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Sample records for appalachian basin exploration

  1. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-04-01

    Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core

  2. Appalachian basin bibliography. Topical report, March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Picciano, L.; Armstrong, T.S.

    1994-03-01

    More than 120 Gas Research Institute reports on gas exploration and production in the Appalachian Basin are listed. They cover geology and reservoir engineering in three gas producing formations: shales, tight gas sands, and coal seams.

  3. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Patchen; Katharine Lee Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Hohn; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; James A. Drahovzal; Christopher D. Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski

    2005-04-01

    The Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Research Consortium has made significant progress toward their goal of producing a geologic play book for the Trenton-Black River gas play. The final product will include a resource assessment model of Trenton-Black River reservoirs; possible fairways within which to concentrate further studies and seismic programs; and a model for the origin of Trenton-Black River hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 15 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. In addition, three surfaces for the area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. A 16-layer velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Considerable progress was made in fault trend delineation and seismic-stratigraphic correlation within the project area. Isopach maps and a network of gamma-ray cross sections supplemented with core descriptions allowed researchers to more clearly define the architecture of the basin during Middle and Late Ordovician time, the control of basin architecture on carbonate and shale deposition and eventually, the location of reservoirs in Trenton Limestone and Black River Group carbonates. The basin architecture itself may be structurally controlled, and this fault-related structural control along platform margins influenced the formation of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in original limestone facies deposited in high energy environments. This resulted in productive trends along the northwest margin of the Trenton platform in Ohio. The continuation of this platform margin into New York should provide further areas with good exploration potential. The focus of the petrographic study shifted from cataloging a broad spectrum of carbonate rocks that occur in the

  4. CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Patchen; Chris Laughrey; Jaime Kostelnik; James Drahovzal; John B. Hickman; Paul D. Lake; John Bocan; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Katharine Lee Avary

    2004-10-01

    The ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' has reached the mid-point in a two-year research effort to produce a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 exploration and production companies and 6 research team members, including four state geological surveys, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks and one administrative and technology transfer task are being conducted basin-wide by research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. All seismic data available to the consortium have been examined at least once. Synthetic seismograms constructed for specific wells have enabled researchers to correlate the tops of 10 stratigraphic units determined from well logs to seismic profiles in New York and Pennsylvania. In addition, three surfaces in that area have been depth converted, gridded and mapped. In the Kentucky-Ohio-West Virginia portion of the study area, a velocity model has been developed to help constrain time-to-depth conversions. Fifteen formation tops have been identified on seismic in that area. Preliminary conclusions based on the available seismic data do not support the extension of the Rome Trough into New York state. Members of the stratigraphy task team measured, described and photographed numerous cores from throughout the basin, and tied these data back to their network of geophysical log cross sections. Geophysical logs were scanned in raster files for use in detailed well examination and construction of cross sections. Logs on these cross sections that are only in raster format are being converted to vector format for final cross section displays. The petrology team measured and sampled one classic outcrop in Pennsylvania and ten cores in four states. More than 600 thin sections were prepared from samples in those four states. A seven-step procedure is being used to analyze all thin

  5. Creating a Geologic Play Book for Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Patchen; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski; David Harris; John Hickman; John Bocan; Michael Hohn

    2005-09-30

    Preliminary isopach and facies maps, combined with a literature review, were used to develop a sequence of basin geometry, architecture and facies development during Cambrian and Ordovician time. The main architectural features--basins, sub basins and platforms--were identified and mapped as their positions shifted with time. This is significant because a better understanding of the control of basin geometry and architecture on the distribution of key facies and on subsequent reservoir development in Ordovician carbonates within the Trenton and Black River is essential for future exploration planning. Good exploration potential is thought to exist along the entire platform margin, where clean grainstones were deposited in skeletal shoals from Indiana thorough Ohio and Ontario into Pennsylvania. The best reservoir facies for the development of hydrothermal dolomites appears to be these clean carbonates. This conclusion is supported by observations taken in existing fields in Indiana, Ontario, Ohio and New York. In contrast, Trenton-Black River production in Kentucky and West Virginia has been from fractured, but non-dolomitized, limestone reservoirs. Facies maps indicate that these limestones were deposited under conditions that led to a higher argillaceous content than the cleaner limestones deposited in higher-energy environments along platform margins. However, even in the broad area of argillaceous limestones, clean limestone buildups have been observed in eastern outcrops and, if present and dolomitized in the subsurface, may provide additional exploration targets. Structure and isopach maps developed as part of the structural and seismic study supported the basin architecture and geometry conclusions, and from them some structural control on the location of architectural features may be inferred. This portion of the study eventually will lead to a determination of the timing relative to fracturing, dolomitization and hydrocarbon charging of reservoirs in the

  6. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  7. Iron control in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, W.R.; Fredette, G.

    1983-11-01

    The Appalachian Basin presents one of the most challenging production and stimulation problems because of the iron content of its hydrocarbon producing formations. A variety of iron compounds in the producing formations present problems that have to be considered to effectively stimulate these formations. A research program was initiated in the later part of 1980 to determine methods of more effectively controlling the iron problems in the Appalachian Basin. Results of this study provide data for comparing the effectiveness of various iron control systems that are used in acid stimulation or breakdown techniques that minimize the release of acid insoluble solids and stabilizes them to decrease the detrimental effect caused by fines migration. Also developed in this study was an iron control system that helps the compatibility of the treating fluid with ferrous iron in the formation water. Flow test data and field results indicate the effectiveness of these iron control systems and treating techniques.

  8. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-06-01

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  9. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  10. Bulge Migration and Pinnacle Reef Development, Devonian Appalachian Foreland Basin.

    PubMed

    Ver Straeten CA; Brett

    2000-05-01

    Detailed stratigraphic analyses of Late Emsian and Early Eifelian (Lower to Middle Devonian) carbonate-dominated strata in the northern Appalachian Basin indicate anomalous, locally varying relative sea level changes and inversions of topography. The distribution of a major basal-bounding unconformity, basinal pinnacle reefs, local absence of parasequences, and eastward migration of shallow marine carbonate lithofacies and related biofacies in the Onondaga Limestone and underlying strata mark the retrograde migration of an elongate, northeast-southwest-trending area of positive relief, bordered on its cratonward side by a similarly migrating basin of intermediate depth. These features are thought to represent the forebulge and back-bulge basin of the Appalachian foreland basin system as it developed during a time of relative quiescence within the Acadian Orogeny. However, the relatively small size of the bulgelike feature (ca. 80-100-km-wide, 20-50-m positive relief), its great distance from the probable deformation front (>400 km), and the lack of a well-developed foredeep immediately adjacent to the bulgelike feature may indicate that it represents a smaller-scale flexural high ("flexural welt") superposed over the cratonward edge of the larger-scale classical forebulge of the basin. Development of shallow-water reefs on the crest of the bulge during sea level lowstand, followed by migration of the bulge and widespread transgression, permitted growth of economically significant pinnacle reefs in the deep basin center. Further subsurface reef exploration should concentrate along the projected position of the bulge during the basal Onondaga lowstand. PMID:10769160

  11. Tioga Bentonite in the Appalachian basin: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, J.M.

    1986-11-01

    The Tioga Bentonite is an interval up to 258 ft (79 m) thick with several tuff layers. It is present throughout nearly all of the central and northern portion of the Appalachian basin, but is missing in the southern Appalachian basin because of the unconformity at the base of the Chattanooga Shale. In parts of the southern Ohio outcrop belt the Tioga Bentonite is uncomformably omitted by overstep of the Ohio Shale, as is true in the Kentucky outcrops on the west side of the Appalachian basin. The Tioga Bentonite also occurs in the Illinois basin, where it is called by the same name in southwestern Indiana, Illinois, and western Kentucky. In the Michigan basin the Kawkawlin Bentonite is probably the same bed as the Tioga Bentonite middle coarse zone of the Appalachian basin. The top of the Tioga middle coarse zone marks the top of the Onesquethaw Stage of the Devonian System throughout 102,000 sq mi (265,000 sq km) in the Appalachian basin. The base of Devonian shales is diachronous in the Appalachian basin, occurring about 530 ft (160 m) below the Tioga middle coarse zone in northeastern Virginia, and about 45 ft (14 m) above the Tioga middle coarse zone in central Ohio. This report lists well and outcrop data for 763 localities where the Tioga Bentonite has been identified in the Appalachian basin. A series of detailed stratigraphic cross sections of the Tioga ash beds shows the internal stratigraphy of the Tioga Bentonite and its relation to overlying and underlying strata.

  12. Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2014-01-01

    Professional Paper 1708 is intended primarily for geoscientists in academia, industry, and government who are interested in Appalachian basin geology and its coal and petroleum resources. Other users, however, may find the topics, papers, and digital images valuable for land-use and policy planning. Among the anticipated benefits of the report are improvements in (1) resource assessment estimates and methodology, (2) exploration strategies, (3) basin models, and (4) energy use policies.

  13. Pennsylvanian gastropod Pseudozygopleura (Pseudozygopleura) from the Appalachian basin: II

    SciTech Connect

    Hoare, R.E.; Sturgeon, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-five additional taxa to those described by Hoare and Sturgeon (1981) of the gastropod Pseudozygopleura (Pseudozygopleura) are described from the Pennsylvania System of the Appalachian Basin. A key for identification of known Pennsylvanian species from this region is included.

  14. Subsurface geology of the Warfield structures in southwestern West Virginia: Implications for tectonic deformation and hydrocarbon exploration in the Central Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, D.; Shumaker, R.C.

    1996-08-01

    Data from over 6000 wells and five multichannel reflection seismic lines were used to constrain the subsurface geometry of the Warfield structures in southwestern West Virginia within the central Appalachian basin. Based on their vertical differences in geometry and structural styles, we divided the Warfield structures into shallow (above the Devonian Onondaga Limestone), intermediate (between the Devonian Onondaga Limestone and the Silurian Tuscarora Sandstone), and deep (below the Ordovician Trenton horizon) structural levels. Shallow structures are related to the Alleghanian deformation above the major detachment horizon of the Devonian shales and consist of the Warfield anticline with a 91.5-m closure and southeast-dipping monoclines, which aided the northwest migration and entrapment of oil and gas. At the intermediate level, the closure of the Warfield anticline is lost because the Alleghanian deformation is obscured below the major detachment of the Devonian shales, which explains the reduced production from the Devonian and Silurian reservoirs. Deep structures are characterized by an asymmetric half graben within a continental rift system known as the Rome trough, in which a thick sequence of sedimentary rocks exists to provide sources for overlying reservoirs. Although stratigraphic traps may be associated with thickness and facies changes, the deep level is structurally unfavorable for trapping hydrocarbons. Based on changes we found in map trend, we divided the Warfield structures into a middle segment and southern and northern bends. The middle segment is parallel to the New York-Alabama lineament (a northeast-trending magnetic gradient); the southern and the northern bends are linked to the 38th parallel lineament (a west-trending fault system) and the Burning Springs-Mann Mountain lineament (a north-trending magnetic gradient), respectively.

  15. Appalachian basin coal-bed methane: Elephant or flea

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.M. )

    1991-08-01

    Historically, interest in the Appalachian basin coal-bed methane resource extends at least over the last 50 years. The Northern and Central Appalachian basins are estimated to contain 61 tcf and 5 tcf of coal-bed methane gas, respectively. Development of this resource has not kept pace with that of other basins, such as the Black Warrior basin of Alabama of the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico and Colorado. Without the benefit of modern completion, stimulation, and production technology, some older Appalachian basin coal-bed methane wells were reported to have produced in excess of 150 used here to characterize some past projects and their results. This work is not intended to comprise a comprehensive survey of all Appalachian basin projects, but rather to provide background information from which to proceed for those who may be interested in doing so. Several constraints to the development of this resource have been identified, including conflicting legal rights of ownership of the gas produced from the coal seams when coal and conventional oil and gas rights are controlled by separate parties. In addition, large leaseholds have been difficult to acquire and finding costs have been high. However, the threshold of minimum economic production may be relatively low when compared with other areas, because low-pressures pipelines are available and gas prices are among the highest in the nation. Interest in the commercial development of the resource seems to be on the increase with several projects currently active and more reported to be planned for the near future.

  16. Effects of Hydrocarbon Extraction on Landscapes of the Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, Terry E.; Milheim, Lesley E.; Roig-Silva, Coral M.; Kalaly, Siddiq S.

    2015-01-01

    The need for energy resources has created numerous economic opportunities for hydrocarbon extraction in the Appalachian basin. The development of alternative energy natural gas resources from deep-shale drilling techniques, along with conventional natural gas extraction methods, has created a flurry of wells, roads, pipelines, and related infrastructure across many parts of the region. An unintended and sometimes overlooked consequence of these activities is their effect on the structure and function of the landscape and ecosystems. The collective effect of over 100,000 hydrocarbon extraction permits for oil, coal bed methane, Marcellus and Utica Shale natural gas wells, and other types of hydrocarbon gases and their associated infrastructure has saturated much of the landscape and disturbed the natural environment in the Appalachian basin. The disturbance created by the sheer magnitude of the development of these collective wells and infrastructure directly affects how the landscape and ecosystems function and how they provide ecological goods and services. 

  17. The central and northern Appalachian Basin-a frontier region for coalbed methane development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Appalachian basin is the world's second largest coalbed-methane (CBM) producing basin. It has nearly 4000 wells with 1996 annual production at 147.8 billion cubic feet (Bcf). Cumulative CBM production is close to 0.9 trillion cubic feet (Tcf). The Black Warrior Basin of Alabama in the southern Appalachian basin (including a very minor amount from the Cahaba coal field) accounts for about 75% of this annual production and about 75% of the wells, and the remainder comes from the central and northern Appalachian basin. The Southwest Virginia coal field accounts for about 95% of the production from the central and northern parts of the Appalachian basin. Production data and trends imply that several of the Appalachian basin states, except for Alabama and Virginia, are in their infancy with respect to CBM development. Total in-place CBM resources in the central and northern Appalachian basin have been variously estimated at 66 to 76 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), of which an estimated 14.55 Tcf (~ 20%) is technically recoverable according to a 1995 U.S. Geological Survey assessment. For comparison in the Black Warrior basin of the 20 Tcf in-place CBM resources, 2.30 Tcf (~ 12%) is technically recoverable. Because close to 0.9 Tcf of CBM has already been produced from the Black Warrior basin and the proved reserves are about 0.8 Tcf for 1996 [Energy Information Administration (EIA), 1997]. U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves, 1996 Annual Report. U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EIA-0216(96), 145 pp.], these data imply that the central and northern Appalachian basin could become increasingly important in the Appalachian basin CBM picture as CBM resources are depleted in the southern Appalachian basin (Black Warrior Basin and Cahaba Coal Field). CBM development in the Appalachian states could decrease the eastern U.S.A.'s dependence on coal for electricity. CBM is expected to provide over the next few decades a virtually untapped source of

  18. Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

    2004-09-15

    Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Appalachian coal assessment: Defining the coal systems of the Appalachian basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, R.C.

    2005-01-01

    The coal systems concept may be used to organize the geologic data for a relatively large, complex area, such as the Appalachian basin, in order to facilitate coal assessments in the area. The concept is especially valuable in subjective assessments of future coal production, which would require a detailed understanding of the coal geology and coal chemistry of the region. In addition, subjective assessments of future coal production would be enhanced by a geographical information system that contains the geologic and geochemical data commonly prepared for conventional coal assessments. Coal systems are generally defined as one or more coal beds or groups of coal beds that have had the same or similar genetic history from their inception as peat deposits, through their burial, diagenesis, and epigenesis to their ultimate preservation as lignite, bituminous coal, or anthracite. The central and northern parts of the Appalachian basin contain seven coal systems (Coal Systems A-G). These systems may be defined generally on the following criteria: (1) on the primary characteristics of their paleopeat deposits, (2) on the stratigraphic framework of the Paleozoic coal measures, (3) on the relative abundance of coal beds within the major stratigraphic groupings, (4) on the amount of sulfur related to the geologic and climatic conditions under which paleopeat deposits accumulated, and (5) on the rank of the coal (lignite to anthracite). ??2005 Geological Society of America.

  20. Coalbed methane resources of the Appalachian Basin, eastern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, Robert C.; Hatch, Joseph R.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessed the technically recoverable, undiscovered coalbed-gas resources in the Appalachian basin and Black Warrior basin Assessment Provinces as about 15.5 trillion cubic feet. Although these resources are almost equally divided between the two areas, most of the production occurs within relatively small areas within these Provinces, where local geological and geochemical attributes have resulted in the generation and retention of large amounts of methane within the coal beds and have enhanced the producibility of the gas from the coal. In the Appalachian basin, coalbed methane (CBM) tests are commonly commercial where the cumulative coal thickness completed in wells is greater than three meters (10 ft), the depth of burial of the coal beds is greater than 100 m (350 ft), and the coal is in the thermogenic gas window. In addition to the ubiquitous cleating within the coal beds, commercial production may be enhanced by secondary fracture porosity related to supplemental fracture systems within the coal beds. In order to release the methane from microporus coal matrix, most wells are dewatered prior to commercial production of gas. Two Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) were defined by the USGS during the assessment: the Pottsville Coal-bed gas TPS in Alabama, and the Carboniferous Coal-bed Gas TPS in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, Virginia, Tennessee, and Alabama. These were divided into seven assessment units, of which three had sufficient data to be assessed. Production rates are higher in most horizontal wells drilled into relatively thick coal beds, than in vertical wells; recovery per unit area is greater, and potential adverse environmental impact is decreased.

  1. Executive summary: Chapter A.1 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    This publication supplements and updates older USGS regional studies of Appalachian basin coal and petroleum resources such as those by Arndt and others (1968) and the numerous contributors to USGS Miscellaneous Map Series I−917 (for example, Harris and others, 1978), respectively. USGS Professional Paper 1708 is intended primarily for geoscientists in academia, industry, and government who are interested in Appalachian basin geology and its coal and petroleum resources. Other users, however, may find the wide variety of topics, papers, and digital images of value for landuse and policy planning issues. Among the anticipated benefits of the report are improvements in (1) resource assessment estimates and methodology, (2) exploration strategies, (3) basin models, and (4) energy use policies.

  2. Clay mineralogy of Devonian shales in the Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hosterman, J.W.; Whitlow, S.T.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the clay mineralogy of the Devonian black shales of the Appalachian basin was undertaken to help predict areas for potential gas resources. Illite (2m) recrystallized during diagenesis is more or less uniformly present throughout all shale units. Chlorite formed during low grade metamorphism is least abundant in the younger units and more abundant in the older units. Illite-smectite mixed-layer clay, which supplied the material for the formation of chlorite, is most abundant in the younger units and least abundant in the older units. Illite-chlorite mixed-layer clay occurs as a trace in all shale units. Kaolinite, the only unaltered detrital clay mineral, occurs in ca. 25 to 30% of the samples. The source of the kaolinite appears to have been to the east and northeast of the basin of deposition. The color of the shale units is primarily due to the organic content; however, those shales that contain calcite are darker than those that do not for equal amounts of organic carbon. 24 references.

  3. Overview of the potential and identified petroleum source rocks of the Appalachian basin, eastern United States: Chapter G.13 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, James L., Jr.; Ryder, Robert T.; Milici, Robert C.; Brown, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The Appalachian basin is the oldest and longest producing commercially viable petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Source rocks for reservoirs within the basin are located throughout the entire stratigraphic succession and extend geographically over much of the foreland basin and fold-and-thrust belt that make up the Appalachian basin. Major source rock intervals occur in Ordovician, Devonian, and Pennsylvanian strata with minor source rock intervals present in Cambrian, Silurian, and Mississippian strata.

  4. Coalbed-methane production in the Appalachian basin: Chapter G.2 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, Robert C.; Polyak, Désirée E.

    2014-01-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the northern, central, and southern Appalachian basin coal regions, which extend almost continuously from Pennsylvania southward to Alabama. Most commercial CBM production in the Appalachian basin is from three structural subbasins: (1) the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; (2) the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and (3) part of the Black Warrior basin in Alabama. The cumulative CBM production in the Dunkard basin through 2005 was 17 billion cubic feet (BCF), the production in the Pocahontas basin through 2006 was 754 BCF, and the production in the part of the Black Warrior basin in Alabama through 2007 was 2.008 TCF. CBM development may be regarded as mature in Alabama, where annual production from 1998 through 2007 was relatively constant and ranged from 112 to 121 BCF. An opportunity still exists for additional growth in the Pocahontas basin. In 2005, annual CBM production in the Pocahontas basin in Virginia and West Virginia was 85 BCF. In addition, opportunities are emerging for producing the large, diffuse CBM resources in the Dunkard basin as additional wells are drilled and technology improves.

  5. Paleozoic unconformities favorable for uranium concentration in northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Unconformities can redistribute uranium from protore rock as ground water moves through poorly consolidated strata beneath the erosion surface, or later moves along the unconformity. Groundwater could migrate farther than in present-day lithified Paleozoic strata in the Appalachian basin, now locally deformed by the Taconic and Allegheny orogenies. Several paleoaquifer systems could have developed uranium geochemical cells. Sandstone mineralogy, occurrences of fluvial strata, and reduzate facies are important factors. Other possibilities include silcrete developed during desert exposure, and uranium concentrated in paleokarst. Thirteen unconformities are evaluated to determine favorable areas for uranium concentration. Cambrian Potsdam sandstone (New York) contains arkoses and possible silcretes just above crystalline basement. Unconformities involving beveled sandstones and possible fluvial strata include Cambrian Hardyston sandstone (New Jersey), Cambrian Potsdam Sandstone (New York), Ordovician Oswego and Juniata formations (Pennsylvania and New York), Silurian Medina Group (New York), and Silurian Vernon, High Falls, and Longwood formations (New York and New Jersey). Devonian Catskill Formation is beveled by Pennsylvanian strata (New York and Pennsylvania). The pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity also bevels Lower Mississippian Pocono, Knapp, and Waverly strata (Pennsylvania, New York, and Ohio), truncates Upper Mississippian Mauch Chunk Formation (Pennsylvania), and forms paleokarst on Mississippian Loyalhanna Limestone (Pennsylvania) and Maxville Limestone (Ohio). Strata associated with these unconformities contain several reports of uranium. Unconformities unfavorable for uranium concentration occur beneath the Middle Ordovician (New York), Middle Devonian (Ohio and New York), and Upper Devonian (Ohio and New York); these involve marine strata overlying marine strata and probably much submarine erosion.

  6. Middle Devonian (Eifelian) carbonates, Appalachian Basin: A new stratigraphic synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ver Straeten, C.A.; Brett, C.E. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-04-01

    Carbonate-dominated strata equivalent to the Onondaga Formation of New York are widely known across eastern North America, from the James Bay Region of Ontario to southeastern Quebec to Georgia to Illinois. Relationships between Onondaga-equivalent strata within the Appalachian Basin itself, however, have been poorly understood. Detailed stratigraphic study of interbedded limestones and calcareous shales of the Selinsgrove Member (Needmore Formation) in central Pennsylvania reveals a number of distinctive marker units that are widely traceable throughout the region. Marker units include: a massive limestone; shale-dominated intervals; several thin black shales; the widely recognized Tioga Ash Beds; distinctive yellow to gray clays that represent additional apparent K-bentonite beds; and pyrite nodule-rich intervals. Combined, these form a very distinctive microstratigraphic framework that is widely correlatable across central Pennsylvania. This microstratigraphic framework is directly correlatable into the Onondaga Limestone of central New York, Direct comparison of the New York and Pennsylvania sections permit recognition of four subunits of the Selinsgrove Member that are equivalent to the four members of the Onondaga Formation (Edgecliff, Nedrow, Moorehouse, and Seneca Members). Therefore, it is shown that the Selinsgrove Member of the Needmore Formation is the direct equivalent of the Onondaga Formation of New York.

  7. Appalachian Basin Low-Permeability Sandstone Reservoir Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Boswell; Susan Pool; Skip Pratt; David Matchen

    1993-04-30

    A preliminary assessment of Appalachian basin natural gas reservoirs designated as 'tight sands' by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) suggests that greater than 90% of the 'tight sand' resource occurs within two groups of genetically-related units; (1) the Lower Silurian Medina interval, and (2) the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Acadian clastic wedge. These intervals were targeted for detailed study with the goal of producing geologic reservoir characterization data sets compatible with the Tight Gas Analysis System (TGAS: ICF Resources, Inc.) reservoir simulator. The first phase of the study, completed in September, 1991, addressed the Medina reservoirs. The second phase, concerned with the Acadian clastic wedge, was completed in October, 1992. This report is a combined and updated version of the reports submitted in association with those efforts. The Medina interval consists of numerous interfingering fluvial/deltaic sandstones that produce oil and natural gas along an arcuate belt that stretches from eastern Kentucky to western New York. Geophysical well logs from 433 wells were examined in order to determine the geologic characteristics of six separate reservoir-bearing intervals. The Acadian clastic wedge is a thick, highly-lenticular package of interfingering fluvial-deltaic sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Geologic analyses of more than 800 wells resulted in a geologic/engineering characterization of seven separate stratigraphic intervals. For both study areas, well log and other data were analyzed to determine regional reservoir distribution, reservoir thickness, lithology, porosity, water saturation, pressure and temperature. These data were mapped, evaluated, and compiled into various TGAS data sets that reflect estimates of original gas-in-place, remaining reserves, and 'tight' reserves. The maps and data produced represent the first basin-wide geologic characterization for either interval. This report outlines the methods and

  8. Principal oil and gas plays in the Appalachian Basin (Province 131) (Chapter I). Middle eocene intrusive igneous rocks of the central Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province: Setting, chemistry, and implications for crustal structure (Chapter J). Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    de Witt, W.; Southworth, C.S.; Gray, K.J.; Sutter, J.F.

    1993-12-31

    ;Contents: Principal Oil and Gas Plays in the Appalachian Basin (Province 131); and Middle Eocene Intrusive Igneous Rocks of the Central Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province - Setting, Chemistry, and Implications for Crustal Structure.

  9. Hydrocarbon generation and brine migration in the central Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Fluid inclusions in mineralized natural fractures from six Devonian shale cores were used to document hydrocarbon generation and brine migration in the central Appalachian basin. The sequence of formation of four regional fracture sets containing the inclusions was used to constrain the relative timing of fluid evolution. The earliest formed fluid inclusions are single-phase liquid inclusions containing a complex mixture of methane, ethane, higher hydrocarbons, and nitrogen. These inclusions formed during burial of the Devonian shales and early hydrocarbon generation in the oil window. As burial proceeded to a maximum and hydrocarbon generation entered the gas phase, later formed fluid inclusions record the presence of a more methane-rich fluid with minor ethane and nitrogen. Either during maximum burial or early uplift of the Devonian shale section, regional stress relaxation was accompanied by regional brine migration. Fluid inclusions record the influx of a methane-saturated, sodium chloride-rich brine and subsequent mixing with a presumably in situ-calcium-rich brine and subsequent mixing with a presumably in-situ calcium-rich brine. The migration pathway is presumed to be the Devonian shale detachment zone and underlying Devonian Oriskany Sandstone. This migration may be related to the fluids forming Mississippi Valley-type ore deposits. Present-day brine compositions reflect this ancient mixing. Brines from deep Cambrian through Silurian rocks are more calcium-chloride rich than brines from shallower Devonian and younger rocks. The sodium chloride-rich brines from Upper Devonian through Pennsylvanian rocks become more dilute as a result of mixing with meteoric water.

  10. Coal and coalbed-methane resources in the Appalachian and Black Warrior basins: maps showing the distribution of coal fields, coal beds, and coalbed-methane fields: Chapter D.1 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trippi, Michael H.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Milici, Robert C.; Kinney, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    The study area for most reports in this volume is the Appalachian basin. The term “Appalachian basin study area” (shortened from “Appalachian basin geologic framework study area”) includes all of the Appalachian Basin Province (Province 67) and part of the neighboring Black Warrior Basin Province (Province 65) of Dolton and others (1995). The boundaries for these two provinces and the study area are shown on figure 1.

  11. Use of stable isotopes to identify sources of methane in Appalachian Basin shallow groundwaters: a review.

    PubMed

    Hakala, J Alexandra

    2014-09-20

    Development of unconventional shale gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin has raised questions regarding the potential for these activities to affect shallow groundwater resources. Geochemical indicators, such as stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes of methane, stable carbon isotopes of ethane, and hydrocarbon ratios, have been used to evaluate methane sources however their utility is complicated by influences from multiple physical (e.g., mixing) and geochemical (e.g., redox) processes. Baseline sampling of shallow aquifers prior to development, and measurement of additional geochemical indicators within samples from across the Appalachian Basin, may aid in identifying natural causes for dissolved methane in shallow groundwater versus development-induced pathways. PMID:25033440

  12. Devonian shales of central Appalachian basin: geological controls on gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, P.H.; Hamilton-Smith, T.; Peterson, R.M. )

    1989-03-01

    Gas reserves of the Devonian shales of the Appalachian basin constitute a large, underdeveloped resource producing from fractured reservoirs. As part of ongoing Gas Research Institute research, K and A Energy Consultants, Inc., is identifying geological controls on gas production. Preliminary findings indicate that local gas production is controlled by a combination of structure and stratigraphy. Regional geological review indicates that Devonian sedimentation and structure is influenced by repeated reactivation of basement faults. Site-specific geologic studies indicate that depositional and structural mechanisms vary substantially throughout the basin. Gas production on the eastern margin of the producing area is controlled by an Alleghenian thrust front located by Grenville normal faults. High-capacity wells are associated with tear faults in the thrust sheets. To the southwest, deformation is controlled by both Grenville and Rome trough basement faults. Reactivation of these faults during later orogenic events produced a complex of high-angle reverse and strike-slip faults. Fracturing in the Devonian shales is produced by shearing and flexure associated with these structures. Syndepositional movement of the basement structures influenced the deposition of coarser grained turbidites and tempestites. The combination of fractures and coarser clastic beds provides effective reservoir systems. The shale contains abundant organic material consisting of terrestrial plant debris and marine algal remains. Thermal maturation of this material produced gas which charged the lower reservoir systems. Exploration along reactivated structural trends is an effective strategy for locating Devonian shale gas accumulations. This approach may also apply to other producing strata in the basin.

  13. Stratigraphic evidence from the Appalachian Basin for continuation of the Taconian orogeny into Early Silurian time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettensohn, Frank R.; Brett, Carlton E.

    2002-01-01

    Traditional interpretations of the Appalachian Basin during Silurian time suggest a period of tectonic stability between Taconian and Acadian orogenies. However, recent interpretations of evidence from deformation and igneous sources in the northern Appalachians indicate Silurian tectonism centered on and near the St. Lawrence promontory and that this tectonism probably effected sedimentation in parts of the Appalachian Basin during much of Silurian time. Of special interest is the tectonism that extended from latest Ordovician into Early Silurian time and the nature of its relationships with known orogenic events. Although evidence and interpretations from deformation and igneous sources have become increasingly well established, there has been little support from the stratigraphic record. Now, however, criteria based on the implications of flexural models, namely the nature and distribution of unconformities, the presence of flexural stratigraphic sequences, and the distribution in time and space of dark-shale-filled foreland basins, provide stratigraphic evidence from the Appalachian Basin that supports Early Silurian (Medinan; early Llandoverian) tectonism related to Taconian orogeny. In particular, the distribution and local angularity of the Ordovician-Silurian or Cherokee unconformity suggest major tectonic influence and a latest Ordovician to Early Silurian inception for that tectonism. An overlying flexural stratigraphic sequence represented by the Lower Silurian Medina Group and the presence of a dark-shale-filled foreland basin reflected by the Power Glen-lower Cabot Head shales support interpretations of flexural subsidence related to deformational loading. Moreover, the distribution in space and time of the foreland basin containing these shales indicates that the basin is more likely a continuation of the northwestwardly shifting trend of earlier Taconian basins than that of later Salinic basins. Although the kinematic regime may be different from

  14. Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Appalachian Basin Province, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Appalachian Basin Province Assessment Team: Milici, Robert C.; Ryder, Robert T.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Crovelli, Robert A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2003-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean of 70.2 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, a mean of 54 million barrels of undiscovered oil, and a mean of 872 million barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in the Appalachian Basin Province.

  15. Gas Research Institute`s appalachian basin research: Selected bibliography. Topical report, July 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Picciano, L.

    1995-07-01

    The Appalachian Basin citations listed in this bibliography present select research reports that provide an overview of research and development (R&D) efforts related to the basin. The bibliography is organized in three sections, one for each of the following unconventional gas resources: coalbed methane, gas shales, and tight gas sands. Citations are further divided into geology and engineering subsections. The citations are only for those reports resulting directly from GRI`s research investment or reviews that extensively used GRI results.

  16. Eustatic and tectonic control of sedimentation in the Pennsylvanian strata of the Central Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnut, D.R. Jr. . Kentucky Geological Survey)

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of the Breathitt Group of the Central Appalachian Basin reveals three orders of depositional cycles or trends. The Breathitt coarsening-upward trend (20 million years (my)) represents increasing intensity of the Alleghenian Orogeny. The major transgression (MT) cycle (2.5 my) was controlled by an unknown eustatic or tectonic mechanism. The major coal beds and intervening strata make up the coal-clastic cycle (CC cycle) (=Appalachian cyclothem) which has a 0.4 my periodicity. This periodicity supports eustatic control of sedimentation modulated by an orbital periodicity. Extensive coastal peats deposited at lowstand (CC cycle) were preserved as coals, whereas highstand peats were eroded during the subsequent drop in sea level. Autocyclic processes such as delta switching and avulsion occurred within CC cycles. An Early Pennsylvanian unconformity represents uplift and erosion of mid-Carboniferous foreland basin deposits. Alluvial deposits (Breathitt Group) derived from the highlands were transported to the northwest toward the forebulge. During lowstand, the only outlet available to further sediment transport (Lee sandstones) was toward the southwest (Ouachita Trough), along the Black Warrior-Appalachian foreland basins. The Middle Pennsylvanian marks a period of intermittent overfilling of the foreland basin and cresting of the forebulge. Marine transgressions entered through the foreland basins and across saddles in the forebulge. After the Ouachita Trough was destroyed during the late Middle Pennsylvanian, marine transgressions migrated only across saddles in the forebulge. In the Late Pennsylvanian, marine waters entered the basin only across the diminished forebulge north of the Jessamine Dome.

  17. Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, P.E.; Maynard, J.B.; Pryor, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    The Eastern Gas Shales Project (1976-1981) of the US DOE has generated a large amount of information on Devonian shale, especially in the western and central parts of the Appalachian Basin (Morgantown Energy Technology Center, 1980). This report summarizes this information, emphasizing the sedimentology of the shales and how it is related to gas, oil, and uranium. This information is reported in a series of statements each followed by a brief summary of supporting evidence or discussion and, where interpretations differ from our own, we include them. We believe this format is the most efficient way to learn about the gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin and have organized our statements as follows: paleogeography and basin analysis; lithology and internal stratigraphy; paleontology; mineralogy, petrology, and chemistry; and gas, oil, and uranium.

  18. Coal resources of selected coal beds and zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie; Tewalt, Susan; Bragg, Linda

    2002-01-01

    The Appalachian Basin is one of the most important coal-producing regions in the world. Bituminous coal has been mined in the basin for the last three centuries, and the cumulative production is estimated at 34.5 billion short tons. Annual production in 1998 was about 452 million short tons; the basin's production is mostly in the northern (32 percent) and central (63 percent) coal regions. The coal is used primarily within the Eastern United States for electric power generation, but some of it is suitable for metallurgical uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment of five coal-producing regions of the United States, including the Appalachian Basin. The USGS, in cooperation with the State geological surveys of Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, has completed a digital coal resource assessment of five of the top-producing coal beds and coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions -- the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay and Pond Creek coal zones, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. Of the 93 billion short tons of original coal in these units, about 66 billion short tons remain.

  19. 2000 resource assessment of selected coal beds and zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Northern and Central Appalachian Basin Coal Regions Assessment Team

    2001-01-01

    This report includes results of a digital assessment of six coal beds or zones in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions that produce over 15 percent of the Nation's coal. Other chapters include an executive summary, a report on geology and mining, a report summarizing other selected coal zones that were not assessed, and a report on USGS coal availability and recoverablity studies in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions.

  20. Assessment of Appalachian Basin Oil and Gas Resources: Utica-Lower Paleozoic Total Petroleum System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    The Utica-Lower Paleozoic Total Petroleum System (TPS) is an important TPS identified in the 2002 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources in the Appalachian basin province (Milici and others, 2003). The TPS is named for the Upper Ordovician Utica Shale, which is the primary source rock, and for multiple lower Paleozoic sandstone and carbonate units that are the important reservoirs. Upper Cambrian through Upper Silurian petroleum-bearing strata that constitute the Utica-Lower Paleozoic TPS thicken eastward from about 2,700 ft at the western margin of the Appalachian basin to about 12,000 ft at the thrust-faulted eastern margin of the Appalachian basin. The Utica-Lower Paleozoic TPS covers approximately 170,000 mi2 of the Appalachian basin from northeastern Tennessee to southeastern New York and from central Ohio to eastern West Virginia. The boundary of the TPS is defined by the following geologic features: (1) the northern boundary (from central Ontario to northeastern New York) extends along the outcrop limit of the Utica Shale-Trenton Limestone; (2) the northeastern boundary (from southeastern New York, through southeastern Pennsylvania-western Maryland-easternmost West Virginia, to northern Virginia) extends along the eastern limit of the Utica Shale-Trenton Limestone in the thrust-faulted eastern margin of the Appalachian basin; (3) the southeastern boundary (from west-central and southwestern Virginia to eastern Tennessee) extends along the eastern limit of the Trenton Limestone in the thrust-faulted eastern margin of the Appalachian basin; (4) the southwestern boundary (from eastern Tennessee, through eastern Kentucky, to southwestern Ohio) extends along the approximate facies change from the Trenton Limestone with thin black shale interbeds (on the east) to the equivalent Lexington Limestone without black shale interbeds (on the west); (5) the northern part of the boundary in southwestern Ohio

  1. Enhancement of the TORIS data base of Appalachian basin oil fields. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-31

    The Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System, or TORIS, was developed by the Department of Energy in the early 1980s with a goal of accounting for 70% of the nation`s original oil in place (OOIP). More than 3,700 oil reservoirs were included in TORIS, but coverage in the Appalachian basin was poor. This TORIS enhancement project has two main objectives: to increase the coverage of oil fields in the Appalachian basin; and to evaluate data for reservoirs currently in TORIS, and to add, change or delete data as necessary. Both of these objectives have been accomplished. The geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia have identified 113 fields in the Appalachian basin to be included in TORIS that collectively contained 80% of the original oil in place in the basin. Furthermore, data in TORIS at the outset of the project was checked and additional data were added to the original 20 TORIS oil fields. This final report is organized into four main sections: reservoir selection; evaluation of data already in TORIS; industry assistance; and data base creation and validation. Throughout the report the terms pool and reservoir may be used in reference to a single zone of oil accumulation and production within a field. Thus, a field is composed of one or more pools at various stratigraphic levels. These pools or reservoirs also are referred to as pay sands that may be individually named sandstones within a formation or group.

  2. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, Robert D

    2005-11-30

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our

  3. Assessment of Appalachian Basin Oil and Gas Resources: Carboniferous Coal-bed Gas Total Petroleum System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    The Carboniferous Coal-bed Gas Total Petroleum System, lies within the central and northern parts of the Appalachian coal field. It consists of five assessment units (AU): the Pocahontas Basin in southwestern Virginia, southern West Virginia, and eastern Kentucky, the Central Appalachian Shelf in Tennessee, eastern Kentucky and southern West Virginia, East Dunkard (Folded) in western Pennsylvania and northern West Virginia, West Dunkard (Unfolded) in Ohio and adjacent parts of Pennsylvania and West Virginia, and the Appalachian Anthracite and Semi-Anthracite AU in Pennsylvania and Virginia. Of these, only the Pocahontas Basin and West Dunkard (Folded) AU were assessed quantitatively by the U.S. Geological survey in 2002 as containing about 3.6 and 4.8 Tcf of undiscovered, technically recoverable gas, respectively (Milici and others, 2003). In general, the coal beds of this Total Petroleum System, which are both the source rock and reservoir, were deposited together with their associated sedimentary strata in Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) time. The generation of biogenic (microbial) gas probably began almost immediately as the peat deposits were first formed. Microbial gas generation is probably occurring at present to some degree throughout the basin, where the coal beds are relatively shallow and wet. With sufficient depth of burial, compaction, and coalification during the late Paleozoic and Early Mesozoic, the coal beds were heated sufficiently to generate thermogenic gas in the eastern part of the Appalachian basin. Trap formation began initially with the deposition of the paleopeat deposits during the Mississippian, and continued into the Late Pennsylvanian and Permian as the Appalachian Plateau strata were deformed during the Alleghanian orogeny. Seals are the connate waters that occupy fractures and larger pore spaces within the coal beds as well as the fine-grained siliciclastic sedimentary strata that are intercalated with the coal. The

  4. Upper Devonian transitional shale facies of western Appalachian basin of southeastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Baranoski, M.T.; Riley, R.A.

    1987-09-01

    Transitional facies have been mapped in five Upper Devonian shale units using geophysical logs from southeastern Ohio. Each facies is a north-northeast-trending zone that parallels the paleodepositional strike of the Appalachian basin during the Late Devonian. The facies are defined by the interfingering of gray and greenish-gray siltstones and shales from the east with black shale from the west. Structure and isopach mapping indicate penecontemporaneous faulting and subsequent filling along faults with sediments in the form of coalescing lobate bodies. Penecontemporaneous faulting may be related to sediment loading of the Catskill delta. The relative position of the transitional facies may indicate the western penetration of far-distal turbidites of the Catskill delta into an anoxic portion of the Appalachian basin.

  5. Federally owned coal and Federal lands in the Northern and Central Appalachian Basin coal regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tewalt, S.J.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessed five coal beds or coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions for the National Coal Resource Assessment: the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay coal zone, the Pond Creek coal zone, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. The assessment produced stratigraphic and geochemical databases and digital coal maps, or models, which characterized the coal beds and coal zones. Using the assessment models, the USGS estimated original and remaining (unmined) resources for these coal beds or zones. The Appalachian Basin assessment was conducted in collaboration with the State geological surveys of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky, and Virginia.

  6. Federally owned coal and Federal lands in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Susan J. Tewalt

    2002-02-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) assessed five coals beds or coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions for the National Coal Resource Assessment: the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay coal zone, the Pond Creek coal zone, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. The assessment produced stratigraphic and geochemical databases and digital coal maps, or models, which characterized the coal beds and coal zones. Using the assessment models, the USGS estimated original and remaining (unmined) resources for these coal beds or zones. The Appalachian Basin assessment was conducted in collaboration with the State geological surveys of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, Kentucky, and Virginia. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Coal resources of selected coal beds and zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Ruppert; Susan Tewalt; Linda Bragg

    2002-02-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is completing a National Coal Resource Assessment of five coal-producing regions of the United States, including the Appalachian Basin. The USGS, in cooperation with the State geological surveys of Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia, has completed a digital coal resource assessment of five of the top-producing coal beds and coal zones in the northern and central Appalachian Basin coal regions -- the Pittsburgh coal bed, the Upper Freeport coal bed, the Fire Clay and Pond Creek coal zones, and the Pocahontas No. 3 coal bed. Of the 93 billion short tons of original coal in these units, about 66 billion short tons remain. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Simulation of CO2 Sequestration and Enhanced Coalbed Methane Production in Multiple Appalachian Basin Coal Seams

    SciTech Connect

    Bromhal, G.S.; Siriwardane, H.J.; Gondle, R.K.

    2007-11-01

    A DOE-funded field injection of carbon dioxide is to be performed in an Appalachian Basin coal seam by CONSOL Energy and CNX Gas later this year. A preliminary analysis of the migration of CO2 within the Upper Freeport coal seam and the resulting ground movements has been performed on the basis of assumed material and geometric parameters. Preliminary results show that ground movements at the field site may be in a range that are measurable by tiltmeter technology.

  9. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

  10. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

  11. INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Jacobi

    2005-05-31

    The primary goal was to enter Phase 2 by analyzing geophysical logs and sidewall cores from a verification well drilled into the Trenton/Black River section along lineaments. However, the well has not yet been drilled; Phase 2 has therefore not been accomplished. We have switched oil and gas exploration and production companies, and are now in continued negotiations with Fortuna concerning a plan to retrieve 18 m of horizontal core across a gas-charged zone in the Trenton/Black River in central New York State, the ''hottest'' play in the Appalachian Basin. We completed analysis of remote sensing images to determine, by using the weights-of-evidence method, which images and processing techniques result in lineaments that best reflect the fractures found in outcrop. The conclusions do not differ from the preliminary conclusions reported in the previous progress report. These data continue to demonstrate that integration of aeromagnetic and remote sensing lineaments, surface structure, and soil gas and seismic allows us to extrapolate Trenton-Black River trends away from confirmatory seismic lines.

  12. Nested Paleozoic successor basins in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Tull, J.F.; Groszos, M.S. )

    1990-11-01

    Field studies in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge and its southwest extension, the Talladega belt, indicate that in at least three regions, polydeformed and metamorphosed turbidite-dominated sequences unconformably overlie rifted-margin continental-terrace wedge clastic rocks and overlying carbonate-platform deposits. These sequences are (1) the Talladega Group (in the Talladega belt), (2) the Walden Creek Group (along the west flank of the Blue Ridge), and (3) the Mineral Bluff Formation (within the core of the Blue Ridge). Paleontologic evidence indicates that the Talladega and Walden Creek Groups are in part as young as Silurian-Devonian. The presence of these anomalously young sequences unconformably above the trailing-margin stratigraphy in the Blue Ridge brings into question conventional ideas of the timing and nature of the tectonic evolution of the ancient continental margin.

  13. Nested Paleozoic "successor" basins in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tull, James F.; Groszos, Mark S.

    1990-11-01

    Field studies in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge and its southwest extension, the Talladega belt, indicate that in at least three regions, polydeformed and metamorphosed turbidite-dominated sequences unconformably overlie rifted-margin continental-terrace wedge clastic rocks and overlying carbonate-platform deposits. These sequences are (1) the Talladega Group (in the Talladega belt), (2) the Walden Creek Group (along the west flank of the Blue Ridge), and (3) the Mineral Bluff Formation (within the core of the Blue Ridge). Paleontologic evidence indicates that the Talladega and Walden Creek Groups are in part as young as Silurian-Devonian. The presence of these anomalously young sequences unconformably above the trailing-margin stratigraphy in the Blue Ridge brings into question conventional ideas of the timing and nature of the tectonic evolution of the ancient continental margin.

  14. Thermal maturity map of Devonian shale in the Illinois, Michigan, and Appalachian basins of North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    East, Joseph A.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Repetski, John E.; Hayba, Daniel O.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the oil and gas in the Illinois, Michigan, and Appalachian basins of eastern North America is thought to be derived from Devonian shale that is within these basins (for example, Milici and others, 2003; Swezey, 2002, 2008, 2009; Swezey and others, 2005, 2007). As the Devonian strata were buried by younger sediments, the Devonian shale was subjected to great temperature and pressure, and in some areas the shale crossed a thermal maturity threshold and began to generate oil. With increasing burial (increasing temperature and pressure), some of this oil-generating shale crossed another thermal maturity threshold and began to generate natural gas. Knowledge of the thermal maturity of the Devonian shale is therefore useful for predicting the occurrence and the spatial distribution of oil and gas within these three basins. This publication presents a thermal maturity map of Devonian shale in the Illinois, Michigan, and Appalachian basins. The map shows outlines of the three basins (dashed black lines) and an outline of Devonian shale (solid black lines). The basin outlines are compiled from Thomas and others (1989) and Swezey (2008, 2009). The outline of Devonian shale is a compilation from Freeman (1978), Thomas and others (1989), de Witt and others (1993), Dart (1995), Nicholson and others (2004), Dicken and others (2005a,b), and Stoeser and others (2005).

  15. Apatite fission-track thermochronology of the central and southern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    Samples were collected in west to east transects across the Appalachian Basin of Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. These samples locations were chosen to test the concept of increasing paleotemperature due to increasing burial from west to east across the Appalachian Basin and to detect any thermal anomalies that exist. Calculated time-temperature (tT) paths based on apatite fission-track apparent ages and confined track length distributions for samples from this study indicate that both the Pennsylvania and southern Appalachian had complex uplift and cooling histories. In Pennsylvania, the Tioga and Kalkberg ash bed samples from central Pennsylvania yield modelled tT paths that indicate early post-Alleghanian (285-270 Ma) cooling with uplift estimated at beginning at {approx}251 {plus minus} 25 Ma. Samples from the western Allegheny Plateau and Allegheny Front contain apatites which have reset to give fission-track ages and track lengths consistent with tT histories beginning at <200 Ma. In northeastern Pennsylvania on the Allegheny Plateau, the modelled tT paths show rapid cooling from temperatures in the range of 110{degree}-120{degree} C at 170-160 Ma. In the southern Appalachian Basin, calculated tT paths indicate that uplift in the northern section was immediately post-Alleghanian folding with uplift beginning first in the northwestern section on the Cumberland Plateau at {approx}226 {plus minus} 23 Ma and progressing to the eastern Valley and Ridge Province of Virginia at {approx}119 {plus minus} 12 Ma. The samples from southwestern Virginia yield a mean apatite fission-track apparent age of 175 {plus minus} 11 Ma which may be the result of a higher heat flow, higher paleogeothermal gradient during the Upper Jurassic-Early Cretaceous extension along the Atlantic Coast.

  16. Introduction to selected references on fossil fuels of the central and southern Appalachian basin: Chapter H.1 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Lentz, Erika E.; Tewalt, Susan J.; Román Colón, Yomayra A.

    2014-01-01

    The Appalachian basin contains abundant coal and petroleum resources that have been studied and extracted for at least 150 years. In this volume, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists describe the geologic framework and geochemical character of the fossil-fuel resources of the central and southern Appalachian basin. Separate subchapters (some previously published) contain geologic cross sections; seismic profiles; burial history models; assessments of Carboniferous coalbed methane and Devonian shale gas; distribution information for oil, gas, and coal fields; data on the geochemistry of natural gas and oil; and the fossil-fuel production history of the basin. Although each chapter and subchapter includes references cited, many historical or other important references on Appalachian basin and global fossil-fuel science were omitted because they were not directly applicable to the chapters.

  17. Allogenic processes, sediment flux, and Carboniferous stratigraphy in the Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cecil, C.B.; Dulong, F.T.; Edgar, N.T. )

    1992-01-01

    The origin of Carboniferous strata in the central Appalachian basin is being evaluated as a function of paleoclimatic, eustatic, and tectonic processes. Of these processes, paleoclimate has, in the past, received the least attention but appears to be of primary importance as a control on stratigraphy. For example, Upper Mississippian strata include both marine carbonates and marine dark gray to black shales. The marine carbonate units are underlain and overlain by paleosols that contain calcic peds, pseudomorphs of gypsum, and rhizoconcretions with vertical root structures suggesting low soil moisture. The marine limestone generally is in sharp contact with an underlying paleosol. The lithostratigraphy of such a sequence is consistent with a transgressive-regressive cycle under relatively dry (semiarid) climatic conditions, which limits siliciclastic influx. In contrast, the marine gray and black shales are bounded by leached paleosols containing horizontal rhizomorphs and coal beds suggestive of wet soil conditions. Terrestrial organic matter in marine shales indicate relatively high terrestrial organic productivity, and the shale units are in gradational contact with underling strata. The lithostratigraphy of the marine shale sequences is consistent with deposition under relatively wet climatic regimes (probably seasonal and subhumid), which increased siliciclastic and terrestrial organic matter input. Relatively short-term climate cycles were a primary control on sediment flux within Carboniferous deposystems in the Appalachian basin. Long-term climate change also occurred as eastern North America moved from relatively dry latitudes of the southern hemisphere through the tropical rainy belt into drier latitudes of the northern hemisphere. Long-term tectonic change provided accommodation space. Such controls can readily be observed throughout Carboniferous strata in the Appalachian basin.

  18. Bituminous coal production in the Appalachian Basin; past, present, and future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    This report on Appalachian basin coal production consists of four maps and associated graphs and tables, with links to the basic data that were used to construct the maps. Plate 1 shows the time (year) of maximum coal production, by county. For illustration purposes, the years of maximum production are grouped into decadal units. Plate 2 shows the amount of coal produced (tons) during the year of maximum coal production for each county. Plate 3 illustrates the cumulative coal production (tons) for each county since about the beginning of the 20th century. Plate 4 shows 1996 annual production by county. During the current (third) cycle of coal production in the Appalachian basin, only seven major coal-producing counties (those with more than 500 million tons cumulative production), including Greene County, Pa.; Boone, Kanawha, Logan, Mingo, and Monongalia Counties, W.Va.; and Pike County, Ky., exhibit a general increase in coal production. Other major coal-producing counties have either declined to a small percentage of their maximum production or are annually maintaining a moderate level of production. In general, the areas with current high coal production have large blocks of coal that are suitable for mining underground with highly efficient longwall methods, or are occupied by very large scale, relatively low cost surface mining operations. The estimated cumulative production for combined bituminous and anthracite coal is about 100 billion tons or less for the Appalachian basin. In general, it is anticipated that the remaining resources will be progressively of lower quality, will cost more to mine, and will become economical only as new technologies for extraction, beneficiation, and consumption are developed, and then only if prices for coal increase.

  19. Stratigraphic framework of Cambrian and Ordovician rocks across Rome Trough, central Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ryder, R.T.

    1987-09-01

    Restored stratigraphic cross sections drawn primarily through the subsurface of parts of Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Kentucky, and Tennessee provide new detailed information to further the understanding of Cambrian and Ordovician sedimentation and tectonics associated with the Rome trough sector of the Appalachian basin. Drilled thickness of the Cambrian and Ordovician sequence ranges from a maximum of about 14,500 ft (4.5 km) along the axis of the trough to a minimum of about 3500 ft (1 km) on the western flank.

  20. Petrology and depositional significance of Conemaugh marine units in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrer, T.R.; Heckel, P.H. . Dept. Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The Conemaugh Group contains the last appearance of Pennsylvanian marine units in the Appalachian basin. The marine units range from argillaceous/silty/sandy skeletal limestones to fossiliferous, dark to light gray shales, calcareous siltstones and sandstones. Limestones are present at least locally in all units and are conspicuous in most units. They commonly contain a more abundant and diverse fauna including abundant conodonts, and frequently contain glaucony and phosphorite, indicating long-term slowdown of deposition. They are typically overlain by fossiliferous shales that generally decrease in fossil abundance and diversity upward, locally contain siderite concretions, and coarsen upward to siltstones that lend diffuse upper boundaries to the marine unit. All the marine units appear to represent transgressive-regressive events extensive enough to reach this area from the Midcontinent where marine deposition is more prominent throughout the interval. Initial transgression produced swampy conditions locally permitting formation of coal, which was eventually overwhelmed by marine sediments. At maximum highstand, when clastic supply was reduced, limestones consisting mainly of skeletal debris and containing abundant conodonts were deposited as a condensed interval in which glaucony and phophorite formed slowly in the absence of detrital or carbonate dilution. These limestones are oxygenated shallow-water counterparts to the dark phosphatic, conodont-rich core shale member of the Midcontinent cyclothem. Regression reintroduced clastics readily into the system in the Appalachian basin, greatly diluting skeletal carbonate grains, thus terminating limestone deposition, and decreasing faunal abundance and diversity upward in the overlying detrital part of the marine unit.

  1. Central Appalachian basin natural gas database: distribution, composition, and origin of natural gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Román Colón, Yomayra A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled a database consisting of three worksheets of central Appalachian basin natural gas analyses and isotopic compositions from published and unpublished sources of 1,282 gas samples from Kentucky, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The database includes field and reservoir names, well and State identification number, selected geologic reservoir properties, and the composition of natural gases (methane; ethane; propane; butane, iso-butane [i-butane]; normal butane [n-butane]; iso-pentane [i-pentane]; normal pentane [n-pentane]; cyclohexane, and hexanes). In the first worksheet, location and American Petroleum Institute (API) numbers from public or published sources are provided for 1,231 of the 1,282 gas samples. A second worksheet of 186 gas samples was compiled from published sources and augmented with public location information and contains carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopic measurements of natural gas. The third worksheet is a key for all abbreviations in the database. The database can be used to better constrain the stratigraphic distribution, composition, and origin of natural gas in the central Appalachian basin.

  2. Sequence stratigraphy and depositional systems of the Lower Silurian Medina Group, northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Castle, J.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Detailed sedimentological analysis of 3500 ft of continuous core from 44 wells in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Ontario, New York, and West Virginia, combined with regional study of geophysical logs, results in new interpretations of sequence stratigraphy and depositional systems in Lower Silurian siliciclastic rocks of the northern Appalachian basin. Above a type-1 sequence boundary at the base of the Medina Group are a lowstand systems tract and a transgressive systems tract that are represented, respectively, by the Whirlpool Sandstone and by the overlying Cabot Head Shale. The thickest sandstones in the Medina Group occur in the Grimsby Sandstone, which is interpreted as a highstand systems tract with basinward-prograding parasequences. Sea level rise after Grimsby parasequence deposition is represented by marine-shelf shale in the uppermost part of the Medina Group. Based on facies successions in the cores, four mappable depositional systems are interpreted for the Grimsby Sandstone and correlative sandstone units; (1) wave-dominated middle shelf, (2) wave- and tide-influenced inner shelf, (3) tide dominated shoreline, and (4) fluvial. The wave-dominated middle-shelf system, which includes very fine-grained shelf-ridge sandstones encased in marine shale, is the most basinward system, occurring from Ontario through parts of eastern Ohio. Shoreward, across the northern Appalachian basin, the influence of tidal processes relative to wave processes generally increased, which may have been related to distance across the shelf, water depth, and shoreline configuration. The shoreline may have been deltaic in some areas and straight in other areas.

  3. Structural controls on fractured coal reservoirs in the southern Appalachian Black Warrior foreland basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groshong, R.H., Jr.; Pashin, J.C.; McIntyre, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Coal is a nearly impermeable rock type for which the production of fluids requires the presence of open fractures. Basin-wide controls on the fractured coal reservoirs of the Black Warrior foreland basin are demonstrated by the variability of maximum production rates from coalbed methane wells. Reservoir behavior depends on distance from the thrust front. Far from the thrust front, normal faults are barriers to fluid migration and compartmentalize the reservoirs. Close to the thrust front, rates are enhanced along some normal faults, and a new trend is developed. The two trends have the geometry of conjugate strike-slip faults with the same ??1 direction as the Appalachian fold-thrust belt and are inferred to be the result of late pure-shear deformation of the foreland. Face cleat causes significant permeability anisotropy in some shallow coal seams but does not produce a map-scale production trend. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Determining the source and genetic fingerprint of natural gases using noble gas geochemistry: a northern Appalachian Basin case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Darrah, Thomas H.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Silurian and Devonian natural gas reservoirs present within New York state represent an example of unconventional gas accumulations within the northern Appalachian Basin. These unconventional energy resources, previously thought to be noneconomically viable, have come into play following advances in drilling (i.e., horizontal drilling) and extraction (i.e., hydraulic fracturing) capabilities. Therefore, efforts to understand these and other domestic and global natural gas reserves have recently increased. The suspicion of fugitive mass migration issues within current Appalachian production fields has catalyzed the need to develop a greater understanding of the genetic grouping (source) and migrational history of natural gases in this area. We introduce new noble gas data in the context of published hydrocarbon carbon (C1,C2+) (13C) data to explore the genesis of thermogenic gases in the Appalachian Basin. This study includes natural gases from two distinct genetic groups: group 1, Upper Devonian (Marcellus shale and Canadaway Group) gases generated in situ, characterized by early mature (13C[C1  C2][13C113C2]: –9), isotopically light methane, with low (4He) (average, 1  103 cc/cc) elevated 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar (where the asterisk denotes excess radiogenic or nucleogenic production beyond the atmospheric ratio), and a variable, atmospherically (air-saturated–water) derived noble gas component; and group 2, a migratory natural gas that emanated from Lower Ordovician source rocks (i.e., most likely, Middle Ordovician Trenton or Black River group) that is currently hosted primarily in Lower Silurian sands (i.e., Medina or Clinton group) characterized by isotopically heavy, mature methane (13C[C1 – C2] [13C113C2]: 3), with high (4He) (average, 1.85  103 cc/cc) 4He/40Ar and 21Ne/40Ar near crustal production levels and elevated crustal noble gas content (enriched 4He,21Ne, 40Ar). Because the release of each crustal noble gas (i.e., He, Ne, Ar

  5. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de )

    1994-02-07

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  6. Microgastropod biofacies of the Upper Carboniferous system in the northern Appalachian (Dunkard) Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.R. Jr.; Rollins, H.B.

    1985-01-01

    Upper Carboniferous microgastropod faunas are numerically abundant and diverse, and have recently received considerable taxonomic attention. However, there has been little attempt to appreciate their biostratigraphic utility. A comprehensive study of microgastropod distribution within fourteen marine units of the Pottsville, Allegheny, and Conemaugh Groups of the northern Appalachian Basin resulted in biofacies and range delimitation of many taxa. Microgastropod biofacies of the Pottsville and Allegheny Groups are less spatially and temporally static than those of the Conemaugh Group. Biofacies distribution suggests that Upper Carboniferous marine depocenters of the Dunkard Basin did not coincide with the structural basin observed today. The seaway connection between the Dunkard Basin and the mid-continent basins was most likely in central Ohio, rather than in southern Ohio and northern Kentucky. Upper Carboniferous microgastropod associations are much more diverse than their macrogastropod counterparts and, in addition, display more rapid temporal and spatial morphological change. Such microgastropod faunas not only offer potential for detailed biostratigraphic zonation of Upper Carboniferous strata, but also constitute a vast untapped data set for a variety of paleoecological and evolutionary studies.

  7. Geologic controls on thermal maturity patterns in Pennsylvanian coal-bearing rocks in the Appalachian basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, L.F.; Hower, J.C.; Ryder, R.T.; Levine, J.R.; Trippi, M.H.; Grady, W.C.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal maturation patterns of Pennsylvanian strata in the Appalachian basin were determined by compiling and contouring published and unpublished vitrinite reflectance (VR) measurements. VR isograd values range from 0.6% in eastern Ohio and eastern Kentucky (western side of the East Kentucky coal field) to greater than 5.5% in eastern Pennsylvania (Southern Anthracite field, Schuylkill County), corresponding to ASTM coal rank classes of high volatile C bituminous to meta-anthracite. VR isograds show that thermal maturity of Pennsylvanian coals generally increases from west to east across the basin. The isograds patterns, which are indicative of maximum temperatures during burial, can be explained by variations in paleodepth of burial, paleogeothermal gradient, or a combination of both. However, there are at least four areas of unusually high-rank coal in the Appalachian basin that depart from the regional trends and are difficult to explain by depth of burial alone: 1) a west-northwestward salient centered in southwestern Pennsylvania; 2) an elliptically-shaped, northeast-trending area centered in southern West Virginia and western Virginia; 3) the eastern part of Black Warrior coal field, Alabama; and 4) the Pennsylvania Anthracite region, in eastern Pennsylvania. High-rank excursions in southwest Pennsylvania, the Black Warrior coal field, and the Pennsylvania Anthracite region are interpreted here to represent areas of higher paleo-heat flow related to syntectonic movement of hot fluids towards the foreland, associated with Alleghanian deformation. In addition to higher heat flow from fluids, the Pennsylvania Anthracite region also experienced greater depth of burial. The high-rank excursion in southwest Virginia was probably primarily controlled by overburden thickness, but may also have been influenced by higher geothermal gradients.

  8. INNOVATIVE METHODOLOGY FOR DETECTION OF FRACTURE-CONTROLLED SWEET SPOTS IN THE NORTHERN APPALACHIAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain

    2005-03-01

    The primary goal was to enter Phase 2 by analyzing geophysical logs and sidewall cores from a verification well drilled into the Trenton/Black River section along lineaments. However, the well has not yet been drilled; Phase 2 has therefore not been accomplished. We have switched oil and gas exploration and production companies, and are now, in conjunction with Fortuna, planning to retrieve 18 m of horizontal core across a gas-charged zone in the Trenton/Black River in central New York State, the ''hottest'' play in the Appalachian Basin. Secondary goals in Phase I were also completed in previous reporting period. Although new structural data were collected and analyzed for a few regions where we had no data, the results did not change the previous conclusions. We have also continued analyzing remote sensing images to determine, by using the weights-of-evidence method, which images and processing techniques result in lineaments that best reflect the fractures found in outcrop. We have tested the lineaments from EarthSat (1997), as well as lineaments we identified on Landsat and ASTER images. For fracture intensification domains (FIDs) along Seneca Lake, we found that lineaments identified on a fused image of Landsat and ASTER images produced better correlation to FIDs than lineaments from EarthSat (1997) and ASTER alone. This relationship held true for all orientations of FIDs except E-striking FIDs, which showed a better correlation with lineaments observed on ASTER lineaments than on the fused Landsat and ASTER image lineaments. For Cayuga Lake FIDs, lineaments identified on a fused image of Landsat and ASTER images also produced significantly better correlation to FIDs than lineaments from ASTER alone for NW- and NNW-striking FIDs. However, for NE-, ENE- and E-striking FIDs, ASTER lineaments generally showed the closest match. These data continue to demonstrate that integration of aeromagnetic and remote sensing lineaments, surface structure, soil gas and

  9. Stratigraphic analysis of the carboniferous rocks of the Central Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Chesnut, D.R. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A series of seven cross sections was constructed across part of the Central Appalachian Basin in Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio. Information used to make these sections included well logs, coal-company core descriptions, measured sections, and mapped surface geology. Newly discovered surface and subsurface structural features such as faults, folds, and flexures, are described. A new, unofficial lithostratigraphic nomenclature was introduced to illustrate the stratigraphic framework, and a regional unconformity was interpreted to occur between the Pennsylvanian Pocahontas Formation and the Pennsylvanian New River Formation. The cross sections reveal that sequential truncation of formations below the unconformity occurs t the northwest in the basin. A regional unconformity and biostratigraphic evidence indicate that the Carboniferous rocks were deposited in a series of several small-scale environmental continua. Pennsylvanian rocks overlying the regional unconformity sequentially overlap the underlying rocks to the northwest in the basin. Belts of quartzose sandstones (Lee Formation) within the overlying rocks, are oriented northeast-southwest. Succeeding sandstone belts onlap the unconformity to the northwest within the basin. A fluvial origin is suggested for the quartzose, conglomeratic sands of the Lee Formation. The source for these sands may have been reworked sediments derived from the Old Red Sandstone continent to the northwest in Canada. The remaining Pennsylvanian coal-bearing clastic rocks (Breathitt Group) were deposited as clastic wedges derived from the east and southeast on coastal lowlands.

  10. Nature, origin, and production characteristics of the Lower Silurian regional oil and gas accumulation, central Appalachian basin, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, R.; Zagorski, W.A.

    2003-01-01

    Low-permeability sandstones of the Lower Silurian regional oil and gas accumulation cover about 45,000 mi2 (117,000 km2) of the Appalachian basin and may contain as much as 30 tcf of recoverable gas resources. Major reservoirs consist of the "Clinton" sandstone and Medina Group sandstones. The stratigraphically equivalent Tuscarora Sandstone increases the area of the Lower Silurian regional accumulation (LSRA) by another 30,000 mi2 (78,000 km2). Approximately 8.7 tcf of gas and 400 million bbl of oil have been produced from the Clinton/Medina reservoirs since 1880. The eastern predominantly gas-bearing part of the LSRA is a basin-center gas accumulation, whereas the western part is a conventional oil and gas accumulation with hybrid features of a basin-center accumulation. The basin-center accumulations have pervasive gas saturation, water near irreducible saturation, and generally low fluid pressures. In contrast, the hybrid-conventional accumulations have less-pervasive oil and gas saturation, higher mobile-water saturation, and both normal and abnormally low fluid pressures. High mobile-water saturation in the hybrid-conventional reservoirs form the updip trap for the basin-center gas creating a broad transition zone, tens of miles wide, that has characteristics of both end-member accumulation types. Although the Tuscarora Sandstone part of the basin-center gas accumulation is pervasively saturated with gas, most of its constituent sandstone beds have low porosity and permeability. Commercial gas fields in the Tuscarora Sandstone are trapped in naturally fractured, faulted anticlines. The origin of the LSRA includes (1) generation of oil and gas from Ordovician black shales, (2) vertical migration through an overlying 1000-ft (305-m)-thick Ordovician shale; (3) abnormally high fluid pressure created by oil-to-gas transformation; (4) updip displacement of mobile pore water by overpressured gas; (5) entrapment of pervasive gas in the basin center; (6) postorogenic

  11. Geologic summary of the Appalachian Basin, with reference to the subsurface disposal of radioactive waste solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colton, G.W.

    1962-01-01

    The Appalachian basin is an elongate depression in the crystalline basement complex< which contains a great volume of predominantly sedimentary stratified rocks. As defined in this paper it extends from the Adirondack Mountains in New York to central Alabama. From east to west it extends from the west flank of the Blue Ridge Mountains to the crest of the Findlay and Cincinnati arches and the Nashville dome. It encompasses an area of about 207,000 square miles, including all of West Virginia and parts of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, Georgia, and Alabama. The stratified rocks that occupy the basin constitute a wedge-shaped mass whose axis of greatest thickness lies close to and parallel to the east edge of the basin. The maximum thickness of stratified rocks preserved in any one part of the basin today is between 35,000 and 40,000 feet. The volume of the sedimentary rocks is approximately 510,000 cubic miles and of volcanic rocks is a few thousand cubic miles. The sedimentary rocks are predominantly Paleozoic in age, whereas the volcanic rocks are predominantly Late Precambrian. On the basis of gross lithology the stratified rocks overlying the crystalline basement complex can be divided into nine vertically sequential units, which are designated 'sequences' in this report. The boundaries between contiguous sequences do not necessarily coincide with the commonly recognized boundaries between systems or series. All sequences are grossly wedge shaped, being thickest along the eastern margin of the basin and thinnest along the western margin. The lowermost unit--the Late Precambrian stratified sequence--is present only along part of the eastern margin of the basin, where it lies unconformably on the basement complex. It consists largely of volcanic tuffs and flows but contains some interbedded sedimentary rocks. The Late Precambrian sequence is overlain by the Early Cambrian clastic sequence. Where

  12. Distribution of maximum burial temperatures across northern Appalachian Basin and implications for Carboniferous sedimentation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, M.J.

    1986-05-01

    Clay-mineral diagenesis and apatite fission-track age data indicate that the maximum burial temperatures to which the Middle Devonian Tioga metabentonite was exposed rise abruptly from low values in western New York State to higher values in the east. The highest temperatures, which approach 175/sup 0/C, were reached just west of Syracuse. Neither the pattern nor the magnitude of burial temperatures can be explained solely by burial of the metabentonite beneath Upper Devonian sediments. Although spatial variations in the geothermal gradient could have produced the observed pattern of burial temperatures, it is more likely that Carboniferous sediments, no longer preserved in the area, were responsible for the indicated burial. The inferred presence of thick Carboniferous sequences in western New York State suggests that the Allegheny orogeny had a stronger influence on sedimentation in the northern Appalachian Basin than has been previously recognized. 25 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Linked sequence development and global climate change: The Upper Mississippian record in the Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D.J.; Eriksson, K.A.

    1999-01-01

    The character and relative stratigraphic position of paleoclimatic indicators within Upper Mississippian strata of southern West Virginia suggest a link between eustasy and patterns of continental- to global-scale atmospheric circulation. At the cyclothem scale, annual rhythms in marine facies, and paleovertisols and lacustrine carbonates in terrestrial units indicate that seasonal, semiarid climatic conditions prevailed during highstand progradation. In contrast, leached paleosols and coals that underlie sequence boundaries and occur within transgressive heterolithic facies are suggestive of humid climatic conditions during late highstand through early transgression. Milankovitch-band, glacial-interglacial cyclicity may explain both sequence development and the evidence for Late Mississippian climate fluctuations in the Appalachian basin. Shifts from seasonal to humid climatic conditions are attributed to systematic variation in monsoonal circulation, whereby seasonal moisture became restricted to the equatorial belt during the lowstands of each {approximately}400 k.y. glacial-interglacial cycle.

  14. Munsell color value as related to organic carbon in Devonian shale of Appalachian basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosterman, J.W.; Whitlow, S.I.

    1981-01-01

    Comparison of Munsell color value with organic carbon content of 880 samples from 50 drill holes in Appalachian basin shows that a power curve is the best fit for the data. A color value below 3 to 3.5 indicates the presence of organic carbon but is meaningless in determining the organic carbon content because a large increase in amount of organic carbon causes only a minor decrease in color value. Above 4, the color value is one of the factors that can be used in calculating the organic content. For samples containing equal amounts of organic carbon, calcareous shale containing more than 5% calcite is darker than shale containing less than 5% calcite.-Authors

  15. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2004-05-31

    This report summarizes the second-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Second-year results include: All current milestones have been met and other components of the project have been functioning in parallel toward satisfaction of year-3 milestones. We also have been effecting the ultimate goal of the project in the dissemination of information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky have much greater extensibility than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that is generating considerable exploration interest. If this structure is productive, it will be one of the largest structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician

  16. Alleghanian episode of K-bentonite illitization in the southern Appalachian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, W.; Aronson, James L.

    1987-08-01

    Mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S) from Middle Ordovician potassium (K)-bentonites was found to be uniformly illitic throughout the southern Appalachian Basin regardless of variable depths of burial of the K-bentonites. The K/Ar ages of illitization are narrowly confined between 272 and 303 Ma (Late Pennsylvanian to Early Permian); this suggests that illitization was a short-lived episode coincident with, and prompted by, the Alleghanian orogeny. The illitization is explainable by the fluid expulsion hypothesis recently proposed by others (e.g., Oliver). Hot saline fluids were flushed to the basin edges from the deeply buried part of the foreland basin during the orogeny; these fluids are thought to be effective agents of illitization. Some of our K-bentonite samples are stratigraphically and geographically close to Mississippi Valley-type lead-zinc deposits, suggesting a similar mode of origin. Rapid illitization of shales, in a fashion similar to that observed for the bentonites, should have led to high pore-water pressures that enabled them to act as ideal decollements during Alleghanian thin-skinned deformation.

  17. Stable Isotopic Constraints on Abiogenic Hydrocarbon gas Contributions to Thermogenic Natural gas Resources in the Northern Appalachian Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burruss, R. C.; Laughrey, C. D.

    2006-05-01

    The generation of abiogenic methane by serpentinization or by graphite-water reactions in high-grade metamorphic rocks is well documented by isotopic, fluid inclusion, and petrographic studies. However, geochemical evidence is equivocal for abiogenic generation of higher hydrocarbon gases (ethane through pentane) in economic resources. Thermogenic hydrocarbon gases, generated by thermal cracking of sedimentary organic matter of biological origin, are progressively enriched in 13C as a function of increasing number of carbon atoms in the molecule. The isotopic composition is controlled by the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) during carbon-carbon bond breaking with the largest KIE for methane. Published work on gases in Precambrian rocks in Canada and South Africa suggest that some were generated by abiogenic Fischer-Tropsch type reactions that produced gases with carbon isotopic compositions that are reversed from the thermogenic trend. We have documented reversed isotopic compositions in natural gas accumulations in lower Paleozoic reservoirs of the Appalachian basin regionally from West Virginia and eastern Ohio through Pennsylvania to central New York. The regional accumulation in lower Silurian age strata shows progressive enhancement of the isotopic reversal with increasing depth in the basin. Multivariate analysis of the molecular and isotopic data define an end-member in the deep basin with an approximate composition of 98 mol % CH4, 1-2 mol % C2H6, << 1 mol % C3H8, and δ13C (CH4) = -27 ‰, δ13C (C2H6) = -40 ‰, δ13C (C3H8) = - 41‰. The nominal similarity of isotopic reversals in the gases from Precambrian rocks to those in the lower Paleozoic rocks of the Appalachian basin suggests that abiogenic F-T reactions may have generated some fraction of the gases in the deep basin. Comparison of molecular and hydrogen isotopic compositions show that the gases of putative abiogenic F-T origin are significantly different from Appalachian basin gases. All the

  18. Appalachian basin bituminous coal: sulfur content and potential sulfur dioxide emissions of coal mined for electrical power generation: Chapter G.5 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trippi, Michael H.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Attanasi, E.D.; Milici, Robert C.; Freeman, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Data from 157 counties in the Appalachian basin of average sulfur content of coal mined for electrical power generation from 1983 through 2005 show a general decrease in the number of counties where coal mining has occurred and a decrease in the number of counties where higher sulfur coals (>2 percent sulfur) were mined. Calculated potential SO2 emissions (assuming no post-combustion SO2 removal) show a corresponding decrease over the same period of time.

  19. Petroleum evaluation of Ordovician black shale source rocks in northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, L.G.; Roen, J.B.

    1988-08-01

    A preliminary appraisal of the Ordovician black shale source beds in the northern part of the Appalachian basin shows that the sequence is composed of the Upper Ordovician Utica Shale and its correlatives. The shales range in thickness from less than 200 ft in the west to more than 600 ft in the east along the Allegheny Front. Structure contours indicate that the shales plunge from 2,000 ft below sea level in central Ohio and to about 12,000 ft below sea level in central and northeastern Pennsylvania. Geochemical analyses of 175 samples indicate that the sequence has an average total organic carbon content (TOC) of 1.34%. Conodont alteration indices (CAI) and production indices indicate that the stages of maturation range from diagenetic in the less deeply buried western part of the basin, which probably produced mostly oil, to catagenetic in the more deeply buried eastern part of the basin, which probably produced mostly gas. Potential for continued hydrocarbon generation is poor in the east and fair to moderate in the western part of the basin. If the authors assume that these rocks have produced hydrocarbons, the hydrocarbons have since migrated. Using an average TOC of 1%, an organic carbon to hydrocarbon conversion factor of 10%, and a volume of rock within the oil and gas generation range as defined by CAI values of 1.5-4, the Ordovician shale could have generated 165 billion bbl of oil or equivalent. If only 1% of the 165 billion bbl was trapped after migration, then 1.65 billion bbl of oil or equivalent would be available for discovery.

  20. Vertical movements of the crust: Case histories from the northern Appalachian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gerald M.

    1987-12-01

    Evidence of former deep burial of Ordovician to Devonian strata of the northern Appalachian Basin has been obtained from various techniques of study, including fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures, δ18O, and vitrinite reflectance. Diagenetic minerals indicate paleotemperatures of 100 200 °C. Maximum depths of burial were calculated from the estimated paleotemperatures; a gradient of 26 °C/km was assumed. Silurian strata of the basin are interpreted to have reached maximum burial depths of 5.0 km; Devonian strata in the Catskill Mountains had former burial depths of ˜6.5 km; Lower Ordovician carbonate sequences were buried to >7 km; Middle Ordovician strata had paleodepths of ˜5 km; and Devonian carbonate strata had paleodepths from 4.5 to 5 km. If these strata were buried deeper than previously thought, unexpectedly large amounts of uplift and erosion, ranging from 4.3 to 7 km, must also have taken place to bring these strata to the present land surface. The occurrence of such large-scale vertical movements of the crust and lithosphere must be recognized in paleogeographic reconstructions. Such drastic changes represent isostatic unroofing, with widespread implications for paleogeography of a kind unrecognized at present.

  1. Lithologic and environmental atlas of Berea Sandstone (Mississippian) in the Appalachian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, P. E.; Maynard, J. B.; Jackson, D.; Dereamer, J.

    1984-01-01

    The Berea Sandstone occurs throughout much of the Appalachian Basin where it is an oil and gas reservoir and is quarried as a building stone. Because of its uniform porosity and permeability in the quarries at South Amherst, Ohio, it has been used by petroleum engineers in North America as a model reservoir sandstone. Currently, the Berea is locally classified as a light gas sand. Six outcrops and 22 cores of the Berea are described. These descriptions are accompanied by wireline logs of the Berea section in the core holes and gamma ray profiles of outcrops to help explorationists, reservoir geologists, and petroleum engineers better interpret the lithology and depositional environments represented by the many thousands of wireline logs in the Applachian Basin. The depositional environments likely to occur in the Berea are briefly described and the various sedimentary structures of the Berea are illustrated so that it can be seen in both outcrops and cores, carefully documents vertical profiles of grain size and sedimentary structures, and concludes with a summary of unresolved problems.

  2. Burial diagenesis of upper Mississippian Greenbrier limestone in central Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, C.

    1987-09-01

    As carbonate sediments undergo progressive burial under conditions of increasing temperature and pressure, they go through a variety of changes. Burial diagenesis includes processes such as mechanical and chemical compaction, mineralogic change, cementation, dolomitization, and various types of neomorphic fabric change. Identifying the products of burial diagenesis may be useful in predicting porosity and reservoir quality in the subsurface. The Upper Mississippian Greenbrier Limestone and equivalents are exposed throughout the central Appalachians. Important textural and mineralogical changes have been recognized in these shallow shelf limestones, which indicate burial to different depths. Variations in trace- and minor-element concentrations occur with increasing diagenesis. Textural alterations include increased matrix (micrite) crystal size and increased twinning of echinoderm fragments. The Greenbrier Limestone can be divided into three diagenetic provinces. Zone 1, located on the extreme western side of the basin, is characterized by little evidence of compaction, mineralogic variation, or textural change. In this area, the limestones were never buried to any great depth. Zone 3, on the eastern side of the basin, is characterized by significant mechanical and chemical compaction, and mineralogic and textural change. Limestones of this diagenetic province have been subjected to relatively high paleotemperatures during deep burial. Zone 2 is of intermediate burial depth and diagenesis and is present between zones 1 and 3.

  3. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the Northern and Central Appalachian basin areas for the potential application of a production process patented by Jack W. McIntyre

    SciTech Connect

    Kvasnicka, D.

    1994-03-01

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of a patented (US Patent Office No. 4,766,957) process developed by Jack W. McIntyre for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Northern and Central Appalachian basin areas. General research, based on a review of published literature from both public and private sources, indicates that the generally thin, but numerous coalbeds found in the greater Appalachian Basin area do exhibit some potential for the application of this patented process. Estimates of total gas reserves in-place (Gas Research Institute, July 1991) for coalbeds in the Central and Northern Appalachian Basin areas are 5 trillion cubic feet (TCF) and 61 TCF respectively. Produced waters associated with coal deposits in the greater Appalachian Basin area can be characterized on the basis of established but limited production of coalbed methane. Central Appalachian coals generally produce small quantities of water (less than 50 barrels of water per day for the average producing well) which is high in total dissolved solids (TDS), greater than 30,000 parts per million (ppM). The chemical quality of water produced from these coal seams represents a significant disposal challenge to the operators of methane-producing wells in the Central Appalachian Basin. By contrast, water associated with the production of coalbed methane in the Northern Appalachian Basin is generally fair to good quality, and daily production volumes are low. However, the relatively slow desorption of methane gas from Northern Appalachian coals may result in a greater net volume of produced water over the economic life of the well. The well operator must respond to long-term disposal needs.

  4. Geochemical variations of rare earth elements in Marcellus shale flowback waters and multiple-source cores in the Appalachian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noack, C.; Jain, J.; Hakala, A.; Schroeder, K.; Dzombak, D. A.; Karamalidis, A.

    2013-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) - encompassing the naturally occurring lanthanides, yttrium, and scandium - are potential tracers for subsurface groundwater-brine flows and geochemical processes. Application of these elements as naturally occurring tracers during shale gas development is reliant on accurate quantitation of trace metals in hypersaline brines. We have modified and validated a liquid-liquid technique for extraction and pre-concentration of REE from saline produced waters from shale gas extraction wells with quantitative analysis by ICP-MS. This method was used to analyze time-series samples of Marcellus shale flowback and produced waters. Additionally, the total REE content of core samples of various strata throughout the Appalachian Basin were determined using HF/HNO3 digestion and ICP-MS analysis. A primary goal of the study is to elucidate systematic geochemical variations as a function of location or shale characteristics. Statistical testing will be performed to study temporal variability of inter-element relationships and explore associations between REE abundance and major solution chemistry. The results of these analyses and discussion of their significance will be presented.

  5. Geographic information system (GIS)-based maps of Appalachian basin oil and gas fields: Chapter C.2 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Kinney, Scott A.; Suitt, Stephen E.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Trippi, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    In 2006 and 2007, the greenline Appalachian basin field maps were digitized under the supervision of Scott Kinney and converted to geographic information system (GIS) files for chapter I.1 (this volume). By converting these oil and gas field maps to a digital format and maintaining the field names where noted, they are now available for a variety of oil and gas and possibly carbon-dioxide sequestration projects. Having historical names assigned to known digitized conventional fields provides a convenient classification scheme into which cumulative production and ultimate field-size databases can be organized. Moreover, as exploratory and development drilling expands across the basin, many previou

  6. Evaluating the performance of hydraulically-fractured shale gas resources in the Appalachian Basin (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakala, A.; Wall, A. J.; Guthrie, G.

    2013-12-01

    Evaluating the performance of engineered-natural systems, such as hydraulically-fractured shales associated with natural gas recovery, depends on an understanding of fracture growth within and outside of the target shale formation, as well as the potential for gas and fluids to migrate to other subsurface resources or underground sources of drinking water. The NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) has a broad research portfolio connected with development of hydraulically-fractured shale resources in the Appalachian Basin. Through a combined field, experimental, modeling, and existing data evaluation effort, the following questions are being addressed: 1) Which subsurface features control the extent to which fractures migrate out of the target fracture zone? 2) Can we improve methods for analyzing natural geochemical tracers? What combination of natural and synthetic tracers can best be used to evaluate subsurface fluid and gas migration? 3) How is wellbore integrity affected by existing shallow gas? Can we predict how shallow groundwater hydrology changes due to drilling? 4) Where are existing wellbores and natural fractures located? What field methods can be used to identify the location of existing wells? To date the NETL-RUA team has focused on four key areas: fracture growth, natural isotopic tracers, impacts of well drilling on shallow hydrology, and statistics on wellbores (locations and conditions). We have found that fracture growth is sensitive to overburden geomechanical features, and that the maximum fracture height outside of the Marcellus Shale aligns with prior assessments (e.g., Fisher et al., 2012). The team has also developed methodologies for the rapid preparation of produced-water samples by MC-ICP-MS and ICP-MS; we are using these methodologies to investigate the potential of key geochemical indicators and species of interest (Sr, Ra) as indicators of fluid and gas migration in the Appalachian Basin. Experimental work on subsurface

  7. Evaluating the performance of hydraulically-fractured shale gas resources in the Appalachian Basin (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, J. A.; Mboh, C.; Rings, J.; Vrugt, J. A.; Vereecken, H.

    2011-12-01

    Evaluating the performance of engineered-natural systems, such as hydraulically-fractured shales associated with natural gas recovery, depends on an understanding of fracture growth within and outside of the target shale formation, as well as the potential for gas and fluids to migrate to other subsurface resources or underground sources of drinking water. The NETL-Regional University Alliance (NETL-RUA) has a broad research portfolio connected with development of hydraulically-fractured shale resources in the Appalachian Basin. Through a combined field, experimental, modeling, and existing data evaluation effort, the following questions are being addressed: 1) Which subsurface features control the extent to which fractures migrate out of the target fracture zone? 2) Can we improve methods for analyzing natural geochemical tracers? What combination of natural and synthetic tracers can best be used to evaluate subsurface fluid and gas migration? 3) How is wellbore integrity affected by existing shallow gas? Can we predict how shallow groundwater hydrology changes due to drilling? 4) Where are existing wellbores and natural fractures located? What field methods can be used to identify the location of existing wells? To date the NETL-RUA team has focused on four key areas: fracture growth, natural isotopic tracers, impacts of well drilling on shallow hydrology, and statistics on wellbores (locations and conditions). We have found that fracture growth is sensitive to overburden geomechanical features, and that the maximum fracture height outside of the Marcellus Shale aligns with prior assessments (e.g., Fisher et al., 2012). The team has also developed methodologies for the rapid preparation of produced-water samples by MC-ICP-MS and ICP-MS; we are using these methodologies to investigate the potential of key geochemical indicators and species of interest (Sr, Ra) as indicators of fluid and gas migration in the Appalachian Basin. Experimental work on subsurface

  8. Assessment of Appalachian basin oil and gas resources: Carboniferous Coal-bed Gas Total Petroleum System: Chapter G.1 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Trap formation began with the deposition of the peat deposits during the Mississippian and continued into the Late Pennsylvanian and Permian, when strata of the Appalachian Plateaus were deformed during the Alleghanian orogeny. The seals are the connate waters that occupy fractures and larger pore spaces within the coal beds, as well as the fine-grained, siliciclastic sedimentary strata that are intercalated with the coal. The critical moment for the petroleum system occurred during the Alleghanian orogeny, when deformation resulted in the geologic structures in the eastern part of the Appalachian basin that enhanced fracture porosity within the coal beds. In places, burial by thrust sheets (thrust loading) in the Valley and Ridge physiographic province may have resulted in the additional generation of thermogenic coalbed methane in the Pennsylvania Anthracite region and in the semianthracite deposits of Virginia and West Virginia, although other explanations have been offered.

  9. What Controls Methane in Potable Ground Water in the Appalachian Basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, D. I.; Smith, B.; Perry, A. E.; Bothun, R.

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of baseline (pre-drilling) sampling for methane in 13,040 potable ground water samples in Northeastern Pennsylvania and 8,004 samples from a "Western Area" (southwest Pennsylvania, eastern Ohio, and north-central West Virginia) that were collected on behalf of Chesapeake Energy Corporation as part of its monitoring program prior to drilling unconventional oil and gas wells in the Marcellus and Utica Formations, as well as the results of a year-long study on temporal variability of methane in ground water at 12 locations in NE Pennsylvania We found dissolved methane common in potable ground water in the Appalachian Basin. In NE Pennsylvania, measureable dissolved methane occurred in 24% of our samples with 3.4% naturally exceeding the PADEP methane notification level of 7 mg/L. In the western area, dissolved methane occurred naturally in 36% of groundwater sampled and in Ohio, 4.1% of samples exceeded the Ohio dissolved methane action level of 10 mg/L. More methane is associated with hydrogeochemical facies trending towards Na-Cl and Na-HCO3 type waters in valleys and along hill flanks. We found no relationship occurs between the concentration of methane and proximity to pre-existing gas wells. Concentrations of methane in domestic wells can naturally vary by factors, depending on pumping regime and time of year.

  10. Mining conditions and deposition in the Amburgy (Westphalian B) coal, Breathitt Group, central Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Greb, S.F.; Eble, C.F.; Hower, J.C.; Phillips, T.L.

    1996-09-01

    Carbonate concretions called clay balls are rare in the Central Appalachian Basin, but were found in the Amburgy coal overlain by the Kendrick Shale Member. In the study area, the Amburgy coal is 0.7 to 0.9 meters thick, moderate to high in sulfur content, moderate to high in ash yield, and mostly bright clarain, except at the top near the area of coal balls, where durain of limited extent occurs. The coal is co-dominated by lycopod and cordaites; tree spores, with subordinate Calamites. The local durain layer is dominated by Densosporites, produced by the shrubby lycopod Ompbalophloios. Coal balls were encountered where the durain is immediately overlain by a coquinoid hash of broken and whole marine fossils, along a trend of coal thinning. The coal balls contain permineralized cordaites, lycopods, calamites, and ferns. The Amburgy coal accumulated as a succession of planar mires. Local splits in the seam are common, indicating contemporaneous clastic influx. The abundance of Cordaites may indicate brackish mire waters related to a coastal position and initial eustatic rise of the marginal Kendrick seas. Near the end of the Amburgy mires, the high ash-Omphalopbloios association is interpreted as a local area that was being drowned by the Kendrick transgression. Ravinement within this local embayment, rapid inundation by marine waters, and concentration of carbonate-bearing waters within transgressive scours may have contributed to the formation of coal balls and pyritic concretions in the upper part of the coal bed.

  11. Biostratigraphic utility of organic-walled phytoplankton, Upper Ordovician-Lower Silurian of Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Colbath, G.K.

    1986-05-01

    Upper Ordovician-Lower Silurian marine mudstones in the Appalachian basin, which have not been subjected to extensive heating or oxidation, contain abundant organic-walled phytoplankton (prasinophycean algal phycomata and acritarchs). In most areas graptolites and conodonts have not been recovered from these rocks, making the phytoplankton particularly important for biostratigraphic correlation. Recent advances have improved the precision with which these microfossils can be used. By tabulating relative abundance data carefully, an abrupt change in the composition of phytoplankton associations can be recognized at the Ordovician-Silurian boundary can be located with greater precision and confidence than is possible using the stratigraphic ranges of individual species. Many supposedly long-ranging species have relatively short stratigraphic ranges, and thus greater utility, as a result of detailed taxonomic studies. Therefore, type and comparative material are important considerations. Also, vesicle wall architecture and dehiscent structures are valuable taxonomic characters. Scanning electron microscopy examination has improved our understanding of small forms (less than 20 ..mu..m in diameter), and has thus increased the number of taxa available for use in biostratigraphy. Further study of samples from vertically extensive stratigraphic sections of established age should help workers refine the biostratigraphy of these microfossils.

  12. Selenium Concentrations in Middle Pennsylvanian Coal-Bearing Strata in the Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neuzil, Sandra G.; Dulong, Frank T.; Cecil, C. Blaine; Fedorko, Nick; Renton, John J.; Bhumbla, D.K.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction This report provides the results of a reconnaissance-level investigation of selenium (Se) concentrations in Middle Pennsylvanian coal-bearing strata in the central Appalachian basin. Bryant and others (2002) reported enrichments of Se concentrations in streams draining areas disturbed by surface mining relative to Se concentrations in streams that drain undisturbed areas; the study was conducted without the benefit of data on Se concentrations in coal-bearing strata prior to anthropogenic disturbance. Thus, the present study was conducted to provide data on Se concentrations in coal-bearing strata prior to land disturbance. The principal objectives of this work are: 1) determine the stratigraphic and regional distribution of Se concentrations in coal-bearing strata, 2) provide reconnaissance-level information on relations, if any, between Se concentrations and lithology (rock-type), and 3) develop a cursory evaluation of the leachability of Se from disturbed strata. The results reported herein are derived from analyses of samples obtained from three widely-spaced cores that were collected from undisturbed rock within a region that has been subjected to extensive land disturbance principally by either coal mining or, to a lesser extent, highway construction. The focus was on low-organic-content lithologies, not coal, within the coal-bearing interval, as these lithologies most commonly make up the fill materials after coal mining or in road construction.

  13. Autogenic gas (self sourced) from shales - an example from the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Milici, R.C. )

    1993-01-01

    Black gas shales of Devonian and Mississippian age occur over much of the Appalachian basin, extending from eastern Tennessee north- and northeastward into Ohio and New York. In general, these shales were deposited along the distal margin of the Acadian Catskill delta in response to episodes of tectonic subsidence and regional transgression during the Acadian orogeny. A major trend of high organic carbon content in the black shales extends along the western side of the Catskill delta, from southwestern Virginia to the southern shores of Lake Erie. The high content of organic detritus in these Devonian and Mississippian black-shale source beds is probably related to high organic productivity in combination with moderate sedimentation rates along the distal margins of the Catskill delta. In general, organic matter in the black shales is more marine and oil prone on the western side of the basin, away from the major sources of siliciclastic input, than it is to the east. Thermal maturity trends follow depositional strike and isopachs of the Catskill delta and, thus, are related to depth of burial. Fracture porosity within the black shale sequence appears to have been affected mostly by regional decollement within discrete stratigraphic units that were, perhaps, overpressured during deformation. Shale gas is produced from relatively large fields in southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, southwestern West Virginia, and southernmost Ohio. To the north, the strata rich in organic matter are thermally immature, and fields along the southern shores of lake Erie in Ohio and Pennsylvania are only marginally productive. To the east in northwestern West Virginia, the organic content of the shales is diluted by increased amounts of siliciclastics; organic matter is not sufficient to sustain long-term gas production, and shale-gas wells are short lived. 79 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Three phases of cooling and unroofing in the Appalachian Basin, Pennsylvania: Implications for flexural control

    SciTech Connect

    Blackmer, G.C.; Gold, D.P. . Dept. of Geosciences); Omar, G.I. . Geology Dept.)

    1992-01-01

    Apatite fission-track ages of 111--184 Ma and mean lengths of 10.7--13.1 [mu]m with unimodal, negatively skewed length distributions indicate slow cooling of Ordovician through Permian rocks in an area extending from the Anthracite Basin to the western Appalachian Plateau. Cooling histories modeled from fission-track data show that cooling began immediately following the Alleghanian Orogeny at 250--240 Ma. Ordovician rocks in the Juniata Culmination began to cool slightly earlier at 265 Ma, probably reflecting synorogenic unroofing of this area during formation of the Valley and Ridge duplex. Unroofing histories were modeled from cooling histories using the one-dimensional heat flow equation. Cooling and unroofing histories can be divided into three periods. The initial period of relatively rapid cooling and unroofing extended from the end of the Alleghanian Orogeny into the Jurassic and represents post-orogenic unroofing due to flexural rebound as orogenic load was removed through erosion. Initial unroofing rates are higher in eater Pennsylvania than in the west, consistent with a flexural model. A period of little to no unroofing from the Jurassic into the Miocene began contemporaneously with the inception of drift at the Atlantic continental margin. As the new continental margin subsided, the remaining load dropped below sea level and was no longer subject to removal, resulting in the cessation of flexural rebound and suppression of unroofing in the foreland. The most rapid unroofing occurred from the Miocene to the present. The nature of this event is unknown; however, it is also observed in increased sedimentation rates in the middle Atlantic offshore basins.

  15. Regional facies distribution and cycle development of Upper Mississippian ramp carbonates, Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Tawil, A.A.; Read, J.F. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01

    Upper Mississippian Greenbrier carbonates in the Appalachian Basin are a wedge shaped unit 0 to 600 m thick that formed on a southward facing ramp (> 200 km wide). Four depositional sequences (about 2 m.y. average duration) can be recognized with component cycles of 100--400 k.y. average duration. Up-dip in Kentucky the roughly equivalent Newman/Slade Formations (20--60 m thick) are dominated by several grainstone cycles that shallow upward into lagoonal facies and/or exposure surfaces, where major caliche horizons coincide with sequence boundaries. In outcrops in West Virginia, the Greenbrier Group is a mid-ramp facies (100--500 m thick). Caliches are absent and the interval appears internally conformable. Red beds commonly define the LST of four depositional sequences. Inner mid-ramp cycles are dominated by transgressive eolianite grainstone facies, oolite shoals, and near-shore deposits, but tidal flat facies are rare. Cyclicity is best developed on the outer mid-ramp (up to 50 cycles developed); cycles are dominated by subtidal grainstone shallowing up into lagoonal and locally thick (up to 8 m units) tidal flat facies, or erosional surfaces. In southwestern Virginia, ramp-slope to basin facies are dominated by non-cyclic deep-marine, dark skeletal wackestone and shaley lime-mudstone facies with beds of deep-marine lime sand (perhaps coincident with low stands). The distribution of facies on the ramp is compatible with moderate amplitude Milankovitch high-frequency sea-level oscillations superimposed on several 3rd order fluctuations of relative sea-level.

  16. Assessment of the Appalachian Basin Geothermal Field: Combining Risk Factors to Inform Development of Low Temperature Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. D.; Whealton, C.; Camp, E. R.; Horowitz, F.; Frone, Z. S.; Jordan, T. E.; Stedinger, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Exploration methods for deep geothermal energy projects must primarily consider whether or not a location has favorable thermal resources. Even where the thermal field is favorable, other factors may impede project development and success. A combined analysis of these factors and their uncertainty is a strategy for moving geothermal energy proposals forward from the exploration phase at the scale of a basin to the scale of a project, and further to design of geothermal systems. For a Department of Energy Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis we assessed quality metrics, which we call risk factors, in the Appalachian Basin of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. These included 1) thermal field variability, 2) productivity of natural reservoirs from which to extract heat, 3) potential for induced seismicity, and 4) presence of thermal utilization centers. The thermal field was determined using a 1D heat flow model for 13,400 bottomhole temperatures (BHT) from oil and gas wells. Steps included the development of i) a set of corrections to BHT data and ii) depth models of conductivity stratigraphy at each borehole based on generalized stratigraphy that was verified for a select set of wells. Wells are control points in a spatial statistical analysis that resulted in maps of the predicted mean thermal field properties and of the standard error of the predicted mean. Seismic risk was analyzed by comparing earthquakes and stress orientations in the basin to gravity and magnetic potential field edges at depth. Major edges in the potential fields served as interpolation boundaries for the thermal maps (Figure 1). Natural reservoirs were identified from published studies, and productivity was determined based on the expected permeability and dimensions of each reservoir. Visualizing the natural reservoirs and population centers on a map of the thermal field communicates options for viable pilot sites and project designs (Figure 1). Furthermore, combining the four risk

  17. Deciphering the mid-Carboniferous eustatic event in the central Appalachian foreland basin, southern West Virginia, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blake, B.M., Jr.; Beuthin, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    A prominent unconformity, present across shallow shelf areas of the Euramerican paleoequatorial basins, is used to demark the boundary between the Mississippian and Pennsylvanian subsystems. This unconformity, the mid-Carboniferous eustatic event, is generally attributed to a major glacio-eustatic sea-level fall. Although a Mississippian-Pennsylvanian unconformity is recognized throughout most of the Appalachian region, the record of the mid-Carboniferous eustatic event in the structurally deepest part of the basin has been controversial. Based on early reports that suggested the most complete Pennsylvanian section was present in southern West Virginia, various conceptual depositional models postulated continuous sedimentation between the youngest Mississippian Bluestone Formation and the oldest Penn-sylvanian Pocahontas Formation. In contrast, tabular-erosion models envisioned axial drainage systems that evolved in response to changing basin dynamics. These models predicted a Mississippian-Pennsylvanian unconformity. All these models suffered from a lack of biostratigraphic control. The presence of a sub-Pocahontas paleovalley, herein named the Lashmeet paleovalley, has been confirmed in southern West Virginia. The Lashmeet paleovalley was incised over 35 m into Bluestone strata and filled by lithic sands derived from the Appalachian orogen to the northeast and east. The polygenetic Green Valley paleosol complex marks the Bluestone-Pocahontas contact on associated interfluves. Together, these features indicate a substantial period of subaerial exposure and argue strongly in favor of a Mississippian-Pennsylvanian unconformity. Paleontologic data from the Bluestone Formation, including marine invertebrates and conodonts from the marine Bramwell Member and paleofloral data, support a late, but not latest, Arnsbergian age assignment. Marine fossils are not known from the Pocahontas Formation, but macrofloral and palynomorph taxa support a Langsettian age for most of

  18. Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain; Stuart Loewenstein; Edward DeRidder; Bruce Hart

    2007-03-31

    For two consecutive years, 2004 and 2005, the largest natural gas well (in terms of gas flow/day) drilled onshore USA targeted the Ordovician Trenton/Black River (T/BR) play in the Appalachian Basin of New York State (NYS). Yet, little data were available concerning the characteristics of the play, or how to recognize and track T/BR prospects across the region. Traditional exploration techniques for entry into a hot play were of limited use here, since existing deep well logs and public domain seismic were almost non-existent. To help mitigate this problem, this research project was conceived with two objectives: (1) to demonstrate that integrative traditional and innovative techniques could be used as a cost-effective reconnaissance exploration methodology in this, and other, areas where existing data in targeted fracture-play horizons are almost non-existent, and (2) determine critical characteristics of the T/BR fields. The research region between Seneca and Cayuga lakes (in the Finger Lakes of NYS) is on strike and east of the discovery fields, and the southern boundary of the field area is about 8 km north of more recently discovered T/BR fields. Phase I, completed in 2004, consisted of integrating detailed outcrop fracture analyses with detailed soil gas analyses, lineaments, stratigraphy, seismic reflection data, well log data, and aeromagnetics. In the Seneca Lake region, Landsat lineaments (EarthSat, 1997) were coincident with fracture intensification domains (FIDs) and minor faults observed in outcrop and inferred from stratigraphy. Soil gas anomalies corresponded to ENE-trending lineaments and FIDs. N- and ENE-trending lineaments were parallel to aeromagnetic anomalies, whereas E-trending lineaments crossed aeromagnetic trends. 2-D seismic reflection data confirmed that the E-trending lineaments and FIDs occur where shallow level Alleghanian salt-cored thrust-faulted anticlines occur. In contrast, the ENE-trending FIDs and lineaments occur where Iapetan

  19. Appalachian basin oil and natural gas: stratigraphic framework, total petroleum systems, and estimated ultimate recovery: Chapter C.1 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Milici, Robert C.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Trippi, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    The most recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Appalachian basin was completed in 2002 (Milici and others, 2003). This assessment was based on the total petroleum system (TPS), a concept introduced by Magoon and Dow (1994) and developed during subsequent studies such as those by the U.S. Geological Survey World Energy Assessment Team (2000) and by Biteau and others (2003a,b). Each TPS is based on specific geologic elements that include source rocks, traps and seals, reservoir rocks, and the generation and migration of hydrocarbons. This chapter identifies the TPSs defined in the 2002 Appalachian basin oil and gas assessment and places them in the context of the stratigraphic framework associated with regional geologic cross sections D–D′ (Ryder and others, 2009, which was re-released in this volume, chap. E.4.1) and E–E′ (Ryder and others, 2008, which was re-released in this volume, chap. E.4.2). Furthermore, the chapter presents a recent estimate of the ultimate recoverable oil and natural gas in the basin.

  20. In search of a Silurian total petroleum system in the Appalachian basin of New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia: Chapter G.11 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Trippi, Michael H.; Lentz, Erika E.; Avary, K. Lee; Harper, John A.; Kappel, William M.; Rea, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Although the TOC analyses in this study indicate that good to very good source rocks are present in the Salina Group and Wills Creek Formation of southwestern Pennsylvania and northern West Virginia, data are insufficient to propose a new Silurian total petroleum system in the Appalachian basin. However, the analytical results of this investigation are encouraging enough to undertake more systematic studies of the source rock potential of the Salina Group, Wills Creek Formation, and perhaps the Tonoloway Formation (Limestone) and McKenzie Limestone (or Member).

  1. Evidence for Cambrian petroleum source rocks in the Rome trough of West Virginia and Kentucky, Appalachian basin: Chapter G.8 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Harris, David C.; Gerome, Paul; Hainsworth, Timothy J.; Burruss, Robert A.; Lillis, Paul G.; Jarvie, Daniel M.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    The bitumen extract from the Rogersville Shale compares very closely with oils or condensates from Cambrian reservoirs in the Carson Associates No. 1 Kazee well, Homer gas field, Elliott County, Ky.; the Inland No. 529 White well, Boyd County, Ky.; and the Miller No. 1 well, Wolfe County, Ky. These favorable oil-source rock correlations suggest a new petroleum system in the Appalachian basin that is characterized by a Conasauga Group source rock and Rome Formation and Conasauga Group reservoirs. This petroleum system probably extends along the Rome trough from eastern Kentucky to at least central West Virginia.

  2. Bituminous coal production in the Appalachian basin: past, present, and future: Chapter D.3 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, Robert C.; Polyak, Désirée E.

    2014-01-01

    This report on Appalachian basin coal production consists of four plates and associated graphs and tables that were used to construct the maps. Figure 1 shows the decade of greatest coal production by county. Figure 2 shows the amount of coal produced for each county (in thousands of short tons) during the year of greatest coal production. These data are sorted by decade. Figure 3 illustrates the cumulative coal production (in thousands of short tons) for each county since about the beginning of the 20th century. Figure 4 shows 2003 production by county in thousands of short tons.

  3. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Devonian Marcellus Shale of the Appalachian Basin Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coleman, James L., Jr.; Milici, Robert C.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Kirshbaum, Mark; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) estimated a mean undiscovered natural gas resource of 84,198 billion cubic feet and a mean undiscovered natural gas liquids resource of 3,379 million barrels in the Devonian Marcellus Shale within the Appalachian Basin Province. All this resource occurs in continuous accumulations. In 2011, the USGS completed an assessment of the undiscovered oil and gas potential of the Devonian Marcellus Shale within the Appalachian Basin Province of the eastern United States. The Appalachian Basin Province includes parts of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. The assessment of the Marcellus Shale is based on the geologic elements of this formation's total petroleum system (TPS) as recognized in the characteristics of the TPS as a petroleum source rock (source rock richness, thermal maturation, petroleum generation, and migration) as well as a reservoir rock (stratigraphic position and content and petrophysical properties). Together, these components confirm the Marcellus Shale as a continuous petroleum accumulation. Using the geologic framework, the USGS defined one TPS and three assessment units (AUs) within this TPS and quantitatively estimated the undiscovered oil and gas resources within the three AUs. For the purposes of this assessment, the Marcellus Shale is considered to be that Middle Devonian interval that consists primarily of shale and lesser amounts of bentonite, limestone, and siltstone occurring between the underlying Middle Devonian Onondaga Limestone (or its stratigraphic equivalents, the Needmore Shale and Huntersville Chert) and the overlying Middle Devonian Mahantango Formation (or its stratigraphic equivalents, the upper Millboro Shale and middle Hamilton Group).

  4. Current perspectives on unconventional shale gas extraction in the Appalachian Basin.

    PubMed

    Lampe, David J; Stolz, John F

    2015-01-01

    The Appalachian Basin is home to three major shales, the Upper Devonian, Marcellus, and Utica. Together, they contain significant quantities of tight oil, gas, and mixed hydrocarbons. The Marcellus alone is estimated to contain upwards of 500 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. The extraction of these deposits is facilitated by a combination of horizontal drilling and slick water stimulation (e.g., hydraulic fracturing) or "fracking." The process of fracking requires large volumes of water, proppant, and chemicals as well as a large well pad (3-7 acres) and an extensive network of gathering and transmission pipelines. Drilling can generate about 1,000 tons of drill cuttings depending on the depth of the formation and the length of the horizontal bore. The flowback and produced waters that return to the surface during production are high in total dissolved solids (TDS, 60,000-350,000 mg L(-1)) and contain halides (e.g., chloride, bromide, fluoride), strontium, barium, and often naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) as well as organics. The condensate tanks used to store these fluids can off gas a plethora of volatile organic compounds. The waste water, with its high TDS may be recycled, treated, or disposed of through deep well injection. Where allowed, open impoundments used for recycling are a source of air borne contamination as they are often aerated. The gas may be "dry" (mostly methane) or "wet," the latter containing a mixture of light hydrocarbons and liquids that need to be separated from the methane. Although the wells can produce significant quantities of natural gas, from 2-7 bcf, their initial decline rates are significant (50-75%) and may cease to be economic within a few years. This review presents an overview of unconventional gas extraction highlighting the environmental impacts and challenges. PMID:25734820

  5. Geologic assessment of natural gas from coal seams in the Northern Appalachian Coal Basin. Topical report, September 1986-September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Kelafant, J.R.; Wicks, D.E.; Kuuskraa, V.A.

    1988-03-01

    Based on a geologic assessment of the Northern Appalachian Coal Basin, natural gas in place is estimated at 61 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), contained in 352,000 billion tons of coal. Over one third of the gas in place is in the deep, areally extensive Kittanning group (24.0 Tcf), although the Freeport (15.5 Tcf), Brookville/Clarion (11.0 Tcf), and Pittsburgh (7.0 Tcf) groups also hold considerable potential for coalbed gas. Five regional cross sections correlating the six major coal groups are included along with areal extent, overburden (depth of burial), coal isopach, and coal-rank maps.

  6. Study of the United States coal resources. [Appalachian Plateau, Interior Basins, Gulf Coastal Plain, Rocky Mountain Basins, High Plains, North Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Ferm, J.C.; Muthig, P.J.

    1982-09-15

    The objectives of this study were: (1) the identification of geologically significant coal resources for the United States, including Alaska; and (2) the preparation of statistically controlled tonnage estimates for each resource type. Particular emphasis was placed on the identification and description of coals in terms of seam thickness, inclination, depth of cover, discontinuities caused by faulting and igneous intrusion, and occurrence as isolated or multiseam deposits. The national resource was organized into six major coal provinces: the Appalachian Plateau, the Interior Basins, the Gulf Coastal Plain, the Rocky Mountain Basins, the High Plains, and North Alaska. Total coal tonnage for a subarea was estimated from an analysis of the cumulative coal thickness derived from borehole or surface section records and subsequently categorized in terms of seam thickness, dip, overburden, multiseam proportions, coal quality, and tonnage impacted by severe faulting and igneous intrusions. Results indicate an aggregate resource in place of 11.6 trillion tons, of which North Alaska accounts for 3.5 trillion tons of subbituminous and bituminous coal; the Rocky Mountains, 2.2 trillion tons of bituminous and subbituminous deposits; and the Gulf Coast, 3.8 trillion tons of lignites. The Appalachian Plateau and Interior Basins are estimated to contain slightly less than 1 trillion tons each of bituminous coal, and the High Plains slightly more than 0.5 trillion tons of lignite. The Appalachian Plateau and Interior Basins are estimated to contain slightly less than 1 trillion tons each, and the High Plains Province is estimated to contain a bit more than 0.5 trillion tons. The implications of the results for research on advanced mining systems are discussed. 27 figures, 25 tables.

  7. Assessment of Appalachian basin oil and gas resources:Devonian shale - Middle and Upper Paleozoic Total Petroleum System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, Robert C.; Swezey, Christopher S.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an assessment of the technically recoverable undiscovered hydrocarbon resources of the Appalachian Basin Province. The assessment province includes parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama. The assessment was based on six major petroleum systems, which include strata that range in age from Cambrian to Pennsylvanian. The Devonian Shale-Middle and Upper Paleozoic Total Petroleum System (TPS) extends generally from New York to Tennessee. This petroleum system has produced a large proportion of the oil and natural gas that has been discovered in the Appalachian basin since the drilling of the Drake well in Pennsylvania in 1859. For assessment purposes, the TPS was divided into 10 assessment units (plays), 4 of which were classified as conventional and 6 as continuous. The results were reported as fully risked fractiles (F95, F50, F5 and the Mean), with the fractiles indicating the probability of recovery of the assessment amount. Products reported were oil (millions of barrels of oil, MMBO), gas (billions of cubic feet of gas, BCFG), and natural gas liquids (millions of barrels of natural gas liquids, MMBNGL). The mean estimates for technically recoverable undiscovered hydrocarbons in the TPS are: 7.53 MMBO, 31,418.88 BCFG (31.42 trillion cubic feet) of gas, and 562.07 MMBNGL.

  8. In search of a Silurian Total Petroleum System in the Appalachian Basin of New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Trippi, Michael H.; Lentz, Erika E.; Avary, K. Lee; Harper, John A.; Kappel, William M.; Rea, Ronald G.

    2007-01-01

    This report provides an evaluation of the source rock potential of Silurian strata in the U.S. portion of the northern Appalachian Basin, using new TOC and RockEval data. The study area consists of all or parts of New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. The stratigraphic intervals that were sampled for this study are as follows: 1) the Lower Silurian Cabot Head Shale, Rochester Shale, and Rose Hill Formation; 2) the Lower and Upper Silurian McKenzie Limestone, Lockport Dolomite, and Eramosa Member of the Lockport Group; and 3) the Upper Silurian Wills Creek Formation, Tonoloway Limestone, Salina Group, and Bass Islands Dolomite. These Silurian stratigraphic intervals were chosen because they are cited in previous publications as potential source rocks, they are easily identified and relatively continuous across the basin, and they contain beds of dark gray to black shale and (or) black argillaceous limestone and dolomite.

  9. China, JNOC start exploration in Tarim basin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-15

    This paper reports that a joint venture of China National Oil and Natural Gas Corp and Japan National Oil Corp (JNOC) has begun exploration in Northwest China's remote Tarim basin in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. That marks the first time China has allowed a foreign oil company to participate in exploration of the highly prospective basin. China pins much of its hope for the future on the Tarim basin as production declines from its older, mainstay fields in the east and offshore results have proved largely disappointing. The Chinese-Japanese combine began operations in the southwest part of the 560,000 sq km basin. The 200 member exploration team plans to complete a seismic survey covering 3,500 line km in the Kashi and Yecheng areas during the next 4 1/2 years. The survey follows a feasibility study that began last October covering 30,000 sq km in the basin.

  10. Innovative Methodology For Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, Rober

    2007-03-28

    This Topical Report (#6 of 9) consists of the figures 3.6-13 to (and including) 3.6-18 (and appropriate figure captions) that accompany the Final Technical Progress Report entitled: “Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin” for DOE/NETL Award DE-AC26-00NT40698.

  11. Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, Rober

    2007-03-31

    This Topical Report (#6 of 9) consists of the figures 3.6-13 to (and including) 3.6-18 (and appropriate figure captions) that accompany the Final Technical Progress Report entitled: "Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin” for DOE/NETL Award DE-AC26-00NT40698.

  12. The Areal Extent of Continuous Type Gas Accumulations in Lower Silurian Clinton Sands and Medina Group Sandstones of the Appalachian Basin and the Environments Affected by Their Development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wandrey, C.J.; Ryder, Robert T.; Nuccio, Vito F.; Aggen, Kerry L.

    1997-01-01

    In order to best preserve and manage our energy and natural resources we must understand the relationships between these resources and the impacts of their development. To further this understanding the U.S. Geological Survey is studying unconventional continuous-type and, to a lesser extent, conventional oil and gas accumulations and the environmental impacts associated with their development. Continuous-type gas accumulations are generally characterized by low matrix permeabilities, large areal extents, and no distinct water contacts. This basin scale map shows the overall extent of these accumulations and the general land use types that may be impacted by their development. The Appalachian Basin has the longest history of oil and gas exploration and production in the United States. Since Drake's Titusville discovery well was drilled in 1859, oil and gas has been continuously produced in the basin. While there is still a great deal of oil and gas production, new field discoveries are rare and relatively small. For most of the second half of the 20th century the Appalachian basin has been considered a mature petroleum province because most of the large plays have already been discovered and developed. One exception to this trend is the Lower Silurian Clinton Sands and Medina Group Gas play which is being developed in New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio. This continuous-type gas play has been expanding since the early 1970's (see inset maps). In the 1980's economic incentives such as large increases in wellhead prices further stimulated continuous-type gas resource development. Continuous-type gas plays can be large in areal extent and in thickness. 'Sweetspots' (areas of greater prodcution) are hard to predict and generally associated with better than average permeabilities, and enhanced by natural fracture systems. With an overall success rate often approaching 90%, drilling most of the play with closely spaced wells is often the best way to maximize gas recovery

  13. Na-Cl-Br systematics of fluid inclusions from Mississippi Valley-type deposits, Appalachian Basin: Constraints on solute origin and migration paths

    SciTech Connect

    Kesler, S.E.; Martini, A.M.; Appold, M.S.; Walter, L.M.; Huston, T.J.; Furman, F.C.

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated Na-Cl-Br systematics of fluid inclusion-hosted brines in Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits from the Appalachian Basin. Unlike other geochemical tracers such as lead and strontium isotopes which constrain metal sources, Na-Cl-Br systematics identify sources of brine salinity. Saline formation waters can vary systematically within and between basins with regard to their Na-Cl-Br compositions depending on the importance of halite dissolution relative to retention of subaerially evaporated seawater for the halogen budget. Oil field brine compositions from the Illinois and Appalachian basins are quite distinct in their Na-Cl-Br systematics. Compositions of saline fluid inclusions in MVT deposits generally are consistent with these regional differences. These results shed new light on the extent of regional flow systems and on the geochemical evolution of saline fluids responsible for mineralization. Nearly all fluid inclusions analyzed from the Appalachian MVT deposits have Na/Br and Cl/Br ratios less than modern seawater, consistent with ratios observed in marine brines involved in halite precipitation. The Na-Cl-Br systematics of the brines responsible for Appalachian MVT deposits may be inherited from original marine brines refluxed into the porous carbonate shelf sediments that host these deposits. The Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios of most fluid inclusion-hosted brines from Appalachian MVT sphalerites and fluorites fall into two compositional groups, one from the Lower Cambrian paleoaquifer and another from the Lower Ordovician paleoaquifer. Leachates from most MVT barite deposits form a third compositional group having lower Na/Br and Cl/Br ratios than the other two. Appalachian MVT leachate compositions differ significantly from those in MVT deposits in the Cincinnati arch-midcontinent region suggesting that these two MVT provinces formed from brines of different origin or flow path. 59 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Thermal maturity patterns (conodont color alteration index and vitrinite reflectance) in Upper Ordovician and Devonian rocks of the Appalachian basin: a major revision of USGS Map I-917-E using new subsurface collections: Chapter F.1 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Repetski, John E.; Ryder, Robert T.; Weary, David J.; Harris, Anita G.; Trippi, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    carbon (TOC) content in weight percent. Although the RockEval and TOC data are included in this chapter (table 1), they are not shown on the maps. The revised CAI isograd and percent vitrinite reflectance isograd maps cover all or parts of Kentucky, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia (fig. 1), and the following three stratigraphic intervals: Upper Ordovician carbonate rocks, Lower and Middle Devonian carbonate rocks, and Middle and Upper Devonian black shales. These stratigraphic intervals were chosen for the following reasons: (1) they represent target reservoirs for much of the oil and gas exploration in the Appalachian basin; (2) they are stratigraphically near probable source rocks for most of the oil and gas; (3) they include geologic formations that are nearly continuous across the basin; (4) they contain abundant carbonate grainstone-packstone intervals, which give a reasonable to good probability of recovery of conodont elements from small samples of drill cuttings; and (5) the Middle and Upper Devonian black shale contains large amounts of organic matter for RockEval, TOC, and dispersed vitrinite analyses. Thermal maturity patterns of the Upper Ordovician Trenton Limestone are of particular interest here, because they closely approximate the thermal maturity patterns in the overlying Upper Ordovician Utica Shale, which is the probable source rock for oil and gas in the Upper Cambrian Rose Run Sandstone (sandstone), Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician Knox Group (Dolomite), Lower and Middle Ordovician Beekmantown Group (dolomite or Dolomite), Upper Ordovician Trenton and Black River Limestones, and Lower Silurian Clinton/Medina sandstone (Cole and others, 1987; Jenden and others, 1993; Laughrey and Baldassare, 1998; Ryder and others, 1998; Ryder and Zagorski, 2003). The thermal maturity patterns of the Lower Devonian Helderberg Limestone (Group), Middle Devonian Onondaga Limestone, and Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale-Upper Devonian Rhine

  15. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2003-05-31

    RDH for conodont alteration index determination to better define regional P-T conditions. Efforts are being made to calibrate and standardize geophysical log correlation, seismic reflection data, and Ordovician lithologic signatures to better resolve subsurface stratigraphy and structure beneath the poorly explored Plateau in Tennessee and southern Kentucky. We held a successful workshop on Ordovician rocks geophysical log correlation August 7, 2003 that was cosponsored by the Appalachian PTTC, the Kentucky and Tennessee geological surveys, the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association, and small independents. Detailed field structural and stratigraphic mapping of a transect across part of the Ordovician clastic wedge in Tennessee was begun in January 2003 to assist in 3-D reconstruction of part of the southern Appalachian basin and better assess the nature of a major potential source rock assemblage. (3) Laying the groundwork through (1) and (2) to understand reservoir architecture, the petroleum systems, ancient fluid migration, and conduct 3-D analysis of the southern Appalachian basin.

  16. Water resources and shale gas/oil production in the Appalachian Basin: critical issues and evolving developments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kappel, William M.; Williams, John H.; Szabo, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Unconventional natural gas and oil resources in the United States are important components of a national energy program. While the Nation seeks greater energy independence and greener sources of energy, Federal agencies with environmental responsibilities, state and local regulators and water-resource agencies, and citizens throughout areas of unconventional shale gas development have concerns about the environmental effects of high volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF), including those in the Appalachian Basin in the northeastern United States (fig. 1). Environmental concerns posing critical challenges include the availability and use of surface water and groundwater for hydraulic fracturing; the migration of stray gas and potential effects on overlying aquifers; the potential for flowback, formation fluids, and other wastes to contaminate surface water and groundwater; and the effects from drill pads, roads, and pipeline infrastructure on land disturbance in small watersheds and headwater streams (U.S. Government Printing Office, 2012). Federal, state, regional and local agencies, along with the gas industry, are striving to use the best science and technology to develop these unconventional resources in an environmentally safe manner. Some of these concerns were addressed in U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fact Sheet 2009–3032 (Soeder and Kappel, 2009) about potential critical effects on water resources associated with the development of gas extraction from the Marcellus Shale of the Hamilton Group (Ver Straeten and others, 1994). Since that time, (1) the extraction process has evolved, (2) environmental awareness related to high-volume hydraulic fracturing process has increased, (3) state regulations concerning gas well drilling have been modified, and (4) the practices used by industry to obtain, transport, recover, treat, recycle, and ultimately dispose of the spent fluids and solid waste materials have evolved. This report updates and expands on Fact Sheet 2009

  17. Utility of Isotopes to Understand the Effect of Shale Gas Drilling on Water Quality: Examples From the Appalachian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S.; Bowman, L.; Pelak, A.; Mulder, M.

    2014-12-01

    Marcellus Shale of the Appalachian Basin is one of the largest unconventional gas resources in the United States. The main public concern associated with hydraulic fracturing of Marcellus shale is that that the quality of underground sources of drinking water (USDW) and surface waters can be compromised due to well casing or grouting failures, creation of new fracture pathways, and improper disposal of produced water. However, this region has a long history of coal mining and oil /gas development and therefore it becomes very important to be able to distinguish if any incidence of water contamination is associated with legacy mining/drilling activities or the newly drilled shale gas wells. In addition, the complex structural regime of the Appalachian makes it difficult to decouple natural migration of deep brines and stray gas along geological faults/ fractures from new pathways created by hydraulic fracturing activities. In order to effectively assess the effect of shale gas development on water quality of this region there is a need 1) to establish the background geochemical signatures of different water sources and, 2) to develop geochemical fingerprints that can track the sources and fates of brines and stray gas in fresh waters. We will present results from several ongoing research projects which demonstrate applicability of stable isotopes as natural tracers to understand changes in hydrologic connections associated with shale gas drilling in this region.

  18. Independent focuses Philippines exploration on Visayan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Rillera, F.G.

    1995-08-21

    Cophil Exploration Corp., a Filipino public company, spearheaded 1995 Philippine oil and gas exploration activity with the start of its gas delineation drilling operations in Libertad, northern Cebu. Cophil and its Australian partners, Coplex Resources NL and PacRim Energy NL, have set out to complete a seven well onshore drilling program within this block this year. The companies are testing two modest shallow gas plays, Libertad and Dalingding, and a small oil play, Maya, all in northern Cebu about 500 km southeast of Manila. Following a short discussion on the geology and exploration history of the Visayan basin, this article briefly summarizes Cophil`s ongoing Cebu onshore drilling program. Afterwards, discussion focuses on identified exploration opportunities in the basin`s offshore sector.

  19. The northern and central Appalachian basin coal region -- The Upper Freeport and Pond Creek coal bed assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, L.; Tewalt, S.; Bragg, L.; Wallack, R.; Freeman, P.; Tully, J.

    1999-07-01

    The Upper Freeport and Pond Creek coal beds are two of six coal beds being assessed by the US Geological Survey (USGS) in the northern and central Appalachian basin coal region. The coal resource assessments were designed to provide up-to-date, concise data on the location, quantity, and quality of US coals for Federal agencies, the public, industry and academia. Assessment products are fully digital and include original and remaining resource estimates; maps depicting areal extent, mined areas, geologic structure contour, isopach, overburden thickness, ash yield, sulfur content, calorific value, and selected trace-element contents; and public domain geochemical and stratigraphic databases. The assessment methodology and a few results are presented.

  20. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Ordovician Utica Shale of the Appalachian Basin Province, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Cook, Troy A.; Ryder, Robert T.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Whidden, Katherine J.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey assessed unconventional oil and gas resources of the Upper Ordovician Utica Shale and adjacent units in the Appalachian Basin Province. The assessment covers parts of Maryland, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. The geologic concept is that black shale of the Utica Shale and adjacent units generated hydrocarbons from Type II organic material in areas that are thermally mature for oil and gas. The source rocks generated petroleum that migrated into adjacent units, but also retained significant hydrocarbons within the matrix and adsorbed to organic matter of the shale. These are potentially technically recoverable resources that can be exploited by using horizontal drilling combined with hydraulic fracturing techniques.

  1. Black shale source rocks and oil generation in the Cambrian and Ordovician of the central Appalachian Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, R.T.; Burruss, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Nearly 600 million bbl of oil (MMBO) and 1 to 1.5 trillion ft3 (tcf) of gas have been produced from Cambrian and Ordovician reservoirs (carbonate and sandstone) in the Ohio part of the Appalachian basin and on adjoining arches in Ohio, Indiana, and Ontario, Canada. Most of the oil and gas is concentrated in the giant Lima-Indiana field on the Findlay and Kankakee arches and in small fields distributed along the Knox unconformity. Based on new geochemical analyses of oils, potential source rocks, bitumen extracts, and previously published geochemical data, we conclude that the oils in both groups of fields originated from Middle and Upper Ordovician blcak shale (Utica and Antes shales) in the Appalachian basin. Moroever, we suggest that approximately 300 MMBO and many trillions of cubic feet of gas in the Lower Silurian Clinton sands of eastern Ohio originated in the same source rocks. Oils from the Cambrian and Ordovician reservoirs have similar saturated hydrocarbon compositions, biomarker distributions, and carbon isotope signatures. Regional variations in the oils are attributed to differences in thermal maturation rather than to differences in source. Total organic carbon content, genetic potential, regional extent, and bitument extract geochemistry identify the balck shale of the Utica and Antes shales as the most plausible source of the oils. Other Cambrian and Ordovician shale and carbonate units, such as the Wells Creek formation, which rests on the Knox unconformity, and the Rome Formation and Conasauga Group in the Rome trough, are considered to be only local petroleum sources. Tmax, CAI, and pyrolysis yields from drill-hole cuttings and core indicate that the Utica Shale in eastern and central Ohio is mature with respect to oil generation. Burial, thermal, and hydrocarbon-generation history models suggest that much of the oil was generated from the Utica-Antes source in the late Paleozoic during the Alleghanian orogeny. A pervasive fracture network

  2. Sample preparation of x-ray diffraction analysis and clay mineralogy of Devonian shale from the Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hosterman, J.W.; Loferski, P.J.

    1981-03-01

    Three well-known methods of preparing the clay fraction for x-ray diffraction analysis were tested and evaluated. Kaolinite was not identified in samples prepared by the two settling methods because of layering due to differing/settling rates of the clay minerals. It is suggested that if one of the two settling methods of sample preparation is used that the clay film should be thin enough for the x-ray beam to penetrate the entire thickness of clay. The vacuum method of sample preparation is preferred. Chlorite, kaolinite, 2M illite (muscovite), and mixed layer are the clay minerals found by x-ray diffraction analysis in Devonian shale of the Appalachian basin. The proportions of mixed-layer clay minerals were determined by comparing areas of selected basal peaks on x-ray diffraction traces of untreated samples with those of samples that had been heated and saturated by ethylene glycol.

  3. Choice of College Major: An Exploration of Appalachian Female Choice of an Early Childhood Education Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannoe, Lisa N.

    2013-01-01

    First generation Appalachian female students are exposed to gender differences in roles and career choices that are modeled in the family. A case study approach was used to obtain qualitative data from five students at Eastern Kentucky University and their mothers regarding why these students chose to major in child development and early childhood…

  4. SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA

    SciTech Connect

    BOB A. HARDAGE; ELOISE DOHERTY; STEPHEN E. LAUBACH; TUCKER F. HENTZ

    1998-08-14

    The principal objectives of this project were to test and evaluate technologies that would result in improved characterization of fractured natural-gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin. The Bureau of Economic Geology (Bureau) worked jointly with industry partner Atlas Resources, Inc. to design, execute, and evaluate several experimental tests toward this end. The experimental tests were of two types: (1) tests leading to a low-cost methodology whereby small-scale microfractures observed in matrix grains of sidewall cores can be used to deduce critical properties of large-scale fractures that control natural-gas production and (2) tests that verify methods whereby robust seismic shear (S) waves can be generated to detect and map fractured reservoir facies. The grain-scale microfracture approach to characterizing rock facies was developed in an ongoing Bureau research program that started before this Appalachian Basin study began. However, the method had not been tested in a wide variety of fracture systems, and the tectonic setting of rocks in the Appalachian Basin composed an ideal laboratory for perfecting the methodology. As a result of this Appalachian study, a low-cost commercial procedure now exists that will allow Appalachian operators to use scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of thin sections extracted from oriented sidewall cores to infer the spatial orientation, relative geologic timing, and population density of large-scale fracture systems in reservoir sandstones. These attributes are difficult to assess using conventional techniques. In the Henderson Dome area, large quartz-lined regional fractures having N20E strikes, and a subsidiary set of fractures having N70W strikes, are prevalent. An innovative method was also developed for obtaining the stratigraphic and geographic tops of sidewall cores. With currently deployed sidewall coring devices, no markings from which top orientation can be obtained are made on the sidewall core itself during

  5. Carboniferous sediment dispersal in the Appalachian-Ouachita juncture: Provenance of selected late Mississippian sandstones in the Black Warrior Basin, Mississippi, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiangyang; O'Connor, Patrick M.; Alsleben, Helge

    2016-08-01

    The Black Warrior Basin is one of several Carboniferous foreland basins along the Appalachian-Ouachita fold-thrust belt in the southeastern United States. Sediment dispersal within the Black Warrior Basin has been a long-debated topic because of a complex tectonic history and the potential interaction between the Appalachian and Ouachita orogenic belts, as well as far field sediment sources. Three dispersal patterns have been proposed, including dispersal routes from the craton, dispersal via the Appalachian foreland, and dispersal from the arc side of the Ouachita suture, but sediment dispersal in the Black Warrior Basin remains inconclusive. In this study, sandstone modal analysis and U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology are used to document the provenance and potential dispersal patterns for selected Mississippian sandstone units in the Black Warrior Basin, Missouri, USA. Results show that the majority of the Lewis, Evans, Sanders, and Carter sandstones are sublitharenite to mature quartzarenite and fall within the Cratonic Interior field on Q-F-L diagrams. U-Pb detrital zircon analyses of the Lewis, Sanders, and Carter sandstones show that there are four distinctive age clusters, including a prominent Paleozoic age cluster (~ 350-500 Ma), a broad Grenville age cluster (~ 900-1350 Ma), and two minor age clusters of the Granite-Rhyolite (~ 1360-1600 Ma) and the Yavapai-Mazatzal (~ 1600-1800 Ma) provinces. All Mississippian sandstones have similar age distributions except for the Lewis sandstone, which lacks zircon grains from the Superior province (>~2500 Ma). Based on the compositional maturity, similarity of age distributions, and changes of relative abundance among different age groups, we conclude that the Late Mississippian sandstone units analyzed during this study were derived from the Laurussian craton and the northern part of the Appalachian foreland through a major axial drainage that occupied the Mississippi Valley Graben.

  6. Michigan Basin basement implications for future exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, J.D. . Dept. of Earth Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Michigan Basin has had a long history of responding to new exploration ideas, technologies, and pursuits. The future still holds opportunity for this Basin. A critical factor in future exploration will be incorporation of the details of basement structure into exploration plays. Facies distributions are strongly influenced by basement structure and diastrophism. In central Michigan successful exploration has focused on structures beneath Devonian oil fields and salts. In southern Michigan Ordovician fracture reservoirs have been the main producers. Between these two areas, outside of the Devonian salt edge, exploration has been minimal to none. This anomaly is unwarranted because structure styles in this middle area are continuous with structure of the central and southern bounding areas. Several potential play concepts can be established for this region. Improved definition of the extensions and continuity of the Silurian reef belt is possible because Silurian shelf margins, and the distributions of pinnacle reefs and basinal evaporite facies coincide with basement structural boundaries. Recognition of sea-level terraces at the top of the Trenton in Indiana and Ohio must be integrated into the depositional models for the Michigan Trenton. Cambro-Ordovician stratigraphy still offers opportunities for alternative correlations which have significant implications for depositional models and hydrocarbon occurrence. Improved seismic resolution, detailed basinal studies, and detailed reservoir characterization analogues will result in definition of new discoveries.

  7. Multi-scale and Integrated Characterization of the Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin: From Microscopes to Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Soeder, Daniel J; McDannell, Kalin T.; Mroz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Historic data from the Department of Energy Eastern Gas Shale Project (ESGP) were compiled to develop a database of geochemical analyses, well logs, lithological and natural fracture descriptions from oriented core, and reservoir parameters. The nine EGSP wells were located throughout the Appalachian Basin and intercepted the Marcellus Shale from depths of 750 meters (2500 ft) to 2500 meters (8200 ft). A primary goal of this research is to use these existing data to help construct a geologic framework model of the Marcellus Shale across the basin and link rock properties to gas productivity. In addition to the historic data, x-ray computerized tomography (CT) of entire cores with a voxel resolution of 240mm and optical microscopy to quantify mineral and organic volumes was performed. Porosity and permeability measurements in a high resolution, steady-state flow apparatus are also planned. Earth Vision software was utilized to display and perform volumetric calculations on individual wells, small areas with several horizontal wells, and on a regional basis. The results indicate that the lithologic character of the Marcellus Shale changes across the basin. Gas productivity appears to be influenced by the properties of the organic material and the mineral composition of the rock, local and regional structural features, the current state of in-situ stress, and lithologic controls on the geometry of induced fractures during stimulations. The recoverable gas volume from the Marcellus Shale is variable over the vertical stratigraphic section, as well as laterally across the basin. The results from this study are expected to help improve the assessment of the resource, and help optimize the recovery of natural gas.

  8. Factors controlling Li concentration and isotopic composition in formation waters and host rocks of Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phan, Thai T.; Capo, Rosemary C; Stewart, Brian W.; Macpherson, Gwen; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Hammack, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    In Greene Co., southwest Pennsylvania, the Upper Devonian sandstone formation waters have δ7Li values of + 14.6 ± 1.2 (2SD, n = 25), and are distinct from Marcellus Shale formation waters which have δ7Li of + 10.0 ± 0.8 (2SD, n = 12). These two formation waters also maintain distinctive 87Sr/86Sr ratios suggesting hydrologic separation between these units. Applying temperature-dependent illitilization model to Marcellus Shale, we found that Li concentration in clay minerals increased with Li concentration in pore fluid during diagenetic illite-smectite transition. Samples from north central PA show a much smaller range in both δ7Li and 87Sr/86Sr than in southwest Pennsylvania. Spatial variations in Li and δ7Li values show that Marcellus formation waters are not homogeneous across the Appalachian Basin. Marcellus formation waters in the northeastern Pennsylvania portion of the basin show a much smaller range in both δ7Li and 87Sr/86Sr, suggesting long term, cross-formational fluid migration in this region. Assessing the impact of potential mixing of fresh water with deep formation water requires establishment of a geochemical and isotopic baseline in the shallow, fresh water aquifers, and site specific characterization of formation water, followed by long-term monitoring, particularly in regions of future shale gas development.

  9. Facies analysis and depositional environment of the Ames Marine Member of the Conemaugh Group in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qayim, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    The lithologic and paleontological aspects for fifty localities of the Ames Marine Member were examined. The regional stratigraphic reconstruction shows that it is variably composed of limestone and shale, and often associated with a thin basal coal seam. A generalized, composite stratigraphic section of the Ames Member consists of the following units from top to bottom: the Grafton Sandstone, Nonmarine Shale, Upper Ames Shale, Upper Ames Limestone, Middle Ames Shale, Lower Ames Limestone, Lower Ames Shale, Ames Coal, Nonmarine Silty Shale, and Harlem Coal. Harlem coal is commonly the basal coal in Ohio, and the Ames Coal is common in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Insoluble residue analysis of 223 samples shows that quartz and glauconite are the major and significant residues. The major petrographic components of the Ames rocks are bioclastic grains of echinoderm, brachiopods, molluscs, bryozoa, and foraminifera in a matrix variably composed of clay and calcium carbonate. A quantitative microfacies study applying factor and cluster analysis reveals five basin-wide biofacies and four lithofacies reflecting a gradient from shoreline to an offshore position. The areal and vertical distribution of the different facies reflects the transgression-regression history of the Ames Cycle. A uniform slow eustatic rise of sea level with an early rapid transgression was responsible for the deposition of most of the Ames marine section. The small, upper, underdeveloped regressive section suggests a rapid regression by active prograding deltaic deposits which rapidly terminated the marine conditions over most the the Appalachian Basin.

  10. Stratigraphy of the Devonian Chattanooga and Ohio shales and equivalents in the Appalachian basin: an example of long-range subsurface correlation using gamma-ray logs

    SciTech Connect

    Roen, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    The correlations discussed demonstrate the utility of the gamma-ray log for regional, basinwide stratigraphic studies. Through the use of these logs, suggested correlations based on paleontologic evidence (Hass, 1956) were confirmed and new correlations were established in the Appalachian basin across at least 700 miles. These logs used in conjunction with a few lithologic logs and gamma-ray profiles of surface sections (Ettensohn and others, 1979) have proven to be a useful tool for long-range stratigraphic studies.

  11. Using 10Be to quantify rates of landscape change in 'dead' orogens - millennial scale rates of bedrock and basin-scale erosion in the southern and central Appalachian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierman, P. R.; Reusser, L.; Portenga, E.

    2011-12-01

    The Appalachian Mountain chain stretches north-south along the eastern margin of North America, in places rising a thousand meters and more above the adjacent piedmont. Here, Davis built his paradigm of landscape evolution, seeing landscape rejuvenation and dissected peneplains, a transient landscape. Hack saw the Appalachians as a dynamic system where topography was adjusted to rock strength, a steady-state landscape. Neither had quantitative data by which to test their theories. Today, we approach landscapes of the Appalachian Mountains quite differently. Over the past decade, we and others have measured in situ-produced 10Be in more than 300 samples of quartz isolated from Appalachian drainage basin sediments and in more than 100 samples from exposed Appalachian bedrock outcrops, most of which are on ridgelines. Samples have been collected from the Susquehanna, Potomac, and Shenandoah drainage basins as well as from the area around the Great Smoky Mountain National Park and the Blue Ridge escarpment, and from rivers draining from the Appalachians across the southeastern United States Piedmont. Most areas of the Appalachian Mountains are eroding only slowly; the average for all drainage basin samples analyzed to date is ~18 m/My (n=328). The highest basin-scale erosion rates, 25-70 m/My are found in the Appalachian Plateau and in the Great Smoky Mountains. Lower rates, on the order on 10-20 m/My, characterize the Shenandoah, Potomac, and Blue Ridge escarpment areas. There is a significant, positive relationship between basin-scale erosion rates and average basin slope. Steeper basins are in general eroding more rapidly than less steep basins. On the whole, the erosion rates of bedrock outcrops are either lower than or similar to those measured at a basin scale. The average erosion rate for samples of outcropping bedrock collected from the Appalachians is ~15 m/My (n=101). In the Potomac River Basin and the Great Smoky Mountains, bedrock and basin-scale erosion

  12. Exploration trends of the Sirte Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Aburawi, R.M.

    1995-08-01

    A wave of intense exploration activity in the Sirte Basin began after the discovery of oil in 1958, and an enormous quantity of hydrocarbon was found in less than ten years. The oil discovery rate has been gradually declining since its peak in the 1960`s, and it is now becoming increasingly difficult and more expensive to find a new reserve. This paper is an attempt to discuss briefly the past exploration cycle, to indicate the present position and to predict the future trend of our activities in the Sirte Basin. The past exploration activities in the Sirte Basin were concentrated along the particular geological trends where the possibilities of finding more reserves are now drastically reduced. Therefore, for the future healthy exploration activities, new ideas are needed to bring about some new favourable areas under further investigation. A new cycle of exploration success will emerge if our exploratory efforts are purposely directed towards the stratigraphic, stratrigraphic/structural traps and subtle type traps, along the migrational pathways and deep plays in the potential oil generative areas.

  13. Appalachian Veterans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnow, Pat, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This journal issue focuses on Appalachian veterans and on the premise that Appalachians and Americans in general are still fighting the battles and dealing with the psychic aftermath of the Civil War and all wars fought since then. One article notes that Appalachian soldiers were 20 to 25% more likely to be killed in Vietnam than other soldiers.…

  14. Appalachian Mountains

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Appalachian Mountains     View Larger Image Multi-angle views of the Appalachian Mountains, March 6, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... from Lake Ontario to northern Georgia, and spanning the Appalachian Mountains. The three images to the right are also in true-color, ...

  15. ENHANCING RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN BY IDENTIFYING TECHNICAL BARRIER AND PREFERRED PRACTICES

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald R. McDowell; Khashayar Aminian; Katharine L. Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Ed. Hohn; Douglas G. Patchen

    2003-09-01

    The Preferred Upstream Management Practices (PUMP) project, a two-year study sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), had three primary objectives: (1) the identification of problems, problematic issues, potential solutions and preferred practices related to oil production; (2) the creation of an Appalachian Regional Council to oversee and continue this investigation beyond the end of the project; and (3) the dissemination of investigative results to the widest possible audience, primarily by means of an interactive website. Investigation and identification of oil production problems and preferred management practices began with a Problem Identification Workshop in January of 2002. Three general issues were selected by participants for discussion: Data Management; Reservoir Engineering; and Drilling Practices. At the same meeting, the concept of the creation of an oversight organization to evaluate and disseminated preferred management practices (PMP's) after the end of the project was put forth and volunteers were solicited. In-depth interviews were arranged with oil producers to gain more insight into problems and potential solutions. Project members encountered considerable reticence on the part of interviewees when it came to revealing company-specific production problems or company-specific solutions. This was the case even though interviewees were assured that all responses would be held in confidence. Nevertheless, the following production issues were identified and ranked in order of decreasing importance: Water production including brine disposal; Management of production and business data; Oil field power costs; Paraffin accumulation; Production practices including cementing. An number of secondary issues were also noted: Problems associated with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Waterflooding; Reservoir characterization; Employee availability, training, and safety; and Sale and Purchase problems. One item was mentioned both in

  16. A digital resource model of the Upper Pennsylvanian Pittsburgh coal bed, Monongahela Group, northern Appalachian basin coal region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, L.F.; Tewalt, S.J.; Bragg, L.J.; Wallack, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is currently conducting a coal resource assessment of the coal beds and zones that are expected to provide the bulk of the Nation's coal resources for the next few decades. The Pittsburgh coal bed is the first bed in the northern and central Appalachian basin coal region to undergo a fully-digital assessment. The bed-specific assessment is being carried out in partnership with the state geologic surveys of West Virginia (WV), Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH), and Maryland (MD). Comprehensive stratigraphic and geochemical databases have been developed for the Pittsburgh coal bed, and areal extent, mined areas, structure contour, isopach, overburden thickness maps of the bed have been released as United States Geological Survey (USGS) Open-File Reports. The resulting resource model indicates that of the original 34 billion short tons (31 billion tonnes) of Pittsburgh coal, 16 billion short tons (14 billion tonnes) remain. Although most of the remaining coal is thinner, deeper, and higher in ash and sulfur (S) than the original resource, there are blocks of extensive thick (6-8 ft or 1.8-2.4 m) coal in southwestern PA and the northern panhandle of WV.The U.S. Geological Survey is currently conducting a coal resource assessment of the coal beds and zones that are expected to provide the bulk of the Nation's coal resources for the next few decades. The Pittsburgh coal bed is the first bed in the northern and central Appalachian basin coal region to undergo a fully-digital assessment. The bed-specific assessment is being carried out in partnership with the state geologic surveys of West Virginia (WV), Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH), and Maryland (MD). Comprehensive stratigraphic and geochemical databases have been developed for the Pittsburgh coal bed, and areal extent, mined areas, structure contour, isopach, overburden thickness maps of the bed have been released as United States Geological Survey (USGS) Open-File Reports. The resulting resource

  17. Paleoclimate controls on late paleozoic sedimentation and peat formation in the central appalachian basin (U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cecil, C.B.; Stanton, R.W.; Neuzil, S.G.; Dulong, F.T.; Ruppert, L.F.; Pierce, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    In the central Appalachian basin, at least two major climate changes affected sedimentation during the late Paleozoic. Stratigraphically, these two changes are indicated by the distribution of coal beds, the variation in coal quality, and the variation in rock lithologies. In latest Mississippian or earliest Pennsylvanian time, the climate changed from dry-seasonal tropical to ever-wet (equable) tropical. The equable climate prevailed into the Middle Pennsylvanian, influencing the morphology and geochemistry in peat-forming environments. Many of the peat deposits, which formed under the equable climate, were probably domed (raised bogs); low concentrations of dissolved solids in peat formation water resulted in low buffering capacity. Organic acids caused acidic (pH < 4), antiseptic conditions that resulted in intense leaching of mineral matter, minimal degradation of organic matter, and low-ash and low-sulfur peat deposits; the resulting coal beds are also low in ash and sulfur. Associated rocks are noncalcareous and consist of sequences of interbedded shale, siltstone, and sandstone including quartz arenite. Another climate change occurred in late Middle Pennsylvanian time when evapopation periodically exceeded rainfall resulting in an increase of both dissolved solids and pH (4 to ??? 7) in surface and near-surface water. Throughout the remainder of the Pennsylvanian, the surfaces of peat deposits were probably planar (not domed); water in peat-forming and other depositional environments became more nearly neutral. The coal beds derived from these peats are highly variable in both ash and sulfur contents. Drier or more seasonal climates are also indicated by sequences of (1) calcareous sandstone and shale, (2) nonmarine limestone that shows shallow-water and subaerial exposure features, and (3) calcareous paleosols that have caliche characteristics. Our data and observations indicate that physical depositional environment models for the origin of coal do not

  18. Appalachian Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Thermal Quality Analysis in Low-Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis (GPFA-AB

    DOE Data Explorer

    Teresa E. Jordan

    2015-11-15

    This collection of files are part of a larger dataset uploaded in support of Low Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis for the Appalachian Basin (GPFA-AB, DOE Project DE-EE0006726). Phase 1 of the GPFA-AB project identified potential Geothermal Play Fairways within the Appalachian basin of Pennsylvania, West Virginia and New York. This was accomplished through analysis of 4 key criteria or ‘risks’: thermal quality, natural reservoir productivity, risk of seismicity, and heat utilization. Each of these analyses represent a distinct project task, with the fifth task encompassing combination of the 4 risks factors. Supporting data for all five tasks has been uploaded into the Geothermal Data Repository node of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS). This submission comprises the data for Thermal Quality Analysis (project task 1) and includes all of the necessary shapefiles, rasters, datasets, code, and references to code repositories that were used to create the thermal resource and risk factor maps as part of the GPFA-AB project. The identified Geothermal Play Fairways are also provided with the larger dataset. Figures (.png) are provided as examples of the shapefiles and rasters. The regional standardized 1 square km grid used in the project is also provided as points (cell centers), polygons, and as a raster. Two ArcGIS toolboxes are available: 1) RegionalGridModels.tbx for creating resource and risk factor maps on the standardized grid, and 2) ThermalRiskFactorModels.tbx for use in making the thermal resource maps and cross sections. These toolboxes contain “item description” documentation for each model within the toolbox, and for the toolbox itself. This submission also contains three R scripts: 1) AddNewSeisFields.R to add seismic risk data to attribute tables of seismic risk, 2) StratifiedKrigingInterpolation.R for the interpolations used in the thermal resource analysis, and 3) LeaveOneOutCrossValidation.R for the cross validations used in

  19. Deep-water carbonate slope failure events in a newly discovered Silurian basin, Blue Ridge province, southern Appalachians, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Unrug, R. )

    1991-03-01

    Siliciclastic deep-water turbidites of the Walden Creek Group, Ocoee Supergroup, underlying the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, contain olistolith blocks and olistostromal debris-flow breccia beds. Paleozoic fossils discovered recently in the olistoliths indicate Silurian age of the carbonates. The Walden Creek Group is therefore Silurian or younger, not late Proterozoic in age, as believed previously. The carbonate olistoliths and breccias formed by collapse of post-Taconic Silurian carbonate-dominated basin present in the Blue Ridge province of the Southern Appalachians into the younger basin of the Walden Creek Group. Two modes of occurrence of the olistoliths are present: (1) discrete horizons in which olistoliths are sitting spaced ten to hundreds of meters apart underneath a widespread conglomerate bed and (2) accumulations of olistoliths in localized stacked horizons in the vertical sequence of the enclosing siliciclastic rocks. Both modes can be related to failure of active fault scarps. Rocks of the olistolith are lithologically varied and record an older event of slope failure within the Silurian carbonate-dominated basin. Three facies assemblages representing two sedimentary environments are present in the olistoliths. Facies assemblage A includes oolitic limestone, stromatolite, carbonate breccia encrusted by stromatolite, and massive sandy limestone. It represents a high-energy, shallow-water, carbonate platform environment. Facies assemblage B consists of bedded dark limestone, alternating with black shale, and represents sediments of the carbonate platform slope. Facies assemblage C includes carbonate breccias intercalated in the bedded limestones and shales and is interpreted as deposits of the lower slope formed by failure of the carbonate platform margin.

  20. High-resolution sequence stratigraphy of Late Mississippian carbonates in the Appalachian basin, implications for compartmentalization of reservoir facies

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Tawil, A.; Read, J.F. )

    1996-01-01

    The Late Mississippian Newman/Greenbrier carbonates were deposited in the Appalachian foreland basin whose depocenter lay to the south and east of Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia. Over 50 closely spaced detailed measured sections along with numerous wireline logs, biostratigraphic data, and lithologic markers are used to construct detailed facies cross-sections. In the Newman limestone along the Cincinnati Arch, four sequences bounded by regional unconformities can be recognized. The lower three sequences contain one to eight oolite bearing disconformity bounded parasequences. Parasequences within sequences one to three, progressively onlap the Waverly and Cincinnati arches. These are dominated by shoal water ooid grainstone and lagoonal skeletal wackestone/mudstone facies, while eolianite quartzose peloidal grainstone facies are restricted to the lower two sequences. Sequence four is thicker and capped by a disconformity, but is internally conformable. It contains thick oolite units in the lower part (up to 10 m), open ramp skeletal packstone and shale (2nd order maximum flooding of the studied interval). In the much thicker foreland basin sections in West Virginia, four sequences also can be defined. The lowstand deposits are characterized by red beds up-dip, locally thickened tidal flat facies down-dip, and thin grainstone tongues extending into the slope/basin facies. Within the sequences, parasequences lack bounding disconformities, and are dominated by open ramp skeletal packstone and shoal water ooid grainstone facies. Eolianite facies are common in landward parts of the lower two sequences. The complex regional distribution and vertical compartmentalization of these multilateral oolitic reservoirs in both areas on this tropical ramp reflect tidal bar morphologies, differential regional subsidence patterns, coupled with 4th order moderate amplitude eustacy.

  1. High-resolution sequence stratigraphy of Late Mississippian carbonates in the Appalachian basin, implications for compartmentalization of reservoir facies

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Tawil, A.; Read, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    The Late Mississippian Newman/Greenbrier carbonates were deposited in the Appalachian foreland basin whose depocenter lay to the south and east of Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia. Over 50 closely spaced detailed measured sections along with numerous wireline logs, biostratigraphic data, and lithologic markers are used to construct detailed facies cross-sections. In the Newman limestone along the Cincinnati Arch, four sequences bounded by regional unconformities can be recognized. The lower three sequences contain one to eight oolite bearing disconformity bounded parasequences. Parasequences within sequences one to three, progressively onlap the Waverly and Cincinnati arches. These are dominated by shoal water ooid grainstone and lagoonal skeletal wackestone/mudstone facies, while eolianite quartzose peloidal grainstone facies are restricted to the lower two sequences. Sequence four is thicker and capped by a disconformity, but is internally conformable. It contains thick oolite units in the lower part (up to 10 m), open ramp skeletal packstone and shale (2nd order maximum flooding of the studied interval). In the much thicker foreland basin sections in West Virginia, four sequences also can be defined. The lowstand deposits are characterized by red beds up-dip, locally thickened tidal flat facies down-dip, and thin grainstone tongues extending into the slope/basin facies. Within the sequences, parasequences lack bounding disconformities, and are dominated by open ramp skeletal packstone and shoal water ooid grainstone facies. Eolianite facies are common in landward parts of the lower two sequences. The complex regional distribution and vertical compartmentalization of these multilateral oolitic reservoirs in both areas on this tropical ramp reflect tidal bar morphologies, differential regional subsidence patterns, coupled with 4th order moderate amplitude eustacy.

  2. Petroleum exploration in the Amadeus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, L. E.

    Although the spectacular outcrops in the Amadeus Basin have attracted researcher for many years, commercial exploration for oil started only in 1958. Up until 1973, 16 petroleum exploration wells were drilled and the major Mereenie Oil and Gas Field and the Palm Valley Gas Field were discovered. In both cases, the principal reservoir is the latest Cambrian-Early Ordovician Pacoota Sandstone; the reservoirs were sourced from the Early Ordovician Horn Valley Siltstone. Due to a combination of adverse circumstances, there was no exploration in the basin between 1973 and 1980. Since activity resumed, 14 further exploratory wells have been drilled and both the Mereenie and Palm Valley Fields have commenced production. The Dingo Gas Field, with flows form the basal part of the latest Proterozoic Arumbera Sandstone, was discovered in 1981. The Dingo Field is currently under study because of low flow rates from the reservoir. Exploration during the 1980's has brought out new concepts regarding the prospectiveness of parts of the basin, many of which have yet to be tested.

  3. Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

    2008-12-31

    To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos

  4. Preliminary report on the clay mineralogy of the Upper Devonian Shales in the southern and middle Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hosterman, John W.; Loferski, Patricia J.

    1978-01-01

    The distribution of kaolinite in parts of the Devonian shale section is the most significant finding of this work. These shales are composed predominately of 2M illite and illitic mixed-layer clay with minor amounts of chlorite and kaolinite. Preliminary data indicate that kaolinite, the only allogenic clay mineral, is present in successively older beds of the Ohio Shale from south to north in the southern and middle parts of the Appalachian basin. This trend in the distribution of kaolinite shows a paleocurrent direction to the southwest. Three well-known methods of preparing the clay fraction for X-ray diffraction analysis were tested and evaluated. Kaolinite was not identified in two of the methods because of layering due to differing settling rates of the clay minerals. It is suggested that if one of the two settling methods of sample preparation is used, the clay film be thin enough for the X-ray beam to penetrate the entire thickness of clay.

  5. Geologic Cross Section D-D' Through the Appalachian Basin from the Findlay Arch, Sandusky County, Ohio, to the Valley and Ridge Province, Hardy County, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Crangle, Robert D., Jr.; Trippi, Michael H.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Lentz, Erika E.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Hope, Rebecca S.

    2009-01-01

    Geologic cross section D-D' is the second in a series of cross sections constructed by the U.S. Geological Survey to document and improve understanding of the geologic framework and petroleum systems of the Appalachian basin. Cross section D-D' provides a regional view of the structural and stratigraphic framework of the Appalachian basin from the Findlay arch in northwestern Ohio to the Valley and Ridge province in eastern West Virginia, a distance of approximately 290 miles. The information shown on the cross section is based on geological and geophysical data from 13 deep drill holes, several of which penetrate the Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of the basin and bottom in Mesoproterozoic (Grenville-age) crystalline basement rocks. This cross section is a companion to cross section E-E' (Ryder and others, 2008) that is located about 25 to 50 mi to the southwest. Although specific petroleum systems in the Appalachian basin are not identified on the cross section, many of their key elements (such as source rocks, reservoir rocks, seals, and traps) can be inferred from lithologic units, unconformities, and geologic structures shown on the cross section. Other aspects of petroleum systems (such as the timing of petroleum generation and preferred migration pathways) may be evaluated by burial history, thermal history, and fluid flow models based on information shown on the cross section. Cross section D-D' lacks the detail to illustrate key elements of coal systems (such as paleoclimate, coal quality, and coal rank), but it does provide a general geologic framework (stratigraphic units and general rock types) for the coal-bearing section. Also, cross section D-D' may be used as a reconnaissance tool to identify plausible geologic structures and strata for the subsurface storage of liquid waste or for the sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  6. Tourmaline in Appalachian - Caledonian massive sulphide deposits and its exploration significance.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    Tourmaline is a common gangue mineral in several types of stratabound mineral deposits, including some massive base-metal sulphide ores of the Appalachian - Caledonian orogen. It is most abundant (sometimes forming massive foliated tourmalinite) in sediment-hosted deposits, such as those at the Elizabeth Cu mine and the Ore Knob Cu mine (North Carolina, USA). Trace amounts of tourmaline occur associated with volcanic-hosted deposits in the Piedmont and New England and also in the Trondheim district. Tourmaline associated with the massive sulphide deposits are Mg- rich dravites with major- and trace-element compositions significantly different from schorl. It is suggested that the necessary B was produced by submarine exhalative processes as a part of the same hydrothermal system that deposited the ores. An abundance of dravite in non-evaporitic terrains is believed to indicate proximity to former subaqueous fumarolic centres.-R.A.H.

  7. Part I: Neoacadian to Alleghanian foreland basin development and provenance in the central appalachian orogen, pine mountain thrust sheet Part II: Structural configuration of a modified Mesozoic to Cenozoic forearc basin system, south-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Peter Benjamin

    Foreland and forearc basins are large sediment repositories that form in response to tectonic loading and lithospheric flexure during orogenesis along convergent plate boundaries. In addition to their numerous valuable natural resources, these systems preserve important geologic information regarding the timing and intensity of deformation, uplift and erosion history, and subsidence history along collisional margins, and, in ancient systems, may provide more macroscopic information regarding climate, plate motion, and eustatic sea level fluctuations. This thesis presents two studies focused in the Paleozoic Appalachian foreland basin system along the eastern United States and in the Mesozoic to Cenozoic Matanuska forearc basin system in south-central Alaska. Strata of the Appalachian foreland basin system preserve the dynamic history of orogenesis and sediment dispersal along the east Laurentian margin, recording multiple episodes of deformation and basin development during Paleozoic time. A well-exposed, >600 m thick measured stratigraphic section of the Pine Mountain thrust sheet at Pound Gap, Kentucky affords one of the most complete exposures of Upper Devonian through Middle Pennsylvanian strata in the basin. These strata provide a window into which the foreland basin's development during two major collisional events known as the Acadian-Neoacadian and the Alleghanian orogenies can be observed. Lithofacies analysis of four major sedimentary successions observed in hanging wall strata record the upward transition from (1) a submarine deltaic fan complex developed on a distal to proximal prodelta in Late Devonian to Middle Mississippian time, to (2) a Middle to Late Mississippian carbonate bank system developed on a slowly subsiding, distal foreland ramp, which was drowned by (3) Late Mississippian renewed clastic influx to a tidally influenced, coastal deltaic complex to fluvial delta plain system unconformably overlain by (4) a fluvial braided river complex

  8. Palynology, geochemistry and Re-Os age of the Lower-Middle Pennsylvanian stage boundary, central Appalachian basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geboy, N.; Tripathy, G. R.; Ruppert, L. F.; Eble, C. F.; Blake, B. M.; Hannah, J. L.; Stein, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    The central Appalachian basin (CAB) in the eastern United States contains complicated sedimentary sequences often with thin and discontinuous strata. As an economically important coal-producing region, the basin's architectural framework and depositional history are important to understand. Typically, eustatic marine incursions, marked with black shale deposits, are used for basin-wide correlation. The Betsie Shale Member of the Kanawha Formation represents one of these relatively thick and laterally extensive marine zones. This study examines the palynoflora of the Matewan coalbed, which conformably underlies the Betsie, in the context of a new Re-Os date for the Betsie Shale Member and additional geochemical measures. At its base, the Matewan contains abundant lycopsid tree spores, indicative of a submerged, flooded paleomire. Upsection, biodiversity increases to include small fern and calamite spores as well as cordaite pollen. Combined with an observed increase of inertinite, the diversification of palynoflora suggests surficial peat exposure and drying out of the paleomire. A S-rich (28 wt. %) shaley parting separates these lower and upper benches of the Matewan and may represent an initial marine pulse prior to the glacioeustatic incursion that ultimately flooded the Matewan and deposited the overlying Betsie Shale. The Betsie is organic-rich (3.05 - 4.89 wt. % TOC) with Re and Os content ranging from 320 - 1,200 ppb and 1.5 - 5.3 ppb, respectively. The highly enriched Re values result in notably high parent:daughter ratios (187Re/188Os = 3,644 - 5,737). The Re-Os isotopic data yield a Model 1 age of 323 ± 7.8 Ma (n = 7; MSWD = 0.63) with evidence that the true age lies closer to the younger end of the uncertainty. This age is consistent with previous paleontologic-based interpretations but represents the first directly measured radiometric date for the Betsie. An absolute age for the Betsie is a critical result, as the member is correlated with units in

  9. Utilization Analysis in Low-Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis for the Appalachian Basin (GPFA-AB)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Teresa E. Jordan

    2015-09-30

    This submission of Utilization Analysis data to the Geothermal Data Repository (GDR) node of the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) is in support of Phase 1 Low Temperature Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis for the Appalachian Basin (project DE-EE0006726). The submission includes data pertinent to the methods and results of an analysis of the Surface Levelized Cost of Heat (SLCOH) for US Census Bureau ‘Places’ within the study area. This was calculated using a modification of a program called GEOPHIRES, available at http://koenraadbeckers.net/geophires/index.php. The MATLAB modules used in conjunction with GEOPHIRES, the MATLAB data input file, the GEOPHIRES output data file, and an explanation of the software components have been provided. Results of the SLCOH analysis appear on 4 .png image files as mapped ‘risk’ of heat utilization. For each of the 4 image (.png) files, there is an accompanying georeferenced TIF (.tif) file by the same name. In addition to calculating SLCOH, this Task 4 also identified many sites that may be prospects for use of a geothermal district heating system, based on their size and industry, rather than on the SLCOH. An industry sorted listing of the sites (.xlsx) and a map of these sites plotted as a layer onto different iterations of maps combining the three geological risk factors (Thermal Quality, Natural Reservoir Quality, and Risk of Seismicity) has been provided. In addition to the 6 image (.png) files of the maps in this series, a shape (.shp) file and 7 associated files are included as well. Finally, supporting files (.pdf) describing the utilization analysis methodology and summarizing the anticipated permitting for a deep district heating system are supplied.

  10. Petrophysics of Lower Silurian sandstones and integration with the tectonic-stratigraphic framework, Appalachian basin, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, J.W.; Byrnes, A.P.

    2005-01-01

    Petrophysical properties were determined for six facies in Lower Silurian sandstones of the Appalachian basin: fluvial, estuarine, upper shoreface, lower shoreface, tidal channel, and tidal flat. Fluvial sandstones have the highest permeability for a given porosity and exhibit a wide range of porosity (2-18%) and permeability (0.002-450 md). With a transition-zone thickness of only 1-6 m (3-20 ft), fluvial sandstones with permeability greater than 5 md have irreducible water saturation (Siw) less than 20%, typical of many gas reservoirs. Upper shoreface sandstones exhibit good reservoir properties with high porosity (10-21%), high permeability (3-250 md), and low S iw (<20%). Lower shoreface sandstones, which are finer grained, have lower porosity (4-12%), lower permeability (0.0007-4 md), thicker transition zones (6-180 m [20-600 ft]), and higher S iw. In the tidal-channel, tidal-flat, and estuarine facies, low porosity (average < 6%), low permeability (average < 0.02 md), and small pore throats result in large transition zones (30-200 m; 100-650 ft) and high water saturations. The most favorable reservoir petrophysical properties and the best estimated production from the Lower Silurian sandstones are associated with fluvial and upper shoreface facies of incised-valley fills, which we interpret to have formed predominantly in areas of structural recesses that evolved from promontories along a collisional margin during the Taconic orogeny. Although the total thickness of the sandstone may not be as great in these areas, reservoir quality is better than in adjacent structural salients, which is attributed to higher energy depositional processes and shallower maximum burial depth in the recesses than in the salients. Copyright ??2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  11. Paleoshoreline patterns in the transgressive-regressive sequences of Pennsylvanian rocks in the northern Appalachian Basin, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Ernest H.

    1994-11-01

    Sheets of sponge spicule flint of Pennsylvanian age (Bashkirian, Moscovian, Kasimovian) that are present in the northern Appalachian Basin of Ohio and adjacent parts of Kentucky, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, are important indicators of paleoshorelines. This flint typically occurs with or occupies the position normally held by shallow-water limestone and contains a normal marine fauna. The flint was deposited above coal or underclay, representing the detritus-starved marine portion of a transgressive-regressive sequence and marking the eastern limit of transgression across a westward-spreading alluvial plain. Flint occurs at several stratigraphic positions in the upper Pottsville-lower Conemaugh interval. The most important are: Boggs, Upper Mercer and Kanawha flints of the upper Pottsville Group; Kilgore-Flint Ridge, Zaleski and Vanport flints of the lower Allegheny Group; and Brush Creek flint of the lower Conemaugh Group. Lithofacies maps of these beds were constructed to show the distribution of the flint. Limestone-hosted flint occurs in long discontinuous chains of sheetlike bodies, whereas shale-hosted flint occurs in single sheets with restricted geographic distribution. Chains of limestone-hosted flint attain maximum dimensions of a few meters in thickness, a few kilometers in width and several hundreds of kilometers in length. The Upper Mercer, Vanport and Brush Creek flints are particularly extensive, forming arcuate shoreline patterns that parallel the fronts of large delta systems. Beds of clay ironstone and/or coal above flint indicate that the lagoonal environment in which flint was deposited was followed closely by a change to stagnant waters. Cementation of flint with silica likely occurred under the lower pH conditions existing at that time and when depths of burial were shallow.

  12. Black Appalachians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waage, Fred, Ed.; Cabbell, Ed, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    This issue of "Now and Then" focuses on black Appalachians, their culture, and their history. It contains local histories, articles, and poems and short stories by Appalachian blacks. Articles include: "A Mountain Artist's Landscape," a profile of artist Rita Bradley by Pat Arnow; "A Part and Apart," a profile of black historian Ed Cabbell by Pat…

  13. Alabama's Appalachian overthrust amid exploratory drilling resurgence

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.D. ); Epsman, M.L.

    1991-06-24

    Oil and gas exploration has been carried out sporadically in the Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama for years, but recently interest in the play has had a major resurgence. The Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama is best exposed in the valley and ridge physiographic province in the northeast part of the state. Resistant ridges of sandstone and chert and valleys of shales and carbonate have been thrust toward the northwest. Seismic data show that this structural style continues under the Cretaceous overlap. The surface and subsurface expression of the Alabama overthrust extends for more than 4,000 sq miles. Oil and gas have been produced for many years from Cambro-Ordovician, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks in the nearby Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi and the Cumberland plateau in Tennessee. The same zones are also potential producing horizons in the Alabama overthrust region.

  14. Perspective of gas exploration in Ying-Qiong Basin

    SciTech Connect

    He, Hanyi; Zhongtiang Hu )

    1996-01-01

    The Yinggehai and Qiongdongnan Basin (Ying-Qiong Basin) in the northwest part of the South China Sea is a Cenozoic sedimentary basin, which has fast-subsiding and thick sediments. The maximum Cenozoic sediments in the center part of the basin is 20,000 m. Six sets of source rocks with prevailing Type III kerogen were developed in the basin, which has a great potential for gas generation. Different types of reservoirs and traps, leading to different assemblages of source rocks, reservoirs, and cap rocks, form good gas pools. Abnormal high temperature and high pressure in the basin resulted in many mud diapirs and made the generation, migration, and accumulation of gas more colorful. Up to now, four gas fields have been discovered in the basin. A large number of anticlines and stratigraphic-lithologic traps in the basin provide an extensive area for gas exploration. The perspective of gas exploration in the basin is vast and bright.

  15. Perspective of gas exploration in Ying-Qiong Basin

    SciTech Connect

    He, Hanyi; Zhongtiang Hu

    1996-12-31

    The Yinggehai and Qiongdongnan Basin (Ying-Qiong Basin) in the northwest part of the South China Sea is a Cenozoic sedimentary basin, which has fast-subsiding and thick sediments. The maximum Cenozoic sediments in the center part of the basin is 20,000 m. Six sets of source rocks with prevailing Type III kerogen were developed in the basin, which has a great potential for gas generation. Different types of reservoirs and traps, leading to different assemblages of source rocks, reservoirs, and cap rocks, form good gas pools. Abnormal high temperature and high pressure in the basin resulted in many mud diapirs and made the generation, migration, and accumulation of gas more colorful. Up to now, four gas fields have been discovered in the basin. A large number of anticlines and stratigraphic-lithologic traps in the basin provide an extensive area for gas exploration. The perspective of gas exploration in the basin is vast and bright.

  16. Origin of middle Silurian Keefer sandstone, east-central Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, S.C.; Textoris, D.A.; Dennison, J.M.

    1988-08-01

    The Keefer Sandstone of northeastern West Virginia and western Maryland was deposited in back-barrier, barrier-island, and marine shelf environments along a prograding, storm-dominated, mesotidal coastline of probable low wave energy. Back-barrier sediments were deposited in tidal-flat and lagoonal environments. Barrier-island sediments are dominated by cross-bedded sandstones deposited in deep, laterally migrating tidal inlets. Erosion accompanying the passage of a migrating tidal inlet usually resulted in the removal of underyling shoreface and shelf sands, so that tidal-inlet sandstones commonly lie with a markedly erosive contact on subtidal shales of the underlying Rose Hill Formation. Sand was transported to the shelf from the coastline by downwelling, storm-generated currents. Chamosite ooids formed in gently agitated waters immediately below fair-weather wave base. Outcrops to the east, which preserve back-barrier and barrier-island lithofacies, record a single basinward progradation of the shoreline. However, outcrops farther west, which preserve finer grained sandstone, shale, and limestone shelf lithofacies, document four progradational events in stacked coarsening-upward sequences. Each is typically capped by transgressive sandstones, commonly hematite ooid-bearing, which mark episodes of coastal retreat. Retreat occurred through shoreface and nearshore erosion. Chamosite ooids were transported basinward during coastal retreat and altered to hematite prior to burial. Transgressive shelf sands contain abundant coarse sand eroded from tidal-inlet deposits. Deposition of the Keefer was a response to a decrease in rate of eustatic sea level rise, or a decrease in basin subsidence rate. This was followed by deposition of the transgressive basin facies of the Rochester Shale.

  17. Potential subsurface structures and hydrocarbon reservoirs in the southern Appalachian Basin beneath the Cumberland Plateau and eastern Highland Rim, Tennessee, Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evenick, Jonathan Charles

    2006-04-01

    Oil and gas exploration in the southern Appalachian basin is typically concentrated around areas with historically proven reserves and very limited prospecting is conducted elsewhere in the region. To remove possible correlation problems and promote regional prospecting a standardized picking methodology was established in geophysical logs for the Middle Ordovician carbonate lithofacies (Nashville-Stones River Groups). This methodology was then used to correlate the units across Cumberland Plateau of Tennessee, Kentucky, and Virginia, from the Nashville-Jessamine domes to the Clinchport-Whiteoak Mountain thrust in the Valley and Ridge. The same lithofacies may extend in Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York, suggesting a standardized nomenclature be established. This methodology is key to resolving regional and local structures, and structural trends in this area. To identify deformation probably associated with blind structural trends and producing fields, regional structure contour, trend surface residual anomaly, and isopach maps were constructed using data from 7,639 geophysical logs, 1,960 drill cores, and 433 surface contacts. These maps correlate well with known producing fields and identified a possible decollement in the Chattanooga Shale along with the southern extension of the Rome trough in Tennessee. A geologic model for hydrocarbon emplacement was constructed to accommodate all the available structural and petroleum information. The model illustrates a proposed decollement soled in the Chattanooga Shale that forms linear potential Mississippian-age traps and a previously unidentified continuation of the Rome trough and Sequatchie Valley fault beneath the western section of the Wartburg basin in Tennessee. The Flynn Creek impact structure was also investigated because it has a good hydrocarbon potential and may have economical reserves. The impact occurred in a carbonate-dominated target during the Late Devonian. Four persistent, concentric faults indicate

  18. Geologic Cross Section E-E' through the Appalachian Basin from the Findlay Arch, Wood County, Ohio, to the Valley and Ridge Province, Pendleton County, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Crangle, Robert D., Jr.; Trippi, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Geologic cross section E-E' is the first in a series of cross sections planned by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to document and improve understanding of the geologic framework and petroleum systems of the Appalachian basin. Cross section E-E' provides a regional view of the structural and stratigraphic framework of the basin from the Findlay arch in northwestern Ohio to the Valley and Ridge province in eastern West Virginia, a distance of approximately 380 miles (mi) (fig. 1, on sheet 1). Cross section E-E' updates earlier geologic cross sections through the central Appalachian basin by Renfro and Feray (1970), Bennison (1978), and Bally and Snelson (1980) and a stratigraphic cross section by Colton (1970). Although other published cross sections through parts of the basin show more structural detail (for example, Shumaker, 1985; Kulander and Dean, 1986) and stratigraphic detail (for example, Ryder, 1992; de Witt and others, 1993; Hettinger, 2001), these other cross sections are of more limited extent geographically and stratigraphically. Although specific petroleum systems in the Appalachian basin are not identified on the cross section, many of their key elements (such as source rocks, reservoir rocks, seals, and traps) can be inferred from lithologic units, unconformities, and geologic structures shown on the cross section. Other aspects of petroleum systems (such as the timing of petroleum generation and preferred migration pathways) may be evaluated by burial history, thermal history, and fluid flow models based on information shown on the cross section. Cross section E-E' lacks the detail to illustrate key elements of coal systems (such as paleoclimate, coal quality, and coal rank), but it does provide a general framework (stratigraphic units and general rock types) for the coal-bearing section. Also, cross section E-E' may be used as a reconnaissance tool to identify plausible geologic structures and strata for the subsurface storage of liquid waste (for

  19. Petrographic maturity parameters of a Devonian shale maturation series, Appalachian Basin, USA. ICCP Thermal Indices Working Group interlaboratory exercise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Araujo, Carla Viviane; Borrego, Angeles G.; Cardott, Brian; das Chagas, Renata Brenand A.; Flores, Deolinda; Goncalves, Paula; Hackley, Paul C.; Hower, James C.; Kern, Marcio Luciano; Kus, Jolanta; Mastalerz, Maria; Filho, João Graciano Mendonça; de Oliveira Mendonça, Joalice; Rego Menezes, Taissa; Newman, Jane; Suarez-Ruiz, Isabel; Sobrinho da Silva, Frederico; Viegas de Souza, Igor

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents results of an interlaboratory exercise on organic matter optical maturity parameters using a natural maturation series comprised by three Devonian shale samples (Huron Member, Ohio Shale) from the Appalachian Basin, USA. This work was conducted by the Thermal Indices Working Group of the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology (ICCP) Commission II (Geological Applications of Organic Petrology). This study aimed to compare: 1. maturation predicted by different types of petrographic parameters (vitrinite reflectance and spectral fluorescence of telalginite), 2. reproducibility of the results for these maturation parameters obtained by different laboratories, and 3. improvements in the spectral fluorescence measurement obtained using modern detection systems in comparison with the results from historical round robin exercises.Mean random vitrinite reflectance measurements presented the highest level of reproducibility (group standard deviation 0.05) for low maturity and reproducibility diminished with increasing maturation (group standard deviation 0.12).Corrected fluorescence spectra, provided by 14 participants, showed a fair to good correspondence. Standard deviation of the mean values for spectral parameters was lowest for the low maturity sample but was also fairly low for higher maturity samples.A significant improvement in the reproducibility of corrected spectral fluorescence curves was obtained in the current exercise compared to a previous investigation of Toarcian organic matter spectra in a maturation series from the Paris Basin. This improvement is demonstrated by lower values of standard deviation and is interpreted to reflect better performance of newer photo-optical measuring systems.Fluorescence parameters measured here are in good agreement with vitrinite reflectance values for the least mature shale but indicate higher maturity than shown by vitrinite reflectance for the two more mature shales. This red shift in

  20. A thrust-ridge paleodepositional model for the Upper Freeport coal bed and associated clastic facies, Upper Potomac coal field, Appalachian basin, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belt, E.S.; Lyons, P.C.

    1989-01-01

    A blind-thrust-ridge model is proposed to explain the lack of coarse clastic material in the vast minable Upper Freeport coal bed (UF). This coal bed contains only fine elastic partings and is overlain by regionally extensive, closely spaced channel-belt deposits in the Upper Potomac coal field of the Appalachian basin. A blind-thrust ridge may have formed a sediment trap and prevented c coarse fluvial sediments from entering the swamp during a period (Westphalian D) when the thick Upper Freeport peat accumulated. Anticlinal thrust ridges and associated depressions may have existed uninterrupted for about 40 km parallel to the Appalachian orogen. Sediment shed from the breached anticlinal ridges accumulated in the sediment trap and was carried out of the ends of the trap by streams that occupied the shear zone at the ends of the blind-thrust ridge. The extent, parallel to the orogen, of thick, areally extensive UF is related to the length of the blind-thrust ridge that, in turn, controlled the spacing of the river-derived coarse clastic sediments that entered the main basin from the east. The thrust plane eventually emerged to the surface of the blind-thrust ridge and peat accumulation was terminated when the ridge became eroded and the sediment trapped behind it was released. The peat was buried by abundant coarse clastic sediment, which formed closely spaced channel belts and intervening flood basins. This model has implications for widespread peat deposits (now coal) that developed in tropical regions a few hundred kilometers from the sea in a tectonically active foreland basin. ?? 1989.

  1. An in situ occurrence of coal balls in the Amburgy coal bed, Pikeville Formation (Duckmantian), central Appalachian Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greb, S.F.; Eble, C.F.; Chesnut, D.R., Jr.; Phillips, T.L.; Hower, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Carbonate concretions containing permineralized peat, commonly called coal balls, were encountered in the Amburgy coal, a generally low-ash (9.4%), but commonly high-sulfur (3.6%), Middle Pennsylvanian coal of the Eastern Kentucky Coal Field. These are the first coal balls from the Amburgy coal, and one of only a few reported occurrences from the central Appalachian Basin. The coal balls occur in the upper part of the coal, between two paleochannel cut-outs at the top of the Pikeville Formation, and immediately beneath a scour with a marine fossil lag at the base of the Kendrick Shale Member, Hyden Formation. The coal is thickest (1.3 m) in a narrow (<300 m), elongate depression between the bounding paleochannels, and thins toward the occurrence of coal balls. Total biovolume as measured from acetate peels of coal balls indicates cordaites or lycopsid (36.1% each) dominance. Vertical sampling through one coal-ball aggregate shows zoning from a lower cordaites-dominant (88.7%) assemblage, to a middle, degraded, sphenopsid-rich assemblage, to an upper lycopsid-dominant (88.6%) assemblage. Beneath the coal balls, palynologic and petrographic analyses indicate the basal and middle portions of the bed are dominated by arborescent lycopsid spores and cordaites pollen, and by vitrinite macerals. The top part of the bed, above the coal balls, contains increased intertinite macerals, increased percentages of small fern spores, and variable ash yield (5-21%). Thickening of the Amburgy coal along a structural low, in combination with basal high-ash yields, vitrinite-dominance, and heterogenous palynoflora, indicate paleotopographic control on initial peat accumulation. Abundant lycopsid spores in the basal and middle part of the coal reflect rheotrophic conditions consistent with accumulation in a paleotopographic depression. Apparent zonation preserved in one of the coal-ball masses may document plant successions in response to flooding. Similar percentages of cordaites and

  2. Exploration in the Ombilin Intermontane Basin, West Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, T. Petroleum Co., Lagos )

    1996-01-01

    The Ombilin Basin is a Tertiary intermontane basin located within the Barisan Mountain Range of Sumatra. Oil exploration commenced in the Ombilin Basin in the early 1980s when geological mapping was carried out, a synthetic aperture radar survey was flown, and a basin-wide geophysical survey was completed. This effort led to the drilling of Sinimar No. 1 to a total depth 3020 m. Sinimar No. 1 was a historic well in Indonesia's oil industry since it was the first oil exploration well drilled in the Ombilin Basin and also the first well drilled in an intermontane basin in Indonesia. Oil, gas and condensate was tested in the well. An integrated interpretation of the well, geophysical and outcrop data indicates that despite its small areal size (30 km x 50 km), the Ombilin Basin is a deep pull-apart basin containing up to 4500 m of Tertiary sediments, ranging in age from Middle Eocene to Early Miocene. The basin currently is in an intermontane basin structural setting but it was also an intermontane basin during its Early Tertiary depositional history. During the Eocene, alluvial fans and massive debris flows were deposited on the basin margins and a large lake occupied the basin center. Fluvial deposition occurred in the basin during the Oligocene followed by deposition of marine shales, sandstones, and isolated reefs during the Miocene. Although the Ombilin Basin is located within Sumatra's magmatic arc and is partially covered by volcanics from extinct and active volcanoes, the subsurface temperature gradients of 1.62 deg. F/100 ft. recorded in Sinimar No. I and 1.47 deg F/100 ft. measured in a deep (670 m) coal exploration core hole are significantly cooler than the average subsurface temperature gradients in the Sumatra back-arc basins. Organic-rich Eocene lacustrine shales are the likely source rocks for the hydrocarbons tested in Sinimar No. 1 and the oil seeps located along the basin margins.

  3. Exploration in the Ombilin Intermontane Basin, West Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, T.

    1996-12-31

    The Ombilin Basin is a Tertiary intermontane basin located within the Barisan Mountain Range of Sumatra. Oil exploration commenced in the Ombilin Basin in the early 1980s when geological mapping was carried out, a synthetic aperture radar survey was flown, and a basin-wide geophysical survey was completed. This effort led to the drilling of Sinimar No. 1 to a total depth 3020 m. Sinimar No. 1 was a historic well in Indonesia`s oil industry since it was the first oil exploration well drilled in the Ombilin Basin and also the first well drilled in an intermontane basin in Indonesia. Oil, gas and condensate was tested in the well. An integrated interpretation of the well, geophysical and outcrop data indicates that despite its small areal size (30 km x 50 km), the Ombilin Basin is a deep pull-apart basin containing up to 4500 m of Tertiary sediments, ranging in age from Middle Eocene to Early Miocene. The basin currently is in an intermontane basin structural setting but it was also an intermontane basin during its Early Tertiary depositional history. During the Eocene, alluvial fans and massive debris flows were deposited on the basin margins and a large lake occupied the basin center. Fluvial deposition occurred in the basin during the Oligocene followed by deposition of marine shales, sandstones, and isolated reefs during the Miocene. Although the Ombilin Basin is located within Sumatra`s magmatic arc and is partially covered by volcanics from extinct and active volcanoes, the subsurface temperature gradients of 1.62 deg. F/100 ft. recorded in Sinimar No. I and 1.47 deg F/100 ft. measured in a deep (670 m) coal exploration core hole are significantly cooler than the average subsurface temperature gradients in the Sumatra back-arc basins. Organic-rich Eocene lacustrine shales are the likely source rocks for the hydrocarbons tested in Sinimar No. 1 and the oil seeps located along the basin margins.

  4. Appalachian Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Susan Emley, Ed.

    In this book, 17 psychologists, anthropologists, social workers and others explore important theoretical and applied issues concerning the mental health of Appalachian people. Rejecting the view of Appalachia as an area dominated by a culture of poverty, these papers portray a strong regional culture based on family, community, and religion. This…

  5. Assessment of the Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Resources of the Clinton, Medina, and Tuscarora Formations in the Appalachian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doolan, C.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has completed an assessment of the geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential within the Appalachian Basin. This assessment was performed as part of the USGS national assessment of geologic CO2 storage resources in which individual sedimentary basins are divided into storage assessment units (SAUs) based on geologic characteristics such as lithology, porosity, permeability, reservoir depth, formation water salinity, and the presence of a regional sealing formation. This study focuses on the assessment of the Clinton, Medina and Tuscarora Formations storage assessment unit (SAU) that covers an area of 48.9 million acres in eastern Kentucky and Ohio, West Virginia, northern and western Pennsylvania, and southwestern New York. The areal extent of the SAU is defined on the western boundary by the 100 foot isopach contour of the combined Rochester and Rose Hill Shales that acts as the regional sealing formation and is defined by the 3,000 foot depth to top contour of the Clinton and Tuscarora Formations elsewhere. Depth-to-top and isopach contours were derived from IHS Energy Group, 2011 data for over 25,000 unique boreholes located throughout the area of the SAU. The Clinton, Medina and Tuscarora Formations SAU is composed of the porous intervals of the Lower to Middle Silurian strata that is bounded by the underlying Ordovician age Queenston Shale, and the overlying Silurian age Rochester and Rose Hill Shales. Porous intervals were deposited in a variety of wave and tidal dominated environments as a result of a Lower Silurian shoreline that prograded southeast to northwest. Porous units in the Tuscarora Formation in southwestern and central Pennsylvania and West Virginia are predominantly fine to medium grained sands of alluvial plain facies and those of the Clinton and Medina Formations in southwestern New York, northeastern Pennsylvania, eastern Ohio and northeastern Kentucky are typically fine grained quartzarenites deposited

  6. A direct comparison of the ages of detrital monazite versus detrital zircon in Appalachian foreland basin sandstones: Searching for the record of Phanerozoic orogenic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietpas, Jack; Samson, Scott; Moecher, David

    2011-10-01

    The provenance potential of detrital monazite was investigated by in situ measurement of 232Th- 208Pb dates of grains isolated from six Middle Carboniferous-Permian sandstones from the Appalachian foreland basin. Provenance assessment of these units was previously investigated by measuring U-Pb crystallization ages of detrital zircon (Thomas et al., 2004; Becker et al., 2005, 2006). Approximately 90% of the detrital zircon ages record Mesoproterozoic or older ages, with only 10% recording the three major pulses of tectonism (Taconian, Acadian and Alleghanian) that are the hallmark of the Appalachian Orogen. 232Th- 208Pb ages of detrital monazite, however, strongly record the complex phases of Paleozoic orogenesis. Nearly 65% of the ages record Paleozoic events, while 35% record Neoproterozoic or older ages. In several of the analyzed sandstones, detrital monazite ages record Paleozoic orogenic events that are completely missed by detrital zircon ages, demonstrating that monazite ages more accurately reflect the character of the sediment source rocks. The inferred maximum age of sediment deposition, as determined by the youngest monazite grains, is ~ 550 Ma younger for two of the analyzed sandstones compared to depositional constraints based on the youngest detrital zircon. The different physical properties and petrogenesis of zircon and monazite are interpreted to be factors for the dramatic differences in sediment provenance information provided by each mineral. The results from this study have important implications for determining sediment provenance, constraining maximum age of sediment deposition, and developing robust regional tectonic models.

  7. Examples from the atlas of major Appalachian Gas Plays

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, D.G.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Nuttall, B.C.; Smosna, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this contract are to produce a panted atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays and to compile a machine-readable database of reservoir data. The Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC or the Consortium), a partnership of the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, and the departments of Geology and Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering at West Virginia University (WVU), agrees with the need to classify gas reservoirs by geologic plays. During meetings with industry representatives, the small independents in the basin emphasized that one of their prime needs was to place each producing reservoir within a stratigraphic framework subdivided by environment of deposition to enable them to develop exploration and development strategies. The text for eight of the 31 play descriptions has been completed, drafting of illustrations for these plays is underway (or complete for some plays), and the review process is ongoing.

  8. Log ASCII Standard (LAS) Files for Geophysical (Gamma Ray) Wireline Well Logs and Their Application to Geologic Cross Section C-C' Through the Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trippi, Michael H.; Crangle, Robert D., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) regional geologic cross section C-C' (Ryder and others, 2008) displays key stratigraphic intervals in the central Appalachian basin. For this cross section, strata were correlated by using descriptions of well cuttings and gamma ray well log traces. This report summarizes the procedures used to convert gamma ray curves on paper well logs to the digital Log ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) Standard (LAS) format using the third-party software application Neuralog. The procedures could be used with other geophysical wireline logs also. The creation of digital LAS files from paper well logs by using Neuralog is very helpful, especially when dealing with older logs with limited or nonexistent digital data. The LAS files from the gamma ray logs of 11 wells used to construct cross section C-C' are included in this report. They may be downloaded from the index page as a single ZIP file.

  9. Coalbed methane potential in the Appalachian states of Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, Kentucky, and Tennessee; an overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, Paul C.

    1996-01-01

    Ricei s (1995) report. This compares with 20 Tcf in place and 2.30 Tcf as technically recoverable CBM for the Black Warrior Basin. These estimates should be considered preliminary because of unknown CBM potential in Ohio, Maryland, Tennessee, and eastern Kentucky. The largest potential for CBM development in the central Appalachian basin is in the Pocahontas coal beds, which have total gas values as much as 700 cf/ton, and in the New River coal beds. In the northern Appalachian basin, the greatest CBM potential is in the Middle Pennsylvanian Allegheny coal beds, which have total gas values as much as 252 cf/ton. Rice (1995) estimated a mean estimated ultimate recovery per well of 521 MMcfg for the central Appalachian basin and means of 121 and 216 MMcfg for the anticlinal and synclinal areas, respectively, of the northern Applachian basin. There is potential for CBM development in the Valley coal fields and Richmond basin of Virginia, the bituminous region of southeastern Kentucky, eastern Ohio, northern Tennessee, and the Georges Creek coal field of western Maryland and adjacent parts of Pennsylvania. Moreover, the Anthracite region of eastern Pennsylvania, which has the second highest known total gas content for a single coal bed (687 cf/ton) in the central and northern Appalachian basin, should be considered to have a fair to good potential for CBM development where structure, bed continuity, and permeability are favorable. CBM is mainly an undeveloped unconventional fossil-fuel resource in the central and northern Appalachian basin states, except in Virginia, and will probably contribute an increasing part of total Appalachian gas production into the next century as development in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, and other Appalachian states continue. The central and northern Appalachian basins are frontier or emerging regions for CBM exploration and development, which will probably extend well into the next century. On the basis of CBM production

  10. Part I: Neoacadian to Alleghanian foreland basin development and provenance in the central appalachian orogen, pine mountain thrust sheet Part II: Structural configuration of a modified Mesozoic to Cenozoic forearc basin system, south-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Peter Benjamin

    Foreland and forearc basins are large sediment repositories that form in response to tectonic loading and lithospheric flexure during orogenesis along convergent plate boundaries. In addition to their numerous valuable natural resources, these systems preserve important geologic information regarding the timing and intensity of deformation, uplift and erosion history, and subsidence history along collisional margins, and, in ancient systems, may provide more macroscopic information regarding climate, plate motion, and eustatic sea level fluctuations. This thesis presents two studies focused in the Paleozoic Appalachian foreland basin system along the eastern United States and in the Mesozoic to Cenozoic Matanuska forearc basin system in south-central Alaska. Strata of the Appalachian foreland basin system preserve the dynamic history of orogenesis and sediment dispersal along the east Laurentian margin, recording multiple episodes of deformation and basin development during Paleozoic time. A well-exposed, >600 m thick measured stratigraphic section of the Pine Mountain thrust sheet at Pound Gap, Kentucky affords one of the most complete exposures of Upper Devonian through Middle Pennsylvanian strata in the basin. These strata provide a window into which the foreland basin's development during two major collisional events known as the Acadian-Neoacadian and the Alleghanian orogenies can be observed. Lithofacies analysis of four major sedimentary successions observed in hanging wall strata record the upward transition from (1) a submarine deltaic fan complex developed on a distal to proximal prodelta in Late Devonian to Middle Mississippian time, to (2) a Middle to Late Mississippian carbonate bank system developed on a slowly subsiding, distal foreland ramp, which was drowned by (3) Late Mississippian renewed clastic influx to a tidally influenced, coastal deltaic complex to fluvial delta plain system unconformably overlain by (4) a fluvial braided river complex

  11. Appalachian Mountains

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... angle, the line-of-sight through the atmosphere is three times longer, and a thin pall of haze over the Appalachians is significantly ... D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. The MISR data were obtained from the NASA Langley ...

  12. APPALACHIAN VOLUNTEERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1964

    COLLEGE STUDENT VOLUNTEERS WORKING IN THE ISOLATED AREAS OF EASTERN KENTUCKY HAVE INSTITUTED A PROGRAM DESIGNED TO AID IN THE WAR ON POVERTY. THE APPALACHIAN VOLUNTEERS WERE INITIALLY SUPPORTED BY A GRANT FROM THE AREA REDEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION AND BY CONTRIBUTIONS, FROM PRIVATE CORPORATIONS AND FOUNDATIONS, OF MONEY AND MATERIALS. GROUNDWORK…

  13. Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

    1983-01-01

    The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study.

  14. Evolution of Cambrian-Ordovician carbonate shelf, United States Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Read, J.F.

    1985-02-01

    Cross sections and isopach maps (palinspastic) of the Cambrian-Ordovician continental shelf, US Appalachians, show that thickness and facies trends are controlled by the Adirondack, New Jersey, and Virginia highs and depocenters in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and by the Rome trough. Carbonate sedimentation was initiated with drowning of Early Cambrian clastics, deposition of carbonate ramp and rimmed shelf facies followed by drowning, then regional regression and deposition of Early to Middle Cambrian red beds and platform margin rimmed shelf facies. During subsequent regional transgression, the Conasauga intrashelf shale basin formed, bounded toward the shelf edge and along depositional strike by Middle to Upper Cambrian oolitic ramp facies and cyclic peritidal carbonates. Intrashelf basin filling and regional regression caused progradation of Late Cambrian cyclic carbonates and clastics across the shelf. By this time, the margin had a relief of 2.5 km. During the Early Ordovician, incipient drowning of the shelf formed subtidal carbonates and bioherms that passed up into cyclic carbonate as sea level oscillations decreased in magnitude. Numerous unconformities interrupt this sequence in the northern Appalachians. The earlier high relief rimmed shelf was converted into a ramp, owing to uplift in the basin, heralding approaching collision. Subsidence rates on the margin were low (4 cm/1000 yr) and typical of a mature passive margin. Shelf sedimentation in the southern Appalachians ceased with arc-continent collision and development of the Knox unconformity, which dies out into the Pennsylvania depocenter. Major exploration targets are in the Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician Knox Group.

  15. Exploration in Ordovician of central Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.H.; Barratt, M.W.

    1985-12-01

    Deep wells in the central Michigan basin have provided sufficient data to define two new mappable formations - the Foster Formation and the Bruggers Formation. Recent conodont studies have corrected the age assignments of the strata containing these formations. Previously, the lower section (Foster) was classified as mostly Cambrian, and the upper unit (Bruggers) was identified as Early Ordovician. Conodont identifications indicate an Early and Middle Ordovician age for the Foster Formation and a Middle Ordovician age for the Bruggers Formation. The Michigan basin existed in embryonic form in the Late Cambrian, but the full outline of the present-day basin did not develop until Early Ordovician. Gas and condensate are produced from the Bruggers Formation as deep as 11,252 ft (3429 m). Geothermal investigations suggest that gas production is possible to the base of the Paleozoic section in the central basin (17,000 ft or 5181 m). Paleotemperatures were higher during the Paleozoic owing to 3000-4000 ft (914-1291 m) of additional sedimentary cover. Five wells are producing from the Bruggers Formation. All are deeper tests in anticlines producing from Devonian reservoirs discovered earlier. The structures are the result of vertical movements of basement fault blocks activated by regional stresses. 12 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Petroleum exploration in Absaroka basin of northwestern Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Sundell, K.A.

    1986-08-01

    A new, virtually unexplored petroleum province with large potential resources can be defined in northwestern Wyoming. Structurally, the Absaroka basin is bounded on the north by the Beartooth uplift, to the west by the Gallatin and Washakie uplifts, to the south by the Washakie and Owl Creek uplifts, and to the east by the Cody arch. The Cody arch connects the southern Beartooth uplift with the northwesternmost Owl Creek uplift and separates the Bighorn basin to the east from the Absaroka basin to the west. The eastern flank of the cody arch is bounded by a major west-dipping thrust fault. The western flank is locally a subhorizontal shelf but overall gently dips to the west-southwest into deeper parts of the Absaroka basin. In contrast to most petroleum basins, the Absaroka basin is topographically a rugged mountain range, created by erosion of a thick sequence of Eocene volcanic rocks that fill the center of the basin and lap onto the adjacent uplifts. Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks that have produced several billion barrels of oil from the adjacent Bighorn and Wind River basins are probably present within the Absaroka basin and should have similar production capabilities. The Absaroka basin may have greater potential than adjacent basins because the volcanics provide additional traps and reservoirs. Domes in Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks beneath the volcanics and stratigraphic traps at the angular unconformity between the volcanics and underlying reservoirs are primary exploration targets. Unique geologic, geophysical, permitting, access, and drilling problems are encountered in all aspects of exploration.

  17. Influence of Appalachian Fatalism on Adolescent Identity Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Tommy M.

    2007-01-01

    The influences of the fatalism frequently associated with Appalachian culture on adolescent identity processes were explored. The sample consisted of 91 Appalachian adolescents and 87 non-Appalachian adolescents. Participants completed measures of fatalism (operationalized in terms of higher hopelessness and lower optimism/efficacy scores) and…

  18. Burial and thermal history of the central Appalachian basin, based on three 2-D models of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, Elisabeth L.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Three regional-scale, cross sectional (2-D) burial and thermal history models are presented for the central Appalachian basin based on the detailed geologic cross sections of Ryder and others (2004), Crangle and others (2005), and Ryder, R.T., written communication. The models integrate the available thermal and geologic information to constrain the burial, uplift, and erosion history of the region. The models are restricted to the relatively undeformed part of the basin and extend from the Rome trough in West Virginia and Pennsylvania northwestward to the Findlay arch in Ohio. This study expands the scope of previous work by Rowan and others (2004) which presented a preliminary burial/thermal history model for a cross section (E-E') through West Virginia and Ohio. In the current study, the burial/thermal history model for E-E' is revised, and integrated with results of two additional cross sectional models (D-D' and C-C'). The burial/thermal history models provide calculated thermal maturity (Ro%) values for the entire stratigraphic sequence, including hydrocarbon source rocks, along each of the three cross sections. In contrast, the Ro and conodont CAI data available in the literature are sparse and limited to specific stratigraphic intervals. The burial/thermal history models also provide the regional temperature and pressure framework that is needed to model hydrocarbon migration.

  19. Petroleum in the Caribbean Basin: Further exploration justified?

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, E.

    1996-08-01

    After more than half a century of exploration for petroleum in that part of the Caribbean Basin covered by this review, the prospects for substantial discoveries remain low. Only Barbados has had modest but sustained production of oil and gas. In Hispaniola minor production from small prospects lasted briefly. Exploration in the northeast Caribbean has not resulted in discoveries. Similar exploration in Puerto Rico and, on a more extensive scale, in Jamaica, has also failed to show positive results. On the Nicaragua Rise (Mosquitia, Tela Basins) drilling has produced shows but no production, a situation also evident in Belize. Nevertheless, examination of these results, in the context of the regional geology of the Caribbean Basin, suggests there are areas where further exploration is justified.

  20. Eustatic control on early dolomitization of cyclic peritidal carbonates: Evidence from the Early Ordovician Upper Knox Group, Appalachians and Middle to Late Cambrian Bonanza King Formation, southern Great basin

    SciTech Connect

    Montanez, I.P. )

    1991-03-01

    The origin of massive dolomite in ancient cyclic carbonate successions remains a poorly resolved issue reflecting the lack of modern analogs of extensive dolomitization. This paper presents evidence for extensive synsedimentary dolomitization of peritidal cyclic carbonates of the Early Ordovician upper Knox Group, Appalachians, and of the Middle to Late Cambrian Bonanza King Formation, southern Great basin. Early dolomitization of these Cambro-Ordovician carbonates was synchronous with regressive conditions governed by superimposed sea-level oscillations (fifth-, fourth-, and third-order).

  1. SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas G. Patchen

    2000-12-01

    Two independent high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys flown by Airmag Surveys, Inc. and interpreted by Pearson, de Ridder and Johnson, Inc were merged, processed and reinterpreted by Pearson, de Ridder and Johnson, Inc for this study. Derived products included depth filtered and reduced to pole maps of total magnetic intensity, vertical and horizontal gradients, interpreted STARMAG structure, lineament analysis and an overall interpretation. The total magnetic intensity patterns of the combined survey conformed reasonably well to those of coarser grid, non-proprietary regional aeromagnetic surveys reviewed. The merged study also helped illustrate regional basement patterns adjacent to and including the northwest edge of the Rome trough. The tectonic grain interpreted is dominantly southwest-northeast with a secondary northwest-southeast component that is consistent with this portion of the Appalachian basin. Magnetic susceptibility appears to be more important locally than basement structure in contributing to the magnetic intensity recorded, based on seismic to aeromagnetic data comparisons made to date. However, significant basement structures cannot be ruled out for this area, and in fact are strongly suspected to be present. The coincidence of the Henderson Dome with a total magnetic intensity low is an intriguing observation that suggests the possibility that structure in the overlying Lower Paleozoic section may be detached from the basement. Rose diagrams of lineament orientations for 2.5 minute unit areas are more practical to use than the full-quadrangle summaries because they focus on smaller areas and involve less averaging. Many of these illustrate a northeast bias. Where orientations abruptly become scattered, there is an indication of intersecting fractures and possible exploration interest. However, the surface lineament study results are less applicable in a practical sense relative to the seismic, subsurface or aeromagnetic control used

  2. Japanese submersible explores the North Fiji Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipboard Scientific Party; Auzende, J.-M.; Urabe, T.; Tanahashi, M.; Ruellan, E.

    1992-03-01

    Since 1987, Japanese and French geologists, geophysicists, and biologists have been studying the North Fiji Basin Ridge within the framework of a joint project named STARMER (Science and Technology Agency of Japan—IFREMER of France). This ridge was first geologically, geophysically, and geochemically surveyed during the 1985 SEAPSO 3 cruise of the R/V Jean Charcot [Auzende et al., 1988]. At that time, water sampling and morphotectonic analysis indicated that the North Fiji Basin Ridge was technically and hydrothermally active. Within the STARMER project, four surface ship cruises have been conducted {Kaiyo 87-88-89 and Yokosuka 90).One significant result of these surveys is the complete mapping of the entire ridge between 14°S and 22°S (Figure 1), an area approximately 900 km long and more than 50 km wide (Sea Beam and Furuno multibeam swath-mapping systems were used). During the Kaiyo 87 cruise, the presence of active hydrothermalism (sulfide deposits, chimneys expelling shimmering water, and associated living animal colonies) was discovered through water sampling and video deep towing.

  3. Visayan Basin - the birthplace of Philippine petroleum exploration revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Rillera, F.G. ); Durkee, E.F. )

    1994-07-01

    Petroleum exploration in the Philippines has its roots in the Visayan Basin in the central Philippines. This is a Tertiary basin with up to 30,000 ft of sedimentary fill. With numerous surface oil and gas manifestations known as early as 1888, the area was the site of the first attempts to establish commercial petroleum production in the country. Over the past 100 years, more than 200 wells have been drilled in the basin. Several of these have yielded significant oil and gas shows. Production, albeit noncommercial in scale, has been demonstrated to be present in some places. A review of past exploration data reveals that many of the earlier efforts failed due to poorly located tests from both structural and stratigraphic standpoints. Poor drilling and completion technology and lack of funding compounded the problems of early explorationists. Because of this, the basin remains relatively underexplored. A recent assessment by COPLEX and E.F. Durkee and Associates demonstrates the presence of many untested prospects in the basin. These prospects may contain recoverable oil and gas potential on the order of 5 to 10 MMBO onshore and 25 to 100 MMBO offshore. With new exploration ideas, innovative development concepts, and the benefit of modern technology, commercial oil and gas production from the basin may yet be realized.

  4. Apatite fission-track thermochronology of the Appalachian foreland basin from the Virginia Piedmont to eastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, M.K. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science); Cerveny, P.F.; Bergman, S.C. . Research and Technical Services)

    1992-01-01

    Apatite fission-track ages have been determined for 29 samples from two transects in the southern Appalachians. The northern transect extends from the VA Piedmont northwest through the Valley and Ridge Province, Cumberland Plateau, and into the Appalachian foreland of southeastern OH. An additional transect was collected from the Pine Mountain thrust in southeastern KY extending northwest to the Cincinnati Arch. Precambrian gneisses and granites from the VA Piedmont yield reset apatite fission-track ages ranging from 103 [+-] 6 to 138 [+-] 11 Ma. Ordovician through Mississippian sedimentary rocks from the Valley and Ridge Province of VA-WV also yield reset apatite fission-track ages ranging from 120 [+-] 8 to 144 [+-] 20 Ma. The cooling histories for the Piedmont and Valley and Ridge rocks of VA and WV thus appear similar, having cooled rapidly between about 103 and 144 Ma. Pennsylvanian samples from the Cumberland Plateau of WV yield rest apatite fission-track ages of 112 [+-] 7 to 169 [+-] 13 MA in the southeast which grade into partially reset (mixed ages) northwest of Charlestown (133 [+-] 13 to 156 [+-] 10 Ma). The Permian Dunkard Formation from the OH-WV border yielded a mixed age of 197 [+-] 13 Ma, suggesting that the Permian has not been subjected to temperatures > 100 C for times greater than 1 Ma, since it was deposited. Mississippian--Pennsylvanian samples from eastern KY yield reset apatite fission-track ages which decrease from the Pine Mt. Thrust (186 [+-] 16 Ma) to Mozelle, KY (136 [+-] 12 Ma), then increase toward the Cincinnati Arch (166 [+-] 18 [minus] 186 [+-] 21 Ma). This is consistent with older apatite fission-track ages (200 Ma) from Ordovician K-bentonites in the vicinity of the Cincinnati Arch.

  5. Exploration applications of satellite imagery in mature basins - A summation

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Z. )

    1991-08-01

    A series of examples supported by surface and subsurface controls illustrates procedures used to integrate satellite imagery interpretation into a conventional exploration program, and the potential contribution of such an approach to the recognition of new hydrocarbon plays in mature basins. Integrated analysis of satellite imagery data consists of four major steps. The first step focuses on the recognition of style, trend, and timing of deformation of exposed structures located at the basin interior or around its margins. This information is obtained through an integrated analysis of satellite imagery data, stereo aerial photography, surface geological mapping, and field observations. The second step consists of integrating the satellite imagery with gravity and magnetic data to recognize obscured and/or buried structures. The third step involves the analysis of available seismic data which is specifically processes to enhance subtle basement topography in order to determine influences on reservoir quality. In the fourth step, subsurface structure, isopach, show, and pool maps derived from available well information are integrated into the structural interpretation. These four analytical steps are demonstrated with examples form the Powder River basin, Western Canada basin, Paris basin, and Central basin platform of west Texas. In all of these highly mature basins, it is easy to demonstrate that (1) hydrocarbon migration and accumulation was largely controlled by subtle basement structures, and (2) these structures can be detected through the integrated analysis of satellite imagery.

  6. Exploration limited since '70s in Libya's Sirte basin

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D. )

    1995-03-13

    Esso Standard made the first Libyan oil discovery in the western Ghadames basin in 1957. The Atshan-2 well tested oil from Devonian sandstones, and the play was a continuation of the Paleozoic trend found productive in the neighboring Edjeleh region of eastern Algeria. Exploration in the Sirte basin began in earnest in 1958. Within the next 10 years, 16 major oil fields had been discovered, each with recoverable reserves greater than 500 million bbl of oil. Libya currently produces under OPEC quota approximately 1.4 million b/d of oil, with discovered in-place reserves of 130 billion bbl of oil. The paper describes the structural framework, sedimentary basins of Libya, the Sirte basin, petroleum geology, play types, source rocks, generation and migration of hydrocarbons, oil reserves, potential, and acreage availability.

  7. Annual and average estimates of water-budget components based on hydrograph separation and PRISM precipitation for gaged basins in the Appalachian Plateaus Region, 1900-2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelms, David L.; Messinger, Terence; McCoy, Kurt J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Groundwater Resources Program study of the Appalachian Plateaus aquifers, annual and average estimates of water-budget components based on hydrograph separation and precipitation data from parameter-elevation regressions on independent slopes model (PRISM) were determined at 849 continuous-record streamflow-gaging stations from Mississippi to New York and covered the period of 1900 to 2011. Only complete calendar years (January to December) of streamflow record at each gage were used to determine estimates of base flow, which is that part of streamflow attributed to groundwater discharge; such estimates can serve as a proxy for annual recharge. For each year, estimates of annual base flow, runoff, and base-flow index were determined using computer programs—PART, HYSEP, and BFI—that have automated the separation procedures. These streamflow-hydrograph analysis methods are provided with version 1.0 of the U.S. Geological Survey Groundwater Toolbox, which is a new program that provides graphing, mapping, and analysis capabilities in a Windows environment. Annual values of precipitation were estimated by calculating the average of cell values intercepted by basin boundaries where previously defined in the GAGES–II dataset. Estimates of annual evapotranspiration were then calculated from the difference between precipitation and streamflow.

  8. Log ASCII Standard (LAS) Files for Geophysical Wireline Well Logs and Their Application to Geologic Cross Sections Through the Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crangle, Robert D., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) uses geophysical wireline well logs for a variety of purposes, including stratigraphic correlation (Hettinger, 2001, Ryder, 2002), petroleum reservoir analyses (Nelson and Bird, 2005), aquifer studies (Balch, 1988), and synthetic seismic profiles (Kulander and Ryder, 2005). Commonly, well logs are easier to visualize, manipulate, and interpret when available in a digital format. In recent geologic cross sections E-E' and D-D', constructed through the central Appalachian basin (Ryder, Swezey, and others, in press; Ryder, Crangle, and others, in press), gamma ray well log traces and lithologic logs were used to correlate key stratigraphic intervals (Fig. 1). The stratigraphy and structure of the cross sections are illustrated through the use of graphical software applications (e.g., Adobe Illustrator). The gamma ray traces were digitized in Neuralog (proprietary software) from paper well logs and converted to a Log ASCII Standard (LAS) format. Once converted, the LAS files were transformed to images through an LAS-reader application (e.g., GeoGraphix Prizm) and then overlain in positions adjacent to well locations, used for stratigraphic control, on each cross section. This report summarizes the procedures used to convert paper logs to a digital LAS format using a third-party software application, Neuralog. Included in this report are LAS files for sixteen wells used in geologic cross section E-E' (Table 1) and thirteen wells used in geologic cross section D-D' (Table 2).

  9. Carbon and sulfur relationships in Devonian shales from the Appalachian Basin as an indicator of environment of deposition.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leventhal, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Interprets the covariance of organic carbon and sulfide sulfur in core samples. This covariance results from the catabolism of organic carbon and concomitant reduction of sulfate by sulfate reducing bacteria to form aqueous sulfide which reacts with iron. Defines a central basin area that was the most anoxic-sulfidic (euxinic). This part of the basin is similar to the area of thickest, most organic carbon-rich sediments and has the greatest source-rock potential for petroleum. -from Author

  10. Exploration for coalbed methane gains momentum in Uinta basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gloyn, Robert W.; Sommer, Steven N.

    1993-01-01

    A development program is planned, and at least three other companies are exploring for coalbed methane in the surrounding area. Estimates have been revised by the Utah Geological Survey for the coalbed methane potential of the southern Uinta basin. They are 8 tcf to more than the earlier estimates of 0.8-4.6 tcf.

  11. Zircon and apatite fission-track evidence for an Early Permian thermal peak and relatively rapid Late Permian cooling in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Roden, M.K. . Dept. of Earth and Environmental Science); Wintsch, R.P. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    New zircon fission-track ages compliment published apatite fission-track ages in the Appalachian Basin to narrowly constrain its thermal history. Geologic evidence can only constrain timing of the thermal peak to be younger than late Pennsylvanian sediments ([approximately] 300 Ma) and older than Mesozoic sediments in the Newark and Gettysburg Basins ([approximately] 210 Ma). Apatite fission-track ages as old as 246 Ma require the Alleghanian thermal peak to have been pre-Triassic. Preliminary data on reset zircon fission-track ages from middle Paleozoic sediments range from 255 to 290 Ma. Zircon fission-track apparent ages from samples younger and structurally higher than these are not reset. Thus, the oldest reset zircon fission-track age constraints the time of the Alleghanian thermal peak to be earliest Permian. Rates of post-Alleghanian cooling have not been well-constrained by geologic data and could be very slow. The difference between apatite and zircon fission-track ages for most of the samples range from 100--120 m.y. reflecting Permo-Triassic cooling of only 1 C/m.y. However, one sample with one of the oldest apatite ages, 245 Ma, yields one of the younger zircon ages of 255 Ma. This requires cooling rates of 10 C/m.y. and uplift rates of [approximately] 0.5 mm/yr. Collectively, these data support an early Permian thermal peak and a two-stage cooling history, consisting of > 100 C cooling (> 8 km denundation) in the Permian followed by relatively slow cooling and exhumation throughout the Mesozoic.

  12. Trace-element budgets in the Ohio/Sunbury shales of Kentucky: Constraints on ocean circulation and primary productivity in the Devonian-Mississippian Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perkins, R.B.; Piper, D.Z.; Mason, C.E.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrography of the Appalachian Basin in late Devonian-early Mississippian time is modeled based on the geochemistry of black shales and constrained by others' paleogeographic reconstructions. The model supports a robust exchange of basin bottom water with the open ocean, with residence times of less than forty years during deposition of the Cleveland Shale Member of the Ohio Shale. This is counter to previous interpretations of these carbon-rich units having accumulated under a stratified and stagnant water column, i.e., with a strongly restricted bottom bottom-water circulation. A robust circulation of bottom waters is further consistent with the palaeoclimatology, whereby eastern trade-winds drove upwelling and arid conditions limited terrestrial inputs of siliciclastic sediment, fresh waters, and riverine nutrients. The model suggests that primary productivity was high (~ 2??g C m- 2 d- 1), although no higher than in select locations in the ocean today. The flux of organic carbon settling through the water column and its deposition on the sea floor was similar to fluxes found in modern marine environments. Calculations based on the average accumulation rate of the marine fraction of Ni suggest the flux of organic carbon settling out of the water column was approximately 9% of primary productivity, versus an accumulation rate (burial) of organic carbon of 0.5% of primary productivity. Trace-element ratios of V:Mo and Cr:Mo in the marine sediment fraction indicate that bottom waters shifted from predominantly anoxic (sulfate reducing) during deposition of the Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale to predominantly suboxic (nitrate reducing) during deposition of the Cleveland Shale Member and the Sunbury Shale, but with anoxic conditions occurring intermittently throughout this period. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  13. An Integrated Geochemical and Paleontological Investigation of Environmental and Biotic Change Associated with Late Devonian Mass Extinctions in the Appalachian Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, E.; Love, G. D.; Boyer, D.; Droser, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Upper Kellwasser (uK) black shale, a global unit at the Frasnian-Famennian boundary, closely associated with the Late Devonian extinction event, is commonly linked to oxygen limitation in the water column. In spite of the significance of this time interval, the nature of the ocean redox geochemistry is poorly understood. Using a multi-proxy approach, this study tests the appropriateness of three distinct oceanographic models for ocean redox chemistry at this time: 1) an oxic setting with sub-oxic bottom waters but with sulfide production confined to sedimentary porewaters; 2) an expanded oxygen minimum zone within a highly stratified marine redox column with only intermittent photic zone (shallow water) euxinia; and 3) a persistently euxinic water column extending up into the photic zone. Bottom water oxygen conditions are described at a high resolution for 4 uK black shale localities in western New York State, using inorganic and organic geochemical proxies and trace fossils to constrain relative oxygen levels and identify signals of anoxia and euxinia in the Devonian Appalachian Basin. Mo concentrations typically range from crustal (2-3 ppm) to moderately enriched values suggestive of suboxic conditions (typically less than 30 ppm), with some higher values between 30 and 40 ppm perhaps suggesting intermittent euxinia, indicating that the uK black shale preserves reduced oxygen bottom water conditions. The levels of enrichment are muted, though, such that these are inconsistent with persistent anoxia or euxinia for the interval, especially as compared to other Phanerozoic euxinic black shale intervals. Other trace metals suggest similarly suboxic to intermittently anoxic bottom water conditions. Lipid biomarker patterns are typical for Paleozoic marine rocks, indicating that the biomarker molecules in the extracted bitumens are syndepositional and not significantly affected by contamination. Independent thermal maturity screening data indicating peak oil

  14. Integrated exploration study of Norwegian-Danish basin, northwestern Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Joergensen, N.B.; Haselton, T.M.

    1987-05-01

    The Norwegian-Danish basin (NDB) extends from offshore Norway southeast through Denmark. This study, initiated by the Danish Energy Agency to evaluate hydrocarbon potential, consists of geophysical structural and stratigraphic mapping combined with geologic source rock and reservoir analysis. Approximately 25 wells and 15,000 km of seismic data were included. Formation of the NDB resulted from uplift of the Variscan foldbelt followed by subsidence of the foreland, i.e., the NDB and the North German basin. The Ringkoebing-Fyn High, a positive feature probably established in the late Precambrian and persisting to present, separates the basins, thus constituting the southern boundary of the NDB. Northeast the basin is bounded by the Fennoscandian shield and to the west by the North Sea graben system. Following deposition of Rotliegendes eolian and fluviatile sandstones, a major Late Permian marine transgression deposited up to 2000 m of evaporites and carbonates. Early Triassic regression resulted in thick red-bed deposits. Halokinesis commencing in the Upper Triassic dominated subsequent structural development. Continued subsidence led to deposition of Early Jurassic shelf mudstones overlain by deltaic sandstones. Rising seas during Late Cretaceous allowed widespread deposition of oceanic pelagic chalk. Early Paleocene wrench movements produced inversion. Basinal downwarping during the Tertiary was accompanied by progradation from the northeast. The complex tectonic history provides numerous different structural styles and a variety of depositional environments. To date only obvious structural features have been tested. This integrated basin study demonstrates that a number of other hydrocarbon plays remain to be explored.

  15. Cognitive Maps of Class, Racial, and Appalachian Inequalities among Rural Appalachians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kevin B.; Bylund, Robert A.

    1983-01-01

    Cognitive maps of social inequities are explored via data collected from 105 rural Appalachian Kentuckians' perceptions of social class, racial, and Appalachian inequities. Looks at: (1) the degree of perceived inequity and (2) the perceptual interrelatedness among the three dimensions of social inequity. (AH)

  16. Integration of photomosaics and stratigraphy in the Western Appalachian Basin as an aid to identify potential hydrocarbon reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Wegweiser, M.D.

    1996-09-01

    Paleozoic stratigraphy of the southern Lake Erie region is commonly interpreted as being dominated by flat-lying sedimentary rocks. Recent surface stratigraphic studies in New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio have revealed the widespread presence of NW- and NE-trending folds and faults exposed along stream beds, and in bluffs along the southern Lake Erie shoreline. A black shale unit, previously unknown in northwestern Pennsylvania, was also discovered and its lateral continuity mapped. The shale forms a disconformable contact with the overlying Northeast Shale. Ship-based photomosaics were made of bluffs along Lake Erie, and integrated with land-based stratigraphic sections to map the continuity of units, identify displacement zones, and identify low amplitude folds. The black shale unit aided identification of offset and folding. Faults observed at the surface off-set Devonian and Mississippian rocks, and unconsolidated Quaternary sediments. Subsurface wrench faults, apparently extending into Precambrian rocks, have been identified by others. These wrench faults are generally perpendicular to the strike of the Appalachian Mountains, and are known as cross-strike discontinuities (CSDs). Principle zones of displacement associated with the CSDs can be recognized at the surface by numerous fractures having little offset, aligned drainage systems, and zones of increased hydrocarbon productivity and fluid migration. Increased hydrocarbons production occurs where reservoirs are cross-cut by the faults. The faults offset various reservoirs in Pennsylvania and Ohio in the subsurface. Identifying the location of these faults at the surface may provide information that leads top the discovery of new potential reservoirs.

  17. Exploration and hydrocarbon potential of interior basins, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Grether, W.J.; Morgan, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    During the early 1980s, ARCO Alaska, Inc., conducted an extensive hydrocarbon exploration program in the Alaskan Interior. The study focused on several basinal areas: Middle Tanana, Minchumina, Holitna, Yukon Flats, and Kandik. Other basinal areas (Upper Tanana, Lowre Tanana, and Yukon-Koyukuk) have been reported in the literature to have lower hydrocarbon potential and were not as extensively studied. Several geological and geophysical techniques, including gravity, aeromagnetic, and CDP seismic surveys, were used to establish sediment thickness, basin volume, morphology, and structural style. Analytical data were collected for hydrocarbon source, reservoir potential, and thermal history. Specialized structural and biostratigraphic studies were conducted in some areas. The Middle Tanana and Kandik basins have the highest hydrocarbon potential. A 6-mi wide by 26-mi long half-graben within the Middle Tanana basin contains 20,000 ft of section. The 1984 ARCO Totek Hills 1 well penetrated 3,015 ft of Tertiary (Pliocene to Eocene) section unconformably overlying metamorphic basement. Because it was drilled on the basin flank, the well tested only the uppermost section within the half-graben. Sandstones averaged 17% porosity and 11 md permeability. Claystones containing type II kerogen showed good oil-generating potential (pyrolysis S1 + S2 values average 17 mg/g). The Kandik basin contains excellent source rocks in the Triassic Glen Shale (S2 averaging 16 mg/g). Hydrocarbon thermal maturation changes from immature to postmature in a stepwise fashion across thrust faults from southeast to northwest. Solid residue of migrated hydrocarbons occurs in formations of Devonian, Pennsylvanian, Permian, and Triasic age.

  18. Oil exploration in nonmarine rift basins of interior Sudan

    SciTech Connect

    Schull, T.J.

    1984-04-01

    In early 1975 Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc. commenced a major petroleum exploration effort in previously unexplored interior Sudan. With the complete cooperation of the Sudanese Government, Chevron has acquired a vast amount of geologic and geophysical data during the past 9 years. These data include extensive aeromagnetic and gravity surveys, 25,000 mi (40,200 km) of seismic data, and the results of 66 wells. This information has defined several large rift basins which are now recognized as a major part of the Central African rift system. The sedimentary basins of interior Sudan are characterized by thick Cretaceous and Tertiary nonmarine clastic sequences. Over 35,000 ft (10,600 m) of sediment have been deposited in the deepest trough, and extensive basinal areas are underlain by more than 20,000 ft (6100 m) of sediment. The depositional sequence includes thick lacustrine shales and claystones, flood plain claystones, and lacustrine, fluvial, and alluvial sandstones and conglomerates. Those lacustrine claystones which were deposited in an anoxic environment provide oil-prone source rocks. Reservoir sandstones have been found in a wide variety of nonmarine sandstone facies. The extensional tectonism which formed these basins began in the Early Cretaceous. Movement along major fault trends continued intermittently into the Miocene. This deformation resulted in a complex structural history which led to the formation of several deep fault-bounded troughs, major interbasin high trends, and complex basin flanks. This tectonism has created a wide variety of structures, many of which have become effective hydrocarbon traps.

  19. Stratigraphic Framework and Depositional Sequences in the Lower Silurian Regional Oil and Gas Accumulation, Appalachian Basin: From Licking County, Ohio, to Fayette County, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.

    2006-01-01

    The Lower Silurian regional oil and gas accumulation was named by Ryder and Zagorski (2003) for a 400-mile (mi)-long by 200-mi-wide hydrocarbon accumulation in the central Appalachian basin of the Eastern United States and Ontario, Canada. From the early 1880s to 2000, approximately 300 to 400 million barrels of oil and eight to nine trillion cubic feet of gas have been produced from the Lower Silurian regional oil and gas accumulation (Miller, 1975; McCormac and others, 1996; Harper and others, 1999). Dominant reservoirs in the regional accumulation are the Lower Silurian 'Clinton' and Medina sandstones in Ohio and westernmost West Virginia and coeval rocks in the Lower Silurian Medina Group (Grimsby Sandstone (Formation) and Whirlpool Sandstone) in northwestern Pennsylvania and western New York. A secondary reservoir is the Upper Ordovician(?) and Lower Silurian Tuscarora Sandstone in central Pennsylvania and central West Virginia, a more proximal eastern facies of the 'Clinton' sandstone and Medina Group (Yeakel, 1962; Cotter, 1982, 1983; Castle, 1998). The Lower Silurian regional oil and gas accumulation is subdivided by Ryder and Zagorski (2003) into the following three parts: (1) an easternmost part consisting of local gas-bearing sandstone units in the Tuscarora Sandstone that is included with the basin-center accumulation; (2) an eastern part consisting predominantly of gas-bearing 'Clinton' sandstone-Medina Group sandstones that have many characteristics of a basin-center accumulation (Davis, 1984; Zagorski, 1988, 1991; Law and Spencer, 1993); and (3) a western part consisting of oil- and gas-bearing 'Clinton' sandstone-Medina Group sandstones that is a conventional accumulation with hybrid features of a basin-center accumulation (Zagorski, 1999). With the notable exception of the offshore part of Lake Erie (de Witt, 1993), the supply of oil and (or) gas in the hybrid-conventional part of the regional accumulation continues to decline because of the many

  20. Geologic cross section C-C' through the Appalachian basin from Erie County, north-central Ohio, to the Valley and Ridge province, Bedford County, south-central Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Trippi, Michael H.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Crangle, Robert D., Jr.; Hope, Rebecca S.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Lentz, Erika E.

    2012-01-01

    Geologic cross section C-C' is the third in a series of cross sections constructed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to document and improve understanding of the geologic framework and petroleum systems of the Appalachian basin. Cross section C-C' provides a regional view of the structural and stratigraphic framework of the Appalachian basin from north-central Ohio to the Valley and Ridge province in south-central Pennsylvania, a distance of approximately 260 miles (mi). This cross section is a companion to cross sections E-E' and D-D' that are located about 50 to 125 mi and 25 to 50 mi, respectively, to the southwest. Cross section C-C' contains much information that is useful for evaluating energy resources in the Appalachian basin. Although specific petroleum systems are not identified on the cross section, many of their key elements (such as source rocks, reservoir rocks, seals, and traps) can be inferred from lithologic units, unconformities, and geologic structures shown on the cross section. Other aspects of petroleum systems (such as the timing of petroleum generation and preferred migration pathways) may be evaluated by burial history, thermal history, and fluid flow models based on what is shown on the cross section. Cross section C-C' also provides a general framework (stratigraphic units and general rock types) for the coal-bearing section, although the cross section lacks the detail to illustrate key elements of coal systems (such as paleoclimate, coal quality, and coal rank). In addition, cross section C-C' may be used as a reconnaissance tool to identify plausible geologic structures and strata for the subsurface storage of liquid waste or for the sequestration of carbon dioxide.

  1. Detrital mica K/Ar ages for Devonian-Pennsylvanian strata of the north central Appalachian Basin: Dominance of the Acadian Orogen as provenance

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, J.L. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Lewis, T.L. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Detrital micas were separated from: the Upper Devonian Walton Sandstone and Ohio Shale; Lower Mississippian Berea Sandstone; Upper Mississippian Mauch Chunk Formation; and the Lower-Middle Pennsylvanian Pottsville and Allegheny Sandstones. A total of 12 separates were conventionally dated, the only biotite being from the Allegheny Formation sandstone, from which a muscovite was also dated. The total range in dates for the study was encompassed by the Allegheny sample of 414 m.y. (muscovite) to 361 m.y. (biotite), each date having an uncertainty of about [+-] 9 m.y. Excluding this sample, a narrower range of Early to Middle Devonian dates from 406--371 m.y. is obtained. For the Walton Sandstone of the proximal Catskill Wedge and for the northeast OH samples of the distal Catskill Wedge, all deposited within Late Devonian-Early Mississippian time, a very narrow span of 20 m.y. is obtained entirely within Early Devonian time and only approximately 30 m.y. older than deposition. All of these provenance ages have been previously found as primary ages of crystallization or cooling therefrom of regional metamorphism and plutonism in the Acadian Orogen of New England. The mean provenance ages are so close to the age of deposition of the distal Devonian/mississippian Catskill strata as to preclude almost any Precambrian contribution from either the Canadian Shield or the uplifted cores of the Orogen. These results support the paleocurrent and paleoenvironmental analysis of the northeast OH section by Lewis (1988) and argue against the classic Bedford Delta interpretation sourced from the north. Furthermore, the Acadian Orogen persisted as the major provenance for the clastic pulses that prograded into the central Appalachian Basin after the post-Catskill transgression, at least up until Middle Pennsylvanian time.

  2. Identifying Seismic Risk in the Appalachian Basin Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis Project Using Potential Fields, Seismicity, and the World Stress Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, F. G.

    2015-12-01

    A collaborative effort between Cornell University, Southern Methodist University, and West Virginia University has been sponsored by the US Department Of Energy to perform a Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis of the low temperature direct use potential for portions of the Appalachian sedimentary basin in New York, Pennsylvania and West Virginia - abbreviated here as GPFA-AB. One risk factor - of several being analyzed for the GPFA-AB - is whether a candidate location is near an active fault, and thereby potentially susceptible to induced seismicity from geothermal operations. Existing fault maps do not share the GPFA-AB boundaries or scale. Hence, their use leads to problems of uneven coverage, varying interpretation of faults vs. lineaments, and different mapping scales. For more uniformity across the GPFA-AB region, we use an analysis of gravity and magnetic fields. Multiscale edge Poisson wavelet analyses of potential fields ("worms") have a physical interpretation as the locations of lateral boundaries in a source distribution that exactly generates the observed field. Not all worms are faults, and of faults, only a subset might be active. Also, worms are only sensitive to steeply dipping structures. To identify some active structures, we plot worms and intra-plate earthquakes from the ISC, NEIC, and EarthScope TA catalogs. Worms within a small distance of epicenters are tracked spatially. To within errors in location, this is a sufficient condition to identify structures that might be active faults - which we categorize with higher risk than other structures. Plotting worms within World Stress Map σ1 directions yields an alternative approach to identifying activatable structures. Here, we use worms to identify structures with strikes favorably oriented for failure by Byerlee's law. While this is a necessary criterion for fault activation it is not a sufficient one - because we lack detailed information about stress magnitudes throughout the GPFA-AB region

  3. Petroleum geology and exploration of Tarim Basin, China

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Di-Gang; Jia Cheng-Zao )

    1996-01-01

    Since 1989 CNPC has carried on large-scale oil and gas exploration and geological research in Tarim Basin of Xinjiang Province, China. Twelve thousand km 2D seismic, 4500 km[sup 2] 3D seismic, and 200 exploratory wells have been completed; ninety-five wells yield commercial oil or gas flows. At this time, eight oil/gas fields have been discovered; they include Lunnan, Yaha, and Tazhong No. 4, having proved 2.7x10[sup 8]t of oil and 109.2x10[sup 9]m[sup 3] of gas in place. Two million six hundred thousand tons of crude oil was yielded in 1995 and 5x10[sup 8]t crude oil will be produced in 1997. The facies of discovered oil-gas pools in Tarim Basin are complex: there are condensate gas pools, volatile oil pools, normal oil pools, and some heavy oil pools. Structural traps form 80% of oil-gas pools. Oil-gases are mainly reservoired in sandstone beds. The burial depths of oil-gas pools range mainly from 4000 to 5500m. Oil and condensate gas occupy 60% and 40% of proved reserves respectively. Oil-gas pools are mainly distributed in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic group, in which Tertiary occupies 50%, Triassic occupies 30% and Carboniferous occupies 20%. Tarim Basin is a large overlapped composite basin, composed of Paleozoic cratonic basins and Mesozoic-Cenozoic foreland basins. Paleozoic and Mesozoic-Cenozoic oil-gas pools have different distribution character. Paleozoic oil-gas accumulations are controlled by cratonic paleo-uplifts and slopes. Mesozoic-Cenozoic oil-gas accumulations are controlled by foredeep uplifts and imbricate thrust structures of foreland thrust belts.

  4. Petroleum geology and exploration of Tarim Basin, China

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Di-Gang; Jia Cheng-Zao

    1996-12-31

    Since 1989 CNPC has carried on large-scale oil and gas exploration and geological research in Tarim Basin of Xinjiang Province, China. Twelve thousand km 2D seismic, 4500 km{sup 2} 3D seismic, and 200 exploratory wells have been completed; ninety-five wells yield commercial oil or gas flows. At this time, eight oil/gas fields have been discovered; they include Lunnan, Yaha, and Tazhong No. 4, having proved 2.7x10{sup 8}t of oil and 109.2x10{sup 9}m{sup 3} of gas in place. Two million six hundred thousand tons of crude oil was yielded in 1995 and 5x10{sup 8}t crude oil will be produced in 1997. The facies of discovered oil-gas pools in Tarim Basin are complex: there are condensate gas pools, volatile oil pools, normal oil pools, and some heavy oil pools. Structural traps form 80% of oil-gas pools. Oil-gases are mainly reservoired in sandstone beds. The burial depths of oil-gas pools range mainly from 4000 to 5500m. Oil and condensate gas occupy 60% and 40% of proved reserves respectively. Oil-gas pools are mainly distributed in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic group, in which Tertiary occupies 50%, Triassic occupies 30% and Carboniferous occupies 20%. Tarim Basin is a large overlapped composite basin, composed of Paleozoic cratonic basins and Mesozoic-Cenozoic foreland basins. Paleozoic and Mesozoic-Cenozoic oil-gas pools have different distribution character. Paleozoic oil-gas accumulations are controlled by cratonic paleo-uplifts and slopes. Mesozoic-Cenozoic oil-gas accumulations are controlled by foredeep uplifts and imbricate thrust structures of foreland thrust belts.

  5. Early and Late Diagenetic Origins of the widespread middle Devonian Purcell/Cherry Valley Limestone in the Appalachian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Arthur, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    Isotopic geochemistry, lithofacies characteristics and fluid inclusion microthemometry are investigated to evaluate the deposition and diagenesis of the thin, basin-wide Purcell/Cherry Valley carbonate member within the Middle Devonian Marcellus Formation. This carbonate interval is fine-grained and sparsely fossiliferous, with abundant nodular and disseminated pyrite, which distinguish it from normal lowstand carbonate units. A process that involves upward or lateral migration of methane with oxidation at or near the seafloor by sulfate-reduction, precipitating pyrite and 13C-depleted carbonate (commonly less than -10‰) could be responsible for the origin of this unusual carbonate layer. Samples of Purcell/Cherry Valley carbonate within Marcellus black shale collected from both shallow well core from the basin margin and core from producing wells in the basin center exhibit depleted carbon isotopic (δ13C=-10.2 to -2‰) and highly depleted oxygen isotopic signatures (δ18O=-13.2 to -8.7‰). The oxygen isotope values may indicate strong late diagenetic overprint. Primary fluid inclusions in calcite precipitates within tectonically induced fractures in this carbonate member mainly consist of three different types: aqueous brine inclusions, methane inclusions and light hydrocarbon inclusions. The petrologic analysis of fluid inclusions shows that hydrocarbons migrated with the brine. The homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions suggest mineral trapping occurred at fluid temperatures of 90-98°C. Moreover, with constrains of isotopic composition of Devonian oilfield brine (δ18O =+2 to -3‰) and veins (δ18O=-12 to -11‰, δ13C=-3.0 to 1‰), the calculated diagenetic temperature should also be relatively high (~ 100°C). Lithofacies characteristics, isotopic compositions and fluid inclusion microthermometries are all consistent with the conclusion that this carbonate member partially originated from methane oxidation and then underwent a high degree of

  6. Evaluation of the hydrocarbon source-rock potential of carbonaceous shales; Upper Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, J.B. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This study investigated the organic matter contained in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale Formation and the Rhinestreet Shale Member of the West Falls Formation (Devonian) in Kentucky, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The organic matter in these formations is predominantly marine in origin, and was most probably derived from algal organisms. The preservation of the organic matter was apparently controlled by the existence of a set of fault-bounded basins associated with the Rome Trough. These basins were anoxic because of limited oxygen recharge by circulating waters. Preservation of organic matter was also enhanced by periodic blooms of the alga Tasnmanites and similar organisms in the waters above the local basins during both Lower Huron and Rhinestreet times. These blooms created such large concentrations of organic matter that the supply of molecular oxygen was exhausted and the preservation of the algal material was enhanced. The temperature dose measured by the reflectance of vitrinite particles was corrected for depth effects in order to identify areas where the rocks had been heated in excess of the normal geothermal gradient. Corrected Vitrinite Temperatures were used to identify those areas where more localized heat pulses have occurred. These heat pulses may have been caused by hot brines circulating from depth through fractures in the affected rocks. The enhanced permeability of the fractures results in anomalously high, present-day heat flow values, and production of hydrocarbon liquids. A significant negative correlation was identified between the vitrinite reflectance temperature, an integrated measure of the thermal history of a rock, and the hydrogen index, a measure of the remaining hydrocarbon potential of kerogen.

  7. Age and position of the sedimentary basin of the Ocoee Supergroup western Blue Ridge tectonic province, southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Unrug, R.; Unrug, S. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Ausich, W.I. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Cuffey, R.J. . Dept. of Geosciences); Mamet, B.L. . Dept. de Geologie); Palmes, S.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    The stratigraphic continuity of the Ocoee Supergroup established recently allows one to extrapolate the Paleozoic age of the Walden Creek Group determined on paleontological evidence to the entire Ocoee succession. The Walden Creek Group rocks contain a fossil assemblage of fenestrate bryozoan, algal, trilobite, ostracod, brachiopod and echinozoan fragments and agglutinated foraminifer tests that indicate Silurian or younger Paleozoic age. The fossils occur in carbonate clasts in polymict conglomerates, and debris-flow breccia beds, and in olistoliths of bedded carbonate and shale, and calcarenite turbidite beds. These carbonate lithologies form a minor, but characteristic constituent of the Walden Creek Group. Fossil have been found also in shale and mudstone siliciclastic lithologies of the Walden Creek Group. The fossils are fragmented and poorly preserved because of several cycles of cementation and solution in the carbonate rocks and a pervasive cleavage in the fine-grained siliciclastic rocks. Recently reported Mississippian plant fossils from the Talladega belt indicate widespread occurrence of Middle Paleozoic basins in the Western Blue Ridge. These pull-apart basins formed in the stress field generated by northward movement of Laurentia past the western margin of Gondwana after the Taconian-Famatinian collision in the Ordovician.

  8. Record of glacial-eustatic sea-level fluctuations in complex middle to late Pennsylvanian facies in the Northern Appalachian Basin and relation to similar events in the Midcontinent basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt, Edward S.; Heckel, Philip H.; Lentz, Leonard J.; Bragonier, William A.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2011-06-01

    Pennsylvanian cycles in the Northern Appalachian Basin (NAB) were historically considered to result from delta-lobe switching, and more recently from sea-level fluctuation with sandy deltas prograding during highstand. These interpretations are revised using new data from cores and outcrop exposures. Thick (> 5 m) channel deposits with a marked erosion surface at their base cutting down across previous cycles are re-interpreted as incised valley fill (IVF) deposits in paleovalleys, because the basal erosion surfaces are widespread, and thus reflect a record of lowstand. Most common are simple paleovalleys that contain mainly sandy fluvial deposits. Compound paleovalleys with sequence boundaries above the basal erosion surface, contain terrestrial, estuarine, and marine deposits. Early to late highstand deposits in interfluvial parts of the cycles are dominated by shale and mudstone, with paleosols, coals, and local non-marine limestone, which reflect floodbasin to lacustrine conditions. These reinterpretations are applied to previously and newly recognized cycles in ascending order: Upper Kittanning, Lower Freeport, Upper Freeport Leader (new), Upper Freeport, Piedmont (new), Mahoning, Mason interval (locally includes Upper New Galilee in the north), and Brush Creek, across a 300-km arc in the Northern Appalachian Basin. These deposits accumulated in a 'high shelf' setting that experienced fewer marine transgressions, and were interrupted by more frequent exposure and downcutting, in contrast to the thicker and more complete succession with more numerous marine units in the Midcontinent. Magnitudes of highstand transgressions into this basin, deduced from the up-dip extent of marine and brackish fossil assemblages, were greatest for the Brush Creek, less so for the Upper Kittanning and Mahoning, and least for the Lower Freeport, Upper Freeport Leader, Piedmont, and Mason. The anomalous basin-wide fresh-water roofshales and equivalents of the Upper Freeport coal may

  9. Central-northern Appalachian coalbed methane flow grows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, Paul C.

    1997-01-01

    Coalbed methane (CBM) has become an increasingly important source of unconventional natural gas in the US within a span of a decade. In 1995, nearly 144 bcf of CBM was produced in the Appalachian basin at a value of about $260 million. From 1992 to 1995, CBM production in the central northern Appalachian basin quadrupled to nearly 31.3 bcf/year at a value of over $55 million, which represents only about 0.2% of the estimated technically recoverable CBM resource. Legal aspects of CBM ownership and environmental problems such as water disposal will become important issues to resolve in the various Appalachian states.

  10. New exploration targets in Malaysia: Deep sandstone reservoirs in Malay basin and turbidites in Sabah basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ngah, K.B. )

    1996-01-01

    Much of the production in Malaysia is from middle to upper Miocene sandstones and carbonates in three main basins: Malay, Sarawak (Its three subbasins-Central Luconia, Balingian and Baram), and Sabah. Fifteen fields produce an average of 630,000 bopd and 3.0 bcfgpd. More than 4.0 billion barrels of oil and 20 tcf of gas have been produced, and reserves are 4.2 billion barrels of oil and 90 tcf. Oil production will decline within the next 1 0 years unless new discoveries are made and/or improved oil recovery methods introduced, but gas production of 5 tcf, expected after the turn of the century, can be sustained for several decades. Successful exploratory wells continue to be drilled in the Malaysian Tertiary basins, and others are anticipated with application of new ideas and technology. In the Malay basin, Miocene sandstone reservoirs in Groups L and M have been considered as very [open quote]high risk[close quotes] targets, the quality of the reservoirs has generally been thought to be poor, especially toward the basinal center, where they occur at greater depth. The cause of porosity loss is primarily burial-related. Because of this factor and overpressuring, drilling of many exploration wells has been suspended at or near the top of Group L. In a recent prospect drilled near the basinal axis on the basis of advanced seismic technology, Groups L and M sandstones show fair porosity (8-15%) and contain gas. In the Sabah basin, turbidite play has received little attention, partly because of generally poor seismic resolution in a very complex structural setting. Only one field is known to produce oil from middle Miocene turbidities. However, using recently acquired 3-D seismic data over this field, new oil pools have been discovered, and they are currently being developed. These finds have created new interest, as has Shell's recent major gas discovery from a turbidite play in this basin.

  11. New exploration targets in Malaysia: Deep sandstone reservoirs in Malay basin and turbidites in Sabah basin

    SciTech Connect

    Ngah, K.B.

    1996-12-31

    Much of the production in Malaysia is from middle to upper Miocene sandstones and carbonates in three main basins: Malay, Sarawak (Its three subbasins-Central Luconia, Balingian and Baram), and Sabah. Fifteen fields produce an average of 630,000 bopd and 3.0 bcfgpd. More than 4.0 billion barrels of oil and 20 tcf of gas have been produced, and reserves are 4.2 billion barrels of oil and 90 tcf. Oil production will decline within the next 1 0 years unless new discoveries are made and/or improved oil recovery methods introduced, but gas production of 5 tcf, expected after the turn of the century, can be sustained for several decades. Successful exploratory wells continue to be drilled in the Malaysian Tertiary basins, and others are anticipated with application of new ideas and technology. In the Malay basin, Miocene sandstone reservoirs in Groups L and M have been considered as very {open_quote}high risk{close_quotes} targets, the quality of the reservoirs has generally been thought to be poor, especially toward the basinal center, where they occur at greater depth. The cause of porosity loss is primarily burial-related. Because of this factor and overpressuring, drilling of many exploration wells has been suspended at or near the top of Group L. In a recent prospect drilled near the basinal axis on the basis of advanced seismic technology, Groups L and M sandstones show fair porosity (8-15%) and contain gas. In the Sabah basin, turbidite play has received little attention, partly because of generally poor seismic resolution in a very complex structural setting. Only one field is known to produce oil from middle Miocene turbidities. However, using recently acquired 3-D seismic data over this field, new oil pools have been discovered, and they are currently being developed. These finds have created new interest, as has Shell`s recent major gas discovery from a turbidite play in this basin.

  12. Thermal maturity patterns (CAI and %Ro) in the Ordovician and Devonian rocks of the Appalachian basin in West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Repetski, John E.; Ryder, Robert T.; Avary, Katharine Lee; Trippi, Michael H.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to enhance existing thermal maturity maps in West Virginia by establishing: 1) new subsurface CAI data points for the Ordovician and Devonian and 2) new %Ro and Rock Eval subsurface data points for Middle and Upper Devonian black shale units. Thermal maturity values for the Ordovician and Devonian strata are of major interest because they contain the source rocks for most of the oil and natural gas resources in the basin. Thermal maturity patterns of the Middle Ordovician Trenton Limestone are evaluated here because they closely approximate those of the overlying Ordovician Utica Shale that is believed to be the source rock for the regional oil and gas accumulation in Lower Silurian sandstones (Ryder and others, 1998) and for natural gas fields in fractured dolomite reservoirs of the Ordovician Black River-Trenton Limestones. Improved CAI-based thermal maturity maps of the Ordovician are important to identify areas of optimum gas generation from the Utica Shale and to provide constraints for interpreting the origin of oil and gas in the Lower Silurian regional accumulation and Ordovician Black River-Trenton fields. Thermal maturity maps of the Devonian will better constrain burial history-petroleum generation models of the Utica Shale, as well as place limitations on the origin of regional oil and gas accumulations in Upper Devonian sandstone and Middle to Upper Devonian black shale.

  13. Coalbed methane exploration in the Lorraine Basin, France

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, B.; Briens, F.; Girdler, D.

    1995-08-01

    DuPont Conoco Hydrocarbures has been involved in a Coalbed Methane (CBM) project in France since 1991. Coalbed methane exploration differs noticeably in several aspects from conventional oil and gas exploration. This paper is divided in three parts and discusses some geological, reservoir and drilling considerations relevant to the exploration and appraisal of a coalbed methane prospect. The first part presents geological issues such as data collection and evaluation of its associated value, building expertise to create a geological and geophysical model integrating the work of a multidisciplinary team, and assessing uncertainties of the data interpretation. A short review of the basin activity, geological and tectonic setting, and environment aspects is presented in order to illustrate some CBM exploration issues. The second part describes a comprehensive coalbed methane reservoir data acquisition program incorporating coal sample optical and chemical analyses, gas sample chromatography, canister desorption, fracture density of coal cores, and measurement of in-situ coal permeability and bounding-strata stress. Field practical concerns are then discussed such as on-site and off-site canister desorption, gas sample collection, rapid estimation of gas content, ash content, total bed moisture, and finally well testing alternatives for permeability and rock stress determination. The third part reviews drilling issues such as drilling and coring options for core hole size and casing size, rig site equipment requirements for continuous coring operations, including mud treatment equipment, core handling material and core work stations, alliance of national and foreign drilling contractors to optimize equipment and experience, and finally overview of coring procedures to identify best practices for pending operations. The paper is derived from Conoco`s experience in CBM exploration in the Lorraine Basin, North East of France.

  14. Trenton exploration and wrenching tectonics - Michigan basin and environs

    SciTech Connect

    Prouty, C.E.

    1984-12-01

    Hydrocarbon production in the Michigan basin occurs primarily from Silurian pinnacle reefs or Middle Ordovician and Middle Devonian linear, faulted, and dolomitized structures. The writer has previously proposed a wrenching model for the basin based on lineament (fault) patterns from Landsat imagery and outcrop fracture analyses (ground truth). The azimuths of existing linear producing fields, whether from Trenton-Black River or younger rocks, closely fit the shear model. Analyses (x-ray diffraction) of numerous well samples from several producing fields show dolomite/calcite ratios of epigenetically formed dolomite (porous reservoir rock) channelways along vertical shear faults, shear folds, cross faults, cross folds, and stratigraphic permeable offshoots from the fault channelways of the wrenching model. The dolomitizing fluids probably entered the fault channelways from artesion waters from below. If so, basin form would be important to reservoir rock development in this system. Geophysical exploration for the strike-slip shear faults in nearly horizontal rocks generally has proved elusive, even for accompanying shear folds where they have small amplitudes. The Trenton-Black River Albion-Scipio giant field is shear faulted but not shear folded. Geophysical search for other similar structures has been far from successful. Thus, model fitting in many instances may be the most effective tool. It should be recognized that faults sensed by the reflected infrared of Landsat are open systems, at least near the surface. It is the unseen closed system components of the model for which one searches.

  15. Regional magnetotelluric surveys in hydrocarbon exploration, Parana' Basin, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, W.D.; Ohofugi, W.; Saad, A.R.

    1985-03-01

    The magnetotelluric geophysical method has been used effectively as a hydrocarbon exploration tool in the intracratonic Parana basin of South America. The 1-2 km thick surface basalts and buried diabase sills pose no problem for the magnetotelluric method because the natural electromagnetic fields used as the energy source pass easily through the basalt. Data for the regional study were taken on six profiles with soundings spaced 8 to 15 km apart. The magnetotelluric sounding data outline a linear uplift known as the Ponta Grossa arch. This major structural feature cuts across the northeast-trending intracratonic basin almost perpendicularly, and is injected with numerous diabase dikes. In the survey area, MT interpretations show that basalts have aggregate thicknesses of as much as 2 km (6,600 ft), and basement may be as much as 6 km (20,000 ft) below the surface. Over most of the basin, the basalts are covered by Upper Cretaceous to Holocene continental sediments of a few hundred meters thickness and are underlain by 2 to 4 km (6,600 to 13,100 ft) thick Paleozoic sediments with possible hydrocarbon potential. Significant electrical contrasts occur between the Permian sediments and older units, so that magnetotelluric measurements can give an indication of the regional thickness of the Permian and younger sediments to aid in interpreting hydrocarbon migration patterns and possible trap areas.

  16. Exploration targets in eastern half of Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Catacosinos, P.A.

    1986-08-01

    Current economic conditions in the world's petroleum market mitigate against exploratory drilling. Yet, the geologic reality is that the US has an energy problem that worsens each year. Areas such as the Michigan basin must be thoroughly evaluated because untapped reserves may lie within the basin. Drilling continues for selected zones throughout much of the lower peninsula of Michigan, but the eastern part of the basin, from the Thumb area southward, remains relatively untested. Wells drilled there would encounter potential producing zones, including the Berea Sandstone, and the Dundee, Richfield, Trenton-Black River, and Bruggers formations. Niagaran reefs may be present, and Cambrian hydrocarbons, as yet undocumented in Michigan, may also exist. Drilling depths on the order of 10,000 ft or less will test the deepest zones. Anticlinal traps, which have been modified by faults and stratigraphic factors such as porosity trends and pinch-outs, are present in the area and are amenable to both geologic and seismic analysis. A sustained exploration effort and strategy using these techniques should produce a successful program.

  17. Multiple-bench architecture and interpretations of original mire phases - Examples from the Middle Pennyslvanian of the Central Appalachian Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greb, S.F.; Eble, C.F.; Hower, J.C.; Andrews, W.M.

    2002-01-01

    Coal seams often exhibit lateral and vertical variability in composition. When sampled as a whole seam this variability is masked. But if a seam is subdivided into correlateable components, this variability can be tested and better understood. Herein, an architectural approach is used to divide seams into intra-seam components. Clastic splits and mineral partings, as well as persistent fusain and durain layers, can be used as intra-seam bounding units to subdivide a seam into subdivisions called benches. Regional examination of Lower and Middle Pennsylvanian-age coal seams shows that many contain laterally persistent bounding surfaces that can be used to define multiple benches of coal within each seam. Inter-bench analyses from some of the most extensively mined seams in the central Appalachian Basin show that individual benches often have different spatial and quality trends. Hence, some component of whole-seam variability is a function of changes in the relative contribution of these different benches to the seam as a whole. Many coal benches also exhibit intra-bench variation in coal parameters. Intra-bench variation can be analyzed in terms of parameters such as sulfur content and ash yield in order to address changes in coal quality for regional resource evaluation. Intra-bench variation can also be analyzed in terms of a combination of palynologic, petrographic, and geochemical parameters, termed compositional groups, in order to better understand the development of the original mire systems. Compositional groups are defined by ranges of multiple criteria, which are inferred to owe their origin to the mire type in which they formed. Vertical changes in compositional groups within coal benches can be used to infer paleo-edaphic conditions during peat accumulation. If seam thickness is a product of bench configuration, and trends in compositional groups occur in benches, then trends in quality can be marginally predicted based upon seam thickness and inferred

  18. A search for stratiform massive-sulfide exploration targets in Appalachian Devonian rocks; a case study using computer-assisted attribute-coincidence mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wedow, Helmuth

    1983-01-01

    The empirical model for sediment-associated, stratiform, exhalative, massive-sulfide deposits presented by D. Large in 1979 and 1980 has been redesigned to permit its use in a computer-assisted search for exploration-target areas in Devonian rocks of the Appalachian region using attribute-coincidence mapping (ACM). Some 36 gridded-data maps and selected maps derived therefrom were developed to show the orthogonal patterns, using the 7-1/2 minute quadrangle as an information cell, of geologic data patterns relevant to the empirical model. From these map and data files, six attribute-coincidence maps were prepared to illustrate both variation in the application of ACM techniques and the extent of possible significant exploration-target areas. As a result of this preliminary work in ACM, four major (and some lesser) exploration-target areas needing further study and analysis have been defined as follows: 1) in western and central New York in the outcrop area of lowermost Upper Devonian rocks straddling the Clarendon-Linden fault; 2) in western Virginia and eastern West Virginia in an area largely coincident with the well-known 'Oriskany' Mn-Fe ores; 3) an area in West Virginia, Maryland, and Virginia along and nearby the trend of the Alabama-New York lineament of King and Zietz approximately between 38- and 40-degrees N. latitude; and 4) an area in northeastern Ohio overlying an area coincident with a significant thickness of Silurian salt and high modern seismic activity. Some lesser, smaller areas suggested by relatively high coincidence may also be worthy of further study.

  19. Remote sensing and image processing for exploration in frontier basins

    SciTech Connect

    Sabins, F.F. )

    1993-02-01

    A variety of remote sensing systems are available to explore the wide range of terrain in Central and South America and Mexico. The remote sensing data are recorded in digital form and must be computer-processed to produce images that are suitable for exploration. Landsat and SPOT images are available for most of the earth, but are restricted by cloud-cover. The broad terrain coverage recorded by Landsat thematic mapper (TM) is well suited for regional exploration. Color images are composited from various combinations of the 6 spectral bands to selectively enhance geologic features in different types of terrain. SPOT images may be acquired as stereo pairs which are valuable for structural interpretations. Radar is an active form of remote sensing that provides its own source of energy at wavelengths of centimeters which penetrate cloud-cover. Radar images are acquired at low depression angles to create shadows and highlights that enhance subtle geologic features. Satellite radar images of earth were recorded from two U.S. space shuttle missions in the 1980s and are currently recorded by the European Remote Sensing satellite and the Japanese Earth Resources Satellite. Mosaics of radar images acquired from aircraft are widely used in oil exploration, especially in cloud-covered regions. Typical images and computer processing method are illustrated with examples from various frontier basins.

  20. Acadian dextral transpression and synorogenic sedimentary successions in the Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrill, B.A.; Thomas, W.A.

    1988-07-01

    The successive Seboomook-Littleton (northern Appalachians) and Catskill-Pocono (central Appalachians) clastic wedges suggest oblique convergence and southwestward migration of Acadian orogeny beginning in Early Devonian and continuing into Early Mississippian. Wrench-fault movement in Maritime Canada coincided with deposition of all but the earliest components of the Catskill-Pocono clastic wedge and continued into the Pennsylvanian. Contrasts between a thin, Lower to Middle Devonian shallow-shelf facies in the Alabama Appalachian fold-thrust belt and a time-equivalent, thick, shallowing-upward sedimentary to volcanic succession in the adjacent Talladega slate belt are interpreted to reflect a wrench-fault basin. A wrench-fault setting for Devonian rocks in Alabama integrated with manifestations of oblique convergence during the Acadian orogeny in the central and northern Appalachians can be accommodated in dextral transpression along the entire length of the Acadian Appalachian orogen.

  1. Assessment of Appalachian basin oil and gas resources: Devonian gas shales of the Devonian Shale-Middle and Upper Paleozoic Total Petroleum System: Chapter G.9 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, Robert C.; Swezey, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the results of a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment of the technically recoverable undiscovered natural gas resources in Devonian shale in the Appalachian Basin Petroleum Province of the eastern United States. These results are part of the USGS assessment in 2002 of the technically recoverable undiscovered oil and gas resources of the province. This report does not use the results of a 2011 USGS assessment of the Devonian Marcellus Shale because the area considered in the 2011 assessment is much greater than the area of the Marcellus Shale described in this report. The USGS assessment in 2002 was based on the identification of six total petroleum systems, which include strata that range in age from Cambrian to Pennsylvanian. The Devonian gas shales described in this report are within the Devonian Shale-Middle and Upper Paleozoic Total Petroleum System, which extends generally from New York to Tennessee. This total petroleum system is divided into ten assessment units (plays), four of which are classified as conventional and six as continuous. The Devonian shales described in this report make up four of these continuous assessment units. The assessment results are reported as fully risked fractiles (F95, F50, F5, and the mean); the fractiles indicate the probability of recovery of the assessment amount. The products reported are oil, gas, and natural gas liquids. The mean estimates for technically recoverable undiscovered hydrocarbons in the four gas shale assessment units are 12,195.53 billion cubic feet (12.20 trillion cubic feet) of gas and 158.91 million barrels of natural gas liquids

  2. Exploration applications of geochemistry in the Midland Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, W.G.; Talukdar, S.C. ); Harmon, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Reservoirs, source rocks, and crude oils were studied at Pegasas field on the eastern flank of the Central Basin platform. The field is a faulted anticlinal structure and produces oil and gas from seven geologically complex reservoirs ranging from the Ordovician Ellenburger to the Permian San Andres formations. A better understanding of the petroleum systems present should lead to improved exploration and development opportunities. Good to excellent-quality, mature oil-prone source rocks occur at numerous horizons between the Permian Spraberry and Ordovician Ellenburger formations. Oil-rock correlations indicate three major petroleum systems: Ordovician sources for oil in Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian reservoirs; Mississippian to Pennsylvanian sources for Pennsylvanian reservoired oils; and Permian sources for oils in Permian reservoirs. The Ordovician to Devonian system experienced peak oil generation, extensive vertical oil migration, and in-reservoir oil maturation in Triassic time; the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian system reached peak oil generation with limited vertical oil migration in Jurassic time; and the Permian system is just reaching peak oil generation and has had little or no vertical oil migration. The total amount of oil available to charge the field is several times the oil in place, and all available traps were filled to capacity. This implies substantial accumulations remain undiscovered in subtle stratigraphic and combination traps in the Pegasus field area. The same is probably true throughout the Midland basin. Integrated studies with geological, geophysical, engineering, and geochemical input can provide valuable exploration information on local as well as regional scales. Pegasus field examples include fault-block isolation reservoir segregation and waterflood or gas cycling efficiency. Such studies may also contribute information leading to lateral and vertical field extension wells.

  3. The evolution of Devonian hydrocarbon gases in shallow aquifers of the northern Appalachian Basin: Insights from integrating noble gas and hydrocarbon geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Thomas H.; Jackson, Robert B.; Vengosh, Avner; Warner, Nathaniel R.; Whyte, Colin J.; Walsh, Talor B.; Kondash, Andrew J.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2015-12-01

    The last decade has seen a dramatic increase in domestic energy production from unconventional reservoirs. This energy boom has generated marked economic benefits, but simultaneously evoked significant concerns regarding the potential for drinking-water contamination in shallow aquifers. Presently, efforts to evaluate the environmental impacts of shale gas development in the northern Appalachian Basin (NAB), located in the northeastern US, are limited by: (1) a lack of comprehensive "pre-drill" data for groundwater composition (water and gas); (2) uncertainty in the hydrogeological factors that control the occurrence of naturally present CH4 and brines in shallow Upper Devonian (UD) aquifers; and (3) limited geochemical techniques to quantify the sources and migration of crustal fluids (specifically methane) at various time scales. To address these questions, we analyzed the noble gas, dissolved ion, and hydrocarbon gas geochemistry of 72 drinking-water wells and one natural methane seep all located ≫1 km from shale gas drill sites in the NAB. In the present study, we consciously avoided groundwater wells from areas near active or recent drilling to ensure shale gas development would not bias the results. We also intentionally targeted areas with naturally occurring CH4 to characterize the geochemical signature and geological context of gas-phase hydrocarbons in shallow aquifers of the NAB. Our data display a positive relationship between elevated [CH4], [C2H6], [Cl], and [Ba] that co-occur with high [4He]. Although four groundwater samples show mantle contributions ranging from 1.2% to 11.6%, the majority of samples have [He] ranging from solubility levels (∼45 × 10-6 cm3 STP/L) with below-detectable [CH4] and minor amounts of tritiogenic 3He in low [Cl] and [Ba] waters, up to high [4He] = 0.4 cm3 STP/L with a purely crustal helium isotopic end-member (3He/4He = ∼0.02 times the atmospheric ratio (R/Ra)) in samples with CH4 near saturation for shallow

  4. Devonian stratigraphy of the Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrill, B.A.; Thomas, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    Lower and lower Middle Devonian (below the top of the Onondaga and equivalent) strata in the Appalachian unmetamorphosed fold-thrust belt are relatively thin and are laterally variable in lithology, thickness, and age. South of Virginia, thickness is less than 100 m; in Virginia and farther north, thickness ranges from 100 to 450 m. Locally, rocks of this age are unconformably absent in Pennsylvania and in Virginia and farther south. Clastic rocks dominate the interval in places along the southeastern margin of the fold-thrust belt and near pinch-outs at unconformities. Elsewhere, the interval is dominated by carbonate rocks. In contrast, thick sequences of lower Devonian rocks are preserved in Appalachian metamorphic belts in New England and in Alabama. The stratigraphic distribution of upper Middle (above the top of the Onondaga and equivalent) and Upper Devonian rocks is dominated by the widespread semicircular Catskill clastic wedge, centered on southeastern Pennsylvania. Near the depocenter, the succession grades upward from deep-water black shale, through shallow-marine sandstones and mudstones, to deltaic and fluvial red beds. These facies prograde both northwestward toward the craton and southwestward along structural strike. Pelitic rocks dominate the distal part of the wedge. Distribution of the Catskill clastic wedge reflects sediment transport onto the earlier Devonian shelf from an Acadian orogenic uplift. Local basins in Maine were probably not interconnected and reflect fault-block uplifts and pull-apart basins associated with wrench faults.

  5. Hybridizing rapidly exploring random trees and basin hopping yields an improved exploration of energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Roth, Christine-Andrea; Dreyfus, Tom; Robert, Charles H; Cazals, Frédéric

    2016-03-30

    The number of local minima of the potential energy landscape (PEL) of molecular systems generally grows exponentially with the number of degrees of freedom, so that a crucial property of PEL exploration algorithms is their ability to identify local minima, which are low lying and diverse. In this work, we present a new exploration algorithm, retaining the ability of basin hopping (BH) to identify local minima, and that of transition based rapidly exploring random trees (T-RRT) to foster the exploration of yet unexplored regions. This ability is obtained by interleaving calls to the extension procedures of BH and T-RRT, and we show tuning the balance between these two types of calls allows the algorithm to focus on low lying regions. Computational efficiency is obtained using state-of-the art data structures, in particular for searching approximate nearest neighbors in metric spaces. We present results for the BLN69, a protein model whose conformational space has dimension 207 and whose PEL has been studied exhaustively. On this system, we show that the propensity of our algorithm to explore low lying regions of the landscape significantly outperforms those of BH and T-RRT. PMID:26714673

  6. Geologic Analysis of Priority Basins for Exploration and Drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, H.B.; Reeves, T.K.

    1999-04-27

    There has been a substantial decline in both exploratory drilling and seismic field crew activity in the United States over the last 10 years, due primarily to the declining price of oil. To reverse this trend and to preserve the entrepreneurial independent operator, the U.S. DOE is attempting to encourage hydrocarbon exploration activities in some of the under exploited regions of the United States. This goal is being accomplished by conducting broad regional reviews of potentially prospective areas within the lower 48 states. Data are being collected on selected areas, and studies are being done on a regional scale generally unavailable to the smaller independent. The results of this work will be made available to the public to encourage the undertaking of operations in areas which have been overlooked until this project. Fifteen criteria have been developed for the selection of study areas. Eight regions have been identified where regional geologic analysis will be performed. This report discusses preliminary findings concerning the geology, early tectonic history, structure and potential unconventional source rocks for the Black Mesa basin and South Central states region, the two highest priority study areas.

  7. Revisiting the Hubbert-Rubey pore pressure model for overthrust faulting: Inferences from bedding-parallel detachment surfaces within Middle Devonian gas shale, the Appalachian Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Murat G.; Engelder, Terry

    2014-12-01

    Both bedding-parallel slickensides and cleavage duplexes are forms of mesoscopic-scale detachment faulting populating black (Marcellus and Geneseo/Burket) and intervening gray (Mahantango) shales of the Middle Devonian, a section known for abnormal pore pressure below the Appalachian Plateau. The abundance and the orientation of slickensides and cleavage duplexes in the more organic-rich black shale relative to gray shale suggests that maturation-related abnormal pore pressure facilitates detachment, a mesoscopic manifestation of the Hubbert-Rubey pore pressure model for overthrust faulting. The former are discrete slip surfaces whereas the latter consists of nested, anastomosing slip surfaces, either cutting through bedding or on disrupted bedding surfaces stacked as mesoscopic versions of thrust duplexes. Cleavage duplexes are between a few cm and over 1 m thick with their hanging walls commonly transported toward the Appalachian foreland, regardless of local limb dip. Cleavage duplexes are most common near the stratigraphic maximum flooding surface, the organic-rich section most prone to develop maturation-related pore pressure in the Middle Devonian gas shales. Bedding-parallel slickensides are somewhat more evenly distributed in the black shale but also found in overlying gray shale. In both black and gray shales, slickensides are more abundant on the limbs of folds, an indication of pore-pressure-related flexural-slip folding. On the macroscopic scale, the Pine Mountain Block of the Southern Appalachian Mountains was enabled by a basal detachment cutting along the Upper Devonian Chattanooga black shale which has a thermal maturity sufficient for the generation of abnormal pore pressure. The Pine Mountain block is a large-scale overthrust showing little evidence of collapse of the hinterland side, a credible example of a pore-pressure-aided overthrust fault block of the type envisioned by the Hubbert-Rubey model.

  8. Minturn Formation of Eagle basin: an exploration frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, C.J.N.; Bartleson, B.

    1986-08-01

    The Eagle basin, a predominantly Desmoinesian evaporite basin in northwestern Colorado, contains many targets for oil and gas reserves. Facies patterns of the Minturn Formation of the Eagle basin are strikingly similar to those of the prolific Paradox Formation of the Paradox basin. Both basins and formations also contain lens-shaped carbonate algal-bioherms. These algal-bioherms are particularly attractive reservoirs where they flank halite-basin margins, the areas of optimum dolomitization. The Minturn formation has been subdivided into individual rock packages using subsurface control. Facies maps constructed for individual units indicate the Eagle basin is a series of smaller basins, each having served as a center for halite deposition. Data support a deep-water model for the deposition of halite; however, a sabkhalike environment existed between the halite basins and the normal marine facies. Halite depocenters appear to have been structurally controlled. The Minturn Formation is very thick and may contain multiple prospective zones at any one location. Within the past year, two and possibly three Minturn discoveries have been made in northwestern Colorado.

  9. Possible continuous-type (unconventional) gas accumulation in the Lower Silurian "Clinton" sands, Medina Group and Tuscarora Sandstone in the Appalachian Basin; a progress report of the 1995 project activities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.; Aggen, Kerry L.; Hettinger, Robert D.; Law, Ben E.; Miller, John J.; Nuccio, Vito F.; Perry, William J., Jr.; Prensky, Stephen E.; Filipo, John J.; Wandrey, Craig J.

    1996-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) 1995 National Assessment of United States oil and gas resources (Gautier and others, 1995), the Appalachian basin was estimated to have, at a mean value, about 61 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of recoverable gas in sandstone and shale reservoirs of Paleozoic age. Approximately one-half of this gas resource is estimated to reside in a regionally extensive, continuous-type gas accumulation whose reservoirs consist of low-permeability sandstone of the Lower Silurian 'Clinton' sands and Medina Group (Gautier and others, 1995; Ryder, 1995). Recognizing the importance of this large regional gas accumulation for future energy considerations, the USGS initiated in January 1995 a multi-year study to evaluate the nature, distribution, and origin of natural gas in the 'Clinton' sands, Medina Group sandstones, and equivalent Tuscarora Sandstone. The project is part of a larger natural gas project, Continuous Gas Accumulations in Sandstones and Carbonates, coordinated in FY1995 by Ben E. Law and Jennie L. Ridgley, USGS, Denver. Approximately 2.6 man years were devoted to the Clinton/Medina project in FY1995. A continuous-type gas accumulation, referred to in the project, is a new term introduced by Schmoker (1995a) to identify those natural gas accumulations whose reservoirs are charged throughout with gas over a large area and whose entrapment does not involve a downdip gas-water contact. Gas in these accumulations is located downdip of the water column and, thus, is the reverse of conventional-type hydrocarbon accumulations. Commonly used industry terms that are more or less synonymous with continuous-type gas accumulations include basin- centered gas accumulation (Rose and others, 1984; Law and Spencer, 1993), tight (low-permeability) gas reservoir (Spencer, 1989; Law and others, 1989; Perry, 1994), and deep basin gas (Masters, 1979, 1984). The realization that undiscovered gas in Lower Silurian sandstone reservoirs of the

  10. Carboniferous stratigraphy of the Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Hines, R.A.; Thomas, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    Carboniferous rocks in the Appalachian fold-thrust belt and foreland basins include parts of four clastic wedges. Distribution, composition, and ages of the clastic wedges record diachronous orogenic uplifts along the Appalachian margin. Lower Mississippian Pocono sandstones form the upper part of the Catskill-Pocono clastic wedge, which includes the Devonian Catskill deltaic facies. Pocono rocks reflect clastic sediments transport toward the northwest and west from an orogenic source east of the Pennsylvania salient. The upper Mississippian-Pennsylvanian Mauch Chunk-Pottsville clastic wedge prograded westward and southwestward from the Pennsylvania salient over Mississippian limestone. The southwestern limit of the Mauch Chunk-Pottsville clastic wedge is overlapped in the Virginia recess by the oppositely directed Pennington-Lee clastic wedge. The Upper Mississippian-Pennsylvanian Pennington-Lee clastic wedge prograded northeastward and northwestward from the Tennessee salient. Southwestward in the Alabama recess, the Pennington clastic facies grades into Mississippian limestone, and Lee-equivalent sandstones extend over the limestone. In the western part of the Alabama recess, Upper Mississippian-Lower Pennsylvanian delta systems prograded northeastward over the Mississippian carbonate facies. These clastic sediments are an eastern shelf-delta part of a thick clastic wedge that consists of turbidites in the Ouachita salient. The eastern fringe of the Ouachita clastic wedge merges with the southwestward-prograding Pennington-Lee clastic wedge above Mississippian carbonate rocks in the Alabama recess.

  11. Petroleum geology of Cook Inlet basin - an exploration model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magoon, L.B.; Claypool, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    Oil exploration commenced onshore adjacent to lower Cook Inlet on the Iniskin Peninsula in 1900, shifted with considerable success to upper Cook Inlet from 1957 through 1965, then returned to lower Cook Inlet in 1977 with the COST well and Federal OCS sale. Lower Cook Inlet COST No. 1 well, drilled to a total depth of 3,775.6 m, penetrated basinwide unconformities at the tops of Upper Cretaceous, Lower Cretaceous, and Upper Jurassic strata at 797.1, 1,540.8, and 2,112.3 m, respectively. Sandstone of potential reservoir quality is present in the Cretaceous and lower Tertiary rocks. All siltstones and shales analyzed are low (0 to 0.5 wt. %) in oil-prone organic matter, and only coals are high in humic organic matter. At total depth, vitrinite readings reached a maximum ave age reflectance of 0.65. Several indications of hydrocarbons were present. Oil analyses suggest that oils from the major fields of the Cook Inlet region, most of which produce from the Tertiary Hemlock Conglomerate, have a common source. More detailed work on stable carbon isotope ratios and the distribution of gasoline-range and heavy (C12+) hydrocarbons confirms this genetic relation among the major fields. In addition, oils from Jurassic rocks under the Iniskin Peninsula and from the Hemlock Conglomerate at the southwestern tip of the Kenai lowland are members of the same or a very similar oil family. The Middle Jurassic strata of the Iniskin Peninsula are moderately rich in organic carbon (0.5 to 1.5 wt. %) and yield shows of oil and of gas in wells and in surface seeps. Extractable hydrocarbons from this strata are similar in chemi al and isotopic composition to the Cook Inlet oils. Organic matter in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks is thermally immature in all wells analyzed. Oil reservoirs in the major producing fields are of Tertiary age and unconformably overlie Jurassic rocks; the pre-Tertiary unconformity may be significant in exploration for new oil reserves. The unconformable relation

  12. Composition of natural gas and crude oil produced from 10 wells in the Lower Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone, Trumbull County, Ohio: Chapter G.7 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burruss, Robert A.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Natural gases and associated crude oils in the “Clinton” sandstone, Medina Group sandstones, and equivalent Tuscarora Sandstone in the northern Appalachian basin are part of a regional, continuous-type or basin-centered accumulation. The origin of the hydrocarbon charge to regional continuoustype accumulations is poorly understood. We have analyzed the molecular and stable isotopic composition of gases and oils produced from 10 wells in the “Clinton” sandstone in Trumbull County, Ohio, in an initial attempt to identify the characteristics of the accumulated fluids. The analyses show that the fluids have remarkably uniform compositions that are similar to previously published analyses of oils (Cole and others, 1987) and gases (Laughrey and Baldasarre, 1998) in Early Silurian reservoirs elsewhere in Ohio; however, geochemical parameters in the oils and gases suggest that the fluids have experienced higher levels of thermal stress than the present-day burial conditions of the reservoir rocks. The crude oils have an unusual geochemical characteristic: they do not contain detectable levels of sterane and triterpane biomarkers. The origin of these absences is unknown.

  13. A Regional Resource: Appalachian Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roesch, Harry

    1975-01-01

    An Appalachian Regional Commission survey of 180 institutions of higher education in the Appalachian Region pinpoints which institutions offer technical assistance to state and local governments and officals. (Author)

  14. Mesozoic rift basins in western desert of Egypt, their southern extension and impact on future exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, M.A. )

    1988-08-01

    Rift basins are a primary target of exploration in east, central, and west Africa. These intracratonic rift basins range in age from the Triassic to the Neogene and are filled with lagoonal-lacustrine sand-shale sequences. Several rift basins may be present in the Western Desert of Egypt. In the northeastern African platform, the Mesozoic Tethyan strand lines were previously interpreted to have limited southern extension onto the continent. This concept, based upon a relatively limited amount of subsurface data, has directed and focused the exploration for oil and gas to the northernmost 120 km of the Western Desert of Egypt. Recent well and geophysical data indicate a southerly extension of mesozoic rift basins several hundred kilometers inland from the Mediterranean Sea. Shushan/Faghur and Abu Gharadig/Bahrein basins may represent subparallel Mesozoic basins, trending northeast-southwest. Marine Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sediments were recently reported from wells drilled approximately 500 km south of the present-day Mediterranean shoreline. The link of these basins with the Sirte basin to the southwest in Libya is not well understood. Exploration is needed to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of such basins.

  15. "We're All Appalachian."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banker, Mark

    2002-01-01

    A teacher at a Knoxville college preparatory school challenges his students to analyze stereotypes about Appalachia and recognize that acceptance of their own Appalachian-ness is vital to their personal well-being and that of the region. Comparisons of Appalachians with Hispanics in northern New Mexico reveal common issues of land use, cultural…

  16. Basin center - fractured source rock plays within tectonically segmented foreland (back-arc) basins: Targets for future exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Weimer, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    Production from fractured reservoirs has long been an industry target, but interest in this type play has increased recently because of new concepts and technology, especially horizontal drilling. Early petroleum exploration programs searched for fractured reservoirs from shale, tight sandstones, carbonates, or basement in anticlinal or fault traps, without particular attention to source rocks. Foreland basins are some of the best oil-generating basins in the world because of their rich source rocks. Examples are the Persian Gulf basin, the Alberta basin and Athabasca tar sands, and the eastern Venezuela basin and Orinoco tar sands. Examples of Cretaceous producers are the wrench-faulted La Paz-Mara anticlinal fields, Maracaibo basin, Venezuela; the active Austin Chalk play in an extensional area on the north flank of the Gulf of Mexico continental margin basin; and the Niobrara Chalk and Pierre Shale plays of the central Rocky Mountains, United States. These latter plays are characteristic of a foreland basin fragmented into intermontane basins by the Laramide orogeny. The Florence field, Colorado, discovered in 1862, and the Silo field, Wyoming, discovered in 1980, are used as models for current prospecting and will be described in detail. The technologies applied to fracture-source rock plays are refined surface and subsurface mapping from new log suites, including resistivity mapping; 3D-3C seismic, gravity, and aeromagnetic mapping; borehole path seismic mapping associated with horizontal drilling; fracture mapping with the Formation MicroScanner and other logging tools; measurements while drilling and other drilling and completion techniques; surface geochemistry to locate microseeps; and local and regional lineament discrimination.

  17. Rift basins of interior Sudan: petroleum exploration and discovery

    SciTech Connect

    Schull, T.J.

    1988-10-01

    The sedimentary basins of interior Sudan are characterized by thick nonmarine clastic sequences of Jurassic(.)-Cretaceous and Tertiary age. Over 45,000 ft (13,716 m) of sediment was deposited in the deepest trough and extensive basinal areas are underlain by more than 20,000 ft (6096 m) of sedimentary rocks. The depositional sequences include thick lacustrine shales and claystones, flood plain claystones, and lacustrine, fluvial, and alluvial sandstones and conglomerates. Those lacustrine claystones deposited in a suboxic environment provide good oil-prone source rocks. Reservoir sandstones have been found in a wide variety of nonmarine sandstone facies. The extensional tectonism that formed these basins began in the Jurassic(.)-Early Cretaceous. Movement along major fault trends continued intermittently into the Miocene. This deformation resulted in a complex structural history that led to the formation of several deep fault-bounded troughs, major interbasinal highs, and complex basin flanks. This tectonism has created a wide variety of structures, many of which have become effective hydrocarbon traps. During the past eight years, several important oil discoveries have been made. Significant accumulations have been delineated in the Heglig and Unity areas, where estimated recoverable reserves are 250-300 million bbl of oil. 14 figures.

  18. The 1911 Quadrant offshore Namibia; Exploration in a virgin basin

    SciTech Connect

    Holtar, E.; Forsberg, A.

    1995-08-01

    As a result of the first licensing round in independent Namibia, the Namibian authorities in 1992 awarded five offshore licenses to five different companies or groups of companies. License no. 001 was awarded in 1992 to a group consisting of three Norwegian oil companies, Norsk Hydro, Saga Petroleum and Statoil, with Hydro as the operator. Somewhat later Bow Valley Energy (now Talisman Energy) farmed in. Since 1992 a seismic survey of 7200 km has been acquired over the license area that covers 11.619 sq. Km of the Walvis Basin. This basin was undrilled until the 1911/15-1 well was finished at a depth of 4586mRKB in early 1994. The sedimentary succession of the 1911/15-1 well reflects a depositional history that postdates the Neocorman Etendeka plateau basalts found onshore Namibia. After the onset of the drift phase in late Hauterivian times, the Walvis Basin subsided and eventually a marine transgression took place. Shallow marine platform sedimentation then prevailed until an Albian tectonic event resulted in complex block faulting and the formation of several sub basins. Subsequent volcanic activity created a series of volcanic centres localized on the Walvis Ridge bathymetric feature. In early Late Cretaceous the Southern African craton was uplifted relative to the shelf, leading to the formation of large scale westward prograding wedges. Later sedimentation largely followed the evolution of a passive continental margin, responding to relative sealevel changes and paleoclimate. A stratigraphic breakdown of the Northern Namibian offshore is proposed, and compared to South African and Angolan nomenclature.

  19. Regional frontier exploration in Sinu basin, northwestern Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, F.A.; Ellis, J.M.; Dekker, L.L.

    1989-03-01

    In 1983, Gulf and Ecopetrol undertook a regional hydrocarbon evaluation of northwestern Colombia, during the course of which much of the Sinu basin was mapped by field geologists aided by low-altitude aerial photographs. Additional seismic and airborne radar data were acquired to assist in developing a regional structural model. The dominant structures of the Sinu basin were produced by westward-vergent thrust faults, which are offset on the order of 10 to 20 km by northwest-southeast-trending compartmental faults. Numerous mud volcanos are surface expressions of overpressured shales, which migrate upward along both thrust and strike-slip faults. Thrust faults are expressed, on the surface, by steep-sided, asymmetrical anticlines, which are separated by broad synclines filled with clastics shed during Tertiary thrusting. The extremely thick section of Tertiary sediments is dominated by shale but contains some potential reservoir sandstones. These resistive sandstones could be accurately mapped on the radar imagery and projected into the subsurface allowing traps to be better defined. Combining field geology with geologic interpretation of aerial photographs and radar images was very effective in developing a regional structural framework of the Sinu basin.

  20. Appalachian Silvopasture Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small farms in the hilly Appalachian Region are comprised of primarily pasture and woodlots. Income producing potential is low for both of these land uses and more intensive agricultural practices used in other parts of the country are poorly suited to the region due to topography and soil limitati...

  1. Appalachian Play Fairway Analysis Seismic Hazards Supporting Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Frank Horowitz

    2016-07-20

    These are the data used in estimating the seismic hazards (both natural and induced) for candidate direct use geothermal locations in the Appalachian Basin Play Fairway Analysis by Jordan et al. (2015). xMin,yMin -83.1407,36.7461 : xMax,yMax -71.5175,45.1729

  2. Polish permian basin: Lithofacies traps for gas within the Rotliegende deposits as a new exploration potential

    SciTech Connect

    Karnkowski, P.H. )

    1993-09-01

    Rotliegende deposits are the most prospective reservoir gas rocks in the Polish Permian basin. Thirty years of their exploration have led to location of numerous gas fields in the upper-most part of these series, particularly in the area of the Fore-Sudetic monocline. Up to this time, exploration studies concentrated mainly on structural objects, and most of the structures were positive gas traps. Well and seismic data also indicate an occurrence of lithofacies gas traps; they occur mainly in the sandstone zones within the fanglomerates surrounding the Wolsztyn Ridge. When comparing the facies regularities in the known gas fields in the German Permian basin (interfingering sandstones and claystones) to the facies patterns of the Polish Permian basin, one may suspect similar exploration possibilities. These are the first promising results. Advances in analysis of the Rotliegende depositional systems will enable us to create a new exploration potential.

  3. Syn- to post-Taconian basin formation in the Southern Québec Appalachians, Canada: constraints from detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, Morgann; Tremblay, Alain; David, Jean

    2015-04-01

    In Southern Québec, In the Southern Quebec Appalachians, the Laurentian continental margin (Humber zone) and adjacent oceanic domain of the Dunnage zone were amalgamated during the Ordovician Taconian orogeny. The Dunnage zone includes ophiolites, overlying synorogenic Ordovician deposits of both the Saint-Daniel Mélange and Magog Group and the remnants of a peri-Laurentian volcanic arc, the Ascot complex. However, recently-acquired detrital zircons geochronological data challenge some aspects of the formation and evolution the Magog Group as documented so far. The Magog Group consists of ~3 km pile of sandstone, felsic volcaniclastic rocks, graphitic slate and sandstone at the base (Frontière, Etchemin and Beauceville formations) overlain by a ~7 km-thick of a turbidites flysch sequence, constituting the St-Victor Formation at the top. The maximum age limit for the Magog Group is currently considered to be Caradocian based on graptolite fauna. This has been proven consistent with a 462 +5/-4 Ma (U-Pb ID-TIMS) from a felsic tuff of the Beauceville Formation, but in obvious contradiction with a detrital zircon U-Pb age of 424  6 Ma recently measured in the St-Victor Formation. A detrital zircon U-Pbgeochronology study (LA-HR-ICPMS), focused on the St-Victor Formation, has been therefore initiated in order to better constrain the age and tectonic evolution of the Magog Group. Results were treated according to a Bayesian mixture modeling to highlight different age populations. A feldspar-rich sandstone, directly overlying the Ascot Complex (ca. 460 Ma) and belonging to the base of the St-Victor Formation, yielded ages as young as 431 ± 3 Ma (Wenlockian). Higher in the stratigraphy, a quartz-feldspars sandstone sample contains zircons as young as 419 ±2 Ma (Pridolian). Finally, another sandstone sample from the stratigraphic top of the analyzed sequence yielded a bimodal age distribution, showing prominent populations clustering around ca. 950 Ma and ca. 435 Ma

  4. RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald C. Surdam

    1999-08-01

    A primary objective of the Institute for Energy Research (IER)-Santa Fe Snyder Corporation DOE Riverton Dome project is to test the validity of a new conceptual model and resultant exploration paradigm for so-called ''basin center'' gas accumulations. This paradigm and derivative exploration strategy suggest that the two most important elements crucial to the development of prospects in the deep, gas-saturated portions of Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins (RMLB) are (1) the determination and, if possible, three-dimensional evaluation of the pressure boundary between normal and anomalous pressure regimes (i.e., this boundary is typically expressed as a significant inversion in both sonic and seismic velocity-depth profiles) , and (2) the detection and delineation of porosity/permeability ''sweet spots'' (i.e., areas of enhanced storage capacity and deliverability) in potential reservoir targets below this boundary. There are other critical aspects in searching for basin center gas accumulations, but completion of these two tasks is essential to the successful exploration for the unconventional gas resources present in anomalously pressured rock/fluid systems in the Rocky Mountain Laramide Basins. The southern Wind River Basin, in particular the Riverton Dome and Emigrant areas, is a neat location for testing this exploration paradigm. Preliminary work within the Wind River Basin has demonstrated that there is a regionally prominent pressure surface boundary that can be detected by inversions in sonic velocity depth gradients in individual well log profiles and that can be seen as a velocity inversion on seismic lines. Also, the Wind River Basin in general--and the Riverton Dome area specially--is characterized by a significant number of anomalously pressured gas accumulations. Most importantly, Santa Fe Snyder Corporation has provided the study with sonic logs, two 3-D seismic studies (40 mi{sup 2} and 30 mi {sup 2}) and a variety of other necessary geological and

  5. Analysis of characteristics of simulated flows from small surface-mined and undisturbed Appalachian watersheds in the Tug Fork basin of Kentucky, Virginia, and West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, A.G.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrologic and climatologic data were collected at 10 small, mined and unmined watersheds in the Tug Fork basin of Kentucky, Virginia, and West Virginia. These data included continuous records of discharge, precipitation, and air temperature. Daily records of sediment concentrations and sediment discharges were also obtained and periodic observations of water-quality data taken. A compilation of all these data is presented. The observed climatic and hydrologic data from these basins were used to calibrate the U.S. Geological Survey Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System for each watershed. The calibrated models of each basin were then used with a set of nearby, long-term climatic data to simulate a long record of stream-flow. A 68-year record of daily streamflow and 57 years of annual peaks were simulated for each site. These simulated records were analyzed to obtain flood-frequency curves, flow-duration curves, mean-annual discharges, and the 7-day, 10-year low flow for each site. The flow characteristics computed from the simulated records of discharge were analyzed graphically and statistically by regression analysis to investigate the degree of relationship and to define the relationship between mining and runoff. For this sample of small basins, peak flows, discharges for 10- and 50-percent flow durations, and mean-annual flows are directly related to percent of drainage area disturbed (measured from aerial photos) and drainage area. Percent of drainage area disturbed is generally a more statistically significant estimator of discharge than drainage area, particularly for peak flows of higher recurrence intervals. (USGS)

  6. Depositional setting of Ordovician and Cambrian rocks in central Appalachian basin along a section from Morrow County, Ohio, to Calhoun County, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Ryder, R.T.

    1988-08-01

    A 200-mi (320 km) long restored stratigraphic section from Morrow County, Ohio, to Calhoun County, West Virginia, contrasts Ordovician and Cambrian rocks deposited on a relatively stable shelf with those deposited in rift and postrift basins. Lithologic data are from commercial logs and from detailed descriptions of cores in five of the nine drill holes used to construct the section. Particularly instructive was the 2,352 ft (717 m) of core from the Hope Natural Gas 9634 Power Oil basement test in Wood County, West Virginia. Rift basin deposits are dominated by medium to dark-gray argillaceous limestone, argillaceous siltstone, and by green-gray to black shale of probable subtidal origin. Dolomite is the dominant rock type in the postrift basin and adjacent stable shelf deposits. The upper part of the postrift sequence, composed of the Middle Ordovician Black River Limestone, the Middle Ordovician Trenton Limestone, and Middle and Upper Ordovician Antes (Utica) Shale with a high organic content, represents deposition in gradually deepening water on an open shelf.

  7. Petroleum geology of Cook Inlet Basin: an exploration model

    SciTech Connect

    Magoon, L.B.; Claypool, G.E.

    1981-06-01

    The potential of Cook Inlet for oil, evaluated with respect to the reservoir rocks encountered in the COST well and the relation of west-flank fields to the oil system, is discussed. The hydrocarbon potential is highest where Tertiary or Cretaceous reservoir rocks truncate Middle Jurassic source rocks. Several lines of evidence suggest that Middle Jurassic rocks are a possible source of all the commercially important oil in the Cook Inlet basin. Nonmarine Tertiary rocks are tentatively eliminated as possible oil source rocks because they are thermally immature and because they contain a coaly type of organic matter that does not yield liquid hydrocarbons efficiently upon pyrolysis. Cretaceous rocks are also tentatively eliminated as possible source rocks because of their inadequate organic richness and thermal immaturity. Only Middle Jurassic rocks contain adequate amounts of thermally mature, oil-prone organic matter and extractable hydrocarbons that both chemically and isotopically resemble Cook Inlet oil. The petroleum in west-flank oil fields first concentrated in a large stratigraphic trap in Tertiary rocks at the end of Miocene time. Pliocene and Pleistocene deformation caused secondary migration of this oil into present structural accumulations. (JMT)

  8. Environmental Compliance for Oil and Gas Exploration and Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Christine

    1999-10-26

    The Appalachian/Illinois Basin Directors is a group devoted to increasing communication among the state oil and gas regulatory agencies within the Appalachian and Illinois Basin producing region. The group is comprised of representatives from the oil and gas regulatory agencies from states in the basin (Attachment A). The directors met to discuss regulatory issues common to the area, organize workshops and seminars to meet the training needs of agencies dealing with the uniqueness of their producing region and perform other business pertinent to this area of oil and gas producing states. The emphasis of the coordinated work was a wide range of topics related to environmental compliance for natural gas and oil exploration and production.

  9. The Role of Language in Interactions with Others on Campus for Rural Appalachian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunstan, Stephany Brett; Jaeger, Audrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Dialects of English spoken in rural, Southern Appalachia are heavily stigmatized in mainstream American culture, and speakers of Appalachian dialects are often subject to prejudice and stereotypes which can be detrimental in educational settings. We explored the experiences of rural, Southern Appalachian college students and the role speaking a…

  10. Appalachian Journal Roundtable Discussion: A Conversation about Teaching Appalachian Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayslette, Sandra; Berry, Chad

    2002-01-01

    This conversation began with the question: what has teaching Appalachian Studies taught us about teaching in general? Several themes emerged. Teaching Appalachian studies makes the subject matter relevant to the personal growth of students; requires innovative curriculum development; and because of its activist past, connects naturally with…