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Sample records for apicomplexan transcriptional regulons

  1. Novel Transcriptional Regulons for Autotrophic Cycle Genes in Crenarchaeota

    PubMed Central

    Leyn, Semen A.; Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autotrophic microorganisms are able to utilize carbon dioxide as their only carbon source, or, alternatively, many of them can grow heterotrophically on organics. Different variants of autotrophic pathways have been identified in various lineages of the phylum Crenarchaeota. Aerobic members of the order Sulfolobales utilize the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate cycle (HHC) to fix inorganic carbon, whereas anaerobic Thermoproteales use the dicarboxylate-hydroxybutyrate cycle (DHC). Knowledge of transcriptional regulation of autotrophic pathways in Archaea is limited. We applied a comparative genomics approach to predict novel autotrophic regulons in the Crenarchaeota. We report identification of two novel DNA motifs associated with the autotrophic pathway genes in the Sulfolobales (HHC box) and Thermoproteales (DHC box). Based on genome context evidence, the HHC box regulon was attributed to a novel transcription factor from the TrmB family named HhcR. Orthologs of HhcR are present in all Sulfolobales genomes but were not found in other lineages. A predicted HHC box regulatory motif was confirmed by in vitro binding assays with the recombinant HhcR protein from Metallosphaera yellowstonensis. For the DHC box regulon, we assigned a different potential regulator, named DhcR, which is restricted to the order Thermoproteales. DhcR in Thermoproteus neutrophilus (Tneu_0751) was previously identified as a DNA-binding protein with high affinity for the promoter regions of two autotrophic operons. The global HhcR and DhcR regulons reconstructed by comparative genomics were reconciled with available omics data in Metallosphaera and Thermoproteus spp. The identified regulons constitute two novel mechanisms for transcriptional control of autotrophic pathways in the Crenarchaeota. IMPORTANCE Little is known about transcriptional regulation of carbon dioxide fixation pathways in Archaea. We previously applied the comparative genomics approach for reconstruction of DtxR family regulons in diverse lineages of Archaea. Here, we utilize similar computational approaches to identify novel regulatory motifs for genes that are autotrophically induced in microorganisms from two lineages of Crenarchaeota and to reconstruct the respective regulons. The predicted novel regulons in archaeal genomes control the majority of autotrophic pathway genes and also other carbon and energy metabolism genes. The HhcR regulon was experimentally validated by DNA-binding assays in Metallosphaera spp. Novel regulons described for the first time in this work provide a basis for understanding the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of autotrophic pathways in Archaea. PMID:25939834

  2. Regulons of global transcription factors in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Koichi; Inui, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a high GC content gram-positive soil bacterium in Actinobacteria, has been used for the industrial production of amino acids and engineered to produce various compounds, including polymer building blocks and biofuels. Since its genome sequence was first published, its versatile metabolic pathways and their genetic components and regulatory mechanisms have been extensively studied. Previous studies on transcriptional factors, including two-component systems and σ factors, in the bacterium have revealed transcriptional regulatory links among the metabolic pathways and those among the stress response systems, forming a complex transcriptional regulatory network. The regulatory links are based on knowledge of the transcription factors, such as their target genes (regulons), DNA sequence motifs for recognition, and effector molecules controlling their activities, all of which are fundamental for understanding their physiological functions. Recent advances in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-based genome-wide analyses provide an opportunity to comprehensively identify the transcription factor regulon, composed of its direct target genes, and its precise consensus binding motif. A common feature among the regulon constituents may provide clues to identify an effector molecule targeting the factor. In this mini-review, we summarize the current knowledge of the regulons of the C. glutamicum transcription factors that have been analyzed via ChIP-based technologies. The regulons consisting of direct target genes revealed new physiological roles of the transcription factors and new regulatory interactions, contributing to refinement and expansion of the transcriptional regulatory network and the development of guidelines and genetic tools for metabolic engineering of C. glutamicum. PMID:26496920

  3. Post-transcriptional RNA Regulons Affecting Cell Cycle and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Blackinton, Jeff G.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular growth cycle is initiated and maintained by punctual, yet agile, regulatory events involving modifications of cell cycle proteins as well as coordinated gene expression to support cyclic checkpoint decisions. Recent evidence indicates that post-transcriptional partitioning of messenger RNA subsets by RNA-binding proteins help physically localize, temporally coordinate, and efficiently translate cell cycle proteins. This dynamic organization of mRNAs encoding cell cycle components contributes to the overall economy of the cell cycle consistent with the post-transcriptional RNA regulon model of gene expression. This review examines several recent studies demonstrating the coordination of mRNA subsets encoding cell cycle proteins during nuclear export and subsequent coupling to protein synthesis, and discusses evidence for mRNA coordination of p53 targets and the DNA damage response pathway. We consider how these observations may connect to upstream and downstream post-transcriptional coordination and coupling of splicing, export, localization, and translation. Published examples from yeast, nematode, insect, and mammalian systems are discussed, and we consider genetic evidence supporting the conclusion that dysregulation of RNA regulons may promote pathogenic states of growth such as carcinogenesis. PMID:24882724

  4. Comparative genomics and evolution of regulons of the LacI-family transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Khoroshkin, Matvei S.; Laikova, Olga N.; Tsoy, Olga V.; Sernova, Natalia V.; Petrova, Svetlana A.; Rakhmaninova, Aleksandra B.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) are essential components of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. LacI-family TFs (LacI-TFs) are broadly distributed among certain lineages of bacteria. The majority of characterized LacI-TFs sense sugar effectors and regulate carbohydrate utilization genes. The comparative genomics approaches enable in silico identification of TF-binding sites and regulon reconstruction. To study the function and evolution of LacI-TFs, we performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of their regulons. For over 1300 LacI-TFs from over 270 bacterial genomes, we predicted their cognate DNA-binding motifs and identified target genes. Using the genome context and metabolic subsystem analyses of reconstructed regulons, we tentatively assigned functional roles and predicted candidate effectors for 78 and 67% of the analyzed LacI-TFs, respectively. Nearly 90% of the studied LacI-TFs are local regulators of sugar utilization pathways, whereas the remaining 125 global regulators control large and diverse sets of metabolic genes. The global LacI-TFs include the previously known regulators CcpA in Firmicutes, FruR in Enterobacteria, and PurR in Gammaproteobacteria, as well as the three novel regulators—GluR, GapR, and PckR—that are predicted to control the central carbohydrate metabolism in three lineages of Alphaproteobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis of regulators combined with the reconstructed regulons provides a model of evolutionary diversification of the LacI protein family. The obtained genomic collection of in silico reconstructed LacI-TF regulons in bacteria is available in the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov). It provides a framework for future structural and functional classification of the LacI protein family and identification of molecular determinants of the DNA and ligand specificity. The inferred regulons can be also used for functional gene annotation and reconstruction of sugar catabolic networks in diverse bacterial lineages. PMID:24966856

  5. Reconstruction of Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory networks via regulon-based associations

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Hossein; Sangurdekar, Dipen; Srivastava, Poonam; Kaveh, Mostafa; Khodursky, Arkady

    2009-01-01

    Background Network reconstruction methods that rely on covariance of expression of transcription regulators and their targets ignore the fact that transcription of regulators and their targets can be controlled differently and/or independently. Such oversight would result in many erroneous predictions. However, accurate prediction of gene regulatory interactions can be made possible through modeling and estimation of transcriptional activity of groups of co-regulated genes. Results Incomplete regulatory connectivity and expression data are used here to construct a consensus network of transcriptional regulation in Escherichia coli (E. coli). The network is updated via a covariance model describing the activity of gene sets controlled by common regulators. The proposed model-selection algorithm was used to annotate the likeliest regulatory interactions in E. coli on the basis of two independent sets of expression data, each containing many microarray experiments under a variety of conditions. The key regulatory predictions have been verified by an experiment and literature survey. In addition, the estimated activity profiles of transcription factors were used to describe their responses to environmental and genetic perturbations as well as drug treatments. Conclusion Information about transcriptional activity of documented co-regulated genes (a core regulon) should be sufficient for discovering new target genes, whose transcriptional activities significantly co-vary with the activity of the core regulon members. Our ability to derive a highly significant consensus network by applying the regulon-based approach to two very different data sets demonstrated the efficiency of this strategy. We believe that this approach can be used to reconstruct gene regulatory networks of other organisms for which partial sets of known interactions are available. PMID:19366454

  6. Transcriptional and functional analysis of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae fur regulon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To ensure survival in the host, bacteria have evolved strategies to acquire the essential element iron. In Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the ferric uptake regulator senses intracellular iron stores and acting as a repressor, directly regulates transcription of iron-responsive genes by binding to a conserve...

  7. Identification of the CRP regulon using in vitro and in vivo transcriptional profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dongling; Constantinidou, Chrystala; Hobman, Jon L.; Minchin, Stephen D.

    2004-01-01

    The Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) is a global regulator that controls transcription initiation from more than 100 promoters by binding to a specific DNA sequence within cognate promoters. Many genes in the CRP regulon have been predicted simply based on the presence of DNA-binding sites within gene promoters. In this study, we have exploited a newly developed technique, run-off transcription/microarray analysis (ROMA) to define CRP-regulated promoters. Using ROMA, we identified 176 operons that were activated by CRP in vitro and 16 operons that were repressed. Using positive control mutants in different regions of CRP, we were able to classify the different promoters into class I or class II/III. A total of 104 operons were predicted to contain Class II CRP-binding sites. Sequence analysis of the operons that were repressed by CRP revealed different mechanisms for CRP inhibition. In contrast, the in vivo transcriptional profiles failed to identify most CRP-dependent regulation because of the complexity of the regulatory network. Analysis of these operons supports the hypothesis that CRP is not only a regulator of genes required for catabolism of sugars other than glucose, but also regulates the expression of a large number of other genes in E.coli. ROMA has revealed 152 hitherto unknown CRP regulons. PMID:15520470

  8. Global transcriptional and proteomic analysis of the Sig1 heat shock regulon of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Amy K; Howell, Heather A; Battista, John R; Peterson, Scott N; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2005-05-01

    The sig1 gene, predicted to encode an extracytoplasmic function-type heat shock sigma factor of Deinococcus radiodurans, has been shown to play a central role in the positive regulation of the heat shock operons groESL and dnaKJ. To determine if Sig1 is required for the regulation of additional heat shock genes, we monitored the global transcriptional and proteomic profiles of a D. radiodurans R1 sig1 mutant and wild-type cells in response to elevated temperature stress. Thirty-one gene products were identified that showed heat shock induction in the wild type but not in the sig1 mutant. Quantitative real-time PCR experiments verified the transcriptional requirement of Sig1 for the heat shock induction of the mRNA of five of these genes-dnaK, groES, DR1314, pspA, and hsp20. hsp20 appears to encode a new member of the small heat shock protein superfamily, DR1314 is predicted to encode a hypothetical protein with no recognizable orthologs, and pspA is predicted to encode a protein involved in maintenance of membrane integrity. Deletion mutation analysis demonstrated the importance in heat shock protection of hsp20 and DR1314. The promoters of dnaKJE, groESL, DR1314, pspA, and hsp20 were mapped and, combined with computer-based pattern searches of the upstream regions of the 26 other Sig1 regulon members, these results suggested that Sig1 might recognize both sigma70-type and sigma(W)-type promoter consensus sequences. These results expand the D. radiodurans Sig1 heat shock regulon to include 31 potential new members, including not only factors with cytoplasmic functions, such as groES and dnaK, but also those with extracytoplasmic functions, like pspA. PMID:15866918

  9. Transcriptome analysis of differentiating trypanosomes reveals the existence of multiple post-transcriptional regulons

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Rafael; Benz, Corinna; Fellenberg, Kurt; Hoheisel, Jrg D; Clayton, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Background Trypanosome gene expression is regulated almost exclusively at the post-transcriptional level, with mRNA degradation playing a decisive role. When trypanosomes are transferred from the blood of a mammal to the midgut of a Tsetse fly, they transform to procyclic forms: gene expression is reprogrammed, changing the cell surface and switching the mode of energy metabolism. Within the blood, trypanosomes can pre-adapt for Tsetse transmission, becoming growth-arrested stumpy forms. We describe here the transitions in gene expression that occur during differentiation of in-vitro cultured bloodstream forms to procyclic forms. Results Some mRNAs showed changes within 30 min of cis-aconitate addition, whereas others responded 12-24 hours later. For the first 12 h after addition of cis-aconitate, cells accumulated at the G1 phase of the cell cycle, and showed decreases in mRNAs required for proliferation, mimicking the changes seen in stumpy forms: many mRNAs needed for ribosomal and flagellar biogenesis showed striking co-regulation. Other mRNAs encoding components of signal transduction pathways and potential regulators were specifically induced only during differentiation. Messenger RNAs encoding proteins required for individual metabolic pathways were often co-regulated. Conclusion Trypanosome genes form post-transcriptional regulons in which mRNAs with functions in particular pathways, or encoding components of protein complexes, show almost identical patterns of regulation. PMID:19857263

  10. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiles during Temperature and Oxidative Stress Reveal Coordinated Expression Patterns and Overlapping Regulons in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Dheeraj; Madhyastha, Dinesh A.; Grover, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Genome wide transcriptional changes by cold stress, heat stress and oxidative stress in rice seedlings were analyzed. Heat stress resulted in predominant changes in transcripts of heat shock protein and heat shock transcription factor genes, as well as genes associated with synthesis of scavengers of reactive oxygen species and genes that control the level of sugars, metabolites and auxins. Cold stress treatment caused differential expression of transcripts of various transcription factors including desiccation response element binding proteins and different kinases. Transcripts of genes that are part of calcium signaling, reactive oxygen scavenging and diverse metabolic reactions were differentially expressed during cold stress. Oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide treatment, resulted in significant up-regulation in transcript levels of genes related to redox homeostasis and down-regulation of transporter proteins. ROS homeostasis appeared to play central role in response to temperature extremes. The key transcription factors that may underlie the concerted transcriptional changes of specific components in various signal transduction networks involved are highlighted. Co-ordinated expression pattern and promoter architectures based analysis (promoter models and overrepresented transcription factor binding sites) suggested potential regulons involved in stress responses. A considerable overlap was noted at the level of transcription as well as in regulatory modules of differentially expressed genes. PMID:22815860

  11. The Cryptosporidium parvum ApiAP2 gene family: insights into the evolution of apicomplexan AP2 regulatory systems

    PubMed Central

    Oberstaller, Jenna; Pumpalova, Yoanna; Schieler, Ariel; Llins, Manuel; Kissinger, Jessica C.

    2014-01-01

    We provide the first comprehensive analysis of any transcription factor family in Cryptosporidium, a basal-branching apicomplexan that is the second leading cause of infant diarrhea globally. AP2 domain-containing proteins have evolved to be the major regulatory family in the phylum to the exclusion of canonical regulators. We show that apicomplexan and perkinsid AP2 domains cluster distinctly from other chromalveolate AP2s. Protein-binding specificity assays of C. parvum AP2 domains combined with motif conservation upstream of co-regulated gene clusters allowed the construction of putative AP2 regulons across the in vitro life cycle. Orthologous Apicomplexan AP2 (ApiAP2) expression has been rearranged relative to the malaria parasite P. falciparum, suggesting ApiAP2 network rewiring during evolution. C. hominis orthologs of putative C. parvum ApiAP2 proteins and target genes show greater than average variation. C. parvum AP2 domains display reduced binding diversity relative to P. falciparum, with multiple domains binding the 5?-TGCAT-3?, 5?-CACACA-3? and G-box motifs (5?-G[T/C]GGGG-3?). Many overrepresented motifs in C. parvum upstream regions are not AP2 binding motifs. We propose that C. parvum is less reliant on ApiAP2 regulators in part because it utilizes E2F/DP1 transcription factors. C. parvum may provide clues to the ancestral state of apicomplexan transcriptional regulation, pre-AP2 domination. PMID:24957599

  12. Defining the Bacillus subtilis sigma(W) regulon: a comparative analysis of promoter consensus search, run-off transcription/macroarray analysis (ROMA), and transcriptional profiling approaches.

    PubMed

    Cao, Min; Kobel, Phil A; Morshedi, Maud M; Wu, Ming Fang Winston; Paddon, Chris; Helmann, John D

    2002-02-22

    The Bacillus subtilis extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor sigma(W) controls a large regulon that is strongly induced by alkali shock. To define the physiological role of sigma(W) we have sought to identify the complete set of genes under sigma(W) control. Previously, we described a promoter consensus search procedure to identify sigma(W) controlled genes. Herein, we introduce a novel method to identify additional target promoters: run-off transcription followed by macroarray analysis (ROMA). We compare the resulting list of targets with those identified in conventional transcriptional profiling studies and using the consensus search approach. While transcriptional profiling identifies genes that are strongly dependent on sigma(W) for in vivo expression, some sigma(W)-dependent promoters are not detected due to the masking effects of other promoter elements, overlapping recognition with other ECF sigma factors, or both. Taken together, the consensus search, ROMA, and transcriptional profiling approaches establish a minimum of 30 promoter sites (controlling approximately 60 genes) as direct targets for activation by sigma(W). Significantly, no single approach identifies more than approximately 80% of the regulon so defined. We therefore suggest that a combination of two or more complementary approaches be employed in studies seeking to achieve maximal coverage when defining bacterial regulons. Our results indicate that sigma(W) controls genes that protect the cell against agents that impair cell wall biosynthesis but fail to reveal any connection to operons likely to function in adaptation to alkaline growth conditions. This is consistent with the observation that a sigW mutant is unaffected in its ability to survive alkali shock. We conclude that in B. subtilis sudden imposition of alkali stress activates the sigma(W) stress response, perhaps by impairing the ability of the cell wall biosynthetic machinery to function. PMID:11866510

  13. Cell division in apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Francia, Maria E; Striepen, Boris

    2014-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum are important human pathogens. These parasites and many of their apicomplexan relatives undergo a complex developmental process in the cells of their hosts, which includes genome replication, cell division and the assembly of new invasive stages. Apicomplexan cell cycle progression is both globally and locally regulated. Global regulation is carried out throughout the cytoplasm by diffusible factors that include cell cycle-specific kinases, cyclins and transcription factors. Local regulation acts on individual nuclei and daughter cells that are developing inside the mother cell. We propose that the centrosome is a master regulator that physically tethers cellular components and that provides spatial and temporal control of apicomplexan cell division. PMID:24384598

  14. Alternative splicing mechanisms orchestrating post-transcriptional gene expression: intron retention and the intron-rich genome of apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, Matteo; Spano, Furio; Magini, Alessandro; Emiliani, Carla; Carruthers, Vern B; Di Cristina, Manlio

    2016-02-01

    Apicomplexan parasites including Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium species have complex life cycles that include multiple hosts and differentiation through several morphologically distinct stages requiring marked changes in gene expression. This review highlights emerging evidence implicating regulation of mRNA splicing as a mechanism to prime these parasites for rapid gene expression upon differentiation. We summarize the most important insights in alternative splicing including its role in regulating gene expression by decreasing mRNA abundance via 'Regulated Unproductive Splicing and Translation'. As a related but less well-understood mechanism, we discuss also our recent work suggesting a role for intron retention for precluding translation of stage specific isoforms of T. gondii glycolytic enzymes. We additionally provide new evidence that intron retention might be a widespread mechanism during parasite differentiation. Supporting this notion, recent genome-wide analysis of Toxoplasma and Plasmodium suggests intron retention is more pervasive than heretofore thought. These findings parallel recent emergence of intron retention being more prevalent in mammals than previously believed, thereby adding to the established roles in plants, fungi and unicellular eukaryotes. Deeper mechanistic studies of intron retention will provide important insight into its role in regulating gene expression in apicomplexan parasites and more general in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26194054

  15. The origins of apicomplexan sequence innovation

    PubMed Central

    Wasmuth, James; Daub, Jennifer; Peregrn-Alvarez, Jos Manuel; Finney, Constance A.M.; Parkinson, John

    2009-01-01

    The Apicomplexa are a group of phylogenetically related parasitic protists that include Plasmodium, Cryptosporidium, and Toxoplasma. Together they are a major global burden on human health and economics. To meet this challenge, several international consortia have generated vast amounts of sequence data for many of these parasites. Here, we exploit these data to perform a systematic analysis of protein family and domain incidence across the phylum. A total of 87,736 protein sequences were collected from 15 apicomplexan species. These were compared with three protein databases, including the partial genome database, PartiGeneDB, which increases the breadth of taxonomic coverage. From these searches we constructed taxonomic profiles that reveal the extent of apicomplexan sequence diversity. Sequences without a significant match outside the phylum were denoted as apicomplexan specialized. These were collated into 9134 discrete protein families and placed in the context of the apicomplexan phylogeny, identifying the putative origin of each family. Most apicomplexan families were associated with an individual genus or species. Interestingly, many genera-specific innovations were associated with specialized host cell invasion and/or parasite survival processes. Contrastingly, those families reflecting more ancestral relationships were enriched in generalized housekeeping functions such as translation and transcription, which have diverged within the apicomplexan lineage. Protein domain searches revealed 192 domains not previously reported in apicomplexans together with a number of novel domain combinations. We highlight domains that may be important to parasite survival. PMID:19363216

  16. RegulonDB version 7.0: transcriptional regulation of Escherichia coli K-12 integrated within genetic sensory response units (Gensor Units)

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Salgado, Heladia; Peralta-Gil, Martin; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; Solano-Lira, Hilda; Jimenez-Jacinto, Verónica; Weiss, Verena; García-Sotelo, Jair S.; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Porrón-Sotelo, Liliana; Alquicira-Hernández, Shirley; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Alquicira-Hernández, Kevin; Martínez-Adame, Ruth; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Huerta, Araceli M.; Mendoza-Vargas, Alfredo; Collado-Torres, Leonardo; Taboada, Blanca; Vega-Alvarado, Leticia; Olvera, Maricela; Olvera, Leticia; Grande, Ricardo; Morett, Enrique; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2011-01-01

    RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx/) is the primary reference database of the best-known regulatory network of any free-living organism, that of Escherichia coli K-12. The major conceptual change since 3 years ago is an expanded biological context so that transcriptional regulation is now part of a unit that initiates with the signal and continues with the signal transduction to the core of regulation, modifying expression of the affected target genes responsible for the response. We call these genetic sensory response units, or Gensor Units. We have initiated their high-level curation, with graphic maps and superreactions with links to other databases. Additional connectivity uses expandable submaps. RegulonDB has summaries for every transcription factor (TF) and TF-binding sites with internal symmetry. Several DNA-binding motifs and their sizes have been redefined and relocated. In addition to data from the literature, we have incorporated our own information on transcription start sites (TSSs) and transcriptional units (TUs), obtained by using high-throughput whole-genome sequencing technologies. A new portable drawing tool for genomic features is also now available, as well as new ways to download the data, including web services, files for several relational database manager systems and text files including BioPAX format. PMID:21051347

  17. Transcription Profiling of the mgrA Regulon in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Luong, Thanh T.; Dunman, Paul M.; Murphy, Ellen; Projan, Steven J.; Lee, Chia Y.

    2006-01-01

    MgrA has been shown to affect multiple Staphylococcus aureus genes involved in virulence and antibiotic resistance. To comprehensively identify the target genes regulated by mgrA, we employed a microarray method to analyze the transcription profiles of S. aureus Newman, its isogeneic mgrA mutant, and an MgrA-overproducing derivative. We compared genes that were differentially expressed at exponential or early stationary growth phases. Our results showed that MgrA affected an impressive number of genes, 175 of which were positively regulated and 180 of which were negatively regulated in an mgrA-specific manner. The target genes included all functional categories. The microarray results were validated by real-time reverse transcription-PCR quantitation of a set of selected genes from different functional categories. Our data also indicate that mgrA regulates virulence factors in a fashion analogous to that of the accessory gene regulatory locus (agr). Accordingly, exoproteins are upregulated and surface proteins are downregulated by the regulator, suggesting that mgrA may function in concert with agr. The fact that a large number of genes are regulated by mgrA implies that MgrA is a major global regulator in S. aureus. PMID:16484201

  18. Streptococcus mutans copes with heat stress by multiple transcriptional regulons modulating virulence and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chengcheng; Niu, Yulong; Zhou, Xuedong; Zheng, Xin; Wang, Shida; Guo, Qiang; Li, Yuqing; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Yang, Yi; Ding, Yi; Lamont, Richard J.; Xu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is closely associated with the virulence of Streptococcus mutans. The virulence expression of S. mutans is linked to its stress adaptation to the changes in the oral environment. In this work we used whole-genome microarrays to profile the dynamic transcriptomic responses of S. mutans during physiological heat stress. In addition, we evaluated the phenotypic changes, including, eDNA release, initial biofilm formation, extracellular polysaccharides generation, acid production/acid tolerance, and ATP turnover of S. mutans during heat stress. There were distinct patterns observed in the way that S. mutans responded to heat stress that included 66 transcription factors for the expression of functional genes being differentially expressed. Especially, response regulators of two component systems (TCSs), the repressors of heat shock proteins and regulators involved in sugar transporting and metabolism co-ordinated to enhance the cell’s survival and energy generation against heat stress in S. mutans. PMID:26251057

  19. The R2R3 MYB transcription factor DUO1 activates a male germline-specific regulon essential for sperm cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Borg, Michael; Brownfield, Lynette; Khatab, Hoda; Sidorova, Anna; Lingaya, Melanie; Twell, David

    2011-02-01

    The male germline in flowering plants arises through asymmetric division of a haploid microspore. The resulting germ cell undergoes mitotic division and specialization to produce the two sperm cells required for double fertilization. The male germline-specific R2R3 MYB transcription factor DUO1 POLLEN1 (DUO1) plays an essential role in sperm cell specification by activating a germline-specific differentiation program. Here, we show that ectopic expression of DUO1 upregulates a significant number (~63) of germline-specific or enriched genes, including those required for fertilization. We validated 14 previously unknown DUO1 target genes by demonstrating DUO1-dependent promoter activity in the male germline. DUO1 is shown to directly regulate its target promoters through binding to canonical MYB sites, suggesting that the DUO1 target genes validated thus far are likely to be direct targets. This work advances knowledge of the DUO1 regulon that encompasses genes with a range of cellular functions, including transcription, protein fate, signaling, and transport. Thus, the DUO1 regulon has a major role in shaping the germline transcriptome and functions to commit progenitor germ cells to sperm cell differentiation. PMID:21285328

  20. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay.The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth. PMID:26717982

  1. The cellular growth rate controls overall mRNA turnover, and modulates either transcription or degradation rates of particular gene regulons

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, José; Delgado-Ramos, Lidia; Ayala, Guillermo; Pelechano, Vicent; Medina, Daniel A.; Carrasco, Fany; González, Ramón; Andrés-León, Eduardo; Steinmetz, Lars; Warringer, Jonas; Chávez, Sebastián; Pérez-Ortín, José E.

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed 80 different genomic experiments, and found a positive correlation between both RNA polymerase II transcription and mRNA degradation with growth rates in yeast. Thus, in spite of the marked variation in mRNA turnover, the total mRNA concentration remained approximately constant. Some genes, however, regulated their mRNA concentration by uncoupling mRNA stability from the transcription rate. Ribosome-related genes modulated their transcription rates to increase mRNA levels under fast growth. In contrast, mitochondria-related and stress-induced genes lowered mRNA levels by reducing mRNA stability or the transcription rate, respectively. We also detected these regulations within the heterogeneity of a wild-type cell population growing in optimal conditions. The transcriptomic analysis of sorted microcolonies confirmed that the growth rate dictates alternative expression programs by modulating transcription and mRNA decay. The regulation of overall mRNA turnover keeps a constant ratio between mRNA decay and the dilution of [mRNA] caused by cellular growth. This regulation minimizes the indiscriminate transmission of mRNAs from mother to daughter cells, and favors the response capacity of the latter to physiological signals and environmental changes. We also conclude that, by uncoupling mRNA synthesis from decay, cells control the mRNA abundance of those gene regulons that characterize fast and slow growth. PMID:26717982

  2. Genome-wide profiling of Hfq-binding RNAs uncovers extensive post-transcriptional rewiring of major stress response and symbiotic regulons in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Quesada, Omar; Reinkensmeier, Jan; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Robledo, Marta; Peregrina, Alexandra; Giegerich, Robert; Toro, Nicolás; Becker, Anke; Jiménez-Zurdo, Jose I

    2014-01-01

    The RNA chaperone Hfq is a global post-transcriptional regulator in bacteria. Here, we used RNAseq to analyze RNA populations from the legume symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti that were co-immunoprecipitated (CoIP-RNA) with a FLAG-tagged Hfq in five growth/stress conditions. Hfq-bound transcripts (1315) were largely identified in stressed bacteria and derived from small RNAs (sRNAs), both trans-encoded (6.4%) and antisense (asRNAs; 6.3%), and mRNAs (86%). Pull-down with Hfq recovered a small proportion of annotated S. meliloti sRNAs (14% of trans-sRNAs and 2% of asRNAs) suggesting a discrete impact of this protein in sRNA pathways. Nonetheless, Hfq selectively stabilized CoIP-enriched sRNAs, anticipating that these interactions are functionally significant. Transcription of 26 Hfq-bound sRNAs was predicted to occur from promoters recognized by the major stress σ factors σE2 or σH1/2. Recovery rates of sRNAs in each of the CoIP–RNA libraries suggest a large impact of Hfq-assisted riboregulation in S. meliloti osmoadaptation. Hfq directly targeted 18% of the predicted S. meliloti mRNAs, which encode functionally diverse proteins involved in transport and metabolism, σE2-dependent stress responses, quorum sensing, flagella biosynthesis, ribosome, and membrane assembly or symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Canonical targeting of the 5′ regions of two of the ABC transporter mRNAs by the homologous Hfq-binding AbcR1 and AbcR2 sRNAs leading to inhibition of protein synthesis was confirmed in vivo. We therefore provide a comprehensive resource for the systems-level deciphering of hitherto unexplored S. meliloti stress and symbiotic post-transcriptional regulons and the identification of Hfq-dependent sRNA–mRNA regulatory pairs. PMID:24786641

  3. Comprehensive Definition of the SigH Regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals Transcriptional Control of Diverse Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Tae; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Peterson, Matthew W.; Gomes, Antonio L. C.; Potluri, Lakshmi-Prasad; Raman, Sahadevan; Galagan, James E.; Husson, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of SigH, one of 12 Mycobacterium tuberculosis alternative sigma factors, is induced by heat, oxidative and nitric oxide stresses. SigH activation has been shown to increase expression of several genes, including genes involved in maintaining redox equilibrium and in protein degradation. However, few of these are known to be directly regulated by SigH. The goal of this project is to comprehensively define the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes and operons that are directly controlled by SigH in order to gain insight into the role of SigH in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. We used ChIP-Seq to identify in vivo SigH binding sites throughout the M. tuberculosis genome, followed by quantification of SigH-dependent expression of genes linked to these sites and identification of SigH-regulated promoters. We identified 69 SigH binding sites, which are located both in intergenic regions and within annotated coding sequences in the annotated M. tuberculosis genome. 41 binding sites were linked to genes that showed greater expression following heat stress in a SigH-dependent manner. We identified several genes not previously known to be regulated by SigH, including genes involved in DNA repair, cysteine biosynthesis, translation, and genes of unknown function. Experimental and computational analysis of SigH-regulated promoter sequences within these binding sites identified strong consensus -35 and -10 promoter sequences, but with tolerance for non-consensus bases at specific positions. This comprehensive identification and validation of SigH-regulated genes demonstrates an extended SigH regulon that controls an unexpectedly broad range of stress response functions. PMID:27003599

  4. Comprehensive Definition of the SigH Regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals Transcriptional Control of Diverse Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Jared D; Singh, Atul K; Park, Sang Tae; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Peterson, Matthew W; Gomes, Antonio L C; Potluri, Lakshmi-Prasad; Raman, Sahadevan; Galagan, James E; Husson, Robert N

    2016-01-01

    Expression of SigH, one of 12 Mycobacterium tuberculosis alternative sigma factors, is induced by heat, oxidative and nitric oxide stresses. SigH activation has been shown to increase expression of several genes, including genes involved in maintaining redox equilibrium and in protein degradation. However, few of these are known to be directly regulated by SigH. The goal of this project is to comprehensively define the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes and operons that are directly controlled by SigH in order to gain insight into the role of SigH in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. We used ChIP-Seq to identify in vivo SigH binding sites throughout the M. tuberculosis genome, followed by quantification of SigH-dependent expression of genes linked to these sites and identification of SigH-regulated promoters. We identified 69 SigH binding sites, which are located both in intergenic regions and within annotated coding sequences in the annotated M. tuberculosis genome. 41 binding sites were linked to genes that showed greater expression following heat stress in a SigH-dependent manner. We identified several genes not previously known to be regulated by SigH, including genes involved in DNA repair, cysteine biosynthesis, translation, and genes of unknown function. Experimental and computational analysis of SigH-regulated promoter sequences within these binding sites identified strong consensus -35 and -10 promoter sequences, but with tolerance for non-consensus bases at specific positions. This comprehensive identification and validation of SigH-regulated genes demonstrates an extended SigH regulon that controls an unexpectedly broad range of stress response functions. PMID:27003599

  5. Quantitative and Qualitative Stem Rust Resistance Factors in Barley Are Associated with Transcriptional Suppression of Defense Regulons

    PubMed Central

    Moscou, Matthew J.; Lauter, Nick; Steffenson, Brian; Wise, Roger P.

    2011-01-01

    Stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici; Pgt) is a devastating fungal disease of wheat and barley. Pgt race TTKSK (isolate Ug99) is a serious threat to these Triticeae grain crops because resistance is rare. In barley, the complex Rpg-TTKSK locus on chromosome 5H is presently the only known source of qualitative resistance to this aggressive Pgt race. Segregation for resistance observed on seedlings of the Q21861 × SM89010 (QSM) doubled-haploid (DH) population was found to be predominantly qualitative, with little of the remaining variance explained by loci other than Rpg-TTKSK. In contrast, analysis of adult QSM DH plants infected by field inoculum of Pgt race TTKSK in Njoro, Kenya, revealed several additional quantitative trait loci that contribute to resistance. To molecularly characterize these loci, Barley1 GeneChips were used to measure the expression of 22,792 genes in the QSM population after inoculation with Pgt race TTKSK or mock-inoculation. Comparison of expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) between treatments revealed an inoculation-dependent expression polymorphism implicating Actin depolymerizing factor3 (within the Rpg-TTKSK locus) as a candidate susceptibility gene. In parallel, we identified a chromosome 2H trans-eQTL hotspot that co-segregates with an enhancer of Rpg-TTKSK-mediated, adult plant resistance discovered through the Njoro field trials. Our genome-wide eQTL studies demonstrate that transcript accumulation of 25% of barley genes is altered following challenge by Pgt race TTKSK, but that few of these genes are regulated by the qualitative Rpg-TTKSK on chromosome 5H. It is instead the chromosome 2H trans-eQTL hotspot that orchestrates the largest inoculation-specific responses, where enhanced resistance is associated with transcriptional suppression of hundreds of genes scattered throughout the genome. Hence, the present study associates the early suppression of genes expressed in this host–pathogen interaction with enhancement of R-gene mediated resistance. PMID:21829384

  6. The Redox-Sensitive Transcriptional Activator OxyR Regulates the Peroxide Response Regulon in the Obligate Anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Edson R.; Owens, Gary; Smith, C. Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    The peroxide response-inducible genes ahpCF, dps, and katB in the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis are controlled by the redox-sensitive transcriptional activator OxyR. This is the first functional oxidative stress regulator identified and characterized in anaerobic bacteria. oxyR and dps were found to be divergently transcribed, with an overlap in their respective promoter regulatory regions. B. fragilis OxyR and Dps proteins showed high identity to homologues from a closely related anaerobe, Porphyromonas gingivalis. Northern blot analysis revealed that oxyR was expressed as a monocistronic 1-kb mRNA and that dps mRNA was approximately 500 bases in length. dps mRNA was induced over 500-fold by oxidative stress in the parent strain and was constitutively induced in the peroxide-resistant mutant IB263. The constitutive peroxide response in strain IB263 was shown to have resulted from a missense mutation at codon 202 (GAT to GGT) of the oxyR gene [oxyR(Con)] with a predicted D202G substitution in the OxyR protein. Transcriptional fusion analysis revealed that deletion of oxyR abolished the induction of ahpC and katB following treatment with hydrogen peroxide or oxygen exposure. However, dps expression was induced approximately fourfold by oxygen exposure in ?oxyR strains but not by hydrogen peroxide. This indicates that dps expression is also under the control of an oxygen-dependent OxyR-independent mechanism. Complementation of ?oxyR mutant strains with wild-type oxyR and oxyR(Con) restored the inducible peroxide response and the constitutive response of the ahpCF, katB, and dps genes, respectively. However, overexpression of OxyR abolished the catalase activity but not katB expression, suggesting that higher levels of intracellular OxyR may be involved in other physiological processes. Analysis of oxyR expression in the parents and in ?oxyR and overexpressing oxyR strains by Northern blotting and oxyR?::xylB fusions revealed that B. fragilis OxyR does not control its own expression. PMID:10960088

  7. Isoprenoid metabolism in apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, Leah; Odom, Audrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites include some of the most prevalent and deadly human pathogens. Novel antiparasitic drugs are urgently needed. Synthesis and metabolism of isoprenoids may present multiple targets for therapeutic intervention. The apicoplast-localized methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis is distinct from the mevalonate (MVA) pathway used by the mammalian host, and this pathway is apparently essential in most Apicomplexa. In this review, we discuss the current field of research on production and metabolic fates of isoprenoids in apicomplexan parasites, including the acquisition of host isoprenoid precursors and downstream products. We describe recent work identifying the first MEP pathway regulator in apicomplexan parasites, and introduce several promising areas for ongoing research into this well-validated antiparasitic target. PMID:25893156

  8. Characterization of a cAMP responsive transcription factor, Cmr (Rv1675c), in TB complex mycobacteria reveals overlap with the DosR (DevR) dormancy regulon

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Sridevi; Bai, Guangchun; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Knapp, Gwendowlyn S.; Peterson, Matthew W.; Gazdik, Michaela; C. Gomes, Antonio L.; Galagan, James E.; McDonough, Kathleen A.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) Cmr (Rv1675c) is a CRP/FNR family transcription factor known to be responsive to cAMP levels and during macrophage infections. However, Cmr's DNA binding properties, cellular targets and overall role in tuberculosis (TB) complex bacteria have not been characterized. In this study, we used experimental and computational approaches to characterize Cmr's DNA binding properties and identify a putative regulon. Cmr binds a 16-bp palindromic site that includes four highly conserved nucleotides that are required for DNA binding. A total of 368 binding sites, distributed in clusters among ∼200 binding regions throughout the Mycobacterium bovis BCG genome, were identified using ChIP-seq. One of the most enriched Cmr binding sites was located upstream of the cmr promoter, and we demonstrated that expression of cmr is autoregulated. cAMP affected Cmr binding at a subset of DNA loci in vivo and in vitro, including multiple sites adjacent to members of the DosR (DevR) dormancy regulon. Our findings of cooperative binding of Cmr to these DNA regions and the regulation by Cmr of the DosR-regulated virulence gene Rv2623 demonstrate the complexity of Cmr-mediated gene regulation and suggest a role for Cmr in the biology of persistent TB infection. PMID:26358810

  9. Genome-Wide Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Sequencing Analysis Shows that WhiB Is a Transcription Factor That Cocontrols Its Regulon with WhiA To Initiate Developmental Cell Division in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Govind; Bibb, Maureen J.; Findlay, Kim C.; Buttner, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT WhiB is the founding member of a family of proteins (the WhiB-like [Wbl] family) that carry a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster and play key roles in diverse aspects of the biology of actinomycetes, including pathogenesis, antibiotic resistance, and the control of development. In Streptomyces, WhiB is essential for the process of developmentally controlled cell division that leads to sporulation. The biochemical function of Wbl proteins has been controversial; here, we set out to determine unambiguously if WhiB functions as a transcription factor using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) in Streptomyces venezuelae. In the first demonstration of in vivo genome-wide Wbl binding, we showed that WhiB regulates the expression of key genes required for sporulation by binding upstream of ~240 transcription units. Strikingly, the WhiB regulon is identical to the previously characterized WhiA regulon, providing an explanation for the identical phenotypes of whiA and whiB mutants. Using ChIP-seq, we demonstrated that in vivo DNA binding by WhiA depends on WhiB and vice versa, showing that WhiA and WhiB function cooperatively to control expression of a common set of WhiAB target genes. Finally, we show that mutation of the cysteine residues that coordinate the [4Fe-4S] cluster in WhiB prevents DNA binding by both WhiB and WhiA in vivo. PMID:27094333

  10. Evolution of apicomplexan secretory organelles

    PubMed Central

    Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2013-01-01

    The alveolate superphylum includes many free-living and parasitic organisms, which are united by the presence of alveolar sacs lying proximal to the plasma membrane, providing cell structure. All species comprising the apicomplexan group of alveolates are parasites and have adapted to the unique requirements of the parasitic lifestyle. Here the evolution of apicomplexan secretory organelles that are involved in the critical process of egress from one cell and invasion of another is explored. The variations within the Apicomplexa and how these relate to species-specific biology will be discussed. In addition, recent studies have identified specific calcium-sensitive molecules that coordinate the various events and regulate the release of these secretory organelles within apicomplexan parasites. Some aspects of this machinery are conserved outside the Apicomplexa, and are beginning to elucidate the conserved nature of the machinery. Briefly, the relationship of this secretion machinery within the Apicomplexa will be discussed, compared with free-living and predatory alveolates, and how these might have evolved from a common ancestor. PMID:23068912

  11. Toxoplasma gondii: the model apicomplexan

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kami; Weiss, Louis M.

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite which is a significant human and veterinary pathogen. Other members of the phylum Apicomplexa are also important pathogens including Plasmodium species (i.e. malaria), Eimeria species, Neospora, Babesia, Theileria and Cryptosporidium. Unlike most of these organisms, T. gondii is readily amenable to genetic manipulation in the laboratory. Cell biology studies are more readily performed in T. gondii due to the high efficiency of transient and stable transfection, the availability of many cell markers, and the relative ease with which the parasite can be studied using advanced microscopic techniques. Thus, for many experimental questions, T. gondii remains the best model system to study the biology of the Apicomplexa. Our understanding of the mechanisms of drug resistance, the biology of the apicoplast, and the process of host cell invasion has been advanced by studies in T. gondii. Heterologous expression of apicomplexan proteins in T. gondii has frequently facilitated further characterisation of proteins that could not be easily studied. Recent studies of Apicomplexa have been complemented by genome sequencing projects that have facilitated discovery of surprising differences in cell biology and metabolism between Apicomplexa. While results in T. gondii will not always be applicable to other Apicomplexa, T. gondii remains an important model system for understanding the biology of apicomplexan parasites. PMID:15003501

  12. Transcription of the argF and argI genes of the arginine biosynthetic regulon of Escherichia coli K12, performed in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sens, D; Natter, W; Garvin, R T; James, E

    1977-09-21

    The cell-free transcription of the argF and argI genes of the arginine biosynthetic regions is described using an S-30 system capable of coupled in vitro transcription-translation. Template DNA isolated from two independently isolated arginine transducing phages was used in this work. Steady state mRNA synthesis was observed which was attributed to RNAase degradation. Regulation of argF mRNA synthesis, directed by the argF gene carried on the specialized transducing phage phi80dargF is effected to the extent of at least 95% by the arginine holorepressor at the transcriptional stage and at least 80% of the regulation of the expression of the argI gene is mediated at the transcriptional stage. Evidence is presented which indicates that the arginine holorepressor prevents RNA polymerase from binding to the arginine promoter and suggests that the operator and promoter sites may overlap. PMID:337119

  13. Gliding motility in apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Heintzelman, Matthew B

    2015-10-01

    Apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium and Toxoplasma, employ a unique form of substrate-dependent locomotion known as gliding motility. In these obligate, intracellular parasites, gliding motility is used for migration through the tissues and cells of the host, for active penetration of the host cell, and, at times, for proactive egress from the host. Gliding motility is powered by an actin-myosin based motor apparatus, known as the glideosome, which is situated within the elaborate cortical domain of the parasite. In this system, myosin is anchored to an internal membrane complex and drives the rearward translocation of actin-associated cell surface adhesins, thus leading to forward movement of the parasite. This review outlines our current understanding of glideosome architecture and the molecular basis of parasite motility. PMID:26428297

  14. σB-and PrfA-Dependent Transcription of Genes Previously Classified as Putative Constituents of the Listeria monocytogenes PrfA Regulon

    PubMed Central

    Ollinger, Juliane; Wiedmann, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Mounting evidence suggests that σB and PrfA coregulate transcription of multiple genes in Listeria monocytogenes, therefore, the relative contributions of σB and PrfA to transcript levels of genes identified previously as differentially regulated by PrfA were measured. Group I genes are recognized virulence genes that are positively regulated by PrfA; group II genes were reported previously as negatively regulated by PrfA; and multiple group III genes were proposed to be coregulated by σB and PrfA. Transcript levels for selected genes were measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in L. monocytogenes 10403S as well as in otherwise isogenic ΔsigB, ΔprfA, and ΔsigBΔprfA strains grown under conditions demonstrated to induce either PrfA activity (0.2% activated charcoal) or both PrfA and σB activity (stationary phase). Although the Group I gene plcA was positively regulated by PrfA, transcript levels for the group II genes lmo0278 and lmo0178 were not affected by the prfA deletion. While the sigB deletion significantly affected transcript levels for the selected group III genes (i.e., lmo0596, lmo0654, bsh, and opuCA), with lower transcript levels in the ΔsigB strains under all conditions tested, transcript levels for these genes were not significantly affected by the prfA deletion. Our results suggest that the regulatory interactions between PrfA and σB contribute to PrfA's predominant role as a direct regulator of virulence genes critical for invasion and intracellular survival in L. monocytogenes 10403S, while σB regulates a wider range of virulence and stress response genes. PMID:18564909

  15. Quorum sensing transcriptional regulator QseA is essential for the expression of multiple virulence regulons of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction and Objectives: QseA is one of several transcriptional regulators that regulates the virulence gene expression in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 through quorum sensing. QseA has been shown to regulate the expression of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), non-LEE...

  16. GlnR-Mediated Regulation of ectABCD Transcription Expands the Role of the GlnR Regulon to Osmotic Stress Management

    PubMed Central

    Shao, ZhiHui; Deng, WanXin; Li, ShiYuan; He, JuanMei; Ren, ShuangXi; Huang, WeiRen; Lu, YinHua; Zhao, GuoPing

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ectoine and hydroxyectoine are excellent compatible solutes for bacteria to deal with environmental osmotic stress and temperature damages. The biosynthesis cluster of ectoine and hydroxyectoine is widespread among microorganisms, and its expression is activated by high salinity and temperature changes. So far, little is known about the mechanism of the regulation of the transcription of ect genes and only two MarR family regulators (EctR1 in methylobacteria and the EctR1-related regulator CosR in Vibrio cholerae) have been found to negatively regulate the expression of ect genes. Here, we characterize GlnR, the global regulator for nitrogen metabolism in actinomycetes, as a negative regulator for the transcription of ectoine/hydroxyectoine biosynthetic genes (ect operon) in Streptomyces coelicolor. The physiological role of this transcriptional repression by GlnR is proposed to protect the intracellular glutamate pool, which acts as a key nitrogen donor for both the nitrogen metabolism and the ectoine/hydroxyectoine biosynthesis. IMPORTANCE High salinity is deleterious, and cells must evolve sophisticated mechanisms to cope with this osmotic stress. Although production of ectoine and hydroxyectoine is one of the most frequently adopted strategies, the in-depth mechanism of regulation of their biosynthesis is less understood. So far, only two MarR family negative regulators, EctR1 and CosR, have been identified in methylobacteria and Vibrio, respectively. Here, our work demonstrates that GlnR, the global regulator for nitrogen metabolism, is a negative transcriptional regulator for ect genes in Streptomyces coelicolor. Moreover, a close relationship is found between nitrogen metabolism and osmotic resistance, and GlnR-mediated regulation of ect transcription is proposed to protect the intracellular glutamate pool. Meanwhile, the work reveals the multiple roles of GlnR in bacterial physiology. PMID:26170409

  17. A common red algal origin of the apicomplexan, dinoflagellate, and heterokont plastids.

    PubMed

    Janouskovec, Jan; Horák, Ales; Oborník, Miroslav; Lukes, Julius; Keeling, Patrick J

    2010-06-15

    The discovery of a nonphotosynthetic plastid in malaria and other apicomplexan parasites has sparked a contentious debate about its evolutionary origin. Molecular data have led to conflicting conclusions supporting either its green algal origin or red algal origin, perhaps in common with the plastid of related dinoflagellates. This distinction is critical to our understanding of apicomplexan evolution and the evolutionary history of endosymbiosis and photosynthesis; however, the two plastids are nearly impossible to compare due to their nonoverlapping information content. Here we describe the complete plastid genome sequences and plastid-associated data from two independent photosynthetic lineages represented by Chromera velia and an undescribed alga CCMP3155 that we show are closely related to apicomplexans. These plastids contain a suite of features retained in either apicomplexan (four plastid membranes, the ribosomal superoperon, conserved gene order) or dinoflagellate plastids (form II Rubisco acquired by horizontal transfer, transcript polyuridylylation, thylakoids stacked in triplets) and encode a full collective complement of their reduced gene sets. Together with whole plastid genome phylogenies, these characteristics provide multiple lines of evidence that the extant plastids of apicomplexans and dinoflagellates were inherited by linear descent from a common red algal endosymbiont. Our phylogenetic analyses also support their close relationship to plastids of heterokont algae, indicating they all derive from the same endosymbiosis. Altogether, these findings support a relatively simple path of linear descent for the evolution of photosynthesis in a large proportion of algae and emphasize plastid loss in several lineages (e.g., ciliates, Cryptosporidium, and Phytophthora). PMID:20534454

  18. A common red algal origin of the apicomplexan, dinoflagellate, and heterokont plastids

    PubMed Central

    Janoukovec, Jan; Hork, Ale; Obornk, Miroslav; Luke, Julius; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of a nonphotosynthetic plastid in malaria and other apicomplexan parasites has sparked a contentious debate about its evolutionary origin. Molecular data have led to conflicting conclusions supporting either its green algal origin or red algal origin, perhaps in common with the plastid of related dinoflagellates. This distinction is critical to our understanding of apicomplexan evolution and the evolutionary history of endosymbiosis and photosynthesis; however, the two plastids are nearly impossible to compare due to their nonoverlapping information content. Here we describe the complete plastid genome sequences and plastid-associated data from two independent photosynthetic lineages represented by Chromera velia and an undescribed alga CCMP3155 that we show are closely related to apicomplexans. These plastids contain a suite of features retained in either apicomplexan (four plastid membranes, the ribosomal superoperon, conserved gene order) or dinoflagellate plastids (form II Rubisco acquired by horizontal transfer, transcript polyuridylylation, thylakoids stacked in triplets) and encode a full collective complement of their reduced gene sets. Together with whole plastid genome phylogenies, these characteristics provide multiple lines of evidence that the extant plastids of apicomplexans and dinoflagellates were inherited by linear descent from a common red algal endosymbiont. Our phylogenetic analyses also support their close relationship to plastids of heterokont algae, indicating they all derive from the same endosymbiosis. Altogether, these findings support a relatively simple path of linear descent for the evolution of photosynthesis in a large proportion of algae and emphasize plastid loss in several lineages (e.g., ciliates, Cryptosporidium, and Phytophthora). PMID:20534454

  19. Bacterial regulon modeling and prediction based on systematic cis regulatory motif analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingqiang; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Guojun; Zhang, Hanyuan; Zeng, Erliang; Liu, Qi; Ma, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Regulons are the basic units of the response system in a bacterial cell, and each consists of a set of transcriptionally co-regulated operons. Regulon elucidation is the basis for studying the bacterial global transcriptional regulation network. In this study, we designed a novel co-regulation score between a pair of operons based on accurate operon identification and cis regulatory motif analyses, which can capture their co-regulation relationship much better than other scores. Taking full advantage of this discovery, we developed a new computational framework and built a novel graph model for regulon prediction. This model integrates the motif comparison and clustering and makes the regulon prediction problem substantially more solvable and accurate. To evaluate our prediction, a regulon coverage score was designed based on the documented regulons and their overlap with our prediction; and a modified Fisher Exact test was implemented to measure how well our predictions match the co-expressed modules derived from E. coli microarray gene-expression datasets collected under 466 conditions. The results indicate that our program consistently performed better than others in terms of the prediction accuracy. This suggests that our algorithms substantially improve the state-of-the-art, leading to a computational capability to reliably predict regulons for any bacteria. PMID:26975728

  20. Bacterial regulon modeling and prediction based on systematic cis regulatory motif analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bingqiang; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Guojun; Zhang, Hanyuan; Zeng, Erliang; Liu, Qi; Ma, Qin

    2016-03-01

    Regulons are the basic units of the response system in a bacterial cell, and each consists of a set of transcriptionally co-regulated operons. Regulon elucidation is the basis for studying the bacterial global transcriptional regulation network. In this study, we designed a novel co-regulation score between a pair of operons based on accurate operon identification and cis regulatory motif analyses, which can capture their co-regulation relationship much better than other scores. Taking full advantage of this discovery, we developed a new computational framework and built a novel graph model for regulon prediction. This model integrates the motif comparison and clustering and makes the regulon prediction problem substantially more solvable and accurate. To evaluate our prediction, a regulon coverage score was designed based on the documented regulons and their overlap with our prediction; and a modified Fisher Exact test was implemented to measure how well our predictions match the co-expressed modules derived from E. coli microarray gene-expression datasets collected under 466 conditions. The results indicate that our program consistently performed better than others in terms of the prediction accuracy. This suggests that our algorithms substantially improve the state-of-the-art, leading to a computational capability to reliably predict regulons for any bacteria.

  1. Bacterial regulon modeling and prediction based on systematic cis regulatory motif analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bingqiang; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Guojun; Zhang, Hanyuan; Zeng, Erliang; Liu, Qi; Ma, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Regulons are the basic units of the response system in a bacterial cell, and each consists of a set of transcriptionally co-regulated operons. Regulon elucidation is the basis for studying the bacterial global transcriptional regulation network. In this study, we designed a novel co-regulation score between a pair of operons based on accurate operon identification and cis regulatory motif analyses, which can capture their co-regulation relationship much better than other scores. Taking full advantage of this discovery, we developed a new computational framework and built a novel graph model for regulon prediction. This model integrates the motif comparison and clustering and makes the regulon prediction problem substantially more solvable and accurate. To evaluate our prediction, a regulon coverage score was designed based on the documented regulons and their overlap with our prediction; and a modified Fisher Exact test was implemented to measure how well our predictions match the co-expressed modules derived from E. coli microarray gene-expression datasets collected under 466 conditions. The results indicate that our program consistently performed better than others in terms of the prediction accuracy. This suggests that our algorithms substantially improve the state-of-the-art, leading to a computational capability to reliably predict regulons for any bacteria. PMID:26975728

  2. DNA topoisomerases in apicomplexan parasites: promising targets for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    García-Estrada, Carlos; Prada, Christopher Fernández; Fernández-Rubio, Celia; Rojo-Vázquez, Francisco; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael

    2010-06-22

    The phylum Apicomplexa includes a large group of protozoan parasites responsible for a wide range of animal and human diseases. Destructive pathogens, such as Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, causative agents of human malaria, Cryptosporidium parvum, responsible of childhood diarrhoea, and Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for miscarriages and abortions in humans, are frequently associated with HIV immunosuppression in AIDS patients. The lack of effective vaccines, along with years of increasing pressure to eradicate outbreaks with the use of drugs, has favoured the formation of multi-drug resistant strains in endemic areas. Almost all apicomplexan of medical interest contain two endosymbiotic organelles that contain their own mitochondrial and apicoplast DNA. Apicoplast is an attractive target for drug testing because in addition to harbouring singular metabolic pathways absent in the host, it also has its own transcription and translation machinery of bacterial origin. Accordingly, apicomplexan protozoa contain an interesting mixture of enzymes to unwind DNA from eukaryotic and prokaryotic origins. On the one hand, the main mechanism of DNA unwinding includes the scission of one-type I-or both DNA strands-type II eukaryotic topoisomerases, establishing transient covalent bonds with the scissile end. These enzymes are targeted by camptothecin and etoposide, respectively, two natural drugs whose semisynthetic derivatives are currently used in cancer chemotherapy. On the other hand, DNA gyrase is a bacterial-borne type II DNA topoisomerase that operates within the apicoplast and is effectively targeted by bacterial antibiotics like fluoroquinolones and aminocoumarins. The present review is an update on the new findings concerning topoisomerases in apicomplexan parasites and the role of these enzymes as targets for therapeutic agents. PMID:20200034

  3. Functional modules of sigma factor regulons guarantee adaptability and evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Sebastian C.; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Schulz, Sebastian; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Franke, Raimo; Häussler, Susanne; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The focus of modern molecular biology turns from assigning functions to individual genes towards understanding the expression and regulation of complex sets of molecules. Here, we provide evidence that alternative sigma factor regulons in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa largely represent insulated functional modules which provide a critical level of biological organization involved in general adaptation and survival processes. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network revealed that transcription factors functionally couple the sigma factor regulons and significantly modulate the transcription levels in the face of challenging environments. The threshold quality of newly evolved transcription factors was reached faster and more robustly in in silico testing when the structural organization of sigma factor networks was taken into account. These results indicate that the modular structures of alternative sigma factor regulons provide P. aeruginosa with a robust framework to function adequately in its environment and at the same time facilitate evolutionary change. Our data support the view that widespread modularity guarantees robustness of biological networks and is a key driver of evolvability. PMID:26915971

  4. Functional modules of sigma factor regulons guarantee adaptability and evolvability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Sebastian C.; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Schulz, Sebastian; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Franke, Raimo; Häussler, Susanne; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The focus of modern molecular biology turns from assigning functions to individual genes towards understanding the expression and regulation of complex sets of molecules. Here, we provide evidence that alternative sigma factor regulons in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa largely represent insulated functional modules which provide a critical level of biological organization involved in general adaptation and survival processes. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network revealed that transcription factors functionally couple the sigma factor regulons and significantly modulate the transcription levels in the face of challenging environments. The threshold quality of newly evolved transcription factors was reached faster and more robustly in in silico testing when the structural organization of sigma factor networks was taken into account. These results indicate that the modular structures of alternative sigma factor regulons provide P. aeruginosa with a robust framework to function adequately in its environment and at the same time facilitate evolutionary change. Our data support the view that widespread modularity guarantees robustness of biological networks and is a key driver of evolvability.

  5. Functional modules of sigma factor regulons guarantee adaptability and evolvability.

    PubMed

    Binder, Sebastian C; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Schulz, Sebastian; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Franke, Raimo; Häussler, Susanne; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The focus of modern molecular biology turns from assigning functions to individual genes towards understanding the expression and regulation of complex sets of molecules. Here, we provide evidence that alternative sigma factor regulons in the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa largely represent insulated functional modules which provide a critical level of biological organization involved in general adaptation and survival processes. Analysis of the operational state of the sigma factor network revealed that transcription factors functionally couple the sigma factor regulons and significantly modulate the transcription levels in the face of challenging environments. The threshold quality of newly evolved transcription factors was reached faster and more robustly in in silico testing when the structural organization of sigma factor networks was taken into account. These results indicate that the modular structures of alternative sigma factor regulons provide P. aeruginosa with a robust framework to function adequately in its environment and at the same time facilitate evolutionary change. Our data support the view that widespread modularity guarantees robustness of biological networks and is a key driver of evolvability. PMID:26915971

  6. Oxidative Stress Control by Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Izui, Natália M.; Schettert, Isolmar; Liebau, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause infectious diseases that are either a severe public health problem or an economic burden. In this paper we will shed light on how oxidative stress can influence the host-pathogen relationship by focusing on three major diseases: babesiosis, coccidiosis, and toxoplasmosis. PMID:25722976

  7. Oxidative stress control by apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Soraya S; Kronenberger, Thales; Meissner, Kamila A; Zimbres, Flávia M; Stegehake, Dirk; Izui, Natália M; Schettert, Isolmar; Liebau, Eva; Wrenger, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause infectious diseases that are either a severe public health problem or an economic burden. In this paper we will shed light on how oxidative stress can influence the host-pathogen relationship by focusing on three major diseases: babesiosis, coccidiosis, and toxoplasmosis. PMID:25722976

  8. The response of Bacillus licheniformis to heat and ethanol stress and the role of the SigB regulon.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Birgit; Schroeter, Rebecca; Jürgen, Britta; Albrecht, Dirk; Evers, Stefan; Bongaerts, Johannes; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schweder, Thomas; Hecker, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The heat and ethanol stress response of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 was analyzed at the transcriptional and/or translational level. During heat shock, regulons known to be heat-induced in Bacillus subtilis 168 are upregulated in B. licheniformis, such as the HrcA, SigB, CtsR, and CssRS regulon. Upregulation of the SigY regulon and of genes controlled by other extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors indicates a cell-wall stress triggered by the heat shock. Furthermore, tryptophan synthesis enzymes were upregulated in heat stressed cells as well as regulons involved in usage of alternative carbon and nitrogen sources. Ethanol stress led to an induction of the SigB, HrcA, and CtsR regulons. As indicated by the upregulation of a SigM-dependent protein, ethanol also triggered a cell wall stress. To characterize the SigB regulon of B. licheniformis, we analyzed the heat stress response of a sigB mutant. It is shown that the B. licheniformis SigB regulon comprises additional genes, some of which do not exist in B. subtilis, such as BLi03885, encoding a hypothetical protein, the Na/solute symporter gene BLi02212, the arginase homolog-encoding gene BLi00198 and mcrA, encoding a protein with endonuclease activity. PMID:23592518

  9. Genome cartography: charting the apicomplexan genome

    PubMed Central

    Kissinger, Jessica C.; DeBarry, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Genes reside in particular genomic contexts that can be mapped at many levels. Historically, genetic maps were used primarily to locate genes. Recent technological advances in genome sequence determination have made the analysis and comparison of whole genomes possible and increasingly tractable. If we shift our focus from gene content (the inventory of genes contained within a genome), to genome composition and organization, what do we see? This review examines what has been learned about the evolution of the apicomplexan genome and the significance and impact of genomic location on our understanding of the eukaryotic genome and parasite biology. PMID:21764378

  10. The PlcR Virulence Regulon of Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Michel; Faegri, Karoline; Perchat, Stéphane; Ravnum, Solveig; Økstad, Ole Andreas; Gominet, Myriam; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Lereclus, Didier

    2008-01-01

    PlcR is a Bacillus cereus transcriptional regulator, which activates gene expression by binding to a nucleotidic sequence called the ‘PlcR box’. To build a list of all genes included in the PlcR regulon, a consensus sequence was identified by directed mutagenesis. The reference strain ATCC14579 sequenced genome was searched for occurrences of this consensus sequence to produce a virtual regulon. PlcR control of these genes was confirmed by comparing gene expression in the reference strain and its isogenic Δ-plcR strain using DNA microarrays, lacZ fusions and proteomics methods. The resulting list included 45 genes controlled by 28 PlcR boxes. Forty of the PlcR controlled proteins were exported, of which 22 were secreted in the extracellular medium and 18 were bound or attached to cell wall structures (membrane or peptidoglycan layer). The functions of these proteins were related to food supply (phospholipases, proteases, toxins), cell protection (bacteriocins, toxins, transporters, cell wall biogenesis) and environment-sensing (two-component sensors, chemotaxis proteins, GGDEF family regulators). Four genes coded for cytoplasmic regulators. The PlcR regulon appears to integrate a large range of environmental signals, including food deprivation and self cell-density, and regulate the transcription of genes designed to overcome obstacles that hinder B. cereus growth within the host: food supply, host barriers, host immune defenses, and competition with other bacterial species. PlcR appears to be a key component in the efficient adaptation of B. cereus to its host environment. PMID:18665214

  11. RegPrecise: a database of curated genomic inferences of transcriptional regulatory interactions in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Novichkov, Pavel S; Laikova, Olga N; Novichkova, Elena S; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Arkin, Adam P; Dubchak, Inna; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2010-01-01

    The RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov) was developed for capturing, visualization and analysis of predicted transcription factor regulons in prokaryotes that were reconstructed and manually curated by utilizing the comparative genomic approach. A significant number of high-quality inferences of transcriptional regulatory interactions have been already accumulated for diverse taxonomic groups of bacteria. The reconstructed regulons include transcription factors, their cognate DNA motifs and regulated genes/operons linked to the candidate transcription factor binding sites. The RegPrecise allows for browsing the regulon collections for: (i) conservation of DNA binding sites and regulated genes for a particular regulon across diverse taxonomic lineages; (ii) sets of regulons for a family of transcription factors; (iii) repertoire of regulons in a particular taxonomic group of species; (iv) regulons associated with a metabolic pathway or a biological process in various genomes. The initial release of the database includes approximately 11,500 candidate binding sites for approximately 400 orthologous groups of transcription factors from over 350 prokaryotic genomes. Majority of these data are represented by genome-wide regulon reconstructions in Shewanella and Streptococcus genera and a large-scale prediction of regulons for the LacI family of transcription factors. Another section in the database represents the results of accurate regulon propagation to the closely related genomes. PMID:19884135

  12. N-Acetylgalactosamine Utilization Pathway and Regulon in Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Leyn, Semen A.; Gao, Fang; Yang, Chen; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2012-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct the N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (GalNAc) and galactosamine (GalN) utilization pathways and transcriptional regulons in Proteobacteria. The reconstructed GalNAc/GalN utilization pathways include multiple novel genes with specific functional roles. Most of the pathway variations were attributed to the amino sugar transport, phosphorylation, and deacetylation steps, whereas the downstream catabolic enzymes in the pathway were largely conserved. The predicted GalNAc kinase AgaK, the novel variant of GalNAc-6-phosphate deacetylase AgaAII and the GalN-6-phosphate deaminase AgaS from Shewanella sp. ANA-3 were validated in vitro using individual enzymatic assays and reconstitution of the three-step pathway. By using genetic techniques, we confirmed that AgaS but not AgaI functions as the main GalN-6-P deaminase in the GalNAc/GalN utilization pathway in Escherichia coli. Regulons controlled by AgaR repressors were reconstructed by bioinformatics in most proteobacterial genomes encoding GalNAc pathways. Candidate AgaR-binding motifs share a common sequence with consensus CTTTC that was found in multiple copies and arrangements in regulatory regions of aga genes. This study provides comprehensive insights into the common and distinctive features of the GalNAc/GalN catabolism and its regulation in diverse Proteobacteria. PMID:22711537

  13. Characterization of the YdeO Regulon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Yuki; Oshima, Taku; Ishihama, Akira; Yamamoto, Kaneyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteria are able to survive under stressful conditions within animals, such as acidic conditions in the stomach, bile salts during transfer to the intestine and anaerobic conditions within the intestine. The glutamate-dependent (GAD) system plays a major role in acid resistance in Escherichia coli, and expression of the GAD system is controlled by the regulatory cascade consisting of EvgAS > YdeO > GadE. To understand the YdeO regulon in vivo, we used ChIP-chip to interrogate the E. coli genome for candidate YdeO binding sites. All of the seven operons identified by ChIP-chip as being potentially regulated by YdeO were confirmed as being under the direct control of YdeO using RT-qPCR, EMSA, DNaseI-footprinting and reporter assays. Within this YdeO regulon, we identified four stress-response transcription factors, DctR, NhaR, GadE, and GadW and enzymes for anaerobic respiration. Both GadE and GadW are involved in regulation of the GAD system and NhaR is an activator for the sodium/proton antiporter gene. In conjunction with co-transcribed Slp, DctR is involved in protection against metabolic endoproducts under acidic conditions. Taken all together, we suggest that YdeO is a key regulator of E. coli survival in both acidic and anaerobic conditions. PMID:25375160

  14. Tracking transmission of apicomplexan symbionts in diverse Caribbean corals.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Nathan L; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Miller, Margaret W; Fogarty, Nicole D; Santos, Scott R

    2013-01-01

    Symbionts in each generation are transmitted to new host individuals either vertically (parent to offspring), horizontally (from exogenous sources), or a combination of both. Scleractinian corals make an excellent study system for understanding patterns of symbiont transmission since they harbor diverse symbionts and possess distinct reproductive modes of either internal brooding or external broadcast spawning that generally correlate with vertical or horizontal transmission, respectively. Here, we focused on the under-recognized, but apparently widespread, coral-associated apicomplexans (Protista: Alveolata) to determine if symbiont transmission depends on host reproductive mode. Specifically, a PCR-based assay was utilized towards identifying whether planula larvae and reproductive adults from brooding and broadcast spawning scleractinian coral species in Florida and Belize harbored apicomplexan DNA. Nearly all (85.5%; n = 85/89) examined planulae of five brooding species (Porites astreoides, Agaricia tenuifolia, Agaricia agaricites, Favia fragum, Mycetophyllia ferox) and adults of P. astreoides were positive for apicomplexan DNA. In contrast, no (n = 0/10) apicomplexan DNA was detected from planulae of four broadcast spawning species (Acropora cervicornis, Acropora palmata, Pseudodiploria strigosa, and Orbicella faveolata) and rarely in gametes (8.9%; n = 5/56) of these species sampled from the same geographical range as the brooding species. In contrast, tissue samples from nearly all (92.0%; n = 81/88) adults of the broadcast spawning species A. cervicornis, A. palmata and O. faveolata harbored apicomplexan DNA, including colonies whose gametes and planulae tested negative for these symbionts. Taken together, these data suggest apicomplexans are transmitted vertically in these brooding scleractinian coral species while the broadcast spawning scleractinian species examined here acquire these symbionts horizontally. Notably, these transmission patterns are consistent with those of other scleractinian coral symbionts. While this study furthers knowledge regarding these symbionts, numerous questions remain to be addressed, particularly in regard to the specific interaction(s) between these apicomplexans and their hosts. PMID:24260438

  15. Comparative Genomics of DtxR Family Regulons for Metal Homeostasis in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Leyn, Semen A.

    2014-01-01

    The DtxR family consists of metal-dependent transcription factors (DtxR-TFs) that regulate the expression of genes involved in metal homeostasis in the cell. The majority of characterized DtxR-TFs belong to Bacteria. In the current work, we applied a comparative genomics approach to predict DNA-binding sites and reconstruct regulons for DtxR-TFs in Archaea. As a result, we inferred 575 candidate binding sites for 139 DtxR-TFs in 77 genomes from 15 taxonomic orders. Novel DNA motifs of archaeal DtxR-TFs that have a common palindromic structure were classified into 10 distinct groups. By combining functional regulon reconstructions with phylogenetic analysis, we selected 28 DtxR-TF clades and assigned them metal specificities and regulator names. The reconstructed FetR (ferrous iron), MntR (manganese), and ZntR (zinc) regulons largely contain known or putative metal uptake transporters from the FeoAB, NRAMP, ZIP, and TroA families. A novel family of putative iron transporters (named Irt), including multiple FetR-regulated paralogs, was identified in iron-oxidizing Archaea from the Sulfolobales order. The reconstructed DtxR-TF regulons were reconciled with available transcriptomics data in Archaeoglobus, Halobacterium, and Thermococcus spp. PMID:25404694

  16. Defining bacterial regulons using ChIP-seq.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kevin S; Park, Dan M; Beauchene, Nicole A; Kiley, Patricia J

    2015-09-15

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a powerful method that identifies protein-DNA binding sites in vivo. Recent studies have illustrated the value of ChIP-seq in studying transcription factor binding in various bacterial species under a variety of growth conditions. These results show that in addition to identifying binding sites, correlation of ChIP-seq data with expression data can reveal important information about bacterial regulons and regulatory networks. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge about ChIP-seq methodology in bacteria, from sample preparation to raw data analysis. We also describe visualization and various bioinformatic analyses of processed ChIP-seq data. PMID:26032817

  17. Divergent mitochondrial respiratory chains in phototrophic relatives of apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Flegontov, Pavel; Michálek, Jan; Janouškovec, Jan; Lai, De-Hua; Jirků, Milan; Hajdušková, Eva; Tomčala, Aleš; Otto, Thomas D; Keeling, Patrick J; Pain, Arnab; Oborník, Miroslav; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-05-01

    Four respiratory complexes and ATP-synthase represent central functional units in mitochondria. In some mitochondria and derived anaerobic organelles, a few or all of these respiratory complexes have been lost during evolution. We show that the respiratory chain of Chromera velia, a phototrophic relative of parasitic apicomplexans, lacks complexes I and III, making it a uniquely reduced aerobic mitochondrion. In Chromera, putative lactate:cytochrome c oxidoreductases are predicted to transfer electrons from lactate to cytochrome c, rendering complex III unnecessary. The mitochondrial genome of Chromera has the smallest known protein-coding capacity of all mitochondria, encoding just cox1 and cox3 on heterogeneous linear molecules. In contrast, another photosynthetic relative of apicomplexans, Vitrella brassicaformis, retains the same set of genes as apicomplexans and dinoflagellates (cox1, cox3, and cob). PMID:25660376

  18. Identification of an archaeal mercury regulon by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Rudrappa, Deepak; Yao, Andrew I; White, Derrick; Pavlik, Benjamin J; Singh, Raghuveer; Facciotti, Marc T; Blum, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Mercury is a heavy metal and toxic to all forms of life. Metal exposure can invoke a response to improve survival. In archaea, several components of a mercury response system have been identified, but it is not known whether metal transport is a member of this system. To identify such missing components, a peptide-tagged MerR transcription factor was used to localize enriched chromosome regions by chromosome immunoprecipitation combined with DNA sequence analysis. Such regions could serve as secondary regulatory binding sites to control the expression of additional genes associated with mercury detoxification. Among the 31 highly enriched loci, a subset of five was pursued as potential candidates based on their current annotations. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of these regions with and without mercury treatment in WT and mutant strains lacking merR indicated significant regulatory responses under these conditions. Of these, a Family 5 extracellular solute-binding protein and the MarR transcription factor shown previously to control responses to oxidation were most strongly affected. Inactivation of the solute-binding protein by gene disruption increased the resistance of mutant cells to mercury challenge. Inductively coupled plasma-MS analysis of the mutant cell line following metal challenge indicated there was less intracellular mercury compared with the isogenic WT strain. Together, these regulated genes comprise new members of the archaeal MerR regulon and reveal a cascade of transcriptional control not previously demonstrated in this model organism. PMID:26408318

  19. The Regulation of the AdcR Regulon in Streptococcus pneumoniae Depends Both on Zn2+- and Ni2+-Availability

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor, Irfan; Shafeeq, Sulman; Afzal, Muhammad; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2015-01-01

    By using a transcriptomic approach, we have elucidated the effect of Ni2+ on the global gene expression of S. pneumoniae D39 by identifying several differentially expressed genes/operons in the presence of a high extracellular concentration of Ni2+. The genes belonging to the AdcR regulon (adcRCBA, adcAII-phtD, phtA, phtB, and phtE) and the PsaR regulon (pcpA, prtA, and psaBCA) were highly upregulated in the presence of Ni2+. We have further studied the role of Ni2+ in the regulation of the AdcR regulon by using ICP-MS analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and transcriptional lacZ-reporter studies, and demonstrate that Ni2+ is directly involved in the derepression of the AdcR regulon via the Zn2+-dependent repressor AdcR, and has an opposite effect on the expression of the AdcR regulon compared to Zn2+. PMID:26697415

  20. Calcium-Dependent Signaling and Kinases in Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Billker, Oliver; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David

    2009-01-01

    Summary Calcium controls many critical events in the complex life cycles of apicomplexan parasites including protein secretion, motility, and development. Calcium levels are normally tightly regulated and rapid release of calcium into the cytosol activates a family of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), which are normally characteristic of plants. CDPKs present in apicomplexans have acquired a number of unique domain structures likely reflecting their diverse functions. Calcium regulation in parasites is closely linked to signaling by cyclic nucleotides and their associated kinases. This review summarizes the pivotal roles that calcium-and cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases play in unique aspects of parasite biology. PMID:19527888

  1. iRegulon: From a Gene List to a Gene Regulatory Network Using Large Motif and Track Collections

    PubMed Central

    Imrichová, Hana; Van de Sande, Bram; Standaert, Laura; Christiaens, Valerie; Hulselmans, Gert; Herten, Koen; Naval Sanchez, Marina; Potier, Delphine; Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Kalender Atak, Zeynep; Fiers, Mark; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Aerts, Stein

    2014-01-01

    Identifying master regulators of biological processes and mapping their downstream gene networks are key challenges in systems biology. We developed a computational method, called iRegulon, to reverse-engineer the transcriptional regulatory network underlying a co-expressed gene set using cis-regulatory sequence analysis. iRegulon implements a genome-wide ranking-and-recovery approach to detect enriched transcription factor motifs and their optimal sets of direct targets. We increase the accuracy of network inference by using very large motif collections of up to ten thousand position weight matrices collected from various species, and linking these to candidate human TFs via a motif2TF procedure. We validate iRegulon on gene sets derived from ENCODE ChIP-seq data with increasing levels of noise, and we compare iRegulon with existing motif discovery methods. Next, we use iRegulon on more challenging types of gene lists, including microRNA target sets, protein-protein interaction networks, and genetic perturbation data. In particular, we over-activate p53 in breast cancer cells, followed by RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, and could identify an extensive up-regulated network controlled directly by p53. Similarly we map a repressive network with no indication of direct p53 regulation but rather an indirect effect via E2F and NFY. Finally, we generalize our computational framework to include regulatory tracks such as ChIP-seq data and show how motif and track discovery can be combined to map functional regulatory interactions among co-expressed genes. iRegulon is available as a Cytoscape plugin from http://iregulon.aertslab.org. PMID:25058159

  2. Phylogeny and evolution of apicoplasts and apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Arisue, Nobuko; Hashimoto, Tetsuo

    2015-06-01

    The phylum Apicomplexa includes many parasitic genera of medical and veterinary importance including Plasmodium (causative agent of malaria), Toxoplasma (toxoplasmosis), and Babesia (babesiosis). Most of the apicomplexan parasites possess a unique, essential organelle, the apicoplast, which is a plastid without photosynthetic ability. Although the apicoplast is considered to have evolved through secondary endosymbiosis of a red alga into the common ancestral cell of apicomplexans, its evolutionary history has been under debate until recently. The apicoplast has a genome around 30-40 kb in length. Repertoire and arrangement of the apicoplast genome-encoded genes differ among apicomplexan genera, although within the genus Plasmodium these are almost conserved. Genes in the apicoplast genome may be useful markers for Plasmodium phylogeny, because these are single copy (except for the inverted repeat region) and may have more phylogenetic signal than the mitochondrial genome that have been most commonly used for Plasmodium phylogeny. This review describes recent studies concerning the evolutionary origin of the apicoplast, presents evolutionary comparison of the primary structures of apicoplast genomes from apicomplexan parasites, and summarizes recent findings of malaria phylogeny based on apicoplast genome-encoded genes. PMID:25451217

  3. In vitro transcription profiling of the σS subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase: re-definition of the σS regulon and identification of σS-specific promoter sequence elements.

    PubMed

    Maciag, Anna; Peano, Clelia; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Egli, Thomas; De Bellis, Gianluca; Landini, Paolo

    2011-07-01

    Specific promoter recognition by bacterial RNA polymerase is mediated by σ subunits, which assemble with RNA polymerase core enzyme (E) during transcription initiation. However, σ(70) (the housekeeping σ subunit) and σ(S) (an alternative σ subunit mostly active during slow growth) recognize almost identical promoter sequences, thus raising the question of how promoter selectivity is achieved in the bacterial cell. To identify novel sequence determinants for selective promoter recognition, we performed run-off/microarray (ROMA) experiments with RNA polymerase saturated either with σ(70) (Eσ(70)) or with σ(S) (Eσ(S)) using the whole Escherichia coli genome as DNA template. We found that Eσ(70), in the absence of any additional transcription factor, preferentially transcribes genes associated with fast growth (e.g. ribosomal operons). In contrast, Eσ(S) efficiently transcribes genes involved in stress responses, secondary metabolism as well as RNAs from intergenic regions with yet-unknown function. Promoter sequence comparison suggests that, in addition to different conservation of the -35 sequence and of the UP element, selective promoter recognition by either form of RNA polymerase can be affected by the A/T content in the -10/+1 region. Indeed, site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirmed that an A/T bias in the -10/+1 region could improve promoter recognition by Eσ(S). PMID:21398637

  4. In vitro transcription profiling of the σS subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase: re-definition of the σS regulon and identification of σS-specific promoter sequence elements

    PubMed Central

    Maciąg, Anna; Peano, Clelia; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Egli, Thomas; De Bellis, Gianluca; Landini, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Specific promoter recognition by bacterial RNA polymerase is mediated by σ subunits, which assemble with RNA polymerase core enzyme (E) during transcription initiation. However, σ70 (the housekeeping σ subunit) and σS (an alternative σ subunit mostly active during slow growth) recognize almost identical promoter sequences, thus raising the question of how promoter selectivity is achieved in the bacterial cell. To identify novel sequence determinants for selective promoter recognition, we performed run-off/microarray (ROMA) experiments with RNA polymerase saturated either with σ70 (Eσ70) or with σS (EσS) using the whole Escherichia coli genome as DNA template. We found that Eσ70, in the absence of any additional transcription factor, preferentially transcribes genes associated with fast growth (e.g. ribosomal operons). In contrast, EσS efficiently transcribes genes involved in stress responses, secondary metabolism as well as RNAs from intergenic regions with yet-unknown function. Promoter sequence comparison suggests that, in addition to different conservation of the −35 sequence and of the UP element, selective promoter recognition by either form of RNA polymerase can be affected by the A/T content in the −10/+1 region. Indeed, site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirmed that an A/T bias in the −10/+1 region could improve promoter recognition by EσS. PMID:21398637

  5. Diversity of extracellular proteins during the transition from the 'proto-apicomplexan' alveolates to the apicomplexan obligate parasites.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Thomas J; Pain, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    The recent completion of high-coverage draft genome sequences for several alveolate protozoans - namely, the chromerids, Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis; the perkinsid Perkinsus marinus; the apicomplexan, Gregarina niphandrodes, as well as high coverage transcriptome sequence information for several colpodellids, allows for new genome-scale comparisons across a rich landscape of apicomplexans and other alveolates. Genome annotations can now be used to help interpret fine ultrastructure and cell biology, and guide new studies to describe a variety of alveolate life strategies, such as symbiosis or free living, predation, and obligate intracellular parasitism, as well to provide foundations to dissect the evolutionary transitions between these niches. This review focuses on the attempt to identify extracellular proteins which might mediate the physical interface of cell-cell interactions within the above life strategies, aided by annotation of the repertoires of predicted surface and secreted proteins encoded within alveolate genomes. In particular, we discuss what descriptions of the predicted extracellular proteomes reveal regarding a hypothetical last common ancestor of a pre-apicomplexan alveolate - guided by ultrastructure, life strategies and phylogenetic relationships - in an attempt to understand the evolution of obligate parasitism in apicomplexans. PMID:26585326

  6. The small FNR regulon of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: comparison with the larger Escherichia coli FNR regulon and interaction with the NarQ-NarP regulon

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Rebekah N; Overton, Tim W; Snyder, Lori AS; McGowan, Simon J; Smith, Harry; Cole, Jeff A; Saunders, Nigel J

    2007-01-01

    Background Neisseria gonorrhoeae can survive during oxygen starvation by reducing nitrite to nitrous oxide catalysed by the nitrite and nitric oxide reductases, AniA and NorB. The oxygen-sensing transcription factor, FNR, is essential for transcription activation at the aniA promoter, and full activation also requires the two-component regulatory system, NarQ-NarP, and the presence of nitrite. The only other gene known to be activated by the gonococcal FNR is ccp encoding a cytochrome c peroxidase, and no FNR-repressed genes have been reported in the gonococcus. In contrast, FNR acts as both an activator and repressor involved in the control of more than 100 operons in E. coli regulating major changes in the adaptation from aerobic to anaerobic conditions. In this study we have performed a microarray-led investigation of the FNR-mediated responses in N. gonorrhoeae to determine the physiological similarities and differences in the role of FNR in cellular regulation in this species. Results Microarray experiments show that N. gonorrhoeae FNR controls a much smaller regulon than its E. coli counterpart; it activates transcription of aniA and thirteen other genes, and represses transcription of six genes that include dnrN and norB. Having previously shown that a single amino acid substitution is sufficient to enable the gonococcal FNR to complement an E. coli fnr mutation, we investigated whether the gonococcal NarQ-NarP can substitute for E. coli NarX-NarL or NarQ-NarP. A plasmid expressing gonococcal narQ-narP was unable to complement E. coli narQP or narXL mutants, and was insensitive to nitrate or nitrite. Mutations that progressively changed the periplasmic nitrate sensing region, the P box, of E. coli NarQ to the sequence of the corresponding region of gonococcal NarQ resulted in loss of transcription activation in response to the availability of either nitrate or nitrite. However, the previously reported ligand-insensitive ability of gonococcal NarQ, the "locked on" phenotype, to activate either E. coli NarL or NarP was confirmed. Conclusion Despite the sequence similarities between transcription activators of E. coli and N. gonorrhoeae, these results emphasise the fundamental differences in transcription regulation between these two types of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:17261178

  7. Apicomplexan Energy Metabolism: Carbon Source Promiscuity and the Quiescence Hyperbole.

    PubMed

    Jacot, Damien; Waller, Ross F; Soldati-Favre, Dominique; MacPherson, Dougal A; MacRae, James I

    2016-01-01

    The nature of energy metabolism in apicomplexan parasites has been closely investigated in the recent years. Studies in Plasmodium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii in particular have revealed that these parasites are able to employ enzymes in non-traditional ways, while utilizing multiple anaplerotic routes into a canonical tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to satisfy their energy requirements. Importantly, some life stages of these parasites previously considered to be metabolically quiescent are, in fact, active and able to adapt their carbon source utilization to survive. We compare energy metabolism across the life cycle of malaria parasites and consider how this varies in other apicomplexans and related organisms, while discussing how this can be exploited for therapeutic intervention in these diseases. PMID:26472327

  8. Targeting Purine and Pyrimidine Metabolism in Human Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, John E.

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis de novo, acquisition by salvage and interconversion of purines and pyrimidines represent the fundamental requirements for their eventual assembly into nucleic acids as nucleotides and the deployment of their derivatives in other biochemical pathways. A small number of drugs targeted to nucleotide metabolism, by virtue of their effect on folate biosynthesis and recycling, have been successfully used against apicomplexan parasites such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma for many years, although resistance is now a major problem in the prevention and treatment of malaria. Many targets not involving folate metabolism have also been explored at the experimental level. However, the unravelling of the genome sequences of these eukaryotic unicellular organisms, together with increasingly sophisticated molecular analyses, opens up possibilities of introducing new drugs that could interfere with these processes. This review examines the status of established drugs of this type and the potential for further exploiting the vulnerability of apicomplexan human pathogens to inhibition of this key area of metabolism. PMID:17266529

  9. The Mutualist Laccaria bicolor Expresses a Core Gene Regulon During the Colonization of Diverse Host Plants and a Variable Regulon to Counteract Host-Specific Defenses.

    PubMed

    Plett, Jonathan M; Tisserant, Emilie; Brun, Annick; Morin, Emmanuel; Grigoriev, Igor V; Kuo, Alan; Martin, Francis; Kohler, Annegret

    2015-03-01

    The coordinated transcriptomic responses of both mutualistic ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi and their hosts during the establishment of symbiosis are not well-understood. This study characterizes the transcriptomic alterations of the ECM fungus Laccaria bicolor during different colonization stages on two hosts (Populus trichocarpa and Pseudotsuga menziesii) and compares this to the transcriptomic variations of P. trichocarpa across the same time-points. A large number of L. bicolor genes (≥ 8,000) were significantly regulated at the transcriptional level in at least one stage of colonization. From our data, we identify 1,249 genes that we hypothesize is the 'core' gene regulon necessary for the mutualistic interaction between L. bicolor and its host plants. We further identify a group of 1,210 genes that are regulated in a host-specific manner. This variable regulon encodes a number of genes coding for proteases and xenobiotic efflux transporters that we hypothesize act to counter chemical-based defenses simultaneously activated at the transcriptomic level in P. trichocarpa. The transcriptional response of the host plant P. trichocarpa consisted of differential waves of gene regulation related to signaling perception and transduction, defense response, and the induction of nutrient transfer in P. trichocarpa tissues. This study, therefore, gives fresh insight into the shifting transcriptomic landscape in both the colonizing fungus and its host and the different strategies employed by both partners in orchestrating a mutualistic interaction. PMID:25338146

  10. RegulonDB version 9.0: high-level integration of gene regulation, coexpression, motif clustering and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Salgado, Heladia; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Ledezma-Tejeida, Daniela; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; García-Sotelo, Jair Santiago; Alquicira-Hernández, Kevin; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pannier, Lucia; Castro-Mondragón, Jaime Abraham; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Solano-Lira, Hilda; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Alquicira-Hernández, Shirley; Porrón-Sotelo, Liliana; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Hernández-Koutoucheva, Anastasia; Moral-Chávez, Víctor Del; Rinaldi, Fabio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2016-01-01

    RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx) is one of the most useful and important resources on bacterial gene regulation,as it integrates the scattered scientific knowledge of the best-characterized organism, Escherichia coli K-12, in a database that organizes large amounts of data. Its electronic format enables researchers to compare their results with the legacy of previous knowledge and supports bioinformatics tools and model building. Here, we summarize our progress with RegulonDB since our last Nucleic Acids Research publication describing RegulonDB, in 2013. In addition to maintaining curation up-to-date, we report a collection of 232 interactions with small RNAs affecting 192 genes, and the complete repertoire of 189 Elementary Genetic Sensory-Response units (GENSOR units), integrating the signal, regulatory interactions, and metabolic pathways they govern. These additions represent major progress to a higher level of understanding of regulated processes. We have updated the computationally predicted transcription factors, which total 304 (184 with experimental evidence and 120 from computational predictions); we updated our position-weight matrices and have included tools for clustering them in evolutionary families. We describe our semiautomatic strategy to accelerate curation, including datasets from high-throughput experiments, a novel coexpression distance to search for ‘neighborhood’ genes to known operons and regulons, and computational developments. PMID:26527724

  11. RegulonDB version 9.0: high-level integration of gene regulation, coexpression, motif clustering and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; Salgado, Heladia; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Ledezma-Tejeida, Daniela; Muñiz-Rascado, Luis; García-Sotelo, Jair Santiago; Alquicira-Hernández, Kevin; Martínez-Flores, Irma; Pannier, Lucia; Castro-Mondragón, Jaime Abraham; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Solano-Lira, Hilda; Bonavides-Martínez, César; Pérez-Rueda, Ernesto; Alquicira-Hernández, Shirley; Porrón-Sotelo, Liliana; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Hernández-Koutoucheva, Anastasia; Del Moral-Chávez, Víctor; Rinaldi, Fabio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2016-01-01

    RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx) is one of the most useful and important resources on bacterial gene regulation,as it integrates the scattered scientific knowledge of the best-characterized organism, Escherichia coli K-12, in a database that organizes large amounts of data. Its electronic format enables researchers to compare their results with the legacy of previous knowledge and supports bioinformatics tools and model building. Here, we summarize our progress with RegulonDB since our last Nucleic Acids Research publication describing RegulonDB, in 2013. In addition to maintaining curation up-to-date, we report a collection of 232 interactions with small RNAs affecting 192 genes, and the complete repertoire of 189 Elementary Genetic Sensory-Response units (GENSOR units), integrating the signal, regulatory interactions, and metabolic pathways they govern. These additions represent major progress to a higher level of understanding of regulated processes. We have updated the computationally predicted transcription factors, which total 304 (184 with experimental evidence and 120 from computational predictions); we updated our position-weight matrices and have included tools for clustering them in evolutionary families. We describe our semiautomatic strategy to accelerate curation, including datasets from high-throughput experiments, a novel coexpression distance to search for 'neighborhood' genes to known operons and regulons, and computational developments. PMID:26527724

  12. An SOS Regulon under Control of a Noncanonical LexA-Binding Motif in the Betaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alberola, Neus; Campoy, Susana; Emerson, David; Barbé, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The SOS response is a transcriptional regulatory network governed by the LexA repressor that activates in response to DNA damage. In the Betaproteobacteria, LexA is known to target a palindromic sequence with the consensus sequence CTGT-N8-ACAG. We report the characterization of a LexA regulon in the iron-oxidizing betaproteobacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus. In silico and in vitro analyses show that LexA targets six genes by recognizing a binding motif with the consensus sequence GAACGaaCGTTC, which is strongly reminiscent of the Bacillus subtilis LexA-binding motif. We confirm that the closely related Gallionella capsiferriformans shares the same LexA-binding motif, and in silico analyses indicate that this motif is also conserved in the Nitrosomonadales and the Methylophilales. Phylogenetic analysis of LexA and the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III (DnaE) reveal that the organisms harboring this noncanonical LexA form a compact taxonomic cluster within the Betaproteobacteria. However, their lexA gene is unrelated to the standard Betaproteobacteria lexA, and there is evidence of its spread through lateral gene transfer. In contrast to other reported cases of noncanonical LexA-binding motifs, the regulon of S. lithotrophicus is comparable in size and function to that of many other Betaproteobacteria, suggesting that a convergent SOS regulon has reevolved under the control of a new LexA protein. Analysis of the DNA-binding domain of S. lithotrophicus LexA reveals little sequence similarity with that of other LexA proteins targeting similar binding motifs, suggesting that network structure may limit site evolution or that structural constrains make the B. subtilis-type motif an optimal interface for multiple LexA sequences. IMPORTANCE Understanding the evolution of transcriptional systems enables us to address important questions in microbiology, such as the emergence and transfer potential of different regulatory systems to regulate virulence or mediate responses to stress. The results reported here constitute the first characterization of a noncanonical LexA protein regulating a standard SOS regulon. This is significant because it illustrates how a complex transcriptional program can be put under the control of a novel transcriptional regulator. Our results also reveal a substantial degree of plasticity in the LexA recognition domain, raising intriguing questions about the space of protein-DNA interfaces and the specific evolutionary constrains faced by these elements. PMID:25986903

  13. A novel sigma factor reveals a unique regulon controlling cell-specific recombination in Mycoplasma genitalium.

    PubMed

    Torres-Puig, Sergi; Broto, Alicia; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume; Pich, Oscar Q

    2015-05-26

    The Mycoplasma genitalium MG428 protein shows homology to members of the sigma-70 family of sigma factors. Herein, we found that MG428 activates transcription of recA, ruvA and ruvB as well as several genes with unknown function. Deletion of MG_428 or some of the up-regulated unknown genes led to severe recombination defects. Single cell analyses revealed that activation of the MG428-regulon is a rare event under laboratory growth conditions. A conserved sequence with sigma-70 promoter architecture (TTGTCA-N(18/19)-ATTWAT) was identified in the upstream region of all of the MG428-regulated genes or operons. Primer extension analyses demonstrated that transcription initiates immediately downstream of this sigma70-type promoter in a MG428-dependent manner. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the conserved -10 and -35 elements corroborated the requirement of these regions for promoter function. Therefore, a new mycoplasma promoter directs transcription of a unique recombination regulon. Additionally, MG428 was found to interact with the RNAP core enzyme, reinforcing the predicted role of this protein as an alternative sigma factor. Finally, our results indicate that MG428 contributes to the generation of genetic diversity in this model organism. Since recombination is an important mechanism to generate antigenic variation, MG428 emerges as a novel factor contributing to M. genitalium virulence. PMID:25925568

  14. A novel sigma factor reveals a unique regulon controlling cell-specific recombination in Mycoplasma genitalium

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Puig, Sergi; Broto, Alicia; Querol, Enrique; Piñol, Jaume; Pich, Oscar Q.

    2015-01-01

    The Mycoplasma genitalium MG428 protein shows homology to members of the sigma-70 family of sigma factors. Herein, we found that MG428 activates transcription of recA, ruvA and ruvB as well as several genes with unknown function. Deletion of MG_428 or some of the up-regulated unknown genes led to severe recombination defects. Single cell analyses revealed that activation of the MG428-regulon is a rare event under laboratory growth conditions. A conserved sequence with sigma-70 promoter architecture (TTGTCA-N18/19-ATTWAT) was identified in the upstream region of all of the MG428-regulated genes or operons. Primer extension analyses demonstrated that transcription initiates immediately downstream of this sigma70-type promoter in a MG428-dependent manner. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the conserved −10 and −35 elements corroborated the requirement of these regions for promoter function. Therefore, a new mycoplasma promoter directs transcription of a unique recombination regulon. Additionally, MG428 was found to interact with the RNAP core enzyme, reinforcing the predicted role of this protein as an alternative sigma factor. Finally, our results indicate that MG428 contributes to the generation of genetic diversity in this model organism. Since recombination is an important mechanism to generate antigenic variation, MG428 emerges as a novel factor contributing to M. genitalium virulence. PMID:25925568

  15. In silico analysis of the cyclophilin repertoire of apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Krücken, Jürgen; Greif, Gisela; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2009-01-01

    Background Cyclophilins (Cyps) are peptidyl cis/trans isomerases implicated in diverse processes such as protein folding, signal transduction, and RNA processing. They are also candidate drug targets, in particular for the immunosuppressant cyclosporine A. In addition, cyclosporine is known to exhibit anti-parasitic effects on a wide range of organisms including several apicomplexa. In order to obtain new non-immunosuppressive drugs targeting apicomplexan cyclophilins, a profound knowledge of the cyclophilin repertoire of this phylum would be necessary. Results BLAST and maximum likelihood analyses identified 16 different cyclophilin subfamilies within the genomes of Cryptosporidium hominis, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, Theileria annulata, Theileria parva, and Babesia bovis. In addition to good statistical support from the phylogenetic analysis, these subfamilies are also confirmed by comparison of cyclophilin domain architecture. Within an individual genome, the number of different Cyp genes that could be deduced varies between 7–9 for Cryptosporidia and 14 for T. gondii. Many of the putative apicomplexan cyclophilins are predicted to be nuclear proteins, most of them presumably involved in RNA processing. Conclusion The genomes of apicomplexa harbor a cyclophilin repertoire that is at least as complex as that of most fungi. The identification of Cyp subfamilies that are specific for lower eukaryotes, apicomplexa, or even the genus Plasmodium is of particular interest since these subfamilies are not present in host cells and might therefore represent attractive drug targets. PMID:19555495

  16. Prevalence of encysted apicomplexans in muscles of raptors.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, D S; Blagburn, B L

    1999-01-28

    An acid-pepsin digestion technique was used to examine portions of breast muscle and heart from raptors for encysted protozoans. Apicomplexan zoites were present in 52 (45.6%) of the 114 samples examined: 11 of 12 (91.7%) red-shouldered hawks (Buteo lineatus), 20 of 34 (58.8%) red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), two of seven (28.6%) Cooper's hawks (Accipiter cooperi), three of four (75%) sharp-shinned hawks (Accipiter striatus), one (100%) Mississippi kites (Ictinia misisippiensis), one of two (50%) American kestrels (Falco sparverius), one bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), one of two (50%) golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), one of three (33%) turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), two of three (66.7%) black vultures (Coragyps atratus), three of six (50%) great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus), five of 15 (33.3%) barred owls (Strix varia), and one of 12 (8.3%) screech owls (Asio otus). Encysted protozoans were not observed in digests of tissues from three broad-winged hawks (Buteo platypterus), four ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), and five barn owls (Tyto alba). Apicomplexan cysts resembling Sarcocystis species were observed in tissue sections of muscles from 28 (37.8%) of 74 raptors. PMID:9950339

  17. New roles for perforins and proteases in apicomplexan egress.

    PubMed

    Roiko, Marijo S; Carruthers, Vern B

    2009-10-01

    Egress is a pivotal step in the life cycle of intracellular pathogens initiating the transition from an expiring host cell to a fresh target cell. While much attention has been focused on understanding cell invasion by intracellular pathogens, recent work is providing a new appreciation of mechanisms and therapeutic potential of microbial egress. This review highlights recent insight into cell egress by apicomplexan parasites and emerging contributions of membranolytic and proteolytic secretory products, along with host proteases. New findings suggest that Toxoplasma gondii secretes a pore-forming protein, TgPLP1, during egress that facilitates parasite escape from the cell by perforating the parasitophorous membrane. Also, in a cascade of proteolytic events, Plasmodium falciparum late-stage schizonts activate and secrete a subtilisin, PfSUB1, which processes enigmatic putative proteases called serine-repeat antigens that contribute to merozoite egress. A new report also suggests that calcium-activated host proteases called calpains aid parasite exit, possibly by acting upon the host cytoskeleton. Together these discoveries reveal important new molecular players involved in the principal steps of egress by apicomplexans. PMID:19614666

  18. New Roles for Perforins and Proteases in Apicomplexan Egress

    PubMed Central

    Roiko, Marijo S.; Carruthers, Vern B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Egress is a pivotal step in the lifecycle of intracellular pathogens initiating the transition from an expiring host cell to a fresh target cell. While much attention has been focused on understanding cell invasion by intracellular pathogens, recent work is providing a new appreciation of mechanisms and therapeutic potential of microbial egress. This review highlights recent insight into cell egress by apicomplexan parasites and emerging contributions of membranolytic and proteolytic secretory products, along with host proteases. New findings suggest that Toxoplasma gondii secretes a pore-forming protein, TgPLP1, during egress that facilitates parasite escape from the cell by perforating the parasitophorous membrane. Also, in a cascade of proteolytic events, Plasmodium falciparum late stage schizonts activate and secrete a subtlilisin, PfSUB1, which processes enigmatic putative proteases called SERAs that contribute to merozoite egress. A new report also suggests that calcium-activated host proteases called calpains aid parasite exit, possibly by acting upon the host cytoskeleton. Together these discoveries reveal important new molecular players involved in the principal steps of egress by apicomplexans. PMID:19614666

  19. Sterol Composition and Biosynthetic Genes of Vitrella brassicaformis, a Recently Discovered Chromerid: Comparison to Chromera velia and Phylogenetic Relationship with Apicomplexan Parasites.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Manoj; Salem, Mohamed; Leblond, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    Vitrella brassicaformis is the second discovered species in the Chromerida, and first in the family Vitrellaceae. Chromera velia, the first discovered species, forms an independent photosynthetic lineage with V. brassicaformis, and both are closely related to peridinin-containing dinoflagellates and nonphotosynthetic apicomplexans; both also show phylogenetic closeness with red algal plastids. We have utilized gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify two free sterols, 24-ethylcholest-5-en-3β-ol, and a minor unknown sterol which appeared to be a C(28:4) compound. We have also used RNA Seq analysis to identify seven genes found in the nonmevalonate/methylerythritol pathway (MEP) for sterol biosynthesis. Subsequent genome analysis of V. brassicaformis showed the presence of two mevalonate (MVA) pathway genes, though the genes were not observed in the transcriptome analysis. Transcripts from four genes (dxr, ispf, ispd, and idi) were selected and translated into proteins to study the phylogenetic relationship of sterol biosynthesis in V. brassicaformis and C. velia to other groups of algae and apicomplexans. On the basis of our genomic and transcriptomic analyses, we hypothesize that the MEP pathway was the primary pathway that apicomplexans used for sterol biosynthesis before they lost their sterol biosynthesis ability, although contribution of the MVA pathway cannot be discounted. PMID:25996517

  20. A comparison of the low temperature transcriptomes and CBF regulons of three plant species that differ in freezing tolerance: Solanum commersonii, Solanum tuberosum, and Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Pino, María-Teresa; Jeknić, Zoran; Zou, Cheng; Shiu, Shin-Han; Chen, Tony H. H.; Thomashow, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Solanum commersonii and Solanum tuberosum are closely related plant species that differ in their abilities to cold acclimate; whereas S. commersonii increases in freezing tolerance in response to low temperature, S. tuberosum does not. In Arabidopsis thaliana, cold-regulated genes have been shown to contribute to freezing tolerance, including those that comprise the CBF regulon, genes that are controlled by the CBF transcription factors. The low temperature transcriptomes and CBF regulons of S. commersonii and S. tuberosum were therefore compared to determine whether there might be differences that contribute to their differences in ability to cold acclimate. The results indicated that both plants alter gene expression in response to low temperature to similar degrees with similar kinetics and that both plants have CBF regulons composed of hundreds of genes. However, there were considerable differences in the sets of genes that comprised the low temperature transcriptomes and CBF regulons of the two species. Thus differences in cold regulatory programmes may contribute to the differences in freezing tolerance of these two species. However, 53 groups of putative orthologous genes that are cold-regulated in S. commersonii, S. tuberosum, and A. thaliana were identified. Given that the evolutionary distance between the two Solanum species and A. thaliana is 112–156 million years, it seems likely that these conserved cold-regulated genes—many of which encode transcription factors and proteins of unknown function—have fundamental roles in plant growth and development at low temperature. PMID:21511909

  1. Factors mediating plastid dependency and the origins of parasitism in apicomplexans and their close relatives

    PubMed Central

    Janouškovec, Jan; Tikhonenkov, Denis V.; Burki, Fabien; Howe, Alexis T.; Kolísko, Martin; Mylnikov, Alexander P.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexans are a major lineage of parasites, including causative agents of malaria and toxoplasmosis. How such highly adapted parasites evolved from free-living ancestors is poorly understood, particularly because they contain nonphotosynthetic plastids with which they have a complex metabolic dependency. Here, we examine the origin of apicomplexan parasitism by resolving the evolutionary distribution of several key characteristics in their closest free-living relatives, photosynthetic chromerids and predatory colpodellids. Using environmental sequence data, we describe the diversity of these apicomplexan-related lineages and select five species that represent this diversity for transcriptome sequencing. Phylogenomic analysis recovered a monophyletic lineage of chromerids and colpodellids as the sister group to apicomplexans, and a complex distribution of retention versus loss for photosynthesis, plastid genomes, and plastid organelles. Reconstructing the evolution of all plastid and cytosolic metabolic pathways related to apicomplexan plastid function revealed an ancient dependency on plastid isoprenoid biosynthesis, predating the divergence of apicomplexan and dinoflagellates. Similarly, plastid genome retention is strongly linked to the retention of two genes in the plastid genome, sufB and clpC, altogether suggesting a relatively simple model for plastid retention and loss. Lastly, we examine the broader distribution of a suite of molecular characteristics previously linked to the origins of apicomplexan parasitism and find that virtually all are present in their free-living relatives. The emergence of parasitism may not be driven by acquisition of novel components, but rather by loss and modification of the existing, conserved traits. PMID:25717057

  2. Factors mediating plastid dependency and the origins of parasitism in apicomplexans and their close relatives.

    PubMed

    Janouškovec, Jan; Tikhonenkov, Denis V; Burki, Fabien; Howe, Alexis T; Kolísko, Martin; Mylnikov, Alexander P; Keeling, Patrick J

    2015-08-18

    Apicomplexans are a major lineage of parasites, including causative agents of malaria and toxoplasmosis. How such highly adapted parasites evolved from free-living ancestors is poorly understood, particularly because they contain nonphotosynthetic plastids with which they have a complex metabolic dependency. Here, we examine the origin of apicomplexan parasitism by resolving the evolutionary distribution of several key characteristics in their closest free-living relatives, photosynthetic chromerids and predatory colpodellids. Using environmental sequence data, we describe the diversity of these apicomplexan-related lineages and select five species that represent this diversity for transcriptome sequencing. Phylogenomic analysis recovered a monophyletic lineage of chromerids and colpodellids as the sister group to apicomplexans, and a complex distribution of retention versus loss for photosynthesis, plastid genomes, and plastid organelles. Reconstructing the evolution of all plastid and cytosolic metabolic pathways related to apicomplexan plastid function revealed an ancient dependency on plastid isoprenoid biosynthesis, predating the divergence of apicomplexan and dinoflagellates. Similarly, plastid genome retention is strongly linked to the retention of two genes in the plastid genome, sufB and clpC, altogether suggesting a relatively simple model for plastid retention and loss. Lastly, we examine the broader distribution of a suite of molecular characteristics previously linked to the origins of apicomplexan parasitism and find that virtually all are present in their free-living relatives. The emergence of parasitism may not be driven by acquisition of novel components, but rather by loss and modification of the existing, conserved traits. PMID:25717057

  3. Divergence of the SigB regulon and pathogenesis of the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Bacillus cereus sensu lato group currently includes seven species (B. cereus, B. anthracis, B. mycoides, B. pseudomycoides, B. thuringiensis, B. weihenstephanensis and B. cytotoxicus) that recent phylogenetic and phylogenomic analyses suggest are likely a single species, despite their varied phenotypes. Although horizontal gene transfer and insertion-deletion events are clearly important for promoting divergence among these genomes, recent studies have demonstrated that a major basis for phenotypic diversity in these organisms may be differential regulation of the highly similar gene content shared by these organisms. To explore this hypothesis, we used an in silico approach to evaluate the relationship of pathogenic potential and the divergence of the SigB-dependent general stress response within the B. cereus sensu lato group, since SigB has been demonstrated to support pathogenesis in Bacillus, Listeria and Staphylococcus species. Results During the divergence of these organisms from a common “SigB-less” ancestor, the placement of SigB promoters at varied locations in the B. cereus sensu lato genomes predict alternative structures for the SigB regulon in different organisms. Predicted promoter changes suggesting differential transcriptional control of a common gene pool predominate over evidence of indels or horizontal gene transfer for explaining SigB regulon divergence. Conclusions Four lineages of the SigB regulon have arisen that encompass different gene contents and suggest different strategies for supporting pathogenesis. This is consistent with the hypothesis that divergence within the B. cereus sensu lato group rests in part on alternative strategies for regulation of a common gene pool. PMID:23088190

  4. Structural and Mechanistic Basis of Zinc Regulation Across the E. coli Zur Regulon

    PubMed Central

    Gilston, Benjamin A.; Wang, Suning; Marcus, Mason D.; Canalizo-Hernández, Mónica A.; Swindell, Elden P.; Xue, Yi; Mondragón, Alfonso; O'Halloran, Thomas V.

    2014-01-01

    Commensal microbes, whether they are beneficial or pathogenic, are sensitive to host processes that starve or swamp the prokaryote with large fluctuations in local zinc concentration. To understand how microorganisms coordinate a dynamic response to changes in zinc availability at the molecular level, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of the zinc-sensing zinc uptake regulator (Zur) protein at each of the known Zur-regulated genes in Escherichia coli. We solved the structure of zinc-loaded Zur bound to the PznuABC promoter and show that this metalloregulatory protein represses gene expression by a highly cooperative binding of two adjacent dimers to essentially encircle the core element of each of the Zur-regulated promoters. Cooperativity in these protein-DNA interactions requires a pair of asymmetric salt bridges between Arg52 and Asp49′ that connect otherwise independent dimers. Analysis of the protein-DNA interface led to the discovery of a new member of the Zur-regulon: pliG. We demonstrate this gene is directly regulated by Zur in a zinc responsive manner. The pliG promoter forms stable complexes with either one or two Zur dimers with significantly less protein-DNA cooperativity than observed at other Zur regulon promoters. Comparison of the in vitro Zur-DNA binding affinity at each of four Zur-regulon promoters reveals ca. 10,000-fold variation Zur-DNA binding constants. The degree of Zur repression observed in vivo by comparison of transcript copy number in wild-type and Δzur strains parallels this trend spanning a 100-fold difference. We conclude that the number of ferric uptake regulator (Fur)-family dimers that bind within any given promoter varies significantly and that the thermodynamic profile of the Zur-DNA interactions directly correlates with the physiological response at different promoters. PMID:25369000

  5. Structural and mechanistic basis of zinc regulation across the E. coli Zur regulon.

    PubMed

    Gilston, Benjamin A; Wang, Suning; Marcus, Mason D; Canalizo-Hernández, Mónica A; Swindell, Elden P; Xue, Yi; Mondragón, Alfonso; O'Halloran, Thomas V

    2014-11-01

    Commensal microbes, whether they are beneficial or pathogenic, are sensitive to host processes that starve or swamp the prokaryote with large fluctuations in local zinc concentration. To understand how microorganisms coordinate a dynamic response to changes in zinc availability at the molecular level, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of the zinc-sensing zinc uptake regulator (Zur) protein at each of the known Zur-regulated genes in Escherichia coli. We solved the structure of zinc-loaded Zur bound to the P(znuABC) promoter and show that this metalloregulatory protein represses gene expression by a highly cooperative binding of two adjacent dimers to essentially encircle the core element of each of the Zur-regulated promoters. Cooperativity in these protein-DNA interactions requires a pair of asymmetric salt bridges between Arg52 and Asp49' that connect otherwise independent dimers. Analysis of the protein-DNA interface led to the discovery of a new member of the Zur-regulon: pliG. We demonstrate this gene is directly regulated by Zur in a zinc responsive manner. The pliG promoter forms stable complexes with either one or two Zur dimers with significantly less protein-DNA cooperativity than observed at other Zur regulon promoters. Comparison of the in vitro Zur-DNA binding affinity at each of four Zur-regulon promoters reveals ca. 10,000-fold variation Zur-DNA binding constants. The degree of Zur repression observed in vivo by comparison of transcript copy number in wild-type and Δzur strains parallels this trend spanning a 100-fold difference. We conclude that the number of ferric uptake regulator (Fur)-family dimers that bind within any given promoter varies significantly and that the thermodynamic profile of the Zur-DNA interactions directly correlates with the physiological response at different promoters. PMID:25369000

  6. MicroRNA regulons in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, H I; Katsura, A; Matsuyama, H; Miyazono, K

    2015-01-01

    Cancer initiation and progression are defined by the behavior of cancer cells per se and the development of tumor tissues, both of which are modulated by crosstalk between cancer cells and the surrounding microenvironment. Advances in cancer research have highlighted the significance of constant evolution of the tumor microenvironment, leading to tumor formation, metastasis and refractoriness to therapy. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that function as major players of posttranscriptional gene regulation in diverse biological processes. They function as both tumor suppressors and promoters in many aspects of the autonomous behavior of cancer cells. Theoretically, dysfunction in the gene regulatory networks of cancer cells is one of the major driving forces for alterations of ostensibly normal surrounding cells. In this context, the core targets of miRNAs, termed miRNA regulons, are currently being expanded to include various modulators of the tumor microenvironment. Recent advances have highlighted two important roles played by miRNAs in the evolution of tumor microenvironments: miRNAs in tumor cells transform the microenvironment via non-cell-autonomous mechanisms, and miRNAs in neighboring cells stabilize cancer hallmark traits. These observations epitomize the distal and proximal functions of miRNAs in tumor microenvironments, respectively. Such regulation by miRNAs affects tumor angiogenesis, immune invasion and tumorstromal interactions. This review summarizes recent findings on the mechanisms of miRNA-mediated regulation of tumor microenvironments, with a perspective on the design of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25132266

  7. Maltotriose is the inducer of the maltose regulon of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Raibaud, O; Richet, E

    1987-01-01

    In a cell-free system programmed with a plasmid bearing a malP'-'lacZ gene fusion under the control of malPp, beta-galactosidase synthesis was strictly dependent on the presence of both the MalT activator protein and the inducer of the Escherichia coli maltose regulon. We show that, among all maltodextrins tested (from maltose to maltoheptaose), only maltotriose was able to induce beta-galactosidase synthesis. Likewise, in an in vitro transcription system, initiation of transcription at malPp required the presence of the MalT protein and maltotriose along with the RNA polymerase holoenzyme; neither maltose nor maltotetraose could substitute for maltotriose. Images PMID:3298211

  8. In silico discovery of the dormancy regulons in a number of Actinobacteria genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimova, Anna; Dubchak, Inna; Arkin, Adam; Gelfand, Mikhail

    2010-11-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a dangerous Actinobacteria infecting nearly one third of the human population. It becomes dormant and phenotypically drug resistant in response to stresses. An important feature of the M. tuberculosis pathogenesis is the prevalence of latent infection without disease, making understanding of the mechanisms used by the bacteria to exist in this state and to switch to metabolically active infectious form a vital problem to consider. M. tuberculosis dormancy is regulated by the three-component regulatory system of two kinases (DosT and DevS) and transcriprional regulator (DevR). DevR activates transcription of a set of genes, which allow the bacteria to survive long periods of anaerobiosis, and may be important for long-term survival within the host during latent infection. The DevR-regulon is studied experimentally in M. tuberculosis and few other phylogenetically close Mycobacteria spp. As many other two-component systems, the devRS operon is autoregulated. However, the mechanism of the dormancy is not completely clear even for these bacteria and there is no data describing the dormancy regulons in other species.

  9. Characterization of the Ers Regulon of Enterococcus faecalis▿

    PubMed Central

    Riboulet-Bisson, Eliette; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Budin-Verneuil, Aurélie; Auffray, Yanick; Hartke, Axel; Giard, Jean-Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Ers has been qualified as the PrfA-like transcriptional regulator of Enterococcus faecalis. In a previous study we reported that Ers is important for the survival within macrophages of this opportunist pathogenic bacterium. In the present work we have used proteomic and microarray expression profiling of E. faecalis JH2-2 and an ers-deleted mutant (Δers mutant) strains to define the Ers regulon. In addition to EF_0082 (encoding a putative facilitator family transporter), already known to be under Ers regulation, three genes or operons displayed a significant decrease (confirmed by reverse transcription quantitative PCR) in expression in the Δers mutant. The first locus corresponds to three genes: arcA, arcB, and arcC1 (arcABC). These genes are members of the ADI operon, encoding enzymes of the arginine deiminase system. The second is the EF_1459 gene, which encodes a hypothetical protein and is located within a putative phage genetic element. Lastly, Ef_3319 is annotated as the alpha subunit of the citrate lyase encoded by citF. citF is a member of a putative 12-gene operon involved in citrate catabolism. Moreover, the promoter sequence, similar to the “PrfA box” and found in the promoter regions of ers and EF_0082, has been shown to be included in the DNA segment recognized by Ers. Phenotypic analysis of the Δers mutant strain revealed a growth defect when cultured with arginine or citrate as the energy source; this was not seen for the wild type. As expected, similar results were obtained with mutants in which arcA and citF were inactivated. In addition, in the mouse peritonitis model of virulence, the Δers mutant appeared significantly less lethal than the JH2-2 wild-type strain. Taken together, these results indicate that the regulator Ers has a pleiotropic effect, especially in the cellular metabolism and virulence of E. faecalis. PMID:18426870

  10. Comparative genomics and functional analysis of rhamnose catabolic pathways and regulons in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Thiel, Vera; Stolyar, Sergey; Stanton, Krista; Fredrickson, James K.; Bryant, Donald A.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Best, Aaron A.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2013-01-01

    L-rhamnose (L-Rha) is a deoxy-hexose sugar commonly found in nature. L-Rha catabolic pathways were previously characterized in various bacteria including Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, homology searches failed to recognize all the genes for the complete L-Rha utilization pathways in diverse microbial species involved in biomass decomposition. Moreover, the regulatory mechanisms of L-Rha catabolism have remained unclear in most species. A comparative genomics approach was used to reconstruct the L-Rha catabolic pathways and transcriptional regulons in the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Chloroflexi, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Thermotogae. The reconstructed pathways include multiple novel enzymes and transporters involved in the utilization of L-Rha and L-Rha-containing polymers. Large-scale regulon inference using bioinformatics revealed remarkable variations in transcriptional regulators for L-Rha utilization genes among bacteria. A novel bifunctional enzyme, L-rhamnulose-phosphate aldolase (RhaE) fused to L-lactaldehyde dehydrogenase (RhaW), which is not homologous to previously characterized L-Rha catabolic enzymes, was identified in diverse bacteria including Chloroflexi, Bacilli, and Alphaproteobacteria. By using in vitro biochemical assays we validated both enzymatic activities of the purified recombinant RhaEW proteins from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and Bacillus subtilis. Another novel enzyme of the L-Rha catabolism, L-lactaldehyde reductase (RhaZ), was identified in Gammaproteobacteria and experimentally validated by in vitro enzymatic assays using the recombinant protein from Salmonella typhimurium. C. aurantiacus induced transcription of the predicted L-Rha utilization genes when L-Rha was present in the growth medium and consumed L-Rha from the medium. This study provided comprehensive insights to L-Rha catabolism and its regulation in diverse Bacteria. PMID:24391637

  11. Genome-wide mapping of TnrA-binding sites provides new insights into the TnrA regulon in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Mirouze, Nicolas; Bidnenko, Elena; Noirot, Philippe; Auger, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    Under nitrogen limitation conditions, Bacillus subtilis induces a sophisticated network of adaptation responses. More precisely, the B. subtilis TnrA regulator represses or activates directly or indirectly the expression of a hundred genes in response to nitrogen availability. The global TnrA regulon have already been identified among which some directly TnrA-regulated genes have been characterized. However, a genome-wide mapping of in vivo TnrA-binding sites was still needed to clearly define the set of genes directly regulated by TnrA. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with hybridization to DNA tiling arrays (ChIP-on-chip), we now provide in vivo evidence that TnrA reproducibly binds to 42 regions on the chromosome. Further analysis with real-time in vivo transcriptional profiling, combined with results from previous reports, allowed us to define the TnrA primary regulon. We identified 35 promoter regions fulfilling three criteria necessary to be part of this primary regulon: (i) TnrA binding in ChIP-on-chip experiments and/or in previous in vitro studies; (ii) the presence of a TnrA box; (iii) TnrA-dependent expression regulation. In addition, the TnrA primary regulon delimitation allowed us to improve the TnrA box consensus. Finally, our results reveal new interconnections between the nitrogen regulatory network and other cellular processes. PMID:25755103

  12. Genome-wide mapping of TnrA-binding sites provides new insights into the TnrA regulon in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Mirouze, Nicolas; Bidnenko, Elena; Noirot, Philippe; Auger, Sandrine

    2015-06-01

    Under nitrogen limitation conditions, Bacillus subtilis induces a sophisticated network of adaptation responses. More precisely, the B. subtilis TnrA regulator represses or activates directly or indirectly the expression of a hundred genes in response to nitrogen availability. The global TnrA regulon have already been identified among which some directly TnrA-regulated genes have been characterized. However, a genome-wide mapping of in vivo TnrA-binding sites was still needed to clearly define the set of genes directly regulated by TnrA. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with hybridization to DNA tiling arrays (ChIP-on-chip), we now provide in vivo evidence that TnrA reproducibly binds to 42 regions on the chromosome. Further analysis with real-time in vivo transcriptional profiling, combined with results from previous reports, allowed us to define the TnrA primary regulon. We identified 35 promoter regions fulfilling three criteria necessary to be part of this primary regulon: (i) TnrA binding in ChIP-on-chip experiments and/or in previous in vitro studies; (ii) the presence of a TnrA box; (iii) TnrA-dependent expression regulation. In addition, the TnrA primary regulon delimitation allowed us to improve the TnrA box consensus. Finally, our results reveal new interconnections between the nitrogen regulatory network and other cellular processes. PMID:25755103

  13. The Gac Regulon of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptome analysis of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 showed that 702 genes were differentially regulated (FC>4, P<0.0001) in a gacS::Tn5 mutant, with 300 and 402 genes up- and down-regulated, respectively. Similar to the Gac-regulon of four other Pseudomonas species, genes involved in motility, b...

  14. A Novel Bipartite Centrosome Coordinates the Apicomplexan Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Suvorova, Elena S.; Francia, Maria; Striepen, Boris; White, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites can change fundamental features of cell division during their life cycles, suspending cytokinesis when needed and changing proliferative scale in different hosts and tissues. The structural and molecular basis for this remarkable cell cycle flexibility is not fully understood, although the centrosome serves a key role in determining when and how much replication will occur. Here we describe the discovery of multiple replicating core complexes with distinct protein composition and function in the centrosome of Toxoplasma gondii. An outer core complex distal from the nucleus contains the TgCentrin1/TgSfi1 protein pair, along with the cartwheel protein TgSas-6 and a novel Aurora-related kinase, while an inner core closely aligned with the unique spindle pole (centrocone) holds distant orthologs of the CEP250/C-Nap protein family. This outer/inner spatial relationship of centrosome cores is maintained throughout the cell cycle. When in metaphase, the duplicated cores align to opposite sides of the kinetochores in a linear array. As parasites transition into S phase, the cores sequentially duplicate, outer core first and inner core second, ensuring that each daughter parasite inherits one copy of each type of centrosome core. A key serine/threonine kinase distantly related to the MAPK family is localized to the centrosome, where it restricts core duplication to once per cycle and ensures the proper formation of new daughter parasites. Genetic analysis of the outer core in a temperature-sensitive mutant demonstrated this core functions primarily in cytokinesis. An inhibition of ts-TgSfi1 function at high temperature caused the loss of outer cores and a severe block to budding, while at the same time the inner core amplified along with the unique spindle pole, indicating the inner core and spindle pole are independent and co-regulated. The discovery of a novel bipartite organization in the parasite centrosome that segregates the functions of karyokinesis and cytokinesis provides an explanation for how cell cycle flexibility is achieved in apicomplexan life cycles. PMID:25734885

  15. A novel bipartite centrosome coordinates the apicomplexan cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Suvorova, Elena S; Francia, Maria; Striepen, Boris; White, Michael W

    2015-03-01

    Apicomplexan parasites can change fundamental features of cell division during their life cycles, suspending cytokinesis when needed and changing proliferative scale in different hosts and tissues. The structural and molecular basis for this remarkable cell cycle flexibility is not fully understood, although the centrosome serves a key role in determining when and how much replication will occur. Here we describe the discovery of multiple replicating core complexes with distinct protein composition and function in the centrosome of Toxoplasma gondii. An outer core complex distal from the nucleus contains the TgCentrin1/TgSfi1 protein pair, along with the cartwheel protein TgSas-6 and a novel Aurora-related kinase, while an inner core closely aligned with the unique spindle pole (centrocone) holds distant orthologs of the CEP250/C-Nap protein family. This outer/inner spatial relationship of centrosome cores is maintained throughout the cell cycle. When in metaphase, the duplicated cores align to opposite sides of the kinetochores in a linear array. As parasites transition into S phase, the cores sequentially duplicate, outer core first and inner core second, ensuring that each daughter parasite inherits one copy of each type of centrosome core. A key serine/threonine kinase distantly related to the MAPK family is localized to the centrosome, where it restricts core duplication to once per cycle and ensures the proper formation of new daughter parasites. Genetic analysis of the outer core in a temperature-sensitive mutant demonstrated this core functions primarily in cytokinesis. An inhibition of ts-TgSfi1 function at high temperature caused the loss of outer cores and a severe block to budding, while at the same time the inner core amplified along with the unique spindle pole, indicating the inner core and spindle pole are independent and co-regulated. The discovery of a novel bipartite organization in the parasite centrosome that segregates the functions of karyokinesis and cytokinesis provides an explanation for how cell cycle flexibility is achieved in apicomplexan life cycles. PMID:25734885

  16. The Yersinia enterocolitica Phospholipase Gene yplA Is Part of the Flagellar Regulon

    PubMed Central

    Schmiel, Deborah H.; Young, Glenn M.; Miller, Virginia L.

    2000-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica yplA encodes a phospholipase required for virulence. Virulence genes are often regulated in response to environmental signals; therefore, yplA expression was examined using a yplA::lacZY transcriptional fusion. Maximal yplA expression occurred between pH 6.5 and pH 7.5 and was induced in the mid-logarithmic growth phase. Potential Fnr, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (Crp), and ςF regulatory sites were identified in the nucleotide sequence. Reduction of yplA expression by aeration, addition of glucose and sucrose, and application of high temperature and salt is consistent with Fnr-, cAMP-Crp-, and ςF-mediated regulation, respectively. Expression of yplA was reduced in flhDC and fliA null strains, indicating that yplA is part of the flagellar regulon. PMID:10735878

  17. Common features and differences in the expression of the three genes forming the UGA regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cardillo, Sabrina B; Correa García, Susana; Bermúdez Moretti, Mariana

    2011-07-15

    The three genes that form the UGA regulon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are responsible for the transport and degradation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in this organism. Despite the differences in the sequence of their promoters, these genes similarly respond to GABA stimuli. The expression of UGA1, UGA2 and UGA4 depends on GABA induction and nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). The induction of these genes requires the action of at least two positive proteins, the specific Uga3 and the pleiotropic Uga35/Dal81 transcription factors. Here we show that all the members of the UGA regulon, as was already demonstrated for UGA4, are negatively regulated by extracellular amino acids through the SPS amino acid sensor. We also show that this negative effect is caused by a low availability of Uga35/Dal81 transcription factor and that Leu3 transcription factor negatively regulates UGA4 and UGA1 expression but it does not affect UGA2 expression. PMID:21708130

  18. The apicomplexan glideosome and adhesins - Structures and function.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Lauren E; Bosch, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    The apicomplexan family of pathogens, which includes Plasmodium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii, are primarily obligate intracellular parasites and invade multiple cell types. These parasites express extracellular membrane protein receptors, adhesins, to form specific pathogen-host cell interaction complexes. Various adhesins are used to invade a variety of cell types. The receptors are linked to an actomyosin motor, which is part of a complex comprised of many proteins known as the invasion machinery or glideosome. To date, reviews on invasion have focused primarily on the molecular pathways and signals of invasion, with little or no structural information presented. Over 75 structures of parasite receptors and glideosome proteins have been deposited with the Protein Data Bank. These structures include adhesins, motor proteins, bridging proteins, inner membrane complex and cytoskeletal proteins, as well as co-crystal structures with peptides and antibodies. These structures provide information regarding key interactions necessary for target receptor engagement, machinery complex formation, how force is transmitted, and the basis of inhibitory antibodies. Additionally, these structures can provide starting points for the development of antibodies and inhibitory molecules targeting protein-protein interactions, with the aim to inhibit invasion. This review provides an overview of the parasite adhesin protein families, the glideosome components, glideosome architecture, and discuss recent work regarding alternative models. PMID:25764948

  19. Modulation of toxin production by the flagellar regulon in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Aubry, Annie; Hussack, Greg; Chen, Wangxue; KuoLee, Rhonda; Twine, Susan M; Fulton, Kelly M; Foote, Simon; Carrillo, Catherine D; Tanha, Jamshid; Logan, Susan M

    2012-10-01

    We show in this study that toxin production in Clostridium difficile is altered in cells which can no longer form flagellar filaments. The impact of inactivation of fliC, CD0240, fliF, fliG, fliM, and flhB-fliR flagellar genes upon toxin levels in culture supernatants was assessed using cell-based cytotoxicity assay, proteomics, immunoassay, and immunoblotting approaches. Each of these showed that toxin levels in supernatants were significantly increased in a fliC mutant compared to that in the C. difficile 630 parent strain. In contrast, the toxin levels in supernatants secreted from other flagellar mutants were significantly reduced compared with that in the parental C. difficile 630 strain. Transcriptional analysis of the pathogenicity locus genes (tcdR, tcdB, tcdE, and tcdA) revealed a significant increase of all four genes in the fliC mutant strain, while transcription of all four genes was significantly reduced in fliM, fliF, fliG, and flhB-fliR mutants. These results demonstrate that toxin transcription in C. difficile is modulated by the flagellar regulon. More significantly, mutant strains showed a corresponding change in virulence compared to the 630 parent strain when tested in a hamster model of C. difficile infection. This is the first demonstration of differential flagellum-related transcriptional regulation of toxin production in C. difficile and provides evidence for elaborate regulatory networks for virulence genes in C. difficile. PMID:22851750

  20. The Iron Stimulon and Fur Regulon of Geobacter sulfurreducens and Their Role in Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Mallory; Qiu, Yu; Shieu, Wendy; Nagarajan, Harish; O'Neil, Regina; Lovley, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Iron plays a critical role in the physiology of Geobacter species. It serves as both an essential component for proteins and cofactors and an electron acceptor during anaerobic respiration. Here, we investigated the iron stimulon and ferric uptake regulator (Fur) regulon of Geobacter sulfurreducens to examine the coordination between uptake of Fe(II) and the reduction of Fe(III) at the transcriptional level. Gene expression studies across a variety of different iron concentrations in both the wild type and a Δfur mutant strain were used to determine the iron stimulon. The stimulon consists of a broad range of gene products, ranging from iron-utilizing to central metabolism and iron reduction proteins. Integration of gene expression and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data sets assisted in the identification of the Fur transcriptional regulatory network and Fur's role as a regulator of the iron stimulon. Additional physiological and transcriptional analyses of G. sulfurreducens grown with various Fe(II) concentrations revealed the depth of Fur's involvement in energy metabolism and the existence of redundancy within the iron-regulatory network represented by IdeR, an alternative iron transcriptional regulator. These characteristics enable G. sulfurreducens to thrive in environments with fluctuating iron concentrations by providing it with a robust mechanism to maintain tight and deliberate control over intracellular iron homeostasis. PMID:24584254

  1. A 1,3-1,4-β-Glucan Utilization Regulon in Paenibacillus sp. Strain JDR-2.

    PubMed

    Chow, Virginia; Kim, Young Sik; Rhee, Mun Su; Sawhney, Neha; St John, Franz J; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D; Preston, James F

    2016-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2 (Paenibacillus JDR-2) secretes a multimodular cell-associated glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10) endoxylanase (XynA10A1) that catalyzes the depolymerization of methylglucuronoxylan (MeGXn) and rapidly assimilates the products of depolymerization. Efficient utilization of MeGXn has been postulated to result from the coupling of the processes of exocellular depolymerization and assimilation of oligosaccharide products, followed by intracellular metabolism. Growth and substrate utilization patterns with barley glucan and laminarin similar to those observed with MeGXn as a substrate suggest similar processes for 1,3-1,4-β-glucan and 1,3-β-glucan depolymerization and product assimilation. The Paenibacillus JDR-2 genome includes a cluster of genes encoding a secreted multimodular GH16 β-glucanase (Bgl16A1) containing surface layer homology (SLH) domains, a secreted GH16 β-glucanase with only a catalytic domain (Bgl16A2), transporter proteins, and transcriptional regulators. Recombinant Bgl16A1 and Bgl16A2 catalyze the formation of trisaccharides, tetrasaccharides, and larger oligosaccharides from barley glucan and of mono-, di-, tri-, and tetrasaccharides and larger oligosaccharides from laminarin. The lack of accumulation of depolymerization products during growth and a marked preference for polymeric glucan over depolymerization products support a process coupling extracellular depolymerization, assimilation, and intracellular metabolism for β-glucans similar to that ascribed to the GH10/GH67 xylan utilization system in Paenibacillus JDR-2. Coordinate expression of genes encoding GH16 β-glucanases, transporters, and transcriptional regulators supports their role as a regulon for the utilization of soluble β-glucans. As in the case of the xylan utilization regulons, this soluble β-glucan regulon provides advantages in the growth rate and yields on polymeric substrates and may be exploited for the efficient conversion of plant-derived polysaccharides to targeted products. PMID:26746717

  2. Ubiquitous associations and a peak fall prevalence between apicomplexan symbionts and reef corals in Florida and the Bahamas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, N. L.; Thornhill, D. J.; Kemp, D. W.; Fitt, W. K.; Santos, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    Although apicomplexans are a widely recognized and important parasitic group, little is known about those associated with invertebrates, such as reef-building scleractinian corals. To resolve the potential impact of apicomplexans on coral health, it is first necessary to further describe this group of putative parasites and determine their prevalence among host species. Here, it was hypothesized that apicomplexan prevalence would vary seasonally, similar to what occurs in other marine apicomplexans as well as some coral symbionts. To test this, Caribbean scleractinian species Porites astreoides, Montastraea (= Orbicella) annularis, M. (= O.) faveolata, and Siderastrea siderea were sampled seasonally from two reefs each in the Florida Keys and the Bahamas for 9- and 5.5-year periods, respectively. Utilizing a PCR-based screening assay, apicomplexan DNA was detected from most Floridian (80.1 %: n = 555/693) and Bahamian (90.7 %: n = 311/343) coral tissue samples collected over these multi-year periods. Furthermore, apicomplexan DNA was detected from nearly all (98.7 %: n = 78/79) single polyps sampled at multiple locations within six M. faveolata colonies, indicating little to no intracolonial variation in the screening assay. Mixed-model logistic regression was utilized to determine the effects of season, host species, and reef on apicomplexan prevalence. The model identified a significant seasonal effect, with the highest apicomplexan prevalence occurring during fall. There also was a large effect of host species, with apicomplexan prevalence significantly lower among S. siderea colonies relative to the other species. While reef did not have a significant effect in the full model, there was a significant difference in apicomplexan prevalence between Floridian and Bahamian reefs for S. siderea, implying regional differences in this host species. Despite seasonal and species-specific differences in prevalence, apicomplexans are ubiquitous constituents of these particular scleractinian coral species from Florida and the Bahamas.

  3. Protococcidian Eleutheroschizon duboscqi, an Unusual Apicomplexan Interconnecting Gregarines and Cryptosporidia

    PubMed Central

    Valigurová, Andrea; Paskerova, Gita G.; Diakin, Andrei; Kováčiková, Magdaléna; Simdyanov, Timur G.

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on the attachment strategy, cell structure and the host-parasite interactions of the protococcidian Eleutheroschizon duboscqi, parasitising the polychaete Scoloplos armiger. The attached trophozoites and gamonts of E. duboscqi were detected at different development stages. The parasite develops epicellularly, covered by a host cell-derived, two-membrane parasitophorous sac forming a caudal tipped appendage. Staining with Evans blue suggests that this tail is protein-rich, supported by the presence of a fibrous substance in this area. Despite the ultrastructural evidence for long filaments in the tail, it stained only weakly for F-actin, while spectrin seemed to accumulate in this area. The attachment apparatus consists of lobes arranged in one (trophozoites) or two (gamonts) circles, crowned by a ring of filamentous fascicles. During trophozoite maturation, the internal space between the parasitophorous sac and parasite turns translucent, the parasite trilaminar pellicle seems to reorganise and is covered by a dense fibrous glycocalyx. The parasite surface is organised in broad folds with grooves in between. Micropores are situated at the bottom of the grooves. A layer of filaments organised in bands, underlying the folds and ending above the attachment fascicles, was detected just beneath the pellicle. Confocal microscopy, along with the application of cytoskeletal drugs (jasplakinolide, cytochalasin D, oryzalin) confirmed the presence of actin and tubulin polymerised forms in both the parasitophorous sac and the parasite, while myosin labelling was restricted to the sac. Despite positive tubulin labelling, no microtubules were detected in mature stages. The attachment strategy of E. duboscqi shares features with that of cryptosporidia and gregarines, i.e. the parasite itself conspicuously resembles an epicellularly located gregarine, while the parasitophorous sac develops in a similar manner to that in cryptosporidia. This study provides a re-evaluation of epicellular development in other apicomplexans and directly compares their niche with that of E. duboscqi. PMID:25915503

  4. Hyperosmotic shock induces the sigma32 and sigmaE stress regulons of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, A A; Baneyx, F

    1999-12-01

    The rise in the levels of sigmaS that accompanies hyperosmotic shock plays an important role in Escherichia coli survival by increasing the transcription of genes involved in the synthesis and transport of osmoprotectants. To determine if other stress regulons collaborate with sigmaS in dealing with high osmolality, we used single copy fusions of lacZ to representative promoters induced by protein misfolding in the cytoplasm (dnaK and ibp ), extracytoplasmic stress [P3rpoH and htrA(degP )] and cold shock (cspA). Both the sigma32-dependent, dnaK and ibp, promoters, and the sigmaE-dependent, P3rpoH and htrA, promoters were rapidly but transiently induced when mid-exponential phase cells were treated with 0.464 M sucrose. The cspA promoter, however, did not respond to the same treatment. Overproduction of the cytoplasmic domain of the sigmaE anti-sigma factor, RseA, reduced the magnitude of osmotic induction in lambdaphi(P3rpoH:lacZ ) lysogens, but had no effect on the activation of the dnaK and ibp promoters. Similarly, induction of the dnaK:lacZ and ibp:lacZ fusions was not altered in either rpoS or ompR genetic backgrounds. Osmotic upshift led to a twofold increase in the enzymatic activity of the lambdaTLF247 rpoH:lacZ translational fusion whether or not the cells were treated with rifampicin, indicating that both heat shock and exposure to high osmolality trigger a transient increase in rpoH translation. Our results suggest that the sigma32, sigmaE and sigmaS regulons closely co-operate in the managment of hyperosmotic stress. Induction of the sigma32 and sigmaE regulons appears to be an emergency response required to repair protein misfolding and facilitate the proper folding of proteins that are rapidly synthesized following loss of turgor, while providing a mechanism to increase the activity of sigmaS, the primary stress factor in osmoadaptation. PMID:10594827

  5. Re-emergence of the apicomplexan theileria equi in the United States: Elimination of persistent infection and transmission risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arthropod-borne apicomplexan pathogens that cause asymptomatic persistent infections present a significant challenge due to their life-long transmission potential. Although anti-microbials have been used to ameliorate acute disease in animals and humans, chemotherapeutic efficacy for apicomplexan pa...

  6. Evidence for a Single Origin of the 35 kb Plastid DNA in Apicomplexans.

    PubMed

    Denny, P; Preiser, P; Williamson, D; Wilson, I

    1998-02-01

    Gene organization on three selected parts of the 35-kb plastid DNA of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum was compared with that of two other apicomplexans, namely Toxoplasma gondii and Eimeria tenella. This comparison included the characteristic inverted ribosomal RNA repeat. A short segment of DNA from Theileria annulata also was included in a separate comparison. Criteria such as the presence or absence of particular genes, their map positions and their sequences, were used to assess whether the apicomplexan plastid DNAs originated from a single origin (a unitary hypothesis for the entire phylum), or whether disparate multiple events were more likely. The results provisionally favour a single origin although clearly this comparison of the apicomplexan plDNAs is still fragmentary. Contrary to the tendency towards homogeneity, evidence was found that the coccidian plastids may have evolved a suppressor mechanism for UGA stop codons. PMID:23196113

  7. Development of a Novel Method for Analyzing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Twitching Motility and Its Application to Define the AmrZ Regulon

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Binjie; Wozniak, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Twitching motility is an important migration mechanism for the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In the commonly used subsurface twitching assay, the sub-population of P. aeruginosa with active twitching motility is difficult to harvest for high-throughput studies. Here we describe the development of a novel method that allows efficient isolation of bacterial sub-populations conducting highly active twitching motility. The transcription factor AmrZ regulates multiple P. aeruginosa virulence factors including twitching motility, yet the mechanism of this activation remains unclear. We therefore set out to understand this mechanism by defining the AmrZ regulon using DNA microarrays in combination with the newly developed twitching motility method. We discovered 112 genes in the AmrZ regulon and many encode virulence factors. One gene of interest and the subsequent focus was lecB, which encodes a fucose-binding lectin. DNA binding assays revealed that AmrZ activates lecB transcription by directly binding to its promoter. The lecB gene was previously shown to be required for twitching motility in P. aeruginosa strain PAK; however, our lecB deletion had no effect on twitching motility in strain PAO1. Collectively, in this study a novel condition was developed for quantitative studies of twitching motility, under which the AmrZ regulon was defined. PMID:26309248

  8. Effect of database drift on network topology and enrichment analyses: a case study for RegulonDB

    PubMed Central

    Muskhelishvili, Georgi; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    RegulonDB is a database storing the biological information behind the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) of the bacterium Escherichia coli. It is one of the key bioinformatics resources for Systems Biology investigations of bacterial gene regulation. Like most biological databases, the content drifts with time, both due to the accumulation of new information and due to refinements in the underlying biological concepts. Conclusions based on previous database versions may no longer hold. Here, we study the change of some topological properties of the TRN of E. coli, as provided by RegulonDB across 16 versions, as well as a simple index, digital control strength, quantifying the match between gene expression profiles and the transcriptional regulatory networks. While many of network characteristics change dramatically across the different versions, the digital control strength remains rather robust and in tune with previous results for this index. Our study shows that: (i) results derived from network topology should, when possible, be studied across a range of database versions, before detailed biological conclusions are derived, and (ii) resorting to simple indices, when interpreting high-throughput data from a network perspective, may help achieving a robustness of the findings against variation of the underlying biological information. Database URL: www.regulondb.ccg.unam.mx PMID:26980514

  9. Streptococcus mutans NADH Oxidase Lies at the Intersection of Overlapping Regulons Controlled by Oxygen and NAD+ Levels

    PubMed Central

    Baker, J. L.; Derr, A. M.; Karuppaiah, K.; MacGilvray, M. E.; Kajfasz, J. K.; Faustoferri, R. C.; Rivera-Ramos, I.; Bitoun, J. P.; Lemos, J. A.; Wen, Z. T.

    2014-01-01

    NADH oxidase (Nox, encoded by nox) is a flavin-containing enzyme used by the oral pathogen Streptococcus mutans to reduce diatomic oxygen to water while oxidizing NADH to NAD+. The critical nature of Nox is 2-fold: it serves to regenerate NAD+, a carbon cycle metabolite, and to reduce intracellular oxygen, preventing formation of destructive reactive oxygen species (ROS). As oxygen and NAD+ have been shown to modulate the activity of the global transcription factors Spx and Rex, respectively, Nox is potentially poised at a critical junction of two stress regulons. In this study, microarray data showed that either addition of oxygen or loss of nox resulted in altered expression of genes involved in energy metabolism and transport and the upregulation of genes encoding ROS-metabolizing enzymes. Loss of nox also resulted in upregulation of several genes encoding transcription factors and signaling molecules, including the redox-sensing regulator gene rex. Characterization of the nox promoter revealed that nox was regulated by oxygen, through SpxA, and by Rex. These data suggest a regulatory loop in which the roles of nox in reduction of oxygen and regeneration of NAD+ affect the activity levels of Spx and Rex, respectively, and their regulons, which control several genes, including nox, crucial to growth of S. mutans under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:24682329

  10. Engineering an Acinetobacter regulon for biosensing and high-throughput enzyme screening in E. coli via flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ramesh K; Kern, Theresa L; Fox, David T; M Strauss, Charlie E

    2014-07-01

    We created a single cell sorting system to screen for enzyme activity in Escherichia coli producing 3,4 dihydroxy benzoate (34DHB). To do so, we engineered a transcription factor regulon controlling the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) for induction by 34DHB. An autoregulated transcription factor, pcaU, was borrowed from Acinetobacter sp ADP1 to E. coli and its promoter region adapted for activity in E. Coli. The engineered pcaU regulon was inducible at >5 μM exogenous 34DHB, making it a sensitive biosensor for this industrially significant nylon precursor. Addition of a second plasmid provided IPTG inducible expression of dehydroshikimate dehydratase enzyme (AsbF), which converts endogenous dehydroshikimate to 34DHB. This system produced GFP fluorescence in an IPTG dose-dependent manner, and was easily detected in single cell on flow cytometer despite a moderate catalytic efficiency of AsbF. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), individual cells carrying the active AsbF could be isolated even when diluted into a decoy population of cells carrying a mutant (inactivated) AsbF variant at one part in a million. The same biosensor was also effective for further optimization of itself. FACS on E. coli carrying randomized loci in the promoter showed several variants with enhanced response to 34DHB. PMID:24861620

  11. Engineering an Acinetobacter regulon for biosensing and high-throughput enzyme screening in E. coli via flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ramesh K.; Kern, Theresa L.; Fox, David T.; M. Strauss, Charlie E.

    2014-01-01

    We created a single cell sorting system to screen for enzyme activity in Escherichia coli producing 3,4 dihydroxy benzoate (34DHB). To do so, we engineered a transcription factor regulon controlling the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) for induction by 34DHB. An autoregulated transcription factor, pcaU, was borrowed from Acinetobacter sp ADP1 to E. coli and its promoter region adapted for activity in E. Coli. The engineered pcaU regulon was inducible at >5 μM exogenous 34DHB, making it a sensitive biosensor for this industrially significant nylon precursor. Addition of a second plasmid provided IPTG inducible expression of dehydroshikimate dehydratase enzyme (AsbF), which converts endogenous dehydroshikimate to 34DHB. This system produced GFP fluorescence in an IPTG dose-dependent manner, and was easily detected in single cell on flow cytometer despite a moderate catalytic efficiency of AsbF. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), individual cells carrying the active AsbF could be isolated even when diluted into a decoy population of cells carrying a mutant (inactivated) AsbF variant at one part in a million. The same biosensor was also effective for further optimization of itself. FACS on E. coli carrying randomized loci in the promoter showed several variants with enhanced response to 34DHB. PMID:24861620

  12. The HU Regulon Is Composed of Genes Responding to Anaerobiosis, Acid Stress, High Osmolarity and SOS Induction

    PubMed Central

    Oberto, Jacques; Nabti, Sabrina; Jooste, Valérie; Mignot, Hervé; Rouviere-Yaniv, Josette

    2009-01-01

    Background The Escherichia coli heterodimeric HU protein is a small DNA-bending protein associated with the bacterial nucleoid. It can introduce negative supercoils into closed circular DNA in the presence of topoisomerase I. Cells lacking HU grow very poorly and display many phenotypes. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the transcription profile of every Escherichia coli gene in the absence of one or both HU subunits. This genome-wide in silico transcriptomic approach, performed in parallel with in vivo genetic experimentation, defined the HU regulon. This large regulon, which comprises 8% of the genome, is composed of four biologically relevant gene classes whose regulation responds to anaerobiosis, acid stress, high osmolarity, and SOS induction. Conclusions/Significance The regulation a large number of genes encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism and catabolism pathways by HU explains the highly pleiotropic phenotype of HU-deficient cells. The uniform chromosomal distribution of the many operons regulated by HU strongly suggests that the transcriptional and nucleoid architectural functions of HU constitute two aspects of a unique protein-DNA interaction mechanism. PMID:19194530

  13. Effect of database drift on network topology and enrichment analyses: a case study for RegulonDB.

    PubMed

    Beber, Moritz E; Muskhelishvili, Georgi; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    RegulonDB is a database storing the biological information behind the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) of the bacterium Escherichia coli. It is one of the key bioinformatics resources for Systems Biology investigations of bacterial gene regulation. Like most biological databases, the content drifts with time, both due to the accumulation of new information and due to refinements in the underlying biological concepts. Conclusions based on previous database versions may no longer hold. Here, we study the change of some topological properties of the TRN of E. coli, as provided by RegulonDB across 16 versions, as well as a simple index, digital control strength, quantifying the match between gene expression profiles and the transcriptional regulatory networks. While many of network characteristics change dramatically across the different versions, the digital control strength remains rather robust and in tune with previous results for this index.Our study shows that: (i) results derived from network topology should, when possible, be studied across a range of database versions, before detailed biological conclusions are derived, and (ii) resorting to simple indices, when interpreting high-throughput data from a network perspective, may help achieving a robustness of the findings against variation of the underlying biological information.Database URL: www.regulondb.ccg.unam.mx. PMID:26980514

  14. Microarray-Based Analysis of the Staphylococcus aureus σB Regulon

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Markus; Dunman, Paul; Kormanec, Jan; Macapagal, Daphne; Murphy, Ellen; Mounts, William; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; Projan, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Microarray-based analysis of the transcriptional profiles of the genetically distinct Staphylococcus aureus strains COL, GP268, and Newman indicate that a total of 251 open reading frames (ORFs) are influenced by σB activity. While σB was found to positively control 198 genes by a factor of ≥2 in at least two of the three genetic lineages analyzed, 53 ORFs were repressed in the presence of σB. Gene products that were found to be influenced by σB are putatively involved in all manner of cellular processes, including cell envelope biosynthesis and turnover, intermediary metabolism, and signaling pathways. Most of the genes and/or operons identified as upregulated by σB were preceded by a nucleotide sequence that resembled the σB consensus promoter sequence of Bacillus subtilis. A conspicuous number of virulence-associated genes were identified as regulated by σB activity, with many adhesins upregulated and prominently represented in this group, while transcription of various exoproteins and toxins were repressed. The data presented here suggest that the σB of S. aureus controls a large regulon and is an important modulator of virulence gene expression that is likely to act conversely to RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr locus. We propose that this alternative transcription factor may be of importance for the invading pathogen to fine-tune its virulence factor production in response to changing host environments. PMID:15205410

  15. Microarray-based analysis of the Staphylococcus aureus sigmaB regulon.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Markus; Dunman, Paul; Kormanec, Jan; Macapagal, Daphne; Murphy, Ellen; Mounts, William; Berger-Bchi, Brigitte; Projan, Steven

    2004-07-01

    Microarray-based analysis of the transcriptional profiles of the genetically distinct Staphylococcus aureus strains COL, GP268, and Newman indicate that a total of 251 open reading frames (ORFs) are influenced by sigmaB activity. While sigmaB was found to positively control 198 genes by a factor of > or =2 in at least two of the three genetic lineages analyzed, 53 ORFs were repressed in the presence of sigmaB. Gene products that were found to be influenced by sigmaB are putatively involved in all manner of cellular processes, including cell envelope biosynthesis and turnover, intermediary metabolism, and signaling pathways. Most of the genes and/or operons identified as upregulated by sigmaB were preceded by a nucleotide sequence that resembled the sigmaB consensus promoter sequence of Bacillus subtilis. A conspicuous number of virulence-associated genes were identified as regulated by sigmaB activity, with many adhesins upregulated and prominently represented in this group, while transcription of various exoproteins and toxins were repressed. The data presented here suggest that the sigmaB of S. aureus controls a large regulon and is an important modulator of virulence gene expression that is likely to act conversely to RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr locus. We propose that this alternative transcription factor may be of importance for the invading pathogen to fine-tune its virulence factor production in response to changing host environments. PMID:15205410

  16. A novel copper-responsive regulon in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Festa, Richard A; Jones, Marcus B; Butler-Wu, Susan; Sinsimer, Daniel; Gerads, Russell; Bishai, William R; Peterson, Scott N; Darwin, K Heran

    2011-01-01

    In this work we describe the identification of a copper-inducible regulon in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Among the regulated genes was Rv0190/MT0200, a paralogue of the copper metalloregulatory repressor CsoR. The five-locus regulon, which includes a gene that encodes the copper-protective metallothionein MymT, was highly induced in wild-type Mtb treated with copper, and highly expressed in an Rv0190/MT0200 mutant. Importantly, the Rv0190/MT0200 mutant was hyper-resistant to copper. The promoters of all five loci share a palindromic motif that was recognized by the gene product of Rv0190/MT0200. For this reason we named Rv0190/MT0200 RicR for regulated in copper repressor. Intriguingly, several of the RicR-regulated genes, including MymT, are unique to pathogenic Mycobacteria. The identification of a copper-responsive regulon specific to virulent mycobacterial species suggests copper homeostasis must be maintained during an infection. Alternatively, copper may provide a cue for the expression of genes unrelated to metal homeostasis, but nonetheless necessary for survival in a host. PMID:21166899

  17. A Novel Copper-Responsive Regulon in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Festa, Richard A.; Jones, Marcus B.; Butler-Wu, Susan; Sinsimer, Daniel; Gerads, Russell; Bishai, William R.; Peterson, Scott N.; Darwin, K. Heran

    2010-01-01

    In this work we describe the identification of a copper-inducible regulon in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Among the regulated genes was Rv0190/MT0200, a paralogue of the copper metalloregulatory repressor CsoR. The five-locus regulon, which includes a gene that encodes the copper-protective metallothionein MymT, was highly induced in wild type Mtb treated with copper, and highly expressed in an Rv0190/MT0200 mutant. Importantly, the Rv0190/MT0200 mutant was hyper-resistant to copper. The promoters of all five loci share a palindromic motif that was recognized by the gene product of Rv0190/MT0200. For this reason we named Rv0190/MT0200 RicR for regulated in copper repressor. Intriguingly, several of the RicR-regulated genes, including MymT, are unique to pathogenic Mycobacteria. The identification of a copper-responsive regulon specific to virulent mycobacterial species suggests copper homeostasis must be maintained during an infection. Alternatively, copper may provide a cue for the expression of genes unrelated to metal homeostasis, but nonetheless necessary for survival in a host. PMID:21166899

  18. The Pho regulon: a huge regulatory network in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Beneit, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important achievements of bacteria is its capability to adapt to the changing conditions of the environment. The competition for nutrients with other microorganisms, especially in the soil, where nutritional conditions are more variable, has led bacteria to evolve a plethora of mechanisms to rapidly fine-tune the requirements of the cell. One of the essential nutrients that are normally found in low concentrations in nature is inorganic phosphate (Pi). Bacteria, as well as other organisms, have developed several systems to cope for the scarcity of this nutrient. To date, the unique mechanism responding to Pi starvation known in detail is the Pho regulon, which is normally controlled by a two component system and constitutes one of the most sensible and efficient regulatory mechanisms in bacteria. Many new members of the Pho regulon have emerged in the last years in several bacteria; however, there are still many unknown questions regarding the activation and function of the whole system. This review describes the most important findings of the last three decades in relation to Pi regulation in bacteria, including: the PHO box, the Pi signaling pathway and the Pi starvation response. The role of the Pho regulon in nutritional regulation cross-talk, secondary metabolite production, and pathogenesis is discussed in detail. PMID:25983732

  19. Novel insights on ENTH domain-containing proteins in apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Kibria, K M Kaderi; Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Oany, Arafat Rahman; Ahmad, Shah Adil Ishtiyaq

    2016-06-01

    The phylum Apicomplexa includes a large group of early branching eukaryotes having significant medical and economical importance. The molecular machinery responsible for protein trafficking is poorly understood in these apicomplexans. One of the most important proteins involved in clathrin-mediated protein trafficking is Epsin, which contains ENTH domain, a conserved domain crucial for membrane bending leading to vesicle formation. We undertook homology searching and phylogenetic analyses to produce a rigorously annotated set of Epsin homologs retrieved from diverse apicomplexan genomes. Genomic and phylogenetic comparisons revealed that apicomplexans contain unusual Epsin homologs that are distinct from those observed in mammals and yeast. Although there are four Epsin genes in mammalian system and five in the yeast genome, apicomplexan parasites consist only a single Epsin gene. The apicomplexan Epsin contains the conserved ENTH domain consisting of phosphoinositide (PtdIns)-binding sites which indicate about their functional significance in the formation of vesicles; however, the absence of ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM) suggests a possible different mechanism for protein trafficking. The existence of dileucine motif in Plasmodium, Cryptosporidum parvum and Eimeria tenella Epsins might solve their functionality while lacking a lot of conserved motifs as this motif is known to interact with different adaptor protein complexes (AP1, AP2 and AP3). Other Epsin homologs are also shown to have different peptide motifs reported for possible interaction with α-ear appendage, γ-ear appendage and EH domain present in different adaptors. Bioinformatic and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the apicomplexan Epsins have unusual functionality from that of the mammalian Epsins. This detailed study may greatly facilitate future molecular cell biological investigation for the role of Epsins in these parasites. PMID:26922178

  20. Analysis of LuxR Regulon Gene Expression during Quorum Sensing in Vibrio fischeri▿

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Nan; Callahan, Sean M.; Dunlap, Paul V.; Stevens, Ann M.

    2007-01-01

    The regulation of the lux operon (luxICDABEG) of Vibrio fischeri has been intensively studied as a model for quorum sensing in proteobacteria. Two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis previously identified several non-Lux proteins in V. fischeri MJ-100 whose expression was dependent on LuxR and 3-oxo-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). To determine if the LuxR-dependent regulation of the genes encoding these proteins was due to direct transcriptional control by LuxR and 3-oxo-C6-HSL or instead was due to indirect control via an unidentified regulatory element, promoters of interest were cloned into a lacZ reporter and tested for their LuxR and 3-oxo-C6-HSL dependence in recombinant Escherichia coli. The promoters for qsrP, acfA, and ribB were found to be directly activated via LuxR-3-oxo-C6-HSL. The sites of transcription initiation were established via primer extension analysis. Based on this information and the position of the lux box-binding site near position −40, all three promoters appear to have a class II-type promoter structure. In order to more fully characterize the LuxR regulon in V. fischeri MJ-100, real-time reverse transcription-PCR was used to study the temporal expression of qsrP, acfA, and ribB during the exponential and stationary phases of growth, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to compare the binding affinities of LuxR to the promoters under investigation. Taken together, the results demonstrate that regulation of the production of QsrP, RibB, and AcfA is controlled directly by LuxR at the level of transcription, thereby establishing that there is a LuxR regulon in V. fischeri MJ-100 whose genes are coordinately expressed during mid-exponential growth. PMID:17400743

  1. Analysis of LuxR regulon gene expression during quorum sensing in Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Qin, Nan; Callahan, Sean M; Dunlap, Paul V; Stevens, Ann M

    2007-06-01

    The regulation of the lux operon (luxICDABEG) of Vibrio fischeri has been intensively studied as a model for quorum sensing in proteobacteria. Two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis previously identified several non-Lux proteins in V. fischeri MJ-100 whose expression was dependent on LuxR and 3-oxo-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). To determine if the LuxR-dependent regulation of the genes encoding these proteins was due to direct transcriptional control by LuxR and 3-oxo-C6-HSL or instead was due to indirect control via an unidentified regulatory element, promoters of interest were cloned into a lacZ reporter and tested for their LuxR and 3-oxo-C6-HSL dependence in recombinant Escherichia coli. The promoters for qsrP, acfA, and ribB were found to be directly activated via LuxR-3-oxo-C6-HSL. The sites of transcription initiation were established via primer extension analysis. Based on this information and the position of the lux box-binding site near position -40, all three promoters appear to have a class II-type promoter structure. In order to more fully characterize the LuxR regulon in V. fischeri MJ-100, real-time reverse transcription-PCR was used to study the temporal expression of qsrP, acfA, and ribB during the exponential and stationary phases of growth, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to compare the binding affinities of LuxR to the promoters under investigation. Taken together, the results demonstrate that regulation of the production of QsrP, RibB, and AcfA is controlled directly by LuxR at the level of transcription, thereby establishing that there is a LuxR regulon in V. fischeri MJ-100 whose genes are coordinately expressed during mid-exponential growth. PMID:17400743

  2. Characterization of the oxidative stress stimulon and PerR regulon of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Palyada, Kiran; Sun, Yi-Qian; Flint, Annika; Butcher, James; Naikare, Hemant; Stintzi, Alain

    2009-01-01

    Background During gut colonization, the enteric pathogen Campylobacter jejuni must surmount the toxic effects of reactive oxygen species produced by its own metabolism, the host immune system, and intestinal microflora. Elucidation of C. jejuni oxidative stress defense mechanisms is critical for understanding Campylobacter pathophysiology. Results The mechanisms of oxidative stress defense in C. jejuni were characterized by transcriptional profiling and phenotypic analysis of wild-type and mutant strains. To define the regulon of the peroxide-sensing regulator, PerR, we constructed an isogenic ?perR mutant and compared its transcriptome profile with that of the wild-type strain. Transcriptome profiling identified 104 genes that belonged to the PerR regulon. PerR appears to regulate gene expression in a manner that both depends on and is independent of the presence of iron and/or H2O2. Mutation of perR significantly reduced motility. A phenotypic analysis using the chick colonization model showed that the ?perR mutant exhibited attenuated colonization behavior. An analysis of changes in the transcriptome induced by exposure to H2O2, cumene hydroperoxide, or menadione revealed differential expression of genes belonging to a variety of biological pathways, including classical oxidative stress defense systems, heat shock response, DNA repair and metabolism, fatty acid biosynthesis, and multidrug efflux pumps. Mutagenic and phenotypic studies of the superoxide dismutase SodB, the alkyl-hydroxyperoxidase AhpC, and the catalase KatA, revealed a role for these proteins in oxidative stress defense and chick gut colonization. Conclusion This study reveals an interplay between PerR, Fur, iron metabolism and oxidative stress defense, and highlights the role of these elements in C. jejuni colonization of the chick cecum and/or subsequent survival. PMID:19835633

  3. Genome wide analysis of the complete GlnR nitrogen-response regulon in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nitrogen is an essential element for bacterial growth and an important component of biological macromolecules. Consequently, responding to nitrogen limitation is critical for bacterial survival and involves the interplay of signalling pathways and transcriptional regulation of nitrogen assimilation and scavenging genes. In the soil dwelling saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis the OmpR-type response regulator GlnR is thought to mediate the transcriptomic response to nitrogen limitation. However, to date only ten genes have been shown to be in the GlnR regulon, a vastly reduced number compared to other organisms. Results We investigated the role of GlnR in the nitrogen limitation response and determined the entire GlnR regulon, by combining expression profiling of M. smegmatis wild type and glnR deletion mutant, with GlnR-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing. We identify 53 GlnR binding sites during nitrogen limitation that control the expression of over 100 genes, demonstrating that GlnR is the regulator controlling the assimilation and utilisation of nitrogen. We also determine a consensus GlnR binding motif and identify key residues within the motif that are required for specific GlnR binding. Conclusions We have demonstrated that GlnR is the global nitrogen response regulator in M. smegmatis, directly regulating the expression of more than 100 genes. GlnR controls key nitrogen stress survival processes including primary nitrogen metabolism pathways, the ability to utilise nitrate and urea as alternative nitrogen sources, and the potential to use cellular components to provide a source of ammonium. These studies further our understanding of how mycobacteria survive nutrient limiting conditions. PMID:23642041

  4. Refinement of the Listeria monocytogenes σB regulon through quantitative proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mujahid, S.; Orsi, R. H.; Vangay, P.; Boor, K. J.

    2013-01-01

    σB is an alternative σ factor that regulates stress response and virulence genes in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. To gain further insight into σB-dependent regulatory mechanisms in L. monocytogenes, we (i) performed quantitative proteomic comparisons between the L. monocytogenes parent strain 10403S and an isogenic ΔsigB mutant and (ii) conducted a meta-analysis of published microarray studies on the 10403S σB regulon. A total of 134 genes were found to be significantly positively regulated by σB at the transcriptomic level with >75 % of these genes preceded by putative σB-dependent promoters; 21 of these 134 genes were also found to be positively regulated by σB through proteomics. In addition, 15 proteins were only found to be positively regulated by σB through proteomics analyses, including Lmo1349, a putative glycine cleavage system protein. The lmo1349 gene is preceded by a 5′ UTR that functions as a glycine riboswitch, which suggests regulation of glycine metabolism by σB in L. monocytogenes. Herein, we propose a model where σB upregulates pathways that facilitate biosynthesis and uptake of glycine, which may then activate this riboswitch. Our data also (i) identified a number of σB-dependent proteins that appear to be encoded by genes that are co-regulated by multiple transcriptional regulators, in particular PrfA, and (ii) found σB-dependent genes and proteins to be overrepresented in the ‘energy metabolism’ role category, highlighting contributions of the σB regulon to L. monocytogenes energy metabolism as well as a role of PrfA and σB interaction in regulating aspects of energy metabolism in L. monocytogenes. PMID:23618998

  5. H-NS and StpA Proteins Stimulate Expression of the Maltose Regulon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Jörgen; Dagberg, Björn; Richet, Evelyne; Uhlin, Bernt Eric

    1998-01-01

    The nucleoid-associated protein H-NS is a major component of the chromosome-protein complex, and it is known to influence the regulation of many genes in Escherichia coli. Its role in gene regulation is manifested by the increased expression of several gene products in hns mutant strains. Here we report findings showing that H-NS and the largely homologous protein StpA play a positive role in the expression of genes in the maltose regulon. In studies with hns mutant strains and derivatives also deficient in the stpA gene, we found that expression of the LamB porin was decreased. Our results showed that the amounts of both LamB protein and lamB mRNA were greatly reduced in hns and hns-stpA mutant strains. The same results were obtained when we monitored the amount of transcription from the malEFG operon. The lamB gene is situated in the malKlamBmalM operon, which forms a divergent operon complex together with the malEFG operon. The activation of these genes depends on the action of the maltose regulon activator MalT and the global activator cyclic AMP receptor protein. Using a malT-lacZ translational fusion and antiserum raised against MalT to measure the expression of MalT, we detected reduced MalT expression in hns and hns-stpA mutant strains in comparison with the wild-type strain. Our results suggest that the H-NS and StpA proteins stimulate MalT translation and hence play a positive role in the control of the maltose regulon. PMID:9829919

  6. Selective inhibition of yeast regulons by daunorubicin: A transcriptome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Marta; Casado, Marta; Portugal, Jos; Pia, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    Background The antitumor drug daunorubicin exerts some of its cytotoxic effects by binding to DNA and inhibiting the transcription of different genes. We analysed this effect in vivo at the transcriptome level using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model and sublethal (IC40) concentrations of the drug to minimise general toxic effects. Results Daunorubicin affected a minor proportion (14%) of the yeast transcriptome, increasing the expression of 195 genes and reducing expression of 280 genes. Daunorubicin down-regulated genes included essentially all genes involved in the glycolytic pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and alcohol metabolism, whereas transcription of ribosomal protein genes was not affected or even slightly increased. This pattern is consistent with a specific inhibition of glucose usage in treated cells, with only minor effects on proliferation or other basic cell functions. Analysis of promoters of down-regulated genes showed that they belong to a limited number of transcriptional regulatory units (regulons). Consistently, data mining showed that daunorubicin-induced changes in expression patterns were similar to those observed in yeast strains deleted for some transcription factors functionally related to the glycolysis and/or the cAMP regulatory pathway, which appeared to be particularly sensitive to daunorubicin. Conclusion The effects of daunorubicin treatment on the yeast transcriptome are consistent with a model in which this drug impairs binding of different transcription factors by competing for their DNA binding sequences, therefore limiting their effectiveness and affecting the corresponding regulatory networks. This proposed mechanism might have broad therapeutic implications against cancer cells growing under hypoxic conditions. PMID:18667070

  7. Evolution of Chloroplast Transcript Processing in Plasmodium and Its Chromerid Algal Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Dorrell, Richard G.; Drew, James; Nisbet, R. Ellen R.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well understood that apicomplexan parasites, such as the malaria pathogen Plasmodium, are descended from free-living algae, and maintain a vestigial chloroplast that has secondarily lost all genes of photosynthetic function. Recently, two fully photosynthetic relatives of parasitic apicomplexans have been identified, the ‘chromerid’ algae Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis, which retain photosynthesis genes within their chloroplasts. Elucidating the processes governing gene expression in chromerid chloroplasts might provide valuable insights into the origins of parasitism in the apicomplexans. We have characterised chloroplast transcript processing pathways in C. velia, V. brassicaformis and P. falciparum with a focus on the addition of an unusual, 3′ poly(U) tail. We demonstrate that poly(U) tails in chromerids are preferentially added to transcripts that encode proteins that are directly involved in photosynthetic electron transfer, over transcripts for proteins that are not involved in photosynthesis. To our knowledge, this represents the first chloroplast transcript processing pathway to be associated with a particular functional category of genes. In contrast, Plasmodium chloroplast transcripts are not polyuridylylated. We additionally present evidence that poly(U) tail addition in chromerids is involved in the alternative processing of polycistronic precursors covering multiple photosynthesis genes, and appears to be associated with high levels of transcript abundance. We propose that changes to the chloroplast transcript processing machinery were an important step in the loss of photosynthesis in ancestors of parasitic apicomplexans. PMID:24453981

  8. Transcriptional regulation of drought response: a tortuous network of transcriptional factors

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dhriti; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Drought is one of the leading factors responsible for the reduction in crop yield worldwide. Due to climate change, in future, more areas are going to be affected by drought and for prolonged periods. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the drought response is one of the major scientific concerns for improving crop yield. Plants deploy diverse strategies and mechanisms to respond and tolerate drought stress. Expression of numerous genes is modulated in different plants under drought stress that help them to optimize their growth and development. Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a major role in plant response and tolerance by regulating the expression of many genes under drought stress. Transcription factors being the major regulator of gene expression play a crucial role in stress response. ABA regulates the expression of most of the target genes through ABA-responsive element (ABRE) binding protein/ABRE binding factor (AREB/ABF) transcription factors. Genes regulated by AREB/ABFs constitute a regulon termed as AREB/ABF regulon. In addition to this, drought responsive genes are also regulated by ABA-independent mechanisms. In ABA-independent regulation, dehydration-responsive element binding protein (DREB), NAM, ATAF, and CUC regulons play an important role by regulating many drought-responsive genes. Apart from these major regulons, MYB/MYC, WRKY, and nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factors are also involved in drought response and tolerance. Our understanding about transcriptional regulation of drought is still evolving. Recent reports have suggested the existence of crosstalk between different transcription factors operating under drought stress. In this article, we have reviewed various regulons working under drought stress and their crosstalk with each other. PMID:26579147

  9. Transcriptome-Based Analysis of the Pantoea stewartii Quorum-Sensing Regulon and Identification of EsaR Direct Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Revathy; Burke, Alison Kernell; Cormier, Guy; Jensen, Roderick V.

    2014-01-01

    Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii is a proteobacterium that causes Stewart's wilt disease in corn plants. The bacteria form a biofilm in the xylem of infected plants and produce capsule that blocks water transport, eventually causing wilt. At low cell densities, the quorum-sensing (QS) regulatory protein EsaR is known to directly repress expression of esaR itself as well as the genes for the capsular synthesis operon transcription regulator, rcsA, and a 2,5-diketogluconate reductase, dkgA. It simultaneously directly activates expression of genes for a putative small RNA, esaS, the glycerol utilization operon, glpFKX, and another transcriptional regulator, lrhA. At high bacterial cell densities, all of this regulation is relieved when EsaR binds an acylated homoserine lactone signal, which is synthesized constitutively over growth. QS-dependent gene expression is critical for the establishment of disease in the plant. However, the identity of the full set of genes controlled by EsaR/QS is unknown. A proteomic approach previously identified around 30 proteins in the QS regulon. In this study, a whole-transcriptome, next-generation sequencing analysis of rRNA-depleted RNA from QS-proficient and -deficient P. stewartii strains was performed to identify additional targets of EsaR. EsaR-dependent transcriptional regulation of a subset of differentially expressed genes was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that EsaR directly bound 10 newly identified target promoters. Overall, the QS regulon of P. stewartii orchestrates three major physiological responses: capsule and cell envelope biosynthesis, surface motility and adhesion, and stress response. PMID:25015891

  10. Genome Sequence of Babesia bovis and Camparative Analysis of Apicomplexan Hemoprotozoa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Babesia bovis is an apicomplexan tick-transmitted pathogen of cattle imposing a global risk and severe constraints to livestock health and economic development. The complete genome sequence was undertaken to facilitate vaccine antigen discovery, and to allow for comparative analysis with the related...

  11. Effects of Enrichment on Expression of Key Nutrient Regulons in Extremophiles in Hydrothermal Springs at Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowlton, M.; Elser, J. J.; Poret-peterson, A. T.

    2011-12-01

    To cope with nutrient limitation, micro-organisms have evolved diverse means to increase acquisition of nutrients such as ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate and trace metals when they become limiting. These strategies typically involve production of compound-specific transporters (i.e., ammonium transporters) or extracellular enzymes (i.e., alkaline phosphatase). Genes that encode these proteins are often under the control of shared regulatory proteins called regulons. Regulons of genes for N, P, or Fe metabolism ultimately affect the transport of vital nutrients into and out of cells and thus help organisms deal with nutrient limitation. Regulons for N, P, and Fe have been found and studied ex situ for model organisms under various nutrient-limiting conditions but are relatively unstudied in the field, especially in hydrothermal systems. The aim of this study was to characterize transcription patterns of genes for N, P, and Fe processing under experimental nutrient enrichment in a complex microbial community from an alkaline hot spring located in Yellowstone National Park. Microbial mat samples and hot spring water were placed in bottles, subjected to a fully factorial manipulation of N (125 μM N as ammonium nitrate), phosphorus (7.8 μM P as sodium phosphate), and Fe (7.8 x 10-2 μM Fe as ferric citrate), and incubated overnight at in situ temperatures. Following incubation, hot spring water was filtered and preserved for nutrient analyses and biomass subsamples were snap-frozen for molecular analysis. Chemical analysis showed a total removal of NH4 and PO4 from the water in all treatments. NO3 decreased slightly in most treatments (control, +N, +P, +Fe, +PFe, and +NPFe) but increased in the others (+NFe and +NP). Interestingly, Fe concentrations were lower in amended samples (+Fe, +NFe, +PFe, and +NPFe) than in unamended samples (control, +N, +P, +NP). To assess the transcriptional responses, primers were designed to target genes controlled by the ferric uptake regulator (Fur), phosphate-responsive signal transduction pathway (Pho), and the nitrogen transcriptional regulator TnrA. These genes-glnA, nrgAB, narB, yusV, asnRS, gltA, pstS, tagA, and phoA- have been successfully sequenced in our microbial mat community. Gene expression work is currently underway to determine if transcription of these genes is altered under single nutrient limitation and/or co-limitation, thus reflecting the results seen in the water chemistry data.

  12. Virulence regulons of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Munson, George P

    2013-12-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is frequently associated with travelers' diarrhea and is a leading cause of infant and childhood mortality in developing countries. Disease is dependent upon the orchestrated expression of enterotoxins, flexible adhesive pili, and other virulence factors. Both the heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable (ST-H) enterotoxins are regulated at the level of transcription by cAMP-receptor protein which represses the expression of LT while activating expression of ST-H. The expression of many different serotypes of adhesive pili is regulated by Rns, a member of the AraC family that represents a subgroup of conserved virulence regulators from several enteric pathogens. These Rns-like regulators recognize similar DNA binding sites, and a compiled sequence logo suggests they may bind DNA through both major and minor groove interactions. These regulators are also tempting targets for novel therapeutics because they play pivotal roles during infection. To that end, high-throughput screens have begun to identify compounds that inhibit the activity of these regulators, predominately by interfering with DNA binding. PMID:24203442

  13. Plant-Type Trehalose Synthetic Pathway in Cryptosporidium and Some Other Apicomplexans

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yonglan; Zhang, Haili; Zhu, Guan

    2010-01-01

    Background The trehalose synthetic pathway is present in bacteria, fungi, plants and invertebrate animals, but is absent in vertebrates. This disaccharide mainly functions as a stress protectant against desiccation, heat, cold and oxidation. Genes involved in trehalose synthesis have been observed in apicomplexan parasites, but little was known about these enzymes. Study on trehalose synthesis in apicomplexans would not only shed new light into the evolution of this pathway, but also provide data for exploring this pathway as novel drug target. Methodology/Principal Findings We have observed the presence of the trehalose synthetic pathway in Cryptosporidium and other apicomplexans and alveolates. Two key enzymes (trehalose 6-phosphate synthase [T6PS; EC 2.4.1.15] and trehalose phosphatase [TPase; EC 3.1.3.12] are present as Class II bifunctional proteins (T6PS-TPase) in the majority of apicomplexans with the exception of Plasmodium species. The enzyme for synthesizing the precursor (UDP-glucose) is homologous to dual-substrate UDP-galactose/glucose pyrophosphorylases (UGGPases), rather than the “classic” UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase). Phylogenetic recontructions indicate that both T6PS-TPases and UGGPases in apicomplexans and other alveolates are evolutionarily affiliated with stramenopiles and plants. The expression level of T6PS-TPase in C. parvum is highly elevated in the late intracellular developmental stage prior to or during the production of oocysts, implying that trehalose may be important in oocysts as a protectant against environmental stresses. Finally, trehalose has been detected in C. parvum oocysts, thus confirming the trehalose synthetic activity in this parasite. Conclusions/Significance A trehalose synthetic pathway is described in the majority of apicomplexan parasites including Cryptosporidium and the presence of trehalose was confirmed in the C. parvum oocyst. Key enzymes in the pathway (i.e., T6PS-TPase and UGGPase) are plant-type and absent in humans and animals, and may potentially serve as novel drug targets in the apicomplexans. PMID:20830297

  14. The Calcium Signaling Toolkit of the Apicomplexan Parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium spp

    PubMed Central

    Lourido, Sebastian; Moreno, Silvia N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites have complex life cycles, frequently split between different hosts and reliant on rapid responses as the parasites react to changing environmental conditions. Calcium ion (Ca2+) signaling is consequently essential for the cellular and developmental changes that support apicomplexan parasitism. Apicomplexan genomes reveal a rich repertoire of genes involved in calcium signaling, although many of the genes responsible for observed physiological changes remain unknown. There is evidence, for example, for the presence of a nifedipine-sensitive calcium entry mechanism in Toxoplasma, but the molecular components involved in Ca2+ entry in both Toxoplasma and Plasmodium, have not been identified. The major calcium stores are the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the acidocalcisomes, and the plant-like vacuole in Toxoplasma, or the food vacuole in Plasmodium spp. Pharmacological evidence suggests that Ca2+ release from intracellular stores may be mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) or cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) although there is no molecular evidence for the presence of receptors for these second messengers in the parasites. Several Ca2+-ATPases are present in apicomplexans and a putative mitochondrial Ca2+/H+ exchanger has been identified. Apicomplexan genomes contain numerous genes encoding Ca2+-binding proteins, with the notable expansion of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), whose study has revealed novel roles in gliding motility, microneme secretion, host cell invasion and egress, and parasite differentiation. Microneme secretion has also been shown to depend on the C2 domain containing protein DOC2 in both Plasmodium spp. and Toxoplasma, providing further evidence for the complex transduction of Ca2+ signals in these organisms. The characterization of these pathways could lead to the discovery of novel drug targets and to a better understanding of the role of Ca2+ in these parasites. PMID:25605521

  15. Basal body structure and composition in the apicomplexans Toxoplasma and Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Francia, Maria E; Dubremetz, Jean-Francois; Morrissette, Naomi S

    2015-01-01

    The phylum Apicomplexa encompasses numerous important human and animal disease-causing parasites, including the Plasmodium species, and Toxoplasma gondii, causative agents of malaria and toxoplasmosis, respectively. Apicomplexans proliferate by asexual replication and can also undergo sexual recombination. Most life cycle stages of the parasite lack flagella; these structures only appear on male gametes. Although male gametes (microgametes) assemble a typical 9+2 axoneme, the structure of the templating basal body is poorly defined. Moreover, the relationship between asexual stage centrioles and microgamete basal bodies remains unclear. While asexual stages of Plasmodium lack defined centriole structures, the asexual stages of Toxoplasma and closely related coccidian apicomplexans contain centrioles that consist of nine singlet microtubules and a central tubule. There are relatively few ultra-structural images of Toxoplasma microgametes, which only develop in cat intestinal epithelium. Only a subset of these include sections through the basal body: to date, none have unambiguously captured organization of the basal body structure. Moreover, it is unclear whether this basal body is derived from pre-existing asexual stage centrioles or is synthesized de novo. Basal bodies in Plasmodium microgametes are thought to be synthesized de novo, and their assembly remains ill-defined. Apicomplexan genomes harbor genes encoding δ- and ε-tubulin homologs, potentially enabling these parasites to assemble a typical triplet basal body structure. Moreover, the UNIMOD components (SAS6, SAS4/CPAP, and BLD10/CEP135) are conserved in these organisms. However, other widely conserved basal body and flagellar biogenesis elements are missing from apicomplexan genomes. These differences may indicate variations in flagellar biogenesis pathways and in basal body arrangement within the phylum. As apicomplexan basal bodies are distinct from their metazoan counterparts, it may be possible to selectively target parasite structures in order to inhibit microgamete motility which drives generation of genetic diversity in Toxoplasma and transmission for Plasmodium. PMID:26855772

  16. The calcium signaling toolkit of the Apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium spp.

    PubMed

    Lourido, Sebastian; Moreno, Silvia N J

    2015-03-01

    Apicomplexan parasites have complex life cycles, frequently split between different hosts and reliant on rapid responses as the parasites react to changing environmental conditions. Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) signaling is consequently essential for the cellular and developmental changes that support Apicomplexan parasitism. Apicomplexan genomes reveal a rich repertoire of genes involved in calcium signaling, although many of the genes responsible for observed physiological changes remain unknown. There is evidence, for example, for the presence of a nifedipine-sensitive calcium entry mechanism in Toxoplasma, but the molecular components involved in Ca(2+) entry in both Toxoplasma and Plasmodium, have not been identified. The major calcium stores are the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the acidocalcisomes, and the plant-like vacuole in Toxoplasma, or the food vacuole in Plasmodium spp. Pharmacological evidence suggests that Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores may be mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) or cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) although there is no molecular evidence for the presence of receptors for these second messengers in the parasites. Several Ca(2+)-ATPases are present in Apicomplexans and a putative mitochondrial Ca(2+)/H(+) exchanger has been identified. Apicomplexan genomes contain numerous genes encoding Ca(2+)-binding proteins, with the notable expansion of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), whose study has revealed roles in gliding motility, microneme secretion, host cell invasion and egress, and parasite differentiation. Microneme secretion has also been shown to depend on the C2 domain containing protein DOC2 in both Plasmodium spp. and Toxoplasma, providing further evidence for the complex transduction of Ca(2+) signals in these organisms. The characterization of these pathways could lead to the discovery of novel drug targets and to a better understanding of the role of Ca(2+) in these parasites. PMID:25605521

  17. Characterization of relA and codY mutants of Listeria monocytogenes: identification of the CodY regulon and its role in virulence.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Hayley J; Pearce, David M; Glenn, Sarah; Taylor, Clare M; Kuhn, Michael; Sonenshein, Abraham L; Andrew, Peter W; Roberts, Ian S

    2007-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive intracellular parasite and the causative organism of human listeriosis. In this article we demonstrate that L. monocytogenes encodes a functional member of the CodY family of global regulatory proteins that is responsive to both GTP and branched chain amino acids. By transcript analyses we identified the CodY regulon in L. monocytogenes and demonstrated that it comprises genes involved in amino acid metabolism, nitrogen assimilation as well as genes involved in sugar uptake and incorporation, indicating a role for CodY in L. monocytogenes in both carbon and nitrogen assimilation. A DeltarelA mutation reduced expression of the CodY regulon in early stationary phase and introduction of a DeltacodY mutation into a DeltarelA strain restored virulence. These data indicate that the avirulence of the DeltarelA mutant can in part be explained by the continued repression of the CodY regulon. The phenotypes of DeltarelA and DeltacodY mutants were studied in J774.A1 and Caco-2 cells and the DeltarelA mutation shown to effect intracellular growth. These results provide the first direct evidence that the activity of a CodY-type protein influences pathogenesis and provides new information on the physiological adaptation of L. monocytogenes to post-exponential phase growth and virulence. PMID:17302820

  18. Evolution of Escherichia coli for maximum HOCl resistance through constitutive expression of the OxyR regulon.

    PubMed

    Gundlach, Jasmin; Winter, Jeannette

    2014-08-01

    Exposure of cells to stress impairs cellular functions and may cause killing or adaptation. Adaptation can be facilitated by stress-induced mutagenesis or epigenetic changes, i.e. phenotypic variation without mutations. Upon exposure to HOCl, which is produced by the innate immune system upon bacterial infection, bacteria trigger stress responses that enable increased survival against the stress. Here, we addressed the question whether bacteria can adapt to high HOCl doses and if so, how the acquired resistance is facilitated. We evolved Escherichia coli cells for maximum HOCl resistance by successively increasing the HOCl concentration in the cultivation medium. HOCl-resistant cells showed broad stress resistance but did not carry any chromosomal mutations as revealed by whole-genome sequencing. According to proteome analysis and analysis of transcript levels of stress-related genes, HOCl resistance was accompanied by altered levels of outer-membrane proteins A, C, F and W, and, most prominently, a constitutively expressed OxyR regulon. Induction of the OxyR regulon is facilitated by a partially oxidized OxyR leading to increased levels of antioxidant proteins such as Dps, AhpC/AhpF and KatG. These changes were maintained in evolved strains even when they were cultivated without stress for a prolonged time, indicating epigenetic changes contributed to stress resistance. This indicated that maximum HOCl resistance was conferred by the accumulated action of the OxyR stress response and other factors such as altered levels of outer-membrane proteins. PMID:24899627

  19. Identification of the alternative sigma factor SigX regulon and its implications for Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Blanka, Andrea; Schulz, Sebastian; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Franke, Raimo; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Casilag, Fiordiligie; Düvel, Juliane; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Kaever, Volkhard; Häussler, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is distinguished by its broad metabolic diversity and its remarkable capability for adaptation, which relies on a large collection of transcriptional regulators and alternative sigma (σ) factors. The largest group of alternative σ factors is that of the extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors, which control key transduction pathways for maintenance of envelope homeostasis in response to external stress and cell growth. In addition, there are specific roles of alternative σ factors in regulating the expression of virulence and virulence-associated genes. Here, we analyzed a deletion mutant of the ECF σ factor SigX and applied mRNA profiling to define the SigX-dependent regulon in P. aeruginosa in response to low-osmolarity-medium conditions. Furthermore, the combination of transcriptional data with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) led to the identification of the DNA binding motif of SigX. Genome-wide mapping of SigX-binding regions revealed enrichment of downstream genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis, type III secretion, swarming and cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling. In accordance, a sigX deletion mutant exhibited altered fatty acid composition of the cell membrane, reduced cytotoxicity, impaired swarming activity, elevated c-di-GMP levels, and increased biofilm formation. In conclusion, a combination of ChIP-seq with transcriptional profiling and bioinformatic approaches to define consensus DNA binding sequences proved to be effective for the elucidation of the regulon of the alternative σ factor SigX, revealing its role in complex virulence-associated phenotypes in P. aeruginosa. PMID:24187091

  20. Identification of the Alternative Sigma Factor SigX Regulon and Its Implications for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Blanka, Andrea; Schulz, Sebastian; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Franke, Raimo; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Casilag, Fiordiligie; Düvel, Juliane; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Kaever, Volkhard

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is distinguished by its broad metabolic diversity and its remarkable capability for adaptation, which relies on a large collection of transcriptional regulators and alternative sigma (σ) factors. The largest group of alternative σ factors is that of the extracytoplasmic function (ECF) σ factors, which control key transduction pathways for maintenance of envelope homeostasis in response to external stress and cell growth. In addition, there are specific roles of alternative σ factors in regulating the expression of virulence and virulence-associated genes. Here, we analyzed a deletion mutant of the ECF σ factor SigX and applied mRNA profiling to define the SigX-dependent regulon in P. aeruginosa in response to low-osmolarity-medium conditions. Furthermore, the combination of transcriptional data with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) led to the identification of the DNA binding motif of SigX. Genome-wide mapping of SigX-binding regions revealed enrichment of downstream genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis, type III secretion, swarming and cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling. In accordance, a sigX deletion mutant exhibited altered fatty acid composition of the cell membrane, reduced cytotoxicity, impaired swarming activity, elevated c-di-GMP levels, and increased biofilm formation. In conclusion, a combination of ChIP-seq with transcriptional profiling and bioinformatic approaches to define consensus DNA binding sequences proved to be effective for the elucidation of the regulon of the alternative σ factor SigX, revealing its role in complex virulence-associated phenotypes in P. aeruginosa. PMID:24187091

  1. Genetic characterization of the HrpL regulon of the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora reveals novel virulence factors.

    PubMed

    McNally, R Ryan; Toth, Ian K; Cock, Peter J A; Pritchard, Leighton; Hedley, Pete E; Morris, Jenny A; Zhao, Youfu; Sundin, George W

    2012-02-01

    The bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of fire blight, an economically significant disease of apple and pear. Disease initiation by E. amylovora requires the translocation of effector proteins into host cells via the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) type III secretion system (T3SS). The alternative sigma factor HrpL positively regulates the transcription of structural and translocated components of the T3SS via hrp promoter elements. To characterize genome-wide HrpL-dependent gene expression in E. amylovora Ea1189, wild-type and Ea1189ΔhrpL strains were cultured in hrp-inducing minimal medium, and total RNA was compared using a custom microarray designed to represent the annotated genes of E. amylovora ATCC 49946. The results revealed 24 genes differentially regulated in Ea1189ΔhrpL relative to Ea1189 with fold-change expression ratios greater than 1.5; of these, 19 genes exhibited decreased transcript abundance and five genes showed increased transcript abundance relative to Ea1189. To expand our understanding of the HrpL regulon and to elucidate direct versus indirect HrpL-mediated effects on gene expression, the genome of E. amylovora ATCC 49946 was examined in silico using a hidden Markov model assembled from known Erwinia spp. hrp promoters. This technique identified 15 putative type III novel hrp promoters, seven of which were validated with quantitative polymerase chain reaction based on expression analyses. It was found that HrpL-regulated genes encode all known components of the hrp T3SS, as well as five putative type III effectors. Eight genes displayed apparent indirect HrpL regulation, suggesting that the HrpL regulon is connected to downstream signalling networks. The construction of deletion mutants of three novel HrpL-regulated genes resulted in the identification of additional virulence factors as well as mutants displaying abnormal motility and biofilm phenotypes. PMID:21831138

  2. Mechanisms Coordinating ELAV/Hu mRNA Regulons

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Laura E.; Keene, Jack D.

    2013-01-01

    The 5’ and 3’ untranslated regions (UTRs) of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) function as platforms that can determine the fate of each mRNA individually and in aggregate. Multiple mRNAs that encode proteins that are functionally related often interact with RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) that coordinate their expression in time and space as RNA regulons within the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) infrastructure we term the ribonome. Recent ribonomic methods have emerged that can determine which mRNAs are bound and regulated by RBPs and ncRNAs, some of which act in combination to determine global outcomes. ELAV/Hu proteins bind to AU-rich elements (ARE) in mRNAs and regulate their stability from splicing to translation, and the ubiquitous HuR protein has been implicated in cancerous cell growth. Recent work is focused on mechanistic models of how ELAV/Hu proteins increase mRNA stability and translation by repressing microRNAs (miRs) and the RNA induced silencing complex (RISC) via ARE-based ribonucleosomes that may affect global functions of mRNA regulons. PMID:23312841

  3. Characterization and analysis of the Burkholderia pseudomallei BsaN virulence regulon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis. A conserved type III secretion system (T3SS3) and type VI secretion system (T6SS1) are critical for intracellular survival and growth. The T3SS3 and T6SS1 genes are coordinately and hierarchically regulated by a TetR-type regulator, BspR. A central transcriptional regulator of the BspR regulatory cascade, BsaN, activates a subset of T3SS3 and T6SS1 loci. Results To elucidate the scope of the BsaN regulon, we used RNAseq analysis to compare the transcriptomes of wild-type B. pseudomallei KHW and a bsaN deletion mutant. The 60 genes positively-regulated by BsaN include those that we had previously identified in addition to a polyketide biosynthesis locus and genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. BsaN was also found to repress the transcription of 51 genes including flagellar motility loci and those encoding components of the T3SS3 apparatus. Using a promoter-lacZ fusion assay in E. coli, we show that BsaN together with the chaperone BicA directly control the expression of the T3SS3 translocon, effector and associated regulatory genes that are organized into at least five operons (BPSS1516-BPSS1552). Using a mutagenesis approach, a consensus regulatory motif in the promoter regions of BsaN-regulated genes was shown to be essential for transcriptional activation. Conclusions BsaN/BicA functions as a central regulator of key virulence clusters in B. pseudomallei within a more extensive network of genetic regulation. We propose that BsaN/BicA controls a gene expression program that facilitates the adaption and intracellular survival of the pathogen within eukaryotic hosts. PMID:25085508

  4. Regulon of the N-Acetylglucosamine Utilization Regulator NagR in Bacillus subtilis▿†

    PubMed Central

    Bertram, Ralph; Rigali, Sébastien; Wood, Natalie; Lulko, Andrzej T.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Titgemeyer, Fritz

    2011-01-01

    N-Acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is the most abundant carbon-nitrogen biocompound on earth and has been shown to be an important source of nutrients for both catabolic and anabolic purposes in Bacillus species. In this work we show that the GntR family regulator YvoA of Bacillus subtilis serves as a negative transcriptional regulator of GlcNAc catabolism gene expression. YvoA represses transcription by binding a 16-bp sequence upstream of nagP encoding the GlcNAc-specific EIIBC component of the sugar phosphotransferase system involved in GlcNAc transport and phosphorylation, as well as another very similar 16-bp sequence upstream of the nagAB-yvoA locus, wherein nagA codes for N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate deacetylase and nagB codes for the glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6-P) deaminase. In vitro experiments demonstrated that GlcN-6-P acts as an inhibitor of YvoA DNA-binding activity, as occurs for its Streptomyces ortholog, DasR. Interestingly, we observed that the expression of nag genes was still activated upon addition of GlcNAc in a ΔyvoA mutant background, suggesting the existence of an auxiliary transcriptional control instance. Initial computational prediction of the YvoA regulon showed a distribution of YvoA binding sites limited to nag genes and therefore suggests renaming YvoA to NagR, for N-acetylglucosamine utilization regulator. Whole-transcriptome studies showed significant repercussions of nagR deletion for several major B. subtilis regulators, probably indirectly due to an excess of the crucial molecules acetate, ammonia, and fructose-6-phosphate, resulting from complete hydrolysis of GlcNAc. We discuss a model deduced from NagR-mediated gene expression, which highlights clear connections with pathways for GlcNAc-containing polymer biosynthesis and adaptation to growth under oxygen limitation. PMID:21602348

  5. Copper trafficking in the CsoR regulon of Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Amanda K; Tan, Benedict G; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2015-01-01

    In the actinobacterium Streptomyces lividans copper homeostasis is controlled through the action of the metalloregulator CsoR. Under copper stress, cuprous ions bind to apo-CsoR resulting in the transcriptional derepression of genes encoding for copper efflux systems involving CopZ-like copper chaperones and CopA-like P-type ATPases. Whether CsoR obtains copper via a protein-protein mediated trafficking mechanism is unknown. In this study we have characterised the copper trafficking properties of two S. lividans CopZ proteins (SLI_1317 and SLI_3079) under the transcriptional control of a CsoR (SLI_4375). Our findings indicate that both CopZ-proteins have cysteine residues in the Cu(i) binding MX1CX2X3C motif with acid-base properties that are modulated for a high cuprous ion affinity and favourable Cu(i)-exchange with a target. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays transfer of Cu(i) is shown to occur in a unidirectional manner from the CopZ to the CsoR. This transfer proceeds via a shallow thermodynamic affinity gradient and is also kinetically favoured through the modulation of the acid-base properties of the cysteine residues in the Cys2His cuprous ion binding motif of CsoR. Using RNA-seq coupled with the mechanistic insights of Cu(i) transfer between CopZ and CsoR in vitro, we propose a copper trafficking pathway for the CsoR regulon that initially involves the buffering of cytosolic copper by three CopZ chaperones followed by transfer of Cu(i) to CsoR to illicit a transcriptional response. PMID:25409712

  6. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  7. Protein-targeting determinants in the secretory pathway of apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Kaasch, A J; Joiner, K A

    2000-08-01

    Apicomplexan parasites possess a highly specialized secretory apparatus. The timed secretion of proteins from three different organelles--micronemes, rhoptries and dense granules--serves to establish and maintain a parasitophorous vacuole inside the host cell in which the parasites can divide. Recent efforts have identified components that sort apicomplexan proteins to these unusual secretory organelles and have shown that this machinery is evolutionarily conserved across species. Concise amino acid sequences (e.g. tyrosine-based motifs) within the targeted protein determine their destination in Apicomplexa in a way similar to mammalian cells. Additionally, the parasite exploits new or unusual mechanisms of protein targeting (e.g. post-secretory membrane insertion). PMID:10972505

  8. Apicomplexan parasites and subversion of the host cell microRNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Mohamed-ali; Cannella, Dominique

    2011-11-01

    RNA silencing plays a major role in innate antiviral and antibacterial defenses in plants, insects, and animals through the action of microRNAs (miRNAs). miRNAs can act in favor of the microorganism, either when it is pathogen-encoded or when the microorganism subverts host miRNAs to its benefit. Recent data point to the possibility that apicomplexan parasites have developed tactics to interfere with host miRNA populations in a parasite-specific manner, thereby identifying the RNA-silencing pathway as a new means to reshape their cellular environment. This review highlights the current understanding and new insights concerning the mechanisms that could be involved and the potential roles of the host microRNome (miRNome) in apicomplexan infection. PMID:21840260

  9. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    PubMed Central

    Wernimont, Amy K.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Finerty, Patrick; Lin, Y.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites, and comprise a CaMK-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C-terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N-terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate-binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal transduction pathways. PMID:20436473

  10. Designing selective inhibitors for calcium-dependent protein kinases in apicomplexans.

    PubMed

    Hui, Raymond; El Bakkouri, Majida; Sibley, L David

    2015-07-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause some of the most severe human diseases, including malaria (caused by Plasmodium), toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis. Treatments are limited by the lack of effective drugs and development of resistance to available agents. By exploiting novel features of protein kinases in these parasites, it may be possible to develop new treatments. We summarize here recent advances in identifying small molecule inhibitors against a novel family of plant-like, calcium-dependent kinases that are uniquely expanded in apicomplexan parasites. Analysis of the 3D structure, activation mechanism, and sensitivity to small molecules had identified several attractive chemical scaffolds that are potent and selective inhibitors of these parasite kinases. Further optimization of these leads may yield promising new drugs for treatment of these parasitic infections. PMID:26002073

  11. PTS Phosphorylation of Mga Modulates Regulon Expression and Virulence in the Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Hondorp, Elise R.; Hou, Sherry C.; Hause, Lara L.; Gera, Kanika; Lee, Ching-En; McIver, Kevin S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability of a bacterial pathogen to monitor available carbon sources in host tissues provides a clear fitness advantage. In the group A streptococcus (GAS), the virulence regulator Mga contains homology to phosphotransferase system (PTS) regulatory domains (PRDs) found in sugar operon regulators. Here we show that Mga was phosphorylated in vitro by the PTS components EI/HPr at conserved PRD histidines. A ∆ptsI (EI-deficient) GAS mutant exhibited decreased Mga activity. However, PTS-mediated phosphorylation inhibited Mga-dependent transcription of emm in vitro. Using alanine (unphosphorylated) and aspartate (phosphomimetic) mutations of PRD histidines, we establish that a doubly phosphorylated PRD1 phosphomimetic (D/DMga4) is completely inactive in vivo, shutting down expression of the Mga regulon. Although D/DMga4 is still able to bind DNA in vitro, homo-multimerization of Mga is disrupted and the protein is unable to activate trancription. PTS- mediated regulation of Mga activity appears to be important for pathogenesis, as bacteria expressing either nonphosphorylated (A/A) or phosphomimetic (D/D) PRD1 Mga mutants were attenuated in a model of GAS invasive skin disease. Thus, PTS-mediated phosphorylation of Mga may allow the bacteria to modulate virulence gene expression in response to carbohydrate status. Furthermore, PRD-containing virulence regulators (PCVRs) appear to be widespread in Gram-positive pathogens. PMID:23651410

  12. Fur regulon of Salmonella typhimurium: identification of new iron-regulated genes.

    PubMed Central

    Tsolis, R M; Bäumler, A J; Stojiljkovic, I; Heffron, F

    1995-01-01

    In order to identify genes belonging to the Fur regulon of Salmonella typhimurium, a bank of 10,000 independent S. typhimurium MudJ insertion mutants was screened for lacZ fusions regulated by the iron response regulator Fur. In parallel, a plasmid gene bank of S. typhimurium consisting of 10,000 independent clones was screened for Fur-regulated promoters or iron binding proteins by the Fur titration assay (FURTA). Fur-regulated MudJ insertions and Fur-regulated promoters were mapped. In addition, iron-regulated promoter activities of transcriptional fusions from MudJ insertions and FURTA-positive clones were quantified. The nucleotide sequences of 11 FURTA-positive plasmids and of short fragments of DNA flanking three MudJ insertions were determined. By these methods we identified 14 Fur-regulated genes of S. typhimurium. For 11 of these genes, Fur-regulated homologs have been described in Escherichia coli or Yersinia enterocolitica, including fhuA,fhuB,fepA,fes,fepD,p43,entB,fur ,foxA,hemP, and fhuE. In addition, we identified three genes with homologs in other bacteria which have not previously been shown to be Fur regulated. PMID:7642488

  13. Identification of the sigmaE regulon of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Skovierova, Henrieta; Rowley, Gary; Rezuchova, Bronislava; Homerova, Dagmar; Lewis, Claire; Roberts, Mark; Kormanec, Jan

    2006-05-01

    The extracytoplasmic function sigma factor, sigma(E), has been shown to play a critical role in virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). The previously optimized two-plasmid system has been used to identify S. Typhimurium promoters recognized by RNA polymerase containing sigma(E). This method allowed identification of 34 sigma(E)-dependent promoters that direct expression of 62 genes in S. Typhimurium, 23 of which (including several specific for S. Typhimurium) have not been identified previously to be dependent upon sigma(E) in Escherichia coli. The promoters were confirmed in S. Typhimurium and transcriptional start points of the promoters were determined by S1-nuclease mapping. All the promoters contained sequences highly similar to the consensus sequence of sigma(E)-dependent promoters. The identified genes belonging to the S. Typhimurium sigma(E)-regulon encode proteins involved in primary metabolism, DNA repair systems and outer-membrane biogenesis, and regulatory proteins, periplasmic proteases and folding factors, proposed lipoproteins, and inner- and outer-membrane proteins with unknown functions. Several of these sigma(E)-dependent genes have been shown to play a role in virulence of S. Typhimurium. PMID:16622052

  14. Genetic Mapping Identifies Novel Highly Protective Antigens for an Apicomplexan Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Damer P.; Billington, Karen J.; Copestake, Susan L.; Oakes, Richard D.; Quail, Michael A.; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Shirley, Martin W.; Smith, Adrian L.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for a myriad of diseases in humans and livestock; yet despite intensive effort, development of effective sub-unit vaccines remains a long-term goal. Antigenic complexity and our inability to identify protective antigens from the pool that induce response are serious challenges in the development of new vaccines. Using a combination of parasite genetics and selective barriers with population-based genetic fingerprinting, we have identified that immunity against the most important apicomplexan parasite of livestock (Eimeria spp.) was targeted against a few discrete regions of the genome. Herein we report the identification of six genomic regions and, within two of those loci, the identification of true protective antigens that confer immunity as sub-unit vaccines. The first of these is an Eimeria maxima homologue of apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) and the second is a previously uncharacterised gene that we have termed ‘immune mapped protein-1’ (IMP-1). Significantly, homologues of the AMA-1 antigen are protective with a range of apicomplexan parasites including Plasmodium spp., which suggest that there may be some characteristic(s) of protective antigens shared across this diverse group of parasites. Interestingly, homologues of the IMP-1 antigen, which is protective against E. maxima infection, can be identified in Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Overall, this study documents the discovery of novel protective antigens using a population-based genetic mapping approach allied with a protection-based screen of candidate genes. The identification of AMA-1 and IMP-1 represents a substantial step towards development of an effective anti-eimerian sub-unit vaccine and raises the possibility of identification of novel antigens for other apicomplexan parasites. Moreover, validation of the parasite genetics approach to identify effective antigens supports its adoption in other parasite systems where legitimate protective antigen identification is difficult. PMID:21347348

  15. Is an Apicomplexan Parasite Responsible for the Collapse of the Iceland Scallop (Chlamys islandica) Stock?

    PubMed Central

    Kristmundsson, Árni; Erlingsdóttir, Ásthildur; Freeman, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the total and unexpected collapse of the Iceland scallop, Chlamys islandica, stocks around Iceland during the 2000s, a commercial fishing ban has been imposed on this valuable resource since 2003. Following the initial identification of an apicomplexan parasite in the scallops, a long-term surveillance program was established to evaluate the effect of the parasite on the population. The infections were highly prevalent in all shell sizes throughout the study. However, the parasite only impacts mature scallops where they cause severe macroscopic changes, characterized by an extensively diminished and abnormally coloured adductor muscle. A highly significant relationship was observed between infection intensity and gonad and adductor muscle indices. The first four years of the study, were characterized by high infection intensity and very poor condition of the adductor muscle and gonads, whilst during subsequent years, infections gradually decreased and the condition of the scallops improved. Histopathological changes were restricted to the presence of apicomplexan zoites which were widely distributed, causing varying degrees of pathology in all organs. In heavy infections, muscular and connective tissues were totally necrotized, destroying significant parts of numerous organs, especially the adductor muscle, digestive gland and gonads. The progression of the disease was in good synchrony with the mortality rates and the subsequent decline observed in the scallop stock and recruitment indices. Our findings strongly suggest that the apicomplexan parasite played a major role in the collapse of the Iceland scallop stock in Breidafjordur. In addition to causing mortality, the infections significantly impact gonad development which contributes further to the collapse of the stock in the form of lower larval recruitment. Furthermore, compelling evidence exists that this apicomplexan pathogen is causing serious disease outbreaks in other scallop populations. Similar abnormal adductor muscles and the parasite itself have been identified or observed in association with other mass mortality events in several different scallop species and commercial stocks in the northern hemisphere. PMID:26684810

  16. Comparative Analysis of Apicoplast-Targeted Protein Extension Lengths in Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Seliverstov, Alexandr V.; Zverkov, Oleg A.; Istomina, Svetlana N.; Pirogov, Sergey A.; Kitsis, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    In general, the mechanism of protein translocation through the apicoplast membrane requires a specific extension of a functionally important region of the apicoplast-targeted proteins. The corresponding signal peptides were detected in many apicomplexans but not in the majority of apicoplast-targeted proteins in Toxoplasma gondii. In T. gondii signal peptides are either much diverged or their extension region is processed, which in either case makes the situation different from other studied apicomplexans. We propose a statistic method to compare extensions of the functionally important regions of apicoplast-targeted proteins. More specifically, we provide a comparison of extension lengths of orthologous apicoplast-targeted proteins in apicomplexan parasites. We focus on results obtained for the model species T. gondii, Neospora caninum, and Plasmodium falciparum. With our method, cross species comparisons demonstrate that, in average, apicoplast-targeted protein extensions in T. gondii are 1.5-fold longer than in N. caninum and 2-fold longer than in P. falciparum. Extensions in P. falciparum less than 87 residues in size are longer than the corresponding extensions in N. caninum and, reversely, are shorter if they exceed 88 residues. PMID:26114107

  17. Two recently sequenced vertebrate genomes are contaminated with apicomplexan species of the Sarcocystidae family.

    PubMed

    Orosz, Ferenc

    2015-11-01

    This paper highlights a general problem, namely that host genome sequences can easily be contaminated with parasite sequences, thus careful isolation of genetic material and careful bioinformatics analysis are needed in all cases. Two recently published genomes are shown here to be contaminated with sequences of apicomplexan parasites which belong to the Sarcocystidae family. Sequences of the characteristic apicomplexan organelle, the apicoplast, were used as queries in BLASTN searches against nucleotide sequences of various animal groups looking for possible contamination. Draft genomes of a bird, Colinus virginianus (Halley et al., 2014), and a bat, Myotis davidii (Zhang et al., 2013) were found to contain at least six and 17 contigs, respectively, originating from the apicoplast of an apicomplexan species, and other genes specific to this phylum can also be found in the published genomes. Obviously, the sources of the genetic material, the muscle and the kidney of the animals, respectively, contained the parasitic cysts. Phylogenetic analyses using 18S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer 1 genes show that the parasite contaminating C. virginianus is a species of Sarcocystis related to ones known to cycle between avian and mammalian hosts. In the case of M. davidii it belongs to the Nephroisospora genus, the only member of which, Nephroisospora eptesici, has been recently identified from the kidney of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus). PMID:26264549

  18. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. Results To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. Multiple variations in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR), numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. PsrA for fatty acid degradation) and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp). Conclusions We tentatively defined the first reference collection of ~100 transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The resulting regulatory network contains ~600 regulated genes per genome that are mostly involved in metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, metals, and stress responses. Several reconstructed regulons including NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism were experimentally validated in S. oneidensis MR-1. Analysis of correlations in gene expression patterns helps to interpret the reconstructed regulatory network. The inferred regulatory interactions will provide an additional regulatory constrains for an integrated model of metabolism and regulation in S. oneidensis MR-1. PMID:21810205

  19. Global Transcriptional Response of Bacillus subtilis to Heat Shock

    PubMed Central

    Helmann, John D.; Wu, Ming Fang Winston; Kobel, Phil A.; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Wilson, Michael; Morshedi, Maud M.; Navre, Marc; Paddon, Chris

    2001-01-01

    In response to heat stress, Bacillus subtilis activates the transcription of well over 100 different genes. Many of these genes are members of a general stress response regulon controlled by the secondary sigma factor, ςB, while others are under control of the HrcA or CtsR heat shock regulators. We have used DNA microarrays to monitor the global transcriptional response to heat shock. We find strong induction of known ςB-dependent genes with a characteristic rapid induction followed by a return to near prestimulus levels. The HrcA and CtsR regulons are also induced, but with somewhat slower kinetics. Analysis of DNA sequences proximal to newly identified heat-induced genes leads us to propose ∼70 additional members of the ςB regulon. We have also identified numerous heat-induced genes that are not members of known heat shock regulons. Notably, we observe very strong induction of arginine biosynthesis and transport operons. Induction of several genes was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. In addition, the transcriptional responses measured by microarray hybridization compare favorably with the numerous previous studies of heat shock in this organism. Since many different conditions elicit both specific and general stress responses, knowledge of the heat-induced general stress response reported here will be helpful for interpreting future microarray studies of other stress responses. PMID:11717291

  20. Genome-wide analysis of the salmonella Fis regulon and its regulatory mechanism on pathogenicity islands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Bin; Wang, Quan; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Fis, one of the most important nucleoid-associated proteins, functions as a global regulator of transcription in bacteria that has been comprehensively studied in Escherichia coli K12. Fis also influences the virulence of Salmonella enterica and pathogenic E. coli by regulating their virulence genes, however, the relevant mechanism is unclear. In this report, using combined RNA-seq and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq technologies, we first identified 1646 Fis-regulated genes and 885 Fis-binding targets in the S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and found a Fis regulon different from that in E. coli. Fis has been reported to contribute to the invasion ability of S. enterica. By using cell infection assays, we found it also enhances the intracellular replication ability of S. enterica within macrophage cell, which is of central importance for the pathogenesis of infections. Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI)-1 and SPI-2 are crucial for the invasion and survival of S. enterica in host cells. Using mutation and overexpression experiments, real-time PCR analysis, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrated that Fis regulates 63 of the 94 Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI)-1 and SPI-2 genes, by three regulatory modes: i) binds to SPI regulators in the gene body or in upstream regions; ii) binds to SPI genes directly to mediate transcriptional activation of themselves and downstream genes; iii) binds to gene encoding OmpR which affects SPI gene expression by controlling SPI regulators SsrA and HilD. Our results provide new insights into the impact of Fis on SPI genes and the pathogenicity of S. enterica. PMID:23717649

  1. Temporal transcriptomic analysis of the Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e σB regulon

    PubMed Central

    Hain, Torsten; Hossain, Hamid; Chatterjee, Som S; Machata, Silke; Volk, Ute; Wagner, Sandra; Brors, Benedikt; Haas, Stefan; Kuenne, Carsten T; Billion, Andre; Otten, Sonja; Pane-Farre, Jan; Engelmann, Susanne; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2008-01-01

    Background The opportunistic food-borne gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can exist as a free-living microorganism in the environment and grow in the cytoplasm of vertebrate and invertebrate cells following infection. The general stress response, controlled by the alternative sigma factor, σB, has an important role for bacterial survival both in the environment and during infection. We used quantitative real-time PCR analysis and immuno-blot analysis to examine σB expression during growth of L. monocytogenes EGD-e. Whole genome-based transcriptional profiling was used to identify σB-dependent genes at different growth phases. Results We detected 105 σB-positively regulated genes and 111 genes which appeared to be under negative control of σB and validated 36 σB-positively regulated genes in vivo using a reporter gene fusion system. Conclusion Genes comprising the σB regulon encode solute transporters, novel cell-wall proteins, universal stress proteins, transcriptional regulators and include those involved in osmoregulation, carbon metabolism, ribosome- and envelope-function, as well as virulence and niche-specific survival genes such as those involved in bile resistance and exclusion. Ten of the σB-positively regulated genes of L. monocytogenes are absent in L. innocua. A total of 75 σB-positively regulated listerial genes had homologs in B. subtilis, but only 33 have been previously described as being σB-regulated in B. subtilis even though both species share a highly conserved σB-dependent consensus sequence. A low overlap of genes may reflects adaptation of these bacteria to their respective environmental conditions. PMID:18226246

  2. RegPredict: an integrated system for regulon inference in prokaryotes by comparative genomics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Novichkov, Pavel S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Stavrovskaya, Elena D.; Novichkova, Elena S.; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Arkin, Adam P.; Mironov, Andrey A.; Dubchak, Inna

    2010-05-26

    RegPredict web server is designed to provide comparative genomics tools for reconstruction and analysis of microbial regulons using comparative genomics approach. The server allows the user to rapidly generate reference sets of regulons and regulatory motif profiles in a group of prokaryotic genomes. The new concept of a cluster of co-regulated orthologous operons allows the user to distribute the analysis of large regulons and to perform the comparative analysis of multiple clusters independently. Two major workflows currently implemented in RegPredict are: (i) regulon reconstruction for a known regulatory motif and (ii) ab initio inference of a novel regulon using several scenarios for the generation of starting gene sets. RegPredict provides a comprehensive collection of manually curated positional weight matrices of regulatory motifs. It is based on genomic sequences, ortholog and operon predictions from the MicrobesOnline. An interactive web interface of RegPredict integrates and presents diverse genomic and functional information about the candidate regulon members from several web resources. RegPredict is freely accessible at http://regpredict.lbl.gov.

  3. Exposure of Bacillus subtilis to Low Pressure (5 Kilopascals) Induces Several Global Regulons, Including Those Involved in the SigB-Mediated General Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Samantha M.; Robles-Martínez, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of how microorganisms respond to pressure have been limited mostly to the extreme high pressures of the deep sea (i.e., the piezosphere). In contrast, despite the fact that the growth of most bacteria is inhibited at pressures below ∼2.5 kPa, little is known of microbial responses to low pressure (LP). To study the global LP response, we performed transcription microarrays on Bacillus subtilis cells grown under normal atmospheric pressure (∼101 kPa) and a nearly inhibitory LP (5 kPa), equivalent to the pressure found at an altitude of ∼20 km. Microarray analysis revealed altered levels of 363 transcripts belonging to several global regulons (AbrB, CcpA, CodY, Fur, IolR, ResD, Rok, SigH, Spo0A). Notably, the highest number of upregulated genes, 86, belonged to the SigB-mediated general stress response (GSR) regulon. Upregulation of the GSR by LP was confirmed by monitoring the expression of the SigB-dependent ctc-lacZ reporter fusion. Measuring transcriptome changes resulting from exposure of bacterial cells to LP reveals insights into cellular processes that may respond to LP exposure. PMID:24878601

  4. Regulon and promoter analysis of the E. coli heat-shock factor, σ32, reveals a multifaceted cellular response to heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Gen; Blankschien, Matthew; Herman, Christophe; Gross, Carol A.; Rhodius, Virgil A.

    2006-01-01

    The heat-shock response (HSR), a universal cellular response to heat, is crucial for cellular adaptation. In Escherichia coli, the HSR is mediated by the alternative σ factor, σ32. To determine its role, we used genome-wide expression analysis and promoter validation to identify genes directly regulated by σ32 and screened ORF overexpression libraries to identify σ32 inducers. We triple the number of genes validated to be transcribed by σ32 and provide new insights into the cellular role of this response. Our work indicates that the response is propagated as the regulon encodes numerous global transcriptional regulators, reveals that σ70 holoenzyme initiates from 12% of σ32 promoters, which has important implications for global transcriptional wiring, and identifies a new role for the response in protein homeostasis, that of protecting complex proteins. Finally, this study suggests that the response protects the cell membrane and responds to its status: Fully 25% of σ32 regulon members reside in the membrane and alter its functionality; moreover, a disproportionate fraction of overexpressed proteins that induce the response are membrane localized. The intimate connection of the response to the membrane rationalizes why a major regulator of the response resides in that cellular compartment. PMID:16818608

  5. The Fur regulon in anaerobically grown Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium: identification of new Fur targets

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is a transcriptional regulator that controls iron homeostasis in bacteria. Although the regulatory role of Fur in Escherichia coli is well characterized, most of the studies were conducted under routine culture conditions, i.e., in ambient oxygen concentration. To reveal potentially novel aspects of the Fur regulon in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under oxygen conditions similar to that encountered in the host, we compared the transcriptional profiles of the virulent wild-type strain (ATCC 14028s) and its isogenic Δfur strain under anaerobic conditions. Results Microarray analysis of anaerobically grown Δfur S. Typhimurium identified 298 differentially expressed genes. Expression of several genes controlled by Fnr and NsrR appeared to be also dependent on Fur. Furthermore, Fur was required for the activity of the cytoplasmic superoxide disumutases (MnSOD and FeSOD). The regulation of FeSOD gene, sodB, occurred via small RNAs (i.e., the ryhB homologs, rfrA and rfrB) with the aid of the RNA chaperone Hfq. The transcription of sodA was increased in Δfur; however, the enzyme was inactive due to the incorporation of iron instead of manganese in SodA. Additionally, in Δfur, the expression of the gene coding for the ferritin-like protein (ftnB) was down-regulated, while the transcription of the gene coding for the nitric oxide (NO·) detoxifying flavohemoglobin (hmpA) was up-regulated. The promoters of ftnB and hmpA do not contain recognized Fur binding motifs, which indicated their probable indirect regulation by Fur. However, Fur activation of ftnB was independent of Fnr. In addition, the expression of the gene coding for the histone-like protein, H-NS (hns) was increased in Δfur. This may explain the observed down-regulation of the tdc operon, responsible for the anaerobic degradation of threonine, and ftnB in Δfur. Conclusions This study determined that Fur is a positive factor in ftnB regulation, while serving to repress the expression of hmpA. Furthermore, Fur is required for the proper expression and activation of the antioxidant enzymes, FeSOD and MnSOD. Finally, this work identified twenty-six new targets of Fur regulation, and demonstrates that H-NS repressed genes are down-regulated in Δfur. PMID:22017966

  6. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in proteobacteria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Leyn, Semen A.; Suvorova, Inna A.; Kholina, Tatiana D.; Sherstneva, Sofia S.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2014-11-20

    Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ~200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific andmore » genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.« less

  7. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in proteobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Leyn, Semen A.; Suvorova, Inna A.; Kholina, Tatiana D.; Sherstneva, Sofia S.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2014-11-20

    Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ~200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.

  8. Comparative Genomics of Transcriptional Regulation of Methionine Metabolism in Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Leyn, Semen A.; Suvorova, Inna A.; Kholina, Tatiana D.; Sherstneva, Sofia S.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2014-01-01

    Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ∼200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria. PMID:25411846

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of Carbohydrate Utilization Pathways in the Bifidobacterium Genus

    PubMed Central

    Khoroshkin, Matvei S.; Leyn, Semen A.; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria, which represent common commensals of mammalian gut, are believed to have positive effects on human health. The influence of certain non-digestible carbohydrates (and their use as so-called prebiotics) on growth and metabolic activity of bifidobacteria is of increasing interest; however, mechanisms of transcriptional control of carbohydrate metabolism are poorly understood in these species. We used a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct carbohydrate utilization pathways and transcriptional regulons in 10 Bifidobacterium genomes. Analysis of regulatory gene regions revealed candidate DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 268 transcription factors from the LacI, ROK, DeoR, AraC, GntR, and TetR families that form 64 orthologous groups of regulators. Most of the reconstructed regulons are local and control specific catabolic pathways for host- and diet-derived glycans and monosaccharides. Mosaic distributions of many of these local regulators across Bifidobacterium species correlate with distribution of corresponding catabolic pathways. In contrast, the maltose, galactose, sucrose, and fructose regulons, as well as a novel global LacI-family regulator that is predicted to control the central carbohydrate metabolism and arabinose catabolism genes, are universally present in all 10 studied bifidobacteria. A novel group of TetR-family regulators presumably controls the glucoside and galactoside utilization pathways. Paralogs of the ribose repressor RbsR control the pyrimidine nucleoside utilization genes. Multiple paralogs of the maltose regulator MalR co-regulate large sets of genes involved in maltodextrin utilization. The inferred metabolic regulons provide new insights on diverse carbohydrate utilization networks in bifidobacteria that can be employed in metabolic modeling, phenotype prediction and the rational development of novel prebiotics. PMID:26903998

  10. Bacterial Regulon Evolution: Distinct Responses and Roles for the Identical OmpR Proteins of Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli in the Acid Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Heather J.; Cameron, Andrew D. S.; Dorman, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of new gene networks is a primary source of genetic innovation that allows bacteria to explore and exploit new niches, including pathogenic interactions with host organisms. For example, the archetypal DNA binding protein, OmpR, is identical between Salmonella Typhimurium serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli, but regulatory specialization has resulted in different environmental triggers of OmpR expression and largely divergent OmpR regulons. Specifically, ompR mRNA and OmpR protein levels are elevated by acid pH in S. Typhimurium but not in E. coli. This differential expression pattern is due to differences in the promoter regions of the ompR genes and the E. coli ompR orthologue can be made acid-inducible by introduction of the appropriate sequences from S. Typhimurium. The OmpR regulon in S. Typhimurium overlaps that of E. coli at only 15 genes and includes many horizontally acquired genes (including virulence genes) that E. coli does not have. We found that OmpR binds to its genomic targets in higher abundance when the DNA is relaxed, something that occurs in S. Typhimurium as a result of acid stress and which is a requirement for optimal expression of its virulence genes. The genomic targets of OmpR do not share a strong nucleotide sequence consensus: we propose that the ability of OmpR to recruit additional genes to its regulon arises from its modest requirements for specificity in its DNA targets with its preference for relaxed DNA allowing it to cooperate with DNA-topology-based allostery to modulate transcription in response to acid stress. PMID:24603618

  11. The Aspergillus nidulans CREA protein mediates glucose repression of the ethanol regulon at various levels through competition with the ALCR-specific transactivator.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, M; Felenbok, B

    1994-09-01

    Carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans is mediated by a negative-acting protein coded by the creA gene. We have investigated how CREA controls the expression of the ethanol regulon genes. CREA is a major component of the control of this regulon. Its presence in the cell results in a permanent, albeit partial, repression of the alc genes under all physiological growth conditions, even when the fungus is grown on carbon sources considered to be non-repressing. A crucial step in the control processes is the repression of the positive-acting specific regulatory gene alcR, by the binding of CREA on its cognate target sites on the alcR promoter. The removal of one of these targets, URSA, results in a 50% derepression of the alcR gene. Furthermore, the presence of this sequence contributes directly to the low alcR expression under nonrepressing conditions and reduces alcR promoter function by at least 100-fold. CREA acts both on the regulatory gene alcR and directly on the two structural genes alcA and aldA, as glucose repression of the latter genes occurs in strains where alcR transcription is driven by a strong constitutive and derepressed promoter. In vivo and in vitro competition experiments show that CREA acts by competing directly with the binding of the ALCR activator for the same region of the alcR promoter, a region which encompasses overlapping targets for both regulatory proteins. These data are consistent with a model in which the activating and repressing regulatory proteins compete to regulate expression of the ethanol regulon genes. PMID:8076597

  12. Identification of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum TP0092 (RpoE) regulon and its implications for pathogen persistence in the host and syphilis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Denisenko, Oleg; Tompa, Martin; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2013-02-01

    Bacteria often respond to harmful environmental stimuli with the induction of extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma (σ) factors that in turn direct RNA polymerase to transcribe specific groups of response genes (or regulons) to minimize cellular damage and favor adaptation to the changed extracellular milieu. In Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the agent of syphilis, the TP0092 gene is predicted to code for the pathogen's only annotated ECF σ factor, homologous to RpoE, known in Escherichia coli to control a key transduction pathway for maintenance of envelope homeostasis in response to external stress and cell growth. Here we have shown that TP0092 is highly transcribed during experimental syphilis. Furthermore, TP0092 transcription levels significantly increase as infection progresses toward immune clearance of the pathogen, suggesting a role for TP0092 in helping T. pallidum respond to harmful stimuli in the host environment. To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the TP0092 regulon at two different time points during infection using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing. A total of 22 chromosomal regions, all containing putative TP0092-binding sites and corresponding to as many T. pallidum genes, were identified. Noteworthy among them are the genes encoding desulfoferrodoxin and thioredoxin, involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Because T. pallidum does not possess other enzymes for ROS detoxification, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, or glutathione peroxidase, our results suggest that the TP0092 regulon is important in protecting the syphilis spirochete from damage caused by ROS produced at the site of infection during the inflammatory response. PMID:23243302

  13. Identification of the Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum TP0092 (RpoE) Regulon and Its Implications for Pathogen Persistence in the Host and Syphilis Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Denisenko, Oleg; Tompa, Martin; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria often respond to harmful environmental stimuli with the induction of extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma (σ) factors that in turn direct RNA polymerase to transcribe specific groups of response genes (or regulons) to minimize cellular damage and favor adaptation to the changed extracellular milieu. In Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum, the agent of syphilis, the TP0092 gene is predicted to code for the pathogen's only annotated ECF σ factor, homologous to RpoE, known in Escherichia coli to control a key transduction pathway for maintenance of envelope homeostasis in response to external stress and cell growth. Here we have shown that TP0092 is highly transcribed during experimental syphilis. Furthermore, TP0092 transcription levels significantly increase as infection progresses toward immune clearance of the pathogen, suggesting a role for TP0092 in helping T. pallidum respond to harmful stimuli in the host environment. To investigate this hypothesis, we determined the TP0092 regulon at two different time points during infection using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing. A total of 22 chromosomal regions, all containing putative TP0092-binding sites and corresponding to as many T. pallidum genes, were identified. Noteworthy among them are the genes encoding desulfoferrodoxin and thioredoxin, involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Because T. pallidum does not possess other enzymes for ROS detoxification, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, or glutathione peroxidase, our results suggest that the TP0092 regulon is important in protecting the syphilis spirochete from damage caused by ROS produced at the site of infection during the inflammatory response. PMID:23243302

  14. The Aspergillus nidulans CREA protein mediates glucose repression of the ethanol regulon at various levels through competition with the ALCR-specific transactivator.

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, M; Felenbok, B

    1994-01-01

    Carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans is mediated by a negative-acting protein coded by the creA gene. We have investigated how CREA controls the expression of the ethanol regulon genes. CREA is a major component of the control of this regulon. Its presence in the cell results in a permanent, albeit partial, repression of the alc genes under all physiological growth conditions, even when the fungus is grown on carbon sources considered to be non-repressing. A crucial step in the control processes is the repression of the positive-acting specific regulatory gene alcR, by the binding of CREA on its cognate target sites on the alcR promoter. The removal of one of these targets, URSA, results in a 50% derepression of the alcR gene. Furthermore, the presence of this sequence contributes directly to the low alcR expression under nonrepressing conditions and reduces alcR promoter function by at least 100-fold. CREA acts both on the regulatory gene alcR and directly on the two structural genes alcA and aldA, as glucose repression of the latter genes occurs in strains where alcR transcription is driven by a strong constitutive and derepressed promoter. In vivo and in vitro competition experiments show that CREA acts by competing directly with the binding of the ALCR activator for the same region of the alcR promoter, a region which encompasses overlapping targets for both regulatory proteins. These data are consistent with a model in which the activating and repressing regulatory proteins compete to regulate expression of the ethanol regulon genes. Images PMID:8076597

  15. An NAD(P)H-Nicotine Blue Oxidoreductase Is Part of the Nicotine Regulon and May Protect Arthrobacter nicotinovorans from Oxidative Stress during Nicotine Catabolism▿

    PubMed Central

    Mihasan, Marius; Chiribau, Calin-Bogdan; Friedrich, Thorsten; Artenie, Vlad; Brandsch, Roderich

    2007-01-01

    An NAD(P)H-nicotine blue (quinone) oxidoreductase was discovered as a member of the nicotine catabolic pathway of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans. Transcriptional analysis and electromobility shift assays showed that the enzyme gene was expressed in a nicotine-dependent manner under the control of the transcriptional activator PmfR and thus was part of the nicotine regulon of A. nicotinovorans. The flavin mononucleotide-containing enzyme uses NADH and, with lower efficiency, NADPH to reduce, by a two-electron transfer, nicotine blue to the nicotine blue leuco form (hydroquinone). Besides nicotine blue, several other quinones were reduced by the enzyme. The NAD(P)H-nicotine blue oxidoreductase may prevent intracellular one-electron reductions of nicotine blue which may lead to semiquinone radicals and potentially toxic reactive oxygen species. PMID:17293530

  16. soxR, a locus governing a superoxide response regulon in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Tsaneva, I R; Weiss, B

    1990-01-01

    The nfo (endonuclease IV) gene of Escherichia coli is induced by superoxide generators such as paraquat (methyl viologen). An nfo'-lacZ operon fusion was used to isolate extragenic mutations affecting its expression. The mutations also affected the expression of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, Mn2(+)-superoxide dismutase (sodA), and three lacZ fusions to soi (superoxide-inducible) genes of unknown function. The mutations were located 2 kilobases clockwise of ssb at 92 min on the current linkage map. One set of mutations, in a new gene designated soxR, caused constitutive overexpression of nfo and the other genes. It included insertions or deletions affecting the carboxyl end of a 17-kilodalton polypeptide. In a soxR mutant, the expression of sodA, unlike that of nfo, was also regulated independently by oxygen tension. Two other mutants were isolated in which the target genes were noninducible; they had an increased sensitivity to killing by superoxide-generating compounds. One had a Tn10 insertion in or near soxR; the other had a multigene deletion encompassing soxR. Therefore, the region functions as a positive regulator because it encodes one or more products needed for the induction of nfo. Regulation is likely to be at the level of transcription because the mutations were able to affect the expression of an nfo'-lac operon fusion that contained the ribosome-binding site for lacZ. Some mutant plasmids that failed to suppress (or complement) constitutivity in trans had insertion mutations several hundred nucleotides upstream of soxR in the general region of a gene for a 13-kilodalton protein encoded by the opposite strand, raising the possibility of a second regulatory gene in this region. The result define a new regulon, controlled by soxR, mediating at least part of the global response to superoxide in E. coli. Images PMID:1695893

  17. A Bayesian Change point model for differential gene expression patterns of the DosR regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Hatch, Kim A; Wernisch, Lorenz; Bacon, Joanna

    2008-01-01

    Background Low oxygen availability has been shown previously to stimulate M. tuberculosis to establish non-replicative persistence in vitro. The two component sensor/regulator dosRS is a major mediator in the transcriptional response of M. tuberculosis to hypoxia and controls a regulon of approximately 50 genes that are induced under this condition. The aim of this study was to determine whether the induction of the entire DosR regulon is triggered as a synchronous event or if induction can unfold as a cascade of events as the differential expression of subsets of genes is stimulated by different oxygen availabilities. Results A novel aspect of our work is the use of chemostat cultures of M. tuberculosis which allowed us to control environmental conditions very tightly. We exposed M. tuberculosis to a sudden drop in oxygen availability in chemostat culture and studied the transcriptional response of the organism during the transition from a high oxygen level (10% dissolved oxygen tension or DOT) to a low oxygen level (0.2% DOT) using DNA microarrays. We developed a Bayesian change point analysis method that enabled us to detect subtle shifts in the timing of gene induction. It results in probabilities of a change in gene expression at certain time points. A computational analysis of potential binding sites upstream of the DosR-controlled genes shows how the transcriptional responses of these genes are influenced by the affinity of these binding sites to DosR. Our study also indicates that a subgroup of DosR-controlled genes is regulated indirectly. Conclusion The majority of the dosR-dependent genes were up-regulated at 0.2% DOT, which confirms previous findings that these genes are triggered by hypoxic environments. However, our change point analysis also highlights genes which were up-regulated earlier at levels of about 8% DOT indicating that they respond to small fluctuations in oxygen availability. Our analysis shows that there are pairs of divergent genes where one gene in the pair is up-regulated before the other, presumably for a flexible response to a constantly changing environment in the host. PMID:18294384

  18. Metabolic pathway redundancy within the apicomplexan-dinoflagellate radiation argues against an ancient chromalveolate plastid.

    PubMed

    Waller, Ross F; Gornik, Sebastian G; Koreny, Ludek; Pain, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    The chromalveolate hypothesis presents an attractively simple explanation for the presence of red algal-derived secondary plastids in 5 major eukaryotic lineages: "chromista" phyla, cryptophytes, haptophytes and ochrophytes; and alveolate phyla, dinoflagellates and apicomplexans. It posits that a single secondary endosymbiotic event occurred in a common ancestor of these diverse groups, and that this ancient plastid has since been maintained by vertical inheritance only. Substantial testing of this hypothesis by molecular phylogenies has, however, consistently failed to provide support for the predicted monophyly of the host organisms that harbour these plastids-the "chromalveolates." This lack of support does not disprove the chromalveolate hypothesis per se, but rather drives the proposed endosymbiosis deeper into the eukaryotic tree, and requires multiple plastid losses to have occurred within intervening aplastidic lineages. An alternative perspective on plastid evolution is offered by considering the metabolic partnership between the endosymbiont and its host cell. A recent analysis of metabolic pathways in a deep-branching dinoflagellate indicates a high level of pathway redundancy in the common ancestor of apicomplexans and dinoflagellates, and differential losses of these pathways soon after radiation of the major extant lineages. This suggests that vertical inheritance of an ancient plastid in alveolates is highly unlikely as it would necessitate maintenance of redundant pathways over very long evolutionary timescales. PMID:27066182

  19. A Conserved Apicomplexan Microneme Protein Contributes to Toxoplasma gondii Invasion and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, My-Hang; Boulanger, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii critically relies on host cell invasion during infection. Proteins secreted from the apical micronemes are central components for host cell recognition, invasion, egress, and virulence. Although previous work established that the sporozoite protein with an altered thrombospondin repeat (SPATR) is a micronemal protein conserved in other apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium, Neospora, and Eimeria, no genetic evidence of its contribution to invasion has been reported. SPATR contains a predicted epidermal growth factor domain and two thrombospondin type 1 repeats, implying a role in host cell recognition. In this study, we assess the contribution of T. gondii SPATR (TgSPATR) to T. gondii invasion by genetically ablating it and restoring its expression by genetic complementation. Δspatr parasites were ∼50% reduced in invasion compared to parental strains, a defect that was reversed in the complemented strain. In mouse virulence assays, Δspatr parasites were significantly attenuated, with ∼20% of mice surviving infection. Given the conservation of this protein among the Apicomplexa, we assessed whether the Plasmodium falciparum SPATR ortholog (PfSPATR) could complement the absence of the TgSPATR. Although PfSPATR showed correct micronemal localization, it did not reverse the invasion deficiency of Δspatr parasites, because of an apparent failure in secretion. Overall, the results suggest that TgSPATR contributes to invasion and virulence, findings that have implications for the many genera and life stages of apicomplexans that express SPATR. PMID:25092910

  20. Hepatozoon ellisgreineri n. sp. (Hepatozoidae): description of the first avian apicomplexan blood parasite inhabiting granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Mobley, Kristin; Iezhova, Tatjana A

    2016-02-01

    Blood parasites of the genus Hepatozoon (Apicomplexa, Hepatozoidae) infect all groups of terrestrial vertebrates, and particularly high prevalence and species diversity have been reported in reptiles and mammals. A few morphologically similar species, in which gamonts inhabit mononuclear leukocytes and red blood cells, have been described in birds. Here, we report a new Hepatozoon species, which was found in wild-caught secretary birds Sagittarius serpentarius, from Tanzania. Hepatozoon ellisgreineri n. sp. can be readily distinguished from all described species of avian Hepatozoon because its gamonts develop only in granulocytes, predominantly in heterophils, a unique characteristic among bird parasites of this genus. Additionally, this is the first reported avian apicomplexan blood parasite, which inhabits and matures in granulocytes. We describe H. ellisgreineri based on morphological characteristics of blood stages and their host cells. This finding broadens knowledge about host cells of avian Hepatozoon spp. and other avian apicomplexan blood parasites, contributing to the better understanding of the diversity of haematozoa. This is the first report of hepatozoonosis in endangered African birds of the Sagittariidae. PMID:26472715

  1. Sphingolipid synthesis and scavenging in the intracellular apicomplexan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Steven; Wansadhipathi-Kannangara, Nilu K.; Bruce, Catherine R.; Mina, John G.; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Casas, Josefina; Hanada, Kentaro; Schwarz, Ralph T.; Sonda, Sabrina; Denny, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential components of eukaryotic cell membranes, particularly the plasma membrane, and are involved in a diverse array of signal transduction pathways. Mammals produce sphingomyelin (SM) as the primary complex sphingolipid via the well characterised SM synthase. In contrast yeast, plants and some protozoa utilise an evolutionarily related inositol phosphorylceramide (IPC) synthase to synthesise IPC. This activity has no mammalian equivalent and IPC synthase has been proposed as a target for anti-fungals and anti-protozoals. However, detailed knowledge of the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway of the apicomplexan protozoan parasites was lacking. In this study bioinformatic analyses indicated a single copy orthologue of the putative SM synthase from the apicomplexan Plasmodium falciparum (the causative agent of malaria) was a bona fide sphingolipid synthase in the related model parasite, Toxoplasma gondii (TgSLS). Subsequently, TgSLS was indicated, by complementation of a mutant cell line, to be a functional orthologue of the yeast IPC synthase (AUR1p), demonstrating resistance to the well characterised AUR1p inhibitor aureobasidin A. In vitro, recombinant TgSLS exhibited IPC synthase activity and, for the first time, the presence of IPC was demonstrated in T. gondii lipid extracts by mass spectrometry. Furthermore, host sphingolipid biosynthesis was indicated to influence, but be non-essential for, T. gondii proliferation, suggesting that whilst scavenging does take place de novo sphingolipid synthesis may be important for parasitism. PMID:23246819

  2. The Large Mitochondrial Genome of Symbiodinium minutum Reveals Conserved Noncoding Sequences between Dinoflagellates and Apicomplexans

    PubMed Central

    Shoguchi, Eiichi; Shinzato, Chuya; Hisata, Kanako; Satoh, Nori; Mungpakdee, Sutada

    2015-01-01

    Even though mitochondrial genomes, which characterize eukaryotic cells, were first discovered more than 50 years ago, mitochondrial genomics remains an important topic in molecular biology and genome sciences. The Phylum Alveolata comprises three major groups (ciliates, apicomplexans, and dinoflagellates), the mitochondrial genomes of which have diverged widely. Even though the gene content of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes is reportedly comparable to that of apicomplexans, the highly fragmented and rearranged genome structures of dinoflagellates have frustrated whole genomic analysis. Consequently, noncoding sequences and gene arrangements of dinoflagellate mitochondrial genomes have not been well characterized. Here we report that the continuous assembled genome (∼326 kb) of the dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium minutum, is AT-rich (∼64.3%) and that it contains three protein-coding genes. Based upon in silico analysis, the remaining 99% of the genome comprises transcriptomic noncoding sequences. RNA edited sites and unique, possible start and stop codons clarify conserved regions among dinoflagellates. Our massive transcriptome analysis shows that almost all regions of the genome are transcribed, including 27 possible fragmented ribosomal RNA genes and 12 uncharacterized small RNAs that are similar to mitochondrial RNA genes of the malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Gene map comparisons show that gene order is only slightly conserved between S. minutum and P. falciparum. However, small RNAs and intergenic sequences share sequence similarities with P. falciparum, suggesting that the function of noncoding sequences has been preserved despite development of very different genome structures. PMID:26199191

  3. Apicomplexan parasites contain a single lipoic acid synthase located in the plastid.

    PubMed

    Thomsen-Zieger, Nadine; Schachtner, Joachim; Seeber, Frank

    2003-07-17

    Apicomplexan parasites contain a vestigial plastid called apicoplast which has been suggested to be a site of [Fe-S] cluster biogenesis. Here we report the cloning of lipoic acid synthase (LipA) from Toxoplasma gondii, a well known [Fe-S] protein. It is able to complement a LipA-deficient Escherichia coli strain, clearly demonstrating that the parasite protein is a functional LipA. The N-terminus of T. gondii LipA is unusual with respect to an internal signal peptide preceding an apicoplast targeting domain. Nevertheless, it efficiently targets a reporter protein to the apicoplast of T. gondii whereas co-localization with the fluorescently labeled mitochondrion was not detected. In silico analysis of several apicomplexan genomes indicates that the parasites, in addition to the presumably apicoplast-resident pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, contain three other mitochondrion-localized target proteins for lipoic acid attachment. We also identified single genes for lipoyl (octanoyl)-acyl carrier protein:protein transferase (LipB) and lipoate protein ligase (LplA) in these genomes. It thus appears that unlike plants, which have only two LipA and LipB isoenzymes in both the chloroplasts and the mitochondria, Apicomplexa seem to use the second known lipoylating activity, LplA, for lipoylation in their mitochondrion. PMID:12860390

  4. The ins and outs of nuclear trafficking: unusual aspects in apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Matthew B; Knoll, Laura J

    2009-06-01

    Apicomplexa is a phylum within the kingdom Protista that contains some of the most significant threats to public health. One of the members of this phylum, Toxoplasma gondii, is amenable to molecular genetic analyses allowing for the identification of factors critical for colonization and disease. A pathway found to be important for T. gondii pathogenesis is the Ran network of nuclear trafficking. Bioinformatics analysis of apicomplexan genomes shows that while Ran is well conserved, the key regulators of Ran--Regulator of Chromosome Condensation 1 and Ran GTPase activating protein--are either highly divergent or absent. Likewise, several import and export receptor molecules that are crucial for nuclear transport are either not present or have experienced genetic drift such that they are no longer recognizable by bioinformatics tools. In this minireview we describe the basics of nuclear trafficking and compare components within apicomplexans to defined systems in humans and yeast. A detailed analysis of the nuclear trafficking network in these eukaryotes is required to understand how this potentially unique cellular biological pathway contributes to host-parasite interactions. PMID:19348590

  5. Metabolic pathway redundancy within the apicomplexan-dinoflagellate radiation argues against an ancient chromalveolate plastid

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Ross F.; Gornik, Sebastian G.; Koreny, Ludek; Pain, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chromalveolate hypothesis presents an attractively simple explanation for the presence of red algal-derived secondary plastids in 5 major eukaryotic lineages: “chromista” phyla, cryptophytes, haptophytes and ochrophytes; and alveolate phyla, dinoflagellates and apicomplexans. It posits that a single secondary endosymbiotic event occurred in a common ancestor of these diverse groups, and that this ancient plastid has since been maintained by vertical inheritance only. Substantial testing of this hypothesis by molecular phylogenies has, however, consistently failed to provide support for the predicted monophyly of the host organisms that harbour these plastids—the “chromalveolates.” This lack of support does not disprove the chromalveolate hypothesis per se, but rather drives the proposed endosymbiosis deeper into the eukaryotic tree, and requires multiple plastid losses to have occurred within intervening aplastidic lineages. An alternative perspective on plastid evolution is offered by considering the metabolic partnership between the endosymbiont and its host cell. A recent analysis of metabolic pathways in a deep-branching dinoflagellate indicates a high level of pathway redundancy in the common ancestor of apicomplexans and dinoflagellates, and differential losses of these pathways soon after radiation of the major extant lineages. This suggests that vertical inheritance of an ancient plastid in alveolates is highly unlikely as it would necessitate maintenance of redundant pathways over very long evolutionary timescales. PMID:27066182

  6. An atomic-resolution view of neofunctionalization in the evolution of apicomplexan lactate dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Jeffrey I; Jacobowitz, Joseph R; Beckett, Brian C; Classen, Scott; Theobald, Douglas L

    2014-01-01

    Malate and lactate dehydrogenases (MDH and LDH) are homologous, core metabolic enzymes that share a fold and catalytic mechanism yet possess strict specificity for their substrates. In the Apicomplexa, convergent evolution of an unusual LDH from MDH produced a difference in specificity exceeding 12 orders of magnitude. The mechanisms responsible for this extraordinary functional shift are currently unknown. Using ancestral protein resurrection, we find that specificity evolved in apicomplexan LDHs by classic neofunctionalization characterized by long-range epistasis, a promiscuous intermediate, and few gain-of-function mutations of large effect. In canonical MDHs and LDHs, a single residue in the active-site loop governs substrate specificity: Arg102 in MDHs and Gln102 in LDHs. During the evolution of the apicomplexan LDH, however, specificity switched via an insertion that shifted the position and identity of this ‘specificity residue’ to Trp107f. Residues far from the active site also determine specificity, as shown by the crystal structures of three ancestral proteins bracketing the key duplication event. This work provides an unprecedented atomic-resolution view of evolutionary trajectories creating a nascent enzymatic function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02304.001 PMID:24966208

  7. A Unique Hexokinase in Cryptosporidium parvum, an Apicomplexan Pathogen Lacking the Krebs Cycle and Oxidative Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yonglan; Zhang, Haili; Guo, Fengguang; Sun, Mingfei; Zhu, Guan

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum may cause virtually untreatable infections in AIDS patients, and is recently identified as one of the top four diarrheal pathogens in children in developing countries. Cryptosporidium differs from other apicomplexans (e.g., Plasmodium and Toxoplasma) by lacking many metabolic pathways including the Krebs cycle and cytochrome-based respiratory chain, thus relying mainly on glycolysis for ATP production. Here we report the molecular and biochemical characterizations of a hexokinase in C. parvum (CpHK). Our phylogenetic reconstructions indicated that apicomplexan hexokinases including CpHK were highly divergent from those of humans and animals (i.e., at the base of the eukaryotic clade). CpHK displays unique kinetic features that differ from those in mammals and Toxoplasma gondii (TgHK) in the preference towards various hexoses and its capacity to use ATP and other NTPs. CpHK also displays substrate inhibition by ATP. Moreover, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) could not only inhibit the CpHK activity, but also the parasite growth in vitro at concentrations nontoxic to host cells (IC50 = 0.54 mM). While the exact action of 2-deoxy-D-glucose on the parasite is subject to further verification, our data suggest that CpHK and the glycolytic pathway may be explored for developing anti-cryptosporidial therapeutics. PMID:25216472

  8. An atomic-resolution view of neofunctionalization in the evolution of apicomplexan lactate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Jeffrey I; Jacobowitz, Joseph R; Beckett, Brian C; Classen, Scott; Theobald, Douglas L

    2014-01-01

    Malate and lactate dehydrogenases (MDH and LDH) are homologous, core metabolic enzymes that share a fold and catalytic mechanism yet possess strict specificity for their substrates. In the Apicomplexa, convergent evolution of an unusual LDH from MDH produced a difference in specificity exceeding 12 orders of magnitude. The mechanisms responsible for this extraordinary functional shift are currently unknown. Using ancestral protein resurrection, we find that specificity evolved in apicomplexan LDHs by classic neofunctionalization characterized by long-range epistasis, a promiscuous intermediate, and few gain-of-function mutations of large effect. In canonical MDHs and LDHs, a single residue in the active-site loop governs substrate specificity: Arg102 in MDHs and Gln102 in LDHs. During the evolution of the apicomplexan LDH, however, specificity switched via an insertion that shifted the position and identity of this 'specificity residue' to Trp107f. Residues far from the active site also determine specificity, as shown by the crystal structures of three ancestral proteins bracketing the key duplication event. This work provides an unprecedented atomic-resolution view of evolutionary trajectories creating a nascent enzymatic function. PMID:24966208

  9. Inference of the Transcriptional Regulatory Network in Staphylococcus aureus by Integration of Experimental and Genomics-Based Evidence▿†

    PubMed Central

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Best, Aaron A.; Tintle, Nathan; DeJongh, Matthew; Osterman, Andrei L.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional regulatory networks are fine-tuned systems that help microorganisms respond to changes in the environment and cell physiological state. We applied the comparative genomics approach implemented in the RegPredict Web server combined with SEED subsystem analysis and available information on known regulatory interactions for regulatory network reconstruction for the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and six related species from the family Staphylococcaceae. The resulting reference set of 46 transcription factor regulons contains more than 1,900 binding sites and 2,800 target genes involved in the central metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, and fatty acids; respiration; the stress response; metal homeostasis; drug and metal resistance; and virulence. The inferred regulatory network in S. aureus includes ∼320 regulatory interactions between 46 transcription factors and ∼550 candidate target genes comprising 20% of its genome. We predicted ∼170 novel interactions and 24 novel regulons for the control of the central metabolic pathways in S. aureus. The reconstructed regulons are largely variable in the Staphylococcaceae: only 20% of S. aureus regulatory interactions are conserved across all studied genomes. We used a large-scale gene expression data set for S. aureus to assess relationships between the inferred regulons and gene expression patterns. The predicted reference set of regulons is captured within the Staphylococcus collection in the RegPrecise database (http://regprecise.lbl.gov). PMID:21531804

  10. The Listeria monocytogenes σB Regulon and Its Virulence-Associated Functions Are Inhibited by a Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, M. Elizabeth; Chaturongakul, Soraya; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The stress-responsive alternative sigma factor σB is conserved across diverse Gram-positive bacterial genera. In Listeria monocytogenes, σB regulates transcription of >150 genes, including genes contributing to virulence and to bacterial survival under host-associated stress conditions, such as those encountered in the human gastrointestinal lumen. An inhibitor of L. monocytogenes σB activity was identified by screening ~57,000 natural and synthesized small molecules using a high-throughput cell-based assay. The compound fluoro-phenyl-styrene-sulfonamide (FPSS) (IC50 = 3.5 µM) downregulated the majority of genes previously identified as members of the σB regulon in L. monocytogenes 10403S, thus generating a transcriptional profile comparable to that of a 10403S ΔsigB strain. Specifically, of the 208 genes downregulated by FPSS, 75% had been identified previously as positively regulated by σB. Downregulated genes included key virulence and stress response genes, such as inlA, inlB, bsh, hfq, opuC, and bilE. From a functional perspective, FPSS also inhibited L. monocytogenes invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells and bile salt hydrolase activity. The ability of FPSS to inhibit σB activity in both L. monocytogenes and Bacillus subtilis indicates its utility as a specific inhibitor of σB across multiple Gram-positive genera. PMID:22128349

  11. Listeria monocytogenes Differential Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Temperature-Dependent Agr Regulation and Suggests Overlaps with Other Regulons

    PubMed Central

    Garmyn, Dominique; Augagneur, Yoann; Gal, Laurent; Vivant, Anne-Laure; Piveteau, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous, opportunistic pathogenic organism. Environmental adaptation requires constant regulation of gene expression. Among transcriptional regulators, AgrA is part of an auto-induction system. Temperature is an environmental cue critical for in vivo adaptation. In order to investigate how temperature may affect AgrA-dependent transcription, we compared the transcriptomes of the parental strain L. monocytogenes EGD-e and its ΔagrA mutant at the saprophytic temperature of 25°C and in vivo temperature of 37°C. Variations of transcriptome were higher at 37°C than at 25°C. Results suggested that AgrA may be involved in the regulation of nitrogen transport, amino acids, purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways and phage-related functions. Deregulations resulted in a growth advantage at 37°C, but affected salt tolerance. Finally, our results suggest overlaps with PrfA, σB, σH and CodY regulons. These overlaps may suggest that through AgrA, Listeria monocytogenes integrates information on its biotic environment. PMID:23024744

  12. Transfer activation of SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements: unraveling the SetCD regulon.

    PubMed

    Poulin-Laprade, Dominic; Matteau, Dominick; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-02-27

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family have been recognized as key drivers of antibiotic resistance dissemination in the seventh-pandemic lineage of Vibrio cholerae. SXT/R391 ICEs propagate by conjugation and integrate site-specifically into the chromosome of a wide range of environmental and clinical Gammaproteobacteria. SXT/R391 ICEs bear setC and setD, two conserved genes coding for a transcriptional activator complex that is essential for activation of conjugative transfer. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with exonuclease digestion (ChIP-exo) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to characterize the SetCD regulon of three representative members of the SXT/R391 family. We also identified the DNA sequences bound by SetCD in MGIVflInd1, a mobilizable genomic island phylogenetically unrelated to SXT/R391 ICEs that hijacks the conjugative machinery of these ICEs to drive its own transfer. SetCD was found to bind a 19-bp sequence that is consistently located near the promoter -35 element of SetCD-activated genes, a position typical of class II transcriptional activators. Furthermore, we refined our understanding of the regulation of excision from and integration into the chromosome for SXT/R391 ICEs and demonstrated that de novo expression of SetCD is crucial to allow integration of the incoming ICE DNA into a naive host following conjugative transfer. PMID:25662215

  13. Variable Suites of Non-effector Genes Are Co-regulated in the Type III Secretion Virulence Regulon across the Pseudomonas syringae Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Mucyn, Tatiana S.; Yourstone, Scott; Lind, Abigail L.; Biswas, Surojit; Nishimura, Marc T.; Baltrus, David A.; Cumbie, Jason S.; Chang, Jeff H.; Jones, Corbin D.; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Grant, Sarah R.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is a phylogenetically diverse species of Gram-negative bacterial plant pathogens responsible for crop diseases around the world. The HrpL sigma factor drives expression of the major P. syringae virulence regulon. HrpL controls expression of the genes encoding the structural and functional components of the type III secretion system (T3SS) and the type three secreted effector proteins (T3E) that are collectively essential for virulence. HrpL also regulates expression of an under-explored suite of non-type III effector genes (non-T3E), including toxin production systems and operons not previously associated with virulence. We implemented and refined genome-wide transcriptional analysis methods using cDNA-derived high-throughput sequencing (RNA-seq) data to characterize the HrpL regulon from six isolates of P. syringae spanning the diversity of the species. Our transcriptomes, mapped onto both complete and draft genomes, significantly extend earlier studies. We confirmed HrpL-regulation for a majority of previously defined T3E genes in these six strains. We identified two new T3E families from P. syringae pv. oryzae 1_6, a strain within the relatively underexplored phylogenetic Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) group IV. The HrpL regulons varied among strains in gene number and content across both their T3E and non-T3E gene suites. Strains within MLST group II consistently express the lowest number of HrpL-regulated genes. We identified events leading to recruitment into, and loss from, the HrpL regulon. These included gene gain and loss, and loss of HrpL regulation caused by group-specific cis element mutations in otherwise conserved genes. Novel non-T3E HrpL-regulated genes include an operon that we show is required for full virulence of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola 1448A on French bean. We highlight the power of integrating genomic, transcriptomic, and phylogenetic information to drive concise functional experimentation and to derive better insight into the evolution of virulence across an evolutionarily diverse pathogen species. PMID:24391493

  14. Genes of the Escherichia coli pur regulon are negatively controlled by a repressor-operator interaction.

    PubMed Central

    He, B; Shiau, A; Choi, K Y; Zalkin, H; Smith, J M

    1990-01-01

    Fusions of lacZ were constructed to genes in each of the loci involved in de novo synthesis of IMP. The expression of each pur-lacZ fusion was determined in isogenic purR and purR+ strains. These measurements indicated 5- to 17-fold coregulation of genes purF, purHD, purC, purMN, purL, and purEK and thus confirm the existence of a pur regulon. Gene purB, which encodes an enzyme involved in synthesis of IMP and in the AMP branch of the pathway, was not regulated by purR. Each locus of the pur regulon contains a 16-base-pair conserved operator sequence that overlaps with the promoter. The purR product, purine repressor, was shown to bind specifically to each operator. Thus, binding of repressor to each operator of pur regulon genes negatively coregulates expression. Images PMID:2198266

  15. Characterization of the CpxRA Regulon in Haemophilus ducreyi?

    PubMed Central

    Labandeira-Rey, Maria; Brautigam, Chad A.; Hansen, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    The Haemophilus ducreyi 35000HP genome encodes a homolog of the CpxRA two-component cell envelope stress response system originally characterized in Escherichia coli. CpxR, the cytoplasmic response regulator, was shown previously to be involved in repression of the expression of the lspB-lspA2 operon (M. Labandeira-Rey, J. R. Mock, and E. J. Hansen, Infect. Immun. 77:3402-3411, 2009). In the present study, the H. ducreyi CpxR and CpxA proteins were shown to closely resemble those of other well-studied bacterial species. A cpxA deletion mutant and a CpxR-overexpressing strain were used to explore the extent of the CpxRA regulon. DNA microarray and real-time reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR analyses indicated several potential regulatory targets for the H. ducreyi CpxRA two-component regulatory system. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) were used to prove that H. ducreyi CpxR interacted with the promoter regions of genes encoding both known and putative virulence factors of H. ducreyi, including the lspB-lspA2 operon, the flp operon, and dsrA. Interestingly, the use of EMSAs also indicated that H. ducreyi CpxR did not bind to the promoter regions of several genes predicted to encode factors involved in the cell envelope stress response. Taken together, these data suggest that the CpxRA system in H. ducreyi, in contrast to that in E. coli, may be involved primarily in controlling expression of genes not involved in the cell envelope stress response. PMID:20805330

  16. The Rsm regulon of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens SS101: role of small RNAs in regulation of lipopeptide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chunxu; van der Voort, Menno; van de Mortel, Judith; Hassan, Karl A; Elbourne, Liam D H; Paulsen, Ian T; Loper, Joyce E; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2015-01-01

    The rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SS101 inhibits growth of oomycete and fungal pathogens, and induces resistance in plants against pathogens and insects. To unravel regulatory pathways of secondary metabolite production in SS101, we conducted a genome-wide search for sRNAs and performed transcriptomic analyses to identify genes associated with the Rsm (repressor of secondary metabolites) regulon. In silico analysis led to the identification of 16 putative sRNAs in the SS101 genome. In frame deletion of the sRNAs rsmY and rsmZ showed that the Rsm system regulates the biosynthesis of the lipopeptide massetolide A and involves the two repressor proteins RsmA and RsmE, with the LuxR-type transcriptional regulator MassAR as their most likely target. Transcriptome analyses of the rsmYZ mutant further revealed that genes associated with iron acquisition, motility and chemotaxis were significantly upregulated, whereas genes of the type VI secretion system were downregulated. Comparative transcriptomic analyses showed that most, but not all, of the genes controlled by RsmY/RsmZ are also controlled by the GacS/GacA two-component system. We conclude that the Rsm regulon of P. fluorescens SS101 plays a critical role in the regulation of lipopeptide biosynthesis and controls the expression of other genes involved in motility, competition and survival in the plant rhizosphere. PMID:25488342

  17. Analysis of the ArcA regulon in anaerobically grown Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a Gram-negative pathogen that must successfully adapt to the broad fluctuations in the concentration of dissolved dioxygen encountered in the host. In Escherichia coli, ArcA (Aerobic Respiratory Control) helps the cells to sense and respond to the presence of dioxygen. The global role of ArcA in E. coli is well characterized; however, little is known about its role in anaerobically grown S. Typhimurium. Results We compared the transcriptional profiles of the virulent wild-type (WT) strain (ATCC 14028s) and its isogenic arcA mutant grown under anaerobic conditions. We found that ArcA directly or indirectly regulates 392 genes (8.5% of the genome); of these, 138 genes are poorly characterized. Regulation by ArcA in S. Typhimurium is similar, but distinct from that in E. coli. Thus, genes/operons involved in core metabolic pathways (e.g., succinyl-CoA, fatty acid degradation, cytochrome oxidase complexes, flagellar biosynthesis, motility, and chemotaxis) were regulated similarly in the two organisms. However, genes/operons present in both organisms, but regulated differently by ArcA in S. Typhimurium included those coding for ethanolamine utilization, lactate transport and metabolism, and succinate dehydrogenases. Salmonella-specific genes/operons regulated by ArcA included those required for propanediol utilization, flagellar genes (mcpAC, cheV), Gifsy-1 prophage genes, and three SPI-3 genes (mgtBC, slsA, STM3784). In agreement with our microarray data, the arcA mutant was non-motile, lacked flagella, and was as virulent in mice as the WT. Additionally, we identified a set of 120 genes whose regulation was shared with the anaerobic redox regulator, Fnr. Conclusion(s) We have identified the ArcA regulon in anaerobically grown S. Typhimurium. Our results demonstrated that in S. Typhimurium, ArcA serves as a transcriptional regulator coordinating cellular metabolism, flagella biosynthesis, and motility. Furthermore, ArcA and Fnr share in the regulation of 120 S. Typhimurium genes. PMID:21418628

  18. Regulation of Erwinia carotovora hrpL(Ecc) (sigma-L(Ecc)), which encodes an extracytoplasmic function subfamily of sigma factor required for expression of the HRP regulon.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Asita; Cui, Yaya; Chatterjee, Arun K

    2002-09-01

    In Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) strain 71 (Ecc71), HrpL(Ecc), an alternate sigma factor of the extracytoplasmic function subfamily, plays a central role in the expression of the hrp (hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity) regulon. We document here that sigma-54 (RpoN) is required for full expression of hrpL(Ecc) and that HrpS, in conjunction with sigma-54, activates hrpL(Ecc) transcription. We also made the novel observation that integration host factor is required for the activation of the hrpL(Ecc) promoter. Our findings reveal that the RsmA/rsmB RNA-mediated post-transcriptional system, known to control extracellular enzyme and harpin production, affects hrpL(Ecc) expression as well. For example, hrpL(Ecc) RNA levels are barely detected in an RsmB- strain. Conversely, hrpL(Ecc) mRNA levels are much higher in RsmA- bacteria than in the RsmA+ parent. This effect is due to RsmA-promoted decay of hrpL(Ecc) RNA. Moreover, the following regulators known to control the production of either RsmA, rsmB RNA, or both also affect hrpL(Ecc) expression: GacA (response regulator of a two-component system), KdgR (an IcII type repressor), HexA (a LysR type repressor), RsmC (a putative transcriptional adapter). Based upon the data now available for Ecc and extrapolating from the evidence in other systems, we propose a tentative model that depicts the Hrp regulatory system of Ecc and explains the basis for coregulation of extracellular enzyme production and expression of the Hrp regulon. PMID:12236604

  19. Quantitative and temporal definition of the Mla transcriptional regulon during barley-powdery mildew interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Barley Mildew resistance locus a (Mla) is a major determinant of immunity to the powdery mildew pathogen, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Alleles of Mla encode cytoplasmic- and membrane-localized coiled-coil, nucleotide binding site, leucine-rich repeat proteins that mediate resistance when complem...

  20. MicroRNAs in the Host-Apicomplexan Parasites Interactions: A Review of Immunopathological Aspects.

    PubMed

    Judice, Carla C; Bourgard, Catarina; Kayano, Ana C A V; Albrecht, Letusa; Costa, Fabio T M

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding regulatory RNAs, have been detected in a variety of organisms ranging from ancient unicellular eukaryotes to mammals. They have been associated with numerous molecular mechanisms involving developmental, physiological and pathological changes of cells and tissues. Despite the fact that miRNA-silencing mechanisms appear to be absent in some Apicomplexan species, an increasing number of studies have reported a role for miRNAs in host-parasite interactions. Host miRNA expression can change following parasite infection and the consequences can lead, for instance, to parasite clearance. In this context, the immune system signaling appears to have a crucial role. PMID:26870701

  1. The apicoplast: a review of the derived plastid of apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Waller, Ross F; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2005-01-01

    The apicoplast is a plastid organelle, homologous to chloroplasts of plants, that is found in apicomplexan parasites such as the causative agents of Malaria Plasmodium spp. It occurs throughout the Apicomplexa and is an ancient feature of this group acquired by the process of endosymbiosis. Like plant chloroplasts, apicoplasts are semi-autonomous with their own genome and expression machinery. In addition, apicoplasts import numerous proteins encoded by nuclear genes. These nuclear genes largely derive from the endosymbiont through a process of intracellular gene relocation. The exact role of a plastid in parasites is uncertain but early clues indicate synthesis of lipids, heme and isoprenoids as possibilities. The various metabolic processes of the apicoplast are potentially excellent targets for drug therapy. PMID:15580780

  2. MicroRNAs in the Host-Apicomplexan Parasites Interactions: A Review of Immunopathological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Judice, Carla C.; Bourgard, Catarina; Kayano, Ana C. A. V.; Albrecht, Letusa; Costa, Fabio T. M.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding regulatory RNAs, have been detected in a variety of organisms ranging from ancient unicellular eukaryotes to mammals. They have been associated with numerous molecular mechanisms involving developmental, physiological and pathological changes of cells and tissues. Despite the fact that miRNA-silencing mechanisms appear to be absent in some Apicomplexan species, an increasing number of studies have reported a role for miRNAs in host-parasite interactions. Host miRNA expression can change following parasite infection and the consequences can lead, for instance, to parasite clearance. In this context, the immune system signaling appears to have a crucial role. PMID:26870701

  3. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR regulon assists in metabolic homeostasis and enables rapid recovery from nonrespiring dormancy.

    PubMed

    Leistikow, Rachel L; Morton, Russell A; Bartek, Iona L; Frimpong, Isaac; Wagner, Karleen; Voskuil, Martin I

    2010-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives in latently infected individuals, likely in a nonreplicating or dormancy-like state. The M. tuberculosis DosR regulon is a genetic program induced by conditions that inhibit aerobic respiration and prevent bacillus replication. In this study, we used a mutant incapable of DosR regulon induction to investigate the contribution of this regulon to bacterial metabolism during anaerobic dormancy. Our results confirm that the DosR regulon is essential for M. tuberculosis survival during anaerobic dormancy and demonstrate that it is required for metabolic processes that occur upon entry into and throughout the dormant state. Specifically, we showed that regulon mechanisms shift metabolism away from aerobic respiration in the face of dwindling oxygen availability and are required for maintaining energy levels and redox balance as the culture becomes anaerobic. We also demonstrated that the DosR regulon is crucial for rapid resumption of growth once M. tuberculosis exits an anaerobic or nitric oxide-induced nonrespiring state. In summary, the DosR regulon encodes novel metabolic mechanisms essential for M. tuberculosis to survive in the absence of respiration and to successfully transition rapidly between respiring and nonrespiring conditions without loss of viability. PMID:20023019

  4. Apicoplast and Endoplasmic Reticulum Cooperate in Fatty Acid Biosynthesis in Apicomplexan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii*

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Srinivasan; Docampo, Melissa D.; MacRae, James I.; Pujol, François M.; Brooks, Carrie F.; van Dooren, Giel G.; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo; Kastaniotis, Alexander J.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Striepen, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for high impact human diseases such as malaria, toxoplasmosis, and cryptosporidiosis. These obligate intracellular pathogens are dependent on both de novo lipid biosynthesis as well as the uptake of host lipids for biogenesis of parasite membranes. Genome annotations and biochemical studies indicate that apicomplexan parasites can synthesize fatty acids via a number of different biosynthetic pathways that are differentially compartmentalized. However, the relative contribution of each of these biosynthetic pathways to total fatty acid composition of intracellular parasite stages remains poorly defined. Here, we use a combination of genetic, biochemical, and metabolomic approaches to delineate the contribution of fatty acid biosynthetic pathways in Toxoplasma gondii. Metabolic labeling studies with [13C]glucose showed that intracellular tachyzoites synthesized a range of long and very long chain fatty acids (C14:0–26:1). Genetic disruption of the apicoplast-localized type II fatty-acid synthase resulted in greatly reduced synthesis of saturated fatty acids up to 18 carbons long. Ablation of type II fatty-acid synthase activity resulted in reduced intracellular growth that was partially restored by addition of long chain fatty acids. In contrast, synthesis of very long chain fatty acids was primarily dependent on a fatty acid elongation system comprising three elongases, two reductases, and a dehydratase that were localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. The function of these enzymes was confirmed by heterologous expression in yeast. This elongase pathway appears to have a unique role in generating very long unsaturated fatty acids (C26:1) that cannot be salvaged from the host. PMID:22179608

  5. Fumarase C, the stable fumarase of Escherichia coli, is controlled by the soxRS regulon.

    PubMed Central

    Liochev, S I; Fridovich, I

    1992-01-01

    Fumarase C was strongly induced by paraquat in a parental strain of Escherichia coli but was not induced in a strain lacking the soxRS response. Moreover, a strain that constitutively expresses the soxRS regulon contained more fumarase C than did the parental strain. The Mn-containing superoxide dismutase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, members of the soxRS regulon, were similarly induced by paraquat. Mutational defects in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased the induction of fumarase C by paraquat. For Mn-containing superoxide dismutase, responsiveness to paraquat was also enhanced in the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-defective strains. Overproduction of the Mn-containing superoxide dismutase, elicited by isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactoside in a tac-sodA fusion strain, did not diminish induction of fumarase C or of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase by paraquat, and induction of these enzymes was more sensitive to paraquat when the cells were growing on succinate rather than on LB medium. These results indicate that fumarase C is a member of the soxRS regulon and that this regulon does not respond to changes in O2- concentration but perhaps does respond to some consequence of a decrease in the ratio of NADPH to NADP+. PMID:1631070

  6. The MetJ regulon in gammaproteobacteria determined by comparative genomics methods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Whole-genome sequencing of bacteria has proceeded at an exponential pace but annotation validation has lagged behind. For instance, the MetJ regulon, which controls methionine biosynthesis and transport, has been studied almost exclusively in E. coli and Salmonella, but homologs of MetJ exist in a variety of other species. These include some that are pathogenic (e.g. Yersinia) and some that are important for environmental remediation (e.g. Shewanella) but many of which have not been extensively characterized in the literature. Results We have determined the likely composition of the MetJ regulon in all species which have MetJ homologs using bioinformatics techniques. We show that the core genes known from E. coli are consistently regulated in other species, and we identify previously unknown members of the regulon. These include the cobalamin transporter, btuB; all the genes involved in the methionine salvage pathway; as well as several enzymes and transporters of unknown specificity. Conclusions The MetJ regulon is present and functional in five orders of gammaproteobacteria: Enterobacteriales, Pasteurellales, Vibrionales, Aeromonadales and Alteromonadales. New regulatory activity for MetJ was identified in the genomic data and verified experimentally. This strategy should be applicable for the elucidation of regulatory pathways in other systems by using the extensive sequencing data currently being generated. PMID:22082356

  7. Characterization of the RelBbu Regulon in Borrelia burgdorferi Reveals Modulation of Glycerol Metabolism by (p)ppGpp

    PubMed Central

    Bugrysheva, Julia V.; Pappas, Christopher J.; Terekhova, Darya A.; Iyer, Radha; Godfrey, Henry P.; Schwartz, Ira; Cabello, Felipe C.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial stringent response is triggered by deficiencies of available nutrients and other environmental stresses. It is mediated by 5'-triphosphate-guanosine-3'-diphosphate and 5'-diphosphate-guanosine-3'-diphosphate (collectively (p)ppGpp) and generates global changes in gene expression and metabolism that enable bacteria to adapt to and survive these challenges. Borrelia burgdorferi encounters multiple stressors in its cycling between ticks and mammals that could trigger the stringent response. We have previously shown that the B. burgdorferi stringent response is mediated by a single enzyme, RelBbu, with both (p)ppGpp synthase and hydrolase activities, and that a B. burgdorferi 297 relBbu null deletion mutant was defective in adapting to stationary phase, incapable of down-regulating synthesis of rRNA and could not infect mice. We have now used this deletion mutant and microarray analysis to identify genes comprising the rel regulon in B. burgdorferi cultured at 34C, and found that transcription of genes involved in glycerol metabolism is induced by relBbu. Culture of the wild type parental strain, the relBbu deletion mutant and its complemented derivative at 34C and 25C in media containing glucose or glycerol as principal carbon sources revealed a growth defect in the mutant, most evident at the lower temperature. Transcriptional analysis of the glp operon for glycerol uptake and metabolism in these three strains confirmed that relBbu was necessary and sufficient to increase transcription of this operon in the presence of glycerol at both temperatures. These results confirm and extend previous findings regarding the stringent response in B. burgdorferi. They also demonstrate that the stringent response regulates glycerol metabolism in this organism and is likely crucial for its optimal growth in ticks. PMID:25688856

  8. The Copper-Responsive RicR Regulon Contributes to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaoshan; Festa, Richard A.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Butler-Wu, Susan; Sacchettini, James C.; Darwin, K. Heran; Samanovic, Marie I.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT As with most life on Earth, the transition metal copper (Cu) is essential for the viability of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, infected hosts can also use Cu to control microbial growth. Several Cu-responsive pathways are present in M. tuberculosis, including the regulated in copper repressor (RicR) regulon, which is unique to pathogenic mycobacteria. In this work, we describe the contribution of each RicR-regulated gene to Cu resistance in vitro and to virulence in animals. We found that the deletion or disruption of individual RicR-regulated genes had no impact on virulence in mice, although several mutants had Cu hypersensitivity. In contrast, a mutant unable to activate the RicR regulon was not only highly susceptible to Cu but also attenuated in mice. Thus, these data suggest that several genes of the RicR regulon are required simultaneously to combat Cu toxicity in vivo or that this regulon is also important for resistance against Cu-independent mechanisms of host defense. IMPORTANCE Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis, killing millions of people every year. Therefore, understanding the biology of M. tuberculosis is crucial for the development of new therapies to treat this devastating disease. Our studies reveal that although host-supplied Cu can suppress bacterial growth, M. tuberculosis has a unique pathway, the RicR regulon, to defend against Cu toxicity. These findings suggest that Cu homeostasis pathways in both the host and the pathogen could be exploited for the treatment of tuberculosis. PMID:24549843

  9. Defense against Protein Carbonylation by DnaK/DnaJ and Proteases of the Heat Shock Regulon

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Åsa; Ballesteros, Manuel; Dukan, Sam; Nyström, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Protein carbonylation is an irreversible oxidative modification that increases during organism aging and bacterial growth arrest. We analyzed whether the heat shock regulon has a role in defending Escherichia coli cells against this deleterious modification upon entry into stationary phase. Providing the cell with ectopically elevated levels of the heat shock transcription factor, σ32, effectively reduced stasis-induced carbonylation. Separate overproduction of the major chaperone systems, DnaK/DnaJ and GroEL/GroES, established that the former of these is more important in counteracting protein carbonylation. Deletion of the heat shock proteases Lon and HslVU enhanced carbonylation whereas a clpP deletion alone had no effect. However, ClpP appears to have a role in reducing protein carbonyls in cells lacking Lon and HslVU. Proteomic immunodetection of carbonylated proteins in the wild-type, lon, and hslVU strains demonstrated that the same spectrum of proteins displayed a higher load of carbonyl groups in the lon and hslVU mutants. These proteins included the β-subunit of RNA polymerase, elongation factors Tu and G, the E1 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, isocitrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and serine hydroxymethyltranferase. PMID:15937182

  10. Defense against protein carbonylation by DnaK/DnaJ and proteases of the heat shock regulon.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, Asa; Ballesteros, Manuel; Dukan, Sam; Nyström, Thomas

    2005-06-01

    Protein carbonylation is an irreversible oxidative modification that increases during organism aging and bacterial growth arrest. We analyzed whether the heat shock regulon has a role in defending Escherichia coli cells against this deleterious modification upon entry into stationary phase. Providing the cell with ectopically elevated levels of the heat shock transcription factor, sigma32, effectively reduced stasis-induced carbonylation. Separate overproduction of the major chaperone systems, DnaK/DnaJ and GroEL/GroES, established that the former of these is more important in counteracting protein carbonylation. Deletion of the heat shock proteases Lon and HslVU enhanced carbonylation whereas a clpP deletion alone had no effect. However, ClpP appears to have a role in reducing protein carbonyls in cells lacking Lon and HslVU. Proteomic immunodetection of carbonylated proteins in the wild-type, lon, and hslVU strains demonstrated that the same spectrum of proteins displayed a higher load of carbonyl groups in the lon and hslVU mutants. These proteins included the beta-subunit of RNA polymerase, elongation factors Tu and G, the E1 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, isocitrate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, and serine hydroxymethyltranferase. PMID:15937182

  11. Analysis of the RpoS regulon in Borrelia burgdorferi in response to mammalian host signals provides insight into RpoS function during the enzootic cycle

    PubMed Central

    Caimano, Melissa J.; Iyer, Radha; Eggers, Christian H.; Gonzalez, Cynthia; Morton, Elizabeth A.; Gilbert, Michael A.; Schwartz, Ira; Radolf, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) adapts to its arthropod and mammalian hosts by altering its transcriptional and antigenic profiles in response to environmental signals associated with each of these milieus. In studies presented here, we provide evidence to suggest that mammalian host signals are important for modulating and maintaining both the positive and negative aspects of mammalian host adaptation mediated by the alternative sigma factor RpoS in Bb. Although considerable overlap was observed between genes induced by RpoS during growth within the mammalian host and following temperature-shift, comparative microarray analyses demonstrated unequivocally that RpoS-mediated repression requires mammalian host-specific signals. A substantial portion of the in vivo RpoS regulon was uniquely upregulated within dialysis membrane chambers, further underscoring the importance of host-derived environmental stimuli for differential gene expression in Bb. Expression profiling of genes within the RpoS regulon by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed a level of complexity to RpoS-dependent gene regulation beyond that observed by microarray, including a broad range of expression levels and the presence of genes whose expression is only partially dependent on RpoS. Analysis of Bb-infected ticks by qRT-PCR established that expression of rpoS is induced during the nymphal blood meal but not within unfed nymphs or engorged larvae. Together, these data have led us to postulate that RpoS acts as a gatekeeper for the reciprocal regulation of genes involved in the establishment of infection within the mammalian host and the maintenance of spirochetes within the arthropod vector. PMID:17645733

  12. Role of the small RNA RyhB in the Fur regulon in mediating the capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis and iron acquisition systems in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The capsular polysaccharide (CPS) and iron acquisition systems are important determinants of Klebsiella pneumoniae infections, and we have previously reported that the ferric uptake repressor (Fur) can play dual role in iron acquisition and CPS biosynthesis. In many bacteria, Fur negatively controls the transcription of the small non-coding RNA RyhB to modulate cellular functions and virulence. However, in K. pneumoniae, the role played by RyhB in the Fur regulon has not been characterised. This study investigated Fur regulation of ryhB transcription and the functional role of RyhB in K. pneumoniae. Results Deletion of fur from K. pneumoniae increased the transcription of ryhB; the electric mobility shift assay and the Fur-titration assay revealed that Fur could bind to the promoter region of ryhB, suggesting that Fur directly represses ryhB transcription. Additionally, in a Δfur strain with elevated CPS production, deletion of ryhB obviously reduced CPS production. The following promoter-reporter assay and quantitative real-time PCR of cps genes verified that RyhB activated orf1 and orf16 transcription to elevate CPS production. However, deletion of ryhB did not affect the mRNA levels of rcsA, rmpA, or rmpA2. These results imply that Fur represses the transcription of ryhB to mediate the biosynthesis of CPS, which is independent of RcsA, RmpA, and RmpA2. In addition, the Δfur strain’s high level of serum resistance was attenuated by the deletion of ryhB, indicating that RyhB plays a positive role in protecting the bacterium from serum killing. Finally, deletion of ryhB in Δfur reduced the expression of several genes corresponding to 3 iron acquisition systems in K. pneumoniae, and resulted in reduced siderophore production. Conclusions The regulation and functional role of RyhB in K. pneumoniae is characterized in this study. RyhB participates in Fur regulon to modulate the bacterial CPS biosynthesis and iron acquisition systems in K. pneumoniae. PMID:22827802

  13. Non-canonical CRP sites control competence regulons in Escherichia coli and many other γ-proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Andrew D. S.; Redfield, Rosemary J.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli's cAMP receptor protein (CRP), the archetypal bacterial transcription factor, regulates over a hundred promoters by binding 22 bp symmetrical sites with the consensus core half-site TGTGA. However, Haemophilus influenzae has two types of CRP sites, one like E.coli's and one with the core sequence TGCGA that regulates genes required for DNA uptake (natural competence). Only the latter ‘CRP-S’ sites require both CRP and the coregulator Sxy for activation. To our knowledge, the TGTGA and TGCGA motifs are the first example of one transcription factor having two distinct binding-site motifs. Here we show that CRP-S promoters are widespread in the γ-proteobacteria and demonstrate their Sxy-dependence in E.coli. Orthologs of most H.influenzae CRP-S-regulated genes are ubiquitous in the five best-studied γ-proteobacteria families, Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Vibrionaceae and Xanthomonadaceae. Phylogenetic footprinting identified CRP-S sites in the promoter regions of the Enterobacteriaceae, Pasteurellaceae and Vibrionaceae orthologs, and canonical CRP sites in orthologs of genes known to be Sxy-independent in H.influenzae. Bandshift experiments confirmed that E.coli CRP-S sequences are low affinity binding sites for CRP, and mRNA analysis showed that they require CRP, cAMP (CRP's allosteric effector) and Sxy for gene induction. This work suggests not only that the γ-proteobacteria share a common DNA uptake mechanism, but also that, in the three best studied families, their competence regulons share both CRP-S specificity and Sxy dependence. PMID:17068078

  14. Two Conserved Amino Acid Motifs Mediate Protein Targeting to the Micronemes of the Apicomplexan Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Di Cristina, Manlio; Spaccapelo, Roberta; Soldati, Dominique; Bistoni, Francesco; Crisanti, Andrea

    2000-01-01

    The micronemal protein 2 (MIC2) of Toxoplasma gondii shares sequence and structural similarities with a series of adhesive molecules of different apicomplexan parasites. These molecules accumulate, through a yet unknown mechanism, in secretory vesicles (micronemes), which together with tubular and membrane structures form the locomotion and invasion machinery of apicomplexan parasites. Our findings indicated that two conserved motifs placed within the cytoplasmic domain of MIC2 are both necessary and sufficient for targeting proteins to T. gondii micronemes. The first motif is based around the amino acid sequence SYHYY. Database analysis revealed that a similar sequence is present in the cytoplasmic tail of all transmembrane micronemal proteins identified so far in different apicomplexan species. The second signal consists of a stretch of acidic residues, EIEYE. The creation of an artificial tail containing only the two motifs SYHYY and EIEYE in a preserved spacing configuration is sufficient to target the surface protein SAG1 to the micronemes of T. gondii. These findings shed new light on the molecular mechanisms that control the formation of the microneme content and the functional relationship that links these organelles with the endoplasmic reticulum of the parasite. PMID:10982850

  15. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-04-16

    In this review, current structural understanding of the apicomplexan glideosome and actin regulation is described. Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the world’s population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actin–myosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actin–myosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective.

  16. Control site location and transcriptional regulation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Collado-Vides, J; Magasanik, B; Gralla, J D

    1991-01-01

    The regulatory regions for 119 Escherichia coli promoters have been analyzed, and the locations of the regulatory sites have been cataloged. The following observations emerge. (i) More than 95% of promoters are coregulated with at least one other promoter. (ii) Virtually all sigma 70 promoters contain at least one regulatory site in a proximal position, touching at least position -65 with respect to the start point of transcription. There are not yet clear examples of upstream regulation in the absence of a proximal site. (iii) Operators within regulons appear in very variable proximal positions. By contrast, the proximal activation sites of regulons are much more fixed. (iv) There is a forbidden zone for activation elements downstream from approximately position -20 with respect to the start of transcription. By contrast, operators can occur throughout the proximal region. When activation elements appear in the forbidden zone, they repress. These latter examples usually involve autoregulation. (v) Approximately 40% of repressible promoters contain operator duplications. These occur either in certain regulons where duplication appears to be a requirement for repressor action or in promoters subject to complex regulation. (vi) Remote operator duplications occur in approximately 10% of repressible promoters. They generally appear when a multiple promoter region is coregulated by cyclic AMP receptor protein. (vii) Sigma 54 promoters do not require proximal or precisely positioned activator elements and are not generally subject to negative regulation. Rationales are presented for all of the above observations. PMID:1943993

  17. The Zur regulon of Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Zinc is considered as an essential element for all living organisms, but it can be toxic at large concentrations. Bacteria therefore tightly regulate zinc metabolism. The Cg2502 protein of Corynebacterium glutamicum was a candidate to control zinc metabolism in this species, since it was classified as metalloregulator of the zinc uptake regulator (Zur) subgroup of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) family of DNA-binding transcription regulators. Results The cg2502 (zur) gene was deleted in the chromosome of C. glutamicum ATCC 13032 by an allelic exchange procedure to generate the zur-deficient mutant C. glutamicum JS2502. Whole-genome DNA microarray hybridizations and real-time RT-PCR assays comparing the gene expression in C. glutamicum JS2502 with that of the wild-type strain detected 18 genes with enhanced expression in the zur mutant. The expression data were combined with results from cross-genome comparisons of shared regulatory sites, revealing the presence of candidate Zur-binding sites in the mapped promoter regions of five transcription units encoding components of potential zinc ABC-type transporters (cg0041-cg0042/cg0043; cg2911-cg2912-cg2913), a putative secreted protein (cg0040), a putative oxidoreductase (cg0795), and a putative P-loop GTPase of the COG0523 protein family (cg0794). Enhanced transcript levels of the respective genes in C. glutamicum JS2502 were verified by real-time RT-PCR, and complementation of the mutant with a wild-type zur gene reversed the effect of differential gene expression. The zinc-dependent expression of the putative cg0042 and cg2911 operons was detected in vivo with a gfp reporter system. Moreover, the zinc-dependent binding of purified Zur protein to double-stranded 40-mer oligonucleotides containing candidate Zur-binding sites was demonstrated in vitro by DNA band shift assays. Conclusion Whole-genome expression profiling and DNA band shift assays demonstrated that Zur directly represses in a zinc-dependent manner the expression of nine genes organized in five transcription units. Accordingly, the Zur (Cg2502) protein is the key transcription regulator for genes involved in zinc homeostasis in C. glutamicum. PMID:20055984

  18. Heme Oxygenase-1-derived Carbon Monoxide Induces the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Dormancy Regulon*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashwani; Deshane, Jessy S.; Crossman, David K.; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Yan, Bo-Shiun; Kramnik, Igor; Agarwal, Anupam; Steyn, Adrie J. C.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms that allow Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to persist in human tissue for decades and to then abruptly cause disease are not clearly understood. Regulatory elements thought to assist Mtb to enter such a state include the heme two-component sensor kinases DosS and DosT and the cognate response regulator DosR. We have demonstrated previously that O2, nitric oxide (NO), and carbon monoxide (CO) are regulatory ligands of DosS and DosT. Here, we show that in addition to O2 and NO, CO induces the complete Mtb dormancy (Dos) regulon. Notably, we demonstrate that CO is primarily sensed through DosS to induce the Dos regulon, whereas DosT plays a less prominent role. We also show that Mtb infection of macrophage cells significantly increases the expression, protein levels, and enzymatic activity of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, the enzyme that produces CO), in an NO-independent manner. Furthermore, exploiting HO-1+/+ and HO-1-/- bone marrow-derived macrophages, we demonstrate that physiologically relevant levels of CO induce the Dos regulon. Finally, we demonstrate that increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels are produced in the lungs of Mtb-infected mice. Our data suggest that during infection, O2, NO, and CO are being sensed concurrently rather than independently via DosS and DosT. We conclude that CO, a previously unrecognized host factor, is a physiologically relevant Mtb signal capable of inducing the Dos regulon, which introduces a new paradigm for understanding the molecular basis of Mtb persistence. PMID:18400743

  19. Lipid Synthesis in Protozoan Parasites: a Comparison Between Kinetoplastids and Apicomplexans

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Srinivasan; Serricchio, Mauro; Striepen, Boris; Bütikofer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is of crucial importance for pathogens. Lipids serve as cellular building blocks, signalling molecules, energy stores, posttranslational modifiers, and pathogenesis factors. Parasites rely on a complex system of uptake and synthesis mechanisms to satisfy their lipid needs. The parameters of this system change dramatically as the parasite transits through the various stages of its life cycle. Here we discuss the tremendous recent advances that have been made in the understanding of the synthesis and uptake pathways for fatty acids and phospholipids in apicomplexan and kinetoplastid parasites, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, Trypanosoma and Leishmania. Lipid synthesis differs in significant ways between parasites from both phyla and the human host. Parasites have acquired novel pathways through endosymbiosis, as in the case of the apicoplast, have dramatically reshaped substrate and product profiles, and have evolved specialized lipids to interact with or manipulate the host. These differences potentially provide opportunities for drug development. We outline the lipid pathways for key species in detail as they progress through the developmental cycle and highlight those that are of particular importance to the biology of the pathogens and/or are the most promising targets for parasite-specific treatment. PMID:23827884

  20. The apicoplast: a plastid in Plasmodium falciparum and other Apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Foth, Bernardo J; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2003-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause severe diseases such as malaria, toxoplasmosis, and coccidiosis (caused by Plasmodium spp., Toxoplasma, and Eimeria, respectively). These parasites contain a relict plastid-termed "apicoplast"--that originated from the engulfment of an organism of the red algal lineage. The apicoplast is indispensable but its exact role in parasites is unknown. The apicoplast has its own genome and expresses a small number of genes, but the vast majority of the apicoplast proteome is encoded in the nuclear genome. The products of these nuclear genes are posttranslationally targeted to the organelle via the secretory pathway courtesy of a bipartite N-terminal leader sequence. Apicoplasts are nonphotosynthetic but retain other typical plastid functions such as fatty acid, isoprenoid and heme synthesis, and products of these pathways might be exported from the apicoplast for use by the parasite. Apicoplast pathways are essentially prokaryotic and therefore excellent drug targets. Some antibiotics inhibiting these molecular processes are already in chemotherapeutic use, whereas many new drugs will hopefully spring from our growing understanding of this intriguing organelle. PMID:12722949

  1. piggyBac Transposon-Mediated Transgenesis in the Apicomplexan Parasite Eimeria tenella

    PubMed Central

    Su, Huali; Liu, Xianyong; Yan, Wenchao; Shi, Tuanyuan; Zhao, Xinxin; Blake, Damer P.; Tomley, Fiona M.; Suo, Xun

    2012-01-01

    piggyBac, a type II transposon that is useful for efficient transgenesis and insertional mutagenesis, has been used for effective and stable transfection in a wide variety of organisms. In this study we investigate the potential use of the piggyBac transposon system for forward genetics studies in the apicomplexan parasite Eimeria tenella. Using the restriction enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) method, E. tenella sporozoites were electroporated with a donor plasmid containing the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) gene flanked by piggyBac inverted terminal repeats (ITRs), an Asc I-linearized helper plasmid containing the transposase gene and the restriction enzyme Asc I. Subsequently, electroporated sporozoites were inoculated into chickens via the cloacal route and transfected progeny oocysts expressing EYFP were sorted by flow cytometry. A transgenic E. tenella population was selected by successive in vivo passage. Southern-blotting analysis showed that exogenous DNA containing the EYFP gene was integrated into the parasite genome at a limited number of integration sites and that the inserted part of the donor plasmid was the fragment located between the 5′ and 3′ ITRs as indicated by primer-specific PCR screening. Genome walking revealed that the insertion sites were TTAA-specific, which is consistent with the transposition characteristics of piggyBac. PMID:22768223

  2. Transcriptomic Profiling of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Reveals Reprogramming of the Crp Regulon by Temperature and Uncovers Crp as a Master Regulator of Small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Nuss, Aaron M.; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Waldmann, Barbara; Reinkensmeier, Jan; Jarek, Michael; Beckstette, Michael; Dersch, Petra

    2015-01-01

    One hallmark of pathogenic yersiniae is their ability to rapidly adjust their life-style and pathogenesis upon host entry. In order to capture the range, magnitude and complexity of the underlying gene control mechanisms we used comparative RNA-seq-based transcriptomic profiling of the enteric pathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis under environmental and infection-relevant conditions. We identified 1151 individual transcription start sites, multiple riboswitch-like RNA elements, and a global set of antisense RNAs and previously unrecognized trans-acting RNAs. Taking advantage of these data, we revealed a temperature-induced and growth phase-dependent reprogramming of a large set of catabolic/energy production genes and uncovered the existence of a thermo-regulated ‘acetate switch’, which appear to prime the bacteria for growth in the digestive tract. To elucidate the regulatory architecture linking nutritional status to virulence we also refined the CRP regulon. We identified a massive remodelling of the CRP-controlled network in response to temperature and discovered CRP as a transcriptional master regulator of numerous conserved and newly identified non-coding RNAs which participate in this process. This finding highlights a novel level of complexity of the regulatory network in which the concerted action of transcriptional regulators and multiple non-coding RNAs under control of CRP adjusts the control of Yersinia fitness and virulence to the requirements of their environmental and virulent life-styles. PMID:25816203

  3. Transcriptomic profiling of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis reveals reprogramming of the Crp regulon by temperature and uncovers Crp as a master regulator of small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Nuss, Aaron M; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Waldmann, Barbara; Reinkensmeier, Jan; Jarek, Michael; Beckstette, Michael; Dersch, Petra

    2015-03-01

    One hallmark of pathogenic yersiniae is their ability to rapidly adjust their life-style and pathogenesis upon host entry. In order to capture the range, magnitude and complexity of the underlying gene control mechanisms we used comparative RNA-seq-based transcriptomic profiling of the enteric pathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis under environmental and infection-relevant conditions. We identified 1151 individual transcription start sites, multiple riboswitch-like RNA elements, and a global set of antisense RNAs and previously unrecognized trans-acting RNAs. Taking advantage of these data, we revealed a temperature-induced and growth phase-dependent reprogramming of a large set of catabolic/energy production genes and uncovered the existence of a thermo-regulated 'acetate switch', which appear to prime the bacteria for growth in the digestive tract. To elucidate the regulatory architecture linking nutritional status to virulence we also refined the CRP regulon. We identified a massive remodelling of the CRP-controlled network in response to temperature and discovered CRP as a transcriptional master regulator of numerous conserved and newly identified non-coding RNAs which participate in this process. This finding highlights a novel level of complexity of the regulatory network in which the concerted action of transcriptional regulators and multiple non-coding RNAs under control of CRP adjusts the control of Yersinia fitness and virulence to the requirements of their environmental and virulent life-styles. PMID:25816203

  4. The Streptococcus sanguinis Competence Regulon Is Not Required for Infective Endocarditis Virulence in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Jill E.; Munro, Cindy L.; Kitten, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is an important component of dental plaque and a leading cause of infective endocarditis. Genetic competence in S. sanguinis requires a quorum sensing system encoded by the early comCDE genes, as well as late genes controlled by the alternative sigma factor, ComX. Previous studies of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans have identified functions for the >100-gene com regulon in addition to DNA uptake, including virulence. We investigated this possibility in S. sanguinis. Strains deleted for the comCDE or comX master regulatory genes were created. Using a rabbit endocarditis model in conjunction with a variety of virulence assays, we determined that both mutants possessed infectivity equivalent to that of a virulent control strain, and that measures of disease were similar in rabbits infected with each strain. These results suggest that the com regulon is not required for S. sanguinis infective endocarditis virulence in this model. We propose that the different roles of the S. sanguinis, S. pneumoniae, and S. mutans com regulons in virulence can be understood in relation to the pathogenic mechanisms employed by each species. PMID:22039480

  5. Evolutionary and Functional Relationships of the dha Regulon by Genomic Context Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Lima, Wanessa C.; Asif, Huma; Oller, Cláudio A.; Menck, Carlos F. M.

    2016-01-01

    3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) and 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) are subproducts of glycerol degradation and of economical interest as they are used for polymers synthesis, such as polyesters and polyurethanes. Some few characterized bacterial species (mostly from Firmicutes and Gamma-proteobacteria groups) are able to catabolize these monomers from glycerol using the gene products from the dha regulon. To expand our knowledge and direct further experimental studies on the regulon and related genes for the anaerobic glycerol metabolism, an extensive genomic screening was performed to identify the presence of the dha genes in fully sequenced prokaryotic genomes. Interestingly, this work shows that although only few bacteria species are known to produce 3-HPA or 1,3-PD, the incomplete regulon is found in more than 100 prokaryotic genomes. However, the complete pathway is found only in a few dozen species belonging to five different taxonomic groups, including one Archaea species, Halalkalicoccus jeotgali. Phylogenetic analysis and conservation of both gene synteny and primary sequence similarity reinforce the idea that these genes have a common origin and were possibly acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT). Besides the evolutionary aspect, the identification of homologs from several different organisms may predict potential alternative targets for faster or more efficient biological synthesis of 3-HPA or 1,3-PD. PMID:26938861

  6. Evolutionary and Functional Relationships of the dha Regulon by Genomic Context Analysis.

    PubMed

    Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Lima, Wanessa C; Asif, Huma; Oller, Cláudio A; Menck, Carlos F M

    2016-01-01

    3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) and 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) are subproducts of glycerol degradation and of economical interest as they are used for polymers synthesis, such as polyesters and polyurethanes. Some few characterized bacterial species (mostly from Firmicutes and Gamma-proteobacteria groups) are able to catabolize these monomers from glycerol using the gene products from the dha regulon. To expand our knowledge and direct further experimental studies on the regulon and related genes for the anaerobic glycerol metabolism, an extensive genomic screening was performed to identify the presence of the dha genes in fully sequenced prokaryotic genomes. Interestingly, this work shows that although only few bacteria species are known to produce 3-HPA or 1,3-PD, the incomplete regulon is found in more than 100 prokaryotic genomes. However, the complete pathway is found only in a few dozen species belonging to five different taxonomic groups, including one Archaea species, Halalkalicoccus jeotgali. Phylogenetic analysis and conservation of both gene synteny and primary sequence similarity reinforce the idea that these genes have a common origin and were possibly acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT). Besides the evolutionary aspect, the identification of homologs from several different organisms may predict potential alternative targets for faster or more efficient biological synthesis of 3-HPA or 1,3-PD. PMID:26938861

  7. An Expression-Driven Approach to the Prediction of Carbohydrate Transport and Utilization Regulons in the Hyperthermophilic Bacterium Thermotoga maritima†

    PubMed Central

    Conners, Shannon B.; Montero, Clemente I.; Comfort, Donald A.; Shockley, Keith R.; Johnson, Matthew R.; Chhabra, Swapnil R.; Kelly, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of genome-wide expression patterns during growth of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima on 14 monosaccharide and polysaccharide substrates was undertaken with the goal of proposing carbohydrate specificities for transport systems and putative transcriptional regulators. Saccharide-induced regulons were predicted through the complementary use of comparative genomics, mixed-model analysis of genome-wide microarray expression data, and examination of upstream sequence patterns. The results indicate that T. maritima relies extensively on ABC transporters for carbohydrate uptake, many of which are likely controlled by local regulators responsive to either the transport substrate or a key metabolic degradation product. Roles in uptake of specific carbohydrates were suggested for members of the expanded Opp/Dpp family of ABC transporters. In this family, phylogenetic relationships among transport systems revealed patterns of possible duplication and divergence as a strategy for the evolution of new uptake capabilities. The presence of GC-rich hairpin sequences between substrate-binding proteins and other components of Opp/Dpp family transporters offers a possible explanation for differential regulation of transporter subunit genes. Numerous improvements to T. maritima genome annotations were proposed, including the identification of ABC transport systems originally annotated as oligopeptide transporters as candidate transporters for rhamnose, xylose, β-xylan, and β-glucans and identification of genes likely to encode proteins missing from current annotations of the pentose phosphate pathway. Beyond the information obtained for T. maritima, the present study illustrates how expression-based strategies can be used for improving genome annotation in other microorganisms, especially those for which genetic systems are unavailable. PMID:16237010

  8. In the NadR Regulon, Adhesins and Diverse Meningococcal Functions Are Regulated in Response to Signals in Human Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Fagnocchi, Luca; Pigozzi, Eva; Scarlato, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The Neisseria meningitidis regulator NadR was shown to repress expression of the NadA adhesin and play a major role in NadA phase-variable expression. In this study, we identified through microarray analysis over 30 genes coregulated with nadA in the NadR mutant and defined members of the NadR regulon through in vitro DNA-binding assays. Two distinct types of promoter architectures (I and II) were identified for NadR targets, differing in both the number and position of NadR-binding sites. All NadR-regulated genes investigated were found to respond to 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4HPA), a small molecule secreted in human saliva, which was previously demonstrated to induce nadA expression by alleviating NadR-dependent repression. Interestingly, two types of NadR 4HPA responsive activities were found on different NadR targets corresponding to the two types of genes identified by different promoter architectures: while NadA and the majority of NadR targets (type I) are induced, only the MafA adhesins (type II) are corepressed in response to the same 4HPA signal. This alternate behavior of NadR was confirmed in a panel of strains in response to 4HPA and after incubation in saliva. The in vitro NadR binding activity at type I and type II promoter regions is differentially affected by 4HPA, suggesting that the nature of the NadR binding sites may define the regulation to which they will be subjected. We conclude that NadR coordinates a broad transcriptional response to signals present in human saliva, mimicked in vitro by 4HPA, enabling the meningococcus to adapt to the relevant host niche. PMID:22081399

  9. Three Chymotrypsin Genes Are Members of the AdpA Regulon in the A-Factor Regulatory Cascade in Streptomyces griseus

    PubMed Central

    Tomono, Ayami; Tsai, Yisan; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2005-01-01

    AdpA is a key transcriptional activator in the A-factor regulatory cascade in Streptomyces griseus, activating a number of genes required for secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation. Of the five chymotrypsin-type serine protease genes, sprA, sprB, and sprD were transcribed in response to AdpA, showing that these protease genes are members of the AdpA regulon. These proteases were predicted to play the same physiological role, since these protease genes were transcribed in a similar time course during growth and the matured enzymes showed high end-to-end similarity to one another. AdpA bound two sites upstream of the sprA promoter approximately at positions −375 and −50 with respect to the transcriptional start point of sprA. Mutational analysis of the AdpA-binding sites showed that both AdpA-binding sites were essential for transcriptional activation. AdpA bound a single site at position −50 in front of the sprB promoter and greatly enhanced the transcription of sprB. The AdpA-binding site at position −40 was essential for transcription of sprD, although there was an additional AdpA-binding site at position −180. Most chymotrypsin activity excreted by S. griseus was attributed to SprA and SprB, because mutant ΔsprAB, having a deletion in both sprA and sprB, lost almost all chymotrypsin activity, as did mutant ΔadpA. Even the double mutant ΔsprAB and triple mutant ΔsprABD grew normally and developed aerial hyphae and spores over the same time course as the wild-type strain. PMID:16159767

  10. Stage-specific expression of protease genes in the apicomplexan parasite, Eimeria tenella

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Proteases regulate pathogenesis in apicomplexan parasites but investigations of proteases have been largely confined to the asexual stages of Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. Thus, little is known about proteases in other Apicomplexa, particularly in the sexual stages. We screened the Eimeria tenella genome database for proteases, classified these into families and determined their stage specific expression. Results Over forty protease genes were identified in the E. tenella genome. These were distributed across aspartic (three genes), cysteine (sixteen), metallo (fourteen) and serine (twelve) proteases. Expression of at least fifteen protease genes was upregulated in merozoites including homologs of genes known to be important in host cell invasion, remodelling and egress in P. falciparum and/or T. gondii. Thirteen protease genes were specifically expressed or upregulated in gametocytes; five of these were in two families of serine proteases (S1 and S8) that are over-represented in the coccidian parasites, E. tenella and T. gondii, distinctive within the Apicomplexa because of their hard-walled oocysts. Serine protease inhibitors prevented processing of EtGAM56, a protein from E. tenella gametocytes that gives rise to tyrosine-rich peptides that are incorporated into the oocyst wall. Conclusion Eimeria tenella possesses a large number of protease genes. Expression of many of these genes is upregulated in asexual stages. However, expression of almost one-third of protease genes is upregulated in, or confined to gametocytes; some of these appear to be unique to the Coccidia and may play key roles in the formation of the oocyst wall, a defining feature of this group of parasites. PMID:23216867

  11. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    SciTech Connect

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Novichkov, Pavel; Stavrovskaya, Elena D.; Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Kazanov, Marat D.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Kovaleva, Galina Y.; Permina, Elizabeth A.; Laikova, Olga N.; Overbeek, Ross; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arkin, Adam P.; Dubchak, Inna; Osterman, Andrei L.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2011-06-15

    Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. Despite the growing number of genome-scale gene expression studies, our abilities to convert the results of these studies into accurate regulatory annotations and to project them from model to other organisms are extremely limited. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. However, even orthologous regulators with conserved DNA-binding motifs may control substantially different gene sets, revealing striking differences in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli. Multiple examples of regulatory network rewiring include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR), and numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism and PsrA for fatty acid degradation) and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp).

  12. Babesia divergens and Neospora caninum apical membrane antigen 1 structures reveal selectivity and plasticity in apicomplexan parasite host cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Michelle L; Crawford, Joanna; Lebrun, Maryse L; Boulanger, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Host cell invasion by the obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium (malaria) and Toxoplasma (toxoplasmosis), requires a step-wise mechanism unique among known host-pathogen interactions. A key step is the formation of the moving junction (MJ) complex, a circumferential constriction between the apical tip of the parasite and the host cell membrane that traverses in a posterior direction to enclose the parasite in a protective vacuole essential for intracellular survival. The leading model of MJ assembly proposes that Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2) is secreted into the host cell and integrated into the membrane where it serves as the receptor for apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) on the parasite surface. We have previously demonstrated that the AMA1-RON2 interaction is an effective target for inhibiting apicomplexan invasion. To better understand the AMA1-dependant molecular recognition events that promote invasion, including the significant AMA1-RON2 interaction, we present the structural characterization of AMA1 from the apicomplexan parasites Babesia divergens (BdAMA1) and Neospora caninum (NcAMA1) by X-ray crystallography. These studies offer intriguing structural insight into the RON2-binding surface groove in the AMA1 apical domain, which shows clear evidence for receptor-ligand co-evolution, and the hyper variability of the membrane proximal domain, which in Plasmodium is responsible for direct binding to erythrocytes. By incorporating the structural analysis of BdAMA1 and NcAMA1 with existing AMA1 structures and complexes we were able to define conserved pockets in the AMA1 apical groove that could be targeted for the design of broadly reactive therapeutics. PMID:23169033

  13. Primary Structure of 28S rRNA Gene Confirms Monophyly of Free-Living Heterotrophic and Phototrophic Apicomplexans (Alveolata).

    PubMed

    Mikhailov, K V; Tikhonenkov, D V; Janouškovec, J; Diakin, A Y; Ofitserov, M V; Mylnikov, A P; Aleshin, V V

    2015-11-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA or 28S rRNA) gene sequences from free-living predatory flagellates Colpodella angusta, Voromonas pontica, and Alphamonas edax (Apicomplexa) confirms their close relationship with chromerids Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis, which possess a functional photosynthetic plastid. Together these organisms form a sister group to parasitic apicomplexans (coccidians and gregarines, or sporozoans sensu lato). This result agrees with the previous conclusion on monophyly of colpodellids and chromerids (chrompodellids) based on phylogenomic data. The revealed relationships demonstrate a complex pattern of acquisition, loss, or modification of plastids and transition to parasitism during alveolate evolution. PMID:26615441

  14. The Eimeria transcript DB: an integrated resource for annotated transcripts of protozoan parasites of the genus Eimeria.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Luiz Thibério; Novaes, Jeniffer; Durham, Alan M; Madeira, Alda Maria B N; Gruber, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Parasites of the genus Eimeria infect a wide range of vertebrate hosts, including chickens. We have recently reported a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella, integrating ORESTES data produced by our group and publicly available Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). All cDNA reads have been assembled, and the reconstructed transcripts have been submitted to a comprehensive functional annotation pipeline. Additional studies included orthology assignment across apicomplexan parasites and clustering analyses of gene expression profiles among different developmental stages of the parasites. To make all this body of information publicly available, we constructed the Eimeria Transcript Database (EimeriaTDB), a web repository that provides access to sequence data, annotation and comparative analyses. Here, we describe the web interface, available sequence data sets and query tools implemented on the site. The main goal of this work is to offer a public repository of sequence and functional annotation data of reconstructed transcripts of parasites of the genus Eimeria. We believe that EimeriaTDB will represent a valuable and complementary resource for the Eimeria scientific community and for those researchers interested in comparative genomics of apicomplexan parasites. Database URL: http://www.coccidia.icb.usp.br/eimeriatdb/ PMID:23411718

  15. The Eimeria Transcript DB: an integrated resource for annotated transcripts of protozoan parasites of the genus Eimeria

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Luiz Thibério; Novaes, Jeniffer; Durham, Alan M.; Madeira, Alda Maria B. N.; Gruber, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Parasites of the genus Eimeria infect a wide range of vertebrate hosts, including chickens. We have recently reported a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria maxima and Eimeria tenella, integrating ORESTES data produced by our group and publicly available Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). All cDNA reads have been assembled, and the reconstructed transcripts have been submitted to a comprehensive functional annotation pipeline. Additional studies included orthology assignment across apicomplexan parasites and clustering analyses of gene expression profiles among different developmental stages of the parasites. To make all this body of information publicly available, we constructed the Eimeria Transcript Database (EimeriaTDB), a web repository that provides access to sequence data, annotation and comparative analyses. Here, we describe the web interface, available sequence data sets and query tools implemented on the site. The main goal of this work is to offer a public repository of sequence and functional annotation data of reconstructed transcripts of parasites of the genus Eimeria. We believe that EimeriaTDB will represent a valuable and complementary resource for the Eimeria scientific community and for those researchers interested in comparative genomics of apicomplexan parasites. Database URL: http://www.coccidia.icb.usp.br/eimeriatdb/ PMID:23411718

  16. Dissimilatory Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Bacteria:Comparative Reconstruction of Transcriptional Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, EricJ.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2005-09-01

    Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO) is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR and NnrR, two-component systems NarXL and NarQP, NO-responsive activator NorR, and nitrite sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches we predict DNA-binding signals for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA signal. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria including Clostridia, Thermotogales and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides metabolism not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species like Escherichia coli), but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding signal. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon includes also two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr) and nipC(dnrN), thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e., nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include denitrification genes. As the result, we demonstrate considerable interconnection between various nitrogen-oxides-responsive regulatory systems for the denitrification and NO detoxification genes and evolutionary plasticity of this transcriptional network.

  17. Nitrofurantoin, phenazopyridine, and the superoxide-response regulon soxRS of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Amábile-Cuevas, Carlos F; Arredondo-García, José Luis

    2013-12-01

    Nitrofurantoin and phenazopyridine are two drugs commonly used against urinary tract infections. Both compounds exert oxidative damage in patients deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This study was done to assess the interactions of these drugs with the soxRS regulon of Escherichia coli, a superoxide-defense system (that includes a nitroreductase that yields the active metabolite of nitrofurantoin) involved in antibiotic multi-resistance. The effects of either nitrofurantoin or phenazopyridine, upon strains with different soxRS genotypes, were measured as minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and growth curves. Also, the ability of these drugs to induce the expression of a soxS'::lacZ gene fusion was assessed. The effect of antibiotics in the presence of phenazopyridine, paraquat (a known soxRS inducer), or an efflux inhibitor, was measured using the disk diffusion method. A strain constitutively expressing the soxRS regulon was slightly more susceptible to nitrofurantoin, and more resistant to phenazopyridine, compared to wild-type and soxRS-deleted strains, during early treatment, but 24-h MICs were the same (8 mg/l nitrofurantoin, 1,000 mg/l phenazopyridine) for all strains. Both compounds were capable of inducing the expression of a soxS'::lacZ fusion, but less than paraquat. Subinhibitory concentrations of phenazopyridine increased the antimicrobial effect of ampicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and nitrofurantoin. The induction or constitutive expression of the soxRS regulon seems to be a disadvantage for E. coli during nitrofurantoin exposure; but might be an advantage during phenazopyridine exposure, indicating that the latter compound could act as a selective pressure for mutations related to virulence and antibiotic multi-resistance. PMID:23793794

  18. Global Regulatory Impact of ClpP Protease of Staphylococcus aureus on Regulons Involved in Virulence, Oxidative Stress Response, Autolysis, and DNA Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Antje; Agerer, Franziska; Hauck, Christof R.; Herrmann, Mathias; Ullrich, Joachim; Hacker, Jörg; Ohlsen, Knut

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen, causing a wide range of infections including sepsis, wound infections, pneumonia, and catheter-related infections. In several pathogens ClpP proteases were identified by in vivo expression technologies to be important for virulence. Clp proteolytic complexes are responsible for adaptation to multiple stresses by degrading accumulated and misfolded proteins. In this report clpP, encoding the proteolytic subunit of the ATP-dependent Clp protease, was deleted, and gene expression of ΔclpP was determined by global transcriptional analysis using DNA-microarray technology. The transcriptional profile reveals a strong regulatory impact of ClpP on the expression of genes encoding proteins that are involved in the pathogenicity of S. aureus and adaptation of the pathogen to several stresses. Expression of the agr system and agr-dependent extracellular virulence factors was diminished. Moreover, the loss of clpP leads to a complete transcriptional derepression of genes of the CtsR- and HrcA-controlled heat shock regulon and a partial derepression of genes involved in oxidative stress response, metal homeostasis, and SOS DNA repair controlled by PerR, Fur, MntR, and LexA. The levels of transcription of genes encoding proteins involved in adaptation to anaerobic conditions potentially regulated by an Fnr-like regulator were decreased. Furthermore, the expression of genes whose products are involved in autolysis was deregulated, leading to enhanced autolysis in the mutant. Our results indicate a strong impact of ClpP proteolytic activity on virulence, stress response, and physiology in S. aureus. PMID:16885446

  19. Comparative genomics of VirR regulons in Clostridium perfringens strains

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium causing severe diseases such as gas gangrene and pseudomembranosus colitis, that are generally due to the secretion of powerful extracellular toxins. The expression of toxin genes is mainly regulated by VirR, the response regulator of a two-component system. Up to now few targets only are known for this regulator and mainly in one strain (Strain 13). Due to the high genomic and phenotypic variability in toxin production by different strains, the development of effective strategies to counteract C. perfringens infections requires methodologies to reconstruct the VirR regulon from genome sequences. Results We implemented a two step computational strategy allowing to consider available information concerning VirR binding sites in a few species to scan all genomes of the same species, assuming the VirR targets are at least partially conserved across these strains. Results obtained are in agreement with previous works where experimental validation of the promoters have been performed and showed the presence of a core and an accessory regulon of VirR in C. perfringens strains with three target genes also located on plasmids. Moreover, the type E strain JGS1987 has the largest predicted regulon with as many as 10 VirR targets not found in the other genomes. Conclusions In this work we exploited available experimental information concerning the targets of the VirR toxin regulator in one C. perfringens strain to obtain plausible predictions concerning target genes in genomes and plasmids of nearby strains. Our predictions are available for wet-lab researchers working on less characterized C. perfringens strains that can thus design focused experiments reducing the search space of their experiments and increasing the probability of characterizing positive targets with less efforts. Main result was that the VirR regulon is variable in different C. perfringens strains with 4 genes controlled in all but one strains and most genes controlled in one or two strains only. PMID:20184757

  20. Disassembly activity of actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) is associated with distinct cellular processes in apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Silvia; Zimmermann, Dennis; Olshina, Maya A.; Wilkinson, Mark; Fisher, Fabio; Tan, Yan Hong; Stewart, Rebecca J.; Tonkin, Christopher J.; Wong, Wilson; Kovar, David R.; Baum, Jake

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin family have been shown to be crucial for the motility and survival of apicomplexan parasites. However, the mechanisms by which ADF proteins fulfill their function remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigate the comparative activities of ADF proteins from Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum, the human malaria parasite, using a conditional T. gondii ADF-knockout line complemented with ADF variants from either species. We show that P. falciparum ADF1 can fully restore native TgADF activity, demonstrating functional conservation between parasites. Strikingly, mutation of a key basic residue (Lys-72), previously implicated in disassembly in PfADF1, had no detectable phenotypic effect on parasite growth, motility, or development. In contrast, organelle segregation was severely impaired when complementing with a TgADF mutant lacking the corresponding residue (Lys-68). Biochemical analyses of each ADF protein confirmed the reduced ability of lysine mutants to mediate actin depolymerization via filament disassembly although not severing, in contrast to previous reports. These data suggest that actin filament disassembly is essential for apicomplexan parasite development but not for motility, as well as pointing to genus-specific coevolution between ADF proteins and their native actin. PMID:26157165

  1. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    PubMed

    Kumpula, Esa Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-05-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the world's population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actin-myosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actin-myosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective. PMID:25945702

  2. Three-dimensional visualisation of developmental stages of an apicomplexan fish blood parasite in its invertebrate host

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although widely used in medicine, the application of three-dimensional (3D) imaging to parasitology appears limited to date. In this study, developmental stages of a marine fish haemogregarine, Haemogregarina curvata (Apicomplexa: Adeleorina), were investigated in their leech vector, Zeylanicobdella arugamensis; this involved 3D visualisation of brightfield and confocal microscopy images of histological sections through infected leech salivary gland cells. Findings 3D assessment demonstrated the morphology of the haemogregarine stages, their spatial layout, and their relationship with enlarged host cells showing reduced cellular content. Haemogregarine meronts, located marginally within leech salivary gland cells, had small tail-like connections to the host cell limiting membrane; this parasite-host cell interface was not visible in two-dimensional (2D) light micrographs and no records of a similar connection in apicomplexan development have been traced. Conclusions This is likely the first account of the use of 3D visualisation to study developmental stages of an apicomplexan parasite in its invertebrate vector. Elucidation of the extent of development of the haemogregarine within the leech salivary cells, together with the unusual connections between meronts and the host cell membrane, illustrates the future potential of 3D visualisation in parasite-vector biology. PMID:22107751

  3. Towards a molecular understanding of the apicomplexan actin motor: on a road to novel targets for malaria remedies?

    PubMed Central

    Kumpula, Esa-Pekka; Kursula, Inari

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of notorious human and animal diseases that give rise to considerable human suffering and economic losses worldwide. The most prominent parasites of this phylum are the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which are widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, and Toxoplasma gondii, which infects one third of the worlds population. These parasites share a common form of gliding motility which relies on an actinmyosin motor. The components of this motor and the actin-regulatory proteins in Apicomplexa have unique features compared with all other eukaryotes. This, together with the crucial roles of these proteins, makes them attractive targets for structure-based drug design. In recent years, several structures of glideosome components, in particular of actins and actin regulators from apicomplexan parasites, have been determined, which will hopefully soon allow the creation of a complete molecular picture of the parasite actinmyosin motor and its regulatory machinery. Here, current knowledge of the function of this motor is reviewed from a structural perspective. PMID:25945702

  4. Mg(2+) signalling defines the group A streptococcal CsrRS (CovRS) regulon.

    PubMed

    Gryllos, Ioannis; Grifantini, Renata; Colaprico, Annalisa; Jiang, Shengmei; Deforce, Emelia; Hakansson, Anders; Telford, John L; Grandi, Guido; Wessels, Michael R

    2007-08-01

    CsrRS (or CovRS) is a two-component system implicated in the control of multiple virulence determinants in the important human pathogen, group A Streptococcus (GAS). Earlier studies suggested that extracellular Mg(2+) signalled through the presumed sensor histidine kinase, CsrS. We now confirm those findings, as complementation of a csrS mutant restored Mg(2+)-dependent gene regulation. Moreover, we present strong evidence that Mg(2+) signals through CsrS to regulate an extensive and previously undefined repertoire of GAS genes. The effect of Mg(2+) on regulation of global gene expression was evaluated using genomic microarrays in an M-type 3 strain of GAS and in an isogenic csrS mutant. Unexpectedly, of the 72 genes identified in the Mg(2+)-stimulated CsrRS regulon, 42 were absent from the CsrR regulon (the latter being defined by comparison of wild-type and CsrR mutant transcriptomes at low Mg(2+)). We observed CsrS-dependent regulation of 72 of the 73 genes whose expression changed in response to elevated extracellular Mg(2+) in wild-type bacteria, a result that identifies CsrS as the principal, if not exclusive, sensor for extracellular Mg(2+) in GAS. To our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize global gene regulation by a GAS two-component system in response to a specific environmental stimulus. PMID:17608796

  5. A miR-19 regulon that controls NF-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gantier, Michael P.; Stunden, H. James; McCoy, Claire E.; Behlke, Mark A.; Wang, Die; Kaparakis-Liaskos, Maria; Sarvestani, Soroush T.; Yang, Yuan H.; Xu, Dakang; Corr, Sinéad C.; Morand, Eric F.; Williams, Bryan R. G.

    2012-01-01

    Fine-tuning of inflammatory responses by microRNAs (miRNAs) is complex, as they can both enhance and repress expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. In this study, we investigate inflammatory responses following global miRNA depletion, to better define the overall contribution of miRNAs to inflammation. We demonstrate that miRNAs positively regulate Toll-like receptor signaling using inducible Dicer1 deletion and global miRNA depletion. We establish an important contribution of miR-19b in this effect, which potentiates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity in human and mouse cells. Positive regulation of NF-κB signaling by miR-19b involves the coordinated suppression of a regulon of negative regulators of NF-κB signaling (including A20/Tnfaip3, Rnf11, Fbxl11/Kdm2a and Zbtb16). Transfection of miR-19b mimics exacerbated the inflammatory activation of rheumatoid arthritis primary fibroblast-like synoviocytes, demonstrating its physiological importance in the pathology of this disease. This study constitutes, to our knowledge, the first description of a miR-19 regulon that controls NF-κB signaling, and suggests that targeting this miRNA and linked family members could regulate the activity of NF-κB signaling in inflammation. PMID:22684508

  6. Characterization of the Fur Regulon in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000▿†

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Bronwyn G.; Bronstein, Philip A.; Myers, Christopher R.; Stodghill, Paul V.; Bolton, James J.; Markel, Eric J.; Filiatrault, Melanie J.; Swingle, Bryan; Gaballa, Ahmed; Helmann, John D.; Schneider, David J.; Cartinhour, Samuel W.

    2011-01-01

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000) is found in a wide variety of environments and must monitor and respond to various environmental signals such as the availability of iron, an essential element for bacterial growth. An important regulator of iron homeostasis is Fur (ferric uptake regulator), and here we present the first study of the Fur regulon in DC3000. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq), 312 chromosomal regions were highly enriched by coimmunoprecipitation with a C-terminally tagged Fur protein. Integration of these data with previous microarray and global transcriptome analyses allowed us to expand the putative DC3000 Fur regulon to include genes both repressed and activated in the presence of bioavailable iron. Using nonradioactive DNase I footprinting, we confirmed Fur binding in 41 regions, including upstream of 11 iron-repressed genes and the iron-activated genes encoding two bacterioferritins (PSPTO_0653 and PSPTO_4160), a ParA protein (PSPTO_0855), and a two-component system (TCS) (PSPTO_3382 to PSPTO_3380). PMID:21784947

  7. Evidence of tRNA cleavage in apicomplexan parasites: half-tRNAs as new potential regulatory molecules of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium berghei

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several lines of evidence demonstrated that organisms ranging from bacteria to higher animals possess a regulated endonucleolytic cleavage pathway producing half-tRNA fragments. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence of this phenomenon in two distantly related apicomplexan parasites, T...

  8. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Evidence for a Cryptic Plastid in the Colpodellid Voromonas pontica, a Close Relative of Chromerids and Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Gile, Gillian H.; Slamovits, Claudio H.

    2014-01-01

    Colpodellids are free-living, predatory flagellates, but their close relationship to photosynthetic chromerids and plastid-bearing apicomplexan parasites suggests they were ancestrally photosynthetic. Colpodellids may therefore retain a cryptic plastid, or they may have lost their plastids entirely, like the apicomplexan Cryptosporidium. To find out, we generated transcriptomic data from Voromonas pontica ATCC 50640 and searched for homologs of genes encoding proteins known to function in the apicoplast, the non-photosynthetic plastid of apicomplexans. We found candidate genes from multiple plastid-associated pathways including iron-sulfur cluster assembly, isoprenoid biosynthesis, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, along with a plastid-type phosphate transporter gene. Four of these sequences include the 5′ end of the coding region and are predicted to encode a signal peptide and a transit peptide-like region. This is highly suggestive of targeting to a cryptic plastid. We also performed a taxon-rich phylogenetic analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences from colpodellids and their relatives, which suggests that photosynthesis was lost more than once in colpodellids, and independently in V. pontica and apicomplexans. Colpodellids therefore represent a valuable source of comparative data for understanding the process of plastid reduction in humanity's most deadly parasite. PMID:24797661

  9. DB-AT: a 2015 update to the Full-parasites database brings a multitude of new transcriptomic data for apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Jąkalski, Marcin; Wakaguri, Hiroyuki; Kischka, Tabea G; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Kawahara, Fumiya; Tsuji, Naotoshi; Cao, Shinuo; Sunaga, Fujiko; Xuan, Xuenan; Okubo, Kazuhiro; Igarashi, Ikuo; Tuda, Josef; Mongan, Arthur E; Eshita, Yuki; Maeda, Ryuichiro; Makałowski, Wojciech; Suzuki, Yutaka; Yamagishi, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The previous release of our Full-parasites database (http://fullmal.hgc.jp/) brought enhanced functionality, an expanded full-length cDNA content, and new RNA-Seq datasets from several important apicomplexan parasites. The 2015 update witnesses the major shift in the databases content with focus on diverse transcriptomes of the apicomplexan parasites. The content of the database was substantially enriched with transcriptome information for new apicomplexan parasites. The latest version covers a total of 17 species, with addition of our newly generated RNA-Seq data of a total of 909,150,388 tags. Moreover, we have generated and included two novel and unique datasets, which represent diverse nature of transcriptomes in individual parasites in vivo and in vitro. One is the data collected from 116 Indonesian patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum. The other is a series of transcriptome data collected from a total of 38 single cells of P. falciparum cultured in vitro. We believe that with the recent advances our database becomes an even better resource and a unique platform in the analysis of apicomplexan parasites and their interaction with their hosts. To adequately reflect the recent modifications and the current content we have changed the database name to DB-AT--DataBase of Apicomplexa Transcriptomes. PMID:25414358

  10. DB-AT: a 2015 update to the Full-parasites database brings a multitude of new transcriptomic data for apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Jąkalski, Marcin; Wakaguri, Hiroyuki; Kischka, Tabea G.; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Kawahara, Fumiya; Tsuji, Naotoshi; Cao, Shinuo; Sunaga, Fujiko; Xuan, Xuenan; Okubo, Kazuhiro; Igarashi, Ikuo; Tuda, Josef; Mongan, Arthur E.; Eshita, Yuki; Maeda, Ryuichiro; Makałowski, Wojciech; Suzuki, Yutaka; Yamagishi, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The previous release of our Full-parasites database (http://fullmal.hgc.jp/) brought enhanced functionality, an expanded full-length cDNA content, and new RNA-Seq datasets from several important apicomplexan parasites. The 2015 update witnesses the major shift in the databases content with focus on diverse transcriptomes of the apicomplexan parasites. The content of the database was substantially enriched with transcriptome information for new apicomplexan parasites. The latest version covers a total of 17 species, with addition of our newly generated RNA-Seq data of a total of 909 150 388 tags. Moreover, we have generated and included two novel and unique datasets, which represent diverse nature of transcriptomes in individual parasites in vivo and in vitro. One is the data collected from 116 Indonesian patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum. The other is a series of transcriptome data collected from a total of 38 single cells of P. falciparum cultured in vitro. We believe that with the recent advances our database becomes an even better resource and a unique platform in the analysis of apicomplexan parasites and their interaction with their hosts. To adequately reflect the recent modifications and the current content we have changed the database name to DB-AT—DataBase of Apicomplexa Transcriptomes. PMID:25414358

  11. Transcriptomic analysis reveals evidence for a cryptic plastid in the colpodellid Voromonas pontica, a close relative of chromerids and apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Gile, Gillian H; Slamovits, Claudio H

    2014-01-01

    Colpodellids are free-living, predatory flagellates, but their close relationship to photosynthetic chromerids and plastid-bearing apicomplexan parasites suggests they were ancestrally photosynthetic. Colpodellids may therefore retain a cryptic plastid, or they may have lost their plastids entirely, like the apicomplexan Cryptosporidium. To find out, we generated transcriptomic data from Voromonas pontica ATCC 50640 and searched for homologs of genes encoding proteins known to function in the apicoplast, the non-photosynthetic plastid of apicomplexans. We found candidate genes from multiple plastid-associated pathways including iron-sulfur cluster assembly, isoprenoid biosynthesis, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, along with a plastid-type phosphate transporter gene. Four of these sequences include the 5' end of the coding region and are predicted to encode a signal peptide and a transit peptide-like region. This is highly suggestive of targeting to a cryptic plastid. We also performed a taxon-rich phylogenetic analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences from colpodellids and their relatives, which suggests that photosynthesis was lost more than once in colpodellids, and independently in V. pontica and apicomplexans. Colpodellids therefore represent a valuable source of comparative data for understanding the process of plastid reduction in humanity's most deadly parasite. PMID:24797661

  12. Two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis of the extracellular proteome of Bacillus cereus reveals the importance of the PlcR regulon.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Michel; kstad, Ole Andreas; Gilois, Nathalie; Sanchis, Vincent; Kolst, Anne-Brit; Lereclus, Didier

    2002-06-01

    Many virulence factors are secreted by the gram-positive, spore forming bacterium Bacillus cereus. Most of them are regulated by the transcriptional activator, PlcR, which is maximally expressed at the beginning of the stationary phase. We used a proteomic approach to study the impact of the PlcR regulon on the secreted proteins of B. cereus, by comparing the extracellular proteomes of strains ATCC 14579 and ATCC 14579 Delta plcR, in which plcR has been disrupted. Our study indicated that, quantitatively, most of the proteins secreted at the onset of the stationary phase are putative virulence factors, all of which are regulated, directly or indirectly, by PlcR. The inactivation of plcR abolished the secretion of some of these virulence factors, and strongly decreased that of others. The genes encoding proteins that are not secreted in the DeltaplcR mutant possessed a regulatory sequence, the PlcR box, upstream from their coding sequence. These proteins include collagenase, phospholipases, haemolysins, proteases and enterotoxins. Proteins for which the secretion was strongly decreased, but not abolished, in the DeltaplcR mutant did not display the PlcR box upstream from their genes. These proteins include flagellins and InhA2. InhA2 is a homologue of InhA, a Bacillus thuringiensis metalloprotease that specifically degrades antibacterial peptides. The mechanism by which PlcR affects the production of flagellins and InhA2 is not known. PMID:12112862

  13. TrxR, a New CovR-Repressed Response Regulator That Activates the Mga Virulence Regulon in Group A Streptococcus?

    PubMed Central

    Leday, Temekka V.; Gold, Kathryn M.; Kinkel, Traci L.; Roberts, Samantha A.; Scott, June R.; McIver, Kevin S.

    2008-01-01

    Coordinate regulation of virulence factors by the group A streptococcus (GAS) Streptococcus pyogenes is important in this pathogen's ability to cause disease. To further elucidate the regulatory network in this human pathogen, the CovR-repressed two-component system (TCS) trxSR was chosen for further analysis based on its homology to a virulence-related TCS in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In a murine skin infection model, an insertion mutation in the response regulator gene, trxR, led to a significant reduction in lesion size, lesion severity, and lethality. Curing the trxR mutation restored virulence comparable to the wild-type strain. The trxSR operon was defined in vivo, and CovR was found to directly repress its promoter in vitro. DNA microarray analysis established that TrxR activates transcription of Mga-regulated virulence genes, which may explain the virulence attenuation of the trxR mutant. This regulation appears to occur by activation of the mga promoter, Pmga, as demonstrated by analysis of a luciferase reporter fusion. Complementation of the trxR mutant with trxR on a plasmid restored expression of Mga regulon genes and restored virulence in the mouse model to wild-type levels. TrxR is the first TCS shown to regulate Mga expression. Because it is CovR repressed, TrxR defines a new pathway by which CovR can influence Mga to affect pathogenesis in the GAS. PMID:18678666

  14. The organization of the fuc regulon specifying L-fucose dissimilation in Escherichia coli K12 as determined by gene cloning.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y M; Zhu, Y; Lin, E C

    1987-12-01

    In Escherichia coli the six known genes specifying the utilization of L-fucose as carbon and energy source cluster at 60.2 min and constitute a regulon. These genes include fucP (encoding L-fucose permease), fucI (encoding L-fucose isomerase), fucK (encoding L-fuculose kinase), fucA (encoding L-fuculose 1-phosphate aldolase), fucO (encoding L-1,2-propanediol oxidoreductase), and fucR (encoding the regulatory protein). In this study the fuc genes were cloned and their positions on the chromosome were established by restriction endonuclease and complementation analyses. Clockwise, the gene order is: fucO-fucA-fucP-fucI-fucK-fucR. The operons comprising the structural genes and the direction of transcription were determined by complementation analysis and Southern blot hybridization. The fucPIK and fucA operons are transcribed clockwise. The fucO operon is transcribed counterclockwise. The fucR gene product activates the three structural operons in trans. PMID:3325779

  15. The TviA auxiliary protein renders the Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi RcsB regulon responsive to changes in osmolarity

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Sebastian E.; Winter, Maria G.; Thiennimitr, Parameth; Gerriets, Valerie A.; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Rüssmann, Holger; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2009-01-01

    In response to osmolarity, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) regulates genes required for Vi capsular antigen expression oppositely to those required for motility and invasion. Previous studies suggest that osmoregulation of motility, invasion and capsule expression is mediated through the RcsC/RcsD/RcsB phosphorelay system. Here we performed gene expression profiling and functional studies to determine the role of TviA, an auxiliary protein of the RcsB response regulator, in controlling virulence gene expression in S. Typhi. TviA repressed expression of genes encoding flagella and the invasion associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1) through repression of the flagellar regulators flhDC and fliZ, resulting in reduced invasion, reduced motility and reduced expression of FliC. Both RcsB and TviA repressed expression of flhDC, but only TviA altered flhDC expression in response to osmolarity. Introduction of tviA into S. enterica serotype Typhimurium rendered flhDC transcription sensitive to changes in osmolarity. These data suggest that the auxiliary TviA protein integrates a new regulatory input into the RcsB regulon of S. Typhi, thereby altering expression of genes encoding flagella, the Vi antigen and T3SS-1 in response to osmolarity. PMID:19703107

  16. Biochemical characterization of FIKK8--A unique protein kinase from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and other apicomplexans.

    PubMed

    Osman, Khan T; Lou, Hua Jane; Qiu, Wei; Brand, Verena; Edwards, Aled M; Turk, Benjamin E; Hui, Raymond

    2015-06-01

    FIKKs are protein kinases with distinctive sequence motifs found exclusively in Apicomplexa. Here, we report on the biochemical characterization of Plasmodium falciparum FIKK8 (PfFIKK8) and its Cryptosporidium parvum orthologue (CpFIKK) - the only member of the family predicted to be cytosolic and conserved amongst non-Plasmodium parasites. Recombinant protein samples of both were catalytically active. We characterized their phosphorylation ability using an enzymatic assay and substrate specificities using an arrayed positional scanning peptide library. Our results show that FIKK8 targets serine, preferably with arginine in the +3 and -3 positions. Furthermore, the soluble and active FIKK constructs in our experiments contained an N-terminal extension (NTE) conserved in FIKK8 orthologues from other apicomplexan species. Based on our results, we propose that this NTE is an integral feature of the FIKK subfamily. PMID:26112892

  17. Biochemical characterization of FIKK8 – A unique protein kinase from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and other apicomplexans

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Khan T.; Lou, Hua Jane; Qiu, Wei; Brand, Verena; Edwards, Aled M.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Hui, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    FIKKs are protein kinases with distinctive sequence motifs found exclusively in Apicomplexa. Here, we report on the biochemical characterization of Plasmodium falciparum FIKK8 (PfFIKK8) and its Cryptosporidium parvum orthologue (CpFIKK) – the only member of the family predicted to be cytosolic and conserved amongst non-Plasmodium parasites. Recombinant protein samples of both were catalytically active. We characterized their phosphorylation ability using an enzymatic assay and substrate specificities using an arrayed positional scanning peptide library. Our results show that FIKK8 targets serine, preferably with arginine in the +3 and −3 positions. Furthermore, the soluble and active FIKK constructs in our experiments contained an N-terminal extension (NTE) conserved in FIKK8 orthologues from other apicomplexan species. Based on our results, we propose that this NTE is an integral feature of the FIKK subfamily. PMID:26112892

  18. BCKDH: The Missing Link in Apicomplexan Mitochondrial Metabolism Is Required for Full Virulence of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium berghei

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheim, Rebecca D.; Limenitakis, Julien; Polonais, Valerie; Seeber, Frank; Barrett, Michael P.; Billker, Oliver; McConville, Malcolm J.; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    While the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii are thought to primarily depend on glycolysis for ATP synthesis, recent studies have shown that they can fully catabolize glucose in a canonical TCA cycle. However, these parasites lack a mitochondrial isoform of pyruvate dehydrogenase and the identity of the enzyme that catalyses the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA remains enigmatic. Here we demonstrate that the mitochondrial branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex is the missing link, functionally replacing mitochondrial PDH in both T. gondii and P. berghei. Deletion of the E1a subunit of T. gondii and P. berghei BCKDH significantly impacted on intracellular growth and virulence of both parasites. Interestingly, disruption of the P. berghei E1a restricted parasite development to reticulocytes only and completely prevented maturation of oocysts during mosquito transmission. Overall this study highlights the importance of the molecular adaptation of BCKDH in this important class of pathogens. PMID:25032958

  19. Binding of Shewanella FadR to the fabA fatty acid biosynthetic gene: implications for contraction of the fad regulon.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Zheng, Beiwen; Gao, Rongsui; Feng, Youjun

    2015-09-01

    The Escherichia coli fadR protein product, a paradigm/prototypical FadR regulator, positively regulates fabA and fabB, the two critical genes for unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis. However the scenario in the other Ɣ-proteobacteria, such as Shewanella with the marine origin, is unusual in that Rodionov and coworkers predicted that only fabA (not fabB) has a binding site for FadR protein. It raised the possibility of fad regulon contraction. Here we report that this is the case. Sequence alignment of the FadR homologs revealed that the N-terminal DNA-binding domain exhibited remarkable similarity, whereas the ligand-accepting motif at C-terminus is relatively-less conserved. The FadR homologue of S. oneidensis (referred to FadR_she) was over-expressed and purified to homogeneity. Integrative evidence obtained by FPLC (fast protein liquid chromatography) and chemical cross-linking analyses elucidated that FadR_she protein can dimerize in solution, whose identity was determined by MALDI-TOF-MS. In vitro data from electrophoretic mobility shift assays suggested that FadR_she is almost functionally-exchangeable/equivalent to E. coli FadR (FadR_ec) in the ability of binding the E. coli fabA (and fabB) promoters. In an agreement with that of E. coli fabA, S. oneidensis fabA promoter bound both FadR_she and FadR_ec, and was disassociated specifically with the FadR regulatory protein upon the addition of long-chain acyl-CoA thioesters. To monitor in vivo effect exerted by FadR on Shewanella fabA expression, the native promoter of S. oneidensis fabA was fused to a LacZ reporter gene to engineer a chromosome fabA-lacZ transcriptional fusion in E. coli. As anticipated, the removal of fadR gene gave about 2-fold decrement of Shewanella fabA expression by β-gal activity, which is almost identical to the inhibitory level by the addition of oleate. Therefore, we concluded that fabA is contracted to be the only one member of fad regulon in the context of fatty acid synthesis in the marine bacteria Shewanella genus. PMID:26050090

  20. Zinc starvation induces a stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is mediated by the Msn2p and Msn4p transcriptional activators.

    PubMed

    Gauci, Victoria J; Beckhouse, Anthony G; Lyons, Victoria; Beh, Eric J; Rogers, Peter J; Dawes, Ian W; Higgins, Vincent J

    2009-12-01

    During the production of wine and beer, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can encounter an environment that is deficient in zinc, resulting in a 'sluggish' or a 'stuck' ferment. It has been shown that the Zap1p-transcription factor induces the expression of a regulon in response to zinc deficiency; however, it was evident that a separate regulon was also activated during zinc deficiency in a Zap1p-independent manner. This study discovered the Msn2p and Msn4p (Msn2/4p) transcriptional activator proteins to be an additional control mechanism inducing the stress response during zinc deficiency. Promoter sequence analysis identified the stress-response element (STRE) motif, recognized by Msn2/4p, and was significantly enriched in the promoters of genes induced by zinc deficiency. An investigation using genome-wide analyses revealed a distinct regulon consisting of STRE-containing genes whose zinc-responsive expression was abolished in an msn2 msn4 double mutant. An STRE-driven lacZ reporter construct confirmed that expression of the genes within this regulon was perturbed by the deletion of MSN2 and MSN4 and also implicated Hog1p as a contributing factor. This research provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the yeast response to zinc deficiency during fermentation. PMID:19702872

  1. A route for fructose utilization by Escherichia coli involving the fucose regulon.

    PubMed

    Kornberg, Hans; Lourenco, Christopher

    2006-12-19

    Fructose can be taken up by Escherichia coli via a variety of membrane-spanning proteins that recognize sugars with the 3,4,5-d-arabino-hexose configuration. Here, we describe a mutant that is devoid of those proteins but takes up fructose via the FucP carrier normally used for the transport of alpha-L-fucose; this implies that the fructose is taken up in the alpha- or beta-fructopyranose form. For growth, the assimilated fructose is sequentially phosphorylated by ATP and (i) manno(fructo)kinase, to form fructose 6-phosphate, and (ii) phosphofructokinase, to form fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, which is a member of central routes of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. The mutation that confers on the organism the ability to take up fructose via the fucose regulon was located as a deletion of the fucA gene with consequent induction of the proton-linked fucose transporter, FucP. PMID:17159144

  2. 1,3-Propanediol production by Escherichia coli expressing genes from the Klebsiella pneumoniae dha regulon

    SciTech Connect

    I-Teh Tong; Hans H. Liao; Cameron, D.C. )

    1991-12-01

    The dha regulon in Klebsiella pneumoniae enables the organism to grown anaerobically on glycerol and produce 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD). Escherichia coli, which does not have a dha system, is unable to grow anaerobically on glycerol without an exogenous electron acceptor and does not produce 1,3-PD. A genomic library of K. pneumoniae ATCC 25955 constructed in E. coli AG1 was enriched for the ability to grow anaerobically on glycerol and dihydoxyacetone and was screened for the production of 1, 3-PD. The cosmid pTC1 (42.5 kn total with an 18.2-kb major insert) was isolated from a 1,3-PD-producing strain of E. coli and found to possess enzymatic activities associated with four genes of the dha regulon: glycersol dehydratase (dhaB), 1,3-PD oxidoreductase (dhaT), glycerol dehydrogenase (dhaD), and dihydroxyacetone kinase (dhaK). All four activities were inducible by the presence of glycerol. When E. coli AG1/pTC1 was grown on complex medium plus glycerol, the yield of 1, 3-PD from glycerol was 0.46 mol/mol. The major fermentation by-products were formate, acetate, and D-lactate. 1,3-PD is an intermediate in organic synthesis and polymer production. The 1,3-PD fermentation provides a useful model system for studying the interaction of a biochemical pathway in a foreign host and for developing strategies for metabolic pathway engineering.

  3. Probing the ArcA regulon under aerobic/ROS conditions in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is part of the oxidative burst encountered upon internalization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) by phagocytic cells. It has previously been established that, the ArcAB two-component system plays a critical role in ROS resistance, but the genes regulated by the system remained undetermined to date. We therefore investigated the ArcA regulon in aerobically growing S. Typhimurium before and after exposure to H2O2 by querying gene expression and other physiological changes in wild type and ΔarcA strains. Results In the ΔarcA strain, expression of 292 genes showed direct or indirect regulation by ArcA in response to H2O2, of which 141were also regulated in aerobiosis, but in the opposite direction. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) of the expression data from WT and ΔarcA strains, revealed that, in response to H2O2 challenge in aerobically grown cells, ArcA down regulated multiple PEP-PTS and ABC transporters, while up regulating genes involved in glutathione and glycerolipid metabolism and nucleotide transport. Further biochemical analysis guided by GSEA results showed that deletion of arcA during aerobic growth lead to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production which was concomitant with an increased NADH/NAD+ ratio. In absence of ArcA under aerobic conditions, H2O2 exposure resulted in lower levels of glutathione reductase activity, leading to a decreased GSH (reduced glutathione)/GSSG (oxidized glutathione) ratio. Conclusion The ArcA regulon was defined in 2 conditions, aerobic growth and the combination of peroxide treatment and aerobic growth in S. Typhimurium. ArcA coordinates a response that involves multiple aspects of the carbon flux through central metabolism, which ultimately modulates the reducing potential of the cell. PMID:24044554

  4. Probing regulon of ArcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by integrated genomic analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Yang, Zamin Koo; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    The Arc two-component system is a global regulator controlling many genes involved in aerobic/anaerobic respiration and fermentative metabolism in Escherichia coli. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 contains a gene encoding a putative ArcA homolog with {approx} 81% amino acid sequence identity to the E. coli ArcA protein but not a full-length arcB gene. To understand the role of ArcA in S. oneidensis, an arcA deletion strain was constructed and subjected to both physiological characterization and microarray analysis. Compared to the wild-type MR-1, the mutant exhibited impaired aerobic growth and a defect in utilizing DMSO in the absence of O{sub 2}. Microarray analyses on cells grown aerobically and anaerobically on fumarate revealed that expression of 1009 genes was significantly affected (p < 0.05) by the mutation. In contrast to E. coli ArcA, the protein appears to be dispensable in regulation of the TCA cycle in S. oneidensis. To further determine genes regulated by the Arc system, an ArcA recognition weight matrix from DNA-binding data and bioinformatics analysis was generated and used to produce an ArcA sequence affinity map. By combining both techniques, we identified an ArcA regulon of at least 50 operons, of which only 6 were found to be directly controlled by ArcA in E. coli. These results indicate that the Arc system in S. oneidensis differs from that in E. coli substantially in terms of its physiological function and regulon while their binding motif are strikingly similar.

  5. Probing regulon of ArcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by integrated genomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Xiaohu; Yang, Zamin K; Palzkill, Timothy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    Background The Arc two-component system is a global regulator controlling many genes involved in aerobic/anaerobic respiration and fermentative metabolism in Escherichia coli. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 contains a gene encoding a putative ArcA homolog with ~81% amino acid sequence identity to the E. coli ArcA protein but not a full-length arcB gene. Results To understand the role of ArcA in S. oneidensis, an arcA deletion strain was constructed and subjected to both physiological characterization and microarray analysis. Compared to the wild-type MR-1, the mutant exhibited impaired aerobic growth and a defect in utilizing DMSO in the absence of O2. Microarray analyses on cells grown aerobically and anaerobically on fumarate revealed that expression of 1009 genes was significantly affected (p < 0.05) by the mutation. In contrast to E. coli ArcA, the protein appears to be dispensable in regulation of the TCA cycle in S. oneidensis. To further determine genes regulated by the Arc system, an ArcA recognition weight matrix from DNA-binding data and bioinformatics analysis was generated and used to produce an ArcA sequence affinity map. By combining both techniques, we identified an ArcA regulon of at least 50 operons, of which only 6 were found to be directly controlled by ArcA in E. coli. Conclusion These results indicate that the Arc system in S. oneidensis differs from that in E. coli substantially in terms of its physiological function and regulon while their binding motif are strikingly similar. PMID:18221523

  6. LuxR- and Acyl-Homoserine-Lactone-Controlled Non-lux Genes Define a Quorum-Sensing Regulon in Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Sean M.; Dunlap, Paul V.

    2000-01-01

    The luminescence (lux) operon (luxICDABEG) of the symbiotic bacterium Vibrio fischeri is regulated by the transcriptional activator LuxR and two acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) autoinducers (the luxI-dependent 3-oxo-hexanoyl-HSL [3-oxo-C6-HSL] and the ainS-dependent octanoyl-HSL [C8-HSL]) in a population density-responsive manner called quorum sensing. To identify quorum-sensing-regulated (QSR) proteins different from those encoded by lux genes, we examined the protein patterns of V. fischeri quorum-sensing mutants defective in luxI, ainS, and luxR by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Five non-Lux QSR proteins, QsrP, RibB, AcfA, QsrV, and QSR 7, were identified; their production occurred preferentially at high population density, required both LuxR and 3-oxo-C6-HSL, and was inhibited by C8-HSL at low population density. The genes encoding two of the QSR proteins were characterized: qsrP directs cells to synthesize an apparently novel periplasmic protein, and ribB is a homolog of the Escherichia coli gene for 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate synthase, a key enzyme for riboflavin synthesis. The qsrP and ribB promoter regions each contained a sequence similar to the lux operon lux box, a 20-bp region of dyad symmetry necessary for LuxR/3-oxo-C6-HSL-dependent activation of lux operon transcription. V. fischeri qsrP and ribB mutants exhibited no distinct phenotype in culture. However, a qsrP mutant, in competition with its parent strain, was less successful in colonizing Euprymna scolopes, the symbiotic host of V. fischeri. The newly identified QSR genes, together with the lux operon, define a LuxR/acyl-HSL-responsive quorum-sensing regulon in V. fischeri. PMID:10781550

  7. LuxR- and acyl-homoserine-lactone-controlled non-lux genes define a quorum-sensing regulon in Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Callahan, S M; Dunlap, P V

    2000-05-01

    The luminescence (lux) operon (luxICDABEG) of the symbiotic bacterium Vibrio fischeri is regulated by the transcriptional activator LuxR and two acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) autoinducers (the luxI-dependent 3-oxo-hexanoyl-HSL [3-oxo-C6-HSL] and the ainS-dependent octanoyl-HSL [C8-HSL]) in a population density-responsive manner called quorum sensing. To identify quorum-sensing-regulated (QSR) proteins different from those encoded by lux genes, we examined the protein patterns of V. fischeri quorum-sensing mutants defective in luxI, ainS, and luxR by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Five non-Lux QSR proteins, QsrP, RibB, AcfA, QsrV, and QSR 7, were identified; their production occurred preferentially at high population density, required both LuxR and 3-oxo-C6-HSL, and was inhibited by C8-HSL at low population density. The genes encoding two of the QSR proteins were characterized: qsrP directs cells to synthesize an apparently novel periplasmic protein, and ribB is a homolog of the Escherichia coli gene for 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone 4-phosphate synthase, a key enzyme for riboflavin synthesis. The qsrP and ribB promoter regions each contained a sequence similar to the lux operon lux box, a 20-bp region of dyad symmetry necessary for LuxR/3-oxo-C6-HSL-dependent activation of lux operon transcription. V. fischeri qsrP and ribB mutants exhibited no distinct phenotype in culture. However, a qsrP mutant, in competition with its parent strain, was less successful in colonizing Euprymna scolopes, the symbiotic host of V. fischeri. The newly identified QSR genes, together with the lux operon, define a LuxR/acyl-HSL-responsive quorum-sensing regulon in V. fischeri. PMID:10781550

  8. Construction and validation of a first-generation long-oligonulceotide microarray by transcriptional of the Bordetella bronchiseptica Bvg regulon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Bordetella bronchiseptica is a bacterial respiratory pathogen that infects a broad range of mammals, causing chronic and often subclinical infections. Gene expression in Bordetella is regulated by a two-component sensory transduction system, BvgAS, which controls the expression of a spec...

  9. Quantitative and qualitative stem rust resistance factors in barley are associated with transcriptional suppression of defense regulons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici; Pgt) is a devastating fungal disease of wheat and barley. Pgt race TTKSK (isolate Ug99) is a serious threat to these Triticeae grain crops because resistance is rare. In barley, the complex Rpg-TTKSK locus on chromosome 5H is presently the only known so...

  10. Molecular basis for modulated regulation of gene expression in the arginine regulon of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Cunin, R; Eckhardt, T; Piette, J; Boyen, A; Piérard, A; Glansdorff, N

    1983-01-01

    We compare the nucleotide sequences of the regulatory regions of five genes or groups of genes of the arginine regulon of Escherichia coli K-12: argF, argI, argR, the bipolar argECBH operon and the carAB operon. All these regions harbour one or two copies of a conserved 18 bp sequence which appears to constitute the basic arginine operator sequence (ARG box). We discuss the influence of ARG box copy number, degree of dyad symmetry, base composition, and position relative to the cognate promoter site on the derepression-repression ratios of the genes of the regulon. A novel hypothesis, based on structural considerations, is also put forward to account for the absence ot attenuation control. Images PMID:6348703

  11. A small-molecule cell-based screen led to the identification of biphenylimidazoazines with highly potent and broad-spectrum anti-apicomplexan activity.

    PubMed

    Moine, Espérance; Denevault-Sabourin, Caroline; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Silpa, Laurence; Gorgette, Olivier; Barale, Jean-Christophe; Jacquiet, Philippe; Brossier, Fabien; Gueiffier, Alain; Dimier-Poisson, Isabelle; Enguehard-Gueiffier, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    An in vitro screening of the anti-apicomplexan activity of 51 compounds, stemming from our chemical library and from chemical synthesis, was performed. As a study model, we used Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), expressing β-galactosidase for the colorimetric assessment of drug activity on parasites cultivated in vitro. This approach allowed the validation of a new series of molecules with a biphenylimidazoazine scaffold as inhibitors of T. gondii growth in vitro. Hence, 8 molecules significantly inhibited intracellular replication of T. gondii in vitro, with EC50 < 1 μM, while being non-toxic for human fibroblasts at these concentrations. Most attractive candidates were then selected for further biological investigations on other apicomplexan parasites (Neospora caninum, Besnoitia besnoiti, Eimeria tenella and Plasmodium falciparum). Finally, two compounds were able to inhibit growth of four different apicomplexans with EC50 in the submicromolar to nanomolar range, for each parasite. These data, including the broad anti-parasite spectrum of these inhibitors, define a new generation of potential anti-parasite compounds of wide interest, including for veterinary application. Studies realized on E. tenella suggest that these molecules act during the intracellular development steps of the parasite. Further experiments should be done to identify the molecular target(s) of these compounds. PMID:25462254

  12. Studying Gene Expression: Database Searches and Promoter Fusions to Investigate Transcriptional Regulation in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Vaz, Betsy M.; Makarevitch, Irina; Stensland, Shane

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory project was designed to illustrate how to search biological databases and utilize the information provided by these resources to investigate transcriptional regulation in Escherichia coli. The students searched several databases (NCBI Genomes, RegulonDB and EcoCyc) to learn about gene function, regulation, and the organization of transcriptional units. A fluorometer and GFP promoter fusions were used to obtain fluorescence data and measure changes in transcriptional activity. The class designed and performed experiments to investigate the regulation of genes necessary for biosynthesis of amino acids and how expression is affected by environmental signals and transcriptional regulators. Assessment data showed that this activity enhanced students’ knowledge of databases, reporter genes and transcriptional regulation. PMID:23653697

  13. A cell–cell signaling peptide activates the PlcR virulence regulon in bacteria of the Bacillus cereus group

    PubMed Central

    Slamti, Leyla; Lereclus, Didier

    2002-01-01

    PlcR is a pleiotropic regulator that activates the expression of genes encoding various virulence factors, such as phospholipases C, proteases and hemolysins, in Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus. Here we show that the activation mechanism is under the control of a small peptide: PapR. The papR gene belongs to the PlcR regulon and is located 70 bp downstream from plcR. It encodes a 48-amino-acid peptide. Disruption of the papR gene abolished expression of the PlcR regulon, resulting in a large decrease in hemolysis and virulence in insect larvae. We demonstrated that the PapR polypeptide was secreted, then reimported via the oligopeptide permease Opp. Once inside the cell, a processed form of PapR, presumably a pentapeptide, activated the PlcR regulon by allowing PlcR to bind to its DNA target. This activating mechanism was found to be strain specific, with this specificity determined by the first residue of the penta peptide. PMID:12198157

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR Regulon Gene Rv0079 Encodes a Putative, Dormancy Associated Translation Inhibitor (DATIN)

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Majid, Mohammad; Kunisch, Ralph; Rani, Pittu Sandhya; Qureshi, Insaf A.; Lewin, Astrid; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major human pathogen that has evolved survival mechanisms to persist in an immune-competent host under a dormant condition. The regulation of M. tuberculosis metabolism during latent infection is not clearly known. The dormancy survival regulon (DosR regulon) is chiefly responsible for encoding dormancy related functions of M. tuberculosis. We describe functional characterization of an important gene of DosR regulon, Rv0079, which appears to be involved in the regulation of translation through the interaction of its product with bacterial ribosomal subunits. The protein encoded by Rv0079, possibly, has an inhibitory role with respect to protein synthesis, as revealed by our experiments. We performed computational modelling and docking simulation studies involving the protein encoded by Rv0079 followed by in vitro translation and growth curve analysis experiments, involving recombinant E. coli and Bacille Calmette Gurin (BCG) strains that overexpressed Rv0079. Our observations concerning the interaction of the protein with the ribosomes are supportive of its role in regulation/inhibition of translation. We propose that the protein encoded by locus Rv0079 is a dormancy associated translation inhibitor or DATIN. PMID:22719925

  15. Xylan Utilization Regulon in Xanthomonas citri pv. citri Strain 306: Gene Expression and Utilization of Oligoxylosides

    PubMed Central

    Chow, V.; Shantharaj, D.; Guo, Y.; Nong, G.; Minsavage, G. V.; Jones, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri pv. citri strain 306 (Xcc306), a causative agent of citrus canker, produces endoxylanases that catalyze the depolymerization of cell wall-associated xylans. In the sequenced genomes of all plant-pathogenic xanthomonads, genes encoding xylanolytic enzymes are clustered in three adjacent operons. In Xcc306, these consecutive operons contain genes encoding the glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10) endoxylanases Xyn10A and Xyn10C, the agu67 gene, encoding a GH67 α-glucuronidase (Agu67), the xyn43E gene, encoding a putative GH43 α-l-arabinofuranosidase, and the xyn43F gene, encoding a putative β-xylosidase. Recombinant Xyn10A and Xyn10C convert polymeric 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan (MeGXn) to oligoxylosides methylglucuronoxylotriose (MeGX3), xylotriose (X3), and xylobiose (X2). Xcc306 completely utilizes MeGXn predigested with Xyn10A or Xyn10C but shows little utilization of MeGXn. Xcc306 with a deletion in the gene encoding α-glucuronidase (Xcc306 Δagu67) will not utilize MeGX3 for growth, demonstrating the role of Agu67 in the complete utilization of GH10-digested MeGXn. Preferential growth on oligoxylosides compared to growth on polymeric MeGXn indicates that GH10 xylanases, either secreted by Xcc306 in planta or produced by the plant host, generate oligoxylosides that are processed by Xyn10 xylanases and Agu67 residing in the periplasm. Coordinate induction by oligoxylosides of xyn10, agu67, cirA, the tonB receptor, and other genes within these three operons indicates that they constitute a regulon that is responsive to the oligoxylosides generated by the action of Xcc306 GH10 xylanases on MeGXn. The combined expression of genes in this regulon may allow scavenging of oligoxylosides derived from cell wall deconstruction, thereby contributing to the tissue colonization and/or survival of Xcc306 and, ultimately, to plant disease. PMID:25595763

  16. Xylan utilization regulon in Xanthomonas citri pv. citri Strain 306: gene expression and utilization of oligoxylosides.

    PubMed

    Chow, V; Shantharaj, D; Guo, Y; Nong, G; Minsavage, G V; Jones, J B; Preston, J F

    2015-03-01

    Xanthomonas citri pv. citri strain 306 (Xcc306), a causative agent of citrus canker, produces endoxylanases that catalyze the depolymerization of cell wall-associated xylans. In the sequenced genomes of all plant-pathogenic xanthomonads, genes encoding xylanolytic enzymes are clustered in three adjacent operons. In Xcc306, these consecutive operons contain genes encoding the glycoside hydrolase family 10 (GH10) endoxylanases Xyn10A and Xyn10C, the agu67 gene, encoding a GH67 α-glucuronidase (Agu67), the xyn43E gene, encoding a putative GH43 α-l-arabinofuranosidase, and the xyn43F gene, encoding a putative β-xylosidase. Recombinant Xyn10A and Xyn10C convert polymeric 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan (MeGXn) to oligoxylosides methylglucuronoxylotriose (MeGX3), xylotriose (X3), and xylobiose (X2). Xcc306 completely utilizes MeGXn predigested with Xyn10A or Xyn10C but shows little utilization of MeGXn. Xcc306 with a deletion in the gene encoding α-glucuronidase (Xcc306 Δagu67) will not utilize MeGX3 for growth, demonstrating the role of Agu67 in the complete utilization of GH10-digested MeGXn. Preferential growth on oligoxylosides compared to growth on polymeric MeGXn indicates that GH10 xylanases, either secreted by Xcc306 in planta or produced by the plant host, generate oligoxylosides that are processed by Xyn10 xylanases and Agu67 residing in the periplasm. Coordinate induction by oligoxylosides of xyn10, agu67, cirA, the tonB receptor, and other genes within these three operons indicates that they constitute a regulon that is responsive to the oligoxylosides generated by the action of Xcc306 GH10 xylanases on MeGXn. The combined expression of genes in this regulon may allow scavenging of oligoxylosides derived from cell wall deconstruction, thereby contributing to the tissue colonization and/or survival of Xcc306 and, ultimately, to plant disease. PMID:25595763

  17. Fecundity reduction in the second gonotrophic cycle of Culex pipiens infected with the apicomplexan blood parasite, Hepatozoon sipedon.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Laura V; Smith, Todd G

    2014-08-01

    Fecundity reduction is a well-recognized phenomenon of parasite infection in insects. Reduced production of eggs might increase longevity of a host and release nutrients to both host and parasite that would otherwise be used for oogenesis. The objective of this study was to assess effects on fecundity caused by Hepatozoon sipedon, an apicomplexan blood parasite of snakes, in its invertebrate host, the mosquito Culex pipiens. In the first gonotrophic cycle, the mean number of eggs laid by mosquitoes infected with H. sipedon did not differ significantly from those laid by uninfected mosquitoes. However, in the second gonotrophic cycle infected mosquitoes laid significantly fewer eggs than did uninfected mosquitoes, and fecundity was reduced by 100% in mosquitoes with parasite burdens of more than 60 oocysts. There was a significant negative correlation between parasite burden, or the number of oocysts, and the number of eggs produced in the second gonotrophic cycle. Significantly fewer viable larvae hatched from eggs laid by infected compared to uninfected mosquitoes in the second gonotrophic cycle. These data indicate that fecundity reduction occurs in this system, although the physiological mechanisms driving this phenotype are not yet known. PMID:24650105

  18. Model of transcriptional activation by MarA in escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Michael E; Rosner, Judah L; Martin, Robert G

    2009-01-01

    The AraC family transcription factor MarA activates approximately 40 genes (the marA/soxS/rob regulon) of the Escherichia coli chromosome resulting in different levels of resistance to a wide array of antibiotics and to superoxides. Activation of marA/soxS/rob regulon promoters occurs in a well-defined order with respect to the level of MarA; however, the order of activation does not parallel the strength of MarA binding to promoter sequences. To understand this lack of correspondence, we developed a computational model of transcriptional activation in which a transcription factor either increases or decreases RNA polymerase binding, and either accelerates or retards post-binding events associated with transcription initiation. We used the model to analyze data characterizing MarA regulation of promoter activity. The model clearly explains the lack of correspondence between the order of activation and the MarA-DNA affinity and indicates that the order of activation can only be predicted using information about the strength of the full MarA-polymerase-DNA interaction. The analysis further suggests that MarA can activate without increasing polymerase binding and that activation can even involve a decrease in polymerase binding, which is opposite to the textbook model of activation by recruitment. These findings are consistent with published chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of interactions between polymerase and the E. coli chromosome. We find that activation involving decreased polymerase binding yields lower latency in gene regulation and therefore might confer a competitive advantage to cells. Our model yields insights into requirements for predicting the order of activation of a regulon and enables us to suggest that activation might involve a decrease in polymerase binding which we expect to be an important theme of gene regulation in E. coli and beyond.

  19. Model of transcriptional activation by MarA in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wall, Michael E; Markowitz, David A; Rosner, Judah L; Martin, Robert G

    2009-12-01

    The AraC family transcription factor MarA activates approximately 40 genes (the marA/soxS/rob regulon) of the Escherichia coli chromosome resulting in different levels of resistance to a wide array of antibiotics and to superoxides. Activation of marA/soxS/rob regulon promoters occurs in a well-defined order with respect to the level of MarA; however, the order of activation does not parallel the strength of MarA binding to promoter sequences. To understand this lack of correspondence, we developed a computational model of transcriptional activation in which a transcription factor either increases or decreases RNA polymerase binding, and either accelerates or retards post-binding events associated with transcription initiation. We used the model to analyze data characterizing MarA regulation of promoter activity. The model clearly explains the lack of correspondence between the order of activation and the MarA-DNA affinity and indicates that the order of activation can only be predicted using information about the strength of the full MarA-polymerase-DNA interaction. The analysis further suggests that MarA can activate without increasing polymerase binding and that activation can even involve a decrease in polymerase binding, which is opposite to the textbook model of activation by recruitment. These findings are consistent with published chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of interactions between polymerase and the E. coli chromosome. We find that activation involving decreased polymerase binding yields lower latency in gene regulation and therefore might confer a competitive advantage to cells. Our model yields insights into requirements for predicting the order of activation of a regulon and enables us to suggest that activation might involve a decrease in polymerase binding which we expect to be an important theme of gene regulation in E. coli and beyond. PMID:20019803

  20. Genome-wide analysis of cell type-specific gene transcription during spore formation in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Saujet, Laure; Pereira, Fátima C; Serrano, Monica; Soutourina, Olga; Monot, Marc; Shelyakin, Pavel V; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Dupuy, Bruno; Henriques, Adriano O; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, a Gram positive, anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium is an emergent pathogen and the most common cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Although transmission of C. difficile is mediated by contamination of the gut by spores, the regulatory cascade controlling spore formation remains poorly characterized. During Bacillus subtilis sporulation, a cascade of four sigma factors, σ(F) and σ(G) in the forespore and σ(E) and σ(K) in the mother cell governs compartment-specific gene expression. In this work, we combined genome wide transcriptional analyses and promoter mapping to define the C. difficile σ(F), σ(E), σ(G) and σ(K) regulons. We identified about 225 genes under the control of these sigma factors: 25 in the σ(F) regulon, 97 σ(E)-dependent genes, 50 σ(G)-governed genes and 56 genes under σ(K) control. A significant fraction of genes in each regulon is of unknown function but new candidates for spore coat proteins could be proposed as being synthesized under σ(E) or σ(K) control and detected in a previously published spore proteome. SpoIIID of C. difficile also plays a pivotal role in the mother cell line of expression repressing the transcription of many members of the σ(E) regulon and activating sigK expression. Global analysis of developmental gene expression under the control of these sigma factors revealed deviations from the B. subtilis model regarding the communication between mother cell and forespore in C. difficile. We showed that the expression of the σ(E) regulon in the mother cell was not strictly under the control of σ(F) despite the fact that the forespore product SpoIIR was required for the processing of pro-σ(E). In addition, the σ(K) regulon was not controlled by σ(G) in C. difficile in agreement with the lack of pro-σ(K) processing. This work is one key step to obtain new insights about the diversity and evolution of the sporulation process among Firmicutes. PMID:24098137

  1. Boosting transcription by transcription: enhancer associated transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Darrow, Emily M.; Chadwick, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancers are traditionally viewed as DNA sequences located some distance from a promoter that act in cis and in an orientation-independent fashion to increase utilization of specific promoters and thereby regulate gene expression. Much progress has been made over the last decade toward understanding how these distant elements interact with target promoters, but how transcription is enhanced remains an object of active inquiry. Recent reports convey the prevalence and diversity of enhancer transcription and transcripts and support both as key factors with mechanistically distinct, but not mutually exclusive roles in enhancer function. Decoupling the causes and effects of transcription on the local chromatin landscape and understanding the role of enhancer transcripts in the context of long-range interactions are challenges that require additional attention. In this review we focus on the possible functions of enhancer transcription by highlighting several recent eRNA papers and, within the context of other enhancer studies, speculate on the role of enhancer transcription in regulating differential gene expression. PMID:24178450

  2. Large-Scale Mapping and Validation of Escherichia coli Transcriptional Regulation from a Compendium of Expression Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Thaden, Joshua T; Mogno, Ilaria; Wierzbowski, Jamey; Cottarel, Guillaume; Kasif, Simon; Collins, James J; Gardner, Timothy S

    2007-01-01

    Machine learning approaches offer the potential to systematically identify transcriptional regulatory interactions from a compendium of microarray expression profiles. However, experimental validation of the performance of these methods at the genome scale has remained elusive. Here we assess the global performance of four existing classes of inference algorithms using 445 Escherichia coli Affymetrix arrays and 3,216 known E. coli regulatory interactions from RegulonDB. We also developed and applied the context likelihood of relatedness (CLR) algorithm, a novel extension of the relevance networks class of algorithms. CLR demonstrates an average precision gain of 36% relative to the next-best performing algorithm. At a 60% true positive rate, CLR identifies 1,079 regulatory interactions, of which 338 were in the previously known network and 741 were novel predictions. We tested the predicted interactions for three transcription factors with chromatin immunoprecipitation, confirming 21 novel interactions and verifying our RegulonDB-based performance estimates. CLR also identified a regulatory link providing central metabolic control of iron transport, which we confirmed with real-time quantitative PCR. The compendium of expression data compiled in this study, coupled with RegulonDB, provides a valuable model system for further improvement of network inference algorithms using experimental data. PMID:17214507

  3. The RNA-binding protein SFPQ orchestrates an RNA regulon to promote axon viability.

    PubMed

    Cosker, Katharina E; Fenstermacher, Sara J; Pazyra-Murphy, Maria F; Elliott, Hunter L; Segal, Rosalind A

    2016-05-01

    To achieve accurate spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) guide nuclear processing, intracellular trafficking and local translation of target mRNAs. In neurons, RBPs direct transport of target mRNAs to sites of translation in remote axons and dendrites. However, it is not known whether an individual RBP coordinately regulates multiple mRNAs within these morphologically complex cells. Here we identify SFPQ (splicing factor, poly-glutamine rich) as an RBP that binds and regulates multiple mRNAs in dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons and thereby promotes neurotrophin-dependent axonal viability. SFPQ acts in nuclei, cytoplasm and axons to regulate functionally related mRNAs essential for axon survival. Notably, SFPQ is required for coassembly of LaminB2 (Lmnb2) and Bclw (Bcl2l2) mRNAs in RNA granules and for axonal trafficking of these mRNAs. Together these data demonstrate that SFPQ orchestrates spatial gene expression of a newly identified RNA regulon essential for axonal viability. PMID:27019013

  4. The ArcA regulon and oxidative stress resistance in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sandy M S; Alugupalli, Kishore R; Ram, Sanjay; Akerley, Brian J

    2007-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae transits between niches within the human host that are predicted to differ in oxygen levels. The ArcAB two-component signal transduction system controls gene expression in response to respiratory conditions of growth and has been implicated in bacterial pathogenesis, yet the mechanism is not understood. We undertook a genome-scale study to identify genes of the H. influenzae ArcA regulon. Deletion of arcA resulted in increased anaerobic expression of genes of the respiratory chain and of H. influenzae's partial tricarboxylic acid cycle, and decreased anaerobic expression levels of genes of polyamine metabolism, and iron sequestration. Deletion of arcA also conferred a susceptibility to transient exposure to hydrogen peroxide that was greater following anaerobic growth than after aerobic growth. Array data revealed that the dps gene, not previously assigned to the ArcA modulon in bacteria, exhibited decreased expression in the arcA mutant. Deletion of dps resulted in hydrogen peroxide sensitivity and complementation restored resistance, providing insight into the previously uncharacterized mechanism of arcA-mediated H2O2 resistance. The results indicate a role for H. influenzae arcA and dps in pre-emptive defence against transitions from growth in low oxygen environments to aerobic exposure to hydrogen peroxide, an antibacterial oxidant produced by phagocytes during infection. PMID:17542927

  5. The roles of peroxide protective regulons in protecting Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris from sodium hypochlorite stress.

    PubMed

    Charoenlap, Nisanart; Sornchuer, Phornphan; Piwkam, Anong; Srijaruskul, Kriangsuk; Mongkolsuk, Skorn; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon

    2015-05-01

    The exposure of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris to sublethal concentrations of a sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution induced the expression of genes that encode peroxide scavenging enzymes within the OxyR and OhrR regulons. Sensitivity testing in various X. campestris mutants indicated that oxyR, katA, katG, ahpC, and ohr contributed to protection against NaOCl killing. The pretreatment of X. campestris cultures with oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), t-butyl hydroperoxide, and the superoxide generator menadione, protected the bacteria from lethal concentrations of NaOCl in an OxyR-dependent manner. Treating the bacteria with a low concentration of NaOCl resulted in the adaptive protection from NaOCl killing and also provided cross-protection from H2O2 killing. Taken together, the results suggest that the toxicity of NaOCl is partially mediated by the generation of peroxides and other reactive oxygen species that are removed by primary peroxide scavenging enzymes, such as catalases and AhpC, as a part of an overall strategy that protects the bacteria from the lethal effects of NaOCl. PMID:25825971

  6. Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effects of global regulators CRP and ArcA

    SciTech Connect

    Leuze, Mike; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Syed, Mustafa H.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2012-05-30

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TF) that bind to DNA recognition sequences in operon promoters. These recognition sequences, many of which are palindromic, are known as regulatory elements or transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Some TFs are global regulators that can modulate the expression of hundreds of genes. In this study we examine global regulator half-sites, where a half-site, which we shall call a binding motif (BM), is one half of a palindromic TFBS. We explore the hypothesis that the number of BMs plays an important role in transcriptional regulation, examining empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP and ArcA regulons. We compare the power of BM counts and of full TFBS characteristics to predict induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full TFBS quality or location.

  7. Characterization of DNA Binding Sites of RokB, a ROK-Family Regulator from Streptomyces coelicolor Reveals the RokB Regulon

    PubMed Central

    Bekiesch, Paulina; Forchhammer, Karl; Apel, Alexander Kristian

    2016-01-01

    ROK-family proteins have been described to act either as sugar kinases or as transcriptional regulators. Few ROK-family regulators have been characterized so far and most of them are involved in carbon catabolite repression. RokB (Sco6115) has originally been identified in a DNA-affinity capturing approach as a possible regulator of the heterologously expressed novobiocin biosynthetic gene cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor M512. Interestingly, both, the rokB deletion mutants as well as its overexpressing mutants showed significantly reduced novobiocin production in the host strain S.coelicolor M512. We identified the DNA-binding site for RokB in the promoter region of the novobiocin biosynthetic genes novH-novW. It overlaps with the novH start codon which may explain the reduction of novobiocin production caused by overexpression of rokB. Bioinformatic screening coupled with surface plasmon resonance based interaction studies resulted in the discovery of five RokB binding sites within the genome of S. coelicolor. Using the genomic binding sites, a consensus motif for RokB was calculated, which differs slightly from previously determined binding motifs for ROK-family regulators. The annotations of the possible members of the so defined RokB regulon gave hints that RokB might be involved in amino acid metabolism and transport. This hypothesis was supported by feeding experiments with casamino acids and L-tyrosine, which could also explain the reduced novobiocin production in the deletion mutants. PMID:27145180

  8. Identification of a Salmonella ancillary copper detoxification mechanism by a comparative analysis of the genome-wide transcriptional response to copper and zinc excess

    PubMed Central

    Pontel, Lucas B.; Scampoli, Nadia L.; Porwollik, Steffen; Checa, Susana K.; McClelland, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Copper and zinc are essential metal ions, but toxic in excess. Bacteria have evolved different strategies to control their intracellular concentrations, ensuring proper supply while avoiding toxicity, including the induction of metal-specific as well as non-specific mechanisms. We compared the transcriptional profiles of Salmonella Typhimurium after exposure to either copper or zinc ions in both rich and minimal media. Besides metal-specific regulatory networks many global stress-response pathways react to an excess of either of these metal ions. Copper excess affects both zinc and iron homeostasis by inducing transcription of these metal-specific regulons. In addition to the control of zinc-specific regulons, zinc excess affects the Cpx regulon and the σE envelope-stress responses. Finally, novel metal-specific upregulated genes were detected including a new copper-detoxification pathway that involves the siderophore enterobactin and the outer-membrane protein TolC. This work sheds light onto the transcriptional landscape of Salmonella after copper or zinc overload, and discloses a new mechanism of copper detoxification. PMID:24858080

  9. Identification of a Salmonella ancillary copper detoxification mechanism by a comparative analysis of the genome-wide transcriptional response to copper and zinc excess.

    PubMed

    Pontel, Lucas B; Scampoli, Nadia L; Porwollik, Steffen; Checa, Susana K; McClelland, Michael; Soncini, Fernando C

    2014-08-01

    Copper and zinc are essential metal ions, but toxic in excess. Bacteria have evolved different strategies to control their intracellular concentrations, ensuring proper supply while avoiding toxicity, including the induction of metal-specific as well as non-specific mechanisms. We compared the transcriptional profiles of Salmonella Typhimurium after exposure to either copper or zinc ions in both rich and minimal media. Besides metal-specific regulatory networks many global stress-response pathways react to an excess of either of these metal ions. Copper excess affects both zinc and iron homeostasis by inducing transcription of these metal-specific regulons. In addition to the control of zinc-specific regulons, zinc excess affects the Cpx regulon and the σ(E) envelope-stress responses. Finally, novel metal-specific upregulated genes were detected including a new copper-detoxification pathway that involves the siderophore enterobactin and the outer-membrane protein TolC. This work sheds light onto the transcriptional landscape of Salmonella after copper or zinc overload, and discloses a new mechanism of copper detoxification. PMID:24858080

  10. Dissecting the interface between apicomplexan parasite and host cell: Insights from a divergent AMA-RON2 pair.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michelle L; Penarete-Vargas, Diana M; Hamilton, Phineas T; Guérin, Amandine; Dubey, Jitender P; Perlman, Steve J; Spano, Furio; Lebrun, Maryse; Boulanger, Martin J

    2016-01-12

    Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii are widely studied parasites in phylum Apicomplexa and the etiological agents of severe human malaria and toxoplasmosis, respectively. These intracellular pathogens have evolved a sophisticated invasion strategy that relies on delivery of proteins into the host cell, where parasite-derived rhoptry neck protein 2 (RON2) family members localize to the host outer membrane and serve as ligands for apical membrane antigen (AMA) family surface proteins displayed on the parasite. Recently, we showed that T. gondii harbors a novel AMA designated as TgAMA4 that shows extreme sequence divergence from all characterized AMA family members. Here we show that sporozoite-expressed TgAMA4 clusters in a distinct phylogenetic clade with Plasmodium merozoite apical erythrocyte-binding ligand (MAEBL) proteins and forms a high-affinity, functional complex with its coevolved partner, TgRON2L1. High-resolution crystal structures of TgAMA4 in the apo and TgRON2L1-bound forms complemented with alanine scanning mutagenesis data reveal an unexpected architecture and assembly mechanism relative to previously characterized AMA-RON2 complexes. Principally, TgAMA4 lacks both a deep surface groove and a key surface loop that have been established to govern RON2 ligand binding selectivity in other AMAs. Our study reveals a previously underappreciated level of molecular diversity at the parasite-host-cell interface and offers intriguing insight into the adaptation strategies underlying sporozoite invasion. Moreover, our data offer the potential for improved design of neutralizing therapeutics targeting a broad range of AMA-RON2 pairs and apicomplexan invasive stages. PMID:26712012

  11. Molecular systematics of marine gregarine apicomplexans from Pacific tunicates, with descriptions of five novel species of Lankesteria.

    PubMed

    Rueckert, Sonja; Wakeman, Kevin C; Jenke-Kodama, Holger; Leander, Brian S

    2015-08-01

    The eugregarines are a group of apicomplexan parasites that mostly infect the intestines of invertebrates. The high level of morphological variation found within and among species of eugregarines makes it difficult to find consistent and reliable traits that unite even closely related lineages. Based mostly on traits observed with light microscopy, the majority of described eugregarines from marine invertebrates has been classified into a single group, the Lecudinidae. Our understanding of the overall diversity and phylogenetic relationships of lecudinids is very poor, mainly because only a modest amount of exploratory research has been done on the group and very few species of lecudinids have been characterized at the molecular phylogenetic level. In an attempt to understand the diversity of marine gregarines better, we surveyed lecudinids that infect the intestines of Pacific ascidians (i.e. sea squirts) using ultrastructural and molecular phylogenetic approaches; currently, these species fall within one genus, Lankesteria. We collected lecudinid gregarines from six ascidian host species, and our data demonstrated that each host was infected by a different species of Lankesteria: (i) Lankesteria hesperidiiformis sp. nov., isolated from Distaplia occidentalis, (ii) Lankesteria metandrocarpae sp. nov., isolated from Metandrocarpa taylori, (iii) Lankesteria halocynthiae sp. nov., isolated from Halocynthia aurantium, (iv) Lankesteria herdmaniae sp. nov., isolated from Herdmania momus, (v) Lankesteria cf. ritterellae, isolated from Ritterella rubra, and (vi) Lankesteria didemni sp. nov., isolated from Didemnum vexillum. Visualization of the trophozoites with scanning electron microscopy showed that four of these species were covered with epicytic folds, whereas two of the species were covered with a dense pattern of epicytic knobs. The molecular phylogenetic data suggested that species of Lankesteria with surface knobs form a clade that is nested within a paraphyletic assemblage species of Lankesteria with epicytic folds. PMID:25985834

  12. Rcs signaling-activated transcription of rcsA induces strong anti-sense transcription of upstream fliPQR flagellar genes from a weak intergenic promoter: regulatory roles for the anti-sense transcript in virulence and motility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingfeng; Harshey, Rasika M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary In Salmonella enterica, an activated Rcs signaling system inhibits initiation of transcription of the flhD master operon. Under these conditions, where motility is shut down, microarray experiments showed an increased RNA signal for three flagellar genes - fliPQR - located upstream of rcsA. We show here that it is the anti-sense (AS) strand of these genes that is transcribed, originating at a weak promoter in the intergenic region between fliR and rcsA. RcsA is an auxiliary regulator for the Rcs system, whose transcription is dependent on the response regulator RcsB. Rcs-activated rightward transcription, but not translation, of rcsA is required for stimulation of leftward AS transcription. Our results implicate a combined action of RcsB and rcsA transcription in activating the AS promoter, likely by modulating DNA superhelicity in the intergenic region. We show that the AS transcript regulates many genes in the Rcs regulon, including SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence and stress-response genes. In the wild-type strain the AS transcript is present in low amounts, independent of Rcs signaling. Here, AS transcription modulates complementary sense RNA levels and impacts swarming motility. It appears that the flagellar AS transcript has been co-opted by the Rcs system to regulate virulence. PMID:19703110

  13. Rcs signalling-activated transcription of rcsA induces strong anti-sense transcription of upstream fliPQR flagellar genes from a weak intergenic promoter: regulatory roles for the anti-sense transcript in virulence and motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingfeng; Harshey, Rasika M

    2009-10-01

    In Salmonella enterica, an activated Rcs signalling system inhibits initiation of transcription of the flhD master operon. Under these conditions, where motility is shut down, microarray experiments showed an increased RNA signal for three flagellar genes -fliPQR- located upstream of rcsA. We show here that it is the anti-sense (AS) strand of these genes that is transcribed, originating at a weak promoter in the intergenic region between fliR and rcsA. RcsA is an auxiliary regulator for the Rcs system, whose transcription is dependent on the response regulator RcsB. Rcs-activated rightward transcription, but not translation, of rcsA is required for stimulation of leftward AS transcription. Our results implicate a combined action of RcsB and rcsA transcription in activating the AS promoter, likely by modulating DNA superhelicity in the intergenic region. We show that the AS transcript regulates many genes in the Rcs regulon, including SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence and stress-response genes. In the wild-type strain the AS transcript is present in low amounts, independent of Rcs signalling. Here, AS transcription modulates complementary sense RNA levels and impacts swarming motility. It appears that the flagellar AS transcript has been co-opted by the Rcs system to regulate virulence. PMID:19703110

  14. Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effect of global regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Leuze, Michael Rex; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Syed, Mustafa H; Beliaev, Alexander S; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TFs) that influence the expression of many genes. Global regulators, including CRP (cAMP Receptor Protein), ArcA, and FNR, can modulate the transcriptional activity of multiple operons. The similarity of a regulatory element s sequence to a TF s consensus binding site (BS) and the position of the regulatory element in an operon promoter are considered the most important determinants of this TF s regulatory influence. In this study we explore the hypothesis that the number of TFBS half-sites (where a half-site is one half of the palindromic BS consensus sequence, which we shall refer to as a binding motif or a BM) of a global regulator in an operon s promoter plays an important role in the operon s transcriptional regulation. We examine empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP regulon in Shewanella oneidenses MR 1 and Escherichia coli, and of the ArcA regulon in S. oneidenses MR 1. We compare the power of CRP BM counts and of full, symmetrical CRP TFBS characteristics, namely similarity to consensus and location, to predict CRP-induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full-length TFBS quality or location. Regression analysis indicates that IHF (Integration Host Factor) and ArcA have synergistic effects on CRP-induced gene transcription, positive and negative, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that the fine-tuning of bacterial transcriptional activity by CRP may involves not only the bending of the operon promoter, facilitated by CRP in cooperation with the histone-like protein IHF, but also the cumulative binding affinity of multiple weak BMs.

  15. Septal Localization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis MtrB Sensor Kinase Promotes MtrA Regulon Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Plocinska, Renata; Purushotham, Gorla; Sarva, Krishna; Vadrevu, Indumathi S.; Pandeeti, Emmanuel V. P.; Arora, Naresh; Plocinski, Przemyslaw; Madiraju, Murty V.; Rajagopalan, Malini

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for activation of the MtrAB two-component regulatory signal transduction system, which includes sensor kinase MtrB and response regulator MtrA, are unknown. Here, we show that an MtrB-GFP fusion protein localized to the cell membrane, the septa, and the poles in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis. This localization was independent of MtrB phosphorylation status but dependent upon the assembly of FtsZ, the initiator of cell division. The M. smegmatis mtrB mutant was filamentous, defective for cell division, and contained lysozyme-sensitive cell walls. The mtrB phenotype was complemented by either production of MtrB protein competent for phosphorylation or overproduction of MtrAY102C and MtrAD13A mutant proteins exhibiting altered phosphorylation potential, indicating that either MtrB phosphorylation or MtrB independent expression of MtrA regulon genes, including those involved in cell wall processing, are necessary for regulated cell division. In partial support of this observation, we found that the essential cell wall hydrolase ripA is an MtrA target and that the expression of bona fide MtrA targets ripA, fbpB, and dnaA were compromised in the mtrB mutant and partially rescued upon MtrAY102C and MtrAD13A overproduction. MtrB septal assembly was compromised upon FtsZ depletion and exposure of cells to mitomycin C, a DNA damaging agent, which interferes with FtsZ ring assembly. Expression of MtrA targets was also compromised under the above conditions, indicating that MtrB septal localization and MtrA regulon expression are linked. We propose that MtrB septal association is a necessary feature of MtrB activation that promotes MtrA phosphorylation and MtrA regulon expression. PMID:22610443

  16. Combined Amplicon Pyrosequencing Assays Reveal Presence of the Apicomplexan type-N (cf. Gemmocystis cylindrus) and Chromera velia on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    PubMed Central

    lapeta, Jan; Linares, Marjorie C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The coral is predominantly composed of the metabolically dependent coral host and the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. The system as a whole interacts with symbiotic eukaryotes, bacteria and viruses. Gemmocystiscylindrus (cf. type-N symbiont) belonging to the obligatory parasitic phylum Apicomplexa (Alveolata) is ubiquitous in the Caribbean coral, but its presence in the Great Barrier Reef coral has yet to be documented. Approaches allowing identification of the healthy community from the pathogenic or saprobic organisms are needed for sustainable coral reef monitoring. Methods & Principal Findings We investigated the diversity of eukaryotes associated with a common reef-building corals from the southern Great Barrier Reef. We used three tag encoded 454 amplicon pyrosequencing assays targeting eukaryote small-subunit rRNA gene to demonstrate the presence of the apicomplexan type-N and a photosynthetic sister species to Apicomplexa - Chromeravelia. Amplicon pyrosequencing revealed presence of the small-subunit rRNA genes of known eukaryotic pathogens (Cryptosporidium and Cryptococcus). We therefore conducted bacterial tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing assay for small-subunit rRNA gene to support effluent exposure of the coral. Bacteria of faecal origin (Enterobacteriales) formed 41% of total sequences in contrast to 0-2% of the coral-associated bacterial communities with and without C. velia, respectively. Significance This is the first time apicomplexan type-N has been detected in the Great Barrier Reef. Eukaryote tag encoded amplicon pyrosequencing assays demonstrate presence of apicomplexan type-N and C. Velia in total coral DNA. The data highlight the need for combined approaches for eukaryotic diversity studies coupled with bacterial community assessment to achieve a more realistic goals of defining the holobiont community and assessing coral disease. With increasing evidence of Apicomplexa in coral reef environments, it is important not only to understand the evolution of these organisms but also identify their potential as pathogens. PMID:24098768

  17. A mutant crp allele that differentially activates the operons of the fuc regulon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Lin, E C

    1988-05-01

    L-Fucose is used by Escherichia coli through an inducible pathway mediated by a fucP-encoded permease, a fucI-encoded isomerase, a fucK-encoded kinase, and a fucA-encoded aldolase. The adolase catalyzes the formation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and L-lactaldehyde. Anaerobically, lactaldehyde is converted by a fucO-encoded oxidoreductase to L-1,2-propanediol, which is excreted. The fuc genes belong to a regulon comprising four linked operons: fucO, fucA, fucPIK, and fucR. The positive regulator encoded by fucR responds to fuculose 1-phosphate as the effector. Mutants serially selected for aerobic growth on propanediol became constitutive in fucO and fucA [fucO(Con) fucA(Con)], but noninducible in fucPIK [fucPIK(Non)]. An external suppressor mutation that restored growth on fucose caused constitutive expression of fucPIK. Results from this study indicate that this suppressor mutation occurred in crp, which encodes the cyclic AMP-binding (or receptor) protein. When the suppressor allele (crp-201) was transduced into wild-type strains, the recipient became fucose negative and fucose sensitive (with glycerol as the carbon and energy source) because of impaired expression of fucA. The fucPIK operon became hyperinducible. The growth rate on maltose was significantly reduced, but growth on L-rhamnose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, glycerol, or glycerol 3-phosphate was close to normal. Lysogenization of fuc+ crp-201 cells by a lambda bacteriophage bearing crp+ restored normal growth ability on fucose. In contrast, lysogenization of [fucO(Con)fucA(Con)fucPIK(Non)crp-201] cells by the same phage retarded their growth on fucose. PMID:2834341

  18. Genome-wide analysis of the PreA/PreB (QseB/QseC) regulon of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Salmonella PreA/PreB two-component system (TCS) is an ortholog of the QseBC TCS of Escherichia coli. In both Salmonella and E. coli, this system has been shown to affect motility and virulence in response to quorum-sensing and hormonal signals, and to affect the transcription of the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) pmrAB operon, which encodes an important virulence-associated TCS. Results To determine the PreA/PreB regulon in S. Typhimurium, we performed DNA microarrays comparing the wild type strain and various preA and/or preB mutants in the presence of ectopically expressed preA (qseB). These data confirmed our previous findings of the negative effect of PreB on PreA gene regulation and identified candidate PreA-regulated genes. A proportion of the activated loci were previously identified as PmrA-activated genes (yibD, pmrAB, cptA, etc.) or were genes located in the local region around preA, including the preAB operon. The transcriptional units were defined in this local region by RT-PCR, suggesting three PreA activated operons composed of preA-preB, mdaB-ygiN, and ygiW-STM3175. Several putative virulence-related phenotypes were examined for preAB mutants, resulting in the observation of a host cell invasion and slight virulence defect of a preAB mutant. Contrary to previous reports on this TCS, we were unable to show a PreA/PreB-dependent effect of the quorum-sensing signal AI-2 or of epinephrine on S. Typhimurium with regard to bacterial motility. Conclusion This work further characterizes this unorthadox OmpR/EnvZ class TCS and provides novel candidate regulated genes for further study. This first in-depth study of the PreA/PreB regulatory system phenotypes and regulation suggests significant comparative differences to the reported function of the orthologous QseB/QseC in E. coli. PMID:19236707

  19. CANDIDATE REGULATORS OF THE COLD STRESS RESPONSE GENE REGULON OF RICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptional regulatory network is an important component of the mechanisms that define the adaptive responses of plants to cold stress. In cold-acclimating plants, the centerpiece of such network is the CBF/DREB family of AP2-type transcription factors. In non-acclimating plants like rice, the n...

  20. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of cyanobacterial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Annegret; Hihara, Yukako

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria are well established model organisms for the study of oxygenic photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism, toxin biosynthesis, and salt acclimation. However, in comparison to other model bacteria little is known about regulatory networks, which allow cyanobacteria to acclimate to changing environmental conditions. The current work has begun to illuminate how transcription factors modulate expression of different photosynthetic regulons. During the past few years, the research on other regulatory principles like RNA-based regulation showed the importance of non-protein regulators for bacterial lifestyle. Investigations on modulation of photosynthetic components should elucidate the contributions of all factors within the context of a larger regulatory network. Here, we focus on regulation of photosynthetic processes including transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, citing examples from a limited number of cyanobacterial species. Though, the general idea holds true for most species, important differences exist between various organisms, illustrating diversity of acclimation strategies in the very heterogeneous cyanobacterial clade. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26549130

  1. Transcriptional control of quorum sensing and associated metabolic interactions in Pseudomonas syringae strain B728a.

    PubMed

    Scott, Russell A; Lindow, Steven E

    2016-03-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae cell densities fluctuate regularly during host plant colonization. Previously we identified nine genes dependent on the quorum-sensing-associated luxR homolog ahlR during epiphytic and apoplastic stages of host colonization. Yet their contributions to host colonization remain obscure, despite ahlR regulon presence within and beyond the P. syringae pan-genome. To elucidate AhIR regulon member functions, we characterized their regulation, interactions with each other, and contributions to the metabolome. We report Psyr_1625, encoding a functional pyruvate deydrogenase-E1 subunit PdhQ, is required to prevent the accumulation of pyruvate in rich media. Furthermore it is exquisitely regulated by both repression of its own promoter by QrpR within a novel clade of the MarR regulator family, and co-transcription on a 5kb transcript originating from the AhlR-driven ahlI promoter, that reads over ahlR and qrpR. Metabolites accumulated during expression of the second AhlR-driven operon (Psyr_1620-1616, paoABCDE), only in a pdhQ mutant background, in addition to pyruvate, are herein associated with derepression of QrpR-repressed pdhQ. AHL signaling, QrpR, and transcriptional read-through events integrate to ensure AHL-dependent expression of a novel metabolism in anticipation of environmental stress, while minimizing endogenously generated cytotoxicity. PMID:26713670

  2. Transcription mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, T Keith; Walker, Amy K

    2006-01-01

    Appropriate regulation of mRNA transcription is central to the differentiation and functions of eukaryotic cells, and to the development of complex organisms. mRNAs are synthesized by the coordinated action of a set of general transcription and mRNA modification factors. These factors and the fundamental mechanisms involved in transcription are conserved among eukaryotes, including C. elegans. Recent studies in various systems have revealed that this apparatus is not controlled through a simple on/off "switch" at the promoter, and that the factors and mechanisms involved in transcription are instead subject to regulation at a surprising number of different levels. In this chapter we will discuss examples in which regulation involving the general mRNA transcription apparatus or other transcription co-factors plays a central role in C. elegans development, and in which C. elegans studies have provided new insights into eukaryotic transcription mechanisms. Together, these studies have shown that regulatory mechanisms that involve the general Pol II machinery are a central participant in many aspects of C. elegans biology. PMID:18050436

  3. Identification and characterization of transcription networks in environmentally significant species

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Charles E.; McCue, Lee Ann

    2005-11-30

    Understanding the regulation of gene expression, transcription regulation in particular, is one of the grand challenges of molecular biology. Transcription regulation is arguably the most important foundation of cellular function, since it exerts the most fundamental control of the abundance of virtually all of a cell's functional macromolecules. Nevertheless, this process, perhaps because of its difficulty, has been the subject of only a limited number of genomic level analyses. We have undertaken bioinformatics projects to address this issue by developing (1) a cross-species comparison method (i.e. phylogenetic footprinting) for the identification of transcription factor binding sites, (2) a Bayesian clustering method to identify regulons, (3) an improved scanning algorithm that uses a position weight matrix and several related species sequence data to locate transcription factor binding sites, and (4) a method to predict cognate binding sites for transcription factors of unknown specificity. These bioinformatics methods were developed using the model proteobacterium Escherichia coli, with further applications to the genomes of environmentally significant microbes (Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Shewanella oneidensis) in later years of the grant.

  4. Cross-species comparison of the Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei quorum-sensing regulons.

    PubMed

    Majerczyk, Charlotte D; Brittnacher, Mitchell J; Jacobs, Michael A; Armour, Christopher D; Radey, Matthew C; Bunt, Richard; Hayden, Hillary S; Bydalek, Ryland; Greenberg, E Peter

    2014-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, and Burkholderia mallei (the Bptm group) are close relatives with very different lifestyles: B. pseudomallei is an opportunistic pathogen, B. thailandensis is a nonpathogenic saprophyte, and B. mallei is a host-restricted pathogen. The acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing (QS) systems of these three species show a high level of conservation. We used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to define the quorum-sensing regulon in each species, and we performed a cross-species analysis of the QS-controlled orthologs. Our analysis revealed a core set of QS-regulated genes in all three species, as well as QS-controlled factors shared by only two species or unique to a given species. This global survey of the QS regulons of B. pseudomallei, B. thailandensis, and B. mallei serves as a platform for predicting which QS-controlled processes might be important in different bacterial niches and contribute to the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. PMID:25182491

  5. Multivariate PLS Modeling of Apicomplexan FabD-Ligand Interaction Space for Mapping Target-Specific Chemical Space and Pharmacophore Fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    Surolia, Avadhesha

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecular recognition underlying drug-target interactions is determined by both binding affinity and specificity. Whilst, quantification of binding efficacy is possible, determining specificity remains a challenge, as it requires affinity data for multiple targets with the same ligand dataset. Thus, understanding the interaction space by mapping the target space to model its complementary chemical space through computational techniques are desirable. In this study, active site architecture of FabD drug target in two apicomplexan parasites viz. Plasmodium falciparum (PfFabD) and Toxoplasma gondii (TgFabD) is explored, followed by consensus docking calculations and identification of fifteen best hit compounds, most of which are found to be derivatives of natural products. Subsequently, machine learning techniques were applied on molecular descriptors of six FabD homologs and sixty ligands to induce distinct multivariate partial-least square models. The biological space of FabD mapped by the various chemical entities explain their interaction space in general. It also highlights the selective variations in FabD of apicomplexan parasites with that of the host. Furthermore, chemometric models revealed the principal chemical scaffolds in PfFabD and TgFabD as pyrrolidines and imidazoles, respectively, which render target specificity and improve binding affinity in combination with other functional descriptors conducive for the design and optimization of the leads. PMID:26535573

  6. Use of a promiscuous, constitutively-active bacterial enhancer-binding protein to define the Sigma54 (RpoN) regulon of Salmonella Typhimurium LT2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Sigma54, or RpoN, is an alternative s factor found widely in eubacteria. A significant complication in analysis of the global sigma54 regulon in a bacterium is that the sigma54 RNA polymerase holoenzyme requires interaction with an active bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) to init...

  7. The impairment of superoxide dismutase coordinates the derepression of the PerR regulon in the response of Staphylococcus aureus to HOCl stress.

    PubMed

    Maalej, Sami; Dammak, Ines; Dukan, Sam

    2006-03-01

    The response of Staphylococcus aureus to hypochlorous acid (HOCl) exposure was investigated. HOCl challenges were performed on cultures interrupted in the exponential phase. Pretreatment with HOCl conferred resistance to hydrogen peroxide in a PerR-dependent manner. Derepression of the PerR regulon was observed at low HOCl concentration (survival >50 %), using several fusions of different stress promoters to lacZ reporter genes. At least four members of the PerR regulon (katA, mrgA, bcp and trxA) encoding proteins with antioxidant properties were strongly induced following exposure to various HOCl concentrations. A striking result was the link between the derepression of the PerR regulon and the decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity following exposure to increased HOCl concentrations. The sodA mutant was more resistant than the wild-type and also had a higher level of 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (a measure of PerR regulon activity) without exposure to HOCl. Together, these results imply that derepression of PerR by HOCl is dependent on the level of SOD and protects exponentially arrested cells against HOCl stress. PMID:16514164

  8. Structural Determinants of DNA Binding by a P. falciparum ApiAP2 Transcriptional Regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, Scott E.; De Silva, Erandi K.; Keck, James L.; Llinás, Manuel

    2010-11-05

    Putative transcription factors have only recently been identified in the Plasmodium spp., with the major family of regulators comprising the Apicomplexan Apetala2 (AP2) proteins. To better understand the DNA-binding mechanisms of these transcriptional regulators, we characterized the structure and in vitro function of an AP2 DNA-binding domain from a prototypical Apicomplexan AP2 protein, PF14{_}0633 from Plasmodium falciparum. The X-ray crystal structure of the PF14{_}0633 AP2 domain bound to DNA reveals a {beta}-sheet fold that binds the DNA major groove through base-specific and backbone contacts; a prominent {alpha}-helix supports the {beta}-sheet structure. Substitution of predicted DNA-binding residues with alanine weakened or eliminated DNA binding in solution. In contrast to plant AP2 domains, the PF14{_}0633 AP2 domain dimerizes upon binding to DNA through a domain-swapping mechanism in which the {alpha}-helices of the AP2 domains pack against the {beta}-sheets of the dimer mates. DNA-induced dimerization of PF14{_}0633 may be important for tethering two distal DNA loci together in the nucleus and/or for inducing functional rearrangements of its domains to facilitate transcriptional regulation. Consistent with a multisite binding mode, at least two copies of the consensus sequence recognized by PF14{_}0633 are present upstream of a previously identified group of sporozoite-stage genes. Taken together, these findings illustrate how Plasmodium has adapted the AP2 DNA-binding domain for genome-wide transcriptional regulation.

  9. Immunogenicity of Novel DosR Regulon-Encoded Candidate Antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Three High-Burden Populations in Africa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Black, Gillian F.; Thiel, Bonnie A.; Ota, Martin O.; Parida, Shreemanta K.; Adegbola, Richard; Boom, W. Henry; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Friggen, Annemiek H.; Hill, Philip C.; Klein, Michel R.; Lalor, Maeve K.; Mayanja, Harriet; Schoolnik, Gary; Stanley, Kim; Weldingh, Karin; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Walzl, Gerhard; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing knowledge about DosR regulon-encoded proteins has led us to produce novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens for immunogenicity testing in human populations in three countries in Africa to which tuberculosis (TB) is endemic. A total of 131 tuberculin skin test-positive and/or ESAT-6/CFP10-positive, human immunodeficiency virus-negative adult household contacts of active pulmonary TB cases from South Africa (n = 56), The Gambia (n = 26), and Uganda (n = 49) were tested for gamma interferon responses to 7 classical and 51 DosR regulon-encoded M. tuberculosis recombinant protein antigens. ESAT-6/CFP10 fusion protein evoked responses in >75% of study participants in all three countries. Of the DosR regulon-encoded antigens tested, Rv1733c was the most commonly recognized by participants from both South Africa and Uganda and the third most commonly recognized antigen in The Gambia. The four most frequently recognized DosR regulon-encoded antigens in Uganda (Rv1733c, Rv0081, Rv1735c, and Rv1737c) included the three most immunogenic antigens in South Africa. In contrast, Rv3131 induced the highest percentage of responders in Gambian contacts (38%), compared to only 3.4% of Ugandan contacts and no South African contacts. Appreciable percentages of TB contacts with a high likelihood of latent M. tuberculosis infection responded to several novel DosR regulon-encoded M. tuberculosis proteins. In addition to significant similarities in antigen recognition profiles between the three African population groups, there were also disparities, which may stem from genetic differences between both pathogen and host populations. Our findings have implications for the selection of potential TB vaccine candidates and for determining biosignatures of latent M. tuberculosis infection, active TB disease, and protective immunity. PMID:19553548

  10. Integration of a complex regulatory cascade involving the SirA/BarA and Csr global regulatory systems that controls expression of the Salmonella SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence regulons through HilD.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Luary C; Yakhnin, Helen; Camacho, Martha I; Georgellis, Dimitris; Babitzke, Paul; Puente, José L; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) play key roles in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica. Previously, we showed that when Salmonella grows in Luria-Bertani medium, HilD, encoded in SPI-1, first induces the expression of hilA, located in SPI-1, and subsequently of the ssrAB operon, located in SPI-2. These genes code for HilA and the SsrA/B two-component system, the positive regulators of the SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulons respectively. In this study, we demonstrate that CsrA, a global regulatory RNA binding protein, post-transcriptionally regulates hilD expression by directly binding near the Shine-Dalgarno and translation initiation codon sequences of the hilD mRNA, preventing its translation and leading to its accelerated turnover. Negative regulation is counteracted by the global SirA/BarA two-component system, which directly activates the expression of CsrB and CsrC, two non-coding regulatory RNAs that sequester CsrA, thereby preventing it from binding to its target mRNAs. Our results illustrate the integration of global and specific regulators into a multifactorial regulatory cascade controlling the expression of virulence genes acquired by horizontal transfer events. PMID:21518393

  11. Repressor for the sn-glycerol 3-phosphate regulon of Escherichia coli K-12: primary structure and identification of the DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, G; Ye, S; Larson, T J

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the glpEGR operon of Escherichia coli was determined. The translational reading frame at the beginning, middle, and end of each gene was verified. The glpE gene encodes an acidic, cytoplasmic protein of 108 amino acids with a molecular weight of 12,082. The glpG gene encodes a basic, cytoplasmic membrane-associated protein of 276 amino acids with a molecular weight of 31,278. The functions of GlpE and GlpG are unknown. The glpR gene encodes the repressor for the glycerol 3-phosphate regulon, a protein predicted to contain 252 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 28,048. The amino acid sequence of the glp repressor was similar to several repressors of carbohydrate catabolic systems, including those of the glucitol (GutR), fucose (FucR), and deoxyribonucleoside (DeoR) systems of E. coli, as well as those of the lactose (LacR) and inositol (IolR) systems of gram-positive bacteria and agrocinopine (AccR) system of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. These repressors constitute a family of related proteins, all of which contain approximately 250 amino acids, possess a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif near the amino terminus, and bind a sugar phosphate molecule as the inducing signal. The DNA recognition helix of the glp repressor and the nucleotide sequence of the glp operator were very similar to those of the deo system. The presumptive recognition helix of the glp repressor was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to match that of the deo repressor or, in a separate construct, to abolish DNA binding. Neither altered form of the glp repressor recognized the glp or deo operator, either in vivo or in vitro. However, both altered forms of the glp repressor were negatively dominant to the wild-type glp repressor, indicating that the inability to bind DNA with high affinity was due to alteration of the DNA-binding domain, not to an inability to oligomerize or instability of the altered repressors. For the first time, analysis of repressors with altered DNA-binding domains has verified the assignment of the helix-turn-helix motif of the transcriptional regulators in the deoR family. PMID:8955387

  12. kil-kor regulon of promiscuous plasmid RK2: structure, products, and regulation of two operons that constitute the kilE locus.

    PubMed Central

    Kornacki, J A; Chang, C H; Figurski, D H

    1993-01-01

    The kil-kor regulon of IncP plasmid RK2 is a complex regulatory network that includes genes for replication and conjugal transfer, as well as for several potentially host-lethal proteins encoded by the kilA, kilB, and kilC loci. While kilB is known to be involved in conjugal transfer, the functions of kilA and kilC are unknown. The coregulation of kilA and kilC with replication and transfer genes indicates a possible role in the maintenance or broad host range of RK2. In this work, we found that a fourth kil locus, designated kilE, is located in the kb 2.4 to 4.5 region of RK2 and is regulated as part of the kil-kor regulon. The cloned kilE locus cannot be maintained in Escherichia coli host cells, unless korA or korC is also present in trans to control its expression. The nucleotide sequence of the kilE region revealed two potential multicistronic operons. The kleA operon consists of two genes, kleA and kleB, predicted to encode polypeptide products with molecular masses of 8.7 and 7.6 kDa, respectively. The kleC operon contains four genes, kleC, kleD, kleE, and kleF, with predicted products of 9.2, 8.0, 12.2, and 11.3 kDa, respectively. To identify the polypeptide products, each gene was cloned downstream of the phage T7 phi 10 promoter and expressed in vivo in the presence of T7 RNA polymerase. A polypeptide product of the expected size was observed for all six kle genes. In addition, kleF expressed a second polypeptide of 6 kDa that most likely results from the use of a predicted internal translational start site. The kleA and kleC genes are each preceded by sequences resembling strong sigma 70 promoters. Primer extension analysis revealed that the putative kleA and kleC promoters are functional in E. coli and that transcription is initiated at the expected nucleotides. The abundance of transcripts initiated in vivo from both the kleA and kleC promoters was reduced in cells containing korA or korC. When korA and korC were present together, they appeared to act synergistically in reducing the level of transcripts from both promoters. The kleA and kleC promoter regions are highly homologous and contain two palindromic sequences (A and C) that are the predicted targets for KorA and KorC proteins. DNA binding studies showed that protein extracts from korA-containing E. coli cells specifically retarded the electrophoretic mobility of DNA fragments containing palindrome A. Extracts from korC-containing cells altered the mobility of DNA fragments containing palindrome C. These results show that KorA and KorC both act as repressors of the kleAand kleC promoters. In the absence of korA and korC, expression of the cloned kleA operon was lethal to E.coli cells, whereas the cloned kleC operon gave rise to slowly growing, unhealthy colonies. Both phenotypes depended on at least one structural gene in each operon, suggesting that the operons encode genes whose products interact with critical host functions required for normal growth and viability. Thus, the kilA, kilC, and kilE loci of RK2 constitute a cluster of at least 10 genes that are coregulated with the plasmid replication initiator and the conjugal transfer system. Their potential toxicity to the host cell indicates that RK2 is able to establish a variety of intimate plasmid-host interactions that may be important to its survival in nature. Images PMID:8349548

  13. The functional landscape bound to the transcription factors of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Prez-Rueda, Ernesto; Tenorio-Salgado, Silvia; Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Balderas-Martnez, Yalbi I; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    Motivated by the experimental evidences accumulated in the last ten years and based on information deposited in RegulonDB, literature look up, and sequence analysis, we analyze the repertoire of 304 DNA-binding Transcription factors (TFs) in Escherichia coli K-12. These regulators were grouped in 78 evolutionary families and are regulating almost half of the total genes in this bacterium. In structural terms, 60% of TFs are composed by two-domains, 30% are monodomain, and 10% three- and four-structural domains. As previously noticed, the most abundant DNA-binding domain corresponds to the winged helix-turn-helix, with few alternative DNA-binding structures, resembling the hypothesis of successful protein structures with the emergence of new ones at low scales. In summary, we identified and described the characteristics associated to the DNA-binding TF in E. coli K-12. We also identified twelve functional modules based on a co-regulated gene matrix. Finally, diverse regulons were predicted based on direct associations between the TFs and potential regulated genes. This analysis should increase our knowledge about the gene regulation in the bacterium E. coli K-12, and provide more additional clues for comprehensive modelling of transcriptional regulatory networks in other bacteria. PMID:26094112

  14. Differential oxidative damage and expression of stress defence regulons in culturable and non-culturable Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Desnues, Benoît; Cuny, Caroline; Grégori, Gérald; Dukan, Sam; Aguilaniu, Hugo; Nyström, Thomas

    2003-04-01

    Potentially pathogenic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae, become non-culturable during stasis. The analysis of such cells has been hampered by difficulties in studying bacterial population heterogeneity. Using in situ detection of protein oxidation in single E. coli cells, and using a density-gradient centrifugation technique to separate culturable and non-culturable cells, we show that the proteins in non-culturable cells show increased and irreversible oxidative damage, which affects various bacterial compartments and proteins. The levels of expression of specific stress regulons are higher in non-culturable cells, confirming increased defects relating to oxidative damage and the occurrence of aberrant, such as by amino-acid misincorporation, proteins. Our data suggest that non-culturable cells are produced due to stochastic deterioration, rather than an adaptive programme, and pinpoint oxidation management as the 'Achilles heel' of these cells. PMID:12671690

  15. Induction of the heat shock regulon in response to increased mistranslation requires oxidative modification of the malformed proteins.

    PubMed

    Fredriksson, Asa; Ballesteros, Manuel; Dukan, Sam; Nyström, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The Escherichia coli rpsD12 allele, which reduces translational fidelity and elevates expression of heat shock protein (Hsp) genes, only enhanced Hsp gene expression in the presence of oxygen. Similarly, the rpsL141 allele, which reduces mistranslation and Hsp gene expression, failed to affect the Hsp regulon in cells grown anaerobically. Increased production of Hsps in response to starvation is associated with increased mistranslation and was demonstrated to likewise require the presence of oxygen. Thus, mistranslation triggered by starvation or mutations in the accuracy centre of the ribosome appear to elevate Hsp gene expression via an oxidative modification of mistranslated proteins. In contrast, Hsp gene induction during temperature upshifts was independent of oxygen availability. The data further suggest that it is the oxidative modification of mistranslated DnaK substrates rather than oxidation of DnaK itself that triggers Hsp gene expression upon starvation. PMID:16359340

  16. Differential oxidative damage and expression of stress defence regulons in culturable and non-culturable Escherichia coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Desnues, Benoît; Cuny, Caroline; Grégori, Gérald; Dukan, Sam; Aguilaniu, Hugo; Nyström, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Potentially pathogenic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae, become non-culturable during stasis. The analysis of such cells has been hampered by difficulties in studying bacterial population heterogeneity. Using in situ detection of protein oxidation in single E. coli cells, and using a density-gradient centrifugation technique to separate culturable and non-culturable cells, we show that the proteins in non-culturable cells show increased and irreversible oxidative damage, which affects various bacterial compartments and proteins. The levels of expression of specific stress regulons are higher in non-culturable cells, confirming increased defects relating to oxidative damage and the occurrence of aberrant, such as by amino-acid misincorporation, proteins. Our data suggest that non-culturable cells are produced due to stochastic deterioration, rather than an adaptive programme, and pinpoint oxidation management as the 'Achilles heel' of these cells. PMID:12671690

  17. Transcriptional Control by A-Factor of Two Trypsin Genes in Streptomyces griseus

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Jun-ya; Chi, Won-Jae; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Hong, Soon-Kwang; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2005-01-01

    AdpA is the key transcriptional activator for a number of genes of various functions in the A-factor regulatory cascade in Streptomyces griseus, forming an AdpA regulon. Trypsin-like activity was detected at a late stage of growth in the wild-type strain but not in an A-factor-deficient mutant. Consistent with these observations, two trypsin genes, sprT and sprU, in S. griseus were found to be members of the AdpA regulon; AdpA activated the transcription of both genes by binding to the operators located at about −50 nucleotide positions with respect to the transcriptional start point. The transcription of sprT and sprU, induced by AdpA, was most active at the onset of sporulation. Most trypsin activity exerted by S. griseus was attributed to SprT, because trypsin activity in an sprT-disrupted mutant was greatly reduced but that in an sprU-disrupted mutant was only slightly reduced. This was consistent with the observation that the amount of the sprT mRNA was much greater than that of the sprU transcript. Disruption of both sprT and sprU (mutant ΔsprTU) reduced trypsin activity to almost zero, indicating that no trypsin genes other than these two were present in S. griseus. Even the double mutant ΔsprTU grew normally and developed aerial hyphae and spores over the same time course as the wild-type strain. PMID:15601713

  18. Candidate regulators of the cold stress response gene regulon of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptional regulation is an important aspect of the complex network of genes involved in plant responses to low temperature. At the seedling stage, most japonica cultivars can survive continuous exposure to as low as 10oC for up to 7 days better than most indica cultivars. Here we present a sna...

  19. Characterization of the Fur regulon in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 is found in a wide variety of environments and as a result must monitor and respond to various environmental signals. In previous studies, we investigated the transcriptional response of DC3000 to iron, an essential element for bacterial grow...

  20. Interplay between the transcription factors acting on the GATA- and GABA-responsive elements of Saccharomyces cerevisiae UGA promoters.

    PubMed

    Cardillo, Sabrina B; Levi, Carolina E; Bermúdez Moretti, Mariana; Correa García, Susana

    2012-04-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport and catabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are subject to a complex transcriptional control that depends on the nutritional status of the cells. The expression of the genes that form the UGA regulon is inducible by GABA and sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). GABA induction of these genes is mediated by Uga3 and Dal81 transcription factors, whereas GATA factors are responsible for NCR. Here, we show how members of the UGA regulon share the activation mechanism. Our results show that both Uga3 and Dal81 interact with UGA genes in a GABA-dependent manner, and that they depend on each other for the interaction with their target promoters and the transcriptional activation. The typical DNA-binding domain Zn(II)(2)-Cys(6) of Dal81 is unnecessary for its activity and Uga3 acts as a bridge between Dal81 and DNA. Both the trans-activation activity of the GATA factor Gln3 and the repressive activity of the GATA factor Dal80 are exerted by their interaction with UGA promoters in response to GABA, indicating that Uga3, Dal81, Gln3 and Dal80 all act in concert to induce the expression of UGA genes. So, an interplay between the factors responsible for GABA induction and those responsible for NCR in the regulation of the UGA genes is proposed here. PMID:22282516

  1. Transcription of two sigma 70 homologue genes, sigA and sigB, in stationary-phase Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Coates, A R

    1999-01-01

    The sigA and sigB genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis encode two sigma 70-like sigma factors of RNA polymerase. While transcription of the sigA gene is growth rate independent, sigB transcription is increased during entry into stationary phase. The sigA gene transcription is unresponsive to environmental stress but that of sigB is very responsive, more so in stationary-phase growth than in log-phase cultures. These data suggest that SigA is a primary sigma factor which, like sigma70, controls the transcription of the housekeeping type of promoters. In contrast, SigB, although showing some overlap in function with SigA, is more like the alternative sigma factor, sigmaS, which controls the transcription of the gearbox type of promoters. Primer extension analysis identified the RNA start sites for both genes as 129 nucleotides upstream to the GTG start codon of sigA and 27 nucleotides from the ATG start codon of sigB. The -10 promoter of sigA but not that of sigB was similar to the sigma70 promoter. The half-life of the sigA transcript was very long, and this is likely to play an important part in its regulation. In contrast, the half-life of the sigB transcript was short, about 2 min. These results demonstrate that the sigB gene may control the regulons of stationary phase and general stress resistance, while sigA may be involved in the housekeeping regulons. PMID:9882660

  2. Analysis of the σE Regulon in Crohn's Disease-Associated Escherichia coli Revealed Involvement of the waaWVL Operon in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Garénaux, Estelle; Carriere, Jessica; Rolhion, Nathalie; Guérardel, Yann; Barnich, Nicolas; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ileal lesions of patients with Crohn's disease are colonized by adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC), which is able to adhere to and to invade intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), to replicate within macrophages, and to form biofilms on the surface of the intestinal mucosa. Previous analyses indicated the involvement of the σE pathway in AIEC-IEC interaction, as well as in biofilm formation, with σE pathway inhibition leading to an impaired ability of AIEC to colonize the intestinal mucosa and to form biofilms. The aim of this study was to characterize the σE regulon of AIEC strain LF82 in order to identify members involved in AIEC phenotypes. Using comparative in silico analysis of the σE regulon, we identified the waaWVL operon as a new member of the σE regulon in reference AIEC strain LF82. We determined that the waaWVL operon is involved in AIEC lipopolysaccharide structure and composition, and the waaWVL operon was found to be essential for AIEC strains to produce biofilm and to colonize the intestinal mucosa. IMPORTANCE An increased prevalence of adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) bacteria was previously observed in the intestinal mucosa of Crohn's disease (CD) patients, and clinical observations revealed bacterial biofilms associated with the mucosa of CD patients. Here, analysis of the σE regulon in AIEC and commensal E. coli identified 12 genes controlled by σE only in AIEC. Among them, WaaWVL factors were found to play an essential role in biofilm formation and mucosal colonization by AIEC. In addition to identifying molecular tools that revealed a pathogenic population of E. coli colonizing the mucosa of CD patients, these results indicate that targeting the waaWVL operon could be a potent therapeutic strategy to interfere with the ability of AIEC to form biofilms and to colonize the gut mucosa. PMID:25666140

  3. Deep Sequencing Analysis of Small Noncoding RNA and mRNA Targets of the Global Post-Transcriptional Regulator, Hfq

    PubMed Central

    Sittka, Alexandra; Lucchini, Sacha; Papenfort, Kai; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Rolle, Katarzyna; Binnewies, Tim T.; Hinton, Jay C. D.; Vogel, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput pyrosequencing (HTPS) technology now allow a thorough analysis of RNA bound to cellular proteins, and, therefore, of post-transcriptional regulons. We used HTPS to discover the Salmonella RNAs that are targeted by the common bacterial Sm-like protein, Hfq. Initial transcriptomic analysis revealed that Hfq controls the expression of almost a fifth of all Salmonella genes, including several horizontally acquired pathogenicity islands (SPI-1, -2, -4, -5), two sigma factor regulons, and the flagellar gene cascade. Subsequent HTPS analysis of 350,000 cDNAs, derived from RNA co-immunoprecipitation (coIP) with epitope-tagged Hfq or control coIP, identified 727 mRNAs that are Hfq-bound in vivo. The cDNA analysis discovered new, small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs) and more than doubled the number of sRNAs known to be expressed in Salmonella to 64; about half of these are associated with Hfq. Our analysis explained aspects of the pleiotropic effects of Hfq loss-of-function. Specifically, we found that the mRNAs of hilD (master regulator of the SPI-1 invasion genes) and flhDC (flagellar master regulator) were bound by Hfq. We predicted that defective SPI-1 secretion and flagellar phenotypes of the hfq mutant would be rescued by overexpression of HilD and FlhDC, and we proved this to be correct. The combination of epitope-tagging and HTPS of immunoprecipitated RNA detected the expression of many intergenic chromosomal regions of Salmonella. Our approach overcomes the limited availability of high-density microarrays that have impeded expression-based sRNA discovery in microorganisms. We present a generic strategy that is ideal for the systems-level analysis of the post-transcriptional regulons of RNA-binding proteins and for sRNA discovery in a wide range of bacteria. PMID:18725932

  4. Global Analysis of Photosynthesis Transcriptional Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Imam, Saheed; Noguera, Daniel R.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888), which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen metabolism and regulation of sRNA synthesis. Using global gene expression analysis combined with ChIP-seq, we mapped the regulons of PrrA, CrpK and MppG. PrrA regulates ∼34 operons encoding mainly photosynthesis and electron transport functions, while CrpK, a previously uncharacterized Crp-family protein, regulates genes involved in photosynthesis and maintenance of iron homeostasis. Furthermore, CrpK and FnrL share similar DNA binding determinants, possibly explaining our observation of the ability of CrpK to partially compensate for the growth defects of a ΔFnrL mutant. We show that the Rrf2 family protein, MppG, plays an important role in photopigment biosynthesis, as part of an incoherent feed-forward loop with PrrA. Our results reveal a previously unrealized, high degree of combinatorial regulation of photosynthetic genes and significant cross-talk between their transcriptional regulators, while illustrating previously unidentified links between photosynthesis and the maintenance of iron homeostasis. PMID:25503406

  5. RegR Virulence Regulon of Rabbit-Specific Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Strain E22

    PubMed Central

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Hocking, Dianna M.; Praszkier, Judyta; Wakefield, Matthew J.; Yang, Ji; Tauschek, Marija

    2013-01-01

    AraC-like regulators play a key role in the expression of virulence factors in enteric pathogens, such as enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteroaggregative E. coli, and Citrobacter rodentium. Bioinformatic analysis of the genome of rabbit-specific EPEC (REPEC) strain E22 (O103:H2) revealed the presence of a gene encoding an AraC-like regulatory protein, RegR, which shares 71% identity to the global virulence regulator, RegA, of C. rodentium. Microarray analysis demonstrated that RegR exerts 25- to 400-fold activation on transcription of several genes encoding putative virulence-associated factors, including a fimbrial operon (SEF14), a serine protease, and an autotransporter adhesin. These observations were confirmed by proteomic analysis of secreted and heat-extracted surface-associated proteins. The mechanism of RegR-mediated activation was investigated by using its most highly upregulated gene target, sefA. Transcriptional analyses and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that RegR activates the expression of sefA by binding to a region upstream of the sefA promoter, thereby relieving gene silencing by the global regulatory protein H-NS. Moreover, RegR was found to contribute significantly to virulence in a rabbit infection experiment. Taken together, our findings indicate that RegR controls the expression of a series of accessory adhesins that significantly enhance the virulence of REPEC strain E22. PMID:23340312

  6. Dehydrogenase GRD1 represents a novel component of the cellulase regulon in Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina).

    PubMed

    Schuster, André; Kubicek, Christian P; Schmoll, Monika

    2011-07-01

    Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) is nowadays the most important industrial producer of cellulase and hemicellulase enzymes, which are used for pretreatment of cellulosic biomass for biofuel production. In this study, we introduce a novel component, GRD1 (glucose-ribitol dehydrogenase 1), which shows enzymatic activity on cellobiose and positively influences cellulase gene transcription, expression, and extracellular endo-1,4-β-D-glucanase activity. grd1 is differentially transcribed upon growth on cellulose and the induction of cellulase gene expression by sophorose. The transcription of grd1 is coregulated with that of cel7a (cbh1) under inducing conditions. GRD1 is further involved in carbon source utilization on several carbon sources, such as those involved in lactose and D-galactose catabolism, in several cases in a light-dependent manner. We conclude that GRD1 represents a novel enhancer of cellulase gene expression, which by coregulation with the major cellulase may act via optimization of inducing mechanisms. PMID:21602376

  7. Microarray analysis identifies Salmonella genes belonging to the low-shear modeled microgravity regulon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, James W.; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Porwollik, Steffen; McClelland, Michael; Hammond, Timothy; Allen, Pat; Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2002-01-01

    The low-shear environment of optimized rotation suspension culture allows both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells to assume physiologically relevant phenotypes that have led to significant advances in fundamental investigations of medical and biological importance. This culture environment has also been used to model microgravity for ground-based studies regarding the impact of space flight on eukaryotic and prokaryotic physiology. We have previously demonstrated that low-shear modeled microgravity (LSMMG) under optimized rotation suspension culture is a novel environmental signal that regulates the virulence, stress resistance, and protein expression levels of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. However, the mechanisms used by the cells of any species, including Salmonella, to sense and respond to LSMMG and identities of the genes involved are unknown. In this study, we used DNA microarrays to elucidate the global transcriptional response of Salmonella to LSMMG. When compared with identical growth conditions under normal gravity (1 x g), LSMMG differentially regulated the expression of 163 genes distributed throughout the chromosome, representing functionally diverse groups including transcriptional regulators, virulence factors, lipopolysaccharide biosynthetic enzymes, iron-utilization enzymes, and proteins of unknown function. Many of the LSMMG-regulated genes were organized in clusters or operons. The microarray results were further validated by RT-PCR and phenotypic analyses, and they indicate that the ferric uptake regulator is involved in the LSMMG response. The results provide important insight about the Salmonella LSMMG response and could provide clues for the functioning of known Salmonella virulence systems or the identification of uncharacterized bacterial virulence strategies.

  8. Elucidation of the RamA Regulon in Klebsiella pneumoniae Reveals a Role in LPS Regulation

    PubMed Central

    De Majumdar, Shyamasree; Yu, Jing; Fookes, Maria; McAteer, Sean P.; Llobet, Enrique; Finn, Sarah; Spence, Shaun; Monaghan, Avril; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Bengoechea, José; Gally, David L.; Fanning, Séamus; Elborn, Joseph S.; Schneiders, Thamarai

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a significant human pathogen, in part due to high rates of multidrug resistance. RamA is an intrinsic regulator in K. pneumoniae established to be important for the bacterial response to antimicrobial challenge; however, little is known about its possible wider regulatory role in this organism during infection. In this work, we demonstrate that RamA is a global transcriptional regulator that significantly perturbs the transcriptional landscape of K. pneumoniae, resulting in altered microbe-drug or microbe-host response. This is largely due to the direct regulation of 68 genes associated with a myriad of cellular functions. Importantly, RamA directly binds and activates the lpxC, lpxL-2 and lpxO genes associated with lipid A biosynthesis, thus resulting in modifications within the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide. RamA-mediated alterations decrease susceptibility to colistin E, polymyxin B and human cationic antimicrobial peptide LL-37. Increased RamA levels reduce K. pneumoniae adhesion and uptake into macrophages, which is supported by in vivo infection studies, that demonstrate increased systemic dissemination of ramA overexpressing K. pneumoniae. These data establish that RamA-mediated regulation directly perturbs microbial surface properties, including lipid A biosynthesis, which facilitate evasion from the innate host response. This highlights RamA as a global regulator that confers pathoadaptive phenotypes with implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis of Enterobacter, Salmonella and Citrobacter spp. that express orthologous RamA proteins. PMID:25633080

  9. Transcription factors and genetic circuits orchestrating the complex, multilayered response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to butanol and butyrate stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Organisms of the genus Clostridium are Gram-positive endospore formers of great importance to the carbon cycle, human normo- and pathophysiology, but also in biofuel and biorefinery applications. Exposure of Clostridium organisms to chemical and in particular toxic metabolite stress is ubiquitous in both natural (such as in the human microbiome) and engineered environments, engaging both the general stress response as well as specialized programs. Yet, despite its fundamental and applied significance, it remains largely unexplored at the systems level. Results We generated a total of 96 individual sets of microarray data examining the transcriptional changes in C. acetobutylicum, a model Clostridium organism, in response to three levels of chemical stress from the native metabolites, butanol and butyrate. We identified 164 significantly differentially expressed transcriptional regulators and detailed the cellular programs associated with general and stressor-specific responses, many previously unexplored. Pattern-based, comparative genomic analyses enabled us, for the first time, to construct a detailed picture of the genetic circuitry underlying the stress response. Notably, a list of the regulons and DNA binding motifs of the stress-related transcription factors were identified: two heat-shock response regulators, HrcA and CtsR; the SOS response regulator LexA; the redox sensor Rex; and the peroxide sensor PerR. Moreover, several transcriptional regulators controlling stress-responsive amino acid and purine metabolism and their regulons were also identified, including ArgR (arginine biosynthesis and catabolism regulator), HisR (histidine biosynthesis regulator), CymR (cysteine metabolism repressor) and PurR (purine metabolism repressor). Conclusions Using an exceptionally large set of temporal transcriptional data and regulon analyses, we successfully built a STRING-based stress response network model integrating important players for the general and specialized metabolite stress response in C. acetobutylicum. Since the majority of the transcription factors and their target genes are highly conserved in other organisms of the Clostridium genus, this network would be largely applicable to other Clostridium organisms. The network informs the molecular basis of Clostridium responses to toxic metabolites in natural ecosystems and the microbiome, and will facilitate the construction of genome-scale models with added regulatory-network dimensions to guide the development of tolerant strains. PMID:24196194

  10. Energetic Consequences of nitrite stress in Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough, inferred from global transcriptional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qiang; Huang, Katherine H.; He, Zhili; Alm, Eric J.; Fields,Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2005-11-03

    Many of the proteins that are candidates for bioenergetic pathways involved with sulfate respiration in Desulfovibrio spp. have been studied, but complete pathways and overall cell physiology remain to be resolved for many environmentally relevant conditions. In order to understand the metabolism of these microorganisms under adverse environmental conditions for improved bioremediation efforts, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was used as a model organism to study stress response to nitrite, an important intermediate in the nitrogen cycle. Previous physiological studies demonstrated that growth was inhibited by nitrite and that nitrite reduction was observed to be the primary mechanism of detoxification. Global transcriptional profiling with whole-genome microarrays revealed coordinated cascades of responses to nitrite in pathways of energy metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, oxidative stress response, and iron homeostasis. In agreement with previous observations, nitrite-stressed cells showed a decrease in the expression of genes encoding sulfate reduction functions in addition to respiratory oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthase activity. Consequently, the stressed cells had decreased expression of the genes encoding ATP-dependent amino acid transporters and proteins involved in translation. Other genes up-regulated in response to nitrite include the genes in the Fur regulon, which is suggested to be involved in iron homeostasis, and genes in the Per regulon, which is predicted to be responsible for oxidative stress response.

  11. Differential expression of transcriptional regulatory units in the prefrontal cortex of patients with bipolar disorder: potential role of early growth response gene 3.

    PubMed

    Pfaffenseller, B; da Silva Magalhães, P V; De Bastiani, M A; Castro, M A A; Gallitano, A L; Kapczinski, F; Klamt, F

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe mental illness with a strong genetic component. Despite its high degree of heritability, current genetic studies have failed to reveal individual loci of large effect size. In lieu of focusing on individual genes, we investigated regulatory units (regulons) in BD to identify candidate transcription factors (TFs) that regulate large groups of differentially expressed genes. Network-based approaches should elucidate the molecular pathways governing the pathophysiology of BD and reveal targets for potential therapeutic intervention. The data from a large-scale microarray study was used to reconstruct the transcriptional associations in the human prefrontal cortex, and results from two independent microarray data sets to obtain BD gene signatures. The regulatory network was derived by mapping the significant interactions between known TFs and all potential targets. Five regulons were identified in both transcriptional network models: early growth response 3 (EGR3), TSC22 domain family, member 4 (TSC22D4), interleukin enhancer-binding factor 2 (ILF2), Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1) and MAP-kinase-activating death domain (MADD). With a high stringency threshold, the consensus across tests was achieved only for the EGR3 regulon. We identified EGR3 in the prefrontal cortex as a potential key target, robustly repressed in both BD signatures. Considering that EGR3 translates environmental stimuli into long-term changes in the brain, disruption in biological pathways involving EGR3 may induce an impaired response to stress and influence on risk for psychiatric disorders, particularly BD. PMID:27163206

  12. The transcriptional program underlying the physiology of clostridial sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Shawn W; Paredes, Carlos J; Tracy, Bryan; Cheng, Nathan; Sillers, Ryan; Senger, Ryan S; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2008-01-01

    Background Clostridia are ancient soil organisms of major importance to human and animal health and physiology, cellulose degradation, and the production of biofuels from renewable resources. Elucidation of their sporulation program is critical for understanding important clostridial programs pertaining to their physiology and their industrial or environmental applications. Results Using a sensitive DNA-microarray platform and 25 sampling timepoints, we reveal the genome-scale transcriptional basis of the Clostridium acetobutylicum sporulation program carried deep into stationary phase. A significant fraction of the genes displayed temporal expression in six distinct clusters of expression, which were analyzed with assistance from ontological classifications in order to illuminate all known physiological observations and differentiation stages of this industrial organism. The dynamic orchestration of all known sporulation sigma factors was investigated, whereby in addition to their transcriptional profiles, both in terms of intensity and differential expression, their activity was assessed by the average transcriptional patterns of putative canonical genes of their regulon. All sigma factors of unknown function were investigated by combining transcriptional data with predicted promoter binding motifs and antisense-RNA downregulation to provide a preliminary assessment of their roles in sporulation. Downregulation of two of these sigma factors, CAC1766 and CAP0167, affected the developmental process of sporulation and are apparently novel sporulation-related sigma factors. Conclusion This is the first detailed roadmap of clostridial sporulation, the most detailed transcriptional study ever reported for a strict anaerobe and endospore former, and the first reported holistic effort to illuminate cellular physiology and differentiation of a lesser known organism. PMID:18631379

  13. Gene function analysis in environmental isolates: The nif regulon of the strict iron oxidizing bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Parro, Víctor; Moreno-Paz, Mercedes

    2003-01-01

    A random genomic library from an environmental isolate of the Gram-negative bacterium Leptospirillum ferrooxidans has been printed on a microarray. Gene expression analysis was carried out with total RNA extracted from L. ferrooxidans cultures in the presence or absence of ammonium as nitrogen source under aerobic conditions. Although practically nothing is known about the genome sequence of this bacterium, this approach allowed us the selection and sequencing of only those clones bearing genes that showed an altered expression pattern. By sequence comparison, we have identified most of the genes of nitrogen fixation regulon in L. ferrooxidans, like the nifHDKENX operon, encoding the structural components of Mo-Fe nitrogenase; nifSU-hesB-hscBA-fdx operon, for Fe-S cluster assembly; the amtB gene (ammonium transporter); modA (molybdenum ABC type transporter); some regulatory genes like ntrC, nifA (the specific activator of nif genes); or two glnB-like genes (encoding the PII regulatory protein). Our results show that shotgun DNA microarrays are very powerful tools to accomplish gene expression studies with environmental bacteria whose genome sequence is still unknown, avoiding the time and effort necessary for whole genome sequencing projects. PMID:12808145

  14. Contribution of the Salmonella enterica KdgR Regulon to Persistence of the Pathogen in Vegetable Soft Rots.

    PubMed

    George, Andrée S; Salas González, Isai; Lorca, Graciela L; Teplitski, Max

    2015-01-01

    During their colonization of plants, human enteric pathogens, such as Salmonella enterica, are known to benefit from interactions with phytopathogens. At least in part, benefits derived by Salmonella from the association with a soft rot caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum were shown to be dependent on Salmonella KdgR, a regulator of genes involved in the uptake and utilization of carbon sources derived from the degradation of plant polymers. A Salmonella kdgR mutant was more fit in soft rots but not in the lesions caused by Xanthomonas spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Bioinformatic, phenotypic, and gene expression analyses demonstrated that the KdgR regulon included genes involved in uptake and metabolism of molecules resulting from pectin degradation as well as those central to the utilization of a number of other carbon sources. Mutant analyses indicated that the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, in part controlled by KdgR, was critical for the persistence within soft rots and likely was responsible for the kdgR phenotype. PMID:26682862

  15. The secreted signaling protein factor C triggers the A-factor response regulon in Streptomyces griseus: overlapping signaling routes.

    PubMed

    Birkó, Zsuzsanna; Bialek, Sylwia; Buzás, Krisztina; Szájli, Emília; Traag, Bjørn A; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Rigali, Sebastien; Vijgenboom, Erik; Penyige, András; Kele, Zoltán; van Wezel, Gilles P; Biró, Sándor

    2007-07-01

    Members of the prokaryotic genus Streptomyces produce over 60% of all known antibiotics and a wide range of industrial enzymes. A leading theme in microbiology is which signals are received and transmitted by these organisms to trigger the onset of morphological differentiation and antibiotic production. The small gamma-butyrolactone A-factor is an important autoregulatory signaling molecule in streptomycetes, and A-factor mutants are blocked in development and antibiotic production. In this study we showed that heterologous expression of the 324-amino acid secreted regulatory protein Factor C resulted in restoration of development and enhanced antibiotic production of an A-factor-deficient bald mutant of Streptomyces griseus, although the parental strain lacks an facC gene. Proteome analysis showed that in the facC transformant the production of several secreted proteins that belong to the A-factor regulon was restored. HPLC-MS/MS analysis indicated that this was due to restoration of A-factor production to wild-type levels in the transformant. This indicates a connection between two highly divergent types of signaling molecules and possible interplay between their regulatory networks. PMID:17376769

  16. Transcriptome analysis of the ArgR regulon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chung-Dar; Yang, Zhe; Li, Wei

    2004-06-01

    Arginine metabolism in pseudomonads with multiple catabolic pathways for its utilization as carbon and nitrogen sources is of particular interest as the model system to study control of metabolic integration. We performed transcriptome analyses to identify genes controlled by the arginine regulatory protein ArgR and to better understand arginine metabolic pathways of P. aeruginosa. We compared gene expression in wild-type strain PAO1 with that in argR mutant strain PAO501 grown in glutamate minimal medium in the presence and absence of arginine. Ten putative transcriptional units of 28 genes were inducible by ArgR and arginine, including all known ArgR-regulated operons under aerobic conditions. The newly identified genes include the putative adcAB operon, which encodes a catabolic arginine decarboxylase and an antiporter protein, and PA0328, which encodes a hypothetical fusion protein of a peptidase and a type IV autotransporter. Also identified as members of the arginine network are the following solute transport systems: PA1971 (braZ) for branched-chain amino acids permease; PA2042 for a putative sodium:serine symporter; PA3934, which belongs to the family of small oligopeptide transporters; and PA5152-5155, which encodes components of an ABC transporter for a putative opine uptake system. The effect of arginine on the expression of these genes was confirmed by lacZ fusion studies and by DNA binding studies with purified ArgR. Only five transcriptional units of nine genes were qualified as repressible by ArgR and arginine, with three operons (argF, carAB, and argG) in arginine biosynthesis and two operons (gltBD and gdhA) in glutamate biosynthesis. These results indicate that ArgR is important in control of arginine and glutamate metabolism and that arginine and ArgR may have a redundant effect in inducing the uptake systems of certain compounds. PMID:15175299

  17. Molecular Characterization of the Mg2+-Responsive PhoP-PhoQ Regulon in Salmonella enterica

    PubMed Central

    Lejona, Sergio; Aguirre, Andrés; Cabeza, María Laura; García Véscovi, Eleonora; Soncini, Fernando C.

    2003-01-01

    The PhoP/PhoQ two-component system controls the extracellular magnesium deprivation response in Salmonella enterica. In addition, several virulence-associated genes that are mainly required for intramacrophage survival during the infection process are under the control of its transcriptional regulation. Despite shared Mg2+ modulation of the expression of the PhoP-activated genes, no consensus sequence common to all of them could be detected in their promoter regions. We have investigated the transcriptional regulation and the interaction of the response regulator PhoP with the promoter regions of the PhoP-activated loci phoPQ, mgtA, slyB, pmrD, pcgL, phoN, pagC, and mgtCB. A direct repeat of the heptanucleotide sequence (G/T)GTTTA(A/T) was identified as the conserved motif recognized by PhoP to directly control the gene expression of the first five loci, among which the first four are ancestral to enterobacteria. On the other hand, no direct interaction of the response regulator with the promoter of phoN, pagC, or mgtCB was apparent by either in vitro or in vivo assays. These loci are Salmonella specific and were probably acquired by horizontal DNA transfer. Besides, sequence analysis of pag promoters revealed the presence of a conserved PhoP box in 6 out of the 12 genes analyzed. Our results strongly suggest that the expression of a set of Mg2+-controlled genes is driven by PhoP via unknown intermediate regulatory mechanisms that could also involve ancillary factors. PMID:14563863

  18. Impact of Anaerobiosis on Expression of the Iron-Responsive Fur and RyhB Regulons

    PubMed Central

    Beauchene, Nicole A.; Myers, Kevin S.; Chung, Dongjun; Park, Dan M.; Weisnicht, Allison M.; Keleş, Sündüz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron, a major protein cofactor, is essential for most organisms. Despite the well-known effects of O2 on the oxidation state and solubility of iron, the impact of O2 on cellular iron homeostasis is not well understood. Here we report that in Escherichia coli K-12, the lack of O2 dramatically changes expression of genes controlled by the global regulators of iron homeostasis, the transcription factor Fur and the small RNA RyhB. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), we found anaerobic conditions promote Fur binding to more locations across the genome. However, by expression profiling, we discovered that the major effect of anaerobiosis was to increase the magnitude of Fur regulation, leading to increased expression of iron storage proteins and decreased expression of most iron uptake pathways and several Mn-binding proteins. This change in the pattern of gene expression also correlated with an unanticipated decrease in Mn in anaerobic cells. Changes in the genes posttranscriptionally regulated by RyhB under aerobic and anaerobic conditions could be attributed to O2-dependent changes in transcription of the target genes: aerobic RyhB targets were enriched in iron-containing proteins associated with aerobic energy metabolism, whereas anaerobic RyhB targets were enriched in iron-containing anaerobic respiratory functions. Overall, these studies showed that anaerobiosis has a larger impact on iron homeostasis than previously anticipated, both by expanding the number of direct Fur target genes and the magnitude of their regulation and by altering the expression of genes predicted to be posttranscriptionally regulated by the small RNA RyhB under iron-limiting conditions. PMID:26670385

  19. Analysis of the Corynebacterium diphtheriae DtxR regulon: identification of a putative siderophore synthesis and transport system that is similar to the Yersinia high-pathogenicity island-encoded yersiniabactin synthesis and uptake system.

    PubMed

    Kunkle, Carey A; Schmitt, Michael P

    2003-12-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor, DtxR, is a global iron-dependent regulatory protein in Corynebacterium diphtheriae that controls gene expression by binding to 19-bp operator sequences. To further define the DtxR regulon in C. diphtheriae, a DtxR repressor titration assay (DRTA) was developed and used to identify 10 previously unknown DtxR binding sites. Open reading frames downstream from seven of the newly identified DtxR binding sites are predicted to encode proteins associated with iron or heme transport. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays indicated that DtxR was able to bind to DNA fragments carrying the 19-bp operator regions, and transcriptional analysis of putative promoter elements adjacent to the binding site sequences revealed that most of these regions displayed iron- and DtxR-regulated activity. A putative siderophore biosynthesis and transport operon located downstream from one of the DtxR binding sites, designated sid, is similar to the yersiniabactin synthesis and uptake genes encoded on the Yersinia pestis high pathogenicity island. The siderophore biosynthetic genes in the sid operon contained a large deletion in the C. diphtheriae C7 strain, but the sid genes were unaffected in four clinical isolates that are representative of the dominant strains from the recent diphtheria epidemic in the former Soviet Union. Mutations in the siderophore biosynthetic genes in a clinical strain had no effect on siderophore synthesis or growth in low-iron conditions; however, a mutation in one of the putative transport proteins, cdtP, resulted in reduced growth in iron-depleted media, which suggests that this system may have a role in iron uptake. The findings from this study indicate that C. diphtheriae contains at least 18 DtxR binding sites and that DtxR may affect the expression of as many as 40 genes. PMID:14617647

  20. Identification and characterization of Toxoplasma?SIP, a conserved apicomplexan cytoskeleton protein involved in maintaining the shape, motility and virulence of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Lentini, Gaelle; Kong-Hap, Marie; El Hajj, Hiba; Francia, Maria; Claudet, Cyrille; Striepen, Boris; Dubremetz, Jean-Franois; Lebrun, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexa possess a complex pellicle that is composed of a plasma membrane and a closely apposed inner membrane complex (IMC) that serves as a support for the actin-myosin motor required for motility and host cell invasion. The IMC consists of longitudinal plates of flattened vesicles, fused together and lined on the cytoplasmic side by a subpellicular network of intermediate filament-like proteins. The spatial organization of the IMC has been well described by electron microscopy, but its composition and molecular organization is largely unknown. Here, we identify a novel protein of the IMC cytoskeletal network in Toxoplasma gondii, called TgSIP, and conserved among apicomplexan parasites. To finely pinpoint the localization of TgSIP, we used structured illumination super-resolution microscopy and revealed that it likely decorates the transverse sutures of the plates and the basal end of the IMC. This suggests that TgSIP might contribute to the organization or physical connection among the different components of the IMC. We generated a T.gondii?SIP deletion mutant and showed that parasites lacking TgSIP are significantly shorter than wild-type parasites and show defects in gliding motility, invasion and reduced infectivity in mice. PMID:25088010

  1. Identification and characterization of Toxoplasma SIP, a conserved apicomplexan cytoskeleton protein involved in maintaining the shape, motility and virulence of the parasite

    PubMed Central

    Lentini, Gaelle; Kong-Hap, Marie; El Hajj, Hiba; Francia, Maria; Claudet, Cyrille; Striepen, Boris; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Lebrun, Maryse

    2015-01-01

    Summary Apicomplexa possess a complex pellicle that is composed of a plasma membrane and a closely apposed inner membrane complex (IMC) that serves as a support for the actin-myosin motor required for motility and host cell invasion. The IMC consists of longitudinal plates of flattened vesicles, fused together and lined on the cytoplasmic side by a subpellicular network of intermediate filament-like proteins. The spatial organization of the IMC has been well described by electron microscopy, but its composition and molecular organization is largely unknown. Here, we identify a novel protein of the IMC cytoskeletal network in Toxoplasma gondii, called TgSIP, and conserved among apicomplexan parasites. To finely pinpoint the localization of TgSIP, we used structured illumination super resolution microscopy and revealed that it likely decorates the transverse sutures of the plates and the basal end of the IMC. This suggests that TgSIP might contribute to the organization or physical connection among the different components of the IMC. We generated a T. gondii SIP deletion mutant and showed that parasites lacking TgSIP are significantly shorter than wild-type parasites and show defects in gliding motility, invasion and reduced infectivity in mice. PMID:25088010

  2. Aminopeptidase N1 (EtAPN1), an M1 Metalloprotease of the Apicomplexan Parasite Eimeria tenella, Participates in Parasite Development

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Simon; Byzia, Anna; Gilbert, Florence B.; McGowan, Sheena; Drag, Marcin; Niepceron, Alisson; Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles; Brossier, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Aminopeptidases N are metalloproteases of the M1 family that have been reported in numerous apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Eimeria. While investigating the potency of aminopeptidases as therapeutic targets against coccidiosis, one of the most important avian diseases caused by the genus Eimeria, we identified and characterized Eimeria tenella aminopeptidase N1 (EtAPN1). Its inhibition by bestatin and amastatin, as well as its reactivation by divalent ions, is typical of zinc-dependent metalloproteases. EtAPN1 shared a similar sequence, three-dimensional structure, and substrate specificity and similar kinetic parameters with A-M1 from Plasmodium falciparum (PfA-M1), a validated target in the treatment of malaria. EtAPN1 is synthesized as a 120-kDa precursor and cleaved into 96-, 68-, and 38-kDa forms during sporulation. Further, immunolocalization assays revealed that, similar to PfA-M1, EtAPN1 is present during the intracellular life cycle stages in both the parasite cytoplasm and the parasite nucleus. The present results support the hypothesis of a conserved role between the two aminopeptidases, and we suggest that EtAPN1 might be a valuable target for anticoccidiosis drugs. PMID:24839124

  3. Genes of the GadX-GadW regulon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Don L; Tucker, Nancy; Ma, Zhuo; Foster, John W; Miranda, Regina L; Cohen, Paul S; Conway, Tyrrell

    2003-05-01

    Acid in the stomach is thought to be a barrier to bacterial colonization of the intestine. Escherichia coli, however, has three systems for acid resistance, which overcome this barrier. The most effective of these systems is dependent on transport and decarboxylation of glutamate. GadX regulates two genes that encode isoforms of glutamate decarboxylase critical to this system, but additional genes associated with the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system remained to be identified. The gadX gene and a second downstream araC-like transcription factor gene, gadW, were mutated separately and in combination, and the gene expression profiles of the mutants were compared to those of the wild-type strain grown in neutral and acidified media under conditions favoring induction of glutamate-dependent acid resistance. Cluster and principal-component analyses identified 15 GadX-regulated, acid-inducible genes. Reverse transcriptase mapping demonstrated that these genes are organized in 10 operons. Analysis of the strain lacking GadX but possessing GadW confirmed that GadX is a transcriptional activator under acidic growth conditions. Analysis of the strain lacking GadW but possessing GadX indicated that GadW exerts negative control over three GadX target genes. The strain lacking both GadX and GadW was defective in acid induction of most but not all GadX target genes, consistent with the roles of GadW as an inhibitor of GadX-dependent activation of some genes and an activator of other genes. Resistance to acid was decreased under certain conditions in a gadX mutant and even more so by combined mutation of gadX and gadW. However, there was no defect in colonization of the streptomycin-treated mouse model by the gadX mutant in competition with the wild type, and the gadX gadW mutant was a better colonizer than the wild type. Thus, E. coli colonization of the mouse does not appear to require glutamate-dependent acid resistance. PMID:12730179

  4. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism.

  5. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the Hfq-regulon in Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011.

    PubMed

    Sobrero, Patricio; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Lanner, Ulrike; Schlosser, Andreas; Becker, Anke; Valverde, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Riboregulation stands for RNA-based control of gene expression. In bacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are a major class of riboregulatory elements, most of which act at the post-transcriptional level by base-pairing target mRNA genes. The RNA chaperone Hfq facilitates antisense interactions between target mRNAs and regulatory sRNAs, thus influencing mRNA stability and/or translation rate. In the α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 2011, the identification and detection of multiple sRNAs genes and the broadly pleitropic phenotype associated to the absence of a functional Hfq protein both support the existence of riboregulatory circuits controlling gene expression to ensure the fitness of this bacterium in both free living and symbiotic conditions. In order to identify target mRNAs subject to Hfq-dependent riboregulation, we have compared the proteome of an hfq mutant and the wild type S. meliloti by quantitative proteomics following protein labelling with (15)N. Among 2139 univocally identified proteins, a total of 195 proteins showed a differential abundance between the Hfq mutant and the wild type strain; 65 proteins accumulated ≥2-fold whereas 130 were downregulated (≤0.5-fold) in the absence of Hfq. This profound proteomic impact implies a major role for Hfq on regulation of diverse physiological processes in S. meliloti, from transport of small molecules to homeostasis of iron and nitrogen. Changes in the cellular levels of proteins involved in transport of nucleotides, peptides and amino acids, and in iron homeostasis, were confirmed with phenotypic assays. These results represent the first quantitative proteomic analysis in S. meliloti. The comparative analysis of the hfq mutant proteome allowed identification of novel strongly Hfq-regulated genes in S. meliloti. PMID:23119037

  6. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Hfq-Regulon in Sinorhizobium meliloti 2011

    PubMed Central

    Sobrero, Patricio; Schlüter, Jan-Philip; Lanner, Ulrike; Schlosser, Andreas; Becker, Anke; Valverde, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Riboregulation stands for RNA-based control of gene expression. In bacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are a major class of riboregulatory elements, most of which act at the post-transcriptional level by base-pairing target mRNA genes. The RNA chaperone Hfq facilitates antisense interactions between target mRNAs and regulatory sRNAs, thus influencing mRNA stability and/or translation rate. In the α-proteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 2011, the identification and detection of multiple sRNAs genes and the broadly pleitropic phenotype associated to the absence of a functional Hfq protein both support the existence of riboregulatory circuits controlling gene expression to ensure the fitness of this bacterium in both free living and symbiotic conditions. In order to identify target mRNAs subject to Hfq-dependent riboregulation, we have compared the proteome of an hfq mutant and the wild type S. meliloti by quantitative proteomics following protein labelling with 15N. Among 2139 univocally identified proteins, a total of 195 proteins showed a differential abundance between the Hfq mutant and the wild type strain; 65 proteins accumulated ≥2-fold whereas 130 were downregulated (≤0.5-fold) in the absence of Hfq. This profound proteomic impact implies a major role for Hfq on regulation of diverse physiological processes in S. meliloti, from transport of small molecules to homeostasis of iron and nitrogen. Changes in the cellular levels of proteins involved in transport of nucleotides, peptides and amino acids, and in iron homeostasis, were confirmed with phenotypic assays. These results represent the first quantitative proteomic analysis in S. meliloti. The comparative analysis of the hfq mutant proteome allowed identification of novel strongly Hfq-regulated genes in S. meliloti. PMID:23119037

  7. Phenylacetic Acid Catabolism and Its Transcriptional Regulation in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Kohl, Thomas A.; Rückert, Christian; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Li, Ling-Hao; Ding, Jiu-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The industrially important organism Corynebacterium glutamicum has been characterized in recent years for its robust ability to assimilate aromatic compounds. In this study, C. glutamicum strain AS 1.542 was investigated for its ability to catabolize phenylacetic acid (PAA). The paa genes were identified; they are organized as a continuous paa gene cluster. The type strain of C. glutamicum, ATCC 13032, is not able to catabolize PAA, but the recombinant strain ATCC 13032/pEC-K18mob2::paa gained the ability to grow on PAA. The paaR gene, encoding a TetR family transcription regulator, was studied in detail. Disruption of paaR in strain AS 1.542 resulted in transcriptional increases of all paa genes. Transcription start sites and putative promoter regions were determined. An imperfect palindromic motif (5′-ACTNACCGNNCGNNCGGTNAGT-3′; 22 bp) was identified in the upstream regions of paa genes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) demonstrated specific binding of PaaR to this motif, and phenylacetyl coenzyme A (PA-CoA) blocked binding. It was concluded that PaaR is the negative regulator of PAA degradation and that PA-CoA is the PaaR effector. In addition, GlxR binding sites were found, and binding to GlxR was confirmed. Therefore, PAA catabolism in C. glutamicum is regulated by the pathway-specific repressor PaaR, and also likely by the global transcription regulator GlxR. By comparative genomic analysis, we reconstructed orthologous PaaR regulons in 57 species, including species of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Flavobacteria, that carry PAA utilization genes and operate by conserved binding motifs, suggesting that PaaR-like regulation might commonly exist in these bacteria. PMID:22685150

  8. Characterization of the Operator Sites of the exu Regulon in ESCHERICHIA COLI K-12 by Operator-Constitutive Mutations and Repressor Titration

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Gilsinger, Mireille; Ritzenthaler, Paul; Blanco, Carlos

    1983-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the exu regulon of the hexuronate system involves the three exuT, uxaCA and uxaB operons and is under the negative control of the exuR regulatory gene product. The technique developed by Casadaban, Chou and Cohen was employed to construct two plasmids containing operon fusions in which the lactose genes were fused to the uxaCA and exuT operons. These fusions were transferred into the chromosome by a reciprocal recombination event, and the resulting strains were used for isolation of mutants defective in repression. Two types of operator-constitutive mutants were obtained: one specific for the uxaCA operon expression and the other affecting the exuT gene expression. This genetic evidence confirms that these two operons which are divergently transcribed each possess their own operator site.—The derepressed expression of the two exuT-lac and uxaCA-lac operons and the uxaB gene was also examined upon introduction of plasmids bearing various operators of the exu regulon. The results of testing exuR repressor titration by multiple copies of the exu operators allowed us to show a gradation in the affinity degrees for the three exu operators: uxaBo has the strongest affinity for the exuR repressor and uxaCo the weakest, although that of exuTo seems to be just slightly greater. This gradation may play a role in the control of the exu regulon expression. PMID:6357945

  9. Time-Resolved Determination of the CcpA Regulon of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363?

    PubMed Central

    Zomer, Aldert L.; Buist, Girbe; Larsen, Rasmus; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon catabolite control protein A (CcpA) is the main regulator involved in carbon catabolite repression in gram-positive bacteria. Time series gene expression analyses of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 and L. lactis MG1363?ccpA using DNA microarrays were used to define the CcpA regulon of L. lactis. Based on a comparison of the transcriptome data with putative CcpA binding motifs (cre sites) in promoter sequences in the genome of L. lactis, 82 direct targets of CcpA were predicted. The main differences in time-dependent expression of CcpA-regulated genes were differences between the exponential and transition growth phases. Large effects were observed for carbon and nitrogen metabolic genes in the exponential growth phase. Effects on nucleotide metabolism genes were observed primarily in the transition phase. Analysis of the positions of putative cre sites revealed that there is a link between either repression or activation and the location of the cre site within the promoter region. Activation was observed when putative cre sites were located upstream of the hexameric ?35 sequence at an average position of ?56.5 or further upstream with decrements of 10.5 bp. Repression was observed when the cre site was located in or downstream of putative ?35 and ?10 sequences. The highest level of repression was observed when the cre site was present at a defined side of the DNA helix relative to the canonical ?10 sequence. Gel retardation experiments, Northern blotting, and enzyme assays showed that CcpA represses its own expression and activates the expression of the divergently oriented prolidase-encoding pepQ gene, which constitutes a link between regulation of carbon metabolism and regulation of nitrogen metabolism. PMID:17028270

  10. Analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Regulon Controlled by the Sensor Kinase KinB and Sigma Factor RpoN

    PubMed Central

    Damron, F. Heath; Owings, Joshua P.; Okkotsu, Yuta; Varga, John J.; Schurr, Jill R.; Goldberg, Joanna B.; Schurr, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Alginate overproduction by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also known as mucoidy, is associated with chronic endobronchial infections in cystic fibrosis. Alginate biosynthesis is initiated by the extracytoplasmic function sigma factor (σ22; AlgU/AlgT). In the wild-type (wt) nonmucoid strains, such as PAO1, AlgU is sequestered to the cytoplasmic membrane by the anti-sigma factor MucA that inhibits alginate production. One mechanism underlying the conversion to mucoidy is mutation of mucA. However, the mucoid conversion can occur in wt mucA strains via the degradation of MucA by activated intramembrane proteases AlgW and/or MucP. Previously, we reported that the deletion of the sensor kinase KinB in PAO1 induces an AlgW-dependent proteolysis of MucA, resulting in alginate overproduction. This type of mucoid induction requires the alternate sigma factor RpoN (σ54). To determine the RpoN-dependent KinB regulon, microarray and proteomic analyses were performed on a mucoid kinB mutant and an isogenic nonmucoid kinB rpoN double mutant. In the kinB mutant of PAO1, RpoN controlled the expression of approximately 20% of the genome. In addition to alginate biosynthetic and regulatory genes, KinB and RpoN also control a large number of genes including those involved in carbohydrate metabolism, quorum sensing, iron regulation, rhamnolipid production, and motility. In an acute pneumonia murine infection model, BALB/c mice exhibited increased survival when challenged with the kinB mutant relative to survival with PAO1 challenge. Together, these data strongly suggest that KinB regulates virulence factors important for the development of acute pneumonia and conversion to mucoidy. PMID:22210761

  11. Insights into the CtrA Regulon in Development of Stress Resistance in Obligatory Intracellular Pathogen Ehrlichia chaffeensis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhihui; Miura, Koshiro; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Kumagai, Yumi; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2011-01-01

    Summary Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Ehrlichiae have a biphasic developmental cycle consisting of dense-cored cells (DCs) and reticulate cells (RCs). Isolated DCs are more stress resistant and infectious than RCs. Here, we report that a response regulator, CtrA was upregulated in human monocytes at the late growth stage when DCs develop. E. chaffeensis CtrA bound to the promoters of late-stage transcribed genes: ctrA, ompA (peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein), bolA (stress-induced morphogen), and surE (stationary phase survival protein), which contain CtrA-binding motifs, and transactivated ompA, surE, and bolA promoter-lacZ fusions in Escherichia coli. OmpA was predominantly expressed in DCs. E. chaffeensis binding to and subsequent infection of monocytes were inhibited by anti-OmpA IgG. E. chaffeensis BolA bound to the promoters of genes encoding outer surface proteins TRP120 and ECH_1038, which were expressed in DCs, and transactivated trp120 and ECH_1038 promoter-lacZ fusions. E. chaffeensis bolA complemented a stress-sensitive E. coli bolA mutant. E. coli expressing E. chaffeensis surE exhibited increased resistance to osmotic stress. Our results suggest that E. chaffeensis CtrA plays a role in coordinating development of the stress resistance for passage from the present to the next host cells through its regulon. PMID:22014113

  12. Proposed megakaryocytic regulon of p53: the genes engaged to control cell cycle and apoptosis during megakaryocytic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Apostolidis, Pani A.; Lindsey, Stephan; Miller, William M.

    2012-01-01

    During endomitosis, megakaryocytes undergo several rounds of DNA synthesis without division leading to polyploidization. In primary megakaryocytes and in the megakaryocytic cell line CHRF, loss or knock-down of p53 enhances cell cycling and inhibits apoptosis, leading to increased polyploidization. To support the hypothesis that p53 suppresses megakaryocytic polyploidization, we show that stable expression of wild-type p53 in K562 cells (a p53-null cell line) attenuates the cells' ability to undergo polyploidization during megakaryocytic differentiation due to diminished DNA synthesis and greater apoptosis. This suggested that p53's effects during megakaryopoiesis are mediated through cell cycle- and apoptosis-related target genes, possibly by arresting DNA synthesis and promoting apoptosis. To identify candidate genes through which p53 mediates these effects, gene expression was compared between p53 knock-down (p53-KD) and control CHRF cells induced to undergo terminal megakaryocytic differentiation using microarray analysis. Among substantially downregulated p53 targets in p53-KD megakaryocytes were cell cycle regulators CDKN1A (p21) and PLK2, proapoptotic FAS, TNFRSF10B, CASP8, NOTCH1, TP53INP1, TP53I3, DRAM1, ZMAT3 and PHLDA3, DNA-damage-related RRM2B and SESN1, and actin component ACTA2, while antiapoptotic CKS1B, BCL2, GTSE1, and p53 family member TP63 were upregulated in p53-KD cells. Additionally, a number of cell cycle-related, proapoptotic, and cytoskeleton-related genes with known functions in megakaryocytes but not known to carry p53-responsive elements were differentially expressed between p53-KD and control CHRF cells. Our data support a model whereby p53 expression during megakaryopoiesis serves to control polyploidization and the transition from endomitosis to apoptosis by impeding cell cycling and promoting apoptosis. Furthermore, we identify a putative p53 regulon that is proposed to orchestrate these effects. PMID:22548738

  13. Analysis of the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae ArcA Regulon Identifies Fumarate Reductase as a Determinant of Virulence▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Buettner, Falk F. R.; Bendallah, Ibrahim M.; Bosse, Janine T.; Dreckmann, Karla; Nash, John H. E.; Langford, Paul R.; Gerlach, Gerald-F.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of the bacterial pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae to grow anaerobically allows the bacterium to persist in the lung. The ArcAB two-component system is crucial for metabolic adaptation in response to anaerobic conditions, and we recently showed that an A. pleuropneumoniae arcA mutant had reduced virulence compared to the wild type (F. F. Buettner, A. Maas, and G.-F. Gerlach, Vet. Microbiol. 127:106-115, 2008). In order to understand the attenuated phenotype, we investigated the ArcA regulon of A. pleuropneumoniae by using a combination of transcriptome (microarray) and proteome (two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and subsequent mass spectrometry) analyses. We show that ArcA negatively regulates the expression of many genes, including those encoding enzymes which consume intermediates during fumarate synthesis. Simultaneously, the expression of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a component of the respiratory chain serving as a direct reduction equivalent for fumarate reductase, was upregulated. This result, together with the in silico analysis finding that A. pleuropneumoniae has no oxidative branch of the citric acid cycle, led to the hypothesis that fumarate reductase might be crucial for virulence by providing (i) energy via fumarate respiration and (ii) succinate and other essential metabolic intermediates via the reductive branch of the citric acid cycle. To test this hypothesis, an isogenic A. pleuropneumoniae fumarate reductase deletion mutant was constructed and studied by using a pig aerosol infection model. The mutant was shown to be significantly attenuated, thereby strongly supporting a crucial role for fumarate reductase in the pathogenesis of A. pleuropneumoniae infection. PMID:18378638

  14. Improving the gene structure annotation of the apicomplexan parasite Neospora caninum fulfils a vital requirement towards an in silico-derived vaccine.

    PubMed

    Goodswen, Stephen J; Barratt, Joel L N; Kennedy, Paul J; Ellis, John T

    2015-04-01

    Neospora caninum is an apicomplexan parasite which can cause abortion in cattle, instigating major economic burden. Vaccination has been proposed as the most cost-effective control measure to alleviate this burden. Consequently the overriding aspiration for N. caninum research is the identification and subsequent evaluation of vaccine candidates in animal models. To save time, cost and effort, it is now feasible to use an in silico approach for vaccine candidate prediction. Precise protein sequences, derived from the correct open reading frame, are paramount and arguably the most important factor determining the success or failure of this approach. The challenge is that publicly available N. caninum sequences are mostly derived from gene predictions. Annotated inaccuracies can lead to erroneously predicted vaccine candidates by bioinformatics programs. This study evaluates the current N. caninum annotation for potential inaccuracies. Comparisons with annotation from a closely related pathogen, Toxoplasma gondii, are also made to distinguish patterns of inconsistency. More importantly, a mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiment is used to validate the annotation. Potential discrepancies originating from a questionable start codon context and exon boundaries were identified in 1943 protein coding sequences. We conclude, where experimental data were available, that the majority of N. caninum gene sequences were reliably predicted. Nevertheless, almost 28% of genes were identified as questionable. Given the limitations of RNA-Seq, the intention of this study was not to replace the existing annotation but to support or oppose particular aspects of it. Ideally, many studies aimed at improving the annotation are required to build a consensus. We believe this study, in providing a new resource on gene structure and annotation, is a worthy contributor to this endeavour. PMID:25747726

  15. Species boundaries in gregarine apicomplexan parasites: a case study-comparison of morphometric and molecular variability in Lecudina cf. tuzetae (Eugregarinorida, Lecudinidae).

    PubMed

    Rueckert, Sonja; Villette, Petra M A H; Leander, Brian S

    2011-01-01

    Trophozoites of gregarine apicomplexans are large feeding cells with diverse morphologies that have played a prominent role in gregarine systematics. The range of variability in trophozoite shapes and sizes can be very high even within a single species depending on developmental stages and host environmental conditions; this makes the delimitation of different species of gregarines based on morphological criteria alone very difficult. Accordingly, comparisons of morphological variability and molecular variability in gregarines are necessary to provide a pragmatic framework for establishing species boundaries within this diverse and poorly understood group of parasites. We investigated the morphological and molecular variability present in the gregarine Lecudina cf. tuzetae from the intestines of Nereis vexillosa (Polychaeta) collected in two different locations in Canada. Three distinct morphotypes of trophozoites were identified and the small subunit (SSU) rDNA was sequenced either from multicell isolates of the same morphotype or from single cells. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether the different morphotypes and localities reflected phylogenetic relatedness as inferred from the SSU rDNA sequence data. Phylogenetic analyses of the SSU rDNA demonstrated that the new sequences did not cluster according to morphotype or locality and instead were intermingled within a strongly supported clade. A comparison of 1,657 bp from 45 new sequences demonstrated divergences between 0% and 3.9%. These data suggest that it is necessary to acquire both morphological and molecular data in order to effectively delimit the "clouds" of variation associated with each gregarine species and to unambiguously reidentify these species in the future. PMID:21569160

  16. Nuclear Glycolytic Enzyme Enolase of Toxoplasma gondii Functions as a Transcriptional Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Mouveaux, Thomas; Oria, Gabrielle; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Slomianny, Christian; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2014-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites including Toxoplasma gondii have complex life cycles within different hosts and their infectivity relies on their capacity to regulate gene expression. However, little is known about the nuclear factors that regulate gene expression in these pathogens. Here, we report that T. gondii enolase TgENO2 is targeted to the nucleus of actively replicating parasites, where it specifically binds to nuclear chromatin in vivo. Using a ChIP-Seq technique, we provide evidence for TgENO2 enrichment at the 5′ untranslated gene regions containing the putative promoters of 241 nuclear genes. Ectopic expression of HA-tagged TgENO1 or TgENO2 led to changes in transcript levels of numerous gene targets. Targeted disruption of TgENO1 gene results in a decrease in brain cyst burden of chronically infected mice and in changes in transcript levels of several nuclear genes. Complementation of this knockout mutant with ectopic TgENO1-HA fully restored normal transcript levels. Our findings reveal that enolase functions extend beyond glycolytic activity and include a direct role in coordinating gene regulation in T. gondii. PMID:25153525

  17. Decoding Biomass-Sensing Regulons of Clostridium thermocellum Alternative Sigma-I Factors in a Heterologous Bacillus subtilis Host System

    PubMed Central

    Rozman Grinberg, Inna; Garty, Yuval; Bayer, Edward A.; Shoham, Yuval; Lamed, Raphael; Borovok, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive, anaerobic, cellulolytic, thermophile Clostridium (Ruminiclostridium) thermocellum secretes a multi-enzyme system called the cellulosome to solubilize plant cell wall polysaccharides. During the saccharolytic process, the enzymatic composition of the cellulosome is modulated according to the type of polysaccharide(s) present in the environment. C. thermocellum has a set of eight alternative RNA polymerase sigma (σ) factors that are activated in response to extracellular polysaccharides and share sequence similarity to the Bacillus subtilis σI factor. The aim of the present work was to demonstrate whether individual C. thermocellum σI-like factors regulate specific cellulosomal genes, focusing on C. thermocellum σI6 and σI3 factors. To search for putative σI6- and σI3-dependent promoters, bioinformatic analysis of the upstream regions of the cellulosomal genes was performed. Because of the limited genetic tools available for C. thermocellum, the functionality of the predicted σI6- and σI3-dependent promoters was studied in B. subtilis as a heterologous host. This system enabled observation of the activation of 10 predicted σI6-dependent promoters associated with the C. thermocellum genes: sigI6 (itself, Clo1313_2778), xyn11B (Clo1313_0522), xyn10D (Clo1313_0177), xyn10Z (Clo1313_2635), xyn10Y (Clo1313_1305), cel9V (Clo1313_0349), cseP (Clo1313_2188), sigI1 (Clo1313_2174), cipA (Clo1313_0627), and rsgI5 (Clo1313_0985). Additionally, we observed the activation of 4 predicted σI3-dependent promoters associated with the C. thermocellum genes: sigI3 (itself, Clo1313_1911), pl11 (Clo1313_1983), ce12 (Clo1313_0693) and cipA. Our results suggest possible regulons of σI6 and σI3 in C. thermocellum, as well as the σI6 and σI3 promoter consensus sequences. The proposed -35 and -10 promoter consensus elements of σI6 are CNNAAA and CGAA, respectively. Additionally, a less conserved CGA sequence next to the C in the -35 element and a highly conserved AT sequence three bases downstream of the -10 element were also identified as important nucleotides for promoter recognition. Regarding σI3, the proposed -35 and -10 promoter consensus elements are CCCYYAAA and CGWA, respectively. The present study provides new clues for understanding these recently discovered alternative σI factors. PMID:26731480

  18. Dynamics of transcriptional start site selection during nitrogen stress-induced cell differentiation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    PubMed

    Mitschke, Jan; Vioque, Agustín; Haas, Fabian; Hess, Wolfgang R; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M

    2011-12-13

    The fixation of atmospheric N(2) by cyanobacteria is a major source of nitrogen in the biosphere. In Nostocales, such as Anabaena, this process is spatially separated from oxygenic photosynthesis and occurs in heterocysts. Upon nitrogen step-down, these specialized cells differentiate from vegetative cells in a process controlled by two major regulators: NtcA and HetR. However, the regulon controlled by these two factors is only partially defined, and several aspects of the differentiation process have remained enigmatic. Using differential RNA-seq, we experimentally define a genome-wide map of >10,000 transcriptional start sites (TSS) of Anabaena sp. PCC7120, a model organism for the study of prokaryotic cell differentiation and N(2) fixation. By analyzing the adaptation to nitrogen stress, our global TSS map provides insight into the dynamic changes that modify the transcriptional organization at a critical step of the differentiation process. We identify >900 TSS with minimum fold change in response to nitrogen deficiency of eight. From these TSS, at least 209 were under control of HetR, whereas at least 158 other TSS were potentially directly controlled by NtcA. Our analysis of the promoters activated during the switch to N(2) fixation adds hundreds of protein-coding genes and noncoding transcripts to the list of potentially involved factors. These data experimentally define the NtcA regulon and the DIF(+) motif, a palindrome at or close to position -35 that seems essential for heterocyst-specific expression of certain genes. PMID:22135468

  19. Dynamics of transcriptional start site selection during nitrogen stress-induced cell differentiation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120

    PubMed Central

    Mitschke, Jan; Vioque, Agustín; Haas, Fabian; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Muro-Pastor, Alicia M.

    2011-01-01

    The fixation of atmospheric N2 by cyanobacteria is a major source of nitrogen in the biosphere. In Nostocales, such as Anabaena, this process is spatially separated from oxygenic photosynthesis and occurs in heterocysts. Upon nitrogen step-down, these specialized cells differentiate from vegetative cells in a process controlled by two major regulators: NtcA and HetR. However, the regulon controlled by these two factors is only partially defined, and several aspects of the differentiation process have remained enigmatic. Using differential RNA-seq, we experimentally define a genome-wide map of >10,000 transcriptional start sites (TSS) of Anabaena sp. PCC7120, a model organism for the study of prokaryotic cell differentiation and N2 fixation. By analyzing the adaptation to nitrogen stress, our global TSS map provides insight into the dynamic changes that modify the transcriptional organization at a critical step of the differentiation process. We identify >900 TSS with minimum fold change in response to nitrogen deficiency of eight. From these TSS, at least 209 were under control of HetR, whereas at least 158 other TSS were potentially directly controlled by NtcA. Our analysis of the promoters activated during the switch to N2 fixation adds hundreds of protein-coding genes and noncoding transcripts to the list of potentially involved factors. These data experimentally define the NtcA regulon and the DIF+ motif, a palindrome at or close to position −35 that seems essential for heterocyst-specific expression of certain genes. PMID:22135468

  20. Transcription factors that defend bacteria against reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria live in a toxic world in which their competitors excrete hydrogen peroxide or superoxide-generating redox-cycling compounds. They protect themselves by activating regulons controlled by the OxyR, PerR, and SoxR transcription factors. OxyR and PerR sense peroxide when it oxidizes key thiolate or iron moieties, respectively; they then induce overlapping sets of proteins that defend their vulnerable metalloenzymes. An additional role for OxyR in detecting electrophilic compounds is possible. In some non-enteric bacteria SoxR appears to control the synthesis and export of redox-cycling compounds, whereas in the enteric bacteria it defends the cell against the same agents. When these compounds oxidize its iron-sulfur cluster, SoxR induces proteins that exclude, excrete, or modify them. It also induces enzymes that defend the cell against the superoxide that such compounds make. Recent work has brought new insight to the biochemistry and physiology of these responses, and comparative studies have clarified their evolutionary histories. PMID:26070785

  1. Transcription in archaea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted transcription factors or transcription-associated proteins in the four archaeal genomes, of which 168 have homologs only in Bacteria, 51 have homologs only in Eucarya, and the remaining 61 have homologs in both phylogenetic domains. Although bacterial and eukaryotic transcription have very few factors in common, each exclusively shares a significantly greater number with the Archaea, especially the Bacteria. This last fact contrasts with the obvious close relationship between the archaeal and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms per se, and in particular, basic transcription initiation. We interpret these results to mean that the archaeal transcription system has retained more ancestral characteristics than have the transcription mechanisms in either of the other two domains.

  2. Transcriptional control mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Granner, D.; Rosenfeld, M.G.; Chang, S.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of papers presented at a symposium on mechanisms of transcriptional control. Topics discussed include: 5'-regulatory elements of the human HPRT gene;nuclear factors interacting with immunoglobulin heavy and K enhancers;mitochondinal transcription factor binds novel control elements of both major promoters of human mt DNA;RNA processing and translation;chromatin structure and assembly;hormonal regulation of transcription and eukaryotic transcription systems.

  3. Relationship of the superoxide dismutase genes, sodA and sodB, to the iron uptake (/ital fur/) regulon in /ital Escherichia coli/ K-12

    SciTech Connect

    Niederhoffer, E.C.; Naranjo, C.M.; Fee, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Expression of sodA, as indicated by MnSod activity is normal in /ital fur/ mutants. This suggests that sodA is not a member of the /ital fur/ regulon and that the putative Fe-binding, regulatory protein of sodA, suggested by Moody and Hassan is not the Fur protein. by contrast, expression of sodB, as indicated by FeSod activity, is completely blocked in /ital fur/ mutants and the effect is restored by transformation with a plasmid having a normal /ital fur/ locus. The observations suggest that Fur, either directly or indirectly, controls SodB biosynthesis. Additional observations are described which indicate that SodB and Fur act together in a complicated fashion to control the biosynthesis of enterobactin. 26 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. A workflow for genome-wide mapping of archaeal transcription factors with ChIP-seq

    PubMed Central

    Wilbanks, Elizabeth G.; Larsen, David J.; Neches, Russell Y.; Yao, Andrew I.; Wu, Chia-Ying; Kjolby, Rachel A. S.; Facciotti, Marc T.

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering the structure of gene regulatory networks across the tree of life remains one of the major challenges in postgenomic biology. We present a novel ChIP-seq workflow for the archaea using the model organism Halobacterium salinarum sp. NRC-1 and demonstrate its application for mapping the genome-wide binding sites of natively expressed transcription factors. This end-to-end pipeline is the first protocol for ChIP-seq in archaea, with methods and tools for each stage from gene tagging to data analysis and biological discovery. Genome-wide binding sites for transcription factors with many binding sites (TfbD) are identified with sensitivity, while retaining specificity in the identification the smaller regulons (bacteriorhodopsin-activator protein). Chromosomal tagging of target proteins with a compact epitope facilitates a standardized and cost-effective workflow that is compatible with high-throughput immunoprecipitation of natively expressed transcription factors. The Pique package, an open-source bioinformatics method, is presented for identification of binding events. Relative to ChIP-Chip and qPCR, this workflow offers a robust catalog of protein–DNA binding events with improved spatial resolution and significantly decreased cost. While this study focuses on the application of ChIP-seq in H. salinarum sp. NRC-1, our workflow can also be adapted for use in other archaea and bacteria with basic genetic tools. PMID:22323522

  5. Physiological and Transcriptional Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Zinc Limitation in Chemostat Cultures

    PubMed Central

    De Nicola, Raffaele; Hazelwood, Lucie A.; De Hulster, Erik A. F.; Walsh, Michael C.; Knijnenburg, Theo A.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; Walker, Graeme M.; Pronk, Jack T.; Daran, Jean-Marc; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional responses of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to Zn availability were investigated at a fixed specific growth rate under limiting and abundant Zn concentrations in chemostat culture. To investigate the context dependency of this transcriptional response and eliminate growth rate-dependent variations in transcription, yeast was grown under several chemostat regimens, resulting in various carbon (glucose), nitrogen (ammonium), zinc, and oxygen supplies. A robust set of genes that responded consistently to Zn limitation was identified, and the set enabled the definition of the Zn-specific Zap1p regulon, comprised of 26 genes and characterized by a broader zinc-responsive element consensus (MHHAACCBYNMRGGT) than so far described. Most surprising was the Zn-dependent regulation of genes involved in storage carbohydrate metabolism. Their concerted down-regulation was physiologically relevant as revealed by a substantial decrease in glycogen and trehalose cellular content under Zn limitation. An unexpectedly large number of genes were synergistically or antagonistically regulated by oxygen and Zn availability. This combinatorial regulation suggested a more prominent involvement of Zn in mitochondrial biogenesis and function than hitherto identified. PMID:17933919

  6. Flexibility of Vibrio cholerae ToxT in Transcription Activation of Genes Having Altered Promoter Spacing▿

    PubMed Central

    Bellair, Michelle; Withey, Jeffrey H.

    2008-01-01

    Cholera, a severe diarrheal disease, is caused by ingestion of the gram-negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae. Expression of V. cholerae virulence factors is highly regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels by a complex network of proteins and small noncoding RNAs. The direct activator of transcription of most V. cholerae virulence genes is the ToxT protein. ToxT binds to a 13-bp sequence, the toxbox, located upstream of genes in its regulon. However, the organization of toxboxes relative to each other and to the core promoter elements at different genes varies dramatically. At different ToxT-activated genes a single toxbox may be necessary and sufficient for full activation, or pairs of toxboxes organized as either inverted or direct repeats may be required for full activation. Although all toxboxes are located at positions consistent with a class I promoter architecture, the locations of toxboxes relative to the transcription start site also vary from gene to gene. To further assess the ability of ToxT to activate transcription from different configurations relative to the core promoter elements, we constructed promoter-lacZ fusions having altered spacing both between toxbox pairs and between the promoter-proximal toxbox and the −35 box at five different ToxT-activated promoters. Our results suggest that that ToxT has remarkable flexibility in its positioning as a transcription activator and that different interactions between ToxT and RNA polymerase occur during transcription activation of promoters having different toxbox configurations. PMID:18849430

  7. Selective Genomic Targeting by FRA-2/FOSL2 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Jeff S.; Klein, David C.; Carter, David A.

    2011-01-01

    FRA-2/FOSL2 is a basic region-leucine zipper motif transcription factor that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. The functional repertoire of this factor is unclear, partly due to a lack of knowledge of genomic sequences that are targeted. Here, we identified novel, functional FRA-2 targets across the genome through expression profile analysis in a knockdown transgenic rat. In this model, a nocturnal rhythm of pineal gland FRA-2 is suppressed by a genetically encoded, dominant negative mutant protein. Bioinformatic analysis of validated sets of FRA-2-regulated and -nonregulated genes revealed that the FRA-2 regulon is limited by genomic target selection rules that, in general, transcend core cis-sequence identity. However, one variant AP-1-related (AP-1R) sequence was common to a subset of regulated genes. The functional activity and protein binding partners of a candidate AP-1R sequence were determined for a novel FRA-2-repressed gene, Rgs4. FRA-2 protein preferentially associated with a proximal Rgs4 AP-1R sequence as demonstrated by ex vivo ChIP and in vitro EMSA analysis; moreover, transcriptional repression was blocked by mutation of the AP-1R sequence, whereas mutation of an upstream consensus AP-1 family sequence did not affect Rgs4 expression. Nocturnal changes in protein complexes at the Rgs4 AP-1R sequence are associated with FRA-2-dependent dismissal of the co-activator, CBP; this provides a mechanistic basis for Rgs4 gene repression. These studies have also provided functional insight into selective genomic targeting by FRA-2, highlighting discordance between predicted and actual targets. Future studies should address FRA-2-Rgs4 interactions in other systems, including the brain, where FRA-2 function is poorly understood. PMID:21367864

  8. THE CBF1-DEPENDENT LOW TEMPERATURE SIGNALLING PATHWAY, REGULON AND INCREASE IN FREEZE TOLERANCE ARE CONSERVED IN POPULUS SPP.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The meristematic tissues of temperate woody perennials must acclimate to freezing temperatures to survive the winter and resume growth the following year. To determine whether the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) family of transcription factors contributing to this process in annual herbaceous species ...

  9. Regulons of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 iron starvation sigma factors PSPTO_0444, PSPTO_1209 and PSPTO_1286

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas syringae is a globally dispersed environmental bacteria that is well known for its ability to cause destructive plant diseases in agricultural and horticultural settings. The ability of bacteria to survive in diverse environments is correlated with a large number of transcription regulat...

  10. Transcriptional Regulatory Network Analysis of MYB Transcription Factor Family Genes in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Smita, Shuchi; Katiyar, Amit; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Pandey, Dev M.; Bansal, Kailash C.

    2015-01-01

    MYB transcription factor (TF) is one of the largest TF families and regulates defense responses to various stresses, hormone signaling as well as many metabolic and developmental processes in plants. Understanding these regulatory hierarchies of gene expression networks in response to developmental and environmental cues is a major challenge due to the complex interactions between the genetic elements. Correlation analyses are useful to unravel co-regulated gene pairs governing biological process as well as identification of new candidate hub genes in response to these complex processes. High throughput expression profiling data are highly useful for construction of co-expression networks. In the present study, we utilized transcriptome data for comprehensive regulatory network studies of MYB TFs by “top-down” and “guide-gene” approaches. More than 50% of OsMYBs were strongly correlated under 50 experimental conditions with 51 hub genes via “top-down” approach. Further, clusters were identified using Markov Clustering (MCL). To maximize the clustering performance, parameter evaluation of the MCL inflation score (I) was performed in terms of enriched GO categories by measuring F-score. Comparison of co-expressed cluster and clads analyzed from phylogenetic analysis signifies their evolutionarily conserved co-regulatory role. We utilized compendium of known interaction and biological role with Gene Ontology enrichment analysis to hypothesize function of coexpressed OsMYBs. In the other part, the transcriptional regulatory network analysis by “guide-gene” approach revealed 40 putative targets of 26 OsMYB TF hubs with high correlation value utilizing 815 microarray data. The putative targets with MYB-binding cis-elements enrichment in their promoter region, functional co-occurrence as well as nuclear localization supports our finding. Specially, enrichment of MYB binding regions involved in drought-inducibility implying their regulatory role in drought response in rice. Thus, the co-regulatory network analysis facilitated the identification of complex OsMYB regulatory networks, and candidate target regulon genes of selected guide MYB genes. The results contribute to the candidate gene screening, and experimentally testable hypotheses for potential regulatory MYB TFs, and their targets under stress conditions. PMID:26734052

  11. Appropriate DevR (DosR)-Mediated Signaling Determines Transcriptional Response, Hypoxic Viability and Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    De Majumdar, Shyamasree; Vashist, Atul; Dhingra, Sakshi; Gupta, Rajesh; Singh, Alka; Challu, Vijay K.; Ramanathan, V. D.; Kumar, Prahlad; Tyagi, Jaya Sivaswami

    2012-01-01

    Background The DevR(DosR) regulon is implicated in hypoxic adaptation and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The present study was designed to decipher the impact of perturbation in DevR-mediated signaling on these properties. Methodology/Principal Findings M. tb complemented (Comp) strains expressing different levels of DevR were constructed in Mut1* background (expressing DevR N-terminal domain in fusion with AphI (DevRN-Kan) and in Mut2ΔdevR background (deletion mutant). They were compared for their hypoxia adaptation and virulence properties. Diverse phenotypes were noted; basal level expression (∼5.3±2.3 µM) when induced to levels equivalent to WT levels (∼25.8±9.3 µM) was associated with robust DevR regulon induction and hypoxic adaptation (Comp 9* and 10*), whereas low-level expression (detectable at transcript level) as in Comp 11* and Comp15 was associated with an adaptation defect. Intermediate-level expression (∼3.3±1.2 µM) partially restored hypoxic adaptation functions in Comp2, but not in Comp1* bacteria that co-expressed DevRN-Kan. Comp* strains in Mut1* background also exhibited diverse virulence phenotypes; high/very low-level DevR expression was associated with virulence whereas intermediate-level expression was associated with low virulence. Transcription profiling and gene expression analysis revealed up-regulation of the phosphate starvation response (PSR) in Mut1* and Comp11* bacteria, but not in WT/Mut2ΔdevR/other Comp strains, indicating a plasticity in expression pathways that is determined by the magnitude of signaling perturbation through DevRN-Kan. Conclusions/Significance A minimum DevR concentration of ∼3.3±1.2 µM (as in Comp2 bacteria) is required to support HspX expression in the standing culture hypoxia model. The relative intracellular concentrations of DevR and DevRN-Kan appear to be critical for determining dormancy regulon induction, hypoxic adaptation and virulence. Dysregulated DevRN-Kan-mediated signaling selectively triggers the PSR in bacteria expressing no/very low level of DevR. Our findings illustrate the important role of appropriate two-component- mediated signaling in pathogen physiology and the resilience of bacteria when such signaling is perturbed. PMID:22563409

  12. The TyrR Transcription Factor Regulates the Divergent akr-ipdC Operons of Enterobacter cloacae UW5

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, Thomas J. D.; Patten, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    The TyrR transcription factor regulates genes involved in the uptake and biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids in Enterobacteriaceae. Genes may be positively or negatively regulated depending on the presence or absence of each aromatic amino acid, all three of which function as cofactors for TyrR. In this report we detail the transcriptional control of two divergently transcribed genes, akr and ipdC, by TyrR, elucidated by promoter fusion expression assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to assess protein-DNA interactions. Expression of both genes was shown to be controlled by TyrR via interactions with two TyrR boxes located within the akr-ipdC intergenic region. Expression of ipdC required TyrR bound to the proximal strong box, and is strongly induced by phenylalanine, and to a lesser extent by tryptophan and tyrosine. Down-regulation of akr was reliant on interactions with the weak box, and may also require a second, as yet unidentified protein for further repression. Tyrosine enhanced repression of akr. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that TyrR interacts with both the strong and weak boxes, and that binding of the weak box in vitro requires an intact adjacent strong box. While the strong box shows a high degree of conservation with the TyrR binding site consensus sequence, the weak box has atypical spacing of the two half sites comprising the palindromic arms. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated sequence-specific interaction between TyrR and the weak box. This is the first report of TyrR-controlled expression of two divergent protein-coding genes, transcribed from independent promoters. Moreover, the identification of a predicted aldo-keto reductase as a member of the TyrR regulon further extends the function of the TyrR regulon. PMID:25811953

  13. High-resolution detection of DNA binding sites of the global transcriptional regulator GlxR in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, Britta; Sala, Claudia; Kohl, Thomas A; Uplekar, Swapna; Baumbach, Jan; Cole, Stewart T; Pühler, Alfred; Tauch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator GlxR has been characterized as a global hub within the gene-regulatory network of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with a specific anti-GlxR antibody and subsequent high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) was applied to C. glutamicum to get new in vivo insights into the gene composition of the GlxR regulon. In a comparative approach, C. glutamicum cells were grown with either glucose or acetate as the sole carbon source prior to immunoprecipitation. High-throughput sequencing resulted in 69 million reads and 2.6 Gb of genomic information. After mapping of these data on the genome sequence of C. glutamicum, 107 enriched DNA fragments were detected from cells grown with glucose as carbon source. GlxR binding sites were identified in the sequence of 79 enriched DNA fragments, of which 21 sites were not previously reported. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with 40-mer oligomers covering the GlxR binding sites were performed for validation of the in vivo results. The detection of new binding sites confirmed the role of GlxR as a regulator of carbon source metabolism and energy conversion, but additionally revealed binding of GlxR in front of the 6C non-coding RNA gene and to non-canonical DNA binding sites within protein-coding regions. The present study underlines the dynamics within the GlxR regulon by identifying in vivo targets during growth on glucose and contributes to the expansion of knowledge of this important transcriptional regulator. PMID:23103979

  14. The TyrR transcription factor regulates the divergent akr-ipdC operons of Enterobacter cloacae UW5.

    PubMed

    Coulson, Thomas J D; Patten, Cheryl L

    2015-01-01

    The TyrR transcription factor regulates genes involved in the uptake and biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids in Enterobacteriaceae. Genes may be positively or negatively regulated depending on the presence or absence of each aromatic amino acid, all three of which function as cofactors for TyrR. In this report we detail the transcriptional control of two divergently transcribed genes, akr and ipdC, by TyrR, elucidated by promoter fusion expression assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to assess protein-DNA interactions. Expression of both genes was shown to be controlled by TyrR via interactions with two TyrR boxes located within the akr-ipdC intergenic region. Expression of ipdC required TyrR bound to the proximal strong box, and is strongly induced by phenylalanine, and to a lesser extent by tryptophan and tyrosine. Down-regulation of akr was reliant on interactions with the weak box, and may also require a second, as yet unidentified protein for further repression. Tyrosine enhanced repression of akr. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that TyrR interacts with both the strong and weak boxes, and that binding of the weak box in vitro requires an intact adjacent strong box. While the strong box shows a high degree of conservation with the TyrR binding site consensus sequence, the weak box has atypical spacing of the two half sites comprising the palindromic arms. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated sequence-specific interaction between TyrR and the weak box. This is the first report of TyrR-controlled expression of two divergent protein-coding genes, transcribed from independent promoters. Moreover, the identification of a predicted aldo-keto reductase as a member of the TyrR regulon further extends the function of the TyrR regulon. PMID:25811953

  15. Control of Proteobacterial Central Carbon Metabolism by the HexR Transcriptional Regulator. A Case Study in Shewanella oneidensis

    SciTech Connect

    Leyn, Semen; Li, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Qijing; Novichkov, Pavel; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2011-08-17

    Bacteria exploit multiple mechanisms for controlling central carbon metabolism (CCM). Thus, a bioinformatic analysis together with some experimental data implicated HexR transcriptional factor as a global CCM regulator in some lineages of Gammaproteobacteria operating as a functional replacement of Cra regulator characteristic of Enterobacteriales. In this study we combined a large-scale comparative genomic reconstruction of HexRcontrolled regulons in 87 species of Proteobacteria with the detailed experimental analysis of HexR regulatory network in Shewanella oneidensis model system. Although nearly all of the HexR-controlled genes are associated with CCM, remarkable variations were revealed in the scale (from 1-2 target operons in Enterobacteriales up to 20 operons in Aeromonadales) and gene content of HexR regulons between 11 compared lineages. A predicted 17-bp pseudo-palindrome with a consensus tTGTAATwwwATTACa, was confirmed as HexR-binding motif for 15 target operons (comprising 30 genes) by in vitro binding assays. The negative effect of the key CCM intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxy-6- phosphogluconate, on the DNA-regulator complex formation was verified. A dual mode of HexR action on various target promoters, repression of genes involved in catabolic pathways and activation of gluconeogenic genes, was for the first time predicted by the bioinformatc analysis and experimentally verified by changed gene expression pattern in S. oneidensis AhexR mutant. Phenotypic profiling revealed the inability of this mutant to grow on lactate or pyruvate as a single carbon source. A comparative metabolic flux analysis of wild-type and mutant strains of S. oneidensis using 13Clactate labeling and GC-MS analysis confirmed the hypothesized HexR role as a master regulator of gluconeogenic flux from pyruvate via the transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA).

  16. Structural determinants of DNA binding by a P. falciparum ApiAP2 transcriptional regulator

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Scott E.; De Silva, Erandi K.; Keck, James L.; Llinás, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Putative transcription factors have only recently been identified in the Plasmodium spp., with the major family of regulators comprising the Apicomplexan AP2 (ApiAP2) proteins. To better understand the DNA-binding mechanisms of these transcriptional regulators, we characterized the structure and in vitro function of an AP2 DNA-binding domain from a prototypical ApiAP2 protein, PF14_0633 from Plasmodium falciparum. The X-ray crystal structure of the PF14_0633 AP2 domain bound to DNA reveals a β-sheet fold that binds the DNA major groove through base-specific and backbone contacts; a prominent α-helix supports the β-sheet structure. Substitution of predicted DNA-binding residues with alanine weakened or eliminated DNA binding in solution. In contrast to plant AP2 domains, the PF14_0633 AP2 domain dimerizes upon binding to DNA through a domain-swapping mechanism in which the α-helices of the AP2 domains pack against the β-sheets of the dimer mates. DNA-induced dimerization of PF14_0633 may be important for tethering two distal DNA loci together in the nucleus and/or for inducing functional rearrangements of its domains to facilitate transcriptional regulation. Consistent with a multi-site binding mode, at least two copies of the consensus sequence recognized by PF14_0633 are present upstream of a previously identified group of sporozoite-stage genes. Taken together, these findings illustrate how Plasmodium has adapted the AP2 DNA-binding domain for genome-wide transcriptional regulation. PMID:19913037

  17. A generic approach to identify Transcription Factor-specific operator motifs; Inferences for LacI-family mediated regulation in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    PubMed Central

    Francke, Christof; Kerkhoven, Robert; Wels, Michiel; Siezen, Roland J

    2008-01-01

    Background A key problem in the sequence-based reconstruction of regulatory networks in bacteria is the lack of specificity in operator predictions. The problem is especially prominent in the identification of transcription factor (TF) specific binding sites. More in particular, homologous TFs are abundant and, as they are structurally very similar, it proves difficult to distinguish the related operators by automated means. This also holds for the LacI-family, a family of TFs that is well-studied and has many members that fulfill crucial roles in the control of carbohydrate catabolism in bacteria including catabolite repression. To overcome the specificity problem, a comprehensive footprinting approach was formulated to identify TF-specific operator motifs and was applied to the LacI-family of TFs in the model gram positive organism, Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. The main premise behind the approach is that only orthologous sequences that share orthologous genomic context will share equivalent regulatory sites. Results When the approach was applied to the 12 LacI-family TFs of the model species, a specific operator motif was identified for each of them. With the TF-specific operator motifs, potential binding sites were found on the genome and putative minimal regulons could be defined. Moreover, specific inducers could in most cases be linked to the TFs through phylogeny, thereby unveiling the biological role of these regulons. The operator predictions indicated that the LacI-family TFs can be separated into two subfamilies with clearly distinct operator motifs. They also established that the operator related to the 'global' regulator CcpA is not inherently distinct from that of other LacI-family members, only more degenerate. Analysis of the chromosomal position of the identified putative binding sites confirmed that the LacI-family TFs are mostly auto-regulatory and relate mainly to carbohydrate uptake and catabolism. Conclusion Our approach to identify specific operator motifs for different TF-family members is specific and in essence generic. The data infer that, although the specific operator motifs can be used to identify minimal regulons, experimental knowledge on TF activity especially is essential to determine complete regulons as well as to estimate the overlap between TF affinities. PMID:18371204

  18. In vitro evidence that RNA Polymerase acetylation and acetyl phosphate-dependent CpxR phosphorylation affect cpxP transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Lima, Bruno P; Lennon, Christopher W; Ross, Wilma; Gourse, Richard L; Wolfe, Alan J

    2016-03-01

    The central metabolite acetyl phosphate (acP) has long been proposed to influence transcription regulation by directly transferring its phosphoryl group to a number of response regulators in many bacterial species. Here, we provide in vitro evidence for this proposition and demonstrate, using an in vitro transcription system, that acP-dependent phosphorylation of aspartate 51 of CpxR induces transcription of one of its regulon members in E. coli, cpxP. We also used this in vitro transcription system to extend our previously reported in vivo data that hypothesized that acetylation of RNA polymerase (RNAP) influences acP-dependent cpxP transcription, using glutamine as a genetic mimic for acetylated arginine 291 of the carboxy-terminal domain of RNAP α subunit. The data we present here lend strong support to the hypothesis that acP has a direct effect on transcription regulation in E. coli via phosphorylation of CpxR, and that RNAP acetylation can modulate this response. PMID:26790713

  19. WRKY transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  20. Plant transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1995-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression relies on the recognition of promoter elements by transcription factors. In the past several years, a considerable number of (putative) transcription factors have been identified in plants. Some genes coding for these factors were isolated by south-western screening with oligonucleotides as a probe or by homology-based screening, and others were initially isolated by genetic means and subsequently identified as the genes for transcription factors. These transcription factors often form families of structurally related proteins with similar DNA-binding specificities and in addition, they are sometimes involved in related phenomena. Some groups of factors homo- and/or heterodimerize to increase the length and variability of the target sequences. Transcriptional activators, in general, comprise a modular activation domain. The activities of the transcription factors are controlled by post-translational modification, like phosphorylation and glycosylation, as well as at the levels of nuclear transport, oligomerization, etc. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of plant transcription factors to help understand the mechanistic aspects of the transcriptional regulation of genes. PMID:8589926

  1. Morphology of nuclear transcription.

    PubMed

    Weipoltshammer, Klara; Schöfer, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Gene expression control is a fundamental determinant of cellular life with transcription being the most important step. The spatial nuclear arrangement of the transcription process driven by RNA polymerases II and III is nonrandomly organized in foci, which is believed to add another regulatory layer on gene expression control. RNA polymerase I transcription takes place within a specialized organelle, the nucleolus. Transcription of ribosomal RNA directly responds to metabolic requirements, which in turn is reflected in the architecture of nucleoli. It differs from that of the other polymerases with respect to the gene template organization, transcription rate, and epigenetic expression control, whereas other features are shared like the formation of DNA loops bringing genes and components of the transcription machinery in close proximity. In recent years, significant advances have been made in the understanding of the structural prerequisites of nuclear transcription, of the arrangement in the nuclear volume, and of the dynamics of these entities. Here, we compare ribosomal RNA and mRNA transcription side by side and review the current understanding focusing on structural aspects of transcription foci, of their constituents, and of the dynamical behavior of these components with respect to foci formation, disassembly, and cell cycle. PMID:26847177

  2. Dissecting the expression patterns of transcription factors across conditions using an integrated network-based approach

    PubMed Central

    Janga, Sarath Chandra; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    In prokaryotes, regulation of gene expression is predominantly controlled at the level of transcription. Transcription in turn is mediated by a set of DNA-binding factors called transcription factors (TFs). In this study, we map the complete repertoire of ?300 TFs of the bacterial model, Escherichia coli, onto gene expression data for a number of nonredundant experimental conditions and show that TFs are generally expressed at a lower level than other gene classes. We also demonstrate that different conditions harbor varying number of active TFs, with an average of about 15% of the total repertoire, with certain stress and drug-induced conditions exhibiting as high as one-third of the collection of TFs. Our results also show that activators are more frequently expressed than repressors, indicating that activation of promoters might be a more common phenomenon than repression in bacteria. Finally, to understand the association of TFs with different conditions and to elucidate their dynamic interplay with other TFs, we develop a network-based framework to identify TFs which act as markers, defined as those which are responsible for condition-specific transcriptional rewiring. This approach allowed us to pinpoint several marker TFs as being central in various specialized conditions such as drug induction or growth condition variations, which we discuss in light of previously reported experimental findings. Further analysis showed that a majority of identified markers effectively control the expression of their regulons and, in general, transcriptional programs of most conditions can be effectively rewired by a very small number of TFs. It was also found that closeness is a key centrality measure which can aid in the successful identification of marker TFs in regulatory networks. Our results suggest the utility of the network-based approaches developed in this study to be applicable for understanding other interactomic data sets. PMID:20631006

  3. Archaeal chromatin and transcription.

    PubMed

    Reeve, John N

    2003-05-01

    Archaea contain a variety of sequence-independent DNA binding proteins consistent with the evolution of several different, sometimes overlapping and exchangeable solutions to the problem of genome compaction. Some of these proteins undergo residue-specific post-translational lysine acetylation or methylation, hinting at analogues of the histone modifications that regulate eukaryotic chromatin structure and transcription. Archaeal transcription initiation most closely resembles the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) system, but Archaea do not appear to have homologues of the multisubunit complexes that remodel eukaryotic chromatin and activate RNAPII initiation. In contrast, they have sequence-specific regulators that repress and perhaps activate archaeal transcription by mechanisms superficially similar to the bacterial paradigm of regulating promoter binding by RNAP. Repressors compete with archaeal TATA-box binding protein (TBP) and TFB for the TATA-box and TFB-recognition elements (BRE) of the archaeal promoter, or with archaeal RNAP for the site of transcription initiation. Transcript-specific regulation by repressors binding to sites of transcript initiation is consistent with such sites having very little sequence conservation. However, most Archaea have only one TBP and/or TFB that presumably must therefore bind to similar TATA-box and BRE sequences upstream of most genes. Repressors that function by competing with TBP and/or TFB binding must therefore also make additional contacts with transcript-specific regulatory sites adjacent or remote from the TATA-box/BRE region. The fate of the archaeal TBP and TFB following transcription initiation remains to be determined. Based on functional homology with their eukaryotic RNAPII-system counterparts, archaeal TBP and possibly also TFB should remain bound to the TATA-box/BRE region after transcription initiation. However, this seems unlikely as it might limit repressor competition at this site to only the first round of transcription initiation. PMID:12694606

  4. Global Transcriptional Responses of the Toxic Cyanobacterium, Microcystis aeruginosa, to Nitrogen Stress, Phosphorus Stress, and Growth on Organic Matter

    PubMed Central

    Harke, Matthew J.; Gobler, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing (RNA-seq) was used to assess the transcriptomic response of the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa during growth with low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (low N), low levels of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (low P), and in the presence of high levels of high molecular weight dissolved organic matter (HMWDOM). Under low N, one third of the genome was differentially expressed, with significant increases in transcripts observed among genes within the nir operon, urea transport genes (urtBCDE), and amino acid transporters while significant decreases in transcripts were observed in genes related to photosynthesis. There was also a significant decrease in the transcription of the microcystin synthetase gene set under low N and a significant decrease in microcystin content per Microcystis cell demonstrating that N supply influences cellular toxicity. Under low P, 27% of the genome was differentially expressed. The Pho regulon was induced leading to large increases in transcript levels of the alkaline phosphatase phoX, the Pst transport system (pstABC), and the sphX gene, and transcripts of multiple sulfate transporter were also significantly more abundant. While the transcriptional response to growth on HMWDOM was smaller (5–22% of genes differentially expressed), transcripts of multiple genes specifically associated with the transport and degradation of organic compounds were significantly more abundant within HMWDOM treatments and thus may be recruited by Microcystis to utilize these substrates. Collectively, these findings provide a comprehensive understanding of the nutritional physiology of this toxic, bloom-forming cyanobacterium and the role of N in controlling microcystin synthesis. PMID:23894552

  5. Toxoplasma Transcription Factor TgAP2XI-5 Regulates the Expression of Genes Involved in Parasite Virulence and Host Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert; Gissot, Mathieu; Huot, Ludovic; Alayi, Tchilabalo Dilezitoko; Hot, David; Marot, Guillemette; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Kim, Kami; Tomavo, Stanislas

    2013-01-01

    Gene regulation in apicomplexan parasites, a phylum containing important protozoan parasites such as Plasmodium and Toxoplasma, is poorly understood. The life cycle of Toxoplasma gondii is complex, with multiple proliferation and differentiation steps, of which tachyzoite proliferation is the most relevant to pathogenesis in humans and animals. Tachyzoites express invasion and virulence factors that are crucial for their survival and manipulation of host cell functions. The expression of those factors is tightly controlled during the tachyzoite cell cycle to permit their correct packaging in newly formed apical secretory organelles named micronemes and rhoptries in the daughter cells. However, little is known about the factors that control the expression of genes encoding the virulence factors present in these parasite-specific secretory organelles. We report that the plant-like nuclear factor TgAP2XI-5 targets more than 300 gene promoters and actively controls the transcription of these genes. Most of these target genes, including those that are essential for parasite virulence, showed a peak of expression in the S and M phases of the cell cycle. Furthermore, we identified the cis-regulatory element recognized by TgAP2XI-5 and demonstrated its ability to actively drive gene transcription. Our results demonstrated that TgAP2XI-5 is a novel DNA sequence-specific transcription factor associated with promoter activation. TgAP2XI-5 may regulate gene transcription of crucial virulence factors in T. gondii. PMID:24025328

  6. Functional diversification of ROK-family transcriptional regulators of sugar catabolism in the Thermotogae phylum

    PubMed Central

    Kazanov, Marat D.; Li, Xiaoqing; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2013-01-01

    Large and functionally heterogeneous families of transcription factors have complex evolutionary histories. What shapes specificities toward effectors and DNA sites in paralogous regulators is a fundamental question in biology. Bacteria from the deep-branching lineage Thermotogae possess multiple paralogs of the repressor, open reading frame, kinase (ROK) family regulators that are characterized by carbohydrate-sensing domains shared with sugar kinases. We applied an integrated genomic approach to study functions and specificities of regulators from this family. A comparative analysis of 11 Thermotogae genomes revealed novel mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the sugar utilization networks, DNA-binding motifs and specific functions. Reconstructed regulons for seven groups of ROK regulators were validated by DNA-binding assays using purified recombinant proteins from the model bacterium Thermotoga maritima. All tested regulators demonstrated specific binding to their predicted cognate DNA sites, and this binding was inhibited by specific effectors, mono- or disaccharides from their respective sugar catabolic pathways. By comparing ligand-binding domains of regulators with structurally characterized kinases from the ROK family, we elucidated signature amino acid residues determining sugar-ligand regulator specificity. Observed correlations between signature residues and the sugar-ligand specificities provide the framework for structure functional classification of the entire ROK family. PMID:23209028

  7. Characterization of the Escherichia coli σS core regulon by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peano, Clelia; Wolf, Johannes; Demol, Julien; Rossi, Elio; Petiti, Luca; De Bellis, Gianluca; Geiselmann, Johannes; Egli, Thomas; Lacour, Stephan; Landini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, selective promoter recognition by RNA polymerase is achieved by its association with σ factors, accessory subunits able to direct RNA polymerase “core enzyme” (E) to different promoter sequences. Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq), we searched for promoters bound by the σS-associated RNA polymerase form (EσS) during transition from exponential to stationary phase. We identified 63 binding sites for EσS overlapping known or putative promoters, often located upstream of genes (encoding either ORFs or non-coding RNAs) showing at least some degree of dependence on the σS-encoding rpoS gene. EσS binding did not always correlate with an increase in transcription level, suggesting that, at some σS-dependent promoters, EσS might remain poised in a pre-initiation state upon binding. A large fraction of EσS-binding sites corresponded to promoters recognized by RNA polymerase associated with σ70 or other σ factors, suggesting a considerable overlap in promoter recognition between different forms of RNA polymerase. In particular, EσS appears to contribute significantly to transcription of genes encoding proteins involved in LPS biosynthesis and in cell surface composition. Finally, our results highlight a direct role of EσS in the regulation of non coding RNAs, such as OmrA/B, RyeA/B and SibC. PMID:26020590

  8. Transcriptional regulation in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Devarati; Fisher, David E

    2009-06-01

    Transcriptional regulation in melanoma is a complex process that tends to hijack the normal melanocyte signaling pathways involved in melanocyte development, pigmentation, and survival. At the center of these often overlapping networks of transcriptional activation and repression is microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), a melanocyte lineage marker that increases pigment production and exhibits diverse effects on cell survival, proliferation, and cell cycle arrest. The particular conditions that allow MITF to produce these potentially contradictory roles have not yet been fully elucidated, but analysis of the pathways involved provides opportunities to learn about new therapeutic strategies. PMID:19464596

  9. ASTP Onboard Voice Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The transcription is presented of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project voice communications as recorded on the command module data storage equipment. Data from this recorder are telemetered (dumped) to Space Tracking and Data Network sites for retransmission to the Johnson Space Center. The transcript is divided into three columns -- time, speaker, and text. The Greenwich mean time column consists of three two-digit numbers representing hours, minutes, and seconds (e.g., 22 34 14) for the Julian dates shown at the top of the page on which a new day begins. The speaker column indicates the source of a transmission; the text column contains the verbatim transcript of the communications.

  10. Transcription factor Rex in regulation of pathophysiology in oral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bitoun, J P; Wen, Z T

    2016-04-01

    The NAD(+) and NADH-sensing transcriptional regulator Rex is widely conserved across gram-positive bacteria. Rex monitors cellular redox poise and controls the expression of genes/operons involved in diverse pathways including alternative fermentation, oxidative stress responses, and biofilm formation. The oral cavity undergoes frequent and drastic fluctuations in nutrient availability, pH, temperature, oxygen tension, saliva, and shear forces. The oral streptococci are major colonizers of oral mucosa and tooth surfaces and include commensals as well as opportunistic pathogens, including the primary etiological agent of dental caries, Streptococcus mutans. Current understanding of the Rex regulon in oral bacteria is mostly based on studies in S. mutans and endodontic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. Indeed, other oral bacteria encode homologs of the Rex protein and much is to be gleaned from more in-depth studies. Our current understanding has Rex positioned at the interface of oxygen and energy metabolism. In biofilms, heterogeneous oxygen tension influences the ratio of intracellular NADH and NAD(+) , which is finely tuned through glycolysis and fermentation. In S. mutans, Rex regulates the expression of glycolytic enzyme NAD(+) -dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and NADH-dependent fermentation enzymes/complexes lactate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, alcohol-acetaldehyde dehydrogenase, and fumarate reductase. In addition, Rex controls the expression of NADH oxidase, a major enzyme used to eliminate oxidative stress and regenerate NAD(+) . Here, we summarize recent studies carried out on the Rex regulators in S. mutans and E. faecalis. This research has important implications for understanding how Rex monitors redox balance and optimizes fermentation pathways for survival and subsequent pathogenicity. PMID:26172563

  11. PtrBAM1, a β-amylase-coding gene of Poncirus trifoliata, is a CBF regulon member with function in cold tolerance by modulating soluble sugar levels.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ting; Zhu, Xiaofang; Duan, Nian; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2014-12-01

    β-Amylase (BAM) catalyses starch breakdown to generate maltose, which can be incorporated into sugar metabolism. However, the role of BAM genes in cold tolerance is less characterized. In this study, we report the isolation and functional characterization of a chloroplast-localizing BAM-encoding gene PtrBAM1 from Poncirus trifoliata. PtrBAM1 was induced by cold, dehydration and salt, but repressed by maltose. Overexpression of PtrBAM1 in tobacco (Nicotiana nudicaulis) increased BAM activity, promoted starch degradation and enhanced the contents of maltose and soluble sugars, whereas opposite changes were observed when PtrBAM1 homolog in lemon (Citrus lemon) was knocked down. The tobacco overexpressing lines exhibited enhanced tolerance to cold at chilling or freezing temperatures. Under cold stress, higher BAM activity and greater accumulation of maltose and soluble sugars were observed in the overexpressing lines when compared with the wild-type or empty vector transformants. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that PtrBAM1 promoter contained a CBF-recognizing element. Yeast one-hybrid assay demonstrated that PtrCBF could interact with the promoter fragment containing the element. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PtrBAM1 is a member of CBF regulon and plays an important role in cold tolerance by modulating the levels of soluble sugars acting as osmolytes or antioxidants. PMID:24905016

  12. A putative nitroreductase from the DosR regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces pro-inflammatory cytokine expression via TLR2 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Peddireddy, Vidyullatha; Doddam, Sankara Narayana; Qureshi, Insaf A.; Yerra, Priyadarshini; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a global encumbrance and it is estimated that nearly one third population of the world acts as a reservoir for this pathogen without any symptoms. In this study, we attempted to characterise one of the genes of DosR regulon, Rv3131, a FMN binding nitroreductase domain containing protein, for its ability to alter cytokine profile, an essential feature of M. tuberculosis latency. Recombinant Rv3131 stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokines in THP-1 cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a time and dose dependent manner. In silico analyses using docking and simulations indicated that Rv3131 could strongly interact with TLR2 via a non-covalent bonding which was further confirmed using cell based colorimetric assay. In THP-1 cells treated with Rv3131 protein, a significant upsurge in the surface expression, overall induction and expression of mRNA of TLR2 was observed when analysed by flow cytometry, western blotting and real time PCR, respectively. Activation of TLR2 by Rv3131 resulted in the phosphorylation of NF- κβ. Results of this study indicate a strong immunogenic capability of Rv3131 elicited via the activation of TLR2 signalling pathway. Therefore, it can be surmised that cytokine secretion induced by Rv3131 might contribute to establishment of M. tuberculosis in the granulomas. PMID:27094446

  13. Bacterial senescence: stasis results in increased and differential oxidation of cytoplasmic proteins leading to developmental induction of the heat shock regulon

    PubMed Central

    Dukan, Sam; Nyström, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Aging, or senescence, is the progressive deterioration of every bodily function over time. A fundamental question that applies to all life forms, including growth-arrested bacteria, is why growing older by necessity causes organisms to grow more fragile. In this work, we demonstrate that the levels of oxidized proteins is correlated to the age of a stationary-phase Escherichia coli culture; both disulfide bridge formation of a cytoplasmic leader-less alkaline phosphatase and protein carbonyl levels increase during stasis. The stasis-induced increase in protein oxidation is enhanced in cells lacking the global regulators OxyR and ςs. Some proteins were found to be specifically susceptible to stasis-induced oxidation; notably several TCA cycle enzymes, glutamine synthetase, glutamate synthase, pyruvate kinase, DnaK, and H-NS. Evidence that oxidation of target proteins during stasis serves as the signal for stationary-phase, developmental, induction of the heat shock regulon is presented by demonstrating that this induction is mitigated by overproducing the superoxide dismutase SodA. In addition, cells lacking cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase activity exhibit superinduction of heat shock proteins. The possibility that oxidative sensitivity of TCA cycle enzymes serves as a feedback mechanism down-regulating toxic respiration is discussed. PMID:9808629

  14. Bacterial senescence: stasis results in increased and differential oxidation of cytoplasmic proteins leading to developmental induction of the heat shock regulon.

    PubMed

    Dukan, S; Nyström, T

    1998-11-01

    Aging, or senescence, is the progressive deterioration of every bodily function over time. A fundamental question that applies to all life forms, including growth-arrested bacteria, is why growing older by necessity causes organisms to grow more fragile. In this work, we demonstrate that the levels of oxidized proteins is correlated to the age of a stationary-phase Escherichia coli culture; both disulfide bridge formation of a cytoplasmic leader-less alkaline phosphatase and protein carbonyl levels increase during stasis. The stasis-induced increase in protein oxidation is enhanced in cells lacking the global regulators OxyR and sigmas. Some proteins were found to be specifically susceptible to stasis-induced oxidation; notably several TCA cycle enzymes, glutamine synthetase, glutamate synthase, pyruvate kinase, DnaK, and H-NS. Evidence that oxidation of target proteins during stasis serves as the signal for stationary-phase, developmental, induction of the heat shock regulon is presented by demonstrating that this induction is mitigated by overproducing the superoxide dismutase SodA. In addition, cells lacking cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase activity exhibit superinduction of heat shock proteins. The possibility that oxidative sensitivity of TCA cycle enzymes serves as a feedback mechanism down-regulating toxic respiration is discussed. PMID:9808629

  15. A putative nitroreductase from the DosR regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces pro-inflammatory cytokine expression via TLR2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Peddireddy, Vidyullatha; Doddam, Sankara Narayana; Qureshi, Insaf A; Yerra, Priyadarshini; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a global encumbrance and it is estimated that nearly one third population of the world acts as a reservoir for this pathogen without any symptoms. In this study, we attempted to characterise one of the genes of DosR regulon, Rv3131, a FMN binding nitroreductase domain containing protein, for its ability to alter cytokine profile, an essential feature of M. tuberculosis latency. Recombinant Rv3131 stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokines in THP-1 cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a time and dose dependent manner. In silico analyses using docking and simulations indicated that Rv3131 could strongly interact with TLR2 via a non-covalent bonding which was further confirmed using cell based colorimetric assay. In THP-1 cells treated with Rv3131 protein, a significant upsurge in the surface expression, overall induction and expression of mRNA of TLR2 was observed when analysed by flow cytometry, western blotting and real time PCR, respectively. Activation of TLR2 by Rv3131 resulted in the phosphorylation of NF- κβ. Results of this study indicate a strong immunogenic capability of Rv3131 elicited via the activation of TLR2 signalling pathway. Therefore, it can be surmised that cytokine secretion induced by Rv3131 might contribute to establishment of M. tuberculosis in the granulomas. PMID:27094446

  16. Intersection of the stringent response and the CodY regulon in low GC Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Tobias; Wolz, Christiane

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria adapt efficiently to a wide range of nutritional environments. Therefore, they possess overlapping regulatory systems that detect intracellular pools of key metabolites. In low GC Gram-positive bacteria, two global regulators, the stringent response and the CodY repressor, respond to an intracellular decrease in amino acid content. Amino acid limitation leads to rapid synthesis of the alarmones pppGpp and ppGpp through the stringent response and inactivates the CodY repressor. Two cofactors, branched chain amino acids (BCAA) and GTP, are ligands for CodY and facilitate binding to the target DNA. Because (p)ppGpp synthesis and accumulation evidentially reduce the intracellular GTP pool, CodY is released from the DNA, and transcription of target genes is altered. Here, we focus on this intimate link between the stringent response and CodY regulation in different Gram-positive species. PMID:24462007

  17. The product of the Klebsiella pneumoniae nifX gene is a negative regulator of the nitrogen fixation (nif) regulon.

    PubMed Central

    Gosink, M M; Franklin, N M; Roberts, G P

    1990-01-01

    An insertional mutation was made in the nifX gene of Klebsiella pneumoniae. This mutation had little effect on the nitrogenase activity of the strain, as measured by acetylene reduction. However, on the addition of NH4+ or O2 (conditions which block nif protein synthesis by transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms), the NifX- mutant synthesized nitrogenase proteins longer and had more accumulated nifHDKTY mRNA than did the wild-type K. pneumoniae at all time points tested. Conversely, overexpression of the wild-type nifX region blocked nif protein synthesis, protein accumulation, and nifHDKTY mRNA accumulation. These complementary results indicate that a product of the nifX region has a role in the negative regulation of nif regulation in response to NH4+ and O2. Images FIG. 3 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 FIG. 9 PMID:2155202

  18. ToxR interferes with CRP-dependent transcriptional activation of ompT in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Caiyi C.; Merrell, D. Scott; Camilli, Andrew; Kaper, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary In pathogenic Vibrio cholerae, the transmembrane DNA-binding protein ToxR co-ordinates the expression of over 20 genes, including those encoding important virulence factors such as cholera toxin and the toxin-co-regulated pilus. The outer membrane protein OmpT is the only member of the ToxR regulon known to be repressed by ToxR. In this study, we examined the environmental conditions that regulate OmpT expression and demonstrated that ompT transcription is upregulated 14-fold when the bacteria enter late log phase from early log phase. Deletion of the crp gene completely abolishes OmpT expression. Comparison of ompT transcription levels in the isogenic crp−, toxR− and crp−toxR− mutants revealed that (i) in the absence of ToxR, constitutive high-level ompT transcription is dependent on cAMP receptor protein (CRP); (ii) ToxR not only interferes with CRP-dependent ompT activation, but also abolishes the CRP-independent, basal level ompT transcription; thus, the mechanism by which ToxR represses ompT transcription involves both antiactivation and direct repression; (iii) both CRP and ToxR are required for the regulation of OmpT expression by growth phase. To provide further insights into the molecular mechanism of CRP-dependent activation of ompT transcription, we demonstrated that CRP-dependent activation requires a CRP binding site centred at −310 of the ompT promoter, without which the interaction of CRP with other CRP binding site(s) more proximal to the promoter results in repression. Mutations in two regions on CRP (AR1 and AR2) that directly contact RNA polymerase (RNAP) abolish activation, suggesting direct interaction of CRP with RNAP from −310 of the ompT promoter via DNA looping. PMID:11952906

  19. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  20. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  1. The sigmaR regulon of Streptomyces coelicolor A32 reveals a key role in protein quality control during disulphide stress.

    PubMed

    Kallifidas, Dimitris; Thomas, Derek; Doughty, Phillip; Paget, Mark S B

    2010-06-01

    Diamide is an artificial disulphide-generating electrophile that mimics an oxidative shift in the cellular thiol-disulphide redox state (disulphide stress). The Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor senses and responds to disulphide stress through the sigma(R)-RsrA system, which comprises an extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor and a redox-active anti-sigma factor. Known targets that aid in the protection and recovery from disulphide stress include the thioredoxin system and genes involved in producing the major thiol buffer mycothiol. Here we determine the global response to diamide in wild-type and sigR mutant backgrounds to understand the role of sigma(R) in this response and to reveal additional regulatory pathways that allow cells to cope with disulphide stress. In addition to thiol oxidation, diamide was found to cause protein misfolding and aggregation, which elicited the induction of the HspR heat-shock regulon. Although this response is sigma(R)-independent, sigma(R) does directly control Clp and Lon ATP-dependent AAA(+) proteases, which may partly explain the reduced ability of a sigR mutant to resolubilize protein aggregates. sigma(R) also controls msrA and msrB methionine sulphoxide reductase genes, implying that sigma(R)-RsrA is responsible for the maintenance of both cysteine and methionine residues during oxidative stress. This work shows that the sigma(R)-RsrA system plays a more significant role in protein quality control than previously realized, and emphasizes the importance of controlling the cellular thiol-disulphide redox balance. PMID:20185507

  2. Cationic antimicrobial peptides serve as activation signals for the Salmonella Typhimurium PhoPQ and PmrAB regulons in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Susan M.; Strandberg, Kristi L.; Conroy, Megan; Gunn, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium uses two-component regulatory systems (TCRSs) to respond to environmental stimuli. Upon infection, the TCRSs PhoP-PhoQ (PhoPQ) and PmrA-PmrB (PmrAB) are activated by environmental signals detected in the lumen of the intestine and within host cells. TCRS-mediated gene expression leads to upregulation of genes involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification and cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) resistance. This research expands on previous studies which have shown that CAMPs can activate Salmonella TCRSs in vitro. The focus of this work was to determine if CAMPs can act as environmental signals for PhoPQ- and PmrAB-mediated gene expression in vitro, during infection of macrophages and in a mouse model of infection. Monitoring of PhoPQ and PmrAB activation using recombinase-based in vivo expression technology (RIVET), alkaline phosphtase and β-galactosidase reporter fusion constructs demonstrated that S. Typhimurium PhoQ can sense CAMPs in vitro. In mouse macrophages, the cathelecidin CRAMP does not activate the PhoPQ regulon. Acidification of the Salmonella-containing vacuole activates PhoP- and PmrA-regulated loci but blocking acidification still does not reveal a role for CRAMP in TCRS activation in mouse macrophages. However, assays performed in susceptible wild type (WT), CRAMP knockout (KO), and matrilysin (a metalloproteinase necessary for activating murine α-defensins) KO mice suggest CRAMP, but not α-defensins, serve as a putative direct TCRS activation signal in the mouse intestine. These studies provide a better understanding of the in vivo environments that result in activation of these virulence-associated TCRSs. PMID:22919691

  3. Regulon Studies and In Planta Role of the BraI/R Quorum-Sensing System in the Plant-Beneficial Burkholderia Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Bruna G.; Mitter, Birgit; Talbi, Chouhra; Sessitsch, Angela; Bedmar, Eulogio J.; Halliday, Nigel; James, Euan K.; Cámara, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The genus Burkholderia is composed of functionally diverse species, and it can be divided into several clusters. One of these, designated the plant-beneficial-environmental (PBE) Burkholderia cluster, is formed by nonpathogenic species, which in most cases have been found to be associated with plants. It was previously established that members of the PBE group share an N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing (QS) system, designated BraI/R, that produces and responds to 3-oxo-C14-HSL (OC14-HSL). Moreover, some of them also possess a second AHL QS system, designated XenI2/R2, producing and responding to 3-hydroxy-C8-HSL (OHC8-HSL). In the present study, we performed liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis to determine which AHL molecules are produced by each QS system of this group of bacteria. The results showed that XenI2/R2 is mainly responsible for the production of OHC8-HSL and that the BraI/R system is involved in the production of several different AHLs. This analysis also revealed that Burkholderia phymatum STM815 produces greater amounts of AHLs than the other species tested. Further studies showed that the BraR protein of B. phymatum is more promiscuous than other BraR proteins, responding equally well to several different AHL molecules, even at low concentrations. Transcriptome studies with Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 and B. phymatum STM815 revealed that the BraI/R regulon is species specific, with exopolysaccharide production being the only common phenotype regulated by this system in the PBE cluster. In addition, BraI/R was shown not to be important for plant nodulation by B. phymatum strains or for endophytic colonization and growth promotion of maize by B. phytofirmans PsJN. PMID:23686262

  4. A proteomic analysis of the regulon of the NarP two-component regulatory system response regulator in the bovine pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica A1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The response of the NarQP two-component signal transduction system regulon in response to the presence of nitrate for the bovine pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica A1 was investigated by proteomic analysis. Total proteins from a narP mutant and the parent SH1217 grown with or without NaNO3 supplement were examined by ISO-DALT 2D electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results Seventeen proteins were differentially expressed in the parent strain SH1217 in response to the addition of NaNO3 to the growth media. These responses were absent in the narP mutant, indicating that the altered production of these proteins is mediated by NarPMh. Interestingly, NarPMh mediated the increased production of some proteins which are not generally associated with nitrate respiration, such as the iron transporters FbpA and YfeA. The increased production of proteins such as superoxide dismutase, SodA, and GAPDH were also observed. The increased production of these iron-regulated proteins by NarPMh is thought to enhance the swift establishment of the nitrate respiration mechanism of M. haemolytica during pathogenesis. Conclusion The data suggested NarPMh acts as an important regulator which regulates the expression of a small set of proteins in response to nitrate availability. This may contribute to the prevalence of M. haemolytica A1 in its host during pathogenesis of BPP, through enhancing the effectiveness of nitrate respiration either directly or indirectly. PMID:22114901

  5. Computational Analysis and In silico Predictive Modeling for Inhibitors of PhoP Regulon in S. typhi on High-Throughput Screening Bioassay Dataset.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harleen; Ahmad, Mohd; Scaria, Vinod

    2016-03-01

    There is emergence of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhi in pandemic proportions throughout the world, and therefore, there is a necessity to speed up the discovery of novel molecules having different modes of action and also less influenced by the resistance formation that would be used as drug for the treatment of salmonellosis particularly typhoid fever. The PhoP regulon is well studied and has now been shown to be a critical regulator of number of gene expressions which are required for intracellular survival of S. enterica and pathophysiology of disease like typhoid. The evident roles of two-component PhoP-/PhoQ-regulated products in salmonella virulence have motivated attempts to target them therapeutically. Although the discovery process of biologically active compounds for the treatment of typhoid relies on hit-finding procedure, using high-throughput screening technology alone is very expensive, as well as time consuming when performed on large scales. With the recent advancement in combinatorial chemistry and contemporary technique for compounds synthesis, there are more and more compounds available which give ample growth of diverse compound library, but the time and endeavor required to screen these unfocused massive and diverse library have been slightly reduced in the past years. Hence, there is demand to improve the high-quality hits and success rate for high-throughput screening that required focused and biased compound library toward the particular target. Therefore, we still need an advantageous and expedient method to prioritize the molecules that will be utilized for biological screens, which saves time and is also inexpensive. In this concept, in silico methods like machine learning are widely applicable technique used to build computational model for high-throughput virtual screens to prioritize molecules for advance study. Furthermore, in computational analysis, we extended our study to identify the common enriched structural entities among the biologically active compound toward finding out the privileged scaffold. PMID:26298582

  6. OpaR Controls a Network of Downstream Transcription Factors in Vibrio parahaemolyticus BB22OP

    PubMed Central

    Kernell Burke, Alison; Guthrie, Leah T. C.; Modise, Thero; Cormier, Guy; Jensen, Roderick V.; McCarter, Linda L.; Stevens, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an emerging world-wide human pathogen that is associated with food-borne gastroenteritis when raw or undercooked seafood is consumed. Expression of virulence factors in this organism is modulated by the phenomenon known as quorum sensing, which permits differential gene regulation at low versus high cell density. The master regulator of quorum sensing in V. parahaemolyticus is OpaR. OpaR not only controls virulence factor gene expression, but also the colony and cellular morphology associated with growth on a surface and biofilm formation. Whole transcriptome Next Generation sequencing (RNA-Seq) was utilized to determine the OpaR regulon by comparing strains BB22OP (opaR+, LM5312) and BB22TR (∆opaR1, LM5674). This work, using the published V. parahaemolyticus BB22OP genome sequence, confirms and expands upon a previous microarray analysis for these two strains that used an Affymetrix GeneChip designed from the closely related V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633 genome sequence. Overall there was excellent correlation between the microarray and RNA-Seq data. Eleven transcription factors under OpaR control were identified by both methods and further confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. Nine of these transcription factors were demonstrated to be direct OpaR targets via in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified hexahistidine-tagged OpaR. Identification of the direct and indirect targets of OpaR, including small RNAs, will enable the construction of a network map of regulatory interactions important for the switch between the nonpathogenic and pathogenic states. PMID:25901572

  7. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy R.; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term transcriptional network refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24018767

  8. Transcription of Vowels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Karen E.; Berni, Mary C.

    2001-01-01

    This article addresses the special problems of transcribing vowels in the evaluation of speech samples. It reviews the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) symbols and diacritics for transcribing vowels and discusses their importance in the transcription of disordered speech and dialect variation. (Contains references.) (Author/DB)

  9. Transcript CONTU Meeting #10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works, Washington, DC.

    Testimony on the copyrightability of computer software was heard at the 10th Commission meeting held at the New York Public Library in November 1976. This transcript of the meeting also includes reports of the Commission subcommittees on photocopying, software, networks, and data bases. (Author/AP)

  10. Transcriptional Profiling of Nitrogen Fixation and the Role of NifA in the Diazotrophic Endophyte Azoarcus sp. Strain BH72

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Abhijit; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Background The model endophyte Azoarcus sp. strain BH72 is known to contribute fixed nitrogen to its host Kallar grass and also expresses nitrogenase genes endophytically in rice seedlings. Availability of nitrogen is a signal regulating the transcription of nitrogenase genes. Therefore, we analysed global transcription in response to differences in the nitrogen source. Methodology/Principal Findings A DNA microarray, comprising 70-mer oligonucleotides representing 3989 open reading frames of the genome of strain BH72, was used for transcriptome studies. Transcription profiles of cells grown microaerobically on N2 versus ammonium were compared. Expression of 7.2% of the genes was significantly up-regulated, and 5.8% down-regulated upon N2 fixation, respectively. A parallel genome-wide prediction of σ54-type promoter elements mapped to the upstream region of 38 sequences of which 36 were modulated under the N2 response. In addition to modulation of genes related to N2 fixation, the expressions of gene clusters that might be related to plant-microbe interaction and of several transcription factors were significantly enhanced. While comparing under N2-fixation conditions the transcriptome of wild type with a nifLA− insertion mutant, NifA being the essential transcriptional activator for nif genes, 24.5% of the genome was found to be affected in expression. A genome-wide prediction of 29 NifA binding sequences matched to 25 of the target genes whose expression was differential during microarray analysis, some of which were putatively negatively regulated by NifA. For selected genes, differential expression was corroborated by real time RT-PCR studies. Conclusion/Significance Our data suggest that life under conditions of nitrogen fixation is an important part of the lifestyle of strain BH72 in roots, as a wide range of genes far beyond the nif regulon is modulated. Moreover, the NifA regulon in strain BH72 appears to encompass a wider range of cellular functions beyond the regulation of nif genes. PMID:24516534

  11. Global transcriptional control by glucose and carbon regulator CcpA in Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Ana; Camiade, Emilie; Monot, Marc; Courtois, Emmanuelle; Barbut, Frédéric; Sernova, Natalia V; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Dupuy, Bruno

    2012-11-01

    The catabolite control protein CcpA is a pleiotropic regulator that mediates the global transcriptional response to rapidly catabolizable carbohydrates, like glucose in Gram-positive bacteria. By whole transcriptome analyses, we characterized glucose-dependent and CcpA-dependent gene regulation in Clostridium difficile. About 18% of all C. difficile genes are regulated by glucose, for which 50% depend on CcpA for regulation. The CcpA regulon comprises genes involved in sugar uptake, fermentation and amino acids metabolism, confirming the role of CcpA as a link between carbon and nitrogen pathways. Using combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome sequence analysis, we detected 55 CcpA binding sites corresponding to ∼140 genes directly controlled by CcpA. We defined the C. difficile CcpA consensus binding site (cre(CD) motif), that is, 'RRGAAAANGTTTTCWW'. Binding of purified CcpA protein to 19 target cre(CD) sites was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. CcpA also directly represses key factors in early steps of sporulation (Spo0A and SigF). Furthermore, the C. difficile toxin genes (tcdA and tcdB) and their regulators (tcdR and tcdC) are direct CcpA targets. Finally, CcpA controls a complex and extended regulatory network through the modulation of a large set of regulators. PMID:22989714

  12. Fur-type transcriptional repressors and metal homeostasis in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Marcus; Chua, Tiing Tiing; Chew, Chyue Yie; Bryant, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Metal homeostasis is a crucial cellular function for nearly all organisms. Some heavy metals (e.g., Fe, Zn, Co, Mo) are essential because they serve as cofactors for enzymes or metalloproteins, and chlorophototrophs such as cyanobacteria have an especially high demand for iron. At excessive levels, however, metals become toxic to cyanobacteria. Therefore, a tight control mechanism is essential for metal homeostasis. Metal homeostasis in microorganisms comprises two elements: metal acquisition from the environment and detoxification or excretion of excess metal ions. Different families of metal-sensing regulators exist in cyanobacteria and each addresses a more or less specific set of target genes. In this study the regulons of three Fur-type and two ArsR-SmtB-type regulators were investigated in a comparative approach in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. One Fur-type regulator controls genes for iron acquisition (Fur); one controls genes for zinc acquisition (Zur); and the third controls two genes involved in oxidative stress (Per). Compared to other well-investigated cyanobacterial strains, however, the set of target genes for each regulator is relatively small. Target genes for the two ArsR-SmtB transcriptional repressors (SmtB (SYNPCC7002_A2564) and SYNPCC7002_A0590) are involved in zinc homeostasis in addition to Zur. Their target genes, however, are less specific for zinc and point to roles in a broader heavy metal detoxification response. PMID:26582412

  13. Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling dictates the chromosomal arrangement of bacterial genes

    PubMed Central

    Sobetzko, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Over the recent decade, the central importance of DNA supercoiling in chromosome organization and global gene regulation of bacteria became more and more visible. With a regulon comprising more than 2000 genes in Escherichia coli, DNA supercoiling is among the most influential regulators of gene expression found in bacteria so far. However, the mechanism creating thousands of diverse temporal gene expression patterns coordinated by DNA supercoiling remains unclear. In this study we show that a specific chromosomal arrangement of genes modulates the local levels of DNA supercoiling at gene promoters via transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling (TCDS) in the model organism E. coli. Our findings provide a consistent explanation for the strong positive coupling of temporal gene expression patterns of neighboring genes. Using comparative genomics we are furthermore able to provide evidence that TCDS is a driving force for the evolution of chromosomal gene arrangement patterns in other Enterobacteriaceae. With the currently available data of promoter supercoiling sensitivity we prove that the same principle is applicable also for the evolutionary distant gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Moreover, our findings are fully consistent with recent investigations concerning the regulatory impact of TCDS on gene pairs in eukaryots underpinning the broad applicability of our analysis. PMID:26783203

  14. Transcriptional profiling of CRP-regulated genes in deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Huahua; Hu, Jing; Xiao, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a conserved regulator in bacteria and involved in regulation of energy metabolism, such as glucose, galactose, and citrate (Green et al., 2014 [1]). As an important catabolite activator protein, it has been well characterized in model microorganism such as Escherichia coli. However, our understanding of the roles of CRP in deep-sea bacteria is rather limited. To indentify the function of CRP, we performed whole genome transcriptional profiling using a custom designed microarray which contains 95% open reading frames of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, which was isolated from West Pacific sediment at a depth of 1914 m (Xiao et al., 2007 [2]; Wang et al., 2008 [3]). Here we describe the experimental procedures and methods in detail to reproduce the results (available at Gene Expression Omnibus database under GSE67731 and GSE67732) and provide resource to be employed for comparative analyses of CRP regulon and the regulatory network of anaerobic respiration in microorganisms which inhabited in different environments, and thus broaden our understanding of mechanism of bacteria against various environment stresses. PMID:26484223

  15. Transcriptional profiling of CRP-regulated genes in deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Jian, Huahua; Hu, Jing; Xiao, Xiang

    2015-09-01

    The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a conserved regulator in bacteria and involved in regulation of energy metabolism, such as glucose, galactose, and citrate (Green et al., 2014 [1]). As an important catabolite activator protein, it has been well characterized in model microorganism such as Escherichia coli. However, our understanding of the roles of CRP in deep-sea bacteria is rather limited. To indentify the function of CRP, we performed whole genome transcriptional profiling using a custom designed microarray which contains 95% open reading frames of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, which was isolated from West Pacific sediment at a depth of 1914 m (Xiao et al., 2007 [2]; Wang et al., 2008 [3]). Here we describe the experimental procedures and methods in detail to reproduce the results (available at Gene Expression Omnibus database under GSE67731 and GSE67732) and provide resource to be employed for comparative analyses of CRP regulon and the regulatory network of anaerobic respiration in microorganisms which inhabited in different environments, and thus broaden our understanding of mechanism of bacteria against various environment stresses. PMID:26484223

  16. Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling dictates the chromosomal arrangement of bacterial genes.

    PubMed

    Sobetzko, Patrick

    2016-02-29

    Over the recent decade, the central importance of DNA supercoiling in chromosome organization and global gene regulation of bacteria became more and more visible. With a regulon comprising more than 2000 genes in Escherichia coli, DNA supercoiling is among the most influential regulators of gene expression found in bacteria so far. However, the mechanism creating thousands of diverse temporal gene expression patterns coordinated by DNA supercoiling remains unclear. In this study we show that a specific chromosomal arrangement of genes modulates the local levels of DNA supercoiling at gene promoters via transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling (TCDS) in the model organism E. coli. Our findings provide a consistent explanation for the strong positive coupling of temporal gene expression patterns of neighboring genes. Using comparative genomics we are furthermore able to provide evidence that TCDS is a driving force for the evolution of chromosomal gene arrangement patterns in other Enterobacteriaceae. With the currently available data of promoter supercoiling sensitivity we prove that the same principle is applicable also for the evolutionary distant gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. Moreover, our findings are fully consistent with recent investigations concerning the regulatory impact of TCDS on gene pairs in eukaryots underpinning the broad applicability of our analysis. PMID:26783203

  17. Transcriptional Profiling Analysis of Bacillus subtilis in Response to High Levels of Fe(3.).

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Bang; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2016-06-01

    Iron is essential to microorganisms for its important biological function but could be highly toxic in excess. We have used genome-wide transcriptional analysis in Fe(3+)-treated (4 mM) Bacillus subtilis to reveal the effect of excess Fe(3+) on B. subtilis and characterized the potential pathways involved in Fe(3+) stress tolerance. A total of 366 and 400 genes were identified as significantly up-regulated and down-regulated, respectively. We found excess Fe(3+) had four major influences on B. subtilis: Fe(3+) resulted in oxidative stress and induced genes involved in oxidative stress resistance including the SigB-regulated genes, but the PerR regulon was not inducible in Fe(3+)-mediated oxidative stress except zosA; Fe(3+) significantly disturbed homeostasis of Mn(2+) and Zn(2+), and the mechanism was proposed in this article; the acidity of Fe(3+)-induced genes involved in acid consuming and production of bases and shifted B. subtilis to carbon starvation state; Fe(3+)-induced genes related to membrane remodeling (bkd operon), which prevents Fe(3+)'s incorporation to membrane lipids. Moreover, Fe(3+) repressed the stringent control response, consistent with the induction of stringent control in iron limitation, demonstrating that iron might be a signal in stringent control of B. subtilis. This study was the first to provide a comprehensive overview of the genetic response of B. subtilis to ecxess Fe(3+). PMID:26858131

  18. Characterisation of a putative AraC transcriptional regulator from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Gupta, Antima; Lack, Nathan A.; Maitra, Arundhati; ten Bokum, Annemieke M.C.; Kendall, Sharon; Sim, Edith; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    Summary MSMEG_0307 is annotated as a transcriptional regulator belonging to the AraC protein family and is located adjacent to the arylamine N-acetyltransferase (nat) gene in Mycobacterium smegmatis, in a gene cluster, conserved in most environmental mycobacterial species. In order to elucidate the function of the AraC protein from the nat operon in M.smegmatis, two conserved palindromic DNA motifs were identified using bioinformatics and tested for protein binding using electrophoretic mobility shift assays with a recombinant form of the AraC protein. We identified the formation of a DNA:AraC protein complex with one of the motifs as well as the presence of this motif in 20 loci across the whole genome of M.smegmatis, supporting the existence of an AraC controlled regulon. To characterise the effects of AraC in the regulation of the nat operon genes, as well as to gain further insight into its function, we generated a ?araC mutant strain where the araC gene was replaced by a hygromycin resistance marker. The level of expression of the nat and MSMEG_0308 genes was down-regulated in the ?araC strain when compared to the wild type strain indicating an activator effect of the AraC protein on the expression of the nat operon genes. PMID:25443504

  19. Using sequence-specific chemical and structural properties of DNA to predict transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Amy L; Hlavacek, William S; Unkefer, Pat J; Mu, Fangping

    2010-01-01

    An important step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the DNA binding sites recognized by each transcription factor (TF). Conventional approaches to prediction of TF binding sites involve the definition of consensus sequences or position-specific weight matrices and rely on statistical analysis of DNA sequences of known binding sites. Here, we present a method called SiteSleuth in which DNA structure prediction, computational chemistry, and machine learning are applied to develop models for TF binding sites. In this approach, binary classifiers are trained to discriminate between true and false binding sites based on the sequence-specific chemical and structural features of DNA. These features are determined via molecular dynamics calculations in which we consider each base in different local neighborhoods. For each of 54 TFs in Escherichia coli, for which at least five DNA binding sites are documented in RegulonDB, the TF binding sites and portions of the non-coding genome sequence are mapped to feature vectors and used in training. According to cross-validation analysis and a comparison of computational predictions against ChIP-chip data available for the TF Fis, SiteSleuth outperforms three conventional approaches: Match, MATRIX SEARCH, and the method of Berg and von Hippel. SiteSleuth also outperforms QPMEME, a method similar to SiteSleuth in that it involves a learning algorithm. The main advantage of SiteSleuth is a lower false positive rate. PMID:21124945

  20. Global transcriptional control by glucose and carbon regulator CcpA in Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Ana; Camiade, Emilie; Monot, Marc; Courtois, Emmanuelle; Barbut, Frédéric; Sernova, Natalia V.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Martin-Verstraete, Isabelle; Dupuy, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The catabolite control protein CcpA is a pleiotropic regulator that mediates the global transcriptional response to rapidly catabolizable carbohydrates, like glucose in Gram-positive bacteria. By whole transcriptome analyses, we characterized glucose-dependent and CcpA-dependent gene regulation in Clostridium difficile. About 18% of all C. difficile genes are regulated by glucose, for which 50% depend on CcpA for regulation. The CcpA regulon comprises genes involved in sugar uptake, fermentation and amino acids metabolism, confirming the role of CcpA as a link between carbon and nitrogen pathways. Using combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome sequence analysis, we detected 55 CcpA binding sites corresponding to ∼140 genes directly controlled by CcpA. We defined the C. difficile CcpA consensus binding site (creCD motif), that is, ‘RRGAAAANGTTTTCWW’. Binding of purified CcpA protein to 19 target creCD sites was demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. CcpA also directly represses key factors in early steps of sporulation (Spo0A and SigF). Furthermore, the C. difficile toxin genes (tcdA and tcdB) and their regulators (tcdR and tcdC) are direct CcpA targets. Finally, CcpA controls a complex and extended regulatory network through the modulation of a large set of regulators. PMID:22989714

  1. The novel transcriptional regulator SA1804 Is involved in mediating the invasion and cytotoxicity of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junshu; Liang, Xudong; Ji, Yinduo

    2015-01-01

    The two-component regulatory system, SaeRS, controls expression of important virulence factors, including toxins and invasins, which contribute to the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus. Previously, we conducted a transcriptomics study for identification of SaeRS regulon and found that inactivation of SaeRS dramatically enhances the transcription of a novel transcriptional regulator (SA1804). This led us to question whether SA1804 is involved in bacterial pathogenicity by regulating the expression of virulence factors. To address this question, we created sa1804, saeRS, and sa1804/saeRS double deletion mutants in a USA300 community-acquired MRSA strain, 923, and determined their impact on the pathogenicity. The deletion of sa1804 dramatically increased the cytotoxicity and enhanced the capacity of bacteria to invade into the epithelial cells (A549), whereas the deletion of saeRS eliminated the cytotoxicity and abolished the bacterial ability to invade into the epithelial cells. Moreover, the double deletions of sa1804 and saeRS appeared a similar phenotype with the saeRS null mutation. Furthermore, we determined the regulatory mechanism of SA1804 using qPCR and gel-shift approaches. Our data indicate that the novel virulence repressor SA1804 is dependent on the regulation of SaeRS. This study sheds light on the regulatory mechanism of virulence factors and allows for us further elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of S. aureus. PMID:25806024

  2. Tailoring the Models of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Pance, Alena

    2013-01-01

    Molecular biology is a rapidly evolving field that has led to the development of increasingly sophisticated technologies to improve our capacity to study cellular processes in much finer detail. Transcription is the first step in protein expression and the major point of regulation of the components that determine the characteristics, fate and functions of cells. The study of transcriptional regulation has been greatly facilitated by the development of reporter genes and transcription factor expression vectors, which have become versatile tools for manipulating promoters, as well as transcription factors in order to examine their function. The understanding of promoter complexity and transcription factor structure offers an insight into the mechanisms of transcriptional control and their impact on cell behaviour. This review focuses on some of the many applications of molecular cut-and-paste tools for the manipulation of promoters and transcription factors leading to the understanding of crucial aspects of transcriptional regulation. PMID:23567272

  3. Vaccinia virus transcription.

    PubMed

    Broyles, Steven S

    2003-09-01

    Vaccinia virus replication takes place in the cytoplasm of the host cell. The nearly 200 kbp genome owes part of its complexity to encoding most of the proteins involved in genome and mRNA synthesis. The multisubunit vaccinia virus RNA polymerase requires a separate set of virus-encoded proteins for the transcription of the early, intermediate and late classes of genes. Cell fractionation studies have provided evidence for a role for host cell proteins in the initiation and termination of vaccinia virus intermediate and late gene transcription. Vaccinia virus resembles nuclear DNA viruses in the integration of viral and host proteins for viral mRNA synthesis, yet is markedly less reliant on host proteins than its nuclear counterparts. PMID:12917449

  4. Divergent transcription is associated with promoters of transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Divergent transcription is a wide-spread phenomenon in mammals. For instance, short bidirectional transcripts are a hallmark of active promoters, while longer transcripts can be detected antisense from active genes in conditions where the RNA degradation machinery is inhibited. Moreover, many described long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcribed antisense from coding gene promoters. However, the general significance of divergent lncRNA/mRNA gene pair transcription is still poorly understood. Here, we used strand-specific RNA-seq with high sequencing depth to thoroughly identify antisense transcripts from coding gene promoters in primary mouse tissues. Results We found that a substantial fraction of coding-gene promoters sustain divergent transcription of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA)/mRNA gene pairs. Strikingly, upstream antisense transcription is significantly associated with genes related to transcriptional regulation and development. Their promoters share several characteristics with those of transcriptional developmental genes, including very large CpG islands, high degree of conservation and epigenetic regulation in ES cells. In-depth analysis revealed a unique GC skew profile at these promoter regions, while the associated coding genes were found to have large first exons, two genomic features that might enforce bidirectional transcription. Finally, genes associated with antisense transcription harbor specific H3K79me2 epigenetic marking and RNA polymerase II enrichment profiles linked to an intensified rate of early transcriptional elongation. Conclusions We concluded that promoters of a class of transcription regulators are characterized by a specialized transcriptional control mechanism, which is directly coupled to relaxed bidirectional transcription. PMID:24365181

  5. Control of Transcriptional Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hojoong; Lis, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Elongation is becoming increasingly recognized as a critically controlled step in transcriptional regulation. While traditional genetic and biochemical studies have identified major players of transcriptional elongation, our understanding of the importance and roles of these factors is evolving rapidly through the recent advances in genome-wide and single-molecule technologies. Here we focus on how elongation can modulate the transcriptional outcome through the rate-liming step of RNA polymerase II pausing near promoters, and how the participating factors were identified. Among the factors we describe are NELF and DSIF, the pausing factors, and P-TEFb, the key player in pause release. We also describe non-exclusive models for how pausing is achieved by making use of high resolution genome-wide mapping of paused Pol II relative to promoter elements and the first nucleosome. We also discuss Pol II elongation through the bodies of genes and the roles of FACT and Spt6, the factors that allow Pol II to move through nucleosomes. PMID:24050178

  6. Impulse control: Temporal dynamics in gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yosef, Nir; Regev, Aviv

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory circuits controlling gene expression constantly rewire to adapt to environmental stimuli, differentiation cues, and disease. We review our current understanding of the temporal dynamics of gene expression in eukaryotes and prokaryotes and the molecular mechanisms that shape them. We delineate several prototypical temporal patterns, including ‘impulse’ (single-pulse) patterns in response to transient environmental stimuli, sustained (state transitioning) patterns in response to developmental cues, and oscillating patterns. We focus on impulse responses and their higher-order temporal organization in regulons and cascades, and describe how core protein circuits and cis-regulatory sequences in promoters integrate with chromatin architecture to generate these responses. PMID:21414481

  7. Inducer responses of BenM, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator from Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1

    SciTech Connect

    Craven, Sarah H.; Ezezika, Obidimma C.; Haddad, Sandra; Hall, Ruth A.; Momany, Cory; Neidle, Ellen L.; Georgia

    2009-06-25

    BenM and CatM control transcription of a complex regulon for aromatic compound degradation. These Acinetobacter baylyi paralogues belong to the largest family of prokaryotic transcriptional regulators, the LysR-type proteins. Whereas BenM activates transcription synergistically in response to two effectors, benzoate and cis,cis-muconate, CatM responds only to cis,cis-muconate. Here, site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the physiological significance of an unexpected benzoate-binding pocket in BenM discovered during structural studies. Residues in BenM were changed to match those of CatM in this hydrophobic pocket. Two BenM residues, R160 and Y293, were found to mediate the response to benzoate. Additionally, alteration of these residues caused benzoate to inhibit activation by cis,cis-muconate, positioned in a separate primary effector-binding site of BenM. The location of the primary site, in an interdomain cleft, is conserved in diverse LysR-type regulators. To improve understanding of this important family, additional regulatory mutants were analysed. The atomic-level structures were characterized of the effector-binding domains of variants that do not require inducers for activation, CatM(R156H) and BenM(R156H,T157S). These structures clearly resemble those of the wild-type proteins in their activated muconate-bound complexes. Amino acid replacements that enable activation without effectors reside at protein interfaces that may impact transcription through effects on oligomerization.

  8. Transcriptional Responses to Sucrose Mimic the Plant-Associated Life Style of the Plant Growth Promoting Endophyte Enterobacter sp. 638

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Wu, Xiao; Ouyang, Liming; Stadler, Andrea; McCorkle, Sean; Zhu, Wei; Maslov, Sergei; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Growth in sucrose medium was previously found to trigger the expression of functions involved in the plant associated life style of the endophytic bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638. Therefore, comparative transcriptome analysis between cultures grown in sucrose or lactate medium was used to gain insights in the expression levels of bacterial functions involved in the endophytic life style of strain 638. Growth on sucrose as a carbon source resulted in major changes in cell physiology, including a shift from a planktonic life style to the formation of bacterial aggregates. This shift was accompanied by a decrease in transcription of genes involved in motility (e.g. flagella biosynthesis) and an increase in the transcription of genes involved in colonization, adhesion and biofilm formation. The transcription levels of functions previously suggested as being involved in endophytic behavior and functions responsible for plant growth promoting properties, including the synthesis of indole-acetic acid, acetoin and 2,3-butanediol, also increased significantly for cultures grown in sucrose medium. Interestingly, despite an abundance of essential nutrients transcription levels of functions related to uptake and processing of nitrogen and iron became increased for cultures grown on sucrose as sole carbon source. Transcriptome data were also used to analyze putative regulatory relationships. In addition to the small RNA csrABCD regulon, which seems to play a role in the physiological adaptation and possibly the shift between free-living and plant-associated endophytic life style of Enterobacter sp. 638, our results also pointed to the involvement of rcsAB in controlling responses by Enterobacter sp. 638 to a plant-associated life style. Targeted mutagenesis was used to confirm this role and showed that compared to wild-type Enterobacter sp. 638 a ΔrcsB mutant was affected in its plant growth promoting ability. PMID:25607953

  9. Analysis of the Activity and Regulon of the Two-Component Regulatory System Composed by Cjj81176_1484 and Cjj81176_1483 of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Luethy, Paul M.; Huynh, Steven; Parker, Craig T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial diarrheal disease and a frequent commensal of the intestinal tract in poultry and other animals. For optimal growth and colonization of hosts, C. jejuni employs two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) to monitor environmental conditions and promote proper expression of specific genes. We analyzed the potential of C. jejuni Cjj81176_1484 (Cjj1484) and Cjj81176_1483 (Cjj1483) to encode proteins of a cognate TCS that influences expression of genes possibly important for C. jejuni growth and colonization. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the regulons of the Cjj81176_1484 (Cjj1484) histidine kinase and the Cjj81176_1483 (Cjj1483) response regulator contain many common genes, suggesting that these proteins likely form a cognate TCS. We found that this TCS generally functions to repress expression of specific proteins with roles in metabolism, iron/heme acquisition, and respiration. Furthermore, the TCS repressed expression of Cjj81176_0438 and Cjj81176_0439, which had previously been found to encode a gluconate dehydrogenase complex required for commensal colonization of the chick intestinal tract. However, the TCS and other specific genes whose expression is repressed by the TCS were not required for colonization of chicks. We observed that the Cjj1483 response regulator binds target promoters in both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms and influences expression of some specific genes independently of the Cjj1484 histidine kinase. This work further expands the signaling mechanisms of C. jejuni and provides additional insights regarding the complex and multifactorial regulation of many genes involved in basic metabolism, respiration, and nutrient acquisition that the bacterium requires for optimal growth in different environments. IMPORTANCE Bacterial two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) link environmental cues to expression of specific genes that enable optimal bacterial growth or colonization of hosts. We found that the Campylobacter jejuni Cjj1484 histidine kinase and Cjj1483 response regulator function as a cognate TCS to largely repress expression of target genes encoding a gluconate dehydrogenase complex required for commensal colonization of the chick intestinal tract, as well as other genes encoding proteins for heme or iron acquisition, metabolism, and respiration. We also discovered different modes by which Cjj1483 may mediate repression with and without Cjj1484. This work provides insight into the signal transduction mechanisms of a leading cause of bacterial diarrheal disease and emphasizes the multifactorial and complex regulation of specific biological processes in C. jejuni. PMID:25691530

  10. The NifA-RpoN regulon of Mesorhizobium loti strain R7A and its symbiotic activation by a novel Lacl/GalR-family regulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, John T.; Brown, Steven D; Ronson, Professor Clive William

    2013-01-01

    Mesorhizobium loti is the microsymbiont of Lotus species, including the model legume L. japonicus. M. loti differs from other rhizobia in that it contains two copies of the key nitrogen fixation regulatory gene nifA, nifA1 and nifA2, both of which are located on the symbiosis island ICEMlSymR7A. M. loti R7A also contains two rpoN genes, rpoN1 located on the chromosome outside of ICEMlSymR7A and rpoN2 that is located on ICEMlSymR7A. The aims of the current work were to establish how nifA expression was activated in M. loti and to characterise the NifA-RpoN regulon. The nifA2 and rpoN2 genes were essential for nitrogen fixation whereas nifA1 and rpoN1 were dispensable. Expression of nifA2 was activated, possibly in response to an inositol derivative, by a novel regulator of the LacI/GalR family encoded by the fixV gene located upstream of nifA2. Other than the well-characterized nif/fix genes, most NifA2-regulated genes were not required for nitrogen fixation although they were strongly expressed in nodules. The NifA-regulated nifZ and fixU genes, along with nifQ which was not NifA-regulated, were required in M. loti for a fully effective symbiosis although they are not present in some other rhizobia. The NifA-regulated gene msi158 that encodes a porin was also required for a fully effective symbiosis. Several metabolic genes that lacked NifA-regulated promoters were strongly expressed in nodules in a NifA2-dependent manner but again mutants did not have an overt symbiotic phenotype. In summary, many genes encoded on ICEMlSymR7A were strongly expressed in nodules but not free-living rhizobia, but were not essential for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. It seems likely that some of these genes have functional homologues elsewhere in the genome and that bacteroid metabolism may be sufficiently plastic to adapt to loss of certain enzymatic functions.

  11. The Salmonella Spi1 virulence regulatory protein HilD directly activates transcription of the flagellar master operon flhDC.

    PubMed

    Singer, Hanna M; Kühne, Caroline; Deditius, Julia A; Hughes, Kelly T; Erhardt, Marc

    2014-04-01

    Infection of intestinal epithelial cells is dependent on the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenicity island 1 (Spi1)-encoded type III injectisome system and flagellar motility. Thus, the expression of virulence and flagellar genes is subject to tight regulatory control mechanisms in order to ensure the correct spatiotemporal production of the respective gene products. In this work, we reveal a new level of cross-regulation between the Spi1 and flagellar regulatory systems. Transposon mutagenesis identified a class of mutants that prevented flhDC autorepression by overexpressing HilD. HilD, HilC, RtsA, and HilA comprise a positive regulatory circuit for the expression of the Spi1 genes. Here, we report a novel transcriptional cross talk between the Spi1 and flagellar regulons where HilD transcriptionally activates flhDC gene expression by binding to nucleotides -68 to -24 upstream from the P5 transcriptional start site. We additionally show that, in contrast to the results of a previous report, HilA does not affect flagellar gene expression. Finally, we discuss a model of the cross-regulation network between Spi1 and the flagellar system and propose a regulatory mechanism via the Spi1 master regulator HilD that would prime flagellar genes for rapid reactivation during host infection. PMID:24488311

  12. The CRYPTOCHROME1-dependent response to excess light is mediated through the transcriptional activators ZINC FINGER PROTEIN EXPRESSED IN INFLORESCENCE MERISTEM LIKE1 and ZML2 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shaikhali, Jehad; de Dios Barajas-Lopz, Juan; tvs, Krisztina; Kremnev, Dmitry; Garcia, Ana Snchez; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Wingsle, Gunnar; Bako, Laszlo; Strand, sa

    2012-07-01

    Exposure of plants to light intensities that exceed the electron utilization capacity of the chloroplast has a dramatic impact on nuclear gene expression. The photoreceptor Cryptochrome 1 (cry1) is essential to the induction of genes encoding photoprotective components in Arabidopsis thaliana. Bioinformatic analysis of the cry1 regulon revealed the putative cis-element CryR1 (GnTCKAG), and here we demonstrate an interaction between CryR1 and the zinc finger GATA-type transcription factors ZINC FINGER PROTEIN EXPRESSED IN INFLORESCENCE MERISTEM LIKE1 (ZML1) and ZML2. The ZML proteins specifically bind to the CryR1 cis-element as demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, and TCTAG was shown to constitute the core sequence required for ZML2 binding. In addition, ZML2 activated transcription of the yellow fluorescent protein reporter gene driven by the CryR1 cis-element in Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts. T-DNA insertion lines for ZML2 and its homolog ZML1 demonstrated misregulation of several cry1-dependent genes in response to excess light. Furthermore, the zml1 and zml2 T-DNA insertion lines displayed a high irradiance-sensitive phenotype with significant photoinactivation of photosystem II (PSII), indicated by reduced maximum quantum efficiency of PSII, and severe photobleaching. Thus, we identified the ZML2 and ZML1 GATA transcription factors as two essential components of the cry1-mediated photoprotective response. PMID:22786870

  13. Characterization of PmfR, the Transcriptional Activator of the pAO1-Borne purU-mabO-folD Operon of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans

    PubMed Central

    Chiribau, Calin B.; Sandu, Cristinel; Igloi, Gabor L.; Brandsch, Roderich

    2005-01-01

    Nicotine catabolism by Arthrobacter nicotinovorans is linked to the presence of the megaplasmid pAO1. Genes involved in this catabolic pathway are arranged on the plasmid into gene modules according to function. During nicotine degradation γ-N-methylaminobutyrate is formed from the pyrrolidine ring of nicotine. Analysis of the pAO1 open reading frames (ORF) resulted in identification of the gene encoding a demethylating γ-N-methylaminobutyrate oxidase (mabO). This gene was shown to form an operon with purU- and folD-like genes. Only in bacteria grown in the presence of nicotine could transcripts of the purU-mabO-folD operon be detected, demonstrating that this operon constitutes part of the pAO1 nicotine regulon. Its transcriptional start site was determined by primer extension analysis. Transcription of the operon was shown to be controlled by a new transcriptional regulator, PmfR, the product of a gene that is transcribed divergently from the purU, mabO, and folD genes. PmfR was purified, and electromobility shift assays and DNase I-nuclease digestion experiments were used to determine that its DNA binding site is located between −48 and −88 nucleotides upstream of the transcriptional start site of the operon. Disruption of pmfR by homologous recombination with a chloramphenicol resistance cassette demonstrated that PmfR acts in vivo as a transcriptional activator. Mutagenesis of the PmfR target DNA suggested that the sequence GTTT-14 bp-AAAC is the core binding site of the regulator upstream of the −35 promoter region of the purU-mabO-folD operon. PMID:15838033

  14. Natural antisense transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Khorkova, Olga; Myers, Amanda J.; Hsiao, Jane; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen the increasing understanding of the crucial role of RNA in the functioning of the eukaryotic genome. These discoveries, fueled by the achievements of the FANTOM, and later GENCODE and ENCODE consortia, led to the recognition of the important regulatory roles of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) arising from what was previously thought to be junk DNA. Roughly defined as non-coding regulatory RNA transcribed from the opposite strand of a coding gene locus, NATs are proving to be a heterogeneous group with high potential for therapeutic application. Here, we attempt to summarize the rapidly growing knowledge about this important non-coding RNA subclass. PMID:24838284

  15. Binding and transcriptional activation of non-flagellar genes by the Escherichia coli flagellar master regulator FlhD2C2

    PubMed Central

    Stafford, Graham P.; Ogi, Tomoo; Hughes, Colin

    2008-01-01

    The gene hierarchy directing biogenesis of peritrichous flagella on the surface of Escherichia coli and other enterobacteria is controlled by the heterotetrameric master transcriptional regulator FlhD2C2. To assess the extent to which FlhD2C2 directly activates promoters of a wider regulon, a computational screen of the E. coli genome was used to search for gene-proximal DNA sequences similar to the 42–44 bp inverted repeat FlhD2C2 binding consensus. This identified the binding sequences upstream of all eight flagella class II operons, and also putative novel FlhD2C2 binding sites in the promoter regions of 39 non-flagellar genes. Nine representative non-flagellar promoter regions were all bound in vitro by active reconstituted FlhD2C2 over the KD range 38–356 nM, and of the nine corresponding chromosomal promoter–lacZ fusions, those of the four genes b1904, b2446, wzzfepE and gltI showed up to 50-fold dependence on FlhD2C2​ in vivo. In comparison, four representative flagella class II promoters bound FlhD2C2 in the KD range 12–43 nM and were upregulated in vivo 30- to 990-fold. The FlhD2C2-binding sites of the four regulated non-flagellar genes overlap by 1 or 2 bp the predicted −35 motif of the FlhD2C2-activated σ70 promoters, as is the case with FlhD2C2-dependent class II flagellar promoters. The data indicate a wider FlhD2C2 regulon, in which non-flagellar genes are bound and activated directly, albeit less strongly, by the same mechanism as that regulating the flagella gene hierarchy. PMID:15941987

  16. New Family of Tungstate-Responsive Transcriptional Regulators in Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric G.; Zane, Grant M.; Siddartha, Kavya; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Dubchak, Inna; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2013-01-01

    The trace elements molybdenum and tungsten are essential components of cofactors of many metalloenzymes. However, in sulfate-reducing bacteria, high concentrations of molybdate and tungstate oxyanions inhibit growth, thus requiring the tight regulation of their homeostasis. By a combination of bioinformatic and experimental techniques, we identified a novel regulator family, tungstate-responsive regulator (TunR), controlling the homeostasis of tungstate and molybdate in sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria. The effector-sensing domains of these regulators are similar to those of the known molybdate-responsive regulator ModE, while their DNA-binding domains are homologous to XerC/XerD site-specific recombinases. Using a comparative genomics approach, we identified DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 40 TunR family members. Positional analysis of TunR sites and putative promoters allowed us to classify most TunR proteins into two groups: (i) activators of modABC genes encoding a high-affinity molybdenum and tungsten transporting system and (ii) repressors of genes for toluene sulfonate uptake (TSUP) family transporters. The activation of modA and modBC genes by TunR in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was confirmed in vivo, and we discovered that the activation was diminished in the presence of tungstate. A predicted 30-bp TunR-binding motif was confirmed by in vitro binding assays. A novel TunR family of bacterial transcriptional factors controls tungstate and molybdate homeostasis in sulfate-reducing deltaproteobacteria. We proposed that TunR proteins participate in protection of the cells from the inhibition by these oxyanions. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a family of bacterial transcriptional factors evolved from site-specific recombinases. PMID:23913324

  17. Zinc Finger Transcription Factors Displaced SREBP Proteins as the Major Sterol Regulators during Saccharomycotina Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Sarah L.; Wang, Can; Holland, Linda M.; Brunel, François; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Zavrel, Martin; White, Theodore C.; Wolfe, Kenneth H.; Butler, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    In most eukaryotes, including the majority of fungi, expression of sterol biosynthesis genes is regulated by Sterol-Regulatory Element Binding Proteins (SREBPs), which are basic helix-loop-helix transcription activators. However, in yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans sterol synthesis is instead regulated by Upc2, an unrelated transcription factor with a Gal4-type zinc finger. The SREBPs in S. cerevisiae (Hms1) and C. albicans (Cph2) have lost a domain, are not major regulators of sterol synthesis, and instead regulate filamentous growth. We report here that rewiring of the sterol regulon, with Upc2 taking over from SREBP, likely occurred in the common ancestor of all Saccharomycotina. Yarrowia lipolytica, a deep-branching species, is the only genome known to contain intact and full-length orthologs of both SREBP (Sre1) and Upc2. Deleting YlUPC2, but not YlSRE1, confers susceptibility to azole drugs. Sterol levels are significantly reduced in the YlUPC2 deletion. RNA-seq analysis shows that hypoxic regulation of sterol synthesis genes in Y. lipolytica is predominantly mediated by Upc2. However, YlSre1 still retains a role in hypoxic regulation; growth of Y. lipolytica in hypoxic conditions is reduced in a Ylupc2 deletion and is abolished in a Ylsre1/Ylupc2 double deletion, and YlSre1 regulates sterol gene expression during hypoxia adaptation. We show that YlSRE1, and to a lesser extent YlUPC2, are required for switching from yeast to filamentous growth in hypoxia. Sre1 appears to have an ancestral role in the regulation of filamentation, which became decoupled from its role in sterol gene regulation by the arrival of Upc2 in the Saccharomycotina. PMID:24453983

  18. Ubiquitin and Proteasomes in Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Fuqiang; Wenzel, Sabine; Tansey, William P.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of gene transcription is vitally important for the maintenance of normal cellular homeostasis. Failure to correctly regulate gene expression, or to deal with problems that arise during the transcription process, can lead to cellular catastrophe and disease. One of the ways cells cope with the challenges of transcription is by making extensive use of the proteolytic and nonproteolytic activities of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Here, we review recent evidence showing deep mechanistic connections between the transcription and ubiquitin-proteasome systems. Our goal is to leave the reader with a sense that just about every step in transcription—from transcription initiation through to export of mRNA from the nucleus—is influenced by the UPS and that all major arms of the system—from the first step in ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation through to the proteasome—are recruited into transcriptional processes to provide regulation, directionality, and deconstructive power. PMID:22404630

  19. Transients in chloroplast gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Allen, John F.

    2008-04-18

    Transcriptional regulation of chloroplast genes is demonstrated by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR). These genes encode apoproteins of the reaction centres of photosystem I and photosystem II. Their transcription is regulated by changes in wavelength of light selectively absorbed by photosystem I and photosystem II, and therefore by the redox state of an electron carrier located between the two photosystems. Chloroplast transcriptional redox regulation is shown to have greater amplitude, and the kinetics of transcriptional changes are more complex, than suggested by previous experiments using only DNA probes in Northern blot experiments. Redox effects on chloroplast transcription appear to be superimposed on an endogenous rhythm of mRNA abundance. The functional significance of these transients in chloroplast gene transcription is discussed.

  20. Imaging Transcription in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Darzacq, Xavier; Yao, Jie; Larson, Daniel R.; Causse, Sebastien Z.; Bosanac, Lana; de Turris, Valeria; Ruda, Vera M.; Lionnet, Timothee; Zenklusen, Daniel; Guglielmi, Benjamin; Tjian, Robert; Singer, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    The advent of new technologies for the imaging of living cells has made it possible to determine the properties of transcription, the kinetics of polymerase movement, the association of transcription factors, and the progression of the polymerase on the gene. We report here the current state of the field and the progress necessary to achieve a more complete understanding of the various steps in transcription. Our Consortium is dedicated to developing and implementing the technology to further this understanding. PMID:19416065

  1. DNA topology and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  2. Deregulated transcription factors in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shima, Yutaka; Kitabayashi, Issay

    2011-08-01

    Specific chromosomal translocations and other mutations associated with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) often involve transcription factors and transcriptional coactivators. Such target genes include AML1, C/EBPα, RARα, MOZ, p300/CBP, and MLL, all of which are important in the regulation of hematopoiesis. The resultant fusion or mutant proteins deregulate the transcription of the affected genes and disrupt their essential role in hematopoiesis, causing differentiation block and abnormal proliferation and/or survival. This review focuses on such transcription factors and coactivators, and describes their roles in leukemogenesis and hematopoiesis. PMID:21823042

  3. Transcriptional Regulation: a Genomic Overview

    PubMed Central

    Riechmann, José Luis

    2002-01-01

    The availability of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comprehensive analysis of transcriptional regulation in plants using novel genomic approaches and methodologies. Such a genomic view of transcription first necessitates the compilation of lists of elements. Transcription factors are the most numerous of the different types of proteins involved in transcription in eukaryotes, and the Arabidopsis genome codes for more than 1,500 of them, or approximately 6% of its total number of genes. A genome-wide comparison of transcription factors across the three eukaryotic kingdoms reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the components of the regulatory machinery of transcription. However, as illustrated by Arabidopsis, transcription in plants follows similar basic principles and logic to those in animals and fungi. A global view and understanding of transcription at a cellular and organismal level requires the characterization of the Arabidopsis transcriptome and promoterome, as well as of the interactome, the localizome, and the phenome of the proteins involved in transcription. PMID:22303220

  4. Promoter-mediated Transcriptional Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiajun; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Genes in eukaryotic cells are typically regulated by complex promoters containing multiple binding sites for a variety of transcription factors, but how promoter dynamics affect transcriptional dynamics has remained poorly understood. In this study, we analyze gene models at the transcriptional regulation level, which incorporate the complexity of promoter structure (PS) defined as transcriptional exits (i.e., ON states of the promoter) and the transition pattern (described by a matrix consisting of transition rates among promoter activity states). We show that multiple exits of transcription are the essential origin of generating multimodal distributions of mRNA, but promoters with the same transition pattern can lead to multimodality of different modes, depending on the regulation of transcriptional factors. In turn, for similar mRNA distributions in the models, the mean ON or OFF time distributions may exhibit different characteristics, thus providing the supplemental information on PS. In addition, we demonstrate that the transcriptional noise can be characterized by a nonlinear function of mean ON and OFF times. These results not only reveal essential characteristics of promoter-mediated transcriptional dynamics but also provide signatures useful for inferring PS based on characteristics of transcriptional outputs. PMID:24461023

  5. The Acid-Inducible asr Gene in Escherichia coli: Transcriptional Control by the phoBR Operon†

    PubMed Central

    Sužiedėlienė, Edita; Sužiedėlis, Kęstutis; Garbenčiūtė, Vaida; Normark, Staffan

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli responds to external acidification (pH 4.0 to 5.0) by synthesizing a newly identified, ∼450-nucleotide RNA component. At maximal levels of induction it is one of the most abundant small RNAs in the cell and is relatively stable bacterial RNA. The acid-inducible RNA was purified, and the gene encoding it, designated asr (for acid shock RNA), mapped at 35.98 min on the E. coli chromosome. Analysis of the asr DNA sequence revealed an open reading frame coding for a 111-amino-acid polypeptide with a deduced molecular mass of approximately 11.6 kDa. According to computer-assisted analysis, the predicted polypeptide contains a typical signal sequence of 30 amino acids and might represent either a periplasmic or an outer membrane protein. The asr gene cloned downstream from a T7 promoter was translated in vivo after transcription using a T7 RNA polymerase transcription system. Expression of a plasmid-encoded asr::lacZ fusion under a native asr promoter was reduced ∼15-fold in a complex medium, such as Luria-Bertani medium, versus the minimal medium. Transcription of the chromosomal asr was abolished in the presence of a phoB-phoR (a two-component regulatory system, controlling the pho regulon inducible by phosphate starvation) deletion mutant. Acid-mediated induction of the asr gene in the Δ(phoB-phoR) mutant strain was restored by introduction of the plasmid with cloned phoB-phoR genes. Primer extension analysis of the asr transcript revealed a region similar to the Pho box (the consensus sequence found in promoters transcriptionally activated by the PhoB protein) upstream from the determined transcription start. The asr promoter DNA region was demonstrated to bind PhoB protein in vitro. We discuss our results in terms of how bacteria might employ the phoB-phoR regulatory system to sense an external acidity and regulate transcription of the asr gene. PMID:10094685

  6. Mastering Transcription: Multiplexed Analysis of Transcription Start Site Sequences.

    PubMed

    Hochschild, Ann

    2015-12-17

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Vvedenskaya et al. (2015) describe a high-throughput sequencing-based methodology for the massively parallel analysis of transcription from a high-complexity barcoded template library both in vitro and in vivo, providing a powerful new tool for the study of transcription. PMID:26687597

  7. Regulation of Expression and Evolution of Genes in Plastids of Rhodophytic Branch.

    PubMed

    Zverkov, Oleg Anatolyevich; Seliverstov, Alexandr Vladislavovich; Lyubetsky, Vassily Alexandrovich

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm and original software were used to cluster all proteins encoded in plastids of 72 species of the rhodophytic branch. The results are publicly available at http://lab6.iitp.ru/ppc/redline72/ in a database that allows fast identification of clusters (protein families) both by a fragment of an amino acid sequence and by a phylogenetic profile of a protein. No such integral clustering with the corresponding functions can be found in the public domain. The putative regulons of the transcription factors Ycf28 and Ycf29 encoded in the plastids were identified using the clustering and the database. A regulation of translation initiation was proposed for the ycf24 gene in plastids of certain red algae and apicomplexans as well as a regulation of a putative gene in apicoplasts of Babesia spp. and Theileria parva. The conserved regulation of the ycf24 gene expression and specificity alternation of the transcription factor Ycf28 were shown in the plastids. A phylogenetic tree of plastids was generated for the rhodophytic branch. The hypothesis of the origin of apicoplasts from the common ancestor of all apicomplexans from plastids of red algae was confirmed. PMID:26840333

  8. Regulation of Expression and Evolution of Genes in Plastids of Rhodophytic Branch

    PubMed Central

    Zverkov, Oleg Anatolyevich; Seliverstov, Alexandr Vladislavovich; Lyubetsky, Vassily Alexandrovich

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm and original software were used to cluster all proteins encoded in plastids of 72 species of the rhodophytic branch. The results are publicly available at http://lab6.iitp.ru/ppc/redline72/ in a database that allows fast identification of clusters (protein families) both by a fragment of an amino acid sequence and by a phylogenetic profile of a protein. No such integral clustering with the corresponding functions can be found in the public domain. The putative regulons of the transcription factors Ycf28 and Ycf29 encoded in the plastids were identified using the clustering and the database. A regulation of translation initiation was proposed for the ycf24 gene in plastids of certain red algae and apicomplexans as well as a regulation of a putative gene in apicoplasts of Babesia spp. and Theileria parva. The conserved regulation of the ycf24 gene expression and specificity alternation of the transcription factor Ycf28 were shown in the plastids. A phylogenetic tree of plastids was generated for the rhodophytic branch. The hypothesis of the origin of apicoplasts from the common ancestor of all apicomplexans from plastids of red algae was confirmed. PMID:26840333

  9. Blue and Red Light Modulates SigB-Dependent Gene Transcription, Swimming Motility and Invasiveness in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Ondrusch, Nicolai; Kreft, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Background In a number of gram-positive bacteria, including Listeria, the general stress response is regulated by the alternative sigma factor B (SigB). Common stressors which lead to the activation of SigB and the SigB-dependent regulon are high osmolarity, acid and several more. Recently is has been shown that also blue and red light activates SigB in Bacillus subtilis. Methodology/Principal Findings By qRT-PCR we analyzed the transcriptional response of the pathogen L. monocytogenes to blue and red light in wild type bacteria and in isogenic deletion mutants for the putative blue-light receptor Lmo0799 and the stress sigma factor SigB. It was found that both blue (455 nm) and red (625 nm) light induced the transcription of sigB and SigB-dependent genes, this induction was completely abolished in the SigB mutant. The blue-light effect was largely dependent on Lmo0799, proving that this protein is a genuine blue-light receptor. The deletion of lmo0799 enhanced the red-light effect, the underlying mechanism as well as that of SigB activation by red light remains unknown. Blue light led to an increased transcription of the internalin A/B genes and of bacterial invasiveness for Caco-2 enterocytes. Exposure to blue light also strongly inhibited swimming motility of the bacteria in a Lmo0799- and SigB-dependent manner, red light had no effect there. Conclusions/Significance Our data established that visible, in particular blue light is an important environmental signal with an impact on gene expression and physiology of the non-phototrophic bacterium L. monocytogenes. In natural environments these effects will result in sometimes random but potentially also cyclic fluctuations of gene activity, depending on the light conditions prevailing in the respective habitat. PMID:21264304

  10. Community signaling between Streptococcus gordonii and Porphyromonas gingivalis is controlled by the transcriptional regulator CdhR

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Aarti; Hirano, Takanori; Bainbridge, Brian W.; Demuth, Donald R.; Xie, Hua; Lamont, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Interspecies signaling between P. gingivalis and S. gordonii serves to constrain development of dual species communities. Contact with S. gordonii propagates a tyrosine phosphorylation dependent signal within P. gingivalis that culminates in reduced transcription of adhesin and signaling genes. Here we demonstrate the involvement of the P. gingivalis orphan LuxR family transcription factor PGN_1373, which we designate CdhR, in this control pathway. Expression of cdhR is elevated following contact with S. gordonii; however, regulation of cdhR did not occur in a mutant lacking the tyrosine phosphatase Ltp1, indicating that CdhR and Ltp1 are components of the same regulon. Contact between S. gordonii and a CdhR mutant resulted in increased transcription of mfa, encoding the subunit of the short fimbriae, along with higher levels of Mfa protein. Expression of luxS, encoding AI-2 synthase, was also increased in the cdhR mutant after contact with S. gordonii. The Mfa adhesive function and AI-2-dependent signaling participate in the formation and development of dual species communities, and consistent with this the cdhR mutant displayed elevated accumulation on a substratum of S. gordonii. Recombinant CdhR protein bound to upstream regulatory regions of both mfa and luxS, indicating that CdhR has a direct effect on gene expression. LuxS was also found to participate in a positive feedback loop that suppresses CdhR expression. Interaction of Mfa fimbriae with S. gordonii is necessary to initiate signaling through CdhR. These results reveal CdhR to be an effector molecule in a negative regulatory network that controls P. gingivalis-S. gordonii heterotypic communities. PMID:21143321

  11. Phonetic Transcription of Disordered Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Thomas W.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews major approaches to the transcription of disordered speech using the International Alphabet (IPA). Application of selected symbols for transcribing non-English sounds is highlighted in clinical examples, as are commonly used diacritic symbols. Included is an overview of the IPA extensions for transcription of atypical speech,…

  12. RNA duplexes in transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Sanjay; Hood, Chantelle L; Suzuki, Kazuo; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2010-10-01

    Transcriptional regulation by small RNA molecules, including small interfering RNA and microRNA, has emerged as an important gene expression modulator. The regulatory pathways controlling gene expression, post-transcriptional gene silencing and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) have been demonstrated in yeast, plants and more recently in human cells. In this review, we discuss the currents models of transcriptional regulation and the main components of the RNA-induced silencing complex and RNA-induced transcriptional silencing complex machinery, as well as confounding off-target effects and gene activation. We also discuss RNA-mediated TGS within the NF-κB motif of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 5' long tandem repeat promoter region and the associated epigenetic modifications. Finally, we outline the current RNA interference (RNAi) delivery methods and describe the current status of human trials investigating potential RNAi therapeutics for several human diseases. PMID:25962003

  13. [Transcript assembly and quality assessment].

    PubMed

    Deng, Feilong; Jia, Xianbo; Lai, Songjia; Liu, Yiping; Chen, Shiyi

    2015-09-01

    The transcript assembly is essential for transcriptome studies trom next-generation sequencing data. However, there are still many faults of algorithms in the present assemblers, which should be largely improved in the future. According to the requirement of reference genome or not, the transcript assembly could be classified into the genome-guided and de novo methods. The two methods have different algorithms and implementation processes. The quality of assembled transcripts depends on a large number of factors, such as the PCR amplification, sequencing techniques, assembly algorithm and genome character. Here, we reviewed the present tools of transcript assembly and various indexes for assessing the quality of assembled transcripts, which would help biologists to determine which assembler should be used in their studies. PMID:26955705

  14. Transcriptional profiling of Bordetella pertussis reveals requirement of RNA chaperone Hfq for Type III secretion system functionality

    PubMed Central

    Bibova, Ilona; Hot, David; Keidel, Kristina; Amman, Fabian; Slupek, Stephanie; Cerny, Ondrej; Gross, Roy; Vecerek, Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of human whooping cough (pertussis) produces a complex array of virulence factors in order to establish efficient infection in the host. The RNA chaperone Hfq and small regulatory RNAs are key players in posttranscriptional regulation in bacteria and have been shown to play an essential role in virulence of a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens. This study represents the first attempt to characterize the Hfq regulon of the human pathogen B. pertussis under laboratory conditions as well as upon passage in the host and indicates that loss of Hfq has a profound effect on gene expression in B. pertussis. Comparative transcriptional profiling revealed that Hfq is required for expression of several virulence factors in B. pertussis cells including the Type III secretion system (T3SS). In striking contrast to the wt strain, T3SS did not become operational in the hfq mutant passaged either through mice or macrophages thereby proving that Hfq is required for the functionality of the B. pertussis T3SS. Likewise, expression of virulence factors vag8 and tcfA encoding autotransporter and tracheal colonization factor, respectively, was strongly reduced in the hfq mutant. Importantly, for the first time we demonstrate that B. pertussis T3SS can be activated upon contact with macrophage cells in vitro. PMID:25674816

  15. Action of multiple intra-QTL genes concerted around a co-localized transcription factor underpins a large effect QTL.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Shalabh; Kumar Biswal, Akshaya; Min, Aye; Henry, Amelia; Oane, Rowena H; Raorane, Manish L; Longkumer, Toshisangba; Pabuayon, Isaiah M; Mutte, Sumanth K; Vardarajan, Adithi R; Miro, Berta; Govindan, Ganesan; Albano-Enriquez, Blesilda; Pueffeld, Mandy; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Slamet-Loedin, Inez; Sundarvelpandian, Kalaipandian; Tsai, Yuan-Ching; Raghuvanshi, Saurabh; Hsing, Yue-Ie C; Kumar, Arvind; Kohli, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Sub-QTLs and multiple intra-QTL genes are hypothesized to underpin large-effect QTLs. Known QTLs over gene families, biosynthetic pathways or certain traits represent functional gene-clusters of genes of the same gene ontology (GO). Gene-clusters containing genes of different GO have not been elaborated, except in silico as coexpressed genes within QTLs. Here we demonstrate the requirement of multiple intra-QTL genes for the full impact of QTL qDTY12.1 on rice yield under drought. Multiple evidences are presented for the need of the transcription factor 'no apical meristem' (OsNAM12.1) and its co-localized target genes of separate GO categories for qDTY12.1 function, raising a regulon-like model of genetic architecture. The molecular underpinnings of qDTY12.1 support its effectiveness in further improving a drought tolerant genotype and for its validity in multiple genotypes/ecosystems/environments. Resolving the combinatorial value of OsNAM12.1 with individual intra-QTL genes notwithstanding, identification and analyses of qDTY12.1has fast-tracked rice improvement towards food security. PMID:26507552

  16. Contributions of ATP, GTP, and Redox State to Nutritional Stress Activation of the Bacillus subtilis σB Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyu; Haldenwang, W. G.

    2005-01-01

    The general stress regulon of Bacillus subtilis is induced by activation of the σB transcription factor. σB activation occurs when one of two phosphatases responds to physical or nutritional stress to activate a positive σB regulator by dephosphorylation. The signal that triggers the nutritional stress phosphatase (RsbP) is unknown; however, RsbP activation occurs under culture conditions (glucose/phosphate starvation, azide or decoyinine treatment) that reduce the cell's levels of ATP and/or GTP. Variances in nucleotide levels in these instances may be coincidental rather than causal. RsbP carries a domain (PAS) that in some regulatory systems can respond directly to changes in electron transport, proton motive force, or redox potential, changes that typically precede shifts in high-energy nucleotide levels. The current work uses Bacillus subtilis with mutations in the oxidative phosphorylation and purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathways in conjunction with metabolic inhibitors to better define the inducing signal for RsbP activation. The data argue that a drop in ATP, rather than changes in GTP, proton motive force, or redox state, is the key to triggering σB activatio