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Sample records for apoptotic signaling cascades

  1. IF1 limits the apoptotic-signalling cascade by preventing mitochondrial remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Faccenda, D; Tan, C H; Seraphim, A; Duchen, M R; Campanella, M

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial structure has a central role both in energy conversion and in the regulation of cell death. We have previously shown that IF1 protects cells from necrotic cell death and supports cristae structure by promoting the oligomerisation of the F1Fo-ATPsynthase. As IF1 is upregulated in a large proportion of human cancers, we have here explored its contribution to the progression of apoptosis and report that an increased expression of IF1, relative to the F1Fo-ATPsynthase, protects cells from apoptotic death. We show that IF1 expression serves as a checkpoint for the release of Cytochrome c (Cyt c) and hence the completion of the apoptotic program. We show that the progression of apoptosis engages an amplification pathway mediated by: (i) Cyt c-dependent release of ER Ca2+, (ii) Ca2+-dependent recruitment of the GTPase Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), (iii) Bax insertion into the outer mitochondrial membrane and (iv) further release of Cyt c. This pathway is accelerated by suppression of IF1 and delayed by its overexpression. IF1 overexpression is associated with the preservation of mitochondrial morphology and ultrastructure, consistent with a central role for IF1 as a determinant of the inner membrane architecture and with the role of mitochondrial ultrastructure in the regulation of Cyt c release. These data suggest that IF1 is an antiapoptotic and potentially tumorigenic factor and may be a valuable predictor of responsiveness to chemotherapy. PMID:23348567

  2. Mangiferin Attenuates Diabetic Nephropathy by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress Mediated Signaling Cascade, TNFα Related and Mitochondrial Dependent Apoptotic Pathways in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Pabitra Bikash; Sinha, Krishnendu; Sil, Parames C.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy in hyperglycemic conditions. It has already been reported that mangiferin, a natural C-glucosyl xanthone and polyhydroxy polyphenol compound protects kidneys from diabetic nephropathy. However, little is known about the mechanism of its beneficial action in this pathophysiology. The present study, therefore, examines the detailed mechanism of the beneficial action of mangiferin on STZ-induced diabetic nephropathy in Wister rats as the working model. A significant increase in plasma glucose level, kidney to body weight ratio, glomerular hypertrophy and hydropic changes as well as enhanced nephrotoxicity related markers (BUN, plasma creatinine, uric acid and urinary albumin) were observed in the experimental animals. Furthermore, increased oxidative stress related parameters, increased ROS production and decreased the intracellular antioxidant defenses were detected in the kidney. Studies on the oxidative stress mediated signaling cascades in diabetic nephropathy demonstrated that PKC isoforms (PKCα, PKCβ and PKCε), MAPKs (p38, JNK and ERK1/2), transcription factor (NF-κB) and TGF-β1 pathways were involved in this pathophysiology. Besides, TNFα was released in this hyperglycemic condition, which in turn activated caspase 8, cleaved Bid to tBid and finally the mitochorndia-dependent apoptotic pathway. In addition, oxidative stress also disturbed the proapoptotic-antiapoptotic (Bax and Bcl-2) balance and activated mitochorndia-dependent apoptosis via caspase 9, caspase 3 and PARP cleavage. Mangiferin treatment, post to hyperglycemia, successfully inhibited all of these changes and protected the cells from apoptotic death. PMID:25233093

  3. Intercellular transfer of apoptotic signals via electrofusion

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Suk; Lee, Wilson; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2012-05-01

    We determined whether cells that are induced to undergo anoikis by matrix detachment can initiate apoptosis in healthy cells following electroporation-induced fusion. Separate populations of MDCK cells undergoing anoikis and stained with FITC-annexin or viable MDCK cells that were labeled with spectrally discrete fluorescent beads were electroporated. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for enumeration of viable cells with beads, apoptotic cells or fused cells. Electroporation promoted a 49-fold increase of the percentage of viable cells that had fused with apoptotic cells. Apoptotic cell-viable cell fusions were 8-fold more likely to not attach to cell culture plastic and 2.3-fold less likely to proliferate after 24 hr incubation than viable cell fusion controls. These data demonstrate that apoptotic signals can be transferred between cells by electrofusion, possibly suggesting a novel investigative approach for optimizing targeted cell deletion in cancer treatment.

  4. Efficacy of PLGA-loaded apigenin nanoparticles in Benzo[a]pyrene and ultraviolet-B induced skin cancer of mice: mitochondria mediated apoptotic signalling cascades.

    PubMed

    Das, Sreemanti; Das, Jayeeta; Samadder, Asmita; Paul, Avijit; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2013-12-01

    Skin cancer is increasing at an alarming rate and becoming resistant to conventional chemotherapy necessitating improved drug delivery system. We loaded apigenin (Ap), a dietary flavonoid having anti-cancer property, with poly (lactic-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NAp) to explore if nano-encapsulation could enhance anti-carcinogenic effect against ultra-violet B (UVB) and Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) induced skin tumor and mitochondrial dysfunction in mice. Particle size, morphology and zeta potential of NAp were determined using dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy. Tumor incidence and multiplicity in UVB-BaP induced mice with/without NAp treatment were ascertained and their histolopathological sections and chromosomal aberrations were studied. ROS accumulation and mitochondrial functioning through relevant markers like mitochondrial transmembrane potential were analyzed. Mitochondrial volume changes/swelling, cytochrome c (cyt c) release, mRNA and protein expressions of Apaf-1, bax, bcl-2, cyt c, cleaved caspase-9 and 3 were studied. Results showed that NAp produced better effects than Ap, due to their smaller size, and faster mobility. NAp reduced tissue damage and frequency of chromosomal aberrations, increased ROS accumulation to mediate mitochondrial-apoptosis through modulation of several apoptotic markers and mitochondrial matrix swelling. NAp showed ameliorative potentials in combating skin cancer and therefore has greater prospect of use in therapeutic management of skin cancer. PMID:24120900

  5. Safrole induces cell death in human tongue squamous cancer SCC-4 cells through mitochondria-dependent caspase activation cascade apoptotic signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fu-Shun; Huang, An-Cheng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Yu, Chun-Shu; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-07-01

    Safrole is one of important food-borne phytotoxin that exhibits in many natural products such as oil of sassafras and spices such as anise, basil, nutmeg, and pepper. This study was performed to elucidate safrole-induced apoptosis in human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-4 cells. The effect of safrole on apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry and DAPI staining and its regulatory molecules were studied by Western blotting analysis. Safrole-induced apoptosis was accompanied with up-regulation of the protein expression of Bax and Bid and down-regulation of the protein levels of Bcl-2 (up-regulation of the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2), resulting in cytochrome c release, promoted Apaf-1 level and sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 in a time-dependent manner. We also used real-time PCR to show safrole promoted the mRNA expressions of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in SCC-4 cells. These findings indicate that safrole has a cytotoxic effect in human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-4 cells by inducing apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis of SCC-4 cells by safrole is involved in mitochondria- and caspase-dependent signal pathways. PMID:21591240

  6. [Sphingolipid-mediated apoptotic signaling pathways].

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, Olivier; Andrieu-Abadie, Nathalie; Ségui, Bruno; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Tardy, Claudine; Bonhoure, Elisabeth; Levade, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    Various sphingolipids are being viewed as bioactive molecules and/or second messengers. Among them, ceramide (or N-acylsphingosine) and sphingosine generally behave as pro-apoptotic mediators. Indeed, ceramide mediates the death signal initiated by numerous stress agents which either stimulate its de novo synthesis or activate sphingomyelinases that release ceramide from sphingomyelin. For instance, the early generation of ceramide promoted by TNF is mediated by a neutral sphingomyelinase the activity of which is regulated by the FAN adaptor protein, thereby controlling caspase activation and the cell death programme. In addition, the activity of this neutral sphingomyelinase is negatively modulated by caveolin, a major constituent of some membrane microdomains. The enzyme sphingosine kinase also plays a crucial role in apoptosis signalling by regulating the intracellular levels of two sphingolipids having opposite effects, namely the pro-apoptotic sphingosine and the anti-apoptotic sphingosine 1-phosphate molecule. Ceramide and sphingosine metabolism therefore appears as a pivotal regulatory pathway in the determination of cell fate. PMID:14708343

  7. Signal transduction induced by apoptotic cells inhibits HIV transcription in monocytes/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gekonge, Bethsebah N; Schiralli, Gillian; Schlegel, Robert A; Henderson, Andrew J

    2006-10-01

    The primary targets of HIV are CD4(+) T cells and macrophages. HIV infection is associated with an increase in apoptosis of infected and uninfected CD4(+) T cells, and these infected cells undergo apoptosis and produce HIV virions with phosphatidylserine (PS) on their surface. During phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, macrophages, using an array of receptors, are able to perceive various surface changes on apoptotic cells. The engagement of phagocytic receptors by ligands on the apoptotic cell surface results in the activation of signaling cascades, which facilitate engulfment. In this study, we examined how PS associated with virions and apoptotic cells influences HIV replication. We demonstrate that virus-associated PS is required for HIV infection of macrophages at a step prior to integration but following strong-stop, indicating that PS-initiated signals alter the establishment of HIV provirus. Conversely, apoptotic cells inhibited HIV transcription in infected macrophages, although this ability to suppress transcription was independent of PS. Furthermore, we show that ELMO, a key signaling molecule that participates in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, inhibited HIV transcription; however, knocking down endogenous ELMO expression in infected U937 cells rescued HIV transcription when these cells were coincubated with apoptotic targets. Taken together, these data show that apoptotic cells and the signals, which they initiate upon recognition by macrophages, influence the successful establishment of HIV infection and provirus transcription. PMID:16885500

  8. How sesquiterpenes modulate signaling cascades in cancers.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, S; Qureshi, M Z; Attar, R; Aslam, A; Kanwal, S; Khalid, S; Qureshi, J M; Aras Perk, A; Farooqi, A A; Ismail, M

    2016-01-01

    Data obtained from high-throughput technologies has started to shed light on the interplay between signal transduction cascades and chromatin modifications thus adding another layer of complexity to the already complex regulation of the protein network. Based on the insights gleaned from almost a decade of research, it has now been convincingly revealed that sesquiterpenes effectively modulated different intracellular signaling cascades in different cancers. In this review we summarize how sesquiterpenes mediated Wnt, Shh, Notch and TRAIL induced signaling cascades. PMID:27453282

  9. Hypothesis for thermal activation of the caspase cascade in apoptotic cell death at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, John A.

    2013-02-01

    Apoptosis is an especially important process affecting disease states from HIV-AIDS to auto-immune disease to cancer. A cascade of initiator and executioner capsase functional proteins is the hallmark of apoptosis. When activated the various caspases activate other caspases or cleave structural proteins of the cytoskeleton, resulting in "blebbing" of the plasma membrane forming apoptotic bodies that completely enclose the disassembled cellular components. Containment of the cytosolic components within the apoptotic bodies differentiates apoptosis from necroptosis and necrosis, both of which release fragmented cytosol and other cellular constituents into the intracellular space. Biochemical models of caspase activation reveal the extensive feedback loops characteristic of apoptosis. They clearly explain the failure of Arrhenius models to give accurate predictions of cell survival curves in hyperthermic heating protocols. Nevertheless, each of the individual reaction velocities can reasonably be assumed to follow Arrhenius kinetics. If so, the thermal sensitivity of the reaction velocity to temperature elevation is: ∂k/∂T = Ea [k/RT2]. Particular reaction steps described by higher activation energies, Ea, are likely more thermally-sensitive than lower energy reactions and may initiate apoptosis in the absence of other stress signals. Additionally, while the classical irreversible Arrhenius formulation fails to accurately represent many cell survival and/or dye uptake curves - those that display an early stage shoulder region - an expanded reversible model of the law of mass action equation seems to prove effective and is directly based on a firm theoretical thermodynamic foundation.

  10. Signalling pathways: jack of all cascades.

    PubMed

    Cahill, M A; Janknecht, R; Nordheim, A

    1996-01-01

    The transcription factors that bind the c-fos promoter element SRE are targeted by multiple, independent signalling cascades; the identities of these signalling pathways and their modes of activation are being elucidated. PMID:8805215

  11. MAPK Cascades in Guard Cell Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yuree; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwak, June M.

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions. PMID:26904052

  12. MAPK Cascades in Guard Cell Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yuree; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwak, June M

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions. PMID:26904052

  13. MAP kinase cascades: scaffolding signal specificity.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, Frank; Peter, Matthias

    2002-01-22

    Scaffold proteins organize many MAP kinase pathways by interacting with several components of these cascades. Recent studies suggest that scaffold proteins provide local activation platforms that contribute to signal specificity by insulating different MAP kinase pathways. PMID:11818078

  14. Propofol inhibits burn injury-induced hyperpermeability through an apoptotic signal pathway in microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, K Y; Liu, X J; Xu, J D; Deng, L J; Wang, G

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have revealed that an intrinsic apoptotic signaling cascade is involved in vascular hyperpermeability and endothelial barrier dysfunction. Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) has also been reported to inhibit apoptotic signaling by regulating mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening and caspase-3 activation. Here, we investigated whether propofol could alleviate burn serum-induced endothelial hyperpermeability through the inhibition of the intrinsic apoptotic signaling cascade. Rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (RLMVECs) were pretreated with propofol at various concentrations, followed by stimulation with burn serum, obtained from burn-injury rats. Monolayer permeability was determined by transendothelial electrical resistance. Mitochondrial release of cytochrome C was measured by ELISA. Bax and Bcl-2 expression and mitochondrial release of second mitochondrial-derived activator of caspases (smac) were detected by Western blotting. Caspase-3 activity was assessed by fluorometric assay; mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) was determined with JC-1 (a potential-sensitive fluorescent dye). Intracellular ATP content was assayed using a commercial kit, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Burn serum significantly increased monolayer permeability (P<0.05), and this effect could be inhibited by propofol (P<0.05). Compared with a sham treatment group, intrinsic apoptotic signaling activation - indicated by Bax overexpression, Bcl-2 downregulation, Δψm reduction, decreased intracellular ATP level, increased cytosolic cytochrome C and smac, and caspase-3 activation - was observed in the vehicle group. Propofol not only attenuated these alterations (P<0.05 for all), but also significantly decreased burn-induced ROS production (P<0.05). Propofol attenuated burn-induced RLMVEC monolayer hyperpermeability by regulating the intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway. PMID:25760023

  15. Surface code—biophysical signals for apoptotic cell clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, Mona; Maueröder, Christian; Brauner, Jan M.; Chaurio, Ricardo; Janko, Christina; Herrmann, Martin; Muñoz, Luis E.

    2013-12-01

    Apoptotic cell death and the clearance of dying cells play an important and physiological role in embryonic development and normal tissue turnover. In contrast to necrosis, apoptosis proceeds in an anti-inflammatory manner. It is orchestrated by the timed release and/or exposure of so-called ‘find-me’, ‘eat me’ and ‘tolerate me’ signals. Mononuclear phagocytes are attracted by various ‘find-me’ signals, including proteins, nucleotides, and phospholipids released by the dying cell, whereas the involvement of granulocytes is prevented via ‘stay away’ signals. The exposure of anionic phospholipids like phosphatidylserine (PS) by apoptotic cells on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane is one of the main ‘eat me’ signals. PS is recognized by a number of innate receptors as well as by soluble bridging molecules on the surface of phagocytes. Importantly, phagocytes are able to discriminate between viable and apoptotic cells both exposing PS. Due to cytoskeleton remodeling PS has a higher lateral mobility on the surfaces of apoptotic cells thereby promoting receptor clustering on the phagocyte. PS not only plays an important role in the engulfment process, but also acts as ‘tolerate me’ signal inducing the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines by phagocytes. An efficient and fast clearance of apoptotic cells is required to prevent secondary necrosis and leakage of intracellular danger signals into the surrounding tissue. Failure or prolongation of the clearance process leads to the release of intracellular antigens into the periphery provoking inflammation and development of systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease like systemic lupus erythematosus. Here we review the current findings concerning apoptosis-inducing pathways, important players of apoptotic cell recognition and clearance as well as the role of membrane remodeling in the engulfment of apoptotic cells by phagocytes.

  16. Apoptotic cell signaling in cancer progression and therapy.

    PubMed

    Plati, Jessica; Bucur, Octavian; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2011-04-01

    Apoptosis is a tightly regulated cell suicide program that plays an essential role in the development and maintenance of tissue homeostasis by eliminating unnecessary or harmful cells. Impairment of this native defense mechanism promotes aberrant cellular proliferation and the accumulation of genetic defects, ultimately resulting in tumorigenesis, and frequently confers drug resistance to cancer cells. The regulation of apoptosis at several levels is essential to maintain the delicate balance between cellular survival and death signaling that is required to prevent disease. Complex networks of signaling pathways act to promote or inhibit apoptosis in response to various cues. Apoptosis can be triggered by signals from within the cell, such as genotoxic stress, or by extrinsic signals, such as the binding of ligands to cell surface death receptors. Various upstream signaling pathways can modulate apoptosis by converging on, and thereby altering the activity of, common central control points within the apoptotic signaling pathways, which involve the BCL-2 family proteins, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, and FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP). This review highlights the role of these fundamental regulators of apoptosis in the context of both normal apoptotic signaling mechanisms and dysregulated apoptotic pathways that can render cancer cells resistant to cell death. In addition, therapeutic strategies aimed at modulating the activity of BCL-2 family proteins, IAPs, and c-FLIP for the targeted induction of apoptosis are briefly discussed. PMID:21340093

  17. ELMO1 signaling in apoptotic germ cell clearance and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Michael R; Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2010-10-01

    Apoptosis and the subsequent removal of dying cells are crucial processes for tissue development and maintenance. Although we are beginning to understand the signaling pathways that control the phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells, the physiological relevance of these pathways is lacking. During spermatogenesis, over half of the developing germ cells eventually die by apoptosis, yet the signaling pathways that regulate the phagocytic clearance of these dying cells or the impact of this clearance on development and maintenance of the germ cell population is not well understood. The ELMO1/Dock180 proteins form an evolutionarily conserved signaling module that functions as a bipartite guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPase Rac. The subsequent Rac-dependent cytoskeletal changes play an important role in the physical engulfment of apoptotic cells. Recent findings demonstrate an in vivo role for ELMO1-dependent clearance in the testes, with implications for spermatogenesis. Here we will discuss the role of apoptotic cell clearance during spermatogenesis, with a particular emphasis on ELMO1/Dock180 signaling. PMID:20958313

  18. Orexin/hypocretin receptor signalling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Kukkonen, JP; Leonard, CS

    2014-01-01

    Orexin (hypocretin) peptides and their two known G-protein-coupled receptors play essential roles in sleep–wake control and powerfully influence other systems regulating appetite/metabolism, stress and reward. Consequently, drugs that influence signalling by these receptors may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treating sleep disorders, obesity and addiction. It is therefore critical to understand how these receptors operate, the nature of the signalling cascades they engage and their physiological targets. In this review, we evaluate what is currently known about orexin receptor signalling cascades, while a sister review (Leonard & Kukkonen, this issue) focuses on tissue-specific responses. The evidence suggests that orexin receptor signalling is multifaceted and is substantially more diverse than originally thought. Indeed, orexin receptors are able to couple to members of at least three G-protein families and possibly other proteins, through which they regulate non-selective cation channels, phospholipases, adenylyl cyclase, and protein and lipid kinases. In the central nervous system, orexin receptors produce neuroexcitation by postsynaptic depolarization via activation of non-selective cation channels, inhibition of K+ channels and activation of Na+/Ca2+ exchange, but they also can stimulate the release of neurotransmitters by presynaptic actions and modulate synaptic plasticity. Ca2+ signalling is also prominently influenced by these receptors, both via the classical phospholipase C−Ca2+ release pathway and via Ca2+ influx, mediated by several pathways. Upon longer-lasting stimulation, plastic effects are observed in some cell types, while others, especially cancer cells, are stimulated to die. Thus, orexin receptor signals appear highly tunable, depending on the milieu in which they are operating. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Orexin Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10

  19. Plant MAPK cascades: Just rapid signaling modules?

    PubMed Central

    Boudsocq, Marie; Danquah, Agyemang; de Zélicourt, Axel; Hirt, Heribert; Colcombet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major phytohormone mediating important stress-related processes. We recently unveiled an ABA-activated MAPK signaling module constituted of MAP3K17/18-MKK3-MPK1/2/7/14. Unlike classical rapid MAPK activation, we showed that the activation of the new MAPK module is delayed and relies on the MAP3K protein synthesis. In this addendum, we discuss the role of this original and unexpected activation mechanism of MAPK cascades which suggests that MAPKs can regulate both early and long-term plant stress responses. PMID:26313321

  20. Activation of the Mitochondrial Apoptotic Signaling Platform during Rubella Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Claus, Claudia; Manssen, Lena; Hübner, Denise; Roßmark, Sarah; Bothe, Viktoria; Petzold, Alice; Große, Claudia; Reins, Mareen; Mankertz, Annette; Frey, Teryl K.; Liebert, Uwe G.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria- as well as p53-based signaling pathways are central for the execution of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Their contribution to rubella virus (RV)-induced apoptosis was addressed through time-specific evaluation of characteristic parameters such as permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane and subsequent release of the pro-apoptotic proteins apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and cytochrome c from mitochondria. Additionally, expression and localization pattern of p53 and selected members of the multifunctional and stress-inducible cyclophilin family were examined. The application of pifithrin μ as an inhibitor of p53 shuttling to mitochondria reduced RV-induced cell death to an extent similar to that of the broad spectrum caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk (benzyloxycarbonyl-V-A-D-(OMe)-fmk). However, RV progeny generation was not altered. This indicates that, despite an increased survival rate of its cellular host, induction of apoptosis neither supports nor restricts RV replication. Moreover, some of the examined apoptotic markers were affected in a strain-specific manner and differed between the cell culture-adapted strains: Therien and the HPV77 vaccine on the one hand, and a clinical isolate on the other. In summary, the results presented indicate that the transcription-independent mitochondrial p53 program contributes to RV-induced apoptosis. PMID:26703711

  1. Activation of the Mitochondrial Apoptotic Signaling Platform during Rubella Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Claus, Claudia; Manssen, Lena; Hübner, Denise; Roßmark, Sarah; Bothe, Viktoria; Petzold, Alice; Große, Claudia; Reins, Mareen; Mankertz, Annette; Frey, Teryl K; Liebert, Uwe G

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondria- as well as p53-based signaling pathways are central for the execution of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Their contribution to rubella virus (RV)-induced apoptosis was addressed through time-specific evaluation of characteristic parameters such as permeabilization of the mitochondrial membrane and subsequent release of the pro-apoptotic proteins apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and cytochrome c from mitochondria. Additionally, expression and localization pattern of p53 and selected members of the multifunctional and stress-inducible cyclophilin family were examined. The application of pifithrin μ as an inhibitor of p53 shuttling to mitochondria reduced RV-induced cell death to an extent similar to that of the broad spectrum caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk (benzyloxycarbonyl-V-A-D-(OMe)-fmk). However, RV progeny generation was not altered. This indicates that, despite an increased survival rate of its cellular host, induction of apoptosis neither supports nor restricts RV replication. Moreover, some of the examined apoptotic markers were affected in a strain-specific manner and differed between the cell culture-adapted strains: Therien and the HPV77 vaccine on the one hand, and a clinical isolate on the other. In summary, the results presented indicate that the transcription-independent mitochondrial p53 program contributes to RV-induced apoptosis. PMID:26703711

  2. Ras Homolog Enriched in Brain (Rheb) Enhances Apoptotic Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Karassek, Sascha; Berghaus, Carsten; Schwarten, Melanie; Goemans, Christoph G.; Ohse, Nadine; Kock, Gerd; Jockers, Katharina; Neumann, Sebastian; Gottfried, Sebastian; Herrmann, Christian; Heumann, Rolf; Stoll, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Rheb is a homolog of Ras GTPase that regulates cell growth, proliferation, and regeneration via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Because of the well established potential of activated Ras to promote survival, we sought to investigate the ability of Rheb signaling to phenocopy Ras. We found that overexpression of lipid-anchored Rheb enhanced the apoptotic effects induced by UV light, TNFα, or tunicamycin in an mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)-dependent manner. Knocking down endogenous Rheb or applying rapamycin led to partial protection, identifying Rheb as a mediator of cell death. Ras and c-Raf kinase opposed the apoptotic effects induced by UV light or TNFα but did not prevent Rheb-mediated apoptosis. To gain structural insight into the signaling mechanisms, we determined the structure of Rheb-GDP by NMR. The complex adopts the typical canonical fold of RasGTPases and displays the characteristic GDP-dependent picosecond to nanosecond backbone dynamics of the switch I and switch II regions. NMR revealed Ras effector-like binding of activated Rheb to the c-Raf-Ras-binding domain (RBD), but the affinity was 1000-fold lower than the Ras/RBD interaction, suggesting a lack of functional interaction. shRNA-mediated knockdown of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK-1) strongly reduced UV or TNFα-induced apoptosis and suppressed enhancement by Rheb overexpression. In conclusion, Rheb-mTOR activation not only promotes normal cell growth but also enhances apoptosis in response to diverse toxic stimuli via an ASK-1-mediated mechanism. Pharmacological regulation of the Rheb/mTORC1 pathway using rapamycin should take the presence of cellular stress into consideration, as this may have clinical implications. PMID:20685651

  3. v-Src Generates a p53-Independent Apoptotic Signal

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Brian L.; Jimenez, Elsa; Martin, G. Steven

    2000-01-01

    Evasion of apoptosis appears to be a necessary event in tumor progression. Some oncogenes, such as c-myc and E1A, induce apoptosis in the absence of survival factors. However, others, such as bcl-2 and v-src, activate antiapoptotic pathways. For v-Src, these antiapoptotic pathways are dependent on the function of Ras, phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, and Stat3. Here we asked whether v-Src can activate a proapoptotic signal when survival signaling is inhibited. We show that when the functions of Ras and PI 3-kinase are inhibited, v-src-transformed Rat-2 fibroblasts undergo apoptosis, evidenced by loss of adherence, nuclear fragmentation, and chromosomal DNA degradation. The apoptotic response is dependent on activation of caspase 3. Under similar conditions nontransformed Rat-2 cells undergo considerably lower levels of apoptosis. Apoptosis induced by v-Src is accompanied by a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c and is blocked by overexpression of bcl-2, indicating that it is mediated by the mitochondrial pathway. However apoptosis induced by v-Src is not accompanied by an increase in the level of p53 and is not dependent on p53 function. Thus v-Src generates a p53-independent proapoptotic signal. PMID:11094078

  4. Crosstalk and Signaling Switches in Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Dirk; Croucher, David R.; Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades control cell fate decisions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis by integrating and processing intra- and extracellular cues. However, similar MAPK kinetic profiles can be associated with opposing cellular decisions depending on cell type, signal strength, and dynamics. This implies that signaling by each individual MAPK cascade has to be considered in the context of the entire MAPK network. Here, we develop a dynamic model of feedback and crosstalk for the three major MAPK cascades; extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and also include input from protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. Focusing on the bistable activation characteristics of the JNK pathway, this model explains how pathway crosstalk harmonizes different MAPK responses resulting in pivotal cell fate decisions. We show that JNK can switch from a transient to sustained activity due to multiple positive feedback loops. Once activated, positive feedback locks JNK in a highly active state and promotes cell death. The switch is modulated by the ERK, p38, and AKT pathways. ERK activation enhances the dual specificity phosphatase (DUSP) mediated dephosphorylation of JNK and shifts the threshold of the apoptotic switch to higher inputs. Activation of p38 restores the threshold by inhibiting ERK activity via the PP1 or PP2A phosphatases. Finally, AKT activation inhibits the JNK positive feedback, thus abrogating the apoptotic switch and allowing only proliferative signaling. Our model facilitates understanding of how cancerous deregulations disturb MAPK signal processing and provides explanations for certain drug resistances. We highlight a critical role of DUSP1 and DUSP2 expression patterns in facilitating the switching of JNK activity and show how oncogene induced ERK hyperactivity prevents the normal apoptotic switch explaining the failure of certain drugs to

  5. Signal Transduction Cascades Regulating Fungal Development and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lengeler, Klaus B.; Davidson, Robert C.; D'souza, Cletus; Harashima, Toshiaki; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Wang, Ping; Pan, Xuewen; Waugh, Michael; Heitman, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Cellular differentiation, mating, and filamentous growth are regulated in many fungi by environmental and nutritional signals. For example, in response to nitrogen limitation, diploid cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo a dimorphic transition to filamentous growth referred to as pseudohyphal differentiation. Yeast filamentous growth is regulated, in part, by two conserved signal transduction cascades: a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade and a G-protein regulated cyclic AMP signaling pathway. Related signaling cascades play an analogous role in regulating mating and virulence in the plant fungal pathogen Ustilago maydis and the human fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans. We review here studies on the signaling cascades that regulate development of these and other fungi. This analysis illustrates both how the model yeast S. cerevisiae can serve as a paradigm for signaling in other organisms and also how studies in other fungi provide insights into conserved signaling pathways that operate in many divergent organisms. PMID:11104818

  6. Thermally Induced Osteocyte Damage Initiates a Remodelling Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Eimear B.; McNamara, Laoise M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal elevations experienced by bone during orthopaedic procedures, such as cutting and drilling, exothermal reactions from bone cement, and thermal therapies such as tumor ablation, can result in thermal damage leading to death of native bone cells (osteocytes, osteoblasts, osteoclasts and mesenchymal stem cells). Osteocytes are believed to be the orchestrators of bone remodeling, which recruit nearby osteoclast and osteoblasts to control resorption and bone growth in response to mechanical stimuli and physical damage. However, whether heat-induced osteocyte damage can directly elicit bone remodelling has yet to be determined. This study establishes the link between osteocyte thermal damage and the remodeling cascade. We show that osteocytes directly exposed to thermal elevations (47°C for 1 minute) become significantly apoptotic and alter the expression of osteogenic genes (Opg and Cox2). The Rankl/Opg ratio is consistently down-regulated, at days 1, 3 and 7 in MLO-Y4s heat-treated to 47°C for 1 minute. Additionally, the pro-osteoblastogenic signaling marker Cox2 is significantly up-regulated in heat-treated MLO-Y4s by day 7. Furthermore, secreted factors from heat-treated MLO-Y4s administered to MSCs using a novel co-culture system are shown to activate pre-osteoblastic MSCs to increase production of the pro-osteoblastic differentiation marker, alkaline phosphatase (day 7, 14), and calcium deposition (day 21). Most interestingly, an initial pro-osteoclastogenic signaling response (increase Rankl and Rankl/Opg ratio at day 1) followed by later stage pro-osteoblastogenic signaling (down-regulation in Rankl and the Rankl/Opg ratio and an up-regulation in Opg and Cox2 by day 7) was observed in non-heat-treated MLO-Y4s in co-culture when these were exposed to the biochemicals produced by heat-treated MLO-Y4s. Taken together, these results elucidate the vital role of osteocytes in detecting and responding to thermal damage by means of thermally induced apoptosis

  7. Thermally induced osteocyte damage initiates a remodelling signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eimear B; Haugh, Matthew G; Voisin, Muriel C; Tallon, David; McNamara, Laoise M

    2015-01-01

    Thermal elevations experienced by bone during orthopaedic procedures, such as cutting and drilling, exothermal reactions from bone cement, and thermal therapies such as tumor ablation, can result in thermal damage leading to death of native bone cells (osteocytes, osteoblasts, osteoclasts and mesenchymal stem cells). Osteocytes are believed to be the orchestrators of bone remodeling, which recruit nearby osteoclast and osteoblasts to control resorption and bone growth in response to mechanical stimuli and physical damage. However, whether heat-induced osteocyte damage can directly elicit bone remodelling has yet to be determined. This study establishes the link between osteocyte thermal damage and the remodeling cascade. We show that osteocytes directly exposed to thermal elevations (47°C for 1 minute) become significantly apoptotic and alter the expression of osteogenic genes (Opg and Cox2). The Rankl/Opg ratio is consistently down-regulated, at days 1, 3 and 7 in MLO-Y4s heat-treated to 47°C for 1 minute. Additionally, the pro-osteoblastogenic signaling marker Cox2 is significantly up-regulated in heat-treated MLO-Y4s by day 7. Furthermore, secreted factors from heat-treated MLO-Y4s administered to MSCs using a novel co-culture system are shown to activate pre-osteoblastic MSCs to increase production of the pro-osteoblastic differentiation marker, alkaline phosphatase (day 7, 14), and calcium deposition (day 21). Most interestingly, an initial pro-osteoclastogenic signaling response (increase Rankl and Rankl/Opg ratio at day 1) followed by later stage pro-osteoblastogenic signaling (down-regulation in Rankl and the Rankl/Opg ratio and an up-regulation in Opg and Cox2 by day 7) was observed in non-heat-treated MLO-Y4s in co-culture when these were exposed to the biochemicals produced by heat-treated MLO-Y4s. Taken together, these results elucidate the vital role of osteocytes in detecting and responding to thermal damage by means of thermally induced apoptosis

  8. Engulfment of apoptotic cells: signals for a good meal.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Kodi S; Lorenz, Ulrike

    2007-12-01

    The clearance of apoptotic cells by phagocytes is an integral component of normal life, and defects in this process can have significant implications for self tolerance and autoimmunity. Recent studies have provided new insights into the engulfment process, including how phagocytes seek apoptotic cells, how they recognize and ingest these targets and how they maintain cellular homeostasis after the 'meal'. Several new factors that regulate engulfment have been identified, whereas the roles of some of the older players require revision. This Review focuses on these recent developments and attempts to highlight some of the important questions in this field. PMID:18037898

  9. Beginnings of a good apoptotic meal: the find-me and eat-me signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ravichandran, Kodi S

    2011-10-28

    Prompt and efficient clearance of apoptotic cells is necessary to prevent secondary necrosis of dying cells and to avoid immune responses to autoantigens. Recent studies have shed light on how apoptotic cells through soluble "find-me" signals advertise their presence to phagocytes at the earliest stages of cell death. Phagocytes sense the find-me signal gradient, and in turn the presence of dying cells, and migrate to their vicinity. The apoptotic cells also expose specific "eat-me" signals on their surface that are recognized by phagocytes through specific engulfment receptors. This review covers the recent progress in the areas of find-me and eat-me signals and how these relate to prompt and immunologically silent clearance of apoptotic cells. PMID:22035837

  10. Beginnings of a good apoptotic meal: the find-me and eat-me signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ravichandran, Kodi S.

    2011-01-01

    Prompt and efficient clearance of apoptotic cells is necessary to prevent secondary necrosis of dying cells, and to avoid immune responses to autoantigens. Recent studies have shed light on how apoptotic cells through soluble ‘find-me signals’ advertise their presence to phagocytes at the earliest stages of cell death. Phagocytes sense the find-me signal gradient, and in turn the presence of dying cells, and migrate to their vicinity. The apoptotic cells also expose specific eat-me signals on their surface that are recognized by phagocytes through specific engulfment receptors. This review covers the recent progress in the areas of find-me and eat-me signals, and how these relate to prompt and immunologically silent clearance of apoptotic cells. PMID:22035837

  11. Apoptotic Cells Initiate Endothelial Cell Sprouting via Electrostatic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Weihua, Zhang; Tsan, Rachel; Schroit, Alan J.; Fidler, Isaiah J.

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the development of new blood vessels from preexisting vessels, is crucial to tissue growth, repair, and maintenance. This process begins with the formation of endothelial cell sprouts followed by the proliferation and migration of neighboring endothelial cells along the pre-formed extensions. The initiating event and mechanism of sprouting is not known. We demonstrate that the phenotypic expression of negative-charged membrane surface in apoptotic cells initiates the formation of directional endothelial cell sprouts that extend toward the dying cells by a mechanism that involves endothelial cell membrane hyperpolarization and cytoskeleton reorganization but is independent of diffusible molecules. PMID:16357162

  12. The "ups and downs" of signaling cascades in addiction.

    PubMed

    Ron, Dorit; Jurd, Rachel

    2005-11-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic disease characterized by compulsive drug use despite the severe negative consequences associated with it. Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse results in molecular adaptations in neuronal signaling pathways, which eventually manifest in the complex behavioral alterations that characterize addiction. These include tolerance, sensitization, dependence, drug craving, and relapse. In this Review, we focus on recent studies highlighting signaling cascades initiated by cocaine, as a representative of a drug of abuse with a defined site of action, and alcohol, as a drug with an undefined primary site of action. Specifically, we describe recent studies that emphasize the role of protein-protein interactions, phosphorylation, and compartmentalization in the molecular mechanisms that result in the cellular and behavioral adaptations that underlie addiction. Signaling cascades that contribute to addiction, as well as those that protect or delay the development of addiction, are presented. PMID:16278489

  13. Prion protein induced signaling cascades in monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, Bjarne; Dorner-Ciossek, Cornelia; Vassallo, Neville; Herms, Jochen; Kretzschmar, Hans A. . E-mail: Hans.Kretzschmar@med.uni-muenchen.de

    2006-02-03

    Prion proteins play a central role in transmission and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}), whose physiological function remains elusive, is anchored to the surface of a variety of cell types including neurons and cells of the lymphoreticular system. In this study, we investigated the response of a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line to exposure with PrP{sup C} fusion proteins synthesized with a human Fc-tag. PrP{sup C} fusion proteins showed an attachment to the surface of monocyte/macrophages in nanomolar concentrations. This was accompanied by an increase of cellular tyrosine phosphorylation as a result of activated signaling pathways. Detailed investigations exhibited activation of downstream pathways through a stimulation with PrP fusion proteins, which include phosphorylation of ERK{sub 1,2} and Akt kinase. Macrophages opsonize and present antigenic structures, contact lymphocytes, and deliver cytokines. The findings reported here may become the basis of understanding the molecular function of PrP{sup C} in monocytes and macrophages.

  14. Apoptotic Cells Induce NF-κB and Inflammasome Negative Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Amir; Tabib, Adi; Grau, Inna; Reiner, Inna; Mevorach, Dror

    2015-01-01

    As they undergo phagocytosis, most early apoptotic cells negatively regulate proinflammatory signaling and were suggested as a major mechanism in the resolution of inflammation. The dextran sulfate sodium model is generally viewed as an epithelial damage model suited to investigate innate immune responses. Macrophages primed with LPS and subsequently exposed to DSS secrete high levels of IL-1β in an NLRP3-, ASC-, and caspase-1-dependent manner. The aim of this research was to test the therapeutic effect of a single dose of apoptotic cells in a DSS-colitis model and to explore possible mechanisms. Primary peritoneal macrophages, the DSS mice model, and Nlrp3-deficient mice, were used to assess the effect apoptotic cells on colitis. Immunohistochemistry, flow-cytometer, and western blots helped to explore the effect and mechanisms. Using a variety of NLRP3 triggering mechanisms, we show that apoptotic cells negatively regulate NF-κB and NLRP3 activation in primary peritoneal macrophages, at pre- and post-transcription levels, via inhibition of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal stabilization, and blocking K+ efflux. This property of apoptotic cells is demonstrated in a dramatic clinical, histological, and immunological amelioration of DSS colitis in Balb/c and B6 mice following a single administration of apoptotic cells. PMID:25822487

  15. Manganese nanoparticle activates mitochondrial dependent apoptotic signaling and autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2011-11-15

    The production of man-made nanoparticles for various modern applications has increased exponentially in recent years, but the potential health effects of most nanoparticles are not well characterized. Unfortunately, in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies are extremely limited by yet unresolved problems relating to dosimetry. In the present study, we systematically characterized manganese (Mn) nanoparticle sizes and examined the nanoparticle-induced oxidative signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that Mn nanoparticles range in size from single nanoparticles ({approx} 25 nM) to larger agglomerates when in treatment media. Manganese nanoparticles were effectively internalized in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells, and they induced a time-dependent upregulation of the transporter protein transferrin. Exposure to 25-400 {mu}g/mL Mn nanoparticles induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mn nanoparticles also significantly increased ROS, accompanied by a caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of proapoptotic protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), as well as activation loop phosphorylation. Blocking Mn nanoparticle-induced ROS failed to protect against the neurotoxic effects, suggesting the involvement of other pathways. Further mechanistic studies revealed changes in Beclin 1 and LC3, indicating that Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy. Primary mesencephalic neuron exposure to Mn nanoparticles induced loss of TH positive dopaminergic neurons and neuronal processes. Collectively, our results suggest that Mn nanoparticles effectively enter dopaminergic neuronal cells and exert neurotoxic effects by activating an apoptotic signaling pathway and autophagy, emphasizing the need for assessing possible health risks associated with an increased use of Mn nanoparticles in modern applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles

  16. Future Antidepressant Targets: Neurotrophic Factors and Related Signaling Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Heath D.; Banasr, Mounira; Duman, Ronald S.

    2009-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrate that neurotrophic factors play critical roles in the etiology and treatment of depression. While the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressants remain unknown, increasing evidence supports a role for increased trophic support in the treatment of depression. Furthermore, antidepressants block or reverse stress-induced down regulation of neurotrophic factor expression in limbic and cortical nuclei involved in the underlying pathophysiology of depression. Thus, components of neurotrophic factor-mediated signaling cascades or the signal transduction pathways that regulate neurotrophic factor expression may provide additional targets for the development of novel, more efficacious antidepressant drugs. PMID:19802372

  17. Tributyltin induces apoptotic signaling in hepatocytes through pathways involving the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Grondin, Melanie; Marion, Michel; Denizeau, Francine; Averill-Bates, Diana A. . E-mail: averill.diana@uqam.ca

    2007-07-01

    Tri-n-butyltin is a widespread environmental toxicant, which accumulates in the liver. This study investigates whether tri-n-butyltin induces pro-apoptotic signaling in rat liver hepatocytes through pathways involving the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Tri-n-butyltin activated the endoplasmic reticulum pathway of apoptosis, which was demonstrated by the activation of the protease calpain, its translocation to the plasma membrane, followed by cleavage of the calpain substrates, cytoskeletal protein vinculin, and caspase-12. Caspase-12 is localized to the cytoplasmic side of the endoplasmic reticulum and is involved in apoptosis mediated by the endoplasmic reticulum. Tri-n-butyltin also caused translocation of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad from the cytosol to mitochondria, as well as changes in mitochondrial membrane permeability, events which can activate the mitochondrial death pathway. Tri-n-butyltin induced downstream apoptotic events in rat hepatocytes at the nuclear level, detected by chromatin condensation and by confocal microscopy using acridine orange. We investigated whether the tri-n-butyltin-induced pro-apoptotic events in hepatocytes could be linked to perturbation of intracellular calcium homeostasis, using confocal microscopy. Tri-n-butyltin caused changes in intracellular calcium distribution, which were similar to those induced by thapsigargin. Calcium was released from a subcellular compartment, which is likely to be the endoplasmic reticulum, into the cytosol. Cytosolic acidification, which is known to trigger apoptosis, also occurred and involved the Cl{sup -}/HCO{sub 3} {sup -} exchanger. Pro-apoptotic events in hepatocytes were inhibited by the calcium chelator, Bapta-AM, and by a calpain inhibitor, which suggests that changes in intracellular calcium homeostasis are involved in tri-n-butyltin-induced apoptotic signaling in rat hepatocytes.

  18. Overexpression of Amyloid- β Protein Precursor Induces Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress and Activates the Intrinsic Apoptotic Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Matthew G.; Marquardt, Kristin; Kirchhof, Danielle; Wilkins, Heather M.; Patterson, David; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a debilitating cognitive disorder which is characterized pathologically by amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Aberrant processing of amyloid beta protein precursor (AβPP) into amyloid-β fragments underlies the formation of senile plaques. Moreover, amyloid-β fragments, particularly Aβ42, exert direct toxic effects within neurons including the induction of mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS). Interestingly, individuals with Down Syndrome (DS) frequently develop early onset AD as a major co-morbid phenotype. One hypothesis for AD associated with DS involves the overexpression of wild type (WT) AβPP protein, due to its location on chromosome 21. However, the mechanism by which the overexpression of WT AβPP might trigger MOS and induce cell death is presently unclear. Here we show that transient overexpression of DsRed2-tagged AβPP (WT) in CHO cells induces the activation of caspase-3 and nuclear fragmentation indicative of apoptosis. AβPP localizes to the mitochondrial fraction of transfected CHO cells and its overexpression causes glutathione (GSH)-sensitive opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and cytochrome c release. MOS and intrinsic apoptosis induced by AβPP were significantly inhibited by the co-expression of Bcl-2 or treatment with either GSH or Boc, a pan-caspase inhibitor. Furthermore, the mPTP inhibitor, cyclosporin A, also significantly protected CHO cells from apoptosis induced by AβPP overexpression. Finally, co-treatment with a β-secretase inhibitor did not significantly protect CHO cells from AβPP overexpression and Aβ42 levels were undetectable in transfected CHO cells. Therefore, the mechanism of AβPP induced MOS and apoptosis is independent of the production of Aβ42. However, a γ-secretase inhibitor showed significant protection of the CHO cells against AβPP overexpression. Thus, suggesting a possible role of the AβPP intracellular domain in this apoptotic

  19. Anti-apoptotic signaling as a cytoprotective mechanism in mammalian hibernation

    PubMed Central

    Mamady, Hapsatou; Tessier, Shannon N.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of normal cell turnover, apoptosis is a natural phenomenon involved in making essential life and death decisions. Apoptotic pathways balance signals which promote cell death (pro-apoptotic pathways) or counteract these signals (anti-apoptotic pathways). We proposed that changes in anti-apoptotic proteins would occur during mammalian hibernation to aid cell preservation during prolonged torpor under cellular conditions that are highly injurious to most mammals (e.g. low body temperatures, ischemia). Immunoblotting was used to analyze the expression of proteins associated with pro-survival in six tissues of thirteen-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus. The brain showed a concerted response to torpor with significant increases in the levels of all anti-apoptotic targets analyzed (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, BI-1, Mcl-1, cIAP1/2, xIAP) as well as enhanced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at S70 and T56. Heart responded similarly with most anti-apoptotic proteins elevated significantly during torpor except for Bcl-xL and xIAP that decreased and Mcl-1 that was unaltered. In liver, BI-1 increased whereas cIAP1/2 decreased. In kidney, there was an increase in BI-1, cIAP and xIAP but decreases in Bcl-xL and p-Bcl-2(T56) content. In brown adipose tissue, protein levels of BI-1, cIAP1/2, and xIAP decreased significantly during torpor (compared with euthermia) whereas Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Mcl-1 were unaltered; however, Bcl-2 showed enhanced phosphorylation at Thr56 but not at Ser70. In skeletal muscle, only xIAP levels changed significantly during torpor (an increase). The data show that anti-apoptotic pathways have organ-specific responses in hibernators with a prominent potential role in heart and brain where coordinated enhancement of anti-apoptotic proteins occurred in response to torpor. PMID:23638364

  20. p38 MAPK and PI3K/AKT Signalling Cascades inParkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Saurabh Kumar; Jha, Niraj Kumar; Kar, Rohan; Ambasta, Rashmi K; Kumar, Pravir

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative condition which has the second largest incidence rate among all other neurodegenerative disorders barring Alzheimer's disease (AD). Currently there is no cure and researchers continue to probe the therapeutic prospect in cell cultures and animal models of PD. Out of the several factors contributing to PD prognosis, the role of p38 MAPK (Mitogen activated protein-kinase) and PI3K/AKT signalling module in PD brains is crucial because the impaired balance between the pro- apoptotic and anti-apoptotic pathways trigger unwanted phenotypes such as microglia activation, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. These factors continue challenging the brain homeostasis in initial stages thereby essentially assisting the dopaminergic (DA) neurons towards progressive degeneration in PD. Neurotherapeutics against PD shall then be targeted against the misregulated accomplices of the p38 and PI3K/AKT cascades. In this review, we have outlined many such established mechanisms involving the p38 MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways which can offer therapeutic windows for the rectification of aberrant DA neuronal dynamics in PD brains. PMID:26261796

  1. The JAK/STAT signaling cascade in gastric carcinoma (Review).

    PubMed

    Khanna, Puja; Chua, Pei Jou; Bay, Boon Huat; Baeg, Gyeong Hun

    2015-11-01

    Gastric carcinoma remains one of the most prevalent forms of cancer worldwide, despite the decline in incidence rates, increased awareness of the disease and advancement in treatment strategies. Helicobacter pylori infection, dietary factors, lifestyle influences and various genetic aberrations have been shown to contribute to the development and progression of gastric cancer. Recent studies on the genomic landscape of gastric adenocarcinoma have identified several key signaling molecules, including epidermal growth factor receptor family (ErbB) members, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor family (VEGFR) members and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway components, that have been implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of gastric cancers. However, clinical trials with compounds that target these molecules have failed to show a significant improvement in overall survival rates when supplemented with conventional therapies. Therefore, it is essential to identify effective prognostic and/or diagnostic biomarkers and develop molecular targeted therapies. The JAK/STAT cascade is a principal signal transduction pathway in cytokine and growth factor signaling, regulating various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival. Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that dysregulated JAK/STAT signaling is a driving force in the pathogenesis of various solid cancers as well as hematopoietic malignancies. Hence, a large number of preclinical and clinical studies of drugs targeting this pathway are currently underway. Notably, aberrant JAK/STAT signaling has also been implicated in gastric cancers. In this review, we focus on the ongoing research on the JAK/STAT cascade in gastric carcinoma and discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting JAK/STAT signaling for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26398764

  2. Differential DNA damage signalling and apoptotic threshold correlate with mouse epiblast-specific hypersensitivity to radiation.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Audrey; Blasi, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Between implantation and gastrulation, mouse pluripotent epiblast cells expand enormously in number and exhibit a remarkable hypersensitivity to DNA damage. Upon low-dose irradiation, they undergo mitotic arrest followed by p53-dependent apoptosis, whereas the other cell types simply arrest. This protective mechanism, active exclusively after E5.5 and lost during gastrulation, ensures the elimination of every mutated cell before its clonal expansion and is therefore expected to greatly increase fitness. We show that the insurgence of apoptosis relies on the epiblast-specific convergence of both increased DNA damage signalling and stronger pro-apoptotic balance. Although upstream Atm/Atr global activity and specific γH2AX phosphorylation are similar in all cell types of the embryo, 53BP1 recruitment at DNA breaks is immediately amplified only in epiblast cells after ionizing radiation. This correlates with rapid epiblast-specific activation of p53 and its transcriptional properties. Moreover, between E5.5 and E6.5 epiblast cells lower their apoptotic threshold by enhancing the expression of pro-apoptotic Bak and Bim and repressing the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL. Thus, even after low-dose irradiation, the cytoplasmic priming of epiblast cells allows p53 to rapidly induce apoptosis via a partially transcription-independent mechanism. PMID:26395482

  3. Inhibition of citrinin-induced apoptotic biochemical signaling in human hepatoma G2 cells by resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chi; Chan, Wen-Hsiung

    2009-10-01

    The mycotoxin citrinin (CTN), a natural contaminant in foodstuffs and animal feeds, exerts cytotoxic and genotoxic effects on various mammalian cells. CTN causes cell injury, including apoptosis, but its precise regulatory mechanisms of action are currently unclear. Resveratrol, a member of the phytoalexin family found in grapes and other dietary plants, possesses antioxidant and anti-tumor properties. In the present study, we examined the effects of resveratrol on apoptotic biochemical events in Hep G2 cells induced by CTN. Resveratrol inhibited CTN-induced ROS generation, activation of JNK, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), as well as activation of caspase-9, caspase-3 and PAK2. Moreover, resveratrol and the ROS scavengers, NAC and alpha-tocopherol, abolished CTN-stimulated intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis. Active JNK was required for CTN-induced mitochondria-dependent apoptotic biochemical changes, including loss of MMP, and activation of caspases and PAK2. Activation of PAK2 was essential for apoptosis triggered by CTN. These results collectively demonstrate that CTN stimulates ROS generation and JNK activation for mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signaling in Hep G2 cells, and these apoptotic biochemical events are blocked by pretreatment with resveratrol, which exerts antioxidant effects. PMID:20111678

  4. Estrogen action and cytoplasmic signaling cascades. Part I: membrane-associated signaling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Segars, James H.; Driggers, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Remarkable progress in recent years has suggested that estrogen action in vivo is complex and often involves activation of cytoplasmic signaling cascades in addition to genomic actions mediated directly through estrogen receptors α and β. Rather than a linear response mediated solely through estrogen-responsive DNA elements, in vivo estrogen might simultaneously activate distinct signaling cascades that function as networks to coordinate tissue responses to estrogen. This complex signaling system provides for exquisite control and plasticity of response to estrogen at the tissue level, and undoubtedly contributes to the remarkable tissue-specific responses to estrogens. In part I of this series, we summarize cytoplasmic signaling modules involving estrogen or estrogen receptors, with particular focus on recently described membrane-associated signaling complexes. PMID:12217492

  5. WNT signaling controls expression of pro-apoptotic BOK and BAX in intestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zeilstra, Jurrit; Joosten, Sander P.J.; Wensveen, Felix M.; Dessing, Mark C.; Schuetze, Denise M.; Eldering, Eric; Spaargaren, Marcel; Pals, Steven T.

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Intestinal adenomas initiated by aberrant activation of the WNT pathway displayed an increased sensitivity to apoptosis. {yields} Expression profiling of apoptosis-related genes in Apc{sup Min/+} mice revealed the differential expression of pro-apoptotic Bok and Bax. {yields} APC-mutant adenomatous crypts in FAP patients showed strongly increased BAX immunoreactivity. {yields} Blocking of {beta}-catenin/TCF-4-mediated signaling in colon cancer cells reduced the expression of BOK and BAX. -- Abstract: In a majority of cases, colorectal cancer is initiated by aberrant activation of the WNT signaling pathway. Mutation of the genes encoding the WNT signaling components adenomatous polyposis coli or {beta}-catenin causes constitutively active {beta}-catenin/TCF-mediated transcription, driving the transformation of intestinal crypts to cancer precursor lesions, called dysplastic aberrant crypt foci. Deregulated apoptosis is a hallmark of adenomatous colon tissue. However, the contribution of WNT signaling to this process is not fully understood. We addressed this role by analyzing the rate of epithelial apoptosis in aberrant crypts and adenomas of the Apc{sup Min/+} mouse model. In comparison with normal crypts and adenomas, aberrant crypts displayed a dramatically increased rate of apoptotic cell death. Expression profiling of apoptosis-related genes along the crypt-villus axis and in Apc mutant adenomas revealed increased expression of two pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members in intestinal adenomas, Bok and Bax. Analysis of the colon of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients along the crypt-to-surface axis, and of dysplastic crypts, corroborated this expression pattern. Disruption of {beta}-catenin/TCF-4-mediated signaling in the colorectal cancer cell line Ls174T significantly decreased BOK and BAX expression, confirming WNT-dependent regulation in intestinal epithelial cells. Our results suggest a feedback mechanism by which

  6. Hydrogen peroxide produced inside mitochondria takes part in cell-to-cell transmission of apoptotic signal.

    PubMed

    Pletjushkina, O Yu; Fetisova, E K; Lyamzaev, K G; Ivanova, O Yu; Domnina, L V; Vyssokikh, M Yu; Pustovidko, A V; Alexeevski, A V; Alexeevski, D A; Vasiliev, J M; Murphy, M P; Chernyak, B V; Skulachev, V P

    2006-01-01

    In monolayer of HeLa cells treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF), apoptotic cells formed clusters indicating possible transmission of apoptotic signal via the culture media. To investigate this phenomenon, a simple method of enabling two cell cultures to interact has been employed. Two coverslips were placed side by side in a Petri dish, one coverslip covered with apoptogen-treated cells (the inducer) and another with non-treated cells (the recipient). TNF, staurosporine, or H2O2 treatment of the inducer cells is shown to initiate apoptosis on the recipient coverslip. This effect is increased by a catalase inhibitor aminotriazole and is arrested by addition of catalase or by pre-treatment of either the inducer or the recipient cells with nanomolar concentrations of mitochondria-targeted cationic antioxidant MitoQ (10-(6 -ubiquinolyl)decyltriphenylphosphonium), which specifically arrests H2O2-induced apoptosis. The action of MitoQ is abolished by an uncoupler preventing accumulation of MitoQ in mitochondria. It is concluded that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by mitochondria in the apoptotic cells initiate the release of H2O2 from these cells. The H2O2 released is employed as a long-distance cell suicide messenger. In processing of such a signal by the recipient cells, mitochondrial ROS production is also involved. It is suggested that the described phenomenon may be involved in expansion of the apoptotic region around a damaged part of the tissue during heart attack or stroke as well as in "organoptosis", i.e. disappearance of organs during ontogenesis. PMID:16457620

  7. Ocimum gratissimum Aqueous Extract Induces Apoptotic Signalling in Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell A549

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han-Min; Lee, Mu-Jang; Kuo, Cheng-Yi; Tsai, Pei-Lin; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Kao, Shao-Hsuan

    2011-01-01

    Ocimum gratissimum (OG) is widely used as a traditional herb for its antibacterial activity in Taiwan. Recently, antitumor effect of OG on breast cancer cell is also reported; however, the effects of OG on human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell A549 remain unclear. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether aqueous OG extract (OGE) affects viability of A549 cells and the signals induced by OGE in A549 cells. Cell viability assays revealed that OGE significantly and dose-dependently decreased the viability of A549 cell but not that of BEAS-2B cell. Morphological examination and DAPI staining indicated that OGE induced cell shrinkage and DNA condensation for A549 cells. Further investigation showed that OGE enhanced activation of caspase-3, caspase-9 and caspase-8 and increased protein level of Apaf-1 and Bak, but diminished the level of Bcl-2. Additionally, OGE inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) yet enhanced the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAP kinase (p38). In conclusion, our findings indicate that OGE suppressed the cell viability of A549 cells, which may result from the activation of apoptotic signaling and the inhibition of anti-apoptotic signaling, suggesting that OGE might be beneficial to lung carcinoma treatment. PMID:20953389

  8. A Complex Signaling Cascade Governs Pristinamycin Biosynthesis in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis

    PubMed Central

    Guezguez, Jamil; Handel, Franziska; Schinko, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Pristinamycin production in Streptomyces pristinaespiralis Pr11 is tightly regulated by an interplay between different repressors and activators. A γ-butyrolactone receptor gene (spbR), two TetR repressor genes (papR3 and papR5), three SARP (Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein) genes (papR1, papR2, and papR4), and a response regulator gene (papR6) are carried on the large 210-kb pristinamycin biosynthetic gene region of Streptomyces pristinaespiralis Pr11. A detailed investigation of all pristinamycin regulators revealed insight into a complex signaling cascade, which is responsible for the fine-tuned regulation of pristinamycin production in S. pristinaespiralis. PMID:26187956

  9. Dietary Fat and Aging Modulate Apoptotic Signaling in Liver of Calorie-Restricted Mice

    PubMed Central

    López-Domínguez, José Alberto; Khraiwesh, Husam; González-Reyes, José Antonio; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; Ramsey, Jon Jay; de Cabo, Rafael; Burón, María Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Imbalance between proliferation and cell death accounts for several age-linked diseases. Aging, calorie restriction (CR), and fat source are all factors that may influence apoptotic signaling in liver, an organ that plays a central metabolic role in the organism. Here, we have studied the combined effect of these factors on a number of apoptosis regulators and effectors. For this purpose, animals were fed diets containing different fat sources (lard, soybean oil, or fish oil) under CR for 6 or 18 months. An age-linked increase in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was detected with CR, including a decrease in Bcl-2/Bax ratio, an enhanced release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and higher caspase-9 activity. However, these changes were not fully transmitted to the effectors apoptosis-inducing factor and caspase-3. CR (which abated aging-related inflammatory responses) and dietary fat altered the activities of caspases-8, -9, and -3. Apoptotic index (DNA fragmentation) and mean nuclear area were increased in aged animals with the exception of calorie-restricted mice fed a lard-based fat source. These results suggest possible protective changes in hepatic homeostasis with aging in the calorie-restricted lard group. PMID:24691092

  10. Dysregulation of Apoptotic Signaling in Cancer: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Plati, Jessica; Bucur, Octavian; Khosravi-Far, Roya

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis is a tightly regulated cell suicide program that plays an essential role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis by eliminating unnecessary or harmful cells. Defects in this native defense mechanism promote malignant transformation and frequently confer chemoresistance to transformed cells. Indeed, the evasion of apoptosis has been recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Given that multiple mechanisms function at many levels to orchestrate the regulation of apoptosis, a multitude of opportunities for apoptotic dysregulation are present within the intricate signaling network of cell. Several of the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells are protected from apoptosis have been elucidated. These advances have facilitated the development of novel apoptosis-inducing agents that have demonstrated single-agent activity against various types of cancers cells and/or sensitized resistant cancer cells to conventional cytotoxic therapies. Herein, we will highlight several of the central modes of apoptotic dysregulation found in cancer. We will also discuss several therapeutic strategies that aim to reestablish the apoptotic response, and thereby eradicate cancer cells, including those that demonstrate resistance to traditional therapies. PMID:18459149

  11. Network Features and Pathway Analyses of a Signal Transduction Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Yanashima, Ryoji; Kitagawa, Noriyuki; Matsubara, Yoshiya; Weatheritt, Robert; Oka, Kotaro; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Tomita, Masaru; Ishizaki, Shun

    2008-01-01

    The scale-free and small-world network models reflect the functional units of networks. However, when we investigated the network properties of a signaling pathway using these models, no significant differences were found between the original undirected graphs and the graphs in which inactive proteins were eliminated from the gene expression data. We analyzed signaling networks by focusing on those pathways that best reflected cellular function. Therefore, our analysis of pathways started from the ligands and progressed to transcription factors and cytoskeletal proteins. We employed the Python module to assess the target network. This involved comparing the original and restricted signaling cascades as a directed graph using microarray gene expression profiles of late onset Alzheimer's disease. The most commonly used method of shortest-path analysis neglects to consider the influences of alternative pathways that can affect the activation of transcription factors or cytoskeletal proteins. We therefore introduced included k-shortest paths and k-cycles in our network analysis using the Python modules, which allowed us to attain a reasonable computational time and identify k-shortest paths. This technique reflected results found in vivo and identified pathways not found when shortest path or degree analysis was applied. Our module enabled us to comprehensively analyse the characteristics of biomolecular networks and also enabled analysis of the effects of diseases considering the feedback loop and feedforward loop control structures as an alternative path. PMID:19543432

  12. A NPxY-independent {beta}5 integrin activation signal regulates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sukhwinder; D'mello, Veera; Henegouwen, Paul van Bergen en; Birge, Raymond B.

    2007-12-21

    Integrin receptors are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors with critical functions in cell adhesion and migration, cell cycle progression, differentiation, apoptosis, and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Integrins are activated by intracellular signaling that alter the binding affinity for extracellular ligands, so-called inside to outside signaling. A common element for integrin activation involves binding of the cytoskeletal protein talin, via its FERM domain, to a highly conserved NPxY motif in the {beta} chain cytoplasmic tails, which is involved in long-range conformation changes to the extracellular domain that impinges on ligand affinity. When the human beta-5 ({beta}5) integrin cDNA was expressed in {alpha}v positive, {beta}5 and {beta}3 negative hamster CS-1 cells, it promoted NPxY-dependent adhesion to VTN-coated surfaces, phosphorylation of FAK, and concomitantly, {beta}5 integrin-EGFP protein was recruited into talin and paxillin-containing focal adhesions. Expression of a NPxY destabilizing {beta}5 mutant (Y750A) abrogated adhesion and {beta}5-Y750A-EGFP was excluded from focal adhesions at the tips of stress fibers. Surprisingly, expression of {beta}5 Y750A integrin had a potent gain-of-function effect on apoptotic cell phagocytosis, and further, a {beta}5-Y750A-EGFP fusion integrin readily bound MFG-E8-coated 10 {mu}m diameter microspheres developed as apoptotic cell mimetics. The critical sequences in {beta}5 integrin were mapped to a YEMAS motif just proximal to the NPxY motif. Our studies suggest that the phagocytic function of {beta}5 integrin is regulated by an unconventional NPxY-talin-independent activation signal and argue for the existence of molecular switches in the {beta}5 cytoplasmic tail for adhesion and phagocytosis.

  13. Inhibition of PI3K signaling triggered apoptotic potential of curcumin which is hindered by Bcl-2 through activation of autophagy in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Akkoç, Yunus; Berrak, Özge; Arısan, Elif Damla; Obakan, Pınar; Çoker-Gürkan, Ajda; Palavan-Ünsal, Narçin

    2015-04-01

    Curcumin is a natural anti-cancer agent derived from turmeric (Curcuma longa). Curcumin triggers intrinsic apoptotic cell death by activating mitochondrial permeabilization due to the altered expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. Phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt, key molecular players in the survival mechanism, have been shown to be associated with the Bcl-2 signaling cascade; therefore, evaluating the therapeutic efficiency of drugs that target both survival and the apoptosis mechanism has gained importance in cancer therapy. We found that Bcl-2 overexpression is a limiting factor for curcumin-induced apoptosis in highly metastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Forced overexpression of Bcl-2 also blocked curcumin-induced autophagy in MCF-7 cells, through its inhibitory interactions with Beclin-1. Pre-treatment of PI3K inhibitor LY294002 enhanced curcumin-induced cell death, apoptosis, and autophagy via modulating the expression of Bcl-2 family members and autophagosome formation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Atg7 silencing further increased apoptotic potential of curcumin in the presence or absence of LY294002 in wt and Bcl-2+ MCF-7 cells. The findings of this study support the hypothesis that blocking the PI3K/Akt pathway may further increased curcumin-induced apoptosis and overcome forced Bcl-2 expression level mediated autophagic responses against curcumin treatment in MCF-7 cells. PMID:25960232

  14. Interaction of LRRK2 with kinase and GTPase signaling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Joon Y.; Dusonchet, Julien; Trengrove, Chelsea; Wolozin, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    LRRK2 is a protein that interacts with a plethora of signaling molecules, but the complexity of LRRK2 function presents a challenge for understanding the role of LRRK2 in the pathophysiology of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Studies of LRRK2 using over-expression in transgenic mice have been disappointing, however, studies using invertebrate systems have yielded a much clearer picture, with clear effects of LRRK2 expression, knockdown or deletion in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila on modulation of survival of dopaminergic neurons. Recent studies have begun to focus attention on particular signaling cascades that are a target of LRRK2 function. LRRK2 interacts with members of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and might regulate the pathway action by acting as a scaffold that directs the location of MAPK pathway activity, without strongly affecting the amount of MAPK pathway activity. Binding to GTPases, GTPase-activating proteins and GTPase exchange factors are another strong theme in LRRK2 biology, with LRRK2 binding to rac1, cdc42, rab5, rab7L1, endoA, RGS2, ArfGAP1, and ArhGEF7. All of these molecules appear to feed into a function output for LRRK2 that modulates cytoskeletal outgrowth and vesicular dynamics, including autophagy. These functions likely impact modulation of α-synuclein aggregation and associated toxicity eliciting the disease processes that we term PD. PMID:25071441

  15. Role of Kv1.3 mitochondrial potassium channel in apoptotic signalling in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gulbins, Erich; Sassi, Nicola; Grassmè, Heike; Zoratti, Mario; Szabò, Ildikò

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria have been shown to play a pivotal role in apoptotic signalling in various cell types. We have recently reported that in lymphocytes the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3, known to reside in the plasma membrane, is active also in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Upon induction of apoptosis, outer-membrane inserted Bax binds to and inhibits Kv1.3 resulting in hyperpolarization, an increase in reactive oxygen species production and cytochrome c release. In cells lacking Kv1.3 these events do not take place. Here, we present new data which further corroborates an important role of this channel in the sequence of events leading to Bax-induced cytochrome c release. Recombinant Kv1.3, when pre-incubated with Bax, prevents the actions of Bax at the level of mitochondria. Furthermore, we report the presence of Kv1.3 protein in mitochondria from PC3 and MCF-7 cancer cells, suggesting that this channel might play a role in the apoptotic signalling not only in lymphocytes but also in other cells. PMID:20114030

  16. Plasma-activated medium induces A549 cell injury via a spiral apoptotic cascade involving the mitochondrial-nuclear network.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Nonomura, Saho; Hara, Hirokazu; Kondo, Shin-ichi; Hori, Masaru

    2015-02-01

    Plasma medicine is a rapidly expanding new field of interdisciplinary research that combines physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma can be applied to living cells and tissues and has emerged as a novel technology for cancer therapy. Plasma has recently been shown to affect cells not only directly, but also by indirect treatment with previously prepared plasma-activated medium (PAM). The objective of this study was to demonstrate the inhibitory effects of PAM on A549 cell survival and elucidate the signaling mechanisms responsible for cell death. PAM maintained its ability to suppress cell viability for at least 1 week when stored at -80°C. The severity of PAM-triggered cell injury depended on the kind of culture medium used to prepare the PAM, especially that with or without pyruvate. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and/or its derived or cooperating reactive oxygen species reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential, downregulated the expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl2, activated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, and released apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria with endoplasmic reticulum stress. However, the activation of caspase 3/7 and attenuation of cell viability by the addition of caspase inhibitor were not observed. The accumulation of adenine 5'-diphosphoribose as a product of the above reactions activated transient receptor potential melastatin 2, which elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels and subsequently led to cell death. These results demonstrated that H2O2 and/or other reactive species in PAM disturbed the mitochondrial-nuclear network in cancer cells through a caspase-independent apoptotic pathway. Moreover, damage to the plasma membrane by H2O2-cooperating charged species not only induced apoptosis, but also increased its permeability to extracellular reactive species. These phenomena were also detected in PAM-treated HepG2 and MCF-7 cells. PMID:25433364

  17. TRAIL is involved in CpG ODN-mediated anti-apoptotic signals.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eun-Jung; Park, Dae-Weon; Jeong, Tae-Whal; Chin, Byung-Rho; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Baek, Suk-Hwan

    2012-04-01

    Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) with the CpG-motifs are recognized by toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), which elicits an immune response. Serum starvation of Raw264.7 cells increased tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) expression. However, treatment with CpG ODN reduced TRAIL expression as well as apoptosis by serum starvation. In serum starved cells, TLR9 inhibitors recovered the decreasing TRAIL expression and sub-G1 accumulation by CpG ODN. CpG ODN-regulated anti-apoptotic signals which were dependent on the Akt-FoxO3a signaling pathway. CpG ODNs activated Akt and inactivated FoxO3a in serum starved cells. Knockdown of FoxO3a by siRNA decreased TRAIL expression and apoptosis in serum-starved cells. In contrast, FoxO3a overexpression increased apoptosis by serum starvation, and CpG ODNs blocked these effects through TRAIL expression. LY294002, a PI3K-Akt inhibitor, blocked the CpG ODN effect of TRAIL expression and the sub-G1 population in serum starved cells. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type Akt reduced additional sub-G1 cells both in non-CpG ODN- and CpG ODN-treated cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate the involvement of Akt-FoxO3a signaling in TLR9-mediated downregulation of TRAIL and anti-apoptotic signals. PMID:22159760

  18. Rottlerin Inhibits Lonicera japonica-Induced Photokilling in Human Lung Cancer Cells through Cytoskeleton-Related Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    You, Bang-Jau; Wu, Yang-Chang; Bao, Bo-Ying; Wu, Chi-Yu; Yang, Ya-Win; Chang, Yu-Hao; Lee, Hong-Zin

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrated that many apoptotic signaling pathways, such as Rho family, PKC family, MAP kinase family, and mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, were triggered by Lonicera japonica extracts and irradiation in CH27 cells. Rottlerin, a PKCδ -selective inhibitor, reversed the photoactivated Lonicera japonica extract-induced decrease in PKCδ protein expression and change in cell morphology in this study. In addition, rottlerin inhibited the photoactivated Lonicera japonica-induced decrease in protein expression of Ras, ERK, p38, PKCα, and PKCε, which are the kinases of prosurvival signaling pathway. We also demonstrated that pretreatment with rottlerin prevented actin microfilaments and microtubules from damage during the photoactivated Lonicera japonica-induced CH27 cell death. Furthermore, the promotion of the cytoskeleton-related signaling cascade following rottlerin by upregulation of cytoskeleton-related mediators (p38, HSP27, FAK, paxillin, and tubulin) and molecules of downstream of F-actin (mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway) reduces CH27 cell death, indicating that cytoskeleton is the potential target in the photoactivated Lonicera japonicaextract-induced photokilling of CH27 cells. PMID:21331326

  19. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Desikan, Radhika; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction. PMID:27581482

  20. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction. PMID:27581482

  1. The Viral Oncoprotein LMP1 Exploits TRADD for Signaling by Masking Its Apoptotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Frank; Neugebauer, Julia; Griese, Janine; Liefold, Nicola; Kutz, Helmut; Briseño, Cinthia; Kieser, Arnd

    2008-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor 1–associated death domain protein (TRADD) mediates induction of apoptosis as well as activation of NF-κB by cellular TNF-receptor 1 (TNFR1). TRADD is also recruited by the latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) oncoprotein of Epstein-Barr virus, but its role in LMP1 signaling has remained enigmatic. In human B lymphocytes, we have generated, to our knowledge, the first genetic knockout of TRADD to investigate TRADD's role in LMP1 signal transduction. Our data from TRADD-deficient cells demonstrate that TRADD is a critical signaling mediator of LMP1 that is required for LMP1 to recruit and activate I-κB kinase β (IKKβ). However, in contrast to TNFR1, LMP1-induced TRADD signaling does not induce apoptosis. Searching for the molecular basis for this observation, we characterized the 16 C-terminal amino acids of LMP1 as an autonomous and unique virus-derived TRADD-binding domain. Replacing the death domain of TNFR1 by LMP1′s TRADD-binding domain converts TNFR1 into a nonapoptotic receptor that activates NF-κB through a TRAF6-dependent pathway, like LMP1 but unlike wild-type TNFR1. Thus, the unique interaction of LMP1 with TRADD encodes the transforming phenotype of viral TRADD signaling and masks TRADD's pro-apoptotic function. PMID:18198944

  2. Anti-apoptotic role of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway in the proliferation of ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    KANDA, SHIORI; MITSUYASU, TAKESHI; NAKAO, YU; KAWANO, SHINTARO; GOTO, YUICHI; MATSUBARA, RYOTA; NAKAMURA, SEIJI

    2013-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway is crucial to growth and patterning during organogenesis. Aberrant activation of the SHH signaling pathway can result in tumor formation. We examined the expression of SHH signaling molecules and investigated the involvement of the SHH pathway in the proliferation of ameloblastoma, the most common benign tumor of the jaws. We used immunohistochemistry on ameloblastoma specimens and immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR on the ameloblastoma cell line AM-1. We also used the inhibitors of SHH signaling, SHH neutralizing antibody and cyclopamine, to assess the effects of SHH on the proliferation of AM-1 cells. We detected expression of SHH, patched, GLI1, GLI2 and GLI3 in the ameloblastoma specimens and AM-1 cells. The proliferation of these cells was significantly inhibited in the presence of SHH neutralizing antibody or cyclopamine; this was confirmed by BrdU incorporation assays. Furthermore, in the presence of SHH neutralizing antibody, nuclear translocation of GLI1 and GLI2 was abolished, apoptosis was induced, BCL-2 expression decreased and BAX expression increased. Our results suggest that the SHH signaling pathway is constitutively active in ameloblastoma and plays an anti-apoptotic role in the proliferation of ameloblastoma cells through autocrine loop stimulation. PMID:23835807

  3. Impact of Antioxidants on Cardiolipin Oxidation in Liposomes: Why Mitochondrial Cardiolipin Serves as an Apoptotic Signal?

    PubMed Central

    Lokhmatikov, Alexey V.; Voskoboynikova, Natalia; Cherepanov, Dmitry A.; Skulachev, Maxim V.; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Skulachev, Vladimir P.; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y.

    2016-01-01

    Molecules of mitochondrial cardiolipin (CL) get selectively oxidized upon oxidative stress, which triggers the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. In a chemical model most closely resembling the mitochondrial membrane—liposomes of pure bovine heart CL—we compared ubiquinol-10, ubiquinol-6, and alpha-tocopherol, the most widespread naturally occurring antioxidants, with man-made, quinol-based amphiphilic antioxidants. Lipid peroxidation was induced by addition of an azo initiator in the absence and presence of diverse antioxidants, respectively. The kinetics of CL oxidation was monitored via formation of conjugated dienes at 234 nm. We found that natural ubiquinols and ubiquinol-based amphiphilic antioxidants were equally efficient in protecting CL liposomes from peroxidation; the chromanol-based antioxidants, including alpha-tocopherol, were 2-3 times less efficient. Amphiphilic antioxidants, but not natural ubiquinols and alpha-tocopherol, were able, additionally, to protect the CL bilayer from oxidation by acting from the water phase. We suggest that the previously reported therapeutic efficiency of mitochondrially targeted amphiphilic antioxidants is owing to their ability to protect those CL molecules that are inaccessible to natural hydrophobic antioxidants, being trapped within respiratory supercomplexes. The high susceptibility of such occluded CL molecules to oxidation may have prompted their recruitment as apoptotic signaling molecules by nature. PMID:27313834

  4. Effects of glycerol on apoptotic signaling pathways during boar spermatozoa cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Changjun; Tang, Keyi; He, Lian; Peng, Wenpei; Ding, Li; Fang, Donghui; Zhang, Yan

    2014-06-01

    Artificial insemination (AI) with post-thawed boar spermatozoa results in low farrowing rates and reduced litter sizes mainly due to cryoinjury or damages to spermatozoa during cryopreservation. Low viability and motility of post-thawed boar spermatozoa are highly associated with apoptosis during cryopreservation. Although glycerol is widely used a cryoprotectant (CPA) for boar spermatozoa cryopreservation, the mechanism and relationship between glycerol and apoptosis-related gene expression needs to be clarified. In this study, we treated boar spermatozoa with different concentrations of glycerol in lactose egg yolk (LEY) extender to evaluate the apoptosis-related gene expression and protease activities of caspases. These results show that: (1) low concentrations of glycerol (2% and 3%) were more suitable for boar spermatozoa cryopreservation; (2) apoptosis-related genes involved in intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic death receptor apoptotic signaling pathways were widely expressed in different concentrations of glycerol treated boar spermatozoa; (3) there was a significant positive correlation (r=0.840, P=0.037) between the percentage of Annexin V(+)/PI(+) staining spermatozoa and caspase-6/9 protease activity. In conclusion, 2% and 3% glycerol have the best anti-apoptotic effects, and the expression of Fas/FasL and Bcl-2/Bax have a strong correlation with spermatozoa parameters. PMID:24680861

  5. Search for acoustic signals from high energy cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, R.; Bowen, T.

    1985-01-01

    High energy cosmic ray secondaries can be detected by means of the cascades they produce when they pass through matter. When the charged particles of these cascades ionize the matter they are traveling through, the heat produced and resulting thermal expansion causes a thermoacoustic wave. These sound waves travel at about one hundred-thousandth the speed of light, and should allow an array of acoustic transducers to resolve structure in the cascade to about 1 cm without high speed electronics or segmentation of the detector.

  6. Tie-mediated signal from apoptotic cells protects stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yalan; Su, Tin Tin; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Many types of normal and cancer stem cells are resistant to killing by genotoxins, but the mechanism for this resistance is poorly understood. Here we show that adult stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster germline and midgut are resistant to ionizing radiation (IR) or chemically induced apoptosis and dissect the mechanism for this protection. We find that upon IR the receptor tyrosine kinase Tie/Tie-2 is activated, leading to the upregulation of microRNA bantam that represses FOXO-mediated transcription of pro-apoptotic Smac/DIABLO orthologue, Hid in germline stem cells. Knockdown of the IR-induced putative Tie ligand, Pvf1, a functional homologue of human Angiopoietin, in differentiating daughter cells renders germline stem cells sensitive to IR, suggesting that the dying daughters send a survival signal to protect their stem cells for future repopulation of the tissue. If conserved in cancer stem cells, this mechanism may provide therapeutic options for the eradication of cancer. PMID:25959206

  7. Phloroglucinol induces apoptosis via apoptotic signaling pathways in HT-29 colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    KANG, MI-HYE; KIM, IN-HYE; NAM, TAEK-JEO NG

    2014-01-01

    Phloroglucinol is a polyphenolic compound that is used to treat and prevent several human diseases, as it exerts beneficial biological activities, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of phloroglucinol on apoptotic signaling pathways in HT-29 colon cancer cells. The results indicated that phloroglucinol suppressed cell viability and induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Phloroglucinol treatment of HT-29 cells resulted in characteristic apoptosis-related changes: altered Bcl-2 family proteins, cytochrome c release, and activation of caspase-3 and caspase-8. This study also showed that proteins involved in apoptosis were stimulated by treatment with phloroglucinol. These findings demonstrated that phloroglucinol exerts anticancer activity in HT-29 colon cancer cells through induction of apoptosis. PMID:25070748

  8. Elevated Levels of Uterine Anti-Apoptotic Signaling May Activate NFKB and Potentially Confer Resistance to Caspase 3-Mediated Apoptotic Cell Death During Pregnancy in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Jeyasuria, Pancharatnam; Subedi, Kalpana; Suresh, Arvind; Condon, Jennifer C.

    2011-01-01

    Preserving the uterus in a state of relative quiescence is vital to the maintenance of a successful pregnancy. Elevated cytoplasmic levels of uterine caspase 3 during pregnancy have been proposed as a potential regulator of uterine quiescence through direct targeting and disabling of the uterine contractile architecture. However, despite highly elevated levels of uterine caspase 3 during pregnancy, there is minimal evidence of apoptosis. This current study defines the mechanism whereby the pregnant uterine myocyte may harness the tocolytic activity of active caspases while avoiding apoptotic cell death. Using the pregnant mouse model, we have analyzed the uterus for changes in pro- and antiapoptotic signaling patterns associated with the advancing stages of pregnancy. Briefly, we have found that members of the IAP family, such as SURVIVIN and XIAP, and the Bcl2 family members, such as MCL1, are elevated in the uterine myocyte during late gestation. The IAP family members are the only endogenous inhibitors of active caspase 3, and MCL1 limits activation of caspase 3 by suppressing proapoptotic signaling. Elevated XIAP levels partner with SURVIVIN, resulting in increased levels of the antiapoptotic MCL1 via NFKB activation; these together have the potential to limit both the activity and level of active caspase 3 in the pregnant uterus as term approaches. We propose that modification of these antiapoptotic signaling partners allows the pregnant uterus to escape the apoptotic action of elevated active caspase 3 levels but also functions to limit the levels of active uterine caspase 3 near term. PMID:21566000

  9. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F.; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Huang, Cher X.; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D.; Stokes, Matthew P.; Silva, Jeffrey C.; Bell, George W.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26438848

  10. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Huang, Cher X; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D; Stokes, Matthew P; Silva, Jeffrey C; Bell, George W; MacArthur, Daniel G; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. PMID:26438848

  11. Decoding the oxidative stress hypothesis in diabetic embryopathy through pro-apoptotic kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peixin; Reece, E. Albert; Wang, Fang; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinat

    2014-01-01

    Maternal diabetes-induced birth defects occur in 6-10% of babies born to mothers with pregestational diabetes, representing a significant maternal-fetal health problem. Currently, these congenital malformations represent a significant maternal-fetal medicine issue, but are likely to create an even greater public health threat as 3 million women of reproductive age (19-44 years) have diabetes in the United States alone, and this number is expected to double by 2030. Neural tube defects (NTDs) and congenital heart defects are the most common types of birth defects associated with maternal diabetes. Animal studies have revealed that embryos under hyperglycemic conditions exhibit high levels of oxidative stress resulting from enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and impaired antioxidant capability. Oxidative stress activates a set of pro-apoptotic kinase signaling intermediates leading to abnormal cell death in the embryonic neural tube, which causes NTD formation. Work in animal models also has revealed that maternal diabetes triggers a series of signaling intermediates: protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, PKCα, βII and δ; apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), c-Jun-N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), caspase and apoptosis. Specifically, maternal diabetes in rodent models activates the pro-apoptotic unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. A reciprocal causation between JNK1/2 activation and ER stress exists in diabetic embryopathy. Molecular studies further demonstrate that deletion of the genes for PKCα, Ask1, Jnk1 or Jnk2 abolishes maternal diabetes-induced neural progenitor apoptosis and ameliorates NTD formation. Similar preventive effects are also observed when ASK1, JNK1/2 or ER stress is inhibited. Cell membrane stabilizers and antioxidant supplements are also effective in prevention of diabetes-induced birth defects. Mechanistic studies have revealed important insights into our understanding the cause of diabetic

  12. Zyxin is a critical regulator of the apoptotic HIPK2-p53 signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Crone, Johanna; Glas, Carolina; Schultheiss, Kathrin; Moehlenbrink, Jutta; Krieghoff-Henning, Eva; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2011-03-15

    HIPK2 activates the apoptotic arm of the DNA damage response by phosphorylating tumor suppressor p53 at serine 46. Unstressed cells keep HIPK2 levels low through targeted polyubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Here we identify the LIM domain protein Zyxin as a novel regulator of the HIPK2-p53 signaling axis in response to DNA damage. Remarkably, depletion of endogenous Zyxin, which colocalizes with HIPK2 at the cytoskeleton and in the cell nucleus, stimulates proteasome-dependent HIPK2 degradation. In contrast, ectopic expression of Zyxin stabilizes HIPK2, even upon enforced expression of its ubiquitin ligase Siah-1. Consistently, Zyxin physically interacts with Siah-1, and knock-down of Siah-1 rescues HIPK2 expression in Zyxin-depleted cancer cells. Mechanistically, our data suggest that Zyxin regulates Siah-1 activity through interference with Siah-1 dimerization. Furthermore, we show that endogenous Zyxin coaccumulates with HIPK2 in response to DNA damage in cancer cells, and that depletion of endogenous Zyxin results in reduced HIPK2 protein levels and compromises DNA damage-induced p53 Ser46 phosphorylation and caspase activation. These findings suggest an unforeseen role for Zyxin in DNA damage-induced cell fate control through modulating the HIPK2-p53 signaling axis. PMID:21248071

  13. Integration of C/N-nutrient and multiple environmental signals into the ABA signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yu; Yamaguchi, Junji; Sato, Takeo

    2015-01-01

    Due to their immobility, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to robustly monitor and appropriately respond to dynamic changes in nutrient availability. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are especially important in regulating plant metabolism and development, thereby affecting crop productivity. In addition to their independent utilization, the ratio of C to N metabolites in the cell, referred to as the “C/N balance”, is important for the regulation of plant growth, although molecular mechanisms mediating C/N signaling remain unclear. Recently ABI1, a protein phosphatase type 2C (PP2C), was shown to be a regulator of C/N response in Arabidopsis plants. ABI1 functions as a negative regulator of abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction. ABA is versatile phytohormone that regulates multiple aspects of plant growth and adaptation to environmental stress. This review highlights the regulation of the C/N response mediated by a non-canonical ABA signaling pathway that is independent of ABA biosynthesis, as well as recent findings on the direct crosstalk between multiple cellular signals and the ABA signaling cascade. PMID:26786013

  14. Regulation of ROS in transmissible gastroenteritis virus-activated apoptotic signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Li; Zhao, Xiaomin; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Dong, Feng; Zhang, Hongling; Song, Xiangjun; Zhang, Wenlong; Tong, Dewen

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •TGEV infection induced ROS accumulation. •ROS accumulation is involved in TGEV-induced mitochondrial integrity impairment. •ROS is associated with p53 activation and apoptosis occurrence in TGEV-infected cells. -- Abstract: Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), an enteropathogenic coronavirus, causes severe lethal watery diarrhea and dehydration in piglets. Previous studies indicate that TGEV infection induces cell apoptosis in host cells. In this study, we investigated the roles and regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TGEV-activated apoptotic signaling. The results showed that TGEV infection induced ROS accumulation, whereas UV-irradiated TGEV did not promote ROS accumulation. In addition, TGEV infection lowered mitochondrial transmembrane potential in PK-15 cell line, which could be inhibited by ROS scavengers, pyrrolidinedithiocarbamic (PDTC) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Furthermore, the two scavengers significantly inhibited the activation of p38 MAPK and p53 and further blocked apoptosis occurrence through suppressing the TGEV-induced Bcl-2 reduction, Bax redistribution, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest that oxidative stress pathway might be a key element in TGEV-induced apoptosis and TGEV pathogenesis.

  15. Tie-mediated signal from apoptotic cells protects stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yalan; Su, Tin Tin; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2015-01-01

    Many types of normal and cancer stem cells are resistant to killing by genotoxins, but the mechanism for this resistance is poorly understood. Here we show that adult stem cells in Drosophila melanogaster germline and midgut are resistant to ionizing radiation (IR) or chemically induced apoptosis and dissect the mechanism for this protection. We find that upon IR the receptor tyrosine kinase Tie/Tie-2 is activated, leading to the upregulation of microRNA bantam that represses FOXO-mediated transcription of pro-apoptotic Smac/DIA-BLO orthologue, Hid in germline stem cells. Knockdown of the IR-induced putative Tie ligand, Pvf1, a functional homologue of human Angiopoietin, in differentiating daughter cells renders germline stem cells sensitive to IR, suggesting that the dying daughters send a survival signal to protect their stem cells for future repopulation of the tissue. If conserved in cancer stem cells, this mechanism may provide therapeutic options for the eradication of cancer. PMID:25959206

  16. Efficient Activation of Apoptotic Signaling during Mitotic Arrest with AK301

    PubMed Central

    Bleiler, Marina; Yeagley, Michelle; Wright, Dennis; Giardina, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic inhibitors are widely utilized chemotherapeutic agents that take advantage of mitotic defects in cancer cells. We have identified a novel class of piperazine-based mitotic inhibitors, of which AK301 is the most potent derivative identified to date (EC50 < 200 nM). Colon cancer cells arrested in mitosis with AK301 readily underwent a p53-dependent apoptosis following compound withdrawal and arrest release. This apoptotic response was significantly higher for AK301 than for other mitotic inhibitors tested (colchicine, vincristine, and BI 2536). AK301-treated cells exhibited a robust mitosis-associated DNA damage response, including ATM activation, γH2AX phosphorylation and p53 stabilization. The association between mitotic signaling and the DNA damage response was supported by the finding that Aurora B inhibition reduced the level of γH2AX staining. Confocal imaging of AK301-treated cells revealed multiple γ-tubulin microtubule organizing centers attached to microtubules, but with limited centrosome migration, raising the possibility that aberrant microtubule pulling may underlie DNA breakage. AK301 selectively targeted APC-mutant colonocytes and promoted TNF-induced apoptosis in p53-mutant colon cancer cells. Our findings indicate that AK301 induces a mitotic arrest state with a highly active DNA damage response. Together with a reversible arrest state, AK301 is a potent promoter of a mitosis-to-apoptosis transition that can target cancer cells with mitotic defects. PMID:27097159

  17. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Viewing Signaling Cascades at a Finer Resolution.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiukun; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Qureshi, Muhammad Zahid; Romero, Mirna Azalea; Tabassum, Sobia; Ismail, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    It is becoming characteristically more understandable that within tumor cells, there lies a sub-population of tumor cells with "stem cell" like properties and remarkable ability of self-renewal. Many features of these self-renewing cells are comparable with normal stem cells and are termed as "cancer stem cells". Accumulating experimentally verified data has started to scratch the surface of spatio-temporally dysregulated intracellular signaling cascades in the biology of prostate cancer stem cells. We partition this multicomponent review into how different signaling cascades operate in cancer stem cells and how bioactive ingredients isolated from natural sources may modulate signaling network. PMID:26846602

  18. Hydrogen sulphide in cardiovascular system: A cascade from interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming-Jie; Cai, Wen-Jie; Zhu, Yi-Chun

    2016-05-15

    As a gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulphide exerts its extensive physiological and pathophysiological effects in mammals. The interaction between sulphur atoms and signalling molecules forms a cascade that modulates cellular functions and homeostasis. In this review, we focus on the signalling mechanism underlying the effect of hydrogen sulphide in the cardiovascular system and metabolism as well as the biological relevance to human diseases. PMID:27071836

  19. Icariin displays anticancer activity against human esophageal cancer cells via regulating endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chongxi; Yang, Yang; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Shuai; Di, Shouyin; Hu, Wei; Ma, Zhiqiang; Li, Tian; Zhu, Yifang; Xin, Zhenlong; Wu, Guiling; Han, Jing; Li, Xiaofei; Yan, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity of icariin (ICA) in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in vitro and in vivo and explored the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) signaling in this activity. ICA treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the viability of human EC109 and TE1 ESCCs. Additionally, ICA exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced by reductions in cell migration, adhesion, and intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels and by increases in the EC109 and TE1 cell apoptotic index, Caspase 9 activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity. Furthermore, ICA treatments upregulated the levels of ERS-related molecules (p-PERK, GRP78, ATF4, p-eIF2α, and CHOP) and a pro-apoptotic protein (PUMA) and simultaneously downregulated an anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl2) in the two ESCC cell lines. The downregulation of ERS signaling using eIF2α siRNA desensitized EC109 and TE1 cells to ICA treatment, and the upregulation of ERS signaling using thapsigargin sensitized EC109 and TE1 cells to ICA treatment. In summary, ERS activation may represent a mechanism of action for the anticancer activity of ICA in ESCCs, and the activation of ERS signaling may represent a novel therapeutic intervention for human esophageal cancer. PMID:26892033

  20. Icariin displays anticancer activity against human esophageal cancer cells via regulating endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptotic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chongxi; Yang, Yang; Liu, Yong; Jiang, Shuai; Di, Shouyin; Hu, Wei; Ma, Zhiqiang; Li, Tian; Zhu, Yifang; Xin, Zhenlong; Wu, Guiling; Han, Jing; Li, Xiaofei; Yan, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity of icariin (ICA) in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in vitro and in vivo and explored the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) signaling in this activity. ICA treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the viability of human EC109 and TE1 ESCCs. Additionally, ICA exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced by reductions in cell migration, adhesion, and intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels and by increases in the EC109 and TE1 cell apoptotic index, Caspase 9 activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity. Furthermore, ICA treatments upregulated the levels of ERS-related molecules (p-PERK, GRP78, ATF4, p-eIF2α, and CHOP) and a pro-apoptotic protein (PUMA) and simultaneously downregulated an anti-apoptotic protein (Bcl2) in the two ESCC cell lines. The downregulation of ERS signaling using eIF2α siRNA desensitized EC109 and TE1 cells to ICA treatment, and the upregulation of ERS signaling using thapsigargin sensitized EC109 and TE1 cells to ICA treatment. In summary, ERS activation may represent a mechanism of action for the anticancer activity of ICA in ESCCs, and the activation of ERS signaling may represent a novel therapeutic intervention for human esophageal cancer. PMID:26892033

  1. Stochastic signaling in biochemical cascades and genetic systems in genetically engineered living cells.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Ramiz; Almog, Ronen; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2010-04-01

    Living cells, either prokaryote or eukaryote, can be integrated within whole-cell biochips (WCBCs) for various applications. We investigate WCBCs where information is extracted from the cells via a cascade of biochemical reactions that involve gene expression. The overall biological signal is weak due to small sample volume, low intrinsic cell response, and extrinsic signal loss mechanisms. The low signal-to-noise ratio problem is aggravated during initial detection stages and limits the minimum detectable signal or, alternatively, the minimum detection time. Taking into account the stochastic nature of biochemical process, we find that the signal is accompanied by relatively large noise disturbances. In this work, we use genetically engineered microbe sensors as a model to study the biochips output signal stochastic behavior. In our model, the microbes are designed to express detectable reporter proteins under external induction. We present analytical approximated expressions and numerical simulations evaluating the fluctuations of the synthesized reporter proteins population based on a set of equations modeling a cascade of biochemical and genetic reactions. We assume that the reporter proteins decay more slowly than messenger RNA molecules. We calculate the relation between the noise of the input signal (extrinsic noise) and biochemical reaction statistics (intrinsic noise). We discuss in further details two cases: (1) a cascade with large decay rates of all biochemical reactions compared to the protein decay rate. We show that in this case, the noise amplitude has a positive linear correlation with the number of stages in the cascade. (2) A cascade which includes a stable enzymatic-binding reaction with slow decay rate. We show that in this case, the noise strongly depends on the protein decay rate. Finally, a general observation is presented stating that the noise in whole-cell biochip sensors is determined mainly by the first reactions in the genetic system

  2. Stochastic signaling in biochemical cascades and genetic systems in genetically engineered living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Ramiz; Almog, Ronen; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2010-04-01

    Living cells, either prokaryote or eukaryote, can be integrated within whole-cell biochips (WCBCs) for various applications. We investigate WCBCs where information is extracted from the cells via a cascade of biochemical reactions that involve gene expression. The overall biological signal is weak due to small sample volume, low intrinsic cell response, and extrinsic signal loss mechanisms. The low signal-to-noise ratio problem is aggravated during initial detection stages and limits the minimum detectable signal or, alternatively, the minimum detection time. Taking into account the stochastic nature of biochemical process, we find that the signal is accompanied by relatively large noise disturbances. In this work, we use genetically engineered microbe sensors as a model to study the biochips output signal stochastic behavior. In our model, the microbes are designed to express detectable reporter proteins under external induction. We present analytical approximated expressions and numerical simulations evaluating the fluctuations of the synthesized reporter proteins population based on a set of equations modeling a cascade of biochemical and genetic reactions. We assume that the reporter proteins decay more slowly than messenger RNA molecules. We calculate the relation between the noise of the input signal (extrinsic noise) and biochemical reaction statistics (intrinsic noise). We discuss in further details two cases: (1) a cascade with large decay rates of all biochemical reactions compared to the protein decay rate. We show that in this case, the noise amplitude has a positive linear correlation with the number of stages in the cascade. (2) A cascade which includes a stable enzymatic-binding reaction with slow decay rate. We show that in this case, the noise strongly depends on the protein decay rate. Finally, a general observation is presented stating that the noise in whole-cell biochip sensors is determined mainly by the first reactions in the genetic system

  3. Ochratoxin a inhibits mouse embryonic development by activating a mitochondrion-dependent apoptotic signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hsuuw, Yan-Der; Chan, Wen-Hsiung; Yu, Jau-Song

    2013-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a mycotoxin found in many foods worldwide, causes nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, and immunotoxicity, both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we explored the cytotoxic effects exerted by OTA on the blastocyst stage of mouse embryos, on subsequent embryonic attachment, on outgrowth in vitro, and following in vivo implantation via embryo transfer. Mouse blastocysts were incubated with or without OTA (1, 5, or 10 μM) for 24 h. Cell proliferation and growth were investigated using dual differential staining; apoptosis was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay; and embryo implantation and post-implantation development were assessed by examination of in vitro growth and the outcome of in vivo embryo transfer, respectively. Blastocysts treated with 10 μM OTA displayed a significantly increased level of apoptosis and a reduction in total cell number. Interestingly, we observed no marked difference in implantation success rate between OTA-pretreated and control blastocysts either during in vitro embryonic development (following implantation in a fibronectin-coated culture dish) or after in vivo embryo transfer. However, in vitro treatment with 10 μM OTA was associated with increased resorption of post-implantation embryos by the mouse uterus, and decreased fetal weight upon embryo transfer. Our results collectively indicate that in vitro exposure to OTA triggers apoptosis and retards early post-implantation development after transfer of embryos to host mice. In addition, OTA induces apoptosis-mediated injury of mouse blastocysts, via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and promotes mitochondrion-dependent apoptotic signaling processes that impair subsequent embryonic development. PMID:23296271

  4. Signalling in the Yeasts: An Informational Cascade with Links to the Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Banuett, Flora

    1998-01-01

    All cells, from bacteria and yeasts to mammalian cells, respond to cues from their environment. A variety of mechanisms exist for the transduction of these external signals to the interior of the cell, resulting in altered patterns of protein activity. Eukaryotic cells commonly transduce external cues via a conserved module composed of three protein kinases, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. This module can then activate substrates, some of which include transcriptional activators. Multiple MAPK signalling pathways coexist in a cell. This review considers different MAPK cascade signalling pathways that govern several aspects of the life cycle of budding and fission yeasts: conjugation and meiosis by the pheromone response pathway, stress response by the high-osmolarity sensing pathway, cell wall biosynthesis in response to activation of the low-osmolarity and heat-sensing pathway, and pseudohyphal growth in response to activation of a subset of the components of the pheromone response pathway. Because the MAPK cascade components are highly conserved, a key question in studies of these pathways is the mechanism by which specificity of response is achieved. Several other issues to be addressed in this review concern the nature of the receptors used to sense the external signals and the mechanism by which the receptors communicate with other components leading to activation of the MAPK cascade. Recently, it has become apparent that MAPK cascades are important in governing the pathogenicity of filamentous fungi. PMID:9618441

  5. Signal Propagation in Multi-Layer DNAzyme Cascades using Structured Chimeric Substrates**

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Carl W.; Lakin, Matthew R.; Horwitz, Eli K.; Fanning, M. Leigh; West, Hannah E.

    2014-01-01

    Signal propagation through enzyme cascades is a critical component of information processing in cellular systems. Although such systems have potential as biomolecular computing tools, rational design of synthetic protein networks remains infeasible. DNA strands with catalytic activity (DNAzymes) are an attractive alternative, enabling rational cascade design through predictable base-pair hybridization principles. Here we report multi-layered DNAzyme signaling and logic cascades. We achieve signaling between DNAzymes using a structured chimeric substrate (SCS) that releases a downstream activator after cleavage by an upstream DNAzyme. The SCS can be activated by various upstream DNAzymes, can be coupled to DNA strand displacement devices, and is highly resistant to interference from background DNA. This work enables rational design of synthetic DNAzyme regulatory networks, with potential applications in biomolecular computing, biodetection, and autonomous theranostics. PMID:24890874

  6. Compartmentalization of NO signaling cascade in skeletal muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Buchwalow, Igor B. . E-mail: buchwalo@uni-muenster.de; Minin, Evgeny A.; Samoilova, Vera E.; Boecker, Werner; Wellner, Maren; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Neumann, Joachim

    2005-05-06

    Skeletal muscle functions regulated by NO are now firmly established. However, the literature on the compartmentalization of NO signaling in myocytes is highly controversial. To address this issue, we examined localization of enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling in the rat quadriceps muscle. Employing immunocytochemical labeling complemented with tyramide signal amplification and electron microscopy, we found NO synthase expressed not only in the sarcolemma, but also along contractile fibers, in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. The expression pattern of NO synthase in myocytes showed striking parallels with the enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling (arginase, phosphodiesterase, and soluble guanylyl cyclase). Our findings are indicative of an autocrine fashion of NO signaling in skeletal muscles at both cellular and subcellular levels, and challenge the notion that the NO generation is restricted to the sarcolemma.

  7. Regulatory effect of chrysin on expression of lenticular calcium transporters, calpains, and apoptotic-cascade components in selenite-induced cataract

    PubMed Central

    Sundararajan, Mahalingam; Thomas, Philip A.; Teresa, P. Archana; Anbukkarasi, Muniyandi

    2016-01-01

    selenite-challenged and simultaneously chrysin-treated (Group IIIa) lenses showed no opacification (Grade 0) after 24 h incubation, while the remaining single lens exhibited only a slight degree of opacification (Grade +). In the Group IIIa lenses, the reduced glutathione, protein sulfhydryl, and malondialdehyde concentrations appeared to have been maintained at near-normal levels. The mean lenticular concentration of calcium was significantly lower in the Group IIIa lenses than that in the Group II lenses and approximated the values observed in the normal control (Group I) lenses. The Group IIIa lenses also exhibited significantly (p<0.05) higher mean lenticular activity of calpain, significantly higher mean mRNA transcript levels of genes that encode m-calpain and lenticular preferred calpain (Lp82), and significantly higher mean levels of the m-calpain and Lp82 proteins than the corresponding values in the Group II lenses. Casein zymography results suggested that chrysin prevented calpain activation and autolysis. Significantly (p<0.05) lower mean levels of mRNA transcripts of the genes that encode calcium transporter proteins (plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase-1 and sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase-2) and lenticular apoptotic-cascade proteins (early growth response protein-1, caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9) and significantly (p<0.05) lower mean concentrations of the proteins themselves were seen in the Group IIIa rat lenses in comparison to the values noted in the Group II rat lenses. Conclusions Chrysin appears to prevent selenite-induced cataractogenesis in vitro by maintaining the redox system components at near-normal levels and by preventing the abnormal expression of several lenticular calcium transporters and apoptotic-cascade proteins, thus preventing accumulation of calcium and subsequent calpain activation and lenticular cell death in cultured Wistar rat lenses. PMID:27168717

  8. An Nfic-hedgehog signaling cascade regulates tooth root development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Feng, Jifan; Li, Jingyuan; Zhao, Hu; Ho, Thach-Vu; Chai, Yang

    2015-10-01

    Coordination between the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) and apical papilla (AP) is crucial for proper tooth root development. The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and Nfic are both involved in tooth root development; however, their relationship has yet to be elucidated. Here, we establish a timecourse of mouse molar root development by histological staining of sections, and we demonstrate that Hh signaling is active before and during root development in the AP and HERS using Gli1 reporter mice. The proper pattern of Hh signaling activity in the AP is crucial for the proliferation of dental mesenchymal cells, because either inhibition with Hh inhibitors or constitutive activation of Hh signaling activity in transgenic mice leads to decreased proliferation in the AP and shorter roots. Moreover, Hh activity is elevated in Nfic(-/-) mice, a root defect model, whereas RNA sequencing and in situ hybridization show that the Hh attenuator Hhip is downregulated. ChIP and RNAscope analyses suggest that Nfic binds to the promoter region of Hhip. Treatment of Nfic(-/-) mice with Hh inhibitor partially restores cell proliferation, AP growth and root development. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an Nfic-Hhip-Hh signaling pathway is crucial for apical papilla growth and proper root formation. This discovery provides insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating tooth root development. PMID:26293299

  9. Activation of a signaling cascade by cytoskeleton stretch.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Masako; Sheetz, Michael P; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2004-11-01

    Cells sense and respond to mechanical force. However, the mechanisms of transduction of extracellular matrix (ECM) forces to biochemical signals are not known. After removing the cell membrane and soluble proteins by Triton X-100 extraction, we found that the remaining complex (Triton cytoskeletons) activated Rap1 upon stretch. Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, C3G, was required for this activation; C3G as well as the adaptor protein, CrkII, in cell extract bound to Triton cytoskeletons in a stretch-dependent manner. CrkII binding, which was Cas dependent, correlated with stretch-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins in Triton cytoskeletons including Cas at the contacts with ECM. These in vitro findings were compatible with in vivo observations of stretch-enhanced phosphotyrosine signals, accumulation of CrkII at cell-ECM contacts, and CrkII-Cas colocalization. We suggest that mechanical force on Triton cytoskeletons activates local tyrosine phosphorylation, which provides docking sites for cytosolic proteins, and initiates signaling to activate Rap1. PMID:15525532

  10. MiR-1180 promotes apoptotic resistance to human hepatocellular carcinoma via activation of NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Guosheng; Wu, Linwei; Tan, Jinfu; Zhang, Bing; Tai, William Chi-shing; Xiong, Shiqiu; Chen, Wei; Yang, Jianyong; Li, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis resistance in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a significant factor in carcinogenesis. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in apoptosis resistance is crucial for developing anticancer therapies. Importantly, small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported as key biomarkers for detecting tumour onset and progression. In the present study, we demonstrate that miR-1180 is upregulated in HCC. Ectopic expression of miR-1180 has an anti-apoptotic effect in HCC, while miR-1180 inhibition increases cell apoptosis, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, our results show that miR-1180 directly targets key inhibitors of the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway (i.e., OTUD7B and TNIP2) and the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 associated death promoter (BAD) protein by post-transcriptional downregulation. Therefore, the anti-apoptotic function of miR-1180 in HCC may occur through NF-κB pathway activation via downregulation of its negative regulators. In conclusion, our study reveals the critical role of miR-1180 during apoptosis resistance in HCC. PMID:26928365

  11. The monomeric receptor binding domain of tetrameric α2-macroglobulin binds to cell surface GRP78 triggering equivalent activation of signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Misra, Uma Kant; Payne, Sturgis; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2013-06-11

    α2-Macroglobulin (α2M) is a broad spectrum proteinase inhibitor that when activated by proteinases (α2M*) undergoes a major conformational change exposing receptor recognition sites in each of its four subunits. These complexes bind to two distinct receptors, namely, the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) and cell surface glucose-regulated protein [Mr ∼ 78000 (GRP78)]. The latter is a very high affinity receptor (Kd = 50-100 pM) whose ligation triggers pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic signaling cascades. Despite its four binding sites, Scatchard analysis of binding of α2M* to cells does not yield a cooperative plot. We, therefore, hypothesize that a monomeric cloned and expressed α2M receptor binding domain (RBD) should trigger comparable signaling events. Indeed, RBD or its K1370A mutant that binds to GRP78 but cannot bind to LRP regulates DNA and protein synthesis by human prostate cancer cells in a manner comparable to that of α2M*. Akt and mTORC1 activation and signaling are also comparably upregulated by α2M*, RBD, or mutant K1370A. Antibodies directed against the carboxyl-terminal domain of GRP78 are antagonists that block α2M*-mediated effects on pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic signaling cascades and protein and DNA synthesis. The effects of RBD and its mutant were similarly blocked by these antibodies. Finally, proteolysis of α2M at pH values from 5.7 to 7.0 causes production of free RBD and RBD-containing fragments. Thus, while α2M* ligates only one GRP78 receptor molecule per α2M*, it may potentially serve as a reservoir for release of up to four binding fragments per molecule. PMID:23721263

  12. Effect of blue light emitting diodes on melanoma cells: involvement of apoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Oh, Phil-Sun; Na, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Hyosook; Jeong, Hwan-Seok; Lim, SeokTae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to examine whether blue LED irradiation induces cellular apoptosis in B16-F10 cells and whether it blocks the early growth of melanoma cells in mice. Irradiation with blue LED was observed to reduce cell viability and to induce apoptotic cell death, as accompanied by exposure of phosphatidylserine on the plasma outside membrane and an accumulation of a sub-G1 population. Furthermore, the mitochondrial membrane potential increased, and mitochondria-related apoptotic proteins (cytochrome c, caspase 3, and PARP) were observed. In addition, the level of intracellular superoxide anion (O2(-)) gradually increased. Interestingly the phosphorylation of p53 increased at earlier times under blue LED irradiation, but reduced after exposure for a longer time. Additionally, the thickness of the mice footpad injected with B16-F10 cells decreased significantly until the 9th day of blue LED irradiation, indicating the inhibition of the early growth rate of the melanoma cells. Our data demonstrate that blue LED irradiation induces apoptotic cell death by activating the mitochondria-mediated pathway and reduces the early growth rate of melanoma cells. Further studies are needed to elucidate the precise mechanism of blue LED in melanoma cells. PMID:25550119

  13. Text mining for metabolic pathways, signaling cascades, and protein networks.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Robert; Krallinger, Martin; Andres, Eduardo; Tamames, Javier; Blaschke, Christian; Valencia, Alfonso

    2005-05-10

    The complexity of the information stored in databases and publications on metabolic and signaling pathways, the high throughput of experimental data, and the growing number of publications make it imperative to provide systems to help the researcher navigate through these interrelated information resources. Text-mining methods have started to play a key role in the creation and maintenance of links between the information stored in biological databases and its original sources in the literature. These links will be extremely useful for database updating and curation, especially if a number of technical problems can be solved satisfactorily, including the identification of protein and gene names (entities in general) and the characterization of their types of interactions. The first generation of openly accessible text-mining systems, such as iHOP (Information Hyperlinked over Proteins), provides additional functions to facilitate the reconstruction of protein interaction networks, combine database and text information, and support the scientist in the formulation of novel hypotheses. The next challenge is the generation of comprehensive information regarding the general function of signaling pathways and protein interaction networks. PMID:15886388

  14. Sensitization of apoptotically-resistant breast carcinoma cells to TNF and TRAIL by inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Christopher B; Parker, Amanda P; Patten, Daniel; Elliott, Steven; Tang, Yan; Frigo, Daniel E; Dugan, Christine M; Coakley, Erin L; Butler, Nancy N; Clayton, John L; Alam, Jawed; Curiel, Tyler J; Beckman, Barbara S; Jaffe, Bernard M; Burow, Matthew E

    2004-06-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade is a critical component in the regulation of cell survival and proliferation decisions. In breast carcinoma cells, activation of the p38-MAPK member of this family occurs in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines and cellular stress. The involvement of p38-MAPK in the activation of the transcription factor, NF-kappaB, suggests a potential role and mechanism for regulation of cell survival and drug resistance. Generation of the resistant MCF-7 variant (MCF-7TN-R) was achieved by prolonged exposure of MCF-7N cells to increasing concentrations of TNF. Differences in MAPK activation and function in the MCF-7 cell variants were determined. The role of the p38-MAPK pathway in regulation of resistance was determined using pharmacological (SB 203580) or molecular [Dominant Inhibitory (DI)-p38] inhibition. The effect of p38 inhibition on NF-kappaB transcriptional activation was analyzed. As compared to the sensitive MCF-7N parent cell line, the MCF-7TN-R cell line displayed significant resistance to TNF- and TRAIL-induced cell death. Analysis of the expression and phosphorylation of members of the MAPK family revealed an increased basal activation of p38 in the MCF-7TN-R variant. The p38-mediated phosphorylation and transcriptional activity were suppressed by pharmacologic inhibition with SB 230580. Treatment of MCF-7TN-R cells with SB partially restored sensitivity to TNF-induced cell death. In addition, use of a DI-p38 construct with or without the addition to TNF induced cell death, thus restoring TNF-sensitivity to these cells. The ability of p38 inhibition to restore apoptotic sensitivity was correlated with suppression of the TNF-induced cell survival pathway, NF-kappaB. The increased activation of p38-MAPK in MCF-7TN-R cells demonstrates that this signaling pathway through activation of NF-kappaB is an important route for control of resistance to cell death in breast carcinoma. Molecular and pharmacological

  15. Phagocytic receptor signaling regulates clathrin and epsin-mediated cytoskeletal remodeling during apoptotic cell engulfment in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qian; He, Bin; Lu, Nan; Conradt, Barbara; Grant, Barth D.; Zhou, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The engulfment and subsequent degradation of apoptotic cells by phagocytes is an evolutionarily conserved process that efficiently removes dying cells from animal bodies during development. Here, we report that clathrin heavy chain (CHC-1), a membrane coat protein well known for its role in receptor-mediated endocytosis, and its adaptor epsin (EPN-1) play crucial roles in removing apoptotic cells in Caenorhabditis elegans. Inactivating epn-1 or chc-1 disrupts engulfment by impairing actin polymerization. This defect is partially suppressed by inactivating UNC-60, a cofilin ortholog and actin server/depolymerization protein, further indicating that EPN-1 and CHC-1 regulate actin assembly during pseudopod extension. CHC-1 is enriched on extending pseudopods together with EPN-1, in an EPN-1-dependent manner. Epistasis analysis places epn-1 and chc-1 in the same cell-corpse engulfment pathway as ced-1, ced-6 and dyn-1. CED-1 signaling is necessary for the pseudopod enrichment of EPN-1 and CHC-1. CED-1, CED-6 and DYN-1, like EPN-1 and CHC-1, are essential for the assembly and stability of F-actin underneath pseudopods. We propose that in response to CED-1 signaling, CHC-1 is recruited to the phagocytic cup through EPN-1 and acts as a scaffold protein to organize actin remodeling. Our work reveals novel roles of clathrin and epsin in apoptotic-cell internalization, suggests a Hip1/R-independent mechanism linking clathrin to actin assembly, and ties the CED-1 pathway to cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:23861060

  16. Sensitive detection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 based on cascade signal amplification in ELISA.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shan; Liu, Daofeng; Guo, Qi; Wu, Songsong; Chen, Rui; Luo, Kai; Hu, Liming; Xiong, Yonghua; Lai, Weihua

    2016-09-01

    In this study, cascade signal amplification in ELISA involving double-antibody sandwich ELISA and indirectly competitive ELISA was established to sensitively detect Escherichia coli O157:H7. In the double-antibody sandwich ELISA, a complex was formed comprising anti-E. coli O157:H7 polyclonal antibody, E. coli O157:H7, biotinylated anti-E. coli O157:H7 monoclonal antibody, streptavidin, and biotinylated β-lactamase. Penicillin solution was then added into the ELISA well and hydrolyzed by β-lactamase. Afterward, the penicillin solution was transferred to indirectly competitive ELISA. The concentration of penicillin can be sensitively detected in indirectly competitive ELISA. In the cascade signal amplification system, increasing the amount of added E. coli O157:H7 resulted in more β-lactamase and less penicillin. The detection sensitivity of E. coli O157:H7, which was 20cfu/mL with the cascade signal amplification in ELISA, was 1,000-fold higher than that of traditional ELISA. Furthermore, the novel method can be used to detect E. coli O157:H7 in milk (2cfu/g). Therefore, this new signaling strategy will facilitate analyses of highly sensitive foodborne pathogens. PMID:27394946

  17. Activation of intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathway in cancer cells by Cymbopogon citratus polysaccharide fractions.

    PubMed

    Thangam, Ramar; Sathuvan, Malairaj; Poongodi, Arasu; Suresh, Veeraperumal; Pazhanichamy, Kalailingam; Sivasubramanian, Srinivasan; Kanipandian, Nagarajan; Ganesan, Nalini; Rengasamy, Ramasamy; Thirumurugan, Ramasamy; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2014-07-17

    Essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus were already reported to have wide ranging medical and industrial applications. However, information on polysaccharides from the plant and their anticancer activities are limited. In the present study, polysaccharides from C. citratus were extracted and fractionated by anion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Two different polysaccharide fractions such as F1 and F2 were obtained, and these fractions were found to have distinct acidic polysaccharides as characterized by their molecular weight and sugar content. NMR spectral analysis revealed the presence of (1→4) linked b-d-Xylofuranose moiety in these polysaccharides. Using these polysaccharide fractions F1 and F2, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities were evaluated against cancer cells in vitro and the mechanism of action of the polysaccharides in inducing apoptosis in cancer cells via intrinsic pathway was also proposed. Two different reproductive cancer cells such as Siha and LNCap were employed for in vitro studies on cytotoxicity, induction of apoptosis and apoptotic DNA fragmentation, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, and profiles of gene and protein expression in response to treatment of cells by the polysaccharide fractions. These polysaccharide fractions exhibited potential cytotoxic and apoptotic effects on carcinoma cells, and they induced apoptosis in these cells through the events of up-regulation of caspase 3, down-regulation of bcl-2 family genes followed by cytochrome c release. PMID:24702929

  18. Membrane localization of scaffold proteins promotes graded signaling in the yeast MAP kinase cascade

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Satoe; Pryciak, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade pathways can show various input-output behaviors, including either switch-like or graded responses to increasing levels of stimulus. Prior studies suggest that switch-like behavior is promoted by positive feedback loops and nonprocessive phosphorylation reactions, but it is unclear whether graded signaling is a default behavior or if it must be enforced by separate mechanisms. Scaffold proteins have been hypothesized to promote graded behavior. Results Here, we experimentally probe the determinants of graded signaling in the yeast mating MAPK pathway. We find that graded behavior is robust, as it resists perturbation by loss of several negative feedback regulators. However, the pathway becomes switch-like when activated by a crosstalk stimulus that bypasses multiple upstream components. To dissect the contributing factors, we developed a method for gradually varying the signal input at different pathway steps in vivo. Input at the beginning of the kinase cascade produced a sharp, threshold-like response. Surprisingly, the scaffold protein Ste5 increased this threshold behavior when limited to the cytosol. However, signaling remained graded whenever Ste5 was allowed to function at the plasma membrane. Conclusions The results suggest that the MAPK cascade module is inherently ultrasensitive, but is converted to a graded system by the pathway-specific activation mechanism. Scaffold-mediated assembly of signaling complexes at the plasma membrane allows faithful propagation of weak signals, which consequently reduces pathway ultrasensitivity. These properties help shape the input-output properties of the system to fit the physiological context. PMID:18722124

  19. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib malate, induces cognitive impairment in vivo via dysregulating VEGFR signaling, apoptotic and autophagic machineries.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aziz, Amal Kamal; Mantawy, Eman M; Said, Riham Soliman; Helwa, Reham

    2016-09-01

    Chemobrain refers to a cluster of cognitive deficits which affects almost 4-75% of chemotherapy-treated cancer patients. Sunitinib, an FDA-approved multityrosine kinase inhibitor, is currently used in treating different types of tumors. Despite being regarded as targeted therapy which blunts sustained angiogenesis in cancer milieu through inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling, the latter has a cardinal role in cognition. Recent clinical reports warned that sunitinib adversely affected memory processing in cancer patients. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms have not been investigated yet. Hence, we explored the impact of a clinically relevant dose of sunitinib on memory processing in vivo and questioned the implication of VEGFR2 signaling, autophagy and apoptosis. Strikingly, sunitinib preferentially impaired spatial cognition as evidenced in Morris water maze, T-maze and passive avoidance task. Consistently, sunitinib degenerated cortical and hippocampal neurons as assessed by histopathological examination and toluidine blue staining. Ultrastructural examination also depicted chromatin condensation, mitochondrial damage and accumulated autophagosomes. Digging deeper, central VEGF/VEGFR2/mTOR signaling was robustly suppressed. Besides, sunitinib boosted cortical and hippocampal p53 and executioner caspase-3 and decreased nuclear factor kappa B and Bcl-2 levels promoting apoptotic cell death. It also profoundly impeded neuronal autophagic flux as shown by decreased beclin-1 and Atg5 and increased p62/SQTSM1 levels. To our knowledge, this is the first study to provide molecular insights into sunitinib-induced chemofog where impeded VEGFR2 signaling and autophagic and hyperactivated apoptotic machineries act in neurodegenerative concert. Importantly, our findings shed light on potential therapeutic strategies to be exploited in the management of sunitinib-induced chemobrain. PMID:27288242

  20. Paper-based microreactor array for rapid screening of cell signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chia-Hao; Lei, Kin Fong; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of cell signaling pathways is important for the study of pathogenesis of cancer. However, the related operations used in these studies are time consuming and labor intensive. Thus, the development of effective therapeutic strategies may be hampered. In this work, gel-free cell culture and subsequent immunoassay has been successfully integrated and conducted in a paper-based microreactor array. Study of the activation level of different kinases of cells stimulated by different conditions, i.e., IL-6 stimulation, starvation, and hypoxia, was demonstrated. Moreover, rapid screening of cell signaling cascades after the stimulations of HGF, doxorubicin, and UVB irradiation was respectively conducted to simultaneously screen 40 kinases and transcription factors. Activation of multi-signaling pathways could be identified and the correlation between signaling pathways was discussed to provide further information to investigate the entire signaling network. The present technique integrates most of the tedious operations using a single paper substrate, reduces sample and reagent consumption, and shortens the time required by the entire process. Therefore, it provides a first-tier rapid screening tool for the study of complicated signaling cascades. It is expected that the technique can be developed for routine protocol in conventional biological research laboratories. PMID:27377153

  1. cAMP-responsive element binding protein mediates a cGMP/protein kinase G-dependent anti-apoptotic signal induced by nitric oxide in retinal neuro-glial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagai-Kusuhara, Azusa; Nakamura, Makoto; Mukuno, Hirokazu; Kanamori, Akiyasu; Negi, Akira; Seigel, Gail M

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is cytoprotective to certain types of neuronal cells. The neuroprotective ability of NO in the retina was reportedly mediated by the cyclic GMP (cGMP) to protein kinase G (PKG) pathway. Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) plays an essential role in the NO/cGMP/PKG-mediated survival of rat cerebellar granule cells. We tested whether CREB transduces the NO/cGMP/PKG anti-apoptotic cascade in R28 neuro-glial progenitor cells. Apoptosis was induced in R28 cells by serum deprivation for 24 h. Varying concentrations of two NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and nipradilol, were added to medium with or without an NO scavenger, a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, or a PKG inhibitor. The cells were immunostained against activated caspase-3 and counterstained with Hoechst 33258. Apoptosis was quantified by counting activated caspase-3 positive or pyknotic cells. SNP and nipradilol rescued R28 cells from apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, at an optimal concentration of 1.0 microM and 10 microM, respectively. Higher concentrations were cytotoxic. The NO scavenger and the inhibitors decreased the anti-apoptotic effect of the NO donors. Intracellular cGMP levels were increased after exposure to SNP and nipradilol. Western blotting showed that both NO donors increased CREB phosphorylation, which was blocked when pre-exposed to the inhibitors. Transfection with a dominant negative CREB construct defective of phosphorylation at Ser-133 interfered with the anti-apoptotic activity of SNP. These results indicate that CREB at least in part mediates the cGMP/PKG-dependent anti-apoptotic signal induced by NO in R28 cells. PMID:17081519

  2. Argon Mediates Anti-Apoptotic Signaling and Neuroprotection via Inhibition of Toll-Like Receptor 2 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Felix; Kaufmann, Kai; Roesslein, Martin; Wellner, Franziska; Auwärter, Volker; Kempf, Jürgen; Loop, Torsten; Buerkle, Hartmut; Goebel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recently, the noble gas argon attracted significant attention due to its neuroprotective properties. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. There is growing evidence that the extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) is involved in Argon´s protective effect. We hypothesized that argon mediates its protective effects via the upstream located toll-like receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4. Methods Apoptosis in a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) was induced using rotenone. Argon treatment was performed after induction of apoptosis with different concentrations (25, 50 and 75 Vol% in oxygen 21 Vol%, carbon dioxide and nitrogen) for 2 or 4 hours respectively. Apoptosis was analyzed using flow cytometry (annexin-V (AV)/propidiumiodide (PI)) staining, caspase-3 activity and caspase cleavage. TLR density on the cells’ surface was analyzed using FACS and immunohistochemistry. Inhibition of TLR signaling and extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) were assessed by western blot, activity assays and FACS analysis. Results Argon 75 Vol% treatment abolished rotenone-induced apoptosis. This effect was attenuated dose- and time-dependently. Argon treatment was accompanied with a significant reduction of TLR2 and TLR4 receptor density and protein expression. Moreover, argon mediated increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated after inhibition of TLR signaling. ERK1/2 and TLR signaling inhibitors abolished the anti-apoptotic and cytoprotective effects of argon. Immunohistochemistry results strengthened these findings. Conclusion These findings suggest that argon-mediated anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective effects are mediated via inhibition of TLR2 and TLR4. PMID:26624894

  3. SDF-1 Chemokine Signalling Modulates the Apoptotic Responses to Iron Deprivation of Clathrin-Depleted DT40 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pance, Alena; Morrissey-Wettey, Frank R.; Craig, Helen; Downing, Alison; Talbot, Richard; Jackson, Antony P.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously deleted both endogenous copies of the clathrin heavy-chain gene in the chicken pre B-cell-line DT40 and replaced them with clathrin under the control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter (Tet-Off). The originally derived cell-line DKO-S underwent apoptosis when clathrin expression was repressed. We have also described a cell-line DKO-R derived from DKO-S cells that was less sensitive to clathrin-depletion. Here we show that the restriction of transferrin uptake, resulting in iron deprivation, is responsible for the lethal consequence of clathrin-depletion. We further show that the DKO-R cells have up-regulated an anti-apoptotic survival pathway based on the chemokine SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4. Our work clarifies several puzzling features of clathrin-depleted DT40 cells and reveals an example of how SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling can abrogate pro-apoptotic pathways and increase cell survival. We propose that the phenomenon described here has implications for the therapeutic approach to a variety of cancers. PMID:25162584

  4. Activation of AMPK/MnSOD signaling mediates anti-apoptotic effect of hepatitis B virus in hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Hong, Hong-Hai; Chen, Shi-Ping; Ma, Cai-Qi; Liu, Han-Yan; Yao, Ya-Chao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-apoptotic capability of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the HepG2 hepatoma cell line and the underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Cell viability and apoptosis were measured by MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Targeted knockdown of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) genes as well as AMPK agonist AICAR and antagonist compound C were employed to determine the correlations of expression of these genes. RESULTS: HBV markedly protected the hepatoma cells from growth suppression and cell death in the condition of serum deprivation. A decrease of superoxide anion production accompanied with an increase of MnSOD expression and activity was found in HepG2.215 cells. Moreover, AMPK activation contributed to the up-regulation of MnSOD. HBx protein was identified to induce the expression of AMPK and MnSOD. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that HBV suppresses mitochondrial superoxide level and exerts an anti-apoptotic effect by activating AMPK/MnSOD signaling pathway, which may provide a novel pharmacological strategy to prevent HCC. PMID:27158203

  5. 6-Shogaol exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects through the modulation of STAT3 and MAPKs signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Moo; Kim, Chulwon; Bae, Hang; Lee, Jong Hyun; Baek, Seung Ho; Nam, Dongwoo; Chung, Won-Seok; Shim, Bum Sang; Lee, Seok-Geun; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Sethi, Gautam; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2015-10-01

    6-shogaol (6SG), one of active ingredients in ginger (Zingiber officinale), is known to exhibit anti-proliferative, anti-metastatic, and pro-apoptotic activities through a mechanism that is not fully elucidated. Because the aberrant activation of STAT3 and MAPKs have been associated with regulation of proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of tumors, we hypothesized that 6SG modulates the activation of STAT3 and MAPKs activation in tumor cells. We found that 6SG strongly inhibited constitutive phosphorylation of STAT3 through inhibition of the activation of upstream JAK2 and c-Src kinases and nuclear translocation of STAT3 on both MDA-MB231 and DU145 cells. Also, 6SG caused the activation of JNK, p38 MAPK, and ERK. Inhibition of ROS generation by N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly prevented 6SG-induced apoptosis. 6SG induced apoptosis as characterized by cleavage of PARP, accumulation of cells in subG1 phase, positive Annexin V binding, down-regulation of STAT3-regulated proteins, and activation of caspase-8, -9, -3 in both MDA-MB231 cells. Compared with other analogues of 6SG, such as 6-gingerol (6G), 8-gingerol (8G), and 10-gingerol (10G), 6SG was found to be the most potent blocker of STAT3 activation. We observed that the administration of 6SG alone significantly suppressed the growth of the tumor. As compared to the vehicle control, 6SG also suppressed the expression of STAT3-regulated gene products such as Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Survivin in tumor tissues. Overall, these findings suggest that 6SG can interfere with multiple signaling cascades involved in tumorigenesis and can be used as a potential therapeutic candidate for both the prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:24962868

  6. Role of protein kinase C δ in apoptotic signaling of oxidized phospholipids in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vogl, F; Humpolícková, J; Amaro, M; Koller, D; Köfeler, H; Zenzmaier, E; Hof, M; Hermetter, A

    2016-04-01

    The oxidized phospholipids (oxPl) 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PGPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC) are cytotoxic components of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Sustained exposure to oxLDL or isolated oxPl induces apoptotic signaling in vascular cells, which is a hallmark of the late phase of atherosclerosis. Activation of sphingomyelinase, the coordinate formation of ceramide and activation of caspase 3/7 as well as the activation of stress-associated kinases are causally involved in this process. Here, we provide evidence for a role of PKCδ in oxPl cytotoxicity. Silencing of the enzyme by siRNA significantly reduced caspase 3/7 activation in RAW 264.7 macrophages under the influence of oxPl. Concomitantly, PKCδ was phosphorylated as a consequence of cell exposure to PGPC or POVPC. Single molecule fluorescence microscopy provided direct evidence for oxPl-protein interaction. Both oxPl recruited an RFP-tagged PKCδ to the plasma membrane in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, two color cross-correlation number and brightness (ccN&B) analysis of the molecular motions revealed that fluorescently labeled PGPC or POVPC analogs co-diffuse and are associated with the fluorescent protein kinase in live cells. The underlying lipid-protein interactions may be due to chemical bonding (imine formation between the phospholipid aldehyde POVPC with protein amino groups) and physical association (with POVPC or PGPC). In summary, our data supports the assumption that PKCδ acts as a proapototic kinase in oxPl-included apoptosis of RAW 264.7 macrophages. The direct association of the bioactive lipids with this enzyme seems to be an important step in the early phase of apoptotic signaling. PMID:26707247

  7. Diacerein-mediated inhibition of IL-6/IL-6R signaling induces apoptotic effects on breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bharti, R; Dey, G; Ojha, P K; Rajput, S; Jaganathan, S K; Sen, R; Mandal, M

    2016-07-28

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) signaling network has been implicated in oncogenic transformations making it attractive target for the discovery of novel cancer therapeutics. In this study, potent antiproliferative and apoptotic effect of diacerein were observed against breast cancer. In vitro apoptosis was induced by this drug in breast cancer cells as verified by increased sub-G1 population, LIVE/DEAD assay, cell cytotoxicity and presence of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells, as well as downregulation of antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and upregulation of apoptotic protein Bax. In addition, apoptosis induction was found to be caspase dependent. Further molecular investigations indicated that diacerein instigated apoptosis was associated with inhibition of IL-6/IL-6R autocrine signaling axis. Suppression of STAT3, MAPK and Akt pathways were also observed as a consequence of diacerein-mediated upstream inhibition of IL-6/IL-6R. Fluorescence study and western blot analysis revealed cytosolic accumulation of STAT3 in diacerein-treated cells. The docking study showed diacerein/IL-6R interaction that was further validated by competitive binding assay and isothermal titration calorimetry. Most interestingly, it was found that diacerein considerably suppressed tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. The in vivo antitumor effect was correlated with decreased proliferation (Ki-67), increased apoptosis (TUNEL) and inhibition of IL-6/IL-6R-mediated STAT3, MAPK and Akt pathway in tumor remnants. Taken together, diacerein offered a novel blueprint for cancer therapy by hampering IL-6/IL-6R/STAT3/MAPK/Akt network. PMID:26616855

  8. MnSOD Overexpression Reduces Fibrosis and Pro-Apoptotic Signaling in the Aging Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Lee, Yang; Kim, Jong-Hee; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan G.

    2015-01-01

    Contractility of the heart is impaired with advancing age via mechanical remodeling, as myocytes are lost through apoptosis and collagenous fibers accumulate. Exercise training confers protection against fibrosis and apoptosis in the aging heart, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. We recently reported that exercise training elevates Mn isoform of superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in the aging heart, concomitant with reduction in oxidative stress and fibrosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that overexpression of MnSOD would be causal in protection against fibrosis and apoptosis in the aging heart. Hearts were extracted from young (8 months) wild-type, young mice overexpressing the Sod2 (MnSOD) gene, old (28 months) wild-type, and old transgenic mice. Left ventricle MnSOD protein levels were elevated in young mice overexpressing the Sod2 (MnSOD) gene and old transgenic mice. MnSODTg mice exhibited lower oxidative stress (total hydroperoxides, 4-hydroxynonenal, and 8-isoprostane) in the old group. Age-related cardiac remodeling and fibrosis was mitigated in MnSOD Tg mice with reductions in extramyocyte space (−65%), collagen-I, and transforming growth factor-β. Pro-apoptotic markers Bax (−38%) and caspase-3 cleavage (−41%) were reduced and apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive nuclei, DNA laddering) was mitigated in MnSOD Tg hearts compared with old wild-type. We conclude that MnSOD elevation is indeed protective against oxidative stress, fibrosis, and apoptosis in the aging heart. PMID:25016531

  9. MnSOD overexpression reduces fibrosis and pro-apoptotic signaling in the aging mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyo-Bum; Lee, Yang; Kim, Jong-Hee; Van Remmen, Holly; Richardson, Arlan G; Lawler, John M

    2015-05-01

    Contractility of the heart is impaired with advancing age via mechanical remodeling, as myocytes are lost through apoptosis and collagenous fibers accumulate. Exercise training confers protection against fibrosis and apoptosis in the aging heart, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. We recently reported that exercise training elevates Mn isoform of superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in the aging heart, concomitant with reduction in oxidative stress and fibrosis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that overexpression of MnSOD would be causal in protection against fibrosis and apoptosis in the aging heart. Hearts were extracted from young (8 months) wild-type, young mice overexpressing the Sod2 (MnSOD) gene, old (28 months) wild-type, and old transgenic mice. Left ventricle MnSOD protein levels were elevated in young mice overexpressing the Sod2 (MnSOD) gene and old transgenic mice. MnSODTg mice exhibited lower oxidative stress (total hydroperoxides, 4-hydroxynonenal, and 8-isoprostane) in the old group. Age-related cardiac remodeling and fibrosis was mitigated in MnSOD Tg mice with reductions in extramyocyte space (-65%), collagen-I, and transforming growth factor-β. Pro-apoptotic markers Bax (-38%) and caspase-3 cleavage (-41%) were reduced and apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive nuclei, DNA laddering) was mitigated in MnSOD Tg hearts compared with old wild-type. We conclude that MnSOD elevation is indeed protective against oxidative stress, fibrosis, and apoptosis in the aging heart. PMID:25016531

  10. Transcription factors and cognate signalling cascades in the regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Vemika; Bhagyaraj, Ella; Parkesh, Raman; Gupta, Pawan

    2016-05-01

    Autophagy is a process that maintains the equilibrium between biosynthesis and the recycling of cellular constituents; it is critical for avoiding the pathophysiology that results from imbalance in cellular homeostasis. Recent reports indicate the need for the design of high-throughput screening assays to identify targets and small molecules for autophagy modulation. For such screening, however, a better understanding of the regulation of autophagy is essential. In addition to regulation by various signalling cascades, regulation of gene expression by transcription factors is also critical. This review focuses on the various transcription factors as well as the corresponding signalling molecules that act together to translate the stimuli to effector molecules that up- or downregulate autophagy. This review rationalizes the importance of these transcription factors functioning in tandem with cognate signalling molecules and their interfaces as possible therapeutic targets for more specific pharmacological interventions. PMID:25651938

  11. Spatio-temporal dynamcis of a cell signal cascade with negative feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maya Bernal, Jose Luis; Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo

    2014-03-01

    We studied the spatio-temporal dynamics of a system of reactio-diffusion equations that models a cell signal transduction pathway with six cycles and negative feedback. The basic cycle consists of the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of two antagonic proteins. We found two regimes of saturation of the enzimatic reaction in the kinetic parameters space and determined the conditions for the signal propagation in the steady state. The trajectories for which transduction occurs are defined in terms of the ratio of the enzimatic activities. We found that in spite of the negative feedback the cell signal cascade behaves as an amplifier and produces phosphoprotein concentration gradients within the cell. This model behaves also as a noise filter and as a switch. Supported by DGAPA-UNAM Contract IN118410-3.

  12. Newly Constructed Network Models of Different WNT Signaling Cascades Applied to Breast Cancer Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Frank; Pukrop, Tobias; Beißbarth, Tim; Bleckmann, Annalen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction WNT signaling is a complex process comprising multiple pathways: the canonical β-catenin-dependent pathway and several alternative non-canonical pathways that act in a β-catenin-independent manner. Representing these intricate signaling mechanisms through bioinformatic approaches is challenging. Nevertheless, a simplified but reliable bioinformatic WNT pathway model is needed, which can be further utilized to decipher specific WNT activation states within e.g. high-throughput data. Results In order to build such a model, we collected, parsed, and curated available WNT signaling knowledge from different pathway databases. The data were assembled to construct computationally suitable models of different WNT signaling cascades in the form of directed signaling graphs. This resulted in four networks representing canonical WNT signaling, non-canonical WNT signaling, the inhibition of canonical WNT signaling and the regulation of WNT signaling pathways, respectively. Furthermore, these networks were integrated with microarray and RNA sequencing data to gain deeper insight into the underlying biology of gene expression differences between MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, representing weakly and highly invasive breast carcinomas, respectively. Differential genes up-regulated in the MDA-MB-231 compared to the MCF-7 cell line were found to display enrichment in the gene set originating from the non-canonical network. Moreover, we identified and validated differentially regulated modules representing canonical and non-canonical WNT pathway components specific for the aggressive basal-like breast cancer subtype. Conclusions In conclusion, we demonstrated that these newly constructed WNT networks reliably reflect distinct WNT signaling processes. Using transcriptomic data, we shaped these networks into comprehensive modules of the genes implicated in the aggressive basal-like breast cancer subtype and demonstrated that non-canonical WNT signaling is

  13. Dioscin inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption though down-regulating the Akt signaling cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Xinhua; Zhai, Zanjing; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Wu, Chuanlong; Liu, Guangwang; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Dai, Kerong

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •A natural-derived compound, dioscin, suppresses osteoclast formation and bone resorption. •Dioscin inhibits osteolytic bone loss in vivo. •Dioscin impairs the Akt signaling cascades pathways during osteoclastogenesis. •Dioscin have therapeutic value in treating osteoclast-related diseases. -- Abstract: Bone resorption is the unique function of osteoclasts (OCs) and is critical for both bone homeostasis and pathologic bone diseases including osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and tumor bone metastasis. Thus, searching for natural compounds that may suppress osteoclast formation and/or function is promising for the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases. In this study, we for the first time demonstrated that dioscin suppressed RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. The suppressive effect of dioscin is supported by the reduced expression of osteoclast-specific markers. Further molecular analysis revealed that dioscin abrogated AKT phosphorylation, which subsequently impaired RANKL-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway and inhibited NFATc1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, in vivo studies further verified the bone protection activity of dioscin in osteolytic animal model. Together our data demonstrate that dioscin suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and function through Akt signaling cascades. Therefore, dioscin is a potential natural agent for the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases.

  14. Cascade signal amplification strategy for subattomolar protein detection by rolling circle amplification and quantum dots tagging.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Yan, Feng; Ding, Lin; Ju, Huangxian; Yin, Yibing

    2010-04-15

    A cascade signal amplification strategy was proposed for detection of protein target at ultralow concentration by combining the rolling circle amplification (RCA) technique with oligonucleotide functionalized quantum dots (QDs), multiplex binding of the biotin-strepavidin system, and anodic stripping voltammetric detection. The RCA product containing tandem-repeat sequences could serve as excellent template for periodic assembly of QDs, which presented per protein recognition event to numerous quantum dot tags for electrochemical readout. Both the RCA and the multiplex binding system showed remarkable amplification efficiency, very little nonspecific adsorption, and low background signal. Using human vascular endothelial growth factor as a model protein, the designed strategy could quantitatively detect protein down to 16 molecules in a 100 microL sample with a linear calibration range from 1 aM to 1 pM and was amenable to quantification of protein target in complex biological matrixes. The proposed cascade signal amplification strategy would become a powerful tool for proteomics research and clinical diagnostics. PMID:20345087

  15. Exploration of Bcl-2 family and caspases-dependent apoptotic signaling pathway in Zearalenone-treated mouse endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jin; Xu, Minglong; Dai, Yujian; Ding, Xiaolin; Xiao, Cheng; Ji, Hongjun; Xu, Yinxue

    2016-08-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is a nonsteroidal estrogenic mycotoxin found in several food commodities worldwide. Although the toxicity of ZEA have been widely studied in a number of cell types, the mechanistic role of ZEA on apoptosis of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) remains poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of ZEA on apoptosis of mouse ESCs and explore the signaling pathway underlying the cytotoxicity of ZEA. The results showed that ZEA treatment caused obvious apoptosis in ESCs as determined by the flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Immunoblotting and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) revealed that ZEA treatment increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. The enzymatic activity assays revealed that caspases-3 and caspase-9 were activated by ZEA treatment in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, flow cytometry show that the apoptotic percentages of cells pretreated with Z-VAD-FMK and Z-LEHD-FMK were markedly reduced compared to the ZEA-treated cells. Overall, the results suggested that ZEA induced obvious apoptosis in ESCs via a Bcl-2 family and caspases-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:27286704

  16. Regulation of MAP kinase signaling cascade by microRNAs in Oryza sativa

    PubMed Central

    Raghuram, Badmi; Sheikh, Arsheed Hussain; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway is one of the most conserved signaling cascade in plants regulating a plethora of cellular processes including normal growth and development, abiotic and biotic stress responses. The perception of external cues triggers the phosphorylation of three tier MAPKKK-MAPKK-MAPK cascade which finally modifies a downstream substrate thereby regulating the cellular processes. Whereas, the transcription regulation by MAPKs, mediated through their substrates is well studied in plants, the transcription and post-transcriptional regulation of the MAPK genes are poorly understood. Previous studies from the animals systems suggested the miRNAs regulate the post-transcriptional regulation of MAPK transcripts. Here we attempt to unravel the post-transcriptional regulation of MAPKs by miRNAs in model crop plant Oryza sativa. Using in silico tools, we predict the miRNAs for 98 out of 99 MAPK transcripts. The predicted miRNAs were validated for the biological relevance of their function. The inverse correlation between relative transcript levels between the MAPKs and their predicted miRNAs validated the in silico prediction. Taken together, this report demonstrates the significance of miRNAs in regulation of the MAPK pathway in plants with a new direction to study the plant signaling molecules. PMID:25482813

  17. MEK1-ERKs signal cascade is required for the replication of Enterovirus 71 (EV71).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, Hao; Zhu, Meng; Luo, Zhijun; Peng, Yihong

    2012-01-01

    The role of the MEK1-ERK signaling cascade in the replication cycle of Enterovirus 71 (EV71), the primary cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), has been analyzed. In vitro infection with EV71 induced a biphasic activation of ERK. The two phases of activation appeared to be triggered by different mechanisms, with the first phase being activated by the binding of viral particles to the membrane receptor of host cells and the second probably being in response to the production of new virus particles. Inhibition of ERK activation by U0126 was found to severely impair virus production. A similar reduction in EV71 replication was also observed when MEK1 expression was subject to knockdown using specific siRNAs. By contrast knockdown of MEK2 expression showed that it was dispensable for virus replication cycle, despite both MEK isoforms being activated and translocated to the nucleus equally well in response to virus infection. Overall, this study suggests distinct functions of the two isoforms of MEK in EV71 replication cycle, with an essential role for MEK1 in stimulating the ERK signaling cascade to promote virus replication. Taken together with our previous work on herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV2) this study highlights MEK1 as a potential broad antiviral molecular target. PMID:22101247

  18. MAVS-MKK7-JNK2 Defines a Novel Apoptotic Signaling Pathway during Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Senlin; Tang, Yijun; Wei, Bo; Yu, Huansha; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Viral infection induces innate immunity and apoptosis. Apoptosis is an effective means to sacrifice virus-infected host cells and therefore restrict the spread of pathogens. However, the underlying mechanisms of this process are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS/VISA/Cardif/IPS-1) is critical for SeV (Sendai virus)-induced apoptosis. MAVS specifically activates c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) but not other MAP kinases. Jnk2−/− cells, but not Jnk1−/− cells, are unable to initiate virus-induced apoptosis and SeV further fails to trigger apoptosis in MAPK kinase 7 (MKK7) knockout (Mkk7−/−) cells. Mechanistically, MAVS recruits MKK7 onto mitochondria via its 3D domain, which subsequently phosphorylates JNK2 and thus activates the apoptosis pathway. Consistently, Jnk2−/− mice, but not Jnk1−/− mice, display marked inflammatory injury in lung and liver after viral challenge. Collectively, we have identified a novel signaling pathway, involving MAVS-MKK7-JNK2, which mediates virus-induced apoptosis and highlights the indispensable role of mitochondrial outer membrane in host defenses. PMID:24651600

  19. FoxP3 inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells by activating the apoptotic signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Gui-Fen; Chen, Shi-Yao; Sun, Zhi-Rong; Miao, Qing; Liu, Yi-Mei; Zeng, Xiao-Qing; Luo, Tian-Cheng; Ma, Li-Li; Lian, Jing-Jing; Song, Dong-Li

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The article revealed FoxP3 gene function in gastric cancer firstly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Present the novel roles of FoxP3 in inhibiting proliferation and promoting apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of FoxP3 increased proapoptotic molecules and repressed antiapoptotic molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of FoxP3 reduced the expression of proapoptotic genes, such as PARP, caspase-3 and caspase-9. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FoxP3 is sufficient for activating the apoptotic signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Forkhead Box Protein 3 (FoxP3) was identified as a key transcription factor to the occurring and function of the regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, limited evidence indicated its function in tumor cells. To elucidate the precise roles and underlying molecular mechanism of FoxP3 in gastric cancer (GC), we examined the expression of FoxP3 and the consequences of interfering with FoxP3 gene in human GC cell lines, AGS and MKN45, by multiple cellular and molecular approaches, such as immunofluorescence, gene transfection, CCK-8 assay, clone formation assay, TUNEL assay, Flow cytometry, immunoassay and quantities polymerase chain reaction (PCR). As a result, FoxP3 was expressed both in nucleus and cytoplasm of GC cells. Up-regulation of FoxP3 inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. Overexpression of FoxP3 increased the protein and mRNA levels of proapoptotic molecules, such as poly ADP-ribose polymerase1 (PARP), caspase-3 and caspase-9, and repressed the expression of antiapoptotic molecules, such as cellular inhibitor of apoptosis-1 (c-IAP1) and the long isoform of B cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2). Furthermore, silencing of FoxP3 by siRNA in GC cells reduced the expression of proapoptotic genes, such as PARP, caspase-3 and caspase-9. Collectively, our findings identify the novel roles of FoxP3 in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis

  20. Annexin A1 released from apoptotic cells acts through formyl peptide receptors to dampen inflammatory monocyte activation via JAK/STAT/SOCS signalling

    PubMed Central

    Pupjalis, Danute; Goetsch, Julia; Kottas, Diane J; Gerke, Volker; Rescher, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    The immunosuppressive effects of apoptotic cells involve inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine release and establishment of an anti-inflammatory cytokine profile, thus limiting the degree of inflammation and promoting resolution. We report here that this is in part mediated by the release of the anti-inflammatory mediator annexin A1 from apoptotic cells and the functional activation of annexin A1 receptors of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family on target cells. Supernatants from apoptotic neutrophils or the annexin A1 peptidomimetic Ac2-26 significantly reduced IL-6 signalling and the release of TNF-α from endotoxin-challenged monocytes. Ac2-26 activated STAT3 in a JAK-dependent manner, resulting in upregulated SOCS3 levels, and depletion of SOCS3 reversed the Ac2-26-mediated inhibition of IL-6 signalling. This identifies annexin A1 as part of the anti-inflammatory pattern of apoptotic cells and links the activation of FPRs to established signalling pathways triggering anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:21254404

  1. Subcellular localization of CrmA: identification of a novel leucine-rich nuclear export signal conserved in anti-apoptotic serpins.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Span, Simone W; Kruyt, Frank A E; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    The cowpox virus-encoded anti-apoptotic protein cytokine response modifier A (CrmA) is a member of the serpin family that specifically inhibits the cellular proteins caspase 1, caspase 8 and granzyme B. In this study, we have used Flag- and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-tagged versions of CrmA to investigate the mechanisms that regulate its subcellular localization. We show that CrmA can actively enter and exit the nucleus and we demonstrate the role of the nuclear export receptor CRM1 in this shuttling process. CrmA contains a novel leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) that is functionally conserved in the anti-apoptotic cellular serpin PI-9. Besides this leucine-rich export signal, additional sequences mapping to a 103-amino-acid region flanking the NES contribute to the CRM1-dependent nuclear export of CrmA. Although YFP-tagged CrmA is primarily located in the cytoplasm, shifting its localization to be predominantly nuclear by fusion of a heterologous nuclear localization signal did not impair its ability to prevent Fas-induced apoptosis. We propose that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling would allow CrmA to efficiently target cellular pro-apoptotic proteins not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus, and thus to carry out its anti-apoptotic function in both compartments. PMID:12667137

  2. Simulated hypogravity impairs the angiogenic response of endothelium by up-regulating apoptotic signals

    SciTech Connect

    Morbidelli, Lucia . E-mail: morbidelli@unisi.it; Monici, Monica; Marziliano, Nicola; Cogoli, Augusto; Fusi, Franco; Waltenberger, Johannes; Ziche, Marina

    2005-08-26

    Health hazards in astronauts are represented by cardiovascular problems and impaired bone healing. These disturbances are characterized by a common event, the loss of function by vascular endothelium, leading to impaired angiogenesis. We investigated whether the exposure of cultured endothelial cells to hypogravity condition could affect their behaviour in terms of functional activity, biochemical responses, morphology, and gene expression. Simulated hypogravity conditions for 72 h produced a reduction of cell number. Genomic analysis of endothelial cells exposed to hypogravity revealed that proapoptotic signals increased, while antiapoptotic and proliferation/survival genes were down-regulated by modelled low gravity. Activation of apoptosis was accompanied by morphological changes with mitochondrial disassembly and organelles/cytoplasmic NAD(P)H redistribution, as evidenced by autofluorescence analysis. In this condition cells were not able to respond to angiogenic stimuli in terms of migration and proliferation. Our study documents functional, morphological, and transcription alterations in vascular endothelium exposed to simulated low gravity conditions, thus providing insights on the occurrence of vascular tissue dysregulation in crewmen during prolonged space flights. Moreover, the alteration of vascular endothelium can intervene as a concause in other systemic effects, like bone remodelling, observed in weightlessness.

  3. Downregulation of oxidative and nitrosative apoptotic signaling by L-carnitine in Ifosfamide-induced Fanconi syndrome rat model.

    PubMed

    Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M; Hafez, Mohamed M; Aldelemy, Meshan Lafi; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M; Al-Rejaie, Salem S; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Al-Harbi, Naif O; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M; Al-Shabanah, Othman A

    2012-01-01

    It is well documented that ifosfamide (IFO) therapy is associated with sever nephropathy in the form of Fanconi syndrome. Although oxidative stress has been reported as a major player in IFO-induced Fanconi syndrome, no mechanism for this effect has been ascertained. Therefore, this study has been initiated to investigate, on gene expression level, the mechanism of IFO-induce nephrotoxicity and those whereby carnitine supplementation attenuates this serious side effect of IFO. To achieve the ultimate goals of this study, adult male rats were assigned to one of four treatment groups, namely, control, L-carnitine, IFO, and IFO plus L-carnitine. Administration of IFO for 5 days significantly increased serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and total nitrate/nitrite (NOx) production in kidney tissues. In addition, IFO significantly increased mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), caspase-9, and caspase-3 and significantly decreased expression of glutathione peroxides (GPx), catalase (CAT), and Bcl2 in kidney tissues. Administration of L-carnitine to IFO-treated rats resulted in a complete reversal of the all biochemical and gene expression changes, induced by IFO, to the control values. Data from this study suggest that L-carnitine prevents the development of IFO-induced nephrotoxicity via downregulation of oxidative and nitrosative apoptotic signaling in kidney tissues. PMID:23213347

  4. Tight Interconnection and Multi-Level Control of Arabidopsis MYB44 in MAPK Cascade Signalling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic stress poses a huge, ever-increasing problem to plants and agriculture. The dissection of signalling pathways mediating stress tolerance is a prerequisite to develop more resistant plant species. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are universal signalling modules. In Arabidopsis, the MAPK MPK3 and its upstream regulator MAPK kinase MKK4 initiate the adaptation response to numerous abiotic and biotic stresses. Yet, molecular steps directly linked with MKK4 – MPK3 activation are largely unknown. Starting with a yeast-two-hybrid screen for interacting partners of MKK4, we identified a transcription factor, MYB44. MYB44 is controlled at multiple levels by and strongly inter-connected with MAPK signalling. As we had shown earlier, stress-induced expression of the MYB44 gene is regulated by a MPK3-targeted bZIP transcription factor VIP1. At the protein level, MYB44 interacts with MPK3 in vivo. MYB44 is phosphorylated by MPK3 in vitro at a single residue, Ser145. Although replacement of Ser145 by a non-phosphorylatable (S145A) or phosphomimetic (S145D) residue did not alter MYB44 subcellular localisation, dimerization behaviour nor DNA-binding characteristics, abiotic stress tolerance tests in stable transgenic Arabidopsis plants clearly related S145 phosphorylation to MYB44 function: Compared to Arabidopsis wild type plants, MYB44 overexpressing lines exhibit an enhanced tolerance to osmotic stress and are slightly more sensitive to abscisic acid. Interestingly, overexpression of the S145A variant revealed that impaired phosphorylation does not render the MYB44 protein non-functional. Instead, S145A lines are highly sensitive to abiotic stress, and thereby remarkably similar to mpk3-deficient plants. Its in vivo interaction with the nuclear sub-pools of both MPK3 and MKK4 renders MYB44 the first plant transcription factor to have a second function as putative MAPK cascade scaffolding protein. PMID:23437396

  5. Engineering modular and tunable genetic amplifiers for scaling transcriptional signals in cascaded gene networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baojun; Barahona, Mauricio; Buck, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Synthetic biology aims to control and reprogram signal processing pathways within living cells so as to realize repurposed, beneficial applications. Here we report the design and construction of a set of modular and gain-tunable genetic amplifiers in Escherichia coli capable of amplifying a transcriptional signal with wide tunable-gain control in cascaded gene networks. The devices are engineered using orthogonal genetic components (hrpRS, hrpV and PhrpL) from the hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) gene regulatory network in Pseudomonas syringae. The amplifiers can linearly scale up to 21-fold the transcriptional input with a large output dynamic range, yet not introducing significant time delay or significant noise during signal amplification. The set of genetic amplifiers achieves different gains and input dynamic ranges by varying the expression levels of the underlying ligand-free activator proteins in the device. As their electronic counterparts, these engineered transcriptional amplifiers can act as fundamental building blocks in the design of biological systems by predictably and dynamically modulating transcriptional signal flows to implement advanced intra- and extra-cellular control functions. PMID:25030903

  6. Signaling cascades and the importance of moonlight in coral broadcast mass spawning.

    PubMed

    Kaniewska, Paulina; Alon, Shahar; Karako-Lampert, Sarit; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Levy, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Many reef-building corals participate in a mass-spawning event that occurs yearly on the Great Barrier Reef. This coral reproductive event is one of earth's most prominent examples of synchronised behavior, and coral reproductive success is vital to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. Although several environmental cues have been implicated in the timing of mass spawning, the specific sensory cues that function together with endogenous clock mechanisms to ensure accurate timing of gamete release are largely unknown. Here, we show that moonlight is an important external stimulus for mass spawning synchrony and describe the potential mechanisms underlying the ability of corals to detect environmental triggers for the signaling cascades that ultimately result in gamete release. Our study increases the understanding of reproductive chronobiology in corals and strongly supports the hypothesis that coral gamete release is achieved by a complex array of potential neurohormones and light-sensing molecules. PMID:26668113

  7. A Gibberellin-Mediated DELLA-NAC Signaling Cascade Regulates Cellulose Synthesis in Rice[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Debao; Wang, Shaogan; Zhang, Baocai; Shang-Guan, Keke; Shi, Yanyun; Zhang, Dongmei; Liu, Xiangling; Wu, Kun; Xu, Zuopeng; Fu, Xiangdong; Zhou, Yihua

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose, which can be converted into numerous industrial products, has important impacts on the global economy. It has long been known that cellulose synthesis in plants is tightly regulated by various phytohormones. However, the underlying mechanism of cellulose synthesis regulation remains elusive. Here, we show that in rice (Oryza sativa), gibberellin (GA) signals promote cellulose synthesis by relieving the interaction between SLENDER RICE1 (SLR1), a DELLA repressor of GA signaling, and NACs, the top-layer transcription factors for secondary wall formation. Mutations in GA-related genes and physiological treatments altered the transcription of CELLULOSE SYNTHASE genes (CESAs) and the cellulose level. Multiple experiments demonstrated that transcription factors NAC29/31 and MYB61 are CESA regulators in rice; NAC29/31 directly regulates MYB61, which in turn activates CESA expression. This hierarchical regulation pathway is blocked by SLR1-NAC29/31 interactions. Based on the results of anatomical analysis and GA content examination in developing rice internodes, this signaling cascade was found to be modulated by varied endogenous GA levels and to be required for internode development. Genetic and gene expression analyses were further performed in Arabidopsis thaliana GA-related mutants. Altogether, our findings reveal a conserved mechanism by which GA regulates secondary wall cellulose synthesis in land plants and provide a strategy for manipulating cellulose production and plant growth. PMID:26002868

  8. Amelioration of nandrolone decanoate-induced testicular and sperm toxicity in rats by taurine: Effects on steroidogenesis, redox and inflammatory cascades, and intrinsic apoptotic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Maha A.E.

    2015-02-01

    The wide abuse of the anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate by athletes and adolescents for enhancement of sporting performance and physical appearance may be associated with testicular toxicity and infertility. On the other hand, taurine; a free β-amino acid with remarkable antioxidant activity, is used in taurine-enriched beverages to boost the muscular power of athletes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of the possible protective effects of taurine on nandrolone decanoate-induced testicular and sperm toxicity in rats. To achieve this aim, male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into four groups and administered either vehicle, nandrolone decanoate (10 mg/kg/week, I.M.), taurine (100 mg/kg/day, p.o.) or combination of taurine and nandrolone decanoate, for 8 successive weeks. Results of the present study showed that taurine reversed nandrolone decanoate-induced perturbations in sperm characteristics, normalized serum testosterone level, and restored the activities of the key steroidogenic enzymes; 3β-HSD, and 17β-HSD. Moreover, taurine prevented nandrolone decanoate-induced testicular toxicity and DNA damage by virtue of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic effects. This was evidenced by taurine-induced modulation of testicular LDH-x activity, redox markers (MDA, NO, GSH contents, and SOD activity), inflammatory indices (TNF-α, ICAM-1 levels, and MMP-9 gene expression), intrinsic apoptotic pathway (cytochrome c gene expression and caspase-3 content), and oxidative DNA damage markers (8-OHdG level and comet assay). In conclusion, at the biochemical and histological levels, taurine attenuated nandrolone decanoate-induced poor sperm quality and testicular toxicity in rats. - Highlights: • Nandrolone decanoate (ND) disrupts sperm profile and steroidogenesis in rats. • ND upregulates gene expression of inflammatory and apoptotic markers. • Taurine normalizes sperm profile and serum testosterone level

  9. Antiproliferative Activity of Cinnamomum cassia Constituents and Effects of Pifithrin-Alpha on Their Apoptotic Signaling Pathways in Hep G2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Lean-Teik; Wu, Shu-Jing

    2011-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (Cin), cinnamic acid (Ca) and cinnamyl alcohol (Cal), major constituents of Cinnamomum cassia, have been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer and other activities. In this study, our aim was to evaluate the antiproliferative activity of these compounds in human hepatoma Hep G2 cells and examine the effects of pifithrin-alpha (PFTα; a specific p53 inhibitor) on their apoptotic signaling transduction mechanism. The antiproliferative activity was measured by XTT assay. Expression of apoptosis-related proteins was detected by western blotting. Results showed that at a concentration of 30 μM, the order of antiproliferative activity in Hep G2 cells was Cin > Ca > Cal. Cin (IC50 9.76 ± 0.67 μM) demonstrated an antiproliferative potency as good as 5-fluorouracil (an anti-cancer drug; IC50 9.57 ± 0.61 μM). Further studies on apoptotic mechanisms of Cin showed that it downregulated the expression of Bcl-XL, upregulated CD95 (APO-1), p53 and Bax proteins, as well as cleaving the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in a time-dependent pattern. PFTα pre-incubation significantly diminished the effect of Cin-induced apoptosis. It markedly upregulated the anti-apoptotic (Bcl-XL) expression and downregulated the pro-apoptotic (Bax) expression, as well as effectively blocking the CD95 (APO-1) and p53 expression, and PARP cleavage in Cin-treated cells. This study indicates that Cin was the most potent antiproliferative constituent of C. cassia, and its apoptotic mechanism in Hep G2 cells could be mediated through the p53 induction and CD95 (APO-1) signaling pathways. PMID:20038571

  10. Signaling gradients in cascades of two-state reaction-diffusion systems.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Coppey, Mathieu; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y

    2009-01-27

    Biological networks frequently use cascades, generally defined as chain-like arrangements of similar modules. Spatially lumped cascades can serve as noise filters, time-delay, or thresholding elements. The operation and functional capabilities of spatially distributed cascades are much less understood. Motivated by studies of pattern formation in the early Drosophila embryo, we analyze cascades of 2-state reaction-diffusion systems. At each stage within such as a cascade, a diffusible particle is reversibly bound by immobile traps and can be annihilated in both mobile and immobile states. When trapped, these particles drive the next stage by converting mobile particles of a different type from a passive to active form. The cascade initiated by injection of mobile particles into the first stage. We derive analytical expressions for the steady-state concentration profiles of mobile and immobile particles and analyze how the output of a cascade is controlled by properties of the constituent stages. PMID:19147842

  11. Dioscin inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption though down-regulating the Akt signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xinhua; Zhai, Zanjing; Liu, Xuqiang; Li, Haowei; Ouyang, Zhengxiao; Wu, Chuanlong; Liu, Guangwang; Fan, Qiming; Tang, Tingting; Qin, An; Dai, Kerong

    2014-01-10

    Bone resorption is the unique function of osteoclasts (OCs) and is critical for both bone homeostasis and pathologic bone diseases including osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and tumor bone metastasis. Thus, searching for natural compounds that may suppress osteoclast formation and/or function is promising for the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases. In this study, we for the first time demonstrated that dioscin suppressed RANKL-mediated osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. The suppressive effect of dioscin is supported by the reduced expression of osteoclast-specific markers. Further molecular analysis revealed that dioscin abrogated AKT phosphorylation, which subsequently impaired RANKL-induced nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway and inhibited NFATc1 transcriptional activity. Moreover, in vivo studies further verified the bone protection activity of dioscin in osteolytic animal model. Together our data demonstrate that dioscin suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast formation and function through Akt signaling cascades. Therefore, dioscin is a potential natural agent for the treatment of osteoclast-related diseases. PMID:24333429

  12. Angiotensin II-triggered kinase signaling cascade in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have projected the renin-angiotensin system as a central component of the physiological and pathological processes of assorted neurological disorders. Its primary effector hormone, angiotensin II (Ang II), not only mediates the physiological effects of vasoconstriction and blood pressure regulation in cardiovascular disease but is also implicated in a much wider range of neuronal activities and diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, neuronal injury, and cognitive disorders. Ang II produces different actions by acting on its two subtypes of receptors (AT1 and AT2); however, the well-known physiological actions of Ang II are mainly mediated through AT1 receptors. Moreover, recent studies also suggest the important functional role of AT2 receptor in the brain. Ang II acts on AT1 receptors and conducts its functions via MAP kinases (ERK1/2, JNK, and p38MAPK), glycogen synthase kinase, Rho/ROCK kinase, receptor tyrosine kinases (PDGF and EGFR), and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (Src, Pyk2, and JAK/STAT). AT1R-mediated NADPH oxidase activation also leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species, widely implicated in neuroinflammation. These signaling cascades lead to glutamate excitotoxicity, apoptosis, cerebral infarction, astrocyte proliferation, nociception, neuroinflammation, and progression of other neurological disorders. The present review focuses on the Ang II-triggered signal transduction pathways in central nervous system. PMID:26574890

  13. Bacterial factors exploit eukaryotic Rho GTPase signaling cascades to promote invasion and proliferation within their host

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, Michel R

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is a main target of many bacterial pathogens. Among the multiple regulation steps of the actin cytoskeleton, bacterial factors interact preferentially with RhoGTPases. Pathogens secrete either toxins which diffuse in the surrounding environment, or directly inject virulence factors into target cells. Bacterial toxins, which interfere with RhoGTPases, and to some extent with RasGTPases, catalyze a covalent modification (ADPribosylation, glucosylation, deamidation, adenylation, proteolysis) blocking these molecules in their active or inactive state, resulting in alteration of epithelial and/or endothelial barriers, which contributes to dissemination of bacteria in the host. Injected bacterial virulence factors preferentially manipulate the RhoGTPase signaling cascade by mimicry of eukaryotic regulatory proteins leading to local actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, which mediates bacterial entry into host cells or in contrast escape to phagocytosis and immune defense. Invasive bacteria can also manipulate RhoGTPase signaling through recognition and stimulation of cell surface receptor(s). Changes in RhoGTPase activation state is sensed by the innate immunity pathways and allows the host cell to adapt an appropriate defense response. PMID:25203748

  14. Molecular adaptations of apoptotic pathways and signaling partners in the cerebral cortex of human cocaine addicts and cocaine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Alvaro-Bartolomé, M; La Harpe, R; Callado, L F; Meana, J J; García-Sevilla, J A

    2011-11-24

    Cocaine induces apoptotic effects in cultured cells and in the developing brain, but the aberrant activation of cell death in the adult brain remains inconclusive, especially in humans. This postmortem human brain study examined the status of canonical apoptotic pathways, signaling partners, and the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a sensor of DNA damage, in prefrontal cortex (PFC) of a small but well-characterized cohort of cocaine abusers (n=10). For comparison, the chosen targets were also quantified in the cerebral cortex of cocaine-treated rats. In the PFC of cocaine abusers, FS7-associated cell surface antigen (Fas) receptor aggregates and Fas-associated death domain (FADD) adaptor were reduced (-26% and -66%, respectively) as well as the content of mitochondrial cytochrome c (-61%). In the same brain samples of cocaine abusers, the proteolytic cleavage of PARP-1 was increased (+39%). Nuclear PARP-1 degradation, possibly a consequence of increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, involved the activation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and not that of caspase-3. In the PFC of cocaine abusers, several signaling molecules associated with cocaine/dopamine and/or apoptotic pathways were not significantly altered, with the exception of anti-apoptotic truncated DARPP-32 (t-DARPP), a truncated isoform of dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32), whose content was decreased (-28%). Chronic exposure to cocaine in rats, including withdrawal for 3 days, did not alter Fas-FADD receptor complex, cytochrome c, caspase-3/fragments, AIF, PARP-1 cleavage, and associated signaling in the cerebral cortex. Chronic cocaine and abstinence, however, increased the content of t-DARPP (+39% and +47%) in rat brain cortex. The major findings indicate that cocaine addiction in humans is not associated with abnormal activation of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in PFC. The downregulation of Fas-FADD receptor complex and cytochrome c

  15. Orphan Receptor GPR179 Forms Macromolecular Complexes With Components of Metabotropic Signaling Cascade in Retina ON-Bipolar Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Orlandi, Cesare; Cao, Yan; Martemyanov, Kirill A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. In the mammalian retina, synaptic transmission between light-excited rod photoreceptors and downstream ON-bipolar neurons is indispensable for dim vision, and disruption of this process leads to congenital stationary night blindness in human patients. The ON-bipolar neurons use the metabotropic signaling cascade, initiated by the mGluR6 receptor, to generate depolarizing responses to light-induced changes in neurotransmitter glutamate release from the photoreceptor axonal terminals. Evidence for the identity of the components involved in transducing these signals is growing rapidly. Recently, the orphan receptor, GPR179, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, has been shown to be indispensable for the synaptic responses of ON-bipolar cells. In our study, we investigated the interaction of GPR179 with principle components of the signal transduction cascade. Methods. We used immunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays in transfected cells and native retinas to characterize the protein–protein interactions involving GPR179. The influence of cascade components on GPR179 localization was examined through immunohistochemical staining of the retinas from genetic mouse models. Results. We demonstrated that, in mouse retinas, GPR179 forms physical complexes with the main components of the metabotropic cascade, recruiting mGluR6, TRPM1, and the RGS proteins. Elimination of mGluR6 or RGS proteins, but not TRPM1, detrimentally affects postsynaptic targeting or GPR179 expression. Conclusions. These observations suggest that the mGluR6 signaling cascade is scaffolded as a macromolecular complex in which the interactions between the components ensure the optimal spatiotemporal characteristics of signal transduction. PMID:24114537

  16. Counteracting MDM2-induced HIPK2 downregulation restores HIPK2/p53 apoptotic signaling in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nardinocchi, Lavinia; Puca, Rosa; Givol, David; D'Orazi, Gabriella

    2010-10-01

    Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is a crucial regulator of p53 apoptotic function by phosphorylating serine 46 (Ser46) in response to DNA damage. In tumors with wild-type p53, its tumor suppressor function is often impaired by MDM2 overexpression that targets p53 for proteasomal degradation. Likewise, MDM2 targets HIPK2 for protein degradation impairing p53-apoptotic function. Here we report that zinc antagonised MDM2-induced HIPK2 degradation as well as p53 ubiquitination. The zinc inhibitory effect on MDM2 activity leads to HIPK2-induced p53Ser46 phosphorylation and p53 pro-apoptotic transcriptional activity. These results suggest that zinc derivatives are potential molecules to target the MDM2-induced HIPK2/p53 inhibition. PMID:20849851

  17. Neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 transduces survival signals in neuronal cells in response to hypoxia-induced apoptotic insults.

    PubMed

    Chio, Chung-Ching; Wei, Li; Chen, Tyng Guey; Lin, Chien-Min; Shieh, Ja-Ping; Yeh, Poh-Shiow; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2016-06-01

    signals in neuronal cells responsible for hypoxiainduced apoptotic insults through activation of a CREB/cIAP2-dependent mechanism. PMID:26613168

  18. Apoptotic cell clearance of Leishmania major-infected neutrophils by dendritic cells inhibits CD8+ T-cell priming in vitro by Mer tyrosine kinase-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro-Gomes, F L; Romano, A; Lee, S; Roffê, E; Peters, N C; Debrabant, A; Sacks, D

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant recruited and infected cells during the early stages of Leishmania major infection in the skin, and depletion of neutrophils promotes immunity to infection transmitted by sand fly bite. In order to better understand how the acute neutrophilic response suppresses immunity, we assessed the consequences of the interaction between neutrophils recovered from the skin-inoculation site and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. The capture of infected, apoptotic neutrophils by the DCs completely inhibited their cross-presentation function that was dependent on engagement of the receptor tyrosine kinase Mer on the DCs. The capture of uninfected neutrophils, or neutrophils infected with Toxoplasma gondii, had only slight immunomodulatory effects. These studies define the clearance of infected, apoptotic neutrophils by DCs and Mer receptor signaling as central to the early immune evasion strategies of L. major, with relevance to other vector-borne pathogens delivered by bite to the skin. PMID:26658192

  19. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol attenuates spatio-cognitive deficits in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model: modulation of the molecular signals in neuronal survival-apoptotic programs.

    PubMed

    Arunsundar, Mohanasundaram; Shanmugarajan, Thukani Sathanantham; Ravichandran, Velayutham

    2015-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common type of dementia, is a devastating neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive neuro-cognitive dysfunction. In our study, we investigated the potential of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET), a dopamine metabolite, and also a polyphenol from olive oil, in ameliorating soluble oligomeric amyloid β1-42 plus ibotenic acid (oA42i)-induced neuro-behavioral dysfunction in C57BL/6 mice. The results depicted that intracerebroventricular injection of oA42i negatively altered the spatial reference and working memories in mice, whereas DOPET treatment significantly augmented the spatio-cognitive abilities against oA42i. Upon investigation of the underlying mechanisms, oA42i-intoxicated mice displayed significantly activated death kinases including JNK- and p38-MAPKs with concomitantly inhibited ERK-MAPK/RSK2, PI3K/Akt1, and JAK2/STAT3 survival signaling pathways in the hippocampal neurons. Conversely, DOPET treatment reversed these dysregulated signaling mechanisms comparable to the sham-operated mice. Notably, oA42i administration altered the Bcl-2/Bad levels and activated the caspase-dependent mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway involving cytochrome c, apoptotic protease activating factor-1, and caspase-9/3. In contrary, DOPET administration stabilized the dysregulated activities of these apoptotic/anti-apoptotic markers and preserved the mitochondrial ultra-architecture. Besides, we observed that oA42i intoxication substantially down-regulated the expression of genes involved in the regulation of survival and memory functions including sirtuin-1, cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), CREB-target genes (BDNF, c-Fos, Nurr1, and Egr1) and a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Fascinatingly, DOPET treatment significantly diminished these aberrations when compared to the oA42i group. Taken together, these results accentuate that DOPET may be a multipotent agent to combat AD. PMID:25274193

  20. L-Lactate protects neurons against excitotoxicity: implication of an ATP-mediated signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, P; Allaman, I; Rothenfusser, K; Fiumelli, H; Marquet, P; Magistretti, P J

    2016-01-01

    Converging experimental data indicate a neuroprotective action of L-Lactate. Using Digital Holographic Microscopy, we observe that transient application of glutamate (100 μM; 2 min) elicits a NMDA-dependent death in 65% of mouse cortical neurons in culture. In the presence of L-Lactate (or Pyruvate), the percentage of neuronal death decreases to 32%. UK5099, a blocker of the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier, fully prevents L-Lactate-mediated neuroprotection. In addition, L-Lactate-induced neuroprotection is not only inhibited by probenicid and carbenoxolone, two blockers of ATP channel pannexins, but also abolished by apyrase, an enzyme degrading ATP, suggesting that ATP produced by the Lactate/Pyruvate pathway is released to act on purinergic receptors in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Finally, pharmacological approaches support the involvement of the P2Y receptors associated to the PI3-kinase pathway, leading to activation of KATP channels. This set of results indicates that L-Lactate acts as a signalling molecule for neuroprotection against excitotoxicity through coordinated cellular pathways involving ATP production, release and activation of a P2Y/KATP cascade. PMID:26893204

  1. L-Lactate protects neurons against excitotoxicity: implication of an ATP-mediated signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, P.; Allaman, I.; Rothenfusser, K.; Fiumelli, H.; Marquet, P.; Magistretti, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Converging experimental data indicate a neuroprotective action of L-Lactate. Using Digital Holographic Microscopy, we observe that transient application of glutamate (100 μM; 2 min) elicits a NMDA-dependent death in 65% of mouse cortical neurons in culture. In the presence of L-Lactate (or Pyruvate), the percentage of neuronal death decreases to 32%. UK5099, a blocker of the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier, fully prevents L-Lactate-mediated neuroprotection. In addition, L-Lactate-induced neuroprotection is not only inhibited by probenicid and carbenoxolone, two blockers of ATP channel pannexins, but also abolished by apyrase, an enzyme degrading ATP, suggesting that ATP produced by the Lactate/Pyruvate pathway is released to act on purinergic receptors in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Finally, pharmacological approaches support the involvement of the P2Y receptors associated to the PI3-kinase pathway, leading to activation of KATP channels. This set of results indicates that L-Lactate acts as a signalling molecule for neuroprotection against excitotoxicity through coordinated cellular pathways involving ATP production, release and activation of a P2Y/KATP cascade. PMID:26893204

  2. Signaling cascades and the importance of moonlight in coral broadcast mass spawning

    PubMed Central

    Kaniewska, Paulina; Alon, Shahar; Karako-Lampert, Sarit; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Levy, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Many reef-building corals participate in a mass-spawning event that occurs yearly on the Great Barrier Reef. This coral reproductive event is one of earth's most prominent examples of synchronised behavior, and coral reproductive success is vital to the persistence of coral reef ecosystems. Although several environmental cues have been implicated in the timing of mass spawning, the specific sensory cues that function together with endogenous clock mechanisms to ensure accurate timing of gamete release are largely unknown. Here, we show that moonlight is an important external stimulus for mass spawning synchrony and describe the potential mechanisms underlying the ability of corals to detect environmental triggers for the signaling cascades that ultimately result in gamete release. Our study increases the understanding of reproductive chronobiology in corals and strongly supports the hypothesis that coral gamete release is achieved by a complex array of potential neurohormones and light-sensing molecules. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09991.001 PMID:26668113

  3. The RET/PTC-RAS-BRAF linear signaling cascade mediates the motile and mitogenic phenotype of thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Rosa Marina; Castellone, Maria Domenica; Guarino, Valentina; De Falco, Valentina; Cirafici, Anna Maria; Salvatore, Giuliana; Caiazzo, Fiorina; Basolo, Fulvio; Giannini, Riccardo; Kruhoffer, Mogens; Orntoft, Torben; Fusco, Alfredo; Santoro, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    In papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs), rearrangements of the RET receptor (RET/PTC) and activating mutations in the BRAF or RAS oncogenes are mutually exclusive. Here we show that the 3 proteins function along a linear oncogenic signaling cascade in which RET/PTC induces RAS-dependent BRAF activation and RAS- and BRAF-dependent ERK activation. Adoptive activation of the RET/PTC-RAS-BRAF axis induced cell proliferation and Matrigel invasion of thyroid follicular cells. Gene expression profiling revealed that the 3 oncogenes activate a common transcriptional program in thyroid cells that includes upregulation of the CXCL1 and CXCL10 chemokines, which in turn stimulate proliferation and invasion. Thus, motile and mitogenic properties are intrinsic to transformed thyroid cells and are governed by an epistatic oncogenic signaling cascade. PMID:15761501

  4. Cardio Protective Effects of Lumbrokinase and Dilong on Second-Hand Smoke-Induced Apoptotic Signaling in the Heart of a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hung-En; Lai, Chao-Hung; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Jong, Gwo-Ping; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Chung, Li-Chin; Pai, Pei-ying; Wen, Su-Ying; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-06-30

    Exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke (SHS) has been epidemiologically linked to heart disease among non-smokers. However, the molecular mechanism behind SHS-induced cardiac disease is not well known. This study found that SD rats exposed to cigarette smoke at a dose of 10 cigarettes for 30 min twice a day for 1 month had a reduced left ventricle-to-tibia length ratio (mg/mm), increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis by TUNEL assay and a wider interstitial space by H&E staining. However, lumbrokinase and dilong both reversed the effects of SHS. Western blotting demonstrated significantly increased expression of the pro-apoptotic protein caspase-3 in the hearts of the rats exposed to SHS. Elevated protein expression levels of Fas, FADD and the apoptotic initiator activated caspase-8, a molecule in the death-receptor-dependent pathway, coupled with increased t-Bid and apoptotic initiator activated caspase-9 were found. Molecules in the mitochondria-dependent pathway, which disrupts mitochondrial membrane potential, were also found in rats exposed to SHS. These factors indicate myocardial apoptosis. However, treatment with lumbrokinase and dilong inhibited SHS-induced apoptosis. Regarding regulation of the survival pathway, we found in western blot analysis that cardiac protein expression of pAkt, Bcl2, and Bcl-xL was significantly down-regulated in rats exposed to SHS. These effects were reversed with lumbrokinase and dilong treatment. The effects of SHS on cardiomyocytes were also found to be mediated by the Fas death receptor-dependent apoptotic pathway, an unbalanced mitochondria membrane potential and decreased survival signaling. However, treatment with both lumbrokinase and dilong inhibited the effects of SHS. Our data suggest that lumbrokinase and dilong may prevent heart disease in SHS-exposed non-smokers. PMID:26014124

  5. Membrane Transfer from Mononuclear Cells to Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Transduces Cell Survival and Activation Signals in the Recipient Cells via Anti-Extrinsic Apoptotic and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ko-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Han; Shen, Chieh-Yu; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yu, Chia-Li; Hsieh, Song-Chou

    2016-01-01

    The biological significance of membrane transfer (trogocytosis) between polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and mononuclear cells (MNCs) remains unclear. We investigated the biological/immunological effects and molecular basis of trogocytosis among various immune cells in healthy individuals and patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). By flow cytometry, we determined that molecules in the immunological synapse, including HLA class-I and-II, CD11b and LFA-1, along with CXCR1, are exchanged among autologous PMNs, CD4+ T cells, and U937 cells (monocytes) after cell-cell contact. Small interfering RNA knockdown of the integrin adhesion molecule CD11a in U937 unexpectedly enhanced the level of total membrane transfer from U937 to PMN cells. Functionally, phagocytosis and IL-8 production by PMNs were enhanced after co-culture with T cells. Total membrane transfer from CD4+ T to PMNs delayed PMN apoptosis by suppressing the extrinsic apoptotic molecules, BAX, MYC and caspase 8. This enhancement of activities of PMNs by T cells was found to be mediated via p38- and P44/42-Akt-MAP kinase pathways and inhibited by the actin-polymerization inhibitor, latrunculin B, the clathrin inhibitor, Pitstop-2, and human immunoglobulin G, but not by the caveolin inhibitor, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In addition, membrane transfer from PMNs enhanced IL-2 production by recipient anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activated MNCs, and this was suppressed by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (PD98059) and protein kinase C (Rottlerin). Of clinical significance, decreased total membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs in patients with active SLE suppressed mononuclear IL-2 production. In conclusion, membrane transfer from MNCs to PMNs, mainly at the immunological synapse, transduces survival and activation signals to enhance PMN functions and is dependent on actin polymerization, clathrin activation, and Fcγ receptors, while membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs depends on MAP kinase and

  6. The ATM Signaling Cascade Promotes Recombination-Dependent Pachytene Arrest in Mouse Spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Julian; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott; Roig, Ignasi

    2015-01-01

    Most mutations that compromise meiotic recombination or synapsis in mouse spermatocytes result in arrest and apoptosis at the pachytene stage of the first meiotic prophase. Two main mechanisms are thought to trigger arrest: one independent of the double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination, and another activated by persistent recombination intermediates. Mechanisms underlying the recombination-dependent arrest response are not well understood, so we sought to identify factors involved by examining mutants deficient for TRIP13, a conserved AAA+ ATPase required for the completion of meiotic DSB repair. We find that spermatocytes with a hypomorphic Trip13 mutation (Trip13mod/mod) arrest with features characteristic of early pachynema in wild type, namely, fully synapsed chromosomes without incorporation of the histone variant H1t into chromatin. These cells then undergo apoptosis, possibly in response to the arrest or in response to a defect in sex body formation. However, TRIP13-deficient cells that additionally lack the DSB-responsive kinase ATM progress further, reaching an H1t-positive stage (i.e., similar to mid/late pachynema in wild type) despite the presence of unrepaired DSBs. TRIP13-deficient spermatocytes also progress to an H1t-positive stage if ATM activity is attenuated by hypomorphic mutations in Mre11 or Nbs1 or by elimination of the ATM-effector kinase CHK2. These mutant backgrounds nonetheless experience an apoptotic block to further spermatogenic progression, most likely caused by failure to form a sex body. DSB numbers are elevated in Mre11 and Nbs1 hypomorphs but not Chk2 mutants, thus delineating genetic requirements for the ATM-dependent negative feedback loop that regulates DSB numbers. The findings demonstrate for the first time that ATM-dependent signaling enforces the normal pachytene response to persistent recombination intermediates. Our work supports the conclusion that recombination defects trigger spermatocyte arrest

  7. Bipolar disorder: involvement of signaling cascades and AMPA receptor trafficking at synapses

    PubMed Central

    DU, JING; QUIROZ, JORGE; YUAN, PEIXIONG; ZARATE, CARLOS; MANJI, HUSSEINI K.

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that severe mood disorders are associated with impairment of structural plasticity and cellular resilience. Cumulative data demonstrate that mood stabilizers regulate intracellular signaling cascades, including protein kinase C (PKC), PKA, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3-β (GSK3-β) and intracellular calcium, which are signaling pathways that regulate synaptic plasticity. In this context, it is noteworthy that a growing body of data indicates that the glutamatergic system, has a major role in neuronal plasticity and cellular resilience, might be involved in the pathophysiology and treatment of mood disorders. AMPA glutamate-receptor trafficking is important in synaptic plasticity and might play crucial roles in maintaining critical neuronal circuits associated with mood. Two clinically effective, structurally dissimilar, antimanic agents, lithium and valproate (VPA), down-regulate synaptic expression of AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 in hippocampus in chronically treated rats. This reduction in synaptic GluR1 by lithium and VPA is due to attenuated phosphorylation of GluR1 at a specific PKA site (residue 845 of GluR1), which is crucial for AMPA receptor insertion. By contrast, imipramine, which can provoke mania, increases synaptic expression of GluR1 in the hippocampus in vivo. Furthermore, there is ample evidence from preclinical and clinical research that the glutamatergic system is involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and that many of the somatic treatments used for mood disorders including antidepressants, mood stabilizers, atypical antipsychotic drugs and electroconvulsive therapy have both direct and indirect effects on the glutamatergic system. Given these findings, further research with medications that specifically affect the glutamatergic system is warranted. Recent studies in our lab have shown that riluzole, a FDA approved medicine that regulates the glutamatergic system, shows

  8. Targeting of pro-apoptotic TLR adaptor SARM to mitochondria: definition of the critical region and residues in the signal sequence.

    PubMed

    Panneerselvam, Porkodi; Singh, Laishram Pradeepkumar; Ho, Bow; Chen, Jianzhu; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2012-03-01

    The fifth and the most well-conserved member of the TLR (Toll-like receptor) adaptor, SARM (sterile α- and HEAT/armadillo-motif-containing protein), has been reported to be an important mediator of apoptosis. However, the exact cellular localization of SARM with respect to its role is unclear. In the present study we show that SARM specifically co-localizes with mitochondria. Endogenous SARM is mainly found in the mitochondria. We demonstrate that the N-terminal 27 amino acids (S27) of SARM, which is hydrophobic and polybasic, acts as a mitochondria-targeting signal sequence, associating SARM to the mitochondria. The S27 peptide has an inherent ability to bind to lipids and mitochondria. This sequence effectively translocates the soluble EGFP (enhanced green fluorescence protein) reporter into the mitochondria. Positioning S27 downstream of the EGFP abrogates its mitochondria-targeting ability. Transmission electron microscopy confirms the ability of S27 to import EGFP into the mitochondria. Importantly, by mutagenesis study, we delineated the specificity of the mitochondria-targeting ability to the arginine residue at the 14th position. The R14A SARM mutant also showed reduced apoptotic potential when compared with the wild-type. Taken together, S27, which is a bona fide signal sequence that targets SARM to the mitochondria, explains the pro-apoptotic activity of SARM. PMID:22145856

  9. Resistance of Crohn's disease T cells to multiple apoptotic signals is associated with a Bcl-2/Bax mucosal imbalance.

    PubMed

    Ina, K; Itoh, J; Fukushima, K; Kusugami, K; Yamaguchi, T; Kyokane, K; Imada, A; Binion, D G; Musso, A; West, G A; Dobrea, G M; McCormick, T S; Lapetina, E G; Levine, A D; Ottaway, C A; Fiocchi, C

    1999-07-15

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a condition characterized by excessive numbers of activated T cells in the mucosa. We investigated whether a defect in apoptosis could prolong T cell survival and contribute to their accumulation in the mucosa. Apoptotic, Bcl-2+, and Bax+ cells in tissue sections were detected by the TUNEL method and immunohistochemistry. T cell apoptosis was induced by IL-2 deprivation, Fas Ag ligation, and exposure to TNF-alpha and nitric oxide. TUNEL+ leukocytes were few in control, CD, and ulcerative colitis (UC) mucosa, with occasional CD68+ and myeloperoxidase+, but no CD45RO+, apoptotic cells. Compared with control and UC, CD T cells grew remarkably more in response to IL-2 and were significantly more resistant to IL-2 deprivation-induced apoptosis. CD T cells were also more resistant to Fas- and nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis, whereas TNF-alpha failed to induce cell death in all groups. Compared with control, CD mucosa contained similar numbers of Bcl-2+, but fewer Bax+, cells, while UC mucosa contained fewer Bcl-2+, but more Bax+, cells. Hence, the Bcl-2/Bax ratio was significantly higher in CD and lower in UC. These results indicate that CD may represent a disorder where the rate of T cell proliferation exceeds that of cell death. Insufficient T cell apoptosis may interfere with clonal deletion and maintenance of tolerance, and result in inappropriate T cell accumulation contributing to chronic inflammation. PMID:10395708

  10. Nanos-mediated repression of hid protects larval sensory neurons after a global switch in sensitivity to apoptotic signals.

    PubMed

    Bhogal, Balpreet; Plaza-Jennings, Amara; Gavis, Elizabeth R

    2016-06-15

    Dendritic arbor morphology is a key determinant of neuronal function. Once established, dendrite branching patterns must be maintained as the animal develops to ensure receptive field coverage. The translational repressors Nanos (Nos) and Pumilio (Pum) are required to maintain dendrite growth and branching of Drosophila larval class IV dendritic arborization (da) neurons, but their specific regulatory role remains unknown. We show that Nos-Pum-mediated repression of the pro-apoptotic gene head involution defective (hid) is required to maintain a balance of dendritic growth and retraction in class IV da neurons and that upregulation of hid results in decreased branching because of an increase in caspase activity. The temporal requirement for nos correlates with an ecdysone-triggered switch in sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli that occurs during the mid-L3 transition. We find that hid is required during pupariation for caspase-dependent pruning of class IV da neurons and that Nos and Pum delay pruning. Together, these results suggest that Nos and Pum provide a crucial neuroprotective regulatory layer to ensure that neurons behave appropriately in response to developmental cues. PMID:27256879

  11. O Death Where Is Thy Sting? Immunologic Tolerance To Apoptotic Self

    PubMed Central

    Ravishankar, Buvana; McGaha, Tracy L.

    2013-01-01

    In higher organisms, innate scavenging cells maintain physiologic homeostasis by removal of the billions of apoptotic cells generated on a daily basis. Apoptotic cell removal requires efficient recognition and uptake by professional and non-professional phagocytic cells, which are governed by an array of soluble and apoptotic cell-integral signals resulting in immunologically silent clearance. While apoptosis is associated with profound suppression of adaptive and innate inflammatory immunity, we have only begun to scratch the surface in understanding how immunologic tolerance to apoptotic self manifest at either the molecular or cellular level. In the last 10 years data has emerged implicating professional phagocytes, most notably stromal macrophages and CD8α+CD103+ dendritic cells, as critical in initiation of the regulatory cascade that will ultimately lead to long-term whole animal immune tolerance. Importantly, recent work by our lab and others has shown that alterations in apoptotic cell perception by the innate immune system either by removal of critical phagocytic sentinels in secondary lymphoid organs or blockage of immunosuppressive pathways leads to pronounced inflammation with a breakdown of tolerance towards self. This challenges the paradigm that apoptotic cells are inherently immunosuppressive suggesting that apoptotic cell tolerance is a “context dependent” event. PMID:23377225

  12. Sending Mixed Signals: The Expanding Role of Molecular Cascade Mutations in Malformations of Cortical Development and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Iffland, Philip H.; Crino, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in gene sequencing techniques have led to a dramatic increase in the number of signaling cascade and cytoskeletal assembly mutations associated with malformations of cortical development and epilepsy. At the forefront of this research are novel mutations found in regulators of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR cascade and tubulin-associated malformations of cortical development. However, there is limited understanding of the consequences of these newly discovered germline and somatic mutations on cellular function or how these changes in cell biology may lead to areas—large or small—of malformed cortex and recurrent spontaneous seizures. We summarize and discuss what is currently known in this field in an effort to shine light on vast gaps in our knowledge of relatively common causes of cortical malformations. PMID:27330441

  13. Electrical Stimuli Are Anti-Apoptotic in Skeletal Muscle via Extracellular ATP. Alteration of This Signal in Mdx Mice Is a Likely Cause of Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies. PMID:24282497

  14. Electrical stimuli are anti-apoptotic in skeletal muscle via extracellular ATP. Alteration of this signal in Mdx mice is a likely cause of dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies. PMID:24282497

  15. Ultraspecific electrochemical DNA biosensor by coupling spontaneous cascade DNA branch migration and dual-signaling sensing strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Zhou, Lili; Bai, Shulian; Zhang, Zhang; Li, Junlong; Jing, Xiaoying; Xie, Guoming

    2016-04-15

    Using spontaneous cascade DNA branch migration and dual-signaling sensing strategy, we developed a novel universal electrochemical biosensor for the highly specific and sensitive detection of nucleic acids. A target strand (Ts) competitively hybridized with a ferrocene (Fc)-labeled signal probe (Fc-S1), which was blocked by a protector strand (Ps), after strand displacement to form the Ts/Fc-S1 duplex. A methylene blue (MB)-modified signal probe (MB-S2) was immobilized on the Au electrode surface by hybridizing with a thiolated capture probe (Cp). Then, the obtained reactants (Ts/Fc-S1 and MB-S2/Cp) suffered spontaneous DNA branch migration and produced two hybridization products (Fc-S1/Cp and MB-S2/Ts). These reactions led to the dissociation of MB molecules and the collection of Fc molecules. The detection mechanism of this DNA biosensor involved distance variation between the redox tags and the Au electrode, which was associated with target-induced cascade DNA branch migration. Moreover, we rationally designed the cascade DNA branch migration to occur spontaneously with ΔG° ≈ 0, at which slight thermodynamic changes caused by base mismatch exerted a disproportionately large effect on the hybridization yield. This "signal-on/off" sensing system exhibited a remarkable analytical performance and an ultrahigh discrimination capability even against a single-base mismatch. The maximum discrimination factor (DF) of base mutations or alterations can reach 17.9. Therefore, our electrochemical biosensor might hold a great potential for further applications in biomedical research and early clinical diagnosis. PMID:26657589

  16. Signal-transducing protein phosphorylation cascades mediated by Ras/Rho proteins in the mammalian cell: the potential for multiplex signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Denhardt, D T

    1996-01-01

    The features of three distinct protein phosphorylation cascades in mammalian cells are becoming clear. These signalling pathways link receptor-mediated events at the cell surface or intracellular perturbations such as DNA damage to changes in cytoskeletal structure, vesicle transport and altered transcription factor activity. The best known pathway, the Ras-->Raf-->MEK-->ERK cascade [where ERK is extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and MEK is mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase/ERK kinase], is typically stimulated strongly by mitogens and growth factors. The other two pathways, stimulated primarily by assorted cytokines, hormones and various forms of stress, predominantly utilize p21 proteins of the Rho family (Rho, Rac and CDC42), although Ras can also participate. Diagnostic of each pathway is the MAP kinase component, which is phosphorylated by a unique dual-specificity kinase on both tyrosine and threonine in one of three motifs (Thr-Glu-Tyr, Thr-Phe-Tyr or Thr-Gly-Tyr), depending upon the pathway. In addition to activating one or more protein phosphorylation cascades, the initiating stimulus may also mobilize a variety of other signalling molecules (e.g. protein kinase C isoforms, phospholipid kinases, G-protein alpha and beta gamma subunits, phospholipases, intracellular Ca2+). These various signals impact to a greater or lesser extent on multiple downstream effectors. Important concepts are that signal transmission often entails the targeted relocation of specific proteins in the cell, and the reversible formation of protein complexes by means of regulated protein phosphorylation. The signalling circuits may be completed by the phosphorylation of upstream effectors by downstream kinases, resulting in a modulation of the signal. Signalling is terminated and the components returned to the ground state largely by dephosphorylation. There is an indeterminant amount of cross-talk among the pathways, and many of the proteins in the pathways belong to families

  17. Electrochemical immunoassay for thyroxine detection using cascade catalysis as signal amplified enhancer and multi-functionalized magnetic graphene sphere as signal tag.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Yaqin; Yu, Yanqing; Liao, Ni; Yuan, Ruo

    2013-08-01

    This paper constructed a reusable electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of thyroxine at an ultralow concentration using cascade catalysis of cytochrome c (Cyt c) and glucose oxidase (GOx) as signal amplified enhancer. It is worth pointing out that numerous Cyt c and GOx were firstly carried onto the double-stranded DNA polymers based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR), and then the amplified responses could be achieved by cascade catalysis of Cyt c and GOx recycling with the help of glucose. Moreover, multi-functionalized magnetic graphene sphere was synthesized and used as signal tag, which not only exhibited good mechanical properties, large surface area and an excellent electron transfer rate of graphene, but also possessed excellent redox activity and desirable magnetic property. With a sandwich-type immunoreaction, the proposed cascade catalysis amplification strategy could greatly enhance the sensitivity for the detection of thyroxine. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a wide linear ranged from 0.05pg mL(-1) to 5ng mL(-1) and a low detection limit down to 15fg mL(-1). Importantly, the proposed method offers promise for reproducible and cost-effective analysis of biological samples. PMID:23870405

  18. Loss of mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein signaling leads to development of reactive stroma and initiation of the gastric neoplastic cascade

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sébastien A. B.; Allaire, Joannie M.; Ouellet, Camille; Maloum-Rami, Faiza; Pomerleau, Véronique; Lemieux, Étienne; Babeu, Jean-Philippe; Rousseau, Jasmin; Paquet, Marilène; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Bmps are morphogens involved in various gastric cellular functions. Studies in genetically-modified mice have shown that Bmp disruption in gastric epithelial and stromal cell compartments leads to the development of tumorigenesis. Our studies have demonstrated that abrogation of gastric epithelial Bmp signaling alone was not sufficient to recapitulate the neoplastic features associated with total gastric loss of Bmp signaling. Thus, epithelial Bmp signaling does not appear to be a key player in gastric tumorigenesis initiation. These observations suggest a greater role for stromal Bmp signaling in gastric polyposis initiation. In order to identify the specific roles played by mesenchymal Bmp signaling in gastric homeostasis, we generated a mouse model with abrogation of Bmp signaling exclusively in the gastro-intestinal mesenchyme (Bmpr1aΔMES). We were able to expose an unsuspected role for Bmp loss of signaling in leading normal gastric mesenchyme to adapt into reactive mesenchyme. An increase in the population of activated-fibroblasts, suggesting mesenchymal transdifferentiation, was observed in mutant stomach. Bmpr1aΔMES stomachs exhibited spontaneous benign polyps with presence of both intestinal metaplasia and spasmolytic-polypeptide-expressing metaplasia as early as 90 days postnatal. These results support the novel concept that loss of mesenchymal Bmp signaling cascade acts as a trigger in gastric polyposis initiation. PMID:27609464

  19. Loss of mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein signaling leads to development of reactive stroma and initiation of the gastric neoplastic cascade.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sébastien A B; Allaire, Joannie M; Ouellet, Camille; Maloum-Rami, Faiza; Pomerleau, Véronique; Lemieux, Étienne; Babeu, Jean-Philippe; Rousseau, Jasmin; Paquet, Marilène; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Bmps are morphogens involved in various gastric cellular functions. Studies in genetically-modified mice have shown that Bmp disruption in gastric epithelial and stromal cell compartments leads to the development of tumorigenesis. Our studies have demonstrated that abrogation of gastric epithelial Bmp signaling alone was not sufficient to recapitulate the neoplastic features associated with total gastric loss of Bmp signaling. Thus, epithelial Bmp signaling does not appear to be a key player in gastric tumorigenesis initiation. These observations suggest a greater role for stromal Bmp signaling in gastric polyposis initiation. In order to identify the specific roles played by mesenchymal Bmp signaling in gastric homeostasis, we generated a mouse model with abrogation of Bmp signaling exclusively in the gastro-intestinal mesenchyme (Bmpr1a(ΔMES)). We were able to expose an unsuspected role for Bmp loss of signaling in leading normal gastric mesenchyme to adapt into reactive mesenchyme. An increase in the population of activated-fibroblasts, suggesting mesenchymal transdifferentiation, was observed in mutant stomach. Bmpr1a(ΔMES) stomachs exhibited spontaneous benign polyps with presence of both intestinal metaplasia and spasmolytic-polypeptide-expressing metaplasia as early as 90 days postnatal. These results support the novel concept that loss of mesenchymal Bmp signaling cascade acts as a trigger in gastric polyposis initiation. PMID:27609464

  20. Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1, a target of NKX2-1/TTF-1 lineage-survival oncogene, inhibits apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1-mediated pro-apoptotic signaling in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ida, Lisa; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Kajino, Taisuke; Shimada, Yukako; Suzuki, Motoshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    We previously identified receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) as a transcriptional target of the NKX2-1/TTF-1 lineage-survival oncogene in lung adenocarcinoma. ROR1 consequently sustains a favorable balance between pro-survival phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-protein kinase B and pro-apoptotic apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-p38MAPK signaling. In contrast to recent advances in understanding how ROR1 sustains pro-survival signaling, the mechanism of ROR1 repression of pro-apoptotic signaling remains rather elusive. In the present study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of ROR1-mediated inhibition of the ASK1-p38MAPK signaling pathway. Growth inhibition mediated by siROR1 was partially but significantly alleviated by ASK1 co-knockdown in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Also, ASK1 phosphorylation at Thr845, which reflects its activated state, was clearly inhibited by ROR1 overexpression in both steady state and oxidative stress-elicited conditions in MSTO-211H cells. In addition, we found that ROR1 was physically associated with ASK1 at the C-terminal serine threonine-rich domain of ROR1. Furthermore, ROR1 kinase activity was shown to be required to repress the ASK1-p38 axis and oxidative stress-induced cell death. The present findings thus support our notion that ROR1 sustains lung adenocarcinoma survival, at least in part, through direct physical interaction with ASK1 and consequential repression of the pro-apoptotic ASK1-p38 axis in a ROR1 kinase activity-dependent manner. PMID:26661061

  1. FGF1 C-terminal domain and phosphorylation regulate intracrine FGF1 signaling for its neurotrophic and anti-apoptotic activities

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, E; Jah, N; Pirou, C; Bouleau, S; Le Floch, N; Vayssière, J-L; Mignotte, B; Renaud, F

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) is a prototypic member of the FGFs family overexpressed in various tumors. Contrarily to most FGFs, FGF1 lacks a secretion peptide signal and acts mainly in an intracellular and nuclear manner. Intracellular FGF1 induces cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. We previously showed that intracellular FGF1 induces neuronal differentiation and inhibits both p53- and serum-free-medium-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. FGF1 nuclear localization is required for these intracellular activities, suggesting that FGF1 regulates p53-dependent apoptosis and neuronal differentiation by new nuclear pathways. To better characterize intracellular FGF1 pathways, we studied the effect of three mutations localized in the C-terminal domain of FGF1 (i.e., FGF1K132E, FGF1S130A and FGF1S130D) on FGF1 neurotrophic and anti-apoptotic activities in PC12 cells. The change of the serine 130 to alanine precludes FGF1 phosphorylation, while its mutation to aspartic acid mimics phosphorylation. These FGF1 mutants kept both a nuclear and cytosolic localization in PC12 cells. Our study highlights for the first time the role of FGF1 phosphorylation and the implication of FGF1 C-terminal domain on its intracellular activities. Indeed, we show that the K132E mutation inhibits both the neurotrophic and anti-apoptotic activities of FGF1, suggesting a regulatory activity for FGF1 C terminus. Furthermore, we observed that both FGF1S130A and FGF1S130D mutant forms induced PC12 cells neuronal differentiation. Therefore, FGF1 phosphorylation does not regulate FGF1-induced differentiation of PC12 cells. Then, we showed that only FGF1S130A protects PC12 cells against p53-dependent apoptosis, thus phosphorylation appears to inhibit FGF1 anti-apoptotic activity in PC12 cells. Altogether, our results show that phosphorylation does not regulate FGF1 neurotrophic activity but inhibits its anti-apoptotic activity after p53-dependent apoptosis induction, giving new insight

  2. Zinc promotes proliferation and activation of myogenic cells via the PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Kazuya; Nagata, Yosuke; Wada, Eiji; Zammit, Peter S.; Shiozuka, Masataka; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells named muscle satellite cells are normally quiescent but are activated in response to various stimuli, such as injury and overload. Activated satellite cells enter the cell cycle and proliferate to produce a large number of myogenic progenitor cells, and these cells then differentiate and fuse to form myofibers. Zinc is one of the essential elements in the human body, and has multiple roles, including cell growth and DNA synthesis. However, the role of zinc in myogenic cells is not well understood, and is the focus of this study. We first examined the effects of zinc on differentiation of murine C2C12 myoblasts and found that zinc promoted proliferation, with an increased number of cells incorporating EdU, but inhibited differentiation with reduced myogenin expression and myotube formation. Furthermore, we used the C2C12 reserve cell model of myogenic quiescence to investigate the role of zinc on activation of myogenic cells. The number of reserve cells incorporating BrdU was increased by zinc in a dose dependent manner, with the number dramatically further increased using a combination of zinc and insulin. Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) are downstream of insulin signaling, and both were phosphorylated after zinc treatment. The zinc/insulin combination-induced activation involved the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and ERK cascade. We conclude that zinc promotes activation and proliferation of myogenic cells, and this activation requires phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt and ERK as part of the signaling cascade. - Highlights: • Zinc has roles for promoting proliferation and inhibition differentiation of C2C12. • Zinc promotes activation of reserve cells. • Insulin and zinc synergize activation of reserve cells. • PI3K/Akt and ERK cascade affect zinc/insulin-mediated activation of reserve cells.

  3. Signal Transduction of Fertilization in Frog Eggs and Anti-Apoptotic Mechanism in Human Cancer Cells: Common and Specific Functions of Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ken-Ichi

    2008-01-01

    Membrane microdomains or lipid/membrane rafts are distinct areas on the plasma membranes, where a specific subset of lipids (e.g. cholesterol, sphingolipids) and proteins (e.g. glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, growth factor receptor/kinases) are getting together and functioning for several aspects of cellular functions. Our recent investigation has revealed that fertilization of African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, requires cholesterol-dependent nature of egg membrane microdomains. Moreover, fertilization of Xenopus eggs involves proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular part and subsequent phosphorylation of a cytoplasmic tyrosine residue of uroplakin III, an egg membrane microdomain-associated protein. Protease activity toward uroplakin III seems to be derived from fertilizing sperm, while phosphorylation of uroplakin III seems to be catalyzed by the egg tyrosine kinase Src, whose activation is required for cytoplasmic rearrangement of fertilized eggs; so-called ‘egg activation’. Therefore, it is assumed that uroplakin III serves an integral part of signal transduction in fertilization of Xenopus. Our more recent study on human cancer cells has revealed that a similar but distinct scheme of signal transduction operates in anti-apoptotic growth of cells. Namely, in human bladder carcinoma cells, cooperation of uroplakin III and Src, both of which localize to the membrane microdomains, allows cells to escape from apoptotic cell death and proliferate under culture conditions deprived of serum. In this review, I briefly introduce about biology of fertilization and cancer, and then present and discuss our experimental data on general importance and specific features of membrane microdomains in Xenopus fertilization and anti-apoptosis in human bladder carcinoma cells. PMID:18949075

  4. Leptin exerts proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects on goose granulosa cells through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rui; Hu, Shenqiang; Xiao, Qihai; Han, Chunchun; Gan, Chao; Gou, Hua; Liu, Hehe; Li, Liang; Xu, Hengyong; He, Hua; Wang, Jiwen

    2015-05-01

    Leptin was known as a pivotal regulator for the control of food intake and energy expenditure. However, leptin has also been found to be involved in the regulation of female reproductive system through interactions with pathways in the hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis and direct action at the ovarian level. In the present study, granulosa cells from goose ovarian preovulatory (F1-F3) follicles were cultured with leptin (0, 1, 10 or 100ng/ml). The proliferative and anti-apoptotic actions of leptin in granulosa cells were revealed by CCK-8, BrdU and TUNEL assays. Quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analyses further indicated that leptin treatment led to increased expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D2, cyclin D3 and bcl-2, and decreased expression of p21 and caspase-3. The effects were involved in the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, as leptin treatment enhanced the expression of PI3K, Akt1, Akt2, Raptor, mTOR, S6K and p-S6K. Moreover, blockade of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway attenuated the influences of leptin on proliferation and apoptosis of granulosa cells, considering that activated factors by leptin were inhibited in the presence of either 20μM LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor) or 10μM rapamycin (an mTOR inhibitor). In addition, leptin had a modulatory effect on the expression of its receptor at the transcriptional and translational levels, and blockade of PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibited both basal and leptin-induced Lepr gene and protein expression. These findings suggest that leptin exerts its proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects on goose granulosa cells through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway via interaction with its receptor. PMID:25576904

  5. Secretomes of apoptotic mononuclear cells ameliorate neurological damage in rats with focal ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Patrick; Mildner, Michael; Haider, Thomas; Traxler, Denise; Beer, Lucian; Ristl, Robin; Golabi, Bahar; Gabriel, Christian; Leutmezer, Fritz; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2014-01-01

    The pursuit of targeting multiple pathways in the ischemic cascade of cerebral stroke is a promising treatment option. We examined the regenerative potential of conditioned medium derived from rat and human apoptotic mononuclear cells (MNC), rMNC apo sec and hMNC apo sec, in experimental stroke. We performed middle cerebral artery occlusion on Wistar rats and administered apoptotic MNC-secretomes intraperitoneally in two experimental settings. Ischemic lesion volumes were determined 48 hours after cerebral ischemia. Neurological evaluations were performed after 6, 24 and 48 hours. Immunoblots were conducted to analyze neuroprotective signal-transduction in human primary glia cells and neurons. Neuronal sprouting assays were performed and neurotrophic factors in both hMNC apo sec and rat plasma were quantified using ELISA. Administration of rat as well as human apoptotic MNC-secretomes significantly reduced ischemic lesion volumes by 36% and 37%, respectively. Neurological examinations revealed improvement after stroke in both treatment groups. Co-incubation of human astrocytes, Schwann cells and neurons with hMNC apo sec resulted in activation of several signaling cascades associated with the regulation of cytoprotective gene products and enhanced neuronal sprouting in vitro. Analysis of neurotrophic factors in hMNC apo sec and rat plasma revealed high levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Our data indicate that apoptotic MNC-secretomes elicit neuroprotective effects on rats that have undergone ischemic stroke. PMID:25383184

  6. A signal amplification strategy using the cascade catalysis of gold nanoclusters and glucose dehydrogenase for ultrasensitive detection of thrombin.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Yaqin; Gui, Guofeng; Zhao, Min; Zhu, Qiang; Yuan, Ruo

    2013-12-15

    This work reports a novel signal amplification strategy for ultrasensitive detection of thrombin by cascade catalysis of gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH). Herein, the AuNCs prepared by using polyamidoamine dendrimer as template were constructed not only as nanocarriers for anchoring the large amounts of secondary thrombin aptamers but also as nanocatalysts to catalyze the oxidation of NADH efficiently. Moreover, a large amount of GDH was loaded through the immobilization technology of DNA hybridization and a large amount of toluidine blue (Tb) was intercalated into the DNA grooves via electrostatic interaction. Significantly, the electrochemical signal was greatly enhanced based on cascade catalysis: firstly, GDH catalyzed the oxidation of glucose to gluconolactone with the concomitant generation of NADH in the presence of NAD(+). Then, AuNCs as nanocatalysts could effectively catalyze NADH to produce NAD(+) with the help of Tb as redox probe. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed aptasensor exhibits a linear range of 1.0×10(-14)-5×10(-9) M with a low detection limit of 3.3×10(-15) M for thrombin detection and shows high sensitivity and good specificity. PMID:23850783

  7. Entamoeba histolytica: differential gene expression during programmed cell death and identification of early pro- and anti-apoptotic signals.

    PubMed

    Monroy, Virginia Sánchez; Flores, Ma Olivia Medel; Villalba-Magdaleno, José D'Artagnan; Garcia, Consuelo Gómez; Ishiwara, David Guillermo Pérez

    2010-12-01

    We have demonstrated that programmed cell death (PCD) in Entamoeba histolytica is induced in vitro by G418 aminoglycoside antibiotic. To ascertain if biochemical and morphological changes previously observed are paired to molecular changes that reflect a genetic program, we looked here for early differential gene expression during the induction of PCD. Using cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and in silico derived analysis we showed in E. histolytica a differential gene expression during PCD induced by G418. The genes identified encoded for proteins homologous to Glutaminyl-tRNA synthase, Ribosomal Subunit Proteins 40S and 18S, Saposin-like, Silent Information Regulator-2 (Sir-2), and Grainins 1 and 2. Using real-time quantitative PCR (RT Q-PCR), we found that glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase, sir-2, grainins and saposin-like genes were strongly overexpressed after 30min of PCD induction, while its expression dramatically decreased up to 60min. On the other hand, overexpression of ribosomal genes increased only 7-fold of basal expression, showing a progressive down-regulation up to 90min. glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase, sir-2 and grainins could act as negative regulators of PCD, trying to control the biochemical changes related to PCD activation. Overexpression of saposin-like gene could act as up-regulator of some cell death pathways. Our results give evidence of the first genes identified during the early stage of PCD in E. histolytica that could be implicated in regulation of apoptotic pathways. PMID:20515683

  8. IL-4 is able to reverse the CD2-mediated negative apoptotic signal to CD4-CD8- alpha beta and/or gamma delta T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Nicoletti, I; Agea, E; Belia, S; Moraca, R; Migliorati, G; Riccardi, C; Grignani, F; Bertotto, A

    1995-11-01

    Activation of immature thymocytes or transformed T lymphocytes via T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 signalling can induce programmed cell death (apoptosis). Recent data indicate that anti-CD3/TCR monoclonal antibodies (mAb) also trigger apoptosis in activated (but not resting) mature peripheral blood T lymphocytes. Here we report that triggering of resting CD4-CD8-TCR alpha beta+ and/or TCR gamma delta+ via the alternative CD2-dependent activation pathway is able to induce programmed cell death. A pair of mitogenic anti-CD2 mAb provoked a dramatic rise in [Ca2+]i that was almost entirely sustained by extracellular fluxes, and the inhibition of membrane [Ca2+/Mg2+] ATPase. The resulting endonuclease activation was able to induce DNA fragmentation, as revealed by propidium iodide staining and gel electrophoresis. Induction of apoptosis was prevented by the presence of interleukin-4 (IL-4) as well as by endonuclease inactivation with 100 microM ZnCl2, but enhanced by the contemporary block of protein kinase C. Thus it seems that in resting T lymphocytes the strong calcium signal delivered by the alternative CD2 activation pathway may act as a negative apoptotic signal in both alpha beta and gamma delta T cells with low (non-major histocompatibility complex restricted) antigenic affinity, so limiting the extension of polyclonal T-cell growth. PMID:8550074

  9. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-01-01

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades. PMID:27117478

  10. Terminalia Chebula provides protection against dual modes of necroptotic and apoptotic cell death upon death receptor ligation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonjung; Byun, Hee Sun; Seok, Jeong Ho; Park, Kyeong Ah; Won, Minho; Seo, Wonhyoung; Lee, So-Ra; Kang, Kidong; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Ill Young; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Son, Chang Gue; Shen, Han-Ming; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-01-01

    Death receptor (DR) ligation elicits two different modes of cell death (necroptosis and apoptosis) depending on the cellular context. By screening a plant extract library from cells undergoing necroptosis or apoptosis, we identified a water extract of Terminalia chebula (WETC) as a novel and potent dual inhibitor of DR-mediated cell death. Investigation of the underlying mechanisms of its anti-necroptotic and anti-apoptotic action revealed that WETC or its constituents (e.g., gallic acid) protected against tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis via the suppression of TNF-induced ROS without affecting the upstream signaling events. Surprisingly, WETC also provided protection against DR-mediated apoptosis by inhibition of the caspase cascade. Furthermore, it activated the autophagy pathway via suppression of mTOR. Of the WETC constituents, punicalagin and geraniin appeared to possess the most potent anti-apoptotic and autophagy activation effect. Importantly, blockage of autophagy with pharmacological inhibitors or genetic silencing of Atg5 selectively abolished the anti-apoptotic function of WETC. These results suggest that WETC protects against dual modes of cell death upon DR ligation. Therefore, WETC might serve as a potential treatment for diseases characterized by aberrantly sensitized apoptotic or non-apoptotic signaling cascades. PMID:27117478

  11. The role of airway macrophages in apoptotic cell clearance following acute and chronic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Grabiec, Aleksander M; Hussell, Tracy

    2016-07-01

    Acute and chronic inflammatory responses in the lung are associated with the accumulation of large quantities of immune and structural cells undergoing apoptosis, which need to be engulfed by phagocytes in a process called 'efferocytosis'. Apoptotic cell recognition and removal from the lung is mediated predominantly by airway macrophages, though immature dendritic cells and non-professional phagocytes, such as epithelial cells and mesenchymal cells, can also display this function. Efficient clearance of apoptotic cells from the airways is essential for successful resolution of inflammation and the return to lung homeostasis. Disruption of this process leads to secondary necrosis of accumulating apoptotic cells, release of necrotic cell debris and subsequent uncontrolled inflammatory activation of the innate immune system by the released 'damage associated molecular patterns' (DAMPS). To control the duration of the immune response and prevent autoimmune reactions, anti-inflammatory signalling cascades are initiated in the phagocyte upon apoptotic cell uptake, mediated by a range of receptors that recognise specific phospholipids or proteins externalised on, or secreted by, the apoptotic cell. However, prolonged activation of apoptotic cell recognition receptors, such as the family of receptor tyrosine kinases Tyro3, Axl and MerTK (TAM), may delay or prevent inflammatory responses to subsequent infections. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism controlling apoptotic cell recognition and removal from the lung in homeostasis and during inflammation, the contribution of defective efferocytosis to chronic inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and cystic fibrosis, and implications of the signals triggered by apoptotic cells in the susceptibility to pulmonary microbial infections. PMID:26957481

  12. Caspase activity and apoptotic signaling in proliferating C2C12 cells following cisplatin or A23187 exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bloemberg, Darin; Quadrilatero, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Investigating cell death signaling using cell culture is commonly performed to examine the effects of novel pharmaceuticals or to further characterize discrete cellular signaling pathways. Here, we provide data regarding the cell death response to either cisplatin or A23187 in sub-confluent C2C12 cells, by utilizing several concentrations and incubation times for each chemical. These data include an assessment of the activation of the proteolytic enzymes caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, calpain, and cathepsin B/L. Additionally, the expression of the apoptosis-regulating proteins Bax, Bcl2, and p53 are presented. PMID:27104214

  13. Caspase activity and apoptotic signaling in proliferating C2C12 cells following cisplatin or A23187 exposure.

    PubMed

    Bloemberg, Darin; Quadrilatero, Joe

    2016-06-01

    Investigating cell death signaling using cell culture is commonly performed to examine the effects of novel pharmaceuticals or to further characterize discrete cellular signaling pathways. Here, we provide data regarding the cell death response to either cisplatin or A23187 in sub-confluent C2C12 cells, by utilizing several concentrations and incubation times for each chemical. These data include an assessment of the activation of the proteolytic enzymes caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, calpain, and cathepsin B/L. Additionally, the expression of the apoptosis-regulating proteins Bax, Bcl2, and p53 are presented. PMID:27104214

  14. High CerS5 expression levels associate with reduced patient survival and transition from apoptotic to autophagy signalling pathways in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Seán; Sheehan, Katherine M; Espina, Virginia; O'Grady, Anthony; Cummins, Robert; Kenny, Dermot; Liotta, Lance; O'Kennedy, Richard; Kay, Elaine W

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Ceramide synthase 5 is involved in the de novo synthesis of ceramide, a sphingolipid involved in cell death and proliferation. In this study, we investigated the role of ceramide synthase 5 in colorectal cancer by examining ceramide synthase 5 expression, clinico‐pathological parameters and association with survival/death signalling pathways in cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of CerS5 was performed on 102 colorectal cancer samples using tissue microarrays constructed from formalin‐fixed and paraffin‐embedded tissues. We found strong membranous ceramide synthase 5 staining in 57 of 102 (56%) colorectal cancers. A multivariate Cox regression analysis of ceramide synthase 5 expression adjusted for disease stage, differentiation and lymphovascular invasion revealed reduced 5‐year overall survival (p = 0.001) and 5‐year recurrence‐free survival (p = 0.002), with hazard ratios of 4.712 and 4.322, respectively. The effect of ceramide synthase 5 expression on tumourigenic processes was further characterised by reverse phase protein array analysis. Reverse phase protein arrays were generated from laser capture microdissection‐enriched carcinoma cells from 19 fresh‐frozen colorectal cancer tissues. Measurements of phosphorylation and total levels of signalling proteins involved in apoptosis, autophagy and other cancer‐related pathways revealed two distinct signalling networks; weak membranous ceramide synthase 5 intensity was associated with a proteomic network dominated by signalling proteins linked to apoptosis, whereas strong ceramide synthase 5 intensity was associated with a proteomic sub‐network mostly composed of proteins linked to autophagy. In conclusion, high ceramide synthase 5 expression was found in colorectal cancer tissue and was associated with poorer patient outcomes. Our findings suggest that this may be mediated by a transition from apoptotic to autophagy signalling pathways in ceramide synthase 5 High expressing

  15. A Cascade of Wnt, Eda, and Shh Signaling Is Essential for Touch Dome Merkel Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Thoresen, Daniel T; Miao, Lingling; Williams, Jonathan S; Wang, Chaochen; Atit, Radhika P; Wong, Sunny Y; Brownell, Isaac

    2016-07-01

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway regulates developmental, homeostatic, and repair processes throughout the body. In the skin, touch domes develop in tandem with primary hair follicles and contain sensory Merkel cells. The developmental signaling requirements for touch dome specification are largely unknown. We found dermal Wnt signaling and subsequent epidermal Eda/Edar signaling promoted Merkel cell morphogenesis by inducing Shh expression in early follicles. Lineage-specific gene deletions revealed intraepithelial Shh signaling was necessary for Merkel cell specification. Additionally, a Shh signaling agonist was sufficient to rescue Merkel cell differentiation in Edar-deficient skin. Moreover, Merkel cells formed in Fgf20 mutant skin where primary hair formation was defective but Shh production was preserved. Although developmentally associated with hair follicles, fate mapping demonstrated Merkel cells primarily originated outside the hair follicle lineage. These findings suggest that touch dome development requires Wnt-dependent mesenchymal signals to establish reciprocal signaling within the developing ectoderm, including Eda signaling to primary hair placodes and ultimately Shh signaling from primary follicles to extrafollicular Merkel cell progenitors. Shh signaling often demonstrates pleiotropic effects within a structure over time. In postnatal skin, Shh is known to regulate the self-renewal, but not the differentiation, of touch dome stem cells. Our findings relate the varied effects of Shh in the touch dome to the ligand source, with locally produced Shh acting as a morphogen essential for lineage specification during development and neural Shh regulating postnatal touch dome stem cell maintenance. PMID:27414798

  16. A Cascade of Wnt, Eda, and Shh Signaling Is Essential for Touch Dome Merkel Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Thoresen, Daniel T.; Miao, Lingling; Williams, Jonathan S.; Wang, Chaochen; Atit, Radhika P.; Wong, Sunny Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway regulates developmental, homeostatic, and repair processes throughout the body. In the skin, touch domes develop in tandem with primary hair follicles and contain sensory Merkel cells. The developmental signaling requirements for touch dome specification are largely unknown. We found dermal Wnt signaling and subsequent epidermal Eda/Edar signaling promoted Merkel cell morphogenesis by inducing Shh expression in early follicles. Lineage-specific gene deletions revealed intraepithelial Shh signaling was necessary for Merkel cell specification. Additionally, a Shh signaling agonist was sufficient to rescue Merkel cell differentiation in Edar-deficient skin. Moreover, Merkel cells formed in Fgf20 mutant skin where primary hair formation was defective but Shh production was preserved. Although developmentally associated with hair follicles, fate mapping demonstrated Merkel cells primarily originated outside the hair follicle lineage. These findings suggest that touch dome development requires Wnt-dependent mesenchymal signals to establish reciprocal signaling within the developing ectoderm, including Eda signaling to primary hair placodes and ultimately Shh signaling from primary follicles to extrafollicular Merkel cell progenitors. Shh signaling often demonstrates pleiotropic effects within a structure over time. In postnatal skin, Shh is known to regulate the self-renewal, but not the differentiation, of touch dome stem cells. Our findings relate the varied effects of Shh in the touch dome to the ligand source, with locally produced Shh acting as a morphogen essential for lineage specification during development and neural Shh regulating postnatal touch dome stem cell maintenance. PMID:27414798

  17. A role for transforming growth factor-{beta} apoptotic signaling pathway in liver injury induced by ingestion of water contaminated with high levels of Cr(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Rafael, A.I.; Almeida, A.; Santos, P.; Parreira, I.; Madeira, V.M.S.; Alves, R.; Cabrita, A.M.S.; Alpoim, M.C.

    2007-10-15

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] exposure is commonly associated with lung cancer. Although other adverse health effects have been reported, some authors, on assuming that orally ingested Cr(VI) is efficiently detoxified upon reduction by body fluids, believe that Cr(VI) do not target cells other than respiratory tract cells. In rodents, ingested Cr(VI)-contaminated water was reported to induce, in the liver, increases in TGF-{beta} transcripts. As TGF-{beta} dependent signaling pathways are closely associated with hepatic injury, the present study was undertaken addressing two specific issues: the effects of ingestion of water contaminated with high levels of Cr(VI) in rat liver structure and function; and the role of the TGF-{beta} pathway in Cr(VI)-induced liver injury. Examination of Wistar rats exposed to 20 ppm Cr(VI)-contaminated water for 10 weeks showed increased serum glucose and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. Liver histological examination revealed hepatocellular apoptosis, further confirmed by immunohystochemical study of Caspase 3 expression. Liver gene expression analysis revealed increased expression of Smad2/Smad4 and Dapk, suggesting the involvement of the TGF-{beta} pathway in the apoptotic process. Since no changes in Smad3 expression were observed it appears apoptosis is using a Smad3-independent pathway. Increased expression of both Caspase 8 and Daxx genes suggests also the involvement of the Fas pathway. Gene expression analysis also revealed that a p160{sup ROCK}-Rho-independent pathway operates, leading to cell contraction and membrane blebbing, characteristic apoptotic features. These findings suggest that either the amount of Cr(VI) ingested overwhelmed the body fluids reductive capacity or some Cr(VI) escapes the reductive protection barrier, thus targeting the liver and inducing apoptosis.

  18. Role of connexin 43 in the mechanism of action of alendronate: dissociation of anti-apoptotic and proliferative signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lezcano, V; Bellido, T; Plotkin, L I; Boland, R; Morelli, S

    2012-02-15

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) inhibit osteocyte and osteoblast apoptosis via opening of connexin (Cx) 43 hemichannels and activating the extracellular signal regulated kinases ERKs. Previously, we hypothesized that intracellular survival signaling is initiated by interaction of BPs with Cx43. However, using whole cell binding assays with [(3)H]-alendronate, herein we demonstrated the presence of saturable, specific and high affinity binding sites in the Cx43-expressing ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic cells, authentic osteoblasts and MLO-Y4 cells expressing Cx43 or not, as well as in HeLa cells lacking Cx43 expression and ROS 17/2.8 cells pretreated with agents that disassemble Cx channels. In addition, both BPs and the PTP inhibitor Na(3)VO(4) increased proliferation of cells expressing Cx43 or not. Furthermore, although BPs are internalized and inhibit intracellular enzymes in osteoclasts, whether the drugs penetrate non-resorptive bone cells is not known. To clarify this, we evaluated the osteoblastic uptake of AF-ALN, a fluorescently labeled analog of alendronate. AF-ALN was rapidly internalized in cells expressing Cx43 or not indicating that this process is not mediated via Cx43 hemichannels. Altogether, these findings suggest that although required for triggering intracellular survival signaling by BPs, Cx43 is dispensable for cellular BP binding, its uptake, as well as the proliferative effects of these agents. PMID:22230328

  19. The non-apoptotic action of Bcl-xL: regulating Ca(2+) signaling and bioenergetics at the ER-mitochondrion interface.

    PubMed

    Williams, Abasha; Hayashi, Teruo; Wolozny, Daniel; Yin, Bojiao; Su, Tzu-Chieh; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Bcl-2 family proteins are known to competitively regulate Ca(2+); however, the specific inter-organelle signaling pathways and related cellular functions are not fully elucidated. In this study, a portion of Bcl-xL was detected at the ER-mitochondrion interface or MAM (mitochondria-associated ER membrane) in association with type 3 inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R3); an association facilitated by the BH4 and transmembrane domains of Bcl-xL. Moreover, increasing Bcl-xL expression enhanced transient mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels upon ER Ca(2+) depletion induced by short-term, non-apoptotic incubation with thapsigargin (Tg), while concomitantly reducing cytosolic Ca(2+) release. These mitochondrial changes appear to be IP3R3-dependent and resulted in decreased NAD/NADH ratios and higher electron transport chain oxidase activity. Interestingly, extended Tg exposure stimulated ER stress, but not apoptosis, and further enhanced TCA cycling. Indeed, confocal analysis indicated that Bcl-xL translocated to the MAM and increased its interaction with IP3R3 following extended Tg treatment. Thus, the MAM is a critical cell-signaling junction whereby Bcl-xL dynamically interacts with IP3R3 to coordinate mitochondrial Ca(2+) transfer and alters cellular metabolism in order to increase the cells' bioenergetic capacity, particularly during periods of stress. PMID:27155879

  20. SUV39H1/H3K9me3 attenuates sulforaphane-induced apoptotic signaling in PC3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, G W; Wickramasekara, S; Palomera-Sanchez, Z; Black, C; Maier, C S; Williams, D E; Dashwood, R H; Ho, E

    2014-01-01

    The isothiocyanate sulforaphane is a promising molecule for development as a therapeutic agent for patients with metastatic prostate cancer. Sulforaphane induces apoptosis in advanced prostate cancer cells, slows disease progression in vivo and is well tolerated at pharmacological doses. However, the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for cancer suppression remain to be fully elucidated. In this investigation we demonstrate that sulforaphane induces posttranslational modification of histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 in metastatic, androgen receptor-negative PC3 prostate cancer cells. Sulforaphane stimulates ubiquitination and acetylation of SUV39H1 within a C-terminal nuclear localization signal peptide motif and coincides with its dissociation from chromatin and a decrease in global trimethyl-histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3) levels. Exogenous SUV39H1 expression leads to an increase in H3K9me3 and decreases sulforaphane-induced apoptotic signaling. SUV39H1 is thus identified as a novel mediator of sulforaphane cytotoxicity in PC3 cells. Our results also suggest SUV39H1 dynamics as a new therapeutic target in advanced prostate cancers. PMID:25486523

  1. The innate immunity adaptor SARM translocates to the nucleus to stabilize lamins and prevent DNA fragmentation in response to pro-apoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Sethman, Chad R; Hawiger, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Sterile alpha and armadillo-motif containing protein (SARM), a highly conserved and structurally unique member of the MyD88 family of Toll-like receptor adaptors, plays an important role in innate immunity signaling and apoptosis. Its exact mechanism of intracellular action remains unclear. Apoptosis is an ancient and ubiquitous process of programmed cell death that results in disruption of the nuclear lamina and, ultimately, dismantling of the nucleus. In addition to supporting the nuclear membrane, lamins serve important roles in chromatin organization, epigenetic regulation, transcription, nuclear transport, and mitosis. Mutations and other damage that destabilize nuclear lamins (laminopathies) underlie a number of intractable human diseases. Here, we report that SARM translocates to the nucleus of human embryonic kidney cells by using its amino-terminal Armadillo repeat region. Within the nucleus, SARM forms a previously unreported lattice akin to the nuclear lamina scaffold. Moreover, we show that SARM protects lamins from apoptotic degradation and reduces internucleosomal DNA fragmentation in response to signaling induced by the proinflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha. These findings indicate an important link between the innate immunity adaptor SARM and stabilization of nuclear lamins during inflammation-driven apoptosis in human cells. PMID:23923041

  2. An electrochemical biosensor for sensitive detection of microRNA-155: combining target recycling with cascade catalysis for signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Chai, Yaqin; Zhang, Pu; Yuan, Ruo

    2015-01-14

    In this work, a new electrochemical biosensor based on catalyzed hairpin assembly target recycling and cascade electrocatalysis (cytochrome c (Cyt c) and alcohol oxidase (AOx)) for signal amplification was constructed for highly sensitive detection of microRNA (miRNA). It is worth pointing out that target recycling was achieved only based on strand displacement process without the help of nuclease. Moreover, porous TiO2 nanosphere was synthesized, which could offer more surface area for Pt nanoparticles (PtNPs) enwrapping and enhance the amount of immobilized DNA strand 1 (S1) and Cyt c accordingly. With the mimicking sandwich-type reaction, the cascade catalysis amplification strategy was carried out by AOx catalyzing ethanol to acetaldehyde with the concomitant formation of high concentration of H2O2, which was further electrocatalyzed by PtNPs and Cyt c. This newly designed biosensor provided a sensitive detection of miRNA-155 from 0.8 fM to 1 nM with a relatively low detection limit of 0.35 fM. PMID:25495913

  3. Induction of cell cycle changes and modulation of apoptogenic/anti-apoptotic and extracellular signaling regulatory protein expression by water extracts of I'm-Yunity™ (PSP)

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Tze-chen; Wu, Peili; Park, Spencer; Wu, Joseph M

    2006-01-01

    degree p50 forms of transcription factor NF-κB, which was accompanied by a reduction in the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2). I'm-Yunity™ (PSP) also elicited an increase in STAT1 (signal transducer and activator of transcription) and correspondingly, decrease in the expression of activated form of ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase). Conclusion Aqueous extracts of I'm-Yunity™ (PSP) induces cell cycle arrest and alterations in the expression of apoptogenic/anti-apoptotic and extracellular signaling regulatory proteins in human leukemia cells, the net result being suppression of proliferation and increase in apoptosis. These findings may contribute to the reported clinical and overall health effects of I'm-Yunity™ (PSP). PMID:16965632

  4. FIA functions as an early signal component of abscisic acid signal cascade in Vicia faba guard cells.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Yusuke; Uraji, Misugi; Watanabe-Sugimoto, Megumi; Okuma, Eiji; Munemasa, Shintaro; Shimoishi, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Iwai, Sumio; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2012-02-01

    An abscisic acid (ABA)-insensitive Vicia faba mutant, fia (fava bean impaired in ABA-induced stomatal closure) had previously been isolated. In this study, it was investigated how FIA functions in ABA signalling in guard cells of Vicia faba. Unlike ABA, methyl jasmonate (MeJA), H(2)O(2), and nitric oxide (NO) induced stomatal closure in the fia mutant. ABA did not induce production of either reactive oxygen species or NO in the mutant. Moreover, ABA did not suppress inward-rectifying K(+) (K(in)) currents or activate ABA-activated protein kinase (AAPK) in mutant guard cells. These results suggest that FIA functions as an early signal component upstream of AAPK activation in ABA signalling but does not function in MeJA signalling in guard cells of Vicia faba. PMID:22131163

  5. Cadmium exposure activates the ERK signaling pathway leading to altered osteoblast gene expression and apoptotic death in Saos-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Arbon, Kate S.; Christensen, Cody M.; Harvey, Wendy A.; Heggland, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports of cadmium in electronic waste and jewelry have increased public awareness regarding this toxic metal. Human exposure to cadmium is associated with the development of osteoporosis. We previously reported cadmium induces apoptosis in human tumor-derived Saos-2 osteoblasts. In this study, we examine the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and protein kinase C (PKC) pathways in cadmium-induced apoptosis and altered osteoblast gene expression. Saos-2 osteoblasts were cultured in the presence or absence of 10 μM CdCl2 for 2–72 hours. We detected significant ERK activation in response to CdCl2 and pretreatment with the ERK inhibitor PD98059 attenuated cadmium-induced apoptosis. However, PKCα activation was not observed after exposure to CdCl2 and pretreatment with the PKC inhibitor, Calphostin C, was unable to rescue cells from cadmium-induced apoptosis. Gene expression studies were conducted using qPCR. Cells exposed to CdCl2 exhibited a significant decrease in the bone-forming genes osteopontin (OPN) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) mRNA. In contrast, SOST, whose protein product inhibits bone formation, significantly increased in response to CdCl2. Pretreatment with PD98059 had a recovery effect on cadmium-induced changes in gene expression. This research demonstrates cadmium can directly inhibit osteoblasts via ERK signaling pathway and identifies SOST as a target for cadmium-induced osteotoxicity. PMID:22019892

  6. Laminar shear flow increases hydrogen sulfide and activates a nitric oxide producing signaling cascade in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Chen, Chang-Ting; Chen, Chi-Shia; Wang, Yun-Ming; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Wang, Danny Ling

    2015-09-01

    Laminar shear flow triggers a signaling cascade that maintains the integrity of endothelial cells (ECs). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a new gasotransmitter is regarded as an upstream regulator of nitric oxide (NO). Whether the H2S-generating enzymes are correlated to the enzymes involved in NO production under shear flow conditions remains unclear as yet. In the present study, the cultured ECs were subjected to a constant shear flow (12 dyn/cm(2)) in a parallel flow chamber system. We investigated the expression of three key enzymes for H2S biosynthesis, cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS), and 3-mercapto-sulfurtransferase (3-MST). Shear flow markedly increased the level of 3-MST. Shear flow enhanced the production of H2S was determined by NBD-SCN reagent that can bind to cysteine/homocystein. Exogenous treatment of NaHS that can release gaseous H2S, ECs showed an increase of phosphorylation in Akt(S473), ERK(T202/Y204) and eNOS(S1177). This indicated that H2S can trigger the NO-production signaling cascade. Silencing of CSE, CBS and 3-MST genes by siRNA separately attenuated the phosphorylation levels of Akt(S473) and eNOS(S1177) under shear flow conditions. The particular mode of shear flow increased H2S production. The interplay between H2S and NO-generating enzymes were discussed in the present study. PMID:26212441

  7. Lovastatin causes FaDu hypopharyngeal carcinoma cell death via AMPK-p63-survivin signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chia-Sheng; Chen, Jung-Chien; Chang, Yi-Fang; Hsu, Ya-Fen; Chiu, Pei-Ting; Shiue, Ching; Chuang, Yu-Fan; Ou, George; Hsu, Ming-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Statins are used widely to lower serum cholesterol and the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Growing evidence shows that statins also exhibit beneficial effects against cancers. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in lovastatin-induced cell death in Fadu hypopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Lovastatin caused cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in FaDu cells. Lovastatin increased p21cip/Waf1 level while the survivin level was decreased in the presence of lovastatin. Survivin siRNA reduced cell viability and induced cell apoptosis in FaDu cells. Lovastatin induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and transcription factor p63. Lovastatin also caused p63 acetylation and increased p63 binding to survivin promoter region in FaDu cells. AMPK-p38MAPK signaling blockade abrogated lovastatin-induced p63 phosphorylation. Lovastatin’s enhancing effect on p63 acetylation was reduced in HDAC3- or HDAC4- transfected cells. Moreover, transfection of cells with AMPK dominant negative mutant (AMPK-DN), HDAC3, HDAC4 or p63 siRNA significantly reduced lovastatin’s effects on p21cip/Waf1 and survivin. Furthermore, lovastatin inhibited subcutaneous FaDu xenografts growth in vivo. Taken together, lovastatin may activate AMPK-p38MAPK-p63-survivin cascade to cause FaDu cell death. This study establishes, at least in part, the signaling cascade by which lovastatin induces hypopharyngeal carcinoma cell death. PMID:27122225

  8. GPR179 Is Required for High Sensitivity of the mGluR6 Signaling Cascade in Depolarizing Bipolar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Thomas A.; Heath, Kathryn M.; Hasan, Nazarul; Noel, Jennifer M.; Samuels, Ivy S.; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Peachey, Neal S.

    2014-01-01

    Parallel visual pathways are initiated at the first retinal synapse by signaling between the rod and cone photoreceptors and two general classes of bipolar cells. For normal function, ON or depolarizing bipolar cells (DBCs) require the G-protein-coupled receptor, mGluR6, an intact G-protein-coupled cascade and the transient receptor potential melastatin 1 (TRPM1) cation channel. In addition, another seven transmembrane protein, GPR179, is required for DBC function and recruits the regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins, RGS7 and RGS11, to the dendritic tips of the DBCs. Here we use the Gpr179nob5 mouse, which lacks GPR179 and has a no b-wave electroretinogram (ERG) phenotype, to demonstrate that despite the absence of both GPR179 and RGS7/RGS11, a small dark-adapted ERG b-wave remains and can be enhanced with long duration flashes. Consistent with the ERG, the mGluR6-mediated gating of TRPM1 can be evoked pharmacologically in Gpr179nob5 and RGS7−/−/RGS11−/− rod BCs if strong stimulation conditions are used. In contrast, direct gating of TRPM1 by capsaicin in RGS7−/−/RGS11−/− and WT rod BCs is similar, but severely compromised in Gpr179nob5 rod BCs. Noise and standing current analyses indicate that the remaining channels in Gpr179nob5 and RGS7−/−/RGS11−/− rod BCs have a very low open probability. We propose that GPR179 along with RGS7 and RGS11 controls the ability of the mGluR6 cascade to gate TRPM1. In addition to its role in localizing RGS7 and RGS11 to the dendritic tips, GPR179 via a direct interaction with the TRPM1 channel alters its ability to be gated directly by capsaicin. PMID:24790204

  9. Linewidth Enhancement Factor and Amplification of Angle-Modulated Optical Signals in Injection-Locked Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Taraprasad; Bhattacharyya, Prosenjit

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear analysis of the effect of linewidth enhancement factor (LEF) on the amplification of angle-modulated optical signals in injection-locked mid-infrared (IR) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). A higher value of LEF tends to conserve the output angle modulation index of the amplified mid-IR signal particularly in the low-modulation frequency region. Further, a higher value of signal injection ratio produces a wider bandwidth of the locked QCL amplifier. The LEF introduces asymmetry in the lockband (LB) of the injection-locked QCL and this asymmetry increases with the increase in the value of LEF. Typically ratio of calculated lower-side LB to upper-side LB for an injection power level of - 20 dB and a LEF of unity is 1.67. The electron relaxation time in the uppermost subband lasing level in a three-level system has a profound effect on the LB asymmetry in a QCL.

  10. Crude saponins from Platycodon grandiflorum induce apoptotic cell death in RC-58T/h/SA#4 prostate cancer cells through the activation of caspase cascades and apoptosis-inducing factor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hye; Oh, Eun-Kyoung; Cho, Hyun-Dong; Kim, Jae-Yong; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Seo, Kwon-Il

    2013-04-01

    Saponins are a major active component of Platycodon grandiflorum (P. grandiflorum) and are known to induce apoptosis in metastatic prostate cancer cell lines. However, thus far, no research has been conducted on the anticancer activity of saponins in RC-58T/h/SA#4 primary prostate cancer cells. In this study, we show that the treatment of prostate cancer cells with saponins extracted from P. grandiflorum (SPG) inhibits cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. SPG significantly induced apoptotic cell death, resulting in an increase in the sub-G1 apoptotic cell population, apoptotic DNA fragmentation and morphological changes. Pre-treatment with a caspase inhibitor modestly attenuated the SPG-induced increase in the sub-G1 cell population, suggesting that caspases play a role in SPG-induced apoptosis. Moreover, SPG-induced apoptosis was associated with changes in caspase activity, the upregulation of the apoptotic protein, Bax and the downregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2. Furthermore, the caspase-independent mitochondrial apoptosis factor, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was upregulated following SPG treatment. These findings indicate that SPG exerts its anticancer effects on RC-58T/h/SA#4 primary prostate cancer cells through mitochondrial caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways. PMID:23443329

  11. Participation of signaling cascades in the regulation of erythropoiesis under conditions of cytostatic treatment.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Zhdanov, V V; Miroshnichenko, L A; Udut, E V; Zyuz'kov, G N; Simanina, E V; Chaikovskii, A V; Stavrova, L A; Trofimova, E S; Burmina, Ya V

    2015-01-01

    We studied the role of signaling pathways in the regulation of erythropoiesis against the background of myelosuppression caused by administration of 5-fluorouracil. The important role of cyclic AMP in the maturation of erythroid progenitors after cytostatic treatment was demonstrated. The secretory activity of myelokaryocytes during the period of erythroid hemopoiesis recovery is mainly regulated via the p38 MAPK signaling pathway; non-erythropoietin factors are involved in the formation of erythropoietic activity of adherent cells of the microenvironment. PMID:25578863

  12. Vehicular Exhaust Particles Promote Allergic Airway Inflammation via an Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Notch Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mingcan; Viera-Hutchins, Loida; Garcia-Lloret, Maria; Rivas, Magali Noval; Wise, Petra; MGhee, Sean A.; Chatila, Zena K.; Daher, Nancy; Sioutas, Constantinos; Chatila, Talal A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Traffic-related particulate matter (PM) has been linked to heightened incidence of asthma and allergic diseases. However, molecular mechanisms by which PM exposure promote allergic diseases remain elusive. Objective We sought to determine the expression, function and regulation of pathways involved in the promotion by PM of allergic airway inflammation. Methods We employed gene expression transcriptional profiling, in vitro culture assays, and vivo murine models of allergic airway inflammation. Results We identified genes of the Notch pathway, most notably Jagged 1 (Jag1), as targets of PM induction in human monocytes and murine dendritic cells (DCs). PM, especially ultrafine particles (UFP), upregulated T helper cytokine, IgE production and allergic airway inflammation in mice in a Jag1 and Notch-dependent manner especially in the context of the pro-asthmatic IL-4 receptor allele Il4raR576. PM-induced Jag1 expression was mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which bound to and activated AhR response elements in the Jag1 promoter. Pharmacological antagonism of AhR or its lineage-specific deletion in CD11c+ cells abrogated the augmentation of airway inflammation by PM. Conclusion PM activate an AhR-Jag1-Notch cascade to promote allergic airway inflammation in concert with pro-asthmatic alleles. PMID:25825216

  13. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Treatment Induces Anti-Proliferative Effects in Prostate Cancer Cells by Redox and Apoptotic Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Martin; Gümbel, Denis; Hanschmann, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Robert; Gelbrich, Nadine; Zimmermann, Uwe; Walther, Reinhard; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Sckell, Axel; Kramer, Axel; Burchardt, Martin; Lillig, Christopher H.; Stope, Matthias B.

    2015-01-01

    One of the promising possibilities of the clinical application of cold plasma, so-called cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), is its application on malignant cells and cancer tissue using its anti-neoplastic effects, primarily through the delivery of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS). In this study, we investigated the impact of CAP on cellular proliferation and consecutive molecular response mechanisms in established prostate cancer (PC) cell lines. PC cells showed a significantly reduced cell growth following CAP treatment as a result of both an immediate increase of intracellular peroxide levels and through the induction of apoptosis indicated by annexin V assay, TUNEL assay, and the evaluation of changes in nuclear morphology. Notably, co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely neutralized CAP effects by NAC uptake and rapid conversion to glutathione (GSH). Vitamin C could not counteract the CAP induced effects on cell growth. In summary, relatively short treatments with CAP of 10 seconds were sufficient to induce a significant inhibition of cancer proliferation, as observed for the first time in urogenital cancer. Therefore, it is important to understand the mode of CAP related cell death and clarify and optimize CAP as cancer therapy. Increased levels of peroxides can alter redox-regulated signaling pathways and can lead to growth arrest and apoptosis. We assume that the general intracellular redox homeostasis, especially the levels of cellular GSH and peroxidases such as peroxiredoxins affect the outcome of the CAP treatment. PMID:26132846

  14. The Apoptotic Effect of Ursolic Acid on SK-Hep-1 Cells is Regulated by the PI3K/Akt, p38 and JNK MAPK Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wan-Ling; Lin, Ping-Yi; Lin, Hui-Chuan; Chen, Yao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) is a pentacyclic triterpene acid that is present in a wide variety of medicinal herbs and edible plants. This study investigated the effect of UA on apoptosis and proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma SK-Hep-1 cells. After treatment of SK-Hep-1 cells with different concentrations of UA, we observed that cell viability was reduced in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, there was a dose-dependent increase in the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 and G2/M phases, with cells treated with 60 μM showing the highest percentages of cells in those phases. UA-induced chromatin condensation of nuclei was observed by using DAPI staining. The western blot results revealed that exposure to UA was associated with decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1, Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and TCTP and increased expression of apoptosis-related proteins TNF-α, Fas, FADD, Bax, cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and PARP. Immunocytochemistry staining showed that treatment with UA resulted in increased expression of caspase-3. Moreover, exposure to UA resulted in the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. These findings suggest that UA inhibits the proliferation of SK-Hep-1 cells and induces apoptosis. PMID:27104510

  15. Bystander effects of PC12 cells treated with Pb²⁺ depend on ROS-mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signaling via gap-junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shu; Zhou, Jin; Chen, Xuemei; Yu, Yunjiang; Ren, Mingzhong; Hu, Guocheng; Liu, Yun; Zou, Fei

    2014-08-17

    The demonstration of bystander effect, which means injured cells propagate damage to neighboring cells, in whole organisms has clear implication of the potential relevance of the non-targeted response to human health. Here we show that 10 μM lead acetate, the optimum concentration for inducing apoptosis confirmed by the expression levels of Bax and Bcl-2, can also induce rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells to exert bystander effects to neighboring cells. In a novel co-culture system, GFP-PC12 (Pb(2+)) cells, which were stable transfected with EF1A-eGFP and pre-exposed with lead acetate, were co-cultured with unexposed PC12 cells at a 1:5 ratio. Parachute assays demonstrated the functional gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) formed between Pb(2+)-exposed and unexposed cells. The Pb(2+)-exposed cells induced very similar effects on neighboring unexposed cells to apoptosis coincide with intracellular ROS generation and the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm). Furthermore, carbenoxolone (CBX), a blocker of GJIC, inhibited the bystander effects. The results indicate that the Pb(2+)-induced insults propagate through GJIC between PC12 cells, while inducing the bystander cells to apoptosis via ROS-mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signaling. PMID:24960054

  16. Tools used to study how protein complexes are assembled in signaling cascades

    PubMed Central

    Dwane, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Most proteins do not function on their own but as part of large signaling complexes that are arranged in every living cell in response to specific environmental cues. Proteins interact with each other either constitutively or transiently and do so with different affinity. When identifying the role played by a protein inside a cell, it is essential to define its particular cohort of binding partners so that the researcher can predict what signaling pathways the protein is engaged in. Once identified and confirmed, the information might allow the interaction to be manipulated by pharmacological inhibitors to help fight disease. PMID:22002082

  17. Identification of signalling cascades involved in red blood cell shrinkage and vesiculation

    PubMed Central

    Kostova, Elena B.; Beuger, Boukje M.; Klei, Thomas R.L.; Halonen, Pasi; Lieftink, Cor; Beijersbergen, Roderick; van den Berg, Timo K.; van Bruggen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Even though red blood cell (RBC) vesiculation is a well-documented phenomenon, notably in the context of RBC aging and blood transfusion, the exact signalling pathways and kinases involved in this process remain largely unknown. We have established a screening method for RBC vesicle shedding using the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin which is a rapid and efficient method to promote vesiculation. In order to identify novel pathways stimulating vesiculation in RBC, we screened two libraries: the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) and the Selleckchem Kinase Inhibitor Library for their effects on RBC from healthy donors. We investigated compounds triggering vesiculation and compounds inhibiting vesiculation induced by ionomycin. We identified 12 LOPAC compounds, nine kinase inhibitors and one kinase activator which induced RBC shrinkage and vesiculation. Thus, we discovered several novel pathways involved in vesiculation including G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)–Akt (protein kinase B) pathway, the Jak–STAT (Janus kinase–signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway and the Raf–MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase)–ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway. Moreover, we demonstrated a link between casein kinase 2 (CK2) and RBC shrinkage via regulation of the Gardos channel activity. In addition, our data showed that inhibition of several kinases with unknown functions in mature RBC, including Alk (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) kinase and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), induced RBC shrinkage and vesiculation. PMID:25757360

  18. The mTOR signalling cascade: paving new roads to cure neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Crino, Peter B

    2016-07-01

    Defining the multiple roles of the mechanistic (formerly 'mammalian') target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway in neurological diseases has been an exciting and rapidly evolving story of bench-to-bedside translational research that has spanned gene mutation discovery, functional experimental validation of mutations, pharmacological pathway manipulation, and clinical trials. Alterations in the dual contributions of mTOR - regulation of cell growth and proliferation, as well as autophagy and cell death - have been found in developmental brain malformations, epilepsy, autism and intellectual disability, hypoxic-ischaemic and traumatic brain injuries, brain tumours, and neurodegenerative disorders. mTOR integrates a variety of cues, such as growth factor levels, oxygen levels, and nutrient and energy availability, to regulate protein synthesis and cell growth. In line with the positioning of mTOR as a pivotal cell signalling node, altered mTOR activation has been associated with a group of phenotypically diverse neurological disorders. To understand how altered mTOR signalling leads to such divergent phenotypes, we need insight into the differential effects of enhanced or diminished mTOR activation, the developmental context of these changes, and the cell type affected by altered signalling. A particularly exciting feature of the tale of mTOR discovery is that pharmacological mTOR inhibitors have shown clinical benefits in some neurological disorders, such as tuberous sclerosis complex, and are being considered for clinical trials in epilepsy, autism, dementia, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. PMID:27340022

  19. Redox metabolites signal polymicrobial biofilm development via the NapA oxidative stress cascade in Aspergillus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He; Kim, Jaekuk; Liew, Mathew; Yan, John K.; Herrera, Oscar; Bok, JinWoo; Kelleher, Neil L.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Filamentous fungi and bacteria form mixed-species biofilms in nature and diverse clinical contexts. They secrete a wealth of redox-active small molecule secondary metabolites, which are traditionally viewed as toxins that inhibit growth of competing microbes. Results Here we report that these “toxins” can act as interspecies signals, affecting filamentous fungal development via oxidative stress regulation. Specifically, in co-culture biofilms, Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazine-derived metabolites differentially modulated Aspergillus fumigatus development, shifting from weak vegetative growth to induced asexual sporulation (conidiation) along a decreasing phenazine gradient. The A. fumigatus morphological shift correlated with the production of phenazine radicals and concomitant reactive oxygen species (ROS) production generated by phenazine redox cycling. Phenazine conidiation signaling was conserved in the genetic model A. nidulans, and mediated by NapA, a homolog of AP-1-like bZIP transcription factor, which is essential for the response to oxidative stress in humans, yeast, and filamentous fungi. Expression profiling showed phenazine treatment induced a NapA-dependent response of the global oxidative stress metabolome including the thioredoxin, glutathione and NADPH-oxidase systems. Conidiation induction in A. nidulans by another microbial redox-active secondary metabolite, gliotoxin, also required NapA. Conclusions This work highlights that microbial redox metabolites are key signals for sporulation in filamentous fungi, which are communicated through an evolutionarily conserved eukaryotic stress response pathway. It provides a foundation for interspecies signaling in environmental and clinical biofilms involving bacteria and filamentous fungi. PMID:25532893

  20. Brazilian Red Propolis Attenuates Inflammatory Signaling Cascade in LPS-Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bueno-Silva, Bruno; Kawamoto, Dione; Ando-Suguimoto, Ellen S.; Alencar, Severino M.; Rosalen, Pedro L.; Mayer, Marcia P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Although previous studies suggested an anti-inflammatory property of Brazilian red propolis (BRP), the mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of BRP and its activity on macrophages were still not elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate whether BRP attenuates the inflammatory effect of LPS on macrophages and to investigate its underlying mechanisms. BRP was added to RAW 264.7 murine macrophages after activation with LPS. NO production, cell viability, cytokines profile were evaluated. Activation of inflammatory signaling pathways and macrophage polarization were determined by RT-qPCR and Western blot. BRP at 50 μg/ml inhibited NO production by 78% without affecting cell viability. Cd80 and Cd86 were upregulated whereas mrc1 was down regulated by BRP indicating macrophage polarization at M1. BRP attenuated the production of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-12, GM-CSF, IFN-Ɣ, IL-1β in cell supernatants although levels of TNF- α and IL-6 were slightly increased after BRP treatment. Levels of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β were also reduced by BRP. BRP significantly reduced the up-regulation promoted by LPS of transcription of genes in inflammatory signaling (Pdk1, Pak1, Nfkb1, Mtcp1, Gsk3b, Fos and Elk1) and of Il1β and Il1f9 (fold-change rate > 5), which were further confirmed by the inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Furthermore, the upstream adaptor MyD88 adaptor-like (Mal), also known as TIRAP, involved in TLR2 and TLR4 signaling, was down- regulated in BRP treated LPS-activated macrophages. Given that BRP inhibited multiple signaling pathways in macrophages involved in the inflammatory process activated by LPS, our data indicated that BRP is a noteworthy food-source for the discovery of new bioactive compounds and a potential candidate to attenuate exhacerbated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26660901

  1. Cell-Centric View of Apoptosis and Apoptotic Cell Death-Inducing Antitumoral Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Apraiz, Aintzane; Boyano, Maria Dolores; Asumendi, Aintzane

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death and especially apoptotic cell death, occurs under physiological conditions and is also desirable under pathological circumstances. However, the more we learn about cellular signaling cascades, the less plausible it becomes to find restricted and well-limited signaling pathways. In this context, an extensive description of pathway-connections is necessary in order to point out the main regulatory molecules as well as to select the most appropriate therapeutic targets. On the other hand, irregularities in programmed cell death pathways often lead to tumor development and cancer-related mortality is projected to continue increasing despite the effort to develop more active and selective antitumoral compounds. In fact, tumor cell plasticity represents a major challenge in chemotherapy and improvement on anticancer therapies seems to rely on appropriate drug combinations. An overview of the current status regarding apoptotic pathways as well as available chemotherapeutic compounds provides a new perspective of possible future anticancer strategies. PMID:24212653

  2. Light-Dependent Translocation of Arrestin in Rod Photoreceptors is Signaled Through a Phospholipase C Cascade and Requires ATP

    PubMed Central

    Orisme, Wilda; Li, Jian; Goldmann, Tobias; Bolch, Susan; Wolfrum, Uwe; Smith, W. Clay

    2009-01-01

    Partitioning of cellular components is a critical mechanism by which cells can regulate their activity. In rod photoreceptors, light induces a large-scale translocation of arrestin from the inner segments to the outer segments. The purpose of this project is to elucidate the signaling pathway necessary to initiate arrestin translocation to the outer segments and the mechanism for arrestin translocation. Mouse retinal organotypic cultures and eyes from transgenic Xenopus tadpoles expressing a fusion of GFP and rod arrestin were treated with both activators and inhibitors of proteins in the phosphoinositide pathway. Confocal microscopy was used to image the effects of the pharmacological agents on arrestin translocation in rod photoreceptors. Retinas were also depleted of ATP using potassium cyanide to assess the requirement for ATP in arrestin translocation. In this study, we demonstrate that components of the G-protein-linked phospholipase C (PLC) pathway play a role in initiating arrestin translocation. Our results show that arrestin translocation can be stimulated by activators of PLC and protein kinase C (PKC), and by cholera toxin in the absence of light. Arrestin translocation to the outer segments is significantly reduced by inhibitors of PLC and PKC. Importantly, we find that treatment with potassium cyanide inhibits arrestin translocation in response to light. Collectively, our results suggest that arrestin translocation is initiated by a G-protein-coupled cascade through PLC and PKC signaling. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that at least the initiation of arrestin translocation requires energy input. PMID:19887106

  3. FUS3 phosphorylates multiple components of the mating signal transduction cascade: evidence for STE12 and FAR1.

    PubMed Central

    Elion, E A; Satterberg, B; Kranz, J E

    1993-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase homologue FUS3 mediates both transcription and G1 arrest in a pheromone-induced signal transduction cascade in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report an in vitro kinase assay for FUS3 and its use in identifying candidate substrates. The assay requires catalytically active FUS3 and pheromone induction. STE7, a MAP kinase kinase homologue, is needed for maximal activity. At least seven proteins that specifically associate with FUS3 are phosphorylated in the assay. Many of these substrates are physiologically relevant and are affected by in vivo levels of numerous signal transduction components. One substrate is likely to be the transcription factor STE12. A second is likely to be FAR1, a protein required for G1 arrest. FAR1 was isolated as a multicopy suppressor of a nonarresting fus3 mutant and interacts with FUS3 in a two hybrid system. Consistent with this FAR1 is a good substrate in vitro and generates a FUS3-associated substrate of expected size. These data support a model in which FUS3 mediates transcription and G1 arrest by direct activation of STE12 and FAR1 and phosphorylates many other proteins involved in the response to pheromone. Images PMID:8334305

  4. Protopanaxatirol type ginsenoside Re promotes cyclic growth of hair follicles via inhibiting transforming growth factor β signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Lee, Jungsul; Choi, Kyungsun; Kim, Sunchang; Choi, Chulhee

    2016-02-19

    Ginsenosides, the major bio-active ingredients included in Panax ginseng, have been known for the hair growth activity and used to treat patients who suffer from hair loss; however, the detailed mechanisms of this action are still largely unknown. This study was conducted to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for hair growth promoting effect of ginsenoside Re (GRe) in vitro and in vivo. Different doses of minoxidil and GRe were administered topically to the back regions of nude mice for up to 45 days, and hair shaft length and hair cycles were determined for hair promoting activities. Topical treatment of GRe significantly increased the hair shaft length and hair existent time, which was comparable to the action of minoxidil. We also demonstrated that GRe stimulated hair shaft elongation in the ex vivo cultures of vibrissa hair follicles isolated from C57BL/6 mouse. Systemic transcriptome analysis by next generation sequencing demonstrated that TGF-β-pathway related genes were selectively down-regulated by treatment of GRe in vivo, and the same treatment suppressed TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of ERK in HeLa cells. The results clearly indicated that GRe is the effective constituent in the ginseng on hair promotion via selective inhibition of the hair growth phase transition related signaling pathways, TGF-β signaling cascades. PMID:26820528

  5. Nitric oxide/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway activated by M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptor cascade inhibits Na+-activated K+ currents in Kenyon cells.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Masaharu; Yoshino, Masami

    2016-06-01

    The interneurons of the mushroom body, known as Kenyon cells, are essential for the long-term memory of olfactory associative learning in some insects. Some studies have reported that nitric oxide (NO) is strongly related to this long-term memory in Kenyon cells. However, the target molecules and upstream and downstream NO signaling cascades are not completely understood. Here we analyzed the effect of the NO signaling cascade on Na(+)-activated K(+) (KNa) channel activity in Kenyon cells of crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). We found that two different NO donors, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP), strongly suppressed KNa channel currents. Additionally, this inhibitory effect of GSNO on KNa channel activity was diminished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), and KT5823, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Next, we analyzed the role of ACh in the NO signaling cascade. ACh strongly suppressed KNa channel currents, similar to NO donors. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of ACh was blocked by pirenzepine, an M1 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist, but not by 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP) and mecamylamine, an M3 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist and a nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, respectively. The ACh-induced inhibition of KNa channel currents was also diminished by the PLC inhibitor U73122 and the calmodulin antagonist W-7. Finally, we found that ACh inhibition was blocked by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). These results suggested that the ACh signaling cascade promotes NO production by activating NOS and NO inhibits KNa channel currents via the sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling cascade in Kenyon cells. PMID:26984419

  6. RNF11 modulates microglia activation through NF-κB signalling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Nirjari V.; Pranski, Elaine L.; Tansey, Malu G.; Lah, James J.; Levey, Allan I.; Betarbet, Ranjita S.

    2012-01-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages in the central nervous system (CNS) that play a major role in neuroinflammation and pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Upon activation, microglia releases a multitude of pro-inflammatory factors that initiate and sustain an inflammatory response by activating various signalling pathways, including the NF-κB pathway in a feed forward cycle. In microglial cells, activation of NF-κB signalling is normally transient, while sustained NF-κB activation is associated with persistent neuroinflammation. RING finger protein 11 (RNF11), in association with A20 ubiquitin-editing complex, is one of the key negative regulators of NF-κB signalling pathway in neurons. In this study, we have demonstrated and confirmed this role of RNF11 in microglia, the immune cells of the CNS. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that RNF11 and A20 interact in a microglial cell line, suggesting the presence of A20 ubiquitin-editing protein complex in microglial cells. Next, using targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown and over-expression of RNF11, we established that RNF11 expression levels are inversely related to NF-κB activation, as evident from altered expression of NF-κB transcribed genes. Moreover our studies, illustrated that RNF11 confers protection against LPS-induced cell cytotoxicity. Thus our investigations clearly demonstrated that microglial RNF11 is a negative regulator of NF-κB signalling pathway and could be a strong potential target for modulating inflammatory responses in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22975135

  7. Do signal transduction cascades influence survival in triple-negative breast cancer? A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Mumm, Jan-Niclas; Kölbl, Alexandra C; Jeschke, Udo; Andergassen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a rather aggressive form of breast cancer, comprised by early metastasis formation and reduced overall survival of the affected patients. Steroid hormone receptors and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 are not overexpressed, limiting therapeutic options. Therefore, new treatment options have to be investigated. The aim of our preliminary study was to detect coherences between some molecules of intracellular signal transduction pathways and survival of patients with TNBC, in order to obtain some hints for new therapeutical solutions. Methods Thirty-one paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples, which were determined to be negative for steroid hormone receptors as well as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, were immunohistochemically stained for a number of signal transduction molecules from several signaling pathways. β-Catenin, HIF1α, MCL, Notch1, LRP6, XBP1, and FOXP3 were stained with specific antibodies, and their staining was correlated with patient survival by Kaplan–Meier analyses. Results Only two of the investigated molecules have shown correlation with overall survival. Cytoplasmic staining of HIF1α and centro-tumoral lymphocyte FOXP3 staining showed statistically significant correlations with survival. Conclusion The coherence of signal transduction molecules with survival of patients with TNBC is still controversially discussed in the literature. Our study comprises one more mosaic stone in the elucidation of these intracellular processes and their influences on patient outcome. Lots of research still has to be done in this field, but it would be worthwhile as it may offer new therapeutic targets for a group of patients with breast cancer, which is still hard to treat. PMID:27307757

  8. Melanopsin-Expressing Amphioxus Photoreceptors Transduce Light via a Phospholipase C Signaling Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Angueyra, Juan Manuel; Pulido, Camila; Malagón, Gerardo; Nasi, Enrico; Gomez, Maria del Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Melanopsin, the receptor molecule that underlies light sensitivity in mammalian ‘circadian’ receptors, is homologous to invertebrate rhodopsins and has been proposed to operate via a similar signaling pathway. Its downstream effectors, however, remain elusive. Melanopsin also expresses in two distinct light-sensitive cell types in the neural tube of amphioxus. This organism is the most basal extant chordate and can help outline the evolutionary history of different photoreceptor lineages and their transduction mechanisms; moreover, isolated amphioxus photoreceptors offer unique advantages, because they are unambiguously identifiable and amenable to single-cell physiological assays. In the present study whole-cell patch clamp recording, pharmacological manipulations, and immunodetection were utilized to investigate light transduction in amphioxus photoreceptors. A Gq was identified and selectively localized to the photosensitive microvillar membrane, while the pivotal role of phospholipase C was established pharmacologically. The photocurrent was profoundly depressed by IP3 receptor antagonists, highlighting the importance of IP3 receptors in light signaling. By contrast, surrogates of diacylglycerol (DAG), as well as poly-unsaturated fatty acids failed to activate a membrane conductance or to alter the light response. The results strengthen the notion that calcium released from the ER via IP3-sensitive channels may fulfill a key role in conveying - directly or indirectly - the melanopsin-initiated light signal to the photoconductance; moreover, they challenge the dogma that microvillar photoreceptors and phoshoinositide-based light transduction are a prerogative of invertebrate eyes. PMID:22235344

  9. Characterization of photomorphogenic responses and signaling cascades controlled by phytochrome-A expressed in different tissues.

    PubMed

    Kirchenbauer, Daniel; Viczián, András; Ádám, Éva; Hegedűs, Zoltán; Klose, Cornelia; Leppert, Michael; Hiltbrunner, Andreas; Kircher, Stefan; Schäfer, Eberhard; Nagy, Ferenc

    2016-07-01

    The photoreceptor phytochrome A acts as a light-dependent molecular switch and regulates responses initiated by very low fluences of light (VLFR) and high fluences (HIR) of far-red light. PhyA is expressed ubiquitously, but how phyA signaling is orchestrated to regulate photomorphogenesis is poorly understood. To address this issue, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana phyA-201 mutant lines expressing the biologically active phyA-YFP photoreceptor in different tissues, and analyzed the expression of several reporter genes, including ProHY5:HY5-GFP and Pro35S:CFP-PIF1, and various FR-HIR-dependent physiological responses. We show that phyA action in one tissue is critical and sufficient to regulate flowering time and root growth; control of cotyledon and hypocotyl growth requires simultaneous phyA activity in different tissues; and changes detected in the expression of reporters are not restricted to phyA-containing cells. We conclude that FR-HIR-controlled morphogenesis in Arabidopsis is mediated partly by tissue-specific and partly by intercellular signaling initiated by phyA. Intercellular signaling is critical for many FR-HIR induced responses, yet it appears that phyA modulates the abundance and activity of key regulatory transcription factors in a tissue-autonomous fashion. PMID:27027866

  10. Two cascaded SOAs used as intensity modulators for adaptively modulated optical OFDM signals in optical access networks.

    PubMed

    Hamié, Ali; Hamzé, Mohamad; Taki, Haidar; Makouk, Layaly; Sharaiha, Ammar; Alaeddine, Ali; Al Housseini, Ali; Giacoumidis, Elias; Tang, J M

    2014-06-30

    Detailed theoretical and numerical investigations of the transmission performance of adaptively modulated optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexed (AMOOFDM) signals are undertaken, for the first time, in optical amplification and chromatic dispersion (CD) compensation free single mode fiber (SMF) intensity-modulated and direct-detection (IMDD) systems using two cascaded semiconductor optical amplifiers in a counterpropagating configuration as an intensity modulator (TC-SOA-CC-IM). A theoretical model describing the characteristics of this configuration is developed. Extensive performance comparisons are also made between the TC-SOA-CC and the single SOA intensity modulators. It is shown that, the TC-SOA-CC reaches its strongly saturated region using a lower input optical power much faster than the single SOA resulting in significantly reduced effective carrier lifetime and thus wide TC-SOA-CC bandwidths. It is shown that at low input optical power, we can increase the signal line rate almost 115% which will be more than twice the transmission performance offered by single SOA. In addition, the TC-SOA-CC-IM is capable of supporting signal line rates higher than corresponding to the SOA-IM by using 10dB lower input optical powers. For long transmission distance, the TC-SOA-CC-IM has much stronger CD compensation capability compared to the SOA-IM. In addition the use of TC-SOA-CC-IM is more effective regarding the capability to benefit from the CD compensation for shorter distances starting at 60km SMF, whilst for the SOA-IM starting at 90km. PMID:24977835

  11. Transcriptomics of Actinorhizal Symbioses Reveals Homologs of the Whole Common Symbiotic Signaling Cascade1[W

    PubMed Central

    Hocher, Valérie; Alloisio, Nicole; Auguy, Florence; Fournier, Pascale; Doumas, Patrick; Pujic, Petar; Gherbi, Hassen; Queiroux, Clothilde; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Normand, Philippe; Bogusz, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Comparative transcriptomics of two actinorhizal symbiotic plants, Casuarina glauca and Alnus glutinosa, was used to gain insight into their symbiotic programs triggered following contact with the nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium Frankia. Approximately 14,000 unigenes were recovered in roots and 3-week-old nodules of each of the two species. A transcriptomic array was designed to monitor changes in expression levels between roots and nodules, enabling the identification of up- and down-regulated genes as well as root- and nodule-specific genes. The expression levels of several genes emblematic of symbiosis were confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. As expected, several genes related to carbon and nitrogen exchange, defense against pathogens, or stress resistance were strongly regulated. Furthermore, homolog genes of the common and nodule-specific signaling pathways known in legumes were identified in the two actinorhizal symbiotic plants. The conservation of the host plant signaling pathway is all the more surprising in light of the lack of canonical nod genes in the genomes of its bacterial symbiont, Frankia. The evolutionary pattern emerging from these studies reinforces the hypothesis of a common genetic ancestor of the Fabid (Eurosid I) nodulating clade with a genetic predisposition for nodulation. PMID:21464474

  12. Temporal protein expression pattern in intracellular signalling cascade during T-cell activation: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, Piyali; Chowdhury, Saikat; Bhowmick, Rupa; Sarkar, Ram Rup

    2015-10-01

    Various T-cell co-receptor molecules and calcium channel CRAC play a pivotal role in the maintenance of cell's functional responses by regulating the production of effector molecules (mostly cytokines) that aids in immune clearance and also maintaining the cell in a functionally active state. Any defect in these co-receptor signalling pathways may lead to an altered expression pattern of the effector molecules. To study the propagation of such defects with time and their effect on the intracellular protein expression patterns, a comprehensive and largest pathway map of T-cell activation network is reconstructed manually. The entire pathway reactions are then translated using logical equations and simulated using the published time series microarray expression data as inputs. After validating the model, the effect of in silico knock down of co-receptor molecules on the expression patterns of their downstream proteins is studied and simultaneously the changes in the phenotypic behaviours of the T-cell population are predicted, which shows significant variations among the proteins expression and the signalling routes through which the response is propagated in the cytoplasm. This integrative computational approach serves as a valuable technique to study the changes in protein expression patterns and helps to predict variations in the cellular behaviour. PMID:26564978

  13. Gigabit radio-over-fiber link for converged baseband and millimeter-wave band signal transmission using cascaded injection-locked Fabry-Pérot laser diodes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Moon-Ki; Won, Yong-Yuk; Han, Sang-Kook

    2009-05-11

    A novel scheme, for both baseband and millimeter-wave band gigabit data transmission in radio-over-fiber system, is proposed and experimentally demonstrated by using cascaded injection-locked Fabry- Pérot laser diodes. It was able to improve suppression ratio of carrier suppressed signal using the cascaded injection-locking. The suppression ratio improvement of the optical carrier suppressed signal of 20 dB was verified. Applying this mechanism, 60-GHz millimeter-wave carrier of enhanced signal quality could be accomplished. Its peak power and phase noise were obtained as -40 dBm and -103.5 dBm/Hz respectively, which was suitable for 60-GHz data transmission. In addition, a successful bidirectional transmission of 1.25-Gbps wired and wireless data was achieved by adopting remodulation technique using a gain-saturated reflective semiconductor optical amplifier for uplink. PMID:19434116

  14. An apoptotic signaling pathway in the interferon antiviral response mediated by RNase L and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase.

    PubMed

    Li, Geqiang; Xiang, Ying; Sabapathy, Kanaga; Silverman, Robert H

    2004-01-01

    Cellular stress responses induced during viral infections are critical to the health and survival of organisms. In higher vertebrates, interferons (IFNs) mediate the innate antiviral response in part through the action of RNase L, a uniquely regulated enzyme. RNase L is activated by 5'-phosphorylated, 2'-5' oligoadenylates (2-5A) produced from IFN-inducible and double stranded RNA-dependent synthetases. We show that viral activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNK) family of MAP kinases and viral induction of apoptosis are both deficient in mouse cells lacking RNase L. Also, JNK phosphorylation in response to 2-5A was greatly reduced in RNase L-/- mouse cells. In addition, 2-5A treatment of the human ovarian carcinoma cell line, Hey1b, resulted in specific ribosomal RNA cleavage products coinciding with JNK activation. Furthermore, suppression of JNK activity with the chemical inhibitor, SP600125, prevented apoptosis induced by 2-5A. In contrast, inhibition of alternative MAP kinases, p38 and ERK, failed to prevent 2-5A-mediated apoptosis. Short interfering RNA to JNK1/JNK2 mRNAs resulted in JNK ablation while also suppressing 2-5A-mediated apoptosis. Moreover, Jnk1-/- Jnk2-/- cells were highly resistant to the apoptotic effects of IFN and 2-5A. These findings suggest that JNK and RNase L function in an integrated signaling pathway during the IFN response that leads to elimination of virus-infected cells through apoptosis. PMID:14570908

  15. Distinct Signaling Cascades Elicited by Different Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 (FPR2) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Parisi, Melania; Ammendola, Rosario

    2013-01-01

    The formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2) is a remarkably versatile transmembrane protein belonging to the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family. FPR2 is activated by an array of ligands, which include structurally unrelated lipids and peptide/proteins agonists, resulting in different intracellular responses in a ligand-specific fashion. In addition to the anti-inflammatory lipid, lipoxin A4, several other endogenous agonists also bind FPR2, including serum amyloid A, glucocorticoid-induced annexin 1, urokinase and its receptor, suggesting that the activation of FPR2 may result in potent pro- or anti-inflammatory responses. Other endogenous ligands, also present in biological samples, include resolvins, amyloidogenic proteins, such as beta amyloid (Aβ)-42 and prion protein (Prp)106–126, the neuroprotective peptide, humanin, antibacterial peptides, annexin 1-derived peptides, chemokine variants, the neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP)-27, and mitochondrial peptides. Upon activation, intracellular domains of FPR2 mediate signaling to G-proteins, which trigger several agonist-dependent signal transduction pathways, including activation of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, p38MAPK, as well as the phosphorylation of cytosolic tyrosine kinases, tyrosine kinase receptor transactivation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of regulatory transcriptional factors, release of calcium and production of oxidants. FPR2 is an attractive therapeutic target, because of its involvement in a range of normal physiological processes and pathological diseases. Here, we review and discuss the most significant findings on the intracellular pathways and on the cross-communication between FPR2 and tyrosine kinase receptors triggered by different FPR2 agonists. PMID

  16. Effects of acute and chronic treatment elicited by lamotrigine on behavior, energy metabolism, neurotrophins and signaling cascades in rats.

    PubMed

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ribeiro, Karine F; Zappellini, Giovanni; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Gomes, Lara M; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Luciano, Thais F; Marques, Scherolin O; Streck, Emilio L; Souza, Cláudio T; Quevedo, João

    2011-12-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the behavioral and molecular effects of lamotrigine. To this aim, Wistar rats were treated with lamotrigine (10 and 20 mg/kg) or imipramine (30 mg/kg) acutely and chronically. The behavior was assessed using forced swimming test. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), Proteina Kinase B (PKB, AKT), glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) levels, citrate synthase, creatine kinase and mitochondrial chain (I, II, II-III and IV) activities were assessed in the brain. The results showed that both treatments reduced the immobility time. The BDNF were increased in the prefrontal after acute treatment with lamotrigine (20 mg/kg), and the BDNF and NGF were increased in the prefrontal after chronic treatment with lamotrigine in all doses. The AKT increased and Bcl-2 and GSK-3 decreased after both treatments in all brain areas. The citrate synthase and creatine kinase increased in the amygdala after acute treatment with imipramine. Chronic treatment with imipramine and lamotrigine (10 mg/kg) increased the creatine kinase in the hippocampus. The complex I was reduced and the complex II, II-III and IV were increased, but related with treatment and brain area. In conclusion, lamotrigine exerted antidepressant-like, which can be attributed to its effects on pathways related to depression, such as neurotrophins, metabolism energy and signaling cascade. PMID:22044672

  17. Domain-Specific Activation of Death-Associated Intracellular Signalling Cascades by the Cellular Prion Protein in Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Vilches, Silvia; Vergara, Cristina; Nicolás, Oriol; Mata, Ágata; Del Río, José A; Gavín, Rosalina

    2016-09-01

    The biological functions of the cellular prion protein remain poorly understood. In fact, numerous studies have aimed to determine specific functions for the different protein domains. Studies of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) domains through in vivo expression of molecules carrying internal deletions in a mouse Prnp null background have provided helpful data on the implication of the protein in signalling cascades in affected neurons. Nevertheless, understanding of the mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity induced by these PrP(C) deleted forms is far from complete. To better define the neurotoxic or neuroprotective potential of PrP(C) N-terminal domains, and to overcome the heterogeneity of results due to the lack of a standardized model, we used neuroblastoma cells to analyse the effects of overexpressing PrP(C) deleted forms. Results indicate that PrP(C) N-terminal deleted forms were properly processed through the secretory pathway. However, PrPΔF35 and PrPΔCD mutants led to death by different mechanisms sharing loss of alpha-cleavage and activation of caspase-3. Our data suggest that both gain-of-function and loss-of-function pathogenic mechanisms may be associated with N-terminal domains and may therefore contribute to neurotoxicity in prion disease. Dissecting the molecular response induced by PrPΔF35 may be the key to unravelling the physiological and pathological functions of the prion protein. PMID:26250617

  18. 17β-estradiol regulates the differentiation of cementoblasts via Notch signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jing; Zhou, Zeyuan; Huang, Li; Li, Yuyu; Li, Jingtao; Zou, Shujuan

    2016-08-12

    Estrogen has been well recognized as a key factor in the homeostasis of bone and periodontal tissue, but the way it regulates the activities of cementoblasts, the cell population maintaining cementum has not been fully understood. In this study, we examined the expression of estrogen receptor in OCCM-30 cells and the effect of 17β-estradiol (E2) on the proliferation and differentiation of OCCM-30 cells. We found that both estrogen receptor α and β were expressed in OCCM-30 cells. E2 exerted no significant influence on the proliferation of OCCM-30 cells, but inhibited the transcription and translation of BSP and Runx2 in the early phase of osteogenic induction except the BSP mRNA. Afterwards in the late phase of osteogenic induction, E2 enhanced the transcription and translation of BSP and Runx2 and promoted the calcium deposition. In addition, the expression level of Notch1, NICD and Hey1 mRNAs responded to exogenous E2 in a pattern similar to that of the osteoblastic markers. DAPT could attenuate the effect of E2 on the expression of osteoblastic markers. These findings indicated that E2 might regulate the differentiation of cementoblasts via Notch signaling. PMID:27289020

  19. AMPK-SKP2-CARM1 signalling cascade in transcriptional regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hi-Jai R; Kim, Hyunkyung; Oh, Sungryong; Lee, Jun-Gi; Kee, Minjung; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kweon, Mi-Na; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Baek, Sung Hee

    2016-06-23

    Autophagy is a highly conserved self-digestion process, which is essential for maintaining homeostasis and viability in response to nutrient starvation. Although the components of autophagy in the cytoplasm have been well studied, the molecular basis for the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of autophagy is poorly understood. Here we identify co-activator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) as a crucial component of autophagy in mammals. Notably, CARM1 stability is regulated by the SKP2-containing SCF (SKP1-cullin1-F-box protein) E3 ubiquitin ligase in the nucleus, but not in the cytoplasm, under nutrient-rich conditions. Furthermore, we show that nutrient starvation results in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent phosphorylation of FOXO3a in the nucleus, which in turn transcriptionally represses SKP2. This repression leads to increased levels of CARM1 protein and subsequent increases in histone H3 Arg17 dimethylation. Genome-wide analyses reveal that CARM1 exerts transcriptional co-activator function on autophagy-related and lysosomal genes through transcription factor EB (TFEB). Our findings demonstrate that CARM1-dependent histone arginine methylation is a crucial nuclear event in autophagy, and identify a new signalling axis of AMPK-SKP2-CARM1 in the regulation of autophagy induction after nutrient starvation. PMID:27309807

  20. Regulatory Cross-Talks and Cascades in Rice Hormone Biosynthesis Pathways Contribute to Stress Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Arindam; Grewal, Rumdeep K.; Kundu, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Crosstalk among different hormone signaling pathways play an important role in modulating plant response to both biotic and abiotic stress. Hormone activity is controlled by its bio-availability, which is again influenced by its biosynthesis. Thus, independent hormone biosynthesis pathways must be regulated and co-ordinated to mount an integrated response. One of the possibilities is to use cis-regulatory elements to orchestrate expression of hormone biosynthesis genes. Analysis of CREs, associated with differentially expressed hormone biosynthesis related genes in rice leaf under Magnaporthe oryzae attack and drought stress enabled us to obtain insights about cross-talk among hormone biosynthesis pathways at the transcriptional level. We identified some master transcription regulators that co-ordinate different hormone biosynthesis pathways under stress. We found that Abscisic acid and Brassinosteroid regulate Cytokinin conjugation; conversely Brassinosteroid biosynthesis is affected by both Abscisic acid and Cytokinin. Jasmonic acid and Ethylene biosynthesis may be modulated by Abscisic acid through DREB transcription factors. Jasmonic acid or Salicylic acid biosynthesis pathways are co-regulated but they are unlikely to influence each others production directly. Thus, multiple hormones may modulate hormone biosynthesis pathways through a complex regulatory network, where biosynthesis of one hormone is affected by several other contributing hormones. PMID:27617021

  1. Gadd45 Proteins as Critical Signal Transducers Linking NF-κB to MAPK Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z.; Song, L.; Huang, C.

    2013-01-01

    The growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45 (Gadd45) proteins are a group of critical signal transducers that are involved in regulations of many cellular functions. Accumulated data indicate that all three Gadd45 proteins (i.e., Gadd45α, Gadd45β, and Gadd45γ) play essential roles in connecting an upstream sensor module, the transcription Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB), to a transcriptional regulating module, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). This NF-κB-Gadd45(s)-MAPK pathway responds to various kinds of extracellular stimuli and regulates such cell activities as growth arrest, differentiation, cell survival, and apoptosis. Defects in this pathway can also be related to oncogenesis. In the first part of this review, the functions of Gadd45 proteins, and briefly NF-κB and MAPK, are summarized. In the second part, the mechanisms by which Gadd45 proteins are regulated by NF-κB, and how they affect MAPK activation, are reviewed. PMID:20025601

  2. Regulatory Cross-Talks and Cascades in Rice Hormone Biosynthesis Pathways Contribute to Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Deb, Arindam; Grewal, Rumdeep K; Kundu, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Crosstalk among different hormone signaling pathways play an important role in modulating plant response to both biotic and abiotic stress. Hormone activity is controlled by its bio-availability, which is again influenced by its biosynthesis. Thus, independent hormone biosynthesis pathways must be regulated and co-ordinated to mount an integrated response. One of the possibilities is to use cis-regulatory elements to orchestrate expression of hormone biosynthesis genes. Analysis of CREs, associated with differentially expressed hormone biosynthesis related genes in rice leaf under Magnaporthe oryzae attack and drought stress enabled us to obtain insights about cross-talk among hormone biosynthesis pathways at the transcriptional level. We identified some master transcription regulators that co-ordinate different hormone biosynthesis pathways under stress. We found that Abscisic acid and Brassinosteroid regulate Cytokinin conjugation; conversely Brassinosteroid biosynthesis is affected by both Abscisic acid and Cytokinin. Jasmonic acid and Ethylene biosynthesis may be modulated by Abscisic acid through DREB transcription factors. Jasmonic acid or Salicylic acid biosynthesis pathways are co-regulated but they are unlikely to influence each others production directly. Thus, multiple hormones may modulate hormone biosynthesis pathways through a complex regulatory network, where biosynthesis of one hormone is affected by several other contributing hormones. PMID:27617021

  3. Peroxiredoxin 1 has an anti-apoptotic role via apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 and p38 activation in mouse models with oral precancerous lesions

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIANFEI; JING, XINYING; NIU, WENWEN; ZHANG, MIN; GE, LIHUA; MIAO, CONGCONG; TANG, XIAOFEI

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1) is important in the protection of cells from oxidative damage and the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Prx1 is overexpressed in oral precancerous lesions of oral leukoplakia (OLK) and oral cancer; however, the association between Prx1 expression and OLK pathogenesis remains unknown. The present study investigated the role of Prx1 and its molecular mechanisms in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis during the pathogenesis of OLK. Wild-type and Prx1 knockout mice were treated with 50 µg/ml 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) or 4NQO + H2O2 for 16 weeks to establish mouse models with tongue precancerous lesions. Apoptotic cells were detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay. The expression of Prx1, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), phosphor-ASK1, p38 and phosphor-p38 was analyzed using immunohistochemical staining, and their mRNA expression levels were evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The present results demonstrated that 4NQO or 4NQO + H2O2 induced the development of tongue precancerous lesions in Prx1 knockout and wild-type mice. Prx1 was overexpressed in tongue precancerous lesions compared with normal tongue mucosa. There was a significant decrease in the degree of moderate or severe epithelial dysplasia, and mild epithelial dysplasia was clearly elevated, in Prx1 knockout mice treated with 4NQO + H2O2 compared with wild-type mice treated with 4NQO + H2O2. Prx1 suppressed apoptosis and upregulated phosphor-ASK1 and phosphor-p38 expression in tongue precancerous lesions. The present results suggest that Prx1 suppresses oxidative stress-induced apoptosis via the ASK1/p38 signalling pathway in mouse tongue precancerous lesions. In conclusion, Prx1 and H2O2 have a coordination role in promoting the progression of tongue precancerous mucosa lesions. The present findings provide novel insight into Prx1 function and the mechanisms of Prx1 in OLK

  4. Abrogation of STAT3 signaling cascade by zerumbone inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Muthu K; Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Li, Feng; Kim, Chulwon; Sikka, Sakshi; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Kumar, Alan Prem; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Sethi, Gautam

    2015-10-01

    Persistent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is one of the characteristic features of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and often linked to its deregulated proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. In the present report, we investigated whether zerumbone, a sesquiterpene, exerts its anticancer effect through modulation of STAT3 activation pathway. The pharmacological effect of zerumbone on STAT3 activation, associated protein kinases and phosphatase, and apoptosis was investigated using both RCC cell lines and xenograft mouse model. We observed that zerumbone suppressed STAT3 activation in a dose- and time-dependent manner in RCC cells. The suppression was mediated through the inhibition of activation of upstream kinases c-Src, Janus-activated kinase 1, and Janus-activated kinase 2. Pervanadate treatment reversed zerumbone-induced downregulation of STAT3, suggesting the involvement of a tyrosine phosphatase. Indeed, we found that zerumbone induced the expression of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 that correlated with its ability to inhibit STAT3 activation. Interestingly, deletion of SHP-1 gene by siRNA abolished the ability of zerumbone to inhibit STAT3 activation. The inhibition of STAT3 activation by zerumbone also caused the suppression of the gene products involved in proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. Finally, when administered i.p., zerumbone inhibited STAT3 activation in tumor tissues and the growth of human RCC xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice without any side effects. Overall, our results suggest for the first time that zerumbone is a novel blocker of STAT3 signaling cascade and thus has an enormous potential for the treatment of RCC and other solid tumors. PMID:24797723

  5. Fluvoxamine moderates reduced voluntary activity following chronic dexamethasone infusion in mice via recovery of BDNF signal cascades.

    PubMed

    Terada, Kazuki; Izumo, Nobuo; Suzuki, Biora; Karube, Yoshiharu; Morikawa, Tomomi; Ishibashi, Yukiko; Kameyama, Toshiki; Chiba, Koji; Sasaki, Noriko; Iwata, Keiko; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Manabe, Takayuki

    2014-04-01

    Major depression is a complex disorder characterized by genetic and environmental interactions. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) effectively treat depression. Neurogenesis following chronic antidepressant treatment activates brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. In this study, we analyzed the effects of the SSRI fluvoxamine (Flu) on locomotor activity and forced-swim behavior using chronic dexamethasone (cDEX) infusions in mice, which engenders depression-like behavior. Infusion of cDEX decreased body weight and produced a trend towards lower locomotor activity during darkness. In the forced-swim test, cDEX-mice exhibited increased immobility times compared with mice administered saline. Flu treatment reversed decreased locomotor activity and mitigated forced-swim test immobility. Real-time polymerase chain reactions using brain RNA samples yielded significantly lower BDNF mRNA levels in cDEX-mice compared with the saline group. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated X-box binding protein-1 (XBP1) gene expression was lower in cDEX-mice compared with the saline group. However, marked expression of the XBP1 gene was observed in cDEX-mice treated with Flu compared with mice given saline and untreated cDEX-mice. Expression of 5-HT2A and Sigma-1 receptors decreased after cDEX infusion compared with the saline group, and these decreases normalized to control levels upon Flu treatment. Our results indicate that the Flu moderates reductions in voluntary activity following chronic dexamethasone infusions in mice via recovery of BDNF signal cascades. PMID:24582626

  6. Neonatal Dexamethasone Treatment Leads to Alterations in Cell Signaling Cascades Controlling Hepatic and Cardiac Function in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Adigun, Abayomi A.; Wrench, Nicola; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that early-life glucocorticoid exposure, either involving stress or the therapy of preterm labor, contributes to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in adulthood. We investigated cellular mechanisms underlying these effects by administering dexamethasone (DEX) to neonatal rats on postnatal (PN) days 1–3 or 7–9, using doses spanning the threshold for somatic growth impairment: 0.05, 0.2 and 0.8 mg/kg. In adulthood, we assessed the effects on hepatic and cardiac cell function mediated through the adenylyl cyclase (AC) signaling cascade, which controls neuronal and hormonal inputs that regulate hepatic glucose metabolism and cardiac contractility. Treatment on PN1-3 produced heterologous sensitization of hepatic signaling, with upregulation of AC itself leading to parallel increases in the responses to β-adrenergic or glucagon receptor stimulation, or to activation of G-proteins by fluoride. The effects were seen at the lowest dose but increasing DEX past the point of somatic growth impairment led to loss of the effect in females. Nonmonotonic effects were also present in the heart, where males showed AC sensitization at the lowest dose, with decreasing effects as the dose was raised; females showed progressive deficits of cardiac AC activity. Shifting the exposure to PN7-9 still elicited AC sensitization but with a greater offsetting contribution at the higher doses. Our findings show that, in contrast to growth restriction, the glucocorticoids associated with stress or the therapy of preterm labor are more sensitive and more important contributors to the cellular abnormalities underlying subsequent metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:19853034

  7. MAPK signaling cascades mediate distinct glucocorticoid resistance mechanisms in pediatric leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Courtney L.; Gearheart, Christy M.; Fosmire, Susan; Delgado-Martin, Cristina; Evensen, Nikki A.; Bride, Karen; Waanders, Angela J.; Pais, Faye; Wang, Jinhua; Bhatla, Teena; Bitterman, Danielle S.; de Rijk, Simone R.; Bourgeois, Wallace; Dandekar, Smita; Park, Eugene; Burleson, Tamara M.; Madhusoodhan, Pillai Pallavi; Teachey, David T.; Raetz, Elizabeth A.; Hermiston, Michelle L.; Müschen, Markus; Loh, Mignon L.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Zhang, Jinghui; Garabedian, Michael J.; Porter, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    The outcome for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients who relapse is dismal. A hallmark of relapsed disease is acquired resistance to multiple chemotherapeutic agents, particularly glucocorticoids. In this study, we performed a genome-scale short hairpin RNA screen to identify mediators of prednisolone sensitivity in ALL cell lines. The incorporation of these data with an integrated analysis of relapse-specific genetic and epigenetic changes allowed us to identify the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway as a mediator of prednisolone resistance in pediatric ALL. We show that knockdown of the specific MAPK pathway members MEK2 and MEK4 increased sensitivity to prednisolone through distinct mechanisms. MEK4 knockdown increased sensitivity specifically to prednisolone by increasing the levels of the glucocorticoid receptor. MEK2 knockdown increased sensitivity to all chemotherapy agents tested by increasing the levels of p53. Furthermore, we demonstrate that inhibition of MEK1/2 with trametinib increased sensitivity of ALL cells and primary samples to chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo. To confirm a role for MAPK signaling in patients with relapsed ALL, we measured the activation of the MEK1/2 target ERK in matched diagnosis-relapse primary samples and observed increased phosphorylated ERK levels at relapse. Furthermore, relapse samples have an enhanced response to MEK inhibition compared to matched diagnosis samples in xenograft models. Together, our data indicate that inhibition of the MAPK pathway increases chemosensitivity to glucocorticoids and possibly other agents and that the MAPK pathway is an attractive target for prevention and/or treatment of relapsed disease. PMID:26324703

  8. Cocaine elicits autophagic cytotoxicity via a nitric oxide-GAPDH signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Guha, Prasun; Harraz, Maged M; Snyder, Solomon H

    2016-02-01

    Cocaine exerts its behavioral stimulant effects by facilitating synaptic actions of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. It is also neurotoxic and broadly cytotoxic, leading to overdose deaths. We demonstrate that the cytotoxic actions of cocaine reflect selective enhancement of autophagy, a process that physiologically degrades metabolites and cellular organelles, and that uncontrolled autophagy can also lead to cell death. In brain cultures, cocaine markedly increases levels of LC3-II and depletes p62, both actions characteristic of autophagy. By contrast, cocaine fails to stimulate cell death processes reflecting parthanatos, monitored by cleavage of poly(ADP ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), or necroptosis, assessed by levels of phosphorylated mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein. Pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy protects neurons against cocaine-induced cell death. On the other hand, inhibition of parthanatos, necroptosis, or apoptosis did not change cocaine cytotoxicity. Depletion of ATG5 or beclin-1, major mediators of autophagy, prevents cocaine-induced cell death. By contrast, depleting caspase-3, whose cleavage reflects apoptosis, fails to alter cocaine cytotoxicity, and cocaine does not alter caspase-3 cleavage. Moreover, depleting PARP-1 or RIPK1, key mediators of parthanatos and necroptosis, respectively, did not prevent cocaine-induced cell death. Autophagic actions of cocaine are mediated by the nitric oxide-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase signaling pathway. Thus, cocaine-associated autophagy is abolished by depleting GAPDH via shRNA; by the drug CGP3466B, which prevents GAPDH nitrosylation; and by mutating cysteine-150 of GAPDH, its site of nitrosylation. Treatments that selectively influence cocaine-associated autophagy may afford therapeutic benefit. PMID:26787898

  9. Antihyperglycemic potentials of a threatened plant, Helonias dioica: antioxidative stress responses and the signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Debrup; Samadder, Asmita; Dutta, Suman; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Helonias dioica (HD) is a threatened species of herb growing in North America. It is used as a traditional medicine for treating various ailments particularly related to reproductive issues. The root is reported to contain approximately 10% of a saponin (chamaelirin; C(36)H(62)O(18)) apart from certain other fatty acids. As saponins are known to have hypoglycemic effects, we suspected its possible antihyperglycemic potentials. We injected intraperitoneally alloxan (ALX) at the dose of 200 mg/kg body weight (bw) to induce hyperglycemia in mice and tested possible hypoglycemic effects of HD in vivo by deploying two doses (100 and 200 mg/kg bw, respectively). We also tested its effects on the isolated pancreatic islets cells in vitro. We used various standard protocols like reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA damage, activities of biomarkers like catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), lipid peroxidase (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH) of the pancreas tissue and glucokinase and glycogen content of the liver of hyperglycemic mice. With a mechanistic approach, we also tracked down the possible signaling pathway involved. We found an elevated level of ROS generation, LPO and overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), p38 Map kinase (p38 MAPK), nuclear factor (NF)-κβ, interferon gamma (IFN-γ), cytochrome c, caspase 3, poly [ADP ribose] polymerase (PARP) and cyclo oxygenase 2 (COX2) in ALX-induced diabetic mouse. Treatment of hyperglycemic mice with both the doses of HD showed a significant decrease with respect to all these parameters of study. Thus, our results suggest that HD prevents ALX-induced islet cell damage and possesses antihyperglycemic and antioxidative potentials. PMID:22169161

  10. Cocaine elicits autophagic cytotoxicity via a nitric oxide-GAPDH signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Prasun; Harraz, Maged M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine exerts its behavioral stimulant effects by facilitating synaptic actions of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. It is also neurotoxic and broadly cytotoxic, leading to overdose deaths. We demonstrate that the cytotoxic actions of cocaine reflect selective enhancement of autophagy, a process that physiologically degrades metabolites and cellular organelles, and that uncontrolled autophagy can also lead to cell death. In brain cultures, cocaine markedly increases levels of LC3-II and depletes p62, both actions characteristic of autophagy. By contrast, cocaine fails to stimulate cell death processes reflecting parthanatos, monitored by cleavage of poly(ADP ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), or necroptosis, assessed by levels of phosphorylated mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein. Pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy protects neurons against cocaine-induced cell death. On the other hand, inhibition of parthanatos, necroptosis, or apoptosis did not change cocaine cytotoxicity. Depletion of ATG5 or beclin-1, major mediators of autophagy, prevents cocaine-induced cell death. By contrast, depleting caspase-3, whose cleavage reflects apoptosis, fails to alter cocaine cytotoxicity, and cocaine does not alter caspase-3 cleavage. Moreover, depleting PARP-1 or RIPK1, key mediators of parthanatos and necroptosis, respectively, did not prevent cocaine-induced cell death. Autophagic actions of cocaine are mediated by the nitric oxide-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase signaling pathway. Thus, cocaine-associated autophagy is abolished by depleting GAPDH via shRNA; by the drug CGP3466B, which prevents GAPDH nitrosylation; and by mutating cysteine-150 of GAPDH, its site of nitrosylation. Treatments that selectively influence cocaine-associated autophagy may afford therapeutic benefit. PMID:26787898

  11. MAPK signaling cascades mediate distinct glucocorticoid resistance mechanisms in pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jones, Courtney L; Gearheart, Christy M; Fosmire, Susan; Delgado-Martin, Cristina; Evensen, Nikki A; Bride, Karen; Waanders, Angela J; Pais, Faye; Wang, Jinhua; Bhatla, Teena; Bitterman, Danielle S; de Rijk, Simone R; Bourgeois, Wallace; Dandekar, Smita; Park, Eugene; Burleson, Tamara M; Madhusoodhan, Pillai Pallavi; Teachey, David T; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Hermiston, Michelle L; Müschen, Markus; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P; Zhang, Jinghui; Garabedian, Michael J; Porter, Christopher C; Carroll, William L

    2015-11-01

    The outcome for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients who relapse is dismal. A hallmark of relapsed disease is acquired resistance to multiple chemotherapeutic agents, particularly glucocorticoids. In this study, we performed a genome-scale short hairpin RNA screen to identify mediators of prednisolone sensitivity in ALL cell lines. The incorporation of these data with an integrated analysis of relapse-specific genetic and epigenetic changes allowed us to identify the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway as a mediator of prednisolone resistance in pediatric ALL. We show that knockdown of the specific MAPK pathway members MEK2 and MEK4 increased sensitivity to prednisolone through distinct mechanisms. MEK4 knockdown increased sensitivity specifically to prednisolone by increasing the levels of the glucocorticoid receptor. MEK2 knockdown increased sensitivity to all chemotherapy agents tested by increasing the levels of p53. Furthermore, we demonstrate that inhibition of MEK1/2 with trametinib increased sensitivity of ALL cells and primary samples to chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo. To confirm a role for MAPK signaling in patients with relapsed ALL, we measured the activation of the MEK1/2 target ERK in matched diagnosis-relapse primary samples and observed increased phosphorylated ERK levels at relapse. Furthermore, relapse samples have an enhanced response to MEK inhibition compared to matched diagnosis samples in xenograft models. Together, our data indicate that inhibition of the MAPK pathway increases chemosensitivity to glucocorticoids and possibly other agents and that the MAPK pathway is an attractive target for prevention and/or treatment of relapsed disease. PMID:26324703

  12. Zinc ferrite nanoparticles activate IL-1b, NFKB1, CCL21 and NOS2 signaling to induce mitochondrial dependent intrinsic apoptotic pathway in WISH cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Ahmad, Javed; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Khan, Shams T.; Musarrat, Javed

    2013-12-01

    localization of NPs. • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs induce DNA damage and mitochondrial dysfunction in WISH cells. • ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs activate inflammatory and oxidative stress signaling in WISH cells. • Elevation of p53, CASP 3, bax and bcl 2 genes affirms intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  13. Radiation induced nuclear factor kappa-B signaling cascade study in mammalian cells by improved detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    To enable long-term human space flight cellular radiation response to densely ionizing radiation needs to be better understood for developing appropriate countermeasures to mitigate acute effects and late radiation risks for the astronaut. The biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions with high linear energy transfer (LET) for effecting DNA damage response pathways as a gateway to cell death or survival is of major concern, not only for tumor radiotherapy but also for new regimes of space missions. Ionizing radiation modulates several signaling pathways resulting in transcription factor activation. NF-kappaB is one of the important transcription factors that respond to changes in the environment of a mammalian cell and plays a key role in many biological processes relevant to radiation response, such as apoptosis, inflammation and carcinogenesis. From medical and biological point of view it is important to understand radiation induced NF-kappaB signaling cascade. For studying NF-kappaB signaling, green fluorescent proteins EGFP and d2EGFP were used previously (Advances in Space Research, 36: 1673-1679, 2005). The current study aims to improve reporter assays by the use of a destabilized variant of red fluorescent protein tdTomato (DD-tdTomato) which gives high fluorescence signals and a better signal/noise ratio for NF-kappaB activation. The reporter system HEK-pNFkappaB-DD-tdTomato-C8 is a dual reporter system which can provide both discrete and cumulative signals after exposure to ionizing radiation (X-rays, heavy ions). In the presence of Shield-1, the fluorescent protein DD-tdTomato is not degraded but accumulated inside the cell which helps to quantify the fold induction of NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression. The minimum dose required to activate NF-kappaB is 6 Gy but accumulated signals data shows that NF-kappaB is activated after 3 Gy in the presence of Shield-1. Average dose and number of heavy ions’ hits per nucleus necessary to double the NF

  14. Inhibition of ROS-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells by nitrone spin traps via induction of phase II enzymes and suppression of mitochondria-dependent pro-apoptotic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Das, Amlan; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Voss, Oliver H.; Doseff, Andrea I.; Villamena, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the main etiological factor behind the pathogenesis of various diseases including inflammation, cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Due to the spin trapping abilities and various pharmacological properties of nitrones, their application as therapeutic agent has been gaining attention. Though the antioxidant properties of the nitrones are well known, the mechanisms by which they modulate the cellular defense machinery against oxidative stress is not well investigated and requires further elucidation. Here, we have investigated the mechanisms of cytoprotection of the nitrone spin traps against oxidative stress in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). Cytoprotective properties of both the cyclic nitrone 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) and linear nitrone alpha-phenyl N-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN) against H2O2-induced cytoxicity were investigated. Preincubation of BAEC with PBN or DMPO resulted in the inhibition of H2O2–mediated cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Nitrone-treatment resulted in the induction and restoration of phase II antioxidant enzymes via nuclear translocation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) in oxidatively-challenged cells. Furthermore, the nitrones were found to inhibit the mitochondrial depolarization and subsequent activation of caspase-3 induced by H2O2. Significant down-regulation of the pro-apoptotic proteins p53 and Bax, and up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and p-Bad were observed when the cells were preincubated with the nitrones prior to H2O2–treatment. It was also observed that Nrf-2 silencing completely abolished the protective effects of nitrones. Hence, these findings suggest that nitrones confer protection to the endothelial cells against oxidative stress by modulating phase II antioxidant enzymes and subsequently inhibiting mitochondria-dependent apoptotic cascade. PMID:22580046

  15. Opioid-receptor (OR) signaling cascades in rat cerebral cortex and model cell lines: the role of plasma membrane structure.

    PubMed

    Ujčíková, H; Brejchová, J; Vošahlíková, M; Kagan, D; Dlouhá, K; Sýkora, J; Merta, L; Drastichová, Z; Novotný, J; Ostašov, P; Roubalová, L; Parenti, M; Hof, M; Svoboda, P

    2014-01-01

    . Validity of this conclusion was supported by the analysis of an immediate PM environment of cholesterol molecules in living delta-OR-G(i)1alpha-HEK293 cells by fluorescent probes 22- and 25-NBD-cholesterol. The alteration of plasma membrane structure by cholesterol depletion made the membrane more hydrated. Understanding of the positive and negative feedback regulatory loops among different OR-initiated signaling cascades (micro-, delta-, and kappa-OR) is crucial for understanding of the long-term mechanisms of drug addiction as the decrease in functional activity of micro-OR may be compensated by increase of delta-OR and/or kappa-OR signaling. PMID:24564656

  16. Apoptotic cell clearance of Leishmania major-infected neutrophils by dendritic cells inhibits CD8⁺ T-cell priming in vitro by Mer tyrosine kinase-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Gomes, F L; Romano, A; Lee, S; Roffê, E; Peters, N C; Debrabant, A; Sacks, D

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant recruited and infected cells during the early stages of Leishmania major infection in the skin, and depletion of neutrophils promotes immunity to infection transmitted by sand fly bite. In order to better understand how the acute neutrophilic response suppresses immunity, we assessed the consequences of the interaction between neutrophils recovered from the skin-inoculation site and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. The capture of infected, apoptotic neutrophils by the DCs completely inhibited their cross-presentation function that was dependent on engagement of the receptor tyrosine kinase Mer on the DCs. The capture of uninfected neutrophils, or neutrophils infected with Toxoplasma gondii, had only slight immunomodulatory effects. These studies define the clearance of infected, apoptotic neutrophils by DCs and Mer receptor signaling as central to the early immune evasion strategies of L. major, with relevance to other vector-borne pathogens delivered by bite to the skin. PMID:26658192

  17. A label-free and cascaded dual-signaling amplified electrochemical aptasensing platform for sensitive prion assay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Xiong, Erhu; Zhou, Jiawan; Li, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jinhua

    2016-11-15

    Prion proteins, as an important biomarker of prion disease, are responsible for the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases). Hence, the sensitive detection of prion protein is very essential for biological studies and medical diagnostics. In this paper, a novel label-free and cascaded dual-signaling amplified electrochemical strategy was developed for sensitive and selective analysis of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). The recognition elements included double-stranded DNA consisted of PrP(C)-binding aptamer (DNA1) and its partially complementary DNA (DNA2), and ordered mesoporous carbon probe (OMCP) fabricated by sealing the electroactive ferrocenecarboxylic acid (Fc) into its inner pores and then using single-stranded DNA (DNA3) as the gatekeeper. In the presence of PrP(C), DNA1 could bind the target protein and free DNA2. More importantly, DNA2 could hybridize with DNA3 to form a rigid duplex DNA and thus triggered the exonuclease III (Exo III) cleavage process to realize the DNA2 recycling, accompanied by opening more biogates and releasing more Fc. The released Fc could be further used as a competitive guest of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) to displace the Rhodamine B (RhB) on the electrode. As a result, an amplified oxidation peak current of Fc (RhB) increased (decreased) with the increase of PrP(C) concentration. When "ΔI=ΔIFc+|ΔIRhB|" (ΔIFc and ΔIRhB were the change values of the oxidation peak currents of Fc and RhB, respectively.) was used as the response signal for quantitative determination of PrP(C), the detection limit was 7.6fM (3σ), which was much lower than that of the most reported methods for PrP(C) assay. This strategy provided a simple and sensitive approach for the detection of PrP(C) and has a great potential for bioanalysis, disease diagnostics, and clinical biomedicine applications. PMID:27208480

  18. The aging brain. Changes in the neuronal insulin/insulin receptor signal transduction cascade trigger late-onset sporadic Alzheimer disease (SAD). A mini-review.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Siegfried

    2002-07-01

    Aging of the brain has been demonstrated to be the main risk factor for late-onset sporadic AD what is in contrast to early-onset familial AD in which mutations predominate the pathology. Aging of the brain was found to be associated with a multitude of aberrancies from normal in morphological, cellular and molecular terms. Recent findings provide clear evidence that the function of the neuronal insulin/insulin receptor signal transduction cascade is of pivotal significance to maintain normal cerebral blood flow and oxidative energy metabolism, work of the endoplasmatic reticulum/Golgi apparatus and the cell cycle in terminally differentiated neurons no longer in the cell cycle. It has become evident that normal metabolism of both amyloid precursor protein and tau-protein is part of interactive processes controlled by the neuronal I/IR signal transduction cascade. In normal brain aging, the function of this cascade starts to fail compared to normal resulting in adverse effects in CBF/oxidative energy metabolism, work of the endoplasmatic reticulum/Golgi apparatus and cell cycle. The aberrancies may not be drastic, but multifold and permanently existing, inclusive the metabolism of APP and tau-protein. The amount of intraneuronally formed betaA4 may increase, and tau-protein may become hyperphosphorylated. These processes as a whole may increase the vulnerability of the aging brain and may facilitate the generation of late-onset sporadic AD. PMID:12111436

  19. Teaching an Old Hormone New Tricks: Cytosolic Ca2+ Elevation Involvement in Plant Brassinosteroid Signal Transduction Cascades1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yichen; Qi, Zhi; Berkowitz, Gerald A.

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are hormones that control many aspects of plant growth and development, acting at the cell level to promote division and expansion. BR regulation of plant and plant cell function occurs through altered expression of many genes. Transcriptional reprogramming downstream from cell perception of this hormone is currently known to be mediated by a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation (“phosphorelay”) cascade that alters the stability of two master transcription regulators. Here, we provide evidence that BR perception by their receptor also causes an elevation in cytosolic Ca2+, initiating a Ca2+ signaling cascade in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell cytosol. BR-dependent increases in the expression of some genes (INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID-INDUCIBLE1 and PHYTOCHROME B ACTIVATION-TAGGED SUPPRESSOR1) were impaired in wild-type plants by a Ca2+ channel blocker and also in the defense-no-death (dnd1) mutant, which lacks a functional cyclic GMP-activated cell membrane Ca2+-conducting channel. Alternatively, mutations that impair the BR phosphorelay cascade did not much affect the BR-dependent expression of these genes. Similar effects of the Ca2+ channel blocker and dnd1 mutation were observed on a BR plant growth phenotype, deetiolation of the seedling hypocotyl. Further evidence presented in this report suggests that a BR-dependent elevation in cyclic GMP may be involved in the Ca2+ signaling cascade initiated by this hormone. The work presented here leads to a new model of the molecular steps that mediate some of the cell responses to this plant hormone. PMID:23852441

  20. A Signaling Cascade from miR444 to RDR1 in Rice Antiviral RNA Silencing Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huacai; Jiao, Xiaoming; Kong, Xiaoyu; Hamera, Sadia; Wu, Yao; Chen, Xiaoying; Fang, Rongxiang; Yan, Yongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Plant RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE1 (RDR1) is a key component of the antiviral RNA-silencing pathway, contributing to the biogenesis of virus-derived small interfering RNAs. This enzyme also is responsible for producing virus-activated endogenous small interfering RNAs to stimulate the broad-spectrum antiviral activity through silencing host genes. The expression of RDR1 orthologs in various plants is usually induced by virus infection. However, the molecular mechanisms of activation of RDR1 expression in response to virus infection remain unknown. Here, we show that a monocot-specific microRNA, miR444, is a key factor in relaying the antiviral signaling from virus infection to OsRDR1 expression. The expression of miR444 is enhanced by infection with Rice stripe virus (RSV), and overexpression of miR444 improves rice (Oryza sativa) resistance against RSV infection accompanied by the up-regulation of OsRDR1 expression. We further show that three miR444 targets, the MIKC(C)-type MADS box proteins OsMADS23, OsMADS27a, and OsMADS57, form homodimers and heterodimers between them to repress the expression of OsRDR1 by directly binding to the CArG motifs of its promoter. Consequently, an increased level of miR444 diminishes the repressive roles of OsMADS23, OsMADS27a, and OsMADS57 on OsRDR1 transcription, thus activating the OsRDR1-dependent antiviral RNA-silencing pathway. We also show that overexpression of miR444-resistant OsMADS57 reduced OsRDR1 expression and rice resistance against RSV infection, and knockout of OsRDR1 reduced rice resistance against RSV infection. In conclusion, our results reveal a molecular cascade in the rice antiviral pathway in which miR444 and its MADS box targets directly control OsRDR1 transcription. PMID:26858364

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha mediates activation of NF-κB and JNK signaling cascades in retinal ganglion cells and astrocytes in opposite ways

    PubMed Central

    Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Ivanov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) is an important mediator of the innate immune response in the retina. TNF can activate various signaling cascades, including NF-κB, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways. The harmful role of these pathways, as well as of TNF, has previously been shown in several retinal neurodegenerative conditions including glaucoma and retinal ischemia. However, TNF and TNF-regulated signaling cascades are capable not only of mediating neurotoxicity, but of being protective. We performed this study to delineate the beneficial and detrimental effects of TNF signaling in the retina. To this end, we used TNF-treated primary retinal ganglion cell (RGC) and astrocyte cultures. Levels of expression of NF-κB subunits in RGCs and astrocytes were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blot (WB) analysis. NF-κB and JNK activity in TNF-treated cells was determined in a time-dependent manner using ELISA and WB. Gene expression in TNF-treated astrocytes was measured by qRT-PCR. We found that NF-κB family members were present in RGCs and astrocytes at the mRNA and protein levels. RGCs failed to activate NF-κB in the presence of TNF, a phenomenon that was associated with sustained JNK activation and RGC death. However, TNF initiated the activation of NF-κB and mediated transient JNK activation in astrocytes. These events were associated with glial survival and increased expression of neurotoxic pro-inflammatory factors. Our findings suggest that, in the presence of TNF, NF-κB and JNK signaling cascades are activated in opposite ways in RGCs and astrocytes. These events can directly and indirectly facilitate RGC death. PMID:25160799

  2. Small GTPase CDC-42 promotes apoptotic cell corpse clearance in response to PAT-2 and CED-1 in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Neukomm, L J; Zeng, S; Frei, A P; Huegli, P A; Hengartner, M O

    2014-01-01

    The rapid clearance of dying cells is important for the well-being of multicellular organisms. In C. elegans, cell corpse removal is mainly mediated by three parallel engulfment signaling cascades. These pathways include two small GTPases, MIG-2/RhoG and CED-10/Rac1. Here we present the identification and characterization of CDC-42 as a third GTPase involved in the regulation of cell corpse clearance. Genetic analyses performed by both loss of cdc-42 function and cdc-42 overexpression place cdc-42 in parallel to the ced-2/5/12 signaling module, in parallel to or upstream of the ced-10 module, and downstream of the ced-1/6/7 module. CDC-42 accumulates in engulfing cells at membranes surrounding apoptotic corpses. The formation of such halos depends on the integrins PAT-2/PAT-3, UNC-112 and the GEF protein UIG-1, but not on the canonical ced-1/6/7 or ced-2/5/12 signaling modules. Together, our results suggest that the small GTPase CDC-42 regulates apoptotic cell engulfment possibly upstream of the canonical Rac GTPase CED-10, by polarizing the engulfing cell toward the apoptotic corpse in response to integrin signaling and ced-1/6/7 signaling in C. elegans. PMID:24632947

  3. Effects of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and low-dose progesterone treatment on apoptotic processes, expression and subcellular localization of key elements within Akt and Erk signaling pathways in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Stanojlović, M; Guševac, I; Grković, I; Zlatković, J; Mitrović, N; Zarić, M; Horvat, A; Drakulić, D

    2015-12-17

    The present study attempted to investigate how chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) and repeated low-dose progesterone (P) treatment affect gene and protein expression, subcellular distribution of key apoptotic elements within protein kinase B (Akt) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk) signal transduction pathways, as well as neurodegenerative processes and behavior. The results revealed the absence of Erk activation in CCH in cytosolic and synaptosomal fractions, indicating a lower threshold of Akt activation in brain ischemia, while P increased their levels above control values. CCH induced an increase in caspase 3 (Casp 3) and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) gene and protein expression. However, P restored expression of examined molecules in all observed fractions, except for the levels of Casp 3 in synapses which highlighted its possible non-apoptotic or even protective function. Our study showed the absence of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated b cells (NF-κB) response to this type of ischemic condition and its strong activation under the influence of P. Further, the initial increase in the number of apoptotic cells and amount of DNA fragmentation induced by CCH was significantly reduced by P. Finally, P reversed the CCH-induced reduction in locomotor activity, while promoting a substantial decrease in anxiety-related behavior. Our findings support the concept that repeated low-dose post-ischemic P treatment reduces CCH-induced neurodegeneration in the hippocampus. Neuroprotection is initiated through the activation of investigated kinases and regulation of their downstream molecules in subcellular specific manner, indicating that this treatment may be a promising therapy for alleviation of CCH-induced pathologies. PMID:26518459

  4. Oxidant Stress and Signal Transduction in the Nervous System with the PI 3-K, Akt, and mTOR Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Wang, Shaohui; Shang, Yan Chen

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress impacts multiple systems of the body and can lead to some of the most devastating consequences in the nervous system especially during aging. Both acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as diabetes mellitus, cerebral ischemia, trauma, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and tuberous sclerosis through programmed cell death pathways of apoptosis and autophagy can be the result of oxidant stress. Novel therapeutic avenues that focus upon the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-K), Akt (protein kinase B), and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) cascade and related pathways offer exciting prospects to address the onset and potential reversal of neurodegenerative disorders. Effective clinical translation of these pathways into robust therapeutic strategies requires intimate knowledge of the complexity of these pathways and the ability of this cascade to influence biological outcome that can vary among disorders of the nervous system. PMID:23203037

  5. Activation of AMPA receptor promotes TNF-α release via the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade in RAW264.7 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Xiu-Li; Ding, Fan; Li, Hui; Tan, Xiao-Qiu; Liu, Xiao; Cao, Ji-Min; Gao, Xue

    2015-05-29

    The relationship between glutamate signaling and inflammation has not been well defined. This study aimed to investigate the role of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) in the expression and release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) from macrophages and the underlying mechanisms. A series of approaches, including confocal microscopy, immunofluorescency, flow cytometry, ELISA and Western blotting, were used to estimate the expression of AMPAR and downstream signaling molecules, TNF-α release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. The results demonstrated that AMPAR was expressed in RAW264.7 cells. AMPA significantly enhanced TNF-α release from RAW264.7 cells, and this effect was abolished by CNQX (AMPAR antagonist). AMPA also induced elevation of ROS production, phosphorylation of c-Src and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in RAW264.7 cells. Blocking c-Src by PP2, scavenging ROS by glutathione (GSH) or inhibiting NF-κB activation by pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) decreased TNF-α production from RAW264.7 cells. We concluded that AMPA promotes TNF-α release in RAW264.7 macrophages likely through the following signaling cascade: AMPAR activation → ROS generation → c-Src phosphorylation → NF-κB activation → TNF-α elevation. The study suggests that AMPAR may participate in macrophage activation and inflammation. - Highlights: • AMPAR is expressed in RAW264.7 macrophages and is upregulated by AMPA stimulation. • Activation of AMPAR stimulates TNF-α release in macrophages through the ROS-cSrc-NFκB signaling cascade. • Macrophage AMPAR signaling may play an important role in inflammation.

  6. Ascochlorin, an isoprenoid antibiotic inhibits growth and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting STAT3 signaling cascade through the induction of PIAS3.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaoyun; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Kim, Chulwon; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Ong, Tina H; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Li, Feng; Shi, Jizhong; Kumar, Alan Prem; Wang, Ling Zhi; Goh, Boon Cher; Magae, Junji; Hui, Kam M; Sethi, Gautam

    2015-04-01

    Deregulated activation of oncogenic transcription factors such as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays a pivotal role in proliferation and survival of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Thus, agents which can inhibit STAT3 activation may have an enormous potential for treatment of HCC patients. Hence, in the present report, we investigated the effect of ascochlorin (ASC), an isoprenoid antibiotic on STAT3 activation cascade in various HCC cell lines and orthotopic mouse model. We observed that ASC could substantially inhibit both constitutive and IL-6/EGF inducible STAT3 activation as well as reduce its DNA binding ability. ASC increased the expression of protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3) which could bind to STAT3 DNA binding domain and thereby down-regulate STAT3 activation. Deletion of PIAS3 gene by siRNA abolished the ability of ASC to inhibit STAT3 activation and induce apoptosis in HCC cells. ASC also modulated the expression of diverse STAT3-regulated oncogenic gene products. Finally, when administered intraperitoneally, ASC also inhibited tumor growth in an orthotopic HCC mouse model and reduced STAT3 activation in tumor tissues. Overall our results indicate that ASC mediates its anti-tumor effects predominantly through the suppression of STAT3 signaling cascade, and can form the basis of novel therapy for HCC patients. PMID:25624051

  7. Differences in the control of basal L-type Ca(2+) current by the cyclic AMP signaling cascade in frog, rat, and human cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Treinys, Rimantas; Bogdelis, Andrius; Rimkutė, Lina; Jurevičius, Jonas; Skeberdis, Vytenis Arvydas

    2016-07-01

    β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) mediate the positive inotropic effects of catecholamines by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of the L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs), which provide Ca(2+) for the initiation and regulation of cell contraction. The overall effect of cAMP-modulating agents on cardiac calcium current (I Ca,L) and contraction depends on the basal activity of LTCCs which, in turn, depends on the basal activities of key enzymes involved in the cAMP signaling cascade. Our current work is a comparative study demonstrating the differences in the basal activities of β-ARs, adenylyl cyclase, phosphodiesterases, phosphatases, and LTCCs in the frog and rat ventricular and human atrial myocytes. The main conclusion is that the basal I Ca,L, and consequently the contractile function of the heart, is secured from unnecessary elevation of its activity and energy consumption at the several "checking-points" of cAMP-dependent signaling cascade and the loading of these "checking-points" may vary in different species and tissues. PMID:26676115

  8. Fangchinoline suppresses the growth and invasion of human glioblastoma cells by inhibiting the kinase activity of Akt and Akt-mediated signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bingyu; Xie, Peng; Su, Jingyuan; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Xiaoming; Liang, Guobiao

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most palindromic and malignant central nervous system neoplasms, and the current treatment is not effectual for GBM. Research of specific medicine for GBM is significant. Fangchinoline possesses a wide range of pharmacological activities and attracts more attentions due to its anti-tumor effects. In this study, two WHO grade IV human GBM cell lines (U87 MG and U118 MG) were exposed to fangchinoline, and we found that fangchinoline specifically inhibits the kinase activity of Akt and markedly suppresses the phosphorylation of Thr308 and Ser473 of Akt in human GBM cells. We also observed that fangchinoline inhibits tumor cell proliferation and invasiveness and induces apoptosis through suppressing the Akt-mediated signaling cascades, including Akt/p21, Akt/Bad, and Akt/matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). These data demonstrated that fangchinoline exerts its anti-tumor effects in human glioblastoma cells, at least partly by inhibiting the kinase activity of Akt and suppressing Akt-mediated signaling cascades. PMID:26408176

  9. Ginsenoside Rd Attenuates Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury via Akt/GSK-3β Signaling and Inhibition of the Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptotic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Lau, Waynebond; Wang, Yajing; Xing, Yuan; Zhang, Xing; Ma, Xinliang; Gao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests Ginsenoside Rd (GSRd), a biologically active extract from the medical plant Panax Ginseng, exerts antioxidant effect, decreasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Current study determined the effect of GSRd on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury (a pathological condition where ROS production is significantly increased) and investigated the underlying mechanisms. The current study utilized an in vivo rat model of MI/R injury and an in vitro neonatal rat cardiomyocyte (NRC) model of simulated ischemia/reperfusion (SI/R) injury. Infarct size was measured by Evans blue/TTC double staining. NRC injury was determined by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assay. ROS accumulation and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was determined by 5, 5′, 6, 6′-tetrachloro-1, 1′, 3, 3′-tetrathylbenzimidazol carbocyanine iodide (JC-1). Cytosolic translocation of mitochondrial cytochrome c and expression of caspase-9, caspase-3, Bcl-2 family proteins, and phosphorylated Akt and GSK-3β were determined by western blot. Pretreatment with GSRd (50 mg/kg) significantly augmented rat cardiac function, as evidenced by increased left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and ±dP/dt. GSRd reduced myocardial infarct size, apoptotic cell death, and blood creatine kinase/lactate dehydrogenase levels after MI/R. In NRCs, GSRd (10 µM) inhibited SI/R-induced ROS generation (P<0.01), decreased cellular apoptosis, stabilized the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and attenuated cytosolic translocation of mitochondrial cytochrome c. GSRd inhibited activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, increased the phosphorylated Akt and GSK-3β, and increased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Together, these data demonstrate GSRd mediated cardioprotective effect against MI/R–induced apoptosis via a mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathway. PMID:23976968

  10. A coumarin derivative (RKS262) inhibits cell-cycle progression, causes pro-apoptotic signaling and cytotoxicity in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh K.; Lange, Thilo S.; Kim, Kyu Kwang

    2011-01-01

    Summary Coumarin derivative RKS262 belongs to a new class of potential anti-tumor agents. RKS262 was identified by structural optimization of Nifurtimox which is currently undergoing phase II clinical trials to treat high-risk neuroblastoma. In a NCI60 cell-line assay RKS262 exhibited significant cytotoxicity in ovarian cancer cells and a variety of other cell lines exceeding effects of commercial drugs such as cisplatin, 5-FU, cyclophosphamide or sapacitabine. Various leukemia cell-lines were most sensitive (GI50:~10 nM) while several non-small cell lung cancer cell lines and few cell lines from other tissues were relatively resistant (GI50> *1µM) to RKS262 treatment. The mechanism of cytotoxicity was examined using ovarian cancer cell-line OVCAR-3 as a model. RKS262 treatment resulted in a reduced mitochondria-transmembrane-depolarization potential. RKS262 effects included up-regulation of apoptotic markers and were not correlated with activation of proapoptotic MAP-Kinases (p38, SAP/JNK). RKS262 exerted strong inhibitory effects on oncogene ras, down-regulated DNA-pk KU-80 subunit expression and caused activation of Akt. A signature effect of RKS262 is the regulation of the mitochondrial Bcl2-family pathway. Pro-apoptotic factors Bid, Bad and Bok were up-regulated while expression of pro-survival factors Bcl-xl and Mcl-1 was inhibited. Moreover, at sub-cytotoxic doses RKS262 delayed OVCAR-3 cell-cycle progression through G2 phase and up-regulated p27 while cyclin-D1 and Cdk-6 were down-regulated, indicating that RKS262 is a specific cyclin/CDK inhibitor. In summary, RKS262 has been identified as a molecule belonging to a new class of potential chemotherapeutic agents affecting the viability of multiple cancer cell-lines and causing selective adverse effects on the viability of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:19865799