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Sample records for apollo mission apollo-1

  1. Apollo 1 Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Officially designated Apollo/Saturn 204, but more commonly known as Apollo 1, this close-up view of the interior of the Command Module shows the effects of the intense heat of the flash fire which killed the prime crew during a routine training exercise. While strapped into their seats inside the Command Module atop the giant Saturn V Moon rocket, a faulty electrical switch created a spark which ignited the pure oxygen environment. The speed and intensity of the fire quickly exhausted the oxygen supply inside the crew cabin. Unable to deploy the hatch due to its cumbersome design and lack of breathable oxygen, the crew lost consciousness and perished. They were: astronauts Virgil I. 'Gus' Grissom, (the second American to fly into space) Edward H. White II, (the first American to 'walk' in space) and Roger B. Chaffee, (a 'rookie' on his first space mission).

  2. Apollo 17 mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Operational and engineering aspects of the Apollo 17 mission are outlined. The vehicle configuration was similar to those of Apollo 15 and 16. There were significant differences in the science payload for Apollo 17 and spacecraft hardware differences and experiment equipment are described. The mission achieved a landing in the Taurus-Littrow region of the moon and returned samples of the pre-Imbrium highlands and young craters.

  3. The Apollo missions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, L. R.

    1971-01-01

    The Apollo 11 and 12 lunar landings are briefly reviewed together with the problems experienced with Apollo 13. As a result of the first two landing missions it became known that parts of the moon are at least four and one-half billion years old. If the moon was once part of the earth, it must have split off very early in its history. Starting with Apollo 16, changes in hardware will result in very significant improvements and capabilities. The landed payload will be increased by over 100%.

  4. Apollo 16 mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Information is provided on the operational and engineering aspects of the Apollo 16 mission. Customary units of measurement are used in those sections of the report pertaining to spacecraft systems and trajectories. The International System of Units is used in sections pertaining to science activities.

  5. Apollo 11 Mission Commemorated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-07-01

    On 24 July 1969, 4 days after Apollo 11 Mission Commander Neil Armstrong and Lunar Module Eagle Pilot Eugene “Buzz” Aldrin had become the first people to walk on the Moon, they and Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins peered through a window of the Mobile Quarantine Facility on board the U.S.S. Hornet following splashdown of the command module in the central Pacific as U.S. President Richard Nixon told them, “This is the greatest week in the history of the world since the creation.” Forty years later, the Apollo 11 crew and other Apollo-era astronauts gathered at several events in Washington, D. C., to commemorate and reflect on the Apollo program, that mission, and the future of manned spaceflight. “I don’t know what the greatest week in history is,” Aldrin told Eos. “But it was certainly a pioneering opening the door. With the door open when we touched down on the Moon, that was what enabled humans to put many more footprints on the surface of the Moon.”

  6. Apollo mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    Dosimetric implications for manned space flight are evaluated by analyzing the radiation field behind the heavy shielding of a manned space vehicle on a near-earth orbital mission and how it compares with actual exposure levels recorded on Apollo missions. Emphasis shifts from flux densities and energy spectra to incident radiation and absorbed doses and dose equivalents as they are recorded within the ship at locations close to crew members.

  7. Apollo 15 mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A detailed discussion is presented of the Apollo 15 mission, which conducted exploration of the moon over longer periods, greater ranges, and with more instruments of scientific data acquisition than previous missions. The topics include trajectory, lunar surface science, inflight science and photography, command and service module performance, lunar module performance, lunar surface operational equipment, pilot's report, biomedical evaluation, mission support performance, assessment of mission objectives, launch phase summary, anomaly summary, and vehicle and equipment descriptions. The capability of transporting larger payloads and extending time on the moon were demonstrated. The ground-controlled TV camera allowed greater real-time participation by earth-bound personnel. The crew operated more as scientists and relied more on ground support team for systems monitoring. The modified pressure garment and portable life support system provided better mobility and extended EVA time. The lunar roving vehicle and the lunar communications relay unit were also demonstrated.

  8. Prime crew photographed during Apollo 7 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr., Apollo 7 commander, is photographed during the Apollo 7 mission (1582); Astronaut Donn F. Eisele, Apollo 7 command module pilot, is photographed during the mission (1583); Astronaut Walter Cunningham, Apollo 7 lunar module pilot, is photographed during mission (1584).

  9. Prime crew photographed during Apollo 7 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr., Apollo 7 commander, is photographed during the Apollo 7 mission (1582); Astronaut Donn F. Eisele, Apollo 7 command module pilot, is phtographed during the mission (1583); Astronaut Walter Cunningham, Apollo 7 lunar module pilot, is photographed during mission (1584).

  10. Apollo experience report: Mission planning for Apollo entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, C. A.; Harpold, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The problems encountered and the experience gained in the entry mission plans, flight software, trajectory-monitoring procedures, and backup trajectory-control techniques of the Apollo Program should provide a foundation upon which future spacecraft programs can be developed. Descriptions of these entry activities are presented. Also, to provide additional background information needed for discussion of the Apollo entry experience, descriptions of the entry targeting for the Apollo 11 mission and the postflight analysis of the Apollo 10 mission are presented.

  11. Apollo Soyuz, mission evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo Soyuz mission was the first manned space flight to be conducted jointly by two nations - the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The primary purpose of the mission was to test systems for rendezvous and docking of manned spacecraft that would be suitable for use as a standard international system, and to demonstrate crew transfer between spacecraft. The secondary purpose was to conduct a program of scientific and applications experimentation. With minor modifications, the Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft were like those flown on previous missions. However, a new module was built specifically for this mission - the docking module. It served as an airlock for crew transfer and as a structural base for the docking mechanism that interfaced with a similar mechanism on the Soyuz orbital module. The postflight evaluation of the performance of the docking system and docking module, as well as the overall performance of the Apollo spacecraft and experiments is presented. In addition, the mission is evaluated from the viewpoints of the flight crew, ground support operations, and biomedical operations. Descriptions of the docking mechanism, docking module, crew equipment and experiment hardware are given.

  12. The Complete Book of Spaceflight: From Apollo 1 to Zero Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, David

    2002-11-01

    A commanding encyclopedia of the history and principles of spaceflight-from earliest conceptions to faster-than-light galaxy-hopping Here is the first truly comprehensive guide to space exploration and propulsion, from the first musings of the Greeks to current scientific speculation about interstellar travel using "warp drives" and wormholes. Space buffs will delight in its in-depth coverage of all key manned and unmanned missions and space vehicles-past, present, and projected-and its clear explanations of the technologies involved. Over the course of more than 2,000 extensively cross-referenced entries, astronomer David Darling also provides fascinating insights into the cultural development of spaceflight. In vivid accounts of the major characters and historical events involved, he provides fascinating tales of early innovators, the cross-pollination that has long existed between science fiction and science fact, and the sometimes obscure links between geopolitics, warfare, and advances in rocketry.

  13. Apollo 13 Facts [Post Mission Honorary Ceremony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Apollo 13 astronauts, James Lovell, Jr., John Swigert, Jr., and Fred Haise, Jr., are seen during this post mission honorary ceremony, led by President Richard Nixon. Lovell is shown during an interview, answering questions about the mission.

  14. Apollo experience report: Guidance and control systems. Mission control programmer for unmanned missions AS-202, Apollo 4, and Apollo 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    An unmanned test flight program required to evaluate the command module heat shield and the structural integrity of the command and service module/Saturn launch vehicle is described. The mission control programer was developed to provide the unmanned interface between the guidance and navigation computer and the other spacecraft systems for mission event sequencing and real-time ground control during missions AS-202, Apollo 4, and Apollo 6. The development of this unmanned programer is traced from the initial concept through the flight test phase. Detailed discussions of hardware development problems are given with the resulting solutions. The mission control programer functioned correctly without any flight anomalies for all missions. The Apollo 4 mission control programer was reused for the Apollo 6 flight, thus being one of the first subsystems to be reflown on an Apollo space flight.

  15. Apollo program flight summary report: Apollo missions AS-201 through Apollo 16, revision 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the Apollo flights from AS-201 through Apollo 16 is presented. The following subjects are discussed for each flight: (1) mission primary objectives, (2) principle objectives of the launch vehicle and spacecraft, (3) secondary objectives of the launch vehicle and spacecraft, (4) unusual features of the mission, (5) general information on the spacecraft and launch vehicle, (6) space vehicle and pre-launch data, and (7) recovery data.

  16. Biocore experiment. [Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, O. T.; Benton, E. V.; Cruty, M. R.; Harrison, G. A.; Haymaker, W.; Humason, G.; Leon, H. A.; Lindberg, R. L.; Look, B. C.; Lushbaugh, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo 17 biological cosmic ray experiment to determine the effect of heavy cosmic ray particles on the brain and eyes is reported. The pocket mouse was selected as the biological specimen for the experiment. The radiation monitors, animal autopsy and animal processing are described, and the radiation effects on the scalp, retina, and viscera are analyzed.

  17. Apollo 14 mission circuit breaker anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Continuity through the circuit breaker in the mechanically closed condition was prevented by a foreign substance on the contact surface onboard Apollo 14. It was concluded that this was the only failure of this type in over 3400 units that were flown, and since no circuit breaker is a single-point failure for crew safety or mission success, no corrective action was taken.

  18. Apollo 17 mission 5-day report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A five day report of the Apollo 17 mission is presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) sequence of events, (2) extravehicular activities, (3) first, second, and third lunar surface extravehicular activity, (4) transearth extravehicular activity, (5) lunar surface experiments conducted, (6) orbital science activities, (7) spacecraft reentry and recovery.

  19. Apollo 13 Astronaut Fred Haise and Apollo 13 Mission Patch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut Fred Haise Jr. of Biloxi, Miss., views his Apollo 13 mission patch, the flight on which he served in 1970, in a StenniSphere display donated to NASA by the American Needlepoint Guild. The exhibit is on permanent display at StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center. In its first year of operation, more than 251,000 visitors representing over 40 countries have viewed the 123 hand-stitched patches in the exhibit. Forty-two guild members from 20 states made the trip to StenniSphere for the opening of the exhibit, one of the most popular at StenniSphere.

  20. Apollo 11 Celebration at Mission Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    NASA and Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) officials join the flight controllers in celebrating the conclusion of the Apollo 11 mission. From left foreground Dr. Maxime A. Faget, MSC Director of Engineering and Development; George S. Trimble, MSC Deputy Director; Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC Director fo Flight Operations; Julian Scheer (in back), Assistant Adminstrator, Office of Public Affairs, NASA HQ.; George M. Low, Manager, Apollo Spacecraft Program, MSC; Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director; and Charles W. Mathews, Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA HQ.

  1. Geologic Traverse Planning for Apollo Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The science on Apollo missions was overseen by the Science Working Panel (SWP), but done by multiple PIs. There were two types of science, packages like the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP) and traverse science. Traverses were designed on Earth for the astronauts to execute. These were under direction of the Lunar Surface PI, but the agreed traverse was a cooperation between the PI and SWP. The landing sites were selected by a different designated committee, not the SWP, and were based on science and safety.

  2. Apollo A-7L Spacesuit Tests and Certification, and Apollo 7 Through 14 Missions Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBarron, James W., II

    2015-01-01

    As a result of his 50 years of experience and research, Jim McBarron shared his significant knowledge about Apollo A-7L spacesuit certification testing and Apollo 7 through 14 missions' spacesuit details.

  3. Endocrine Laboratory Results Apollo Missions 14 and 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.

    1972-01-01

    Endocrine/metabolic responses to space flight have been measured on the crewmen of Apollo missions 14 and 15. There were significant biochemical changes in the crewmen of both missions immediately postflight. However, the Apollo 15 mission results differed from Apollo 14 and preflight shown by a normal to increased urine volume with slight increases in antidiuretic hormone. Although Apollo 15 was the first mission in which the exchangeable potassium measurement was made (a decrease), results from other missions were indicative of similar conclusions.

  4. Apollo 12 Mission Summary and Splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) video release presents footage of the November 14, 1969 Apollo-12 space mission begun from launch complex pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Charles Conrad, Jr., Richard F. Gordon, Jr., and Alan L. Bean make up the three-man spacecrew. The video includes the astronaut's pre-launch breakfast, President Nixon, his wife, and daughter arriving at Cape Kennedy in time to see the launch, as well as countdown and liftoff. After the launch, President Nixon gives a brief congratulatory speech to the members of launch control at KSC. The video also presents views of the astronauts and spacecraft in space as well as splashdown of the command module on November 24, 1969. The video ends with the recovery, by helicopter and additional personnel, of the spacecrew from the command module floating in the waters of the Atlantic.

  5. Apollo Mission Techniques Lunar Orbit Activities - Part 1a

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the planned sequence of events and the rationale for all lunar missions, and the flight experiences and lessons learned for the lunar orbit activities from a trajectory perspective. Shown are trajectories which include the moon's position at the various stages in the complete trip from launch, to the return and reentry. Included in the presentation are objectives and the sequence of events,for the Apollo 8, and Apollo 10. This is followed by a discussion of Apollo 11, including: the primary mission objective, the sequence of events, and the flight experience. The next mission discussed was Apollo 12. It reviews the objectives, the ground tracking, procedure changes, and the sequence of events. The aborted Apollo 13 mission is reviewed, including the objectives, and the sequence of events. Brief summaries of the flight experiences for Apollo 14-16 are reviewed. The flight sequence of events of Apollo 17 are discussed. In summary each mission consistently performing precision landings required that Apollo lunar orbit activities devote considerable attention to: (1) Improving fidelity of lunar gravity models, (2) Maximizing availability of ground tracking, (3) Minimizing perturbations on the trajectory, (4) Maximizing LM propellant reserves for hover time. Also the use of radial separation maneuvers (1) allows passive re-rendezvous after each rev, but ... (2) sensitive to small dispersions in initial sep direction

  6. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view of Mission Operations Control Room in Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) during the ceremonies aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission. The Apollo 13 spacecraft, with Astronauts James Lovell, John Swigert, and Fred Haise aboard splashed down in the South Pacific at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970.

  7. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view of Mission Operations Control Room in Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) during the ceremonies aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission. Dr. Donald K. Slayton (in black shirt, left of center), Director of Flight Crew Operations at MSC, and Chester M. Lee of the Apollo Program Directorate, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters, shake hands, while Dr. Rocco A. Petrone, Apollo Program Director, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters (standing, near Lee), watches the large screen showing Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., Apollo 13 commander, during the on-board ceremonies. In the foreground, Glynn S. Lunney (extreme left) and Eugene F. Kranz (smoking a cigar), two Apollo 13 Flight Directors, view the activity from their consoles.

  8. Endocrine, electrolyte, and fluid volume changes associated with Apollo missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Alexander, W. C.; Johnson, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    The endocrine and metabolic results obtained before and after the Apollo missions and the results of the limited in-flight sampling are summarized and discussed. The studies were designed to evaluate the biochemical changes in the returning Apollo crewmembers, and the areas studied included balance of fluids and electrolytes, regulation of calcium metabolism, adaptation to the environment, and regulation of metabolic processes.

  9. The Moon: What Have the Apollo Missions Taught Us? Part II: The View from Apollo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeever, S. W. S.

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes scientific findings resulting from the Apollo missions, including lunar rocks and soil, age determination, and the moon's interior, evolution, and origin. Indicates experiments for future lunar research. (SK)

  10. Apollo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    US programme to land men on the moon. Included 11 manned missions, October 1968-December 1972, with three missions restricted to a lunar flyby or orbital survey (Apollos 8, 10 and 13), and six landings (Apollos 11, 12, 14, 15, 16 and 17). Returned 385 kg of lunar soil and rock samples which provided evidence that the Moon was about the same age as the Earth and probably originated from material d...

  11. The Apollo Missions and the Chemistry of the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacer, Richard A.; Ehmann, William D.

    1975-01-01

    Presents the principle chemical features of the moon obtained by analyzing lunar samples gathered on the Apollo missions. Outlines the general physical features of the moon and presents theories on its origin. (GS)

  12. Engineering potential for lunar missions after Apollo.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    The need for continuing post-Apollo lunar research is defined by outlining problems in stellar, planetary, biological, and social evolution which require specific studies of the moon. Engineering capabilities existing immediately after the Apollo program are described in the areas of launch vehicles and spacecraft, lunar surface mobility, instrumentation, and communications.

  13. Bonus: Apollo's Amazing Mission and Spin-Offs from Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Two posters examine the 1969 Apollo moon mission. The first tracks the stages and path of the mission, suggesting that students create their own diagrams or models. The second presents a puzzle that helps student understand how many items developed for the mission are useful to today's everyday life. (SM)

  14. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 liftoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Sigurd A. Sjoberg, Director of Flight Operations at Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), views the Apollo 13 liftoff from a console in the MSC Mission Control Center, bldg 30. Apollo 13 lifted off at 1:13 p.m., April 11, 1970 (34627); Astronaut Thomas F. Mattingly II, who was scheduled as a prime crewman for the Apollo 13 mission but was replaced in the final hours when it was discovered he had been exposed to measles, watches the liftoff phase of the mission. He is seated at a console in the Mission Control Center's Mission Operations Control Room. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, a spacecraft communicator for the mission, looks on at right (34628).

  15. Visual light flash phenomenon. [Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsky, L. S.; Osborne, W. Z.; Bailey, J. V.

    1973-01-01

    Light flash phenomenon observed by crewmen on Apollo 14, 15, 16, and 17 are analyzed. The passage of cosmic rays through the crewman's head and eyes was recorded by the Apollo light flash moving emulsion detector. Events of all the light flash observations are tabulated. It is suggested that the most probable explanation of the phenomenon is that it is caused by cosmic rays penetrating the eyes and retinas of the observers.

  16. Apollo 14 and 15 missions: Intermittent steerable antenna operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An attempt was made to determine the cause of antenna tracking interruptions during Apollo 14 and Apollo 15 missions prior to powered descent, and after ascent from the lunar surface but before rendezvous. Probable causes examined include: (1) amplitude modulation on the uplink radio frequency carrier, (2) noise capacitively or inductively coupled into the track error line, and (3) hardware problems resulting in tracking loop instabilities. It was determined that amplitude modulation caused the antenna oscillations. The corrective procedures taken are given.

  17. Plans and objectives of the remaining Apollo missions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    The three remaining Apollo missions will have significantly increased scientific capabilities. These result from increased payload, more time on the surface, improved range, and more sophisticated experiments on the surface and in orbit. Landing sites for the last three missions will be carefully selected to maximize the total scientific return.

  18. Apollo 16 mission: Oxidizer deservicing tank failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An explosive failure of a ground support equipment decontamination unit tank occurred during the postflight deactivation of the oxidizer (nitrogen tetroxide) portion of the Apollo 16 command module reaction control system. A discussion of the significant aspects of the incident and conclusions are included.

  19. Apollo 14 mission food preparation unit leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A bubble of water collected on the delivery probe of the food preparation unit after hot water was dispensed by the Apollo 14 crew. Postflight tests showed that dimensional interference between the cylinder and the piston at hot water temperatures produced the apparent leak by causing erratic and slow stroke time of the valve assembly.

  20. View of Mission Control Center celebrating conclusion of Apollo 11 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center, bldg 30, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), at the conclusion of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. The television monitor shows President Richard M. Nixon greeting the Apollo 11 astronauts aboard the U.S.S. Hornet in the Pacific recovery area (40301); NASA and MSC Officials join the flight controllers in celebrating the conclusion of the Apollo 11 mission. From left foreground Dr. Maxime A. Faget, MSC Director of Engineering and Development; George S. Trimble, MSC Deputy Director; Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC Director fo Flight Operations; Julian Scheer (in back), Assistant Adminstrator, Offic of Public Affairs, NASA HQ.; George M. Low, Manager, Apollo Spacecraft Program, MSC; Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director; and Charles W. Mathews, Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA HQ (40302).

  1. Suprathermal ion detector results from Apollo missions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    This paper reviews briefly the knowledge of the ion environment of the moon as obtained from the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package, Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment. Topics to be discussed include: an interplanetary shock as seen from the lunar surface; bow shock and magnetosheath ions; magnetotail plasma seen during a magnetic disturbance; suprathermal ions seen during passage of the sunset and sunrise terminators; and ions associated with neutral gas clouds in the vicinity of the moon, and in particular the low energy mono-energetic spectrum of these ions. It is believed that these low energy spectra and some terminator ions can be explained by ion acceleration by the interplanetary electric field. This paper serves as catalog to references to these and other related phenomena.

  2. Apollo-Soyuz US-USSR joint mission results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, A. L.; Evans, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The technical and nontechnical objectives of the Apollo-Soyuz mission are briefly considered. The mission demonstrated that Americans and Russians can work together to perform a very complex operation, including rendezvous in space, docking, and the conduction of joint experiments. Certain difficulties which had to be overcome were partly related to differences concerning the role of the astronaut in the basic alignment and docking procedures for space vehicles. Attention is also given to the experiments conducted during the mission and the approach used to overcome the language barrier.

  3. Towards a Selenographic Information System: Apollo 15 Mission Digitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votava, J. E.; Petro, N. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Apollo missions represent some of the most technically complex and extensively documented explorations ever endeavored by mankind. The surface experiments performed and the lunar samples collected in-situ have helped form our understanding of the Moon's geologic history and the history of our Solar System. Unfortunately, a complication exists in the analysis and accessibility of these large volumes of lunar data and historical Apollo Era documents due to their multiple formats and disconnected web and print locations. Described here is a project to modernize, spatially reference, and link the lunar data into a comprehensive SELENOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM, starting with the Apollo 15 mission. Like its terrestrial counter-parts, Geographic Information System (GIS) programs, such as ArcGIS, allow for easy integration, access, analysis, and display of large amounts of spatially-related data. Documentation in this new database includes surface photographs, panoramas, samples and their laboratory studies (major element and rare earth element weight percents), planned and actual vehicle traverses, and field notes. Using high-resolution (<0.25 m/pixel) images from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) the rover (LRV) tracks and astronaut surface activities, along with field sketches from the Apollo 15 Preliminary Science Report (Swann, 1972), were digitized and mapped in ArcMap. Point features were created for each documented sample within the Lunar Sample Compendium (Meyer, 2010) and hyperlinked to the appropriate Compendium file (.PDF) at the stable archive site: http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/lunar/compendium.cfm. Historical Apollo Era photographs and assembled panoramas were included as point features at each station that have been hyperlinked to the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal (ALSJ) online image library. The database has been set up to allow for the easy display of spatial variation of select attributes between samples. Attributes of interest that have

  4. MSFC Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount experiment systems mission evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, A. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed evaluation is presented of the Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount experiments performance throughout the eight and one-half month Skylab Mission. Descriptions and the objectives of each instrument are included. The anomalies experienced, the causes, and corrective actions taken are discussed. Conclusions, based on evaluation of the performance of each instrument, are presented. Examples of the scientific data obtained, as well as a discussion of the quality and quantity of the data, are presented.

  5. Emblem of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is the Official emblem of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission which will be flown by Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans and Harrison H. Schmitt. The insignia is dominated by the image of Apollo, the Greek sun god. Suspended in space behind the head of Apollo is an American eagle of contemporary design, the red bars of the eagle's wing represent the bars in the U.S. flag; the three white stars symbolize the three astronaut crewmen. The background is deep blue space and within it are the Moon, the planet Saturn and a spiral galaxy or nebula. The Moon is partially overlaid by the eagle's wing suggesting that this is a celestial body that man has visited and in that sense conquered. The thrust of the eagle and the gaze of Apollo to the right and toward Saturn and the galaxy is meant to imply that man's goals in space will someday include the planets and perhaps the stars. The colors of the emblem are red, white and blue, the colors of our flag; with the addition of gold, to

  6. MSFC Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount summary mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    A summary of the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) performance during the 8.5-month Skylab mission is presented. A brief description of each ATM system, system performance summaries, discussion of all significant ATM anomalies which occurred during the Skylab mission, and, in an appendix, a summary of the Skylab ATM Calibration Rocket Project (CALROC) are provided. The text is supplemented and amplified by photographs, drawings, curves, and tables. The report shows that the ATM not only met, but exceeded premission performance criteria, and that participation of man in space for this scientific investigation greatly enhanced the quality and quantity of the data attained.

  7. MSFC Flight Mission Directive Apollo-Saturn 205 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The purpose of this directive is to provide, under one cover, coordinated direction for the AS-205 Space Vehicle Flight. Within this document, mission objectives are specified, vehicle configuration is described and referenced, flight trajectories, data acquisition requirements, instrumentation requirements, and detailed documentation requirements necessary to meet launch vehicle mission objectives are defined and/or referenced.

  8. KSC Launch Complex 34 during Apollo/Saturn Mission 202 pre-launch alert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Scene at the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 34 during an Apollo/Saturn Mission 202 pre-launch alert. The mission was a step toward qualifying the Apollo Command and Service modules and the uprated Saturn I launch vehicle for manned flight.

  9. Official emblam of Apollo 11, the first scheduled lunar landing mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Official emblam of Apollo 11, the first scheduled lunar landing mission. It depicts and eagle descending toward the lunar surface with an olive branch, symbolizing America's peaceful mission in space.

  10. MSFC Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount thermal control system mission evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, U.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Saturn Workshop Assembly was designed to expand the knowledge of manned earth orbital operations and accomplish a multitude of scientific experiments. The Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), a module of the Skylab Saturn Workshop Assembly, was the first manned solar observatory to successfully observe, monitor, and record the structure and behavior of the sun outside the earth's atmosphere. The ATM contained eight solar telescopes that recorded solar phenomena in X-ray, ultraviolet, white light, and hydrogen alpha regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. In addition, the ATM contained the Saturn Workshop Assembly's pointing and attitude control system, a data and communication system, and a solar array/rechargeable battery power system. This document presents the overall ATM thermal design philosophy, premission and mission support activity, and the mission thermal evaluation. Emphasis is placed on premission planning and orbital performance with particular attention on problems encountered during the mission. ATM thermal performance was satisfactory throughout the mission. Although several anomalies occurred, no failure was directly attributable to a deficiency in the thermal design.

  11. Apollo experience report: Mission planning for lunar module descent and ascent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, F. V.

    1972-01-01

    The premission planning, the real-time situation, and the postflight analysis for the Apollo 11 lunar descent and ascent are described. A comparison between premission planning and actual results is included. A navigation correction capability, developed from Apollo 11 postflight analysis was used successfully on Apollo 12 to provide the first pinpoint landing. An experience summary, which illustrates typical problems encountered by the mission planners, is also included.

  12. Where No Man Has Gone Before: A History of Apollo Lunar Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, William David

    1988-01-01

    This book is a narrative account of the development of the science program for the Apollo lunar landing missions. It focuses on the interaction between scientific interests and operational considerations in such matters as landing site selection and training of crews, quarantine and back contamination control, and presentation of results from scientific investigations. Scientific exploration of the moon on later flights, Apollo 12 through Apollo 17 is emphasized.

  13. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 oxygen cell failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Two phases of busy activity during critical moments of the Apollo 13 mission are reflected in this view in the Mission Control Center (MCC), bldg 30, Manned Spacecraft Center (MCC). In the foreground, Henry Simmons (left) of Newsweek magazine and John E. Riley, Public Information Specialist, Public Affairs Office, MCC, man their positions in the Press Room. At extreme left of photo, Gerald D. Griffin, Shift 2 Flight Director, talks on telephone in Mission Operations Control Room. When this photograph was taken, the Apollo 13 lunar landing had been cancelled, and the problem-plagued Apollo 13 crewmen were in transearth trajectory attempting to bring their crippled spacecraft back home.

  14. Prime crew of Apollo/Saturn Mission 204 prepares for water egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The prime crew of the first manned Apollo space flight, Apollo/Saturn Mission 204, is suited up aboard the NASA Motor Vessel Retriever in preparation for Apolllo water egress training in the Gulf of Mexico. Left to right, are Astronauts Edward H. White II, senior pilot; Virgil I. Grissom, command pilot; and Roger B. Chaffee, pilot.

  15. Backup Crew of the first manned Apollo mission practice water egress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Backup crew for Apollo/Saturn Mission 204, the first manned Apollo space flight, onboard the NASA Motor Vessel Retriever during water egress training activity in the Gulf of Mexico. Left to right, are Astronauts James A. McDivitt, Russell L. Schwickart, and David R. Scott.

  16. Portrait of Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander of Apollo 11 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Portrait of Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander of the Apollo 11 Lunar Landing mission in his space suit, with his helmet on the table in front of him. Behind him is a large photograph of the lunar surface.

  17. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 oxygen cell failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Several persons important to the Apollo 13 mission, at consoles in the Mission Operations Control Room of the Mission Control Center (MCC). Seated at consoles, from left to right, are Astronaut Donald K. Slayton, Director of Flight Crew Operations; Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Shift 3 spacecraft communicator; and Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 13 back-up crew. Standing, left to right, are Astronaut Tom K. Mattingly, who was replaced as Apollo 13 command module pilot after it was learned he may come down with measles, and Astronaut Vance D. Brand, Shift 2 spacecraft communicator. Several hours earlier crew members of the Apollo 13 mission reported to MCC that trouble had developed with an oxygen cell in their spacecraft.

  18. Saturn V Instrument Unit for the Apollo 4 Mission in the Vehicle Assembly Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This photograph was taken during the final assembly operation of the Saturn V launch vehicle for the Apollo 4 (SA 501) mission. The instrument unit (IU) was mated atop the S-IC/S-II assembly in the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay at the Kennedy Space Center. The Apollo 4 mission was the first launch of the Saturn V launch vehicle. Objectives of the unmanned Apollo 4 test flight were to obtain flight information on launch vehicle and spacecraft structural integrity and compatibility, flight loads, stage separation, and subsystems operation including testing of restart of the S-IVB stage, and to evaluate the Apollo command module heat shield. The Apollo 4 was launched on November 9, 1967 from KSC.

  19. Saturn V Instrument Unit for the Apollo 4 Mission in the Vehicle Assembly Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This photograph was taken during the final assembly operation of the Saturn V launch vehicle for the Apollo 4 (SA 501) mission. The instrument unit (IU) was hoisted to be mated to the S-IC/S-II assembly in the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay at the Kennedy Space Center. The Apollo 4 mission was the first launch of the Saturn V launch vehicle. Objectives of the unmanned Apollo 4 test flight were to obtain flight information on launch vehicle and spacecraft structural integrity and compatibility, flight loads, stage separation, and subsystems operation including testing of restart of the S-IVB stage, and to evaluate the Apollo command module heat shield. The Apollo 4 was launched on November 9, 1967 from KSC.

  20. Saturn V Vehicle for the Apollo 4 Mission in the Vehicle Assembly Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This photograph depicts the Saturn V vehicle (SA-501) for the Apollo 4 mission in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). After the completion of the assembly operation, the work platform was retracted and the vehicle was readied to rollout from the VAB to the launch pad. The Apollo 4 mission was the first launch of the Saturn V launch vehicle. Objectives of the unmanned Apollo 4 test flight were to obtain flight information on launch vehicle and spacecraft structural integrity and compatibility, flight loads, stage separation, and subsystems operation including testing of restart of the S-IVB stage, and to evaluate the Apollo command module heat shield. The Apollo 4 was launched on November 9, 1967 from KSC.

  1. The cryogenics analysis program for Apollo mission planning and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W.; Williams, J.

    1971-01-01

    The cryogenics analysis program was developed as a simplified tool for use in premission planning operations for the Apollo command service module. Through a dynamic development effort, the program has been extended to include real time and postflight analysis capabilities with nominal and contingency planning features. The technical aspects of the program and a comparison of ground test and mission data with data generated by using the cryogenics analysis program are presented. The results of the program capability to predict flight requirements also are presented. Comparisons of data from the program with data from flight results, from a tank qualifications program, and from various system anomalies that have been encountered are discussed. Future plans and additional considerations for the program also are included. Among these plans are a three tank management scheme for hydrogen, venting profile generation for Skylab, and a capability for handling two gas atmospheres. The plan for two gas atmospheres will involve the addition of the capability to handle nitrogen as well as oxygen and hydrogen.

  2. Launch of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The huge, 363-foot tall Apollo 12 (Spacecraft 108/Lunar Module 6/Saturn 507) space vehicles is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, at 11:22 a.m., November 14, 1969 (58883); View of the launch from across the water. Note the flocks of birds flying across the water as the Apollo spacecraft lifts off (58884).

  3. The Japanese Air Pollusion Observation Missions, GMAP-Asia and APOLLO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Y.; Kita, K.; Kanaya, Y.; Gmap-Asia; Apollo Mission Team

    2011-12-01

    There are two mission concepts in Japan for air quality observation, GMAP-Asia (Geostationary mission for Meteorology and Air Pollution) from geostationary orbit and APOLLO (Atmospheric pollution observation) from Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of International Space Station (ISS). The mission's purpose is to identify human versus natural sources of ozone and its precursors, aerosols, and intercontinental air pollution transport, and understand the dynamics of coastal ecosystems. The scientific targets are: 1. Understanding of global air quality status. 2. Air pollution and human health. 3. Impact of air pollution on climate change. GMAP-Asia passed the Mission Definition Review in Japanese space agency in December 2009, and continue the investigation of the instrument. Science working groups are developing and prioritizing the requirements for atmospheric composition, and aerosols for for APOLLO mission. In this talk we will summarize the current status of GMAP-Asia and APOLLO mission study activities.

  4. Apollo 14 mission report. Supplement 7: Inflight demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Experiments performed on board the Apollo 14 are reviewed. These include a liquid transfer demonstration during the transearth coast, electrophoresis separation, a composite casting demonstration, and a heat flow and convection demonstration.

  5. Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Test subject sitting at the controls: Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White further described this simulator in his paper , 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' (Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.) 'A typical mission would start with the first cart positioned on model 1 for the translunar approach and orbit establishment. After starting the descent, the second cart is readied on model 2 and, at the proper time, when superposition occurs, the pilot's scene is switched from model 1 to model 2. then cart 1 is moved to and readied on model 3. The procedure continues until an altitude of 150 feet is obtained. The cabin of the LM vehicle has four windows which represent a 45 degree field of view. The projection screens in front of each window represent 65 degrees which allows limited head motion before the edges of the display can be seen. The lunar scene is presented to the pilot by rear projection on the

  6. Apollo A-7L Spacesuit Development for Apollo 7 Through 14 Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBarron, James W., II

    2015-01-01

    Jim McBarron has over 50 years of experience with NASA spacesuit development and operations as well as the U.S. Air Force pressure suit. As a result of his experience and research, he shared his significant knowledge about early Apollo spacesuit development, A-7L suit requirements, and design details.

  7. Apollo

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Apollo ; CASRN 74115 - 24 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  8. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 oxygen cell failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    A group of eight astronauts and flight controllers monitor the console activity in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of the Mission Control Center (MCC) during the Apollo 13 lunar landing mission. Seated, left to right, are MOCR Guidance Officer Raymond F. Teague; Astronaut Edgar D. Michell, and Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., Standing, left to right, are Scientist-Astronaut Anthony W. England; Astronaut Joe H. Engle; Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan; Astronaut Ronald E. Evans; and M.P. Frank, a flight controller. When this picture was made, the Apollo 13 moon landing had already been cancelled, and the Apollo 13 crewmen were in transearth trajectory attempting to bring their crippled spacecraft back home.

  9. A description of hardware and mission planning for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littleton, F. C.

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo-Soyuz Test Program (ASTP) is scheduled for flight in July 1975. This paper will describe briefly the mission planning and hardware associated with the program. Of interest are modifications to the basic Apollo and Soyuz vehicles as well as the newly developed docking module and docking system. Joint aspects of the mission profile are explained. Science objectives and corresponding experiments are described. Utilization of the ATS-6 Satellite for relay of TV, voice, and data to the ground is also a topic. The paper concludes with a discussion of the joint flight control interface.

  10. Radish plant exposed to lunar material collected on the Apollo 12 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The leaves of this radish plant were rubbed with lunar material colleted on the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission in experiments conducted in the Manned Spacecraft Center's Lunar Receiving Laboratory. The plant was exposed to the material 30 days before this photograph was made. Evidently no ill effects resulted from contact with the lunar soil.

  11. Dual exposure view of exterior and interior of Apollo Mission simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Dual exposure showing the Apollo Mission Simulator in bldg 5. In the exterior view Astronauts William A. Anders, Michael Collins, and Frank Borman (reading from top of stairs) are about to enter the simulator. Interior view shows the three astronauts in the simulator. They are (left to right) Borman, Collins, and Anders.

  12. Dr. George Mueller Follows the Progress of the Apollo 11 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Dr. George E. Mueller, Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, NASA, follows the progress of the Apollo 11 mission. This photo was taken on July 16, 1969 in the Launch Control Center at the Spaceport on the morning of the launch.

  13. Apollo 16 mission report. Supplement 2: Service Propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. J.; Wood, S. C.

    1974-01-01

    The Apollo 16 Mission was the sixteenth in a series of flights using Apollo flight hardware and included the fifth lunar landing of the Apollo Program. The Apollo 16 Mission utilized CSM 113 which was equipped with SPS Engine S/N 66 (Injector S/N 137). The engine configuration and expected performance characteristics are presented. Since previous flight results of the SPS have consistently shown the existence of a negative mixture ratio shift, SPS Engine S/N 66 was reorificed to increase the mixture ratio for this mission. The propellant unbalance for the two major engine firings is compared with the predicted unbalance. Although the unbalance at the end of the TEI burn is significantly different than the predicted unbalance, the propellant mixture ratio was well within limits. The SPS performed six burns during the mission, with a total burn duration of 575.3 seconds. The ignition time, burn duration and velocity gain for each of the six SPS burns are reported.

  14. Apollo experience report: Guidance and control systems: Automated control system for unmanned mission AS-201

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, G. F.

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo command module heat shield and Apollo command and service module/Saturn launch vehicle structural integrity were evaluated in an unmanned test flight. An automated control system was developed to provide the mission event sequencing, the real-time ground control interface, and the backup attitude reference system for the unmanned flight. The required mission events, the design logic, the redundancy concept, and the ground-support-equipment concept are described and some development problem areas are discussed. The mission event time line and the real-time ground command list are included to provide an outline of the control system capabilities and requirements. The mission was accomplished with the automated control system, which functioned without flight anomalies.

  15. Apollo Soyuz test project, USA-USSR. [mission plan of spacecraft docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The mission plan of the docking of a United States Apollo and a Soviet Union Soyuz spacecraft in Earth orbit to test compatible rendezvous and docking equipment and procedures is presented. Space experiments conducted jointly by the astronauts and cosmonauts during the joint phase of the mission as well as experiments performed solely by the U.S. astronauts and spread over the nine day span of the flight are included. Biographies of the astronauts and cosmonauts are given.

  16. Saturn 5 launch vehicle flight evaluation report-AS-511 Apollo 16 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A postflight analysis of the Apollo 16 mission is presented. The basic objective of the flight evaluation is to acquire, reduce, analyze, and report on flight data to the extent required to assure future mission success and vehicle reliability. Actual flight problems are identified, their causes are deet determined, and recommendations are made for corrective actions. Summaries of launch operations and spacecraft performance are included. Significant events for all phases of the flight are provide in tabular form.

  17. Radioactivity observed in the sodium iodide gamma-ray spectrometer returned on the Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, C. S.; Trombka, J. I.; Schmadebeck, R. L.; Eller, E.; Bielefeld, M. J.; Okelley, G. D.; Eldridge, J. S.; Northcutt, K. J.; Metzger, A. E.; Reedy, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    In order to obtain information on radioactive background induced in the Apollo 15 and 16 gamma-ray spectrometers (7 cm x 7 cm NaI) by particle irradiation during spaceflight, and identical detector was flown and returned to earth on the Apollo 17 mission. The induced radioactivity was monitored both internally and externally from one and a half hours after splashdown. When used in conjunction with a computation scheme for estimating induced activation from calculated trapped proton and cosmic-ray fluences, these results show an important contribution resulting from both thermal and energetic neutrons produced in the heavy spacecraft by cosmic-ray interactions.

  18. Apollo experience report: Mission evaluation team postflight documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodson, J. W.; Cordiner, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The various postflight reports prepared by the mission evaluation team, including the final mission evaluation report, report supplements, anomaly reports, and the 5-day mission report, are described. The procedures for preparing each report from the inputs of the various disciplines are explained, and the general method of reporting postflight results is discussed. Recommendations for postflight documentation in future space programs are included. The official requirements for postflight documentation and a typical example of an anomaly report are provided as appendixes.

  19. Decompression sickness in simulated Apollo-Soyuz space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, J. P.; Robertson, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Apollo-Soyuz docking module atmospheres were evaluated for incidence of decompression sickness in men simulating passage from the Russian spacecraft atmosphere, to the U.S. spacecraft atmosphere, and then to the American space suit pressure. Following 8 hr of 'shirtsleeve' exposure to 31:69::O2:N2 gas breathing mixture, at 10 psia, subjects were 'denitrogenated' for either 30 or 60 min with 100% O2 prior to decompression directly to 3.7 psia suit equivalent while performing exercise at fixed intervals. Five of 21 subjects experienced symptoms of decompression sickness after 60 min of denitrogenation compared to 6 among 20 subjects after 30 min of denitrogenation. A condition of Grade I bends was reported after 60 min of denitrogenation, and 3 of these 5 subjects noted the disappearance of all symptoms of bends at 3.7 psia. After 30 min of denitrogenation, 2 out of 6 subjects developed Grade II bends at 3.7 psia.

  20. NASA's Lunar Polar Ice Prospector, RESOLVE: Mission Rehearsal in Apollo Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Picard, Martin; Quinn, Jacqueline; Sanders, Gerald B.; Colaprete, Anthony; Elphic, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    After the completion of the Apollo Program, space agencies didn't visit the moon for many years. But then in the 90's, the Clementine and Lunar Prospector missions returned and showed evidence of water ice at the poles. Then in 2009 the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite indisputably showed that the Cabeus crater contained water ice and other useful volatiles. Furthermore, instruments aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) show evidence that the water ice may also be present in areas that receive several days of continuous sunlight each month. However, before we can factor this resource into our mission designs, we must understand the distribution and quantity of ice or other volatiles at the poles and whether it can be reasonably harvested for use as propellant or mission consumables. NASA, in partnership with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), has been developing a payload to answer these questions. The payload is named RESOLVE. RESOLVE is on a development path that will deliver a tested flight design by the end of 2014. The team has developed a Design Reference Mission using LRO data that has RESOLVE landing near Cabeus Crater in May of2016. One of the toughest obstacles for RESOLVE's solar powered mission is its tight timeline. RESOLVE must be able to complete its objectives in the 5-7 days of available sunlight. The RESOLVE team must be able to work around obstacles to the mission timeline in real time. They can't afford to take a day off to replan as other planetary missions have done. To insure that this mission can be executed as planned, a prototype version of RESOLVE was developed this year and tested at a lunar analog site on Hawaii, known as Apollo Valley, which was once used to train the Apollo astronauts. The RESOLVE team planned the mission with the same type of orbital imagery that would be available from LRO. The simulation team prepositioned a Lander in Apollo Valley with RESOLVE on top mounted on its CSA rover. Then the mission

  1. Mission objectives for geological exploration of the Apollo 16 landing site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlberger, W. R.; Horz, F.; Sevier, J. R.; Ulrich, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of the Apollo 16 mission to delineate the nature and origin of two major physiographic units of the central lunar highlands are discussed. Surface exploration plans, specific sampling procedures, operational constraints, and suites of samples that were collected for specific local objectives are described. Pre-mission hypotheses that favored a volcanic origin for the Cayley plains as well as the Descartes mountains were proved to be wrong by the mission results, but not enough samples have been studied to draw any other definite conclusions. Two contrasting schools of thought about the origin of the Apollo fragmental impact deposits are described: one maintains that the samples are predominantly of local origin, while the other suggests more distant, basin-related sources.

  2. Preserving the Science Legacy from the Apollo Missions to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, N. S.; Evans, C. A.; Zeigler, R. A.; Lehnert, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Six Apollo missions landed on the Moon from 1969-72, returning to Earth 382 kg of lunar rock, soil, and core samples—among the best documented and preserved samples on Earth that have supported a robust research program for 45 years. From mission planning through sample collection, preliminary examination, and subsequent research, strict protocols and procedures are followed for handling and allocating Apollo subsamples. Even today, 100s of samples are allocated for research each year, building on the science foundation laid down by the early Apollo sample studies and combining new data from today's instrumentation, lunar remote sensing missions and lunar meteorites. Today's research includes advances in our understanding of lunar volatiles, lunar formation and evolution, and the origin of evolved lunar lithologies. Much sample information is available to researchers at curator.jsc.nasa.gov. Decades of analyses on lunar samples are published in LPSC proceedings volumes and other peer-reviewed journals, and tabulated in lunar sample compendia entries. However, for much of the 1969-1995 period, the processing documentation, individual and consortia analyses, and unpublished results exist only in analog forms or primitive digital formats that are either inaccessible or at risk of being lost forever because critical data from early investigators remain unpublished. We have initiated several new efforts to rescue some of the early Apollo data, including unpublished analytical data. We are scanning NASA documentation that is related to the Apollo missions and sample processing, and we are collaborating with IEDA to establish a geochemical database called Moon DB. To populate this database, we are working with prominent lunar PIs to organize and transcribe years of both published and unpublished data. Other initiatives include micro-CT scanning of complex lunar samples to document their interior structure (e.g. clasts, vesicles); linking high-resolution scans of Apollo

  3. Preserving the Science Legacy from the Apollo Missions to the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cindy; Zeigler, Ryan; Lehnert, Kerstin; Todd, Nancy; Blumenfeld, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Six Apollo missions landed on the Moon from 1969-72, returning to Earth 382 kg of lunar rock, soil, and core samples-among the best documented and preserved samples on Earth that have supported a robust research program for 45 years. From mission planning through sample collection, preliminary examination, and subsequent research, strict protocols and procedures are followed for handling and allocating Apollo subsamples. Even today, 100s of samples are allocated for research each year, building on the science foundation laid down by the early Apollo sample studies and combining new data from today's instrumentation, lunar remote sensing missions and lunar meteorites. Today's research includes advances in our understanding of lunar volatiles, lunar formation and evolution, and the origin of evolved lunar lithologies. Much sample information is available to researchers at curator.jsc.nasa.gov. Decades of analyses on lunar samples are published in LPSC proceedings volumes and other peer-reviewed journals, and tabulated in lunar sample compendia entries. However, for much of the 1969-1995 period, the processing documentation, individual and consortia analyses, and unpublished results exist only in analog forms or primitive digital formats that are either inaccessible or at risk of being lost forever because critical data from early investigators remain unpublished. We have initiated several new efforts to rescue some of the early Apollo data, including unpublished analytical data. We are scanning NASA documentation that is related to the Apollo missions and sample processing, and we are collaborating with IEDA to establish a geochemical database called Moon DB. To populate this database, we are working with prominent lunar PIs to organize and transcribe years of both published and unpublished data. Other initiatives include micro-CT scanning of complex lunar samples to document their interior structure (e.g. clasts, vesicles); linking high-resolution scans of Apollo

  4. Lunar interior as seen by seismology: from Apollo to future missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonne, Philippe; Kobayashi, Naoki; Garcia, Raphael; Weber, Renee; Johnson, Catherine; Gagnepain-Beyneix, Jeannine

    2012-07-01

    About 40 years ago, the Apollo missions deployed a network of 4 passive seismometers on the Moon, at landing sites 12, 14, 15 and 16. A seismometer was also deployed on Apollo 11 and a gravimeter on Apollo 17 landing sites. Although this network stopped its operation in 1977, the analysis of the data is surprisingly still ongoing and has led to the determination of major radial features in the lunar interior, including the recent discovery of core phases in 2011 by Weber et al and Garcia et all, 2011. We review in this presentation the general results of these seismic analyses, from the subsurface near the landing sites to the core. Special focus is given to the crustal structure, both in term of thickness and lateral variation and to the core structure, in term of radius, core state, temperature and composition. We also discuss the existence of possible discontinuities in the mantle, proposed by some early seismic models but challenged by others and interpreted as the possible limit of an early magma ocean. We finally present the perspectives of future missions, first with the SELENE2 mission, which is expected to deploy a new generation of very broad band seismometer followed by other projects proposed either in Europe or the USA. By using the expected sensitivity of the seismometers considered for these mission, we conclude by presenting the potential challenges, science objectives and discoveries of this future step in the seismic exploration of our satellite.

  5. Apollo 15 mission. Temporary loss of command module television picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An investigation was made into the temporary loss of command module color television picture by the ground station converter at Mission Control Center. Results show the picture loss was caused by a false synchronization pulse that resulted from the inability of the black level clipping circuit to respond adequately to the video signal when bright sunlight suddenly entered the camera's field of view.

  6. The Effects of Lunar Dust on EVA Systems During the Apollo Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Mission documents from the six Apollo missions that landed on the lunar surface have been studied in order to catalog the effects of lunar dust on Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) systems, primarily the Apollo surface space suit. It was found that the effects could be sorted into nine categories: vision obscuration, false instrument readings, dust coating and contamination, loss of traction, clogging of mechanisms, abrasion, thermal control problems, seal failures, and inhalation and irritation. Although simple dust mitigation measures were sufficient to mitigate some of the problems (i.e., loss of traction) it was found that these measures were ineffective to mitigate many of the more serious problems (i.e., clogging, abrasion, diminished heat rejection). The severity of the dust problems were consistently underestimated by ground tests, indicating a need to develop better simulation facilities and procedures.

  7. The Effects of Lunar Dust on EVA Systems During the Apollo Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Mission documents from the six Apollo missions that landed on the lunar surface have been studied in order to catalog the effects of lunar dust on Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) systems, primarily the Apollo surface space suit. It was found that the effects could be sorted into nine categories: vision obscuration, false instrument readings, dust coating and contamination, loss of traction, clogging of mechanisms, abrasion, thermal control problems, seal failures, and inhalation and irritation. Although simple dust mitigation measures were sufficient to mitigate some of the problems (i.e., loss of traction) it was found that these measures were ineffective to mitigate many of the more serious problems (i.e., clogging, abrasion, diminished heat rejection). The severity of the dust problems were consistently underestimated by ground tests, indicating a need to develop better simulation facilities and procedures.

  8. Crew of the first manned Apollo mission practice water egress procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Prime crew for the first manned Apollo mission practice water egress procedures with full scale boilerplate model of their spacecraft. In the water at right is Astronaut Edward H. White (foreground) and Astronaut Roger B. Chaffee. In raft near the spacecraft is Astronaut Virgil I. Grissom. NASA swimmers are in the water to assist in the practice session that took place at Ellington AFB, near the Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston.

  9. Crew of the first manned Apollo mission practice water egress procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Prime crew for the first manned Apollo mission relax in a life raft during water egress training in the Gulf of Mexico with a full scale boilerplate model of their spacecraft. Left to right, are Astronauts Roger B. Chaffee, pilot, Virgil I. Grissom, command pilot, and Edward H. White II (facing camera), senior pilot. In background is the 'Duchess', a yacht owned by La Porte businessman Paul Barkley and provided by him as a press boat for newsmen covering the training.

  10. Rock sample brought to earth from the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A scientist's gloved hand holds one of the numerous rock samples brought back to Earth from the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission. This sample is a highly shattered basaltic rock with a thin black-glass coating on five of its six sides. Glass fills fractures and cements the rock together. The rock appears to have been shattered and thrown out by a meteorite impact explosion and coated with molten rock material before the rock fell to the surface.

  11. Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle Flight Evaluation Report-AS-512 Apollo 17 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An evaluation of the launch vehicle and lunar roving vehicle performance for the Apollo 17 flight is presented. The objective of the evaluation is to acquire, reduce, analyze, and report on flight data to the extent required to assure future mission success and vehicle reliability. Actual flight problems are identified, their causes are determined, and recommendations are made for corrective action. Summaries of launch operations and spacecraft performance are included. The significant events for all phases of the flight are analyzed.

  12. Saturn 5 launch vehicle flight evaluation report-AS-509 Apollo 14 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A postflight analysis of the Apollo 14 flight is presented. The basic objective of the flight evaluation is to acquire, reduce, analyze, and report on flight data to the extent required to assure future mission success and vehicle reliability. Actual flight failures are identified, their causes are determined and corrective actions are recommended. Summaries of launch operations and spacecraft performance are included. The significant events for all phases of the flight are analyzed.

  13. Saturn V S-IVB (Third) Stage for the Apollo 4 Mission in the Vehicle Assembly Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This photograph was taken during the final assembly operation of the Saturn V launch vehicle for the Apollo 4 (SA 501) mission. The S-IVB (third) stage was hoisted to be mated to the S-IC/S-II/IU assembly in the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay at the Kennedy Space Center. The Apollo 4 mission was the first launch of the Saturn V launch vehicle. Objectives of the unmanned Apollo 4 test flight were to obtain flight information on launch vehicle and spacecraft structural integrity and compatibility, flight loads, stage separation, and subsystems operation including testing of restart of the S-IVB stage, and to evaluate the Apollo command module heat shield. The Apollo 4 was launched on November 9, 1967 from KSC.

  14. Saturn V S-IVB (Third) Stage for the Apollo 4 Mission in the Vehicle Assembly Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    This photograph was taken during the final assembly operation of the Saturn V launch vehicle for the Apollo 4 (SA 501) mission. The S-IVB (third) stage was mated to the S-IC/S-II/IU assembly in the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay at the Kennedy Space Center. The Apollo 4 mission was the first launch of the Saturn V launch vehicle. Objectives of the unmanned Apollo 4 test flight were to obtain flight information on launch vehicle and spacecraft structural integrity and compatibility, flight loads, stage separation, and subsystems operation including testing of restart of the S-IVB stage, and to evaluate the Apollo command module heat shield. The Apollo 4 was launched on November 9, 1967 from KSC.

  15. Rescue and Preservation of Sample Data from the Apollo Missions to the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Nancy S.; Zeigler, Ryan A.; Evans, Cindy A.; Lehnert, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Six Apollo missions landed on the Moon from 1969-72, returning to Earth 382 kg of lunar rock, soil, and core samples. These samples are among the best documented and preserved samples on Earth that have supported a robust research program for 45 years. From mission planning through sample collection, preliminary examination, and subsequent research, strict protocols and procedures are followed for handling and allocating Apollo subsamples, resulting in the production of vast amounts of documentation. Even today, hundreds of samples are allocated for research each year, building on the science foundation laid down by the early Apollo sample studies and combining new data from today's instrumentation, lunar remote sensing missions and lunar meteorites. Much sample information is available to researchers at curator.jsc.nasa.gov. Decades of analyses on lunar samples are published in LPSC proceedings volumes and other peer-reviewed journals, and tabulated in lunar sample compendia entries. However, for much of the 1969-1995 period, the processing documentation, individual and consortia analyses, and unpublished results exist only in analog forms or primitive digital formats that are either inaccessible or at risk of being lost forever because critical data from early investigators remain unpublished.

  16. The Mission Transcript Collection: U.S. Human Spaceflight Missions from Mercury Redstone 3 to Apollo 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Aboard every U.S. piloted spacecraft, from Mercury through Apollo, NASA installed tape recorders that captured nearly every word spoken by the astronauts during their history-making flights into space. For the first time ever, NASA has digitally scanned all of the transcripts made from both the onboard tapes and those tape recordings made on the ground from the air-to-ground transmissions and placed them on this two CD-ROM set. Gathered in this special collection are 80 transcripts totaling nearly 45,000 pages of text that cover every US human spaceflight from the first human Mercury mission through the last lunar landing flight of Apollo 17. Users of this CD will note that the quantity and type of transcripts made for each mission vary. For example, the Mercury flights each had one transcript whereas the Gemini missions produced several. Starting with the Gemini flights, NASA produced a Public Affairs Office (PAO) commentary version, as well as at least one "technical" air-to-ground transcript version, per mission. Most of the Apollo missions produced four transcripts per flight. These included the onboard voice data recorder transcripts made from the Data Storage Equipment (DSE) on the Command Module (CM), and the Data Storage Electronics Assembly (DSEA) onboard the Lunar Module (LM), in addition to the PAO commentary and air-to-ground technical transcripts. The CD set includes an index listing each transcript file by name. Some of the transcripts include a detailed explanation of their contents and how they were made. Also included in this collection is a listing of all the original air-to-ground audiotapes housed in NASA's archives from which many of these transcripts were made. We hope you find this collection of transcripts interesting and useful.

  17. Apollo experience report: Guidance and control systems; lunar module mission programer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernon, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the concept, operational requirements, design, and development of the lunar module mission programer is presented, followed by a review of component and subsystem performance during design-feasibility, design-verification, and qualification tests performed in the laboratory. The system was further proved on the unmanned Apollo 5 mission. Several anomalies were detected, and satisfactory solutions were found. These problems are defined and examined, and the corrective action taken is discussed. Suggestions are given for procedural changes to be used if future guidance and control systems of this type are to be developed.

  18. The Apollo Medical Operations Project: Recommendations to improve crew health and performance for future exploration missions and lunar surface operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Novak, Joseph D.; Polk, James D.; Gillis, David B.; Schmid, Josef; Duncan, James M.; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    Introduction: Medical requirements for the future crew exploration vehicle (CEV), lunar surface access module (LSAM), advanced extravehicular activity (EVA) suits, and Lunar habitat are currently being developed within the exploration architecture. While much is known about the vehicle and lunar surface activities during Apollo, relatively little is known about whether the hardware, systems, or environment impacted crew health or performance during these missions. Also, inherent to the proposed aggressive surface activities is the potential risk of injury to crewmembers. The Space Medicine Division at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) requested a study in December 2005 to identify Apollo mission issues relevant to medical operations impacting crew health and/or performance during a lunar mission. The goals of this project were to develop or modify medical requirements for new vehicles and habitats, create a centralized database for future access, and share relevant Apollo information with various working groups participating in the exploration effort. Methods: A review of medical operations during Apollo missions 7-17 was conducted. Ten categories of hardware, systems, or crew factors were identified during preliminary data review generating 655 data records which were captured in an Access® database. The preliminary review resulted in 285 questions. The questions were posed to surviving Apollo crewmembers using mail, face-to-face meetings, phone communications, or online interactions. Results: Fourteen of 22 surviving Apollo astronauts (64%) participated in the project. This effort yielded 107 recommendations for future vehicles, habitats, EVA suits, and lunar surface operations. Conclusions: To date, the Apollo Medical Operations recommendations are being incorporated into the exploration mission architecture at various levels and a centralized database has been developed. The Apollo crewmember's input has proved to be an invaluable resource. We will continue

  19. Pulmonary function evaluation during the Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Previous experience during Apollo postflight exercise testing indicated no major changes in pulmonary function. Pulmonary function has been studied in detail following exposure to hypoxic and hyperoxic normal gravity environments, but no previous study has reported on men exposed to an environment that was both normoxic at 258 torr total pressure and at null gravity as encountered in Skylab. Forced vital capacity (FVC) was measured during the preflight and postflight periods of the Skylab 2 mission. Inflight measurements of vital capacity (VC) were obtained during the last 2 weeks of the second manned mission (Skylab 3). More detailed pulmonary function screening was accomplished during the Skylab 4 mission. The primary measurements made during Skylab 4 testing included residual volume determination (RV), closing volume (CV), VC, FVC and its derivatives. In addition, VC was measured in flight at regular intervals during the Skylab 4 mission. Vital capacity was decreased slightly (-10%) in flight in all Skylab 4 crewmen. No major preflight-to-postflight changes were observed. The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) crewmen were studied using equipment and procedures similar to those employed during Skylab 4. Postflight evaluation of the ASTP crewmen was complicated by their inadvertent exposure to nitrogen tetroxide gas fumes upon reentry.

  20. Apollo 14 mission report. Supplement 5: Descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.; Wood, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of the LM-8 descent propulsion system during the Apollo 14 mission was evaluated and found to be satisfactory. The average engine effective specific impulse was 0.1 second higher than predicted, but well within the predicted l sigma uncertainty. The engine performance corrected to standard inlet conditions for the FTP portion of the burn at 43 seconds after ignition was as follows: thrust, 9802, lbf; specific impulse, 304.1 sec; and propellant mixture ratio, 1603. These values are + or - 0.8, -0.06, and + or - 0.3 percent different respectively, from the values reported from engine acceptance tests and were within specification limits.

  1. Saturn 5 launch vehicle flight evaluation report, AS-510, Apollo 15 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A postflight analysis of the Apollo 15 flight is presented. The performance of the launch vehicle, spacecraft, and lunar roving vehicle are discussed. The objective of the evaluation is to acquire, reduce, analyze, and report on flight data to the extent required to assure future mission success and vehicle reliability. Actual flight problems are identified, their causes are determined, and recommendations are made for corrective actions. Summaries of launch operations and spacecraft performance are included. Significant events for all phases of the flight are tabulated.

  2. Apollo by the Numbers: A Statistical Reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orloff, Richard; Garber, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide researchers, students, and space enthusiasts with a comprehensive reference for facts about Project Apollo, America's effort to put humans in the Moon. Research for this work started in 1988, when the author discovered that, despite the number of excellent books that focused on the drama of events that highlighted Apollo, there were none that focused on the drama of the numbers. This book is separated into two parts. The first part contains narratives for the Apollo 1 fire and the 11 flown Apollo missions. Included after each narrative is a series of data tables, followed by a comprehensive timeline of events from just before liftoff to just after crew and spacecraft recovery. The second part contains more than 50 tables. These tables organize much of the data from the narratives in one place so they can be compared among all missions. The tables offer additional data as well. The reader can select a specific mission narrative or specific data table by consulting the Table of Contents.

  3. Apollo experience report: The role of flight mission rules in mission preparation and conduct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keyser, L. W.

    1974-01-01

    The development of flight mission rules from the mission development phase through the detailed mission-planning phase and through the testing and training phase is analyzed. The procedure for review of the rules and the coordination requirements for mission-rule development are presented. The application of the rules to real-time decision making is outlined, and consideration is given to the benefit of training ground controllers and flightcrews in the methods of determining the best response to a nonnominal in-flight situation for which no action has been preplanned. The Flight Mission Rules document is discussed in terms of the purpose and objective thereof and in terms of the definition, the development, and the use of mission rules.

  4. High-performing simulations of the space radiation environment for the International Space Station and Apollo Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Matthew Lawrence

    The space radiation environment is a significant challenge to future manned and unmanned space travels. Future missions will rely more on accurate simulations of radiation transport in space through spacecraft to predict astronaut dose and energy deposition within spacecraft electronics. The International Space Station provides long-term measurements of the radiation environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO); however, only the Apollo missions provided dosimetry data beyond LEO. Thus dosimetry analysis for deep space missions is poorly supported with currently available data, and there is a need to develop dosimetry-predicting models for extended deep space missions. GEANT4, a Monte Carlo Method, provides a powerful toolkit in C++ for simulation of radiation transport in arbitrary media, thus including the spacecraft and space travels. The newest version of GEANT4 supports multithreading and MPI, resulting in faster distributive processing of simulations in high-performance computing clusters. This thesis introduces a new application based on GEANT4 that greatly reduces computational time using Kingspeak and Ember computational clusters at the Center for High Performance Computing (CHPC) to simulate radiation transport through full spacecraft geometry, reducing simulation time to hours instead of weeks without post simulation processing. Additionally, this thesis introduces a new set of detectors besides the historically used International Commission of Radiation Units (ICRU) spheres for calculating dose distribution, including a Thermoluminescent Detector (TLD), Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), and human phantom combined with a series of new primitive scorers in GEANT4 to calculate dose equivalence based on the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) standards. The developed models in this thesis predict dose depositions in the International Space Station and during the Apollo missions showing good agreement with experimental measurements

  5. Mission requirements CSM-111/DM-2 Apollo/Soyuz test project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmer, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    Test systems are developed for rendezvous and docking of manned spacecraft and stations that are suitable for use as a standard international system. This includes the rendezvous and docking of Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft, and crew transfer. The conduct of the mission will include: (1) testing of compatible rendezvous systems in orbit; (2) testing of universal docking assemblies; (3) verifying the techniques for transfer of cosmonauts and astronauts; (4) performing certain activities by U.S.A. and U.S.S.R. crews in joint flight; and (5) gaining of experience in conducting joint flights by U.S.A. and U.S.S.R. spacecraft, including, in case of necessity, rendering aid in emergency situations.

  6. Measurements of heavy solar wind and higher energy solar particles during the Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. M.; Zinner, E.; Maurette, M.

    1973-01-01

    The lunar surface cosmic ray experiment, consisting of sets of mica, glass, plastic, and metal foil detectors, was successfully deployed on the Apollo 17 mission. One set of detectors was exposed directly to sunlight and another set was placed in shade. Preliminary scanning of the mica detectors shows the expected registration of heavy solar wind ions in the sample exposed directly to the sun. The initial results indicate a depletion of very-heavy solar wind ions. The effect is probably not real but is caused by scanning inefficiencies. Despite the lack of any pronounced solar activity, energetic heavy particles with energies extending to 1 MeV/nucleon were observed. Equal track densities of approximately 6000 tracks/cm sq 0.5 microns in length were measured in mica samples exposed in both sunlight and shade.

  7. NASA's J-2X Engine Builds on the Apollo Program for Lunar Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snoddy, Jimmy R.

    2006-01-01

    In January 2006, NASA streamlined its U.S. Vision for Space Exploration hardware development approach for replacing the Space Shuttle after it is retired in 2010. The revised CLV upper stage will use the J-2X engine, a derivative of NASA s Apollo Program Saturn V s S-II and S-IVB main propulsion, which will also serve as the Earth Departure Stage (EDS) engine. This paper gives details of how the J- 2X engine effort mitigates risk by building on the Apollo Program and other lessons learned to deliver a human-rated engine that is on an aggressive development schedule, with first demonstration flight in 2010 and human test flights in 2012. It is well documented that propulsion is historically a high-risk area. NASA s risk reduction strategy for the J-2X engine design, development, test, and evaluation is to build upon heritage hardware and apply valuable experience gained from past development efforts. In addition, NASA and its industry partner, Rocketdyne, which originally built the J-2, have tapped into their extensive databases and are applying lessons conveyed firsthand by Apollo-era veterans of America s first round of Moon missions in the 1960s and 1970s. NASA s development approach for the J-2X engine includes early requirements definition and management; designing-in lessons learned from the 5-2 heritage programs; initiating long-lead procurement items before Preliminary Desi& Review; incorporating design features for anticipated EDS requirements; identifying facilities for sea-level and altitude testing; and starting ground support equipment and logistics planning at an early stage. Other risk reduction strategies include utilizing a proven gas generator cycle with recent development experience; utilizing existing turbomachinery ; applying current and recent main combustion chamber (Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator) and channel wall nozzle (COBRA) advances; and performing rigorous development, qualification, and certification testing of the engine system

  8. Apollo 13 emblem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This is the insignia of the Apollo 13 lunar landing mission. Represented in the Apollo 13 emblem is Apollo, the sun god of Greek mythology, symbolizing how the Apollo flights have extended the light of knowledge to all mankind. The Latin phrase Ex Luna, Scientia means 'From the Moon, Knowledge'.

  9. Apollo 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, David

    1972-01-01

    This is the Press Kit that was given to the various media outlets that were interested in covering the Apollo 17 mission. It includes information about the moon, lunar science, concentrating on the planned mission. The kit includes information about the flight, and the trajectory, planned orbit insertion maneuvers, the extravehicular mission events, a comparison with the Apollo 16, a map of the lunar surface, and the surface activity, information about the Taurus-Littrow landing site, the planned science experiments, the power source for the experiment package and diagrams of some of the instrumentation that was used to perform the experiments.

  10. On Eagle's Wings: The Parkes Observatory's Support of the Apollo 11 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkissian, John M.

    At 12:56 p.m., on Monday 21 July 1969 (AEST), six hundred million people witnessed Neil Armstrong's historic first steps on the Moon through television pictures transmitted to Earth from the lunar module, Eagle. Three tracking stations were receiving the signals simultaneously. They were the CSIRO's Parkes Radio Telescope, the Honeysuckle Creek tracking station near Canberra, and NASA's Goldstone station in California. During the first nine minutes of the broadcast, NASA alternated between the signals being received by the three stations. When they switched to the Parkes pictures, they were of such superior quality that NASA remained with them for the rest of the 2½-hour moonwalk. The television pictures from Parkes were received under extremely trying and dangerous conditions. A violent squall struck the telescope on the day of the historic moonwalk. The telescope was buffeted by strong winds that swayed the support tower and threatened the integrity of the telescope structure. Fortunately, cool heads prevailed and as Aldrin activated the TV camera, the Moon rose into the field-of-view of the Parkes telescope. This report endeavours to explain the circumstances of the Parkes Observatory's support of the Apollo 11 mission, and how it came to be involved in the historic enterprise.

  11. Reliability and Failure in NASA Missions: Blunders, Normal Accidents, High Reliability, Bad Luck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    NASA emphasizes crew safety and system reliability but several unfortunate failures have occurred. The Apollo 1 fire was mistakenly unanticipated. After that tragedy, the Apollo program gave much more attention to safety. The Challenger accident revealed that NASA had neglected safety and that management underestimated the high risk of shuttle. Probabilistic Risk Assessment was adopted to provide more accurate failure probabilities for shuttle and other missions. NASA's "faster, better, cheaper" initiative and government procurement reform led to deliberately dismantling traditional reliability engineering. The Columbia tragedy and Mars mission failures followed. Failures can be attributed to blunders, normal accidents, or bad luck. Achieving high reliability is difficult but possible.

  12. Thermal property measurements on lunar material returned by Apollo 11 and 12 missions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horai, K.-I.; Simmons, G.

    1972-01-01

    Measurement of thermal diffusivity on Apollo 11 type A and type C samples in the temperature range between 150 and 440 K under atmospheric pressure. Thermal diffusivity of type C material is lower and less temperature-dependent than type A material. Both types of samples exhibit lower thermal diffusivities than nonporous terrestrial basalt. The rate of heat generation of Apollo 11 and 12 samples was calculated from the concentrations of radioactive elements: potassium, thorium, and uranium. Apollo 11 crystalline rocks show an average rate of heat generation which is not significantly different from terrestrial basalt. The Th/U ratio does not differ greatly from chondritic and terrestrial averages.

  13. The Apollo Medical Operations Project: Recommendations to Improve Crew Health and Performance for Future Exploration Missions and Lunar Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Novak, Joseph D.; Polk, James D.; Gillis, David B.; Schmid, Josef; Duncan, James M.; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    Medical requirements for the future Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM), advanced Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suits and Lunar habitat are currently being developed. Crews returning to the lunar surface will construct the lunar habitat and conduct scientific research. Inherent in aggressive surface activities is the potential risk of injury to crewmembers. Physiological responses and the operational environment for short forays during the Apollo lunar missions were studied and documented. Little is known about the operational environment in which crews will live and work and the hardware will be used for long-duration lunar surface operations. Additional information is needed regarding productivity and the events that affect crew function such as a compressed timeline. The Space Medicine Division at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) requested a study in December 2005 to identify Apollo mission issues relevant to medical operations that had impact to crew health and/or performance. The operationally oriented goals of this project were to develop or modify medical requirements for new exploration vehicles and habitats, create a centralized database for future access, and share relevant Apollo information with the multiple entities at NASA and abroad participating in the exploration effort.

  14. The Apollo Medical Operations Project: Recommendations to Improve Crew Health and Performance for Future Exploration Missions and Lunar Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Polk, James D.; Gillis, David B.; Schmid, Joseph; Duncan, James M.; Davis, Jeffrey R.; Novak, Joseph D.

    2007-01-01

    Medical requirements for the future Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM), advanced Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suits and Lunar habitat are currently being developed. Crews returning to the lunar surface will construct the lunar habitat and conduct scientific research. Inherent in aggressive surface activities is the potential risk of injury to crewmembers. Physiological responses to and the operational environment of short forays during the Apollo lunar missions were studied and documented. Little is known about the operational environment in which crews will live and work and the hardware that will be used for long-duration lunar surface operations.Additional information is needed regarding productivity and the events that affect crew function such as a compressed timeline. The Space Medicine Division at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) requested a study in December 2005 to identify Apollo mission issues relevant to medical operations that had impact to crew health and/or performance. The operationally oriented goals of this project were to develop or modify medical requirements for new exploration vehicles and habitats, create a centralized database for future access, and share relevant Apollo information with the multiple entities at NASA and abroad participating in the exploration effort.

  15. Comparison of the magnetic properties of glass from Luna 20 with similar properties of glass from the Apollo missions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Thorpe, A.N.; Alexander, C.C.; Briggs, C.L.

    1973-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made on four glass spherules and fragments from the Luna 20 fines; two at 300??K and two from 300??K to 4??K. From these data the magnetic susceptibility extrapolated to infinite field, the magnetization at low fields and also the saturation magnetization at high fields, the Curie constant, the Weiss temperature, and the temperature-independent susceptibility were determined. Using a model previously proposed for the Apollo specimens, the Curie constant of the antiferromagnetic inclusions and a zero field splitting parameter were calculated for the same specimens. The data show the relatively low concentration of iron in all forms in these specimens. In addition, the Weiss temperature is lower than that measured for the Apollo specimens, and can be attributed almost entirely to the ligand field distortion about the Fe2+ ions in the glassy phase. The data further suggest that the Luna 20 specimens cooled more slowly than those of the Apollo missions, and that some of the antiferromagnetic inclusions in the glass may have crystallized from the glass during cooling. ?? 1973.

  16. Characterization of Apollo Regolith by X-Ray and Electron Microbeam Techniques: An Analog for Future Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, Ryan A.

    2015-01-01

    The Apollo missions collected 382 kg of rock and regolith from the Moon; approximately 1/3 of the sample mass collected was regolith. Lunar regolith consists of well mixed rocks, minerals, and glasses less than 1-centimeter n size. The majority of most surface regolith samples were sieved into less than 1, 1-2, 2-4, and 4-10- millimiter size fractions; a portion of most samples was re-served unsieved. The initial characterization and classification of most Apollo regolith particles was done primarily by binocular microscopy. Optical classification of regolith is difficult because (1) the finest fraction of the regolith coats and obscures the textures of the larger particles, and (b) not all lithologies or minerals are uniquely identifiable optically. In recent years, we have begun to use more modern x-ray beam techniques [1-3], coupled with high resolution 3D optical imaging techniques [4] to characterize Apollo and meteorite samples as part of the curation process. These techniques, particularly in concert with SEM imaging of less than 1-millimeter regolith grain mounts, allow for the rapid characterization of the components within a regolith.

  17. Effect of photogrammetric reading error on slope-frequency distributions. [obtained from Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.; Wu, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of reading error on two hypothetical slope frequency distributions and two slope frequency distributions from actual lunar data in order to ensure that these errors do not cause excessive overestimates of algebraic standard deviations for the slope frequency distributions. The errors introduced are insignificant when the reading error is small and the slope length is large. A method for correcting the errors in slope frequency distributions is presented and applied to 11 distributions obtained from Apollo 15, 16, and 17 panoramic camera photographs and Apollo 16 metric camera photographs.

  18. Apollo Soyuz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froehlich, W.

    1978-01-01

    The mission, background, and spacecraft of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project are summarized. Scientific experiments onboard the spacecraft are reviewed, along with reentry procedures. A small biography of each of the five astronauts (U.S. and Russian) is also presented.

  19. Backup Crew of the first manned Apollo mission practice water egress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Backup crew for the first manned Apollo space flight practice water egress procedures with full scale boilerplate model of their spacecraft. Training took place at Ellington AFB, near the Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston. Crew members are Astronauts David R. Scott (top of spacecraft); Russell L. Schweickart (upper right); and James McDivitt (standing in hatch).

  20. Thin section of rock brought back to earth by Apollo 12 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    An idea of the mineralogy and texture of a lunar sample can be achieved by use of color microphotos. This thin section is Apollo 12 lunar sample number 12057.27, under polarized light. The lavender minerals are pyrexene; the black mineral is ilmenite; the white and brown, feldspar; and the remainder, olivine.

  1. Jim Lovell Recalls Apollo 8 Launch Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronaut Jim Lovell, veteran of two Gemini flights as well as the legendary missions of Apollo 8 and Apollo 13, recalls his thoughts on launch day of Apollo 8 in 1968, when humans first left the E...

  2. Petrographic and petrological studies of lunar rocks. [from the Apollo 15 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winzer, S. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thin sections and polished electron probe mounts of Apollo 15 glasscoated breccias 15255, 15286, 15466, and 15505 were examined optically and analyzed by sem/microprobe. Sections from breccias 15465 and 15466 were examined in detail, and chemical and mineralogical analyses of several larger lithic clasts, green glass, and partly crystallized green glass spheres are presented. Area analyses of 33 clasts from the above breccias were also done using the SEM/EDS system. Mineralogical and bulk chemical analyses of clasts from the Apollo 15 glass-coated breccias reveal a diverse set of potential rock types, including plutonic and extrusive igneous rocks and impact melts. Examination of the chemistry of the clasts suggests that many of these clasts, like those found in 61175, are impact melts. Their variability suggests formation by several small local impacts rather than by a large basin-forming event.

  3. APOLLO 17 : The Final Splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 17 returns safely to Earth, bringing to an end the APOLLO series of lunar missions From the film documentary 'APOLLO 17: On the shoulders of Giants'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APPOLO 17 : Sixth and last manned lunar landing mission in the APOLLO series with Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E.Evans, and Harrison H. (Jack) Schmitt. Landed at Taurus-Littrow on Dec 11.,1972. Deployed camera and experiments; performed EVA with lunar roving vehicle. Returned lunar samples. Mission Duration 301hrs 51min 59sec

  4. Apollo 17: On the Shoulders of Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A documentary view of the Apollo 17 journey to Taurus-Littrow, the final lunar landing mission in the Apollo program is discussed. The film depicts the highlights of the mission and relates the Apollo program to Skylab, the Apollo-Soyuz linkup and the Space Shuttle.

  5. Electromyographic analysis of skeletal muscle changes arising from 9 days of weightlessness in the Apollo-Soyuz space mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafevers, E. V.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hursta, W. N.

    1976-01-01

    Both integration and frequency analyses of the electromyograms from voluntary contractions were performed in one crewman of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project mission. Of particular interest were changes in excitability, electrical efficiency, and fatigability. As a result of 9 days of weightlessness, muscle excitability was shown to increase; muscle electrical efficiency was found to decrease in calf muscles and to increase in arm muscles; and fatigability was found to increase significantly, as shown by spectral power shifts into lower frequencies. It was concluded from this study that skeletal muscles are affected by the disuse of weightlessness early in the period of weightlessness, antigravity muscles seem most affected by weightlessness, and exercise may abrogate the weightlessness effect. It was further concluded that electromyography is a sensitive tool for measuring spaceflight muscle effects.

  6. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Langley Center Director Floyd Thompson shows Ann Kilgore the 'picture of the century.' This was the first picture of the earth taken from space. From Spaceflight Revolution: 'On 23 August 1966 just as Lunar Orbiter I was about to pass behind the moon, mission controllers executed the necessary maneuvers to point the camera away from the lunar surface and toward the earth. The result was the world's first view of the earth from space. It was called 'the picture of the century' and 'the greatest shot taken since the invention of photography.' Not even the color photos of the earth taken during the Apollo missions superseded the impact of this first image of our planet as a little island of life floating in the black and infinite sea of space.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), pp. 345-346.

  7. Petrologic and mineralogic investigation of some crystalline rocks returned by the Apollo 14 mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gancarz, A. J.; Albee, A. L.; Chodos, A. A.

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 14 crystalline rocks (14053 and 14310) and crystalline rock fragments (14001,7,1; 14001,7,3; 14073; 14167,8,1 and 14321,191,X-1) on which Rb/Sr, Ar-40/Ar-39, or cosmic ray exposure ages have been determined by our colleagues were studied with the electron microprobe and the petrographic microscope. Rock samples 14053 and 14310 are mineralogically and petrologically distinct from each other. On the basis of mineralogic and petrologic characteristics all of the fragments, except 14001,7,1, are correlative with rock 14310. Sample 14073 is an orthopyroxene basalt with chemical and mineralogic affinities to ?KREEP,' the ?magic' and ?cryptic' components. Fragment 14001,7,1 is very similar to Luny Rock I.

  8. Apollo 16 mission anomaly report no. 1: Oxidizer deservicing tank failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The command module reaction control system is emptied of all remaining propellant using ground support equipment designed to provide an acid/base neutralization of the propellant in both the liquid and gaseous phases so that it may be disposed of safely. During the deactivation operation of the oxidizer from the Apollo 16 command module on 7 May 1972, the scrubber tank of the decontamination unit exploded, destroying the ground support equipment unit and damaging the building that housed the operation. Only minor injuries were received by the personnel in the area and the command module was not damaged. Test results show that the failure was caused by an insufficient quantity of neutralizer for the quantity of oxidizer. This insufficiency lead to exothermic nitration-type reactions which produced large quantities of gas at a very high rate and failed the decontamination tank.

  9. Apollo/Saturn 5 Postflight Trajectory - SA-513 Skylab 1 Mission. Tracking and Flight Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The postflight trajectory for the Apollo/Saturn V SA-513 Skylab I flight is presented. An analysis is included of the orbital and powered flight trajectories of the launch vehicle, the orbital trajectory of the spent S-II stage, and the free flight impact trajectory of the expended S-IC stage. Launch vehicle trajectory dependent parameters are provided in earth-fixed launch site, launch vehicle navigation, and geographic polar coordinate systems. The time history of the trajectory parameters for the launch vehicle is presented from guidance reference release to the transfer to ATM control. Tables of significant launch vehicle parameters at engine cutoff, stage separation, and workshop orbit insertion are included. Figures of such parameters as altitude, surface and cross range, and the magnitude of total velocity and acceleration as a function of range time for the powered flight trajectory are given.

  10. Flight Operations reunion for the Apollo 11 20th anniversary of the first manned lunar landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The following major areas are presented: (1) the Apollo years; (2) official flight control manning list for Apollo 11; (3) original mission control emblem; (4) foundations of flight control; (5) Apollo-11 20th anniversary program and events; (6) Apollo 11 mission operations team certificate; (7) Apollo 11 mission summary (timeline); and (8) Apollo flight control team photographs and biographies.

  11. Apollo 17 mission Report. Supplement 6: Calibration results for gamma ray spectrometer sodium iodide crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, C.; Trombka, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    A major difficulty in medium energy gamma-ray remote sensing spectroscopy and astronomy measurements was the high rate of unwanted background resulting from the following major sources: (1) prompt secondary gamma-rays produced by cosmic-ray interactions in satellite materials; (2) direct charged-particle counts; (3) radioactivity induced in the detector materials by cosmic-ray and trapped protons; (4) radioactivity induced in detector materials by the planetary (e.g., earth or moon) albedo neutron flux; (5) radioactivity induced in the detector materials by the interaction of secondary neutrons produced throughout the spacecraft by cosmic-ray and trapped proton interactions; (6) radioactivity induced in spacecraft materials by the mechanisms outlined in 3, 4, and 5; and (7) natural radioactivity in spacecraft and detector materials. The purpose of this experiment was to obtain information on effects 3, 4, and 5, and from this information start developing calculational methods for predicting the background induced in the crystal detector in order to correct the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometer data for this interference.

  12. APOLLO 17 : A symbol for the APOLLO program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 17 : The astonauts intend, as a symbolic gesture, to return a piece of moon-rock to share with countries all around the world. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 17: On the shoulders of Giants'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APPOLO 17 : Sixth and last manned lunar landing mission in the APOLLO series with Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E.Evans, and Harrison H. (Jack) Schmitt. Landed at Taurus-Littrow on Dec 11.,1972. Deployed camera and experiments; performed EVA with lunar roving vehicle. Returned lunar samples. Mission Duration 301hrs 51min 59sec

  13. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    From Spaceflight Revolution: 'Top NASA officials listen to a LOPO briefing at Langley in December 1966. Sitting to the far right with his hand on his chin is Floyd Thompson. To the left sits Dr. George Mueller, NASA associate administrator for Manned Space Flight. On the wall is a diagram of the sites selected for the 'concentrated mission.' 'The most fundamental issue in the pre-mission planning for Lunar Orbiter was how the moon was to be photographed. Would the photography be 'concentrated' on a predetermined single target, or would it be 'distributed' over several selected targets across the moon's surface? On the answer to this basic question depended the successful integration of the entire mission plan for Lunar Orbiter.' The Lunar Orbiter Project made systematic photographic maps of the lunar landing sites. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 337.

  14. Apollo experience report: Battery subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trout, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Experience with the Apollo command service module and lunar module batteries is discussed. Significant hardware development concepts and hardware test results are summarized, and the operational performance of batteries on the Apollo 7 to 13 missions is discussed in terms of performance data, mission constraints, and basic hardware design and capability. Also, the flight performance of the Apollo battery charger is discussed. Inflight data are presented.

  15. Apollo Lesson Sampler: Apollo 13 Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains a two-part case study of the Apollo 13 accident. The first lesson contains an overview of the electrical system hardware on the Apollo spacecraft, providing a context for the details of the oxygen tank explosion, and the failure chain reconstruction that led to the conditions present at the time of the accident. Given this background, the lesson then covers the tank explosion and immediate damage to the spacecraft, and the immediate response of Mission Control to what they saw. Part 2 of the lesson picks up shortly after the explosion of the oxygen tank on Apollo 13, and discusses how Mission Control gained insight to and understanding of the damage in the aftermath. Impacts to various spacecraft systems are presented, along with Mission Control's reactions and plans for in-flight recovery leading to a successful entry. Finally, post-flight vehicle changes are presented along with the lessons learned.

  16. Montage of Apollo Crew Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This montage depicts the flight crew patches for the manned Apollo 7 thru Apollo 17 missions. The Apollo 7 through 10 missions were basically manned test flights that paved the way for lunar landing missions. Primary objectives met included the demonstration of the Command Service Module (CSM) crew performance; crew/space vehicle/mission support facilities performance and testing during a manned CSM mission; CSM rendezvous capability; translunar injection demonstration; the first manned Apollo docking, the first Apollo Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA), performance of the first manned flight of the lunar module (LM); the CSM-LM docking in translunar trajectory, LM undocking in lunar orbit, LM staging in lunar orbit, and manned LM-CSM docking in lunar orbit. Apollo 11 through 17 were lunar landing missions with the exception of Apollo 13 which was forced to circle the moon without landing due to an onboard explosion. The craft was,however, able to return to Earth safely. Apollo 11 was the first manned lunar landing mission and performed the first lunar surface EVA. Landing site was the Sea of Tranquility. A message for mankind was delivered, the U.S. flag was planted, experiments were set up and 47 pounds of lunar surface material was collected for analysis back on Earth. Apollo 12, the 2nd manned lunar landing mission landed in the Ocean of Storms and retrieved parts of the unmanned Surveyor 3, which had landed on the Moon in April 1967. The Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) was deployed, and 75 pounds of lunar material was gathered. Apollo 14, the 3rd lunar landing mission landed in Fra Mauro. ALSEP and other instruments were deployed, and 94 pounds of lunar materials were gathered, using a hand cart for first time to transport rocks. Apollo 15, the 4th lunar landing mission landed in the Hadley-Apennine region. With the first use of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), the crew was bale to gather 169 pounds of lunar material. Apollo 16, the 5th lunar

  17. Using Technology to Better Characterize the Apollo Sample Suite: A Retroactive PET Analysis and Potential Model for Future Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    From 1969-1972 the Apollo missions collected 382 kg of lunar samples from six distinct locations on the Moon. Studies of the Apollo sample suite have shaped our understanding of the formation and early evolution of the Earth-Moon system, and have had important implications for studies of the other terrestrial planets (e.g., through the calibration of the crater counting record) and even the outer planets (e.g., the Nice model of the dynamical evolution of the Solar System). Despite nearly 50 years of detailed research on Apollo samples, scientists are still developing new theories about the origin and evolution of the Moon. Three areas of active research are: (1) the abundance of water (and other volatiles) in the lunar mantle, (2) the timing of the formation of the Moon and the duration of lunar magma ocean crystallization, (3) the formation of evolved lunar lithologies (e.g., granites) and implications for tertiary crustal processes on the Moon. In order to fully understand these (and many other) theories about the Moon, scientists need access to "new" lunar samples, particularly new plutonic samples. Over 100 lunar meteorites have been identified over the past 30 years, and the study of these samples has greatly aided in our understanding of the Moon. However, terrestrial alteration and the lack of geologic context limit what can be learned from the lunar meteorites. Although no "new" large plutonic samples (i.e., hand-samples) remain to be discovered in the Apollo sample collection, there are many large polymict breccias in the Apollo collection containing relatively large (approximately 1 cm or larger) previously identified plutonic clasts, as well as a large number of unclassified lithic clasts. In addition, new, previously unidentified plutonic clasts are potentially discoverable within these breccias. The question becomes how to non-destructively locate and identify new lithic clasts of interest while minimizing the contamination and physical degradation of

  18. Apollo: A retrospective analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Launius, Roger D.

    1994-01-01

    Since the completion of Project Apollo more than twenty years ago there have been a plethora of books, studies, reports, and articles about its origin, execution, and meaning. At the time of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the first landing, it is appropriate to reflect on the effort and its place in U.S. and NASA history. This monograph has been written as a means to this end. It presents a short narrative account of Apollo from its origin through its assessment. That is followed by a mission by mission summary of the Apollo flights and concluded by a series of key documents relative to the program reproduced in facsimile. The intent of this monograph is to provide a basic history along with primary documents that may be useful to NASA personnel and others desiring information about Apollo.

  19. APOLLO 12: A heartstopping launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 12: A heartstopping launch as the rocket is struck by lightning. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 12: 'Pinpoint for Science'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLLO 12: Second manned lunar landing and return with Charles 'Pete' Conrad, Jr., Richard F. Gordon, and Alan F. Bean. Landed in the Ocean of Storms on November 19, 1969; deployed television camera and ALSEP experiments; two EVA's performed; collected core samples and lunar materials; photographed and retrieved parts from surveyor 3 spacecraft. Mission duration 244hrs 36min 24sec

  20. APOLLO 11: The heroes Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The crew of APOLLO 11 return as heroes after their succesfull landing on the lunar surface. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 11:'The Eagle Has Landed'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLLO 11: First manned lunar landing and return to Earth with Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin. Landed in the Sea of Tranquilityon July 20, 1969; deployed TV camera and EASEP experiments, performed lunar surface EVA, returned lunar soil samples. Mission Duration 195 hrs 18 min 35sec

  1. Apollo: A Retrospective Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Launius, Roger D.

    2004-01-01

    The program to land an American on the Moon and return safely to Earth in the 1960s has been called by some observers a defining event of the twentieth century. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., even suggested that when Americans two centuries hence study the twentieth century, they will view the Apollo lunar landing as the critical event of the century. While that conclusion might be premature, there can be little doubt but that the flight of Apollo 11 in particular and the overall Apollo program in general was a high point in humanity s quest to explore the universe beyond Earth. Since the completion of Project Apollo more than twenty years ago there have been a plethora of books, studies, reports, and articles about its origin, execution, and meaning. At the time of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the first landing, it is appropriate to reflect on the effort and its place in U.S. and NASA history. This monograph has been written as a means to this end. It presents a short narrative account of Apollo from its origin through its assessment. That is followed by a mission by mission summary of the Apollo flights and concluded by a series of key documents relative to the program reproduced in facsimile. The intent of this monograph is to provide a basic history along with primary documents that may be useful to NASA personnel and others desiring information about Apollo.

  2. Apollo light flash investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, W. Z.; Pinsky, L. S.; Bailey, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    The visual phenomenon of light flashes resulting from high energy, heavy cosmic rays penetrating the command module structure and crewmembers' eyes is investigated. Light flash events observed during dedicated sessions on Apollo 15, 16, 17 are described along with a Monte Carlo simulation of the exposure of an astronaut to cosmic radiation during a mission. Results of the Apollo Light Flash Moving Emulsion Detector experiment developed for Apollo 16 and 17 to obtain a direct record of incident cosmic ray particles are correlated with crewmembers' reports of light flashes.

  3. Apollo lunar sounder experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, R.J.; Adams, G.F.; Brown, W.E., Jr.; Eggleton, R.E.; Jackson, P.; Jordan, R.; Linlor, W.I.; Peeples, W.J.; Porcello, L.J.; Ryu, J.; Schaber, G.; Sill, W.R.; Thompson, T.W.; Ward, S.H.; Zelenka, J.S.

    1973-01-01

    The scientific objectives of the Apollo lunar sounder experiment (ALSE) are (1) mapping of subsurface electrical conductivity structure to infer geological structure, (2) surface profiling to determine lunar topographic variations, (3) surface imaging, and (4) measuring galactic electromagnetic radiation in the lunar environment. The ALSE was a three-frequency, wide-band, coherent radar system operated from lunar orbit during the Apollo 17 mission.

  4. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    1/4 scale model of Apollo Heat Shield being prepared for testing. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 356.

  5. A Comparative Analysis of the Geology Tools Used During the Apollo Lunar Program and Their Suitability for Future Missions to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lindsay Kathleen

    With the current push to return to planetary exploration it is important to consider what science will be performed on such missions and how it is to be performed. This study considered three hand tools used for geologic sampling during the Apollo missions to determine whether handle redesigns guided by NASA-STD-3001 improved the performance of the tools. The tools of interest were the large adjustable scoop, the rake, and the 32-inch tongs, selected for relevance and usability in the test location. The three tools with their original and modified handle diameters were tested with two subjects wearing the NDX-1 Planetary Suit and performed within the regolith bin operated by Swamp Works at Kennedy Space Center. The effects of the tool modifications on task performance did not conclusively demonstrate improvement. However, a methodology was developed that may prove beneficial in future tests using larger sample sizes.

  6. Former Apollo astronauts speak at Apollo 11 anniversary banquet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Former Apollo astronauts Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin (left) and Gene Cernan share stories about their missions for an audience attending an anniversary banquet honoring the Apollo program team, the people who made the entire lunar landing program possible. The banquet was held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, part of the KSC Visitor Complex. This is the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch and moon landing, July 16 and July 20, 1969. Other guests at the banquet were astronauts Wally Schirra, Gene Cernan and Walt Cunningham. Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon; Gene Cernan was the last.

  7. Apollo Expeditions to the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cortright, E. M. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo program is described from the planning stages through Apollo 17. The organization of the program is discussed along with the development of the spacecraft and related technology. The objectives and accomplishments of each mission are emphasized along with personal accounts of the major figures involved. Other topics discussed include: ground support systems and astronaut selection.

  8. Apollo 13 Command Module recovery after splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Crewmen aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission, hoist the Command Module aboard ship. The Apollo 13 crewmen were already aboard the Iwo Jima when this photograph was taken. The Apollo 13 spacecraft splashed down at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970 in the South Pacific Ocean.

  9. Rb-Sr ages of igneous rocks from the Apollo 14 mission and the age of the Fra Mauro formation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Internal Rb-Sr isochrons were determined on four basaltic rocks and on a basaltic clast from a breccia from the Fra Mauro landing site. An internal isochron was determined for rock 12004 and yielded a value in agreement with previous results for basaltic rocks from the Apollo 12 site. The crystallization ages for Apollo 14 basalts are only 0.2 to 0.3 AE older than were found for mare basalts from the Sea of Tranquility. Assuming these leucocratic igneous rocks to be representative of the Fra Mauro site, it follows that there were major igneous processes active in these regions, and presumably throughout the highlands, at times only slightly preceding the periods at which the maria were last flooded.

  10. Gene Cernan on Apollo 17

    NASA Video Gallery

    Apollo 17 Commander Gene Cernan recalls fixing a lunar rover problem with duct tape during his December 1972 mission. Cernan's interview was part of the commemoration of NASA's 50th anniversary in ...

  11. Apollo experience report: Abort planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyle, C. T.; Foggatt, C. E.; Weber, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    Definition of a practical return-to-earth abort capability was required for each phase of an Apollo mission. A description of the basic development of the complex Apollo abort plan is presented. The process by which the return-to-earth abort plan was developed and the constraining factors that must be included in any abort procedure are also discussed. Special emphasis is given to the description of crew warning and escape methods for each mission phase.

  12. Log of Apollo 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The major events of the first manned moon landing mission, Apollo 11, are presented in chronological order from launch time until arrival of the astronauts aboard the U.S.S. Hornet. The log is descriptive, non-technical, and includes numerous color photographs of the astronauts on the moon. (PR)

  13. Apollo gastrointestinal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, B. L.; Huang, C. T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fecal bile acid patterns for the Apollo 17 flight were studied to determine the cause of diarrhea on the mission. The fecal sterol analysis gave no indication of an infectious diarrhea, or specific, or nonspecific etiology occurring during the entire flight. It is assumed that the gastrointestinal problems encountered are the consequences of altered physiology, perhaps secondary to physical or emotional stress of flight.

  14. APOLLO 15 Galileo's Gravity Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 15: A demonstration of a classic experiment. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 15 'The mountains of the Moon''', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO 15: Fourth manned lunar landing with David R. Scott, Alfred M. Worden, and James B. Irwin. Landed at Hadley rilleon July 30, 1971;performed EVA with Lunar Roving Vehicle; deployed experiments. P& F Subsattelite spring-launched from SM in lunar orbit. Mission Duration 295 hrs 11 min 53sec

  15. APOLLO 13: The Spirit that Built America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 13: Nixon commends the crew of APOLLO 13 From the film documentary 'APOLLO 13: 'Houston, We've got a problem'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO 13 : Third manned lunar landing attempt with James A. Lovell, Jr., John L. Swigert, Jr., and Fred w. Haise, Jr. Pressure lost in SM oxygen system; mission aborted; LM used for life support. Mission Duration 142hrs 54mins 41sec

  16. First-order feasibility analysis of a space suit radiator concept based on estimation of water mass sublimation using Apollo mission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metts, Jonathan G.; Klaus, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal control of a space suit during extravehicular activity (EVA) is typically accomplished by sublimating water to provide system cooling. Spacecraft, on the other hand, primarily rely on radiators to dissipate heat. Integrating a radiator into a space suit has been proposed as an alternative design that does not require mass consumption for heat transfer. While providing cooling without water loss offers potential benefits for EVA application, it is not currently practical to rely on a directional, fixed-emissivity radiator to maintain thermal equilibrium of a spacesuit where the radiator orientation, environmental temperature, and crew member metabolic heat load fluctuate unpredictably. One approach that might make this feasible, however, is the use of electrochromic devices that are capable of infrared emissivity modulation and can be actively controlled across the entire suit surface to regulate net heat flux for the system. Integrating these devices onto the irregular, compliant space suit material requires that they be fabricated on a flexible substrate, such as Kapton film. An initial assessment of whether or not this candidate technology presents a feasible design option was conducted by first characterizing the mass of water loss from sublimation that could theoretically be saved if an electrochromic suit radiator was employed for thermal control. This is particularly important for lunar surface exploration, where the expense of transporting water from Earth is excessive, but the technology is potentially beneficial for other space missions as well. In order to define a baseline for this analysis by comparison to actual data, historical documents from the Apollo missions were mined for comprehensive, detailed metabolic data from each lunar surface outing, and related data from NASA's more recent "Advanced Lunar Walkback" tests were also analyzed. This metabolic database was then used to validate estimates for sublimator water consumption during surface

  17. Apollo Lunar Sample Integration into Google Moon: A New Approach to Digitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M. D.; Todd, N. S.; Lofgren, G. E.

    2011-03-01

    The Google Moon Apollo Lunar Sample Data Integration project enhances the Apollo mission data available on Google Moon and provides an interactive research and learning tool for the Apollo lunar rock sample collection.

  18. Apollo 8 Capsule Hoisted Onto Recovery Ship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    This is a photograph of the Apollo 8 Capsule being hoisted onto the recovery ship following splashdown on December 27, 1968. The first manned Apollo mission to escape Earth's gravity and travel to the lunar vicinity, the Saturn V, SA-503, Apollo 8 mission liftoff occurred seven days prior, on December 21, 1968. Aboard were astronauts William Anders, Lunar Module (LM) Pilot; James Lovell, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Frank Borman, commander. The mission achieved operational experience and tested the Apollo command module systems, including communications, tracking, and life-support, in cis-lunar space and lunar orbit, and allowed evaluation of crew performance on a lunar orbiting mission. The crew photographed the lunar surface, both far side and near side, obtaining information on topography and landmarks as well as other scientific information necessary for future Apollo landings. All systems operated within allowable parameters and all objectives of the mission were achieved.

  19. Apollo 15-Lunar Module Falcon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This is a photo of the Apollo 15 Lunar Module, Falcon, on the lunar surface. Apollo 15 launched from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on July 26, 1971 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. Aboard was a crew of three astronauts including David R. Scott, Mission Commander; James B. Irwin, Lunar Module Pilot; and Alfred M. Worden, Command Module Pilot. The first mission designed to explore the Moon over longer periods, greater ranges and with more instruments for the collection of scientific data than on previous missions, the mission included the introduction of a $40,000,000 lunar roving vehicle (LRV) that reached a top speed of 16 kph (10 mph) across the Moon's surface. The successful Apollo 15 lunar landing mission was the first in a series of three advanced missions planned for the Apollo program. The primary scientific objectives were to observe the lunar surface, survey and sample material and surface features in a preselected area of the Hadley-Apennine region, setup and activation of surface experiments and conduct in-flight experiments and photographic tasks from lunar orbit. Apollo 15 televised the first lunar liftoff and recorded a walk in deep space by Alfred Worden. Both the Saturn V rocket and the LRV were developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  20. Astronauts Stafford and Brand at controls of Apollo Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Two American ASTP crewmen, Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford (foreground) and Vance D. Brand are seen at the controls of the Apollo Command Module during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission.

  1. Astronaut Vance Brand at controls of Apollo Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Astronaut Vance D. Brand, command module pilot of the American ASTP crew, is seen at the controls of the Apollo Command Module during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission.

  2. APOLLO 10: Simulated Lunar Gravity Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Training for APOLLO 10. The astronauts train in a simulated microgravity environment - underwater and in the air - to familiarise them with the effect of lunar gravity. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 10: 'Green Light for a Lunar Landing''. Part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 10: Manned lunar orbital flight with Thomas P Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan to test all aspects of an actual manned lunar landing except the landing. Mission Duration 192hrs 3mins 23 sec

  3. A new look at lunar soil collected from the sea of tranquility during the Apollo 11 mission.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Carol; Greenberg, Gary; Kiely, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    Complementary state-of-the-art optical, scanning electron, and X-ray microscopy techniques have been used to study the morphology of Apollo 11 lunar soil particles (10084-47). The combination of innovative lighting geometries with image processing of a through focal series of images has allowed us to obtain a unique collection of high-resolution light micrographs of these fascinating particles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) stereo-pair imaging has been exploited to illustrate some of the unique morphological properties of lunar regolith. In addition, for the first time, X-ray micrographs with submicron resolution have been taken of individual particles using X-ray ultramicroscopy (XuM). This SEM-based technique lends itself readily to the imaging of pores, cracks, and inclusions and allows the internal structure of an entire particle to be viewed. Rotational SEM and XuM movies have also been constructed from a series of images collected at sequential angles through 360°. These offer a new and insightful view of these complex particles providing size, shape, and spatial information on many of their internal features. PMID:21087545

  4. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Israel Taback (left) and Clifford H. Nelson, head of LOPO, ponder the intricacies of the spacecraft design. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 323.

  5. Apollo Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggar, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the scientific activities of the Apollo program, including findings from analyses of the returned lunar sample. Descriptions are made concerning the possible origin of the moon and the formation of the lunar surface. (CC)

  6. Apollo 11: 20th anniversary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1989-07-01

    The Apollo 11 Mission which culminated in the first manned lunar landing on July 20, 1969 is recounted. Historical footage of preparation, takeoff, stage separation, the Eagle Lunar Lander, and the moon walk accompany astronauts Michael Collins, Buzz Aldrin, and Neal Armstrong giving their recollections of the mission are shown.

  7. Activity Book. Celebrate Apollo 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchert, Linda; And Others

    1994-01-01

    An activity book helps students learn about the 1969 Apollo 11 mission to the moon as they get a sense of the mission's impact on their lives. The activities enhance understanding of science, math, social studies, and language arts. A teacher's page offers information on books, magazines, computer materials, and special resources. (SM)

  8. Apollo 13 Command Module recovery after splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Crewmen aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission, guide the Command Module (CM) atop a dolly on board the ship. The CM is connected by strong cable to a hoist on the vessel. The Apollo 13 crewmen were already aboard the Iwo Jima when this photograph was taken. The Apollo 13 spacecraft splashed down at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970 in the South Pacific Ocean.

  9. Apollo 10 - 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This video gives overviews of the Apollo 10 and Apollo 11 missions to the moon, including footage from the launches and landings of the Command Module Columbia, which is used for both flights. The Apollo 10 crewmembers, Commander Thomas Stafford, Command Module Pilot John Young, and Lunar Module Pilot Eugene Cernan, are seen as they suit-up in preparation for launch and then as they experiment with the microgravity environment on their way to the moon. The moon's surface is seen in detail as the Command Module orbits at an altitude of 69 miles. The Apollo 11 crewmembers, Commander Neil Armstrong, Command Module Pilot Michael Collins, and Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin, are seen during various training activities, including simulated lunar gravity training, practicing collecting lunar material, and using the moonquake detector. Footage shows the approach and landing of the Lunar Module Eagle on the moon. Armstrong and Aldrin descend to the moon's surface, collect a sample of lunar dust, and erect the American flag. Eagle's liftoff from the moon is seen.

  10. Relativistic time corrections for Apollo 12 and Apollo 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented of computer calculations on the relativistic time corrections relative to a ground-based clock of on-board clock readings for a lunar mission, using simple Newtonian gravitational potentials of earth and moon and based on actual trajectory data for Apollo 12 and Apollo 13. Although the second order Doppler effect and the gravitational red shift give rise to corrections of opposite sign, the net accumulated time corrections, namely a gain of 560 (+ or - 1.5) microseconds for Apollo 12 and gain of 326 (+ or - 1.3) microseconds for Apollo 13, are still large enough that with present day atomic frequency standards, such as the rubidium clock, they can be measured with an accuracy of about + or - 0.5 percent.

  11. APOLLO 16: One for the Album

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 16 :Charles M. Duke photographs Cmdr. John W. Young in front of the Lunar Module. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 16: 'Nothing So Hidden'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO16: Fifth manned lunar landing mission withJohn W. Young, Ken Mattingly, and Charles M. Duke. Landed at Descartes on April 20 1972. Deployed camera and experiments; performed EVA with lunar roving vehicle. Deployed P&F Subsattelite in lunar orbit. Mission Duration 265hrs 51 min 5sec

  12. APOLLO 13: The Crew Makes Emergency Repairs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 13: Support on the ground design emergency equipment for the crew of Aquarius, and then radio instructions From the film documentary 'APOLLO 13: 'Houston, We've got a problem'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO 13 : Third manned lunar landing attempt with James A. Lovell, Jr., John L. Swigert, Jr., and Fred w. Haise, Jr. Pressure lost in SM oxygen system; mission aborted; LM used for life support. Mission Duration 142hrs 54mins 41sec

  13. APOLLO 14: Lift off from lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 14: The lunar module 'Falcon' lifts off from the lunar surface From the film documentary 'APOLLO 14: 'Mission to Fra Mauro'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO 14: Third manned lunar landing with Alan B. Shepard, Jr.,Stuart A. Roosa, and Edgar D. Mitchell. Landed in the Fra Mauro area on Ferurary 5, 1971; performed EVA, deployed lunar experiments, returned lunar samples. Mission Duration 216 hrs 1 min 58 sec

  14. APOLLO 13: The crew beats the odds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 13: The world holds its breath as the astronauts try to survive the final moments of their voyage From the film documentary 'APOLLO 13: 'Houston, We've got a problem'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO 13 : Third manned lunar landing attempt with James A. Lovell, Jr., John L. Swigert, Jr., and Fred w. Haise, Jr. Pressure lost in SM oxygen system; mission aborted; LM used for life support. Mission Duration 142hrs 54mins 41sec

  15. APOLLO 13: A News Bulletin from ABC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 13: ABC breaks the news of a mishap aboard the spacecraft From the film documentary 'APOLLO 13: 'Houston, We've got a problem'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO 13 : Third manned lunar landing attempt with James A. Lovell, Jr., John L. Swigert, Jr., and Fred W. Haise, Jr. Pressure lost in SM oxygen system; mission aborted; LM used for life support. Mission Duration 142hrs 54mins 41sec

  16. Apollo 16 Crew Aboard Rescue Ship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    The Apollo 16 Command Module splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on April 27, 1972 after an 11-day moon exploration mission. The 3-man crew is shown here aboard the rescue ship, USS Horton. From left to right are: Mission Commander John W. Young, Lunar Module pilot Charles M. Duke, and Command Module pilot Thomas K. Mattingly II. The sixth manned lunar landing mission, the Apollo 16 (SA-511) lifted off on April 16, 1972. The Apollo 16 mission continued the broad-scale geological, geochemical, and geophysical mapping of the Moon's crust, begun by the Apollo 15, from lunar orbit. This mission marked the first use of the Moon as an astronomical observatory by using the ultraviolet camera/spectrograph which photographed ultraviolet light emitted by Earth and other celestial objects. The Lunar Roving Vehicle, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, was also used.

  17. Former Apollo astronauts talk to the media.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Apollo/Saturn V Center, Lisa Malone (left), chief of KSC's Media Services branch, relays a question from the media to former Apollo astronaut Neil A. Armstrong. Beside Armstrong are Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin, Gene Cernan, and Walt Cunningham, all of whom also flew on Apollo missions. The four met with the media prior to an anniversary banquet highlighting the contributions of aerospace employees who made the Apollo program possible. The banquet celebrated the 30th anniversary of the launch and moon landing, July 16 and July 20, 1969. Neil Armstrong was the first man to set foot on the moon.

  18. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Lunar Orbiter's 'Typical Flight sequence of Events' turned out to be quite typical indeed, as all five spacecraft performed exactly as planned. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 340.

  19. Apollo 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Independent School District, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Apollo 20 project was launched during the 2010-2011 school year to accelerate Houston Independent School District's (HISD's) efforts to improve student performance in every school and close the achievement gap districtwide. This partnership with EdLabs at Harvard University incorporates best practices from successful public and charter schools…

  20. APOLLO 9 : Who's in charge of Spider & Gumdrop?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Introduces the crew of the APOLLO 9 mission. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 9: The Duet of Spider & Gumdrop': part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) Mission: APOLLO 9: Earth orbital flight with James A. McDivitt, David R. Scott, and Russell Schweickart. First flight of the Lunar Module. Performed rendezvous, docking and E.V.A..Mission Duration 241hrs 0m 54s.

  1. Apollo Telescope Mount of Skylab: an overview.

    PubMed

    Tousey, R

    1977-04-01

    This introductory paper describes Skylab and the course of events that led to this complex space project. In particular it covers the Apollo Telescope Mount and its instruments and the method of operation of the ATM mission. PMID:20168601

  2. Apollo 13 Facts [Post Flight Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Apollo 13 astronauts, James Lovell, Jr., John Swigert, Jr., and Fred Haise, Jr., are seen during this post flight press conference. They describe their mission and answer questions from the audience.

  3. Apollo 8's Christmas Eve 1968 Message

    NASA Video Gallery

    Apollo 8, the first manned mission to the moon, entered lunar orbit on Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, 1968. That evening, the astronauts--Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot Jim Lovell, and Lunar...

  4. The Apollo Program and Lunar Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuiper, Gerard P.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the history of the Vanguard project and the findings in Ranger records and Apollo missions, including lunar topography, gravity anomalies, figure, and chemistry. Presented are speculative remarks on the research of the origin of the Moon. (CC)

  5. Food and nutrition studies for Apollo 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C., Jr.; Rambaut, P. C.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rapp, R. M.; Wheeler, H. O.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been conducted on nutrient intake and absorption during the Apollo 16 mission. Results indicate that inflight intakes of all essential nutrients were adequate and that absorption of these materials occurred normally.

  6. Apollo 12 Lunar Module pictured as seen from Apollo 12 command/service module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM), still attached to the Saturn V third (S-IVB) stage, is pictured as seen from Apollo 12 command/service modules (CSM) on the first day of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission. This photograph was taken following CSM separation from LM/S-IVB and prior to Luanr Module extraction from the S-IVB stage. The Spacecraft Lunar Module Adapter (SLA) panels have already been jettisoned.

  7. Apollo 15 at Hadley Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This publication highlights the mission of Apollo 15 and includes many detailed black and white and color photographs taken near the lunar Apennine Mountains and the mile-wide, meandering Hadley Rille. Some of the photographs are full page (9 by 12 inch) reproductions. (Author/PR)

  8. Apollo experience report: Consumables budgeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    The procedures and techniques used in predicting the consumables usage for the Apollo mission are discussed. Because of the many interfaces and influences on the consumables system, it is impractical to document all facets of consumables budgeting; therefore, information in this report is limited to the major contributions to the formulation of a consumables budget.

  9. Apollo 11 Lunar Science Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Wendell

    1970-01-01

    Report of a conference called to discuss the findings of 142 scientists from their investigations of samples of lunar rock and soil brought back by the Apollo 11 mission. Significant findings reported include the age and composition of the lunar samples, and the absence of water and organic matter. Much discussed was the origin and structure of…

  10. Plasma thyroxine changes of the Apollo crewmen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheinfeld, M.; Leach, C. S.; Johnson, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    Blood drawn from Apollo crew members prior to the mission, at recovery, and postmission, was used to examine the effect Apollo mission activities have on thyroid hormone levels. At recovery, statistically significant increases in thyroxine and the free thyroxine index were found. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were decreased. No change of statistical significance was found in the T3 binding percentage, total serum proteins, and albumin. We conclude that Apollo activities and environment caused the postmission increase in plasma thyroxine. The prolonged postmission decreases in serum cholesterol may be one result of the increased thyroxine activity.

  11. APOLLO 10: Training for Lunar Surface Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Astronauts train on a mock-up lunar surface, practicing the procedures they will follow on the real thing, and adjusting to the demands of the workload. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 10: 'Green Light for a Lunar Landing''. Part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 10: Manned lunar orbital flight with Thomas P Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan to test all aspects of an actual manned lunar landing except the landing. Mission Duration 192hrs 3mins 23 sec

  12. APOLLO 11: Lunar Module Separates for descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Separation of the Lunar module for descent to the Lunar surface From the film documentary 'APOLLO 11:'The eagle Has Landed'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLLO 11: First manned lunar landing and return to Earth with Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin. Landed in the Sea of Tranquilityon July 20, 1969; deployed TV camera and EASEP experiments, performed lunar surface EVA, returned lunar soil samples. Mission Duration 195 hrs 18 min 35sec

  13. APOLLO 10: Improvments in Living Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Living conditions were superior on this flight to any previously. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 10: 'Green Light for a Lunar Landing''. Part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 10: Manned lunar orbital flight with Thomas P Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan to test all aspects of an actual manned lunar landing except the landing. Mission Duration 192hrs 3mins 23 sec

  14. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Representatives of NASA Langley and Boeing signed the Lunar Orbiter contract on 16 April 1964 and sent it to NASA headquarters for final review. Three weeks later, on 7 May, Administrator James E. Webb approved the $80-million incentives contract to build five Lunar Orbiter spacecraft. Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 331.

  15. Apollo Program Summary Report: Synopsis of the Apollo Program Activities and Technology for Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Overall program activities and the technology developed to accomplish lunar exploration are discussed. A summary of the flights conducted over an 11-year period is presented along with specific aspects of the overall program, including lunar science, vehicle development and performance, lunar module development program, spacecraft development testing, flight crew summary, mission operations, biomedical data, spacecraft manufacturing and testing, launch site facilities, equipment, and prelaunch operations, and the lunar receiving laboratory. Appendixes provide data on each of the Apollo missions, mission type designations, spacecraft weights, records achieved by Apollo crewmen, vehicle histories, and a listing of anomalous hardware conditions noted during each flight beginning with Apollo 4.

  16. Apollo 13 Crew Returns Home

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    This photograph shows Apollo 13 astronauts Fred Haise, John Swigert, and James Lovell aboard the recovery ship, USS Iwo Jima after safely touching down in the Pacific Ocean at the end of their ill-fated mission. The mission was aborted after 56 hours of flight, 205,000 miles from Earth, when an oxygen tank in the service module exploded. The command module, Odyssey, brought the three astronauts back home safely.

  17. Apollo 17: At Taurus Littrow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderton, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    A summation, with color illustrations, is presented on the Apollo 17 mission. The height, weight, and thrust specifications are given on the launch vehicle. Presentations are given on: the night launch; earth to moon ascent; separation and descent; EVA, the sixth lunar surface expedition; ascent from Taurus-Littrow; the America to Challenger rendezvous; return, reentry, and recovery; the scientific results of the mission; background information on the astronauts; and the future projects.

  18. APOLLO 16: Putting the 'rover' thru its paces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 16 : Cmdr Young puts the 'rover' thru a full field test... From the film documentary 'APOLLO 16: 'Nothing So Hidden'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLLO 16: Fifth manned lunar landing mission with John W. Young, Ken Mattingly, and Charles M. Duke. Landed at Descartes on April 20 1972. Deployed camera and experiments; performed EVA with lunar roving vehicle. Deployed P&F subsattelite in lunar orbit. Mission Duration 265hrs. 51 min. 5sec.

  19. APOLLO 17 : Time...Enemy of the Lunar Investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 17 : There's just never enough time to do everything, especially on the moon From the film documentary 'APOLLO 17: On the shoulders of Giants'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APPOLO 17 : Sixth and last manned lunar landing mission in the APOLLO series with Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E.Evans, and Harrison H. (Jack) Schmitt. Landed at Taurus-Littrow on Dec 11.,1972. Deployed camera and experiments; performed EVA with lunar roving vehicle. Returned lunar samples. Mission Duration 301hrs 51min 59sec

  20. APOLLO 17 : 'Rover' gets some Rough and Ready Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 17 : Some tough roving neccesitates rough and ready repairs From the film documentary 'APOLLO 17: On the shoulders of Giants'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APPOLO 17 : Sixth and last manned lunar landing mission in the APOLLO series with Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E.Evans, and Harrison H. (Jack) Schmitt. Landed at Taurus-Littrow on Dec 11.,1972. Deployed camera and experiments; performed EVA with lunar roving vehicle. Returned lunar samples. Mission Duration 301hrs 51min 59sec

  1. Astronaut Richard Truly seen working with Apollo docking mechanism model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Astronaut Richard H. Truly, an Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) spacecraft communicator, is seen working with an Apollo docking mechanism in the Mission Control Center during the joint U.S.-USSR ASTP docking in Earth orbit mission. Astronaut Truly, a member of the American ASTP crew support team, was working on the docking probe problem. The crew had notified ground control that there was a problem with removing the probe from the tunnel of the Apollo Command Module.

  2. Geologic setting of Apollo 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, C. A.; Muehlberger, W. R.; Ulrich, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    Prior to the Apollo 16 mission, the materials of the Cayley Plains and the Descartes Mountains were thought to be mostly of volcanic origin. Rock and soil samples from these regions strongly suggest, however, that they may be products of multiring basin forming impacts, although minor local volcanism is not precluded. The smooth planar surfaces may have been formed initially by Imbrium ejecta which flowed into topographic lows at the distal margins of the lineated Fra Mauro ejecta. It is emphasized, however, that the rocks and soils returned from the Apollo 16 site cannot necessarily be considered representative of the lunar crust in the Descartes region from which they were collected.

  3. Astronaut Eugene Cernan eating a meal aboard Apollo 17 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A fellow crewman took this photograph of Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 17 mission commander, eating a meal under the weightless conditions of space during the final lunar landing mission in the Apollo program. Cernan appears to be eating chocolate pudding.

  4. Apollo 17 preliminary science report. [Apollo 17 investigation of Taurus-Littrow lunar region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An analysis of the Apollo 17 flight is presented in the form of a preliminary science report. The subjects discussed are: (1) Apollo 17 site selection, (2) mission description, (3) geological investigation of landing site, (4) lunar experiments, (5) visual flight flash phenomenon, (6) volcanic studies, (7) mare ridges and related studies, (8) remote sensing and photogrammetric studies, and (9) astronomical photography. Extensive photographic data are included for all phases of the mission.

  5. Integration of Apollo Lunar Sample Data into Google Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, Melissa D.; Todd, Nancy S.; Lofgren, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The Google Moon Apollo Lunar Sample Data Integration project is a continuation of the Apollo 15 Google Moon Add-On project, which provides a scientific and educational tool for the study of the Moon and its geologic features. The main goal of this project is to provide a user-friendly interface for an interactive and educational outreach and learning tool for the Apollo missions. Specifically, this project?s focus is the dissemination of information about the lunar samples collected during the Apollo missions by providing any additional information needed to enhance the Apollo mission data on Google Moon. Apollo missions 15 and 16 were chosen to be completed first due to the availability of digitized lunar sample photographs and the amount of media associated with these missions. The user will be able to learn about the lunar samples collected in these Apollo missions, as well as see videos, pictures, and 360 degree panoramas of the lunar surface depicting the lunar samples in their natural state, following collection and during processing at NASA. Once completed, these interactive data layers will be submitted for inclusion into the Apollo 15 and 16 missions on Google Moon.

  6. Artist's concept of Apollo 8 start thrust engine and head for home

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    North American Rockwell artist's concept illustrating a phase of the scheduled Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission. Here, after 20 hours of lunar orbit, Apollo 8 astronauts start the 20,500 lb. thrust engine and head for home.

  7. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White further described LOLA in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; From Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  8. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White described the simulator as follows: 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  9. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Track, Model 2 and Model 1, the 20-foot sphere. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) From Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966. 'The model system is designed so that a television camera is mounted on a camera boom on each transport cart and each cart system is shared by two models. The cart's travel along the tracks represents longitudinal motion along the plane of a nominal orbit, vertical travel of the camera boom represents latitude on out-of-plane travel, and horizontal travel of the camera boom represents altitude changes.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379.

  10. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White further described LOLA in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  11. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Construction of Model 1 used in the LOLA simulator. This was a twenty-foot sphere which simulated for the astronauts what the surface of the moon would look like from 200 miles up. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White wrote: 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  12. Apollo Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Construction of Model 2 used in the LOLA simulator: Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White wrote in his paper, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  13. Apollo Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Construction of the track which runs in front of Model 3: Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White wrote in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'The model system is designed so that a television camera is mounted on a camera boom on each transport cart and each cart system is shared by two models. The cart's travel along the tracks represents longitudinal motion along the plane of a nominal orbit, vertical travel of the camera boom represents latitude on out-of-plane travel, and horizontal travel of the camera boom represents altitude changes.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  14. Apollo Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Construction of the track which runs in front of Model 2. Technicians work on Model 1, the 20-foot sphere. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White wrote in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'The model system is designed so that a television camera is mounted on a camera boom on each transport cart and each cart system is shared by two models. The cart's travel along the tracks represents longitudinal motion along the plane of a nominal orbit, vertical travel of the camera boom represents latitude on out-of-plane travel, and horizontal travel of the camera boom represents altitude changes.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  15. Apollo Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Construction of Model 1 used in the LOLA simulator. This was a twenty-foot sphere which simulated for the astronauts what the surface of the moon would look like from 200 miles up. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White wrote in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  16. APOLLO 11: Landing the Eagle - The Final Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 11: Landing the Eagle - The Final Approach. The dramatic final 60 seconds before touchdown. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 11:'The Eagle Has Landed'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLLO 11: First manned lunar landing and return to Earth with Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin. Landed in the Sea of Tranquilityon July 20, 1969; deployed TV camera and EASEP experiments, performed lunar surface EVA, returned lunar soil samples. Mission Duration 195 hrs 18 min 35sec

  17. APOLLO 12: C.Conrad Jr. collects geological samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 12: 'Pete' Conrad collects samples from the lunar surface, while at the same time adjusting to, and remarking on, the working conditions. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 12: 'Pinpoint for Science'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLLO 12: Second manned lunar landing and return with Charles 'Pete' Conrad, Jr., Richard F. Gordon, and Alan F. Bean. Landed in the Ocean of Storms on November 19, 1969; deployed television camera and ALSEP experiments; two EVA's performed; collected core samples and lunar materials; photographed and retrieved parts from surveyor 3 spacecraft. Mission duration 244hrs 36min 24sec

  18. APOLLO 8: It's Christmas in zero gravity...

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Astronauts and ground control consider how Santa is going to gain access to the command module... From the film documentary 'APOLLO 8:'Debrief': part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) First manned Saturn V flight with Frank Borman, James A. Lovell, Jr.,and william A. Anders. First manned lunar orbit mission; provided a close-up look at the moon during 10 lunar orbits. Mission Duration 147hrs 0m 42s

  19. Apollo 17 Lunar Surface Experiment equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Table-top views of some of the Apollo 17 Lunar Surface Experiment equipment. Included are the Geophone Module and Cable Reels of the Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (S-203), a component of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package which will be carried on the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission. After it is triggered, the experiment will settle down into a passive listening mode, detecting Moonquakes, meteorite impacts and the thump caused by the Lunar Module ascent stage impact (37259); The remote antenna for the Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (S-203) (37260).

  20. APOLLO 8: Birth of a Machine (Pt 2/2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Part 2 of the clip 'Birth of a machine'. This clip reveals the origins of the major components of the mission. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 8:'Debrief': part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 8: First manned Saturn V flight with Frank Borman, James A. Lovell, Jr., and william A. Anders. First manned lunar orbit mission; provided a close-up look at the moon during 10 lunar orbits. Mission Duration 147hrs 0m 42s

  1. APOLLO 9: What in Space are Spider & Gumdrop?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Describes Spider and Gumdrop and the purpose of the mission From the film documentary 'APOLLO 9: The Duet of Spider & Gumdrop': part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) Mission: APOLLO 9: Earth orbital flight with James A. McDivitt, David R. Scott, and Russell Schweickart. First flight of the Lunar Module. Performed rendezvous, docking and E.V.A..Mission Duration 241hrs 0m 54s.

  2. Apollo experience report: Safety activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, C. N.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the flight safety experiences gained during the Apollo Program and safety, from the viewpoint of program management, engineering, mission planning, and ground test operations was discussed. Emphasis is placed on the methods used to identify the risks involved in flight and in certain ground test operations. In addition, there are discussions on the management and engineering activities used to eliminate or reduce these risks.

  3. Moonlit View of Apollo 17 On Launch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is a breathtaking moonlit view of Apollo 17 on the Launch Pad at Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC). The seventh and last manned lunar landing and return to Earth mission, the Apollo 17, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Mission Commander Eugene A. Cernan, Lunar Module pilot Harrison H. Schmitt, and Command Module pilot Ronald E. Evans, lifted off on December 7, 1972. The basic objective of the Apollo 17 mission was to sample basin-rim highland material and adjacent mare material, and investigate the geological evolutionary relationship between these two major units. The mission marked the longest Apollo mission, 504 hours, and the longest lunar surface stay time, 75 hours, which allowed the astronauts to conduct an extensive geological investigation. They collected 257 pounds (117 kilograms) of lunar samples with the use of the Marshall Space Flight Center designed Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). The mission ended on December 19, 1972.

  4. Apollo 9 Lunar Module in lunar landing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    View of the Apollo 9 Lunar Module, in a lunar landing configuration, as photographed form the Command/Service Module on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. The landing gear on the 'Spider' has been deployed. Lunar surface probes (sensors) extend out from the landing gear foot pads. Inside the 'Spider' were Astronauts James A. McDivitt, Apollo 9 commander; and Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot.

  5. Apollo 17 Lunar Surface Experiment: Lunar Atmosphere Composition Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Table-top views of one of the Apollo 17 Lunar Surface Experiments. This view is of the Lunar Atmosphere Composition Experiment (LACE) (Lunar Mass Spectrometer), Experiment S-205, one of the experiments of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package which will be carried on the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission. The LACE will measrue components in the ambient lunar atmosphere in the range of one to 110 atomic mass units (AMU).

  6. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    A 'suited' test subject on the Reduced Gravity Walking Simulator located in the hanger at Langley Research Center. The initial version of this simulator was located inside the hanger. Later a larger version would be located at the Lunar Landing Facility. The purpose of this simulator was to study the subject while walking, jumping or running. Researchers conducted studies of various factors such as fatigue limit, energy expenditure, and speed of locomotion. Francis B. Smith wrote in 'Simulators For Manned Space Research:' 'The cables which support the astronaut are supported by an overhead trolley about 150 feet above the center line of the walkway and the support is arranged so that the subject is free to walk, run, jump, and perform other self-locomotive tasks in a more-or-less normal manner, even though he is constrained to move in one place.' 'The studies thus far show that an astronaut should have no particular difficulty in walking in a pressurized space suit on a hard lunar surface. Rather, the pace was faster and the suit was found to be more comfortable and less fatiguing under lunar 'g' than under earth 'g.' When the test subject wished to travel hurriedly any appreciable distance, a long loping gait at about 10 feet per second was found to be most comfortable.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 377; Francis B. Smith, 'Simulators For Manned Space Research,' Paper for 1966 IEEE International Convention, New York, NY, March 21-25, 1966.

  7. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Artists used paintbrushes and airbrushes to recreate the lunar surface on each of the four models comprising the LOLA simulator. Project LOLA or Lunar Orbit and Landing Approach was a simulator built at Langley to study problems related to landing on the lunar surface. It was a complex project that cost nearly $2 million dollars. James Hansen wrote: 'This simulator was designed to provide a pilot with a detailed visual encounter with the lunar surface; the machine consisted primarily of a cockpit, a closed-circuit TV system, and four large murals or scale models representing portions of the lunar surface as seen from various altitudes. The pilot in the cockpit moved along a track past these murals which would accustom him to the visual cues for controlling a spacecraft in the vicinity of the moon. Unfortunately, such a simulation--although great fun and quite aesthetic--was not helpful because flight in lunar orbit posed no special problems other than the rendezvous with the LEM, which the device did not simulate. Not long after the end of Apollo, the expensive machine was dismantled.' (p. 379) Ellis J. White further described LOLA in his paper 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' 'Model 1 is a 20-foot-diameter sphere mounted on a rotating base and is scaled 1 in. = 9 miles. Models 2,3, and 4 are approximately 15x40 feet scaled sections of model 1. Model 4 is a scaled-up section of the Crater Alphonsus and the scale is 1 in. = 200 feet. All models are in full relief except the sphere.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution, NASA SP-4308, p. 379; Ellis J. White, 'Discussion of Three Typical Langley Research Center Simulation Programs,' Paper presented at the Eastern Simulation Council (EAI's Princeton Computation Center), Princeton, NJ, October 20, 1966.

  8. APOLLO 8: Birth of a Machine (pt 1/2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    This clip shows the launch of APOLLO 8: The 'Birth of a Machine' and begins to reveal the origin of its components. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 8:'Debrief'': part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) First manned Saturn V flight with Frank Borman, James A. Lovell, Jr.,and william A. Anders. First manned lunar orbit mission; provided a close-up look at the moon during 10 lunar orbits. Mission Duration 147hrs. 0 min. 42s.

  9. APOLLO 9: Dave scott performs Extra Vehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Dave Scott performs Extra Vehicular Activities around the Command Module 'Gumdrop'. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 9: The Duet of Spider & Gumdrop': part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) Mission: APOLLO 9: Earth orbital flight with James A. McDivitt, David R. Scott, and Russell Schweickart. First flight of the Lunar Module. Performed rendezvous, docking and E.V.A..Mission Duration 241hrs 0m 54s.

  10. APOLLO 16: Young and Duke head for North Ray Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 16 : Young and Duke head for North Ray Crater From the film documentary 'APOLLO 16: 'Nothing So Hidden'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO16: Fifth manned lunar landing mission withJohn W. Young, Ken Mattingly, and Charles M. Duke. Landed at Descartes on April 20 1972. Deployed camera and experiments; performed EVA with lunar roving vehicle. Deployed P&F Subsattelite in lunar orbit. Mission Duration 265hrs 51 min 5sec

  11. APOLLO 16: A liesurely lunar Lift-off

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 16 : Lift-off should be stress-free event. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 16: 'Nothing So Hidden'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO16: Fifth manned lunar landing mission withJohn W. Young, Ken Mattingly, and Charles M. Duke. Landed at Descartes on April 20 1972. Deployed camera and experiments; performed EVA with lunar roving vehicle. Deployed P&F Subsattelite in lunar orbit. Mission Duration 265hrs 51 min 5sec

  12. APOLLO 14: Docking trouble (pt 2/2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 14: At last the crew is able to mate the command and lunar modules. But the hitch has raised some serious issues.. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 14: 'Mission to Fra Mauro'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO 14: Third manned lunar landing with Alan B. Shepard, Jr.,Stuart A. Roosa, and Edgar D. Mitchell. Landed in the Fra Mauro area on Ferurary 5, 1971; performed EVA, deployed lunar experiments, returned lunar samples. Mission Duration 216 hrs 1 min 58 sec

  13. APOLLO 14: Docking trouble (pt 1/2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    APOLLO 14: The crew are having problems docking the command module to the lunar module: the locking mechanism will not engage. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 14: 'Mission to Fra Mauro'', part of a documentary series on the APOLLO missions made in the early '70's and narrated by Burgess Meredith. APOLO 14: Third manned lunar landing with Alan B. Shepard, Jr.,Stuart A. Roosa, and Edgar D. Mitchell. Landed in the Fra Mauro area on Ferurary 5, 1971; performed EVA, deployed lunar experiments, returned lunar samples. Mission Duration 216 hrs 1 min 58 sec

  14. Apollo rocks, fines and soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allton, J.; Bevill, T.

    Apollo rocks and soils not only established basic lunar properties and ground truth for global remote sensing, they also provided important lessons for planetary protection (Adv. Space Res ., 1998, v. 22, no. 3 pp. 373-382). The six Apollo missions returned 2196 samples weighing 381.7 kg, comprised of rocks, fines, soil cores and 2 gas samples. By examining which samples were allocated for scientific investigations, information was obtained on usefulness of sampling strategy, sampling devices and containers, sample types and diversity, and on size of sample needed by various disciplines. Diversity was increased by using rakes to gather small rocks on the Moon and by removing fragments >1 mm from soils by sieving in the laboratory. Breccias and soil cores are diverse internally. Per unit weight these samples were more often allocated for research. Apollo investigators became adept at wringing information from very small sample sizes. By pushing the analytical limits, the main concern was adequate size for representative sampling. Typical allocations for trace element analyses were 750 mg for rocks, 300 mg for fines and 70 mg for core subsamples. Age-dating and isotope systematics allocations were typically 1 g for rocks and fines, but only 10% of that amount for core depth subsamples. Historically, allocations for organics and microbiology were 4 g (10% for cores). Modern allocations for biomarker detection are 100mg. Other disciplines supported have been cosmogenic nuclides, rock and soil petrology, sedimentary volatiles, reflectance, magnetics, and biohazard studies . Highly applicable to future sample return missions was the Apollo experience with organic contamination, estimated to be from 1 to 5 ng/g sample for Apollo 11 (Simonheit &Flory, 1970; Apollo 11, 12 &13 Organic contamination Monitoring History, U.C. Berkeley; Burlingame et al., 1970, Apollo 11 LSC , pp. 1779-1792). Eleven sources of contaminants, of which 7 are applicable to robotic missions, were

  15. 13 Things That Saved Apollo 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodfill, Jared

    2012-01-01

    Perhaps, the most exciting rescue, terrestrial or extra-terrestrial, is the successful return of the Apollo 13 crew to Earth in April of 1970. The mission s warning system engineer, Jerry Woodfill, who remains a NASA employee after 47 years of government service has examined facets of the rescue for the past 42 years. He will present "13 Things That Saved Apollo 13" from the perspective of his real time experience as well as two score years of study. Many are recent discoveries never before published in mission reports, popular books or documentary and Hollywood movies depicting the rescue.

  16. Data User's Note: Apollo seismological investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vostreys, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Seismological objectives and equipment used in the passive seismic, active seismic, lunar seismic profiling, and the lunar gravimeter experiments conducted during Apollo 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17 missions are described. The various formats in which the data form these investigations can be obtained are listed an an index showing the NSSDC identification number is provided. Tables show manned lunar landing missions, lunar seismic network statistics, lunar impact coordinate statistics, detonation masses and times of EP's, the ALSEP (Apollo 14) operational history; compressed scale playout tape availability, LSPE coverage for one lunation, and experimenter interpreted events types.

  17. APOLLO 10 ASTRONAUT ENTERS LUNAR MODULE SIMULATOR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Apollo 10 lunar module pilot Eugene A. Cernan prepares to enter the lunar module simulator at the Flight Crew Training Building at the NASA Spaceport. Cernan, Apollo 10 commander Thomas P. Stafford and John W. Young, command module pilot, are to be launched May 18 on the Apollo 10 mission, a dress rehearsal for a lunar landing later this summer. Cernan and Stafford are to detach the lunar module and drop to within 10 miles of the moon's surface before rejoining Young in the command/service module. Looking on as Cernan puts on his soft helmet is Snoopy, the lovable cartoon mutt whose name will be the lunar module code name during the Apollo 10 flight. The command/service module is to bear the code name Charlie Brown.

  18. The Apollo 17 Lunar Surface Journal

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.

    1995-08-01

    The material included in the Apollo 17 Lunar Surface Journal has been assembled so that an uninitiated reader can understand, in some detail, what happened during Apollo 17 and why and what was learned, particularly about living and working on the Moon. At its heart, the Journal consists a corrected mission transcript which is interwoven with commentary by the crew and by Journal Editor -- commentary which, we hope, will make the rich detail of Apollo 17 accessible to a wide audience. To make the Journal even more accessible, this CD-ROM publication contains virtually all of the Apollo 17 audio, a significant fraction of the photographs and a selection of drawings, maps, video clips, and background documents.

  19. Apollo 9 Command/Service Modules photographed from Lunar Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 9 Command/Service Modules photographed from the Lunar Module, 'Spider', on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. Docking mechanism is visible in nose of the Command Module, 'Gumdrop'. Object jutting out from the Service Module aft bulkhead is the high-gain S-Band antenna.

  20. Apollo 9 Lunar Module in lunar landing configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    View of the Apollo 9 Lunar Module, in a lunar landing configuration, as photographed form the Command/Service Module on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. The landing gear on the Lunar Module 'Spider' has been deployed. Note Lunar Module's upper hatch and docking tunnel.

  1. Frogmen on Apollo command module boilerplate flotation collar during recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Apollo command module boilerplate floats in the Atlantic Ocean during a practice recovery exercise. Frogmen in a liferaft and on the flotation collar secure the command module boilerplate for hoisting onto a nearby recovery ship. The exercise was conducted in preparation for the forthcoming Apollo-Saturn 201 (AS-201) mission.

  2. Saturn V S-IC (First) Stage for Apollo 8 in the Vehicle Assembly Building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    The S-IC stage being erected for the final assembly of the Saturn V launch vehicle for the Apollo 8 mission (AS-503), is photographed in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) high bay at the Kennedy Space Center. The Apollo 8 mission was the first Saturn V manned mission with astronauts Frank Borman, James A. Lovell, and William Anders. They escaped Earth's gravity and traveled to lunar vicinity. The launch of Apollo 8 occurred on December 21, 1968.

  3. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Cable system which supports the test subject on the Reduced Gravity Walking Simulator. The purpose of this simulator was to study the subject while walking, jumping or running. Researchers conducted studies of various factors such as fatigue limit, energy expenditure, and speed of locomotion. A.W. Vigil described the purpose of the simulator as follows: 'When the astronauts land on the moon they will be in an unfamiliar environment involving, particularly, a gravitational field only one-sixth as strong as on earth. A novel method of simulating lunar gravity has been developed and is supported by a puppet-type suspension system at the end of a long pendulum. A floor is provided at the proper angle so that one-sixth of the subject's weight is supported by the floor with the remainder being supported by the suspension system. This simulator allows almost complete freedom in vertical translation and pitch and is considered to be a very realistic simulation of the lunar walking problem. For this problem this simulator suffers only slightly from the restrictions in lateral movement it puts on the test subject. This is not considered a strong disadvantage for ordinary walking problems since most of the motions do, in fact, occur in the vertical plane. However, this simulation technique would be severely restrictive if applied to the study of the extra-vehicular locomotion problem, for example, because in this situation complete six degrees of freedom are rather necessary. This technique, in effect, automatically introduces a two-axis attitude stabilization system into the problem. The technique could, however, be used in preliminary studies of extra-vehicular locomotion where, for example, it might be assumed that one axis of the attitude control system on the astronaut maneuvering unit may have failed.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995); A.W. Vigil, 'Discussion of Existing

  4. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    : NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 377; A.W. Vigil, 'Discussion of Existing and Planned Simulators for Space Research,' Paper presented at Conference on the Role of Simulation in Space Technology,' Blacksburg, VA, August 17-21, 1964.

  5. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 377; A.W. Vigil, 'Discussion of Existing and Planned Simulators for Space Research,' Paper presented at Conference on the Role of Simulation in Space Technology,' Blacksburg, VA, August 17-21, 1964.

  6. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), p. 377; A.W. Vigil, 'Discussion of Existing and Planned Simulators for Space Research,' Paper presented at Conference on the Role of Simulation in Space Technology,' Blacksburg, VA, August 17-21, 1964.

  7. Apollo Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    .' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, NASA SP-4308, p. 377; A.W. Vigil, 'Discussion of Existing and Planned Simulators for Space Research,' Paper presented at Conference on the Role of Simulation in Space Technology,' Blacksburg, VA, August 17-21, 1964.

  8. Astronaut Vance Brand seen in hatchway leading to Apollo Docking module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Astronaut Vance D. Brand, command module pilot of the American Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) crew, is seen in the hatchway leading from the Apollo Command Module (CM) into the Apollo Docking Module (DM) during joint U.S.-USSR ASTP docking in Earth orbit mission. The 35mm camera is looking from the DM into the CM.

  9. F-1 engines of Apollo/Saturn V first stage leave trail of flame after liftoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The five F-1 engines of the Apollo/Saturn V space vehicle's first (S-IC) stage leaves a trail of flame in the sky after liftoff. The launch of the Apollo 6 (Spacecraft 020/Saturn 502) unmanned space mission occurred on April 4, 1968. These views of the Apollo 6 launch were taken from a chase plane.

  10. Project Apollo: The Tough Decisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seamans, Robert C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The report reviews the major Mercury and then Gemini precursors for the Apollo mission program and its development and mission sequence. But, very importantly, it describes the major and often complex deliberations that encouraged inputs from the broad range of informed internal Agency individuals in order to arrive at the resulting actions taken; it recognizes differences among their various views, including even sensitivities within the leadership of the Agency, and it acknowledges NASA's relationships with the President and key executive branch personnel, as well as the very important and often complex relationships with members of Congress. The process of writing this book was searching and comprehensive. The achievement of the world's first manned lunar landings, after the earlier Mercury and Gemini programs played catch-up to match the Soviet Union's advanced position, clearly established the United States' preeminence in space. Early in the book, Bob describes an extended meeting in the White House in which the President's views and those of Mr. Webb were seriously discussed. Bob tells how, through Apollo's lunar landing, NASA clearly met both President Kennedy's goal to overcome the Soviets' leadership image and James Webb's goal to use Apollo as a major part of his program to demonstrate U.S. technological preeminence.