyzed using solvent accessibility models for protein stability confirmation. Results. Genotypic analysis of APE1 (rs1130409) showed statistically significant association of Asp148Glu with elevated susceptibility to breast cancer. The in silico analysis results indicated that the nsSNP Asp148Glu may cause changes in the protein structure and is associated with breast cancer risk. Conclusion. Taken together, this is the first report that established that Asp148Glu variant has structural and functional effect on the APE1 and may play an important role in breast cancer progression in Saudi population. PMID:26257461

  2. APE1/Ref-1 facilitates recovery of gray and white matter and neurological function after mild stroke injury.

    PubMed

    Stetler, R Anne; Gao, Yanqin; Leak, Rehana K; Weng, Zhongfang; Shi, Yejie; Zhang, Lili; Pu, Hongjian; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Xiaoming; Hassan, Sulaiman; Ferguson, Carolyn; Homanics, Gregg E; Cao, Guodong; Bennett, Michael V L; Chen, Jun

    2016-06-21

    A major hallmark of oxidative DNA damage after stroke is the induction of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and strand breaks. To mitigate cell loss after oxidative DNA damage, ischemic cells rapidly engage the base excision-repair proteins, such as the AP site-repairing enzyme AP endonuclease-1 (APE1), also named redox effector factor-1 (Ref-1). Although forced overexpression of APE1 is known to protect against oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration, there is no concrete evidence demonstrating a role for endogenous APE1 in the long-term recovery of gray and white matter following ischemic injury. To address this gap, we generated, to our knowledge, the first APE1 conditional knockout (cKO) mouse line under control of tamoxifen-dependent Cre recombinase. Using a well-established model of transient focal cerebral ischemia (tFCI), we show that induced deletion of APE1 dramatically enlarged infarct volume and impaired the recovery of sensorimotor and cognitive deficits. APE1 cKO markedly increased postischemic neuronal and oligodendrocyte degeneration, demonstrating that endogenous APE1 preserves both gray and white matter after tFCI. Because white matter repair is instrumental in behavioral recovery after stroke, we also examined the impact of APE1 cKO on demyelination and axonal conduction and discovered that APE1 cKO aggravated myelin loss and impaired neuronal communication following tFCI. Furthermore, APE1 cKO increased AP sites and activated the prodeath signaling proteins, PUMA and PARP1, after tFCI in topographically distinct manners. Our findings provide evidence that endogenous APE1 protects against ischemic infarction in both gray and white matter and facilitates the functional recovery of the central nervous system after mild stroke injury. PMID:27274063

  3. APE1/Ref-1 facilitates recovery of gray and white matter and neurological function after mild stroke injury

    PubMed Central

    Stetler, R. Anne; Gao, Yanqin; Leak, Rehana K.; Weng, Zhongfang; Zhang, Lili; Pu, Hongjian; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Xiaoming; Hassan, Sulaiman; Ferguson, Carolyn; Homanics, Gregg E.; Cao, Guodong; Bennett, Michael V. L.; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A major hallmark of oxidative DNA damage after stroke is the induction of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and strand breaks. To mitigate cell loss after oxidative DNA damage, ischemic cells rapidly engage the base excision-repair proteins, such as the AP site-repairing enzyme AP endonuclease-1 (APE1), also named redox effector factor-1 (Ref-1). Although forced overexpression of APE1 is known to protect against oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration, there is no concrete evidence demonstrating a role for endogenous APE1 in the long-term recovery of gray and white matter following ischemic injury. To address this gap, we generated, to our knowledge, the first APE1 conditional knockout (cKO) mouse line under control of tamoxifen-dependent Cre recombinase. Using a well-established model of transient focal cerebral ischemia (tFCI), we show that induced deletion of APE1 dramatically enlarged infarct volume and impaired the recovery of sensorimotor and cognitive deficits. APE1 cKO markedly increased postischemic neuronal and oligodendrocyte degeneration, demonstrating that endogenous APE1 preserves both gray and white matter after tFCI. Because white matter repair is instrumental in behavioral recovery after stroke, we also examined the impact of APE1 cKO on demyelination and axonal conduction and discovered that APE1 cKO aggravated myelin loss and impaired neuronal communication following tFCI. Furthermore, APE1 cKO increased AP sites and activated the prodeath signaling proteins, PUMA and PARP1, after tFCI in topographically distinct manners. Our findings provide evidence that endogenous APE1 protects against ischemic infarction in both gray and white matter and facilitates the functional recovery of the central nervous system after mild stroke injury. PMID:27274063

  4. Differences in the nonverbal requests of great apes and human infants.

    PubMed

    van der Goot, Marloes H; Tomasello, Michael; Liszkowski, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how great apes and human infants use imperative pointing to request objects. In a series of three experiments (infants, N = 44; apes, N = 12), subjects were given the opportunity to either point to a desired object from a distance or else to approach closer and request it proximally. The apes always approached close to the object, signaling their request through instrumental actions. In contrast, the infants quite often stayed at a distance, directing the experimenters' attention to the desired object through index-finger pointing, even when the object was in the open and they could obtain it by themselves. Findings distinguish 12-month-olds' imperative pointing from ontogenetic and phylogenetic earlier forms of ritualized reaching. PMID:23901779

  5. DNA Repair and Cancer Therapy: Targeting APE1/Ref-1 Using Dietary Agents

    PubMed Central

    Raffoul, Julian J.; Heydari, Ahmad R.; Hillman, Gilda G.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the cancer protective effects of dietary agents and other natural compounds isolated from fruits, soybeans, and vegetables on neoplasia. Studies have also revealed the potential for these natural products to be combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for the more effective treatment of cancer. In this paper we discuss the potential for targeting the DNA base excision repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 using dietary agents such as soy isoflavones, resveratrol, curcumin, and the vitamins ascorbate and α-tocopherol. We also discuss the potential role of soy isoflavones in sensitizing cancer cells to the effects of radiotherapy. A comprehensive review of the dual nature of APE1/Ref-1 in DNA repair and redox activation of cellular transcription factors, NF-κB and HIF-1α, is also discussed. Further research efforts dedicated to delineating the role of APE1/Ref-1 DNA repair versus redox activity in sensitizing cancer cells to conventional treatment are warranted. PMID:22997517

  6. A cautionary note on fecal sampling and molecular epidemiology in predatory wild great apes.

    PubMed

    De Nys, Hélène Marie; Madinda, Nadège Freda; Merkel, Kevin; Robbins, Martha; Boesch, Christophe; Leendertz, Fabian Hubertus; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien

    2015-08-01

    Fecal samples are an important source of information on parasites (viruses, prokaryotes, or eukaryotes) infecting wild great apes. Molecular analysis of fecal samples has already been used for deciphering the origins of major human pathogens such as HIV-1 or Plasmodium falciparum. However, for apes that hunt (chimpanzees and bonobos), detection of parasite nucleic acids may reflect either true infection of the host of interest or ingestion of an infected prey, for example, another non-human primate. To determine the potential magnitude of this issue, we estimated the prevalence of prey DNA in fecal samples obtained from two wild chimpanzee communities. We observed values >15%, which are higher than or close to the fecal detection rates of many great ape parasites. Contamination of fecal samples with parasite DNA from dietary origin may therefore occasionally impact non-invasive epidemiological studies. This problem can be addressed (at least partially) by monitoring the presence of prey DNA. PMID:26031302

  7. Reconstruction of genomic rearrangements in great apes and gibbons by chromosome painting.

    PubMed Central

    Jauch, A; Wienberg, J; Stanyon, R; Arnold, N; Tofanelli, S; Ishida, T; Cremer, T

    1992-01-01

    The homology between hylobatid chromosomes and other primates has long remained elusive. We used chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization of all human chromosome-specific DNA libraries to "paint" the chromosomes of primates and establish homologies between the human, great ape (chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan), and gibbon karyotypes (Hylobates lar species group, 2n = 44). The hybridization patterns unequivocally demonstrate the high degree of chromosomal homology and synteny of great ape and human chromosomes. Relative to human, no translocations were detected in great apes, except for the well-known fusion-origin of human chromosome 2 and a 5;17 translocation in the gorilla. In contrast, numerous translocations were detected that have led to the massive reorganization of the gibbon karyotype: the 22 autosomal human chromosomes have been divided into 51 elements to compose the 21 gibbon autosomes. Molecular cytogenetics promises to finally allow hylobatids to be integrated into the overall picture of chromosomal evolution in the primates. Images PMID:1528869

  8. Chimpanzee fauna isotopes provide new interpretations of fossil ape and hominin ecologies

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Sherry V.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen stable isotopes within modern and fossil tooth enamel record the aspects of an animal's diet and habitat use. This investigation reports the first isotopic analyses of enamel from a large chimpanzee community and associated fauna, thus providing a means of comparing fossil ape and early hominin palaeoecologies with those of a modern ape. Within Kibale National Park forest, oxygen isotopes differentiate primate niches, allowing for the first isotopic reconstructions of degree of frugivory versus folivory as well as use of arboreal versus terrestrial resources. In a comparison of modern and fossil community isotopic profiles, results indicate that Sivapithecus, a Miocene ape from Pakistan, fed in the forest canopy, as do chimpanzees, but inhabited a forest with less continuous canopy or fed more on leaves. Ardipithecus, an early hominin from Ethiopia, fed both arboreally and terrestrially in a more open habitat than inhabited by chimpanzees. PMID:24197413

  9. The Role of Socio-Communicative Rearing Environments on the Development of Social and Physical Cognition in Apes

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J. L.; Lyn, H.; Schaeffer, J. A.; Hopkins, W. D.

    2011-01-01

    The cultural intelligence hypothesis (CIH) claims that humans' advanced cognition is a direct result of human culture and that children are uniquely specialized to absorb and utilize this cultural experience (Tomasello, 2000). Comparative data demonstrating that 2.5 year old human children outperform apes on measures of social cognition but not on measures of physical cognition support this claim (E. Herrmann, J. Call, M. V. Hernandez-Lloreda, B. Hare, & M. Tomasello, 2007). However, the previous study failed to control for rearing when comparing these two species. Specifically, the human children were raised in a human culture whereas the apes were raised in standard sanctuary settings. To further explore the CIH, here we compared the performance on multiple measures of social and physical cognition in a group of standard reared apes raised in conditions typical of zoo and biomedical laboratory settings to that of apes reared in an enculturated socio-communicatively rich environment. Overall, the enculturated apes significantly outperformed their standard reared counterparts on the cognitive tasks and this was particularly true for measures of communication. Furthermore, the performance of the enculturated apes was very similar to previously reported data from 2.5 year old children. We conclude that apes who are reared in a human-like socio-communicatively rich environment develop superior communicative abilities compared to apes reared in standard laboratory settings, which supports some assumptions of the cultural intelligence hypothesis. PMID:22010903

  10. Great Apes Make Anticipatory Looks Based on Long-Term Memory of Single Events.

    PubMed

    Kano, Fumihiro; Hirata, Satoshi

    2015-10-01

    Everyday life poses a continuous challenge for individuals to encode ongoing events, retrieve past events, and predict impending events [1-4]. Attention and eye movements reflect such online cognitive and memory processes [5, 6], especially through "anticipatory looks" [7-10]. Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of nonhuman animals to retrieve detailed information about single events that happened in the distant past [11-20]. However, no study has tested whether nonhuman animals employ online memory processes, in which they encode ongoing movie-like events into long-term storage during single viewing experiences. Here, we developed a novel eye-tracking task to examine great apes' anticipatory looks to the events that they had encountered one time 24 hr earlier. Half-minute movie clips depicted novel and potentially alarming situations to the participant apes (six bonobos, six chimpanzees). In the experiment 1 clip, an aggressive ape-like character came out from one of two identical doors. While viewing the same movie again, apes anticipatorily looked at the door where the character would show up. In the experiment 2 clip, the human actor grabbed one of two objects and attacked the character with it. While viewing the same movie again but with object-location switched, apes anticipatorily looked at the object that the human would use, rather than the former location of the object. Our results thus show that great apes, just by watching the events once, encoded particular information (location and content) into long-term memory and later retrieved that information at a particular time in anticipation of the impending events. PMID:26387711

  11. Cognitive inferences in fossil apes (Primates, Hominoidea): does encephalization reflect intelligence?

    PubMed

    Alba, David M

    2010-01-01

    Paleobiological inferences on general cognitive abilities (intelligence) in fossil hominoids strongly rely on relative brain size or encephalization, computed by means of allometric residuals, quotients or constants. Th is has been criticized on the basis that it presumably fails to reflect the higher intelligence of great apes, and absolute brain size has been favored instead. Many problems of encephalization metrics stem from the decrease of allometric slopes towards lower taxonomic level, thus making it difficult to determine at what level encephalization metrics have biological meaning. Here, the hypothesis that encephalization can be used as a good neuroanatomical proxy for intelligence is tested at two different taxonomic levels. A significant correlation is found between intelligence and encephalization only at a lower taxonomic level, i.e. on the basis of a low allometric slope, irrespective of whether species data or independent contrasts are employed. This indicates that higher-level slopes, resulting from encephalization grade shifts between subgroups (including hylobatids vs. great apes), do not reflect functional equivalence, whereas lower-level metrics can be employed as a paleobiological proxy for intelligence. Thus, in accordance to intelligence rankings, lower-level metrics indicate that great apes are more encephalized than both monkeys and hylobatids. Regarding fossil taxa, encephalization increased during hominin evolution (particularly in Homo), but during the Miocene a significant shift towards higher encephalization (and inferred enhanced cognitive abilities) must have been also involved in the emergence of the great-ape-and-human clade (Hominidae). This is confirmed by the modern great-ape-like degree of encephalization displayed by the fossil great ape Hispanopithecus, which contrasts with the rather hylobatid-like degree of the stem hominoid Proconsul. The similarly low encephalization of Oreopithecus might result from secondary reduction

  12. Consequences of Non-Intervention for Infectious Disease in African Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Sadie J.; Walsh, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious disease has recently joined poaching and habitat loss as a major threat to African apes. Both “naturally” occurring pathogens, such as Ebola and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV), and respiratory pathogens transmitted from humans, have been confirmed as important sources of mortality in wild gorillas and chimpanzees. While awareness of the threat has increased, interventions such as vaccination and treatment remain controversial. Here we explore both the risk of disease to African apes, and the status of potential responses. Through synthesis of published data, we summarize prior disease impact on African apes. We then use a simple demographic model to illustrate the resilience of a well-known gorilla population to disease, modeled on prior documented outbreaks. We found that the predicted recovery time for this specific gorilla population from a single outbreak ranged from 5 years for a low mortality (4%) respiratory outbreak, to 131 years for an Ebola outbreak that killed 96% of the population. This shows that mortality rates comparable to those recently reported for disease outbreaks in wild populations are not sustainable. This is particularly troubling given the rising pathogen risk created by increasing habituation of wild apes for tourism, and the growth of human populations surrounding protected areas. We assess potential future disease spillover risk in terms of vaccination rates amongst humans that may come into contact with wild apes, and the availability of vaccines against potentially threatening diseases. We discuss and evaluate non-interventionist responses such as limiting tourist access to apes, community health programs, and safety, logistic, and cost issues that constrain the potential of vaccination. PMID:22216162

  13. Great apes and children infer causal relations from patterns of variation and covariation.

    PubMed

    Völter, Christoph J; Sentís, Inés; Call, Josep

    2016-10-01

    We investigated whether nonhuman great apes (N=23), 2.5-year-old (N=20), and 3-year-old children (N=40) infer causal relations from patterns of variation and covariation by adapting the blicket detector paradigm for apes. We presented chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), bonobos (Pan paniscus), orangutans (Pongo abelii), gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), and children (Homo sapiens) with a novel reward dispenser, the blicket detector. The detector was activated by inserting specific (yet randomly determined) objects, the so-called blickets. Once activated a reward was released, accompanied by lights and a short tone. Participants were shown different patterns of variation and covariation between two different objects and the activation of the detector. When subsequently choosing between one of the two objects to activate the detector on their own all species, except gorillas (who failed the training), took these patterns of correlation into account. In particular, apes and 2.5-year-old children ignored objects whose effect on the detector completely depended on the presence of another object. Follow-up experiments explored whether the apes and children were also able to re-evaluate evidence retrospectively. Only children (3-year-olds in particular) were able to make such retrospective inferences about causal structures from observing the effects of the experimenter's actions. Apes succeeded here only when they observed the effects of their own interventions. Together, this study provides evidence that apes, like young children, accurately infer causal structures from patterns of (co)variation and that they use this information to inform their own interventions. PMID:27343481

  14. Consequences of non-intervention for infectious disease in African great apes.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sadie J; Walsh, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    Infectious disease has recently joined poaching and habitat loss as a major threat to African apes. Both "naturally" occurring pathogens, such as Ebola and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV), and respiratory pathogens transmitted from humans, have been confirmed as important sources of mortality in wild gorillas and chimpanzees. While awareness of the threat has increased, interventions such as vaccination and treatment remain controversial. Here we explore both the risk of disease to African apes, and the status of potential responses. Through synthesis of published data, we summarize prior disease impact on African apes. We then use a simple demographic model to illustrate the resilience of a well-known gorilla population to disease, modeled on prior documented outbreaks. We found that the predicted recovery time for this specific gorilla population from a single outbreak ranged from 5 years for a low mortality (4%) respiratory outbreak, to 131 years for an Ebola outbreak that killed 96% of the population. This shows that mortality rates comparable to those recently reported for disease outbreaks in wild populations are not sustainable. This is particularly troubling given the rising pathogen risk created by increasing habituation of wild apes for tourism, and the growth of human populations surrounding protected areas. We assess potential future disease spillover risk in terms of vaccination rates amongst humans that may come into contact with wild apes, and the availability of vaccines against potentially threatening diseases. We discuss and evaluate non-interventionist responses such as limiting tourist access to apes, community health programs, and safety, logistic, and cost issues that constrain the potential of vaccination. PMID:22216162

  15. Thyroid Autoantibodies Are Rare in Nonhuman Great Apes and Hypothyroidism Cannot Be Attributed to Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Aliesky, Holly; Courtney, Cynthia L.; Rapoport, Basil

    2013-01-01

    The great apes include, in addition to Homo, the genera Pongo (orangutans), Gorilla (gorillas), and Pan, the latter comprising two species, P. troglodytes (chimpanzees) and P. paniscus (bonobos). Adult-onset hypothyroidism was previously reported in 4 individual nonhuman great apes. However, there is scarce information on normal serum thyroid hormone levels and virtually no data for thyroid autoantibodies in these animals. Therefore, we examined thyroid hormone levels and TSH in all nonhuman great ape genera including adults, adolescents, and infants. Because hypothyroidism in humans is commonly the end result of thyroid autoimmunity, we also tested healthy and hypothyroid nonhuman great apes for antibodies to thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), and the TSH receptor (TSHR). We established a thyroid hormone and TSH database in orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos (447 individuals). The most striking differences are the greatly reduced free-T4 and free-T3 levels in orangutans and gorillas vs chimpanzees and bonobos, and conversely, elevated TSH levels in gorillas vs Pan species. Antibodies to Tg and TPO were detected in only 2.6% of adult animals vs approximately 10% in humans. No animals with Tg, TPO, or TSHR antibodies exhibited thyroid dysfunction. Conversely, hypothyroid nonhuman great apes lacked thyroid autoantibodies. Moreover, thyroid histology in necropsy tissues was similar in euthyroid and hypothyroid individuals, and lymphocytic infiltration was absent in 2 hypothyroid animals. In conclusion, free T4 and free T3 are lower in orangutans and gorillas vs chimpanzees and bonobos, the closest living human relatives. Moreover, thyroid autoantibodies are rare and hypothyroidism is unrelated to thyroid autoimmunity in nonhuman great apes. PMID:24092641

  16. On the simulation of trailing edge noise with a hybrid LES/APE method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewert, R.; Schröder, W.

    2004-02-01

    A hybrid method is applied to predict trailing edge noise based on a large eddy simulation (LES) of the compressible flow problem and acoustic perturbation equations (APE) for the time-dependent simulation of the acoustic field. The acoustic simulation in general considers the mean flow convection and refraction effects such that the computational domain of the flow simulation has to comprise only the significant acoustic source region. Using a modified rescaling method for the prediction of the unsteady turbulent inflow boundary layer, the LES just resolves the flow field in the immediate vicinity of the trailing edge. The linearized APE completely prevent the unbounded growth of hydrodynamic instabilities in critical mean flows.

  17. Dyadic brain modelling, mirror systems and the ontogenetic ritualization of ape gesture

    PubMed Central

    Arbib, Michael; Ganesh, Varsha; Gasser, Brad

    2014-01-01

    The paper introduces dyadic brain modelling, offering both a framework for modelling the brains of interacting agents and a general framework for simulating and visualizing the interactions generated when the brains (and the two bodies) are each coded up in computational detail. It models selected neural mechanisms in ape brains supportive of social interactions, including putative mirror neuron systems inspired by macaque neurophysiology but augmented by increased access to proprioceptive state. Simulation results for a reduced version of the model show ritualized gesture emerging from interactions between a simulated child and mother ape. PMID:24778382

  18. The Aqua-Planet Experiment (APE): CONTROL SST Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Michael; Williamson, David L.; Nakajima, Kensuke; Ohfuchi, Wataru; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki O.; Hayashi, Yoshi-Yuki; Nakamura, Hisashi; Ishiwatari, Masaki; Mcgregor, John L.; Borth, Hartmut; Wirth, Volkmar; Frank, Helmut; Bechtold, Peter; Wedi, Nils P.; Tomita, Hirofumi; Satoh, Masaki; Zhao, Ming; Held, Isaac M.; Suarez, Max J.; Lee, Myong-In; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Liu, Yimin; Wang, Zaizhi; Molod, Andrea M.; Rajendran, Kavirajan; Kotoh, Akio; Stratton, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Climate simulations by 16 atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) are compared on an aqua-planet, a water-covered Earth with prescribed sea surface temperature varying only in latitude. The idealised configuration is designed to expose differences in the circulation simulated by different models. Basic features of the aqua-planet climate are characterised by comparison with Earth. The models display a wide range of behaviour. The balanced component of the tropospheric mean flow, and mid-latitude eddy covariances subject to budget constraints, vary relatively little among the models. In contrast, differences in damping in the dynamical core strongly influence transient eddy amplitudes. Historical uncertainty in modelled lower stratospheric temperatures persists in APE.Aspects of the circulation generated more directly by interactions between the resolved fluid dynamics and parameterized moist processes vary greatly. The tropical Hadley circulation forms either a single or double inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) at the equator, with large variations in mean precipitation. The equatorial wave spectrum shows a wide range of precipitation intensity and propagation characteristics. Kelvin mode-like eastward propagation with remarkably constant phase speed dominates in most models. Westward propagation, less dispersive than the equatorial Rossby modes, dominates in a few models or occurs within an eastward propagating envelope in others. The mean structure of the ITCZ is related to precipitation variability, consistent with previous studies.The aqua-planet global energy balance is unknown but the models produce a surprisingly large range of top of atmosphere global net flux, dominated by differences in shortwave reflection by clouds. A number of newly developed models, not optimised for Earth climate, contribute to this. Possible reasons for differences in the optimised models are discussed.The aqua-planet configuration is intended as one component of an

  19. Prognostic Significance of Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease (APE/Ref-1) Expression in Rectal Cancer Treated With Preoperative Radiochemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jin-Man; Liang, Zhe Long; Jang, Ji Young; Kim, Sup; Huh, Gil Ja; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Cho, Moon-June

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Human apurinic endonuclease/redox factor 1 (APE/Ref-1) mediates repair of radiation-induced DNA lesions and regulates transcription via redox-based activation. We investigated the predictive and prognostic significance of APE/Ref-1 expression in pretreatment biopsy specimens in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) (cT3-T4 or N+). Methods and Materials: APE/Ref-1 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in pretreatment biopsy specimens obtained from 83 patients with LARC. Patients received preoperative radiotherapy of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, combined with oral capecitabine and leucovorin chemotherapy, followed by curative surgery. The prognostic significance of various clinicopathologic characteristics, including APE/Ref-1 protein expression, was evaluated. Results: APE/Ref-1 was expressed in 97% of patient samples. Exclusive APE/Ref-1 nuclear staining was observed in 49 of 83 samples (59%), and mixed nuclear and cytoplasmic staining was observed in 31 samples (37%). APE/Ref-1 nuclear expression levels were low in 49 patients (59%) and high in 34 patients (41%). The level of APE/Ref-1 nuclear expression was not a prognostic factor for overall and disease-free survival. Cytoplasmic expression of APE/Ref-1 was a borderline-significant predictive factor for pathologic tumor response (p = 0.08) and a significant prognostic factor for disease-free survival, as shown by univariate analysis (p = 0.037). Multivariate analysis confirmed that cytoplasmic localization of APE/Ref-1 is a significant predictor of disease-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.45; p = 0.046). Conclusions: APE/Ref-1 was expressed in a majority of pretreatment biopsy specimens from patients with LARC. The level of APE/Ref-1 nuclear expression was not a significant predictive and prognostic factor; however, cytoplasmic localization of the protein was negatively associated with disease-free survival. These results indicate that cytoplasmic expression of APE/Ref-1 represents an adverse

  20. Diversity, host switching and evolution of Plasmodium vivax infecting African great apes

    PubMed Central

    Prugnolle, Franck; Rougeron, Virginie; Becquart, Pierre; Berry, Antoine; Makanga, Boris; Rahola, Nil; Arnathau, Céline; Ngoubangoye, Barthélémy; Menard, Sandie; Willaume, Eric; Ayala, Francisco J.; Fontenille, Didier; Ollomo, Benjamin; Durand, Patrick; Paupy, Christophe; Renaud, François

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is considered to be absent from Central and West Africa because of the protective effect of Duffy negativity. However, there are reports of persons returning from these areas infected with this parasite and observations suggesting the existence of transmission. Among the possible explanations for this apparent paradox, the existence of a zoonotic reservoir has been proposed. May great apes be this reservoir? We analyze the mitochondrial and nuclear genetic diversity of P. vivax parasites isolated from great apes in Africa and compare it to parasites isolated from travelers returning from these regions of Africa, as well as to human isolates distributed all over the world. We show that the P. vivax sequences from parasites of great apes form a clade genetically distinct from the parasites circulating in humans. We show that this clade’s parasites can be infectious to humans by describing the case of a traveler returning from the Central African Republic infected with one of them. The relationship between this P. vivax clade in great apes and the human isolates is discussed. PMID:23637341

  1. Humans and great apes share increased neocortical neuropeptide Y innervation compared to other haplorhine primates

    PubMed Central

    Raghanti, Mary Ann; Edler, Melissa K.; Meindl, Richard S.; Sudduth, Jessica; Bohush, Tatiana; Erwin, Joseph M.; Stimpson, Cheryl D.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays a role in a variety of basic physiological functions and has also been implicated in regulating cognition, including learning and memory. A decrease in neocortical NPY has been reported for Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression, potentially contributing to associated cognitive deficits. The goal of the present analysis was to examine variation in neocortical NPY-immunoreactive axon and varicosity density among haplorhine primates (monkeys, apes, and humans). Stereologic methods were used to measure the ratios of NPY-expressing axon length density to total neuron density (ALv/Nv) and NPY-immunoreactive varicosity density to neuron density (Vv/Nv), as well as the mean varicosity spacing in neocortical areas 10, 24, 44, and 22 (Tpt) of humans, African great apes, New World monkeys, and Old World monkeys. Humans and great apes showed increased cortical NPY innervation relative to monkey species for ALv/Nv and Vv/Nv. Furthermore, humans and great apes displayed a conserved pattern of varicosity spacing across cortical areas and layers, with no differences between cortical layers or among cortical areas. These phylogenetic differences may be related to shared life history variables and may reflect specific cognitive abilities. PMID:24616688

  2. Inferences by exclusion in the great apes: the effect of age and species.

    PubMed

    Call, Josep

    2006-10-01

    This study investigated the ability of chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and bonobos to make inferences by exclusion using the procedure pioneered by Premack and Premack (Cognition 50:347-362, 1994) with chimpanzees. Thirty apes were presented with two different food items (banana vs. grape) on a platform and covered with identical containers. One of the items was removed from the container and placed between the two containers so that subjects could see it. After discarding this item, subjects could select between the two containers. In Experiment 1, apes preferentially selected the container that held the item that the experimenter had not discarded, especially if subjects saw the experimenter remove the item from the container (but without seeing the container empty). Experiment 3 in which the food was removed from one of the containers behind a barrier confirmed these results. In contrast, subjects performed at chance levels when a stimulus (colored plastic chip: Exp. 1; food item: Exp. 2 and Exp. 3) designated the item that had been removed. These results indicated that apes made inferences, not just learned to use a discriminative cue to avoid the empty container. Apes perceived and treated the item discarded by the experimenter as if it were the very one that had been hidden under the container. Results suggested a positive relationship between age and inferential ability independent of memory ability but no species differences. PMID:16924458

  3. Apes finding ants: Predator-prey dynamics in a chimpanzee habitat in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Garrido, Alejandra; Umaru, Buba; Allon, Oliver; Sommer, Volker

    2013-12-01

    Some chimpanzee populations prey upon army ants, usually with stick tools. However, how their prey's subterranean nesting and nomadic lifestyle influence the apes' harvesting success is still poorly understood. This is particularly true for chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes ellioti) at Gashaka/Nigeria, which consume army ants (Dorylus rubellus) with much higher frequency than at other sites. We assessed various harvesting and search options theoretically available to the apes. For this, we reconstructed annual consumption patterns from feces and compared the physical characteristics of exploited ant nests with those that were not targeted. Repeated exploitation of a discovered nest is viable only in the short term, as disturbed colonies soon moved to a new site. Moreover, monitoring previously occupied nest cavities is uneconomical, as ants hardly ever re-used them. Thus, the apes have to detect new nests regularly, although colony density is relatively low (1 colony/1.3 ha). Surprisingly, visual search cues seem to be of limited importance because the probability of a nest being exploited was independent of its conspicuousness (presence of excavated soil piles, concealing leaf-litter or vegetation). However, chimpanzees preferentially targeted nests in forests or at the base of food trees, that is, where the apes spend relatively more time and/or where ant colony density is highest. Taken together, our findings suggest that, instead of employing a search strategy based on visual cues or spatial memory, chimpanzee predation on army ants contains a considerable opportunistic element. PMID:24022711

  4. APE-X (Appropriate Placement in English for a Variable, the Individual Goal of Each Student.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Custer County High School, Miles City, MT.

    APE-X, representing Appropriate Placement in English for X (a variable, the individual goal of each student), is designed to individualize instruction by giving students the material they need at the levels of difficulty most appropriate for them. The entire English curriculum is broken into four and one-half week units in five categories;…

  5. Combining the APES and Minimum-variance Beamformers for Adaptive Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh Asl, Babak

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, adaptive minimum-variance (MV) beamforming has been successfully applied to medical ultrasound imaging, resulting in simultaneous improvement in imaging resolution and contrast. MV has high resolution and hence can provide accurate estimates of the target locations. However, the MV amplitude estimates are significantly biased downward, especially when occurring the errors in model parameters. The amplitude and phase estimation (APES) beamformer gives much more accurate amplitude estimates at the target locations, but at the cost of lower resolution. To reap the benefits of both MV and APES, we have proposed a modified APES (MAPES) beamformer by adding a parameter which controls the trade-off between spatial and amplitude resolutions. We have also proposed an adaptive beamformer which combines the MV and APES. The proposed beamformer first estimates the peak locations using the MV estimator and then refines the amplitude estimates at these locations using the MAPES estimator. By using simulated and experimental data-point targets as well as cyst phantoms-we show the efficacy of the proposed beamformers. PMID:26333280

  6. Fossil hominin shoulders support an African ape-like last common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Young, Nathan M.; Capellini, Terence D.; Roach, Neil T.; Alemseged, Zeresenay

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructing the behavioral shifts that drove hominin evolution requires knowledge of the timing, magnitude, and direction of anatomical changes over the past ∼6–7 million years. These reconstructions depend on assumptions regarding the morphotype of the Homo–Pan last common ancestor (LCA). However, there is little consensus for the LCA, with proposed models ranging from African ape to orangutan or generalized Miocene ape-like. The ancestral state of the shoulder is of particular interest because it is functionally associated with important behavioral shifts in hominins, such as reduced arboreality, high-speed throwing, and tool use. However, previous morphometric analyses of both living and fossil taxa have yielded contradictory results. Here, we generated a 3D morphospace of ape and human scapular shape to plot evolutionary trajectories, predict ancestral morphologies, and directly test alternative evolutionary hypotheses using the hominin fossil evidence. We show that the most parsimonious model for the evolution of hominin shoulder shape starts with an African ape-like ancestral state. We propose that the shoulder evolved gradually along a single morphocline, achieving modern human-like configuration and function within the genus Homo. These data are consistent with a slow, progressive loss of arboreality and increased tool use throughout human evolution. PMID:26351685

  7. Palaeontological evidence for an Oligocene divergence between Old World monkeys and apes.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Nancy J; Seiffert, Erik R; O'Connor, Patrick M; Roberts, Eric M; Schmitz, Mark D; Krause, Cornelia; Gorscak, Eric; Ngasala, Sifa; Hieronymus, Tobin L; Temu, Joseph

    2013-05-30

    Apes and Old World monkeys are prominent components of modern African and Asian ecosystems, yet the earliest phases of their evolutionary history have remained largely undocumented. The absence of crown catarrhine fossils older than ∼20 million years (Myr) has stood in stark contrast to molecular divergence estimates of ∼25-30 Myr for the split between Cercopithecoidea (Old World monkeys) and Hominoidea (apes), implying long ghost lineages for both clades. Here we describe the oldest known fossil 'ape', represented by a partial mandible preserving dental features that place it with 'nyanzapithecine' stem hominoids. Additionally, we report the oldest stem member of the Old World monkey clade, represented by a lower third molar. Both specimens were recovered from a precisely dated 25.2-Myr-old stratum in the Rukwa Rift, a segment of the western branch of the East African Rift in Tanzania. These finds extend the fossil record of apes and Old World monkeys well into the Oligocene epoch of Africa, suggesting a possible link between diversification of crown catarrhines and changes in the African landscape brought about by previously unrecognized tectonic activity in the East African rift system. PMID:23676680

  8. Genetic Differences Between Great Apes and Humans: Implications for Human Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Varki, Ajit

    2004-03-17

    When considering protein sequences, humans are 99-100% identical to chimpanzees and bonobos, our closest evolutionary relatives. The evolution of humans (and the unique features of our species) from a common ancestor with these great apes involved many steps, influenced by interactions amongst factors of genetic, developmental, ecological, microbial, climatic, behavioral, cultural and social origin. The genetic factors can be approached by direct comparisons of human and great ape genomes, genes and gene products, and by elucidating biochemical and biological consequences of the differences. We have discovered multiple genetic and biochemical differences between humans and great apes, particularly in relationship to a family of cell surface molecules called sialic acids. These differences have implications for the human condition, ranging from susceptibility or resistance to microbial pathogens; effects on endogenous receptors in the immune system; potential effects on placental signaling; the expression of oncofetal antigens in cancers; consequences of dietary intake of animal foods; and the development of the mammalian brain. This talk will provide an overview of these and other genetic differences between humans and great apes, with attention to differences potentially relevant to the evolution of humans.

  9. Fossil hominin shoulders support an African ape-like last common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Young, Nathan M; Capellini, Terence D; Roach, Neil T; Alemseged, Zeresenay

    2015-09-22

    Reconstructing the behavioral shifts that drove hominin evolution requires knowledge of the timing, magnitude, and direction of anatomical changes over the past ∼6-7 million years. These reconstructions depend on assumptions regarding the morphotype of the Homo-Pan last common ancestor (LCA). However, there is little consensus for the LCA, with proposed models ranging from African ape to orangutan or generalized Miocene ape-like. The ancestral state of the shoulder is of particular interest because it is functionally associated with important behavioral shifts in hominins, such as reduced arboreality, high-speed throwing, and tool use. However, previous morphometric analyses of both living and fossil taxa have yielded contradictory results. Here, we generated a 3D morphospace of ape and human scapular shape to plot evolutionary trajectories, predict ancestral morphologies, and directly test alternative evolutionary hypotheses using the hominin fossil evidence. We show that the most parsimonious model for the evolution of hominin shoulder shape starts with an African ape-like ancestral state. We propose that the shoulder evolved gradually along a single morphocline, achieving modern human-like configuration and function within the genus Homo. These data are consistent with a slow, progressive loss of arboreality and increased tool use throughout human evolution. PMID:26351685

  10. The vertebral formula of the last common ancestor of African apes and humans.

    PubMed

    McCollum, Melanie A; Rosenman, Burt A; Suwa, Gen; Meindl, Richard S; Lovejoy, C Owen

    2010-03-15

    The modal number of lumbar vertebrae in modern humans is five. It varies between three and four in extant African apes (mean=3.5). Because both chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) possess the same distributions of thoracic, lumbar, and sacral vertebrae, it has been assumed from parsimony that the last common ancestor (LCA) of African apes and humans possessed a similarly short lower back. This "short-backed LCA" scenario has recently been viewed favorably in an analysis of the intra- and interspecific variation in axial formulas observed among African apes and humans (Pilbeam, 2004. J Exp Zool 302B:241-267). However, the number of bonobo (Pan paniscus) specimens in that study was small (N=17). Here we reconsider vertebral type and number in the LCA in light of an expanded P. paniscus sample as well as evidence provided by the human fossil record. The precaudal (pre-coccygeal) axial column of bonobos differs from those of chimpanzees and gorillas in displaying one additional vertebra as well as significantly different combinations of sacral, lumbar, and thoracic vertebrae. These findings, along with the six-segmented lumbar column of early Australopithecus and early Homo, suggest that the LCA possessed a long axial column and long lumbar spine and that reduction in the lumbar column occurred independently in humans and in each ape clade, and continued after separation of the two species of Pan as well. Such an explanation is strongly congruent with additional details of lumbar column reduction and lower back stabilization in African apes. PMID:19688850

  11. Patterns of differences in brain morphology in humans as compared to extant apes

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Although human evolution is characterized by a vast increase in brain size, it is not clear whether or not certain regions of the brain are enlarged disproportionately in humans, or how this enlargement relates to differences in overall neural morphology. The aim of this study is to determine whether or not there are specific suites of features that distinguish the morphology of the human brain from that of apes. The study sample consists of whole brain, in vivo magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of anatomically modern humans (Homo sapiens sapiens) and five ape species (gibbons, orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos). Twenty-nine 3D landmarks, including surface and internal features of the brain were located on 3D MRI reconstructions of each individual using MEASURE software. Landmark coordinate data were scaled for differences in size and analyzed using Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis (EDMA) to statistically compare the brains of each non-human ape species to the human sample. Results of analyses show both a pattern of brain morphology that is consistently different between all apes and humans, as well as patterns that differ among species. Further, both the consistent and species-specific patterns include cortical and subcortical features. The pattern that remains consistent across species indicates a morphological reorganization of 1) relationships between cortical and subcortical frontal structures, 2) expansion of the temporal lobe and location of the amygdala, and 3) expansion of the anterior parietal region. Additionally, results demonstrate that, although there is a pattern of morphology that uniquely defines the human brain, there are also patterns that uniquely differentiate human morphology from the morphology of each non-human ape species, indicating that reorganization of neural morphology occurred at the evolutionary divergence of each of these groups. PMID:21056456

  12. APE1-mediated DNA damage repair provides survival advantage for esophageal adenocarcinoma cells in response to acidic bile salts.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jun; Chen, Zheng; Peng, Dunfa; Zaika, Alexander; Revetta, Frank; Washington, M Kay; Belkhiri, Abbes; El-Rifai, Wael

    2016-03-29

    Chronic Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is the main risk factor for the development of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and its progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Accordingly, EAC cells are subjected to high levels of oxidative stress and subsequent DNA damage. In this study, we investigated the expression and role of Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) protein in promoting cancer cell survival by counteracting the lethal effects of acidic bile salts (ABS)-induced DNA damage. Immunohistochemistry analysis of human tissue samples demonstrated overexpression of APE1 in more than half of EACs (70 of 130), as compared to normal esophagus and non-dysplastic BE samples (P < 0.01). To mimic in vivo conditions, we treated in vitro cell models with a cocktail of ABS. The knockdown of endogenous APE1 in EAC FLO-1 cells significantly increased oxidative DNA damage (P < 0.01) and DNA single- and double-strand breaks (P < 0.01), whereas overexpression of APE1 in EAC OE33 cells reversed these effects. Annexin V/PI staining indicated that the APE1 expression in OE33 cells protects against ABS-induced apoptosis. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous APE1 in FLO-1 cells increased apoptosis under the same conditions. Mechanistic investigations indicated that the pro-survival function of APE1 was associated with the regulation of stress response c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 kinases. Pharmacological inhibition of APE1 base excision repair (BER) function decreased cell survival and enhanced activation of JNK and p38 kinases by ABS. Our findings suggest that constitutive overexpression of APE1 in EAC may be an adaptive pro-survival mechanism that protects against the genotoxic lethal effects of bile reflux episodes. PMID:26934647

  13. Comparing ape densities and habitats in northern Congo: surveys of sympatric gorillas and chimpanzees in the Odzala and Ndoki regions.

    PubMed

    Devos, Céline; Sanz, Crickette; Morgan, David; Onononga, Jean-Robert; Laporte, Nadine; Huynen, Marie-Claude

    2008-05-01

    The conservation status of western lowland gorillas and central chimpanzees in western equatorial Africa remains largely speculative because many remote areas have never been surveyed and the impact of emergent diseases in the region has not been well documented. In this study, we compared ape densities and habitats in the Lokoué study area in Odzala National Park and the Goualougo Triangle in Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park in northern Republic of Congo. Both of these sites have long been considered strongholds for the conservation of chimpanzees and gorillas, but supposedly differ in vegetative composition and relative ape abundance. We compared habitats between these sites using conventional ground surveys and classified Landsat-7 ETM+ satellite images. We present density estimates via both standing-crop and marked-nest methods for the first time for sympatric apes of the Congo Basin. The marked-nest method was effective in depicting chimpanzee densities, but underestimated gorilla densities at both sites. Marked-nest surveys also revealed a dramatic decline in the ape population of Lokoué which coincided with a local Ebola epidemic. Normal baseline fluctuations in ape nest encounter rates during the repeated passages of marked-nest surveys were clearly distinguishable from a 80% decline in ape nest encounter rates at Lokoué. Our results showed that ape densities, habitat composition, and population dynamics differed between these populations in northern Congo. We emphasize the importance of intensifying monitoring efforts and further refinement of ape survey methods, as our results indicated that even the largest remaining ape populations in intact and protected forests are susceptible to sudden and dramatic declines. PMID:18176937

  14. APE1-mediated DNA damage repair provides survival advantage for esophageal adenocarcinoma cells in response to acidic bile salts

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jun; Chen, Zheng; Peng, Dunfa; Zaika, Alexander; Revetta, Frank; Washington, M. Kay; Belkhiri, Abbes; El-Rifai, Wael

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is the main risk factor for the development of Barrett's esophagus (BE) and its progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Accordingly, EAC cells are subjected to high levels of oxidative stress and subsequent DNA damage. In this study, we investigated the expression and role of Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) protein in promoting cancer cell survival by counteracting the lethal effects of acidic bile salts (ABS)-induced DNA damage. Immunohistochemistry analysis of human tissue samples demonstrated overexpression of APE1 in more than half of EACs (70 of 130), as compared to normal esophagus and non-dysplastic BE samples (P < 0.01). To mimic in vivo conditions, we treated in vitro cell models with a cocktail of ABS. The knockdown of endogenous APE1 in EAC FLO-1 cells significantly increased oxidative DNA damage (P < 0.01) and DNA single- and double-strand breaks (P < 0.01), whereas overexpression of APE1 in EAC OE33 cells reversed these effects. Annexin V/PI staining indicated that the APE1 expression in OE33 cells protects against ABS-induced apoptosis. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous APE1 in FLO-1 cells increased apoptosis under the same conditions. Mechanistic investigations indicated that the pro-survival function of APE1 was associated with the regulation of stress response c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 kinases. Pharmacological inhibition of APE1 base excision repair (BER) function decreased cell survival and enhanced activation of JNK and p38 kinases by ABS. Our findings suggest that constitutive overexpression of APE1 in EAC may be an adaptive pro-survival mechanism that protects against the genotoxic lethal effects of bile reflux episodes. PMID:26934647

  15. Serum APE1 Autoantibodies: A Novel Potential Tumor Marker and Predictor of Chemotherapeutic Efficacy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Xia; Qing, Yi; Liao, Ling; Lu, Xian-Feng; Zhang, Shi-Heng; Li, Zheng; Yang, Yu-Xin; Wang, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), which has the dual functions of both DNA repair and redox activity, has been reported to be highly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and this appears to be a characteristic related to chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we identified serum APE1 autoantibodies (APE1-AAbs) in NSCLC patients and healthy controls by immunoblotting and investigated the expression of APE1-AAbs by indirect ELISA from the serum of 292 NSCLC patients and 300 healthy controls. In addition, serum APE1-AAbs level alterations of 91 patients were monitored before and after chemotherapy. Our results showed that serum APE1-AAbs can be detected in both NSCLC patients and healthy controls. Serum APE1-AAbs were significantly higher than those of healthy controls and closely related to APE1 antigen levels both in tumor tissues and the peripheral blood. Moreover, the change in levels of serum APE1-AAbs in NSCLC is closely associated with the response to chemotherapy. These results suggest that APE1-AAbs is a potential tumor marker and predictor of therapeutic efficacy in NSCLC. PMID:23472128

  16. Nuclear depletion of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1/Ref-1) is an indicator of energy disruption in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shilpee; Englander, Ella W.

    2012-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein critical for cellular survival. Its involvement in adaptive survival responses includes key roles in redox sensing, transcriptional regulation and repair of DNA damage via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Ape1 is abundant in most cell types and central in integrating the first BER step catalyzed by different DNA glycosylases. BER is the main process for removal of oxidative DNA lesions in post mitotic brain cells, and after ischemic brain injury preservation of Ape1 coincides with neuronal survival, while its loss has been associated with neuronal death. Here, we report that in cultured primary neurons, diminution of cellular ATP by either oligomycin or H2O2, is accompanied by depletion of nuclear Ape1, while other BER proteins are unaffected and retain their nuclear localization under these conditions. Importantly, while H2O2 induces γH2AX phosphorylation, indicative of chromatin rearrangements in response to DNA damage, oligomycin does not. Furthermore, despite comparable diminution of ATP content, H2O2 and oligomycin differentially affect critical parameters of mitochondrial respiration that ultimately determine cellular ATP content. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that in neurons, nuclear compartmentalization of Ape1 depends on ATP and loss of nuclear Ape1 reflects disruption of neuronal energy homeostasis. Energy crisis is a hallmark of stroke and other ischemic/hypoxic brain injuries. In vivo studies have shown that Ape1 deficit precedes neuronal loss in injured brain regions. Thus, our findings bring to light the possibility that energy failure-induced Ape1 depletion triggers neuronal death in ischemic brain injuries. PMID:22841870

  17. Nuclear depletion of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1/Ref-1) is an indicator of energy disruption in neurons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shilpee; Englander, Ella W

    2012-11-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein critical for cellular survival. Its involvement in adaptive survival responses includes key roles in redox sensing, transcriptional regulation, and repair of DNA damage via the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Ape1 is abundant in most cell types and central in integrating the first BER step catalyzed by different DNA glycosylases. BER is the main process for removal of oxidative DNA lesions in postmitotic brain cells, and after ischemic brain injury preservation of Ape1 coincides with neuronal survival, while its loss has been associated with neuronal death. Here, we report that in cultured primary neurons, diminution of cellular ATP by either oligomycin or H(2)O(2) is accompanied by depletion of nuclear Ape1, while other BER proteins are unaffected and retain their nuclear localization under these conditions. Importantly, while H(2)O(2) induces γH2AX phosphorylation, indicative of chromatin rearrangements in response to DNA damage, oligomycin does not. Furthermore, despite comparable diminution of ATP content, H(2)O(2) and oligomycin differentially affect critical parameters of mitochondrial respiration that ultimately determine cellular ATP content. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that in neurons, nuclear compartmentalization of Ape1 depends on ATP and loss of nuclear Ape1 reflects disruption of neuronal energy homeostasis. Energy crisis is a hallmark of stroke and other ischemic/hypoxic brain injuries. In vivo studies have shown that Ape1 deficit precedes neuronal loss in injured brain regions. Thus, our findings bring to light the possibility that energy failure-induced Ape1 depletion triggers neuronal death in ischemic brain injuries. PMID:22841870

  18. APE1 is dispensable for S-region cleavage but required for its repair in class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianliang; Husain, Afzal; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Maki

    2014-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for antibody diversification, namely somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). The deficiency of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1) in CH12F3-2A B cells reduces CSR to ∼20% of wild-type cells, whereas the effect of APE1 loss on SHM has not been examined. Here we show that, although APE1’s endonuclease activity is important for CSR, it is dispensable for SHM as well as IgH/c-myc translocation. Importantly, APE1 deficiency did not show any defect in AID-induced S-region break formation, but blocked both the recruitment of repair protein Ku80 to the S region and the synapse formation between Sμ and Sα. Knockdown of end-processing factors such as meiotic recombination 11 homolog (MRE11) and carboxy-terminal binding protein (CtBP)-interacting protein (CtIP) further reduced the remaining CSR in Ape1-null CH12F3-2A cells. Together, our results show that APE1 is dispensable for SHM and AID-induced DNA breaks and may function as a DNA end-processing enzyme to facilitate the joining of broken ends during CSR. PMID:25404348

  19. Housing and care of monkeys and apes in laboratories: adaptations allowing essential species-specific behaviour.

    PubMed

    Röder, E L; Timmermans, P J A

    2002-07-01

    During the last two decades an increasing amount of attention has been paid to the housing and care of monkeys and apes in laboratories, as has been done with the housing and care of other categories of captive animals. The purpose of this review is to develop recommendations for adaptations of housing and care from our knowledge of the daily behavioural activity of monkeys and apes in natural conditions and in enriched laboratory conditions. This review deals mainly with adaptations of daily housing and care with respect to behaviour, and it is restricted to commonly-used species: Callitrichidae (Callitrix jacchus, Saguinus oedipus); Cebidae (Aotus trivirgatus, Saimiri sciureus, Cebus apella); Cercopithecidae (Macaca fascicularis, M. mulatta, M. nemestrina, M. arctoides, Chlorocebus aethiops, Papio hamadryas, P. cynocephalus); Pongidae (Pan troglodytes). PMID:12144737

  20. Detection of termites and other insects consumed by African great apes using molecular fecal analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Ibrahim; Delaporte, Eric; Raoult, Didier; Bittar, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of insects by apes has previously been reported based on direct observations and/or trail signs in feces. However, DNA-based diet analyses may have the potential to reveal trophic links for these wild species. Herein, we analyzed the insect-diet diversity of 9 feces obtained from three species of African great apes, gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and bonobo (Pan paniscus), using two mitochondrial amplifications for arthropods. A total of 1056 clones were sequenced for Cyt-b and COI gene libraries, which contained 50 and 56 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. BLAST research revealed that the OTUs belonged to 32 families from 5 orders (Diptera, Isoptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, and Orthoptera). While ants were not detected by this method, the consumption of flies, beetles, moths, mosquitoes and termites was evident in these samples. Our findings indicate that molecular techniques can be used to analyze insect food items in wild animals. PMID:24675424

  1. African great apes are naturally infected with polyomaviruses closely related to Merkel cell polyomavirus.

    PubMed

    Leendertz, Fabian H; Scuda, Nelly; Cameron, Kenneth N; Kidega, Tonny; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Leendertz, Siv Aina J; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Boesch, Christophe; Calvignac, Sébastien; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    The oncogenic Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) infects humans worldwide, but little is known about the occurrence of viruses related to MCPyV in the closest phylogenetic relatives of humans, great apes. We analyzed samples from 30 wild chimpanzees and one captive gorilla and identified two new groups of polyomaviruses (PyVs). These new viruses are by far the closest relatives to MCPyV described to date, providing the first evidence of the natural occurrence of PyVs related to MCPyV in wild great apes. Similar to MCPyV, the prevalence of these viruses is relatively high (>30%). This, together with the fact that humans in West and Central Africa frequently hunt and butcher primates, may point toward further MCPyV-like strains spreading to, or already existing in, our species. PMID:21047967

  2. Samuel Fernberger's rejected doctoral dissertation: a neglected resource for the history of ape research in America.

    PubMed

    Dewsbury, Donald A

    2009-02-01

    I summarize a never-completed 1911 doctoral dissertation on ape behavior by Samuel Fernberger of the University of Pennsylvania. Included are observations on many behavioral patterns including sensory and perceptual function, learning, memory, attention, imagination, personality, and emotion in an orangutan and two chimpanzees. There are examples of behavior resembling insight, conscience, tool use and imitation. Language comprehension was good but speech production was minimal. The document appears to contradict a brief published article on the project by William Furness in that punishment was frequently used. The document is important for understanding Fernberger's early career, for anticipations of later research, and for understanding the status of ape research at the time. PMID:19579568

  3. Functional Implications of Human-Specific Changes in Great Ape microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramallo, Eva; Torruella-Loran, Ignasi; Fernández-Bellon, Hugo; Abelló, Teresa; Kondova, Ivanela; Bontrop, Ronald; Hvilsom, Christina; Navarro, Arcadi; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Espinosa-Parrilla, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs are crucial post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression involved in a wide range of biological processes. Although microRNAs are highly conserved among species, the functional implications of existing lineage-specific changes and their role in determining differences between humans and other great apes have not been specifically addressed. We analyzed the recent evolutionary history of 1,595 human microRNAs by looking at their intra- and inter-species variation in great apes using high-coverage sequenced genomes of 82 individuals including gorillas, orangutans, bonobos, chimpanzees and humans. We explored the strength of purifying selection among microRNA regions and found that the seed and mature regions are under similar and stronger constraint than the precursor region. We further constructed a comprehensive catalogue of microRNA species-specific nucleotide substitutions among great apes and, for the first time, investigated the biological relevance that human-specific changes in microRNAs may have had in great ape evolution. Expression and functional analyses of four microRNAs (miR-299-3p, miR-503-3p, miR-508-3p and miR-541-3p) revealed that lineage-specific nucleotide substitutions and changes in the length of these microRNAs alter their expression as well as the repertoires of target genes and regulatory networks. We suggest that the studied molecular changes could have modified crucial microRNA functions shaping phenotypes that, ultimately, became human-specific. Our work provides a frame to study the impact that regulatory changes may have in the recent evolution of our species. PMID:27105073

  4. Shared Pattern of Endocranial Shape Asymmetries among Great Apes, Anatomically Modern Humans, and Fossil Hominins

    PubMed Central

    Balzeau, Antoine; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Grimaud-Hervé, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Anatomical asymmetries of the human brain are a topic of major interest because of their link with handedness and cognitive functions. Their emergence and occurrence have been extensively explored in human fossil records to document the evolution of brain capacities and behaviour. We quantified for the first time antero-posterior endocranial shape asymmetries in large samples of great apes, modern humans and fossil hominins through analysis of “virtual” 3D models of skull and endocranial cavity and we statistically test for departures from symmetry. Once based on continuous variables, we show that the analysis of these brain asymmetries gives original results that build upon previous analysis based on discrete traits. In particular, it emerges that the degree of petalial asymmetries differs between great apes and hominins without modification of their pattern. We indeed demonstrate the presence of shape asymmetries in great apes, with a pattern similar to modern humans but with a lower variation and a lower degree of fluctuating asymmetry. More importantly, variations in the position of the frontal and occipital poles on the right and left hemispheres would be expected to show some degree of antisymmetry when population distribution is considered, but the observed pattern of variation among the samples is related to fluctuating asymmetry for most of the components of the petalias. Moreover, the presence of a common pattern of significant directional asymmetry for two components of the petalias in hominids implicates that the observed traits were probably inherited from the last common ancestor of extant African great apes and Homo sapiens. These results also have important implications for the possible relationships between endocranial shape asymmetries and functional capacities in hominins. It emphasizes the uncoupling between lateralized activities, some of them well probably distinctive to Homo, and large-scale cerebral lateralization itself, which is not

  5. The behavioral ecology of sympatric African apes: implications for understanding fossil hominoid ecology.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Craig B

    2006-01-01

    The behavioral ecology of the great apes is key evidence used in the reconstruction of the behavior of extinct ape and hominid taxa. Chimpanzees and gorillas have been studied in detail in the wild, and some studies of their behavioral ecology in sympatry have also been been carried out. Although the two ape species have divergent behavior and ecology in important respects, recent studies have shown that the interspecific differences are not as stark as previously thought and subsequently urge new consideration of how they share forest resources when sympatric. These new data require re-examination of assumptions about key aspects of chimpanzee-gorilla ecological divergence, such as diet, ranging and nesting patterns, and the mating system. Diet is a key component of the species' adaptive complexes that facilitates avoidance of direct competition from the other. While the nutritional basis for chimpanzee food choice remains unclear and no doubt varies from site to site, this species is a ripe fruit specialist and ranges farther during periods of ripe fruit scarcity. Gorillas in the same habitat also feed on ripe fruit when widely available, but fall back onto fibrous plant foods during lean periods. The inclusion of animal protein in the diet of the chimpanzees and its absence in that of the gorillas also distinguish the species ecologically. It may also offer clues to aspects of ecological divergence among early members of the hominid phylogeny. The paper concludes by suggesting likely characteristics of sympatric associations of Pliocene hominids, based on field data from extant sympatric apes. PMID:16283423

  6. Association between polymorphisms of APE1 and OGG1 and risk of colorectal cancer in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ching-Yu; Hsieh, Ling-Ling; Tang, Reiping; Santella, Regina M; Chang-Chieh, Chung Rong; Yeh, Chih-Ching

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of OGG1 (Ser326Cys, 11657A/G, and Arg154His) and APE1 (Asp148Glu, and T-656G) polymorphisms on colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. METHODS: We enrolled 727 cases newly diagnosed with colorectal adenocarcinoma and 736 age- and sex-matched healthy controls from a medical center in Taiwan. Genomic DNA isolated from the buffy coat was used for genotyping through polymerase chain reaction. Unconditional logistic regressions were used for calculating ORs and 95%CIs to determine the association between the genetic polymorphisms and CRC risk. Haplotype frequencies were estimated using PHASE software. Moreover, stratification analyses on the basis of sex, age at diagnosis, and tumor subsite and stage were performed. RESULTS: The CRC risk was higher in patients with the OGG1 326Ser/Cys + Cys/Cys genotype (OR = 1.38, 95%CI: 1.03-1.85, P = 0.030), particularly high in patients with stage III + IV cancer (OR = 1.48, 95%CI: 1.03-2.13) compared with patients with the Ser/Ser genotype. In addition, OGG1 11657G allele carriers had a 41% reduced CRC risk among stage 0-II patients (OR = 0.59, 95%CI: 0.35-0.98). The CRC risk was significantly higher among females with the APE1 Glu allele (OR = 1.41, 95%CI: 1.02-1.96). The APE1 148Glu/-656G haplotype was also associated with a significant CRC risk in females (OR = 1.36, 95%CI: 1.03-1.78). CONCLUSION: OGG1 and APE1 polymorphisms are associated with stage- and sex-specific risk of CRC in the Taiwanese population. PMID:27022219

  7. Functional Implications of Human-Specific Changes in Great Ape microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Alicia; Melé, Marta; Balcells, Ingrid; García-Ramallo, Eva; Torruella-Loran, Ignasi; Fernández-Bellon, Hugo; Abelló, Teresa; Kondova, Ivanela; Bontrop, Ronald; Hvilsom, Christina; Navarro, Arcadi; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Espinosa-Parrilla, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs are crucial post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression involved in a wide range of biological processes. Although microRNAs are highly conserved among species, the functional implications of existing lineage-specific changes and their role in determining differences between humans and other great apes have not been specifically addressed. We analyzed the recent evolutionary history of 1,595 human microRNAs by looking at their intra- and inter-species variation in great apes using high-coverage sequenced genomes of 82 individuals including gorillas, orangutans, bonobos, chimpanzees and humans. We explored the strength of purifying selection among microRNA regions and found that the seed and mature regions are under similar and stronger constraint than the precursor region. We further constructed a comprehensive catalogue of microRNA species-specific nucleotide substitutions among great apes and, for the first time, investigated the biological relevance that human-specific changes in microRNAs may have had in great ape evolution. Expression and functional analyses of four microRNAs (miR-299-3p, miR-503-3p, miR-508-3p and miR-541-3p) revealed that lineage-specific nucleotide substitutions and changes in the length of these microRNAs alter their expression as well as the repertoires of target genes and regulatory networks. We suggest that the studied molecular changes could have modified crucial microRNA functions shaping phenotypes that, ultimately, became human-specific. Our work provides a frame to study the impact that regulatory changes may have in the recent evolution of our species. PMID:27105073

  8. eulerAPE: Drawing Area-Proportional 3-Venn Diagrams Using Ellipses

    PubMed Central

    Micallef, Luana; Rodgers, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Venn diagrams with three curves are used extensively in various medical and scientific disciplines to visualize relationships between data sets and facilitate data analysis. The area of the regions formed by the overlapping curves is often directly proportional to the cardinality of the depicted set relation or any other related quantitative data. Drawing these diagrams manually is difficult and current automatic drawing methods do not always produce appropriate diagrams. Most methods depict the data sets as circles, as they perceptually pop out as complete distinct objects due to their smoothness and regularity. However, circles cannot draw accurate diagrams for most 3-set data and so the generated diagrams often have misleading region areas. Other methods use polygons to draw accurate diagrams. However, polygons are non-smooth and non-symmetric, so the curves are not easily distinguishable and the diagrams are difficult to comprehend. Ellipses are more flexible than circles and are similarly smooth, but none of the current automatic drawing methods use ellipses. We present eulerAPE as the first method and software that uses ellipses for automatically drawing accurate area-proportional Venn diagrams for 3-set data. We describe the drawing method adopted by eulerAPE and we discuss our evaluation of the effectiveness of eulerAPE and ellipses for drawing random 3-set data. We compare eulerAPE and various other methods that are currently available and we discuss differences between their generated diagrams in terms of accuracy and ease of understanding for real world data. PMID:25032825

  9. Lineage-Specific Changes in Biomarkers in Great Apes and Humans.

    PubMed

    Ronke, Claudius; Dannemann, Michael; Halbwax, Michel; Fischer, Anne; Helmschrodt, Christin; Brügel, Mathias; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Scholz, Markus; Ceglarek, Uta; Thiery, Joachim; Pääbo, Svante; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Although human biomedical and physiological information is readily available, such information for great apes is limited. We analyzed clinical chemical biomarkers in serum samples from 277 wild- and captive-born great apes and from 312 healthy human volunteers as well as from 20 rhesus macaques. For each individual, we determined a maximum of 33 markers of heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and pancreas function, hemoglobin and lipid metabolism and one marker of inflammation. We identified biomarkers that show differences between humans and the great apes in their average level or activity. Using the rhesus macaques as an outgroup, we identified human-specific differences in the levels of bilirubin, cholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase, and bonobo-specific differences in the level of apolipoprotein A-I. For the remaining twenty-nine biomarkers there was no evidence for lineage-specific differences. In fact, we find that many biomarkers show differences between individuals of the same species in different environments. Of the four lineage-specific biomarkers, only bilirubin showed no differences between wild- and captive-born great apes. We show that the major factor explaining the human-specific difference in bilirubin levels may be genetic. There are human-specific changes in the sequence of the promoter and the protein-coding sequence of uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase 1 (UGT1A1), the enzyme that transforms bilirubin and toxic plant compounds into water-soluble, excretable metabolites. Experimental evidence that UGT1A1 is down-regulated in the human liver suggests that changes in the promoter may be responsible for the human-specific increase in bilirubin. We speculate that since cooking reduces toxic plant compounds, consumption of cooked foods, which is specific to humans, may have resulted in relaxed constraint on UGT1A1 which has in turn led to higher serum levels of bilirubin in humans. PMID:26247603

  10. Humans and Great Apes Cohabiting the Forest Ecosystem in Central African Republic Harbour the Same Hookworms

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Modrý, David; Kitagawa, Masahiro; Shutt, Kathryn A.; Todd, Angelique; Kalousová, Barbora; Profousová, Ilona; Petrželková, Klára J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hookworms are important pathogens of humans. To date, Necator americanus is the sole, known species of the genus Necator infecting humans. In contrast, several Necator species have been described in African great apes and other primates. It has not yet been determined whether primate-originating Necator species are also parasitic in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings The infective larvae of Necator spp. were developed using modified Harada-Mori filter-paper cultures from faeces of humans and great apes inhabiting Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic. The first and second internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA and partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of mtDNA obtained from the hookworm larvae were sequenced and compared. Three sequence types (I–III) were recognized in the ITS region, and 34 cox1 haplotypes represented three phylogenetic groups (A–C). The combinations determined were I-A, II-B, II-C, III-B and III-C. Combination I-A, corresponding to N. americanus, was demonstrated in humans and western lowland gorillas; II-B and II-C were observed in humans, western lowland gorillas and chimpanzees; III-B and III-C were found only in humans. Pairwise nucleotide difference in the cox1 haplotypes between the groups was more than 8%, while the difference within each group was less than 2.1%. Conclusions/Significance The distinctness of ITS sequence variants and high number of pairwise nucleotide differences among cox1 variants indicate the possible presence of several species of Necator in both humans and great apes. We conclude that Necator hookworms are shared by humans and great apes co-habiting the same tropical forest ecosystems. PMID:24651493

  11. Lineage-Specific Changes in Biomarkers in Great Apes and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ronke, Claudius; Dannemann, Michael; Halbwax, Michel; Fischer, Anne; Helmschrodt, Christin; Brügel, Mathias; André, Claudine; Atencia, Rebeca; Mugisha, Lawrence; Scholz, Markus; Ceglarek, Uta; Thiery, Joachim; Pääbo, Svante; Prüfer, Kay; Kelso, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Although human biomedical and physiological information is readily available, such information for great apes is limited. We analyzed clinical chemical biomarkers in serum samples from 277 wild- and captive-born great apes and from 312 healthy human volunteers as well as from 20 rhesus macaques. For each individual, we determined a maximum of 33 markers of heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and pancreas function, hemoglobin and lipid metabolism and one marker of inflammation. We identified biomarkers that show differences between humans and the great apes in their average level or activity. Using the rhesus macaques as an outgroup, we identified human-specific differences in the levels of bilirubin, cholinesterase and lactate dehydrogenase, and bonobo-specific differences in the level of apolipoprotein A-I. For the remaining twenty-nine biomarkers there was no evidence for lineage-specific differences. In fact, we find that many biomarkers show differences between individuals of the same species in different environments. Of the four lineage-specific biomarkers, only bilirubin showed no differences between wild- and captive-born great apes. We show that the major factor explaining the human-specific difference in bilirubin levels may be genetic. There are human-specific changes in the sequence of the promoter and the protein-coding sequence of uridine diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase 1 (UGT1A1), the enzyme that transforms bilirubin and toxic plant compounds into water-soluble, excretable metabolites. Experimental evidence that UGT1A1 is down-regulated in the human liver suggests that changes in the promoter may be responsible for the human-specific increase in bilirubin. We speculate that since cooking reduces toxic plant compounds, consumption of cooked foods, which is specific to humans, may have resulted in relaxed constraint on UGT1A1 which has in turn led to higher serum levels of bilirubin in humans. PMID:26247603

  12. Toward granting linguistic competence to apes: A review of Savage-Rumbaugh et al.'s Language Comprehension in Ape and Child1

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, Mark L.

    1996-01-01

    Savage-Rumbaugh et al.'s (1993) monograph describes a study that compared the language comprehension of an 8-year-old ape (a bonobo named Kanzi) with that of a normal 2-year-old human (Alia). The primary purpose of the research was to see if Kanzi could comprehend novel and compound spoken English commands without imitative prompts, contrived reinforcement contingencies, or explicit training procedures. As it turned out, Kanzi acquired a complex comprehension repertoire in a pattern similar to the human child's and even performed better than the human child in many cases. Although this review describes these empirical results favorably, it questions the authors' claim that the subjects learned the repertoire on their own, without reinforcement or training. A close examination of the subjects' histories and of the procedures, transcripts, and videos suggested that the training and testing procedures involved a number of independent variables and processes that were not discussed by the authors, including conditioned reinforcement and punishment, verbal prompts, stimulus control, establishing operations, and extinction. Nonetheless, the methodological and empirical contributions to ape and human language research are substantial and deserve behavior analysts' attention and support. Behavior analysts could contribute to this kind of research by applying the analytic and conceptual tools of behavior analysis in general and the concepts from Verbal Behavior (Skinner, 1957) in particular.

  13. Functional characterization of Ape1 variants identified in the human population

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Masood Z.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Mohrenweiser, Harvey W.; Wilson, David M.

    2000-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are common mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions. Ape1 is the major human repair enzyme for abasic sites and incises the phosphodiester backbone 5′ to the lesion to initiate a cascade of events aimed at removing the AP moiety and maintaining genetic integrity. Through resequencing of genomic DNA from 128 unrelated individuals, and searching published reports and sequence databases, seven amino acid substitution variants were identified in the repair domain of human Ape1. Functional characterization revealed that three of the variants, L104R, E126D and R237A, exhibited ∼40–60% reductions in specific incision activity. A fourth variant, D283G, is similar to the previously characterized mutant D283A found to exhibit ∼10% repair capacity. The most common substitution (D148E; observed at an allele frequency of 0.38) had no impact on endonuclease and DNA binding activities, nor did a G306A substitution. A G241R variant showed slightly enhanced endonuclease activity relative to wild-type. In total, four of seven substitutions in the repair domain of Ape1 imparted reduced function. These reduced function variants may represent low penetrance human polymorphisms that associate with increased disease susceptibility. PMID:11024165

  14. Evolutionary tree for apes and humans based on cleavage maps of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, S D; Wilson, A C; Brown, W M

    1981-01-01

    The high rate of evolution of mitochondrial DNA makes this molecule suitable for genealogical research on such closely related species as humans and apes. Because previous approaches failed to establish the branching order of the lineages leading to humans, gorillas, and chimpanzees, we compared human mitochondrial DNA to mitochondrial DNA from five species of ape (common chimpanzee, pygmy chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and gibbon). About 50 restriction endonuclease cleavage sites were mapped in each mitochondrial DNA, and the six maps were aligned with respect to 11 invariant positions. Differences among the maps were evident at 121 positions. Both conserved and variable sites are widely dispersed in the mitochondrial genome. Besides site differences, ascribed to point mutations, there is evidence for one rearrangement: the gorilla map is shorter than the other owing to the deletion of 95 base pairs near the origin of replication. The parsimony method of deriving all six maps from a common ancestor produced a genealogical tree in which the common and pygmy chimpanzee maps are the most closely related pair; the closest relative of this pair is the gorilla map; most closely related to this trio is the human map. This tree is only slightly more parsimonious than some alternative trees. Although this study has given a magnified view of the genetic differences among humans and apes, the possibility of a three-way split among the lineages leading to humans, gorillas, and chimpanzees still deserves serious consideration. Images PMID:6264476

  15. Gestural and symbolic development among apes and humans: support for a multimodal theory of language evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie-Lynch, Kristen; Greenfield, Patricia M.; Lyn, Heidi; Savage-Rumbaugh, Sue

    2014-01-01

    What are the implications of similarities and differences in the gestural and symbolic development of apes and humans?This focused review uses as a starting point our recent study that provided evidence that gesture supported the symbolic development of a chimpanzee, a bonobo, and a human child reared in language-enriched environments at comparable stages of communicative development. These three species constitute a complete clade, species possessing a common immediate ancestor. Communicative behaviors observed among all species in a clade are likely to have been present in the common ancestor. Similarities in the form and function of many gestures produced by the chimpanzee, bonobo, and human child suggest that shared non-verbal skills may underlie shared symbolic capacities. Indeed, an ontogenetic sequence from gesture to symbol was present across the clade but more pronounced in child than ape. Multimodal expressions of communicative intent (e.g., vocalization plus persistence or eye-contact) were normative for the child, but less common for the apes. These findings suggest that increasing multimodal expression of communicative intent may have supported the emergence of language among the ancestors of humans. Therefore, this focused review includes new studies, since our 2013 article, that support a multimodal theory of language evolution. PMID:25400607

  16. Disproportionate Cochlear Length in Genus Homo Shows a High Phylogenetic Signal during Apes' Hearing Evolution.

    PubMed

    Braga, J; Loubes, J-M; Descouens, D; Dumoncel, J; Thackeray, J F; Kahn, J-L; de Beer, F; Riberon, A; Hoffman, K; Balaresque, P; Gilissen, E

    2015-01-01

    Changes in lifestyles and body weight affected mammal life-history evolution but little is known about how they shaped species' sensory systems. Since auditory sensitivity impacts communication tasks and environmental acoustic awareness, it may have represented a deciding factor during mammal evolution, including apes. Here, we statistically measure the influence of phylogeny and allometry on the variation of five cochlear morphological features associated with hearing capacities across 22 living and 5 fossil catarrhine species. We find high phylogenetic signals for absolute and relative cochlear length only. Comparisons between fossil cochleae and reconstructed ape ancestral morphotypes show that Australopithecus absolute and relative cochlear lengths are explicable by phylogeny and concordant with the hypothetized ((Pan,Homo),Gorilla) and (Pan,Homo) most recent common ancestors. Conversely, deviations of the Paranthropus oval window area from these most recent common ancestors are not explicable by phylogeny and body weight alone, but suggest instead rapid evolutionary changes (directional selection) of its hearing organ. Premodern (Homo erectus) and modern human cochleae set apart from living non-human catarrhines and australopiths. They show cochlear relative lengths and oval window areas larger than expected for their body mass, two features corresponding to increased low-frequency sensitivity more recent than 2 million years ago. The uniqueness of the "hypertrophied" cochlea in the genus Homo (as opposed to the australopiths) and the significantly high phylogenetic signal of this organ among apes indicate its usefulness to identify homologies and monophyletic groups in the hominid fossil record. PMID:26083484

  17. Genetic Differences Between Humans and Great Apes -- Implications for the Evolution of Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varki, Ajit

    2004-06-01

    At the level of individual protein sequences, humans are 97-100% identical to the great apes, our closest evolutionary relatives. The evolution of humans (and of human intelligence) from a common ancestor with the chimpanzee and bonobo involved many steps, influenced by interactions amongst factors of genetic, developmental, ecological, microbial, climatic, behavioral, cultural and social origin. The genetic factors can be approached by direct comparisons of human and great ape genomes, genes and gene products, and by elucidating biochemical and biological consequences of any differences found. We have discovered multiple genetic and biochemical differences between humans and great apes, particularly with respect to a family of cell surface molecules called sialic acids, as well as in the metabolism of thyroid hormones. The hormone differences have potential consequences for human brain development. The differences in sialic acid biology have multiple implications for the human condition, ranging from susceptibility or resistance to microbial pathogens, effects on endogenous receptors in the immune system, and potential effects on placental signaling, expression of oncofetal antigens in cancers, consequences of dietary intake of animal foods, and development of the mammalian brain.

  18. Great Apes and Biodiversity Offset Projects in Africa: The Case for National Offset Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kormos, Rebecca; Kormos, Cyril F.; Humle, Tatyana; Lanjouw, Annette; Rainer, Helga; Victurine, Ray; Mittermeier, Russell A.; Diallo, Mamadou S.; Rylands, Anthony B.; Williamson, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    The development and private sectors are increasingly considering “biodiversity offsets” as a strategy to compensate for their negative impacts on biodiversity, including impacts on great apes and their habitats in Africa. In the absence of national offset policies in sub-Saharan Africa, offset design and implementation are guided by company internal standards, lending bank standards or international best practice principles. We examine four projects in Africa that are seeking to compensate for their negative impacts on great ape populations. Our assessment of these projects reveals that not all apply or implement best practices, and that there is little standardization in the methods used to measure losses and gains in species numbers. Even if they were to follow currently accepted best-practice principles, we find that these actions may still fail to contribute to conservation objectives over the long term. We advocate for an alternative approach in which biodiversity offset and compensation projects are designed and implemented as part of a National Offset Strategy that (1) takes into account the cumulative impacts of development in individual countries, (2) identifies priority offset sites, (3) promotes aggregated offsets, and (4) integrates biodiversity offset and compensation projects with national biodiversity conservation objectives. We also propose supplementary principles necessary for biodiversity offsets to contribute to great ape conservation in Africa. Caution should still be exercised, however, with regard to offsets until further field-based evidence of their effectiveness is available. PMID:25372894

  19. Skeletal development of hallucal tarsometatarsal joint curvature and angulation in extant apes and modern humans.

    PubMed

    Gill, Corey M; Bredella, Miriam A; DeSilva, Jeremy M

    2015-11-01

    The medial cuneiform, namely the curvature and angulation of its distal facet with metatarsal 1, is crucial as a stabilizer in bipedal locomotion and an axis upon which the great toe medially deviates during arboreal locomotion in extant apes. Previous work has shown that facet curvature and angulation in adult dry-bone specimens can distinguish African apes from Homo, and can even distinguish among species of Gorilla. This study provides the first ontogenetic assessment of medial cuneiform curvature and angulation in juvenile (n = 68) and adult specimens (n = 102) using computed tomography in humans and extant ape specimens, including Pongo. Our data find that modern human juveniles initially have a convex and slightly medially oriented osseous surface of the developing medial cuneiform distal facet that flattens and becomes more distally oriented with age. The same pattern (though of a different magnitude) occurs developmentally in the chimpanzee medial cuneiform, but not in Gorilla or Pongo, whose medial cuneiform facet angulation remains unchanged ontogenetically. These data suggest that the medial cuneiform ossifies in a distinguishable pattern between Pongo, Gorilla, Pan, and Homo, which may in part be due to subtle differences in the loading environment at the hallucal tarsometatarsal joint-a finding that has important implications for interpreting fossil medial cuneiforms. PMID:26319411

  20. Great apes and biodiversity offset projects in Africa: the case for national offset strategies.

    PubMed

    Kormos, Rebecca; Kormos, Cyril F; Humle, Tatyana; Lanjouw, Annette; Rainer, Helga; Victurine, Ray; Mittermeier, Russell A; Diallo, Mamadou S; Rylands, Anthony B; Williamson, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    The development and private sectors are increasingly considering "biodiversity offsets" as a strategy to compensate for their negative impacts on biodiversity, including impacts on great apes and their habitats in Africa. In the absence of national offset policies in sub-Saharan Africa, offset design and implementation are guided by company internal standards, lending bank standards or international best practice principles. We examine four projects in Africa that are seeking to compensate for their negative impacts on great ape populations. Our assessment of these projects reveals that not all apply or implement best practices, and that there is little standardization in the methods used to measure losses and gains in species numbers. Even if they were to follow currently accepted best-practice principles, we find that these actions may still fail to contribute to conservation objectives over the long term. We advocate for an alternative approach in which biodiversity offset and compensation projects are designed and implemented as part of a National Offset Strategy that (1) takes into account the cumulative impacts of development in individual countries, (2) identifies priority offset sites, (3) promotes aggregated offsets, and (4) integrates biodiversity offset and compensation projects with national biodiversity conservation objectives. We also propose supplementary principles necessary for biodiversity offsets to contribute to great ape conservation in Africa. Caution should still be exercised, however, with regard to offsets until further field-based evidence of their effectiveness is available. PMID:25372894

  1. Gestural and symbolic development among apes and humans: support for a multimodal theory of language evolution.

    PubMed

    Gillespie-Lynch, Kristen; Greenfield, Patricia M; Lyn, Heidi; Savage-Rumbaugh, Sue

    2014-01-01

    What are the implications of similarities and differences in the gestural and symbolic development of apes and humans?This focused review uses as a starting point our recent study that provided evidence that gesture supported the symbolic development of a chimpanzee, a bonobo, and a human child reared in language-enriched environments at comparable stages of communicative development. These three species constitute a complete clade, species possessing a common immediate ancestor. Communicative behaviors observed among all species in a clade are likely to have been present in the common ancestor. Similarities in the form and function of many gestures produced by the chimpanzee, bonobo, and human child suggest that shared non-verbal skills may underlie shared symbolic capacities. Indeed, an ontogenetic sequence from gesture to symbol was present across the clade but more pronounced in child than ape. Multimodal expressions of communicative intent (e.g., vocalization plus persistence or eye-contact) were normative for the child, but less common for the apes. These findings suggest that increasing multimodal expression of communicative intent may have supported the emergence of language among the ancestors of humans. Therefore, this focused review includes new studies, since our 2013 article, that support a multimodal theory of language evolution. PMID:25400607

  2. Unique genomic sequences in human chromosome 16p are conserved in the great apes.

    PubMed

    Tarzami, S T; Kringstein, A M; Conte, R A; Verma, R S

    1997-01-27

    In humans, acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMML) with abnormal bone marrow eosinophilia is diagnosed by the presence of a pericentric inversion in chromosome 16, involving breakpoints p13;q23 [i.e., inv(16)(p13;q23)]. A pericentric inversion involves breaks that have occurred on the p and q arms and the segment in between is rotated 180 degrees and reattaches. The recent development of a "human micro-coatasome" painting probe for 16p contains unique DNA sequences that fluorescently label only the short arm of chromosome 16, which facilitates the identification of such inversions and represents an ideal tool for analyzing the "divergence/convergence" of the equivalent human chromosome 16 (PTR 18, GGO 17 and PPY 19) in the great apes, chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan. When the probe is used on the type of pericentric inversion characteristic of AMML, signals are observed on the proximal portions (the regions closest to the centromere) of the long and short arms of chromosome 16. The probe hybridized to only the short arm of all three ape chromosomes and signals were not observed on the long arms, suggesting that a pericentric inversion similar to that seen in AMML has not occurred in any of these great apes. PMID:9037113

  3. Differential resource utilization by extant great apes and australopithecines: towards solving the C4 conundrum.

    PubMed

    Sponheimer, Matt; Lee-Thorp, Julia A

    2003-09-01

    Morphological and biogeochemical evidence suggest that australopithecines had diets markedly different from those of extant great apes. Stable carbon isotope analysis, for example, has shown that significant amounts of the carbon consumed by australopithecines were derived from C(4) photosynthesis in plants. This means that australopithecines were eating large quantities of C(4) plants such as tropical grasses and sedges, or were eating animals that were themselves eating C(4) plants. In contrast, there is no evidence that modern apes consume appreciable amounts of any of these foods, even in the most arid extents of their ranges where these foods are most prevalent. Environmental reconstructions of early australopithecine environments overlap with modern chimpanzee habitats. This, in conjunction with the stable isotope evidence, suggests that australopithecines and great apes, even in similar environments, would utilize available resources differently. Thus, the desire or capacity to use C(4) foods may be a basal character of our lineage. We do not know, however, which of the nutritionally disparate C(4) foods were utilized by hominids. Here we discuss which C(4) resources were most likely consumed by australopithecines, as well as the potential nutritional, physiological, and social consequences of eating these foods. PMID:14527627

  4. Upregulation of PD-L1 and APE1 is associated with tumorigenesis and poor prognosis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qing, Yi; Li, Qing; Ren, Tao; Xia, Wei; Peng, Yu; Liu, Gao-Lei; Luo, Hao; Yang, Yu-Xin; Dai, Xiao-Yan; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastric cancer is a fatal malignancy with a rising incidence rate. Effective methods for early diagnosis, monitoring metastasis, and prognosis are currently unavailable for gastric cancer. In this study, we examined the association of programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) expression with the prognosis of gastric cancer. Methods The expressions of PD-L1 and APE1 were detected by immunohistochemistry in 107 cases of human gastric carcinoma. The correlation of PD-L1 and APE1 expression with the clinicopathologic features of gastric carcinoma was analyzed by SPSS version 19.0. Results The positive expression rates of PD-L1 and APE1 in gastric cancer tissues were 50.5% (54/107) and 86.9% (93/107), respectively. PD-L1 and APE1 positive expressions were significantly associated with depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, pathological type, overall survival, and higher T stage. Furthermore, the expression of PD-L1 in highly differentiated gastric cancers was higher than that in poorly differentiated cancers (P=0.008). Moreover, the expression of APE1 and PD-L1 in gastric cancers was positively correlated (r=0.336, P<0.01). Multivariate analysis showed that the depth of invasion was a significant prognostic factor (risk ratio 19.91; P=0.000), but there was no significant relationship with PD-L1, APE1, prognosis, and other characteristics. Conclusion The deregulation of PD-L1 and APE1 might contribute to the development and the poor prognosis of gastric cancer. Our findings suggest that high expression of PD-L1 and APE1 is a risk factor of gastric cancer and a new biomarker to predict the prognosis of gastric cancer. Furthermore, our findings suggest that targeting the PD-L1 and APE1 signaling pathways may be a new strategy for cancer immune therapy and targeted therapy for gastric cancer, especially in patients with deep invasion and lymph node metastasis. PMID:25733810

  5. Reconsidering great ape imitation and pantomime. Comment on "Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: framing the language-ready brain" by Michael A. Arbib

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russon, Anne E.

    2016-03-01

    Like previous commentators, I see Arbib's reconstruction of the mirror neuron system's contribution to language evolution [1] as valuable but in need of revision [2,3]. My concerns focus on his proposed behavioral pathway to language - complex imitation to pantomime to protosign - as it concerns great apes. Arbib portrays these abilities as unique to the human lineage, despite evidence that great apes are capable of all three. I suggest great ape findings worth reconsidering.

  6. Gravity and solidity in four great ape species (Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus, Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus): vertical and horizontal variations of the table task.

    PubMed

    Cacchione, Trix; Call, Josep; Zingg, Robert

    2009-05-01

    Three experiments modeled after infant studies were run on four great ape species (Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus, Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus) to investigate their reasoning about solidity and gravity constraints. The aims were: (a) to find out if great apes are subject to gravity biased search or display sensitivity for object solidity, (b) to check for species differences, and (c) to assess if a gravity hypothesis or more parsimonious explanations best account for failures observed. Results indicate that great apes, unlike monkeys, show no reliable gravity bias, that ape species slightly differ in terms of their performance, and that the errors made are best explained by a gravity account. PMID:19450024

  7. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (Ape1/Ref-1) is essential for IL-21-induced signal transduction through ERK1/2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Juliana, Farha M.; Nara, Hidetoshi; Onoda, Tadashi; Rahman, Mizanur; Araki, Akemi; Jin, Lianjin; Fujii, Hodaka; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Hoshino, Tomoaki; Asao, Hironobu

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IL-21 induces nuclear accumulation of Ape1/Ref-1 protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ape1/Ref-1 is indispensable in IL-21-induced cell proliferation and survival signal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ape1/Ref-1 is required for IL-21-induced ERK1/2 activation. -- Abstract: IL-21 is a pleiotropic cytokine that regulates T-cell and B-cell differentiation, NK-cell activation, and dendritic cell functions. IL-21 activates the JAK-STAT, ERK, and PI3K pathways. We report here that Ape1/Ref-1 has an essential role in IL-21-induced cell growth signal transduction. Overexpression of Ape1/Ref-1 enhances IL-21-induced cell proliferation, but it is suppressed by overexpressing an N-terminal deletion mutant of Ape1/Ref-1 that lacks the redox domain. Furthermore, knockdown of the Ape1/Ref-1 mRNA dramatically compromises IL-21-induced ERK1/2 activation and cell proliferation with increasing cell death. These impaired activities are recovered by the re-expression of Ape1/Ref-1 in the knockdown cells. Our findings are the first demonstration that Ape1/Ref-1 is an indispensable molecule for the IL-21-mediated signal transduction through ERK1/2 activation.

  8. Identification of differences in human and great ape phytanic acid metabolism that could influence gene expression profiles and physiological functions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that anatomical differences in human and great ape guts arose in response to species-specific diets and energy demands. To investigate functional genomic consequences of these differences, we compared their physiological levels of phytanic acid, a branched chain fatty acid that can be derived from the microbial degradation of chlorophyll in ruminant guts. Humans who accumulate large stores of phytanic acid commonly develop cerebellar ataxia, peripheral polyneuropathy, and retinitis pigmentosa in addition to other medical conditions. Furthermore, phytanic acid is an activator of the PPAR-alpha transcription factor that influences the expression of genes relevant to lipid metabolism. Results Despite their trace dietary phytanic acid intake, all great ape species had elevated red blood cell (RBC) phytanic acid levels relative to humans on diverse diets. Unlike humans, chimpanzees showed sexual dimorphism in RBC phytanic acid levels, which were higher in males relative to females. Cultured skin fibroblasts from all species had a robust capacity to degrade phytanic acid. We provide indirect evidence that great apes, in contrast to humans, derive significant amounts of phytanic acid from the hindgut fermentation of plant materials. This would represent a novel reduction of metabolic activity in humans relative to the great apes. Conclusion We identified differences in the physiological levels of phytanic acid in humans and great apes and propose this is causally related to their gut anatomies and microbiomes. Phytanic acid levels could contribute to cross-species and sex-specific differences in human and great ape transcriptomes, especially those related to lipid metabolism. Based on the medical conditions caused by phytanic acid accumulation, we suggest that differences in phytanic acid metabolism could influence the functions of human and great ape nervous, cardiovascular, and skeletal systems. PMID:20932325

  9. Secreted APE1/Ref-1 inhibits TNF-α-stimulated endothelial inflammation via thiol-disulfide exchange in TNF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Myoung Soo; Choi, Sunga; Lee, Yu Ran; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Kang, Gun; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Kim, Soo Jin; Lee, Sang Do; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein with redox activity and is proved to be secreted from stimulated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functions of extracellular APE1/Ref-1 with respect to leading anti-inflammatory signaling in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells in response to acetylation. Treatment of TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells with an inhibitor of deacetylase that causes intracellular acetylation, considerably suppressed vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). During TSA-mediated acetylation in culture, a time-dependent increase in secreted APE1/Ref-1 was confirmed. The acetyl moiety of acetylated-APE1/Ref-1 was rapidly removed based on the removal kinetics. Additionally, recombinant human (rh) APE1/Ref-1 with reducing activity induced a conformational change in rh TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) by thiol-disulfide exchange. Following treatment with the neutralizing anti-APE1/Ref-1 antibody, inflammatory signals via the binding of TNF-α to TNFR1 were remarkably recovered, leading to up-regulation of reactive oxygen species generation and VCAM-1, in accordance with the activation of p66shc and p38 MAPK. These results strongly indicate that anti-inflammatory effects in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells by acetylation are tightly linked to secreted APE1/Ref-1, which inhibits TNF-α binding to TNFR1 by reductive conformational change, with suggestion as an endogenous inhibitor of vascular inflammation. PMID:26964514

  10. Processing of abasic site damaged lesions by APE1 enzyme on DNA adsorbed over normal and organomodified clay.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Bhavini; Banerjee, Shib Shankar; Singh, Vandana; Das, Prolay; Bhowmick, Anil K

    2014-10-01

    The efficiency of the apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1) DNA repair enzyme in the processing of abasic site DNA damage lesions at precise location in DNA oligomer duplexes that are adsorbed on clay surfaces was evaluated. Three different forms of clay namely montmorillonite, quaternary ammonium salt modified montmorillonite and its boiled counterpart i.e. partially devoid of organic moiety were used for a comparative study of adsorption, desorption and DNA repair efficiency on their surfaces. The interaction between the DNA and the clay was analysed by X-ray diffraction, Atomic force microscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and Infrared spectroscopy. The abasic site cleavage efficiency of APE1 enzyme was quantitatively evaluated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Apart from the difference in the DNA adsorption or desorption capacity of the various forms of clay, substantial variation in the repair efficiency of abasic sites initiated by the APE1 enzyme on the clay surfaces was observed. The incision efficiency of APE1 enzyme at abasic sites was found to be greatly diminished, when the DNA was adsorbed over organomodified montmorillonite. The reduced repair activity indicates an important role of the pendant surfactant groups on the clay surfaces in directing APE1 mediated cleavage of abasic site DNA damage lesions. PMID:25048946

  11. Analysis of the human and ape foot during bipedal standing with implications for the evolution of the foot.

    PubMed

    Wang, W J; Crompton, R H

    2004-12-01

    The ratio of the power arm (the distance from the heel to the talocrural joint) to the load arm (that from the talocrural joint to the distal head of the metatarsals), or RPL, differs markedly between the human and ape foot. The arches are relatively higher in the human foot in comparison with those in apes. This study evaluates the effect of these two differences on biomechanical effectiveness during bipedal standing, estimating the forces acting across the talocrural and tarsometatarsal joints, and attempts to identify which type of foot is optimal for bipedal standing. A simple model of the foot musculoskeletal system was built to represent the geometric and force relationships in the foot during bipedal standing, and measurements for a variety of human and ape feet applied. The results show that: (1) an RPL of around 40% (as is the case in the human foot) minimizes required muscle force at the talocrural joint; (2) the presence of an high arch in the human foot reduces forces in the plantar musculature and aponeurosis; and (3) the human foot has a lower total of force in joints and muscles than do the ape feet. These results indicate that the proportions of the human foot, and the height of the medial arch are indeed better optimized for bipedal standing than those of apes, further suggesting that their current state is to some extent the product of positive selection for enhanced bipedal standing during the evolution of the foot. PMID:15519591

  12. Metacarpal torsion in apes, humans, and early Australopithecus: implications for manipulatory abilities

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human hands, when compared to that of apes, have a series of adaptations to facilitate manipulation. Numerous studies have shown that Australopithecus afarensis and Au. africanus display some of these adaptations, such as a longer thumb relative to the other fingers, asymmetric heads on the second and fifth metacarpals, and orientation of the second metacarpal joints with the trapezium and capitate away from the sagittal plane, while lacking others such as a very mobile fifth metacarpal, a styloid process on the third, and a flatter metacarpo-trapezium articulation, suggesting some adaptation to manipulation but more limited than in humans. This paper explores variation in metacarpal torsion, a trait said to enhance manipulation, in humans, apes, early australopithecines and specimens from Swartkrans. This study shows that humans are different from large apes in torsion of the third and fourth metacarpals. Humans are also characterized by wedge-shaped bases of the third and fourth metacarpals, making the metacarpal-base row very arched mediolaterally and placing the ulnar-most metacarpals in a position that facilitate opposition to the thumb in power or cradle grips. The third and fourth metacarpals of Au. afarensis are very human-like, suggesting that the medial palm was already well adapted for these kinds of grips in that taxon. Au. africanus present a less clear human-like morphology, suggesting, perhaps, that the medial palm was less suited to human-like manipulation in that taxa than in Au. afarensis. Overall, this study supports previous studies on Au. afarensis and Au. africanus that these taxa had derived hand morphology with some adaptation to human-like power and precision grips and support the hypothesis that dexterous hands largely predated Homo. PMID:26500820

  13. Great ape skeletal collections: making the most of scarce and irreplaceable resources in the digital age.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Adam D; Marcus, Emily; Wood, Bernard

    2013-12-01

    Information about primate genomes has re-emphasized the importance of the great apes (Pan, Gorilla, and Pongo) as, for most purposes, the appropriate comparators when generating hypotheses about the most recent common ancestor of the hominins and panins, or the most recent common ancestor of the hominin clade. Great ape skeletal collections are thus an important and irreplaceable resource for researchers conducting these types of comparative analyses, yet the integrity of these collections is threatened by unnecessary use and their availability is threatened by financial pressures on the institutions in which the collections reside. We discuss the general history of great ape skeletal collections, and in order to get a better sense of the utility and potential of these important sources of data we assemble the equivalent of a biography of the Powell-Cotton Collection. We explore the history of how this collection of chimpanzee and gorilla skeletons was accumulated, how it came to be recognized as a potentially important source of comparative information, who has made use of it, and what types of data have been collected. We present a protocol for collecting information about each individual animal (e.g., which bones are preserved, their condition, etc.) and have made that information about the Powell-Cotton Collection freely available in an online relational database (Human Origins Database, www.humanoriginsdatabase.org). As an illustration of the practical application of these data, we developed a tabular summary of ontogenetic information about each individual (see Appendices A and B). Collections like the Powell-Cotton are irreplaceable sources of material regarding the hard-tissue evidence and recent history of the closest living relatives of modern humans. We end this contribution by suggesting ways that curators and the researchers who use and rely on these reference collections could work together to help preserve and protect them so that future generations

  14. Scapular shape of extant hominoids and the African ape/modern human last common ancestor.

    PubMed

    Green, David J; Spiewak, Ted A; Seitelman, Brielle; Gunz, Philipp

    2016-05-01

    Newly discovered early hominin fossil scapulae have bolstered investigations of scapular shape, which have long been used to interpret behavioral variation among primates. However, unexpected similarities between Pongo and Homo - particularly in scapular spine orientation - have raised questions about the functional utility of scapular morphology and its phylogenetic context in the hominin lineage. Not surprisingly, significant disagreement surrounds disparate morphological reconstructions of the modern human/African ape last common ancestor (LCA). Our study utilizes geometric morphometric (GM) approaches - two employing homologous, anatomical landmarks and a "spine-free" alternative using 98 sliding semilandmarks along the boundary of the subscapular fossa. The landmark-based "wireframe" GM analysis principally sorted groups by spine orientation: Homo and Pongo were similar to one another with more transversely-oriented spines as compared to Hylobates and the African apes. In contrast, Homo and Gorilla clustered together in our semilandmark analysis with superoinferiorly broad blades. Pan scapulae were similar, but had more mediolaterally compressed blades and laterally-positioned superior angles. Hylobates was superoinferiorly narrow, yet obliquely expanded relative to the vertebral border. Pongo scapulae were unique among hominoids in being nearly as broad as they were long. Previously documented 'convergence' of Homo and Pongo scapulae appears to be principally driven by similarities in spine orientation, rather than overall blade shape. Therefore, we contend that it is more parsimonious to reconstruct the African ape/Homo LCA scapula as being Gorilla-like, especially in light of similar characterizations of certain fossil hominin scapulae. Accordingly, the evolution of Pan (highly oblique spine and laterally-situated superior angle) and Homo (transversely-oriented spine) scapular morphology would have involved relatively minor shifts from this ancestral

  15. Metacarpal torsion in apes, humans, and early Australopithecus: implications for manipulatory abilities.

    PubMed

    Drapeau, Michelle S M

    2015-01-01

    Human hands, when compared to that of apes, have a series of adaptations to facilitate manipulation. Numerous studies have shown that Australopithecus afarensis and Au. africanus display some of these adaptations, such as a longer thumb relative to the other fingers, asymmetric heads on the second and fifth metacarpals, and orientation of the second metacarpal joints with the trapezium and capitate away from the sagittal plane, while lacking others such as a very mobile fifth metacarpal, a styloid process on the third, and a flatter metacarpo-trapezium articulation, suggesting some adaptation to manipulation but more limited than in humans. This paper explores variation in metacarpal torsion, a trait said to enhance manipulation, in humans, apes, early australopithecines and specimens from Swartkrans. This study shows that humans are different from large apes in torsion of the third and fourth metacarpals. Humans are also characterized by wedge-shaped bases of the third and fourth metacarpals, making the metacarpal-base row very arched mediolaterally and placing the ulnar-most metacarpals in a position that facilitate opposition to the thumb in power or cradle grips. The third and fourth metacarpals of Au. afarensis are very human-like, suggesting that the medial palm was already well adapted for these kinds of grips in that taxon. Au. africanus present a less clear human-like morphology, suggesting, perhaps, that the medial palm was less suited to human-like manipulation in that taxa than in Au. afarensis. Overall, this study supports previous studies on Au. afarensis and Au. africanus that these taxa had derived hand morphology with some adaptation to human-like power and precision grips and support the hypothesis that dexterous hands largely predated Homo. PMID:26500820

  16. Old world monkeys compare to apes in the primate cognition test battery.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Vanessa; Pankau, Birte; Fischer, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of intelligence rests on comparative analyses of brain sizes as well as the assessment of cognitive skills of different species in relation to potential selective pressures such as environmental conditions and social organization. Because of the strong interest in human cognition, much previous work has focused on the comparison of the cognitive skills of human toddlers to those of our closest living relatives, i.e. apes. Such analyses revealed that apes and children have relatively similar competencies in the physical domain, while human children excel in the socio-cognitive domain; in particular in terms of attention sharing, cooperation, and mental state attribution. To develop a full understanding of the evolutionary dynamics of primate intelligence, however, comparative data for monkeys are needed. We tested 18 Old World monkeys (long-tailed macaques and olive baboons) in the so-called Primate Cognition Test Battery (PCTB) (Herrmann et al. 2007, Science). Surprisingly, our tests revealed largely comparable results between Old World monkeys and the Great apes. Single comparisons showed that chimpanzees performed only better than the macaques in experiments on spatial understanding and tool use, but in none of the socio-cognitive tasks. These results question the clear-cut relationship between cognitive performance and brain size and--prima facie--support the view of an accelerated evolution of social intelligence in humans. One limitation, however, is that the initial experiments were devised to tap into human specific skills in the first place, thus potentially underestimating both true nonhuman primate competencies as well as species differences. PMID:22485130

  17. Comparative psychology and the great apes - Their competence in learning, language, and numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of comparative studies conducted for the past three decades is presented. These studies have led to the establishment of the Language Research Center that provides facilities for research into questions of primate behavior and cognition. Several experiments conducted among chimpanzees are discussed and comparative analyses with the lesser apes, monkeys, and humans are offered. Among the primates, brain complexity varies widely and the evidence is strong that encephalization and enhanced brain complexity facilitate the learning of concepts, the transfer of learning to an advantage, and mediational and observational learning.

  18. Opal phytoliths found on the teeth of the extinct ape Gigantopithecus blacki: implications for paleodietary studies.

    PubMed Central

    Ciochon, R L; Piperno, D R; Thompson, R G

    1990-01-01

    Identification of opal phytoliths bonded to the enamel surface of the teeth of Gigantopithecus blacki indicates that this extinct ape had a varied diet of grasses and fruits. By using the scanning electron microscope at magnifications of 2000-6000x specific opal phytoliths were observed and photographed on the fossilized teeth of an extinct species. Since opal phytoliths represent the inorganic remains of once-living plant cells, their documentation on the teeth of Gigantopithecus introduces a promising technique for the determination of diet in extinct mammalian species which should find numerous applications in the field of paleoanthropology as well as vertebrate paleontology. Images PMID:2236026

  19. Opal phytoliths found on the teeth of the extinct ape Gigantopithecus blacki: implications for paleodietary studies.

    PubMed

    Ciochon, R L; Piperno, D R; Thompson, R G

    1990-10-01

    Identification of opal phytoliths bonded to the enamel surface of the teeth of Gigantopithecus blacki indicates that this extinct ape had a varied diet of grasses and fruits. By using the scanning electron microscope at magnifications of 2000-6000x specific opal phytoliths were observed and photographed on the fossilized teeth of an extinct species. Since opal phytoliths represent the inorganic remains of once-living plant cells, their documentation on the teeth of Gigantopithecus introduces a promising technique for the determination of diet in extinct mammalian species which should find numerous applications in the field of paleoanthropology as well as vertebrate paleontology. PMID:2236026

  20. Femur ontogeny in humans and great apes: heterochronic implications for hominid évolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardieu, Christine

    1997-12-01

    Did the first hominids have a short developmental period similar to that of the great apes, or a longer period closer to that of modern humans? Some morphological modifications undergone by the human femur during growth are shown to be excellent markers of different developmental stages. The femur of the first hominids ( Australopithecus afarensis) shows only features of infantile growth, whereas characters of both infantile and adolescent growth are typical of later hominids ( Homo). In the first australopithecines the period of peripubertal growth would have still been short. The prolongation of the adolescent period appears to be a characteristic of Homo.

  1. Great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo abelii) follow visual trails to locate hidden food.

    PubMed

    Völter, Christoph J; Call, Josep

    2014-05-01

    Whether nonhuman primates understand causal relations beyond mere associations is still a matter of debate. We presented all four species of nonhuman great apes (N = 36) with a choice between 2 opaque, upside down cups after displacing them out of sight from their starting positions. Crucially, 1 of them had left a yogurt trail behind it. Great apes spontaneously used the trail to select the yogurt baited cup. Follow-up experiments demonstrated that chimpanzees distinguished trails based on the temporal order of cause and effect by ignoring trails that were already present before the reward was hidden. Additionally, chimpanzees did not select cups based on the amount of yogurt near them but instead preferred cups that signaled the endpoint of the trail. We conclude that apes' choices reveal sensitivity to a causal relation between cause (reward) and effect (trail) including their temporal order. PMID:24866009

  2. Diverse Small Molecule Inhibitors of Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease APE1 Identified from a Screen of a Large Public Collection

    PubMed Central

    Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Kim, Daemyung; Vyjayanti, Vaddadi N.; Maloney, David J.; Jadhav, Ajit; Wilson, David M.; Simeonov, Anton

    2012-01-01

    The major human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 plays a pivotal role in the repair of base damage via participation in the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Increased activity of APE1, often observed in tumor cells, is thought to contribute to resistance to various anticancer drugs, whereas down-regulation of APE1 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents. Thus, inhibiting APE1 repair endonuclease function in cancer cells is considered a promising strategy to overcome therapeutic agent resistance. Despite ongoing efforts, inhibitors of APE1 with adequate drug-like properties have yet to be discovered. Using a kinetic fluorescence assay, we conducted a fully-automated high-throughput screen (HTS) of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR), as well as additional public collections, with each compound tested as a 7-concentration series in a 4 µL reaction volume. Actives identified from the screen were subjected to a panel of confirmatory and counterscreen tests. Several active molecules were identified that inhibited APE1 in two independent assay formats and exhibited potentiation of the genotoxic effect of methyl methanesulfonate with a concomitant increase in AP sites, a hallmark of intracellular APE1 inhibition; a number of these chemotypes could be good starting points for further medicinal chemistry optimization. To our knowledge, this represents the largest-scale HTS to identify inhibitors of APE1, and provides a key first step in the development of novel agents targeting BER for cancer treatment. PMID:23110144

  3. New oligonucleotide derivatives as unreactive substrate analogues and potential inhibitors of human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Kupryushkin, Maxim S; Abramova, Tatyana V; Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Miroshnikova, Anastasia D; Stetsenko, Dmitry A; Pyshnyi, Dmitrii V; Fedorova, Olga S

    2016-01-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 is one of the key enzymes of the base excision DNA repair system. The main biological function of APE1 is the hydrolysis of the phosphodiester bond on the 5'-side of an apurinic/apyrimidinic site (AP-site) to give the 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl group. It has long been known that AP-sites have mutagenic and cytotoxic effects and their accumulation in DNA is a potential hazard to the cell lifecycle. The structural and biochemical studies of APE1 are complicated by its high catalytic activity towards the AP-site and its cyclic or acyclic analogues. This work has focussed on the design, synthesis and analysis of oligonucleotide derivatives as potentially unreactive APE1 substrates. We have shown that the replacement of oxygen atoms in the phosphate group on the 5'-side from the AP-site analogue tetrahydrofuran (F) considerably decreases the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of modified oligonucleotides. We have calculated that a N3'-P5' phosphoramidate linkage is hydrolysed about 30 times slower than the native phosphodiester bond while phosphorothioate or primary phosphoramidate linkages are cleaved more than three orders of magnitude slower. The value of IC50 of the oligonucleotide duplex containing a primary phosphoramidate linkage is 2.5 × 10(-7) M, which is in accordance with the APE1 association constant of DNA duplexes containing AP-sites. Thus, it is demonstrated that oligonucleotide duplexes with chemical modifications could be used as unreactive substrates and potential competitive inhibitors of APE1. PMID:26548492

  4. Transcriptional Up-Regulation of APE1/Ref-1 in Hepatic Tumor: Role in Hepatocytes Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Di Maso, Vittorio; Mediavilla, María Gabriela; Vascotto, Carlo; Lupo, Francesco; Baccarani, Umberto; Avellini, Claudio; Tell, Gianluca; Tiribelli, Claudio; Crocè, Lory Saveria

    2015-01-01

    Objective Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most frequent neoplasm worldwide and the most serious complication of long-standing chronic liver diseases (CLD). Its development is associated with chronic inflammation and sustained oxidative stress. Deregulation of apurinic apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1), a master regulator of cellular response to oxidative stress, has been associated with poor prognosis in several cancers including HCC. Design In the present study we investigated the APE1/Ref-1 mRNA levels in cirrhotic and HCC tissues obtained during HCC resection. The possible protective role of APE1/Ref-1 against oxidative stress and apoptosis was evaluated in vitro in immortalized human hepatocytes (IHH) over-expressing APE1/Ref-1. Results APE1/Ref-1 was up-regulated in HCC, regulation occurring at the transcriptional level. APE1/Ref-1 mRNA content increased with the progression of liver disease with the transcriptional up-regulation present in cirrhosis significantly increased in HCC. The up-regulation was higher in the less differentiated cancers. In vitro, over-expression of APE1/Ref-1 in normal hepatocytes conferred cell protection against oxidative stress and it was associated with BAX inhibition and escape from apoptosis. Conclusion APE1/Ref-1 is up-regulated in HCC and this over-expression correlates with cancer aggressiveness. The up-regulation occurs at the transcriptional level and it is present in the earliest phases of hepatocarcinogenesis. The APE-1/Ref-1 over-expression is associated with hepatocyte survival and inhibits BAX activation and apoptosis. These data suggest a possible role of APE1/Ref-1 over-expression both in hepatocyte survival and HCC development calling attention to this molecule as a promising marker for HCC diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26624999

  5. Recently recovered Kenyapithecus mandible and its implications for great ape and human origins.

    PubMed

    McCrossin, M L; Benefit, B R

    1993-03-01

    We report here a Kenyapithecus africanus juvenile mandible recovered from middle Miocene (ca. 14-16 million years) deposits of Maboko Island (Lake Victoria), Kenya. Symphyseal and dental attributes of the mandible distinguish K. africanus, a species widely regarded as the earliest known member of the great ape and human clade, from other Miocene large-bodied hominoids. The Maboko Island mandible exhibits a markedly proclined symphyseal axis, massive inferior transverse torus, mesiodistally narrow, high-crowned, and strongly procumbent lateral incisor, and molars with cingula restricted to the median buccal cleft. Although the presence of some of these conditions in Kenyapithecus was suggested earlier, the fragmentary and ill-preserved nature of previously known specimens led certain authorities to doubt their validity. Our assessment of mandibular and dental morphology indicates that K. africanus diverged after Proconsul and Griphopithecus but prior to the last common ancestor of Sivapithecus, extant great apes, and humans. The robustly constructed mandibular symphysis and anterior dentition suggest that incisal biting played as important a role as thick molar enamel in the dietary adaptations of K. africanus. PMID:8446615

  6. Ultrasensitive electrochemical strategy for trace detection of APE-1 via triple signal amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Yaqin; Xiang, Yu; Yuan, Ruo; Yuan, Yali; Liao, Ni

    2013-03-15

    A novel ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay for the determination of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE-1) using a three-step signal amplification process was reported in this work. The first-step signal amplification process was based on the labeled biotinylated alkaline phosphatase (bio-AP) on the nickel hexacyanoferrates nanoparticle-decorated Au nanochains (Ni-AuNCs) toward the biocatalysis of ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AA-P) to in-situ produce ascorbic acid (AA). Then the signal was further amplified by electrochemical oxidation of the in-situ-produced AA because of the catalysis of Ni-AuNCs. Finally, with the nanochain-modified streptavidin (SA), the stoichiometry of bio-AP could be increased through the specific and high affinity interaction of streptavidin-biotin. On the other hand, a kind of organic material (PTC-NH(2)), owing the amino-functionalized interface and unique electrochemical properties, as matrix for primary antibodies (Ab(1)) immobilization could lower the background current signal and enhance the amount of immobilized Ab(1). With a sandwich-type immunoreaction, the triple signal amplification greatly enhanced the sensitivity for the detection of APE-1. Under optimal conditions, the electrochemical immunosensor exhibited a linear range of 0.01-100 pg/mL with an extremely low detection limit of 3.9 fg/mL (signal/noise=3). PMID:22981009

  7. Are apes inequity averse? New data on the token-exchange paradigm.

    PubMed

    Bräuer, Juliane; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Recent studies have produced mixed evidence about inequity aversion in nonhuman primates. Brosnan et al. [Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences 272:253-258, 2005] found inequity aversion in chimpanzees and argued that effort is crucial, if subjects are to evaluate how they are rewarded in comparison to a competitor for an identical performance. In this study we investigated inequity aversion with chimpanzees, bonobos and orangutans, using the method of Brosnan et al. [Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences 272:253-258, 2005] after introducing some methodological improvements. Subjects always received a less-preferred food in exchange for a token, whereas the competitor received either the same type of food for their token (equity) or a more favored food for it (inequity). Apes did not refuse more of the less-preferred food when a competitor had received the more favored food. Thus, with an improved methodology we failed to reproduce the findings of Brosnan et al. [Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B. Biological Sciences 272:253-258, 2005] that apes show inequity aversion. PMID:19021260

  8. Relative growth of the limbs and trunk in the African apes.

    PubMed

    Shea, B T

    1981-10-01

    Examination of relative growth and allometry is important for our understanding of the African apes, as they represent a closely related group of species of increasing body size. This study presents a comparison of ontogenetic relative growth patterns of some postcranial dimensions in Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, and Gorilla gorilla. Interspecific proportion differences among the three species are also analyzed. It is stressed that reliable ontogenetic information can only be obtained if subadults are examined-growth data cannot be inferred from static adult scaling. Results indicate that some postcranial relative growth patterns are very similar in the three species, suggesting differential extrapolation of a common growth pattern, whereas for other proportion comparisons the growth trends differ markedly among the species, producing distinct shape differences in the adults. Interspecific shape changes among the three species are characterized by positive allometry of chest girth and negative allometry of body height and leg length. It is suggested that relative decrease of leg length with increasing body size among the African pongids might be expected on biomechanical grounds, in quadrupedal terrestrialism. Relative to body weight or trunk length, the limbs of the bonobo (Pan paniscus) are longer than in the common chimpanzee or the gorilla, with a lower intermembral index. This may most closely resemble the primitive condition for the African apes. PMID:7325219

  9. An evolutionary conserved early replicating segment on the sex chromosomes of man and the great apes.

    PubMed

    Weber, B; Schempp, W; Wiesner, H

    1986-01-01

    Replication studies on prometaphase chromosomes of man, the chimpanzee, the pygmy chimpanzee, the gorilla, and the orangutan reveal great interspecific homologies between the autosomes. The early replicating X chromosomes clearly show a high degree of conservation of both the pattern and the time course of replication. An early replicating segment on the short arm of the X chromosomes of man (Xp22.3) which escapes inactivation can be found on the X chromosomes of the great apes as well. Furthermore, the most early replicating segment on the Y chromosomes of all species tested appears to be homologous to this segment on the X chromosomes. Therefore, these early replicating segments in the great apes may correspond to the pseudoautosomal segment proposed to exist in man. From further cytogenetic characterization of the Y chromosomes it is evident that structural alterations have resulted in an extreme divergence in both the euchromatic and heterochromatic parts. It is assumed, therefore, that, in contrast to the X chromosomes, the Y chromosomes have undergone a rapid evolution within the higher primates. PMID:3096642

  10. Physical intuitions about support relations in monkeys (Macaca fuscata) and apes (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Murai, Chizuko; Tanaka, Masayuki; Sakagami, Masamichi

    2011-05-01

    Nonhuman primates, like humans, have demonstrated various physical intuitions. Cacchione and Krist (2004) examined chimpanzees' intuitions about support relations with the violation-of-expectation task. They reported that the chimpanzees possessed intuitions about support, but their intuitions differed from those of humans in part; they were sensitive to "contact/no-contact" and "amount of contact" but not "type of contact" rule. To further explore intuitions about support in nonhuman primates, we conducted similar experiments on monkeys (Japanese monkeys) and apes (chimpanzees). In three experiments, we presented physically possible and impossible events of different support relations to the participants and measured their looking times. The results reveal that the chimpanzees and monkeys detect the violations of "contact/no-contact" and "amount of contact" but not "type of contact" variable. Therefore, the apes and monkeys possess similar intuitions; however, these intuitions differ in part from those of humans. The present study provides new and corroborative evidence of intuitions about support in nonhuman primates. However, this again leads to the question of distinctive understanding about support relations among primate species. PMID:21604855

  11. The choice to access outdoor areas affects the behavior of great apes.

    PubMed

    Kurtycz, Laura M; Wagner, Katherine E; Ross, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor access is often cited as a critical component of appropriate housing for great apes in captivity, and although studies have shown that offering primates choices can improve welfare, choice to access specific areas has been empirically neglected. Behavioral data were collected on chimpanzees and gorillas housed in naturalistic enclosures while (a) restricted to an indoor enclosure and (b) permitted free access to an adjacent outdoor area. To isolate the factor of choice, only the sessions in which apes remained indoors were compared. With choice, chimpanzees showed more frequent social, F(1, 5) = 20.526, p = .006, and self-directed behaviors, F(1, 5) = 13.507, p = .014, and lower inactivity levels, F(1, 5) = 9.239, p = .029. Gorillas were more frequently inactive, F(1, 8) = 22.259, p = .002, and produced lower levels of object manipulation, F(1, 8) = 8.243, p = .021, and feeding, F(1, 8) = 5.407, p = .049. Results are consistent with an association between choice and the expression of species-typical and arousal behaviors in chimpanzees. The effects are less evident in gorillas, but this outcome may be buffered by the species' lower motivation to utilize the outdoor spaces. Findings highlight species-specific reactions to access to choice that may offer insight for enclosure design, management, and nonhuman animal welfare. PMID:24673476

  12. Enamel thickness in the Middle Miocene great apes Anoiapithecus, Pierolapithecus and Dryopithecus

    PubMed Central

    Alba, D. M.; Fortuny, J.; Moyà-Solà, S.

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of industrial computed tomography, relative enamel thickness (RET) is computed in three Middle Miocene (ca 11.9–11.8 Ma) hominoids from Abocador de Can Mata (Vallès-Penedès Basin, Catalonia, Spain): Pierolapithecus catalaunicus from BCV1 and Anoiapithecus brevirostris from C3-Aj, interpreted as stem hominids; and Dryopithecus fontani from C3-Ae of uncertain phylogenetic affinities. Pierolapithecus displays an average RET value of 19.5, Anoiapithecus of 18.6 and Dryopithecus of 10.6. The thick-enamelled condition of Pierolapithecus and Anoiapithecus is also characteristic of afropithecids, including the more derived kenyapithecins from the early Middle Miocene of Eurasia (Griphopithecus and Kenyapithecus). Given the presence of other dentognathic and craniofacial similarities, thick enamel may be interpreted as a symplesiomorphy of the Hominidae (the great ape and human clade), which would have been later independently modified along several lineages. Given the correlation between thick enamel and hard-object feeding, our results suggest that thick enamel might have been the fundamental adaptation that enabled the out-of-Africa dispersal of great-ape ancestors and their subsequent initial radiation throughout Eurasia. The much thinner enamel of Dryopithecus is difficult to interpret given phylogenetic uncertainties, being either a hominine synapomorphy or a convergently developed feature. PMID:20335211

  13. Barriers and traps: great apes' performance in two functionally equivalent tasks.

    PubMed

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Jaeck, Franka; Jaek, Franka; Call, Josep

    2012-09-01

    Tool-using tasks that require subjects to overcome the obstacles to get a reward have been a major component of research investigating causal knowledge in primates. Much of the debate in this research has focused on whether subjects simply use certain stimulus features or instead use more functionally relevant information regarding the effect that certain features may have on a moving reward. Here, we presented two obstacle tasks, a trap platform and a barrier platform, to 22 great apes. Although perceptually similar, these two tasks contain two perceptually different but functionally equivalent obstacles: a trap and a barrier. In a pre-exposure phase, subjects either experienced an obstacle task or a task without any obstacle. In the transfer phase, all subjects were presented with an obstacle task, either the trap platform or the barrier platform. Our results show that those subjects who received an obstacle task prior to the second task performed better than those who first received a non-obstacle task. The type of obstacle task that subjects received first did not have any effect on their performance in the transfer phase. We suggest that apes possess some knowledge about the effects that obstacles have on slow-moving unsupported objects. PMID:22544302

  14. Task constraints mask great apes' ability to solve the trap-table task.

    PubMed

    Girndt, Antje; Meier, T; Call, J

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have investigated animals' causal knowledge with a task requiring subjects to use a tool to bring a reward within reach whilst avoiding a trap. Previous studies have suggested limitations in the ability of several species to avoid traps in tubes or tables. However, certain features may have inflated task difficulty. We tested 20 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), 7 orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus), 5 bonobos (Pan paniscus), and 5 gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) in the trap-table--a task in which subjects have to pull one of two rakes prepositioned behind two rewards on a flat surface. One of the rewards is in front of a trap into which it will fall. We investigated the effect of trap type, tool type, the number of available tools, and reinforcement regime on performance. We replicated previous findings showing that apes failed to choose the correct rake above chance. However, when they could instead choose where to insert a single tool, around 80% of the apes solved the trap-table task in the first trial, revealing an important effect of task constraints on their performance. PMID:18248114

  15. Common Visual Preference for Curved Contours in Humans and Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Among the visual preferences that guide many everyday activities and decisions, from consumer choices to social judgment, preference for curved over sharp-angled contours is commonly thought to have played an adaptive role throughout human evolution, favoring the avoidance of potentially harmful objects. However, because nonhuman primates also exhibit preferences for certain visual qualities, it is conceivable that humans’ preference for curved contours is grounded on perceptual and cognitive mechanisms shared with extant nonhuman primate species. Here we aimed to determine whether nonhuman great apes and humans share a visual preference for curved over sharp-angled contours using a 2-alternative forced choice experimental paradigm under comparable conditions. Our results revealed that the human group and the great ape group indeed share a common preference for curved over sharp-angled contours, but that they differ in the manner and magnitude with which this preference is expressed behaviorally. These results suggest that humans’ visual preference for curved objects evolved from earlier primate species’ visual preferences, and that during this process it became stronger, but also more susceptible to the influence of higher cognitive processes and preference for other visual features. PMID:26558754

  16. APES: Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer -- A high time resolution monodirectional magnetic deflection electron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R. G.; Samara, M.; Grubbs, G.; Ogasawara, K.; Miller, G.; Trevino, J. A.; Webster, J.; Stange, J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a description of the Acute Precipitating Electron Spectrometer (APES) that was designed and built for the Ground-to-Rocket Electron Electrodynamics Correlative Experiment (GREECE) auroral sounding rocket mission. The purpose was to measure the precipitating electron spectrum with high time resolution, on the order of milliseconds. The trade-off made in order to achieve high time resolution was to limit the aperture to only one look direction. The energy selection was done by using a permanent magnet to separate the incoming electrons, such that the different energies would fall onto different regions of the microchannel plate and therefore be detected by different anodes. A rectangular microchannel plate (MCP) was used (15 mm × 100 mm), and there was a total of 50 discrete anodes under the MCP, each one 15 mm × 1.5 mm, with a 0.5 mm spacing between anodes. The target energy range of APES was 200 eV to 30 keV.

  17. Predicting the vulnerability of great apes to disease: the role of superspreaders and their potential vaccination.

    PubMed

    Carne, Charlotte; Semple, Stuart; Morrogh-Bernard, Helen; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Lehmann, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Disease is a major concern for the conservation of great apes, and one that is likely to become increasingly relevant as deforestation and the rise of ecotourism bring humans and apes into ever closer proximity. Consequently, it is imperative that preventative measures are explored to ensure that future epidemics do not wipe out the remaining populations of these animals. In this paper, social network analysis was used to investigate vulnerability to disease in a population of wild orang-utans and a community of wild chimpanzees. Potential 'superspreaders' of disease--individuals with disproportionately central positions in the community or population--were identified, and the efficacy of vaccinating these individuals assessed using simulations. Three resident female orang-utans were identified as potential superspreaders, and females and unflanged males were predicted to be more influential in disease spread than flanged males. By contrast, no superspreaders were identified in the chimpanzee network, although males were significantly more central than females. In both species, simulating the vaccination of the most central individuals in the network caused a greater reduction in potential disease pathways than removing random individuals, but this effect was considerably more pronounced for orang-utans. This suggests that targeted vaccinations would have a greater impact on reducing disease spread among orang-utans than chimpanzees. Overall, these results have important implications for orang-utan and chimpanzee conservation and highlight the role that certain individuals may play in the spread of disease and its prevention by vaccination. PMID:24386405

  18. Rapid evolution of the cerebellum in humans and other great apes.

    PubMed

    Barton, Robert A; Venditti, Chris

    2014-10-20

    Humans' unique cognitive abilities are usually attributed to a greatly expanded neocortex, which has been described as "the crowning achievement of evolution and the biological substrate of human mental prowess". The human cerebellum, however, contains four times more neurons than the neocortex and is attracting increasing attention for its wide range of cognitive functions. Using a method for detecting evolutionary rate changes along the branches of phylogenetic trees, we show that the cerebellum underwent rapid size increase throughout the evolution of apes, including humans, expanding significantly faster than predicted by the change in neocortex size. As a result, humans and other apes deviated significantly from the general evolutionary trend for neocortex and cerebellum to change in tandem, having significantly larger cerebella relative to neocortex size than other anthropoid primates. These results suggest that cerebellar specialization was a far more important component of human brain evolution than hitherto recognized and that technical intelligence was likely to have been at least as important as social intelligence in human cognitive evolution. Given the role of the cerebellum in sensory-motor control and in learning complex action sequences, cerebellar specialization is likely to have underpinned the evolution of humans' advanced technological capacities, which in turn may have been a preadaptation for language. PMID:25283776

  19. Recently recovered Kenyapithecus mandible and its implications for great ape and human origins.

    PubMed Central

    McCrossin, M L; Benefit, B R

    1993-01-01

    We report here a Kenyapithecus africanus juvenile mandible recovered from middle Miocene (ca. 14-16 million years) deposits of Maboko Island (Lake Victoria), Kenya. Symphyseal and dental attributes of the mandible distinguish K. africanus, a species widely regarded as the earliest known member of the great ape and human clade, from other Miocene large-bodied hominoids. The Maboko Island mandible exhibits a markedly proclined symphyseal axis, massive inferior transverse torus, mesiodistally narrow, high-crowned, and strongly procumbent lateral incisor, and molars with cingula restricted to the median buccal cleft. Although the presence of some of these conditions in Kenyapithecus was suggested earlier, the fragmentary and ill-preserved nature of previously known specimens led certain authorities to doubt their validity. Our assessment of mandibular and dental morphology indicates that K. africanus diverged after Proconsul and Griphopithecus but prior to the last common ancestor of Sivapithecus, extant great apes, and humans. The robustly constructed mandibular symphysis and anterior dentition suggest that incisal biting played as important a role as thick molar enamel in the dietary adaptations of K. africanus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8446615

  20. Locational diversity of alpha satellite DNA and intergeneric hybridization aspects in the Nomascus and Hylobates genera of small apes.

    PubMed

    Baicharoen, Sudarath; Miyabe-Nishiwaki, Takako; Arsaithamkul, Visit; Hirai, Yuriko; Duangsa-ard, Kwanruen; Siriaroonrat, Boripat; Domae, Hiroshi; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Koga, Akihiko; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we discovered that alpha satellite DNA has unique and genus-specific localizations on the chromosomes of small apes. This study describes the details of alpha satellite localization in the genera Nomascus and Hylobates and explores their usefulness in distinguishing parental genome sets in hybrids between these genera. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to establish diagnostic criteria of alpha satellite DNA markers in discriminating small ape genomes. In particular we established the genus specificity of alpha satellite distribution in three species of light-cheeked gibbons (Nomascus leucogenys, N. siki, and N. gabriellae) in comparison to that of Hylobates lar. Then we determined the localization of alpha satellite DNA in a hybrid individual which resulted from a cross between these two genera. In Nomascus the alpha satellite DNA blocks were located at the centromere, telomere, and four interstitial regions. In Hylobates detectable amounts of alpha satellite DNA were seen only at centromeric regions. The differences in alpha satellite DNA locations between Nomascus and Hylobates allowed us to easily distinguish the parental chromosomal sets in the genome of intergeneric hybrid individuals found in Thai and Japanese zoos. Our study illustrates how molecular cytogenetic markers can serve as diagnostic tools to identify the origin of individuals. These molecular tools can aid zoos, captive breeding programs and conservation efforts in managing small apes species. Discovering more information on alpha satellite distribution is also an opportunity to examine phylogenetic and evolutionary questions that are still controversial in small apes. PMID:25290445

  1. Human rather than ape-like orbital morphology allows much greater lateral visual field expansion with eye abduction.

    PubMed

    Denion, Eric; Hitier, Martin; Levieil, Eric; Mouriaux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    While convergent, the human orbit differs from that of non-human apes in that its lateral orbital margin is significantly more rearward. This rearward position does not obstruct the additional visual field gained through eye motion. This additional visual field is therefore considered to be wider in humans than in non-human apes. A mathematical model was designed to quantify this difference. The mathematical model is based on published computed tomography data in the human neuro-ocular plane (NOP) and on additional anatomical data from 100 human skulls and 120 non-human ape skulls (30 gibbons; 30 chimpanzees / bonobos; 30 orangutans; 30 gorillas). It is used to calculate temporal visual field eccentricity values in the NOP first in the primary position of gaze then for any eyeball rotation value in abduction up to 45° and any lateral orbital margin position between 85° and 115° relative to the sagittal plane. By varying the lateral orbital margin position, the human orbit can be made "non-human ape-like". In the Pan-like orbit, the orbital margin position (98.7°) was closest to the human orbit (107.1°). This modest 8.4° difference resulted in a large 21.1° difference in maximum lateral visual field eccentricity with eyeball abduction (Pan-like: 115°; human: 136.1°). PMID:26190625

  2. Human rather than ape-like orbital morphology allows much greater lateral visual field expansion with eye abduction

    PubMed Central

    Denion, Eric; Hitier, Martin; Levieil, Eric; Mouriaux, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    While convergent, the human orbit differs from that of non-human apes in that its lateral orbital margin is significantly more rearward. This rearward position does not obstruct the additional visual field gained through eye motion. This additional visual field is therefore considered to be wider in humans than in non-human apes. A mathematical model was designed to quantify this difference. The mathematical model is based on published computed tomography data in the human neuro-ocular plane (NOP) and on additional anatomical data from 100 human skulls and 120 non-human ape skulls (30 gibbons; 30 chimpanzees / bonobos; 30 orangutans; 30 gorillas). It is used to calculate temporal visual field eccentricity values in the NOP first in the primary position of gaze then for any eyeball rotation value in abduction up to 45° and any lateral orbital margin position between 85° and 115° relative to the sagittal plane. By varying the lateral orbital margin position, the human orbit can be made “non-human ape-like”. In the Pan-like orbit, the orbital margin position (98.7°) was closest to the human orbit (107.1°). This modest 8.4° difference resulted in a large 21.1° difference in maximum lateral visual field eccentricity with eyeball abduction (Pan-like: 115°; human: 136.1°). PMID:26190625

  3. Neuronal Populations in the Basolateral Nuclei of the Amygdala Are Differentially Increased in Humans Compared With Apes: A Stereological Study

    PubMed Central

    Barger, Nicole; Stefanacci, Lisa; Schumann, Cynthia M.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Annese, Jacopo; Allman, John M.; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Hof, Patrick R.; Semendeferi, Katerina

    2016-01-01

    In human and nonhuman primates, the amygdala is known to play critical roles in emotional and social behavior. Anatomically, individual amygdaloid nuclei are connected with many neural systems that are either differentially expanded or conserved over the course of primate evolution. To address amygdala evolution in humans and our closest living relatives, the apes, we used design-based stereological methods to obtain neuron counts for the amygdala and each of four major amygdaloid nuclei (the lateral, basal, accessory basal, and central nuclei) in humans, all great ape species, lesser apes, and one monkey species. Our goal was to determine whether there were significant differences in the number or percent of neurons distributed to individual nuclei among species. Additionally, regression analyses were performed on independent contrast data to determine whether any individual species deviated from allometric trends. There were two major findings. In humans, the lateral nucleus contained the highest number of neurons in the amygdala, whereas in apes the basal nucleus contained the highest number of neurons. Additionally, the human lateral nucleus contained 59% more neurons than predicted by allometric regressions on nonhuman primate data. Based on the largest sample ever analyzed in a comparative study of the hominoid amygdala, our findings suggest that an emphasis on the lateral nucleus is the main characteristic of amygdala specialization over the course of human evolution. PMID:22473387

  4. Evidence for a midlife crisis in great apes consistent with the U-shape in human well-being.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Alexander; King, James E; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; Oswald, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    Recently, economists and behavioral scientists have studied the pattern of human well-being over the lifespan. In dozens of countries, and for a large range of well-being measures, including happiness and mental health, well-being is high in youth, falls to a nadir in midlife, and rises again in old age. The reasons for this U-shape are still unclear. Present theories emphasize sociological and economic forces. In this study we show that a similar U-shape exists in 508 great apes (two samples of chimpanzees and one sample of orangutans) whose well-being was assessed by raters familiar with the individual apes. This U-shaped pattern or "midlife crisis" emerges with or without use of parametric methods. Our results imply that human well-being's curved shape is not uniquely human and that, although it may be partly explained by aspects of human life and society, its origins may lie partly in the biology we share with great apes. These findings have implications across scientific and social-scientific disciplines, and may help to identify ways of enhancing human and ape well-being. PMID:23169637

  5. What Does an Intermediate Success Rate Mean? An Analysis of a Piagetian Liquid Conservation Task in the Great Apes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suda, Chikako; Call, Josep

    2006-01-01

    The study investigates what an intermediate success rate means in bonobos, chimpanzees, and orangutans. Apes participated in liquid conservation experiments where they had to track the larger of two different quantities of juice after various kinds of transformations [Suda, C., & Call, J. (2004). Piagetian liquid conservation in the great apes…

  6. Conservation Education and Environmental Communication in Great Ape Re-Introduction Projects: Two Cases from the Republic of Congo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Barbara J.; Wall, John E.; Kaya, J. A. Placide

    2012-01-01

    Among species recovery tools available, re-introduction of animals to the wild is one of the more complex. Since the mid-1990s two successful great ape re-introductions have taken place in the Republic of Congo, leading some conservationists to revisit re-introduction as a strategy. This research explored the role of conservation education and…

  7. The Role of Socio-Communicative Rearing Environments in the Development of Social and Physical Cognition in Apes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Jamie L.; Lyn, Heidi; Schaeffer, Jennifer A.; Hopkins, William D.

    2011-01-01

    The cultural intelligence hypothesis (CIH) claims that humans' advanced cognition is a direct result of human culture and that children are uniquely specialized to absorb and utilize this cultural experience (Tomasello, 2000). Comparative data demonstrating that 2.5-year-old human children outperform apes on measures of social cognition but not on…

  8. A new APE1/Ref-1-dependent pathway leading to reduction of NF-kappaB and AP-1, and activation of their DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kozue; Hirao, Satoshi; Kabe, Yasuaki; Ogura, Yuji; Sato, Iwao; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Wada, Tadashi; Handa, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    APE1/Ref-1 is thought to be a multifunctional protein involved in reduction-oxidation (redox) regulation and base excision DNA repair, and is required for early embryonic development in mice. APE1/Ref-1 has redox activity and AP endonuclease activity, and is able to enhance DNA-binding activity of several transcription factors, including NF-kappaB, AP-1 and p53, through reduction of their critical cysteine residues. However, it remains elusive exactly how APE1/Ref-1 carries out its essential functions in vivo. Here, we show that APE1/Ref-1 not only reduces target transcription factors directly but also facilitates their reduction by other reducing molecules such as glutathione or thioredoxin. The new activity of APE1/Ref-1, termed redox chaperone activity, is exerted at concentration significantly lower than that required for its redox activity and is neither dependent on its redox activity nor on its AP endonuclease activity. We also show evidence that redox chaperone activity of APE1/Ref-1 is critical to NF-kappaB-mediated gene expression in human cells and is mediated through its physical association with target transcription factors. Thus, APE1/Ref-1 may play multiple roles in an antioxidative stress response pathway through its different biochemical activities. These findings also provide new insight into the mechanism of intracellular redox regulation. PMID:18586825

  9. Screening wild and semi-free ranging great apes for putative sexually transmitted diseases: Evidence of Trichomonadidae infections.

    PubMed

    Rushmore, Julie; Allison, Andrew B; Edwards, Erin E; Bagal, Ujwal; Altizer, Sonia; Cranfield, Mike R; Glenn, Travis C; Liu, Hsi; Mudakikwa, Antoine; Mugisha, Lawrence; Muller, Martin N; Stumpf, Rebecca M; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Wrangham, Richard; Yabsley, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can persist endemically, are known to cause sterility and infant mortality in humans, and could have similar impacts in wildlife populations. African apes (i.e., chimpanzees, bonobos, and to a lesser extent gorillas) show multi-male mating behavior that could offer opportunities for STD transmission, yet little is known about the prevalence and impact of STDs in this endangered primate group. We used serology and PCR-based detection methods to screen biological samples from wild and orphaned eastern chimpanzees and gorillas (N = 172 individuals, including adults, and juveniles) for four classes of pathogens that either commonly cause human STDs or were previously detected in captive apes: trichomonads, Chlamydia spp., Treponema pallidum (syphilis and yaws), and papillomaviruses. Based on results from prior modeling and comparative research, we expected STD prevalence to be highest in females versus males and in sexually mature versus immature individuals. All samples were negative for Chlamydia, Treponema pallidum, and papillomaviruses; however, a high percentage of wild chimpanzee urine and fecal samples showed evidence of trichomonads (protozoa). Analysis revealed that females were more likely than males to have positive urine-but not fecal-samples; however, there was no evidence of age (sexual maturity) differences in infection status. Sequence analysis of chimpanzee trichomonad samples revealed a close relationship to previously described trichomonads within the genus Tetratrichomonas. Phylogenetic comparisons to archived sequences from multiple vertebrate hosts suggests that many of the chimpanzee parasites from our study are likely transmitted via fecal-oral contact, but the transmission of some Tetratrichomonas sequence-types remains unknown and could include sexual contact. Our work emphasizes that only a fraction of infectious agents affecting wild apes are presently known to science, and that further work on great

  10. Bonobo habituation in a forest-savanna mosaic habitat: influence of ape species, habitat type, and sociocultural context.

    PubMed

    Narat, Victor; Pennec, Flora; Simmen, Bruno; Ngawolo, Jean Christophe Bokika; Krief, Sabrina

    2015-10-01

    Habituation is the term used to describe acceptance by wild animals of a human observer as a neutral element in their environment. Among primates, the process takes from a few days for Galago spp. to several years for African apes. There are also intraspecies differences reflecting differences in habitat, home range, and ape-human relationship history. Here, we present the first study of the process of bonobo habituation in a fragmented habitat, a forest-savanna mosaic in the community-based conservation area led by the Congolese nongovernmental organization Mbou-Mon-Tour, Democratic Republic of the Congo. In this area, local people use the forest almost every day for traditional activities but avoid bonobos because of a traditional taboo. Because very few flight reactions were observed during habituation, we focused on quantitative parameters to assess the development of ape tolerance and of the tracking efficiency of observer teams. During the 18-month study period (May 2012-October 2013), 4043 h (319 days) were spent in the forest and bonobos were observed for a total of 405 h (196 contacts on 134 days). The average contact duration was stable over time (124 min), but the minimal distance during a contact decreased with habituation effort. Moreover, bonobo location and tracking efficiency, daily ratio of contact time to habituation effort, and the number of observations at ground level were positively correlated with habituation effort. Our observations suggest that bonobos become habituated relatively rapidly. These results are discussed in relation to the habitat type, ape species, and the local sociocultural context of villagers. The habituation process involves changes in ape behavior toward observers and also more complex interactions concerning the ecosystem, including the building of an efficient local team. Before starting a habituation process, knowledge of the human sociocultural context is essential to assess the balance between risks and benefits

  11. Size and diet in the evolution of African ape craniodental form.

    PubMed

    Shea, B T

    1983-01-01

    Interspecific differences in craniodental morphology among Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, and Gorilla gorilla are analyzed. These apes differ in both diet and body size, and thus present an excellent example in which to apply an allometric criterion of subtraction in order to determine morphological differences which might be related to divergent dietary specialization. The use of ontogenetic allometry in particular as a criterion of subtraction is discussed. Bivariate and multivariate results indicate that most of the variation in skull form among the species relates to the extension of a common growth trend to different sizes. Comparative analysis of growth trajectories reveals a number of differences, but none that appear to relate to a reorganization of skull proportions which might correspond to a dietary shift towards increased folivory. The dentition clearly exhibits non-allometric shape changes corresponding to the dietary differences, however. The meaning of these differences between cranial and dental patterns is discussed. PMID:6862324

  12. The spread of a novel behavior in wild chimpanzees: New insights into the ape cultural mind

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Thibaud; Poisot, Timothée; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Hoppitt, William; Hobaiter, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    For years, the animal culture debate has been dominated by the puzzling absence of direct evidence for social transmission of behavioral innovations in the flagship species of animal culture, the common chimpanzee. Although social learning of novel behaviors has been documented in captivity, critics argue that these findings lack ecological validity and therefore may not be relevant for understanding the evolution of culture. For the wild, it is possible that group-specific behavioral differences emerge because group members respond individually to unspecified environmental differences, rather than learning from each other. In a recent paper, we used social network analyses in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) to provide direct evidence for social transmission of a behavioral innovation, moss-sponging, to extract water from a tree hole. Here, we discuss the implications of our findings and how our new methodological approach could help future studies of social learning and culture in wild apes. PMID:26479151

  13. The spread of a novel behavior in wild chimpanzees: New insights into the ape cultural mind.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Thibaud; Poisot, Timothée; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Hoppitt, William; Hobaiter, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    For years, the animal culture debate has been dominated by the puzzling absence of direct evidence for social transmission of behavioral innovations in the flagship species of animal culture, the common chimpanzee. Although social learning of novel behaviors has been documented in captivity, critics argue that these findings lack ecological validity and therefore may not be relevant for understanding the evolution of culture. For the wild, it is possible that group-specific behavioral differences emerge because group members respond individually to unspecified environmental differences, rather than learning from each other. In a recent paper, we used social network analyses in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) to provide direct evidence for social transmission of a behavioral innovation, moss-sponging, to extract water from a tree hole. Here, we discuss the implications of our findings and how our new methodological approach could help future studies of social learning and culture in wild apes. PMID:26479151

  14. Forearm articular proportions and the antebrachial index in Homo sapiens, Australopithecus afarensis and the great apes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Frank L'Engle; Cunningham, Deborah L; Amaral, Lia Q

    2015-12-01

    When hominin bipedality evolved, the forearms were free to adopt nonlocomotor tasks which may have resulted in changes to the articular surfaces of the ulna and the relative lengths of the forearm bones. Similarly, sex differences in forearm proportions may be more likely to emerge in bipeds than in the great apes given the locomotor constraints in Gorilla, Pan and Pongo. To test these assumptions, ulnar articular proportions and the antebrachial index (radius length/ulna length) in Homo sapiens (n=51), Gorilla gorilla (n=88), Pan troglodytes (n=49), Pongo pygmaeus (n=36) and Australopithecus afarensis A.L. 288-1 and A.L. 438-1 are compared. Intercept-adjusted ratios are used to control for size and minimize the effects of allometry. Canonical scores axes show that the proximally broad and elongated trochlear notch with respect to size in H. sapiens and A. afarensis is largely distinct from G. gorilla, P. troglodytes and P. pygmaeus. A cluster analysis of scaled ulnar articular dimensions groups H. sapiens males with A.L. 438-1 ulna length estimates, while one A.L. 288-1 ulna length estimate groups with Pan and another clusters most closely with H. sapiens, G. gorilla and A.L. 438-1. The relatively low antebrachial index characterizing H. sapiens and non-outlier estimates of A.L. 288-1 and A.L. 438-1 differs from those of the great apes. Unique sex differences in H. sapiens suggest a link between bipedality and forearm functional morphology. PMID:26256651

  15. Episodic Diversifying Selection Shaped the Genomes of Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus and Related Gammaretroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Niccolò; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Roca, Alfred L.; Xu, Wenqin; Eiden, Maribeth V.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gibbon ape leukemia viruses (GALVs) are part of a larger group of pathogenic gammaretroviruses present across phylogenetically diverse host species of Australasian mammals. Despite the biomedical utility of GALVs as viral vectors and in cancer gene therapy, full genome sequences have not been determined for all of the five identified GALV strains, nor has a comprehensive evolutionary analysis been performed. We therefore generated complete genomic sequences for each GALV strain using hybridization capture and high-throughput sequencing. The four strains of GALV isolated from gibbons formed a monophyletic clade that was closely related to the woolly monkey virus (WMV), which is a GALV strain that likely originated in a gibbon host. The GALV-WMV clade in turn formed a sister group to the koala retroviruses (KoRVs). Genomic signatures of episodic diversifying selection were detected among the gammaretroviruses with concentration in the env gene across the GALV strains that were particularly oncogenic and KoRV strains that were potentially exogenous, likely reflecting their adaptation to the host immune system. In vitro studies involving vectors chimeric between GALV and KoRV-B established that variable regions A and B of the surface unit of the envelope determine which receptor is used by a viral strain to enter host cells. IMPORTANCE The gibbon ape leukemia viruses (GALVs) are among the most medically relevant retroviruses due to their use as viral vectors for gene transfer and in cancer gene therapy. Despite their importance, full genome sequences have not been determined for the majority of primate isolates, nor has comprehensive evolutionary analysis been performed, despite evidence that the viruses are facing complex selective pressures associated with cross-species transmission. Using hybridization capture and high-throughput sequencing, we report here the full genome sequences of all the GALV strains and demonstrate that diversifying selection is

  16. Sequence divergence of the red and green visual pigments in great apes and humans.

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, S S; Jorgensen, A L; Battisti, L; Iwasaki, L; Motulsky, A G

    1994-01-01

    We have determined the coding sequences of red and green visual pigment genes of the chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan. The deduced amino acid sequences of these pigments are highly homologous to the equivalent human pigments. None of the amino acid differences occurred at sites that were previously shown to influence pigment absorption characteristics. Therefore, we predict the spectra of red and green pigments of the apes to have wavelengths of maximum absorption that differ by < 2 nm from the equivalent human pigments and that color vision in these nonhuman primates will be very similar, if not identical, to that in humans. A total of 14 within-species polymorphisms (6 involving silent substitutions) were observed in the coding sequences of the red and green pigment genes of the great apes. Remarkably, the polymorphisms at 6 of these sites had been observed in human populations, suggesting that they predated the evolution of higher primates. Alleles at polymorphic sites were often shared between the red and green pigment genes. The average synonymous rate of divergence of red from green sequences was approximately 1/10th that estimated for other proteins of higher primates, indicating the involvement of gene conversion in generating these polymorphisms. The high degree of homology and juxtaposition of these two genes on the X chromosome has promoted unequal recombination and/or gene conversion that led to sequence homogenization. However, natural selection operated to maintain the degree of separation in peak absorbance between the red and green pigments that resulted in optimal chromatic discrimination. This represents a unique case of molecular coevolution between two homologous genes that functionally interact at the behavioral level. PMID:8041777

  17. Human-associated Staphylococcus aureus strains within great ape populations in Central Africa (Gabon).

    PubMed

    Nagel, M; Dischinger, J; Türck, M; Verrier, D; Oedenkoven, M; Ngoubangoye, B; Le Flohic, G; Drexler, J F; Bierbaum, G; Gonzalez, J-P

    2013-11-01

    The risk of serious infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus is well-known. However, most studies regarding the distribution of (clinically relevant) S. aureus among humans and animals took place in the western hemisphere and only limited data are available from (Central) Africa. In this context, recent studies focused on S. aureus strains in humans and primates, but the question of whether humans and monkeys share related S. aureus strains or may interchange strains remained largely unsolved. In this study we aimed to evaluate the distribution and spread of human-like S. aureus strains among great apes living in captivity. Therefore, a primate facility at the International Centre for Medical Research of Franceville (Gabon) was screened. We detected among the primates a common human S. aureus strain, belonging to the spa-type t148. It was isolated from three different individuals of the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), of which one individual showed a large necrotizing wound. This animal died, most probably of a staphylococcal sepsis. Additionally, we discovered the t148 type among chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) that were settled in the immediate neighbourhood of the infected gorillas. A detailed analysis by pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that the gorilla and chimpanzee isolates represented two closely related strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a human-associated S. aureus strain causing disease in great apes. The simultaneous detection in gorillas and chimpanzees indicated an interspecies transmission of this S. aureus strain. Our results recommend that protection of wild animals must not only be based on habitat conservation, but also on the assessment of the risk of contact with human pathogens. PMID:23398468

  18. Conserved structural chemistry for incision activity in structurally non-homologous apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 and endonuclease IV DNA repair enzymes.

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Shin, David S.; Mol, Clifford D.; Izum, Tadahide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Mantha, Anil K.; Szczesny, Bartosz; Ivanov, Ivaylo N.; Hosfield, David J.; Maiti, Buddhadev; Pique, Mike E.; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hitomi, Kenichi; Cunningham, Richard P.; Mitra, Sankar; Tainer, John A.

    2013-03-22

    Non-coding apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA form spontaneously and as DNA base excision repair intermediates are the most common toxic and mutagenic in vivo DNA lesion. For repair, AP sites must be processed by 5' AP endonucleases in initial stages of base repair. Human APE1 and bacterial Nfo represent the two conserved 5' AP endonuclease families in the biosphere; they both recognize AP sites and incise the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the lesion, yet they lack similar structures and metal ion requirements. Here, we determined and analyzed crystal structures of a 2.4 ? resolution APE1-DNA product complex with Mg(2+) and a 0.92 Nfo with three metal ions. Structural and biochemical comparisons of these two evolutionarily distinct enzymes characterize key APE1 catalytic residues that are potentially functionally similar to Nfo active site components, as further tested and supported by computational analyses. We observe a magnesium-water cluster in the APE1 active site, with only Glu-96 forming the direct protein coordination to the Mg(2+). Despite differences in structure and metal requirements of APE1 and Nfo, comparison of their active site structures surprisingly reveals strong geometric conservation of the catalytic reaction, with APE1 catalytic side chains positioned analogously to Nfo metal positions, suggesting surprising functional equivalence between Nfo metal ions and APE1 residues. The finding that APE1 residues are positioned to substitute for Nfo metal ions is supported by the impact of mutations on activity. Collectively, the results illuminate the activities of residues, metal ions, and active site features for abasic site endonucleases.

  19. Nucleolar accumulation of APE1 depends on charged lysine residues that undergo acetylation upon genotoxic stress and modulate its BER activity in cells

    PubMed Central

    Lirussi, Lisa; Antoniali, Giulia; Vascotto, Carlo; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Poletto, Mattia; Romanello, Milena; Marasco, Daniela; Leone, Marilisa; Quadrifoglio, Franco; Bhakat, Kishor K.; Scaloni, Andrea; Tell, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) is the main abasic endonuclease in the base excision repair (BER) pathway of DNA lesions caused by oxidation/alkylation in mammalian cells; within nucleoli it interacts with nucleophosmin and rRNA through N-terminal Lys residues, some of which (K27/K31/K32/K35) may undergo acetylation in vivo. Here we study the functional role of these modifications during genotoxic damage and their in vivo relevance. We demonstrate that cells expressing a specific K-to-A multiple mutant are APE1 nucleolar deficient and are more resistant to genotoxic treatment than those expressing the wild type, although they show impaired proliferation. Of interest, we find that genotoxic treatment induces acetylation at these K residues. We also find that the charged status of K27/K31/K32/K35 modulates acetylation at K6/K7 residues that are known to be involved in the coordination of BER activity through a mechanism regulated by the sirtuin 1 deacetylase. Of note, structural studies show that acetylation at K27/K31/K32/K35 may account for local conformational changes on APE1 protein structure. These results highlight the emerging role of acetylation of critical Lys residues in regulating APE1 functions. They also suggest the existence of cross-talk between different Lys residues of APE1 occurring upon genotoxic damage, which may modulate APE1 subnuclear distribution and enzymatic activity in vivo. PMID:22918947

  20. Trans-complementation by human apurinic endonuclease (Ape) of hypersensitivity to DNA damage and spontaneous mutator phenotype in apn1-yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, D M; Bennett, R A; Marquis, J C; Ansari, P; Demple, B

    1995-01-01

    Abasic (AP) sites in DNA are potentially lethal and mutagenic. 'Class II' AP endonucleases initiate the repair of these and other DNA lesions. In yeast, the predominant enzyme of this type is Apn1, and its elimination sensitizes the cells to killing by simple alkylating agents or oxidants, and raises the rate of spontaneous mutation. We investigated the ability of the major human class II AP endonuclease, Ape, which is structurally unrelated to Apn1, to replace the yeast enzyme in vivo. Confocal immunomicroscopy studies indicate that approximately 25% of the Ape expressed in yeast is present in the nucleus. High-level Ape expression corresponding to approximately 7000 molecules per nucleus, equal to the normal Apn1 copy number, restored resistance to methyl methanesulfonate to near wild-type levels in Apn1-deficient (apn1-) yeast. Ape expression in apn1- yeast provided little protection against H2O2 challenges, consistent with the weak 3'-repair diesterase activity of the human enzyme. Ape expression at approximately 2000 molecules per nucleus reduced the spontaneous mutation rate of apn1- yeast to that seen for wild-type cells. Because Ape has a powerful AP endonuclease but weak 3'-diesterase activity, these findings indicate that endogenously generated AP sites can drive spontaneous mutagenesis. Images PMID:8559661

  1. Transferability of HIV by arthropods supports the hypothesis about transmission of the virus from apes to man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigen, Manfred; Kloft, Werner; Brandner, Gerhard

    2002-03-01

    The primate Pan troglodytes troglodytes, a chimpanzee subspecies, has recently been defined as a natural animal host of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Apes are traditionally hunted in Africa and are offered for sale in open-air meat markets. The bloody carcasses are regularly covered with blood-feeding flies, amongst them possibly the stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans L.), a cosmopolitically occurring biting fly. This fly is the effective vector for the retrovirus causing equine leukemia. According to laboratory experiments, the infectivity of ingested HIV is not reduced in the regurgitates of this fly. These findings are combined to explain the mechanism for a possible primary transmission of HIV from ape to man.

  2. New synthetic sulfone derivatives inhibit growth, adhesion and the leucine arylamidase APE2 gene expression of Candida albicans in vitro.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Ochal, Zbigniew

    2015-01-15

    The successful preventing and effective treatment of invasive Candida albicans infections required research focused on synthesis of new classes of agents and antifungal activity studies. Bromodichloromethyl-4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (named compound 6); dichloromethyl-4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (named 7); and chlorodibromomethyl-4-hydrazino-3-nitrophenyl sulfone (named 11) on inhibition of planktonic cells' growth, leucine arylamidase APE2 gene expression, and adhesion to epithelial cells were investigated. In vitro anti-Candida activities were determined against wild-types, and the morphogenesis mutants: Δefg1 and Δcph1. MICs of compounds 6, 7 and 11 (concentrated at 0.25-16μg/ml) were determined using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute Broth Microdilution Method (M27-A3 Document). APE2 expression was analyzed using RT-PCR; relative quantification was normalized against ACT1 in cells growth in YEPD and on Caco-2 cell line. Adherence assay of C. albicans to Caco-2 was performed in 24-well-plate. The structure activity relationship suggested that sulfone containing hydrazine function at C-1 (compound 11) showed higher antifungal activity (cell inhibition%=100 at 1-16μg/ml) than the remaining sulfones with chlorine at C-1. Δcph1/Δefg1 was highly sensitive to compound 11, while the sensitivity was reduced in Δcph1/Δefg1::EFG1 (%=100 at 16-fold higher concentration). Compound 11 significantly affected adherence to epithelium (P ⩽0.05) and hyphae formation. The APE2 up-regulation plays role in sulfones' resistance on MAP kinase pathway. Either CPH1 or EFG1 play a role in the resistance mechanism in sulfones. The strain-dependent phenomenon is a factor in the sulfone resistance mechanism. Sulfones' mode of action was attributed to reduced virulence arsenal in terms of adhesiveness and pathogenic potential related to the APE2 expression and morphogenesis. PMID:25515956

  3. Sexual selection and the evolution of visually conspicuous sexually dimorphic traits in male monkeys, apes, and human beings.

    PubMed

    Dixson, Alan; Dixson, Barnaby; Anderson, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    Striking secondary sexual traits, such as brightly colored "sexual skin," capes of hair, beards, and other facial adornments occur in adult males of many anthropoid primate species. This review focuses upon the role of sexual selection in the evolution of these traits. A quantitative approach is used to measure sexually dimorphic characters and to compare their development in the monogamous, polygynous, and multimale-multifemale mating systems of monkeys, apes, and human beings. PMID:16913285

  4. Hindlimb muscle architecture in non-human great apes and a comparison of methods for analysing inter-species variation.

    PubMed

    Myatt, Julia P; Crompton, Robin H; Thorpe, Susannah K S

    2011-08-01

    By relating an animal's morphology to its functional role and the behaviours performed, we can further develop our understanding of the selective factors and constraints acting on the adaptations of great apes. Comparison of muscle architecture between different ape species, however, is difficult because only small sample sizes are ever available. Further, such samples are often comprised of different age-sex classes, so studies have to rely on scaling techniques to remove body mass differences. However, the reliability of such scaling techniques has been questioned. As datasets increase in size, more reliable statistical analysis may eventually become possible. Here we employ geometric and allometric scaling techniques, and ancovas (a form of general linear model, GLM) to highlight and explore the different methods available for comparing functional morphology in the non-human great apes. Our results underline the importance of regressing data against a suitable body size variable to ascertain the relationship (geometric or allometric) and of choosing appropriate exponents by which to scale data. ancova models, while likely to be more robust than scaling for species comparisons when sample sizes are high, suffer from reduced power when sample sizes are low. Therefore, until sample sizes are radically increased it is preferable to include scaling analyses along with ancovas in data exploration. Overall, the results obtained from the different methods show little significant variation, whether in muscle belly mass, fascicle length or physiological cross-sectional area between the different species. This may reflect relatively close evolutionary relationships of the non-human great apes; a universal influence on morphology of generalised orthograde locomotor behaviours or, quite likely, both. PMID:21507000

  5. Mitochondrial evidence for multiple radiations in the evolutionary history of small apes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gibbons or small apes inhabit tropical and subtropical rain forests in Southeast Asia and adjacent regions, and are, next to great apes, our closest living relatives. With up to 16 species, gibbons form the most diverse group of living hominoids, but the number of taxa, their phylogenetic relationships and their phylogeography is controversial. To further the discussion of these issues we analyzed the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene from 85 individuals representing all gibbon species, including most subspecies. Results Based on phylogenetic tree reconstructions, several monophyletic clades were detected, corresponding to genera, species and subspecies. A significantly supported branching pattern was obtained for members of the genus Nomascus but not for the genus Hylobates. The phylogenetic relationships among the four genera were also not well resolved. Nevertheless, the new data permitted the estimation of divergence ages for all taxa for the first time and showed that most lineages emerged during four short time periods. In the first, between ~6.7 and ~8.3 mya, the four gibbon genera diverged from each other. In the second (~3.0 - ~3.9 mya) and in the third period (~1.3 - ~1.8 mya), Hylobates and Hoolock differentiated. Finally, between ~0.5 and ~1.1 mya, Hylobates lar diverged into subspecies. In contrast, differentiation of Nomascus into species and subspecies was a continuous and prolonged process lasting from ~4.2 until ~0.4 mya. Conclusions Although relationships among gibbon taxa on various levels remain unresolved, the present study provides a more complete view of the evolutionary and biogeographic history of the hylobatid family, and a more solid genetic basis for the taxonomic classification of the surviving taxa. We also show that mtDNA constitutes a useful marker for the accurate identification of individual gibbons, a tool which is urgently required to locate hunting hotspots and select individuals for captive breeding programs

  6. Ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws parallel great apes in motor self-regulation despite smaller brains.

    PubMed

    Kabadayi, Can; Taylor, Lucy A; von Bayern, Auguste M P; Osvath, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    Overriding motor impulses instigated by salient perceptual stimuli represent a fundamental inhibitory skill. Such motor self-regulation facilitates more rational behaviour, as it brings economy into the bodily interaction with the physical and social world. It also underlies certain complex cognitive processes including decision making. Recently, MacLean et al. (MacLean et al. 2014 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 111, 2140-2148. (doi:10.1073/pnas.1323533111)) conducted a large-scale study involving 36 species, comparing motor self-regulation across taxa. They concluded that absolute brain size predicts level of performance. The great apes were most successful. Only a few of the species tested were birds. Given birds' small brain size-in absolute terms-yet flexible behaviour, their motor self-regulation calls for closer study. Corvids exhibit some of the largest relative avian brain sizes-although small in absolute measure-as well as the most flexible cognition in the animal kingdom. We therefore tested ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws in the so-called cylinder task. We found performance indistinguishable from that of great apes despite the much smaller brains. We found both absolute and relative brain volume to be a reliable predictor of performance within Aves. The complex cognition of corvids is often likened to that of great apes; our results show further that they share similar fundamental cognitive mechanisms. PMID:27152224

  7. Ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws parallel great apes in motor self-regulation despite smaller brains

    PubMed Central

    Kabadayi, Can; Taylor, Lucy A.; von Bayern, Auguste M. P.; Osvath, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Overriding motor impulses instigated by salient perceptual stimuli represent a fundamental inhibitory skill. Such motor self-regulation facilitates more rational behaviour, as it brings economy into the bodily interaction with the physical and social world. It also underlies certain complex cognitive processes including decision making. Recently, MacLean et al. (MacLean et al. 2014 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 111, 2140–2148. (doi:10.1073/pnas.1323533111)) conducted a large-scale study involving 36 species, comparing motor self-regulation across taxa. They concluded that absolute brain size predicts level of performance. The great apes were most successful. Only a few of the species tested were birds. Given birds' small brain size—in absolute terms—yet flexible behaviour, their motor self-regulation calls for closer study. Corvids exhibit some of the largest relative avian brain sizes—although small in absolute measure—as well as the most flexible cognition in the animal kingdom. We therefore tested ravens, New Caledonian crows and jackdaws in the so-called cylinder task. We found performance indistinguishable from that of great apes despite the much smaller brains. We found both absolute and relative brain volume to be a reliable predictor of performance within Aves. The complex cognition of corvids is often likened to that of great apes; our results show further that they share similar fundamental cognitive mechanisms. PMID:27152224

  8. Adenovirus and herpesvirus diversity in free-ranging great apes in the Sangha region of the Republic Of Congo.

    PubMed

    Seimon, Tracie A; Olson, Sarah H; Lee, Kerry Jo; Rosen, Gail; Ondzie, Alain; Cameron, Kenneth; Reed, Patricia; Anthony, Simon J; Joly, Damien O; Karesh, William B; McAloose, Denise; Lipkin, W Ian

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases have caused die-offs in both free-ranging gorillas and chimpanzees. Understanding pathogen diversity and disease ecology is therefore critical for conserving these endangered animals. To determine viral diversity in free-ranging, non-habituated gorillas and chimpanzees in the Republic of Congo, genetic testing was performed on great-ape fecal samples collected near Odzala-Kokoua National Park. Samples were analyzed to determine ape species, identify individuals in the population, and to test for the presence of herpesviruses, adenoviruses, poxviruses, bocaviruses, flaviviruses, paramyxoviruses, coronaviruses, filoviruses, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We identified 19 DNA viruses representing two viral families, Herpesviridae and Adenoviridae, of which three herpesviruses had not been previously described. Co-detections of multiple herpesviruses and/or adenoviruses were present in both gorillas and chimpanzees. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and lymphocryptovirus (LCV) were found primarily in the context of co-association with each other and adenoviruses. Using viral discovery curves for herpesviruses and adenoviruses, the total viral richness in the sample population of gorillas and chimpanzees was estimated to be a minimum of 23 viruses, corresponding to a detection rate of 83%. These findings represent the first description of DNA viral diversity in feces from free-ranging gorillas and chimpanzees in or near the Odzala-Kokoua National Park and form a basis for understanding the types of viruses circulating among great apes in this region. PMID:25781992

  9. Lack of aprataxin impairs mitochondrial functions via downregulation of the APE1/NRF1/NRF2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Diaz, Beatriz; Barca, Emanuele; Balreira, Andrea; Lopez, Luis C; Tadesse, Saba; Krishna, Sindhu; Naini, Ali; Mariotti, Caterina; Castellotti, Barbara; Quinzii, Catarina M

    2015-08-15

    Ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 1 (AOA1) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in APTX, which encodes the DNA strand-break repair protein aprataxin (APTX). CoQ10 deficiency has been identified in fibroblasts and muscle of AOA1 patients carrying the common W279X mutation, and aprataxin has been localized to mitochondria in neuroblastoma cells, where it enhances preservation of mitochondrial function. In this study, we show that aprataxin deficiency impairs mitochondrial function, independent of its role in mitochondrial DNA repair. The bioenergetics defect in AOA1-mutant fibroblasts and APTX-depleted Hela cells is caused by decreased expression of SDHA and genes encoding CoQ biosynthetic enzymes, in association with reductions of APE1, NRF1 and NRF2. The biochemical and molecular abnormalities in APTX-depleted cells are recapitulated by knockdown of APE1 in Hela cells and are rescued by overexpression of NRF1/2. Importantly, pharmacological upregulation of NRF1 alone by 5-aminoimidazone-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide does not rescue the phenotype, which, in contrast, is reversed by the upregulation of NRF2 by rosiglitazone. Accordingly, we propose that the lack of aprataxin causes reduction of the pathway APE1/NRF1/NRF2 and their target genes. Our findings demonstrate a critical role of APTX in transcription regulation of mitochondrial function and the pathogenesis of AOA1 via a novel pathomechanistic pathway, which may be relevant to other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25976310

  10. Great apes' (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus) understanding of tool functional properties after limited experience.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Esther; Wobber, Victoria; Call, Josep

    2008-05-01

    Primates' understanding of tool functionality has been investigated extensively using a paradigm in which subjects are presented with a tool that they must use to obtain an out-of-reach reward. After being given experience on an initial problem, monkeys can transfer their skill to tools of different shapes while ignoring irrelevant tool changes (e.g., color). In contrast, monkeys without initial training perform poorly on the same tasks. Compared to most monkeys, great apes show a clear propensity for tool using and may not require as much experience to succeed on tool functionality tasks. We investigated this question by presenting 171 apes (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla gorilla, and Pongo pygmaeus) with several tool-use problems without giving them initial training or familiarizing them with the test materials. Apes succeeded without experience, but only on problems based on basic properties such as the reward being supported by an object. However, only minimal experience was sufficient to allow them to quickly improve their performance on more complex problems in which the reward was not in contact with the tool. PMID:18489238

  11. Tubes, tables and traps: great apes solve two functionally equivalent trap tasks but show no evidence of transfer across tasks.

    PubMed

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Call, Josep; Colmenares, Fernando

    2008-07-01

    Previous studies on tool using have shown that presenting subjects with certain modifications in the experimental setup can substantially improve their performance. However, procedural modifications (e.g. trap table task) may not only remove task constraints but also simplify the problem conceptually. The goal of this study was to design a variation of the trap-table that was functionally equivalent to the trap-tube task. In this new task, the subjects had to decide where to insert the tool and in which direction the reward should be pushed. We also administered a trap-tube task that allowed animals to push or rake the reward with the tool to compare the subjects' performance on both tasks. We used a larger sample of subjects than in previous studies and from all the four species of great apes (Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, and Pongo pygmaeus). The results showed that apes performed better in the trap-platform task than in the trap-tube task. Subjects solved the tube task faster than in previous studies and they also preferred to rake in rather than to push the reward out. There was no correlation in the level of performance between both tasks, and no indication of interspecies differences. These data are consistent with the idea that apes may possess some specific causal knowledge of traps but may lack the ability to establish analogical relations between functional equivalent tasks. PMID:18183433

  12. Remembering in tool-use tasks in children and apes: the role of the information at encoding.

    PubMed

    Martin-Ordas, Gema; Atance, Cristina M; Call, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Providing adults with relevant information (knowledge that they will be tested at some future time) increases motivation to remember. Research has shown that it is more effective to have this information prior to, rather than after, an encoding phase. We investigated this effect in apes and children in the context of tool-use tasks. In Experiment 1 we presented chimpanzees, orangutans, and bonobos with two tool-use tasks and three different two-tool sets. We had two conditions: prospective (PP) and retrospective (RP). In the PP subjects were shown the task that they would have to solve before they were shown the tools with which they could solve it. In the RP this order was reversed. Apes remembered the location of the useful tool better in the PP than in the RP. In Experiment 2 we presented 3- and 4-year-olds with the same conditions. Both age groups remembered the location of the correct tool in the PP, but only the 4-year-olds did so in the RP. Thus providing apes and preschool children with relevant information prior to, rather than after, the encoding phase enhances memory. These results have important implications for the understanding of the evolution of memory in general, and encoding mechanisms in particular. PMID:23767928

  13. Adenovirus and Herpesvirus Diversity in Free-Ranging Great Apes in the Sangha Region of the Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Seimon, Tracie A.; Olson, Sarah H.; Lee, Kerry Jo; Rosen, Gail; Ondzie, Alain; Cameron, Kenneth; Reed, Patricia; Anthony, Simon J.; Joly, Damien O.; McAloose, Denise; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases have caused die-offs in both free-ranging gorillas and chimpanzees. Understanding pathogen diversity and disease ecology is therefore critical for conserving these endangered animals. To determine viral diversity in free-ranging, non-habituated gorillas and chimpanzees in the Republic of Congo, genetic testing was performed on great-ape fecal samples collected near Odzala-Kokoua National Park. Samples were analyzed to determine ape species, identify individuals in the population, and to test for the presence of herpesviruses, adenoviruses, poxviruses, bocaviruses, flaviviruses, paramyxoviruses, coronaviruses, filoviruses, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). We identified 19 DNA viruses representing two viral families, Herpesviridae and Adenoviridae, of which three herpesviruses had not been previously described. Co-detections of multiple herpesviruses and/or adenoviruses were present in both gorillas and chimpanzees. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and lymphocryptovirus (LCV) were found primarily in the context of co-association with each other and adenoviruses. Using viral discovery curves for herpesviruses and adenoviruses, the total viral richness in the sample population of gorillas and chimpanzees was estimated to be a minimum of 23 viruses, corresponding to a detection rate of 83%. These findings represent the first description of DNA viral diversity in feces from free-ranging gorillas and chimpanzees in or near the Odzala-Kokoua National Park and form a basis for understanding the types of viruses circulating among great apes in this region. PMID:25781992

  14. Human AP endonuclease (APE1/Ref-1) and its acetylation regulate YB-1-p300 recruitment and RNA polymerase II loading in the drug-induced activation of multidrug resistance gene MDR1.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, S; Mantha, A K; Mitra, S; Bhakat, K K

    2011-01-27

    The overexpression of human apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 1 (APE1/Ref-1), a key enzyme in the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway, is often associated with tumor cell resistance to various anticancer drugs. In this study, we examined the molecular basis of transcriptional regulatory (nonrepair) function of APE1 in promoting resistance to certain types of drugs. We have recently shown that APE1 stably interacts with Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1), and acts as its coactivator for the expression of multidrug resistance gene MDR1, thereby causing drug resistance. In this study, we show, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time that APE1 is stably associated with the basic transcription factor RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) and the coactivator p300 on the endogenous MDR1 promoter. The depletion of APE1 significantly reduces YB-1-p300 recruitment to the promoter, resulting in reduced RNA pol II loading. Drug-induced APE1 acetylation, which is mediated by p300, enhances formation of acetylated APE1 (AcAPE1)-YB-1-p300 complex on the MDR1 promoter. Enhanced recruitment of this complex increases MDR1 promoter-dependent luciferase activity and its endogenous expression. Using APE1-downregulated cells and cells overexpressing wild-type APE1 or its nonacetylable mutant, we have demonstrated that the loss of APE1's acetylation impaired MDR1 activation and sensitizes the cells to cisplatin or etoposide. We have thus established the basis for APE1's acetylation-dependent regulatory function in inducing MDR1-mediated drug resistance. PMID:20856196

  15. Role of the DNA Base Excision Repair Protein, APE1 in Cisplatin, Oxaliplatin, or Carboplatin Induced Sensory Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Mark R.; Jiang, Yanlin; Guo, Chunlu; Reed, April; Meng, Hongdi; Vasko, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Although chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a dose-limiting side effect of platinum drugs, the mechanisms of this toxicity remain unknown. Previous work in our laboratory suggests that cisplatin-induced CIPN is secondary to DNA damage which is susceptible to base excision repair (BER). To further examine this hypothesis, we studied the effects of cisplatin, oxaliplatin, and carboplatin on cell survival, DNA damage, ROS production, and functional endpoints in rat sensory neurons in culture in the absence or presence of reduced expression of the BER protein AP endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE1). Using an in situ model of peptidergic sensory neuron function, we examined the effects of the platinum drugs on hind limb capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation. Exposing sensory neurons in culture to the three platinum drugs caused a concentration-dependent increase in apoptosis and cell death, although the concentrations of carboplatin were 10 fold higher than cisplatin. As previously observed with cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin also increased DNA damage as indicated by an increase in phospho-H2AX and reduced the capsaicin-evoked release of CGRP from neuronal cultures. Both cisplatin and oxaliplatin increased the production of ROS as well as 8-oxoguanine DNA adduct levels, whereas carboplatin did not. Reducing levels of APE1 in neuronal cultures augmented the cisplatin and oxaliplatin induced toxicity, but did not alter the effects of carboplatin. Using an in vivo model, systemic injection of cisplatin (3 mg/kg), oxaliplatin (3 mg/kg), or carboplatin (30 mg/kg) once a week for three weeks caused a decrease in capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation, which was delayed in onset. The effects of cisplatin on capsaicin-evoked vasodilatation were attenuated by chronic administration of E3330, a redox inhibitor of APE1 that serendipitously enhances APE1 DNA repair activity in sensory neurons. These outcomes support the importance of the BER pathway, and particularly APE

  16. Genetic Load of Loss-of-Function Polymorphic Variants in Great Apes.

    PubMed

    de Valles-Ibáñez, Guillem; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Luisi, Pierre; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Casals, Ferran

    2016-03-01

    Loss of function (LoF) genetic variants are predicted to disrupt gene function, and are therefore expected to substantially reduce individual's viability. Knowing the genetic burden of LoF variants in endangered species is of interest for a better understanding of the effects of declining population sizes on species viability. In this study, we have estimated the number of LoF polymorphic variants in six great ape populations, based on whole-genome sequencing data in 79 individuals. Our results show that although the number of functional variants per individual is conditioned by the effective population size, the number of variants with a drastic phenotypic effect is very similar across species. We hypothesize that for those variants with high selection coefficients, differences in effective population size are not important enough to affect the efficiency of natural selection to remove them. We also describe that mostly CpG LoF mutations are shared across species, and an accumulation of LoF variants at olfactory receptor genes in agreement with its pseudogenization in humans and other primate species. PMID:26912403

  17. The evolution of African great ape subtelomeric heterochromatin and the fusion of human chromosome 2.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Mario; Catacchio, Claudia R; Sajjadian, Saba; Vives, Laura; Sudmant, Peter H; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Graves, Tina A; Wilson, Richard K; Eichler, Evan E

    2012-06-01

    Chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes differ from human chromosomes by the presence of large blocks of subterminal heterochromatin thought to be composed primarily of arrays of tandem satellite sequence. We explore their sequence composition and organization and show a complex organization composed of specific sets of segmental duplications that have hyperexpanded in concert with the formation of subterminal satellites. These regions are highly copy number polymorphic between and within species, and copy number differences involving hundreds of copies can be accurately estimated by assaying read-depth of next-generation sequencing data sets. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses suggest that the structures have arisen largely independently in the two lineages with the exception of a few seed sequences present in the common ancestor of humans and African apes. We propose a model where an ancestral human-chimpanzee pericentric inversion and the ancestral chromosome 2 fusion both predisposed and protected the chimpanzee and human genomes, respectively, to the formation of subtelomeric heterochromatin. Our findings highlight the complex interplay between duplicated sequences and chromosomal rearrangements that rapidly alter the cytogenetic landscape in a short period of evolutionary time. PMID:22419167

  18. The evolution of African great ape subtelomeric heterochromatin and the fusion of human chromosome 2

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Mario; Catacchio, Claudia R.; Sajjadian, Saba; Vives, Laura; Sudmant, Peter H.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Graves, Tina A.; Wilson, Richard K.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2012-01-01

    Chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes differ from human chromosomes by the presence of large blocks of subterminal heterochromatin thought to be composed primarily of arrays of tandem satellite sequence. We explore their sequence composition and organization and show a complex organization composed of specific sets of segmental duplications that have hyperexpanded in concert with the formation of subterminal satellites. These regions are highly copy number polymorphic between and within species, and copy number differences involving hundreds of copies can be accurately estimated by assaying read-depth of next-generation sequencing data sets. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses suggest that the structures have arisen largely independently in the two lineages with the exception of a few seed sequences present in the common ancestor of humans and African apes. We propose a model where an ancestral human-chimpanzee pericentric inversion and the ancestral chromosome 2 fusion both predisposed and protected the chimpanzee and human genomes, respectively, to the formation of subtelomeric heterochromatin. Our findings highlight the complex interplay between duplicated sequences and chromosomal rearrangements that rapidly alter the cytogenetic landscape in a short period of evolutionary time. PMID:22419167

  19. Tandem repeat variation in human and great ape populations and its impact on gene expression divergence.

    PubMed

    Bilgin Sonay, Tugce; Carvalho, Tiago; Robinson, Mark D; Greminger, Maja P; Krützen, Michael; Comas, David; Highnam, Gareth; Mittelman, David; Sharp, Andrew; Marques-Bonet, Tomàs; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are stretches of DNA that are highly variable in length and mutate rapidly. They are thus an important source of genetic variation. This variation is highly informative for population and conservation genetics. It has also been associated with several pathological conditions and with gene expression regulation. However, genome-wide surveys of TR variation in humans and closely related species have been scarce due to technical difficulties derived from short-read technology. Here we explored the genome-wide diversity of TRs in a panel of 83 human and nonhuman great ape genomes, in a total of six different species, and studied their impact on gene expression evolution. We found that population diversity patterns can be efficiently captured with short TRs (repeat unit length, 1-5 bp). We examined the potential evolutionary role of TRs in gene expression differences between humans and primates by using 30,275 larger TRs (repeat unit length, 2-50 bp). Genes that contained TRs in the promoters, in their 3' untranslated region, in introns, and in exons had higher expression divergence than genes without repeats in the regions. Polymorphic small repeats (1-5 bp) had also higher expression divergence compared with genes with fixed or no TRs in the gene promoters. Our findings highlight the potential contribution of TRs to human evolution through gene regulation. PMID:26290536

  20. Artefacts of apes, humans, and others: towards comparative assessment and analysis.

    PubMed

    Gowlett, J A J

    2009-10-01

    This paper explores issues of technology and artefacts in a comparative cross-species frame, using archaeological examples and modern data sets to illustrate points about process and content. It develops the argument that regardless of species, artefacts have a special significance as external projections of the mind, often necessitating cognitive judgements on the basis of several variables and subject to influences by cultural tradition, functional needs, and raw materials. In humans, apes, and other tool using animals, behaviour overlaps in some respects and is vastly different in others. Overlapping aspects are worth seeking out and exploiting, as they provide opportunities to investigate factors influencing variation and to gain insights into cognition. Recent primatological research establishes much more foundation for continuity, but many of the details of artefacts and their variation remain to be explored. This paper presents case studies of variability and standardisation that suggest the limits on variation are as tight in some chimpanzee produced artefacts as in many produced by humans, and functional constraints appear to operate more strongly on some parts of artefacts than others. Thus, degree of standardisation cannot be used as a simple index to 'refinement,' but the widespread overlap in standardisation between human and nonhuman artefacts greatly expands the scope for study. PMID:19740522

  1. How great apes perform on a modified trap-tube task.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Nicholas J; Call, Josep

    2006-07-01

    To date, neither primates nor birds have shown clear evidence of causal knowledge when attempting to solve the trap tube task. One factor that may have contributed to mask the knowledge that subjects may have about the task is that subjects were only allowed to push the reward away from them, which is a particularly difficult action for primates in certain problem solving situations. We presented five orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus), two chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), two bonobos (Pan paniscus), and one gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) with a modified trap tube that allowed subjects to push or rake the reward with the tool. In two additional follow-up tests, we inverted the tube 180 degrees rendering the trap nonfunctional and also presented subjects with the original task in which they were required to push the reward out of the tube. Results showed that all but one of the subjects preferred to rake the reward. Two orangutans and one chimpanzee (all of whom preferred to rake the reward), consistently avoided the trap only when it was functional but failed the original task. These findings suggest that some great apes may have some causal knowledge about the trap-tube task. Their success, however, depended on whether they were allowed to choose certain tool-using actions. PMID:16612632

  2. Extreme selective sweeps independently targeted the X chromosomes of the great apes

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kiwoong; Munch, Kasper; Hobolth, Asger; Dutheil, Julien Yann; Veeramah, Krishna R.; Woerner, August E.; Hammer, Michael F.; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2015-01-01

    The unique inheritance pattern of the X chromosome exposes it to natural selection in a way that is different from that of the autosomes, potentially resulting in accelerated evolution. We perform a comparative analysis of X chromosome polymorphism in 10 great ape species, including humans. In most species, we identify striking megabase-wide regions, where nucleotide diversity is less than 20% of the chromosomal average. Such regions are found exclusively on the X chromosome. The regions overlap partially among species, suggesting that the underlying targets are partly shared among species. The regions have higher proportions of singleton SNPs, higher levels of population differentiation, and a higher nonsynonymous-to-synonymous substitution ratio than the rest of the X chromosome. We show that the extent to which diversity is reduced is incompatible with direct selection or the action of background selection and soft selective sweeps alone, and therefore, we suggest that very strong selective sweeps have independently targeted these specific regions in several species. The only genomic feature that we can identify as strongly associated with loss of diversity is the location of testis-expressed ampliconic genes, which also have reduced diversity around them. We hypothesize that these genes may be responsible for selective sweeps in the form of meiotic drive caused by an intragenomic conflict in male meiosis. PMID:25941379

  3. Assessing the psychological health of captive and wild apes: a response to Ferdowsian et al. (2011).

    PubMed

    Rosati, Alexandra G; Herrmann, Esther; Kaminski, Juliane; Krupenye, Christopher; Melis, Alicia P; Schroepfer, Kara; Tan, Jingzhi; Warneken, Felix; Wobber, Victoria; Hare, Brian

    2013-08-01

    As many studies of cognition and behavior involve captive animals, assessing any psychological impact of captive conditions is an important goal for comparative researchers. Ferdowsian and colleagues (2011) sought to address whether captive chimpanzees show elevated signs of psychopathology relative to wild apes. They modified a checklist of diagnostic criteria for major depression and posttraumatic stress disorder in humans, and applied these criteria to various captive and wild chimpanzee populations. We argue that measures derived from human diagnostic criteria are not a powerful tool for assessing the psychological health of nonverbal animals. In addition, we highlight certain methodological drawbacks of the specific approach used by Ferdowsian and colleagues (2011). We propose that research should (1) focus on objective behavioral criteria that account for species-typical behaviors and can be reliably identified across populations; (2) account for population differences in rearing history when comparing how current environment impacts psychological health in animals; and (3) focus on how changes in current human practices can improve the well-being of both captive and wild animals. PMID:22889365

  4. Watering holes: The use of arboreal sources of drinking water by Old World monkeys and apes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Narayan; Huffman, Michael A; Gupta, Shreejata; Nautiyal, Himani; Mendonça, Renata; Morino, Luca; Sinha, Anindya

    2016-08-01

    Water is one of the most important components of an animal's diet, as it is essential for life. Primates, as do most animals, procure water directly from standing or free-flowing sources such as pools, ponds and rivers, or indirectly by the ingestion of certain plant parts. The latter is frequently described as the main source of water for predominantly arboreal species. However, in addition to these, many species are known to drink water accumulated in tree-holes. This has been commonly observed in several arboreal New World primate species, but rarely reported systematically from Old World primates. Here, we report observations of this behaviour from eight great ape and Old World monkey species, namely chimpanzee, orangutan, siamang, western hoolock gibbon, northern pig-tailed macaque, bonnet macaque, rhesus macaque and the central Himalayan langur. We hypothesise three possible reasons why these primates drink water from tree-holes: (1) coping with seasonal or habitat-specific water shortages, (2) predator/human conflict avoidance, and (3) potential medicinal benefits. We also suggest some alternative hypotheses that should be tested in future studies. This behaviour is likely to be more prevalent than currently thought, and may have significant, previously unknown, influences on primate survival and health, warranting further detailed studies. PMID:27234173

  5. Genetic Load of Loss-of-Function Polymorphic Variants in Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    de Valles-Ibáñez, Guillem; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Luisi, Pierre; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Casals, Ferran

    2016-01-01

    Loss of function (LoF) genetic variants are predicted to disrupt gene function, and are therefore expected to substantially reduce individual’s viability. Knowing the genetic burden of LoF variants in endangered species is of interest for a better understanding of the effects of declining population sizes on species viability. In this study, we have estimated the number of LoF polymorphic variants in six great ape populations, based on whole-genome sequencing data in 79 individuals. Our results show that although the number of functional variants per individual is conditioned by the effective population size, the number of variants with a drastic phenotypic effect is very similar across species. We hypothesize that for those variants with high selection coefficients, differences in effective population size are not important enough to affect the efficiency of natural selection to remove them. We also describe that mostly CpG LoF mutations are shared across species, and an accumulation of LoF variants at olfactory receptor genes in agreement with its pseudogenization in humans and other primate species. PMID:26912403

  6. From apes to humans: locomotion as a key feature for phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Senut, Brigitte

    2002-03-01

    If bipedalism has often been considered to be of a crucial interest for understanding hominid evolution, the acceptance of locomotor features to build phylogenies is still far from being a reality in the field. Especially for hominid evolution, it still seems to be difficult to accept that traits, other than craniodental ones, can be useful for defining the major dichotomies. The recent discovery of Australopithecus anamensis suggests a challenging view of the major dichotomy between apes and humans. Whilst it is widely accepted that Ardipithecus ramidus is ancestral to Australopithecus anamensis, which in its turn is ancestral to Australopithecus afarensis and then to later hominids, the postcranial adaptations, which should be taken into account, suggest another branching pattern. Based on the fact that by 4.0 million years two different locomotor patterns can be identified in hominids, two lineages would appear to be present: the "Australopithecine" lineage (with Australopithecus afarensis or Ardipithecus ramidus if the latter is really a hominid sensu stricto) and the "Hominine" lineage (with Australopithecus anamensis = Praeanthropus africanus). PMID:12050904

  7. Tandem repeat variation in human and great ape populations and its impact on gene expression divergence

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin Sonay, Tugce; Carvalho, Tiago; Robinson, Mark D.; Greminger, Maja P.; Krützen, Michael; Comas, David; Highnam, Gareth; Mittelman, David; Sharp, Andrew; Marques-Bonet, Tomàs; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Tandem repeats (TRs) are stretches of DNA that are highly variable in length and mutate rapidly. They are thus an important source of genetic variation. This variation is highly informative for population and conservation genetics. It has also been associated with several pathological conditions and with gene expression regulation. However, genome-wide surveys of TR variation in humans and closely related species have been scarce due to technical difficulties derived from short-read technology. Here we explored the genome-wide diversity of TRs in a panel of 83 human and nonhuman great ape genomes, in a total of six different species, and studied their impact on gene expression evolution. We found that population diversity patterns can be efficiently captured with short TRs (repeat unit length, 1–5 bp). We examined the potential evolutionary role of TRs in gene expression differences between humans and primates by using 30,275 larger TRs (repeat unit length, 2–50 bp). Genes that contained TRs in the promoters, in their 3′ untranslated region, in introns, and in exons had higher expression divergence than genes without repeats in the regions. Polymorphic small repeats (1–5 bp) had also higher expression divergence compared with genes with fixed or no TRs in the gene promoters. Our findings highlight the potential contribution of TRs to human evolution through gene regulation. PMID:26290536

  8. Extracellularly secreted APE1/Ref-1 triggers apoptosis in triple-negative breast cancer cells via RAGE binding, which is mediated through acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Ran; Kim, Ki Mo; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Choi, Sunga

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the mechanism of apoptosis caused by post-translational modification, hyperacetylation in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. We previously showed that trichostatin A (TSA) induced secretion of acetylated apurinic apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (Ac-APE1/Ref-1). This is the first report showing that Ac-APE1/Ref-1 initiates apoptosis in TNBC cells by binding to the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). The functional significance of secreted Ac-APE1/Ref-1 was studied by induction of intracellular hyperacetylation through co-treatment with acetylsalicylic acid and TSA in MDA-MB-231 cells. In response to hyperacetylation, secretion of Ac-APE1/Ref-1 in vesicles was observed, resulting in significantly decreased cell viability and induction of apoptosis with increased expression of RAGE. The hyperacetylation-induced apoptosis was similar in two other TNBC cell lines: BT-459 and MDA-MB-468. Therefore, hyperacetylation may be a therapeutic target for treatment of TNBCs. This study introduces a novel paradigm whereby post-translational modification induces apoptotic cell death in breast cancer cells resistant to standard chemotherapeutic agents through secretion of auto- or paracrine molecules such as Ac-APE1/Ref-1. PMID:26125438

  9. Accelerated processing of solitary and clustered abasic site DNA damage lesions by APE1 in the presence of aqueous extract of Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Bhavini; DAS, Prolay; Kumari, Rekha

    2016-06-01

    The stimulatory effect of the aqueous extract of G. lucidum, a basidiomycetes class fungus in the APE1-enzyme-mediated processing of solitary and bistranded clustered abasic sites DNA damages is presented. Abasic sites are considered the most common type of DNA damage lesions. Our study shows enhanced activity of APE1 in the processing of abasic sites in the presence of the polysaccharides fraction of G. lucidum. Remarkable increase in the amount of single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) from solitary and bistranded clustered abasic sites respectively with APE1 in the presence of the extract was found. This trend is maintained when abasic sites in DNA oligomers are exposed to fibroblast cell extracts in the presence of the extract. While DNA conformational alteration is negligible, APE1 enzyme shows characteristic changes in the alpha helix and beta strand ratio after incubation with G. lucidum extract. The enhanced reactivity of APE1 at the molecular level in the presence of G. lucidium is attributed to this effect. This study potentially amplifies the scope of the use of G. lucidum, which was earlier shown to have only reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging properties with regards to DNA damage inhibition. PMID:27240987

  10. Aminated polyethersulfone-silver nanoparticles (AgNPs-APES) composite membranes with controlled silver ion release for antibacterial and water treatment applications.

    PubMed

    Haider, M Salman; Shao, Godlisten N; Imran, S M; Park, Sung Soo; Abbas, Nadir; Tahir, M Suleman; Hussain, Manwar; Bae, Wookeun; Kim, Hee Taik

    2016-05-01

    The present study reports the antibacterial disinfection properties of a series of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) immobilized membranes. Initially, polyethersulfone (PES) was functionalized through the introduction of amino groups to form aminated polyethersulfone (NH2-PES, APES). AgNPs were then coordinately immobilized on the surface of the APES composite membrane to form AgNPs-APES. The properties of the obtained membrane were examined by FT-IR, XPS, XRD, TGA, ICP-OES and SEM-EDAX analyses. These structural characterizations revealed that AgNPs ranging from 5 to 40nm were immobilized on the surface of the polymer membrane. Antibacterial tests of the samples showed that the AgNPs-APES exhibited higher activity than the AgNPs-PES un-functionalized membrane. Generally, the AgNPs-APES 1cm×3cm strip revealed a four times longer life than the un-functionalized AgNPs polymer membranes. The evaluation of the Ag(+) leaching properties of the obtained samples indicated that approximately 30% of the AgNPs could be retained, even after 12days of operation. Further analysis indicated that silver ion release can be sustained for approximately 25days. The present study provides a systematic and novel approach to synthesize water treatment membranes with controlled and improved silver (Ag(+)) release to enhance the lifetime of the membranes. PMID:26952479

  11. The Ape-1/Ref-1 redox antagonist E3330 inhibits the growth of tumor endothelium and endothelial progenitor cells: therapeutic implications in tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zou, Gang-Ming; Karikari, Collins; Kabe, Yasuaki; Handa, Hiroshi; Anders, Robert A; Maitra, Anirban

    2009-04-01

    The apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (Ape-1/Ref-1) is a multi-functional protein, involved in DNA repair and the activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors. The Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain acts as a cytoprotective element in normal endothelial cells, mitigating the deleterious effects of apoptotic stimuli through induction of survival signals. We explored the role of the Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain in the maintenance of tumor-associated endothelium, and of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which contribute to tumor angiogenesis. We demonstrate that E3330, a small molecule inhibitor of the Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain, blocks the in vitro growth of pancreatic cancer-associated endothelial cells (PCECs) and EPCs, which is recapitulated by stable expression of a dominant-negative redox domain mutant. Further, E3330 blocks the differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into CD31(+) endothelial progeny. Exposure of PCECs to E3330 results in a reduction of H-ras expression and intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, as well as decreased DNA-binding activity of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, HIF-1alpha. E3330 also reduces secreted and intracellular vascular endothelial growth factor expression by pancreatic cancer cells, while concomitantly downregulating the cognate receptor Flk-1/KDR on PCECs. Inhibition of the Ape-1/Ref-1 redox domain with E3330 or comparable angiogenesis inhibitors might be a potent therapeutic strategy in solid tumors. PMID:19097035

  12. Apes (Gorilla gorilla, Pan paniscus, P. troglodytes, Pongo abelii) versus corvids (Corvus corax, C. corone) in a support task: the effect of pattern and functionality.

    PubMed

    Albiach-Serrano, Anna; Bugnyar, Thomas; Call, Josep

    2012-11-01

    Apes (Gorilla gorilla, Pan paniscus, P. troglodytes, Pong abelii) and corvids (Corvus corax, C. corone) are among the most proficient and flexible tool users in the animal kingdom. Although it has been proposed that this is the result of convergent evolution, little is known about whether this is limited to behavior or also includes the underlying cognitive mechanisms. We compared several species of apes (bonobos, chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans) and corvids (carrion crows and common ravens) using exactly the same paradigm: a support task with elements from the classical patterned-string tasks. Corvids proved able to solve at least an easy pattern, whereas apes outperformed corvids with respect to the complexity of the patterns solved, the relative number of subjects solving each problem, and the speed to reach criterion. We addressed the question of whether subjects based their choices purely on perceptual cues or on a more abstract understanding of the problem. This was done by using a perceptually very similar but causally different condition where instead of paper strips there were strip shapes painted on a platform. Corvids' performance did not differ between conditions, whereas apes were able to solve the real but not the painted task. This shows that apes were not basing their choices just on spatial or arbitrary perceptual cues. Instead, and unlike corvids, they must have had some causal knowledge of the task. PMID:22545765

  13. Simulation of a two-dimensional dipolar system on a APE100/quadrics SIMD architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, A.; Pisacane, F.; Rosato, V.

    1997-06-01

    The temperature behavior of a system of dipoles with long-range interactions has been simulated via a two-dimensional lattice Monte Carlo on a massively (SIMD) platform (Quadrics/APE100). Thermodynamic quantities have been evaluated in order to locate and to characterize the phase transition in absence of applied field. Emphasis is given to the code implementation on the SIMD architecture and to the relevant features which have been used to improve code capabilities and performances. The probability of simultaneous occurrence of at least k spanning clusters has been studied by Monte Carlo simulations on the 2D square lattice with free boundaries at the bond percolation threshold p{sub c} = {1/2}. It is found that the probability of k and more Incipient Spanning Clusters (ISC) have the values P(k > 1) {approx} 0.00658(3) and P(k > 2) {approx} 0.00000148(21) provided that the limit of these probabilities for infinite lattices exists. The probability P(k > 3) of more than three ISC could be estimated to be of the order of 10{sup -11} and is beyond the possibility to compute such a value by nowadays computers. So, it is impossible to check in simulations the Aizenman law for the probabilities when k {much_gt} 1. We have detected a single sample with four ISC in a total number of about 1010 samples investigated. The probability of this single event is 1/10 for that number of samples. The influence of boundary conditions is discussed in the last section.

  14. Response facilitation in the four great apes: is there a role for empathy?

    PubMed

    Amici, Federica; Aureli, Filippo; Call, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Contagious yawning is a form of response facilitation found in humans and other primates in which observing a model yawning enhances the chance that the observer will also yawn. Because contagious yawning seems to be more easily triggered when models are conspecifics or have a strong social bond with the observer, it has been proposed that contagious yawning is linked to empathy. A possible way to test this hypothesis is to analyze whether individuals' responses differ when they observe models yawning or performing different involuntary (i.e., nose wiping, scratching) and voluntary (i.e., hand closing, wrist shaking) actions that are not linked to empathy. In this study, we tested the four great ape species with two different setups by exposing them to a human experimenter repeatedly performing these actions online, and video-recorded conspecifics repeatedly performing these actions on a screen. We examined which behaviors were subject to response facilitation, whether response facilitation was triggered by both human models and video-recorded conspecifics, and whether all species showed evidence of response facilitation. Our results showed that chimpanzees yawned significantly more when and shortly after watching videos of conspecifics (but not humans) yawning than in control conditions, and they did not do so as a response to increased levels of anxiety. For all other behaviors, no species produced more target actions when being exposed to either model than under control conditions. Moreover, the individuals that were more "reactive" when watching yawning videos were not more reactive when exposed to other actions. Since, at least in chimpanzees, (1) subjects only showed response facilitation when they were exposed to yawning and (2) only if models were conspecifics, it appears that contagious yawning is triggered by unique mechanisms and might be linked to empathy. PMID:23975161

  15. Joint orientation and function in great ape and human proximal pedal phalanges.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Nicole L; Richmond, Brian G

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have referred to the degree of dorsal canting of the base of the proximal phalanx as an indicator of human-like metatarsophalangeal joint function and thus a diagnostic trait of habitual bipedality in the fossil record. Here, we used a simple method to investigate differences in forefoot function on a finer scale. Building on Duncan et al.'s (Am J Phys Anthropol 93 [1994] 67-81) research, we tested whether dorsal canting reflects differences between sexes in locomotor behavior, whether habitual shoe wear influences dorsal canting in humans, and whether proximal joint morphology differs between rays in Pan and humans. Our results corroborate previous research in showing that humans have proximal phalanges with joint orientations that are significantly more dorsal than, but overlap with, those of great apes. We also found that male gorillas have significantly more dorsally canted second proximal phalanges than their female counterparts, while the opposite pattern between the sexes was found in Pan troglodytes. Inter-ray comparisons indicate that Pan have more dorsally canted first proximal phalanges than second proximal phalanges, while the opposite pattern was found in humans. Minimally shod humans have slightly but significantly more dorsally canted second proximal phalanges than those of habitually shod humans, indicating that phalanges of unshod humans provide the most appropriate comparative samples for analyses of early hominins. Overall, our analysis suggests that though the measurement of dorsal canting is limited in its sensitivity to certain intraspecific differences in function, phalangeal joint orientation reflects interspecific differences in joint function, with the caveat that different patterns of forefoot function during gait can involve similar articular sets of metatarsophalangeal joints. PMID:19554617

  16. Dental wear, wear rate, and dental disease in the African apes.

    PubMed

    Elgart, Alison A

    2010-06-01

    The African apes possess thinner enamel than do other hominoids, and a certain amount of dentin exposure may be advantageous in the processing of tough diets eaten by Gorilla. Dental wear (attrition plus abrasion) that erodes the enamel exposes the underlying dentin and creates additional cutting edges at the dentin-enamel junction. Hypothetically, efficiency of food processing increases with junction formation until an optimal amount is reached, but excessive wear hinders efficient food processing and may lead to sickness, reduced fecundity, and death. Occlusal surfaces of molars and incisors in three populations each of Gorilla and Pan were videotaped and digitized. The quantity of incisal and molar occlusal dental wear and the lengths of dentin-enamel junctions were measured in 220 adult and 31 juvenile gorilla and chimpanzee skulls. Rates of dental wear were calculated in juveniles by scoring the degree of wear between adjacent molars M1 and M2. Differences were compared by principal (major) axis analysis. ANOVAs compared means of wear amounts. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the relationship between molar wear and incidence of dental disease. Results indicate that quantities of wear are significantly greater in permanent incisors and molars and juvenile molars of gorillas compared to chimpanzees. The lengths of dentin-enamel junctions were predominantly suboptimal. Western lowland gorillas have the highest quantities of wear and the most molars with suboptimal wear. The highest rates of wear are seen in Pan paniscus and Pan t. troglodytes, and the lowest rates are found in P.t. schweinfurthii and G. g. graueri. Among gorillas, G. b. beringei have the highest rates but low amounts of wear. Coefficients between wear and dental disease were low, but significant when all teeth were combined. Gorilla teeth are durable, and wear does not lead to mechanical senescence in this sample. PMID:20077466

  17. Evidence for Ape and Human Specializations in Geniculostriate Projections from VGLUT2 Immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Katherine L.; Suwyn, Carolyn; Reding, Katherine M.; Smiley, John F.; Hackett, Troy A.; Preuss, Todd M.

    2012-01-01

    Vesicular glutamate transporters reuptake glutamate into synaptic vesicles at excitatory synapses. Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) is localized in the cortical terminals of neuronal somas located in the main sensory nuclei of the thalamus. Thus, immunolabeling of cortex with antibodies to VGLUT2 can reveal geniculostriate terminal distributions in species in which connectivity cannot be studied with tract-tracing techniques, permitting broader comparative studies of cortical specializations. Here, we used VGLUT2 immunohistochemistry to compare the organization of geniculostriate afferents in primary visual cortex in hominid primates (humans, chimpanzees, orangutan), Old World monkeys (rhesus macaques, vervets), and New World monkeys (squirrel monkeys). The New World and Old World monkeys had a broad, dense band of terminal-like labeling in cortical layer 4C, a narrow band of labeling in layer 4A, and additional labeling in layers 2/3 and 6, consistent with results from conventional tract-tracing studies in these species. By contrast, although the hominid primates had a prominent layer 4C band, labeling of layer 4A was sparse or absent. Label was also present in layers 2/3 and 6, although labeling of layer 6 in hominids was weaker and possibly more individually variable than in Old World and New World monkeys. These findings are consistent with previous observations from cytochrome oxidase histochemistry and a very small number of connectivity studies, suggesting that the projection from the parvocellular layers of the lateral geniculate nucleus to layer 4A were strongly reduced or eliminated in humans and apes following their evolutionary divergence from the other anthropoid primates. PMID:22889767

  18. Great ape origins of personality maturation and sex differences: a study of orangutans and chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Alexander; King, James E

    2015-04-01

    Human personality development evinces increased emotional stability, prosocial tendencies, and responsibility. One hypothesis offered to explain this pattern is Social-Investment Theory, which posits that culturally defined social roles, including marriage and employment, are responsible for the increased maturity. Alternatively, Five-Factor Theory emphasizes the role of biological factors, such as those governing physical development, which may predate the emergence of humans. Five-Factor Theory, unlike Social-Investment Theory, predicts that all or some of the human personality developmental trends should be present in great apes, our closest evolutionary relatives. To test this prediction and to better understand the evolutionary origins of sex differences, we examined age and sex differences in the chimpanzee and orangutan personality domains Extraversion, Dominance, Neuroticism, and Agreeableness. We also examined the Activity and Gregariousness facets of Extraversion and the orangutan Intellect domain. Extraversion and Neuroticism declined across age groups in both species, in common with humans. A significant interaction indicated that Agreeableness declined in orangutans but increased in chimpanzees, as it does in humans, though this may reflect differences in how Agreeableness was defined in each species. Significant interactions indicated that male chimpanzees, unlike male orangutans, displayed higher Neuroticism scores than females and maintained higher levels of Activity and Dominance into old age than female chimpanzees, male orangutans, and female orangutans. Personality-age correlations were comparable across orangutans and chimpanzees and were similar to those reported in human studies. Sex differences were stronger in chimpanzees than in humans or orangutans. These findings support Five-Factor Theory, suggest the role of gene-culture coevolution in shaping personality development, and suggest that sex differences evolved independently in different

  19. Comparative morphology of the hominin and African ape hyoid bone, a possible marker of the evolution of speech.

    PubMed

    Steele, James; Clegg, Margaret; Martelli, Sandra

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the morphology of the hyoid in three closely related species, Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, and Gorilla gorilla. Differences and similarities between the hyoids of these species are characterized and used to interpret the morphology and affi nities of the Dikika A. afarensis, Kebara 2 Neanderthal, and other fossil hominin hyoid bones. Humans and African apes are found to have distinct hyoid morphologies. In humans the maximum width across the distal tips of the articulated greater horns is usually slightly greater than the maximum length (distal greater horn tip to most anterior point of the hyoid body in the midline). A different pattern is usually found in the African ape hyoids, which have much greater maximum lengths. In humans, the hyoid body is also much more anteroposteriorly shallow in proportion to its height and width, and this is true for all age classes. The Dikika australopithecine hyoid body proportions are chimpanzeelike. A discriminant function analysis, using a larger subadult sample from the three extant species than that reported by Alemseged et al. (2006), confirms this finding. The Kebara hyoid dimensions (body alone, and articulated body and greater horns) are almost all within the observed range for human hyoids. Discriminant functions clearly distinguish human from African ape hyoids and classify the Kebara 2 hyoid as human (confirming the finding of Arensburg et al. 1989). Our virtual dissection of a chimpanzee air sac system shows its subhyoid extension into the dorsal hyoid body. Following Alemseged et al. (2006), the expanded bulla characteristic of the African ape and australopithecine hyoid body is therefore interpreted as refl ecting the presence of such a laryngeal air sac extension. Its absence in the human, Neanderthal, and H. heidelbergensis (Atapuerca SH) hyoids implicates the loss of the laryngeal air sacs as a derived Neanderthal and modern human trait, which evolved no later than the middle Pleistocene. If

  20. Are chimpanzees really so poor at understanding imperative pointing? Some new data and an alternative view of canine and ape social cognition.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, William D; Russell, Jamie; McIntyre, Joe; Leavens, David A

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable interest in comparative research on different species' abilities to respond to human communicative cues such as gaze and pointing. It has been reported that some canines perform significantly better than monkeys and apes on tasks requiring the comprehension of either declarative or imperative pointing and these differences have been attributed to domestication in dogs. Here we tested a sample of chimpanzees on a task requiring comprehension of an imperative request and show that, though there are considerable individual differences, the performance by the apes rival those reported in pet dogs. We suggest that small differences in methodology can have a pronounced influence on performance on these types of tasks. We further suggest that basic differences in subject sampling, subject recruitment and rearing experiences have resulted in a skewed representation of canine abilities compared to those of monkeys and apes. PMID:24278128

  1. Are Chimpanzees Really So Poor at Understanding Imperative Pointing? Some New Data and an Alternative View of Canine and Ape Social Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, William D.; Russell, Jamie; McIntyre, Joe; Leavens, David A.

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable interest in comparative research on different species’ abilities to respond to human communicative cues such as gaze and pointing. It has been reported that some canines perform significantly better than monkeys and apes on tasks requiring the comprehension of either declarative or imperative pointing and these differences have been attributed to domestication in dogs. Here we tested a sample of chimpanzees on a task requiring comprehension of an imperative request and show that, though there are considerable individual differences, the performance by the apes rival those reported in pet dogs. We suggest that small differences in methodology can have a pronounced influence on performance on these types of tasks. We further suggest that basic differences in subject sampling, subject recruitment and rearing experiences have resulted in a skewed representation of canine abilities compared to those of monkeys and apes. PMID:24278128

  2. Identification and characterization of CaApe2--a neutral arginine/alanine/leucine-specific metallo-aminopeptidase from Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Klinke, Thomas; Rump, Andreas; Pönisch, Roman; Schellenberger, Wolfgang; Müller, Eva-Christina; Otto, Albrecht; Klimm, Wolfgang; Kriegel, Thomas M

    2008-09-01

    The proteolytic potential of the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans was evaluated by the identification and functional characterization of a peptidolytic enzyme isolated from the cell wall of the microorganism. Determination of basic structural and kinetic data identified a neutral arginine/alanine/leucine-specific metallo-aminopeptidase of unknown function termed CaApe2, which is encoded by ORF CaO19.5197 (GenBank RefSeq XM_705313). Mass spectrometric tryptic peptide analysis and N-terminal protein sequencing revealed serine-88 to represent the N-terminus of CaApe2. Taking into account the results of DNA and protein sequence analysis including inspection of the genomic region upstream of ORF CaO19.5197, the gene CaAPE2 is likely to consist of two exons linked by a phase-2 intron with exons 1 and 2 encoding a signal peptide and the amino acids 88-954 of ORF CaO19.5197, respectively. The isolated CaApe2 protein shares an equally high similarity with the gene products ScAap1 and ScApe2, suggesting duplication of a phylogenetically ancient precursor gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The observed failure to cleave human type-I and type-IV collagen in vitro challenges a direct role that secreted CaApe2 might play in the degradation of extracellular matrix components during host colonization, but does not exclude per se a contribution of the aminopeptidase to the pathogenicity of C. albicans. PMID:18637841

  3. Phylogenetic relations of humans and African apes from DNA sequences in the Psi eta-globin region

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, M.M.; Slightom, J.L.; Goodman, M.

    1987-10-16

    Sequences from the upstream and downstream flanking DNA regions of the Psi eta-globin locus in Pan troglodytes (common chimpanzee), Gorilla gorilla (gorilla), and Pongo pygmaeus (orangutan, the closest living relative to Homo, Pan, and Gorilla) provided further data for evaluating the phylogenetic relations of humans and African apes. These newly sequenced orthologs (an additional 4.9 kilobase pairs (kbp) for each species) were combined with published Psi eta-gene sequences and then compared to the same orthologous stretch (a continuous 7.1-kbp region) available for humans. Phylogenetic analysis of these nucleotide sequences by the parsimony method indicated (i) that human and chimpanzee are more closely related to each other than either is to gorilla and (ii) that the slowdown in the rate of sequence evolution evident in higher primates is especially pronounced in humans. These results indicate that features unique to African apes (but not to humans) are primitive and that even local molecular clocks should be applied with caution.

  4. Ontogenetic allometry, heterochrony, and interspecific differences in the skull of African apes, using tridimensional Procrustes analysis.

    PubMed

    Berge, Christine; Penin, Xavier

    2004-06-01

    Ontogenetic studies of African ape skulls lead to an analysis of morphological differences in terms of allometry, heterochrony, and sexual dimorphism. The use of geometric morphometrics allows us 1) to define size and shape variations as independent factors (an essential but seldom respected condition for heterochrony), and 2) to calculate in percentage of shape changes and to graphically represent the parts of shape variation which are related to various biological phenomena: common allometry, intraspecific allometry, and allometric and nonallometric shape discrimination. Three tridimensional Procrustes analyses and the calculation of multivariate allometries, discriminant functions, and statistical tests are used to compare the skulls of 50 Pan troglodytes, and 50 Gorilla gorilla of different dental stages. The results both complement and modify classical results obtained from similar material but with different methods. Size and Scaling in Primate Morphology, New York: Plenum, p. 175-205). As previously described by Shea, the common growth allometric pattern is very important (64% of total shape variation). It corresponds to a larger increase of facial volume than of neurocranial volume, a more obliquely oriented foramen magnum, and a noticeable reshaping of the nuchal region (higher inion). However, the heterochronic interpretation based on common allometry is rather different from Shea. Gorillas differ from chimpanzees not only with a larger magnitude of allometric change (rate peramorphosis), as is classically said, but also grow more in size than in shape (size acceleration). In other words, for a similar stage of growth, gorillas have the size and shape corresponding to older chimpanzees, and for a similar shape, gorillas have a larger size than chimpanzees. In contrast, sexual dimorphism actually corresponds to allometric changes only, as classically demonstrated (time hypermorphosis). Sexual dimorphism is here significant in adult gorillas alone, and

  5. Airborne polar experiment (APE): tests and qualification of the scientific instrumentation installed on the stratospheric platform M-55 aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rossi, Giuseppe; Puccini, Massimo; Puccetti, Giuseppe

    1995-12-01

    The paper describes the environmental tests to be carried out on the scientific instrumentation to be flown on the M-55 Geophysika in the frame of the APE Program. The instruments, developed by different European research institutes, are for remote sensing and in situ measurements of the major components of the Earth's stratosphere. The paper presents the technological activities that ENEA (Ente Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie l'Energia e l'Ambiente) is carrying out in its laboratories to verify the correspondence of the various instruments to meet the requirements for airborne application. The reference documents used have been the RTCA/DO-160C and the MDB (Myasishchev Design Bureau) specifications.

  6. Orosomucoid typing of apes (family Pongidae) by isoelectric focusing: Among primates do only humans have two functional orosomucoid loci

    SciTech Connect

    Yuasa, I. ); Umetsu, K. ); Udono, T.; Sasaoka, S. ); Suzuki, R.; Shotake, T.; Kawamoto, Y.; Takenaka, O.; Nozawa, K. )

    1991-12-01

    It has been demonstrated that human orosomucoid (ORM) is controlled by more than one functional loci, while Macaca ORM is controlled by one locus. To examine the time when the ORM gene was duplicated in the evolution of primates, plasma samples from 118 apes (family Pongidae) belonging to 4 genera and 12 species were investigated for ORM polymorphism using isoelectric focusing followed by immunoprinting. The band patterns of ORM in the subfamily Ponginae showed quantitatively different products as in humans. A pedigree study of common chimpanzees supported the two-locus model for ORM. Gibbons (subfamily Hylobatinae) displayed highly variable band patterns, but the number of loci was not determined unequivocally. Thus, this study shows that duplication of the ORM gene in primates occurred either before or after the divergence of hylobatinae and Ponginae, consistent with a previous prediction from the molecular evolutionary rate of ORM.

  7. Great ape Y Chromosome and mitochondrial DNA phylogenies reflect subspecies structure and patterns of mating and dispersal.

    PubMed

    Hallast, Pille; Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo; Batini, Chiara; Zadik, Daniel; Rocchi, Mariano; Schempp, Werner; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of genetic diversity in great ape species is likely to have been affected by patterns of dispersal and mating. This has previously been investigated by sequencing autosomal and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but large-scale sequence analysis of the male-specific region of the Y Chromosome (MSY) has not yet been undertaken. Here, we use the human MSY reference sequence as a basis for sequence capture and read mapping in 19 great ape males, combining the data with sequences extracted from the published whole genomes of 24 additional males to yield a total sample of 19 chimpanzees, four bonobos, 14 gorillas, and six orangutans, in which interpretable MSY sequence ranges from 2.61 to 3.80 Mb. This analysis reveals thousands of novel MSY variants and defines unbiased phylogenies. We compare these with mtDNA-based trees in the same individuals, estimating time-to-most-recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for key nodes in both cases. The two loci show high topological concordance and are consistent with accepted (sub)species definitions, but time depths differ enormously between loci and (sub)species, likely reflecting different dispersal and mating patterns. Gorillas and chimpanzees/bonobos present generally low and high MSY diversity, respectively, reflecting polygyny versus multimale-multifemale mating. However, particularly marked differences exist among chimpanzee subspecies: The western chimpanzee MSY phylogeny has a TMRCA of only 13.2 (10.8-15.8) thousand years, but that for central chimpanzees exceeds 1 million years. Cross-species comparison within a single MSY phylogeny emphasizes the low human diversity, and reveals species-specific branch length variation that may reflect differences in long-term generation times. PMID:26883546

  8. Great ape Y Chromosome and mitochondrial DNA phylogenies reflect subspecies structure and patterns of mating and dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Hallast, Pille; Maisano Delser, Pierpaolo; Batini, Chiara; Zadik, Daniel; Rocchi, Mariano; Schempp, Werner; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of genetic diversity in great ape species is likely to have been affected by patterns of dispersal and mating. This has previously been investigated by sequencing autosomal and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but large-scale sequence analysis of the male-specific region of the Y Chromosome (MSY) has not yet been undertaken. Here, we use the human MSY reference sequence as a basis for sequence capture and read mapping in 19 great ape males, combining the data with sequences extracted from the published whole genomes of 24 additional males to yield a total sample of 19 chimpanzees, four bonobos, 14 gorillas, and six orangutans, in which interpretable MSY sequence ranges from 2.61 to 3.80 Mb. This analysis reveals thousands of novel MSY variants and defines unbiased phylogenies. We compare these with mtDNA-based trees in the same individuals, estimating time-to-most-recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for key nodes in both cases. The two loci show high topological concordance and are consistent with accepted (sub)species definitions, but time depths differ enormously between loci and (sub)species, likely reflecting different dispersal and mating patterns. Gorillas and chimpanzees/bonobos present generally low and high MSY diversity, respectively, reflecting polygyny versus multimale–multifemale mating. However, particularly marked differences exist among chimpanzee subspecies: The western chimpanzee MSY phylogeny has a TMRCA of only 13.2 (10.8–15.8) thousand years, but that for central chimpanzees exceeds 1 million years. Cross-species comparison within a single MSY phylogeny emphasizes the low human diversity, and reveals species-specific branch length variation that may reflect differences in long-term generation times. PMID:26883546

  9. The ZNF75 zinc finger gene subfamily: Isolation and mapping of the four members in humans and great apes

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, A.; Strina, D.; Frattini, A.

    1996-07-15

    We have previously reported the characterization of the human ZNF75 gene located on Xq26, which has only limited homology (less than 65%) to other ZF genes in the databases. Here, we describe three human zinc finger genes with 86 to 95% homology to ZNF75 at the nucleotide level, which represent all the members of the human ZNF75 subfamily. One of these, ZNF75B, is a pseudogene mapped to chromosome 12q13. The other two, ZNF75A and ZNF75C, maintain on ORF in the sequenced region, and at least the latter is expressed in the U937 cell line. They were mapped to chromosomes 16 and 11, respectively. All these genes are conserved in chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. The ZNF75B homologue is a pseudogene in all three great apes, and in chimpanzee it is located on chromosome 10 (phylogenetic XII), at p13 (corresponding to the human 12q13). The chimpanzee homologue of ZNF75 is also located on the Xq26 chromosome, in the same region, as detected by in situ hybridization. As expected, nucleotide changes were clearly more abundant between human and organutan than between human and chimpanzee or gorilla homologues. Members of the same class were more similar to each other than to the other homologues within the same species. This suggests that the duplication and/or retrotranscription events occurred in a common ancestor long before great ape speciation. This, together with the existance of at least two genes in cows and horses, suggests a relatively high conservation of this gene family. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Investigation of the Role of the Histidine-Aspartate Pair in the Human Exonuclease III-like Abasic Endonuclease, Ape1

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, David F. ); Hoyt, David W. ); Khazi, Fayaz A.; Bagu, John R. ); Lindsey, Andrea G.; Wilson, David M.

    2003-05-30

    Hydrogen bonded histidine-aspartate (His-Asp) pairs are critical constituents in several key enzymatic reactions. To date, the role that these pairs play in catalysis is best understood in serine and trypsin-like proteases, where structural and biochemical NMR studies have revealed important pKa values and hydrogen-bonding patterns within the catalytic pocket. However, the role of the His-Asp pair in metal-assisted catalysis is less clear. Here, we apply liquid state NMR to investigate the role of a critical histidine of apurinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1), a human DNA repair enzyme that cleaves adjacent to abasic sites in DNA using one or more divalent cations and an active site His-Asp pair. The studies within suggest that the Ape1 His- Asp pair functions as neither a general base catalyst nor a metal ligand. Rather, the pair likely stabilizes the pentavalent transition state necessary for phospho-transfer.

  11. Strongyloides infections of humans and great apes in Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic and in degraded forest fragments in Bulindi, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Kalousova, Barbora; McLennan, Matthew R; Modry, David; Profousova-Psenkova, Ilona; Shutt-Phillips, Kathryn A; Todd, Angelique; Huffman, Michael A; Petrzelkova, Klara J

    2016-10-01

    DNA sequence analysis was carried out on Strongyloides spp. larvae obtained from fecal samples of local humans, a wild western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and a central chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) inhabiting Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas (DSPA), Central African Republic, and eastern chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) living in degraded forest fragments on farmland in Bulindi, Uganda. From humans, both Strongyloides fuelleborni and Strongyloides stercoralis were recorded, though the former was predominant. Only S. fuelleborni was present in the great apes in both areas. Phylogenetic analysis of partial mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (Cox1) and comparison of 18S rDNA hyper variable region IV (HVR-IV) sequences implied that in DSPA S. fuelleborni populations in humans differ from those in the nonhuman great apes. PMID:27180094

  12. Token transfers among great apes (Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus, Pan paniscus, and Pan troglodytes): species differences, gestural requests, and reciprocal exchange.

    PubMed

    Pelé, Marie; Dufour, Valérie; Thierry, Bernard; Call, Josep

    2009-11-01

    Great apes appear to be the nonhuman primates most capable of recognizing trading opportunities and engaging in transfers of commodities with conspecifics. Spontaneous exchange of goods between them has not yet been reported. We tested gorillas (Gorilla gorilla), orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus), bonobos (Pan paniscus), and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) in a token-exchange task involving two conspecifics and a human experimenter. Tested in pairs, subjects had to exchange tokens with a partner to obtain food from the experimenter. We observed 4, 5, 264, and 328 transfers of tokens in gorillas, chimpanzees, orangutans, and bonobos, respectively. Most gifts were indirect in gorillas, chimpanzees, and bonobos, whereas most were direct in orangutans. The analysis showed no evidence of calculated reciprocity in interactions. A main finding of the study was the high rate of repeated gifts and begging gestures recorded in orangutans. This raises the question of the meaning of pointing in great apes and their ability to understand the communicative intent of others. PMID:19929106

  13. Genetic Variations in the Promoter of the APE1 Gene Are Associated with DMF-Induced Abnormal Liver Function: A Case-Control Study in a Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhimin; Shen, Huanxi; Yang, Dandan; Zhang, Feng; Bai, Ying; Li, Qian; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Hengdong; Zhu, Baoli

    2016-01-01

    Acute or long-term exposure to N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) can induce abnormal liver function. It is well known that DMF is mainly metabolized in the liver and thereby produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). The base excision repair (BER) pathway is regarded as a very important pathway involved in repairing ROS-induced DNA damage. Several studies have explored the associations between GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP2E1 polymorphisms and DMF-induced abnormal liver function; however, little is known about how common hOGG1, XRCC1 and APE1 polymorphisms and DMF induce abnormal liver function. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the polymorphisms in the hOGG1 (rs159153 and rs2072668), XRCC1 (rs25487, rs25489, and rs1799782), APE1 (rs1130409 and 1760944) genes in the human BER pathway were associated with the susceptibility to DMF-induced abnormal liver function in a Chinese population. These polymorphisms were genotyped in 123 workers with DMF-induced abnormal liver function and 123 workers with normal liver function. We found that workers with the APE1 rs1760944 TG/GG genotypes had a reduced risk of abnormal liver function, which was more pronounced in the subgroups that were exposed to DMF for <10 years, exposed to ≥10 mg/m³ DMF, never smoked and never drank. In summary, our study supported the hypothesis that the APE1 rs1760944 T > G polymorphism may be associated with DMF-induced abnormal liver function in the Chinese Han population. PMID:27463724

  14. Why vocal production of atypical sounds in apes and its cerebral correlates have a lot to say about the origin of language.

    PubMed

    Meguerditchian, Adrien; Taglialatela, Jared P; Leavens, David A; Hopkins, William D

    2014-12-01

    Ackermann et al. mention the "acquisition of species-atypical sounds" in apes without any discussion. In our commentary, we demonstrate that these atypical sounds in chimpanzees not only include laryngeal sounds, but also have a major significance regarding the origins of language, if we consider looking at their context of use, their social properties, their relations with gestures, their lateralization, and their neurofunctional correlates as well. PMID:25514955

  15. Genetic Variations in the Promoter of the APE1 Gene Are Associated with DMF-Induced Abnormal Liver Function: A Case-Control Study in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhimin; Shen, Huanxi; Yang, Dandan; Zhang, Feng; Bai, Ying; Li, Qian; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Hengdong; Zhu, Baoli

    2016-01-01

    Acute or long-term exposure to N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) can induce abnormal liver function. It is well known that DMF is mainly metabolized in the liver and thereby produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). The base excision repair (BER) pathway is regarded as a very important pathway involved in repairing ROS-induced DNA damage. Several studies have explored the associations between GSTM1, GSTT1, CYP2E1 polymorphisms and DMF-induced abnormal liver function; however, little is known about how common hOGG1, XRCC1 and APE1 polymorphisms and DMF induce abnormal liver function. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the polymorphisms in the hOGG1 (rs159153 and rs2072668), XRCC1 (rs25487, rs25489, and rs1799782), APE1 (rs1130409 and 1760944) genes in the human BER pathway were associated with the susceptibility to DMF-induced abnormal liver function in a Chinese population. These polymorphisms were genotyped in 123 workers with DMF-induced abnormal liver function and 123 workers with normal liver function. We found that workers with the APE1 rs1760944 TG/GG genotypes had a reduced risk of abnormal liver function, which was more pronounced in the subgroups that were exposed to DMF for <10 years, exposed to ≥10 mg/m3 DMF, never smoked and never drank. In summary, our study supported the hypothesis that the APE1 rs1760944 T > G polymorphism may be associated with DMF-induced abnormal liver function in the Chinese Han population. PMID:27463724

  16. Differences in between-reinforcer value modulate the selective-value effect in great apes (Pan troglodytes, P. Paniscus, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo abelii).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Amaro, Alejandro; Peretó, Mar; Call, Josep

    2016-02-01

    We investigated how apes allocated their choices between 2 food options that varied in terms of their quantity and quality. Experiment 1 tested whether subjects preferred an AB option over an A option, where the A item is preferred to the B item (e.g., apple + carrot vs. apple). Additionally, we tested whether the length of the intertrial interval (ITI) affected subjects' choices. Five orangutans, 4 gorillas, 7 bonobos, and 10 chimpanzees received 3 types of trials: preference (A vs. B), quantity (AA vs. A), and mixed (AB vs. A where A is the preferred food). We used 3 food items that substantially differed in terms of preference (carrots, apples, and pellets). Subjects showed no overall preference for the mixed option (AB) compared with the single option (A), even though they showed clear preferences during both the preference and quantity trials. The intertrial length had no effect on choice behavior. Experiment 2 further explored apes' choices by using 3 highly preferred food items (bananas, grapes, and pellets) in 6 orangutans, 4 gorillas, 8 bonobos, and 18 chimpanzees. Unlike the results of Experiment 1, apes generally chose the mixed option. Our results indicated that apes did not show a general "selective-value" effect but chose depending on the relative value of the food items involved. Subjects were more likely to select the mixed over the single option when (a) the mixed option was composed of items that were closer in value and (b) they were compared against the less valuable item forming the mixed option. PMID:26460854

  17. All great ape species (Gorilla gorilla, Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Pongo abelii) and two-and-a-half-year-old children (Homo sapiens) discriminate appearance from reality.

    PubMed

    Karg, Katja; Schmelz, Martin; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Nonhuman great apes and human children were tested for an understanding that appearance does not always correspond to reality. Subjects were 29 great apes (bonobos [Pan paniscus], chimpanzees [Pan troglodytes], gorillas [Gorilla gorilla], and orangutans [Pongo abelii]) and 24 2½-year-old children. In our task, we occluded portions of 1 large and 1 small food stick such that the size relations seemed reversed. Subjects could then choose which one they wanted. There was 1 control condition and 2 experimental conditions (administered within subjects). In the control condition subjects saw only the apparent stick sizes, whereas in the 2 experimental conditions they saw the true stick sizes as well (the difference between them being what the subjects saw first: the apparent or the real stick sizes). All great ape species and children successfully identified the bigger stick, despite its smaller appearance, in the experimental conditions, but not in the control. We discuss these results in relation to the understanding of object permanence and conservation, and exclude reversed reward contingency learning as an explanation. PMID:25150962

  18. Direct and indirect reputation formation in nonhuman great apes (Pan paniscus, Pan troglodytes, Gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus) and human children (Homo sapiens).

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Esther; Keupp, Stefanie; Hare, Brian; Vaish, Amrisha; Tomasello, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Humans make decisions about when and with whom to cooperate based on their reputations. People either learn about others by direct interaction or by observing third-party interactions or gossip. An important question is whether other animal species, especially our closest living relatives, the nonhuman great apes, also form reputations of others. In Study 1, chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, and 2.5-year-old human children experienced a nice experimenter who tried to give food/toys to the subject and a mean experimenter who interrupted the food/toy giving. In studies 2 and 3, nonhuman great apes and human children could only passively observe a similar interaction, in which a nice experimenter and a mean experimenter interacted with a third party. Orangutans and 2.5-year-old human children preferred to approach the nice experimenter rather than the mean one after having directly experienced their respective behaviors. Orangutans, chimpanzees, and 2.5-year-old human children also took into account experimenter actions toward third parties in forming reputations. These studies show that the human ability to form direct and indirect reputation judgment is already present in young children and shared with at least some of the other great apes. PMID:22746158

  19. Revised estimates of the ocean energy cycle and the key role of the western boundary in the APE to KE conversion due to high latitude cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailleux, Remi

    2014-05-01

    The ocean energy cycle is a key aspect of the ocean circulation, and has been traditionally framed in terms of Lorenz (1955) theory of available potential energy. However, the latest available observational estimate of the ocean energy cycle is due to Oort and Peixoto (1994) and is now very dated. Moreover, the latter estimate relies on the so-called Lorenz quasi-geostrophic approximation, which is known to be very inaccurate. Oort and Peixoto also neglected the internal energy contribution to the total available potential energy, which is now understood to be far from negligible, and to account for up to 40 percent of the total APE. The purpose of this work is to revisit observational estimates of the ocean energy cycle by taking advantage of a newly developed APE framework, as well as of the many new available observational products for temperature, salinity and surface buoyancy fluxes. In contrast to previous frameworks, our APE framework (Tailleux, 2013) relies on a physically well defined local APE definition, which is valid for a binary Boussinesq or fully compressible fluid with an arbitrary nonlinear equation of state. As part of our approach, we also developed a new fast and accurate way to construct Lorenz reference state of minimum potential energy, based on using the joint probability distribution function for temperature and salinity. Results will be presented for a variety of observational products, as well as for the ECCO2 ocean state estimate. The role of the deep western boundary as the place where the APE created by high latitude is converted into kinetic energy (KE) as part of driving the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation will be emphasized. References: Tailleux, R., 2013: Available potential energy density for a multicomponent Boussinesq fluid with arbitrary nonlinear equation of state.J. Fluid Mech., 735,499-518. Sijp, W., J.M.Gregory, R. Tailleux, P. Spence, 2012: The key role of the western boundary in linking the AMOC strength to

  20. The ethics of killing human/great-ape chimeras for their organs: a reply to Shaw et al.

    PubMed

    Palacios-González, César

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to critically examine David Shaw, Wybo Dondorp, and Guido de Wert's arguments in favour of the procurement of human organs from human/nonhuman-primate chimeras, specifically from great-ape/human chimeras. My main claim is that their arguments fail and are in need of substantial revision. To prove this I first introduce the topic, and then reconstruct Shaw et al.'s position and arguments. Next, I show that Shaw et al.: (1) failed to properly apply the subsidiarity and proportionality principles; (2) neglected species overlapping cases in their ethical assessment; (3) ignored the ethics literature on borderline persons; and (4) misunderstood McMahan's two-tiered moral theory. These mistakes render an important part of their conclusions either false or problematic to the point that they would no longer endorse them. Finally I will briefly mention a possible multipolar solution to the human organ shortage problem that would reduce the need for chimeras' organs. PMID:26294174

  1. The future of future-oriented cognition in non-humans: theory and the empirical case of the great apes

    PubMed Central

    Osvath, Mathias; Martin-Ordas, Gema

    2014-01-01

    One of the most contested areas in the field of animal cognition is non-human future-oriented cognition. We critically examine key underlying assumptions in the debate, which is mainly preoccupied with certain dichotomous positions, the most prevalent being whether or not ‘real’ future orientation is uniquely human. We argue that future orientation is a theoretical construct threatening to lead research astray. Cognitive operations occur in the present moment and can be influenced only by prior causation and the environment, at the same time that most appear directed towards future outcomes. Regarding the current debate, future orientation becomes a question of where on various continua cognition becomes ‘truly’ future-oriented. We question both the assumption that episodic cognition is the most important process in future-oriented cognition and the assumption that future-oriented cognition is uniquely human. We review the studies on future-oriented cognition in the great apes to find little doubt that our closest relatives possess such ability. We conclude by urging that future-oriented cognition not be viewed as expression of some select set of skills. Instead, research into future-oriented cognition should be approached more like research into social and physical cognition. PMID:25267827

  2. Clouds at the tropical tropopause: A case study during the APE-THESEO campaign over the western Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santacesaria, Vincenzo; Carla, Roberto; MacKenzie, Robert; Adriani, Alberto; Cairo, Francesco; Didonfrancesco, Guido; Kiemle, Christoph; Redaelli, Gianluca; Beuermann, Jürgen; Schiller, Cornelius; Peter, Thomas; Luo, Beiping; Wernli, Heini; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Ulanovsky, Alexey; Yushkov, Vladimir; Sitnikov, Nikolay; Balestri, Stefano; Stefanutti, Leopoldo

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we report a detailed description of a thin cirrus at the tropopause above a cumulonimbus (Cb) convective cluster observed during the Airborne Platform for Earth Observation-Third European Stratospheric Experiment for Ozone (APE-THESEO) campaign in February-March 1999 in the western Indian Ocean. The thin cirrus (Ci) has an optical depth at 532 nm below 0.1, with extended subvisible stretches, and is located directly below the tropopause, which was supersaturated with respect to ice. A direct comparison between the optical depth retrieved by Meteosat and that obtained by means of the hygrometers installed on the M55-Geophysica aircraft is discussed showing discrepancies ranging from 10 to 20%. Combining satellite and aircraft data, we show that the observed Ci is not due to cirrus outflow from Cb anvils. In the absence of any deeply convective clouds reaching altitudes above 15 km, we propose a possible mechanism of Ci formation based on a net mesoscale transport of water vapor from altitudes above 16 km to the tropopause region around 18 km. This transport could be driven by the critical layer and turbulence induced by gravity waves that could have been generated by lower level Cb cluster activity. The proposed mechanism for high-altitude Ci formation corroborates the new paradigm of a tropical tropopause layer (TTL) or "substratosphere," several kilometers thick, which is decoupled from the convection-dominated lower troposphere.

  3. Lack of prosociality in great apes, capuchin monkeys and spider monkeys: convergent evidence from two different food distribution tasks

    PubMed Central

    Amici, Federica; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Call, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Prosociality can be defined as any behaviour performed to alleviate the needs of others or to improve their welfare. Prosociality has probably played an essential role in the evolution of cooperative behaviour and several studies have already investigated it in primates to understand the evolutionary origins of human prosociality. Two main tasks have been used to test prosociality in a food context. In the Platforms task, subjects can prosocially provide food to a partner by selecting a prosocial platform over a selfish one. In the Tokens task, subjects can prosocially provide food to a partner by selecting a prosocial token over a selfish one. As these tasks have provided mixed results, we used both tasks to test prosociality in great apes, capuchin monkeys and spider monkeys. Our results provided no compelling evidence of prosociality in a food context in any of the species tested. Additionally, our study revealed serious limitations of the Tokens task as it has been previously used. These results highlight the importance of controlling for confounding variables and of using multiple tasks to address inconsistencies present in the literature. PMID:25209941

  4. Safety testing for replication-competent retrovirus associated with gibbon ape leukemia virus-pseudotyped retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Reeves, L; Cornetta, K

    2001-01-01

    The potential pathogenicity of replication-competent retroviruses (RCR) requires vigilant testing to exclude inadvertent contamination of clinical gene therapy vector products with RCR. Pseudotyped vectors using the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) envelope have entered into clinical trials but specific recommendations regarding methods for screening of vector product and analysis of clinical samples have not been set forth. Unfortunately, current screening assays used for detecting amphotropic RCR are not suitable for GALV-pseudotyped RCR. We modified the extended S+/L- assay for RCR detection by using human 293 cells for virus amplification. Of five cell lines tested, 293 cells were selected because they combined a high transduction efficiency and an ability to generate RCR at high titer. After optimizing the amplification assay, a dilution of GALV virus could consistently be detected at a dilution of 10(-6). In coculture experiments, one GALV-infected cell could be consistently detected in 10(6) uninfected cells. A PCR-based assay was developed that was capable of detecting 100 copies of a GALV envelope containing plasmid diluted in 1 microg of DNA obtained from uninfected cells. PCR was also able to detect one GALV-infected cell in 10(6) uninfected cells. These assays will be suitable for testing of vector preparations and for monitoring of clinical samples from patients treated in clinical gene therapy protocols. The assays developed are similar in methodology and sensitivity to those currently used for certification of amphotropic retroviral vectors. PMID:11177543

  5. Pre-Sleep and Sleeping Platform Construction Behavior in Captive Orangutans (Pongo spp.): Implications for Ape Health and Welfare.

    PubMed

    Samson, David R; Shumaker, Rob

    2015-01-01

    The nightly construction of a 'nest' or sleeping platform is a behavior that has been observed in every wild great ape population studied, yet in captivity, few analyses have been performed on sleep related behavior. Here, we report on such behavior in three female and two male captive orangutans (Pongo spp.), in a natural light setting, at the Indianapolis Zoo. Behavioral samples were generated, using infrared cameras for a total of 47 nights (136.25 h), in summer (n = 25) and winter (n = 22) periods. To characterize sleep behaviors, we used all-occurrence sampling to generate platform construction episodes (n = 217). Orangutans used a total of 2.4 (SD = 1.2) techniques and 7.5 (SD = 6.3) actions to construct a sleeping platform; they spent 10.1 min (SD - 9.9 min) making the platform and showed a 77% preference for ground (vs. elevated) sleep sites. Comparisons between summer and winter platform construction showed winter start times (17:12 h) to be significantly earlier and longer in duration than summer start times (17:56 h). Orangutans should be provisioned with seasonally appropriate, high quality materials suitable for construction of sleeping platforms to increase sleep quality and improve animal health and welfare. PMID:25998256

  6. Pointing and pantomime in wild apes? Female bonobos use referential and iconic gestures to request genito-genital rubbing.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Pamela Heidi; Moscovice, Liza R

    2015-01-01

    Referential and iconic gesturing provide a means to flexibly and intentionally share information about specific entities, locations, or goals. The extent to which nonhuman primates use such gestures is therefore of special interest for understanding the evolution of human language. Here, we describe novel observations of wild female bonobos (Pan paniscus) using referential and potentially iconic gestures to initiate genito-genital (GG) rubbing, which serves important functions in reducing social tension and facilitating cooperation. We collected data from a habituated community of bonobos at Luikotale, DRC, and analysed n = 138 independent gesture bouts made by n = 11 females. Gestures were coded in real time or from video. In addition to meeting the criteria for intentionality, in form and function these gestures resemble pointing and pantomime-two hallmarks of human communication-in the ways in which they indicated the relevant body part or action involved in the goal of GG rubbing. Moreover, the gestures led to GG rubbing in 83.3% of gesture bouts, which in turn increased tolerance in feeding contexts between the participants. We discuss how biologically relevant contexts in which individuals are motivated to cooperate may facilitate the emergence of language precursors to enhance communication in wild apes. PMID:26358661

  7. Pointing and pantomime in wild apes? Female bonobos use referential and iconic gestures to request genito-genital rubbing

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Pamela Heidi; Moscovice, Liza R.

    2015-01-01

    Referential and iconic gesturing provide a means to flexibly and intentionally share information about specific entities, locations, or goals. The extent to which nonhuman primates use such gestures is therefore of special interest for understanding the evolution of human language. Here, we describe novel observations of wild female bonobos (Pan paniscus) using referential and potentially iconic gestures to initiate genito-genital (GG) rubbing, which serves important functions in reducing social tension and facilitating cooperation. We collected data from a habituated community of bonobos at Luikotale, DRC, and analysed n = 138 independent gesture bouts made by n = 11 females. Gestures were coded in real time or from video. In addition to meeting the criteria for intentionality, in form and function these gestures resemble pointing and pantomime–two hallmarks of human communication–in the ways in which they indicated the relevant body part or action involved in the goal of GG rubbing. Moreover, the gestures led to GG rubbing in 83.3% of gesture bouts, which in turn increased tolerance in feeding contexts between the participants. We discuss how biologically relevant contexts in which individuals are motivated to cooperate may facilitate the emergence of language precursors to enhance communication in wild apes. PMID:26358661

  8. A novel test of planning ability: great apes can plan step-by-step but not in advance of action.

    PubMed

    Tecwyn, Emma C; Thorpe, Susannah K S; Chappell, Jackie

    2013-11-01

    The ability to identify an appropriate sequence of actions or to consider alternative possible action sequences might be particularly useful during problem solving in the physical domain. We developed a new 'paddle-box' task to test the ability of different ape species to plan an appropriate sequence of physical actions (rotating paddles) to retrieve a reward from a goal location. The task had an adjustable difficulty level and was not dependent on species-specific behaviours (e.g. complex tool use). We investigated the planning abilities of captive orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) using the paddle-box. In experiment 1, subjects had to rotate one or two paddles before rotating the paddle with the reward on. Subjects of both species performed poorly, though orangutans rotated more non-food paddles, which may be related to their greater exploratory tendencies and bolder temperament compared with bonobos. In experiment 2 subjects could always rotate the paddle with the reward on first and still succeed, and most subjects of both species performed appropriate sequences of up to three paddle rotations to retrieve the reward. Poor performance in experiment 1 may have been related to subjects' difficulty in inhibiting the prepotent response to act on the reward immediately. PMID:24153327

  9. The Influence of Life History and Sexual Dimorphism on Entheseal Changes in Modern Humans and African Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Entheseal changes have been widely studied with regard to their correlation to biomechanical stress and their usefulness for biocultural reconstructions. However, anthropological and medical studies have demonstrated the marked influence of both age and sex on the development of these features. Studies of entheseal changes are mostly aimed in testing functional hypotheses and are mostly focused on modern humans, with few data available for non-human primates. The lack of comparative studies on the effect of age and sex on entheseal changes represent a gap in our understanding of the evolutionary basis of both development and degeneration of the human musculoskeletal system. The aim of the present work is to compare age trajectories and patterns of sexual dimorphism in entheseal changes between modern humans and African great apes. To this end we analyzed 23 postcranial entheses in a human contemporary identified skeletal collection (N = 484) and compared the results with those obtained from the analysis of Pan (N = 50) and Gorilla (N = 47) skeletal specimens. Results highlight taxon-specific age trajectories possibly linked to differences in life history schedules and phyletic relationships. Robusticity trajectories separate Pan and modern humans from Gorilla, whereas enthesopathic patterns are unique in modern humans and possibly linked to their extended potential lifespan. Comparisons between sexes evidence a decreasing dimorphism in robusticity from Gorilla, to modern humans to Pan, which is likely linked to the role played by size, lifespan and physical activity on robusticity development. The present study confirms previous hypotheses on the possible relevance of EC in the study of life history, pointing moreover to their usefulness in evolutionary studies. PMID:25251439

  10. Sequences in Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus Envelope That Confer Sensitivity to HIV-1 Accessory Protein Vpu▿†

    PubMed Central

    Janaka, Sanath Kumar; Lucas, Tiffany M.; Johnson, Marc C.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 efficiently forms pseudotyped particles with many gammaretrovirus glycoproteins, such as Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MLV) Env, but not with the related gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) Env or with a chimeric F-MLV Env with a GaLV cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). This incompatibility is modulated by the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpu. Because the GaLV Env CTD does not resemble tetherin or CD4, the well-studied targets of Vpu, we sought to characterize the modular sequence in the GaLV Env CTD required for this restriction in the presence of Vpu. Using a systematic mutagenesis scan, we determined that the motif that makes GaLV Env sensitive to Vpu is INxxIxxVKxxVxRxK. This region in the CTD of GaLV Env is predicted to form a helix. Mutations in the CTD that would break this helix abolish sensitivity to Vpu. Although many of these positions can be replaced with amino acids with similar biophysical properties without disrupting the Vpu sensitivity, the final lysine residue is required. This Vpu sensitivity sequence appears to be modular, as the unrelated Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Env can be made Vpu sensitive by replacing its CTD with the GaLV Env CTD. In addition, F-MLV Env can be made Vpu sensitive by mutating two amino acids in its cytoplasmic tail to make it resemble more closely the Vpu sensitivity motif. Surprisingly, the core components of this Vpu sensitivity sequence are also present in the host surface protein CD4, which is also targeted by Vpu through its CTD. PMID:21917962

  11. Stable isotope ecology of Miocene bovids from Northern Greece and the ape/monkey turnover in the Balkans.

    PubMed

    Merceron, Gildas; Kostopoulos, Dimitris S; Bonis, Louis de; Fourel, François; Koufos, George D; Lécuyer, Christophe; Martineau, François

    2013-08-01

    Eurasia was home to a great radiation of hominoid primates during the Miocene. All were extinct by the end of the Miocene in Western Eurasia. Here, we investigate the hypothesis of climate and vegetation changes at a local scale when the cercopithecoid Mesopithecus replaced the hominoid Ouranopithecus along the Axios River, Greece. Because they are herbivorous and were much more abundant than primates, bovids are preferred to primates to study climate change in the Balkans as a cause of hominoid extinction. By measuring carbon stable isotope ratios of bovid enamel, we conclude that Ouranopithecus and Mesopithecus both evolved in pure C3 environments. However, the large range of δ(13)C values of apatite carbonate from bovids combined with their molar microwear and mesowear patterns preclude the presence of dense forested landscapes in northern Greece. Instead, these bovids evolved in rather open landscapes with abundant grasses in the herbaceous layer. Coldest monthly estimated temperatures were below 10°C and warmest monthly temperatures rose close to or above 20°C for the two time intervals. Oxygen isotope compositions of phosphate from bulk samples did not show significant differences between sites but did show between-species variation within each site. Different factors influence oxygen isotope composition in this context, including water provenience, feeding ecology, body mass, and rate of amelogenesis. We discuss this latter factor in regard to the high intra-tooth variations in δ(18)Op reflecting important amplitudes of seasonal variations in temperature. These estimations fit with paleobotanical data and differ slightly from estimations based on climate models. This study found no significant change in climate before and after the extinction of Ouranopithecus along the Axios River. However, strong seasonal variations with relatively cold winters were indicated, conditions quite usual for extant monkeys but unusual for great apes distributed today in

  12. Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease/Redox Factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) Redox Function Negatively Regulates NRF2*

    PubMed Central

    Fishel, Melissa L.; Wu, Xue; Devlin, Cecilia M.; Logsdon, Derek P.; Jiang, Yanlin; Luo, Meihua; He, Ying; Yu, Zhangsheng; Tong, Yan; Lipking, Kelsey P.; Maitra, Anirban; Rajeshkumar, N. V.; Scandura, Glenda; Kelley, Mark R.; Ivan, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) (henceforth referred to as Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein that in addition to its base excision DNA repair activity exerts redox control of multiple transcription factors, including nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), STAT3, activator protein-1 (AP-1), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), and tumor protein 53 (p53). In recent years, Ref-1 has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in cancer, particularly in pancreatic ductal carcinoma. Although a significant amount of research has centered on Ref-1, no wide-ranging approach had been performed on the effects of Ref-1 inhibition and transcription factor activity perturbation. Starting with a broader approach, we identified a previously unsuspected effect on the nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (NRF2), a critical regulator of cellular defenses against oxidative stress. Based on genetic and small molecule inhibitor-based methodologies, we demonstrated that repression of Ref-1 potently activates NRF2 and its downstream targets in a dose-dependent fashion, and that the redox, rather than the DNA repair function of Ref-1 is critical for this effect. Intriguingly, our results also indicate that this pathway does not involve reactive oxygen species. The link between Ref-1 and NRF2 appears to be present in all cells tested in vitro, noncancerous and cancerous, including patient-derived tumor samples. In particular, we focused on understanding the implications of the novel interaction between these two pathways in primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tumor cells and provide the first evidence that this mechanism has implications for overcoming the resistance against experimental drugs targeting Ref-1 activity, with clear translational implications. PMID:25492865

  13. Analysis of joint force and torque for the human and non-human ape foot during bipedal walking with implications for the evolution of the foot.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weijie; Abboud, Rami J; Günther, Michael M; Crompton, Robin H

    2014-08-01

    The feet of apes have a different morphology from those of humans. Until now, it has merely been assumed that the morphology seen in humans must be adaptive for habitual bipedal walking, as the habitual use of bipedal walking is generally regarded as one of the most clear-cut differences between humans and apes. This study asks simply whether human skeletal proportions do actually enhance foot performance during human-like bipedalism, by examining the influence of foot proportions on force, torque and work in the foot joints during simulated bipedal walking. Skeletons of the common chimpanzee, orangutan, gorilla and human were represented by multi-rigid-body models, where the components of the foot make external contact via finite element surfaces. The models were driven by identical joint motion functions collected from experiments on human walking. Simulated contact forces between the ground and the foot were found to be reasonably comparable with measurements made during human walking using pressure- and force-platforms. Joint force, torque and work in the foot were then predicted. Within the limitations of our model, the results show that during simulated human-like bipedal walking, (1) the human and non-human ape (NHA) feet carry similar joint forces, although the distributions of the forces differ; (2) the NHA foot incurs larger joint torques than does the human foot, although the human foot has higher values in the first tarso-metatarsal and metatarso-phalangeal joints, whereas the NHA foot incurs higher values in the lateral digits; and (3) total work in the metatarso-phalangeal joints is lower in the human foot than in the NHA foot. The results indicate that human foot proportions are indeed well suited to performance in normal human walking. PMID:24925580

  14. A Genetic Variant of Hepatitis B Virus Divergent from Known Human and Ape Genotypes Isolated from a Japanese Patient and Provisionally Assigned to New Genotype J▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tatematsu, Kanako; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kurbanov, Fuat; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Mano, Shuhei; Maeshiro, Tatsuji; Nakayoshi, Tomokuni; Wakuta, Moriaki; Miyakawa, Yuzo; Mizokami, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) of a novel genotype (J) was recovered from an 88-year-old Japanese patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who had a history of residing in Borneo during the World War II. It was divergent from eight human (A to H) and four ape (chimpanzee, gorilla, gibbon, and orangutan) HBV genotypes, as well as from a recently proposed ninth human genotype I, by 9.9 to 16.5% of the entire genomic sequence and did not have evidence of recombination with any of the nine human genotypes and four nonhuman genotypes. Based on a comparison of the entire nucleotide sequence against 1,440 HBV isolates reported, HBV/J was nearest to the gibbon and orangutan genotypes (mean divergences of 10.9 and 10.7%, respectively). Based on a comparison of four open reading frames, HBV/J was closer to gibbon/orangutan genotypes than to human genotypes in the P and large S genes and closest to Australian aboriginal strains (HBV/C4) and orangutan-derived strains in the S gene, whereas it was closer to human than ape genotypes in the C gene. HBV/J shared a deletion of 33 nucleotides at the start of preS1 region with C4 and gibbon genotypes, had an S-gene sequence similar to that of C4, and expressed the ayw subtype. Efficient infection, replication, and antigen expression by HBV/J were experimentally established in two chimeric mice with the liver repopulated for human hepatocytes. The HBV DNA sequence recovered from infected mice was identical to that in the inoculum. Since HBV/J is positioned phylogenetically in between human and ape genotypes, it may help to trace the origin of HBV and merits further epidemiological surveys. PMID:19640977

  15. The risk of disease to great apes: simulating disease spread in orang-utan (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) and chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) association networks.

    PubMed

    Carne, Charlotte; Semple, Stuart; Morrogh-Bernard, Helen; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Lehmann, Julia

    2014-01-01

    All great ape species are endangered, and infectious diseases are thought to pose a particular threat to their survival. As great ape species vary substantially in social organisation and gregariousness, there are likely to be differences in susceptibility to disease types and spread. Understanding the relation between social variables and disease is therefore crucial for implementing effective conservation measures. Here, we simulate the transmission of a range of diseases in a population of orang-utans in Sabangau Forest (Central Kalimantan) and a community of chimpanzees in Budongo Forest (Uganda), by systematically varying transmission likelihood and probability of subsequent recovery. Both species have fission-fusion social systems, but differ considerably in their level of gregariousness. We used long-term behavioural data to create networks of association patterns on which the spread of different diseases was simulated. We found that chimpanzees were generally far more susceptible to the spread of diseases than orang-utans. When simulating different diseases that varied widely in their probability of transmission and recovery, it was found that the chimpanzee community was widely and strongly affected, while in orang-utans even highly infectious diseases had limited spread. Furthermore, when comparing the observed association network with a mean-field network (equal contact probability between group members), we found no major difference in simulated disease spread, suggesting that patterns of social bonding in orang-utans are not an important determinant of susceptibility to disease. In chimpanzees, the predicted size of the epidemic was smaller on the actual association network than on the mean-field network, indicating that patterns of social bonding have important effects on susceptibility to disease. We conclude that social networks are a potentially powerful tool to model the risk of disease transmission in great apes, and that chimpanzees are

  16. The Risk of Disease to Great Apes: Simulating Disease Spread in Orang-Utan (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii) and Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) Association Networks

    PubMed Central

    Carne, Charlotte; Semple, Stuart; Morrogh-Bernard, Helen; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Lehmann, Julia

    2014-01-01

    All great ape species are endangered, and infectious diseases are thought to pose a particular threat to their survival. As great ape species vary substantially in social organisation and gregariousness, there are likely to be differences in susceptibility to disease types and spread. Understanding the relation between social variables and disease is therefore crucial for implementing effective conservation measures. Here, we simulate the transmission of a range of diseases in a population of orang-utans in Sabangau Forest (Central Kalimantan) and a community of chimpanzees in Budongo Forest (Uganda), by systematically varying transmission likelihood and probability of subsequent recovery. Both species have fission-fusion social systems, but differ considerably in their level of gregariousness. We used long-term behavioural data to create networks of association patterns on which the spread of different diseases was simulated. We found that chimpanzees were generally far more susceptible to the spread of diseases than orang-utans. When simulating different diseases that varied widely in their probability of transmission and recovery, it was found that the chimpanzee community was widely and strongly affected, while in orang-utans even highly infectious diseases had limited spread. Furthermore, when comparing the observed association network with a mean-field network (equal contact probability between group members), we found no major difference in simulated disease spread, suggesting that patterns of social bonding in orang-utans are not an important determinant of susceptibility to disease. In chimpanzees, the predicted size of the epidemic was smaller on the actual association network than on the mean-field network, indicating that patterns of social bonding have important effects on susceptibility to disease. We conclude that social networks are a potentially powerful tool to model the risk of disease transmission in great apes, and that chimpanzees are

  17. Analysis of joint force and torque for the human and non-human ape foot during bipedal walking with implications for the evolution of the foot

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weijie; Abboud, Rami J; Günther, Michael M; Crompton, Robin H

    2014-01-01

    The feet of apes have a different morphology from those of humans. Until now, it has merely been assumed that the morphology seen in humans must be adaptive for habitual bipedal walking, as the habitual use of bipedal walking is generally regarded as one of the most clear-cut differences between humans and apes. This study asks simply whether human skeletal proportions do actually enhance foot performance during human-like bipedalism, by examining the influence of foot proportions on force, torque and work in the foot joints during simulated bipedal walking. Skeletons of the common chimpanzee, orangutan, gorilla and human were represented by multi-rigid-body models, where the components of the foot make external contact via finite element surfaces. The models were driven by identical joint motion functions collected from experiments on human walking. Simulated contact forces between the ground and the foot were found to be reasonably comparable with measurements made during human walking using pressure- and force-platforms. Joint force, torque and work in the foot were then predicted. Within the limitations of our model, the results show that during simulated human-like bipedal walking, (1) the human and non-human ape (NHA) feet carry similar joint forces, although the distributions of the forces differ; (2) the NHA foot incurs larger joint torques than does the human foot, although the human foot has higher values in the first tarso-metatarsal and metatarso-phalangeal joints, whereas the NHA foot incurs higher values in the lateral digits; and (3) total work in the metatarso-phalangeal joints is lower in the human foot than in the NHA foot. The results indicate that human foot proportions are indeed well suited to performance in normal human walking. PMID:24925580

  18. The association of -656T > G and 1349T > G polymorphisms of ApE1 gene and the risk of female infertility.

    PubMed

    Mashayekhi, Farhad; Yousefi, Mostafa; Salehi, Zivar; Pournourali, Mostafa

    2016-05-01

    Despite enormous progress in the understanding of human reproductive physiology, the underlying cause of male infertility remains undefined in about 50.0% of cases, which are referred to as idiopathic infertility. Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (ApE1) is a multifunctional protein that has an important role in the base excision repair pathway. The present study aimed to evaluate whether two functional ApE1 polymorphisms (-656T > G and 1349T > G) are associated with the susceptibility of female infertility. Blood samples were collected from 100 patients diagnosed with female infertility and 100 control subjects and genotyped by tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR). The results indicated that individuals with the variant TG genotypes had a significantly increased risk of female infertility (p = 0.035, OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 1.04-3.74). Whereas, a significant association between 1349T > G polymorphism and female infertility risk was not observed (p = 0.1). Larger studies with more patients and controls are required to confirm the results. PMID:26790616

  19. Evolutionary pattern of mutation in the factor IX genes of great apes: How does it compare to the pattern of recent germline mutation in patients with hemophilia B?

    SciTech Connect

    Grouse, L.H.; Ketterling, R.P.; Sommer, S.S.

    1994-09-01

    Most mutations causing hemophilia B have arisen within the past 150 years. By correcting for multiple biases, the underlying rates of spontaneous germline mutation have been estimated in the factor IX gene. From these rates, an underlying pattern of mutation has emerged. To determine if this pattern compares to a underlying pattern found in the great apes, sequence changes were determined in intronic regions of the factor IX gene. The following species were studied: Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee), Pongo pygmacus (orangutan) and Homo sapiens. Intronic sequences at least 200 bp from a splice junction were randomly chosen, amplified by cross-species PCR, and sequenced. These regions are expected to be subject to little if any selective pressure. Early diverged species of Old World monkeys were also studied to help determine the direction of mutational changes. A total of 62 sequence changes were observed. Initial data suggest that the average pattern since evolution of the great apes has a paucity of transitions at CpG dinucleotides and an excess of microinsertions to microdeletions when compared to the pattern observed in humans during the past 150 years (p<.05). A larger study is in progress to confirm these results.

  20. An exceptionally long CA-repeat in the core promoter of SCGB2B2 links with the evolution of apes and Old World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Nikkhah, M; Rezazadeh, M; Khorram Khorshid, H R; Biglarian, A; Ohadi, M

    2016-01-15

    We have recently reported a genome-scale catalog of human protein-coding genes that contain "exceptionally long" STRs (≥6-repeats) in their core promoter, which may be of selective advantage in this species. At the top of that list, SCGB2B2 (also known as SCGBL), contains one of the longest CA-repeat STRs identified in a human gene core promoter, at 25-repeats. In the study reported here, we analyzed the conservation status of this CA-STR across evolution. The functional implication of this STR to alter gene expression activity was also analyzed in the HEK-293 cell line. We report that the SCGB2B2 core promoter CA-repeat reaches exceptional lengths, ranging from 9- to 25-repeats, across Apes (Hominoids) and the Old World monkeys (CA>2-repeats were not detected in any other species). The longest CA-repeats and highest identity in the SCGB2B2 protein sequence were observed between human and bonobo. A trend for increased gene expression activity was observed from the shorter to the longer CA-repeats (p<0.009), and the CA-repeat increased gene expression activity, per se (p<0.02). We propose that the SCGB2B2 gene core promoter CA-repeat functions as an expression code for the evolution of Apes and the Old World monkeys. PMID:26437309

  1. Handedness for Unimanual Grasping in 564 Great Apes: The Effect on Grip Morphology and a Comparison with Hand Use for a Bimanual Coordinated Task

    PubMed Central

    Meguerditchian, Adrien; Phillips, Kimberley A.; Chapelain, Amandine; Mahovetz, Lindsay M.; Milne, Scott; Stoinski, Tara; Bania, Amanda; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth; Schaeffer, Jennifer; Russell, Jamie; Hopkins, William D.

    2015-01-01

    A number of factors have been proposed to influence within and between species variation in handedness in non-human primates. In the initial study, we assessed the influence of grip morphology on hand use for simple reaching in a sample of 564 great apes including 49 orangutans Pongo pygmaeus, 66 gorillas Gorilla gorilla, 354 chimpanzees Pan troglodytes and 95 bonobos Pan paniscus. Overall, we found a significant right hand bias for reaching. We also found a significant effect of the grip morphology of hand use. Grasping with the thumb and index finger was more prevalent in the right compared to left hand in all four species. There was no significant sex effect on the patterns of handedness. In a subsample of apes, we also compared consistency in hand use for simple reaching with previously published data on a task that measures handedness for bimanual actions. We found that the ratio of subjects with consistent right compared to left hand use was more prevalent in bonobos, chimpanzees and gorillas but not orangutans. However, for all species, the proportion of subjects with inconsistent hand preferences between the tasks was relatively high suggesting some measures may be more sensitive in assessing handedness than others. PMID:26635693

  2. Handedness for Unimanual Grasping in 564 Great Apes: The Effect on Grip Morphology and a Comparison with Hand Use for a Bimanual Coordinated Task.

    PubMed

    Meguerditchian, Adrien; Phillips, Kimberley A; Chapelain, Amandine; Mahovetz, Lindsay M; Milne, Scott; Stoinski, Tara; Bania, Amanda; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth; Schaeffer, Jennifer; Russell, Jamie; Hopkins, William D

    2015-01-01

    A number of factors have been proposed to influence within and between species variation in handedness in non-human primates. In the initial study, we assessed the influence of grip morphology on hand use for simple reaching in a sample of 564 great apes including 49 orangutans Pongo pygmaeus, 66 gorillas Gorilla gorilla, 354 chimpanzees Pan troglodytes and 95 bonobos Pan paniscus. Overall, we found a significant right hand bias for reaching. We also found a significant effect of the grip morphology of hand use. Grasping with the thumb and index finger was more prevalent in the right compared to left hand in all four species. There was no significant sex effect on the patterns of handedness. In a subsample of apes, we also compared consistency in hand use for simple reaching with previously published data on a task that measures handedness for bimanual actions. We found that the ratio of subjects with consistent right compared to left hand use was more prevalent in bonobos, chimpanzees and gorillas but not orangutans. However, for all species, the proportion of subjects with inconsistent hand preferences between the tasks was relatively high suggesting some measures may be more sensitive in assessing handedness than others. PMID:26635693

  3. Apes, lice and prehistory

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Robin A

    2009-01-01

    Although most epidemic human infectious diseases are caused by recently introduced pathogens, cospeciation of parasite and host is commonplace for endemic infections. Occasional host infidelity, however, provides the endemic parasite with an opportunity to survive the potential extinction of its host. Such infidelity may account for the survival of certain types of human lice, and it is currently exemplified by viruses such as HIV. PMID:19232074

  4. Apes are intuitive statisticians.

    PubMed

    Rakoczy, Hannes; Clüver, Annette; Saucke, Liane; Stoffregen, Nicole; Gräbener, Alice; Migura, Judith; Call, Josep

    2014-04-01

    Inductive learning and reasoning, as we use it both in everyday life and in science, is characterized by flexible inferences based on statistical information: inferences from populations to samples and vice versa. Many forms of such statistical reasoning have been found to develop late in human ontogeny, depending on formal education and language, and to be fragile even in adults. New revolutionary research, however, suggests that even preverbal human infants make use of intuitive statistics. Here, we conducted the first investigation of such intuitive statistical reasoning with non-human primates. In a series of 7 experiments, Bonobos, Chimpanzees, Gorillas and Orangutans drew flexible statistical inferences from populations to samples. These inferences, furthermore, were truly based on statistical information regarding the relative frequency distributions in a population, and not on absolute frequencies. Intuitive statistics in its most basic form is thus an evolutionarily more ancient rather than a uniquely human capacity. PMID:24440657

  5. How the great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus, Pan paniscus, Gorilla gorilla) perform on the reversed reward contingency task II: transfer to new quantities, long-term retention, and the impact of quantity ratios.

    PubMed

    Uher, Jana; Call, Josep

    2008-05-01

    We tested 6 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), 3 orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus), 4 bonobos (Pan paniscus), and 2 gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) in the reversed reward contingency task. Individuals were presented with pairs of quantities ranging between 0 and 6 food items. Prior to testing, some experienced apes had solved this task using 2 quantities while others were totally naïve. Experienced apes transferred their ability to multiple-novel pairs after 6 to 19 months had elapsed since their initial testing. Two out of 6 naïve apes (1 chimpanzee, 1 bonobo) solved the task--a proportion comparable to that of a previous study using 2 pairs of quantities. Their acquisition speed was also comparable to the successful subjects from that study. The ratio between quantities explained a large portion of the variance but affected naïve and experienced individuals differently. For smaller ratios, naïve individuals were well below 50% correct and experienced ones were well above 50%, yet both groups tended to converge toward 50% for larger ratios. Thus, some apes require no procedural modifications to overcome their strong bias for selecting the larger of 2 quantities. PMID:18489236

  6. A partial skeleton of the fossil great ape Hispanopithecus laietanus from Can Feu and the mosaic evolution of crown-hominoid positional behaviors.

    PubMed

    Alba, David M; Almécija, Sergio; Casanovas-Vilar, Isaac; Méndez, Josep M; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    The extinct dryopithecine Hispanopithecus (Primates: Hominidae), from the Late Miocene of Europe, is the oldest fossil great ape displaying an orthograde body plan coupled with unambiguous suspensory adaptations. On the basis of hand morphology, Hispanopithecus laietanus has been considered to primitively retain adaptations to above-branch quadrupedalism-thus displaying a locomotor repertoire unknown among extant or fossil hominoids, which has been considered unlikely by some researchers. Here we describe a partial skeleton of H. laietanus from the Vallesian (MN9) locality of Can Feu 1 (Vallès-Penedès Basin, NE Iberian Peninsula), with an estimated age of 10.0-9.7 Ma. It includes dentognathic and postcranial remains of a single, female adult individual, with an estimated body mass of 22-25 kg. The postcranial remains of the rib cage, shoulder girdle and forelimb show a mixture of monkey-like and modern-hominoid-like features. In turn, the proximal morphology of the ulna-most completely preserved in the Can Feu skeleton than among previously-available remains-indicates the possession of an elbow complex suitable for preserving stability along the full range of flexion/extension and enabling a broad range of pronation/supination. Such features, suitable for suspensory behaviors, are however combined with an olecranon morphology that is functionally related to quadrupedalism. Overall, when all the available postcranial evidence for H. laietanus is considered, it emerges that this taxon displayed a locomotor repertoire currently unknown among other apes (extant or extinct alike), uniquely combining suspensory-related features with primitively-retained adaptations to above-branch palmigrady. Despite phylogenetic uncertainties, Hispanopithecus is invariably considered an extinct member of the great-ape-and-human clade. Therefore, the combination of quadrupedal and suspensory adaptations in this Miocene crown hominoid clearly evidences the mosaic nature of locomotor

  7. Emerging Roles of the Nucleolus in Regulating the DNA Damage Response: The Noncanonical DNA Repair Enzyme APE1/Ref-1 as a Paradigmatical Example

    PubMed Central

    Antoniali, Giulia; Lirussi, Lisa; Poletto, Mattia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: An emerging concept in DNA repair mechanisms is the evidence that some key enzymes, besides their role in the maintenance of genome stability, display also unexpected noncanonical functions associated with RNA metabolism in specific subcellular districts (e.g., nucleoli). During the evolution of these key enzymes, the acquisition of unfolded domains significantly amplified the possibility to interact with different partners and substrates, possibly explaining their phylogenetic gain of functions. Recent Advances: After nucleolar stress or DNA damage, many DNA repair proteins can freely relocalize from nucleoli to the nucleoplasm. This process may represent a surveillance mechanism to monitor the synthesis and correct assembly of ribosomal units affecting cell cycle progression or inducing p53-mediated apoptosis or senescence. Critical Issues: A paradigm for this kind of regulation is represented by some enzymes of the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway, such as apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1). In this review, the role of the nucleolus and the noncanonical functions of the APE1 protein are discussed in light of their possible implications in human pathologies. Future Directions: A productive cross-talk between DNA repair enzymes and proteins involved in RNA metabolism seems reasonable as the nucleolus is emerging as a dynamic functional hub that coordinates cell growth arrest and DNA repair mechanisms. These findings will drive further analyses on other BER proteins and might imply that nucleic acid processing enzymes are more versatile than originally thought having evolved DNA-targeted functions after a previous life in the early RNA world. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 621–639. PMID:23879289

  8. Inhibition of APE1/Ref-1 redox activity rescues human retinal pigment epithelial cells from oxidative stress and reduces choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Zhou, T.; Kelley, M.R.; Edwards, P.; Gao, H.; Qiao, X.

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of current treatment for age related macular degeneration (AMD) by targeting one molecule is limited due to its multifactorial nature and heterogeneous pathologies. Treatment strategy to target multiple signaling pathways or pathological components in AMD pathogenesis is under investigation for better clinical outcome. Inhibition of the redox function of apurinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1) was found to suppress endothelial angiogenesis and promote neuronal cell recovery, thereby may serve as a potential treatment for AMD. In the current study, we for the first time have found that a specific inhibitor of APE1 redox function by a small molecule compound E3330 regulates retinal pigment epithelium (RPEs) cell response to oxidative stress. E3330 significantly blocked sub-lethal doses of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) induced proliferation decline and senescence advancement of RPEs. At the same time, E3330 remarkably decreased the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and down-regulated the productions of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as attenuated the level of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 in RPEs. A panel of stress and toxicity responsive transcription factors that were significantly upregulated by oxLDL was restored by E3330, including Nrf2/Nrf1, p53, NF-κB, HIF1, CBF/NF-Y/YY1, and MTF-1. Further, a single intravitreal injection of E3330 effectively reduced the progression of laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in mouse eyes. These data revealed that E3330 effectively rescued RPEs from oxidative stress induced senescence and dysfunctions in multiple aspects in vitro, and attenuated laser-induced damages to RPE–Bruch׳s membrane complex in vivo. Together with its previously established anti-angiogenic and neuroprotection benefits, E3330 is implicated for potential use for AMD treatment. PMID:24624338

  9. The evolution of the frontal lobes: a volumetric analysis based on three-dimensional reconstructions of magnetic resonance scans of human and ape brains.

    PubMed

    Semendeferi, K; Damasio, H; Frank, R; Van Hoesen, G W

    1997-04-01

    Scenarios regarding the evolution of cognitive function in hominids depend largely on our understanding of the organization of the frontal lobes in extant humans and apes. The frontal lobe is involved in functions such as creative thinking, planning of future actions, decision making, artistic expression, aspects of emotional behavior, as well as working memory, language and motor control. It is often claimed that the frontal lobe is disproportionately larger in humans than in other species, but conflicting reports exist on this issue. The brain of the apes in particular remains largely unknown. In this report we measure the volume of the frontal lobe as a whole and of its main sectors (including cortex and immediately underlying white matter) in living humans, and in post-mortem brains of the chimpanzee, gorilla, orang-utan, gibbon and the macaque using three-dimensional reconstructions of magnetic resonance (MR) scans of the brain. On the basis of these data we suggest that although the absolute volume of the brain and the frontal lobe is largest in humans, the relative size of the frontal lobe is similar across hominoids, and that humans do not have a larger frontal lobe than expected from a primate brain of the human size. We also report that the relative size of the sectors of the frontal lobe (dorsal, mesial, orbital) is similar across the primate species studied. Our conclusions are preliminary, because the size of our sample, although larger than in previous studies, still remains small. With this caveat we conclude that the overall volume of the frontal lobe in hominids enlarged in absolute size along with the rest of the brain, but did not become relatively larger after the split of the human line from the ancestral African hominoid stock. Aspects other than relative volume of the frontal lobe have to be responsible for the cognitive specializations of the hominids. PMID:9085187

  10. Generating relativistic pseudo-potentials with explicit incorporation of semi-core states using APE, the Atomic Pseudo-potentials Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Micael J. T.; Nogueira, Fernando

    2008-04-01

    We present a computer package designed to generate and test norm-conserving pseudo-potentials within Density Functional Theory. The generated pseudo-potentials can be either non-relativistic, scalar relativistic or fully relativistic and can explicitly include semi-core states. A wide range of exchange-correlation functionals is included. Program summaryProgram title: Atomic Pseudo-potentials Engine (APE) Catalogue identifier: AEAC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 88 287 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 649 959 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90, C Computer: any computer architecture, running any flavor of UNIX Operating system: GNU/Linux RAM: <5 Mb Classification: 7.3 External routines: GSL ( http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/) Nature of problem: Determination of atomic eigenvalues and wave-functions using relativistic and nonrelativistic Density-Functional Theory. Construction of pseudo-potentials for use in ab-initio simulations. Solution method: Grid-based integration of the Kohn-Sham equations. Restrictions: Relativistic spin-polarized calculations are not possible. The set of exchange-correlation functionals implemented in the code does not include orbital-dependent functionals. Unusual features: The program creates pseudo-potential files suitable for the most widely used ab-initio packages and, besides the standard non-relativistic Hamann and Troullier-Martins potentials, it can generate pseudo-potentials using the relativistic and semi-core extensions to the Troullier-Martins scheme. APE also has a very sophisticated and user-friendly input system. Running time: The example given in this paper (Si) takes 10 s to run on a Pentium

  11. Assessment of landscape-scale distribution of sympatric great apes in African rainforests: concurrent use of nest and camera-trap surveys.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yoshihiro; Iwata, Yuji; Ando, Chieko; Nze Nkoguee, Chimene; Inoue, Eiji; Akomo, Etienne-Francois Okoue; Nguema, Philippe Mbehang; Bineni, Thierry Diop; Banak, Ludovic Ngok; Takenoshita, Yuji; Ngomanda, Alfred; Yamagiwa, Juichi

    2013-12-01

    Information on the distribution and abundance of sympatric great apes (Pan troglodytes troglodytes and Gorilla gorilla gorilla) are important for effective conservation and management. Although much research has been done to improve the precision of nest-surveys, trade-offs between data-reliability and research-efficiency have not been solved. In this study, we used different approaches to assess the landscape-scale distribution patterns of great apes. We conducted a conventional nest survey and a camera-trap survey concurrently, and checked the consistency of the estimates. We divided the study area (ca. 500 km²), containing various types of vegetation and topography, into thirty 16-km² grids (4 km × 4 km) and performed both methods along 2-km transects centered in each grid. We determined the nest creator species according to the definitions by Tutin & Fernandez [Tutin & Fernandez, 1984, Am J Primatol 6:313-336] and estimated nest-site densities of each species by using the conventional distance-sampling approach. We calculated the mean capture rate of 3 camera traps left for 3 months at each grid as the abundance index. Our analyses showed that both methods provided roughly consistent results for the distribution patterns of the species; chimpanzee groups (parties) were more abundant in the montane forest, and gorilla groups were relatively homogeneously distributed across vegetation types. The line-transect survey also showed that the number of nests per nest site did not vary among vegetation types for either species. These spatial patterns seemed to reflect the ecological and sociological features of each species. Although the consistent results may be largely dependent on site-specific conditions (e.g., high density of each species, distinct distribution pattern between the two species), conventional nest-surveys and a subsequent check of their consistency with independent estimates may be a reasonable approach to obtain certain information on

  12. The AL 333-160 fourth metatarsal from Hadar compared to that of humans, great apes, baboons and proboscis monkeys: non-conclusive evidence for pedal arches or obligate bipedality in Hadar hominins.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P J; Sarmiento, E E; Meldrum, D J

    2012-10-01

    Based on comparisons to non-statistically representative samples of humans and two great ape species (i.e. common chimpanzees Pan troglodytes and lowland gorillas Gorilla gorilla), Ward et al. (2011) concluded that a complete hominin fourth metatarsal (4th MT) from Hadar, AL 333-160, belonged to a committed terrestrial biped with fixed transverse and longitudinal pedal arches, which was no longer under selection favoring substantial arboreal behaviors. According to Ward et al., the Hadar 4th MT had (1) a torsion value indicating a transverse arch, (2) sagittal plane angles between the diaphyseal long axis and the planes of the articular surfaces indicating a longitudinal arch, and (3) a narrow mediolateral to dorsoplantar base ratio, an ectocuneiform facet, and tarsal articular surface contours all indicating a rigid foot without an ape-like mid-tarsal break. Comparisons of the Hadar 4th MT characters to those of statistically representative samples of humans, all five great ape species, baboons and proboscis monkeys show that none of the correlations Ward et al. make to localized foot function were supported by this analysis. The Hadar 4th MT characters are common to catarrhines that have a midtarsal break and lack fixed transverse or longitudinal arches. Further comparison of the AL 333-160 4th MT length, and base, midshaft and head circumferences to those of catarrhines with field collected body weights show that this bone is uniquely short with a large base. Its length suggests the AL 333-160 individual was a poor leaper with limited arboreal behaviors and lacked a longitudinal arch, i.e. its 4th MT long axis was usually held perpendicular to gravity. Its large base implies cuboid-4th MT joint mobility. A relatively short 4th MT head circumference indicates AL 333-160 had small proximal phalanges with a restricted range of mobility. Overall, AL 333-160 is most similar to the 4th MT of eastern gorillas, a slow moving quadruped that sacrifices arboreal behaviors

  13. The Great Ape Project: legislating for the control of the use of non-human hominids in research, testing and teaching--Animal Welfare Act 1999 (New Zealand).

    PubMed

    Wells, Neil

    2004-06-01

    The Animal Welfare Act 1999 (New Zealand), which commenced on January 1 2000, provides that the use of non-human hominids in research, testing or teaching is not permitted unless the Director-General of Agriculture approves the use, and then, only if the use is in the interests of the non-human hominid itself or its species. The Animal Welfare Act 1999 originated with two parliamentary bills. The first, a private member's bill in the name of Pete Hodgson MP, was tabled in 1997, and the second, a Government measure, was tabled a year later. Neither bill made any reference to non-human hominids. The Great Ape Project made submissions that non-human hominids be afforded similar rights to humans, i.e. not to be deprived of life, not to be subjected to torture or cruel treatment and not to be subjected to medical or scientific experimentation. Proponents and opponents of the measure argued for and against the tenet of introducing "rights" issues into what was essentially "welfare" legislation. These arguments are analysed, and the legislative process that enabled this modification is examined. PMID:23577482

  14. Discovery of a novel retrovirus sequence in an Australian native rodent (Melomys burtoni): a putative link between gibbon ape leukemia virus and koala retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Greg; Clarke, Daniel; McKee, Jeff; Young, Paul; Meers, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV) and koala retrovirus (KoRV) share a remarkably close sequence identity despite the fact that they occur in distantly related mammals on different continents. It has previously been suggested that infection of their respective hosts may have occurred as a result of a species jump from another, as yet unidentified vertebrate host. To investigate possible sources of these retroviruses in the Australian context, DNA samples were obtained from 42 vertebrate species and screened using PCR in order to detect proviral sequences closely related to KoRV and GALV. Four proviral partial sequences totalling 2880 bases which share a strong similarity with KoRV and GALV were detected in DNA from a native Australian rodent, the grassland melomys, Melomys burtoni. We have designated this novel gammaretrovirus Melomys burtoni retrovirus (MbRV). The concatenated nucleotide sequence of MbRV shares 93% identity with the corresponding sequence from GALV-SEATO and 83% identity with KoRV. The geographic ranges of the grassland melomys and of the koala partially overlap. Thus a species jump by MbRV from melomys to koalas is conceivable. However the genus Melomys does not occur in mainland South East Asia and so it appears most likely that another as yet unidentified host was the source of GALV. PMID:25251014

  15. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K.

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Distinct roles of Ape1 protein, an enzyme involved in DNA repair, in high or low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation-induced cell killing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Xiang; Chen, Guangnan; Zhang, Xiangming; Tang, Xiaobing; Park, Dongkyoo; Cucinotta, Francis A; Yu, David S; Deng, Xingming; Dynan, William S; Doetsch, Paul W; Wang, Ya

    2014-10-31

    High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation from space heavy charged particles or a heavier ion radiotherapy machine kills more cells than low LET radiation, mainly because high LET radiation-induced DNA damage is more difficult to repair. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is the ratio of the effects generated by high LET radiation to low LET radiation. Previously, our group and others demonstrated that the cell-killing RBE is involved in the interference of high LET radiation with non-homologous end joining but not homologous recombination repair. This effect is attributable, in part, to the small DNA fragments (≤40 bp) directly produced by high LET radiation, the size of which prevents Ku protein from efficiently binding to the two ends of one fragment at the same time, thereby reducing non-homologous end joining efficiency. Here we demonstrate that Ape1, an enzyme required for processing apurinic/apyrimidinic (known as abasic) sites, is also involved in the generation of small DNA fragments during the repair of high LET radiation-induced base damage, which contributes to the higher RBE of high LET radiation-induced cell killing. This discovery opens a new direction to develop approaches for either protecting astronauts from exposure to space radiation or benefiting cancer patients by sensitizing tumor cells to high LET radiotherapy. PMID:25210033

  17. The Steady State Great Ape? Long Term Isotopic Records Reveal the Effects of Season, Social Rank and Reproductive Status on Bonobo Feeding Behavior.

    PubMed

    Oelze, Vicky M; Douglas, Pamela Heidi; Stephens, Colleen R; Surbeck, Martin; Behringer, Verena; Richards, Michael P; Fruth, Barbara; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    Dietary ecology of extant great apes is known to respond to environmental conditions such as climate and food availability, but also to vary depending on social status and life history characteristics. Bonobos (Pan paniscus) live under comparatively steady ecological conditions in the evergreen rainforests of the Congo Basin. Bonobos are an ideal species for investigating influences of sociodemographic and physiological factors, such as female reproductive status, on diet. We investigate the long term dietary pattern in wild but fully habituated bonobos by stable isotope analysis in hair and integrating a variety of long-term sociodemographic information obtained through observations. We analyzed carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in 432 hair sections obtained from 101 non-invasively collected hair samples. These samples represented the dietary behavior of 23 adult bonobos from 2008 through 2010. By including isotope and crude protein data from plants we could establish an isotope baseline and interpret the results of several general linear mixed models using the predictors climate, sex, social rank, reproductive state of females, adult age and age of infants. We found that low canopy foliage is a useful isotopic tracer for tropical rainforest settings, and consumption of terrestrial herbs best explains the temporal isotope patterns we found in carbon isotope values of bonobo hair. Only the diet of male bonobos was affected by social rank, with lower nitrogen isotope values in low-ranking young males. Female isotope values mainly differed between different stages of reproduction (cycling, pregnancy, lactation). These isotopic differences appear to be related to changes in dietary preference during pregnancy (high protein diet) and lactation (high energy diet), which allow to compensate for different nutritional needs during maternal investment. PMID:27626279

  18. A tsetse and tabanid fly survey of African great apes habitats reveals the presence of a novel trypanosome lineage but the absence of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Votýpka, Jan; Rádrová, Jana; Skalický, Tomáš; Jirků, Milan; Jirsová, Dagmar; Mihalca, Andrei D; D'Amico, Gianluca; Petrželková, Klára J; Modrý, David; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-10-01

    Tsetse and tabanid flies transmit several Trypanosoma species, some of which are human and livestock pathogens of major medical and socioeconomic impact in Africa. Recent advances in molecular techniques and phylogenetic analyses have revealed a growing diversity of previously unidentified tsetse-transmitted trypanosomes potentially pathogenic to livestock and/or other domestic animals as well as wildlife, including African great apes. To map the distribution, prevalence and co-occurrence of known and novel trypanosome species, we analyzed tsetse and tabanid flies collected in the primary forested part of the Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic, which hosts a broad spectrum of wildlife including primates and is virtually devoid of domestic animals. Altogether, 564 tsetse flies and 81 tabanid flies were individually screened for the presence of trypanosomes using 18S rRNA-specific nested PCR. Herein, we demonstrate that wildlife animals are parasitized by a surprisingly wide range of trypanosome species that in some cases may circulate via these insect vectors. While one-third of the examined tsetse flies harbored trypanosomes either from the Trypanosoma theileri, Trypanosoma congolense or Trypanosoma simiae complex, or one of the three new members of the genus Trypanosoma (strains 'Bai', 'Ngbanda' and 'Didon'), more than half of the tabanid flies exclusively carried T. theileri. To establish the putative vertebrate hosts of the novel trypanosome species, we further analyzed the provenance of blood meals of tsetse flies. DNA individually isolated from 1033 specimens of Glossina spp. and subjected to high-throughput library-based screening proved that most of the examined tsetse flies engorged on wild ruminants (buffalo, sitatunga, bongo), humans and suids. Moreover, they also fed (albeit more rarely) on other vertebrates, thus providing indirect but convincing evidence that trypanosomes can be transmitted via these vectors among a wide range of

  19. Comparative restriction endonuclease maps of proviral DNA of the primate type C simian sarcoma-associated virus and gibbon ape leukemia virus group.

    PubMed Central

    Trainor, C D; Wong-Staal, F; Reitz, M S

    1982-01-01

    Extrachromosomal DNA was purified from canine thymus cells acutely infected with different strains of infectious primate type C viruses of the woolly monkey (simian) sarcoma helper virus and gibbon ape leukemia virus group. All DNA preparations contained linear proviral molecules of 9.1 to 9.2 kilobases, at least some of which represent complete infectious proviral DNA. Cells infected with a replication-defective fibroblast-transforming sarcoma virus and its helper, a replication-competent nontransforming helper virus, also contained a 6.6- to 6.7-kilobase DNA. These proviral DNA molecules were digested with different restriction endonucleases, and the resultant fragments were oriented to the viral RNA by a combination of partial digestions, codigestion with more than one endonuclease, digestion of integrated proviral DNA, and hybridization with 3'- and 5'-specific viral probes. The 3'- and 5'-specific probes each hybridized to fragments from both ends of proviral DNA, indicating that, in common with those of other retroviruses, these proviruses contain a large terminal redundancy at both ends, each of which consists of sequences derived from both the 3' and 5' regions of the viral RNA. The proviral sequences are organized 3',5'-unique-3',5'. Four restriction enzymes (KpnI, SmaI, PstI, and SstI) recognized sites within the large terminal redundancies, and these sites were conserved within all the isolates tested. This suggests that both the 3' and 5' ends of the genomic RNA of these viruses are extremely closely related. In contrast, the restriction sites within the unique portion of the provirus were not strongly conserved within this group of viruses, even though they were related along most of their genomes. Whereas the 5' 60 to 70% of the RNA of these viruses was more closely related by liquid hybridization experiments than was the 3' 30 to 40%, restriction sites within this region were not preferentially conserved, suggesting that small sequence differences or

  20. Signing Apes and Evolving Linguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokoe, William C.

    Linguistics retains from its antecedents, philology and the study of sacred writings, some of their apologetic and theological bias. Thus it has not been able to face squarely the question how linguistic function may have evolved from animal communication. Chimpanzees' use of signs from American Sign Language forces re-examination of language…

  1. Terrestrial apes and phylogenetic trees

    PubMed Central

    Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2010-01-01

    The image that best expresses Darwin’s thinking is the tree of life. However, Darwin’s human evolutionary tree lacked almost everything because only the Neanderthals were known at the time and they were considered one extreme expression of our own species. Darwin believed that the root of the human tree was very deep and in Africa. It was not until 1962 that the root was shown to be much more recent in time and definitively in Africa. On the other hand, some neo-Darwinians believed that our family tree was not a tree, because there were no branches, but, rather, a straight stem. The recent years have witnessed spectacular discoveries in Africa that take us close to the origin of the human tree and in Spain at Atapuerca that help us better understand the origin of the Neanderthals as well as our own species. The final form of the tree, and the number of branches, remains an object of passionate debate. PMID:20445090

  2. Small-molecule BH3 mimetic and pan-Bcl-2 inhibitor AT-101 enhances the antitumor efficacy of cisplatin through inhibition of APE1 repair and redox activity in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tao; Shan, Jinlu; Li, Mengxia; Qing, Yi; Qian, Chengyuan; Wang, Guangjie; Li, Qing; Lu, Guoshou; Li, Chongyi; Peng, Yu; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Shiheng; Yang, Yuxing; Cheng, Yi; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    AT-101 is a BH3 mimetic and pan-Bcl-2 inhibitor that has shown potent anticancer activity in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in murine models, but failed to show clinical efficacy when used in combination with docetaxel in NSCLC patients. Our recent study has demonstrated that AT-101 enhanced the antitumor effect of cisplatin (CDDP) in a murine model of NSCLC via inhibition of the interleukin-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway. This study explored the underlying mechanisms for the enhanced anticancer activity of CDDP by AT-101. Our results show that, when compared with monotherapy, AT-101 significantly enhanced the inhibitory effects of CDDP on proliferation and migration of A549 cells and on tube formation and migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. AT-101 promoted the proapoptotic activity of CDDP in A549 cells. AT-101 also enhanced the inhibitory effect of CDDP on DNA repair and redox activities of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) in A549 cells. In tumor tissues from nude mice treated with AT-101 plus CDDP or monotherapy, the combination therapy resulted in greater inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation than the monotherapy. These results suggest that AT-101 can enhance the antitumor activity of CDDP in NSCLC via inhibition of APE1 DNA repair and redox activities and by angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis, but other mechanisms cannot be excluded. We are now conducting a Phase II trial to examine the clinical efficacy and safety profile of combined use of AT-101 plus CDDP in advanced NSCLC patients. PMID:26089640

  3. The Joint Effect of hOGG1, APE1, and ADPRT Polymorphisms and Cooking Oil Fumes on the Risk of Lung Adenocarcinoma in Chinese Non-Smoking Females

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiaoxia; Yin, Zhihua; Lu, Yao; Zhang, Haibo; Yan, Ying; Zhao, Yuxia; Li, Xuelian; Cui, Zeshi; Yu, Miao; Yao, Lu; Zhou, Baosen

    2013-01-01

    Background The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), and adenosine diphosphate ribosyl transferase (ADPRT) genes play an important role in the DNA base excision repair pathway. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in critical genes are suspected to be associated with the risk of lung cancer. This study aimed to identify the association between the polymorphisms of hOGG1 Ser326Cys, APE1 Asp148Glu, and ADPRT Val762Ala, and the risk of lung adenocarcinoma in the non-smoking female population, and investigated the interaction between genetic polymorphisms and environmental exposure in lung adenocarcinoma. Methods We performed a hospital-based case-control study, including 410 lung adenocarcinoma patients and 410 cancer-free hospital control subjects who were matched for age. Each case and control was interviewed to collect information by well-trained interviewers. A total of 10 ml of venous blood was collected for genotype testing. Three polymorphisms were analyzed by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Results We found that individuals who were homozygous for the variant hOGG1 326Cys/Cys showed a significantly increased risk of lung adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.01–2.36; P = 0.045). When the combined effect of variant alleles was analyzed, we found an increased OR of 1.89 (95% CI: 1.24–2.88, P = 0.003) for lung adenocarcinoma individuals with more than one homozygous variant allele. In stratified analyses, we found that the OR for the gene-environment interaction between Ser/Cys and Cys/Cys genotypes of hOGG1 codon 326 and cooking oil fumes for the risk of lung adenocarcinoma was 1.37 (95% CI: 0.77–2.44; P = 0.279) and 2.79 (95% CI: 1.50–5.18; P = 0.001), respectively. Conclusions The hOGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism might be associated with the risk of lung adenocarcinoma in Chinese non-smoking females. Furthermore, there is a

  4. Efficient cleavage of single and clustered AP site lesions within mono-nucleosome templates by CHO-K1 nuclear extract contrasts with retardation of incision by purified APE1

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, Laura J.; Menoni, Hervé; Angelov, Dimitar; Lomax, Martine E.; O’Neill, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage is a unique characteristic of radiation-induced DNA damage and the formation of these sites poses a serious challenge to the cell’s repair machinery. Within a cell DNA is compacted, with nucleosomes being the first order of higher level structure. However, few data are reported on the efficiency of clustered-lesion processing within nucleosomal DNA templates. Here, we show retardation of cleavage of a single AP site by purified APE1 when contained in nucleosomal DNA, compared to cleavage of an AP site in non-nucleosomal DNA. This retardation seen in nucleosomal DNA was alleviated by incubation with CHO-K1 nuclear extract. When clustered DNA damage sites containing bistranded AP sites were present in nucleosomal DNA, efficient cleavage of the AP sites was observed after treatment with nuclear extract. The resultant DSB formation led to DNA dissociating from the histone core and nucleosomal dispersion. Clustered damaged sites containing bistranded AP site/8-oxoG residues showed no retardation of cleavage of the AP site but retardation of 8-oxoG excision, compared to isolated lesions, thus DSB formation was not seen. An increased understanding of processing of clustered DNA damage in a nucleosomal environment may lead to new strategies to enhance the cytotoxic effects of radiotherapeutics. PMID:26439176

  5. Linguistic Apes: What Are They Saying?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrace, Herbert S.

    1979-01-01

    Focusing on the question, "Can chimpanzees produce new sentences or merely sequences?" Terrace describes his efforts to teach the chimpanzee Nim to communicate through sign language. From his results, and the Gardners' experiments with Washoe, he concludes that no proof yet exists that chimpanzees can use language as humans do. (SJL)

  6. Language Comprehension in Ape and Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage-Rumbaugh, E. Sue; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A two-year-old child and an eight-year-old bonobo exposed to spoken English and lexigrams from infancy were asked to respond to novel sentences. Both subjects comprehended novel requests and simple syntactic devices. The bonobo decoded the syntactic device of word recursion more accurately than the child; the child performed better than the bonobo…

  7. Ape Metaphysics: Object Individuation without Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, Natacha; Rakoczy, Hannes; Call, Josep

    2008-01-01

    Developmental research suggests that whereas very young infants individuate objects purely on spatiotemporal grounds, from (at latest) around 1 year of age children are capable of individuating objects according to the kind they belong to and the properties they instantiate. As the latter ability has been found to correlate with language, some…

  8. Great Apes' Capacities to Recognize Relational Similarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haun, Daniel B. M.; Call, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Recognizing relational similarity relies on the ability to understand that defining object properties might not lie in the objects individually, but in the relations of the properties of various object to each other. This aptitude is highly relevant for many important human skills such as language, reasoning, categorization and understanding…

  9. Colloquium paper: terrestrial apes and phylogenetic trees.

    PubMed

    Arsuaga, Juan Luis

    2010-05-11

    The image that best expresses Darwin's thinking is the tree of life. However, Darwin's human evolutionary tree lacked almost everything because only the Neanderthals were known at the time and they were considered one extreme expression of our own species. Darwin believed that the root of the human tree was very deep and in Africa. It was not until 1962 that the root was shown to be much more recent in time and definitively in Africa. On the other hand, some neo-Darwinians believed that our family tree was not a tree, because there were no branches, but, rather, a straight stem. The recent years have witnessed spectacular discoveries in Africa that take us close to the origin of the human tree and in Spain at Atapuerca that help us better understand the origin of the Neanderthals as well as our own species. The final form of the tree, and the number of branches, remains an object of passionate debate. PMID:20445090

  10. A naked ape would have fewer parasites.

    PubMed

    Pagel, Mark; Bodmer, Walter

    2003-08-01

    Unusually among the mammals, humans lack an outer layer of protective fur or hair. We propose the hypothesis that humans evolved hairlessness to reduce parasite loads, especially ectoparasites that may carry disease. We suggest that hairlessness is maintained by these naturally selected benefits and by sexual selection operating on both sexes. Hairlessness is made possible in humans owing to their unique abilities to regulate their environment via fire, shelter and clothing. Clothes and shelters allow a more flexible response to the external environment than a permanent layer of fur and can be changed or cleaned if infested with parasites. Naked molerats, another hairless and non-aquatic mammal species, also inhabit environments in which ectoparasite transmission is expected to be high, but in which temperatures are closely regulated. Our hypothesis explains features of human hairlessness-such as the marked sex difference in body hair, and its retention in the pubic regions-that are not explained by other theories. PMID:12952654

  11. Uncovering the cultural knowledge of sanctuary apes.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Thibaud

    2013-05-01

    Behavioral differences observed between wild communities of the same species have been called "cultures" by some researchers who aimed to underline the similarities with human cultures. However, whether these differences truly result from social learning processes is debated. Despite promising recent research, data acquired in the wild still fail to exclude genetic and ecological factors from being potential explanations for the observed behavioral differences. A potential way to address this problem is through field experiments where communities of the same subspecies are exposed to identical apparatuses. This way, genetic and ecological factors can be controlled for, although their influence cannot be fully excluded. Working with wild-born Sumatran orangutans originating from two genetically distinct populations, we recently combined field experiments with captive work to show that genetic differences could not account for differences in their knowledge of stick use. Additionally, we found evidence that our subjects arrived at the sanctuary with a knowledge that they acquired but could not express in their community of origin. These findings suggest that animal cultures must also be analyzed at the cognitive level. Only in this way can we understand the true extent of animal cultures and how they relate to human cultures. PMID:23713136

  12. Sinuses and flotation: does the aquatic ape theory hold water?

    PubMed

    Rae, Todd C; Koppe, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The idea that people went through an aquatic phase at some time in their evolutionary past is currently undergoing a popular resurgence (see Foley & Lahr). This idea has even started to gain some traction in more learned circles; the late paleoanthropologist Phillip Tobias wrote in support of aspects of it in an edited e-book and a conference on the topic held recently in London was endorsed by celebrities such as the television presenter Sir David Attenborough. Despite (or perhaps because of) the lack of interest within the academic community, advocates of the concept continue to fill the media (and blogosphere) with challenges to the "savannah hypothesis" of the origins of people and to bemoan the fact that their views are not taken seriously by mainstream academia. PMID:24753346

  13. Ruminant diets and the Miocene extinction of European great apes

    PubMed Central

    Merceron, Gildas; Kaiser, Thomas M.; Kostopoulos, Dimitris S.; Schulz, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The successful evolutionary radiations of European hominoids and pliopithecoids came to an end during the Late Miocene. Using ruminant diets as environmental proxies, it becomes possible to detect variations in vegetation over time with the potential to explain fluctuations in primate diversity along a NW–SE European transect. Analysis shows that ruminants had diverse diets when primate diversity reached its peak, with more grazers in eastern Europe and more browsers farther west. After the drop in primate diversity, grazers accounted for a greater part of western and central European communities. Eastwards, the converse trend was evident with more browsing ruminants. These opposite trends indicate habitat loss and an increase in environmental uniformity that may have severely favoured the decline of primate diversity. PMID:20519220

  14. Perfectible Apes in Decadent Cultures: Rousseau's Anthropology Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wokler, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Briefly discusses the views of Claude Levi-Strauss and Robert Ardrey who cite Rousseau as a personal influence even though they hold opposing anthropological ideals. The author claims that this situation is due to misinterpretations of Rousseau's work. An interpretation of Rousseau's anthropology is given reconciling the differences. (BC)

  15. Monkeys, Apes and Other Primates. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Andre

    This book is written for children 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume introduces the primate family, their physiology, and habits. Topics described include: (1) kinds of monkeys, including lemur, chimpanzee, gorilla, squirrel monkey, and marmoset; (2) behaviors when…

  16. Ruminant diets and the Miocene extinction of European great apes.

    PubMed

    Merceron, Gildas; Kaiser, Thomas M; Kostopoulos, Dimitris S; Schulz, Ellen

    2010-10-22

    The successful evolutionary radiations of European hominoids and pliopithecoids came to an end during the Late Miocene. Using ruminant diets as environmental proxies, it becomes possible to detect variations in vegetation over time with the potential to explain fluctuations in primate diversity along a NW-SE European transect. Analysis shows that ruminants had diverse diets when primate diversity reached its peak, with more grazers in eastern Europe and more browsers farther west. After the drop in primate diversity, grazers accounted for a greater part of western and central European communities. Eastwards, the converse trend was evident with more browsing ruminants. These opposite trends indicate habitat loss and an increase in environmental uniformity that may have severely favoured the decline of primate diversity. PMID:20519220

  17. A neuronal morphologic type unique to humans and great apes

    PubMed Central

    Nimchinsky, Esther A.; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Allman, John M.; Perl, Daniel P.; Erwin, Joseph M.; Hof, Patrick R.

    1999-01-01

    We report the existence and distribution of an unusual type of projection neuron, a large, spindle-shaped cell, in layer Vb of the anterior cingulate cortex of pongids and hominids. These spindle cells were not observed in any other primate species or any other mammalian taxa, and their volume was correlated with brain volume residuals, a measure of encephalization in higher primates. These observations are of particular interest when considering primate neocortical evolution, as they reveal possible adaptive changes and functional modifications over the last 15–20 million years in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region that plays a major role in the regulation of many aspects of autonomic function and of certain cognitive processes. That in humans these unique neurons have been shown previously to be severely affected in the degenerative process of Alzheimer’s disease suggests that some of the differential neuronal susceptibility that occurs in the human brain in the course of age-related dementing illnesses may have appeared only recently during primate evolution. PMID:10220455

  18. Apes in Space: Saving an Imperilled Orangutan Population in Sumatra

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Smith, Gail; Campbell-Smith, Miran; Singleton, Ian; Linkie, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Deforestation rates in Sumatra are amongst the highest in the tropics. Lowland forests, which support the highest densities of orangutans, are particularly vulnerable to clearance and fragmentation because they are highly accessible. Consequently, many orangutans will, in the future, live in strictly or partially isolated populations. Whilst orangutans have been extensively studied in primary forests, their response to living in human-dominated landscapes remains poorly known, despite it being essential for their future management. Here, we focus on an isolated group of critically endangered Sumatran orangutans (Pongo abelii) that co-exist with farmers in a mixed agroforest system consisting of degraded natural forest, smallholder (predominantly rubber) farms and oil palm plantations. Over 24 months we conducted the first ever spatial assessment of orangutan habitat use in the human-transformed landscape of Batang Serangan, North Sumatra. From 1,204 independent crop-raiding incidents recorded, orangutans showed strong foraging preference for mixed farmland/degraded forest habitat over oil palm patches. The core home range areas of the eight adult orangutans encompassed only 14% of the available study area. Monthly home range sizes averaged 423 ha (±139, SD) for males, and 131±46 ha for females, and were positively influenced by wild and cultivated fruit presence, and by crop consumption. The average daily distance travelled was similar for both adult males (868 m±350, SD) and females (866 m±195), but increased when orangutans raided crops. These findings show that orangutans can survive, demographically, in certain types of degraded landscapes, foraging on a mixture of crops and wild fruits. However, the poor quality habitat offered to orangutans by oil palm plantations, in terms of low food availability and as a barrier to female movements, is cause for concern since this is the land use type that is most rapidly replacing the preferred forest habitat across both Sumatran and Bornean orangutan ranges. PMID:21364732

  19. The scope of culture in chimpanzees, humans and ancestral apes.

    PubMed

    Whiten, Andrew

    2011-04-12

    More studies have focused on aspects of chimpanzee behaviour and cognition relevant to the evolution of culture than on any other species except our own. Accordingly, analysis of the features shared by chimpanzees and humans is here used to infer the scope of cultural phenomena in our last common ancestor, at the same time clarifying the nature of the special characteristics that advanced further in the hominin line. To do this, culture is broken down into three major aspects: the large scale, population-level patterning of traditions; social learning mechanisms; and the behavioural and cognitive contents of culture. Each of these is further dissected into subcomponents. Shared features, as well as differences, are identified in as many as a dozen of these, offering a case study for the comparative analysis of culture across animal taxa and a deeper understanding of the roots of our own cultural capacities. PMID:21357222

  20. Apes Communicate about Absent and Displaced Objects: Methodology Matters

    PubMed Central

    Lyn, Heidi; Russell, Jamie L.; Leavens, David A.; Bard, Kim A.; Boysen, Sarah T.; Schaeffer, Jennifer A.; Hopkins, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Displaced reference is the ability to refer to an item that has been moved (displaced) in space and/or time, and has been called one of the true hallmarks of referential communication. Several studies suggest that nonhuman primates have this capability, but a recent experiment concluded that in a specific situation (absent entities) human infants display displaced reference but chimpanzees do not. Here we show that chimpanzees and bonobos of diverse rearing histories are capable of displaced reference to absent and displaced objects. It is likely that some of the conflicting findings from animal cognition studies are due to relatively minor methodological differences, but are compounded by interpretation errors. Comparative studies are of great importance in elucidating the evolution of human cognition, however, greater care must be taken with methodology and interpretation for these studies to accurately reflect species differences. PMID:23681052

  1. Tracking and Inferring Spatial Rotation by Children and Great Apes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okamoto-Barth; Sanae; Call, Josep

    2008-01-01

    Finding hidden objects in space is a fundamental ability that has received considerable research attention from both a developmental and a comparative perspective. Tracking the rotational displacements of containers and hidden objects is a particularly challenging task. This study investigated the ability of 3-, 5-, 7-, and 9-year-old children and…

  2. ALKYLPHENOL (APE) MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT OF REGION 5

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two draft reports have been prepared for publication - a USGS document titled "Alkylphenols and hormones in wastewater treatment plant influents, effluents, and receiving streams of the Great Lakes Region" and a journal article titled "Biological responses of male fatehead minno...

  3. The scope of culture in chimpanzees, humans and ancestral apes

    PubMed Central

    Whiten, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    More studies have focused on aspects of chimpanzee behaviour and cognition relevant to the evolution of culture than on any other species except our own. Accordingly, analysis of the features shared by chimpanzees and humans is here used to infer the scope of cultural phenomena in our last common ancestor, at the same time clarifying the nature of the special characteristics that advanced further in the hominin line. To do this, culture is broken down into three major aspects: the large scale, population-level patterning of traditions; social learning mechanisms; and the behavioural and cognitive contents of culture. Each of these is further dissected into subcomponents. Shared features, as well as differences, are identified in as many as a dozen of these, offering a case study for the comparative analysis of culture across animal taxa and a deeper understanding of the roots of our own cultural capacities. PMID:21357222

  4. Macroscopic inspection of ape feces: what's in a quantification method?

    PubMed

    Phillips, Caroline A; McGrew, William C

    2014-06-01

    Macroscopic inspection of feces has been used to investigate primate diet. The limitations of this method to identify food-items to species level have long been recognized, but ascertaining aspects of diet (e.g., folivory) are achievable by quantifying food-items in feces. Quantification methods applied include rating food-items using a scale of abundance, estimating their percentage volume, and weighing food-items. However, verification as to whether or not composition data differ, depending on which quantification method is used during macroscopic inspection, has not been done. We analyzed feces collected from ten adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) of the Kanyawara community in Kibale National Park, Uganda. We compare dietary composition totals obtained from using different quantification methods and ascertain if sieve mesh size influences totals calculated. Finally, this study validates findings from direct observation of feeding by the same individuals from whom the fecal samples had been collected. Contrasting diet composition totals obtained by using different quantification methods and sieve mesh sizes can influence folivory and frugivory estimates. However, our findings were based on the assumption that fibrous matter contained pith and leaf fragments only, which remains to be verified. We advocate macroscopic inspection of feces can be a valuable tool to provide a generalized overview of dietary composition for primate populations. As most populations remain unhabituated, scrutinizing and validating indirect measures are important if they are to be applied to further understand inter- and intra-species dietary variation. PMID:24482001

  5. The apes' edge: positional learning in chimpanzees and humans.

    PubMed

    Endress, Ansgar D; Carden, Sarah; Versace, Elisabetta; Hauser, Marc D

    2010-05-01

    A wide variety of organisms produce actions and signals in particular temporal sequences, including the motor actions recruited during tool-mediated foraging, the arrangement of notes in the songs of birds, whales and gibbons, and the patterning of words in human speech. To accurately reproduce such events, the elements that comprise such sequences must be memorized. Both memory and artificial language learning studies have revealed at least two mechanisms for memorizing sequences, one tracking co-occurrence statistics among items in sequences (i.e., transitional probabilities) and the other one tracking the positions of items in sequences, in particular those of items in sequence-edges. The latter mechanism seems to dominate the encoding of sequences after limited exposure, and to be recruited by a wide array of grammatical phenomena. To assess whether humans differ from other species in their reliance on one mechanism over the other after limited exposure, we presented chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and human adults with brief exposure to six items, auditory sequences. Each sequence consisted of three distinct sound types (X, A, B), arranged according to two simple temporal rules: the A item always preceded the B item, and the sequence-edges were always occupied by the X item. In line with previous results with human adults, both species primarily encoded positional information from the sequences; that is, they kept track of the items that occurred in the sequence-edges. In contrast, the sensitivity to co-occurrence statistics was much weaker. Our results suggest that a mechanism to spontaneously encode positional information from sequences is present in both chimpanzees and humans and may represent the default in the absence of training and with brief exposure. As many grammatical regularities exhibit properties of this mechanism, it may be recruited by language and constrain the form that certain grammatical regularities take. PMID:20012457

  6. Do humans ape? Or do apes human? Imitation and intention in humans (Homo sapiens) and other animals.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Alexandra C

    2003-09-01

    A. Whiten, D. M. Custance, J.-C. Gomez, P. Teixidor, and K. A. Bard (1996) tested chimpanzees' (Pan troglodytes) and human children's (Homo sapiens) skills at imitation with a 2-action test on an "artificial fruit." Chimpanzees imitated to a restricted degree; children were more thoroughly imitative. Such results prompted some to assert that the difference in imitation indicates a difference in the subjects' understanding of the intentions of the demonstrator (M. Tomasello, 1996). In this experiment, 37 adult human subjects were tested with the artificial fruit. Far from being perfect imitators, the adults were less imitative than the children. These results cast doubt on the inference from imitative performance to an ability to understand others' intentions. The results also demonstrate how any test of imitation requires a control group and attention to the level of behavioral analysis. PMID:14498809

  7. Brains and Music, Whales and Apes, Hearing and Learning...and More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    This article is about whalesongs, hearing, musical brains, and a number of other topics explored over the past 35 years. Previous research is reviewed briefly, and more attention is given to recent efforts with an emphasis on collaborative research conducted with many wonderful colleagues. First is a brief account of the Institute for Music…

  8. Differences in the Ability of Apes and Children to Instruct Others Using Gestures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Katja; Call, Josep; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In all human cultures, people gesture iconically. However, the evolutionary basis of iconic gestures is unknown. In this study, chimpanzees and bonobos, and 2- and 3-year-old children, learned how to operate two apparatuses to get rewards. Then, at test, only a human adult had access to the apparatuses, and participants could instruct her about…

  9. Dietary Specialization during the Evolution of Western Eurasian Hominoids and the Extinction of European Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    DeMiguel, Daniel; Alba, David M.; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2014-01-01

    Given the central adaptive role of diet, paleodietary inference is essential for understanding the relationship between evolutionary and paleoenvironmental change. Here we rely on dental microwear analysis to investigate the role of dietary specialization in the diversification and extinction of Miocene hominoids from Western Eurasian between 14 and 7 Ma. New microwear results for five extinct taxa are analyzed together with previous data for other Western Eurasian genera. Except Pierolapithecus (that resembles hard-object feeders) and Oreopithecus (a soft-frugivore probably foraging opportunistically on other foods), most of the extinct taxa lack clear extant dietary analogues. They display some degee of sclerocarpy, which is most clearly expressed in Griphopithecus and Ouranopithecus (adapted to more open and arid environments), whereas Anoiapithecus, Dryopithecus and, especially, Hispanopithecus species apparently relied more strongly on soft-frugivory. Thus, contrasting with the prevailing sclerocarpic condition at the beginning of the Eurasian hominoid radiation, soft- and mixed-frugivory coexisted with hard-object feeding in the Late Miocene. Therefore, despite a climatic trend towards cooling and increased seasonality, a progressive dietary diversification would have occurred (probably due to competitive exclusion and increased environmental heterogeneity), although strict folivory did not evolve. Overall, our analyses support the view that the same dietary specializations that enabled Western Eurasian hominoids to face progressive climatic deterioration were the main factor ultimately leading to their extinction when more drastic paleoenvironmental changes took place. PMID:24848272

  10. Facial Orientation and Facial Shape in Extant Great Apes: A Geometric Morphometric Analysis of Covariation

    PubMed Central

    Neaux, Dimitri; Guy, Franck; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Coudyzer, Walter; Vignaud, Patrick; Ducrocq, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    The organization of the bony face is complex, its morphology being influenced in part by the rest of the cranium. Characterizing the facial morphological variation and craniofacial covariation patterns in extant hominids is fundamental to the understanding of their evolutionary history. Numerous studies on hominid facial shape have proposed hypotheses concerning the relationship between the anterior facial shape, facial block orientation and basicranial flexion. In this study we test these hypotheses in a sample of adult specimens belonging to three extant hominid genera (Homo, Pan and Gorilla). Intraspecific variation and covariation patterns are analyzed using geometric morphometric methods and multivariate statistics, such as partial least squared on three-dimensional landmarks coordinates. Our results indicate significant intraspecific covariation between facial shape, facial block orientation and basicranial flexion. Hominids share similar characteristics in the relationship between anterior facial shape and facial block orientation. Modern humans exhibit a specific pattern in the covariation between anterior facial shape and basicranial flexion. This peculiar feature underscores the role of modern humans' highly-flexed basicranium in the overall integration of the cranium. Furthermore, our results are consistent with the hypothesis of a relationship between the reduction of the value of the cranial base angle and a downward rotation of the facial block in modern humans, and to a lesser extent in chimpanzees. PMID:23441232

  11. Apes, Wolves, Birds, and Humans: Toward a Comparative Foundation for a Functional Theory of Language Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jane H.

    1977-01-01

    This article reviews the possibilities that a comparative, functionally oriented view of communication evolution offers to a linguist interested in the evolution of human languages and suggests a wide variety of areas which might be further investigated with profit. (CFM)

  12. Apes Know that Hidden Objects Can Affect the Orientation of Other Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Call, Josep

    2007-01-01

    Four bonobos, seven gorillas, and six orangutans were presented with two small rectangular boards on a platform. One of the boards had a piece of food under it so that it acquired an inclined orientation whereas the other remained flat on the platform. Subjects preferentially selected the inclined board. In another experiment, subjects were…

  13. Functional aspects of metatarsal head shape in humans, apes, and Old World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Peter J; Almécija, Sergio; Patel, Biren A; Orr, Caley M; Tocheri, Matthew W; Jungers, William L

    2015-09-01

    Modern human metatarsal heads are typically described as "dorsally domed," mediolaterally wide, and dorsally flat. Despite the apparent functional importance of these features in forefoot stability during bipedalism, the distinctiveness of this morphology has not been quantitatively evaluated within a broad comparative framework. In order to use these features to reconstruct fossil hominin locomotor behaviors with any confidence, their connection to human bipedalism should be validated through a comparative analysis of other primates with different locomotor behaviors and foot postures, including species with biomechanical demands potentially similar to those of bipedalism (e.g., terrestrial digitigrady). This study explores shape variation in the distal metatarsus among humans and other extant catarrhines using three-dimensional geometric morphometrics (3 DGM). Shape differences among species in metatarsal head morphology are well captured by the first two principal components of Procrustes shape coordinates, and these two components summarize most of the variance related to "dorsal doming" and "dorsal expansion." Multivariate statistical tests reveal significant differences among clades in overall shape, and humans are reliably distinguishable from other species by aspects of shape related to a greater degree of dorsal doming. Within quadrupeds, terrestrial species also trend toward more domed metatarsal heads, but not to the extent seen in humans. Certain aspects of distal metatarsus shape are likely related to habitual dorsiflexion of the metatarsophalangeal joints, but the total morphological pattern seen in humans is distinct. These comparative results indicate that this geometric morphometric approach is useful to characterize the complexity of metatarsal head morphology and will help clarify its relationship with function in fossil primates, including early hominins. PMID:26276534

  14. Monitoring great ape and elephant abundance at large spatial scales: measuring effectiveness of a conservation landscape.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Emma J; Strindberg, Samantha; Bakabana, Parfait C; Elkan, Paul W; Iyenguet, Fortuné C; Madzoké, Bola; Malanda, Guy Aimé F; Mowawa, Brice S; Moukoumbou, Calixte; Ouakabadio, Franck K; Rainey, Hugo J

    2010-01-01

    Protected areas are fundamental to biodiversity conservation, but there is growing recognition of the need to extend beyond protected areas to meet the ecological requirements of species at larger scales. Landscape-scale conservation requires an evaluation of management impact on biodiversity under different land-use strategies; this is challenging and there exist few empirical studies. In a conservation landscape in northern Republic of Congo we demonstrate the application of a large-scale monitoring program designed to evaluate the impact of conservation interventions on three globally threatened species: western gorillas, chimpanzees and forest elephants, under three land-use types: integral protection, commercial logging, and community-based natural resource management. We applied distance-sampling methods to examine species abundance across different land-use types under varying degrees of management and human disturbance. We found no clear trends in abundance between land-use types. However, units with interventions designed to reduce poaching and protect habitats--irrespective of land-use type--harboured all three species at consistently higher abundance than a neighbouring logging concession undergoing no wildlife management. We applied Generalized-Additive Models to evaluate a priori predictions of species response to different landscape processes. Our results indicate that, given adequate protection from poaching, elephants and gorillas can profit from herbaceous vegetation in recently logged forests and maintain access to ecologically important resources located outside of protected areas. However, proximity to the single integrally protected area in the landscape maintained an overriding positive influence on elephant abundance, and logging roads--even subject to anti-poaching controls--were exploited by elephant poachers and had a major negative influence on elephant distribution. Chimpanzees show a clear preference for unlogged or more mature forests and human disturbance had a negative influence on chimpanzee abundance, in spite of anti-poaching interventions. We caution against the pitfalls of missing and confounded co-variables in model-based estimation approaches and highlight the importance of spatial scale in the response of different species to landscape processes. We stress the importance of a stratified design-based approach to monitoring species status in response to conservation interventions and advocate a holistic framework for landscape-scale monitoring that includes smaller-scale targeted research and punctual assessment of threats. PMID:20428233

  15. Sign Language and Language Acquisition in Man and Ape. New Dimensions in Comparative Pedolinguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Fred C. C., Ed.

    A collection of research materials on sign language and primatology is presented here. The essays attempt to show that: sign language is a legitimate language that can be learned not only by humans but by nonhuman primates as well, and nonhuman primates have the capability to acquire a human language using a different mode. The following…

  16. Ape duos and trios: spontaneous cooperation with free partner choice in chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Eppley, Timothy M.; Campbell, Matthew W.; de Waal, Frans B.M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to push the boundaries of cooperation among captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). There has been doubt about the level of cooperation that chimpanzees are able to spontaneously achieve or understand. Would they, without any pre-training or restrictions in partner choice, be able to develop successful joint action? And would they be able to extend cooperation to more than two partners, as they do in nature? Chimpanzees were given a chance to cooperate with multiple partners of their own choosing. All members of the group (N = 11) had simultaneous access to an apparatus that required two (dyadic condition) or three (triadic condition) individuals to pull in a tray baited with food. Without any training, the chimpanzees spontaneously solved the task a total of 3,565 times in both dyadic and triadic combinations. Their success rate and efficiency increased over time, whereas the amount of pulling in the absence of a partner decreased, demonstrating that they had learned the task contingencies. They preferentially approached the apparatus when kin or nonkin of similar rank were present, showing a preference for socially tolerant partners. The forced partner combinations typical of cooperation experiments cannot reveal these abilities, which demonstrate that in the midst of a complex social environment, chimpanzees spontaneously initiate and maintain a high level of cooperative behavior. PMID:24949236

  17. Responses to the Assurance game in monkeys, apes, and humans using equivalent procedures.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Sarah F; Parrish, Audrey; Beran, Michael J; Flemming, Timothy; Heimbauer, Lisa; Talbot, Catherine F; Lambeth, Susan P; Schapiro, Steven J; Wilson, Bart J

    2011-02-22

    There is great interest in the evolution of economic behavior. In typical studies, species are asked to play one of a series of economic games, derived from game theory, and their responses are compared. The advantage of this approach is the relative level of consistency and control that emerges from the games themselves; however, in the typical experiment, procedures and conditions differ widely, particularly between humans and other species. Thus, in the current study, we investigated how three primate species, capuchin monkeys, chimpanzees, and humans, played the Assurance (or Stag Hunt) game using procedures that were, to the best of our ability, the same across species, particularly with respect to training and pretesting. Our goal was to determine what, if any, differences existed in the ways in which these species made decisions in this game. We hypothesized differences along phylogenetic lines, which we found. However, the species were more similar than might be expected. In particular, humans who played using "nonhuman primate-friendly" rules did not behave as is typical. Thus, we find evidence for similarity in decision-making processes across the order Primates. These results indicate that such comparative studies are possible and, moreover, that in any comparison rating species' relative abilities, extreme care must be taken in ensuring that one species does not have an advantage over the others due to methodological procedures. PMID:21300874

  18. Ape Conservation Physiology: Fecal Glucocorticoid Responses in Wild Pongo pygmaeus morio following Human Visitation

    PubMed Central

    Muehlenbein, Michael P.; Ancrenaz, Marc; Sakong, Rosman; Ambu, Laurentius; Prall, Sean; Fuller, Grace; Raghanti, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Nature-based tourism can generate important revenue to support conservation of biodiversity. However, constant exposure to tourists and subsequent chronic activation of stress responses can produce pathological effects, including impaired cognition, growth, reproduction, and immunity in the same animals we are interested in protecting. Utilizing fecal samples (N = 53) from 2 wild habituated orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus morio) (in addition to 26 fecal samples from 4 wild unhabituated orangutans) in the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, we predicted that i) fecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations would be elevated on the day after tourist visitation (indicative of normal stress response to exposure to tourists on the previous day) compared to samples taken before or during tourist visitation in wild, habituated orangutans, and ii) that samples collected from habituated animals would have lower fecal glucocorticoid metabolites than unhabituated animals not used for tourism. Among the habituated animals used for tourism, fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels were significantly elevated in samples collected the day after tourist visitation (indicative of elevated cortisol production on the previous day during tourist visitation). Fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels were also lower in the habituated animals compared to their age-matched unhabituated counterparts. We conclude that the habituated animals used for this singular ecotourism project are not chronically stressed, unlike other species/populations with documented permanent alterations in stress responses. Animal temperament, species, the presence of coping/escape mechanisms, social confounders, and variation in amount of tourism may explain differences among previous experiments. Acute alterations in glucocorticoid measures in wildlife exposed to tourism must be interpreted conservatively. While permanently altered stress responses can be detrimental, preliminary results in these wild habituated orangutans suggest that low levels of predictable disturbance can likely result in low physiological impact on these animals. PMID:22438916

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Eastern gorilla (Gorilla beringei) and implications for african ape biogeography.

    PubMed

    Das, Ranajit; Hergenrother, Scott D; Soto-Calderón, Iván D; Dew, J Larry; Anthony, Nicola M; Jensen-Seaman, Michael I

    2014-01-01

    The Western and Eastern species of gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and Gorilla beringei) began diverging in the mid-Pleistocene, but in a complex pattern with ongoing gene flow following their initial split. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of 1 Eastern and 1 Western gorilla to provide the most accurate date for their mitochondrial divergence, and to analyze patterns of nucleotide substitutions. The most recent common ancestor of these genomes existed about 1.9 million years ago, slightly more recent than that of chimpanzee and bonobo. We in turn use this date as a calibration to reanalyze sequences from the Eastern lowland and mountain gorilla subspecies to estimate their mitochondrial divergence at approximately 380000 years ago. These dates help frame a hypothesis whereby populations became isolated nearly 2 million years ago with restricted maternal gene flow, followed by ongoing male migration until the recent past. This process of divergence with prolonged hybridization occurred against the backdrop of the African Pleistocene, characterized by intense fluctuations in temperature and aridity, while at the same time experiencing tectonic uplifting and consequent shifts in the drainage of major river systems. Interestingly, this same pattern of introgression following divergence and discrepancies between mitochondrial and nuclear loci is seen in fossil hominins from Eurasia, suggesting that such processes may be common in hominids and that living gorillas may provide a useful model for understanding isolation and migration in our extinct relatives. PMID:25189777

  20. A Comparison of the Gestural Communication of Apes and Human Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael; Camaioni, Luigia

    1997-01-01

    Compared the gestures of typical human infants, children with autism, chimpanzees, and human-raised chimpanzees. Typical infants differed from the other groups in their use of: triadic gestures directing another's attention to an outside entity; declarative gestures; and imitation in acquiring some gestures. These differences derive from an…

  1. A Nonverbal False Belief Task: The Performance of Children and Great Apes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Compared performance of preschool children, chimpanzees, and orangutans on nonverbal task of false-belief understanding and tested children's performance on a verbal version of the same task. Found that children's performance on verbal and nonverbal tasks were highly correlated, and no chimp or orangutan succeeded in the nonverbal false-belief…

  2. Case Study of Small Molecules As Antimalarials: 2-Amino-1-phenylethanol (APE) Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Antiparasitic oral drugs have been associated to lipophilic molecules due to their intrinsic permeability. However, these kind of molecules are associated to numerous adverse effects, which have been extensively studied. Within the Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set (TCAMS) we have identified two small, soluble and simple hits that even presenting antiplasmodial activities in the range of 0.4–0.5 μM are able to show in vivo activity. PMID:24944739

  3. Entropy versus APE production: On the buoyancy power input in the oceans energy cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tailleux, R.

    2010-11-01

    This letter argues that the current controversy about whether Wbuoyancy, the power input due to the surface buoyancy fluxes, is large or small in the oceans stems from two distinct and incompatible views on how Wbuoyancy relates to the volume-integrated work of expansion/contraction B. The current prevailing view is that Wbuoyancy should be identified with the net value of B, which current theories estimate to be small. The alternative view, defended here, is that only the positive part of B, i.e., the one converting internal energy into mechanical energy, should enter the definition of Wbuoyancy, since the negative part of B is associated with the non-viscous dissipation of mechanical energy. Two indirect methods suggest that by contrast, the positive part of B is potentially large.

  4. Building a Phylogenetic Tree of the Human and Ape Superfamily Using DNA-DNA Hybridization Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Caroline Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The study describes the process of DNA-DNA hybridization and the history of its use by Sibley and Alquist in simple, straightforward, and interesting language that students easily understand to create their own phylogenetic tree of the hominoid superfamily. They calibrate the DNA clock and use it to estimate the divergence dates of the various…

  5. Monitoring Great Ape and Elephant Abundance at Large Spatial Scales: Measuring Effectiveness of a Conservation Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Emma J.; Strindberg, Samantha; Bakabana, Parfait C.; Elkan, Paul W.; Iyenguet, Fortuné C.; Madzoké, Bola; Malanda, Guy Aimé F.; Mowawa, Brice S.; Moukoumbou, Calixte; Ouakabadio, Franck K.; Rainey, Hugo J.

    2010-01-01

    Protected areas are fundamental to biodiversity conservation, but there is growing recognition of the need to extend beyond protected areas to meet the ecological requirements of species at larger scales. Landscape-scale conservation requires an evaluation of management impact on biodiversity under different land-use strategies; this is challenging and there exist few empirical studies. In a conservation landscape in northern Republic of Congo we demonstrate the application of a large-scale monitoring program designed to evaluate the impact of conservation interventions on three globally threatened species: western gorillas, chimpanzees and forest elephants, under three land-use types: integral protection, commercial logging, and community-based natural resource management. We applied distance-sampling methods to examine species abundance across different land-use types under varying degrees of management and human disturbance. We found no clear trends in abundance between land-use types. However, units with interventions designed to reduce poaching and protect habitats - irrespective of land-use type - harboured all three species at consistently higher abundance than a neighbouring logging concession undergoing no wildlife management. We applied Generalized-Additive Models to evaluate a priori predictions of species response to different landscape processes. Our results indicate that, given adequate protection from poaching, elephants and gorillas can profit from herbaceous vegetation in recently logged forests and maintain access to ecologically important resources located outside of protected areas. However, proximity to the single integrally protected area in the landscape maintained an overriding positive influence on elephant abundance, and logging roads – even subject to anti-poaching controls - were exploited by elephant poachers and had a major negative influence on elephant distribution. Chimpanzees show a clear preference for unlogged or more mature forests and human disturbance had a negative influence on chimpanzee abundance, in spite of anti-poaching interventions. We caution against the pitfalls of missing and confounded co-variables in model-based estimation approaches and highlight the importance of spatial scale in the response of different species to landscape processes. We stress the importance of a stratified design-based approach to monitoring species status in response to conservation interventions and advocate a holistic framework for landscape-scale monitoring that includes smaller-scale targeted research and punctual assessment of threats. PMID:20428233

  6. Flowers are an important food for small apes in southern Sumatra.

    PubMed

    Lappan, Susan

    2009-08-01

    Flowers are included in the diets of many primates, but are not generally regarded as making an important contribution to primate energy budgets. However, observations of a number of lemur, platyrrhine, and cercopithecine populations suggest that some flower species may function as key primate fallback foods in periods of low abundance of preferred foods (generally ripe fruits), and that flowers may be preferred foods in some cases. I report heavy reliance on flowers during some study months for a siamang (Symphalangus syndactylus) population in southern Sumatra. Siamangs at Way Canguk spent 12% of feeding time eating flowers from October 2000 to August 2002, and in 1 month flower-feeding time exceeded 40% of total feeding time. The overall availabilities of fig and nonfig fruits, flowers, and new leaves in the study area were not significant predictors of the proportion of time that siamangs spent consuming any plant part. However, flower-feeding time was highest in months when nonfig fruit-feeding time was lowest, and a switch from heavy reliance on fruit to substantial flower consumption was associated with a shift in activity patterns toward reduced energy expenditure, which is consistent with the interpretation that flowers may function as a fallback food for Way Canguk siamangs. Hydnocarpus gracilis, a plant from which siamangs only consume flowers, was the third-most-commonly consumed plant at Way Canguk (after Ficus spp. and Dracontomelon dao), and flowers from this plant were available in most months. It is possible that relatively high local availability of these important siamang plant foods is one factor promoting high siamang density in the study area. PMID:19459180

  7. The Aqua-planet Experiment (APE): Response to Changed Meridional SST Profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, David L.; Blackburn, Michael; Nakajima, Kensuke; Ohfuchi, Wataru; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki O.; Hayashi, Yoshi-Yuki; Nakamura, Hisashi; Ishiwatari, Masaki; Mcgregor, John L.; Borth, Hartmut; Wirth, Volkmar; Frank, Helmut; Bechtold, Peter; Wedi, Nils P.; Tomita, Hirofumi; Satoh, Masaki; Zhao, Ming; Held, Isaac M.; Suarez, Max J.; Lee, Myong-In; Watanabe, Masahiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Liu, Yimin; Wang, Zaizhi; Molod, Andrew; RajenDran, Kavirajan; Kitoh, Akio; Stratton, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the sensitivity of Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) simulations to changes in the meridional distribution of sea surface temperature (SST). The simulations are for an aqua-planet, a water covered Earth with no land, orography or sea- ice and with specified zonally symmetric SST. Simulations from 14 AGCMs developed for Numerical Weather Prediction and climate applications are compared. Four experiments are performed to study the sensitivity to the meridional SST profile. These profiles range from one in which the SST gradient continues to the equator to one which is flat approaching the equator, all with the same maximum SST at the equator. The zonal mean circulation of all models shows strong sensitivity to latitudinal distribution of SST. The Hadley circulation weakens and shifts poleward as the SST profile flattens in the tropics. One question of interest is the formation of a double versus a single ITCZ. There is a large variation between models of the strength of the ITCZ and where in the SST experiment sequence they transition from a single to double ITCZ. The SST profiles are defined such that as the equatorial SST gradient flattens, the maximum gradient increases and moves poleward. This leads to a weakening of the mid-latitude jet accompanied by a poleward shift of the jet core. Also considered are tropical wave activity and tropical precipitation frequency distributions. The details of each vary greatly between models, both with a given SST and in the response to the change in SST. One additional experiment is included to examine the sensitivity to an off-equatorial SST maximum. The upward branch of the Hadley circulation follows the SST maximum off the equator. The models that form a single precipitation maximum when the maximum SST is on the equator shift the precipitation maximum off equator and keep it centered over the SST maximum. Those that form a double with minimum on the equatorial maximum SST shift the double structure off the equator, keeping the minimum over the maximum SST. In both situations only modest changes appear in the shifted profile of zonal average precipitation. When the upward branch of the Hadley circulation moves into the hemisphere with SST maximum, the zonal average zonal, meridional and vertical winds all indicate that the Hadley cell in the other hemisphere dominates.

  8. The Planet of the Apes: The Fable of the Hundredth Monkey in Anti-Nuclear Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Stephen D.

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes a fable current in the discourse of the nuclear freeze movement in the 1980s, that of the "Hundredth Monkey." Shows that Aristotle's classification of the fable as a type of exemplary proof is inadequate to an understanding of its persuasive force. (MS)

  9. Unilateral visual impairment in rural south India–Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study (APEDS)

    PubMed Central

    Marmamula, Srinivas; Khanna, Rohit C; Rao, Gullapalli N

    2016-01-01

    AIM To report the prevalence and causes of unilateral visual impairment (UVI) in rural population of all ages in rural Andhra Pradesh, India. METHODS A population-based cross sectional study using a multi-stage cluster sampling methodology was carried out in West Godavari, Adilabad and Mahbubnagar districts in south India. A comprehensive eye examination that included presenting and best corrected visual acuity and dilated fundus examination was conducted by trained professionals. UVI is defined as presenting visual acuity <6/18 in one eye but ≥6/18 in other eye. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to test association of UVI with socio-demographic risk factors. RESULTS Data were analyzed for 6634/7771 participants after excluding those with bilateral visual impairment. The mean age of the participants was 27.4y (standard deviation: 17.9y), 51.9% were women and 49.1% were educated. The prevalence of UVI was 7.8% (95% CI: 7.2%-8.5%). Uncorrected refractive error (60.8%), cataract (17.4%) and retinal causes (6.6%) were the leading causes of UVI. On multiple logistic regression analyses, older age, not having education, living in well-off district had significantly higher odds of being associated with UVI. UVI was not associated with gender. CONCLUSION UVI is common in rural south India. Most of it is due to cataract and refractive errors, both of which can be addressed at primary and secondary levels of eye care. Burden of UVI should also be considered in planning eye care services. PMID:27275437

  10. Rational Tool Use and Tool Choice in Human Infants and Great Apes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttelmann, David; Carpenter, Malinda; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael

    2008-01-01

    G. Gergely, H. Bekkering, and I. Kiraly (2002) showed that 14-month-old infants imitate rationally, copying an adult's unusual action more often when it was freely chosen than when it was forced by some constraint. This suggests that infants understand others' intentions as rational choices of action plans. It is important to test whether apes…

  11. Ope`ape`a: Solving the puzzles of Hawaii's only bat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonaccorso, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    The Hawaiian hoary bat is described as the only land mammal native to Hawaii. In fact, this bat (Lasiurus cinereus semotus) arrived on the islands some 10,000 years ago – in what must qualify as one of the most spectacular immigrations in the history of mammals. The Hawaiian islands, after all, are 2,400 miles (3,860 kilometers) from the nearest landfall on the North American continent, and the distance to Australia, New Guinea or Asia is even farther.

  12. Connecting the GPE and APE Curricula for Students with Mild and Moderate Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Luke E.

    2011-01-01

    Many physical educators today face the challenge of including students with mild and moderate disabilities in their general physical education (GPE) programs. While most GPE teachers are willing to modify their instructional methods and activities to accommodate students with disabilities, this may not be enough to adequately address the students'…

  13. Apes' and Children's Understanding of Cooperative and Competitive Motives in a Communicative Situation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Esther; Tomasello, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Chimpanzees ("Pan troglodytes") and bonobos ("Pan paniscus") (Study 1) and 18- and 24-month-old human children (Study 2) participated in a novel communicative task. A human experimenter (E) hid food or a toy in one of two opaque containers before gesturing towards the reward's location in one of two ways. In the Informing condition, she attempted…

  14. Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Eastern Gorilla (Gorilla beringei) and Implications for African Ape Biogeography

    PubMed Central

    Das, Ranajit; Hergenrother, Scott D.; Soto-Calderón, Iván D.; Dew, J. Larry; Anthony, Nicola M.

    2014-01-01

    The Western and Eastern species of gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and Gorilla beringei) began diverging in the mid-Pleistocene, but in a complex pattern with ongoing gene flow following their initial split. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of 1 Eastern and 1 Western gorilla to provide the most accurate date for their mitochondrial divergence, and to analyze patterns of nucleotide substitutions. The most recent common ancestor of these genomes existed about 1.9 million years ago, slightly more recent than that of chimpanzee and bonobo. We in turn use this date as a calibration to reanalyze sequences from the Eastern lowland and mountain gorilla subspecies to estimate their mitochondrial divergence at approximately 380000 years ago. These dates help frame a hypothesis whereby populations became isolated nearly 2 million years ago with restricted maternal gene flow, followed by ongoing male migration until the recent past. This process of divergence with prolonged hybridization occurred against the backdrop of the African Pleistocene, characterized by intense fluctuations in temperature and aridity, while at the same time experiencing tectonic uplifting and consequent shifts in the drainage of major river systems. Interestingly, this same pattern of introgression following divergence and discrepancies between mitochondrial and nuclear loci is seen in fossil hominins from Eurasia, suggesting that such processes may be common in hominids and that living gorillas may provide a useful model for understanding isolation and migration in our extinct relatives. PMID:25189777

  15. Aping Humanity--Scopes: A Tale of Two Titans of Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Edward J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the John Scopes case of 1925 in which he was tried and convicted for teaching evolution. Gives background on the two famous attorneys for the case: William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow. Explains that the case turned into a media sensation because of the profound issues and oratory skills of the attorneys. (CMK)

  16. Ape conservation physiology: fecal glucocorticoid responses in wild Pongo pygmaeus morio following human visitation.

    PubMed

    Muehlenbein, Michael P; Ancrenaz, Marc; Sakong, Rosman; Ambu, Laurentius; Prall, Sean; Fuller, Grace; Raghanti, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Nature-based tourism can generate important revenue to support conservation of biodiversity. However, constant exposure to tourists and subsequent chronic activation of stress responses can produce pathological effects, including impaired cognition, growth, reproduction, and immunity in the same animals we are interested in protecting. Utilizing fecal samples (N = 53) from 2 wild habituated orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus morio) (in addition to 26 fecal samples from 4 wild unhabituated orangutans) in the Lower Kinabatangan Wildlife Sanctuary of Sabah, Malaysian Borneo, we predicted that i) fecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations would be elevated on the day after tourist visitation (indicative of normal stress response to exposure to tourists on the previous day) compared to samples taken before or during tourist visitation in wild, habituated orangutans, and ii) that samples collected from habituated animals would have lower fecal glucocorticoid metabolites than unhabituated animals not used for tourism. Among the habituated animals used for tourism, fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels were significantly elevated in samples collected the day after tourist visitation (indicative of elevated cortisol production on the previous day during tourist visitation). Fecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels were also lower in the habituated animals compared to their age-matched unhabituated counterparts. We conclude that the habituated animals used for this singular ecotourism project are not chronically stressed, unlike other species/populations with documented permanent alterations in stress responses. Animal temperament, species, the presence of coping/escape mechanisms, social confounders, and variation in amount of tourism may explain differences among previous experiments. Acute alterations in glucocorticoid measures in wildlife exposed to tourism must be interpreted conservatively. While permanently altered stress responses can be detrimental, preliminary results in these wild habituated orangutans suggest that low levels of predictable disturbance can likely result in low physiological impact on these animals. PMID:22438916

  17. I Have Students with Physical and Motor Problems: How Can an APE, OT, or PT Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silliman-French, Lisa; Candler, Catherine; French, Ron; Hamilton, Merry Lynne

    2007-01-01

    Majority of students with mental and/or motor impairments are frequently placed in general physical education classes. However, these students often are unable to attain the expected outcomes in these general settings. Based on the experience of the authors, general physical educators often attempt to modify their goals, objectives, teaching…

  18. Why Don't We Ask? A Complementary Method for Assessing the Status of Great Apes

    PubMed Central

    Meijaard, Erik; Mengersen, Kerrie; Buchori, Damayanti; Nurcahyo, Anton; Ancrenaz, Marc; Wich, Serge; Atmoko, Sri Suci Utami; Tjiu, Albertus; Prasetyo, Didik; Nardiyono; Hadiprakarsa, Yokyok; Christy, Lenny; Wells, Jessie; Albar, Guillaume; Marshall, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Species conservation is difficult. Threats to species are typically high and immediate. Effective solutions for counteracting these threats, however, require synthesis of high quality evidence, appropriately targeted activities, typically costly implementation, and rapid re-evaluation and adaptation. Conservation management can be ineffective if there is insufficient understanding of the complex ecological, political, socio-cultural, and economic factors that underlie conservation threats. When information about these factors is incomplete, conservation managers may be unaware of the most urgent threats or unable to envision all consequences of potential management strategies. Conservation research aims to address the gap between what is known and what knowledge is needed for effective conservation. Such research, however, generally addresses a subset of the factors that underlie conservation threats, producing a limited, simplistic, and often biased view of complex, real world situations. A combination of approaches is required to provide the complete picture necessary to engage in effective conservation. Orangutan conservation (Pongo spp.) offers an example: standard conservation assessments employ survey methods that focus on ecological variables, but do not usually address the socio-cultural factors that underlie threats. Here, we evaluate a complementary survey method based on interviews of nearly 7,000 people in 687 villages in Kalimantan, Indonesia. We address areas of potential methodological weakness in such surveys, including sampling and questionnaire design, respondent biases, statistical analyses, and sensitivity of resultant inferences. We show that interview-based surveys can provide cost-effective and statistically robust methods to better understand poorly known populations of species that are relatively easily identified by local people. Such surveys provide reasonably reliable estimates of relative presence and relative encounter rates of such species, as well as quantifying the main factors that threaten them. We recommend more extensive use of carefully designed and implemented interview surveys, in conjunction with more traditional field methods. PMID:21483859

  19. Nut-like oil seeds: food for monkeys, chimpanzees, humans, and probably ape-men.

    PubMed

    Peters, C R

    1987-07-01

    The hypothetical hyperrobust australopithecine gnathic nutcracker adaptation is reexamined in light of ecobotanical information on edible wild nuts provided by the flora of tropical and subtropical Africa. The nut producing species are tree-forms. Those of the forest region do not as a rule produce fruits with edible mesocarps. In contrast, the woodland savanna species (particularly in the Zambezian region) characteristically provide an important whole fruit, i.e., a nutritious mesocarp in addition to edible oil-rich nut seeds. These fruits drop from the tree before they are fully mature and go through the final ripening phase on the ground. They are important seasonal foods for a variety of vertebrates, including primates, elephants, and antelope. Altogether the nuts exhibit a broad range of toughness values, measured here as strength under compression. The woodland nuts are not as tough (177-934 kg force, breaking load) as those of the tropical forest (192-1,673 kg force). The seed-predators of the woodland species include squirrels, baboons, warthogs, and parrots. Paleoecological analyses indicate that it was the woodland nuts that were probably available to Australopithecus boisei and A. robustus. Preliminary estimates of adult male gnathic nut-cracking capabilities suggest that A. boisei could have orally cracked a significant portion of the woodland nuts. In spite of this, ecobotanical data indicate that we can probably reject the hypothesis that these hominids were year-round gnathic nut-cracking specialists. Both the indirect and direct evidence support this conclusion. PMID:3113265

  20. Why Brains Are Not Computers, Why Behaviorism Is Not Satanism, and Why Dolphins Are Not Aquatic Apes.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Louise

    2016-05-01

    Modern psychology has, to all intents and purposes, become synonymous with cognitive psychology, with an emphasis on the idea that the brain is a form of computer, whose job is to take in sensory input, process information, and produce motor output. This places the brain at a remove from both the body and environment and denies the intimate connection that exists between them. As a result, a great injustice is done to both human and nonhuman animals: On the one hand, we fail to recognize the distinctive nature of nonhuman cognition, and on the other hand, we continue to promote a somewhat misleading view of human psychological capacities. Here, I suggest a more mutualistic, embodied, enactive view might allow us to ask more interesting questions about how animals of all kinds come to know their worlds, in ways that avoid the (inevitable) anthropocentric baggage of the cognitivist viewpoint. PMID:27606181

  1. Sympatric Apes in Sacred Forests: Shared Space and Habitat Use by Humans and Endangered Javan Gibbons (Hylobates moloch)

    PubMed Central

    Reisland, Melissa Ann; Lambert, Joanna E.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we use a combination of ethnographic observation and GIS analysis to explore the use of space by humans and gibbons (Hylobates moloch) to determine areas of potential space competition in the sacred forest and nature reserve Cagar Alam Leuweung Sancang in West Java, Indonesia. More specifically, we test whether gibbons respond to the presence of humans in a manner consistent with predator-avoidance and predicted that the gibbon study subjects would avoid areas visited by humans (Risk-Disturbance Hypothesis). Data were collected August 2010-June 2011. We collected GPS locations and behavioral data on both the humans (6,652 hours) and the gibbons (1,253 hours) in the forest using 10 minute instantaneous sampling. Results indicate that humans preferentially assemble at the most sacred spot in the forest (Cikajayaan waterfall). Two gibbon groups’ home ranges encompassed most of the sacred areas. Group B avoided areas of high human use, as high human use areas and high gibbon use areas did not overlap. Group C, though, continued to use areas that were heavily visited by humans. We thus found partial support for the Risk-Disturbance Hypothesis, although the variation in gibbon response to human disturbance indicates behavioral flexibility. We suggest that understanding the effects of shared space on wildlife is necessary for informing conservation policy in human-visited forests. PMID:26790025

  2. APE: the Active Phasing Experiment to test new control system and phasing technology for a European Extremely Large Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonte, F.; Yaitskova, N.; Derie, F.; Constanza, A.; Brast, R.; Buzzoni, B.; Delabre, B.; Dierickx, P.; Dupuy, C.; Esteves, R.; Frank, C.; Guisard, S.; Karban, R.; Koenig, E.; Kolb, J.; Nylund, M.; Noethe, L.; Surdej, I.; Courteville, A.; Wilhelm, R.; Montoya, L.; Reyes, M.; Esposito, S.; Pinna, E.; Dohlen, K.; Ferrari, M.; Langlois, M.

    2005-08-01

    The future European Extremely Large Telescope will be composed of one or two giant segmented mirrors (up to 100 m of diameter) and of several large monolithic mirrors (up to 8 m in diameter). To limit the aberrations due to misalignments and defective surface quality it is necessary to have a proper active optics system. This active optics system must include a phasing system to limit the degradation of the PSF due to misphasing of the segmented mirrors. We will present the lastest design and development of the Active Phasing Experiment that will be tested in laboratory and on-sky connected to a VLT at Paranal in Chile. It includes an active segmented mirror, a static piston plate to simulate a secondary segmented mirror and of four phasing wavefront sensors to measure the piston, tip and tilt of the segments and the aberrations of the VLT. The four phasing sensors are the Diffraction Image Phase Sensing Instrument developed by Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, the Pyramid Phasing Sensor developed by Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, the Shack-Hartmann Phasing Sensor developed by the European Southern Observatory and the Zernike Unit for Segment phasing developed by Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille. A reference measurement of the segmented mirror is made by an internal metrology developed by Fogale Nanotech. The control system of Active Phasing Experiment will perform the phasing of the segments, the guiding of the VLT and the active optics of the VLT. These activities are included in the Framework Programme 6 of the European Union.

  3. The pattern of the arterial supply of the pancreas in anthropoid apes, catarrhine monkeys and platyrrhine monkeys.

    PubMed

    Shawuti, Alimujiang; Miyaki, Takayoshi; Saito, Toshiyuki; Itoh, Masahiro

    2009-11-01

    To get the full understanding of the arterial distribution to the pancreas, the analysis of the distribution of the variety of monkey species would be helpful. In this study, we studied the layout of the pancreatic artery in anthropoids (1 gorilla, 3 chimpanzees and 2 white-handed gibbons), in catarrhine monkeys (1 hamadryas baboon, 2 anubid baboons, 10 savannah monkeys) and in platyrrhine monkeys (6 squirrel monkeys). The pancreas of the monkeys was supplied by the arteries originating from the celiac trunk and/or superior mesenteric artery. There were three patterns in the arterial distribution; (1) the celiac artery supplied the major area of the pancreas. (2) the superior mesenteric artery supplied the major area of the pancreas. (3) the celiac artery supplied the whole pancreas. The pattern of the arterial distribution to the monkey pancreas had a wide variety. The result would be helpful for the elucidation of the development of the vascular distribution in the pancreas. PMID:20166548

  4. Gold Apes Hydrogen. The Structure and Bonding in the Planar B7Au2- and B7Au2 Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Hua JIN.; Wang, Lai S.; Zubarev, Dmitry Y.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2006-02-09

    We produced the B7Au2- mixed cluster and studied its electronic structure and chemical bonding using photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The photoelectron spectra of B7Au2- were observed to be relatively simple with vibrational resolution, in contrast to the complicated spectra observed for pure B7-, which had contributions from three isomers (Alexandrova et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 2004, 108, 3509). Theoretical calculations show that B7Au2- possesses an extremely stable planar structure, identical to that of B7H2-, demonstrating that Au mimics H in its bonding to boron, analogous to the Au-Si bonding. The ground state structure of B7Au2- (B7H2-) can be viewed as adding two Au (H) atoms to the terminal B atoms of a higher-lying planar isomer of B7-. The bonding and stability in the planar B7Au2- (B7H2-) clusters are elucidated on the basis of the strong covalent B-Au (H) bonding and the concepts of aromaticity/antiaromaticity in these systems.

  5. "Try to Do the Best You Can": How Pre-Service APE Specialists Experience Teaching Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombo-Dougovito, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) present an exceptional need for varied instruction within the physical education environment. Adapted physical educators need to be prepared to make a significant amount of choices in regards to adaptations and modifications given the situations they may encounter with their students. However, many…

  6. Comparative anatomy of the pelvic vessels in the bearded capuchin (Sapajus libidinosus) and baboons, apes and modern humans.

    PubMed

    Aversi-Ferreira, Roqueline A G M F; de Souza Vieira, Vanessa; Tomaz, Carlos; Aversi-Ferreira, Tales Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Cebus/Sapajus has shown high cognitive and manipulatory behaviour as well as intermittent bipedalism. Although the function of the muscles and bones of this genus has been widely investigated, the arterial system that supports these tissues has not been studied in much detail, and a full description of the blood vessels of the pelvis is still missing. Therefore, we studied the vessels of the pelvis of Sapajus libidinosus in terms of their origin, distribution and muscle irrigation and compared them with those of other primates available in the literature. In general, the distribution pattern and origin of arteries in the pelvis of the bearded capuchin are more similar to those of baboons compared to other primates. This similarity may be because both have a tail, a similar body shape and use, preferentially, quadrupedal movement. PMID:25377625

  7. Brief communication: Hand preference for bimanual and unimanual feeding in captive gorillas: extension in a second colony of apes.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Megan

    2012-08-01

    Right-hand dominance is widely considered to be a uniquely human trait. Whether nonhuman primates exhibit similar population-level hand preferences remains a topic of considerable debate. Despite extensive research focusing on laterality in nonhuman primates, our interpretation of these studies is limited due to methodological issues including the lack of a common measure of hand preference and the use of tasks that may not be reliable indicators of handedness. The use of consistent methods between studies is necessary to enable comparisons within and between species and allow for more general conclusions to be drawn from these results. The present study replicates methods used in recent research reporting population-level right-handedness in captive gorillas (Meguerditchian et al.,2010). Observational data were collected on hand preference for unimanual and bimanual feeding in 14 captive western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). Individual-level preferences were found, primarily for bimanual feeding; however, the data reveal no group-level directional bias (contra Meguerditchian et al.). Like the study by Meguerditchian et al. (2010), though, bimanual feeding revealed significantly stronger hand preferences than unimanual reaching, and age, sex, group membership, or rearing history had no effect on hand preference. Finally, variations in diet and corresponding grip type between studies suggest that hand preferences may vary across bimanual tasks depending on grip morphology. This study aims to contribute to our existing knowledge of primate laterality by increasing the number of individuals investigated using methods that allow for comparisons with similar research. PMID:22639326

  8. Sympatric Apes in Sacred Forests: Shared Space and Habitat Use by Humans and Endangered Javan Gibbons (Hylobates moloch).

    PubMed

    Reisland, Melissa Ann; Lambert, Joanna E

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we use a combination of ethnographic observation and GIS analysis to explore the use of space by humans and gibbons (Hylobates moloch) to determine areas of potential space competition in the sacred forest and nature reserve Cagar Alam Leuweung Sancang in West Java, Indonesia. More specifically, we test whether gibbons respond to the presence of humans in a manner consistent with predator-avoidance and predicted that the gibbon study subjects would avoid areas visited by humans (Risk-Disturbance Hypothesis). Data were collected August 2010-June 2011. We collected GPS locations and behavioral data on both the humans (6,652 hours) and the gibbons (1,253 hours) in the forest using 10 minute instantaneous sampling. Results indicate that humans preferentially assemble at the most sacred spot in the forest (Cikajayaan waterfall). Two gibbon groups' home ranges encompassed most of the sacred areas. Group B avoided areas of high human use, as high human use areas and high gibbon use areas did not overlap. Group C, though, continued to use areas that were heavily visited by humans. We thus found partial support for the Risk-Disturbance Hypothesis, although the variation in gibbon response to human disturbance indicates behavioral flexibility. We suggest that understanding the effects of shared space on wildlife is necessary for informing conservation policy in human-visited forests. PMID:26790025

  9. Intruders: New Neighbors in "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" and "The Hundred-Foot Journey"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts over territory are about the power to establish dominant cultures in territories and are often accompanied by cultural claims to legitimacy by each side. The cultural claims, or ideologies, are often expressed in terms of "homeland" dwellers versus "intruders." Two recent movies, "Dawn of the Planet of the…

  10. Digit ratios predict polygyny in early apes, Ardipithecus, Neanderthals and early modern humans but not in Australopithecus

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Emma; Rolian, Campbell; Cashmore, Lisa; Shultz, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Social behaviour of fossil hominoid species is notoriously difficult to predict owing to difficulties in estimating body size dimorphism from fragmentary remains and, in hominins, low canine size dimorphism. Recent studies have shown that the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D : 4D), a putative biomarker for prenatal androgen effects (PAEs), covaries with intra-sexual competition and social systems across haplorrhines; non-pair-bonded polygynous taxa have significantly lower 2D : 4D ratios (high PAE) than pair-bonded monogamous species. Here, we use proximal phalanx ratios of extant and fossil specimens to reconstruct the social systems of extinct hominoids. Pierolapithecus catalaunicus, Hispanopithecus laietanus and Ardipithecus ramidus have ratios consistent with polygynous extant species, whereas the ratio of Australopithecus afarensis is consistent with monogamous extant species. The early anatomically modern human Qafzeh 9 and Neanderthals have lower digit ratios than most contemporary human populations, indicating increased androgenization and possibly higher incidence of polygyny. Although speculative owing to small sample sizes, these results suggest that digit ratios represent a supplementary approach for elucidating the social systems of fossil hominins. PMID:21047863

  11. Digit ratios predict polygyny in early apes, Ardipithecus, Neanderthals and early modern humans but not in Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Emma; Rolian, Campbell; Cashmore, Lisa; Shultz, Susanne

    2011-05-22

    Social behaviour of fossil hominoid species is notoriously difficult to predict owing to difficulties in estimating body size dimorphism from fragmentary remains and, in hominins, low canine size dimorphism. Recent studies have shown that the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D : 4D), a putative biomarker for prenatal androgen effects (PAEs), covaries with intra-sexual competition and social systems across haplorrhines; non-pair-bonded polygynous taxa have significantly lower 2D : 4D ratios (high PAE) than pair-bonded monogamous species. Here, we use proximal phalanx ratios of extant and fossil specimens to reconstruct the social systems of extinct hominoids. Pierolapithecus catalaunicus, Hispanopithecus laietanus and Ardipithecus ramidus have ratios consistent with polygynous extant species, whereas the ratio of Australopithecus afarensis is consistent with monogamous extant species. The early anatomically modern human Qafzeh 9 and Neanderthals have lower digit ratios than most contemporary human populations, indicating increased androgenization and possibly higher incidence of polygyny. Although speculative owing to small sample sizes, these results suggest that digit ratios represent a supplementary approach for elucidating the social systems of fossil hominins. PMID:21047863

  12. Reconsidering the Medawar paradigm placental viviparity existed for eons, even in vertebrates; without a "problem": Why are Tregs important for preeclampsia in great apes?

    PubMed

    Chaouat, Gérard

    2016-04-01

    The classic Medawar paradigm sees viviparity in vertebrates as a "problem". Established in 1953, it was then largely determined by a self-non-self view of the immune system. However, there are alternative models of the immune system, such as the danger model. For these models, pregnancy is neither a problem nor a danger. Supporting this view, we recall that placenta or placental-like-dependent(1) (allo) pregnancy has existed for eons. In fact, it appeared as far back as the time of aquatic colony invertebrates, such as some of the Bryozoa.(2) Since then, convergent evolution has seen placentation appear in a large variety of phyla. These placentae did not seem to cause "immunological problems", even in vertebrates possessing a graft rejection potential. The reappearance of placentae in marsupial and eutherian mammals found placentae confronted with a highly developed adaptive immune system. Two strategies were developed, therefore: short-term only placentation (marsupials) or specialised control of T cell-mediated immunity (Tregs). The problem is likely to be most acute in cases of deep invasive placentation. As an alternative to a restricted view of the Medawar paradigm for preeclampsia, an integrated model putting both inflammation and Tregs into perspective is proposed, somehow embedding the questioning of the initial Medawar paradigm. PMID:26412292

  13. Saliva Crystallization Occurs in Female Bornean Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus): Could It Be a New Option for Monitoring of Menstrual Cycle in Captive Great Apes?

    PubMed

    Kubátová, Anna; Fedorova, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Saliva crystallization was previously studied in both humans and animals with various results. The study aimed to confirm of the presence of saliva crystallization in female Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus), to evaluate the quality of samples which were collected from animals and processed by keepers, and to test preliminarily if the saliva crystallization could be connected with menstrual cycle and could serve as a cheap, quick and simple method for the basic monitoring of their reproductive status. The research was carried out from September 2014 to January 2015. Sampling of saliva was done in three female orangutans from three zoological gardens (Dvur Kralove, Usti nad Labem, Bojnice) daily, mostly by tongue prints on glass slides with ground edges or by sampling directly from the mouth using plastic spoons from which the saliva was transferred onto glass slides. Samples were evaluated by light microscopy with ×400 magnification. The quality of the sample and type of crystallization was assessed for two different approaches. In total, 246 samples were evaluated. We confirmed the presence of saliva crystallization in orangutans. The quality of samples was variable however acceptable. Unfortunately, it was impossible to detect exact fertile period in two females. However in one orangutan female, when the crystallization was evaluated by the approach typically used in humans, we discovered that saliva crystallization during the fertile period significantly differed from saliva crystallization in the non-fertile period. This points out the possibility of using saliva crystallization for detection of the fertile period in orangutans. However, further research was recommended. PMID:27458728

  14. Bisphenol A exposure and healing effects of Adiantum capillus-veneris L. plant extract (APE) in bisphenol A-induced reproductive toxicity in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Balal; Amina; Liu, Guijian; Wang, Ruwei; Qadir, Abdul; Ali, Muhammad Ubaid; Kanwal, Qudsia; Munir, Bushra; Asmatullah; Abbas, Zaigham

    2016-06-01

    The current study presents the bisphenol A exposure and the ameliorative effects of Adiantum capillus-veneris on testicular toxicity induced by bisphenol A. Adult male albino rats were divided into five groups of five animals each: A (control), B (vehicle control), C (toxic), D (protective), and E (ameliorative) were served distilled water, olive oil, bisphenol A (BPA) at 100 mg/kg body weight, A. capillus-veneris plant extract at 25 mg/kg body weight, and BPA + A. capillus-veneris, respectively. All of the doses were administered orally for 15 days, and the rats were then sacrificed. Blood samples for the testosterone assay and both testes were collected for histological examination. The body weight, paired testes weight, relative tissue weight index, Johnsen scoring of tubules, and level of serum testosterone decreased in BPA-treated rats. Similarly, histological examination of the testes in BPA-treated animals revealed a lower number of Leydig cells, an irregular basement membrane, sloughing of germinal layers, vacuolization, a lower number of spermatocytes, and debris in the lumen. However, co-administration of A. capillus-veneris with BPA increased the total antioxidative capacity (330.82 ± 22.46 μmol/mg protein) of the testes and restored the serum testosterone level (1.70 ng/ml); histological features showed restoration in the stages of spermatogenesis. Conclusively, A. capillus-veneris plant extract overcomes the estrogenic effects of BPA on the reproductive system of rats and protects rats' testes against BPA-induced injury/damage via an antioxidative mechanism that appears to be conciliated. PMID:26936479

  15. Fallen Angels or Risen Apes? A Tale of the Intricate Complexities of Imbalanced Immune Responses in the Pathogenesis and Progression of Immune-Mediated and Viral Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ondondo, Beatrice Omusiro

    2014-01-01

    Excessive immune responses directed against foreign pathogens, self-antigens, or commensal microflora can cause cancer establishment and progression if the execution of tight immuno-regulatory mechanisms fails. On the other hand, induction of potent tumor antigen-specific immune responses together with stimulation of the innate immune system is a pre-requisite for effective anti-tumor immunity, and if suppressed by the strong immuno-regulatory mechanisms can lead to cancer progression. Therefore, it is crucial that the inevitable co-existence of these fundamental, yet conflicting roles of immune-regulatory cells is carefully streamlined as imbalances can be detrimental to the host. Infection with chronic persistent viruses is characterized by severe immune dysfunction resulting in T cell exhaustion and sometimes deletion of antigen-specific T cells. More often, this is due to increased immuno-regulatory processes, which are triggered to down-regulate immune responses and limit immunopathology. However, such heightened levels of immune disruption cause a concomitant loss of tumor immune-surveillance and create a permissive microenvironment for cancer establishment and progression, as demonstrated by increased incidences of cancer in immunosuppressed hosts. Paradoxically, while some cancers arise as a consequence of increased immuno-regulatory mechanisms that inhibit protective immune responses and impinge on tumor surveillance, other cancers arise due to impaired immuno-regulatory mechanisms and failure to limit pathogenic inflammatory responses. This intricate complexity, where immuno-regulatory cells can be beneficial in certain immune settings but detrimental in other settings underscores the need for carefully formulated interventions to equilibrate the balance between immuno-stimulatory and immuno-regulatory processes. PMID:24639678

  16. Sequence divergence, polymorphism and evolution of the middle-wave and long-wave visual pigment genes of great apes and Old World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dulai, K S; Bowmaker, J K; Mollon, J D; Hunt, D M

    1994-10-01

    In man, the spectral shift between the middle-wave (MW) and long-wave (LW) visual pigments is largely achieved by amino acid substitution at two codons, both located in exon 5. A third amino acid site coded by exon 3 is polymorphic between pigments. We have studied the equivalent regions of the cone opsin genes in two members of the Hominidea (the gorilla, Gorilla gorilla and the chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes) and in three members of the Cercopithecoidea family of Old World primates (the diana monkey, Cercopithecus diana, the talapoin monkey, Miopithecus talapoin, and the crab-eating macaque, Macaca fascicularis). No variation in the codons that specify the amino acids involved in spectral tuning were found. We predict therefore that the MW and LW pigments of gorilla and chimpanzee have similar spectral characteristics to those of man. Multiple copies of the same opsin gene sequence were identified in the chimpanzee, talapoin and macaque and we also show that non-human Old World primates are similar to man in showing a bunching of polymorphic sites in exon 3. We discuss the ancestry of the separate MW and LW genes of Old World primates and the equivalent polymorphic gene of the marmoset, a New World primate. PMID:7975287

  17. Hairless mutation: a driving force of humanization from a human–ape common ancestor by enforcing upright walking while holding a baby with both hands

    PubMed Central

    Sutou, Shizuyo

    2012-01-01

    Three major characteristics distinguish humans from other primates: bipedality, practical nakedness, and the family as a social unit. A hairless mutation introduced into the chimpanzee/human last common ancestor (CLCA) 6 million years ago (Mya) diverged hairless human and hairy chimpanzee lineages. All primates except humans can carry their babies without using their hands. A hairless mother would be forced to stand and walk upright. Her activities would be markedly limited. The male partner would have to collect food and carry it to her by hand to keep her and their baby from starving; irresponsible and selfish males could not have left their offspring. The mother would have sexually accepted her partner at any time as a reward for food. Sexual relations irrespective of estrus cycles might have strengthened the pair bond. Molecular and paleontological dating indicates that CLCA existed 6 Mya, and early hominin fossils show that they were bipeds, indicating that humanization from CLCA occurred rapidly. A single mutation in animals with scalp hair is known to induce hairless phenotype (ectodermal dysplasia). Bipedalism and hairlessness are disadvantageous traits; only those who could survive trials and tribulations in cooperation with family members must have been able to evolve as humans. PMID:22404045

  18. Comparing the performances of apes (Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus) and human children (Homo sapiens) in the floating peanut task.

    PubMed

    Hanus, Daniel; Mendes, Natacha; Tennie, Claudio; Call, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Mendes et al. [1] described the use of a liquid tool (water) in captive orangutans. Here, we tested chimpanzees and gorillas for the first time with the same "floating peanut task." None of the subjects solved the task. In order to better understand the cognitive demands of the task, we further tested other populations of chimpanzees and orangutans with the variation of the peanut initially floating or not. Twenty percent of the chimpanzees but none of the orangutans were successful. Additional controls revealed that successful subjects added water only if it was necessary to obtain the nut. Another experiment was conducted to investigate the reason for the differences in performance between the unsuccessful (Experiment 1) and the successful (Experiment 2) chimpanzee populations. We found suggestive evidence for the view that functional fixedness might have impaired the chimpanzees' strategies in the first experiment. Finally, we tested how human children of different age classes perform in an analogous experimental setting. Within the oldest group (8 years), 58 percent of the children solved the problem, whereas in the youngest group (4 years), only 8 percent were able to find the solution. PMID:21687710

  19. It Gets Crowded with an Elephant and an Ape in the Room: Teaching about Female and Male Cognitive Differences and Similarities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Diane F.

    2014-01-01

    It is important to understand the many controversies about cognitive sex differences because beliefs about these differences are often used to justify pubic policies and individual actions. As teachers of psychology, we need to provide a safe environment where students can think and argue about why, how, and how much females and males are similar…

  20. Comparing the Performances of Apes (Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes, Pongo pygmaeus) and Human Children (Homo sapiens) in the Floating Peanut Task

    PubMed Central

    Hanus, Daniel; Mendes, Natacha; Tennie, Claudio; Call, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Mendes et al. [1] described the use of a liquid tool (water) in captive orangutans. Here, we tested chimpanzees and gorillas for the first time with the same “floating peanut task.” None of the subjects solved the task. In order to better understand the cognitive demands of the task, we further tested other populations of chimpanzees and orangutans with the variation of the peanut initially floating or not. Twenty percent of the chimpanzees but none of the orangutans were successful. Additional controls revealed that successful subjects added water only if it was necessary to obtain the nut. Another experiment was conducted to investigate the reason for the differences in performance between the unsuccessful (Experiment 1) and the successful (Experiment 2) chimpanzee populations. We found suggestive evidence for the view that functional fixedness might have impaired the chimpanzees' strategies in the first experiment. Finally, we tested how human children of different age classes perform in an analogous experimental setting. Within the oldest group (8 years), 58 percent of the children solved the problem, whereas in the youngest group (4 years), only 8 percent were able to find the solution. PMID:21687710

  1. The ontogeny of great ape gesture - not a simple story. Comment on "Towards a Computational Comparative Neuroprimatology: Framing the language-ready brain" by Michael A. Arbib

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebal, Katja

    2016-03-01

    Although there is an increasing number of studies investigating gestural communication in primates other than humans in both natural and captive settings [1], very little is known about how they acquire their gestures. Different mechanisms have been proposed, including genetic transmission [2], social learning [3], or ontogenetic ritualization [4]. This latter mechanism is central to Arbib's paper [5], because he uses dyadic brain modeling - that is "modeling the brains of two creatures as they interact with each other, so that the action of one affects the perception of the other and so the cycle of interactions continues, with both brains changing in the process" - to explain how gestures might emerge in ontogeny from previously non-communicative behaviors over the course of repeated and increasingly abbreviated and thus ritualized interactions. The aim of my comment is to discuss the current evidence from primate gesture research with regard the different mechanisms proposed for gesture acquisition and how this might confirm or challenge Arbib's approach.

  2. Making Space for Permanent Molars in Growing Baboon (Papio anubis) and Great Ape (Pan paniscus and P. troglodytes) Mandibles: Possible Ontogenetic Strategies and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Boughner, Julia C.

    2011-01-01

    While mandible proportions do not appear to constrain permanent molar initiation times, how adequate space is created in the corpus for these teeth in a timely way is not well understood. This question is important for explaining how primate tooth and jaw development and evolution are coordinated. Landmark and linear measurement data were used to characterize mandible shape, growth trajectory, and growth rate between two genera, Papio and Pan, with contrasting permanent molar initiation schedules and mandible proportions. 3D geometric morphometric and 2D bivariate analyses showed genus-level differences in mandible morphology from birth that were amplified by different postnatal growth trajectories. Different corpus proportions and regional variation in corpus growth rates helped create space in a timely way for the molars. Regional corpus growth rates may evolve alongside permanent molar morphology and developmental timing to modify space available in the corpus for these teeth. PMID:22567294

  3. Quantitative Analyses about Market- and Prevalence-Based Needs for Adapted Physical Education Teachers in the Public Schools in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jiabei

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze quantitative needs for more adapted physical education (APE) teachers based on both market- and prevalence-based models. The market-based need for more APE teachers was examined based on APE teacher positions funded, while the prevalence-based need for additional APE teachers was analyzed based on students…

  4. The Rudiments of Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canfield, John V.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the question of whether nonhuman species, such as apes, possess rudimentary language, focusing on the ideas of Ludwig Wittgenstein and Noam Chomsky in regard to the development of oral language in young children and apes. (51 references) (MDM)

  5. 75 FR 35516 - Pipeline Safety: Request for Special Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... 192.121... Anchor Point Energy, LLC, (APE) pipeline Energy, LLC. seeks relief from certain Federal... considered as possible for conversion to Class 2 during the life of the project. APE is requesting that...

  6. 78 FR 55072 - Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses all areas subject...

  7. 77 FR 24193 - Columbia Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO(s) as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses all...

  8. 77 FR 38614 - Northwest Pipeline, GP; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses all areas subject to ground disturbance...

  9. 76 FR 54758 - Alliance Pipeline L.P.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the Planned...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... properties.\\4\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO as the project is further developed. On natural gas projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses...

  10. 78 FR 33401 - CenterPoint Energy Gas Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... will define the ] project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the State Historic Preservation Office as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at...

  11. 78 FR 35627 - Columbia Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... effects on historic properties.\\5\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPOs as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a...

  12. 76 FR 35884 - Gas Transmission Northwest LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-20

    ... properties.\\3\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO as the project is further developed. On natural gas projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses...

  13. 76 FR 10350 - Kern River Gas Transmission Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... on historic properties.\\4\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO(s) as the project is further developed. On natural gas facility projects, the APE...

  14. 75 FR 52524 - Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... on historic properties.\\3\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO(s) as the project is further developed. On natural gas facility projects, the APE...

  15. 78 FR 18970 - Trunkline LNG Company, LLC; Trunkline LNG Export, LLC; Trunkline Gas Company, LLC; Supplemental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... properties.\\5\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPOs as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses...

  16. 77 FR 4803 - Dominion Transmission, Inc.; Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPOs. For typical natural gas projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses all areas subject to ground disturbance (examples...

  17. 77 FR 41779 - Millennium Pipeline Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... effects on historic properties.\\4\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO(s) as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a...

  18. 75 FR 63462 - Central New York Oil and Gas Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... effects on historic properties.\\3\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO(s) as the project is further developed. On natural gas facility projects, the APE...

  19. 78 FR 66911 - Texas Eastern Transmission, LP; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... effects on historic properties.\\4\\ We will define the ] project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at...

  20. 78 FR 62317 - Clarksville Gas and Water; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-16

    ... effects on historic properties.\\4\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPOs as the Project is further developed. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at...

  1. 75 FR 57269 - Southern LNG Company, LLC; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... properties.\\3\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO as the project is further developed. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a...

  2. 78 FR 62010 - Empire Pipeline, Inc.; National Fuel Gas Supply Corporation; Notice of Intent To Prepare an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-11

    ... properties.\\4\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO(s) as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses...

  3. 77 FR 58122 - Colorado Interstate Gas Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-19

    ... will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses all areas subject...

  4. 78 FR 14784 - Northern Natural Gas Company; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-07

    ... will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses all areas subject...

  5. 77 FR 27048 - Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... properties.\\4\\ We will define the project-specific Area of Potential Effects (APE) in consultation with the SHPO as the project develops. On natural gas facility projects, the APE at a minimum encompasses...

  6. Selecting Surrogates for an Alkylphenol Ethoxylate Analytical Method in Sewage and Soil Matrices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) are nonionic surfactants commonly used in industrial detergents. These products contain complex mixtures of branched and linear chains. APEs and their degradation products, alkylphenols, are highly toxic to aquatic organisms, potentially estrogeni...

  7. Reference pressure changes and available potential energy in isobaric coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, F. R.

    1985-01-01

    A formulation of the available potential energy (APE) equation in isobaric coordinates which alleviates the need for computing temporal derivatives of reference pressure and describes how work done relates to changes in the APE of a limited region is presented. The APE budget equation possesses terms analogous to those in Johnson's (1970) isentropic version. It is shown that APE changes result from either mechanical work inside the domain or an exchange of energy via boundary processes with the surrounding environment.

  8. 9 CFR 3.80 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... great apes 3 and will be calculated by using the following table: 4 3 The different species of nonhuman... lbs. (15 kg.). Group 6—great apes over 55.0 lbs. (25 kg.), except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)(ii... facilities, including Federal research facilities, must provide great apes weighing over 110 lbs. (50 kg)...

  9. Perspectives on Adapted Physical Education Services to Rural Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Joe; Ellery, Peter; Maguire, Paul

    Spurred by the inclusion trend, adapted physical education (APE) has emerged as a fundamental education service for children with disabilities in recent years. Although only 15 states have a certification or endorsement in APE, the Adapted Physical Education National Standards examination has produced certified APE educators in 21 additional…

  10. Phylogenetic implications of the first African Middle Miocene hominoid frontal bone from Otavi, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickford, Martin; Sola, Salvador Moya; Köhler, Meike

    1997-09-01

    The discovery of a hominoid frontal at Berg Aukas, Namibia, aged 13-12 Ma, permits an analysis of the phylogenetic relations between fossil and extant great apes. The Namibian specimen is closer morphologically to African apes and humans (AAH), whereas all fossil Eurasian great apes differ markedly from AAH but are closer to the Pongo clade.

  11. 9 CFR 3.80 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... great apes 3 and will be calculated by using the following table: 4 3 The different species of nonhuman... lbs. (15 kg.). Group 6—great apes over 55.0 lbs. (25 kg.), except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)(ii... facilities, including Federal research facilities, must provide great apes weighing over 110 lbs. (50 kg)...

  12. 9 CFR 3.80 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... great apes 3 and will be calculated by using the following table: 4 3 The different species of nonhuman... lbs. (15 kg.). Group 6—great apes over 55.0 lbs. (25 kg.), except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)(ii... facilities, including Federal research facilities, must provide great apes weighing over 110 lbs. (50 kg)...

  13. 9 CFR 3.80 - Primary enclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... great apes 3 and will be calculated by using the following table: 4 3 The different species of nonhuman... lbs. (15 kg.). Group 6—great apes over 55.0 lbs. (25 kg.), except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)(ii... facilities, including Federal research facilities, must provide great apes weighing over 110 lbs. (50 kg)...

  14. Assessment of Major and Daily Stressful Events During Adolescence: The Adolescent Perceived Events Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compas, Bruce E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Conducted four studies to develop Adolescent Perceived Events Scale (APES), measure of major and daily stressful events during adolescence. Describes test construction, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity of APES. Summarizes subsequent research showing APES to be significantly related to behavior problems and psychological…

  15. Activities in Developmental Physical Education; Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarnieri, Barbara; Sandeen, Cecile

    Presented in the curriculum guide are activities for a sequenced physical education program to be used with trainable mentally retarded students (TMR). Defined are teaching approaches such as station teaching. Reviewed are a brief history of adaptive physical education (APE), APE literature on TMR children, and local APE program development.…

  16. Evolution of the primate beta-globin gene region: nucleotide sequence of the delta-beta-globin intergenic region of gorilla and phylogenetic relationships between African apes and man.

    PubMed

    Perrin-Pecontal, P; Gouy, M; Nigon, V M; Trabuchet, G

    1992-01-01

    A 6.0-kb DNA fragment from Gorilla gorilla including the 5' part of the beta-globin gene and about 4.5 kb of its upstream flanking region was cloned and sequenced. The sequence was compared to the human, chimpanzee, and macaque delta-beta intergenic region. This analysis reveals four tandemly repeated sequences (RS), at the same location in the four species, showing a variable number of repeats generating both intraspecific (polymorphism) and interspecific variability. These tandem arrays delimit five regions of unique sequence called IG for intergenic. The divergence for these IG sequences is 1.85 +/- 0.22% between human and gorilla, which is not significantly different from the value estimated in the same region between chimpanzee and human (1.62 +/- 0.21%). The CpG and TpA dinucleotides are avoided. CpGs evolve faster than other sequence sites but do not confuse phylogenetic inferences by producing parallel mutations in different lineages. About 75% of CpG doublets have become TpG or CpA since the common ancestor, in agreement with the methylation/deamination pattern. Comparison of this intergenic region gives information on branching order within Hominoidea. Parsimony and distance-based methods when applied to the delta-beta intergenic region provide evidence (although not statistically significant) that human and chimpanzee are more closely related to each other than to gorilla. CpG sites are indeed rich in information by carrying substitutions along the short internal branch. Combining these results with those on the psi eta-delta intergenic region, shows in a statistically significant way that chimpanzee is the closest relative of human. PMID:1556740

  17. Evolution of the redox function in mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, M M; Luo, M; Gaur, R K; Delaplane, S; Li, X; Kelley, M R

    2008-08-25

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (hApe1) encodes two important functional activities: an essential base excision repair (BER) activity and a redox activity that regulates expression of a number of genes through reduction of their transcription factors, AP-1, NFkappaB, HIF-1alpha, CREB, p53 and others. The BER function is highly conserved from prokaryotes (E. coli exonuclease III) to humans (hApe1). Here, we provide evidence supporting a redox function unique to mammalian Apes. An evolutionary analysis of Ape sequences reveals that, of the 7 Cys residues, Cys 93, 99, 208, 296, and 310 are conserved in both mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrate Apes, while Cys 65 is unique to mammalian Apes. In the zebrafish Ape (zApe), selected as the vertebrate sequence most distant from human, the residue equivalent to Cys 65 is Thr 58. The wild-type zApe enzyme was tested for redox activity in both in vitro EMSA and transactivation assays and found to be inactive, similar to C65A hApe1. Substitution of Thr 58 with Cys in zApe, however, resulted in a redox active enzyme, suggesting that a Cys residue in this position is indeed critical for redox function. In order to further probe differences between redox active and inactive enzymes, we have determined the crystal structures of vertebrate redox inactive enzymes, the C65A human Ape1 enzyme and the zApe enzyme at 1.9 and 2.3A, respectively. Our results provide new insights on the redox function and highlight a dramatic gain-of-function activity for Ape1 in mammals not found in non-mammalian vertebrates or lower organisms. PMID:18579163

  18. Isolation and characterisation of five neurotoxic and cardiotoxic polypeptides from the sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, T; Schaller, C; Schulze, C; Sanchez-Rodriguez, J; Dannmeier, C; Ravens, U; Heubach, J F; Eckhardt, K; Schmidtmayer, J; Schmidt, H; Aneiros, A; Wachter, E; Béress, L

    2001-05-01

    Five toxins (APE 1 to APE 5) of the sea anemone species Anthopleura elegantissima (Brandt) have been isolated from a toxic by-product fraction of its concentrated crude watery-methanolic extract, prepared previously for the isolation of a neuropeptide (the head-activator) by Schaller and Bodenmüller (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78 (1981) 7000) from 200kg sea anemones. Toxin purification was performed by desalting of the starting material by dialysis (MWCO 3500) against distilled water, anion exchange chromatography on QAE-Sephadex A25 at pH 8, twice gel filtration on Sephadex G50 m, repeated chromatography on QAE-Sephadex at pH 10 and chromatography on the cation exchanger Fractogel EMD SO(3)(-)-650 M.Final purification of the toxins was achieved by HPLC on MN SP 250/10 Nucleosil 500-5 C(18) PPN and MN SP 250/21 Nucleosil 300-7 C(18). Each toxin was composed of at least two isotoxins of which APE 1-1, APE 1-2, APE 2-1, APE 2-2 and APE 5-3 were isolated in preparative scale. With exception of APE 5-3 the sequences of the isotoxins have been elucidated. They resemble the 47 residue type-I long polypeptide toxins native to Anemonia sulcata (Pennant). All isotoxins paralyse the shore crab (Carcinus maenas) by tetanic contractions after i.m. application. The toxins modify current passing through the fast Na(+) channel in neuroblastoma cells, leading to delayed and incomplete inactivation. APE 1-1, APE 2-1 and APE 5-3 produce a positive inotropic effect in mammalian heart muscle, although they differ in potency. The order of potency is APE 2-1>APE 1-1>APE 5-3 (i.e. threshold concentrations are 1, 10 and 300nM, respectively). In addition, they enhance the spontaneous beating frequency in isolated right atria (guinea pig). The most potent cardiotoxic isotoxin is APE 2-1, its sequence is identical with that of AP-C, a toxin isolated and characterised previously by Norton et al. (Drugs and Foods from the Sea, 1978, University of Oklahoma Press, p. 37-50).LD50 APE 2-1:1 micro

  19. Fitness Supplements as a Gateway Substance for Anabolic-Androgenic Steroid Use

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Tom; Harty, Seth; Langenbucher, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 3.0% of young Americans have used anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). A traditional model of adolescent substance use, the gateway hypothesis, suggests that drug use follows a chronological, causal sequence, whereby initial use of a specific drug leads to an increased likelihood of future drug use. Therefore, the use of illicit appearance and performance enhancing drugs (APED), such as AASs, also follows an analogous progression, whereby legal APEDs, (e.g., nutritional supplements) precedes illicit APED use. We examined the relationship between nutritional supplement use, beliefs about APEDs, and APED use in 201 male (n = 100) and female (n = 101) undergraduates. Participants completed measures of muscle dysmorphia (MDDI), body checking (BCQ, MBCQ), eating disorder symptoms (EDE–Q), perfectionism (FMPS), positive beliefs about the efficacy–safety of AAS use and APED use patterns. A series of covariance structure models (CSM) showed body image disturbance, compulsive exercise, illicit drug use, and perfectionism, independent of gender, were significant predictors of positive beliefs about AAS. Those who used both fat burning and muscle building supplements reported the strongest beliefs in AAS efficacy–safety, which was associated with higher likelihood of current illicit APED use. There was evidence of significant indirect relationships between supplement use and illicit APED use through contact with other AAS users and beliefs about AAS. The potential role for nutritional supplement use in the initiation of illegal APED use is discussed. Future prevention efforts may benefit from targeting legal APED users in youth. PMID:22486333

  20. Fitness supplements as a gateway substance for anabolic-androgenic steroid use.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Tom; Harty, Seth; Langenbucher, James W

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 3.0% of young Americans have used anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). A traditional model of adolescent substance use, the gateway hypothesis, suggests that drug use follows a chronological, causal sequence, whereby initial use of a specific drug leads to an increased likelihood of future drug use. Therefore, the use of illicit appearance and performance enhancing drugs (APED), such as AASs, also follows an analogous progression, whereby legal APEDs, (e.g., nutritional supplements) precedes illicit APED use. We examined the relationship between nutritional supplement use, beliefs about APEDs, and APED use in 201 male (n = 100) and female (n = 101) undergraduates. Participants completed measures of muscle dysmorphia (MDDI), body checking (BCQ, MBCQ), eating disorder symptoms (EDE-Q), perfectionism (FMPS), positive beliefs about the efficacy-safety of AAS use and APED use patterns. A series of covariance structure models (CSM) showed body image disturbance, compulsive exercise, illicit drug use, and perfectionism, independent of gender, were significant predictors of positive beliefs about AAS. Those who used both fat burning and muscle building supplements reported the strongest beliefs in AAS efficacy-safety, which was associated with higher likelihood of current illicit APED use. There was evidence of significant indirect relationships between supplement use and illicit APED use through contact with other AAS users and beliefs about AAS. The potential role for nutritional supplement use in the initiation of illegal APED use is discussed. Future prevention efforts may benefit from targeting legal APED users in youth. PMID:22486333

  1. Shape-based analysis of right ventricular dysfunction associated with acute pulmonary embolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajbakhsh, Nima; Xue, Wenzhe; Wu, Hong; Liang, Jianming; McMahon, Eileen M.; Belohlavek, Marek

    2012-03-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (APE) is known as one of the major causes of sudden death. However, high level of mortality caused by APE can be reduced, if detected in early stages of development. Hence, biomarkers capable of early detection of APE are of utmost importance. This study investigates how APE affects the biomechanics of the cardiac right ventricle (RV), taking one step towards developing functional biomarkers for early diagnosis and determination of prognosis of APE. To that end, we conducted a pilot study in pigs, which revealed the following major changes due to the severe RV afterload caused by APE: (1) waving paradoxical motion of the RV inner boundary, (2) decrease in local curvature of the septum, (3) lower positive correlation between the movement of inner boundaries of the septal and free walls of the RV, (4) slower blood ejection by the RV, and (5) discontinuous movement observed particularly in the middle of the RV septal wall.

  2. Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengxia

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1, also known as REF-1) was isolated based on its ability to cleave at AP sites in DNA or activate the DNA binding activity of certain transcription factors. We review herein topics related to this multi-functional DNA repair and stress-response protein. Recent Advances: APE1 displays homology to Escherichia coli exonuclease III and is a member of the divalent metal-dependent α/β fold-containing phosphoesterase superfamily of enzymes. APE1 has acquired distinct active site and loop elements that dictate substrate selectivity, and a unique N-terminus which at minimum imparts nuclear targeting and interaction specificity. Additional activities ascribed to APE1 include 3′–5′ exonuclease, 3′-repair diesterase, nucleotide incision repair, damaged or site-specific RNA cleavage, and multiple transcription regulatory roles. Critical Issues: APE1 is essential for mouse embryogenesis and contributes to cell viability in a genetic background-dependent manner. Haploinsufficient APE1+/− mice exhibit reduced survival, increased cancer formation, and cellular/tissue hyper-sensitivity to oxidative stress, supporting the notion that impaired APE1 function associates with disease susceptibility. Although abnormal APE1 expression/localization has been seen in cancer and neuropathologies, and impaired-function variants have been described, a causal link between an APE1 defect and human disease remains elusive. Future Directions: Ongoing efforts aim at delineating the biological role(s) of the different APE1 activities, as well as the regulatory mechanisms for its intra-cellular distribution and participation in diverse molecular pathways. The determination of whether APE1 defects contribute to human disease, particularly pathologies that involve oxidative stress, and whether APE1 small-molecule regulators have clinical utility, is central to future investigations. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 678–707

  3. Toward homochiral protocells in noncatalytic peptide systems.

    PubMed

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Walker, Sara Imari

    2009-10-01

    The activation-polymerization-epimerization-depolymerization (APED) model of Plasson et al. has recently been proposed as a mechanism for the evolution of homochirality on prebiotic Earth. The dynamics of the APED model in two-dimensional spatially-extended systems is investigated for various realistic reaction parameters. It is found that the APED system allows for the formation of isolated homochiral proto-domains surrounded by a racemate. A diffusive slowdown of the APED network induced, for example, through tidal motion or evaporating pools and lagoons leads to the stabilization of homochiral bounded structures as expected in the first self-assembled protocells. PMID:19370399

  4. Andrographis paniculata Extract and Andrographolide Modulate the Hepatic Drug Metabolism System and Plasma Tolbutamide Concentrations in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haw-Wen; Huang, Chin-Shiu; Liu, Pei-Fen; Li, Chien-Chun; Liu, Cheng-Tzu; Chiang, Jia-Rong; Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Lii, Chong-Kuei

    2013-01-01

    Andrographolide is the most abundant terpenoid of A. paniculata which is used in the treatment of diabetes. In this study, we investigated the effects of A. paniculata extract (APE) and andrographolide on the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes in rat liver and determined whether modulation of these enzymes changed the pharmacokinetics of tolbutamide. Rats were intragastrically dosed with 2 g/kg/day APE or 50 mg/kg/day andrographolide for 5 days before a dose of 20 mg/kg tolbutamide was given. APE and andrographolide reduced the AUC0–12 h of tolbutamide by 37% and 18%, respectively, compared with that in controls. The protein and mRNA levels and enzyme activities of CYP2C6/11, CYP1A1/2, and CYP3A1/2 were increased by APE and andrographolide. To evaluate whether APE or andrographolide affected the hypoglycemic action of tolbutamide, high-fat diet-induced obese mice were used and treated in the same manner as the rats. APE and andrographolide increased CYP2C6/11 expression and decreased plasma tolbutamide levels. In a glucose tolerance test, however, the hypoglycemic effect of tolbutamide was not changed by APE or andrographolide. These results suggest that APE and andrographolide accelerate the metabolism rate of tolbutamide through increased expression and activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes. APE and andrographolide, however, do not impair the hypoglycemic effect of tolbutamide. PMID:23997806

  5. Apple Pomace Extract Improves Endurance in Exercise Performance by Increasing Strength and Weight of Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji-Woong; Shim, Jae-Jung; Choi, Il-Dong; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Ra, Jehyeon; Ku, Hyung Keun; Lee, Dong Eun; Kim, Tae-Youl; Jeung, Woonhee; Lee, Jung-Hee; Lee, Ki Won; Huh, Chul-Sung; Sim, Jae-Hun; Ahn, Young-Tae

    2015-12-01

    Ursolic acid is a lipophilic pentacyclic triterpenoid found in many fruits and herbs and is used in several herbal folk medicines for diabetes. In this study, we evaluated the effects of apple pomace extract (APE; ursolic acid content, 183 mg/g) on skeletal muscle atrophy. To examine APE therapeutic potential in muscle atrophy, we investigated APE effects on the expression of biomarkers associated with muscle atrophy and hypertrophy. We found that APE inhibited atrophy, while inducing hypertrophy in C2C12 myotubes by decreasing the expression of atrophy-related genes and increasing the expression of hypertrophy-associated genes. The in vivo experiments using mice fed a diet with or without APE showed that APE intake increased skeletal muscle mass, as well as grip strength and exercise capacity. In addition, APE significantly improved endurance in the mice, as evidenced by increased exhaustive running time and muscle weight, and reduced the expression of the genes involved in the development of muscle atrophy. APE also decreased the concentration of serum lactate and lactate dehydrogenase, inorganic phosphate, and creatinine, the indicators of accumulated fatigue and exercise-induced stress. These results suggest that APE may be useful as an ergogenic functional food or dietary supplement. PMID:26331671

  6. Toward Homochiral Protocells in Noncatalytic Peptide Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleiser, Marcelo; Walker, Sara Imari

    2009-10-01

    The activation-polymerization-epimerization-depolymerization (APED) model of Plasson et al. has recently been proposed as a mechanism for the evolution of homochirality on prebiotic Earth. The dynamics of the APED model in two-dimensional spatially-extended systems is investigated for various realistic reaction parameters. It is found that the APED system allows for the formation of isolated homochiral proto-domains surrounded by a racemate. A diffusive slowdown of the APED network induced, for example, through tidal motion or evaporating pools and lagoons leads to the stabilization of homochiral bounded structures as expected in the first self-assembled protocells.

  7. Spectral estimation of gapped data and SAR imaging with angular diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Erik G.; Li, Jian; Stoica, Peter; Liu, Guoqing; Williams, Robert L.

    2001-08-01

    The Amplitude and Phase EStimation (APES) approach to amplitude spectrum estimation has been receiving considerably attention recently. We develop an extension of APES for the spectral estimation of gapped (incomplete) data and apply it to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging with angular diversity. It has recently been shown that APES minimizes a certain least-squares criterion with respect to the estimate of the spectrum. Our new algorithm is called gapped-data APES and is based on minimizing this criterion with respect to the missing data as well. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm and its applicability to SAR imaging with angular diversity.

  8. Nonspecific DNA Binding and Coordination of the First Two Steps of Base Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Michael R.; O'Brien, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway repairs a wide variety of damaged nucleobases in DNA. This pathway is initiated by a DNA repair glycosylase, which locates the site of damage and catalyzes the excision of the damaged nucleobase. The resulting abasic site is further processed by apurinic/apyrimidinic site endonuclease 1 (APE1) to create a single strand nick with the 3'-hydroxyl that serves as a primer for DNA repair synthesis. Since an abasic site is highly mutagenic it is critical that the steps of the BER pathway be coordinated. Most human glycosylases bind tightly to their abasic product. APE1 displaces the bound glycosylase, thereby stimulating multiple turnover base excision. It has been proposed that direct protein-protein interactions are involved in the stimulation by APE1, but no common interaction motifs have been identified among the glycosylases that are stimulated by APE1. We characterized the APE1 stimulation of alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) using a variety of symmetric and asymmetric lesion-containing oligonucleotides. Efficient stimulation on a wide variety of substrates favors a model whereby both AAG and APE1 can simultaneously bind to DNA, but may not interact directly. Rather, nonspecific DNA binding by both AAG and APE1 enables APE1 to replace AAG at the abasic site. AAG is not displaced into solution, but remains bound to an adjacent undamaged site. We propose that nonspecific DNA binding interactions allow transient exposure of the abasic site so that it can be captured by APE1. PMID:20701268

  9. Making Meaning out of Human/Animal: Scientific Competition of Classifications in the Spanish Legislature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Ross

    2010-01-01

    In the summer of 2008, the Spanish legislature resolved to grant great apes (though not all simians) basic human rights. While the decision to grant such rights came about largely through the lobbying efforts of the Great Ape Project (GAP), the decision has potential reverberations throughout the scientific world and beyond in its implications for…

  10. Tissue concentrations of organic contaminants in fish and their biological effects in a wastewater-dominated urban stream

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data are presented on the fish tissue concentrations of persistent organic compounds and alkylphenol and alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) in large-mouth bass collected from a waste water dominated stream in downtown Chicago. The fish residue concentrations of APEs are compared to concentrations of th...

  11. Zoo Visitor Knowledge and Attitudes toward Gorillas and Chimpanzees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukas, K. E.; Ross, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    The authors conducted an evaluation of visitor knowledge and conservation attitudes toward African apes at Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo. Using S. R. Kellert's and J. Dunlap's (1989) analysis of zoo visitor knowledge and attitudes as a model, they modified and administered a survey to 1,000 visitors to the ape facility. On average, visitors correctly…

  12. Molecular Recognition of DNA Damage Sites by Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, W. A.

    2005-07-28

    The DNA repair/redox factor AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) is a multifunctional protein which is known to to be essential for DNA repair activity in human cells. Structural/functional analyses of the APE activity is thus been an important research field to assess cellular defense mechanisms against ionizing radiation.

  13. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 induced upregulation of fibroblast growth factor 2 and its receptor 3 induces angiogenesis in human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tao; Qing, Yi; Dai, Nan; Li, Mengxia; Qian, Chengyuan; Yang, Yuxin; Cheng, Yi; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Shiheng; Zhong, Zhaoyang; Wang, Dong

    2014-02-01

    Tumor angiogenesis contributes to inferior prognosis in osteosarcoma. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and its receptor 3 (FGFR3) signaling pathway plays an important role in the angiogenic process. In this study we observed that high expression of APE1, FGF2 and FGFR3, and microvessel density are positively correlated with poor prognosis of osteosarcoma patients. Furthermore, the Cox model showed that the tumor size, FGF2 and its receptor 3 (FGFR3), and microvessel density were adverse prognostic factors. Based on our clinical data, and the fact that APE1 is involved in tumor angiogenesis, we hypothesize that it is very likely that APE1 may indirectly promote angiogenesis by upregulating fibroblast FGF2 and FGFR3. Our preliminary data show small interfering RNA-mediated silence of APE1 experiments, which further supports this hypothesis. APE1-small interfering RNA significantly inhibited tumor angiogenesis by downregulating in vitro expression of FGF2 and FGFR3 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in Matrigel tube formation assay, and further inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. Thus, the proposed APE1-FGF2 and FGFR3 pathway may provide a novel mechanism for regulation of FGF2 and FGFR3 by APE1 in tumor angiogenesis. PMID:24329908

  14. A single amino acid substitution in the DNA-binding domain of Aeropyrum pernix DNA ligase impairs its interaction with proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Kiyonari, Shinichi; Kamigochi, Toru; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2007-09-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is known as a DNA sliding clamp that acts as a platform for the assembly of enzymes involved in DNA replication and repair. Previously, it was reported that a crenarchaeal PCNA formed a heterotrimeric structure, and that each PCNA subunit has distinct binding specificity to PCNA-binding proteins. Here we describe the PCNA-binding properties of a DNA ligase from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix K1. Based on our findings on the Pyrococcus furiosus DNA ligase-PCNA interaction, we predicted that the aromatic residue, Phe132, in the DNA-binding domain of A. pernix DNA ligase (ApeLig) would play a critical role in binding to A. pernix PCNA (ApePCNA). Surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed that the ApeLig F132A mutant does not interact with an immobilized subunit of ApePCNA. Furthermore, we could not detect any stimulation of the ligation activity of the ApeLig F132A protein by ApePCNA in vitro. These results indicated that the phenylalanine, which is located in our predicted PCNA-binding region in ApeLig, has a critical role for the physical and functional interaction with ApePCNA. PMID:17487442

  15. Human metapneumovirus infection in chimpanzees, United States.

    PubMed

    Slater, Owen M; Terio, Karen A; Zhang, Yange; Erdman, Dean D; Schneider, Eileen; Kuypers, Jane M; Wolinsky, Steven M; Kunstman, Kevin J; Kunstman, Jennifer; Kinsel, Michael J; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2014-12-01

    Zoonotic disease transmission and infections are of particular concern for humans and closely related great apes. In 2009, an outbreak of human metapneumovirus infection was associated with the death of a captive chimpanzee in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Biosecurity and surveillance for this virus in captive great ape populations should be considered. PMID:25417845

  16. Occurrence of Highly-Substituted Ethoxy-Carboxylates in Runoff Waters Near an Aircraft Deicing Facility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reports documenting the occurrence of the metabolites of alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) are common. However, few data show the occurrence of the oxidative metabolite of the APEs, the carboxylates, and especially those with substitution greater than the 5 ethoxymer. An important reason for this has...

  17. Prospective Physical Education Teachers' Attitudes Toward Teaching Students with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Samuel R.

    1998-01-01

    Investigated the attitudes of prospective physical education (PE) teachers toward teaching students with disabilities, before and after matriculation in introductory adapted PE (APE) courses and with and without practicum experiences. Surveys of students from seven universities nationwide indicated that participation in APE courses, with or…

  18. The Descent of Hominoids and Hominids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilbeam, David

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the divergence of apes from the Old World monkeys and the later divergence of humans from apes. Contrasts current views with those held approximately five years ago. Topics considered include hominoid evolution, hominoid radiation, dryomorphs and ramamorphs, appearance of the first hominids, and adaptive radiation of these hominids. (JN)

  19. Elusive Rivalry? Conceptions of the Philosophy of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John

    2010-01-01

    What is analytical philosophy of education (APE)? And what has been its place in the history of the subject over the past 50 years? In a recent essay in "Ethics and Education" (Vol. 2, No. 2, October 2007) on 'Rival conceptions of the philosophy of education', Paul Standish described a number of features of APE. Relying on both historical and…

  20. Assimilation of Voices in Psychotherapy: The Case of Jan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honos-Webb, Lara; Surko, Michael; Stiles, William B.; Greenberg, Leslie S.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a marker-based method for tracking the assimilation of a previously outcast voice into the self, conceived as a community of voices. Using a qualitative assimilation analysis of a sample case, tracks two major themes, excerpts 43 passages, and rates each passage on the Assimilation of Problematic Experiences Scale (APES). APES ratings…

  1. Adapted Physical Education Teachers' Concerns in Teaching Students with Disabilities in an Urban Public School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Samuel R.; Akuffo, Patrick B.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not adapted physical education (APE) teachers had job-related concerns associated with teaching students with disabilities in an urban public school district. The participants were six experienced, itinerant APE teachers, who taught in urban public schools in a midwestern state in the United…

  2. Roles and Responsibilities of Adapted Physical Education Teachers in an Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akuffo, Patrick B.; Hodge, Samuel R.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the roles and responsibilities of itinerant adapted physical education (APE) teachers at urban public schools. A second purpose is to determine how they execute their roles and responsibilities. Participants include six women with experience as itinerant APE teachers from the same urban school district. The…

  3. Teaching the Self-Contained Adapted Physical Education Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Martin E.; Taliaferro, Andrea; Campbell, Amanda Love; Harris, Natasha; Tipton, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide information to general physical education teachers on how to conduct a self-contained adapted physical education (APE) class. The article begins with an example of a traditional model for a self-contained APE class, where all students work on the same goals using basically the same equipment and…

  4. Commentary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Comments on Gauvain's discussion, in this issue, of the development of thinking from a sociocultural perspective, expanding her analysis by comparing research on apes who have developed in natural habitats with apes raised by humans in something resembling a human culture. Argues that the study of nonhuman primates can contribute to the emerging…

  5. Leveling the Playing Field: Adapted PE Brings Together Kids with and without Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarrett, Denise

    2000-01-01

    Adapted physical education (APE) makes whatever adjustments are needed to allow students with disabilities to participate in regular physical education classes. APE at Beaverton School District (Oregon) is described, as well as the individualized special physical education classes provided to children with severe disabilities. (SV)

  6. Quantitative Analysis of the Adapted Physical Education Employment Market in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jiabei

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the employment market of adapted physical education (APE) careers in higher education since 1975 to see if the increase of this market has continued since 1998. Based on the data collected from the "Chronicle of Higher Education", a total of 887 APE job openings have been posted since 1975, including about…

  7. Adapted Physical Education Service Approaches and the Effects on the Perceived Efficacy Beliefs of General Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umhoefer, Donna L.; Vargas, Tiffanye M.; Beyer, Robbi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what effect the type of APE service approach had on GPE teachers' efficacy when working with students with disabilities. The three approaches of APE service delivery chosen for the study were (a) consultation, (b) itinerant, and (c) collaborative. Results indicate significant differences between levels of…

  8. The diagnostic dilemma of pathological appearance and performance enhancing drug use.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, Tom; Lai, Justine K; Langenbucher, James W; Schneider, Melanie; Yehuda, Rachel; Pfaff, Donald W

    2011-03-01

    Appearance and performance enhancing drug (APED) use includes the use of a range of pharmacologically distinct substances and concurrent investment in outward appearance or achievement, dietary control, and frequent exercise. A number of existing reviews and conceptual papers have defined pathological forms of APED use within the APED class of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and using the framework of AAS dependence. We review published data on APED use including human studies of AAS users and identified three defining phenomenological features associated with increased health risk and pathology. These features included (1) polypharmacy or the concurrent use of several pharmacologically distinct substances used to change outward appearance or increase likelihood of personal achievement; (2) significant body image disturbance; (3) rigid practices and preoccupations with diet and exercise. Investigations into the latent structure of APED use suggest these features cluster together in a homogenous group of APED users who have the highest health risk and most psychopathology. These features are discussed in the context of AAS dependence and problems with defining classic tolerance-withdrawal symptoms among APED users. Suggestions for a resolution and outline for future research needed to determine the best system for identifying and diagnosing pathological APED use are discussed. PMID:21115306

  9. The Diagnostic Dilemma of Pathological Appearance and Performance Enhancing Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Tom; Lai, Justine K.; Langenbucher, James W.; Schneider, Melanie; Yehuda, Rachel; Pfaff, Donald W.

    2010-01-01

    Appearance and performance enhancing drug (APED) use includes the use of a range of pharmacologically distinct substances and concurrent investment in outward appearance or achievement, dietary control, and frequent exercise. A number of existing reviews and conceptual papers have defined pathological forms of APED use within the APED class of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and using the framework of AAS dependence. We review published data on APED use including human studies of AAS users and identified three defining phenomenological features associated with increased health risk and pathology. These features included (1) polypharmacy or the concurrent use of several pharmacologically distinct substances used to change outward appearance or increase likelihood of personal achievement; (2) significant body image disturbance; (3) rigid practices and preoccupations with diet and exercise. Investigations into the latent structure of APED use suggest these features cluster together in a homogenous group of APED users who have the highest health risk and most psychopathology. These features are discussed in the context of AAS dependence and problems with defining classic tolerance-withdrawal symptoms among APED users. Suggestions for a resolution and outline for future research needed to determine the best system for identifying and diagnosing pathological APED use are discussed. PMID:21115306

  10. Human Metapneumovirus Infection in Chimpanzees, United States

    PubMed Central

    Terio, Karen A.; Zhang, Yange; Erdman, Dean D.; Schneider, Eileen; Kuypers, Jane M.; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Kunstman, Kevin J.; Kunstman, Jennifer; Kinsel, Michael J.; Gamble, Kathryn C.

    2014-01-01

    Zoonotic disease transmission and infections are of particular concern for humans and closely related great apes. In 2009, an outbreak of human metapneumovirus infection was associated with the death of a captive chimpanzee in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Biosecurity and surveillance for this virus in captive great ape populations should be considered. PMID:25417845

  11. Commentary: is Alzheimer's disease uniquely human?

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Caleb E.; Austad, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    That Alzheimer's disease (AD) might be a human-specific disease was hypothesized by Rapoport in 1989. Apes and humans share an identical amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide amino acid sequence and accumulate considerable Aβ deposits after age 40 years, an age when amyloid plaques are uncommon in humans. Despite their early Aβ buildup, ape brains have not shown evidence dystrophic neurites near plaques. Aging great ape brains also have few neurofibrillary tangles, with one exception of 1 obese chimpanzee euthanized after a stroke who displayed abundant neurofibrillary tangles, but without the typical AD distribution. We discuss the need for more exacting evaluation of neuron density with age, and note husbandry issues that may allow great apes to live to greater ages. We remain reserved about expectations for fully developed AD-like pathology in the great apes of advanced ages and cautiously support Rapoport's hypothesis. PMID:25533426

  12. Quantitative three-dimensional shape analysis of the proximal hallucial metatarsal articular surface in Homo, Pan, Gorilla, and Hylobates.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Daniel J; Broadfield, Douglas; Proctor, Kristopher

    2008-02-01

    Multidimensional morphometrics is used to compare the proximal articular surface of the first metatarsal between Homo, Pan, Gorilla, Hylobates, and the hominin fossils A.L. 333-54 (A. afarensis), SKX 5017 (P. robustus), and OH 8 (H. habilis). Statistically significant differences in articular surface morphology exist between H. sapiens and the apes, and between ape groups. Ape groups are characterized by greater surface depth, an obliquely curved articular surface through the dorso-lateral and medio-plantar regions, and a wider medio-lateral surface relative to the dorso-plantar height. The OH 8 articular surface is indistinguishable from H. sapiens, while A.L. 333-54 and SKX 5017 more closely resemble the apes. P. robustus and A. afarensis exhibit ape-like oblique curvature of the articular surface. PMID:18046775

  13. Development and Validation of the Appearance and Performance Enhancing Drug Use Schedule

    PubMed Central

    Langenbucher, James W.; Lai, Justine Karmin; Loeb, Katharine L.; Hollander, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Appearance-and-performance enhancing drug (APED) use is a form of drug use that includes use of a wide range of substances such as anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and associated behaviors including intense exercise and dietary control. To date, there are no reliable or valid measures of the core features of APED use. The present study describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the Appearance and Performance Enhancing Drug Use Schedule (APEDUS) which is a semi-structured interview designed to assess the spectrum of drug use and related features of APED use. Eighty-five current APED using men and women (having used an illicit APED in the past year and planning to use an illicit APED in the future) completed the APEDUS and measures of convergent and divergent validity. Inter-rater agreement, scale reliability, one-week test-retest reliability, convergent and divergent validity, and construct validity were evaluated for each of the APEDUS scales. The APEDUS is a modular interview with 10 sections designed to assess the core drug and non-drug phenomena associated with APED use. All scales and individual items demonstrated high inter-rater agreement and reliability. Individual scales significantly correlated with convergent measures (DSM-IV diagnoses, aggression, impulsivity, eating disorder pathology) and were uncorrelated with a measure of social desirability. APEDUS subscale scores were also accurate measures of AAS dependence. The APEDUS is a reliable and valid measure of APED phenomena and an accurate measure of the core pathology associated with APED use. Issues with assessing APED use are considered and future research considered. PMID:21640487

  14. Downregulation of the DNA repair enzyme apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 stimulates transforming growth factor-β1 production and promotes actin rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Yasui, Hironobu; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-05-22

    The DNA repair enzyme apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) plays a central role in base excision repair and functions as a reductive activator of various transcription factors. Multiple other functionalities have been ascribed to APE1 in addition to these major functions. A recent study showed that APE1 knockdown upregulated the expression of a set of genes related to extracellular matrix (ECM) production, indicating an additional novel biological role for this enzyme. Based on this finding, we have investigated the effect of APE1 downregulation on ECM-related gene expression and its biological consequences. Endogenous APE1 expression was downregulated in human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells and human lung carcinoma A549 cells using siRNA. When the expression of six ECM-related genes (TGFB1, LAMC1, FN1, COL1A1, COL3A1, and COL4A1) was evaluated, we found that APE1 knockdown upregulated the expression of TGFB1 in both cell lines. APE1 downregulation promoted actin rearrangement, inducing F-actin accumulation in HeLa cells and the dissipation of stress fibers in A549 cells. We also discovered that APE1 knockdown enhanced cellular motility in A549 cells, which was suppressed by the inhibition of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signaling. These results suggested that APE1 controls the organization of actin cytoskeleton through the regulation of TGF-β1 expression, providing novel insights into the biological significance of APE1. PMID:25858321

  15. Regulation of Rac1 and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Response to Infection of Gastrointestinal Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ablack, Amber; Hall, Emily H.; Butcher, Lindsay D.; Bhattacharyya, Asima; Eckmann, Lars; Harris, Paul R.; Das, Soumita; Ernst, Peter B.; Crowe, Sheila E.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during infection is an immediate host defense leading to microbial killing. APE1 is a multifunctional protein induced by ROS and after induction, protects against ROS-mediated DNA damage. Rac1 and NAPDH oxidase (Nox1) are important contributors of ROS generation following infection and associated with gastrointestinal epithelial injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if APE1 regulates the function of Rac1 and Nox1 during oxidative stress. Gastric or colonic epithelial cells (wild-type or with suppressed APE1) were infected with Helicobacter pylori or Salmonella enterica and assessed for Rac1 and NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production. Rac1 and APE1 interactions were measured by co-immunoprecipitation, confocal microscopy and proximity ligation assay (PLA) in cell lines or in biopsy specimens. Significantly greater levels of ROS were produced by APE1-deficient human gastric and colonic cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells compared to control cells after infection with either gastric or enteric pathogens. H. pylori activated Rac1 and Nox1 in all cell types, but activation was higher in APE1 suppressed cells. APE1 overexpression decreased H. pylori-induced ROS generation, Rac1 activation, and Nox1 expression. We determined that the effects of APE1 were mediated through its N-terminal lysine residues interacting with Rac1, leading to inhibition of Nox1 expression and ROS generation. APE1 is a negative regulator of oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal epithelium during bacterial infection by modulating Rac1 and Nox1. Our results implicate APE1 in novel molecular interactions that regulate early stress responses elicited by microbial infections. PMID:26761793

  16. A murine AP-endonuclease gene-targeted deficiency with post-implantation embryonic progression and ionizing radiation sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, D L; MacInnes, M A; Takiguchi, Y; Purtymun, P E; Henrie, M; Flannery, M; Meneses, J; Pedersen, R A; Chen, D J

    1998-10-21

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (here designated APE/REF) carries out repair incision at abasic or single-strand break damages in mammals. This multifunctional protein also has putative role(s) as a cysteine 'reducing factor' (REF) in cell-stress transcriptional responses. To assess the significance of APE/REF for embryonic teratogenesis we constructed a more precisely targeted Ape/Ref-deficient genotype in mice. Ape/Ref gene replacement in ES cells eliminated the potential of APE/REF protein synthesis while retaining the Ape/Ref bi-directional promoter that avoided potential inactivation of an upstream gene. Chimeric animals crossed into Tac:N:NIHS-BC produced germline transmission. Homozygous null Ape/Ref-embryos exhibited successful implantation and nearly normal developmental progression until embryonic day 7.5 followed by morphogenetic failure and adsorption of embryos by day 9.5. We characterized the cellular events proceeding to embryonic lethality and examined ionizing radiation sensitivity of pre-implantation Ape/Ref-null embryos. After intermating of heterozygotes, Mendelian numbers of putative Ape/Ref-null progeny embryos at day 6.5 displayed a several-fold elevation of pycnotic, fragmenting cell nuclei within the embryo proper-the epiblast. Increased cell-nucleus degeneration occurred within epiblast cells while mitosis continued and before obvious morphogenetic disruption. Mitogenic response to epiblast cell death, if any, was ineffective for replacement of lost cells. Extra-embryonic yolk sac, a trophectoderm derived lineage retained normal appearance to day 9. Explanted homozygous Ape/Ref-null blastocysts displayed increased sensitivity to gamma-irradiation, most likely a manifestation of APE/REF incision defect. Our study establishes that this new Ape/Ref deficiency genotype is definitely capable of post-implantation developmental progression to the onset of gastrulation. Function(s) of APE/REF in base damage incision and also conceivably in

  17. Crystallization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae aminopeptidase 1, the major cargo protein of the Cvt pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Wakana; Suzuki, Nobuo N.; Fujioka, Yuko; Suzuki, Kuninori; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Aminopeptidase 1, a cargo protein in the cytosol-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway, was expressed, purified and crystallized in two crystal forms. The vacuole hydrolase aminopeptidase 1 (Ape1) is a cargo protein transported to the vacuole by the cytosol-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway during conditions of growth and by autophagy during conditions of starvation. After transport to the vacuole, Ape1 is processed into mature Ape1 (mApe1). mApe1 has been expressed, purified and crystallized in two crystal forms. Form I belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 120.6, b = 219.5, c = 133.1 Å, β = 116.5°. Form II belongs to space group R3, with unit-cell parameters a = 141.2, c = 349.4 Å. Diffraction data were collected from these crystals to a resolution of 2.5 Å for form I and 1.83 Å for form II. Self-rotation functions and the volume-to-weight ratio values suggest that forms I and II contain 12 and four mApe1 molecules per asymmetric unit, respectively, and that mApe1 exists as a tetrahedral dodecamer in both crystal forms.

  18. Human AP Endonuclease 1: A Potential Marker for the Prediction of Environmental Carcinogenesis Risk

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Sung; Kim, Hye Lim; Kim, Yeo Jin; Weon, Jong-Il; Sung, Mi-Kyung; Chung, Hai Won; Seo, Young Rok

    2014-01-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) functions mainly in DNA repair as an enzyme removing AP sites and in redox signaling as a coactivator of various transcription factors. Based on these multifunctions of APE1 within cells, numerous studies have reported that the alteration of APE1 could be a crucial factor in development of human diseases such as cancer and neurodegeneration. In fact, the study on the combination of an individual's genetic make-up with environmental factors (gene-environment interaction) is of great importance to understand the development of diseases, especially lethal diseases including cancer. Recent reports have suggested that the human carcinogenic risk following exposure to environmental toxicants is affected by APE1 alterations in terms of gene-environment interactions. In this review, we initially outline the critical APE1 functions in the various intracellular mechanisms including DNA repair and redox regulation and its roles in human diseases. Several findings demonstrate that the change in expression and activity as well as genetic variability of APE1 caused by environmental chemical (e.g., heavy metals and cigarette smoke) and physical carcinogens (ultraviolet and ionizing radiation) is likely associated with various cancers. These enable us to ultimately suggest APE1 as a vital marker for the prediction of environmental carcinogenesis risk. PMID:25243052

  19. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 regulates angiogenesis in a transforming growth factor β-dependent manner in human osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuan; Shan, Jinlu; Dai, Nan; Zhong, Zhaoyang; Qing, Yi; Yang, Yuxing; Zhang, Shiheng; Li, Chongyi; Sui, Jiangdong; Ren, Tao; Li, Mengxia; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis and has been reported to be inversely correlated with overall survival of osteosarcoma patients. It has been shown that apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), a dually functional protein possessing both base excision repair and redox activities, is involved in tumor angiogenesis, although these mechanisms are not fully understood. Our previous study showed that the expression of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) was significantly reduced in APE1-deficient osteosarcoma cells. Transforming growth factor β promotes cancer metastasis through various mechanisms including immunosuppression, angiogenesis, and invasion. In the current study, we initially revealed that APE1, TGFβ, and microvessel density (MVD) have pairwise correlation in osteosarcoma tissue samples, whereas TGFβ, tumor size, and MVD were inversely related to the prognosis of the cohort. We found that knocking down APE1 in osteosarcoma cells resulted in TGFβ downregulation. In addition, APE1-siRNA led to suppression of angiogenesis in vitro based on HUVECs in Transwell and Matrigel tube formation assays. Reduced secretory protein level of TGFβ of culture medium also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of Smad3 of HUVECs. In a mouse xenograft model, siRNA-mediated silencing of APE1 downregulated TGFβ expression, tumor size, and MVD. Collectively, the current evidence indicates that APE1 regulates angiogenesis in osteosarcoma by controlling the TGFβ pathway, suggesting a novel target for anti-angiogenesis therapy in human osteosarcoma. PMID:26250694

  20. Slow base excision by human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase limits the rate of formation of AP sites and AP endonuclease 1 does not stimulate base excision.

    PubMed

    Maher, Robyn L; Vallur, Aarthy C; Feller, Joyce A; Bloom, Linda B

    2007-01-01

    The base excision repair pathway removes damaged DNA bases and resynthesizes DNA to replace the damage. Human alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) is one of several damage-specific DNA glycosylases that recognizes and excises damaged DNA bases. AAG removes primarily damaged adenine residues. Human AP endonuclease 1 (APE1) recognizes AP sites produced by DNA glycosylases and incises the phophodiester bond 5' to the damaged site. The repair process is completed by a DNA polymerase and DNA ligase. If not tightly coordinated, base excision repair could generate intermediates that are more deleterious to the cell than the initial DNA damage. The kinetics of AAG-catalyzed excision of two damaged bases, hypoxanthine and 1,N6-ethenoadenine, were measured in the presence and absence of APE1 to investigate the mechanism by which the base excision activity of AAG is coordinated with the AP incision activity of APE1. 1,N6-ethenoadenine is excised significantly slower than hypoxanthine and the rate of excision is not affected by APE1. The excision of hypoxanthine is inhibited to a small degree by accumulated product, and APE1 stimulates multiple turnovers by alleviating product inhibition. These results show that APE1 does not significantly affect the kinetics of base excision by AAG. It is likely that slow excision by AAG limits the rate of AP site formation in vivo such that AP sites are not created faster than can be processed by APE1. PMID:17018265