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Sample records for apparent false negative

  1. False Negative Problem of Counting Bloom Filter

    E-print Network

    Liu, Yunhao

    False Negative Problem of Counting Bloom Filter Deke Guo, Member, IEEE, Yunhao Liu, Senior Member a false positive, but it will never return a false negative under well-behaved operations. By investigating the mainstream variants, however, we observe that a Bloom filter does return false negatives

  2. The false-negative Meckel's scan

    SciTech Connect

    Wilton, G.; Froelich, J.W.

    1982-10-01

    A case is presented of a 17-month-old girl who underwent two Meckel's scans with /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate. The initial study was interpreted as normal while a subsequent study five days later was definitely positive. Surgery immediately following the positive Meckel's scan demonstrated a Meckel's diverticulum containing gastric mucosa without evidence of active hemorrhage. This prompted a review of the literature in reference to false-negative Meckel's scans which revealed a wide variance in the reported incidence of false-negative examinations. Repeat scintigraphy in the face of a strong clinical suspicion after an initial normal study may decrease the indicence of false-negative imaging series.

  3. Accounting for false negatives in hotspot detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sego, Landon H.; Wilson, John E.

    2007-08-28

    Hotspot sampling designs are used in environmental sampling to identify the location of one (or more) contiguous regions of elevated contamination. These regions are known as hotspots. The problem of how to calculate the probability of detecting an elliptical hotspot using a rectangular or triangular grid of sampling points was addressed by Singer and Wickman in 1969. This approach presumed that any sample which coincided with a hotspot would detect the hotspot without error. However, for many sampling methodologies, there is a chance that the hotspot will not be detected even though it has been sampled directly--a false negative. We present a mathematical solution and a numerical algorithm which account for false negatives when calculating the probability of detecting hotspots that are circular in shape.

  4. A Closer Look at Self-Reported Suicide Attempts: False Positives and False Negatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploderl, Martin; Kralovec, Karl; Yazdi, Kurosch; Fartacek, Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    The validity of self-reported suicide attempt information is undermined by false positives (e.g., incidences without intent to die), or by unreported suicide attempts, referred to as false negatives. In a sample of 1,385 Austrian adults, we explored the occurrence of false positives and false negatives with detailed, probing questions. Removing…

  5. "False Positive" Claims of Near-Death Experiences and "False Negative" Denials of Near-Death Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greyson, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Some persons who claim to have had near-death experiences (NDEs) fail research criteria for having had NDEs ("false positives"); others who deny having had NDEs do meet research criteria for having had NDEs ("false negatives"). The author evaluated false positive claims and false negative denials in an organization that promotes near-death…

  6. Black and green tea - luminol false-negative bloodstains detection.

    PubMed

    Bancirova, Martina

    2012-06-01

    The antioxidant properties of black and green teas are well known. It is also possible to determine their antioxidant capacity by using a chemiluminscent method. This method is based on the measurement of the delay in the emission of light from the luminol reaction in the presence of the antioxidant. Bloodstains which are invisible to the naked eye can also be detected by luminol. Three common methods (detection using the Grodsky or Weber formulations and by Bluestar® Forensic latent bloodstain reagent) are based on the luminol chemiluminescence reaction. The bloodstains can be masked by drinks and/or foods containing antioxidants. The aim of this work was to compare the ability of black and green teas containing antioxidants to cause false negative results during chemiluminescent bloodstain detection. PMID:22583502

  7. False-negative mammograms. Medical, legal, and risk management implications.

    PubMed

    Brenner, R J

    2000-07-01

    From a strictly biologic perspective, delay in diagnosis of breast cancer is axiomatic. The number of cell divisions that must occur before detection is possible by either clinical or mammographic methods means that a finite time has occurred in which the outcome for any given case may have already been determined. That early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer lead to improved survival may be intuitive, but clinical trials have been necessary to validate the concept. Delay in diagnosis is unavoidable but the period of delay may be lessened in many cases, prompting earlier intervention and impacting outcomes. Mammography is an important vehicle for such earlier intervention and the issue of the false-negative mammogram is of concern to the radiology community, the lay community, and the courts. Mammographic interpretation has not yet approached a sufficiently standardized benchmark. Detection and diagnosis are dependent on a series of factors that need to be integrated to achieve the dual goals of timely intervention for bonafide purposes and reduction of unnecessary procedures and interventions. Some of the reasons for delay in diagnosis are unavoidable, beginning with the absence of clinical or imaging features of malignancy and extending to limitations of sufficiently specific features to prompt intervention. On the other hand, other reasons are avoidable and attention to many of these causes should lessen the incidence of such delay. Regardless of the reason, those women who feel that their breast cancer should have been diagnosed at an earlier time may consider subjecting their mammographic studies to independent reviews. At such a point, the precise reasons for delay may be better analyzed, all in an attempt to provide an adequate reconciliation of what has come to be known as the false-negative mammogram. PMID:10943275

  8. Abort Trigger False Positive and False Negative Analysis Methodology for Threshold-Based Abort Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Cruz, Jose A.; Johnson Stephen B.; Lo, Yunnhon

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a quantitative methodology for bounding the false positive (FP) and false negative (FN) probabilities associated with a human-rated launch vehicle abort trigger (AT) that includes sensor data qualification (SDQ). In this context, an AT is a hardware and software mechanism designed to detect the existence of a specific abort condition. Also, SDQ is an algorithmic approach used to identify sensor data suspected of being corrupt so that suspect data does not adversely affect an AT's detection capability. The FP and FN methodologies presented here were developed to support estimation of the probabilities of loss of crew and loss of mission for the Space Launch System (SLS) which is being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The paper provides a brief overview of system health management as being an extension of control theory; and describes how ATs and the calculation of FP and FN probabilities relate to this theory. The discussion leads to a detailed presentation of the FP and FN methodology and an example showing how the FP and FN calculations are performed. This detailed presentation includes a methodology for calculating the change in FP and FN probabilities that result from including SDQ in the AT architecture. To avoid proprietary and sensitive data issues, the example incorporates a mixture of open literature and fictitious reliability data. Results presented in the paper demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach in providing quantitative estimates that bound the probability of a FP or FN abort determination.

  9. Abstract Current intrusion detection techniques are plagued with false positives and false negatives. Ensuring that intrusions

    E-print Network

    Erbacher, Robert F.

    Abstract ­ Current intrusion detection techniques are plagued with false positives and false to analyze the available data, make far more rapid assessments as to the nature of a given event or event to intrusion detection is the discrimination between innocuous and malicious events. This is made particularly

  10. Using Sniffing Behavior to Differentiate True Negative from False Negative Responses in Trained Scent-Detection Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Daniel S.; Feugier, Alexandre; Zulch, Helen; Guest, Claire; Harris, Rob; Pike, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    False negatives are recorded in every chemical detection system, but when animals are used as a scent detector, some false negatives can arise as a result of a failure in the link between detection and the trained alert response, or a failure of the handler to identify the positive alert. A false negative response can be critical in certain scenarios, such as searching for a live person or detecting explosives. In this study, we investigated whether the nature of sniffing behavior in trained detection dogs during a controlled scent-detection task differs in response to true positives, true negatives, false positives, and false negatives. A total of 200 videos of 10 working detection dogs were pseudorandomly selected and analyzed frame by frame to quantify sniffing duration and the number of sniffing episodes recorded in a Go/No-Go single scent-detection task using an eight-choice test apparatus. We found that the sniffing duration of true negatives is significantly shorter than false negatives, true positives, and false positives. Furthermore, dogs only ever performed one sniffing episode towards true negatives, but two sniffing episodes commonly occurred in the other situations. These results demonstrate how the nature of sniffing can be used to more effectively assess odor detection by dogs used as biological detection devices. PMID:25214467

  11. Children's false memories: easier to elicit for a negative than for a neutral event.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Candel, Ingrid; Merckelbach, Harald

    2008-06-01

    The present study examined the role of valence in the development of children's implanted false memories. Seventy-six 7-year-old children listened to two true and one false narrative. The false narrative was either neutral ("moving to another classroom") or emotional negative ("being accused by the teacher for copying off your neighbor"). In addition, half of the children were presented with their class photograph while listening to the narratives. During two interviews, children recalled as many details as possible from the true and false events. Results showed that the negative event elicited more false memories than the neutral event. The presentation of a true photograph did not promote the development of false memories. PMID:18462700

  12. [Magnetic resonance imaging for lumbar disk pathology. incidence of false negatives].

    PubMed

    Berthelot, J M; Maugars, Y; Delecrin, J; Caillon, F; Prost, A

    1995-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has had an impressive impact on evaluation of degenerative diseases of the spine. Nevertheless, false negatives can occur on images involving lumbar discs. Degenerative disc diseases documented on discrography and/or pathology examination of the discs can go unrecognized. Likewise sensitivity for the detection of protruding discal hernias is not totally satisfactory (20% false negatives). Finally, a magnetic resonance image visualizing displacement of the disc is not specific (10 to 15% false positives); images showing protrusion or hernia can be seen in 30% of asymptomatic patients. Although MRI gives slightly more information than other imaging techniques, false images do exist. Moreover, the usefulness of MRI to demonstrate disc disease in case of a negative CT-scan remains to be demonstrated. PMID:7494842

  13. A gender difference in the false recall of negative words: women DRM more than men.

    PubMed

    Dewhurst, Stephen A; Anderson, Rachel J; Knott, Lauren M

    2012-01-01

    Gender differences in susceptibility to associative memory illusions in the Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm were investigated using negative and neutral word lists. Women (n=50) and men (n=50) studied 20 lists of 12 words that were associates of a non-presented critical lure. Ten lists were associates of negatively valenced lures (e.g., cry, evil) and ten were associates of neutral lures (e.g., chair, slow). When asked to recall the words after each list, women falsely recalled more negative lures than men, but there was no gender difference in the false recall of neutral lures. These findings suggest that women reflect on associations within negative lists to a greater degree than men and are thereby more likely to generate the negative critical lures. PMID:21432635

  14. Negative feedback from maternal signals reduces false alarms by collectively signalling offspring

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, Jennifer A.; Cocroft, Reginald B.

    2012-01-01

    Within animal groups, individuals can learn of a predator's approach by attending to the behaviour of others. This use of social information increases an individual's perceptual range, but can also lead to the propagation of false alarms. Error copying is especially likely in species that signal collectively, because the coordination required for collective displays relies heavily on social information. Recent evidence suggests that collective behaviour in animals is, in part, regulated by negative feedback. Negative feedback may reduce false alarms by collectively signalling animals, but this possibility has not yet been tested. We tested the hypothesis that negative feedback increases the accuracy of collective signalling by reducing the production of false alarms. In the treehopper Umbonia crassicornis, clustered offspring produce collective signals during predator attacks, advertising the predator's location to the defending mother. Mothers signal after evicting the predator, and we show that this maternal communication reduces false alarms by offspring. We suggest that maternal signals elevate offspring signalling thresholds. This is, to our knowledge, the first study to show that negative feedback can reduce false alarms by collectively behaving groups. PMID:22787019

  15. Reducing false negatives in clinical practice: the role of neural network technology.

    PubMed

    Mango, L J

    1996-10-01

    The fact that some cervical smears result in false-negative findings is an unavoidable and unpredictable consequence of the conventional (manual microscopic) method of screening. Errors in the detection and interpretation of abnormality are cited as leading causes of false-negative cytology findings; these are random errors that are not known to correlate with any patient risk factor, which makes the false-negative findings a "silent" threat that is difficult to prevent. Described by many as a labor-intensive procedure, the microscopic evaluation of a cervical smear involves a detailed search among hundreds of thousands of cells on each smear for a possible few that may indicate abnormality. Investigations into causes of false-negative findings preceding the discovery of high-grade lesions found that many smears had very few diagnostic cells that were often very small in size. These small cells were initially overlooked or misinterpreted and repeatedly missed on rescreening. PAPNET testing is designed to supplement conventional screening by detecting abnormal cells that initially may have been missed by microscopic examination. This interactive system uses neural networks, a type of artificial intelligence well suited for pattern recognition, to automate the arduous search for abnormality. The instrument focuses the review of suspicious cells by a trained cytologist. Clinical studies indicate that PAPNET testing is sensitive to abnormality typically missed by conventional screening and that its use as a supplemental test improves the accuracy of screening. PMID:8885796

  16. Unexplained False Negative Results in Noninvasive Prenatal Testing: Two Cases Involving Trisomies 13 and 18

    PubMed Central

    Hochstenbach, R.; Page-Christiaens, G. C. M. L.; van Oppen, A. C. C.; Lichtenbelt, K. D.; van Harssel, J. J. T.; Brouwer, T.; Manten, G. T. R.; van Zon, P.; Elferink, M.; Kusters, K.; Akkermans, O.; Ploos van Amstel, J. K.; Schuring-Blom, G. H.

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) validation studies show high sensitivity and specificity for detection of trisomies 13, 18, and 21. False negative cases have rarely been reported. We describe a false negative case of trisomy 13 and another of trisomy 18 in which NIPT was commercially marketed directly to the clinician. Both cases came to our attention because a fetal anatomy scan at 20 weeks of gestation revealed multiple anomalies. Karyotyping of cultured amniocytes showed nonmosaic trisomies 13 and 18, respectively. Cytogenetic investigation of cytotrophoblast cells from multiple placental biopsies showed a low proportion of nontrisomic cells in each case, but this was considered too small for explaining the false negative NIPT result. The discordant results also could not be explained by early gestational age, elevated maternal weight, a vanishing twin, or suboptimal storage or transport of samples. The root cause of the discrepancies could, therefore, not be identified. The couples involved experienced difficulties in accepting the unexpected and late-adverse outcome of their pregnancy. We recommend that all parties involved in caring for couples who choose NIPT should collaborate to clarify false negative results in order to unravel possible biological causes and to improve the process of patient care from initial counseling to communication of the result. PMID:26137330

  17. Sadder and less accurate? False memory for negative material in depression.

    PubMed

    Joormann, Jutta; Teachman, Bethany A; Gotlib, Ian H

    2009-05-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that induced sad mood is associated with increased accuracy of recall in certain memory tasks; the effects of clinical depression, however, are likely to be quite different. The authors used the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm to examine the impact of clinical depression on erroneous recall of neutral and/or emotional stimuli. Specifically, they presented Deese-Roediger-McDermott lists that were highly associated with negative, neutral, or positive lures and compared participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder and nondepressed control participants on the accuracy of their recall of presented material and their false recall of never-presented lures. Compared with control participants, major depressive disorder participants recalled fewer words that had been previously presented but were more likely to falsely recall negative lures; there were no differences between major depressive disorder and control participants in false recall of positive or neutral lures. These findings indicate that depression is associated with false memories of negative material. PMID:19413415

  18. Prime time news: the influence of primed positive and negative emotion on susceptibility to false memories.

    PubMed

    Porter, Stephen; ten Brinke, Leanne; Riley, Sean N; Baker, Alysha

    2014-01-01

    We examined the relation between emotion and susceptibility to misinformation using a novel paradigm, the ambiguous stimuli affective priming (ASAP) paradigm. Participants (N = 88) viewed ambiguous neutral images primed either at encoding or retrieval to be interpreted as either highly positive or negative (or neutral/not primed). After viewing the images, they either were asked misleading or non-leading questions. Following a delay, memory accuracy for the original images was assessed. Results indicated that any emotional priming at encoding led to a higher susceptibility to misinformation relative to priming at recall. In particular, inducing a negative interpretation of the image at encoding led to an increased susceptibility of false memories for major misinformation (an entire object not actually present in the scene). In contrast, this pattern was reversed when priming was used at recall; a negative reinterpretation of the image decreased memory distortion relative to unprimed images. These findings suggest that, with precise experimental control, the experience of emotion at event encoding, in particular, is implicated in false memory susceptibility. PMID:24552271

  19. False-negative dipyridamole-thallium-201 myocardial imaging after caffeine infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, P.; Corstens, F.H.; Aengevaeren, W.R.; Wackers, F.J.; Thien, T. )

    1991-08-01

    The vasodilator effect of intravenously administered dipyridamole may be caused by an increase in endogenous plasma adenosine levels. The authors evaluated the effect of caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, on the diagnostic results of dipyridamole-201Tl myocardial imaging in eight patients with coronary artery disease. Caffeine infusion significantly attenuated the dipyridamole-induced fall in blood pressure and the accompanied increase in heart rate. The infusion of dipyridamole alone resulted in chest pain and ST-segment depressions on the electrocardiogram in four patients, whereas none of these problems occurred when the tests were repeated after caffeine. In six of eight patients, caffeine was responsible for false-negative dipyridamole-201Tl tests. Semiquantitive scores of the dipyridamole-induced 201Tl perfusion defects were decreased by caffeine from 9.0 {plus minus} 0.9 to 2.0 {plus minus} 1.1 points (p less than 0.05). Computerized analysis revealed a caffeine-mediated reduction in the percent reversibility of the images from 46% {plus minus} 16% to 6% {plus minus} 10% (p less than 0.05). They conclude that the use of caffeinated products prior to dipyridamole-201Tl testing may be responsible for false-negative findings.

  20. False memories, negative affects, and psychic reality: the role of extra-clinical data in psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Good, Michael I; Dayand, Max; Rowell, Eve

    2005-12-01

    Psychoanalysis as a treatment originated in the idea that neurosis is related to the ways in which individual psychic reality departs from actuality. Psychic reality includes memories, beliefs and their associated affects and fantasies connected with an individual's experience of the inner and outer world. The psychoanalytic determination of what meaningful memories or beliefs are inaccurate, distorted or false ordinarily relies upon principles of intra-clinical validation. By itself, however, intra-clinical validation is subject to limitations and pitfalls that conviction alone about what is actual cannot circumvent. Despite this fact, there are remarkably few analytic case reports demonstrating false or significantly distorted memories through the use of data obtained from outside the consulting room. This paucity of reports may be related, at least in part, to the belief that the use of extra-clinical data is essentially unanalytic or supports resistance. Based on the views that (a) psychic reality cannot be regarded as exclusively subjective or objective but is inherently both; and that (b) a goal of analysis is to achieve a different, acceptable and more accurate view of reality, the authors report a clinical case involving a confirmably false pivotal memory and its associated negative affects. They discuss theoretical and technical considerations in utilizing extra-clinical data during the treatment process. PMID:16318938

  1. Avoiding False Positive Antigen Detection by Flow Cytometry on Blood Cell Derived Microparticles: The Importance of an Appropriate Negative Control

    PubMed Central

    Crompot, Emerence; Van Damme, Michael; Duvillier, Hugues; Pieters, Karlien; Vermeesch, Marjorie; Perez-Morga, David; Meuleman, Nathalie; Mineur, Philippe; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence; Stamatopoulos, Basile

    2015-01-01

    Background Microparticles (MPs), also called microvesicles (MVs) are plasma membrane-derived fragments with sizes ranging from 0.1 to 1?m. Characterization of these MPs is often performed by flow cytometry but there is no consensus on the appropriate negative control to use that can lead to false positive results. Materials and Methods We analyzed MPs from platelets, B-cells, T-cells, NK-cells, monocytes, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B-cells. Cells were purified by positive magnetic-separation and cultured for 48h. Cells and MPs were characterized using the following monoclonal antibodies (CD19,20 for B-cells, CD3,8,5,27 for T-cells, CD16,56 for NK-cells, CD14,11c for monocytes, CD41,61 for platelets). Isolated MPs were stained with annexin-V-FITC and gated between 300nm and 900nm. The latex bead technique was then performed for easy detection of MPs. Samples were analyzed by Transmission (TEM) and Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM). Results Annexin-V positive events within a gate of 300-900nm were detected and defined as MPs. Our results confirmed that the characteristic antigens CD41/CD61 were found on platelet-derived-MPs validating our technique. However, for MPs derived from other cell types, we were unable to detect any antigen, although they were clearly expressed on the MP-producing cells in the contrary of several data published in the literature. Using the latex bead technique, we confirmed detection of CD41,61. However, the apparent expression of other antigens (already deemed positive in several studies) was determined to be false positive, indicated by negative controls (same labeling was used on MPs from different origins). Conclusion We observed that mother cell antigens were not always detected on corresponding MPs by direct flow cytometry or latex bead cytometry. Our data highlighted that false positive results could be generated due to antibody aspecificity and that phenotypic characterization of MPs is a difficult field requiring the use of several negative controls. PMID:25978814

  2. Internal amplification controls have not been employed in fungal PCR hence potential false negative results.

    PubMed

    Paterson, R R M

    2007-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is subject to false negative results. Samples of fungi with the genes of interest (e.g. a disease or mycotoxin) may be categorized as negative and safe as a consequence. Fungi are eukaryotic organisms that are involved in many fields of human activity such as antibiotic, toxin and food production. Certain taxa are implicated in human, animal and plant diseases. However, fungi are difficult to identify and PCR techniques have been proposed increasingly for this purpose. Internal amplification controls (IACs) will ameliorate the situation and need to become mandatory. These are nucleic acids that posses a sequence which will provide a PCR product (i) using the same primers employed for the target gene, and (ii) that will not coincide on the gel with the product of the target gene. Only one group of workers employed an IAC, to respond to potential inhibition, which was reported in 1995 from this present assessment of numerous reports. Inhibitors in cultures need to be minimized, and secondary metabolites are an obvious source. The fields reviewed herein include medical mycology, mycotoxicology, environmental mycology and plant mycology. The conclusion is that previous reports are compromised because IACs have not been employed in fungal PCR; future research must include this control at an early stage. PMID:17184314

  3. Evaluation of inadequate, indeterminate, false-negative and false-positive cases in cytological examination for breast cancer according to histological type

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously investigated the current status of breast cytology cancer screening at seven institutes in our area of southern Fukuoka Prefecture, and found some differences in diagnostic accuracy among the institutions. In the present study, we evaluated the cases involved and noted possible reasons for their original cytological classification as inadequate, indeterminate, false-negative and false-positive according to histological type. Methods We evaluated the histological findings in 5693 individuals who underwent cytological examination for breast cancer (including inadequate, indeterminate, false-negative and false-positive cases), to determine the most common histological types and/or features in these settings and the usefulness/limitations of cytological examination for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Results Among 1152 cytologically inadequate cases, histology revealed that 75/173 (43.6%) cases were benign, including mastopathy (fibrocystic disease) in 38.6%, fibroadenoma in 24.0% and papilloma in 5.3%. Ninety-five of 173 (54.9%) cases were histologically malignant, with scirrhous growing type, invasive ductal carcinoma (SIDC) being significantly more frequent (49.5%) than papillotubular growing type (Papi-tub) (P?false-negative cases, SIDC was significantly more frequent (42.3%) than DCIS (P?=?0.0049) and Papi-tub (P?=?0.001). There were three false-positive cases, with one each of fibroadenoma, epidermal cyst and papilloma. Conclusions The inadequate, indeterminate, false-negative and false-positive cases showed similar histological types, notably SIDC for malignant tumors, and mastopathy, fibroadenoma and papilloma for benign cases. We need to pay particular attention to the collection and assessment of aspirates for these histological types of breast disease. In particular, several inadequate, indeterminate and false-negative cases with samples collected by aspiration were diagnosed as SIDC. These findings should encourage the use of needle biopsy rather than aspiration when this histological type is identified on imaging. Namely, good communication between clinicians and pathological staff, and triple assessment (i.e., clinical, pathological and radiological assessment), are important for accurate diagnosis of aspiration samples. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/7349809170055423 PMID:22607447

  4. Technetium-99m white blood cell imaging: False-negative result in salmonella osteomyelitis associated with sickle cell disease

    SciTech Connect

    Guze, B.H.; Hawkins, R.A.; Marcus, C.S.

    1989-02-01

    The authors report a case of sickle cell anemia associated osteomyelitis where the Tc-99m white blood cell imaging was negative, and bone imaging showed increased uptake in the region in question. The reasons for the possible false-negative image are discussed.

  5. False-Negative Rate and Recovery Efficiency Performance of a Validated Sponge Wipe Sampling Method

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, Paula; Piepel, Gregory F.; Boucher, Raymond; Tezak, Matthew S.; Amidan, Brett G.; Einfeld, Wayne

    2012-02-01

    Recovery of spores from environmental surfaces varies due to sampling and analysis methods, spore size and characteristics, surface materials, and environmental conditions. Tests were performed to evaluate a new, validated sponge wipe method using Bacillus atrophaeus spores. Testing evaluated the effects of spore concentration and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false-negative rate (FNR), limit of detection (LOD), and their uncertainties. Ceramic tile and stainless steel had the highest mean RE values (48.9 and 48.1%, respectively). Faux leather, vinyl tile, and painted wood had mean RE values of 30.3, 25.6, and 25.5, respectively, while plastic had the lowest mean RE (9.8%). Results show roughly linear dependences of RE and FNR on surface roughness, with smoother surfaces resulting in higher mean REs and lower FNRs. REs were not influenced by the low spore concentrations tested (3.10x10^-3 to 1.86 CFU/cm^2). Stainless steel had the lowest mean FNR (0.123), and plastic had the highest mean FNR (0.479). The LOD90 (>1 CFU detected 90% of the time) varied with surface material, from 0.015 CFU/cm^2 on stainless steel up to 0.039 on plastic. It may be possible to improve sampling results by considering surface roughness in selecting sampling locations and interpreting spore recovery data. Further, FNR values (calculated as a function of concentration and surface material) can be used presampling to calculate the numbers of samples for statistical sampling plans with desired performance and postsampling to calculate the confidence in characterization and clearance decisions.

  6. False-Negative Rate and Recovery Efficiency Performance of a Validated Sponge Wipe Sampling Method

    PubMed Central

    Piepel, Greg F.; Boucher, Raymond; Tezak, Matt; Amidan, Brett G.; Einfeld, Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Recovery of spores from environmental surfaces varies due to sampling and analysis methods, spore size and characteristics, surface materials, and environmental conditions. Tests were performed to evaluate a new, validated sponge wipe method using Bacillus atrophaeus spores. Testing evaluated the effects of spore concentration and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false-negative rate (FNR), limit of detection (LOD), and their uncertainties. Ceramic tile and stainless steel had the highest mean RE values (48.9 and 48.1%, respectively). Faux leather, vinyl tile, and painted wood had mean RE values of 30.3, 25.6, and 25.5, respectively, while plastic had the lowest mean RE (9.8%). Results show roughly linear dependences of RE and FNR on surface roughness, with smoother surfaces resulting in higher mean REs and lower FNRs. REs were not influenced by the low spore concentrations tested (3.10 × 10?3 to 1.86 CFU/cm2). Stainless steel had the lowest mean FNR (0.123), and plastic had the highest mean FNR (0.479). The LOD90 (?1 CFU detected 90% of the time) varied with surface material, from 0.015 CFU/cm2 on stainless steel up to 0.039 on plastic. It may be possible to improve sampling results by considering surface roughness in selecting sampling locations and interpreting spore recovery data. Further, FNR values (calculated as a function of concentration and surface material) can be used presampling to calculate the numbers of samples for statistical sampling plans with desired performance and postsampling to calculate the confidence in characterization and clearance decisions. PMID:22138998

  7. Negative affect promotes encoding of and memory for details at the expense of the gist: affect, encoding, and false memories.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, Justin

    2013-01-01

    I investigated whether negative affective states enhance encoding of and memory for item-specific information reducing false memories. Positive, negative, and neutral moods were induced, and participants then completed a Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) false-memory task. List items were presented in unique spatial locations or unique fonts to serve as measures for item-specific encoding. The negative mood conditions had more accurate memories for item-specific information, and they also had fewer false memories. The final experiment used a manipulation that drew attention to distinctive information, which aided learning for DRM words, but also promoted item-specific encoding. For the condition that promoted item-specific encoding, false memories were reduced for positive and neutral mood conditions to a rate similar to that of the negative mood condition. These experiments demonstrated that negative affective cues promote item-specific processing reducing false memories. People in positive and negative moods encode events differently creating different memories for the same event. PMID:23134550

  8. AhR/Arnt:XRE interaction: Turning false negatives into true positives in the modified yeast one-hybrid assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Shin, Jumi A.

    2009-01-01

    Given the frequent occurrence of false negatives in yeast genetic assays, it is both interesting and practical to address the possible mechanisms of false negatives and, more important, to turn false negatives into true positives. We recently developed a modified yeast one-hybrid system (MY1H) useful for investigation of simultaneous protein–protein and protein:DNA interactions in vivo. We coexpressed the basic helix–loop–helix/Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH/PAS) domains of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (Arnt)—namely NAhR and NArnt, respectively—which are known to form heterodimers and bind the cognate xenobiotic response element (XRE) sequence both in vitro and in vivo, as a positive control in the study of XRE-binding proteins in the MY1H system. However, we observed negative results, that is, no positive signal detected from binding of the NAhR/NArnt heterodimer and XRE site. We demonstrate that by increasing the copy number of XRE sites integrated into the yeast genome and using double GAL4 activation domains, the NAhR/NArnt heterodimer forms and specifically binds the cognate XRE sequence, an interaction that is now clearly detectable in the MY1H system. This methodology may be helpful in troubleshooting and correcting false negatives that arise from unproductive transcription in yeast genetic assays. PMID:18722998

  9. Hypothetical explanations of the negative apparent effects of cloud seeding in the whitetop experiment.

    PubMed

    Lovasich, J L; Neyman, J; Scott, E L; Wells, M A

    1971-11-01

    In order to explain the apparent losses of rain ascribable to seeding at the Whitetop trial, particularly large and highly significant in the stratum E (but not in the opposite stratum W) of experimental days, it has been hypothesized that seeding causes widespread cloudiness and subsequent lowering of ground temperatures. This hypothesis is flatly contradicted by the observations: the seeded E-days (but not W-days) were uniformly less cloudy and hotter than those without seeding. Curiously, these differences prevailed not only from the scheduled time of seeding but also for several hours beforehand. The average rainfall for the 10 hr that preceded the time of seeding was investigated in eight "cells", defined by the day's wind direction to be downwind, upwind, and to the sides and "far" and "near" the center of seeding. Highly significant decreases were found in the far-upwind and far-left cells, indicating an earlymorning disparity between those E-days that later were declared as experimental to be seeded and those E-days that were declared as experimental not to be seeded. This disparity, difficult to explain by chance variation, suggests that particular caution be used in treating differences in the rainfall between seeded and not-seeded days in the Whitetop trial as having been caused by seeding. PMID:16591951

  10. To What Extent Could We Detect Field Defects? An Empirical Study of False Negatives in Static Bug Finding Tools

    E-print Network

    California at Davis, University of

    To What Extent Could We Detect Field Defects? An Empirical Study of False Negatives in Static Bug much loss. Static bug-finding tools are believed to help detect and remove defects. These tools in the field and reported by users? If these tools had been used, would they have detected these field defects

  11. Legacy of road salt: Apparent positive larval effects counteracted by negative postmetamorphic effects in wood frogs.

    PubMed

    Dananay, Kacey L; Krynak, Katherine L; Krynak, Timothy J; Benard, Michael F

    2015-10-01

    Road salt runoff has potentially large effects on wetland communities, but is typically investigated in short-term laboratory trials. The authors investigated effects of road salt contamination on wood frogs (Rana sylvatica) by combining a field survey with 2 separate experiments. The field survey tested whether wood frog larval traits were associated with road salt contamination in natural wetlands. As conductivity increased, wood frog larvae were less abundant, but those found were larger. In the first experiment of the present study, the authors raised larvae in outdoor artificial ponds under 4 salt concentrations and measured larval vital rates, algal biomass, and zooplankton abundance. Salt significantly increased larval growth, algal biomass, and decreased zooplankton abundance. In the second experiment, the authors raised larvae to metamorphosis in the presence and absence of salt contamination and followed resulting juvenile frogs in terrestrial pens at high and low densities. Exposure to road salt as larvae caused juvenile frogs to have greater mortality in low-density terrestrial environments, possibly because of altered energy allocation, changes in behavior, or reduced immune defenses. The present study suggests that low concentrations of road salt can have positive effects on larval growth yet negative effects on juvenile survival. These results emphasize the importance of testing for effects of contaminants acting through food webs and across multiple life stages as well as the potential for population-level consequences in natural environments. PMID:26033303

  12. Can concurrent core biopsy and fine needle aspiration biopsy improve the false negative rate of sonographically detectable breast lesions?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to determine the accuracy of concurrent core needle biopsy (CNB) and fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) for breast lesions and to estimate the false-negative rate using the two methods combined. Methods Over a seven-year period, 2053 patients with sonographically detectable breast lesions underwent concurrent ultrasound-guided CNB and FNAB. The sonographic and histopathological findings were classified into four categories: benign, indeterminate, suspicious, and malignant. The histopathological findings were compared with the definitive excision pathology results. Patients with benign core biopsies underwent a detailed review to determine the false-negative rate. The correlations between the ultrasonography, FNAB, and CNB were determined. Results Eight hundred eighty patients were diagnosed with malignant disease, and of these, 23 (2.5%) diagnoses were found to be false-negative after core biopsy. After an intensive review of discordant FNAB results, the final false-negative rate was reduced to 1.1% (p-value = 0.025). The kappa coefficients for correlations between methods were 0.304 (p-value < 0.0001) for ultrasound and FNAB, 0.254 (p-value < 0.0001) for ultrasound and CNB, and 0.726 (p-value < 0.0001) for FNAB and CNB. Conclusions Concurrent CNB and FNAB under ultrasound guidance can provide accurate preoperative diagnosis of breast lesions and provide important information for appropriate treatment. Identification of discordant results using careful radiological-histopathological correlation can reduce the false-negative rate. PMID:20637074

  13. True-positive exercise electrocardiogram/false-negative thallium-201 scintigram: a proposal of a mechanism for the paradox.

    PubMed

    Madias, J E; Knez, P; Win, M T

    2000-08-01

    A 72-year-old man with exertional angina had a strongly positive exercise electrocardiogram (EECG) with a negative thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigram (Tl). Arteriography revealed triple-vessel coronary artery disease, for which he underwent aortocoronary bypass grafting. Repeat EECG was negative, and it was again associated with a negative Tl. The false-negative Tl on the first test was felt to be due to a rare phenomenon of homogeneously distributed reversible exercise-induced myocardial ischemia, leading to a uniform radiotracer count density. The even distribution of ischemia would also be expected to render a false-negative EECG, due to electrocardiographic cancellation, and this is frequently the case. However, in the patient presented herein, we propose that the ischemic cardiac apex rendered the EECG strongly positive because its position was not opposed by an ischemic muscular region, and thus an uncancelled ischemic ST-segment vector was generated. This hypothesis is supported by our recent work showing the unique role of the ischemic apex (among all the other myocardial territories) in rendering the EECG positive. PMID:10941551

  14. Current negative mood encourages changes in end-of-life treatment decisions and is associated with false memories.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Stefanie J

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of mood on people's end-of-life treatment decisions and their false memories of those decisions, participants took part in two sessions. At Time 1, participants were experimentally induced into positive or negative moods. They decided whether they would want to receive or refuse treatments in a range of hypothetical medical scenarios, such as tube feeding while in a coma. Four weeks later, at Time 2, participants were induced into the same or the opposite mood and made these decisions a second time. They also recalled their previous decisions. Participants in negative moods at Time 2 changed more of their current decisions and falsely remembered more of their previous decisions than participants in positive moods. These findings suggest that people's current moods influence whether they change their treatment decisions; current decisions in turn bias recall of past decisions. PMID:21432660

  15. Simple duplex fecal PCR assay that allows identification of false-negative results in Helicobacter sp.-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Bourgade, Franck; Montagutelli, Xavier; Bigbee, Cassie; Weiss, April; Rigottier-Gois, Lionel; Conti, Claudio J; Benavides, Fernando

    2004-10-01

    We designed a simple and sensitive duplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for detection of false-negative results during routine Helicobacter sp. feces analysis. We took advantage of the various Lactobacillus species that form part of the normal intestinal flora of laboratory rodents to improve our PCR diagnostic assays. Using this one-step PCR assay, we were able to rule out false-negative results without the need of adding internal standard molecules. This is an important quality control for PCR diagnostic tests, since the presence of inhibitors in feces can prevent detection of Helicobacter infections using PCR analysis. Use of this Lactobacillus group-specific PCR assay can be extended to other feces tests used in mouse quality-control programs. PMID:15575366

  16. All That Glisters Is Not Gold: Sampling-Process Uncertainty in Disease-Vector Surveys with False-Negative and False-Positive Detections

    PubMed Central

    Abad-Franch, Fernando; Valença-Barbosa, Carolina; Sarquis, Otília; Lima, Marli M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vector-borne diseases are major public health concerns worldwide. For many of them, vector control is still key to primary prevention, with control actions planned and evaluated using vector occurrence records. Yet vectors can be difficult to detect, and vector occurrence indices will be biased whenever spurious detection/non-detection records arise during surveys. Here, we investigate the process of Chagas disease vector detection, assessing the performance of the surveillance method used in most control programs – active triatomine-bug searches by trained health agents. Methodology/Principal Findings Control agents conducted triplicate vector searches in 414 man-made ecotopes of two rural localities. Ecotope-specific ‘detection histories’ (vectors or their traces detected or not in each individual search) were analyzed using ordinary methods that disregard detection failures and multiple detection-state site-occupancy models that accommodate false-negative and false-positive detections. Mean (±SE) vector-search sensitivity was ?0.283±0.057. Vector-detection odds increased as bug colonies grew denser, and were lower in houses than in most peridomestic structures, particularly woodpiles. False-positive detections (non-vector fecal streaks misidentified as signs of vector presence) occurred with probability ?0.011±0.008. The model-averaged estimate of infestation (44.5±6.4%) was ?2.4–3.9 times higher than naïve indices computed assuming perfect detection after single vector searches (11.4–18.8%); about 106–137 infestation foci went undetected during such standard searches. Conclusions/Significance We illustrate a relatively straightforward approach to addressing vector detection uncertainty under realistic field survey conditions. Standard vector searches had low sensitivity except in certain singular circumstances. Our findings suggest that many infestation foci may go undetected during routine surveys, especially when vector density is low. Undetected foci can cause control failures and induce bias in entomological indices; this may confound disease risk assessment and mislead program managers into flawed decision making. By helping correct bias in naïve indices, the approach we illustrate has potential to critically strengthen vector-borne disease control-surveillance systems. PMID:25233352

  17. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Apparently Negative Electric Polarization in Shaped Graded Dielectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chun-Zhen; Gao, Yin-Hao; Gao, Yong; Huang, Ji-Ping

    2010-05-01

    By using a first-principles approach, we investigate the pathway of electric displacement fields in shaped graded dielectric materials existing in the form of cloaks with various shapes. We reveal a type of apparently negative electric polarization (ANEP), which is due to a symmetric oscillation of the paired electric permittivities, satisfying a sum rule. The ANEP does not occur for a spherical cloak, but appears up to maximum as a/b (the ratio between the long and short principal axis of the spheroidal cloak) is about 5/2, and eventually disappears as a/b becomes large enough corresponding to a rod-like shape. Further, the cloaking efficiency is calculated for different geometrical shapes and demonstrated to closely relate to the ANEP. The possibility of experiments is discussed. This work has relevance to dielectric shielding based on shaped graded dielectric materials.

  18. Effects of Maternal Negativity and of Early and Recent Recurrent Depressive Disorder on Children’s False Belief Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Rohrer, Lisa M.; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.; Toth, Sheree L.; Maughan, Angeline

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that children of depressed mothers are at risk for problems in a variety of developmental domains; however, little is known about the effects of maternal depression on children’s emerging understanding of false beliefs. In this study, three false belief tasks were administered to five-year-old children whose mothers had either met criteria for major depressive disorder within the first 20 months of the child’s life (n = 91) or had never been depressed (n = 50). Significant difficulties in performance were found among the children of depressed mothers, especially those whose mothers had experienced early and recent recurrent depressive disorder. Regardless of diagnostic status, children whose mothers exhibited negativity during problem-solving tasks administered at an earlier developmental period also were less likely to demonstrate false belief understanding. These effects remained even after child verbal ability was controlled. PMID:21244156

  19. Balancing the false negative and positive rates in suspect screening with high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry using multivariate statistics.

    PubMed

    Vergeynst, Leendert; Van Langenhove, Herman; Demeestere, Kristof

    2015-02-17

    Modern high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) enables full-spectrum trace level analysis of emerging environmental organic contaminants. This raises the opportunity for post-acquisition suspect screening when no reference standards are a priori available. When setting up a conventional screening identification train based on successively different identification criteria including mass error and isotope fit, the false negative rate typically accumulates upon advancing through the decision tree. The challenge is thus to elaborate a well-balanced screening, in which the different criteria are equally stringent, leading to a controllable number of false negatives. Presented is a novel suspect screening approach using liquid-chromatography Orbitrap HRMS. Based on a multivariate statistical model, the screening takes into account the accurate mass error of the mono isotopic ion and up to three isotopes, isotope ratios, and a peak/noise filter. As such, for the first time, controlling the overall false negative rate of the screening algorithm to a desired level (5% in this study) is achieved. Simultaneously, a well-balanced identification decision is guaranteed taking the different identification criteria as a whole in a holistic statistical approach. Taking into account 1, 2, and 3 isotopes decreases the false positive rate from 22, 2.8 to <0.3%, but the cost of increasing the median limits of identification from 200, 2000 to 2062 ng L(-1), respectively, should also be considered. As proof of concept, 7 biologically treated wastewaters were screened toward 77 suspect pharmaceuticals resulting in the indicative identification of 25 suspects. Subsequently obtained reference standards allowed confirmation for 19 out of these 25 pharmaceutical contaminants. PMID:25565253

  20. Laparoscopic lymphatic mapping and sentinel node biopsies for early-stage gastric cancer: the cause of false negativity.

    PubMed

    Tonouchi, Hitoshi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Tanaka, Kouji; Kobayashi, Minako; Ohmori, Yukinari; Kusunoki, Masato

    2005-04-01

    Sentinel node (SN) biopsies might be useful for performing minimally invasive surgery without interrupting surgical curability. This study examined the cause of false negativity during laparoscopic lymphatic mapping and SN biopsies for early-stage gastric cancer. Thirty-seven patients with gastric cancer (preoperative stage T1-2 or N0) who underwent laparoscopic lymph node mapping and SN biopsies between March 2001 and June 2004 were enrolled in this study. The tracer, patent blue and technecium-99m-labeled tin colloid, was injected endoscopically. Blue-stained or radioactive nodes were defined as SNs. Gastrectomy with lymphadenectomy was performed then the results of the SN biopsies were compared with the final diagnosis of the removed lymph nodes in permanent sections. Sentinel nodes were successfully identified in 35 patients (94.6%), and they were positive in 3 of 4 patients with metastatic lymph nodes; sensitivity was 75% and specificity was 100%. Sentinel node status could therefore be used to diagnose lymph node status with 97.1% accuracy. Of 6 SNs with metastasis, 5 showed radioactivity, and only 2 were blue stained. In the false negative case, a radioactive SN with metastasis in the right paracardial region was missed during laparoscopic mapping. An error in laparoscopic intracorporeal detection of the radioactive node with metastasis occurred because we could not eliminate the shine-through effect. We found that during laparoscopic SN mapping there is a high risk of false negativity with SNs located in the right paracardial region. To apply laparoscopic SN mapping to early-stage gastric cancer patients, the shine-through effect must be eliminated because radiotracers are essential for this method. PMID:15770372

  1. Inferential false memories of events: negative consequences protect from distortions when the events are free from further elaboration.

    PubMed

    Mirandola, Chiara; Toffalini, Enrico; Grassano, Massimo; Cornoldi, Cesare; Melinder, Annika

    2014-01-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate whether negative emotionally charged and arousing content of to-be-remembered scripted material would affect propensity towards memory distortions. We further investigated whether elaboration of the studied material through free recall would affect the magnitude of memory errors. In this study participants saw eight scripts. Each of the scripts included an effect of an action, the cause of which was not presented. Effects were either negatively emotional or neutral. Participants were assigned to either a yes/no recognition test group (recognition), or to a recall and yes/no recognition test group (elaboration + recognition). Results showed that participants in the recognition group produced fewer memory errors in the emotional condition. Conversely, elaboration + recognition participants had lower accuracy and produced more emotional memory errors than the other group, suggesting a mediating role of semantic elaboration on the generation of false memories. The role of emotions and semantic elaboration on the generation of false memories is discussed. PMID:23663060

  2. Detectability of the Eurasian otter by standard surveys: an approach using marking intensity to estimate false negative rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balestrieri, Alessandro; Remonti, Luigi; Prigioni, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    False negative detections may bias the surveys for rare species and reduce the reliability of models based on the proportion of occupied patches. We assessed the detectability of the Eurasian otter Lutra lutra through the standard survey method by analysing the detection history of 28 sampling stretches surveyed monthly between March 2001 and January 2003. Each survey negative for otter spraints was considered as a false negative if the otter had been recorded in the previous and/or following month (respectively, cFN and FN). Otter marking intensity (MI) (MI=N° of spraints per kilometre) was calculated and assumed to represent an index of its relative abundance. Spraints were found in 81.7% of all surveys. Yearly MI ranged from 1.02 to 101.4 spraints per kilometre. In 2002, mean MI was significantly lower than in the previous year, while no clear seasonal trend could be outlined. The minimum number of surveys required to establish the occurrence of the otter, as estimated by a probability model, was 2.6 and was inversely related to MI. For a sub-sample of 18 sampling stretches, the relation between the frequency of both cFN and FN and five variables of potential interest for otters was tested by means of stepwise linear multiple regressions, yielding two highly significant models, which both included only MI as the explanatory variable. The frequency of both FN and cFN was correlated to MI and the resulting equations used to assess the percentage of surveys positive for otters in both years. After the correction for non-detections, otter site occupancy did not vary between the 2 years, except for one river when applying the more conservative estimate of false negatives (cFN). Multiple visits and the assessing of MI should become standard components of otter surveys. This approach has broad applicability and may be applied to assess the large-scale distribution of other rare or elusive mammalian carnivores.

  3. False fire alarms have a negative impact on UW operations False (or nuisance) alarms are very disruptive to UW operations. The alarms

    E-print Network

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    recorded by any single business/company within the city limits. Of those 161 alarms, 90 alarms (manual pull attributed to construction projects. Dust, steam and other airborne particles are the leading cause of false partitions and dust barriers ­ Review bid documents and specifications to establish what types of temporary

  4. False negative rate and other performance measures of a sponge-wipe surface sampling method for low contaminant concentrations.

    SciTech Connect

    Einfeld, Wayne; Krauter, Paula A.; Boucher, Raymond M.; Tezak, Mathew; Amidan, Brett G.; Piepel, Greg F.

    2011-05-01

    Recovery of spores from environmental surfaces is known to vary due to sampling methodology, techniques, spore size and characteristics, surface materials, and environmental conditions. A series of tests were performed to evaluate a new, validated sponge-wipe method. Specific factors evaluated were the effects of contaminant concentrations and surface materials on recovery efficiency (RE), false negative rate (FNR), limit of detection (LOD) - and the uncertainties of these quantities. Ceramic tile and stainless steel had the highest mean RE values (48.9 and 48.1%, respectively). Faux leather, vinyl tile, and painted wood had mean RE values of 30.3, 25.6, and 25.5, respectively, while plastic had the lowest mean RE (9.8%). Results show a roughly linear dependence of surface roughness on RE, where the smoothest surfaces have the highest mean RE values. REs were not influenced by the low spore concentrations tested (3 x 10{sup -3} to 1.86 CFU/cm{sup 2}). The FNR data were consistent with RE data, showing a trend of smoother surfaces resulting in higher REs and lower FNRs. Stainless steel generally had the lowest mean FNR (0.123) and plastic had the highest mean FNR (0.479). The LOD{sub 90} varied with surface material, from 0.015 CFU/cm{sup 2} on stainless steel up to 0.039 on plastic. Selecting sampling locations on the basis of surface roughness and using roughness to interpret spore recovery data can improve sampling. Further, FNR values, calculated as a function of concentration and surface material, can be used pre-sampling to calculate the numbers of samples for statistical sampling plans with desired performance, and post-sampling to calculate the confidence in characterization and clearance decisions.

  5. Tracking false-negative results in molecular diagnosis: proposal of a triplex-PCR based method for leishmaniasis diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular biological methods have become increasingly relevant to the diagnosis and control of infectious diseases, such as leishmaniasis. Since various factors may affect the sensitivity of PCR assays, including DNA yield and purity, an optimal extraction method is pivotal. Losses of a parasite’s DNA during extraction may significantly impair its detection by PCR and lead to false-negative results. This study proposes a triplex PCR assay targeting the parasite’s DNA, an external control (pUC18) and an internal control (G3PD) for accurate diagnosis of leishmaniasis. Results Two primer pairs were designed to detect the plasmid pUC18 and a triplex PCR assay targeting the Leishmania braziliensis kinetoplast DNA, the external control and the internal control was standardized. The triplex PCR assay was assessed for its ability to detect the three target DNA fragments simultaneously. PCR products from pUC18 DNA resulted in bands of 368 (P1) and 316 (P2) base pairs (bp). The triplex PCR optimized with the chosen external control system (P1) allowed the simultaneous detection of the internal control (G3PD – 567 bp) as well as of small quantities (10 pg) of the target parasite’s DNA, detected by amplification of a 138 bp product. Conclusions The new tool standardized herein enables a more reliable interpretation of PCR results, mainly by contributing to quality assurance of leishmaniasis diagnosis. Furthermore, after simple standardization steps, this protocol could be applied to the diagnosis of other infectious diseases in reference laboratories. This triplex PCR enables the assessment of small losses during the DNA extraction process, problems concerning DNA degradation (sample quality) and the detection of L. braziliensis kDNA. PMID:24808911

  6. Serum Thyroglobulin (Tg) Monitoring of Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Cancer Using Sensitive (Second-Generation) Immunometric Assays Can Be Disrupted by False-Negative and False-Positive Serum Thyroglobulin Autoantibody Misclassifications

    PubMed Central

    Petrovic, Ivana; Fatemi, Shireen; LoPresti, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reliable thyroglobulin (Tg) autoantibody (TgAb) detection before Tg testing for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is critical when TgAb status (positive/negative) is used to authenticate sensitive second-generation immunometric assay (2GIMA) measurements as free from TgAb interference and when reflexing “TgAb-positive” sera to TgAb-resistant, but less sensitive, Tg methodologies (radioimmunoassay [RIA] or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry [LC-MS/MS]). Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess how different Kronus (K) vs Roche (R) TgAb method cutoffs for “positivity” influence false-negative vs false-positive serum TgAb misclassifications that may reduce the clinical utility of reflex Tg testing. Methods: Serum Tg2GIMA, TgRIA, and TgLC-MS/MS measurements for 52 TgAb-positive and 37 TgAb-negative patients with persistent/recurrent DTC were compared. A total of 1426 DTC sera with TgRIA of ?1.0 ?g/L had false-negative and false-positive TgAb frequencies determined using low Tg2GIMA/TgRIA ratios (<75%) to indicate TgAb interference. Results: TgAb-negative patients with disease displayed Tg2GIMA, TgRIA, and TgLC-MS/MS serum discordances (% coefficient of variation = 24 ± 20%, range, 0%–100%). Of the TgAb-positive patients with disease, 98% had undetectable/lower Tg2GIMA vs either TgRIA or TgLC-MS/MS (P < .01), whereas 8 of 52 (15%) had undetectable Tg2GIMA + TgLC-MS/MS associated with TgRIA of ?1.0 ?g/L. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis reported more sensitivity for TgAb method K vs R (81.9% vs 69.1%, P < .001), but receiver operating characteristic curve cutoffs (>0.6 kIU/L [K] vs >40 kIU/L [R]) had unacceptably high false-negative frequencies (22%–32%), whereas false positives approximated 12%. Functional sensitivity cutoffs minimized false negatives (13.5% [K] vs 21.3% [R], P < .01) and severe interferences (Tg2GIMA, <0.10 ?g/L) (0.7% [K] vs 2.4% [R], P < .05) but false positives approximated 23%. Conclusions: Reliable detection of interfering TgAbs is method and cutoff dependent. No cutoff eliminated both false-negative and false-positive TgAb misclassifications. Functional sensitivity cutoffs were optimal for minimizing false negatives but have inherent imprecision (20% coefficient of variation) that, exacerbated by TgAb biologic variability during DTC monitoring, could cause TgAb status to fluctuate for patients with low TgAb concentrations, prompting unnecessary Tg method changes and disrupting Tg monitoring. Laboratories using reflexing should limit Tg method changes by considering a patient's Tg + TgAb testing history in addition to current TgAb status before Tg method selection. PMID:25226290

  7. Dogs cannot bark: event-related brain responses to true and false negated statements as indicators of higher-order conscious processing.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Cornelia; Kübler, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated event-related brain potentials elicited by true and false negated statements to evaluate if discrimination of the truth value of negated information relies on conscious processing and requires higher-order cognitive processing in healthy subjects across different levels of stimulus complexity. The stimulus material consisted of true and false negated sentences (sentence level) and prime-target expressions (word level). Stimuli were presented acoustically and no overt behavioral response of the participants was required. Event-related brain potentials to target words preceded by true and false negated expressions were analyzed both within group and at the single subject level. Across the different processing conditions (word pairs and sentences), target words elicited a frontal negativity and a late positivity in the time window from 600-1000 msec post target word onset. Amplitudes of both brain potentials varied as a function of the truth value of the negated expressions. Results were confirmed at the single-subject level. In sum, our results support recent suggestions according to which evaluation of the truth value of a negated expression is a time- and cognitively demanding process that cannot be solved automatically, and thus requires conscious processing. Our paradigm provides insight into higher-order processing related to language comprehension and reasoning in healthy subjects. Future studies are needed to evaluate if our paradigm also proves sensitive for the detection of consciousness in non-responsive patients. PMID:22022414

  8. Effects of Maternal Negativity and of Early and Recent Recurrent Depressive Disorder on Children's False Belief Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Lisa M.; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.; Toth, Sheree L.; Maughan, Angeline

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that children of depressed mothers are at risk for problems in a variety of developmental domains; however, little is known about the effects of maternal depression on children's emerging understanding of false beliefs. In this study, 3 false belief tasks were administered to 5-year-old children whose mothers had either met…

  9. JC Virus PCR Detection Is Not Infallible: A Fulminant Case of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy with False-Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid Studies despite Progressive Clinical Course and Radiological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Babi, Mohamed-Ali; Pendlebury, William; Braff, Steven; Waheed, Waqar

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case with a false-negative PCR-based analysis for JC virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a patient with clinical and radiological findings suggestive of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) who was on chronic immunosuppressive therapy for rheumatoid arthritis. Our patient developed rapidly progressive global decline with clinical and radiographic findings suggestive of PML, but JC virus PCR in CSF was negative. The patient passed away 3 months from the onset of her neurological symptoms. Autopsy confirmed the diagnosis of PML with presence of JC-polyoma virus by immunohistochemical staining. This case highlights the potential of false-negative JC virus PCR in CSF when radiographic and clinical features are suggestive of “possible PML.” We review the plausible causes of potential false-negative CSF results and suggest that when the clinical presentation is suspicious for PML repeat CSF analysis utilizing ultrasensitive PCR assay and subsequent brain biopsy should be considered if CSF remains negative. Additionally, appropriate exclusion of other neurologic conditions is essential. PMID:25861493

  10. Hepatitis C Virus Core Mutations Associated with False-Negative Serological Results for Genotype 3a Core Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Dunford, Linda; Freitas, Ines; Holder, Paul; Nguyen, Lan Anh; O'Gorman, Joanne; Connell, Jeff; Carr, Michael; Hall, William; De Gascun, Cillian

    2015-01-01

    Genetic characterization of the genotype 3a (GT3a) hepatitis C virus (HCV) core region from HCV core antigen (HCVcAg)-negative/RNA-positive cases and HCVcAg-positive/RNA-positive controls identified significant associations between the substitutions A48T and T49A/P and failure to detect HCVcAg (P < 0.05). Polymorphisms at residues 48 and 49 in the core protein are present across all major epidemic and endemic GTs. These findings have implications for HCV diagnosis, particularly in low-income regions in which GT3a HCV is endemic. PMID:25994168

  11. Experimental Design for a Macrofoam-Swab Study Relating the Recovery Efficiency and False Negative Rate to Low Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates on Four Surface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2014-12-05

    This report describes the experimental design for a laboratory study to quantify the recovery efficiencies and false negative rates of a validated, macrofoam-swab sampling method for low concentrations of Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) spores on four surface materials (stainless steel, glass, vinyl tile, plastic light cover panel). Two analytical methods (culture and polymerase chain reaction) will be used. Only one previous study has investigated how the false negative rate depends on test factors. The surrogates BAS and BG have not been tested together in the same study previously. Hence, this study will provide for completing gaps in the available information on the performance of macrofoam-swab sampling at low concentrations.

  12. Experimental Design for a Macrofoam Swab Study Relating the Recovery Efficiency and False Negative Rate to Low Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates on Four Surface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2014-04-16

    This report describes the experimental design for a laboratory study to quantify the recovery efficiencies and false negative rates of a validated, macrofoam swab sampling method for low concentrations of Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) spores on four surface materials (stainless steel, glass, vinyl tile, plastic light cover panel). Two analytical methods (plating/counting and polymerase chain reaction) will be used. Only one previous study has investigated false negative as a function of affecting test factors. The surrogates BAS and BG have not been tested together in the same study previously. Hence, this study will provide for completing gaps in the available information on the performance of macrofoam swab sampling at low concentrations.

  13. Adenocarcinoma with BAC Features Presented as the Nonsolid Nodule Is Prone to Be False-Negative on 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hu-bing; Wang, Lijuan; Wang, Quan-shi; Han, Yan-jian; Li, Hong-sheng; Zhou, Wen-lan; Tian, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The present study investigated which type of adenocarcinoma with BAC features was prone to be false-negative on 18F-FDG PET/CT. Materials and Methods. A retrospective study was performed on 51 consecutive patients with localized adenocarcinoma with BAC features. CT and PET were assessed for lesion size, GGO percentage, and SUVmax. Lesions with FDG uptake the same as or more than mediastinal blood-pool activity were considered as PET-positive. Results. Of the 51 cases, 19.6% presented as pure GGO nodules, 31.4% as mixed nodules, and 49.0% as solid nodules. None of the pure GGO nodules was 18F-FDG avid, compared with 37.5% of mixed nodules and 96.0% of solid nodules (?2 = 31.55, P = 0.000). In the mixed nodule group, SUVmax was negatively correlated with GGO percentage (r = ?0.588; P = 0.021). The positive detection rate of 18F-FDG PET/CT was 50.0%, 55.6%, and 100% in tumors 1.1–2.0?cm, 2.1–3.0?cm, and >3.0?cm in diameter, respectively (?2 = 5.815, P = 0.055). General linear model factor analysis showed that the GGO was an important factor contributing to false-negative PET/CT results (F = 23.992, P = 0.000), but lesion size was not (F = 0.602, P = 0.866). Conclusions. The present study indicated that the adenocarcinoma with BAC features presented as nonsolid nodule is prone to be false negative on 18F-FDG PET/CT. PMID:25879020

  14. Impact of age on the false negative rate of human papillomavirus DNA test in patients with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance

    PubMed Central

    Won, Kyu-Hee; Lee, Jae Yeon; Cho, Hye-Yon; Suh, Dong Hoon; No, Jae Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Human papillomavirus (HPV) test was incorporated into the triage of lesser abnormal cervical cytologies: atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) or low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL). This study aimed to evaluate the impact of age on the efficacy of HPV testing in patients with lesser abnormal cervical cytologies. Methods A total of 439 patients with ASCUS or LSIL were included. The association between age groups and the diagnostic performances of HPV test for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+) was evaluated. Results Median age was 44 years (range, 17 to 75 years). ASCUS was more frequently observed in older patients while LSIL was more common in younger patients (P=0.002). CIN2+ was found in 11.3% (32/284) of the ASCUS patients and 12.9% (20/155) of patients with LSIL. Older patients with ASCUS showed lower HPV infection rates (P=0.025), but not LSIL (P=0.114). However, the prevalence of CIN2+ was similar between the age groups with ASCUS or LSIL. In patients with ASCUS, the false negative rate of HPV test for CIN2+ was 6.2%. The false negative rate of the HPV test became higher with increasing of the age after the age of 50 (P=0.034). Conclusion Our findings suggest that false negative rate of the HPV test for CIN2+ in ASCUS patients older than 50 years might become higher with increasing of the age. Negative HPV results in patients of the age >50 years with ASCUS should be carefully interpreted. PMID:25798425

  15. Ubiquitous presence of fastidious endophytic bacteria in field shoots and index-negative apparently clean shoot-tip cultures of papaya.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Pious; Kumari, Sima; Swarna, Ganiga K; Prakash, Devalakere P; Dinesh, Makki R

    2007-09-01

    This study establishes the widespread prevalence of fastidious or viable but non-culturable endophytic bacteria in field shoots and in unsuspicious shoot-tip cultures of papaya (Carica papaya L.) against the norm of asepsis in vitro. A total of 150 shoot-tips (approximately 10 mm) were inoculated on MS-based culture medium after surface sterilization of field-derived axillary shoots of cv. Surya during November or January (100 and 50, respectively) when 35-50% cultures showed endophytic microbial growth on culture medium. Indexing of apparently clean cultures using bacteriological media helped in detecting and removing additional 14-17% stocks with covert bacteria during the first two passages. The rest of the stocks stayed consistently index-negative during the first eight subculture cycles, but appeared positive in PCR-screening undertaken thereafter employing universal bacterial 16S rRNA gene primers indicating the association of non-cultivable bacteria. Direct sequencing of the PCR product yielded overlapping nucleotide data signifying mixed template or the presence of diverse endophytic microorganisms. This was confirmed by light microscopy of tissue sap revealing viable bacteria in considerable numbers, which were detected under phase contrast or with negative staining. Planting tissue segments or applying homogenate from these stocks on diverse bacteriological media did not induce the organisms to grow in vitro. The shoot cultures displayed variation in growth and rooting potential, the onus of such variation was solely attributable to the associated microorganisms. The findings were confirmed with additional field shoots and fresh in vitro stocks established subsequently. The observations have implications in micropropagation and all other applications involving plant cell, tissue, organ, and protoplast culture. PMID:17492452

  16. The use of core needle biopsy as first-line in diagnosis of thyroid nodules reduces false negative and inconclusive data reported by fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The reported reliability of core needle biopsy (CNB) is high in assessing thyroid nodules after inconclusive fine-needle aspiration (FNA) attempts. However, first-line use of CNB for nodules considered at risk by ultrasonography (US) has yet to be studied. The aim of this study were: 1) to evaluate the potential merit of using CNB first-line instead of conventional FNA in thyroid nodules with suspicious ultrasonographic features; 2) to compare CNB and FNA as a first-line diagnostic procedure in thyroid lesions at higher risk of cancer. Methods Seventy-seven patients with a suspicious-appearing, recently discovered solid thyroid nodule were initially enrolled as study participants. No patients had undergone prior thyroid fine-needle aspiration/biopsy. Based on study design, all patients were proposed to undergo CNB as first-line diagnostic aspiration, while those patients refusing to do so underwent conventional FNA. Results Five patients refused the study, and a total of 31 and 41 thyroid nodules were subjected to CNB and FNA, respectively. At follow-up, the overall rate of malignancy was of 80% (CNB, 77%; FNA, 83%). However, the diagnostic accuracy of CNB (97%) was significantly (P?false negative (N?=?1), indeterminate (N?=?2) or not adequate (N?=?1) samples. Conclusions CNB can reduce the false negative and inconclusive results of conventional FNA and should be considered a first-line method in assessing solid thyroid nodules at high risk of malignancy. PMID:24661377

  17. SYBR Green-Based Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assay for Detection of West Nile Virus Circumvents False-Negative Results Due to Strain Variability

    PubMed Central

    Papin, James F.; Vahrson, Wolfgang; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2004-01-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR is used routinely for the high-throughput diagnosis of viral pathogens, such as West Nile virus (WNV). Rapidly evolving RNA viruses present a challenge for diagnosis because they accumulate mutations that may render them undetectable. To explore the effect of sequence variations on assay performance, we generated every possible single point mutation within the target region of the widely used TaqMan assay for WNV and found that the TaqMan assay failed to detect 47% of possible single nucleotide variations in the probe-binding site and was unable to detect any targets with more than two mutations. In response, we developed and validated a less expensive assay with the intercalating dye SYBR green. The SYBR green-based assay was as sensitive as the TaqMan assay for WNV. Importantly, it detected 100% of possible WNV target region variants. The assay developed here adds an additional layer of protection to guard against false-negative results that result from natural variations or drug-directed selection and provides a rapid means to identify such variants for subsequent detailed analysis. PMID:15070997

  18. Normalization using weighted negative second order exponential error functions (NeONORM) provides robustness against asymmetries in comparative transcriptome profiles and avoids false calls.

    PubMed

    Noth, Sebastian; Brysbaert, Guillaume; Benecke, Arndt

    2006-05-01

    Studies on high-throughput global gene expression using microarray technology have generated ever larger amounts of systematic transcriptome data. A major challenge in exploiting these heterogeneous datasets is how to normalize the expression profiles by inter-assay methods. Different non-linear and linear normalization methods have been developed, which essentially rely on the hypothesis that the true or perceived logarithmic fold-change distributions between two different assays are symmetric in nature. However, asymmetric gene expression changes are frequently observed, leading to suboptimal normalization results and in consequence potentially to thousands of false calls. Therefore, we have specifically investigated asymmetric comparative transcriptome profiles and developed the normalization using weighted negative second order exponential error functions (NeONORM) for robust and global inter-assay normalization. NeONORM efficiently damps true gene regulatory events in order to minimize their misleading impact on the normalization process. We evaluated NeONORM's applicability using artificial and true experimental datasets, both of which demonstrated that NeONORM could be systematically applied to inter-assay and inter-condition comparisons. PMID:16970549

  19. False Negative Rates of a Macrofoam-Swab Sampling Method with Low Surface Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates via Real-Time PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, Janine R.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Sydor, Michael A.; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L

    2015-05-01

    Surface sampling for Bacillus anthracis spores has traditionally relied on detection via bacterial cultivation methods. Although effective, this approach does not provide the level of organism specificity that can be gained through molecular techniques. False negative rates (FNR) and limits of detection (LOD) were determined for two B. anthracis surrogates with modified rapid viability-polymerase chain reaction (mRV-PCR) following macrofoam-swab sampling. This study was conducted in parallel with a previously reported study that analyzed spores using a plate-culture method. B. anthracis Sterne (BAS) or B. atrophaeus Nakamura (BG) spores were deposited onto four surface materials (glass, stainless steel, vinyl tile, and plastic) at nine target concentrations (2 to 500 spores/coupon; 0.078 to 19.375 colony-forming units [CFU] per cm²). Mean FNR values for mRV-PCR analysis ranged from 0 to 0.917 for BAS and 0 to 0.875 for BG and increased as spore concentration decreased (over the concentrations investigated) for each surface material. FNRs based on mRV-PCR data were not statistically different for BAS and BG, but were significantly lower for glass than for vinyl tile. FNRs also tended to be lower for the mRV-PCR method compared to the culture method. The mRV-PCR LOD?? was lowest for glass (0.429 CFU/cm² with BAS and 0.341 CFU/cm² with BG) and highest for vinyl tile (0.919 CFU/cm² with BAS and 0.917 CFU/cm² with BG). These mRV-PCR LOD?? values were lower than the culture values (BAS: 0.678 to 1.023 CFU/cm² and BG: 0.820 to 1.489 CFU/cm²). The FNR and LOD?? values reported in this work provide guidance for environmental sampling of Bacillus spores at low concentrations.

  20. Recovery Efficiency, False Negative Rate, and Limit of Detection Performance of a Validated Macrofoam-Swab Sampling Method with Low Surface Concentrations of Two Bacillus anthracis Surrogates

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L; Amidan, Brett G.; Sydor, Michael A.; Barrett, Christopher A.

    2015-03-31

    The performance of a macrofoam-swab sampling method was evaluated using Bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAS) and Bacillus atrophaeus Nakamura (BG) spores applied at nine low target amounts (2-500 spores) to positive-control plates and test coupons (2 in. × 2 in.) of four surface materials (glass, stainless steel, vinyl tile, and plastic). Test results from cultured samples were used to evaluate the effects of surrogate, surface concentration, and surface material on recovery efficiency (RE), false negative rate (FNR), and limit of detection. For RE, surrogate and surface material had statistically significant effects, but concentration did not. Mean REs were the lowest for vinyl tile (50.8% with BAS, 40.2% with BG) and the highest for glass (92.8% with BAS, 71.4% with BG). FNR values ranged from 0 to 0.833 for BAS and 0 to 0.806 for BG, with values increasing as concentration decreased in the range tested (0.078 to 19.375 CFU/cm2, where CFU denotes ‘colony forming units’). Surface material also had a statistically significant effect. A FNR-concentration curve was fit for each combination of surrogate and surface material. For both surrogates, the FNR curves tended to be the lowest for glass and highest for vinyl title. The FNR curves for BG tended to be higher than for BAS at lower concentrations, especially for glass. Results using a modified Rapid Viability-Polymerase Chain Reaction (mRV-PCR) analysis method were also obtained. The mRV-PCR results and comparisons to the culture results will be discussed in a subsequent report.

  1. Relationship between prognostic factors of breast cancer and 99mTc-sestamibi uptake in patients who underwent scintimammography: Multivariate analysis of causes of false-negative results.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, F; Ermani, M; Marzola, M C; Zucchetta, P; Cecchin, D; Basso, S M M; Brandes, A A; Bui, F

    2006-02-01

    The complementary role of sestamibi scintimammography (SSM) in patients with breast cancer (BC) is well established. The aim of this study was to establish whether a relationship exists between sestamibi uptake, evaluated as a tumour-to-background ratio (TBR), and the main prognostic factors of BC. SSM with the measurement of TBR was performed preoperatively in 102 women (median age 57 years, range 32-81 years) who underwent curative surgery for primary BC. Final pathology showed 4 (3.9%) with pT1a, 17 (16.7%) with pT1b, 44 (43.1%) with pT1c and 37 (36.3%) with pT2 breast carcinomas. The overall sensitivity of SSM was 80.4%. An ANOVA showed significant (P<0.01) differences between the TBR of patients with G1 vs. G3 tumours, and between the TBR of those with G2 vs. G3 breast carcinomas. Moreover, there was a difference (P=0.021) between the TBR of patients (n=12, 11.8%) with CEA serum levels >10 ng/ml (2.031+/-0.420), and those with normal (n=90, 88.2%) CEA values (1.713+/-0.446), whilst no difference (P=NS) was found between patients (n=27, 26.5%) with CA 15-3 >30 U/ml (1.893+/-0.401) and those with normal (n=75, 73.5%) CA 15-3 values (1.699+/-0.462). There was a mild inverse correlation between TBR and both the oestrogen (R=0.25, P=0.011) and the progesterone receptor (R=0.23, P=0.02) rate. The logistic regression analysis showed that only size and CA 15-3 serum levels represent true independent parameters, but the function was able to predict only 11 out of 21 (52.4%) patients with false-negative SSM. TBR is independent of age and mainly correlates with the size of the tumour. There are no reliable preoperative prognostic factors that are really useful for improving SSM sensitivity in patients with small breast carcinomas. PMID:15985369

  2. False names.

    PubMed Central

    Rendleman, N

    1998-01-01

    A patient's unique, personal name is fundamental in medical relationships. Sometimes, patients may use false names, which obscure family, ethnic, sexual, or billing identities. The means and motivations involved--fraud, concealment, gaining financial or personal advantage, gratifying a psychic need, or changing group assignment--produce a variety of distinct clinical manifestations of false name use. These may be classified as alias, pseudonym, manipulator, fraud, psychotic, amnestic, medical factitioner, and renamed. The identification of falsely named patients enables clinicians to improve care for these types of patients. Individual cases are briefly described and a discussion of naming in society and medicine follows. This preliminary discussion may serve to fuel further refinement. PMID:9830369

  3. Apparent-Dip Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, R. B.; Lamar, D. L.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews methods of determining apparent dip and highlights the use of a device which consists of a nomogram printed on a protractor. Explains how the apparent-dip calculator-protractor can be constructed and outlines the steps for its operation. (ML)

  4. MSPI False Indication Probability Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Kelly; Kurt Vedros; Robert Youngblood

    2011-03-01

    This paper examines false indication probabilities in the context of the Mitigating System Performance Index (MSPI), in order to investigate the pros and cons of different approaches to resolving two coupled issues: (1) sensitivity to the prior distribution used in calculating the Bayesian-corrected unreliability contribution to the MSPI, and (2) whether (in a particular plant configuration) to model the fuel oil transfer pump (FOTP) as a separate component, or integrally to its emergency diesel generator (EDG). False indication probabilities were calculated for the following situations: (1) all component reliability parameters at their baseline values, so that the true indication is green, meaning that an indication of white or above would be false positive; (2) one or more components degraded to the extent that the true indication would be (mid) white, and “false” would be green (negative) or yellow (negative) or red (negative). In key respects, this was the approach taken in NUREG-1753. The prior distributions examined were the constrained noninformative (CNI) prior used currently by the MSPI, a mixture of conjugate priors, the Jeffreys noninformative prior, a nonconjugate log(istic)-normal prior, and the minimally informative prior investigated in (Kelly et al., 2010). The mid-white performance state was set at ?CDF = ?10 ? 10-6/yr. For each simulated time history, a check is made of whether the calculated ?CDF is above or below 10-6/yr. If the parameters were at their baseline values, and ?CDF > 10-6/yr, this is counted as a false positive. Conversely, if one or all of the parameters are set to values corresponding to ?CDF > 10-6/yr but that time history’s ?CDF < 10-6/yr, this is counted as a false negative indication. The false indication (positive or negative) probability is then estimated as the number of false positive or negative counts divided by the number of time histories (100,000). Results are presented for a set of base case parameter values, and three sensitivity cases in which the number of FOTP demands was reduced, along with the Birnbaum importance of the FOTP.

  5. Positive consequences of false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Patel, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research is replete with examples of the negative consequences of false memories. In the current research, we provide a different perspective on false memories and their development and demonstrate that false memories can have positive consequences. Specifically, we examined the role false memories play in subsequent problem-solving tasks. Children and adults studied and recalled neutral or survival-relevant lists of associated words. They then solved age-normed compound remote associates, some of whose solutions had been primed by false memories created when studying the previous lists. The results showed that regardless of age: (a) survival-related words were not only better recollected but were also more susceptible than neutral words to false memory illusions; and (b) survival-related false memories were better than neutral false memories as primes for problem-solving. These findings are discussed in the context of recent speculation concerning the positive consequences of false memories, and the adaptive nature of reconstructive memory. PMID:23843125

  6. Experimental Design for a Sponge-Wipe Study to Relate the Recovery Efficiency and False Negative Rate to the Concentration of a Bacillus anthracis Surrogate for Six Surface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Krauter, Paula; Einfeld, Wayne

    2010-12-16

    Two concerns were raised by the Government Accountability Office following the 2001 building contaminations via letters containing Bacillus anthracis (BA). These included the: 1) lack of validated sampling methods, and 2) need to use statistical sampling to quantify the confidence of no contamination when all samples have negative results. Critical to addressing these concerns is quantifying the probability of correct detection (PCD) (or equivalently the false negative rate FNR = 1 ? PCD). The PCD/FNR may depend on the 1) method of contaminant deposition, 2) surface concentration of the contaminant, 3) surface material being sampled, 4) sample collection method, 5) sample storage/transportation conditions, 6) sample processing method, and 7) sample analytical method. A review of the literature found 17 laboratory studies that focused on swab, wipe, or vacuum samples collected from a variety of surface materials contaminated by BA or a surrogate, and used culture methods to determine the surface contaminant concentration. These studies quantified performance of the sampling and analysis methods in terms of recovery efficiency (RE) and not PCD/FNR (which left a major gap in available information). Quantifying the PCD/FNR under a variety of conditions is a key aspect of validating sample and analysis methods, and also for calculating the confidence in characterization or clearance decisions based on a statistical sampling plan. A laboratory study was planned to partially fill the gap in PCD/FNR results. This report documents the experimental design developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for a sponge-wipe method. The study will investigate the effects on key response variables from six surface materials contaminated with eight surface concentrations of a BA surrogate (Bacillus atrophaeus). The key response variables include measures of the contamination on test coupons of surface materials tested, contamination recovered from coupons by sponge-wipe samples, RE, and PCD/FNR. The experimental design involves 16 test runs, to be performed in two blocks of eight runs. Three surface materials (stainless steel, vinyl tile, and ceramic tile) were tested in the first block, while three other surface materials (plastic, painted wood paneling, and faux leather) will be tested in the second block. The eight surface concentrations of the surrogate were randomly assigned to test runs within each block. Some of the concentrations will be very low and may present challenges for deposition, sampling, and analysis. However, such tests are needed to investigate RE and PCD/FNR over the full range of concentrations of interest. In each run, there will be 10 test coupons of each of the three surface materials. A positive control sample will be generated prior to each test sample. The positive control results will be used to 1) calculate RE values for the wipe sampling and analysis method, and 2) fit RE- and PCD-concentration equations, for each of the six surface materials. Data analyses will support 1) estimating the PCD for each combination of contaminant concentration and surface material, 2) estimating the surface concentrations and their uncertainties of the contaminant for each combination of concentration and surface material, 3) estimating RE (%) and their uncertainties for each combination of contaminant concentration and surface material, 4) fitting PCD-concentration and RE-concentration equations for each of the six surface materials, 5) assessing goodness-of-fit of the equations, and 6) quantifying the uncertainty in PCD and RE predictions made with the fitted equations.

  7. Experimental Design for a Sponge-Wipe Study to Relate the Recovery Efficiency and False Negative Rate to the Concentration of a Bacillus anthracis Surrogate for Six Surface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Krauter, Paula; Einfeld, Wayne

    2011-05-01

    Two concerns were raised by the Government Accountability Office following the 2001 building contaminations via letters containing Bacillus anthracis (BA). These included the: 1) lack of validated sampling methods, and 2) need to use statistical sampling to quantify the confidence of no contamination when all samples have negative results. Critical to addressing these concerns is quantifying the false negative rate (FNR). The FNR may depend on the 1) method of contaminant deposition, 2) surface concentration of the contaminant, 3) surface material being sampled, 4) sample collection method, 5) sample storage/transportation conditions, 6) sample processing method, and 7) sample analytical method. A review of the literature found 17 laboratory studies that focused on swab, wipe, or vacuum samples collected from a variety of surface materials contaminated by BA or a surrogate, and used culture methods to determine the surface contaminant concentration. These studies quantified performance of the sampling and analysis methods in terms of recovery efficiency (RE) and not FNR (which left a major gap in available information). Quantifying the FNR under a variety of conditions is a key aspect of validating sample and analysis methods, and also for calculating the confidence in characterization or clearance decisions based on a statistical sampling plan. A laboratory study was planned to partially fill the gap in FNR results. This report documents the experimental design developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for a sponge-wipe method. The testing was performed by SNL and is now completed. The study investigated the effects on key response variables from six surface materials contaminated with eight surface concentrations of a BA surrogate (Bacillus atrophaeus). The key response variables include measures of the contamination on test coupons of surface materials tested, contamination recovered from coupons by sponge-wipe samples, RE, and FNR. The experimental design involves 16 test runs, performed in two blocks of eight runs. Three surface materials (stainless steel, vinyl tile, and ceramic tile) were tested in the first block, while three other surface materials (plastic, painted wood paneling, and faux leather) were tested in the second block. The eight surface concentrations of the surrogate were randomly assigned to test runs within each block. Some of the concentrations were very low and presented challenges for deposition, sampling, and analysis. However, such tests are needed to investigate RE and FNR over the full range of concentrations of interest. In each run, there were 10 test coupons of each of the three surface materials. A positive control sample was generated at the same time as each test sample. The positive control results will be used to 1) calculate RE values for the wipe sampling and analysis method, and 2) fit RE- and FNR-concentration equations, for each of the six surface materials. Data analyses will support 1) estimating the FNR for each combination of contaminant concentration and surface material, 2) estimating the surface concentrations and their uncertainties of the contaminant for each combination of concentration and surface material, 3) estimating RE (%) and their uncertainties for each combination of contaminant concentration and surface material, 4) fitting FNR-concentration and RE-concentration equations for each of the six surface materials, 5) assessing goodness-of-fit of the equations, and 6) quantifying the uncertainty in FNR and RE predictions made with the fitted equations.

  8. Apparent Superluminal Behavior

    E-print Network

    A. D. Jackson; A. Lande; B. Lautrup

    2000-09-15

    The apparent superluminal propagation of electromagnetic signals seen in recent experiments is shown to be the result of simple and robust properties of relativistic field equations. Although the wave front of a signal passing through a classically forbidden region can never move faster than light, an attenuated replica of the signal is reproduced ``instantaneously'' on the other side of the barrier. The reconstructed signal, causally connected to the forerunner rather than the bulk of the input signal, appears to move through the barrier faster than light.

  9. Emotions and false memories: valence or arousal?

    PubMed

    Corson, Yves; Verrier, Nadège

    2007-03-01

    The effects of mood on false memories have not been studied systematically until recently. Some results seem to indicate that negative mood may reduce false recall and thus suggest an influence of emotional valence on false memory. The present research tested the effects of both valence and arousal on recall and recognition and indicates that the effect is actually due to arousal. In fact, whether participants' mood is positive, negative, or neutral, false memories are significantly more frequent under conditions of high arousal than under conditions of low arousal. PMID:17444912

  10. The apparent Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binétruy, P.; Helou, A.

    2015-10-01

    We exploit the parallel between dynamical black holes and cosmological spacetimes to describe the evolution of Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universes from the point of view of an observer in terms of the dynamics of the apparent horizon. Using the Hayward-Kodama formalism of dynamical black holes, we clarify the role of the Clausius relation to derive the Friedmann equations for a Universe, in the spirit of Jacobson’s work on the thermodynamics of spacetime. We also show how dynamics at the horizon naturally leads to the quantum-mechanical process of Hawking radiation. We comment on the connection of this work with recent ideas to consider our observable Universe as a Bose-Einstein condensate and on the corresponding role of vacuum energy.

  11. False call rate estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldrin, John C.; Knopp, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, several approaches are presented for the estimation of false call rate including confidence bounds during an NDE reliability study. Bootstrapping methods are applied to nonparametric models (for hit-miss data) and several noise distribution models. By applying bootstrapping with a student t-distribution used to address the "heavy tail" behavior of the data, the estimated false call rate with confidence bounds was found to be in good agreement with the observed data.

  12. Hypnotizability, not suggestion, influences false memory development.

    PubMed

    Dasse, Michelle N; Elkins, Gary R; Weaver, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotizability influences the development of false memories. In Experiment 1, participants heard a positive or negative suggestion regarding hypnosis and then listened to 8 Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm lists in a hypnotic state. Neither hypnosis nor prehypnotic suggestion affected memory. Highly hypnotizable participants were more accurate in recall and recognition. In Experiment 2, suggestions were delivered in the form of feedback. Participants heard a positive or negative suggestion about their performance prior to either the encoding or retrieval of 8 DRM lists. Neither accurate nor false memories were affected by the suggestion. Highly hypnotizable individuals recognized fewer critical lures if they received a negative suggestion about their performance. These results highlight the unusual role of hypnotizability in the creation of false memories. PMID:25365130

  13. On the Bartnik mass of apparent horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantoulidis, Christos; Schoen, Richard

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we characterize the intrinsic geometry of apparent horizons (outermost marginally outer trapped surfaces) in asymptotically flat spacetimes; that is, the Riemannian metrics on the two sphere which can arise. Furthermore we determine the minimal ADM mass of a spacetime containing such an apparent horizon. The results are conveniently formulated in terms of the quasi-local mass introduced by Bartnik (1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 2346-8). The Hawking mass provides a lower bound for Bartnik’s quasilocal mass on apparent horizons by way of Penrose’s conjecture on time symmetric slices, proven in 1997 by Huisken and Ilmanen (2001 J. Differ. Geom. 59 353-437) and in full generality in 1999 by Bray (2001 J. Differ. Geom. 59 177-267). We compute Bartnik’s mass for all non-degenerate apparent horizons and show that it coincides with the Hawking mass. As a corollary we disprove a conjecture due to Gibbons in the spirit of Thorne’s hoop conjecture (Gibbons 2009 arXiv:0903.1580), and construct a new large class of examples of apparent horizons with the integral of the negative part of the Gauss curvature arbitrarily large.

  14. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-10-20

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage. 7 figs.

  15. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1992-01-01

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  16. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    This invention consists of a viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching, the user`s eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  17. Reducing False Sharing and Improving Spatial Locality in a

    E-print Network

    compatible. Index Terms--Data reuse, cache locality, false sharing, loop and memory layout transformations to be considered in the case of shared-memory parallel machines, namely, false sharing [8], [46]. False sharing on the processors. The negative impact of false sharing on the memory performance can be devastating. Eggers

  18. Moon - False Color Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This false-color mosaic was constructed from a series of 53 images taken through three spectral filters by Galileo's imaging system as the spacecraft flew over the northern regions of the Moon on December 7, 1992. The part of the Moon visible from Earth is on the left side in this view. The color mosaic shows compositional variations in parts of the Moon's northern hemisphere. Bright pinkish areas are highlands materials, such as those surrounding the oval lava-filled Crisium impact basin toward the bottom of the picture. Blue to orange shades indicate volcanic lava flows. To the left of Crisium, the dark blue Mare Tranquillitatis is richer in titanium than the green and orange maria above it. Thin mineral-rich soils associated with relatively recent impacts are represented by light blue colors; the youngest craters have prominent blue rays extending from them. The Galileo project, whose primary mission is the exploration of the Jupiter system in 1995-97, is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  19. Diabetes: What's True and False?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Diabetes: What's True and False? KidsHealth > Teens > Diabetes Center > ... which are false. Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. False: Type 1 diabetes happens when the cells ...

  20. Diabetes: What's True and False?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Digestive System How the Body Works Main Page Diabetes: What's True and False? KidsHealth > Kids > Diabetes Center > ... True or False: Eating Too Much Sugar Causes Diabetes False: When kids get type 1 diabetes , it's ...

  1. White Rock in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image shows the wind eroded deposit in Pollack Crater called 'White Rock'. This image was collected during the Southern Fall Season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -8, Longitude 25.2 East (334.8 West). 0 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. Iani Chaos in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image of a portion of the Iani Chaos region was collected during the Southern Fall season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.6 Longitude 342.4 East (17.6 West). 36 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  3. False Belief vs. False Photographs: A Test of Theory of Mind or Working Memory?

    PubMed Central

    Callejas, Alicia; Shulman, Gordon L.; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Theory of mind (ToM), the ability to reason about other people’s thoughts and beliefs, has been traditionally studied in behavioral and neuroimaging experiments by comparing performance in “false belief” and “false photograph” (control) stories. However, some evidence suggests that these stories are not matched in difficulty, complicating the interpretation of results. Here, we more fully evaluated the relative difficulty of comprehending these stories and drawing inferences from them. Subjects read false belief and false photograph stories followed by comprehension questions that probed true (“reality” questions) or false beliefs (“representation” questions) appropriate to the stories. Stories and comprehension questions were read and answered, respectively, more slowly in the false photograph than false belief conditions, indicating their greater difficulty. Interestingly, accuracy on representation questions for false photograph stories was significantly lower than for all other conditions and correlated positively with participants’ working memory span scores. These results suggest that drawing representational inferences from false photo stories is particularly difficult and places heavy demands on working memory. Extensive naturalistic practice with ToM reasoning may enable a more flexible and efficient mental representation of false belief stories, resulting in lower memory load requirements. An important implication of these results is that the differential modulation of right temporal–parietal junction (RTPJ) during ToM and “false photo” control conditions may reflect the documented negative correlation of RTPJ activity with working memory load rather than a specialized involvement in ToM processes. PMID:22069395

  4. False Belief vs. False Photographs: A Test of Theory of Mind or Working Memory?

    PubMed

    Callejas, Alicia; Shulman, Gordon L; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Theory of mind (ToM), the ability to reason about other people's thoughts and beliefs, has been traditionally studied in behavioral and neuroimaging experiments by comparing performance in "false belief" and "false photograph" (control) stories. However, some evidence suggests that these stories are not matched in difficulty, complicating the interpretation of results. Here, we more fully evaluated the relative difficulty of comprehending these stories and drawing inferences from them. Subjects read false belief and false photograph stories followed by comprehension questions that probed true ("reality" questions) or false beliefs ("representation" questions) appropriate to the stories. Stories and comprehension questions were read and answered, respectively, more slowly in the false photograph than false belief conditions, indicating their greater difficulty. Interestingly, accuracy on representation questions for false photograph stories was significantly lower than for all other conditions and correlated positively with participants' working memory span scores. These results suggest that drawing representational inferences from false photo stories is particularly difficult and places heavy demands on working memory. Extensive naturalistic practice with ToM reasoning may enable a more flexible and efficient mental representation of false belief stories, resulting in lower memory load requirements. An important implication of these results is that the differential modulation of right temporal-parietal junction (RTPJ) during ToM and "false photo" control conditions may reflect the documented negative correlation of RTPJ activity with working memory load rather than a specialized involvement in ToM processes. PMID:22069395

  5. False Position, Double False Position and Cramer's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boman, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    We state and prove the methods of False Position (Regula Falsa) and Double False Position (Regula Duorum Falsorum). The history of both is traced from ancient Egypt and China through the work of Fibonacci, ending with a connection between Double False Position and Cramer's Rule.

  6. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed. PMID:23639921

  7. Reduced False Memory after Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenn, Kimberly M.; Gallo, David A.; Margoliash, Daniel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sleep contributes to the successful maintenance of previously encoded information. This research has focused exclusively on memory for studied events, as opposed to false memories. Here we report three experiments showing that sleep reduces false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) memory illusion. False

  8. Apparent Solar Tornado - Like Prominences

    E-print Network

    Panasenco, Olga; Velli, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have reawakened interest in the old and fascinating phenomenon of solar tornado-like prominences. This class of prominences was first introduced by Pettit (1932), who studied them over many years. Observations of tornado prominences similar to the ones seen by SDO had already been documented by Secchi (1877) in his famous "Le Soleil". High resolution and high cadence multiwavelength data obtained by SDO reveal that the tornado-like appearance of these prominences is mainly an illusion due to projection effects. We discuss two different cases where prominences on the limb might appear to have a tornado-like behavior. One case of apparent vortical motions in prominence spines and barbs arises from the (mostly) 2D counterstreaming plasma motion along the prominence spine and barbs together with oscillations along individual threads. The other case of apparent rotational motion is observed in prominence cavities and results from the 3D ...

  9. Penrose inequality and apparent horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dov, Ishai

    2004-12-15

    A spherically symmetric spacetime is presented with an initial data set that is asymptotically flat, satisfies the dominant energy condition, and such that on this initial data M<{radical}(A/16{pi}), where M is the total mass and A is the area of the apparent horizon. This provides a counterexample to a commonly stated version of the Penrose inequality, though it does not contradict the true Penrose inequality.

  10. The persistence of false beliefs.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Fowler, Nicci Bowman; Nelson, Kally J; Bernstein, Daniel M; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2008-09-01

    Do false beliefs last? To explore this question, this study planted false beliefs or memories of a childhood experience with asparagus. We found that these false beliefs had consequences for subjects, when assessed directly after the suggestive manipulation. Moreover, subjects were brought back two weeks later to see if their false beliefs persisted. After two weeks, subjects' confidence in their new memories, and the consequences of those memories were diminished, but not extinguished. These false beliefs were found to be somewhat weaker than other subjects' true beliefs for the same events. Another novel finding was that the manipulation was sufficiently powerful to affect actual food choices. PMID:18620329

  11. Sleep deprivation and false memories.

    PubMed

    Frenda, Steven J; Patihis, Lawrence; Loftus, Elizabeth F; Lewis, Holly C; Fenn, Kimberly M

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have investigated factors that affect susceptibility to false memories. However, few have investigated the role of sleep deprivation in the formation of false memories, despite overwhelming evidence that sleep deprivation impairs cognitive function. We examined the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and false memories and the effect of 24 hr of total sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories. We found that under certain conditions, sleep deprivation can increase the risk of developing false memories. Specifically, sleep deprivation increased false memories in a misinformation task when participants were sleep deprived during event encoding, but did not have a significant effect when the deprivation occurred after event encoding. These experiments are the first to investigate the effect of sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories, which can have dire consequences. PMID:25031301

  12. Ego depletion results in an increase in spontaneous false memories.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Alberts, Hugo; Cuppens, Lesly

    2012-12-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to examine whether depleted cognitive resources might have ramifications for the formation of neutral and negative spontaneous false memories. To examine this, participants received neutral and negative Deese/Roediger-McDermott false memory wordlists. Also, for half of the participants, cognitive resources were depleted by use of an ego depletion manipulation (solving difficult calculations while being interfered with auditory noise). Our chief finding was that depleted cognitive resources made participants more vulnerable for the production of false memories. Our results shed light on how depleted cognitive resources affect neutral and negative correct and errant memories. PMID:23085670

  13. With sadness comes accuracy; with happiness, false memory: mood and the false memory effect.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, Justin; Clore, Gerald L

    2005-10-01

    The Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm lures people to produce false memories. Two experiments examined whether induced positive or negative moods would influence this false memory effect. The affect-as-information hypothesis predicts that, on the one hand, positive affective cues experienced as task-relevant feedback encourage relational processing during encoding, which should enhance false memory effects. On the other hand, negative affective cues are hypothesized to encourage item-specific processing at encoding, which should discourage such effects. The results of Experiment 1 are consistent with these predictions: Individuals in negative moods were significantly less likely to show false memory effects than those in positive moods or those whose mood was not manipulated. Experiment 2 introduced inclusion instructions to investigate whether moods had their effects at encoding or retrieval. The results replicated the false memory finding of Experiment 1 and provide evidence that moods influence the accessibility of lures at encoding, rather than influencing monitoring at retrieval of whether lures were actually presented. PMID:16181441

  14. Linguistic Determinants of the Difficulty of True-False Test Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Candida C.; Peterson, James L.

    1976-01-01

    Adults read a prose passage and responded to passages based on it which were either true or false and were phrased either affirmatively or negatively. True negatives yielded most errors, followed in order by false negatives, true affirmatives, and false affirmatives. (Author/RC)

  15. The distinctiveness heuristic in false recognition and false recall.

    PubMed

    McCabe, David P; Smith, Anderson D

    2006-07-01

    The effects of generative processing on false recognition and recall were examined in four experiments using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott false memory paradigm (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995). In each experiment, a Generate condition in which subjects generated studied words from audio anagrams was compared to a Control condition in which subjects simply listened to studied words presented normally. Rates of false recognition and false recall were lower for critical lures associated with generated lists, than for critical lures associated with control lists, but only in between-subjects designs. False recall and recognition did not differ when generate and control conditions were manipulated within-subjects. This pattern of results is consistent with the distinctiveness heuristic (Schacter, Israel, & Racine, 1999), a metamemorial decision-based strategy whereby global changes in decision criteria lead to reductions of false memories. This retrieval-based monitoring mechanism appears to operate in a similar fashion in reducing false recognition and false recall. PMID:16754242

  16. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23.943 ...Powerplant General § 23.943 Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of...airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes...

  17. 14 CFR 25.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 25.943 Section 25.943 ...Powerplant General § 25.943 Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction...airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes...

  18. 14 CFR 25.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 25.943 Section 25.943 ...Powerplant General § 25.943 Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction...airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes...

  19. 14 CFR 25.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 25.943 Section 25.943 ...Powerplant General § 25.943 Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction...airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes...

  20. 14 CFR 25.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 25.943 Section 25.943 ...Powerplant General § 25.943 Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction...airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes...

  1. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2013-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23.943 ...Powerplant General § 23.943 Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of...airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes...

  2. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2014-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23.943 ...Powerplant General § 23.943 Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of...airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes...

  3. 14 CFR 25.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 25.943 Section 25.943 ...Powerplant General § 25.943 Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction...airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes...

  4. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2012-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23.943 ...Powerplant General § 23.943 Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of...airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes...

  5. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23.943 ...Powerplant General § 23.943 Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of...airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes...

  6. False Beliefs about Emotion: Children's Understanding of Misleading Emotional Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Dana; Harris, Paul L.

    1988-01-01

    Forty-eight children aged four and six years listened to stories in which it would be appropriate for the protagonist to feel a negative emotion. Results indicated that six-year-olds were more accurate than four-year-olds in judging that real and apparent emotion would not coincide when the protagonist hid feelings. (RJC)

  7. Study modality and false recall.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebekah E; Engle, Randall W

    2011-01-01

    False memories occur when individuals mistakenly report an event as having taken place when that event did not in fact occur. The DRM (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) paradigm provides an effective technique for creating and investigating false memories. In this paradigm participants study a list of words (e.g., SOUR, CANDY,…) that are highly associated to a non-presented critical item (e.g., SWEET). The study phase is followed by a test of memory for the study list words. Researchers typically find very high levels of false recall of the critical non-presented item. However, the likelihood of falsely remembering the non-presented critical items can be reduced by presenting studied associates visually rather than auditorally (e.g., Smith & Hunt, 1998). This is referred to as the modality effect in false memory. The current study investigated the role of resource availability in the expression of this modality effect in false recall. In Experiment 1 false recall was reduced in the visual study presentation condition relative to the auditory condition for participants with higher working memory capacity, but not for participants with lower working memory capacity. In Experiment 2 the effect of study modality on false recall was eliminated by the addition of a divided attention task at encoding. Both studies support the proposal that resource availability plays a role in the expression of the modality effect in the DRM paradigm (Smith, Lozito, & Bayen, 2005). PMID:20494859

  8. Dividing attention lowers children's but increases adults' false memories.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Peters, Maarten; Howe, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of divided attention on children's and adults' neutral and negative true and false memories in a standard Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm. Children (7- and 11-year-olds; n = 126) and adults (n = 52) received 5 neutral and 5 negative Deese/Roediger-McDermott word lists; half of each group also received a divided attention task. The results showed that divided attention affected children's and adults' false memory levels differently but did not alter true memory differently. Our results revealed a developmental shift in that divided attention lowered children's false memory rates but increased adults' false memory rates, regardless of the nature of the material (i.e., neutral or negative). Our study indicates that manipulations that target conscious processing (e.g., divided attention) result in marked qualitative and quantitative differences between children's and adults' false memories but not true memories. PMID:21859233

  9. Color logic of apparent motion.

    PubMed

    Kolers, P A; Green, M

    1984-01-01

    Two shapes of either the same or different color will seem to be in smooth apparent motion with like-colored mates, at proper conditions of flash timing and spacing. An experiment is reported in which the condition was tested for unlike-colored pairs, for example red-green alternated with green-red. The question of interest was how the visual system would resolve the disparity of color. An 'intelligent' solution would rotate the shapes in three dimensions. Like-colored and unlike-colored parts were found to move and transform similarly, however, the resolution being dependent more upon timing than upon color. The motion of intelligence as it might be applied to vision is discussed in light of these results. PMID:6514510

  10. Dividing Attention Lowers Children's but Increases Adults' False Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otgaar, Henry; Peters, Maarten; Howe, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of divided attention on children's and adults' neutral and negative true and false memories in a standard Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm. Children (7- and 11-year-olds; n = 126) and adults (n = 52) received 5 neutral and 5 negative Deese/Roediger-McDermott word lists; half of each group also received a…

  11. False memories of emotional and neutral words.

    PubMed

    El Sharkawy, Jennifer; Groth, Katarina; Vetter, Céline; Beraldi, Anna; Fast, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    This study used the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm to investigate the direction and the extent to which emotional valence in semantic word lists influences the formation of false memories (FM). The experimental paradigm consisted of 1) a study phase (learning of neutral and negative lists of words semantically associated to a non-presented critical lure (CL), 2) a free recall phase, and 3) a recognition phase. Participants had to indicate whether the displayed item was "new" (new item or non-studied CL) or "old" (studied list item). CL associated with negative word lists elicited significantly more FM than CL associated with neutral word lists. This finding is in contrast to previous work showing that emotional words elicit fewer FM than neutral words. The results of our study also suggest that valence is capable of influencing emotional memory in terms of encoding and retrieval processes. PMID:18413909

  12. Tunneling decay of false kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Éric; Gobeil, Yan; MacKenzie, Richard; Marleau, Luc; Paranjape, M. B.; Ung, Yvan

    2015-07-01

    We consider the decay of "false kinks," that is, kinks formed in a scalar field theory with a pair of degenerate symmetry-breaking false vacua in 1 +1 dimensions. The true vacuum is symmetric. A second scalar field and a peculiar potential are added in order for the kink to be classically stable. We find an expression for the decay rate of a false kink. As with any tunneling event, the rate is proportional to exp (-SE) where SE is the Euclidean action of the bounce describing the tunneling event. This factor varies wildly depending on the parameters of the model. Of interest is the fact that for certain parameters SE can get arbitrarily small, implying that the kink is only barely stable. Thus, while the false vacuum itself may be very long-lived, the presence of kinks can give rise to rapid vacuum decay.

  13. False allegation of child abduction.

    PubMed

    Canning, Kathleen E; Hilts, Mark A; Muirhead, Yvonne E

    2011-05-01

    Cases in which a child has been falsely reported as missing or abducted can be extremely challenging to the law enforcement agencies responsible for their investigation. In the absence of a witnessed abduction or an obvious crime scene, it is difficult to determine whether a child has actually been abducted or has become a victim of a homicide and a false allegation. The purpose of this study was to examine falsely alleged kidnapping cases and identify successful investigative strategies. Sixty-one adjudicated false allegation cases involving 66 victims were analyzed. The mean age of the victim was 5 years. Victims came from generally unstable, high-risk family situations and were killed primarily by biological parents. Victims were killed because they were unwanted or viewed as an obstacle to a desired goal, or they were victims of abuse or maltreatment that ended in fatality. PMID:21361941

  14. Negative mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Richard T.

    2015-03-01

    Some physical aspects of negative mass are examined. Several unusual properties, such as the ability of negative mass to penetrate any armor, are analysed. Other surprising effects include the bizarre system of negative mass chasing positive mass, naked singularities and the violation of cosmic censorship, wormholes, and quantum mechanical results as well. In addition, a brief look into the implications for strings is given.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of false bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizovtseva, Irina; Alexandrov, Dmitri; Ryashko, Lev

    2014-05-01

    Nansen from his observations in the Beaufort Sea published in 1897 noted that heat transfer from the fresh water to the arctic salt water is the only source of ice accretion during the polar summer. This transfer mechanism, unusual at first sight, is responsible for the initiation and evolution of a false bottom ice, changing ice properties to a great extent and affecting various processes while interacting with the ocean and the atmosphere. A false bottom represents a thin layer of ice which forms in summer underneath the floe where fresh water lies between the salt water and the ice. Details of how this process occurs in nature are now emerging from different laboratory and field experiments. The false bottoms appearing at the interface between the fresh and salt water as a result of double-diffusive convection normally lie below surface and under-ice melt ponds. Such false bottoms represent the only significant source of ice growth in the Arctic during the spring-summer period. Their evolution influences the mass balance of the Arctic sea-ice cover recognized as an indicator of climate change. However, the quantity, aerial extent and other properties of false bottoms are difficult to measure because coring under the surface melt ponds leads to direct mixing of surface and under-ice water. This explains why their aerial extent and overall volume is still not known despite the fact that the upper limit of the ice coverage by the false bottom is approximately half of the ice surface. The growth of false bottoms also leads to other important consequences for different physical, chemical and biological processes associated with their dynamics. This study addressed to a broad community of readers is concerned with non-linear behavior of false bottoms including their stochastic dynamics due to possible fluctuations of the main process parameters in the ocean and the atmosphere.

  16. If at first you don't succeed. False hopes of self-change.

    PubMed

    Polivy, Janet; Herman, C Peter

    2002-09-01

    Despite repeated failure at attempts to change aspects of their behavior, people make frequent attempts at self-change. The generally negative outcome of many such self-change efforts makes it difficult to understand why so many individuals persist at these attempts. The authors have described this cycle of failure and renewed effort as a "false hope syndrome" characterized by unrealistic expectations about the likely speed, amount, ease, and consequences of self-change attempts. In this article, the authors further develop their conceptualization of this syndrome and review its evidential basis. They review the reasons why so many people tend to fail in their self-change attempts and then examine how people interpret these failures in such a way that they are led to keep trying repeatedly despite apparently overwhelming odds. Finally, the authors discuss the psychological consequences of repeated failure and analyze the distinction between confidence and overconfidence. PMID:12237978

  17. Sleep Loss Produces False Memories

    PubMed Central

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Lahl, Olaf; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a) as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b) as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., “night”, “dark”, “coal”,…), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: “black”). Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss. PMID:18946511

  18. Evolutionary Psychology and False Confession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bering, Jesse M.; Shackelford, Todd K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents comments on Kassin's review, (see record 2005-03019-002) of the psychology of false confessions. The authors note that Kassin's review makes a compelling argument for the need for legal reform in police interrogation practices. Because his work strikes at the heart of the American criminal justice system--its fairness--the…

  19. Selenographic distribution of apparent crater depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Hon, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    If apparent crater depth is a function of crater diameter, then the frequencies of crater depth and diameter should be similar and the distribution of apparent depths of craters on the lunar surface should be random. Apparent depths of complex craters, which range from 0.2 to 4.3 km on the moon, exhibit little correlation with crater diameters. Crater frequency decreases at increasing diameters, but apparent crater depth displays a Gaussian distribution. The average crater depth for all young craters is 1.8 km. The mean depth of craters on the maria is 1.3 km, and the mean depth of craters on the highlands is 2.1 km. A contour map of apparent crater depths exhibits sufficient organization to suggest that the apparent crater depth is correlated to major lunar provinces. In general, regions of shallow craters are associated with basin interiors. Greater apparent depths are associated with highland terrains.

  20. The false classification of extinction risk in noisy environments

    PubMed Central

    Connors, B. M.; Cooper, A. B.; Peterman, R. M.; Dulvy, N. K.

    2014-01-01

    Abundance trends are the basis for many classifications of threat and recovery status, but they can be a challenge to interpret because of observation error, stochastic variation in abundance (process noise) and temporal autocorrelation in that process noise. To measure the frequency of incorrectly detecting a decline (false-positive or false alarm) and failing to detect a true decline (false-negative), we simulated stable and declining abundance time series across several magnitudes of observation error and autocorrelated process noise. We then empirically estimated the magnitude of observation error and autocorrelated process noise across a broad range of taxa and mapped these estimates onto the simulated parameter space. Based on the taxa we examined, at low classification thresholds (30% decline in abundance) and short observation windows (10 years), false alarms would be expected to occur, on average, about 40% of the time assuming density-independent dynamics, whereas false-negatives would be expected to occur about 60% of the time. However, false alarms and failures to detect true declines were reduced at higher classification thresholds (50% or 80% declines), longer observation windows (20, 40, 60 years), and assuming density-dependent dynamics. The lowest false-positive and false-negative rates are likely to occur for large-bodied, long-lived animal species. PMID:24898368

  1. Mood-congruent false memories persist over time.

    PubMed

    Knott, Lauren M; Thorley, Craig

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined the role of mood-congruency and retention interval on the false recognition of emotion laden items using the Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm. Previous research has shown a mood-congruent false memory enhancement during immediate recognition tasks. The present study examined the persistence of this effect following a one-week delay. Participants were placed in a negative or neutral mood, presented with negative-emotion and neutral-emotion DRM word lists, and administered with both immediate and delayed recognition tests. Results showed that a negative mood state increased remember judgments for negative-emotion critical lures, in comparison to neutral-emotion critical lures, on both immediate and delayed testing. These findings are discussed in relation to theories of spreading activation and emotion-enhanced memory, with consideration of the applied forensic implications of such findings. PMID:24294987

  2. Affect influences false memories at encoding: evidence from recognition data.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, Justin; Clore, Gerald L

    2011-08-01

    Memory is susceptible to illusions in the form of false memories. Prior research found, however, that sad moods reduce false memories. The current experiment had two goals: (1) to determine whether affect influences retrieval processes, and (2) to determine whether affect influences the strength and the persistence of false memories. Happy or sad moods were induced either before or after learning word lists designed to produce false memories. Control groups did not experience a mood induction. We found that sad moods reduced false memories only when induced before learning. Signal detection analyses confirmed that sad moods induced prior to learning reduced activation of nonpresented critical lures suggesting that they came to mind less often. Affective states, however, did not influence retrieval effects. We conclude that negative affective states promote item-specific processing, which reduces false memories in a similar way as using an explicitly guided cognitive control strategy. PMID:21517165

  3. Affect Influences False Memories at Encoding: Evidence from Recognition Data

    PubMed Central

    Storbeck, Justin; Clore, Gerald L.

    2014-01-01

    Memory is susceptible to illusions in the form of false memories. Prior research found, however, that sad moods reduce false memories. The current experiment had two goals: (1) to determine whether affect influences retrieval processes, and (2) to determine whether affect influences the strength and the persistence of false memories. Happy or sad moods were induced either before or after learning word lists designed to produce false memories. Control groups did not experience a mood induction. We found that sad moods reduced false memories only when induced before learning. Signal detection analyses confirmed that sad moods induced prior to learning reduced activation of nonpresented critical lures suggesting that they came to mind less often. Affective states, however, did not influence retrieval effects. We conclude that negative affective states promote item-specific processing, which reduces false memories in a similar way as using an explicitly guided cognitive control strategy. PMID:21517165

  4. 49 CFR 234.107 - False activation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false False activation. 234.107 Section 234.107 ...System Malfunction § 234.107 False activation. Upon receipt of a credible report of a false activation, a railroad having...

  5. 49 CFR 234.107 - False activation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false False activation. 234.107 Section 234.107 ...System Malfunction § 234.107 False activation. Upon receipt of a credible report of a false activation, a railroad having...

  6. Pleiotropy, apparent stabilizing selection and uncovering fitness

    E-print Network

    Sokolowski, Marla

    Pleiotropy, apparent stabilizing selection and uncovering fitness optima Katrina McGuigan1 , Locke ow- ing to joint effects with fitness, and results in the genetic variation being concentrated with high levels of genetic vari- ation can be used to uncover fitness optima that are defined by apparent

  7. [Chemotherapies of negative schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Petit, M; Dollfus, S

    1991-01-01

    Five years ago, Goldberg claimed that negative symptoms of schizophrenia do respond to neuroleptics. This apparent discovery is, in fact, a very common way of thinking for European schools of psychiatry, specially the French one guided by Delay and Deniker. Initially focused on reserpine and some alerting phenothiazines such as thioproperazine, this opinion has been extended to benzamides in the 1970s. The analysis of the publications devoted to this point indicates that several drugs are actually considered as potent disinhibitors (i.e. active on negative symptoms of schizophrenia): Phenothiazines: As shown in the controlled studies by Itil (1971), Poirier-Littré (1988), fluphenazine and pipotiazine improve the BPRS anergia factor and the SANS score. Butyrophenones: The first description of the "imipramine like" effect of trifluperidol by Janssen (1959) initiated the studies by Gallant (1960), Fox (1963). They compared trifluperidol at low doses versus haloperidol and chlorpromazine at medium and high doses, BPRS anergia factor improved only at low doses. Diphenylbutylpiperidines (DPBP): Meltzer's review (1986) concluded to the efficacy of such drugs on negative symptoms appearing as a specific biochemical relationship effect. A definite analysis about doses leads to a very different interpretation: DPBP low doses and only low doses improved negative symptoms as much as some low doses of phenothiazines. On the opposite, DPBP, phenothiazines and butyrophenones high doses are inefficient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1683624

  8. False-color Dalmatian Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 10 May 2004 This daytime visible color image was collected on May 18, 2003 during the Southern Spring season in Noachis Terra.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -74, Longitude 351.9 East (8.1 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Apparent shape of a swimming pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelson, Kenneth S.

    2010-12-01

    The apparent depth of a pool depends on the angle between the normal to the pool surface and the ray that reaches the observer's eye. For small angles, the ratio of apparent to actual depth is 1/n, where n is the index of refraction of the water. As the angle increases, the image of a point on the bottom becomes astigmatic giving rise to two principal images. For both images, the apparent depth becomes smaller as the angle becomes larger. I show that the appearance of a typical gymnasium pool is significantly different depending on whether the observer is standing at the shallow or the deep end of the pool. In either case, one of the principal astigmatic images will be much more apparent than the other.

  10. Southern Spring in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    This image was collected June 25, 2003 during the southern spring season. This false color image shows both the layered ice cap and darker 'spots' that are seen only when the sun first lights the polar surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -82.3, Longitude 306 East (54 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Understanding dynamical black hole apparent horizons

    E-print Network

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical, non-asymptotically flat black holes are best characterized by their apparent horizons. Cosmological black hole solutions of General Relativity exhibit two types of apparent horizon behaviours which, thus far, appeared to be completely disconnected. By taking the limit to General Relativity of a class of Brans-Dicke spacetimes, it is shown how one of these two behaviours is really a limit of the other.

  12. Apparent Thermal Conductivity Of Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, Glen E.

    1995-01-01

    Mathematical model of apparent or effective thermal conductivity between two successive layers of multilayer thermal insulation (MLI) offers potential for optimizing performance of insulation. One gains understanding of how each physical mechanism contributes to overall flow of heat through MLI blanket. Model helps analyze engineering tradeoffs among such parameters as number of layers, thicknesses of gaps between layers, types of spacers placed in gaps, weight, overall thickness, and effects of foregoing on apparent thermal conductivity through blanket.

  13. Negative probability

    E-print Network

    Andreas Blass; Yuri Gurevich

    2015-02-02

    This article was written for the Logic in Computer Science column in the February 2015 issue of the Bulletin of the European Association for Theoretical Computer Science. The intended audience is general computer science audience. The uncertainty principle asserts a limit to the precision with which position x and momentum p of a particle can be known simultaneously. You may know the probability distributions of x and p individually but the joint distribution makes no physical sense. Yet Wigner exhibited such a joint distribution f(x,p). There was, however, a little trouble with it: some of its values were negative. Nevertheless Wigner's discovery attracted attention and found applications. There are other joint distribution, all with negative values, which produce the correct marginal distributions of x and p. But only Wigner's distribution produces the correct marginal distributions for all linear combinations of position and momentum. We offer a simple proof of the uniqueness and discuss related issues.

  14. The consequences of suggesting false childhood food events.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Daniel M; Scoboria, Alan; Arnold, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We combined data across eight published experiments (N=1369) to examine the formation and consequences of false autobiographical beliefs and memories. Our path models revealed that the formation of false autobiographical belief fully mediated the pathway between suggesting to people that they had experienced a positive or negative food-related event in the past and current preference for that food. Suggestion indirectly affected intention to eat the food via change in autobiographical belief. The development of belief with and without memory produced similar changes in food preferences and behavior intention, indicating that belief in the event drives changes in suggestion-related attitudes. Finally, positive suggestions (e.g., "you loved asparagus the first time you tried it") yielded stronger effects than negative suggestions (e.g., "you got sick eating egg salad"). These findings show that false autobiographical suggestions lead to the development of autobiographical beliefs, which in turn, have consequences for one's attitudes and behaviors. PMID:25613303

  15. 7 CFR 996.11 - Negative aflatoxin content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Negative aflatoxin content. 996.11 Section 996.11 Agriculture...STATES Definitions § 996.11 Negative aflatoxin content. Negative aflatoxin content means 15 parts per billion...

  16. Apparent Linear Attenuation Coefficients in Phase Contrast X-Ray Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng

    2011-01-01

    In the inline phase contrast x-ray tomography the reconstructed apparent linear attenuation coefficient values may be greatly larger than sample’s linear attenuation coefficients or even be negative. In this work we present a general formula to quantitatively relate the apparent linear attenuation coefficient values in cone-beam phase contrast tomography to sample’s linear attenuation coefficients and refractive indices. This formula overcomes the gross inaccuracy of the existing formula in the literature in analyzing high-resolution phase contrast tomography, and it will be useful for correctly interpreting and quantifying the apparent linear attenuation coefficients in cone-beam x-ray phase contrast tomography. PMID:21691420

  17. Valence and the development of immediate and long-term false memory illusions.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Candel, Ingrid; Otgaar, Henry; Malone, Catherine; Wimmer, Marina C

    2010-01-01

    Across five experiments we examined the role of valence in children's and adults' true and false memories. Using the Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm and either neutral or negative-emotional lists, both adults' (Experiment 1) and children's (Experiment 2) true recall and recognition was better for neutral than negative items, and although false recall was also higher for neutral items, false recognition was higher for negative items. The last three experiments examined adults' (Experiment 3) and children's (Experiments 4 and 5) 1-week long-term recognition of neutral and negative-emotional information. The results replicated the immediate recall and recognition findings from the first two experiments. More important, these experiments showed that although true recognition decreased over the 1-week interval, false recognition of neutral items remained unchanged whereas false recognition of negative-emotional items increased. These findings are discussed in terms of theories of emotion and memory as well as their forensic implications. PMID:20391177

  18. Adaptation to apparent motion in crowding condition.

    PubMed

    Rajimehr, Reza; Vaziri-Pashkam, Maryam; Afraz, Seyed-Reza; Esteky, Hossein

    2004-04-01

    Visual adaptation has been successfully used for studying the neural activity of different cortical areas in response to visual stimuli when observers do not have explicit conscious access to those stimuli. We compared the orientation selective adaptation to apparent motion and its effect on the perception of stimuli with bistable apparent motion in crowded and non-crowded conditions. In the crowding paradigm conscious access to a visual stimulus is severely impaired when it is flanked by other similar stimuli in the peripheral visual field. As expected, adaptation to the target stimulus occurred in the non-crowded condition in all of the individual subjects (n=4; P<0.001). Although in the crowded condition subjects were not able to discriminate the target stimulus, adaptation to that stimulus was still preserved (P<0.001). There was no significant difference between the adaptations in the two conditions of the apparent motion (P>0.05). Imaging studies have shown that V5 cortex is the earliest visual area that specifically responds to apparent motion. Our results suggest that in certain conditions V5 may be activated while there is no explicit conscious access to the apparent motion. PMID:14992836

  19. 19 CFR 111.32 - False information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false False information. 111.32 Section 111.32 Customs... CUSTOMS BROKERS Duties and Responsibilities of Customs Brokers § 111.32 False information. A broker must... procure the giving of, any false or misleading information or testimony in any matter pending before...

  20. The Distinctions of False and Fuzzy Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schooler, Jonathan W.

    1998-01-01

    Notes that fuzzy-trace theory has been used to understand false memories of children. Demonstrates the irony imbedded in the theory, maintaining that a central implication of fuzzy-trace theory is that some errors characterized as false memories are not really false at all. These errors, when applied to false alarms to related lures, are best…

  1. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  2. 14 CFR 25.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 25.943 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.943 Negative acceleration. No... the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in § 25.333. This must be shown...

  3. 14 CFR 25.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 25.943 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.943 Negative acceleration. No... the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in § 25.333. This must be shown...

  4. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  5. 14 CFR 25.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 25.943 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.943 Negative acceleration. No... the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in § 25.333. This must be shown...

  6. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  7. 14 CFR 25.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 25.943 Section 25... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.943 Negative acceleration. No... the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in § 25.333. This must be shown...

  8. 14 CFR 23.943 - Negative acceleration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Negative acceleration. 23.943 Section 23... Negative acceleration. No hazardous malfunction of an engine, an auxiliary power unit approved for use in... the airplane is operated at the negative accelerations within the flight envelopes prescribed in §...

  9. Proactive and Retroactive Effects of Negative Suggestion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Alan S.; Brown, Christine M.; Mosbacher, Joy L.; Dryden, W. Erich

    2006-01-01

    The negative effects of false information presented either prior to (proactive interference; PI) or following (retroactive interference; RI) true information was examined with word definitions (Experiment 1) and trivia facts (Experiment 2). Participants were explicitly aware of which information was true and false when shown, and true-false

  10. Geophysics Fatally Flawed by False Fundamental Philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, L. S.

    2004-05-01

    For two centuries scientists have failed to realize Laplace's nebular hypothesis \\(1796\\) of Earth's creation is false. As a consequence, geophysicists today are misinterpreting and miscalculating many fundamental aspects of the Earth and Solar System. Why scientists have deluded themselves for so long is a mystery. The greatest error is the assumption Earth was created 4.6 billion years ago as a molten protoplanet in its present size, shape and composition. This assumption ignores daily accretion of more than 200 tons/day of meteorites and dust, plus unknown volumes of solar insolation that created coal beds and other biomass that increased Earth's mass and diameter over time! Although the volume added daily is minuscule compared with Earth's total mass, logic and simple addition mandates an increase in mass, diameter and gravity. Increased diameter from accretion is proved by Grand Canyon stratigraphy that shows a one kilometer increase in depth and planetary radius at a rate exceeding three meters \\(10 ft\\) per Ma from start of the Cambrian \\(540 Ma\\) to end of the Permian \\(245 Ma\\)-each layer deposited onto Earth's surface. This is unequivocal evidence of passive external growth by accretion, part of a dual growth and expansion process called "Accreation" \\(creation by accretion\\). Dynamic internal core expansion, the second stage of Accreation, did not commence until the protoplanet reached spherical shape at 500-600 km diameter. At that point, gravity-powered compressive heating initiated core melting and internal expansion. Expansion quickly surpassed the external accretion growth rate and produced surface volcanoes to relieve explosive internal tectonic pressure and transfer excess mass (magma)to the surface. Then, 200-250 Ma, expansion triggered Pangaea's breakup, first sundering Asia and Australia to form the Pacific Ocean, followed by North and South America to form the Atlantic Ocean, by the mechanism of midocean ridges, linear underwater volcanoes, that enable planetary expansion the same way cranial sutures permit human skulls to grow to maturity. Expansion is shown by the Asian and Australian trenches, from Kamchatka to the Marianas, and from Samoa to the tip of Macquarie Ridge south of New Zealand, that are mirror images of the western coasts of North and South America. This is clear evidence neither the Atlantic nor the Pacific Ocean existed 250 Ma when Earth was much smaller. In just 250 Ma external accretion and internal core expansion increased Earth's diameter from 7640 km to 12,735 km and increased total surface area to 361,060,000 sq. km, the area occupied by today's oceans-oceans that did not exist 250 Ma when Earth was slightly larger than Mars is today \\(6787 km\\). The fallacy of the nebular hypothesis did not become apparent until after Oliver and Isacks introduced the concept of subduction in 1967. Subduction was based on the false assumption that Earth's diameter is constant and unchanging, and spawned the theory of Plate Tectonics that "revolutionized" geophysics in a short period of time-a "revolution" destined for failure. Evidence is presented showing all solar bodies originate as comets \\(fragments of supernovae explosions\\) captured by the Sun that become meteoroids or asteroids by external accretion of meteorites and dust from over 370 known meteor streams.\\(Terentjeva, 1964\\) Accreation replaces the nebular hypothesis and rejuvenates Carey's Earth Expansion theory that, unfortunately, was pushed aside by plate tectonics because it lacked a plausible mechanism. However, expansion carries an ultimate threat to Mankind's tenure on Earth and exploration of Mars as the future home of Mankind takes on added significance.

  11. Frog Swarms: Earthquake Precursors or False Alarms?

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Rachel A.; Conlan, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary Media reports linking unusual animal behaviour with earthquakes can potentially create false alarms and unnecessary anxiety among people that live in earthquake risk zones. Recently large frog swarms in China and elsewhere have been reported as earthquake precursors in the media. By examining international media reports of frog swarms since 1850 in comparison to earthquake data, it was concluded that frog swarms are naturally occurring dispersal behaviour of juveniles and are not associated with earthquakes. However, the media in seismic risk areas may be more likely to report frog swarms, and more likely to disseminate reports on frog swarms after earthquakes have occurred, leading to an apparent link between frog swarms and earthquakes. Abstract In short-term earthquake risk forecasting, the avoidance of false alarms is of utmost importance to preclude the possibility of unnecessary panic among populations in seismic hazard areas. Unusual animal behaviour prior to earthquakes has been reported for millennia but has rarely been scientifically documented. Recently large migrations or unusual behaviour of amphibians have been linked to large earthquakes, and media reports of large frog and toad migrations in areas of high seismic risk such as Greece and China have led to fears of a subsequent large earthquake. However, at certain times of year large migrations are part of the normal behavioural repertoire of amphibians. News reports of “frog swarms” from 1850 to the present day were examined for evidence that this behaviour is a precursor to large earthquakes. It was found that only two of 28 reported frog swarms preceded large earthquakes (Sichuan province, China in 2008 and 2010). All of the reported mass migrations of amphibians occurred in late spring, summer and autumn and appeared to relate to small juvenile anurans (frogs and toads). It was concluded that most reported “frog swarms” are actually normal behaviour, probably caused by juvenile animals migrating away from their breeding pond, after a fruitful reproductive season. As amphibian populations undergo large fluctuations in numbers from year to year, this phenomenon will not occur on a yearly basis but will depend on successful reproduction, which is related to numerous climatic and geophysical factors. Hence, most large swarms of amphibians, particularly those involving very small frogs and occurring in late spring or summer, are not unusual and should not be considered earthquake precursors. In addition, it is likely that reports of several mass migration of small toads prior to the Great Sichuan Earthquake in 2008 were not linked to the subsequent M = 7.9 event (some occurred at a great distance from the epicentre), and were probably co-incidence. Statistical analysis of the data indicated frog swarms are unlikely to be connected with earthquakes. Reports of unusual behaviour giving rise to earthquake fears should be interpreted with caution, and consultation with experts in the field of earthquake biology is advised. PMID:26479746

  12. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6 False statements. Any false statement or forgery on the application or supporting papers...

  13. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6 False statements. Any false statement or forgery on the application or supporting papers...

  14. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6 False statements. Any false statement or forgery on the application or supporting papers...

  15. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6 False statements. Any false statement or forgery on the application or supporting papers...

  16. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6 False statements. Any false statement or forgery on the application or supporting papers...

  17. False-positive IgM serology in coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Kuberski, Tim; Herrig, Judith; Pappagianis, D

    2010-06-01

    The clinical observation has been made that there might be an unacceptable number of false-positive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test results for IgM among persons suspected of having coccidioidomycosis. Patients with a positive result for IgM by EIA are thought to have a diagnosis of acute coccidioidomycosis. However, this study found that 82% of patients with an IgM-positive and IgG-negative EIA result did not have coccidioidomycosis. PMID:20357210

  18. December 2012 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens)

    E-print Network

    265 December 2012 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens): Northern Gulf of Mexico Stock STOCK DEFINITION AND GEOGRAPHIC RANGE The false killer whale is distributed worldwide throughout warm temperate and Fulling 2004; Maze-Foley and Mullin 2006). False killer whales were seen only in the spring and summer

  19. December 2005 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens)

    E-print Network

    250 December 2005 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens): Northern Gulf of Mexico Stock STOCK DEFINITION AND GEOGRAPHIC RANGE The false killer whale is distributed worldwide throughout warm temperate occur in oceanic waters (Figure 1; Mullin and Fulling 2004). False killer whales were seen only

  20. December 2009 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens)

    E-print Network

    547 December 2009 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens): Northern Gulf of Mexico Stock STOCK DEFINITION AND GEOGRAPHIC RANGE The false killer whale is distributed worldwide throughout warm temperate and Fulling 2004; Maze-Foley and Mullin 2006). False killer whales were seen only in the spring and summer

  1. October 2008 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens)

    E-print Network

    254 October 2008 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens): Northern Gulf of Mexico Stock STOCK DEFINITION AND GEOGRAPHIC RANGE The false killer whale is distributed worldwide throughout warm temperate occur in oceanic waters (Figure 1; Mullin and Fulling 2004). False killer whales were seen only

  2. October 2007 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens)

    E-print Network

    299 October 2007 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens): Northern Gulf of Mexico Stock STOCK DEFINITION AND GEOGRAPHIC RANGE The false killer whale is distributed worldwide throughout warm temperate occur in oceanic waters (Figure 1; Mullin and Fulling 2004). False killer whales were seen only

  3. December 2005 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens)

    E-print Network

    348 December 2005 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens): Northern Gulf of Mexico Stock STOCK DEFINITION AND GEOGRAPHIC RANGE The false killer whale is distributed worldwide throughout warm temperate occur in oceanic waters (Figure 1; Mullin and Fulling 2004). False killer whales were seen only

  4. December 2009 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens)

    E-print Network

    December 2009 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens): Northern Gulf of Mexico Stock STOCK DEFINITION AND GEOGRAPHIC RANGE The false killer whale is distributed worldwide throughout warm temperate and Fulling 2004; Maze-Foley and Mullin 2006). False killer whales were seen only in the spring and summer

  5. Apparent extended body motions in depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Heiko; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    1991-01-01

    Five experiments were designed to investigate the influence of three-dimensional (3-D) orientation change on apparent motion. Projections of an orientation-specific 3-D object were sequentially flashed in different locations and at different orientations. Such an occurrence could be resolved by perceiving a rotational motion in depth around an axis external to the object. Consistent with this proposal, it was found that observers perceived curved paths in depth. Although the magnitude of perceived trajectory curvature often fell short of that required for rotational motions in depth (3-D circularity), judgments of the slant of the virtual plane on which apparent motions occurred were quite close to the predictions of a model that proposes circular paths in depth.

  6. Fenofibric Acid Can Cause False-Positive Urine Methylenedioxymethamphetamine Immunoassay Results.

    PubMed

    Quesada, Loreto; Gomila, Isabel; Fe, Antonia; Servera, Miguel A; Yates, Christopher; Morell-Garcia, Daniel; Castanyer, Bartomeu; Barceló, Bernardino

    2015-11-01

    We present a false-positive result of ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxy-NN-methylamphetamine) screening due to the therapeutic use of fenofibrate, an antihyperlipidemic drug. Our hypothesis was that the main metabolite of fenofibrate, fenofibric acid, was responsible for this cross-reactivity on a DRI(®) Ecstasy Assay, using a cut-off of 500 ng/mL. We estimated that the addition of 225 µg/mL pure fenofibric acid to blank urine would be sufficient to result in a positive DRI(®) Ecstasy Assay. The results obtained on the urine samples analyses of the patient show that the DRI(®) Ecstasy Assay resulted negative 2 days after discontinuing fenofibrate treatment, when the urine fenofibric acid concentration corrected by creatinine and determinated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was 20.3 µg/mg creatinine. The cross-reactivity data for fenofibric acid would seem to indicate that there was insufficient concentration of measured compound to account for the positive immunochemical results for ecstasy. This apparent discrepancy can be explained in several ways, one of them is that the ?-glucuronidase-resistent fenofibric acid isomers are responsible. This process could explain the low recovery of free fenofibric acid when we use the developed method for its quantification in urine samples. Positive results on immunoassay screening must be considered presumptive until confirmation with another method based on a different principle, preferably gas chromatography-mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:26203185

  7. Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces

    E-print Network

    M. Mofidi; B. Prakash; B. N. J. Persson; O. Albohl

    2007-10-18

    We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short wavelength roughness, which may give the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the substrate surface asperities. The presented results are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

  8. Apparent Charge Transfer at Semiconductor Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Carpinelli, Joseph M.; Stumpf, Roland R.; Weitering, Hanno H.

    1999-05-11

    We investigate the apparent charge transfer between adatoms in the GeXPb[l.XjGe(lll) interface both experimentally and theoretically. Scanning tunneling microscopy and surface core level measurements suggest significant charge transfer from the Ge adatoms to the Pb adatoms. However, first-principles calculations unambiguously find that the total electronic displacement is negligibly small, and that the results of published experiments can be explained as a result of bond rearrangement.

  9. Comment: An Apparent Controversy in Auroral Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2007-03-01

    In his article ``A turning point in auroral physics,'' Bryant argued against what he called the `standard' theory of auroral acceleration, according to which the electrons ``gain their energy from static electric fields,'' and offered wave acceleration as an alternative. Because of the importance of the process, not only for the aurora borealis but also for other cosmic plasmas, a clarification of this apparent controversy seems to be in place.

  10. Predicting apparent Sherwood numbers for fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, H.; Tsotsas, E.

    1999-09-01

    Mass transfer data of bubbling fluidized beds have been reevaluated with a new model which is completely predictive. The model is based on a two-phase approach with active bypass, formally plug flow for the suspension gas and a consideration of backmixing in the main kinetic coefficient, i.e. in the apparent particle-to-fluid Sherwood number. A good agreement with experimental results of various authors with a broad range of Reynolds numbers and particle diameters is demonstrated.

  11. A 3D Apparent Horizon Finder

    E-print Network

    Joseph Libson; Joan Masso; Edward Seidel; Wai-Mo Suen

    1994-12-21

    We report on an efficient method for locating the apparent horizon in numerically constructed dynamical 3D black hole spacetimes. Instead of solving the zero expansion partial differential equation, our method uses a minimization procedure. Converting the PDE problem to minimization eliminates the difficulty of imposing suitable boundary conditions for the PDE. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in both 2D and 3D cases. The method is also highly parallelizable for implementation in massively parallel computers.

  12. False memory susceptibility is correlated with categorisation ability in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Kathryn; Chittka, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Our memory is often surprisingly inaccurate, with errors ranging from misremembering minor details of events to generating illusory memories of entire episodes. The pervasiveness of such false memories generates a puzzle: in the face of selection pressure for accuracy of memory, how could such systematic failures have persisted over evolutionary time? It is possible that memory errors are an inevitable by-product of our adaptive memories and that semantic false memories are specifically connected to our ability to learn rules and concepts and to classify objects by category memberships. Here we test this possibility using a standard experimental false memory paradigm and inter-individual variation in verbal categorisation ability. Indeed it turns out that the error scores are significantly negatively correlated, with those individuals scoring fewer errors on the categorisation test being more susceptible to false memory intrusions in a free recall test. A similar trend, though not significant, was observed between individual categorisation ability and false memory susceptibility in a word recognition task. Our results therefore indicate that false memories, to some extent, might be a by-product of our ability to learn rules, categories and concepts. PMID:25254105

  13. False memory susceptibility is correlated with categorisation ability in humans.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kathryn; Chittka, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Our memory is often surprisingly inaccurate, with errors ranging from misremembering minor details of events to generating illusory memories of entire episodes. The pervasiveness of such false memories generates a puzzle: in the face of selection pressure for accuracy of memory, how could such systematic failures have persisted over evolutionary time? It is possible that memory errors are an inevitable by-product of our adaptive memories and that semantic false memories are specifically connected to our ability to learn rules and concepts and to classify objects by category memberships. Here we test this possibility using a standard experimental false memory paradigm and inter-individual variation in verbal categorisation ability. Indeed it turns out that the error scores are significantly negatively correlated, with those individuals scoring fewer errors on the categorisation test being more susceptible to false memory intrusions in a free recall test. A similar trend, though not significant, was observed between individual categorisation ability and false memory susceptibility in a word recognition task. Our results therefore indicate that false memories, to some extent, might be a by-product of our ability to learn rules, categories and concepts. PMID:25254105

  14. Apparent Solar Tornado-Like Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasenco, Olga; Martin, Sara F.; Velli, Marco

    2014-02-01

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have reawakened interest in the old and fascinating phenomenon of solar tornado-like prominences. This class of prominences was first introduced by Pettit ( Astrophys. J. 76, 9, 1932), who studied them over many years. Observations of tornado prominences similar to the ones seen by SDO had already been documented by Secchi ( Le Soleil, 1877). High-resolution and high-cadence multiwavelength data obtained by SDO reveal that the tornado-like appearance of these prominences is mainly an illusion due to projection effects. We discuss two different cases where prominences on the limb might appear to have a tornado-like behavior. One case of apparent vortical motions in prominence spines and barbs arises from the (mostly) 2D counterstreaming plasma motion along the prominence spine and barbs together with oscillations along individual threads. The other case of apparent rotational motion is observed in a prominence cavity and results from the 3D plasma motion along the writhed magnetic fields inside and along the prominence cavity as seen projected on the limb. Thus, the "tornado" impression results either from counterstreaming and oscillations or from the projection on the plane of the sky of plasma motion along magnetic-field lines, rather than from a true vortical motion around an (apparent) vertical or horizontal axis. We discuss the link between tornado-like prominences, filament barbs, and photospheric vortices at their base.

  15. The Apparent Thermal Conductivity of Pozzolana Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessenouci, M. Z.; Triki, N. E. Bibi; Khelladi, S.; Draoui, B.; Abene, A.

    The recent development of some lightweight construction materials, such as light concrete, can play an important role as an insulator, while maintaining sufficient levels of mechanical performance. The quality of insulation to provide depends on the climate, the exposure of the walls and also the materials used in the construction. The choice of a material to be used as an insulator, obviously, depends on its availability and its cost. This is a study of natural pozzolanas as basic components in building materials. It is intended to highlight their thermal advantage. It is economically advantageous to use pozzolana in substitution for a portion of the clinker as hydraulically active additions, as well as in compositions of lightweight concretes in the form of pozzolanic aggregate mixtures, which provide mechanical strengths that comply with current standards. A theoretical study is conducted on the apparent thermal conductivity of building materials, namely concrete containing pozzolana. Thermal modeling, apparent to that commonly used for porous materials, has been applied to pozzolana concrete. Experimental results on measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity of pozzolana concrete are reported in this study, using an approach that considers that concrete is composed of two solid ingredients, a binding matrix (hydrated cement paste) and all aggregates. A second comparative theoretical approach is used for the case where concrete consists of a solid phase and a fluid phase (air).

  16. Apparent Acceleration and an Alternative Concordance from Causal Backreaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochner, Brett

    2015-01-01

    A phenomenological formalism is presented in which the apparent acceleration of the universe is generated by cosmic structure formation, without resort to Dark Energy, modifications to gravity, or a local void. The observed acceleration results from the combined effect of innumerable local perturbations due to individually virializing systems, overlapping together in a smoothly-inhomogeneous adjustment of the FRW metric, in a process governed by the causal flow of inhomogeneity information outward from each clumped system. After noting how common arguments claiming to limit backreaction are physically unrealistic, models are presented which fit the supernova luminosity distance data essentially as well as ?CDM, while bringing several important cosmological parameters to a new Concordance. These goals are all achieved with a second-generation version of our formalism that accounts for the negative feedback of Causal Backreaction upon itself due to the slowed propagation of gravitational inhomogeneity information.

  17. Pluto behaving badly: false beliefs and their consequences.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Shari R; Laney, Cara; Morris, Erin K; Garry, Maryanne; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2008-01-01

    We exposed college students to suggestive materials in order to lead them to believe that, as children, they had a negative experience at Disneyland involving the Pluto character. A sizable minority of subjects developed a false belief or memory that Pluto had uncomfortably licked their ear. Suggestions about a positive experience with Pluto led to even greater acceptance of a lovable ear-licking episode. False beliefs and memories had repercussions; those seduced by the bad suggestions were not willing to pay as much for a Pluto souvenir. These findings are among the first to demonstrate that false beliefs can have repercussions for people, meaning that they can influence their later thoughts, beliefs, and behaviors. PMID:19105582

  18. Lasting false beliefs and their behavioral consequences.

    PubMed

    Geraerts, Elke; Bernstein, Daniel M; Merckelbach, Harald; Linders, Christel; Raymaekers, Linsey; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2008-08-01

    False beliefs and memories can affect people's attitudes, at least in the short term. But can they produce real changes in behavior? This study explored whether falsely suggesting to subjects that they had experienced a food-related event in their childhood would lead to a change in their behavior shortly after the suggestion and up to 4 months later. We falsely suggested to 180 subjects that, as children, they had gotten ill after eating egg salad. Results showed that, after this manipulation, a significant minority of subjects came to believe they had experienced this childhood event even though they had initially denied having experienced it. This newfound autobiographical belief was accompanied by the intent to avoid egg salad, and also by significantly reduced consumption of egg-salad sandwiches, both immediately and 4 months after the false suggestion. The false suggestion of a childhood event can lead to persistent false beliefs that have lasting behavioral consequences. PMID:18816279

  19. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13...descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. (a) Articles which...Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys thereof...

  20. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13...descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. (a) Articles which...Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys thereof...

  1. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13...descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. (a) Articles which...Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys thereof...

  2. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13...descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. (a) Articles which...Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys thereof...

  3. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13...descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. (a) Articles which...Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys thereof...

  4. Constructing rich false memories of committing crime.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julia; Porter, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Memory researchers long have speculated that certain tactics may lead people to recall crimes that never occurred, and thus could potentially lead to false confessions. This is the first study to provide evidence suggesting that full episodic false memories of committing crime can be generated in a controlled experimental setting. With suggestive memory-retrieval techniques, participants were induced to generate criminal and noncriminal emotional false memories, and we compared these false memories with true memories of emotional events. After three interviews, 70% of participants were classified as having false memories of committing a crime (theft, assault, or assault with a weapon) that led to police contact in early adolescence and volunteered a detailed false account. These reported false memories of crime were similar to false memories of noncriminal events and to true memory accounts, having the same kinds of complex descriptive and multisensory components. It appears that in the context of a highly suggestive interview, people can quite readily generate rich false memories of committing crime. PMID:25589599

  5. False vs True rupture of membranes.

    PubMed

    Cohain, J S

    2015-05-01

    New medical nomenclature: False rupture of membranes or False ROM and Double rupture of membranes or Double ROM are being introduced into the English language. A single caregiver found about 1% of term births and 10% of term PROM involved False ROM, in which the chorion breaks while the amnion remains intact. Diagnostically, if meconium or vernix is observed, then both the chorionic and amniotic sacs have broken. In the absence of detection of vernix or meconium, an immediate accurate diagnostic test for False ROM is lacking and differentiating between True ROM from False ROM is possible only after leaking stops, which takes hours to days. The obvious benefit of differentiating between 'True' and 'False' ROM, is that in the case of False ROM, the amnion is intact and ascending infections are likely not at increased risk, although research is lacking as to whether False ROM is associated with an increased rate of ascending infection. Three cases of False ROM are presented and avenues for future research are enumerated. PMID:25279443

  6. Developmental trends in different types of spontaneous false memories: implications for the legal field.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L; Peters, Maarten; Sauerland, Melanie; Raymaekers, Linsey

    2013-01-01

    In an emerging area of memory research, it is becoming apparent that one particular type of false memory, called spontaneous false memory, follows a developmental trajectory that is the opposite of what is commonly assumed in false memory research - that is, spontaneous false memories are more likely to occur in adults than in children. The present study focused on developmental trends of different types of spontaneous false memories. Specifically, in the current study, 6-8 year-olds, 10-12 year-olds, and adults were presented with two methods to induce spontaneous false memories: (i) semantically related word lists that are commonly used to evoke spontaneous false memories [i.e, Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm]; and (ii) a video in which related details were not shown but were presented during a recognition task. The results showed that children were more likely to form false memories than adults in the video false memory paradigm, whereas DRM false memories were more evident in adults than in children. Furthermore, we found that on a general level, DRM false memories were positively related to video spontaneous false memories. We explain that stimuli that contain obvious themes attenuate or even reverse developmental trends in spontaneous false memories. PMID:23839901

  7. Repetition increases false recollection in older people.

    PubMed

    Pitarque, Alfonso; Sales, Alicia; Meléndez, Juan Carlos; Algarabel, Salvador

    2015-02-01

    Aging is accompanied by an increase in false alarms on recognition tasks, and these false alarms increase with repetition in older people (but not in young people). Traditionally, this increase was thought to be due to a greater use of familiarity in older people, but it was recently pointed out that false alarms also have a clear recollection component in these people. The main objective of our study is to analyze whether the expected increase in the rate of false alarms in older people due to stimulus repetition is produced by an inadequate use of familiarity, recollection, or both processes. To do so, we carried out an associative recognition experiment using pairs of words and pairs of images (faces associated with everyday contexts), in which we analyzed whether the repetition of some of the pairs increases the rate of false alarms in older people (compared to what was found in a sample of young people), and whether this increase is due to familiarity or recollection (using a remember-know paradigm). Our results show that the increase in false alarms in older people due to repetition is produced by false recollection, calling into question both dual and single-process models of recognition. Also, older people falsely recollect details of never studied stimuli, a clear case of perceptual illusions. These results are better explained in terms of source-monitoring errors, mediated by people's retrieval expectations. PMID:25330138

  8. Les Faux-amis (False Cognates)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maillot, Jean

    1977-01-01

    A summary of the study of false cognates by Koessler and Derocquigny. The following topics are studied: The origin and meaning of the term; a classification according to monosemy or polysemy; false cognates on the multilingual level and in language families; and extensions of meaning. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  9. Can False Memories Prime Problem Solutions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.; Garner, Sarah R.; Dewhurst, Stephen A.; Ball, Linden J.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that false memories can prime performance on related implicit and explicit memory tasks. The present research examined whether false memories can also be used to prime higher order cognitive processes, namely, insight-based problem solving. Participants were asked to solve a number of compound remote associate task…

  10. Explaining the Development of False Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Valerie F.; Holliday, Robyn; Marche, Tammy

    2002-01-01

    Reviews explanatory dimensions of children's false memory relevant to forensic practice: measurement, development, social factors, individual differences, varieties of memories and memory judgments, and varieties of procedures inducing false memories. Asserts that recent studies fail to use techniques that separate acquiescence from memory…

  11. How Does Distinctive Processing Reduce False Recall?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.; Dunlap, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    False memories arising from associatively related lists are a robust phenomenon that resists many efforts to prevent it. However, a few variables have been shown to reduce this form of false memory. Explanations for how the reduction is accomplished have focused on either output monitoring processes or constraints on access, but neither idea alone…

  12. Creating false memories for visual scenes.

    PubMed

    Miller, M B; Gazzaniga, M S

    1998-06-01

    Creating false memories has become an important tool to investigate the processes underlying true memories. In the course of investigating the constructive and/or reconstructive processes underlying the formation of false memories, it has become clear that paradigms are needed that can create false memories reliably in a variety of laboratory settings. In particular, neuroimaging techniques present certain constraints in terms of subject response and timing of stimuli that a false memory paradigm needs to comply with. We have developed a picture paradigm which results in the false recognition of items of a scene which did not occur almost as often as the true recognition of items that did occur. It uses a single presentation of pictures with thematic, stereotypical scenes (e.g. a beach scene). Some of the exemplars from the scene were removed (e.g. a beach ball) and used as lures during an auditory recognition test. Subjects' performance on this paradigm was compared with their performance on the word paradigm reintroduced by Roediger and McDermott. The word paradigm has been useful in creating false memories in several neuroimaging studies because of the high frequency of false recognition for critical lures (words not presented but closely associated with lists of words that were presented) and the strong subjective sense of remembering accompanying these false recognitions. However, it has several limitations including small numbers of lures and a particular source confusion. The picture paradigm avoids these limitations and produces identical effects on normal subjects. PMID:9705061

  13. Priming analogical reasoning with false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Threadgold, Emma; Ball, Linden J

    2015-08-01

    Like true memories, false memories are capable of priming answers to insight-based problems. Recent research has attempted to extend this paradigm to more advanced problem-solving tasks, including those involving verbal analogical reasoning. However, these experiments are constrained inasmuch as problem solutions could be generated via spreading activation mechanisms (much like false memories themselves) rather than using complex reasoning processes. In three experiments we examined false memory priming of complex analogical reasoning tasks in the absence of simple semantic associations. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated the robustness of false memory priming in analogical reasoning when backward associative strength among the problem terms was eliminated. In Experiments 2a and 2b, we extended these findings by demonstrating priming on newly created homonym analogies that can only be solved by inhibiting semantic associations within the analogy. Overall, the findings of the present experiments provide evidence that the efficacy of false memory priming extends to complex analogical reasoning problems. PMID:25784574

  14. An individual difference analysis of false recognition.

    PubMed

    Salthouse, Timothy A; Siedlecki, Karen L

    2007-01-01

    Two studies with moderately large samples of participants were conducted to examine correlates of false recognition. In Experiment 1 false recognition of words was found to be a robust and reliable phenomenon at the level of individuals, and the tendency to classify critical lures as old was more closely related to the correct classification of old items as old than to the incorrect classification of unrelated new items as old. False recognition was not significantly related to any of the cognitive abilities that were assessed, including episodic memory, or to other factors such as personality and chronic mood. In Experiment 2 these findings were extended to include dot pattern and face stimuli. Although measures of veridical memory were significantly correlated across the different types of stimulus material, false recognition rates only had modest and generally not significant correlations, which suggests that the tendency to produce false recognitions may be a task-specific characteristic of individuals. PMID:17892087

  15. Predictors of suggestibility and false-memory production in young adult women.

    PubMed

    Peiffer, L C; Trull, T J

    2000-06-01

    Recent controversy over memories retrieved in therapy has highlighted the importance of increasing our understanding of individual differences in suggestibility and false-memory production. The purpose of this laboratory study was to assess the ability of several clinically relevant variables (acquiescence, self-esteem, and negative affect) to predict the tendency to yield to suggestive questioning, to alter responses in the face of interpersonal criticism, or to produce false memories (in this study, false recall of implied words). Results indicated that acquiescence significantly predicted suggestibility, as did competence self-esteem scores, but global self-esteem and negative affect scores did not. False-memory production (i.e., false recall of implied words) was associated with higher levels of both acquiescence and negative affect, but the tendency to alter responses after criticism was not significantly predicted by any variable. PMID:10900567

  16. Affective valence influences participant's susceptibility to false memories and illusory recollection.

    PubMed

    Dehon, Hedwige; Larøi, Frank; Van der Linden, Martial

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the influence of emotional valence on the production of DRM false memories (Roediger & McDermott, 1995). Participants were presented with neutral, positive, or negative DRM lists for a later recognition (Experiment 1) or recall (Experiment 2) test. In both experiments, confidence and recollective experience (i.e., "Remember-Know" judgments; Tulving, 1985) were also assessed. Results consistently showed that, compared with neutral lists, affective lists induced more false recognition and recall of nonpresented critical lures. Moreover, although confidence ratings did not differ between the false remembering from the different kinds of lists, "Remember" responses were more often associated with negative than positive and neutral false remembering of the critical lures. In contrast, positive false remembering of the critical lures was more often associated with "Know" responses. These results are discussed in light of the Paradoxical Negative Emotion (PNE) hypothesis (Porter, Taylor, & ten Bricke, 2008). PMID:21038946

  17. False recognition of instruction-set lures.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Evan T; Chubala, Chrissy M; Spear, Jackie; Jamieson, Randall K; Hockley, William E; Crump, Matthew J C

    2016-01-01

    False remembering has been examined using a variety of procedures, including the Deese-Roediger-McDermott procedure, the false fame procedure and the two-list recognition procedure. We present six experiments in a different empirical framework examining false recognition of words included in the experimental instructions (instruction-set lures). The data show that participants' false alarm rate to instruction-set lures was twice their false alarm rate to standard lures. That result was statistically robust even when (1) the relative strength of targets to instruction-set lures was increased, (2) participants were warned about the instruction-set lures, (3) the instruction-set lures were camouflaged in the study instructions and (4) the instruction-set lures were presented verbally at study but visually at test. False recognition of instruction-set lures was only mitigated when participants were distracted between encountering the instruction-set lures and studying the training list. The results confirm the ease with which recognition succumbs to familiarity and demonstrate the robustness of false recognition. PMID:25438094

  18. 49 CFR 520.21 - Preparation of environmental reviews, negative declarations, and notices of intent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Preparation of environmental reviews, negative declarations...TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURES FOR CONSIDERING ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Procedures § 520.21 Preparation of environmental reviews, negative...

  19. 49 CFR 520.21 - Preparation of environmental reviews, negative declarations, and notices of intent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Preparation of environmental reviews, negative declarations...TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURES FOR CONSIDERING ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Procedures § 520.21 Preparation of environmental reviews, negative...

  20. 49 CFR 520.21 - Preparation of environmental reviews, negative declarations, and notices of intent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Preparation of environmental reviews, negative declarations...TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURES FOR CONSIDERING ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Procedures § 520.21 Preparation of environmental reviews, negative...

  1. 49 CFR 520.21 - Preparation of environmental reviews, negative declarations, and notices of intent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Preparation of environmental reviews, negative declarations...TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURES FOR CONSIDERING ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Procedures § 520.21 Preparation of environmental reviews, negative...

  2. 49 CFR 520.21 - Preparation of environmental reviews, negative declarations, and notices of intent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Preparation of environmental reviews, negative declarations...TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURES FOR CONSIDERING ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Procedures § 520.21 Preparation of environmental reviews, negative...

  3. 40 CFR 52.122 - Negative declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Negative declarations. 52.122 Section 52.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.122 Negative declarations. (a) The following air pollution control districts...

  4. 40 CFR 52.122 - Negative declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Negative declarations. 52.122 Section 52.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.122 Negative declarations. (a) The following air pollution control districts...

  5. 40 CFR 52.122 - Negative declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Negative declarations. 52.122 Section 52.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.122 Negative declarations. (a) The following air pollution control districts...

  6. 40 CFR 52.122 - Negative declarations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Negative declarations. 52.122 Section 52.122 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.122 Negative declarations. (a) The following air pollution control districts...

  7. Can language prediction lead to false memories? 

    E-print Network

    Speed, Laura

    2010-06-30

    The present study sought to investigate the use of prediction during sentence comprehension and whether prediction could lead to false memories for sentences when the ending of a sentence is not properly recovered. Participants listened to sentences...

  8. Animal cognition: bumble bees suffer 'false memories'.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Judith

    2015-03-16

    The existence of 'false memories', where individuals remember events that they have never actually experienced, is well established in humans. Now a new study reports that insects similarly form illusory memories through merging of memory traces. PMID:25784044

  9. Creating a False Memory in the Hippocampus

    E-print Network

    Ramirez Moreno, Steve

    Memories can be unreliable. We created a false memory in mice by optogenetically manipulating memory engram–bearing cells in the hippocampus. Dentate gyrus (DG) or CA1 neurons activated by exposure to a particular context ...

  10. Controlling False Positives in Association Rule Mining

    E-print Network

    Liu, Guimei; Wong, Limsoon

    2011-01-01

    Association rule mining is an important problem in the data mining area. It enumerates and tests a large number of rules on a dataset and outputs rules that satisfy user-specified constraints. Due to the large number of rules being tested, rules that do not represent real systematic effect in the data can satisfy the given constraints purely by random chance. Hence association rule mining often suffers from a high risk of false positive errors. There is a lack of comprehensive study on controlling false positives in association rule mining. In this paper, we adopt three multiple testing correction approaches---the direct adjustment approach, the permutation-based approach and the holdout approach---to control false positives in association rule mining, and conduct extensive experiments to study their performance. Our results show that (1) Numerous spurious rules are generated if no correction is made. (2) The three approaches can control false positives effectively. Among the three approaches, the permutation...

  11. Stereotypes influence false memories for imagined events.

    PubMed

    Kleider, Heather M; Goldinger, Stephen D; Knuycky, Leslie

    2008-02-01

    Two experiments tested the influences of vivid imagery and person schemata on eyewitness accuracy. Participants watched an event sequence including actors performing stereotype-consistent and inconsistent actions. Additionally, participants either read descriptions of actions (Experiment 1) or vividly imagined actions (Experiment 2). After either 30 minutes or 2 days, recognition memory, source memory, and remember/know judgements were made. After 2 days, false alarms to imagined events increased, relative to the 30-minute test; those false alarms were more often misattributed to stereotype-consistent actors, relative to the same actions in the reading condition. In addition, the accompanying remember judgements were higher for false alarms to imagined events, relative to read events, regardless of stereotype consistency. Overall the results suggest that, over time, vivid imagery reinforces schema activation, increasing stereotype-consistent false memories. PMID:18286415

  12. 20 CFR 356.3 - False claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDIES FOR FRAUDULENT CLAIMS OR STATEMENTS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 356.3 False claims. In the case of penalties assessed under 31 U.S.C. 3729 based on actions...

  13. True versus False Positives and Negatives on the "Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Kozlowski, Alison M.; Fitzgerald, Mary E.; Sipes, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Given the importance of early intervention services for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), early diagnosis of children is critical. At present, several ASD screeners exist for young children, with the "Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers" ("M-CHAT") being one of the most widely researched. While the "M-CHAT" has good sensitivity…

  14. Review article: the false-bottom ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Jouzel, J.; Nizovtseva, I.; Ryashko, L. B.

    2013-11-01

    Nansen from his observations in the Beaufort Sea published in 1897 noted that heat transfer from the fresh water (with a~temperature of 0 °C) to the arctic salt water (with a temperature of -1.6 °C) is the only source of ice accretion during the polar summer. This transfer mechanism, unusual at first sight, is responsible for the initiation and evolution of a false bottom ice, changing ice properties to a great extent and affecting various processes while interacting with the ocean and the atmosphere. The processes of false bottom ice growth from below (i.e. from the ocean to the atmosphere) become of prime importance in the era of global warming and climate change. In this review, we summarize the theoretical approaches, field and laboratory observations, conducted during more than 100 yr, in order to address the problem of false bottoms to a broad community of readers. We also discuss the recent modeling advances to which we have contributed. A "false bottom" is a thin layer of ice which forms in summer underneath the floe, where fresh water lies between the salt water and the ice. Such false bottoms represent the only significant source of ice growth in the Arctic during the spring-summer period. Their evolution influences the mass balance of the Arctic sea-ice cover, which is recognized as an indicator of climate change. However, the quantity, aerial extent and other properties of false bottoms are difficult to measure because coring under the surface melt ponds leads to direct mixing of surface and under-ice water. This explains why their aerial extent and overall volume is still not known despite the fact that the upper limit of the present-day estimate of the false bottom ice coverage is approximately half of the sea ice surface. The growth of false bottoms also leads to other important consequences for various physical, chemical and biological processes associated with their dynamics.

  15. Children's False Memory and True Disclosure in the Face of Repeated Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaaf, Jennifer M.; Alexander, Kristen Weede; Goodman, Gail S.

    2008-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate children's memory and suggestibility for events differing in valence (positive or negative) and veracity (true or false). A total of 82 3- and 5-year-olds were asked repeated questions about true and false events, either in a grouped order (i.e., all questions about a certain event asked consecutively)…

  16. Visual false memories in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali Reza; Heydari, Ali Hosain; Abdollahi, Mohammad Hossain; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Dalgleish, Tim; Jobson, Laura

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated visual false memories in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Scenic False Memory paradigm (SFM, Hauschildt, Peters, Jelinek, & Moritz, 2012) was administered to male Iranian military personnel who had participated in the Iran-Iraq war and were diagnosed with (n = 21) or without (n = 21) PTSD and a sample of healthy male non-trauma-exposed controls (n = 21). Trauma-exposed participants recalled and recognized a significantly lower percentage of hits and a significantly greater percentage of false memories for both trauma-related and non-trauma-related video scenes, than non-trauma-exposed controls. Among the trauma-exposed participants, those with and without PTSD did not differ significantly in terms of percentage of hits and false memories recalled on the SFM. Those with PTSD were found to recognize significantly fewer hits for both the trauma-related and non-trauma-related videos than those without PTSD. Those with PTSD also recognized significantly more false memories for the trauma video scene than the non-PTSD group. The findings suggest that those with trauma exposure, and in particular those with PTSD, may have a greater susceptibility to visual false memory. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26390193

  17. How Does Distinctive Processing Reduce False Recall?

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.; Dunlap, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    False memories arising from associatively related lists are a robust phenomenon that resists many efforts to prevent it. However, a few variables have been shown to reduce this form of false memory. Explanations for how the reduction is accomplished have focused on either output monitoring processes or constraints on access, but neither idea alone is sufficient to explain extant data. Our research was driven by a framework that distinguishes item-based and event-based distinctive processing to account for the effects of different variables on both correct recall of study list items and false recall. We report the results of three experiments examining the effect of a deep orienting task and the effect of visual presentation of study items, both of which have been shown to reduce false recall. The experiments replicate those previous findings and add important new information about the effect of the variables on a recall test that eliminates the need for monitoring. The results clearly indicate that both post-access monitoring and constraints on access contribute to reductions in false memories. The results also showed that the manipulations of study modality and orienting task had different effects on correct and false recall, a pattern that was predicted by the item-based/event-based distinctive processing framework. PMID:22003267

  18. False Discovery Rate Estimation in Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Suruchi; Yadav, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    With the advancement in proteomics separation techniques and improvements in mass analyzers, the data generated in a mass-spectrometry based proteomics experiment is rising exponentially. Such voluminous datasets necessitate automated computational tools for high-throughput data analysis and appropriate statistical control. The data is searched using one or more of the several popular database search algorithms. The matches assigned by these tools can have false positives and statistical validation of these false matches is necessary before making any biological interpretations. Without such procedures, the biological inferences do not hold true and may be outright misleading. There is a considerable overlap between true and false positives. To control the false positives amongst a set of accepted matches, there is a need for some statistical estimate that can reflect the amount of false positives present in the data processed. False discovery rate (FDR) is the metric for global confidence assessment of a large-scale proteomics dataset. This chapter covers the basics of FDR, its application in proteomics, and methods to estimate FDR. PMID:26519173

  19. Reducing False Positives in Runtime Analysis of Deadlocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensalem, Saddek; Havelund, Klaus; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an improvement of a standard algorithm for detecting dead-lock potentials in multi-threaded programs, in that it reduces the number of false positives. The standard algorithm works as follows. The multi-threaded program under observation is executed, while lock and unlock events are observed. A graph of locks is built, with edges between locks symbolizing locking orders. Any cycle in the graph signifies a potential for a deadlock. The typical standard example is the group of dining philosophers sharing forks. The algorithm is interesting because it can catch deadlock potentials even though no deadlocks occur in the examined trace, and at the same time it scales very well in contrast t o more formal approaches to deadlock detection. The algorithm, however, can yield false positives (as well as false negatives). The extension of the algorithm described in this paper reduces the amount of false positives for three particular cases: when a gate lock protects a cycle, when a single thread introduces a cycle, and when the code segments in different threads that cause the cycle can actually not execute in parallel. The paper formalizes a theory for dynamic deadlock detection and compares it to model checking and static analysis techniques. It furthermore describes an implementation for analyzing Java programs and its application to two case studies: a planetary rover and a space craft altitude control system.

  20. Emotional false memories in children with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Mirandola, Chiara; Losito, Nunzia; Ghetti, Simona; Cornoldi, Cesare

    2014-02-01

    Research has shown that children with learning disabilities (LD) are less prone to evince associative illusions of memory as a result of impairments in their ability to engage in semantic processing. However, it is unclear whether this observation is true for scripted life events, especially if they include emotional content, or across a broad spectrum of learning disabilities. The present study addressed these issues by assessing recognition memory for script-like information in children with nonverbal learning disability (NLD), children with dyslexia, and typically developing children (N=51). Participants viewed photographs about 8 common events (e.g., family dinner), and embedded in each episode was either a negative or a neutral consequence of an unseen action. Children's memory was then tested on a yes/no recognition task that included old and new photographs. Results showed that the three groups performed similarly in recognizing target photographs, but exhibited differences in memory errors. Compared to other groups, children with NLD were more likely to falsely recognize photographs that depicted an unseen cause of an emotional seen event and associated more "Remember" responses to these errors. Children with dyslexia were equally likely to falsely recognize both unseen causes of seen photographs and photographs generally consistent with the script, whereas the other participant groups were more likely to falsely recognize unseen causes rather than script-consistent distractors. Results are interpreted in terms of mechanisms underlying false memories' formation in different clinical populations of children with LD. PMID:24295924

  1. Apparent Benzene Solubility in Tetraphenylborate Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Swingle, R.F.; Peterson, R.A.; Crawford, C.L.

    1997-11-01

    Personnel conducted testing to determine the apparent solubility of benzene in potassium tetraphenylborate (KTPB) slurries. The lack of benzene vapor pressure suppression in these tests indicate that for a 6.5 wt percent solids KTPB slurry in 4.65 M Na+ salt solution at approximately 25 degrees Celsius, no significant difference exists between the solubility of benzene in the slurry and the solubility of benzene in salt solution without KTPB solids. The work showed similar results in slurry with 6,000 mg/L sludge and 2,000 mg/L monosodium titanate added. Slurries containing tetraphenylborate decomposition intermediates (i.e., 4,200 mg/L triphenylboron (3PB), 510 mg/L diphenylborinic acid (2PB) and 1,500 mg/L phenylboric acid (1PB) or 100 mg/L tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP)) also showed no significant difference in benzene solubility form filtrate containing no KTPB solids. Slurry containing 2,000 mg/L Surfynol 420 did exhibit significant additional benzene solubility, as did irradiated slurries. The vapor pressure depression in the irradiated slurries presumably results from dissolution of biphenyl and other tetraphenylborate irradiation products in the benzene.

  2. Apparent speed increases at low luminance

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri-Pashkam, Maryam; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effect of luminance on apparent speed, subjects adjusted the speed of a low-luminance rotating grating (0.31 cd/m2) to match that of a high-luminance one (1260 cd/m2). Above 4 Hz, subjects overestimated the speed of the low-luminance grating. This overestimation increased as a function of temporal rate and reached 30% around 10 Hz temporal rates. The speed overestimation became significant once the lower luminance was 2.4 log units lower than the high luminance comparison. Next the role of motion smear in speed overestimation was examined. First it was shown that the length of the perceived motion smear increased at low luminances. Second, the length of the visible smear was manipulated by changing the presentation time of the stimuli. Speed overestimation was reduced at shorter presentation times. Third the speed of a blurred stimulus was compared to a stimulus with sharp edges and the blurred stimulus was judged to move faster. These results indicate that the length of motion smear following a target contributes to its perceived speed and that this leads to speed overestimation at low luminance where motion traces lengthen because of increased persistence. PMID:19146275

  3. Loop transformations to prevent false sharing

    SciTech Connect

    Granston, E.D.; Montaut, T.; Bodin, F.

    1995-08-01

    To date, page management in shared virtual memory (SVM) systems has been primarily the responsibility of the run-time system. However, there are some problems that are difficult to resolve efficiently at run time. Chief among these is false sharing. In this paper, a loop transformation theory is developed for identifying and eliminating potential sources of multiple-writer false sharing and other sources of page migration resulting from regular references in numerical applications. Loop nests of one and two dimensions (before blocking) with single-level, DOALL-style parallelism are covered. The potential of these transformations is demonstrated experimentally.

  4. Structure and Motion Estimation from Apparent Contours under Circular Motion

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Structure and Motion Estimation from Apparent Contours under Circular Motion Kwan-Yee K. Wong a the appar- ent contours of a smooth surface. Fixed image features under circular motion circular motion and more widely spaced images. Existing techniques for model reconstruction from apparent

  5. Vendor cited for false PFC savings claim

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstein, I.

    1983-08-29

    A Cynex power factor controller (PFC) vendor claiming a 60% saving was cited by the Better Business Bureau for false advertising after a user survey revealed that savings were only 20% at best. The company plans no future advertising claims, although it insists that 60% savings are possible. The inventor disagrees. (DCK)

  6. Infants' Reasoning about Others' False Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Hyun-joo; Baillargeon, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Prior research suggests that children younger than age 3 or 4 do not understand that an agent may be deceived by an object's misleading appearance. The authors asked whether 14.5-month-olds would give evidence in a violation-of-expectation task that they understand that agents may form false perceptions. Infants first watched events in which an…

  7. A Synchronization Account of False Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Brendan T.; Jones, Michael N.; Mewhort, Douglas J. K.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a computational model to explain a variety of results in both standard and false recognition. A key attribute of the model is that it uses plausible semantic representations for words, built through exposure to a linguistic corpus. A study list is encoded in the model as a gist trace, similar to the proposal of fuzzy trace theory…

  8. Development of the False-Memory Illusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainerd, C. J.; Forrest, T. J.; Karibian, D.; Reyna, V. F.

    2006-01-01

    The counterintuitive developmental trend in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) illusion (that false-memory responses increase with age) was investigated in learning-disabled and nondisabled children from the 6- to 14-year-old age range. Fuzzy-trace theory predicts that because there are qualitative differences in how younger versus older children…

  9. Acute effects of triazolam on false recognition.

    PubMed

    Mintzer, M Z; Griffiths, R R

    2000-12-01

    Neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and electrophysiological techniques have been applied to the study of false recognition; however, psychopharmacological techniques have not been applied. Benzodiazepine sedative/anxiolytic drugs produce memory deficits similar to those observed in organic amnesia and may be useful tools for studying normal and abnormal memory mechanisms. The present double-blind, placebo-controlled repeated measures study examined the acute effects of orally administered triazolam (Halcion; 0.125 and 0.25 mg/70 kg), a benzodiazepine hypnotic, on performance in the Deese (1959)/Roediger-McDermott (1995) false recognition paradigm in 24 healthy volunteers. Paralleling previous demonstrations in amnesic patients, triazolam produced significant dose-related reductions in false recognition rates to nonstudied words associatively related to studied words, suggesting that false recognition relies on normal memory mechanisms impaired in benzodiazepine-induced amnesia. The results also suggested that relative to placebo, triazolam reduced participants' reliance on memory for item-specific versus list-common semantic information and reduced participants' use of remember versus know responses. PMID:11219963

  10. Item-specific processing reduces false memories.

    PubMed

    McCabe, David P; Presmanes, Alison G; Robertson, Chuck L; Smith, Anderson D

    2004-12-01

    We examined the effect of item-specific and relational encoding instructions on false recognition in two experiments in which the DRM paradigm was used (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995). Type of encoding (item-specific or relational) was manipulated between subjects in Experiment 1 and within subjects in Experiment 2. Decision-based explanations (e.g., the distinctiveness heuristic) predict reductions in false recognition in between-subjects designs, but not in within-subjects designs, because they are conceptualized as global shifts in decision criteria. Memory-based explanations predict reductions in false recognition in both designs, resulting from enhanced recollection of item-specific details. False recognition was reduced following item-specific encoding instructions in both experiments, favoring a memory-based explanation. These results suggest that providing unique cues for the retrieval of individual studied items results in enhanced discrimination between those studied items and critical lures. Conversely, enhancing the similarity of studied items results in poor discrimination among items within a particular list theme. These results are discussed in terms of the item-specific/ relational framework (Hunt & McDaniel, 1993). PMID:15875978

  11. Growth of false bottoms under sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Naomi; Feltham, Daniel; Flocco, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    In the summer months, melt water from the surface of Arctic sea ice can percolate through the relatively porous ice and collect at the ice-ocean interface, filling hollows in the base of the ice. These pools are called under-ice melt ponds. Freezing can occur at the interface between the fresh water and the oceanic mixed layer, forming a sheet of ice called a false bottom. These have been observed to thicken and migrate upwards over time. False bottoms insulate the true base of the sea ice from the ocean and their formation is a significant mechanism of Arctic sea ice summer growth. Current parameterisations of basal ablation of sea ice in climate models do not account for these processes, the inclusion of which could improve the accuracy of predictions of Arctic sea ice. In this poster, a one-dimensional thermodynamic model of the evolution of under-ice melt ponds and false bottoms is presented. Our aim is to develop a parameterisation of the impact of under ice melt ponds and false bottoms on basal ablation of Arctic sea ice appropriate for use in gridded climate models.

  12. When Distinctiveness Fails, False Memories Prevail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.

    1998-01-01

    Notes that fuzzy-trace theory provides a link between indices of memory performance and the theoretical processes that underlie that performance. Author argues false memories can arise because of processes that normally affect forgetting. Maintains that, to the extent that memories lose their distinctive properties, such memories may become…

  13. Earth's Climate Sensitivity: Apparent Inconsistencies in Recent Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Stephen E.; Charlson, Robert J.; Kahn, Ralph; Rodhe, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Earth's equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) and forcing of Earth's climate system over the industrial era have been re-examined in two new assessments: the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and a study by Otto et al. (2013). The ranges of these quantities given in these assessments and also in the Fourth (2007) IPCC Assessment are analyzed here within the framework of a planetary energy balance model, taking into account the observed increase in global mean surface temperature over the instrumental record together with best estimates of the rate of increase of planetary heat content. This analysis shows systematic differences among the several assessments and apparent inconsistencies within individual assessments. Importantly, the likely range of ECS to doubled CO2 given in AR5, 1.5-4.5 K/(3.7Wm(exp -2)) exceeds the range inferred fromthe assessed likely range of forcing, 1.2-2.9 K/(3.7 W m(exp -2)), where 3.7 W m(exp -2) denotes the forcing for doubled CO2. Such differences underscore the need to identify their causes and reduce the underlying uncertainties. Explanations might involve underestimated negative aerosol forcing, overestimated total forcing, overestimated climate sensitivity, poorly constrained ocean heating, limitations of the energy balance model, or a combination of effects.

  14. Earths Climate Sensitivity: Apparent Inconsistencies in Recent Assessments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwartz, Stephen E.; Charlson, Robert J.; Kahn, Ralph; Rodhe, Henning

    2014-12-08

    Earth's equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) and forcing of Earth's climate system over the industrial era have been re-examined in two new assessments: the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and a study by Otto et al. (2013). The ranges of these quantities given in these assessments and also in the Fourth (2007) IPCC Assessment are analyzed here within the framework of a planetary energy balance model, taking into account the observed increase in global mean surface temperature over the instrumental record together with best estimates of the rate of increase of planetary heat content.more »This analysis shows systematic differences among the several assessments and apparent inconsistencies within individual assessments. Importantly, the likely range of ECS to doubled CO? given in AR5, 1.5–4.5 K/(3.7 W m?²) exceeds the range inferred from the assessed likely range of forcing, 1.2–2.9 K/(3.7 W m?²), where 3.7 W ?² denotes the forcing for doubled CO?. Such differences underscore the need to identify their causes and reduce the underlying uncertainties. Explanations might involve underestimated negative aerosol forcing, overestimated total forcing, overestimated climate sensitivity, poorly constrained ocean heating, limitations of the energy balance model, or a combination of effects.« less

  15. Earths Climate Sensitivity: Apparent Inconsistencies in Recent Assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Stephen E.; Charlson, Robert J.; Kahn, Ralph; Rodhe, Henning

    2014-12-08

    Earth's equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) and forcing of Earth's climate system over the industrial era have been re-examined in two new assessments: the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and a study by Otto et al. (2013). The ranges of these quantities given in these assessments and also in the Fourth (2007) IPCC Assessment are analyzed here within the framework of a planetary energy balance model, taking into account the observed increase in global mean surface temperature over the instrumental record together with best estimates of the rate of increase of planetary heat content. This analysis shows systematic differences among the several assessments and apparent inconsistencies within individual assessments. Importantly, the likely range of ECS to doubled CO? given in AR5, 1.5–4.5 K/(3.7 W m?²) exceeds the range inferred from the assessed likely range of forcing, 1.2–2.9 K/(3.7 W m?²), where 3.7 W ?² denotes the forcing for doubled CO?. Such differences underscore the need to identify their causes and reduce the underlying uncertainties. Explanations might involve underestimated negative aerosol forcing, overestimated total forcing, overestimated climate sensitivity, poorly constrained ocean heating, limitations of the energy balance model, or a combination of effects.

  16. Mood, dissociation and false memories using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott procedure.

    PubMed

    Wright, Daniel B; Startup, Helen M; Mathews, Sorcha A

    2005-08-01

    Who is likely to have a false memory? Does being in a certain transient state, such as a negative mood, mean that a person is more like to have a false memory? These important questions are examined using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) procedure. The amount of false memories was compared with people's score on a dissociation measure and by mood. Unlike past research, which has used different procedures to explore false memories, we found that dissociation was not associated with false memories. We argue that this is because the DRM procedure requires two processes for a false memory (the generation of the critical lure and mistaking its source), while most false memory procedures only require one process (source monitoring error) because the errant information is suggested to the participant. This pattern of results suggests that only errors with the source monitoring process are associated with dissociation. We found that mood was related to false memories, but it was dependent on the specific task demands. If participants were told to recall as many words as they could, then people in a negative mood had more false memories. However, if they were told to recall as many words as they felt like recalling, then there were more false memories for people in a positive mood. This can be explained by the mood-as-input hypothesis. Results are discussed in relation to both theories and applications of memory. PMID:16131407

  17. On reducing false sharing while improving locality on shared memory multiprocessors Mahmut Kandemir Alok Choudhary J. Ramanujamy Prith Banerjee

    E-print Network

    On reducing false sharing while improving locality on shared memory multiprocessors Mahmut Kandemir, there is another crit- ical issue to be considered in the case of shared-memory parallel machines, namely, false the computa- tions on the processors. The negative impact of false sharing on the memory performance can

  18. MTS in false positive reduction for multi-sensor fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodley, Robert; Gosnell, Michael; Cudney, Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    The Mahalanobis Taguchi System (MTS) is a relatively new tool in the vehicle health maintenance domain, but has some distinct advantages in current multi-sensor implementations. The use of Mahalanobis Spaces (MS) allows the algorithm to identify characteristics of sensor signals to identify behaviors in machines. MTS is extremely powerful with the caveat that the correct variables are selected to form the MS. In this research work, 56 sensors monitor various aspects of the vehicles. Typically, using the MTS process, identification of useful variables is preceded by validation of the measurements scale. However, the MTS approach doesn't directly include any mitigating steps should the measurement scale not be validated. Existing work has performed outlier removal in construction of the MS, which can lead to better validation. In our approach, we modify the outlier removal process with more liberal definitions of outliers to better identify variables' impact prior to identification of useful variables. This subtle change substantially lowered the false positive rate due to the fact that additional variables were retained. Traditional MTS approaches identify useful variables only to the extent they provide usefulness in identifying the positive (abnormal) condition. The impact of removing false negatives is not included. Initial results show our approach can reduce false positive values while still maintaining complete fault identification for this vehicle data set.

  19. Impact of {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Before and After Definitive Radiation Therapy in Patients With Apparently Solitary Plasmacytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Paul J.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Wirth, Andrew; Ryan, Gail; Seymour, John F.; Prince, H. Miles

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) on management of patients with apparently isolated plasmacytoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with apparently solitary plasmacytoma who underwent FDG-PET for staging or restaging were identified from a central PET database. They were either candidates for or had received definitive radiation therapy (RT). Results: Seventeen patients had initial staging scans for bone (n = 11) or soft tissue (n = 6) plasmacytomas, and 11 had PET scans after RT. Only 1 of 14 known untreated sites of plasmacytoma was not identified on staging PET (lesion sensitivity = 93%). Three plasmacytomas were excised before PET. Staging PET influenced management in 6 of 17 patients (35%) by showing multiple myeloma (n = 1), discouraging RT after complete resection (n = 1), excluding plasmacytoma at a second site (n = 1), by increasing RT fields (n = 2), or by suggesting sarcoidosis (n = 1). Fifteen of 17 patients with initial staging PET scans received definitive RT. Restaging PET scans after RT showed complete metabolic response in 8 of 11 cases and progressive disease in 2. Two patients with either no response or partial metabolic response had late responses. Staging sestamibi and PET scans were concordant in five of six occasions (one sestamibi scan was false negative). Conclusions: FDG-PET has value for staging and RT planning in plasmacytoma and potentially could have a role in response-assessment after RT. Slow resolution of FDG uptake posttreatment does not necessarily imply an adverse prognosis.

  20. Creating a false memory in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Steve; Liu, Xu; Lin, Pei-Ann; Suh, Junghyup; Pignatelli, Michele; Redondo, Roger L; Ryan, Tomás J; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2013-07-26

    Memories can be unreliable. We created a false memory in mice by optogenetically manipulating memory engram-bearing cells in the hippocampus. Dentate gyrus (DG) or CA1 neurons activated by exposure to a particular context were labeled with channelrhodopsin-2. These neurons were later optically reactivated during fear conditioning in a different context. The DG experimental group showed increased freezing in the original context, in which a foot shock was never delivered. The recall of this false memory was context-specific, activated similar downstream regions engaged during natural fear memory recall, and was also capable of driving an active fear response. Our data demonstrate that it is possible to generate an internally represented and behaviorally expressed fear memory via artificial means. PMID:23888038

  1. When distinctiveness fails, false memories prevail.

    PubMed

    Howe, M L

    1998-11-01

    The argument advanced in this article is that false memories can arise because of processes that normally affect forgetting, namely, the decline of distinctiveness and the rise of retroactive interference. Specifically, when the distinctiveness of a trace relative to the background of other traces diminishes, the potential for interference among like traces increases. To the extent that memories lose their distinctive properties, including the source of the memory, such memories may become confused with events that are supposed to be recalled as actually having occurred. This idea is elaborated in the context of studies of the effects of distinctiveness on reducing retroactive interference in children's long-term retention. It is concluded that advances in understanding false memories and the role distinctiveness might play in reducing such misrememberings is contingent on the development of additional formal modeling approaches like the one presented in the lead paper by Brainerd and Reyna (1998, this issue). PMID:9843622

  2. Spirit Beholds Bumpy Boulder (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit began collecting images for a 360-degree panorama of new terrain, the rover captured this view of a dark boulder with an interesting surface texture. The boulder sits about 40 centimeters (16 inches) tall on Martian sand about 5 meters (16 feet) away from Spirit. It is one of many dark, volcanic rock fragments -- many pocked with rounded holes called vesicles -- littering the slope of 'Low Ridge.' The rock surface facing the rover is similar in appearance to the surface texture on the outside of lava flows on Earth.

    Spirit took this false-color image with the panoramic camera on the rover's 810th sol, or Martian day, of exploring Mars (April 13, 2006). This image is a false-color rendering using camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters.

  3. Emotional true and false memories in children with callous-unemotional traits.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Jill; Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L; de Ruiter, Corine

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have found that children with callous-unemotional (CU) traits have a deficit in processing emotionally negative material. The present study examined whether this deficit also affects emotional memory. Twenty-two children with low CU traits and 24 children with high CU traits between 8 and 12 years of age were selected from a community sample and presented with neutral and negative emotional words, using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm. On true recall, there was no difference between the groups. Both groups had higher true recall rates for the neutral word lists than for the negative lists. However, on false recall, although there were no group differences for neutral word lists, the high CU group recalled significantly fewer critical lures on the negative word lists than the low CU group. Furthermore, the high CU group had significantly less false recall on the negative word lists compared to the neutral word lists, while the low CU group showed no difference in false recall between the word lists. These results indicate that children with high CU traits have no deficiencies in true memory performance, yet are less susceptible to developing false memories concerning emotionally negative material. PMID:23163255

  4. False Context Fear Memory in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Sarah; Holmes, Nathan M.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Four experiments used rats to study false context fear memories. In Experiment 1, rats were pre-exposed to a distinctive chamber (context A) or to a control environment (context C), shocked after a delay in a second chamber (context B) and tested either in B or A. Rats pre-exposed to A froze just as much as control rats in B but more than control…

  5. Quantum nucleation of false-vacuum bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Fischler, W.; Morgan, D.; Polchinski, J. )

    1990-04-15

    We show that a small bubble of false vacuum can tunnel to the critical size for inflation, and calculate the amplitude in leading WKB approximation. An initially nonsingular space becomes an exterior space plus a baby universe (which contains the bubble), joined by a black-hole singularity. We work in a Hamiltonian formalism; the corresponding Euclidean bounce is shown to have a degenerate vierbein.

  6. Detecting false intent using eye blink measures.

    PubMed

    Marchak, Frank M

    2013-01-01

    Eye blink measures have been shown to be diagnostic in detecting deception regarding past acts. Here we examined-across two experiments with increasing degrees of ecological validity-whether changes in eye blinking can be used to determine false intent regarding future actions. In both experiments, half of the participants engaged in a mock crime and then transported an explosive device with the intent of delivering it to a "contact" that would use it to cause a disturbance. Eye blinking was measured for all participants when presented with three types of questions: relevant to intent to transport an explosive device, relevant to intent to engage in an unrelated illegal act, and neutral questions. Experiment 1 involved standing participants watching a video interviewer with audio presented ambiently. Experiment 2 involved standing participants questioned by a live interviewer. Across both experiments, changes in blink count during and immediately following individual questions, total number of blinks, and maximum blink time length differentiated those with false intent from truthful intent participants. In response to questions relevant to intent to deliver an explosive device vs. questions relevant to intent to deliver illegal drugs, those with false intent showed a suppression of blinking during the questions when compared to the 10 s period after the end of the questions, a lower number of blinks, and shorter maximum blink duration. The results are discussed in relation to detecting deception about past activities as well as to the similarities and differences to detecting false intent as described by prospective memory and arousal. PMID:24130546

  7. A synchronization account of false recognition.

    PubMed

    Johns, Brendan T; Jones, Michael N; Mewhort, Douglas J K

    2012-12-01

    We describe a computational model to explain a variety of results in both standard and false recognition. A key attribute of the model is that it uses plausible semantic representations for words, built through exposure to a linguistic corpus. A study list is encoded in the model as a gist trace, similar to the proposal of fuzzy trace theory (Brainerd & Reyna, 2002), but based on realistically structured semantic representations of the component words. The model uses a decision process based on the principles of neural synchronization and information accumulation. The decision process operates by synchronizing a probe with the gist trace of a study context, allowing information to be accumulated about whether the word did or did not occur on the study list, and the efficiency of synchronization determines recognition. We demonstrate that the model is capable of accounting for standard recognition results that are challenging for classic global memory models, and can also explain a wide variety of false recognition effects and make item-specific predictions for critical lures. The model demonstrates that both standard and false recognition results may be explained within a single formal framework by integrating realistic representation assumptions with a simple processing mechanism. PMID:22884279

  8. False memories in Lewy-body disease.

    PubMed

    Algarabel, Salvador; Pitarque, Alfonso; Sales, Alicia; Meléndez, Juan Carlos; Escudero, Joaquín

    2015-12-01

    Recently, de Boysson, Belleville, Phillips et al. (2011) found that patients with Lewy-body disease (LBD) showed significantly lower rates of false memories than healthy controls, using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) experimental procedure. Given that this result could be explained by the practically null rate of true recognition in the LBD group (0.09), we decided to replicate the study by de Boysson et al. (2011), but including a new condition that would maximize the true recognition rate (and analyze its effect on the rate of false memories). Specifically, in a DRM experiment, we manipulated (within subjects) two study and recognition conditions: in the "immediate" condition, both the LBD patients and the control group of healthy older people received a different recognition test after each study list (containing twelve words associated with a non-presented critical word), while in the "delayed" condition (similar to the one in de Boysson et al., 2011), the participants received the entire series of study lists and then took only one recognition test. The results showed that, in both samples, the "immediate" condition produced higher corrected rates of both true and false recognition than the "delayed" condition, although they were both lower in the LBD patients, which shows that these patients are capable of encoding and recognizing the general similitude underlying information (gist memory) in the right conditions. PMID:26355527

  9. Uranus in True and False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    These two pictures of Uranus -- one in true color (left) and the other in false color -- were compiled from images returned Jan. 17, 1986, by the narrow-angle camera of Voyager 2. The spacecraft was 9.1 million kilometers (5.7 million miles) from the planet, several days from closest approach. The picture at left has been processed to show Uranus as human eyes would see it from the vantage point of the spacecraft. The picture is a composite of images taken through blue, green and orange filters. The darker shadings at the upper right of the disk correspond to the day-night boundary on the planet. Beyond this boundary lies the hidden northern hemisphere of Uranus, which currently remains in total darkness as the planet rotates. The blue-green color results from the absorption of red light by methane gas in Uranus' deep, cold and remarkably clear atmosphere. The picture at right uses false color and extreme contrast enhancement to bring out subtle details in the polar region of Uranus. Images obtained through ultraviolet, violet and orange filters were respectively converted to the same blue, green and red colors used to produce the picture at left. The very slight contrasts visible in true color are greatly exaggerated here. In this false-color picture, Uranus reveals a dark polar hood surrounded by a series of progressively lighter concentric bands. One possible explanation is that a brownish haze or smog, concentrated over the pole, is arranged into bands by zonal motions of the upper atmosphere. The bright orange and yellow strip at the lower edge of the planet's limb is an artifact of the image enhancement. In fact, the limb is dark and uniform in color around the planet. The Voyager project is manages for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  10. 30 CFR 43.6 - Notice of negative finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Notice of negative finding. 43.6 Section 43.6... Notice of negative finding. (a) If it is determined that a special inspection is not warranted, a written notice of negative finding shall be issued as soon as possible following such determination. (b) If it...

  11. 30 CFR 43.6 - Notice of negative finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Notice of negative finding. 43.6 Section 43.6... Notice of negative finding. (a) If it is determined that a special inspection is not warranted, a written notice of negative finding shall be issued as soon as possible following such determination. (b) If it...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5935 - External negative pressure ventilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External negative pressure ventilator. 868.5935... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5935 External negative pressure ventilator. (a) Identification. An external negative pressure ventilator (e.g., iron lung, cuirass) is...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5935 - External negative pressure ventilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External negative pressure ventilator. 868.5935... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5935 External negative pressure ventilator. (a) Identification. An external negative pressure ventilator (e.g., iron lung, cuirass) is...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5935 - External negative pressure ventilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External negative pressure ventilator. 868.5935... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5935 External negative pressure ventilator. (a) Identification. An external negative pressure ventilator (e.g., iron lung, cuirass) is...

  15. Polyphase apparent power and power factor under distorted waveform conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Filipski, P.S. )

    1991-07-01

    Apparent power has no unique meaning when used to describe polyphase nonsinusoidal systems. Several different definitions are discussed in the paper. Implications of this ambiguity on power factor calculations, revenue metering, and compensation are shown. The time-domain based method of defining and measuring the apparent power is discussed. The paper points out the necessity of a critical revision of terms relating to apparent power in the IEEE Standard Dictionary.

  16. Psychoactive drugs and false memory: comparison of dextroamphetamine and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on false recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; Gallo, David A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Several psychoactive drugs are known to influence episodic memory. However, these drugs’ effects on false memory, or the tendency to incorrectly remember nonstudied information, remain poorly understood. Objectives Here, we examined the effects of two commonly used psychoactive drugs, one with memory-enhancing properties (dextroamphetamine; AMP), and another with memory-impairing properties (?9-tetrahydrocannabinol; THC), on false memory using the Deese/Roediger–McDermott (DRM) illusion. Methods Two parallel studies were conducted in which healthy volunteers received either AMP (0, 10, and 20 mg) or THC (0, 7.5, and 15 mg) in within-subjects, randomized, double-blind designs. Participants studied DRM word lists under the influence of the drugs, and their recognition memory for the studied words was tested 2 days later, under sober conditions. Results As expected, AMP increased memory of studied words relative to placebo, and THC reduced memory of studied words. Although neither drug significantly affected false memory relative to placebo, AMP increased false memory relative to THC. Across participants, both drugs’ effects on true memory were positively correlated with their effects on false memory. Conclusions Our results indicate that AMP and THC have opposing effects on true memory, and these effects appear to correspond to similar, albeit more subtle, effects on false memory. These findings are consistent with previous research using the DRM illusion and provide further evidence that psychoactive drugs can affect the encoding processes that ultimately result in the creation of false memories. PMID:21647577

  17. Negative-ion states

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    In this brief review, we discuss some of the properties of atomic and molecular negative ions and their excited states. Experiments involving photon reactions with negative ions and polar dissociation are summarized. 116 references, 14 figures.

  18. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, R.W.

    1984-05-08

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions. 8 figs.

  19. Photograph of Saturn constructed in false color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This Saturn photograph has been constructed in false color from a green and a violet frame obtained Aug. 19 by Voyager 2 from a range of 7.1 million kilometers (4.4 million miles). In true color, the blue oval in the center of the image would be brown and the two spots below and to the right would be white. The convective structure below the blue oval is moving west at 20 meters-per-second (40 mph) relative to the oval. The wavelike structures in the ribbon to the north are moving eastward at 150 meters-per-second (300 mph). In this image, the smallest observable features are 130 km. (80 mi.) across. The separate green and violet frames used to construct this picture are displayed in an accompanying release (P-23916BW, S-2-13). The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

  20. Remembering, imagining, false memories & personal meanings.

    PubMed

    Conway, Martin A; Loveday, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    The Self-Memory System encompasses the working self, autobiographical memory and episodic memory. Specific autobiographical memories are patterns of activation over knowledge structures in autobiographical and episodic memory brought about by the activating effect of cues. The working self can elaborate cues based on the knowledge they initially activate and so control the construction of memories of the past and the future. It is proposed that such construction takes place in the remembering-imagining system - a window of highly accessible recent memories and simulations of near future events. How this malfunctions in various disorders is considered as are the implication of what we term the modern view of human memory for notions of memory accuracy. We show how all memories are to some degree false and that the main role of memories lies in generating personal meanings. PMID:25592676

  1. Dynamics and instability of false vacuum bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Johnson, Matthew C.

    2005-11-15

    This paper examines the classical dynamics of false-vacuum regions embedded in surrounding regions of true vacuum, in the thin-wall limit. The dynamics of all generally relativistically allowed solutions--most but not all of which have been previously studied--are derived, enumerated, and interpreted. We comment on the relation of these solutions to possible mechanisms whereby inflating regions may be spawned from noninflating ones. We then calculate the dynamics of first-order deviations from spherical symmetry, finding that many solutions are unstable to such aspherical perturbations. The parameter space in which the perturbations on bound solutions inevitably become nonlinear is mapped. This instability has consequences for the Farhi-Guth-Guven mechanism for baby universe production via quantum tunneling.

  2. Testing Jumps via False Discovery Rate Control

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yu-Min

    2013-01-01

    Many recently developed nonparametric jump tests can be viewed as multiple hypothesis testing problems. For such multiple hypothesis tests, it is well known that controlling type I error often makes a large proportion of erroneous rejections, and such situation becomes even worse when the jump occurrence is a rare event. To obtain more reliable results, we aim to control the false discovery rate (FDR), an efficient compound error measure for erroneous rejections in multiple testing problems. We perform the test via the Barndorff-Nielsen and Shephard (BNS) test statistic, and control the FDR with the Benjamini and Hochberg (BH) procedure. We provide asymptotic results for the FDR control. From simulations, we examine relevant theoretical results and demonstrate the advantages of controlling the FDR. The hybrid approach is then applied to empirical analysis on two benchmark stock indices with high frequency data. PMID:23573190

  3. A right hemisphere bias towards false memory.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, Katy J; Shillcock, Richard

    2007-03-01

    We extend to English Ito's (2001) demonstration of a hemispheric asymmetry in a false recognition and list-learning paradigm in Japanese. We show for English a significant interaction between the hemifield to which the probe word was presented and the probe type (non-studied but semantically related to the studied words versus non-studied and semantically unrelated to the studied words). The right hemisphere performed less well in rejecting the semantically related "lures"; the left hemisphere performed better in rejecting the semantically novel unstudied words. We discuss the results in terms of a model of fine semantic coding in the LH and coarse semantic coding in the RH, together with the dependence on memory probes that retain the representational signature of the hemisphere to which they were initially projected. Sex of the participants was also included as an independent variable; the results suggested that most of the effect lay with the female participants. PMID:17365631

  4. View from Spirit's Overwintering Position (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has this view northward from the position at the north edge of the 'Home Plate' plateau where the rover will spend its third Martian winter.

    Husband Hill is on the horizon. The dark area in the middle distance is 'El Dorado' sand dune field.

    Spirit used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to capture this image during the rover's 1,448th Martian day, of sol (Jan. 29, 2008).

    This view combines separate images taken through the Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers. It is presented in a false-color stretch to bring out subtle color differences in the scene.

  5. False context fear memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sarah E; Holmes, Nathan M; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2015-10-01

    Four experiments used rats to study false context fear memories. In Experiment 1, rats were pre-exposed to a distinctive chamber (context A) or to a control environment (context C), shocked after a delay in a second chamber (context B) and tested either in B or A. Rats pre-exposed to A froze just as much as control rats in B but more than control rats in A. In Experiment 2, rats were pre-exposed to A or C, subjected to an immediate shock in B and tested in B or A. Rats pre-exposed to A froze when tested in A but did not freeze when tested in B and control rats did not freeze in either A or B. The false fear memory to the pre-exposed A was contingent on its similarity with the shocked B. In Experiment 3, rats pre-exposed to A and subjected to immediate shock in B froze when tested in A but did not freeze when tested in C and rats pre-exposed to C did not freeze when tested either in A or C. In Experiment 4, rats pre-exposed to A and subjected to immediate shock in B froze more when tested in A than rats whose pre-exposure to A began with an immediate shock. The results were discussed in terms of a dual systems explanation of context fear conditioning: a hippocampal-dependent process that forms a unitary representation of context and an amygdala-based process which associates this representation with shock. PMID:26373831

  6. Is the truth in the details? Extended narratives help distinguishing false "memories" from false "reports".

    PubMed

    Sjödén, Björn; Granhag, Pär Anders; Ost, James; Roos Af Hjelmsäter, Emma

    2009-06-01

    The present study examined the effects of fantasy proneness on false "reports" and false "memories", of existent and non-existent footage of a public event. We predicted that highly fantasy prone individuals would be more likely to stand by their initial claim of having seen a film of the event than low fantasy prone participants when prompted for more details about their experiences. Eighty creative arts students and 80 other students were asked whether they had seen CCTV footage preceding the attack on Swedish foreign minister Anna Lindh up to, and including, non-existent footage of the actual moment of the attack. If affirmative, they were probed for extended narratives of what they claimed to have seen. Overall, 64% of participants provided a false "report" by answering yes to the initial question. Of these, 30% provided no explicit details of the attack, and a further 15% retracted their initial answer in their narratives. This left 19% of the sample who appeared to have false "memories" because they provided explicit details of the actual moment of the attack. Women scored higher than men and art students scored higher than other students on fantasy proneness, but there was no effect on levels of false reporting or false "memory". Memories were rated more vivid and clear for existent compared to non-existent aspects of the event. In sum, these data suggest a more complex relationship between memory distortions and fantasy proneness than previously observed. PMID:19000104

  7. Apparent speed and speed sensitivity during adaptation to motion

    E-print Network

    Bex, Peter

    Apparent speed and speed sensitivity during adaptation to motion Peter J. Bex Department Received December 17, 1998; revised manuscript received May 3, 1999; accepted June 28, 1999 Adaptation aftereffects--changes in the apparent speed of a moving pattern following adaptation. We measured changes

  8. "Apparent Weight": A Concept that Is Confusing and Unnecessary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Albert A.

    2010-01-01

    Two recent articles make prominent use of the concept of "apparent weight." The concept of "apparent weight" leads to two confusing inconsistencies. We need to know that with very little change in our representations, we can give our students an improved understanding of "weight" without ever having to invent the appealing but confusing concept of…

  9. Evidence That F Plasmid Transfer Replication Underlies Apparent Adaptive Mutation

    E-print Network

    Roth, John R.

    Evidence That F Plasmid Transfer Replication Underlies Apparent Adaptive Mutation Timothy Galitski of adaptive mutability. This strain carries a revertible mutant Iac allele on an F plasmid and accu- mulates plasmid (6). Here, we present data indicating that the apparent adaptive mutation seen in this strain

  10. Thermodynamics of apparent horizon and modified Friedman equations

    E-print Network

    Ahmad Sheykhi

    2010-12-02

    Starting from the first law of thermodynamics, $dE=T_hdS_h+WdV$, at apparent horizon of a FRW universe, and assuming that the associated entropy with apparent horizon has a quantum corrected relation, $S=\\frac{A}{4G}-\\alpha \\ln \\frac{A}{4G}+\\beta \\frac{4G}{A}$, we derive modified Friedmann equations describing the dynamics of the universe with any spatial curvature. We also examine the time evolution of the total entropy including the quantum corrected entropy associated with the apparent horizon together with the matter field entropy inside the apparent horizon. Our study shows that, with the local equilibrium assumption, the generalized second law of thermodynamics is fulfilled in a region enclosed by the apparent horizon.

  11. Multiple Weather Factors Affect Apparent Survival of European Passerine Birds

    PubMed Central

    Salewski, Volker; Hochachka, Wesley M.; Fiedler, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Weather affects the demography of animals and thus climate change will cause local changes in demographic rates. In birds numerous studies have correlated demographic factors with weather but few of those examined variation in the impacts of weather in different seasons and, in the case of migrants, in different regions. Using capture-recapture models we correlated weather with apparent survival of seven passerine bird species with different migration strategies to assess the importance of selected facets of weather throughout the year on apparent survival. Contrary to our expectations weather experienced during the breeding season did not affect apparent survival of the target species. However, measures for winter severity were associated with apparent survival of a resident species, two short-distance/partial migrants and a long-distance migrant. Apparent survival of two short distance migrants as well as two long-distance migrants was further correlated with conditions experienced during the non-breeding season in Spain. Conditions in Africa had statistically significant but relatively minor effects on the apparent survival of the two long-distance migrants but also of a presumably short-distance migrant and a short-distance/partial migrant. In general several weather effects independently explained similar amounts of variation in apparent survival for the majority of species and single factors explained only relatively low amounts of temporal variation of apparent survival. Although the directions of the effects on apparent survival mostly met our expectations and there are clear predictions for effects of future climate we caution against simple extrapolations of present conditions to predict future population dynamics. Not only did weather explains limited amounts of variation in apparent survival, but future demographics will likely be affected by changing interspecific interactions, opposing effects of weather in different seasons, and the potential for phenotypic and microevolutionary adaptations. PMID:23593131

  12. 'Endurance Crater's' Dazzling Dunes (false-color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity creeps farther into 'Endurance Crater,' the dune field on the crater floor appears even more dramatic. This false-color image taken by the rover's panoramic camera shows that the dune crests have accumulated more dust than the flanks of the dunes and the flat surfaces between them. Also evident is a 'blue' tint on the flat surfaces as compared to the dune flanks. This results from the presence of the hematite-containing spherules ('blueberries') that accumulate on the flat surfaces.

    Sinuous tendrils of sand less than 1 meter (3.3 feet) high extend from the main dune field toward the rover. Scientists hope to send the rover down to one of these tendrils in an effort to learn more about the characteristics of the dunes. Dunes are a common feature across the surface of Mars, and knowledge gleaned from investigating the Endurance dunes close-up may apply to similar dunes elsewhere.

    Before the rover heads down to the dunes, rover drivers must first establish whether the slippery slope that leads to them is firm enough to ensure a successful drive back out of the crater. Otherwise, such hazards might make the dune field a true sand trap.

  13. Possible and False Biomarkers from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Max P.

    2004-01-01

    The Search for life in the Solar System is one of NASA's main goals for the coming decade. We may never observe alien life directly; we or our robotic craft may always be removed from it by many years, or meters of crust. If we do find evidence of Life elsewhere in the Solar System it will probably be in form of chemical biomarkers, quintessentially biological molecules that indicate the presence of micro-organisms. What molecules would be truly indicative of alien life? Chlorophyll fragments, which are often used by geochemists are probably far too specific. Simpler molecules, such as fatty acids, amino acids and nucleo-bases might seem to be biomarkers, but they can form non-biotically in space. Alkyl substituted aromatics in ALH 84001 have been invoked as biomarkers, but they are not strong evidence in and of themselves. Understanding the range of nonbiological organic molecules which could act as false biomarkers in space is a prerequisite for any reasonable search for true biomarkers on other worlds. When simple organics arrive at the surface of a body like Europa, either from below or from space, how long do they survive and what do they make? How can we distinguish these from real biomarkers? In this talk I will present some ideas about what might be useful qualities to consider in a potential biomarker, and will ask for advice from the attendant geochemists.

  14. Avoiding the False Peaks in Correlation Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A S

    2009-07-31

    Fiducials imprinted on laser beams are used to perform video image based alignment of the 192 laser beams in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In many video images, matched filtering is used to detect the location of these fiducials. Generally, the highest correlation peak is used to determine the position of the fiducials. However, when the signal to-be-detected is very weak compared to the noise, this approach totally breaks down. The highest peaks act as traps for false detection. The active target images used for automatic alignment in the National Ignition Facility are examples of such images. In these images, the fiducials of interest exhibit extremely low intensity and contrast, surrounded by high intensity reflection from metallic objects. Consequently, the highest correlation peaks are caused by these bright objects. In this work, we show how the shape of the correlation is exploited to isolate the valid matches from hundreds of invalid correlation peaks, and therefore identify extremely faint fiducials under very challenging imaging conditions.

  15. Part-set cuing of false memories.

    PubMed

    Reysen, Matthew B; Nairne, James S

    2002-06-01

    Part-set cuing inhibition describes the common finding that re-presenting items from a word list can reduce subjects' overall recall performance for studied items. Do part-set cuing effects occur for false memories as well? In the present experiments, subjects studied lists of words drawn from Roediger and McDermott (1995). After studying each list, subjects completed math problems and then recalled the list items either with or without accompanying list cues. In Experiment 1, the recall cues consisted of items drawn randomly from the original list. In Experiment 2, an additional type of cued recall task was added in which the even numbered list items were used as cues. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate robust part-set cuing effects for critical nonpresented items. In addition, they show that whereas recall of critical words is reduced by the presence of cues at test, retrieval cues do not affect critical words and studied words in exactly the same manner. PMID:12120805

  16. Deep Hole in 'Clovis' (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    At a rock called 'Clovis,' the rock abrasion tool on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit cut a 9-millimeter (0.35-inch) hole during the rover's 216th martian day, or sol (Aug. 11, 2004). The hole is the deepest drilled in a rock on Mars so far. This false color view was made from images taken by Spirit's panoramic camera on sol 226 (Aug. 21, 2004) at around 12:50 p.m. local true solar time -- early afternoon in Gusev Crater on Mars. To the right is a 'brush flower' of circles produced by scrubbing the surface of the rock with the abrasion tool's wire brush. Scientists used rover's Moessbauer spectrometer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometer to look for iron-bearing minerals and determine the elemental chemical composition of the rock. This composite combines images taken with the camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters. The grayish-blue hue in this image suggests that the interior of the rock contains iron minerals that are less oxidized than minerals on the surface. The diameter of the hole cut into the rock is 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches).

  17. Band of Bright Rock (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This image captured by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows 'Cape St. Vincent,' one of the many promontories that jut out from the walls of Victoria Crater, Mars. The material at the top of the promontory consists of loose, jumbled rock, then a bit further down into the crater, abruptly transitions to solid bedrock. This transition point is marked by a bright band of rock, visible around the entire crater.

    Scientists say this bright band represents what used to be the surface of Mars just before an impact formed Victoria Crater. After Opportunity begins to descend into the crater in early July 2007, it will examine the band carefully at an accessible location with a gentle slope. These investigations might help determine if the band's brighter appearance is the result of ancient interactions with the Martian atmosphere.

    This image was taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera on sol 1167 (May 6, 2007). It is presented in false color to accentuate differences in surface materials.

  18. False-color composite of Oetztal, Austria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This image is a false-color composite of Oetztal, Austria located in the Central Alps centered at 46.8 degrees north latitude, 10.70 degrees east longitude, at the border between Switzerland (top), Italy (left) and Austria (right and bottom). The area shown is 50 kilometers (30 miles) south of Inssbruck, Austria. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperature Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying on the Space Shuttle Endeavour on its 14th orbit. Approximately one quarter of this image is covered by glaciers, the largest of which, Gepatschferner, is visible as a triangular yellow patch in the center of the scene. The blue areas are lakes (Gepatsch dam at center right; Lake Muta at top right) and glacier ice. The yellow areas are slopes facing the radar and areas of dry snow. Purple corresponds to slopes facing away from the radar. Yellow in the valley bottom corresponds to tree covered areas. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory alternative photo number is P-43890.

  19. Nucleation and evolution of false vacuum bubbles in scalar-tensor gravity

    E-print Network

    Bum-Hoon Lee; Dong-han Yeom

    2011-11-01

    In this presentation, we discuss the nucleation and subsequent evolution of false vacuum bubbles in the scalar-tensor gravity. First, we transform the scalar-tensor type theory of gravity to the standard Brans-Dicke type. Second, we transform the Brans-Dicke type theory from the Jordan frame to the Einstein frame. For a certain potential, a true vacuum bubble in the Einstein frame can be transformed to a false vacuum bubble in the Jordan frame by a conformal transformation. Thus, in the Jordan frame, the nucleation of a false vacuum bubble can be possible and its subsequent evolution can be described with the help of thin-wall approximation. False vacuum bubbles have physical importance: a set of false vacuum bubbles might generate a negative energy bath and it has further theoretical implications.

  20. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  1. Frog Swarms: Earthquake Precursors or False Alarms?

    PubMed

    Grant, Rachel A; Conlan, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    In short-term earthquake risk forecasting, the avoidance of false alarms is of utmost importance to preclude the possibility of unnecessary panic among populations in seismic hazard areas. Unusual animal behaviour prior to earthquakes has been reported for millennia but has rarely been scientifically documented. Recently large migrations or unusual behaviour of amphibians have been linked to large earthquakes, and media reports of large frog and toad migrations in areas of high seismic risk such as Greece and China have led to fears of a subsequent large earthquake. However, at certain times of year large migrations are part of the normal behavioural repertoire of amphibians. News reports of "frog swarms" from 1850 to the present day were examined for evidence that this behaviour is a precursor to large earthquakes. It was found that only two of 28 reported frog swarms preceded large earthquakes (Sichuan province, China in 2008 and 2010). All of the reported mass migrations of amphibians occurred in late spring, summer and autumn and appeared to relate to small juvenile anurans (frogs and toads). It was concluded that most reported "frog swarms" are actually normal behaviour, probably caused by juvenile animals migrating away from their breeding pond, after a fruitful reproductive season. As amphibian populations undergo large fluctuations in numbers from year to year, this phenomenon will not occur on a yearly basis but will depend on successful reproduction, which is related to numerous climatic and geophysical factors. Hence, most large swarms of amphibians, particularly those involving very small frogs and occurring in late spring or summer, are not unusual and should not be considered earthquake precursors. In addition, it is likely that reports of several mass migration of small toads prior to the Great Sichuan Earthquake in 2008 were not linked to the subsequent M = 7.9 event (some occurred at a great distance from the epicentre), and were probably co-incidence. Statistical analysis of the data indicated frog swarms are unlikely to be connected with earthquakes. Reports of unusual behaviour giving rise to earthquake fears should be interpreted with caution, and consultation with experts in the field of earthquake biology is advised. PMID:26479746

  2. Spirit's West Valley Panorama (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA'S Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this westward view from atop a low plateau where Sprit spent the closing months of 2007.

    After several months near the base of the plateau called 'Home Plate' in the inner basin of the Columbia Hills range inside Gusev Crater, Spirit climbed onto the eastern edge of the plateau during the rover's 1,306th Martian day, or sol, (Sept. 5, 2007). It examined rocks and soils at several locations on the southern half of Home Plate during September and October. It was perched near the western edge of Home Plate when it used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to take the images used in this view on sols 1,366 through 1,369 (Nov. 6 through Nov. 9, 2007). With its daily solar-energy supply shrinking as Martian summer turned to fall, Spirit then drove to the northern edge of Home Plate for a favorable winter haven. The rover reached that northward-tilting site in December, in time for the fourth Earth-year anniversary of its landing on Mars. Spirit reached Mars on Jan. 4, 2004, Universal Time (Jan. 3, 2004, Pacific Standard Time). It landed at a site at about the center of the horizon in this image.

    This panorama covers a scene spanning left to right from southwest to northeast. The western edge of Home Plate is in the foreground, generally lighter in tone than the more distant parts of the scene. A rock-dotted hill in the middle distance across the left third of the image is 'Tsiolkovski Ridge,' about 30 meters or 100 feet from the edge of Home Plate and about that same distance across. A bump on the horizon above the left edge of Tsiolkovski Ridge is 'Grissom Hill,' about 8 kilometers or 5 miles away. At right, the highest point of the horizon is 'Husband Hill,' to the north and about 800 meters or half a mile away.

    This view combines separate images taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers. It is presented in a false-color stretch to bring out subtle color differences in the scene.

  3. 'Lyell' Panorama inside Victoria Crater (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    During four months prior to the fourth anniversary of its landing on Mars, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined rocks inside an alcove called 'Duck Bay' in the western portion of Victoria Crater. The main body of the crater appears in the upper right of this stereo panorama, with the far side of the crater lying about 800 meters (half a mile) away. Bracketing that part of the view are two promontories on the crater's rim at either side of Duck Bay. They are 'Cape Verde,' about 6 meters (20 feet) tall, on the left, and 'Cabo Frio,' about 15 meters (50 feet) tall, on the right. The rest of the image, other than sky and portions of the rover, is ground within Duck Bay.

    Opportunity's targets of study during the last quarter of 2007 were rock layers within a band exposed around the interior of the crater, about 6 meters (20 feet) from the rim. Bright rocks within the band are visible in the foreground of the panorama. The rover science team assigned informal names to three subdivisions of the band: 'Steno,' 'Smith,' and 'Lyell.'

    This view combines many images taken by Opportunity's panoramic camera (Pancam) from the 1,332nd through 1,379th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (Oct. 23 to Dec. 11, 2007). Images taken through Pancam filters centered on wavelengths of 753 nanometers, 535 nanometers and 432 nanometers were mixed to produce this view, which is presented in a false-color stretch to bring out subtle color differences in the scene. Some visible patterns in dark and light tones are the result of combining frames that were affected by dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera.

    Opportunity landed on Jan. 25, 2004, Universal Time, (Jan. 24, Pacific Time) inside a much smaller crater about 6 kilometers (4 miles) north of Victoria Crater, to begin a surface mission designed to last 3 months and drive about 600 meters (0.4 mile).

  4. Experimental investigation of false positive errors in auditory species occurrence surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A.W.; Weir, Linda A.; McClintock, Brett T.; Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Bailey, Larissa L.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2012-01-01

    False positive errors are a significant component of many ecological data sets, which in combination with false negative errors, can lead to severe biases in conclusions about ecological systems. We present results of a field experiment where observers recorded observations for known combinations of electronically broadcast calling anurans under conditions mimicking field surveys to determine species occurrence. Our objectives were to characterize false positive error probabilities for auditory methods based on a large number of observers, to determine if targeted instruction could be used to reduce false positive error rates, and to establish useful predictors of among-observer and among-species differences in error rates. We recruited 31 observers, ranging in abilities from novice to expert, that recorded detections for 12 species during 180 calling trials (66,960 total observations). All observers made multiple false positive errors and on average 8.1% of recorded detections in the experiment were false positive errors. Additional instruction had only minor effects on error rates. After instruction, false positive error probabilities decreased by 16% for treatment individuals compared to controls with broad confidence interval overlap of 0 (95% CI: -46 to 30%). This coincided with an increase in false negative errors due to the treatment (26%; -3 to 61%). Differences among observers in false positive and in false negative error rates were best predicted by scores from an online test and a self-assessment of observer ability completed prior to the field experiment. In contrast, years of experience conducting call surveys was a weak predictor of error rates. False positive errors were also more common for species that were played more frequently, but were not related to the dominant spectral frequency of the call. Our results corroborate other work that demonstrates false positives are a significant component of species occurrence data collected by auditory methods. Instructing observers to only report detections they are completely certain are correct is not sufficient to eliminate errors. As a result, analytical methods that account for false positive errors will be needed, and independent testing of observer ability is a useful predictor for among-observer variation in observation error rates.

  5. Proactive and retroactive effects of negative suggestion.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alan S; Brown, Christine M; Mosbacher, Joy L; Dryden, W Erich

    2006-11-01

    The negative effects of false information presented either prior to (proactive interference; PI) or following (retroactive interference; RI) true information was examined with word definitions (Experiment 1) and trivia facts (Experiment 2). Participants were explicitly aware of which information was true and false when shown, and true-false discrimination was evaluated via multiple-choice tests. Negative suggestion, defined as poorer performance on interference items than noninterference (control) items, consistently occurred when the wrong information followed the correct information (RI) but not when it preceded the correct information (PI). These effects did not change as a function of retention interval (immediate, 1 week, or 3 weeks) or number of incorrect alternatives (1 or 3). Implications of this outcome for experiencing incorrect information in both academic and nonacademic situations are considered. PMID:17087580

  6. Apparent molal volumes, apparent molal compressibilities, and their isotope effects in aqueous and non-aqueous carbohydrate solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    Apparent molal volumes and compressibilities of aqueous and nonaqueous solutions including their isotope effects were investigated. The apparent molal volumes were derived from densities measured with a vibrating tube densitometer. Aqueous solution limiting apparent molal volumes and expansibilities are reported for glucose, sucrose, fructose, and myo-inositol at various temperatures. The concentration dependence of the molar volume isotope effect and the temperature dependence of the limiting values are given for glucose, sucrose, and myo-inositol. Non-aqueous limiting apparent molal volumes are reported for glucose in DMSO, DMSO-d/sub 6/, DMF, and ethylene glycol, galactose in DMSO, sucrose in DMSO and DMF, ..alpha..-methyl glucoside in DMSO, DMF, and methanol, and ..beta..-methyl glucoside in DMSO. The apparent molal adiabatic compressibility were obtained from sound speeds measured with two sing-around ultrasonic velocimeters. Aqueous limiting apparent molal adiabatic compressibilities are presented for glucose, sucrose, fructose, and myo-inositol at 15 and 25/sup 0/C. Isothermal values at 25/sup 0/ are also reported. Non-aqueous limiting apparent molal adiabatic compressibilities are given for glucose, sucrose, ..alpha..- and ..beta..-methyl glucosides in DMSO, and glucose, in DMF.

  7. Masking and color inheritance along the apparent motion path

    E-print Network

    Johnston, Alan

    Masking and color inheritance along the apparent motion path David Souto # $ Cognitive, Perceptual, and Brain Sciences, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, London, UK Alan Johnston # $ Cognitive, Perceptual, and Brain Sciences, Division of Psychology and Language

  8. Gusev Rocks Solidified from Lava (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    In recent weeks, as NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has driven through the basin south of 'Husband Hill,' it has been traversing mainly sand and dune deposits. This week, though, Spirit has been maneuvering along the edge of an arc-shaped feature called 'Lorre Ridge' and has encountered some spectacular examples of basaltic rocks with striking textures. This panoramic camera (Pancam) image shows a group of boulders informally named 'FuYi.' These basaltic rocks were formed by volcanic processes and may be a primary constituent of Lorre Ridge and other interesting landforms in the basin.

    Spirit first encountered basalts at its landing site two years ago, on a vast plain covered with solidified lava that appeared to have flowed across Gusev Crater. Later, basaltic rocks became rare as Spirit climbed Husband Hill. The basaltic rocks that Spirit is now seeing are interesting because they exhibit many small holes or vesicles, similar to some kinds of volcanic rocks on Earth. Vesicular rocks form when gas bubbles are trapped in lava flows and the rock solidifies around the bubbles. When the gas escapes, it leaves holes in the rock. The quantity of gas bubbles in rocks on Husband Hill varies considerably; some rocks have none and some, such as several here at FuYi, are downright frothy.

    The change in textures and the location of the basalts may be signs that Spirit is driving along the edge of a lava flow. This lava may be the same as the basalt blanketing the plains of Spirit's landing site, or it may be different. The large size and frothy nature of the boulders around Lorre Ridge might indicate that eruptions once took place at the edge of the lava flow, where the lava interacted with the rocks of the basin floor. Scientists hope to learn more as Spirit continues to investigate these rocks.

    As Earth approaches the Chinese New Year (The Year of the Dog), the Athena science team decided to use nicknames representing Chinese culture and geography to identify rocks and features investigated by Spirit during the Chinese New Year celebration period. In ancient Chinese myth, FuYi was the first great emperor and lived in the east. He explained the theory of 'Yin' and 'Yang' to his people, invented the net to catch fish, was the first to use fire to cook food, and invented a musical instrument known as the 'Se' to accompany his peoples' songs and dances. Other rocks and features are being informally named for Chinese gods, warriors, inventors, and scientists, as well as rivers, lakes, and mountains.

    Spirit took this image on the rover's Martian day, or sol, 731 (Jan. 23, 2006). This is a false-color composite combining images taken with the Pancam's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters.

  9. An Improved Comprehensive Model for the Apparent Viscosity of Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank; Anderson, Spencer

    2008-11-01

    An improved comprehensive model for the apparent viscosity of blood is developed and used in simulations of the microcirculation in capillary bundles of rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia. In the microcirculation, the apparent viscosity of blood depends on the local vessel diameter, hematocrit, and shear rate. The proposed comprehensive model extends the apparent viscosity model developed by Pries, Secomb, Gaehtgens, and Gross (Circulation Research, 67, 826-834, 1990), which describes the effect of vessel diameter and hematocrit on the apparent viscosity. A shear thinning term is developed using the experimental data of Lipowsky, Usami, and Chien (Microvascular Research, 19, 297-319, 1980). Curve fits of this data can be combined with equations given in the Pries et al. work to create a system of equations that can be used to find the shear thinning factor. The simulations based on the improved apparent viscosity model use realistic vessel topology for the microvasculature, reconstructed from microscope images of tissue samples, and consider passive and active vessel properties. The numerical method is based on a Hagen-Poiseuille balance in the microvessels and a sparse matrix solver is used to obtain the solution. It was found that the inclusion of the shear factor decreases the overall flowrate in the capillary bundle. Many vessel connections in the fascia are characterized by relatively low shear rates and therefore increased apparent viscosity.

  10. How the Sausage is Made: Kepler's False Alarms, False Positives, and Planet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, J.

    2014-04-01

    The Kepler mission has now designated over 7,000 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs), or transit-like signatures, utilizing up to four years of data. The number of potentially habitable planet candidates (PCs) among this sample has risen significantly over time. However, starting with Kepler threshold crossing events (TCEs), there are initially about as many false alarms (FAs) detected as there are KOIs. Furthermore, due to its design, contamination from eclipsing binaries, variable stars, and other transiting planets result in a significant number of KOIs being designated as false positives (FPs). Many of these FAs and FPs occur at long orbital periods, where habitable planets are typically found. I will review the process of how an initial TCE becomes a KOI, and then is ultimately classified as a FA, FP, or PC, along with the various vetting tools employed. The understanding of this process is crucial to performing accurate statistical analyses on populations of habitable planet candidates discovered by Kepler.

  11. False memory ? false memory: DRM errors are unrelated to the misinformation effect.

    PubMed

    Ost, James; Blank, Hartmut; Davies, Joanna; Jones, Georgina; Lambert, Katie; Salmon, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    The DRM method has proved to be a popular and powerful, if controversial, way to study 'false memories'. One reason for the controversy is that the extent to which the DRM effect generalises to other kinds of memory error has been neither satisfactorily established nor subject to much empirical attention. In the present paper we contribute data to this ongoing debate. One hundred and twenty participants took part in a standard misinformation effect experiment, in which they watched some CCTV footage, were exposed to misleading post-event information about events depicted in the footage, and then completed free recall and recognition tests. Participants also completed a DRM test as an ostensibly unrelated filler task. Despite obtaining robust misinformation and DRM effects, there were no correlations between a broad range of misinformation and DRM effect measures (mean r ?=?-.01). This was not due to reliability issues with our measures or a lack of power. Thus DRM 'false memories' and misinformation effect 'false memories' do not appear to be equivalent. PMID:23573186

  12. False Memory ? False Memory: DRM Errors Are Unrelated to the Misinformation Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ost, James; Blank, Hartmut; Davies, Joanna; Jones, Georgina; Lambert, Katie; Salmon, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    The DRM method has proved to be a popular and powerful, if controversial, way to study ‘false memories’. One reason for the controversy is that the extent to which the DRM effect generalises to other kinds of memory error has been neither satisfactorily established nor subject to much empirical attention. In the present paper we contribute data to this ongoing debate. One hundred and twenty participants took part in a standard misinformation effect experiment, in which they watched some CCTV footage, were exposed to misleading post-event information about events depicted in the footage, and then completed free recall and recognition tests. Participants also completed a DRM test as an ostensibly unrelated filler task. Despite obtaining robust misinformation and DRM effects, there were no correlations between a broad range of misinformation and DRM effect measures (mean r ?=??.01). This was not due to reliability issues with our measures or a lack of power. Thus DRM ‘false memories’ and misinformation effect ‘false memories’ do not appear to be equivalent. PMID:23573186

  13. Apparent Temperature and Air Pollution vs. Elderly Population Mortality in Metro Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Krsti?, Goran

    2011-01-01

    Background Meteorological conditions and air pollution in urban environments have been associated with general population and elderly mortality, showing seasonal variation. Objectives This study is designed to evaluate the relationship between apparent temperature (AT) and air pollution (PM2.5) vs. mortality in elderly population of Metro Vancouver. Methods Statistical analyses are performed on moving sum daily mortality rates vs. moving average AT and PM2.5 in 1-, 2-, 3-, 5-, and 7-day models for all seasons, warm temperatures above 15°C, and cold temperatures below 10°C. Results Approximately 37% of the variation in all-season mortality from circulatory and respiratory causes can be explained by the variation in 7-day moving average apparent temperature (r2?=?0.37, p<0.001). Although the analytical results from air pollution models show increasingly better prediction ability of longer time-intervals (r2?=?0.012, p<0.001 in a 7-day model), a very weak negative association between elderly mortality and air pollution is observed. Conclusions Apparent temperature is associated with mortality from respiratory and circulatory causes in elderly population of Metro Vancouver. In a changing climate, one may anticipate to observe potential health impacts from the projected high- and particularly from the low-temperature extremes. PMID:21980381

  14. Inflation after False Vacuum Decay: Observational Prospects after Planck

    E-print Network

    Raphael Bousso; Daniel Harlow; Leonardo Senatore

    2013-10-01

    We assess two potential signals of the formation of our universe by the decay of a false vacuum. Negative spatial curvature is one possibility, but the window for its detection is now small. However, another possible signal is a suppression of the CMB power spectrum at large angles. This arises from the steepening of the effective potential as it interpolates between a flat inflationary plateau and the high barrier separating us from our parent vacuum. We demonstrate that these two effects can be parametrically separated in angular scale. Observationally, the steepening effect appears to be excluded at large l; but it remains consistent with the slight lack of power below l about 30 found by the WMAP and Planck collaborations. We give two simple models which improve the fit to the Planck data; one with observable curvature and one without. Despite cosmic variance, we argue that future CMB polarization and most importantly large-scale structure observations should be able to corroborate the Planck anomaly if it is real. If we further assume the specific theoretical setting of a landscape of metastable vacua, as suggested by string theory, we can estimate the probability of seeing a low-l suppression in the CMB. There are significant theoretical uncertainties in such calculations, but we argue the probability for a detectable suppression may be as large as O(1), and in general is significantly larger than the probability of seeing curvature.

  15. Do false belief and verb non-factivity share similar neural circuits?

    PubMed

    Chen, Lan; Cheung, Him; Szeto, Ching-Yee; Zhu, Zude; Wang, Suiping

    2012-02-21

    The present study investigates whether the complement falsity elicited by strong non-factive verbs and the false belief activated by a standard nonverbal false belief task produce similar electrophysiological activities in the brain. The hypothesis is based on the notion that both complement falsity and false belief involve decoupling a false mental representation from reality. Some previous studies have reported a behavioral correlation between children's false belief reasoning and interpretation of strong non-factive verbs together with their false complements, but a neural basis for this correlation has not been found. Our event-related potential (ERP) results with normal adults showed that both nonverbal false belief and strong non-factive verb comprehension elicited a negative late slow waveform divergence compared to their respective baselines. Although these slow waves due to the two types of stimuli had slightly different scalp distributions, both were regarded as reflecting primarily frontal activation. Such ERP similarity provides evidence for a common neural basis shared by nonverbal false belief reasoning and comprehension of strong non-factive verbs. PMID:22249115

  16. Negative birefringent polyimide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W. (Inventor); Cheng, Stephen Z. D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A negative birefringent film, useful in liquid crystal displays, and a method for controlling the negative birefringence of a polyimide film is disclosed which allows the matching of an application to a targeted amount of birefringence by controlling the degree of in-plane orientation of the polyimide by the selection of functional groups within both the diamine and dianhydride segments of the polyimide which affect the polyimide backbone chain rigidity, linearity, and symmetry. The higher the rigidity, linearity and symmetry of the polyimide backbone, the larger the value of the negative birefringence of the polyimide film.

  17. Magnetic negative stiffness dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiang; Zhu, Songye

    2015-07-01

    This communication presents the design principle and experimental validation of two novel configurations of magnetic negative stiffness dampers (MNSDs), both of which are composed of several permanent magnets arranged in a conductive pipe. The MNSD, as a passive device, efficiently integrates negative stiffness and eddy-current damping in a simple and compact design, in which the negative stiffness behavior depends on the different arrangements of the permanent magnets. When applied to structural vibration control, passive MNSD may achieve a performance comparable with semi-active or active control in some applications. Laboratory experiments of small-scale prototypes successfully verified the proposed MNSD design concept.

  18. Adults' Memories of Childhood: True and False Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qin, Jianjian; Ogle, Christin M.; Goodman, Gail S.

    2008-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined factors that, according to the source-monitoring framework, might influence false memory formation and true/false memory discernment. In Experiment 1, combined effects of warning and visualization on false childhood memory formation were examined, as were individual differences in true and false childhood…

  19. Nearly extremal apparent horizons in simulations of merging black holes

    E-print Network

    Geoffrey Lovelace; Mark A. Scheel; Robert Owen; Matthew Giesler; Reza Katebi; Bela Szilagyi; Tony Chu; Nicholas Demos; Daniel A. Hemberger; Lawrence E. Kidder; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Nousha Afshari

    2015-02-27

    The spin angular momentum $S$ of an isolated Kerr black hole is bounded by the surface area $A$ of its apparent horizon: $8\\pi S \\le A$, with equality for extremal black holes. In this paper, we explore the extremality of individual and common apparent horizons for merging, rapidly spinning binary black holes. We consider simulations of merging black holes with equal masses $M$ and initial spin angular momenta aligned with the orbital angular momentum, including new simulations with spin magnitudes up to $S/M^2 = 0.994$. We measure the area and (using approximate Killing vectors) the spin on the individual and common apparent horizons, finding that the inequality $8\\pi S A$ and for which our lower bound on their Booth-Fairhurst extremality exceeds unity. These superextremal surfaces are always surrounded by marginally outer trapped surfaces (i.e., by apparent horizons) with $8\\pi Sapparent horizon is always less than unity but can exceed the value for an extremal Kerr black hole. (Abstract abbreviated.)

  20. Positivity, negativity, and entanglement

    E-print Network

    Perlmutter, Eric; Rota, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    We explore properties of the universal terms in the entanglement entropy and logarithmic negativity in 4d CFTs, aiming to clarify the ways in which they behave like the analogous entanglement measures in quantum mechanics. We show that, unlike entanglement entropy in finite-dimensional systems, the sign of the universal part of entanglement entropy is indeterminate. In particular, if and only if the central charges obey $a>c$, the entanglement across certain classes of entangling surfaces can become arbitrarily negative, depending on the geometry and topology of the surface. The negative contribution is proportional to the product of $a-c$ and the genus of the surface. Similarly, we show that in $a>c$ theories, the logarithmic negativity does not always exceed the entanglement entropy.

  1. Positivity, negativity, and entanglement

    E-print Network

    Eric Perlmutter; Mukund Rangamani; Massimiliano Rota

    2015-09-22

    We explore properties of the universal terms in the entanglement entropy and logarithmic negativity in 4d CFTs, aiming to clarify the ways in which they behave like the analogous entanglement measures in quantum mechanics. We show that, unlike entanglement entropy in finite-dimensional systems, the sign of the universal part of entanglement entropy is indeterminate. In particular, if and only if the central charges obey $a>c$, the entanglement across certain classes of entangling surfaces can become arbitrarily negative, depending on the geometry and topology of the surface. The negative contribution is proportional to the product of $a-c$ and the genus of the surface. Similarly, we show that in $a>c$ theories, the logarithmic negativity does not always exceed the entanglement entropy.

  2. Logo and Negative Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawn, Candace A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes LOGO's turtle graphics capabilities based on a sixth-grade classroom's activities with negative numbers and Logo programming. A sidebar explains LOGO and offers suggestions to teachers for using LOGO effectively. (LRW)

  3. 19 CFR 10.551 - Issuance of negative origin determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issuance of negative origin determinations. 10.551...-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.551 Issuance of negative origin determinations. If, as a result of an origin verification initiated under § 10.550 of this subpart, CBP denies...

  4. 19 CFR 10.473 - Issuance of negative origin determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Issuance of negative origin determinations. 10.473... Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.473 Issuance of negative origin determinations. If CBP determines, as a result of an origin verification initiated under this subpart, that...

  5. 19 CFR 10.618 - Issuance of negative origin determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Issuance of negative origin determinations. 10.618...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.618 Issuance of negative origin determinations. If, as a result of an origin verification initiated under...

  6. 19 CFR 10.473 - Issuance of negative origin determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issuance of negative origin determinations. 10.473... Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.473 Issuance of negative origin determinations. If CBP determines, as a result of an origin verification initiated under this subpart, that...

  7. 19 CFR 10.785 - Issuance of negative origin determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Issuance of negative origin determinations. 10.785... Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.785 Issuance of negative origin determinations. If, as a result of an origin verification initiated under this subpart, CBP determines that...

  8. 19 CFR 10.785 - Issuance of negative origin determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issuance of negative origin determinations. 10.785... Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.785 Issuance of negative origin determinations. If, as a result of an origin verification initiated under this subpart, CBP determines that...

  9. 19 CFR 10.888 - Issuance of negative origin determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Issuance of negative origin determinations. 10.888... Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.888 Issuance of negative origin determinations. If, as a result of an origin verification initiated under this subpart, CBP determines that...

  10. 19 CFR 10.618 - Issuance of negative origin determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issuance of negative origin determinations. 10.618...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.618 Issuance of negative origin determinations. If, as a result of an origin verification initiated under...

  11. 19 CFR 10.825 - Issuance of negative origin determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Issuance of negative origin determinations. 10.825... Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.825 Issuance of negative origin determinations. If, as a result of an origin verification initiated under this subpart, CBP determines that...

  12. 19 CFR 10.551 - Issuance of negative origin determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Issuance of negative origin determinations. 10.551...-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.551 Issuance of negative origin determinations. If, as a result of an origin verification initiated under § 10.550 of this subpart, CBP denies...

  13. 19 CFR 10.825 - Issuance of negative origin determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Issuance of negative origin determinations. 10.825... Free Trade Agreement Origin Verifications and Determinations § 10.825 Issuance of negative origin determinations. If, as a result of an origin verification initiated under this subpart, CBP determines that...

  14. Pseudo-spectral apparent horizon finders: an efficient new algorithm

    E-print Network

    Carsten Gundlach

    1997-10-20

    We review the problem of finding an apparent horizon in Cauchy data (Sigma, g_ab, K_ab) in three space dimensions without symmetries. We describe a family of algorithms which includes the pseudo-spectral apparent horizon finder of Nakamura et al. and the curvature flow method proposed by Tod as special cases. We suggest that other algorithms in the family may combine the speed of the former with the robustness of the latter. A numerical implementation for Cauchy data given on a grid in Cartesian coordinates is described, and tested on Brill-Lindquist and Kerr initial data. The new algorithm appears faster and more robust than previous ones.

  15. Thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in generalized gravity theories

    E-print Network

    Shao-Feng Wu; Bin Wang; Guo-Hong Yang

    2008-01-17

    We present a general procedure to construct the first law of thermodynamics on the apparent horizon and illustrate its validity by examining it in some extended gravity theories. Applying this procedure, we can describe the thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in Randall-Sundrum braneworld imbedded in a nontrivial bulk. We discuss the mass-like function which was used to link Friedmann equation to the first law of thermodynamics and obtain its special case which gives the generalized Misner-Sharp mass in Lovelock gravity.

  16. On apparent temperature in low-frequency Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Nariyuki, Yasuhiro

    2012-08-15

    Low-frequency, parallel propagating Alfvenic turbulence in collisionless plasmas is theoretically studied. Alfvenic turbulence is derived as an equilibrium state (Beltrami field) in the magnetohydrodynamic equations with the pressure anisotropy and multi-species of ions. It is shown that the conservation of the total 'apparent temperature' corresponds to the Bernoulli law. A simple model of the radially expanding solar wind including Alfvenic turbulence is also discussed. The conversion of the wave energy in the 'apparent temperature' into the 'real temperature' is facilitated with increasing radial distance.

  17. Negative refraction without negative index in metallic photonic crystals

    E-print Network

    Negative refraction without negative index in metallic photonic crystals Chiyan Luo, Steven G: It is shown that certain metallic photonic crystals can enable negative refraction and subwavelength imaging negative values of and µ," Sov. Phys. Usp. 10, 509-514 (1968). 5. J. B. Pendry, "Negative refraction makes

  18. An analysis of false positive reactions occurring with the Captia Syph G EIA.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J; Moyes, A; Young, H; McMillan, A

    1991-01-01

    AIM--The Captia Syph G enzyme immuno assay (EAI) offers the potential for the rapid automated detection of syphilis antibodies. This study was designed to assess the role of other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in producing false positive reactions in the Captia Syph G EIA. The role of rheumatoid factor (RF) as a potential source of false positives was also analysed. METHODS--Patients who attended a genitourinary medicine (GUM) department and gave a false positive reaction with the EIA between 1988 and 1990 were compared with women undergoing antenatal testing and with the control clinic population (EIA negative) over the same time period. The incidence of sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the clinic population and the false positive reactors was measured in relation to gonorrhoea, chlamydia, genital warts, candidiasis, "other conditions not requiring treatment" and "other conditions requiring treatment." Male: female sex ratios were also compared. Ninety two RF positive sera were analysed with the EIA. RESULTS--The rate of false positive reactions did not differ with respect to the diagnosis within the GUM clinic population. The antenatal group of women, however, had a lower incidence of false positive reactions than the GUM clinic group. No RF positive sera were positive on Captia Syph G EIA testing. CONCLUSIONS--There is no cross reaction between Captia Syph G EIA and any specific STD or with RF positive sera. The lower incidence of false positive reactions in antenatal women is unexplained but may be related to physiological changes associated with pregnancy. PMID:1743715

  19. Clinical Significance of CK19 Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujisue, Mamiko; Nishimura, Reiki; Okumura, Yasuhiro; Tashima, Rumiko; Nishiyama, Yasuyuki; Osako, Tomofumi; Toyozumi, Yasuo; Arima, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) by means of One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification (OSNA) is gaining widespread use as a quick and accurate method. This assay detects the expression level of cytokeratin 19 (CK19) which is present in some but not all breast tumors. In this study, the clinical significance of negative CK19 was investigated in 219 cases of primary breast cancer. In 179 patients with clinically negative nodes, OSNA and imprint smear cytology of SLN were performed simultaneously. The OSNA revealed a node-positive rate of 24.6%. Negative CK19 correlated significantly with negative ER/PgR and higher Ki-67 values, and marginally with higher nuclear grade and p53 overexpression. The triple negative subtype showed lower CK19 expression. OSNA revealed that one of the negative CK19 cases was actually a false negative but this was corrected with the use of the imprint smear cytology. In conclusion, CK19 negativity reflected the aggressiveness of primary breast cancer. OSNA assay used to analyze SLN was useful, but there is a possibility that it will mistakenly detect false negatives in CK19 negative tumors. Therefore, in tumors with negative CK19, the imprint smear cytology may be more useful in cases with macrometastasis. PMID:24216695

  20. Clinical Significance of CK19 Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujisue, Mamiko; Nishimura, Reiki; Okumura, Yasuhiro; Tashima, Rumiko; Nishiyama, Yasuyuki; Osako, Tomofumi; Toyozumi, Yasuo; Arima, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) by means of One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification (OSNA) is gaining widespread use as a quick and accurate method. This assay detects the expression level of cytokeratin 19 (CK19) which is present in some but not all breast tumors. In this study, the clinical significance of negative CK19 was investigated in 219 cases of primary breast cancer. In 179 patients with clinically negative nodes, OSNA and imprint smear cytology of SLN were performed simultaneously. The OSNA revealed a node-positive rate of 24.6%. Negative CK19 correlated significantly with negative ER/PgR and higher Ki-67 values, and marginally with higher nuclear grade and p53 overexpression. The triple negative subtype showed lower CK19 expression. OSNA revealed that one of the negative CK19 cases was actually a false negative but this was corrected with the use of the imprint smear cytology. In conclusion, CK19 negativity reflected the aggressiveness of primary breast cancer. OSNA assay used to analyze SLN was useful, but there is a possibility that it will mistakenly detect false negatives in CK19 negative tumors. Therefore, in tumors with negative CK19, the imprint smear cytology may be more useful in cases with macrometastasis. PMID:24216695

  1. Bias of apparent tracer ages in heterogeneous environments.

    PubMed

    McCallum, James L; Cook, Peter G; Simmons, Craig T; Werner, Adrian D

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of apparent ages often assumes that a water sample is composed of a single age. In heterogeneous aquifers, apparent ages estimated with environmental tracer methods do not reflect mean water ages because of the mixing of waters from many flow paths with different ages. This is due to nonlinear variations in atmospheric concentrations of the tracer with time resulting in biases of mixed concentrations used to determine apparent ages. The bias of these methods is rarely reported and has not been systematically evaluated in heterogeneous settings. We simulate residence time distributions (RTDs) and environmental tracers CFCs, SF6 , (85) Kr, and (39) Ar in synthetic heterogeneous confined aquifers and compare apparent ages to mean ages. Heterogeneity was simulated as both K-field variance (?(2) ) and structure. We demonstrate that an increase in heterogeneity (increase in ?(2) or structure) results in an increase in the width of the RTD. In low heterogeneity cases, widths were generally on the order of 10 years and biases generally less than 10%. In high heterogeneity cases, widths can reach 100?s of years and biases can reach up to 100%. In cases where the temporal variations of atmospheric concentration of individual tracers vary, different patterns of bias are observed for the same mean age. We show that CFC-12 and CFC-113 ages may be used to correct for the mean age if analytical errors are small. PMID:23550995

  2. Increasing Range Of Apparent Depth In A Stereoscopic Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busquets, Anthony M.; Parrish, Russell V.; Williams, Steven P.

    1995-01-01

    Optical configuration conceived for increasing range of apparent depth provided by stereoscopic display system, without imposing concomitant reduction in field of view. Observer wears shuttered goggles synchronized with alternating left- and right-eye views on display. However, instead of looking directly at display screen, observer looks at screen via reflection in mirror collimating light emitted by screen.

  3. Reconstruction and Motion Estimation from Apparent Contours under Circular Motion

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Reconstruction and Motion Estimation from Apparent Contours under Circular Motion K-Y. K. Wong, P, where a novel technique, based on properties of the affine epipolar geometry under circular motion structure and motion from the contours of a smooth-curved surface. A novel and simpler technique

  4. Apparent horizons in D-dimensional Robinson-Trautman spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Svitek, Otakar

    2009-05-01

    We derive the higher dimensional generalization of Penrose-Tod equation describing apparent horizons in Robinson-Trautman spacetimes. New results concerning the existence and uniqueness of its solutions in four dimensions are proven. Namely, previous results of Tod [1] are generalized to nonvanishing cosmological constant.

  5. Controlling the Apparent Inertia of Passive Human-Interactive Robots

    E-print Network

    Amaral, Luis A.N.

    Controlling the Apparent Inertia of Passive Human- Interactive Robots Tom Worsnopp Michael Peshkin of cobots is to use computer- controllable CVTs (continuously variable transmissions) to produce high@northwestern.edu kmlynch@northwestern.edu Abstract--We have been exploring the use of passive robotic mechanisms

  6. INTRODUCTION Unlike Earth, Venus apparently lacks plate tectonics. Thus

    E-print Network

    Jurdy, Donna M.

    INTRODUCTION Unlike Earth, Venus apparently lacks plate tectonics. Thus plumes may be an important at different scales has been attributed to plume or diapiric activ- ity on Venus. Examples of these include activity in the Beta-Atla-Themis region, Venus Audeliz Matias Donna M. Jurdy* Department of Geological

  7. Apparent Display Resolution Enhancement for Moving Images Piotr Didyk1

    E-print Network

    Waldmann, Uwe

    of such details. To this end, we display images rapidly varying over time along a given tra- jectory on a highApparent Display Resolution Enhancement for Moving Images Piotr Didyk1 Elmar Eisemann1,2 Tobias) or small text (right) on a typical display is challenging and often fails if the display resolution

  8. Apparent digestible energy value of crude glycerol fed to pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The apparent digestible energy of crude glycerol, a co-product of biodiesel production, was determined in two studies conducted at the Iowa State University Swine Nutrition Research Farm, Ames, IA. In the first study, 24 barrows with an average body weight of 11.0 kg were fed 376 g/d of a basal corn...

  9. Earth'sFuture An apparent hiatus in global warming?

    E-print Network

    Trenberth, Kevin Edward

    Earth'sFuture An apparent hiatus in global warming? Kevin E. Trenberth1 and John T. Fasullo1 1National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA Abstract Global warming first became surface temperatures while sea-level rise is more relentless. Global warming has not stopped; it is merely

  10. Management and Conservation Article Apparent Survival and Population

    E-print Network

    Colwell, Mark

    Management and Conservation Article Apparent Survival and Population Growth of Snowy Plovers population of the threatened western snowy plover (Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus) in coastal northern was more stable. These results, combined with annual variation in the number of newly marked plovers

  11. NATAL PHILOPATRY AND APPARENT SURVIVAL OF JUVENILE SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS

    E-print Network

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    NATAL PHILOPATRY AND APPARENT SURVIVAL OF JUVENILE SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS ERICA NOL,1,3 SIMONE study of Semipalmated Plovers (Charadrius semipalmatus) marked as hatchlings to an arctic breeding site. melodus; Larson et al. 2000, Colwell et al. 2007b, Stenzel et al. 2007). The Semipalmated Plover (C

  12. An Apparent Paradox: Catt's Anomaly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieraccini, M.; Selleri, S.

    2013-01-01

    Catt's anomaly is a sort of "thought experiment" (a "gedankenexperiment") where electrons seem to travel at the speed of light. Although its author argued with conviction for many years, it has a clear and satisfactory solution and it can be considered indubitably just an apparent paradox. Nevertheless, it is curious and…

  13. Spatial Attention and Audiovisual Interactions in Apparent Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanabria, Daniel; Soto-Faraco, Salvador; Spence, Charles

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the authors combined the cross-modal dynamic capture task (involving the horizontal apparent movement of visual and auditory stimuli) with spatial cuing in the vertical dimension to investigate the role of spatial attention in cross-modal interactions during motion perception. Spatial attention was manipulated endogenously, either…

  14. Discovery of an Apparent Nova in M81

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornoch, K.; Alfaro, M. Diaz; Ordonez-Etxeberria, I.; Vaduvescu, O.

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of an apparent nova in M81 on a co-added 1600-s narrow-band H-alpha CCD image taken with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma under ~2.4" seeing on 2015 Jan. 15.126 UT.

  15. Ghosts as Negative Spinors

    E-print Network

    Andre van Tonder

    2002-07-11

    We study the the properties of a BRST ghost degree of freedom complementary to a two-state spinor. We show that the ghost may be regarded as a unit carrier of negative entropy. We construct an irreducible representation of the su(2) Lie algebra with negative spin, equal to -1/2, on the ghost state space and discuss the representation of finite SU(2) group elements. The Casimir operator J^2 of the combined spinor-ghost system is nilpotent and coincides with the BRST operator Q. Using this, we discuss the sense in which the positive and negative spin representations cancel in the product to give an effectively trivial representation. We compute an effective dimension, equal to 1/2, and character for the ghost representation and argue that these are consistent with this cancellation.

  16. Application of anomalous diffusion in production of negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimbo, K.

    1984-11-01

    The production of negative hydrogen ions is investigated in the reflex-type negative ion sources. When anomalous diffusion in the positive column was found by Hoh and Lehnert (Phys. Fluids 3, 600 (1960)), it was pointed out that the large particle loss produced by anomalous diffusion is compensated for by the larger particle production inside the plasma. In the present experiments anomalous diffusion was artificially encouraged by changing the radial electric field inside the reflex discharge. Apparent encouragement of negative ion current by the increase of the density fluctuation amplitude is observed. Twice as much negative ion current was obtained with the artificial encouragement as without. On the other hand, the larger extracted negative ion current was observed with a lower electron temperature, which is calculated from the anomalous diffusion coefficient derived from a simple nonlinear theory. This result is consistent with Wadehra's calculated results (Appl. Phys. Lett. 35, 917 (1979)).

  17. Neural processing associated with true and false memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Okado, Yoko; Stark, Craig

    2003-12-01

    We investigated the neural bases for false memory with fMRI by examining neural activity during retrieval processes that yielded true or false memories. We used a reality monitoring paradigm in which participants saw or imagined pictures of concrete objects. (A subsequent misinformation task was also used to increase false memory rates.) At test, fMRI data were collected as the participants determined whether they had seen or had only imagined the object at study. True memories were of seen pictures accurately endorsed as seen, and for false memories were of imagined pictures falsely endorsed as seen. Three distinct patterns of activity were observed: Left frontal and parietal activity was not different for true and for false memories, whereas activity was greater for true than for false memories in occipital visual regions and posterior portions of the parahippocampal gyrus, and activity was greater for false than for true memories in right anterior cingulate gyrus. Possible interpretations are discussed. PMID:15040552

  18. 75 FR 2853 - False Killer Whale Take Reduction Team Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ...2007). In addition, data indicate that false killer whale depredation of catch and/or bait is increasing in the Hawaii-based longline fisheries. False killer whales have been observed while vessels are in...

  19. Decoy methods for assessing false positives and false discovery rates in shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanghui; Wu, Wells W; Zhang, Zheng; Masilamani, Shyama; Shen, Rong-Fong

    2009-01-01

    The potential of getting a significant number of false positives (FPs) in peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) obtained by proteomic database search has been well-recognized. Among the attempts to assess FPs, the concomitant use of target and decoy databases is widely practiced. By adjusting filtering criteria, FPs and false discovery rate (FDR) can be controlled at a desired level. Although the target-decoy approach is gaining in popularity, subtle differences in decoy construction (e.g., reversing vs stochastic methods), rate calculation (e.g., total vs unique PSMs), or searching (separate vs composite) do exist among various implementations. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of these differences on FP and FDR estimations using a rat kidney protein sample and the SEQUEST search engine as an example. On the effects of decoy construction, we found that, when a single scoring filter (XCorr) was used, stochastic methods generated a higher estimation of FPs and FDR than sequence reversing methods, likely due to an increase in unique peptides. This higher estimation could largely be attenuated by creating decoy databases similar in effective size but not by a simple normalization with a unique-peptide coefficient. When multiple filters were applied, the differences seen between reversing and stochastic methods significantly diminished, suggesting multiple filterings reduce the dependency on how a decoy is constructed. For a fixed set of filtering criteria, FDR and FPs estimated by using unique PSMs were almost twice those using total PSMs. The higher estimation seemed to be dependent on data acquisition setup. As to the differences between performing separate or composite searches, in general, FDR estimated from the separate search was about three times that from the composite search. The degree of difference gradually decreased as the filtering criteria became more stringent. Paradoxically, the estimated true positives in separate search were higher when multiple filters were used. By analyzing a standard protein mixture, we demonstrated that the higher estimation of FDR and FPs in the separate search likely reflected an overestimation, which could be corrected with a simple merging procedure. Our study illustrates the relative merits of different implementations of the target-decoy strategy, which should be worth contemplating when large-scale proteomic biomarker discovery is to be attempted. PMID:19061407

  20. FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens): Western North Atlantic Stock

    E-print Network

    74 May 2015 FALSE KILLER WHALE (Pseudorca crassidens): Western North Atlantic Stock STOCK DEFINITION AND GEOGRAPHIC RANGE The false killer whale is distributed worldwide throughout warm temperate that this species routinely occurs in the western North Atlantic. False killer whales have been sighted in U

  1. Compelling Untruths: Content Borrowing and Vivid False Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampinen, James Michael; Meier, Christopher R.; Arnal, Jack D.; Leding, Juliana K.

    2005-01-01

    False memories are sometimes accompanied by surprisingly vivid experiential detail that makes them difficult to distinguish from actual memories. Such strikingly real false memories may be produced by a process called content borrowing in which details from presented items are errantly borrowed to corroborate the occurrence of the false memory…

  2. Lexical Association and False Memory for Words in Two Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Hung, Hsu-Ching

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between language experience and false memory produced by the DRM paradigm. The word lists used in Stadler, et al. (Memory & Cognition, 27, 494-500, 1999) were first translated into Chinese. False recall and false recognition for critical non-presented targets were then tested on a group of Chinese users. The…

  3. The Strategic Nature of False Recognition in the DRM Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael B.; Guerin, Scott A.; Wolford, George L.

    2011-01-01

    The false memory effect produced by the Deese/Roediger & McDermott (DRM) paradigm is reportedly impervious to warnings to avoid false alarming to the critical lures (D. A. Gallo, H. L. Roediger III, & K. B. McDermott, 2001). This finding has been used as strong evidence against models that attribute the false alarms to a decision process…

  4. Presence predicts false memories of virtual environment content Bertus Labuschagne

    E-print Network

    Blake, Edwin

    1 Presence predicts false memories of virtual environment content Bertus Labuschagne CVC Laboratory. of Computer Science University of Cape Town edwin@cs.uct.ac.za Abstract False memories can be created and create false memories. We tested this notion by repeatedly exposing 47 subjects to a themed VE, and after

  5. 20 CFR 702.217 - Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation...Claims Procedures Notice § 702.217 Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation...S.C. 909, if the injury results in death, shall be punished by a fine not...

  6. 20 CFR 702.217 - Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation...Claims Procedures Notice § 702.217 Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation...S.C. 909, if the injury results in death, shall be punished by a fine not...

  7. 20 CFR 702.217 - Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation...Claims Procedures Notice § 702.217 Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation...S.C. 909, if the injury results in death, shall be punished by a fine not...

  8. 20 CFR 702.217 - Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation...Claims Procedures Notice § 702.217 Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation...S.C. 909, if the injury results in death, shall be punished by a fine not...

  9. 20 CFR 702.217 - Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation...Claims Procedures Notice § 702.217 Penalty for false statement, misrepresentation...S.C. 909, if the injury results in death, shall be punished by a fine not...

  10. Chinese Preschoolers' Implicit and Explicit False-Belief Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Bo; Low, Jason; Jing, Zhang; Qinghua, Qu

    2012-01-01

    Mandarin-speaking preschoolers in Mainland China (3- to 4-year-olds; N = 192) were tested for dissociations between anticipatory looking (AL) and verbal judgments on false-belief tasks. The dissociation between the two kinds of understanding was robust despite direct false-belief test questions using a Mandarin specific think-falsely verb and…

  11. 49 CFR 236.785 - Position, false restrictive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Position, false restrictive. 236.785 Section 236.785 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 236.785 Position, false restrictive. A position of a semaphore arm that is more restrictive than...

  12. 49 CFR 236.785 - Position, false restrictive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Position, false restrictive. 236.785 Section 236.785 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 236.785 Position, false restrictive. A position of a semaphore arm that is more restrictive than...

  13. 49 CFR 236.785 - Position, false restrictive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Position, false restrictive. 236.785 Section 236.785 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 236.785 Position, false restrictive. A position of a semaphore arm that is more restrictive than...

  14. 49 CFR 236.785 - Position, false restrictive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Position, false restrictive. 236.785 Section 236.785 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 236.785 Position, false restrictive. A position of a semaphore arm that is more restrictive than...

  15. 49 CFR 236.785 - Position, false restrictive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Position, false restrictive. 236.785 Section 236.785 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... § 236.785 Position, false restrictive. A position of a semaphore arm that is more restrictive than...

  16. Fuzzy-Trace Theory and Children's False Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainerd, C. J.; Reyna, V. F.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a unified theoretical approach to children's false-memory reports that deals with both spontaneous and implanted reports. Details false recognition and misinformation models that allow researchers to determine the impact of identity judgment, nonidentity judgment, and similarity judgment in false memory reports. (LBT)

  17. Telling true from false: cannabis users show increased susceptibility to false memories

    PubMed Central

    Riba, J; Valle, M; Sampedro, F; Rodríguez-Pujadas, A; Martínez-Horta, S; Kulisevsky, J; Rodríguez-Fornells, A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies on the neurocognitive impact of cannabis use have found working and declarative memory deficits that tend to normalize with abstinence. An unexplored aspect of cognitive function in chronic cannabis users is the ability to distinguish between veridical and illusory memories, a crucial aspect of reality monitoring that relies on adequate memory function and cognitive control. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that abstinent cannabis users have an increased susceptibility to false memories, failing to identify lure stimuli as events that never occurred. In addition to impaired performance, cannabis users display reduced activation in areas associated with memory processing within the lateral and medial temporal lobe (MTL), and in parietal and frontal brain regions involved in attention and performance monitoring. Furthermore, cannabis consumption was inversely correlated with MTL activity, suggesting that the drug is especially detrimental to the episodic aspects of memory. These findings indicate that cannabis users have an increased susceptibility to memory distortions even when abstinent and drug-free, suggesting a long-lasting compromise of memory and cognitive control mechanisms involved in reality monitoring. PMID:25824306

  18. Telling true from false: cannabis users show increased susceptibility to false memories.

    PubMed

    Riba, J; Valle, M; Sampedro, F; Rodríguez-Pujadas, A; Martínez-Horta, S; Kulisevsky, J; Rodríguez-Fornells, A

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies on the neurocognitive impact of cannabis use have found working and declarative memory deficits that tend to normalize with abstinence. An unexplored aspect of cognitive function in chronic cannabis users is the ability to distinguish between veridical and illusory memories, a crucial aspect of reality monitoring that relies on adequate memory function and cognitive control. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that abstinent cannabis users have an increased susceptibility to false memories, failing to identify lure stimuli as events that never occurred. In addition to impaired performance, cannabis users display reduced activation in areas associated with memory processing within the lateral and medial temporal lobe (MTL), and in parietal and frontal brain regions involved in attention and performance monitoring. Furthermore, cannabis consumption was inversely correlated with MTL activity, suggesting that the drug is especially detrimental to the episodic aspects of memory. These findings indicate that cannabis users have an increased susceptibility to memory distortions even when abstinent and drug-free, suggesting a long-lasting compromise of memory and cognitive control mechanisms involved in reality monitoring. PMID:25824306

  19. Optically induced 'negative forces'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogariu, Aristide; Sukhov, Sergey; Sáenz, José

    2013-01-01

    Attracting objects with optical beams may seem like science fiction, but various schemes already do this, albeit with some caveats and limitations. The most recent progress in this emerging field is reviewed, with particular emphasis on manipulation of small objects by optically induced 'negative forces'.

  20. The Negative Repetition Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  1. Is there a positive bias in false recognition? Evidence from confabulating amnesia patients.

    PubMed

    Alkathiri, Nura H; Morris, Robin G; Kopelman, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    Although there is some evidence for a positive emotional bias in the content of confabulations in brain damaged patients, findings have been inconsistent. The present study used the semantic-associates procedure to induce false recall and false recognition in order to examine whether a positive bias would be found in confabulating amnesic patients, relative to non-confabulating amnesic patients and healthy controls. Lists of positive, negative and neutral words were presented in order to induce false recall or false recognition of non-presented (but semantically associated) words. The latter were termed 'critical intrusions'. Thirteen confabulating amnesic patients, 13 non-confabulating amnesic patients and 13 healthy controls were investigated. Confabulating patients falsely recognised a higher proportion of positive (but unrelated) words, compared with non-confabulating patients and healthy controls. No differences were found for recall memory. Signal detection analysis, however, indicated that the positive bias for false recognition memory might reflect weaker memory in the confabulating amnesic group. This suggested that amnesia patients with weaker memory are more likely to confabulate and the content of these confabulations are more likely to be positive. PMID:26253010

  2. Emotional content enhances true but not false memory for categorized stimuli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hae-Yoon; Kensinger, Elizabeth A; Rajaram, Suparna

    2013-04-01

    Past research has shown that emotion enhances true memory, but that emotion can either increase or decrease false memory. Two theoretical possibilities-the distinctiveness of emotional stimuli and the conceptual relatedness of emotional content-have been implicated as being responsible for influencing both true and false memory for emotional content. In the present study, we sought to identify the mechanisms that underlie these mixed findings by equating the thematic relatedness of the study materials across each type of valence used (negative, positive, or neutral). In three experiments, categorically bound stimuli (e.g., funeral, pets, and office items) were used for this purpose. When the encoding task required the processing of thematic relatedness, a significant true-memory enhancement for emotional content emerged in recognition memory, but no emotional boost to false memory (exp. 1). This pattern persisted for true memory with a longer retention interval between study and test (24 h), and false recognition was reduced for emotional items (exp. 2). Finally, better recognition memory for emotional items once again emerged when the encoding task (arousal ratings) required the processing of the emotional aspect of the study items, with no emotional boost to false recognition (EXP. 3). Together, these findings suggest that when emotional and neutral stimuli are equivalently high in thematic relatedness, emotion continues to improve true memory, but it does not override other types of grouping to increase false memory. PMID:23196385

  3. False Memories for Suggestions: The Impact of Conceptual Elaboration

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Maria S.; Mitchell, Karen J.; Payment, Kristie; Drivdahl, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Relatively little attention has been paid to the potential role that reflecting on the meaning and implications of suggested events (i.e., conceptual elaboration) might play in promoting the creation of false memories. Two experiments assessed whether encouraging repeated conceptual elaboration, would, like perceptual elaboration, increase false memory for suggested events. Results showed that conceptual elaboration of suggested events more often resulted in high confidence false memories (Experiment 1) and false memories that were accompanied by the phenomenal experience of remembering them (Experiment 2) than did surface-level processing. Moreover, conceptual elaboration consistently led to higher rates of false memory than did perceptual elaboration. The false memory effects that resulted from conceptual elaboration were highly dependent on the organization of the postevent interview questions, such that conceptual elaboration only increased false memory beyond surface level processing when participants evaluated both true and suggested information in relation to the same theme or dimension. PMID:21103451

  4. [False positive death certification. Does the Lazarus phenomenon partly explain false positive death certification by rescue services in Germany, Austria and Switzerland?].

    PubMed

    Herff, H; Loosen, S-J; Paal, P; Mitterlechner, T; Rabl, W; Wenzel, V

    2010-04-01

    Apart from misdiagnosis, the Lazarus phenomenon, a spontaneous return of circulation after cardiac arrest, is a potential cause for false positive death certification. Because of medicolegal consequences and thus a negative publication bias, the incidence of false positive death certification is unknown. As a false positive death certification results in criminal prosecution and thus media interest, numerous media archives in Germany, Austria and Switzerland were searched for such reports. A total of nine cases of false positive death certification in these three countries were identified since the early 1990s of which eight occurred in an emergency medical service system setting. Apart from a lack of diligence of emergency physicians, a Lazarus phenomenon could be the reason for such incidents. As definite signs of death will not have developed only a few minutes after stopping CPR it might be difficult for an emergency physician to definitely certify a patient's death in an out-of-hospital setting with 100% safety. Thus, prehospital death certification poses a risk of error and subsequent legal prosecution of the emergency physician, as a Lazarus phenomenon may still occur in this phase. Delegation of death certification from emergency physicians to qualified physicians in a follow-up examination might increase both legal safety for emergency physicians in the field and patient safety. PMID:20224947

  5. The False Memory and the Mirror Effects: The Role of Familiarity and Backward Association in Creating False Recollections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anaki, D.; Faran, Y.; Ben-Shalom, D.; Henik, A.

    2005-01-01

    The mirror effect refers to a phenomenon where the hit rate is higher for low frequency words while the false alarm rate is higher for high frequency distractors. Using a false memory paradigm (Roediger & McDermott, 1995), we examined whether false memory for non-presented lures would be influenced by the lure's familiarity. The results revealed…

  6. [False interpretations of computed tomograms in malignant lymph node diseases of the pelvis and abdomen].

    PubMed

    Feuerbach, S; Lukas, P; Gmeinwieser, J

    1984-12-01

    In the presence of a retroperitoneal mass with loss of normal aortic and caval contours no distinction can be made by CT between metastases or malignant lymphoma and primary sarcoma or retroperitoneal fibrosis if a primary tumour is not known. A false diagnose is quite possible if intestinal loops or vessels are considered as enlarged lymph nodes. These pitfalls can be avoided by intravenous application of contrast medium and by filling of all intestinal loops with orally administered contrast medium, in special cases even via a gastric tube. Pitfalls in post-therapeutic changes, like haematoma, scar tissue or lymphocele, are confounded with tumour recurrence of recent metastases and are give false-positive results in follow-up examinations. If no regression of lymph node enlargement after therapy is observed, a distinction between active metastases and nodal induration is impossible. False-negative results are due to metastatic, but not enlarged lymph nodes and cannot be avoided by CT. PMID:6518724

  7. Interaction of sleep and emotional content on the production of false memories.

    PubMed

    McKeon, Shannon; Pace-Schott, Edward F; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2012-01-01

    Sleep benefits veridical memories, resulting in superior recall relative to off-line intervals spent awake. Sleep also increases false memory recall in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm. Given the suggestion that emotional veridical memories are prioritized for consolidation over sleep, here we examined whether emotion modulates sleep's effect on false memory formation. Participants listened to semantically related word lists lacking a critical lure representing each list's "gist." Free recall was tested after 12 hours containing sleep or wake. The Sleep group recalled more studied words than the Wake group but only for emotionally neutral lists. False memories of both negative and neutral critical lures were greater following sleep relative to wake. Morning and Evening control groups (20-minute delay) did not differ ruling out circadian accounts for these differences. These results support the adaptive function of sleep in both promoting the consolidation of veridical declarative memories and in extracting unifying aspects from memory details. PMID:23145159

  8. On the thermodynamics of the cosmological apparent horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, M. D.

    2015-11-01

    It has been shown by Cai et al. that the apparent horizon of radius r0 in the cosmological Friedmann space-time emits radiation at the temperature T0 = 1/2? r0. Here, we derive this result from the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the wave function of the Universe ?, starting from a classical gravitational Lagrangian L that contains a quadratic higher-derivative term R2 , the scalar component of which is non-tachyonic, by application of the horizon hypothesis and definition of the physical three-space on the time-slice dx0 = 0. We also extend our previous analysis of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the wave function ? of the apparent horizon of the de Sitter space-time to include the case of a more general energy-momentum source, that generates an arbitrary Friedmann space-time, confirming the expression for T0 after application of the ADM formalism.

  9. Apparent sizes of black holes and their alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graber, James

    2009-05-01

    Observers recently made a non-trivial measurement of the apparent diameter of Sagittarius A*, the black-hole candidate at the center of the Milky Way (Doeleman, et al., Nature, 4 September 2008). At face value, this measurement appears to be more than two sigma smaller than predicted. Better measurements are anticipated within the next five to 10 years, or perhaps much sooner. This presents an opportunity for a new, further (imprecise, to be sure, but qualitatively independent) test of the predictions of general relativity. We present a few mathematical formulae relevant for predicting the apparent size of black holes or the equivalent collapsed objects in all metric theories of gravity, including general relativity.

  10. Wavelength dependence of the apparent diameter of retinal blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Robert; Twietmeyer, Karen; Chipman, Russell; Beaudry, Neil; Salyer, David

    2005-04-01

    Imaging of retinal blood vessels may assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and hypertension. However, close examination reveals that the contrast and apparent diameter of vessels are dependent on the wavelength of the illuminating light. In this study multispectral images of large arteries and veins within enucleated swine eyes are obtained with a modified fundus camera by use of intravitreal illumination. The diameters of selected vessels are measured as a function of wavelength by cross-sectional analysis. A fixed scale with spectrally independent dimension is placed above the retina to isolate the chromatic effects of the imaging system and eye. Significant apparent differences between arterial and venous diameters are found, with larger diameters observed at shorter wavelengths. These differences are due primarily to spectral absorption in the cylindrical blood column.

  11. Perceived Causality Can Alter the Perceived Trajectory of Apparent Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Ho; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2013-01-01

    When objects collide, human observers perceive not only motion but also causal relations, such as which object caused the other to move. In the present experiments, we investigated whether such causal interpretations can actually influence the perceived path of apparent motion. Displays contained two alternately flashing motion targets positioned at either end of a semicircular occluder. Two additional “context objects” moved in such a way that the motion targets appeared to collide with and launch them. The collision was manipulated so that it was consistent with apparent motion either along the straight path between the targets or along a curved path passing behind the occluder. Subjects almost exclusively perceived motion consistent with the implied launch, which suggests that causally coherent interpretations can influence basic perceptual processes. PMID:23474831

  12. The subtle causes of apparent non-repeatability

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschildt, H.

    1994-04-01

    Machine tools are highly deterministic, i.e., they obey cause and effect relationships that are within our ability to understand and control. There is nothing random or probabilistic about their behavior. When apparent non-repeatability occurs in routine machine tool testing, the cause must be sought and identified and possibly dealt with. Four cases studies illustrate the humbling but gratifying experience of being a machine tool error detective.

  13. Motion Processing and From-from-Apparent-Motion in Infancy 

    E-print Network

    Hirshkowitz, Amy

    2014-08-05

    MOTION PROCESSING AND FORM-FROM-APPARENT-MOTION IN INFANCY A Dissertation by AMY HIRSHKOWITZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Chair of Committee, Teresa Wilcox Committee Members, Gerianne Alexander Emily Davidson Carl Gabbard Head of Department, Paul Wellman August 2014 Major Subject: Psychology Copyright 2014 Amy Hirshkowitz ii...

  14. Apparent Viscosity of Active Nematics in Poiseuille Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhenlu; Su, Jianbing; Zeng, Xiaoming

    2015-09-01

    A Leslie-Erickson continuum hydrodynamic for flowing active nematics has been used to characterize active particle systems such as bacterial suspensions. The behavior of such a system under a plane pressure-driven Poiseuille flow is analyzed. When plate anchoring is tangential and normal, we find the apparent viscosity formula indicating a significant difference between tangential anchoring and normal anchoring conditions for both active rodlike and discoid nematics.

  15. Discovery of an Apparent Nova in M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornoch, K.; Carey, G.; Kucakova, H.

    2015-11-01

    We report the discovery of an apparent nova in M31 on a co-added 900-s R-band CCD frame taken on 2015 Nov. 22.718 UT with the 0.65-m telescope at Ondrejov and independently on two 600-s luminance filter CCD frames taken on Nov. 22.756 UT with the 0.20-m telescope at Bromsgrove.

  16. Social sampling explains apparent biases in judgments of social environments.

    PubMed

    Galesic, Mirta; Olsson, Henrik; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    How people assess their social environments plays a central role in how they evaluate their life circumstances. Using a large probabilistic national sample, we investigated how accurately people estimate characteristics of the general population. For most characteristics, people seemed to underestimate the quality of others' lives and showed apparent self-enhancement, but for some characteristics, they seemed to overestimate the quality of others' lives and showed apparent self-depreciation. In addition, people who were worse off appeared to enhance their social position more than those who were better off. We demonstrated that these effects can be explained by a simple social-sampling model. According to the model, people infer how others are doing by sampling from their own immediate social environments. Interplay of these sampling processes and the specific structure of social environments leads to the apparent biases. The model predicts the empirical results better than alternative accounts and highlights the importance of considering environmental structure when studying human cognition. PMID:23104680

  17. Product design enhancement using apparent usability and affective quality.

    PubMed

    Seva, Rosemary R; Gosiaco, Katherine Grace T; Santos, Ma Crea Eurice D; Pangilinan, Denise Mae L

    2011-03-01

    In this study, apparent usability and affective quality were integrated in a design framework called the Usability Perception and Emotion Enhancement Model (UPEEM). The UPEEM was validated using structural equation modeling (SEM). The methodology consists of four phases namely product selection, attribute identification, design alternative generation, and design alternative evaluation. The first stage involved the selection of a product that highly involves the consumer. In the attribute identification stage, design elements of the product were identified. The possible values of these elements were also determined for use in the experimentation process. Design of experiments was used to identify how the attributes will be varied in the design alternative stage and which of the attributes significantly contribute to affective quality, apparent usability, and desirability in the design evaluation stage. Results suggest that product attributes related to form are relevant in eliciting intense affect and perception of usability in mobile phones especially those directly related to functionality and aesthetics. This study considered only four product attributes among so many due to the constraints of the research design employed. Attributes related to aesthetic perception of a product enhance apparent usability such as those related to dimensional ratios. PMID:20961531

  18. Apparent kinetics of high temperature oxidative decomposition of microalgal biomass.

    PubMed

    Ali, Saad Aldin M; Razzak, Shaikh A; Hossain, Mohammad M

    2014-10-28

    The oxidative thermal characteristics of two microalgae species biomass Nannochloropsis oculta and Chlorella vulgaris have been investigated. The apparent kinetic parameters for the microalgal biomass oxidation process are estimated by fitting the experimental data to the nth order rate model. Also, the iso-conversional methods Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO) were used to evaluate the apparent activation energy. The results indicate that biomass of different microalgae strains exhibit different thermal behavior and characteristics. In addition, growth parameters and medium composition can affect the biomass productivity and composition. This would have significant impact on the thermal decomposition trend of the biomass. The kinetic modeling of the oxidation reaction with direct model fitting method shows good prediction to the experimental data. The apparent activation energies estimated by KAS and FWO methods for N. oculta were 149.2 and 151.8kJ/mol, respectively, while for C. vulgaris were 214.4 and 213.4kJ/mol, respectively. PMID:25459869

  19. Negative refraction and superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amariti, Antonio; Forcella, Davide; Mariotti, Alberto; Siani, Massimo

    2011-10-01

    We discuss exotic properties of charged hydrodynamical systems, in the broken superconducting phase, probed by electromagnetic waves. Motivated by general arguments from hydrodynamics, we observe that negative refraction, namely the propagation in opposite directions of the phase velocities and of the energy flux, is expected for low enough frequencies. We corroborate this general idea by analyzing a holographic superconductor in the AdS/CFT correspondence, where the response functions can be explicitly computed. We study the dual gravitational theory both in the probe and in the backreacted case. We find that, while in the first case the refractive index is positive at every frequency, in the second case there is negative refraction at low enough frequencies. This is in agreement with hydrodynamic considerations.

  20. Negative Refraction and Superconductivity

    E-print Network

    Antonio Amariti; Davide Forcella; Alberto Mariotti; Massimo Siani

    2011-07-06

    We discuss exotic properties of charged hydrodynamical systems, in the broken superconducting phase, probed by electromagnetic waves. Motivated by general arguments from hydrodynamics, we observe that negative refraction, namely the propagation in opposite directions of the phase velocities and of the energy flux, is expected for low enough frequencies. We corroborate this general idea by analyzing a holographic superconductor in the AdS/CFT correspondence, where the response functions can be explicitly computed. We study the dual gravitational theory both in the probe and in the backreacted case. We find that, while in the first case the refractive index is positive at every frequency, in the second case there is negative refraction at low enough frequencies. This is in agreement with hydrodynamic considerations.

  1. Negative Emissions Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Danny

    2006-04-01

    Although `negative emissions' of carbon dioxide need not, in principle, involve use of biological processes to draw carbon out of the atmosphere, such `agricultural' sequestration' is the only known way to remove carbon from the atmosphere on time scales comparable to the time scale for anthropogenic increases in carbon emissions. In order to maintain the `negative emissions' the biomass must be used in such a way that the resulting carbon dioxide is separated and permanently sequestered. Two options for sequestration are in the topsoil and via geologic carbon sequestration. The former has multiple benefits, but the latter also is needed. Thus, although geologic carbon sequestration is viewed skeptically by some environmentalists as simply a way to keep using fossil fuels---it may be a key part of reversing accelerating climate forcing if rapid climate change is beginning to occur. I will first review the general approach of agricultural sequestration combined with use of resulting biofuels in a way that permits carbon separation and then geologic sequestration as a negative emissions technology. Then I discuss the process that is the focus of my company---the EPRIDA cycle. If deployed at a sufficiently large scale, it could reverse the increase in CO2 concentrations. I also estimate of benefits --carbon and other---of large scale deployment of negative emissions technologies. For example, using the EPRIDA cycle by planting and soil sequestering carbon in an area abut In 3X the size of Texas would remove the amount of carbon that is being accumulated worldwide each year. In addition to the atmospheric carbon removal, the EPRIDA approach also counters the depletion of carbon in the soil---increasing topsoil and its fertility; reduces the excess nitrogen in the water by eliminating the need for ammonium nitrate fertilizer and reduces fossil fuel reliance by providing biofuel and avoiding natural gas based fertilizer production.

  2. The use of surrogate species in risk assessment: using life history data to safeguard against false negatives.

    PubMed

    Banks, John E; Ackleh, Azmy S; Stark, John D

    2010-02-01

    The use of surrogate species is an important tool in predicting the effects of management decisions or the establishment of protective measures for endangered/threatened species. While relying on a handful of model species to predict the fate of scores of distantly related target species has been criticized, a quantitative measure linking life history traits and population predictions has been sorely missing. We derive here a closed-form expression aimed at determining conditions under which sublethal effects of a toxicant on surrogate species population outcomes will reliably predict outcomes of target (listed) species. We develop a critical threshold in fecundity reduction above which the surrogate species outcomes indicate positive population growth, while the listed species is driven to extinction. Thus we have established a means of determining conditions under which we are prone to making a "Type II" error in assessing ecological risk using surrogate species. Finally, we use the derived expression and life history data to compare outcomes from four different commonly used fish surrogate species (round goby, fathead minnow, smallmouth bass, cutthroat trout) and their target listed species (Chinook and Coho salmon). We illustrate that all four surrogate species fail to predict population outcomes for the listed species in cases of as little as 15% fecundity reduction due to toxicant exposure. Furthermore, surrogate species reliability is a function of toxicant level, so that some species are reliable at some levels but not at others. We discuss the implications of these findings, and outline further analyses that occur as a natural extension of the criteria developed here. PMID:20136742

  3. Bioinformatic analysis of variability of Newcastle disease virus diagnostic primers and probes and the potential for false negative detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or other molecular diagnostic methods is commonly used for the primary diagnosis of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). However, NDV in nature has a range of virulence, and the low virulence viruses must be differentiated from virulent ...

  4. ASSESSING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF APPARENT CORRELATIONS BETWEEN RADIO AND GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR FLUXES

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlidou, V.; Richards, J. L.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; King, O. G.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reeves, R.; Stevenson, M. A.; Angelakis, E.; Fuhrmann, L.; Zensus, J. A.; Giroletti, M.; Reimer, A.; Healey, S. E.; Romani, R. W.; Shaw, M. S.

    2012-06-01

    Whether or not a correlation exists between the radio and gamma-ray flux densities of blazars is a long-standing question, and one that is difficult to answer confidently because of various observational biases, which may either dilute or apparently enhance any intrinsic correlation between radio and gamma-ray luminosities. We introduce a novel method of data randomization to evaluate quantitatively the effect of these biases and to assess the intrinsic significance of an apparent correlation between radio and gamma-ray flux densities of blazars. The novelty of the method lies in a combination of data randomization in luminosity space (to ensure that the randomized data are intrinsically, and not just apparently, uncorrelated) and significance assessment in flux space (to explicitly avoid Malmquist bias and automatically account for the limited dynamical range in both frequencies). The method is applicable even to small samples that are not selected with strict statistical criteria. For larger samples we describe a variation of the method in which the sample is split in redshift bins, and the randomization is applied in each bin individually; this variation is designed to yield the equivalent to luminosity-function sampling of the underlying population in the limit of very large, statistically complete samples. We show that for a smaller number of redshift bins, the method yields a worse significance, and in this way it is conservative: although it may fail to confirm an existing intrinsic correlation in a small sample that cannot be split into many redshift bins, it will not assign a stronger, artificially enhanced significance. We demonstrate how our test performs as a function of number of sources, strength of correlation, and number of redshift bins used, and we show that while our test is robust against common-distance biases and associated false positives for uncorrelated data, it retains the power of other methods in rejecting the null hypothesis of no correlation for correlated data.

  5. Effect of surface fissure on apparent resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailhac, P.; Gance, J.; Malet, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fissures are features of interest, prone to create preferential flow path, modifying locally the soil hydrogeological behavior. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is a suitable tool to monitor such preferential flow path. However, this technique is not efficient in the presence of surface fissure, due to a bad resistivity recovering around the fissure vicinity during the inversion process. Therefore, we propose a description of fissure effect on raw apparent resistivity on three resistivity arrays. The purposes of the study are multiple. First, we aim at making ERT users aware of surface fissure effect, and propose a first help to interpret basically resistivity pseudo sections. Second, we propose to ERT users to automatically conduct a surface fissure survey on the studied profile, in order to consider each fissure in a forward DC model and to suppress their effect. Finally, this study is only a first step toward 2D fissure shape inversion, and time-lapse monitoring of fissure drying and filling. In this study, we create a fissure model based on different geomorphological descriptors. After describing the FEM-DC forward modeling strategy, we investigate the fissure effect on pseudo section of apparent resistivity for a Wenner-Schlumberger (WS), a dipole-dipole (DD) and a gradient (GRAD) array. We determine a fissure detectability threshold for each array and perform a sensitivity analysis on the different fissure parameters (position, width, depth, dip angles...). The crack filling or drying effect is also investigated. The possibility to remove fissure effect and to propose a first interpretation of time-lapse data is illustrated on real data. This study show again the higher sensitivity of the DD array compared to the GRAD and WS arrays. Not only the maximal amplitude in the pseudo section is higher for the DD array, but also the anomaly pattern created by the fissure is much larger for this acquisition geometry. The minimal depth detectable for the DD array is 0.1 times the electrode spacing, and 0.16 for the GRAD and WS arrays. Globally, fissure opening width and dip angle have little impact compared to the fissure depth which can make vary apparent resistivity for more than 200 %. Apparent resistivities quantitative and qualitative interpretation is very difficult in this case and fissure geometry effect must be removed from apparent resistivity pseudo-section. The fissure water filling tends to suppress linearly the topographic effect with the percentage of filling. The conductive effect, produced by the addition of conductive water in the fissure, interacts constructively with fissure effect, but is less pronounced (maximum 15 % compared to the 60% of the fissure shape effect).

  6. Earthquake Apparent Stress Scaling for the 1999 Hector Mine Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, W. R.; Mayeda, K.

    2003-12-01

    There is currently a disagreement within the geophysical community on the way earthquake energy scales with magnitude. One set of studies finds evidence that energy release per seismic moment (apparent stress) is constant (e.g. Choy and Boatwright, 1995; McGarr, 1999; Ide and Beroza, 2001). Other studies find the apparent stress increases with magnitude (e.g. Kanamori et al., 1993; Abercrombie, 1995; Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Izutani and Kanamori, 2001). The resolution of this issue is complicated by the difficulty of accurately accounting for attenuation, radiation inhomogeneities, bandwidth and determining the seismic energy radiated by earthquakes over a wide range of event sizes in a consistent manner. We try to improve upon earlier results by using consistent techniques over common paths for a wide range of sizes and seismic phases. We have examined about 130 earthquakes from the Hector Mine earthquake sequence in Southern California. These earthquakes range in size from the October 16,1999 Mw=7.1 mainshock down to ML=3.0 aftershocks into 2000. The mainshock has unclipped Pg and Lg phases at a number of high quality regional stations (e.g. CMB, ELK, TUC) where we can use the common path to examine apparent stress scaling relations directly. We are careful to avoid any event selection bias that would be related to apparent stress values. We fix each stations path correction using the independent moment and energy estimates for the mainshock. We then use those corrections to determine the seismic energy for each event based on regional Lg spectra. We use a modeling technique (MDAC) based on a modified Brune (1970) spectral shape but without any assumptions of corner-frequency scaling (Walter and Taylor, 2002). We perform similar analysis using the Pg spectra. We find the energy estimates for the same events are consistent for Lg estimates, Pg estimates and the estimates using the independent regional coda envelope technique (Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Mayeda et al, 2003). So far the results show the seismic energy to moment values or apparent stress increases with moment similar to our 1996 study. We plan to perform similar studies for other Southern California earthquake sequences. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  7. POSSIBLE DETECTION OF APPARENT SUPERLUMINAL INWARD MOTION IN MARKARIAN 421 AFTER THE GIANT X-RAY FLARE IN 2010 FEBRUARY

    SciTech Connect

    Niinuma, K.; Kino, M.; Oyama, T.; Nagai, H.; Isobe, N.; Gabanyi, K. E.; Hada, K.; Koyama, S.; Asada, K.; Fujisawa, K.

    2012-11-10

    We report on the very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) follow-up observations using the Japanese VLBI Network array at 22 GHz for the largest X-ray flare of TeV blazar Mrk 421 that occurred in 2010 mid-February. The total of five epochs of observations were performed at intervals of about 20 days between 2010 March 7 and May 31. No newborn component associated with the flare was seen directly in the total intensity images obtained by our multi-epoch VLBI observations. However, one jet component located at {approx}1 mas northwest from the core was able to be identified, and its proper motion can be measured as -1.66 {+-} 0.46 mas yr{sup -1}, which corresponds to an apparent velocity of -3.48 {+-} 0.97c. Here, this negative velocity indicates that the jet component was apparently moving toward the core. As the most plausible explanation, we discuss that the apparent negative velocity was possibly caused by the ejection of a new component, which could not be resolved with our observations. In this case, the obtained Doppler factor of the new component is around 10-20, which is consistent with the ones typically estimated by model fittings of spectral energy distribution for this source.

  8. False Paradoxes of Superposition in Electric and Acoustic Waves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Richard C.

    1980-01-01

    Corrected are several misconceptions concerning the apparently "missing" energy that results when acoustic or electromagnetic waves cancel by destructive interference and the wave impedance reflected to the sources of the wave energy changes so that the input power is reduced. (Author/CS)

  9. False lock performance of Shuttle Costas loop receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, K. T.; Holmes, J. K.; Huth, G. K.; Lindsey, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The false (sideband) lock problem in Shuttle Costas loop receivers, in the presence of noise, is assessed. False lock margin is defined depending on symbol signal-to-noise ratio rather than in the absence of noise. Closed-form results are given for the case where the arm filters of the Costas loop are one-pole Butterworth filters as used in the Shuttle receivers. However, the approach taken is also general enough to cover filters of arbitrary characteristics. As part of the development of the false lock margin, it is shown that the false lock phenomenon of the squaring loop is identical to that of the Costas loop.

  10. Recollection rejection: false-memory editing in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Brainerd, C J; Reyna, V F; Wright, Ron; Mojardin, A H

    2003-10-01

    Mechanisms for editing false events out of memory reports have fundamental implications for theories of false memory and for best practice in applied domains in which false reports must be minimized (e.g., forensic psychological interviews, sworn testimony). A mechanism posited in fuzzy-trace theory, recollection rejection, is considered. A process analysis of false-memory editing is presented, which assumes that false-but-gist-consistent events (e.g., the word SOFA, when the word COUCH was experienced) sometimes cue the retrieval of verbatim traces of the corresponding true events (COUCH), generating mismatches that counteract the high familiarity of false-but-gist-consistent events. Empirical support comes from 2 qualitative phenomena: recollective suppression of semantic false memory and inverted-U relations between retrieval time and semantic false memory. Further support comes from 2 quantitative methodologies: conjoint recognition and receiver operating characteristics. The analysis also predicts a novel false-memory phenomenon (erroneous recollection rejection), in which true events are inappropriately edited out of memory reports. PMID:14599242

  11. Identifying apparent velocity changes in cross correlated microseism noise data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friderike Volk, Meike; Bean, Christopher; Lokmer, Ivan; Pérez, Nemesio; Ibáñez, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Currently there is a strong interest of using cross correlation of ambient noise to retrieve Green's functions. These are usually used to calculate the seismic wave velocity of the subsurface and therefore can be used for subsurface imaging or monitoring of various geological settings where we expect rapid velocity changes (e.g. reservoirs or volcanoes). The assumption of this method is that the wavefields which are correlated must be diffuse. This criterion is fulfilled if the ambient noise sources are uniformly distributed or the scattering in the medium is high enough to mitigate any source directivity. The location of the sources is usually unknown and it can change in time. These temporal and spatial variations of the microseism noise sources may lead to changes in the retrieved Green's functions, and so, to the apparent changes in seismic wave velocities. To further investigate the apparent changes in Green's functions we undertook an active seismic experiment in Tenerife lasting three months. A small airgun was used as an active source and was shooting repeatedly every 15 minutes. The shots and the microseism noise were recorded at several seismic stations at the same time. That data set gives us the opportunity to compare the changes in seismic wave velocity recovered through cross correlation of ambient noise and changes we measure through active shots from the airgun. The aim is to distinguish between apparent seismic velocity changes and seismic velocity changes caused by changes in the medium. We also use the data set to track the direction of the microseism noise sources to see if changes which are only recovered through cross correlation can be related to temporal and spatial variations of the microseism noise sources.

  12. Conservation strategies for species affected by apparent competition.

    PubMed

    Wittmer, Heiko U; Serrouya, Robert; Elbroch, L Mark; Marshall, Andrew J

    2013-04-01

    Apparent competition is an indirect interaction between 2 or more prey species through a shared predator, and it is increasingly recognized as a mechanism of the decline and extinction of many species. Through case studies, we evaluated the effectiveness of 4 management strategies for species affected by apparent competition: predator control, reduction in the abundances of alternate prey, simultaneous control of predators and alternate prey, and no active management of predators or alternate prey. Solely reducing predator abundances rapidly increased abundances of alternate and rare prey, but observed increases are likely short-lived due to fast increases in predator abundance following the cessation of control efforts. Substantial reductions of an abundant alternate prey resulted in increased predation on endangered huemul (Hippocamelus bisulcus) deer in Chilean Patagonia, which highlights potential risks associated with solely reducing alternate prey species. Simultaneous removal of predators and alternate prey increased survival of island foxes (Urocyon littoralis) in California (U.S.A.) above a threshold required for population recovery. In the absence of active management, populations of rare woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) continued to decline in British Columbia, Canada. On the basis of the cases we examined, we suggest the simultaneous control of predators and alternate prey is the management strategy most likely to increase abundances and probabilities of persistence of rare prey over the long term. Knowing the mechanisms driving changes in species' abundances before implementing any management intervention is critical. We suggest scientists can best contribute to the conservation of species affected by apparent competition by clearly communicating the biological and demographic forces at play to policy makers responsible for the implementation of proposed management actions. PMID:23282104

  13. Area invariance of apparent horizons under arbitrary Lorentz boosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp; Matzner, Richard A.; Natchu, Vishnu

    2010-02-01

    It is a well known analytic result in general relativity that the 2-dimensional area of the apparent horizon of a black hole remains invariant regardless of the motion of the observer, and in fact is independent of the t = constant slice, which can be quite arbitrary in general relativity. Nonetheless the explicit computation of horizon area is often substantially more difficult in some frames (complicated by the coordinate form of the metric), than in other frames. Here we give an explicit demonstration for very restricted metric forms of (Schwarzschild and Kerr) vacuum black holes. In the Kerr-Schild coordinate expression for these spacetimes they have an explicit Lorentz-invariant form. We consider boosted versions with the black hole moving through the coordinate system. Since these are stationary black hole spacetimes, the apparent horizons are two dimensional cross sections of their event horizons, so we compute the areas of apparent horizons in the boosted space with (boosted) t = constant, and obtain the same result as in the unboosted case. Note that while the invariance of area is generic, we deal only with black holes in the Kerr-Schild form, and consider only one particularly simple change of slicing which amounts to a boost. Even with these restrictions we find that the results illuminate the physics of the horizon as a null surface and provide a useful pedagogical tool. As far as we can determine, this is the first explicit calculation of this type demonstrating the area invariance of horizons. Further, these calculations are directly relevant to transformations that arise in computational representation of moving black holes. We present an application of this result to initial data for boosted black holes.

  14. The false memory syndrome: Experimental studies and comparison to confabulations

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, M.F.; Fras, I.A.

    2011-01-01

    False memories, or recollections that are factually incorrect but strongly believed, remain a source of confusion for both psychiatrists and neurologists. We propose model for false memories based on recent experimental investigations, particularly when analyzed in comparison to confabulations, which are the equivalent of false memories from neurological disease. Studies using the Deese/Roedinger–McDermott experimental paradigm indicate that false memories are associated with the need for complete and integrated memories, self-relevancy, imagination and wish fulfillment, familiarity, emotional facilitation, suggestibility, and sexual content. In comparison, confabulations are associated with the same factors except for emotional facilitation, suggestibility, and sexual content. Both false memories and confabulations have an abnormal sense of certainty for their recollections, and neuroanatomical findings implicate decreased activity in the ventromedial frontal lobe in this certainty. In summary, recent studies of false memories in comparison to confabulations support a model of false memories as internally-generated but suggestible and emotionally-facilitated fantasies or impulses, rather than repressed memories of real events. Furthermore, like confabulations, in order for false memories to occur there must be an attenuation of the normal, nonconscious, right frontal “doubt tag” regarding their certainty. PMID:21177042

  15. 42 CFR 1001.901 - False or improper claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false False or improper claims. 1001.901 Section 1001.901 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG... consider the following factors— (1) The nature and circumstances surrounding the actions that are the...

  16. False Allegations of Abuse and Neglect when Parents Separate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trocme, Nico; Bala, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The 1998 Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS-98) is the first national study to document the rate of intentionally false allegations of abuse and neglect investigated by child welfare services in Canada. This paper provides a detailed summary of the characteristics associated with intentionally false

  17. Correlates of False Self in Adolescent Romantic Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sippola, Lorrie K.; Buchanan, Carie M.; Kehoe, Sabrina

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the association between interpersonal competencies in the peer domain and feelings of false self in romantic relationships. Participants included 238 White, middle-class boys and girls (Grades 10 and 11). Students completed self report measures of false self in romantic relationships and interpersonal…

  18. Visual Distinctiveness and the Development of Children's False Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    Distinctiveness effects in children's (5-, 7-, and 11-year-olds) false memory illusions were examined using visual materials. In Experiment 1, developmental trends (increasing false memories with age) were obtained using Deese-Roediger-McDermott lists presented as words and color photographs but not line drawings. In Experiment 2, when items were…

  19. Associations among False Belief Understanding, Counterfactual Reasoning, and Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guajardo, Nicole R.; Parker, Jessica; Turley-Ames, Kandi

    2009-01-01

    The primary purposes of the present study were to clarify previous work on the association between counterfactual thinking and false belief performance to determine (1) whether these two variables are related and (2) if so, whether executive function skills mediate the relationship. A total of 92 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds completed false belief,…

  20. Development of False Memories in Bilingual Children and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.; Gagnon, Nadine; Thouas, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    The effects of within- versus between-languages (English-French) study and test on rates of bilingual children's and adults' true and false memories were examined. Children aged 6 through 12 and university-aged adults participated in a standard Deese-Roediger-McDermott false memory task using free recall and recognition. Recall results showed…

  1. False Memories for Suggestions: The Impact of Conceptual Elaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaragoza, Maria S.; Mitchell, Karen J.; Payment, Kristie; Drivdahl, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Relatively little attention has been paid to the potential role that reflecting on the meaning and implications of suggested events (i.e., conceptual elaboration) might play in promoting the creation of false memories. Two experiments assessed whether encouraging repeated conceptual elaboration, would, like perceptual elaboration, increase false

  2. Effects of Aging and Education on False Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yuh-Shiow; Lee, Chia-Lin; Yang, Hua-Te

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of aging and education on participants' false memory for words that were not presented. Three age groups of participants with either a high or low education level were asked to study lists of semantically related words. Both age and education were found to affect veridical and false memory, as indicated in the…

  3. The fSAM Model of False Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Daniel R.; Smith, Troy A.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a new theory of false memory building upon existing associative memory models and implemented in fSAM, the first fully specified quantitative model of false recall. Participants frequently intrude unstudied critical words while recalling lists comprising their strongest semantic associates but infrequently produce other…

  4. Veridical and False Recall in Adults Who Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Courtney T.; Sheng, Li; Ratner, Nan Bernstein; Gkalitsiou, Zoi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study used a false memory paradigm to explore the veridical and false recall of adults who stutter. Method: Twelve adults who stutter and 12 age-matched typically fluent peers listened to and then verbally recalled lists of words that consisted of either semantic or phonological associates or an equal number of semantic and…

  5. Recollection Rejection: How Children Edit Their False Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainerd, C. J.; Reyna, V. F.

    2002-01-01

    Presents new measure of children's use of an editing operation that suppresses false memories by accessing verbatim traces of true events. Application of the methodology showed that false-memory editing increased dramatically between early and middle childhood. Measure reacted appropriately to experimental manipulations. Developmental reductions…

  6. Do Children "DRM" Like Adults? False Memory Production in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Richard L.; Warren, Amye R.; Shelton, Jill T.; Price, Jodi; Reed, Andrea W.; Williams, Danny

    2008-01-01

    The Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm was used to investigate developmental trends in accurate and false memory production. In Experiment 1, DRM lists adjusted to be more consistent with children's vocabulary were used with 2nd graders, 8th graders, and college students. Accurate and false recall and recognition increased with age, but…

  7. 50 CFR 216.94 - False statements or endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false False statements or endorsements. 216.94 Section 216.94 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna...

  8. False Sharing and its Eect on Shared Memory Performance3

    E-print Network

    Scott, Michael L.

    False Sharing and its Eect on Shared Memory Performance3 William J. Bolosky bolosky@cs.rochester.edu Computer Science Department University of Rochester Rochester, NY 14627-0226 Abstract False sharing occurs when processors in a shared-memory parallel system make references to dierent data objects within

  9. True and False Memories, Parietal Cortex, and Confidence Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urgolites, Zhisen J.; Smith, Christine N.; Squire, Larry R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have asked whether activity in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and the neocortex can distinguish true memory from false memory. A frequent complication has been that the confidence associated with correct memory judgments (true memory) is typically higher than the confidence associated with incorrect memory judgments (false memory).…

  10. False Recognition in Lewy-Body Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Boysson, C.; Belleville, S.; Phillips, N. A.; Johns, E. K.; Goupil, D.; Souchay, C.; Bouchard, R.; Chertkow, H.

    2011-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to evaluate the false recognition phenomenon in persons with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and those with Lewy-body disease (LBD). Patients with LBD (n=10) or FTD (n=15) and their corresponding controls (n=30) were subjected to the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm to induce false recognition. Patients were…

  11. Study Modality and False Recall: The Influence of Resource Availability

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebekah E.; Engle, Randall W.

    2010-01-01

    False memories occur when individuals mistakenly report an event as having taken place when that event did not in fact occur. The DRM (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) paradigm provides an effective technique for creating and investigating false memories. In this paradigm participants study a list of words (e.g., SOUR, CANDY,…) that are highly associated to a non-presented critical item (e.g., SWEET). The study phase is followed by a test of memory for the study list words. Researchers typically find very high levels of false recall of the critical non-presented item. However, the likelihood of falsely remembering the non-presented critical items can be reduced by presenting studied associates visually rather than auditorally (e.g. Smith & Hunt, 1998). This is referred to as the modality effect in false memory. The current study investigated the role of resource availability in the expression of this modality effect in false recall. In Experiment 1 false recall was reduced in the visual study presentation condition relative to the auditory condition for participants with higher working memory capacity, but not for participants with lower working memory capacity. In Experiment 2 the effect of study modality on false recall was eliminated by the addition of a divided attention task at encoding. Both studies support the proposal that resource availability plays a role in the expression of the modality effect in the DRM paradigm (Smith, Lozito, & Bayen, 2005). PMID:20494859

  12. CSI (Crime Scene Induction): Creating False Memories of Committing Crime.

    PubMed

    Porter, Stephen B; Baker, Alysha T

    2015-12-01

    We describe two merging lines of empirical inquiry: entire false memories for autobiographical events and false confessions. A recent study showed that people can be led to remember, and confess to, perpetrating serious crimes that never occurred when confronted with suggestive interview tactics commonly used in police interrogations. PMID:26639160

  13. Retrieval Failure Contributes to Gist-Based False Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Scott A.; Robbins, Clifford A.; Gilmore, Adrian W.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    People often falsely recognize items that are similar to previously encountered items. This robust memory error is referred to as "gist-based false recognition". A widely held view is that this error occurs because the details fade rapidly from our memory. Contrary to this view, an initial experiment revealed that, following the same encoding…

  14. Using Recall to Reduce False Recognition: Diagnostic and Disqualifying Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Whether recall of studied words (e.g., parsley, rosemary, thyme) could reduce false recognition of related lures (e.g., basil) was investigated. Subjects studied words from several categories for a final recognition memory test. Half of the subjects were given standard test instructions, and half were instructed to use recall to reduce false

  15. 7 CFR 1450.12 - Filing of false claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Filing of false claims. 1450.12 Section 1450.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP)...

  16. 7 CFR 1450.12 - Filing of false claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Filing of false claims. 1450.12 Section 1450.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP)...

  17. 7 CFR 1450.12 - Filing of false claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Filing of false claims. 1450.12 Section 1450.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP)...

  18. 7 CFR 1450.12 - Filing of false claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Filing of false claims. 1450.12 Section 1450.12 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP)...

  19. 42 CFR 1001.901 - False or improper claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false False or improper claims. 1001.901 Section 1001.901 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES PROGRAM INTEGRITY-MEDICARE AND STATE HEALTH CARE PROGRAMS Permissive Exclusions § 1001.901...

  20. 42 CFR 1001.901 - False or improper claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false False or improper claims. 1001.901 Section 1001.901 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES PROGRAM INTEGRITY-MEDICARE AND STATE HEALTH CARE PROGRAMS Permissive Exclusions § 1001.901...

  1. Mere Memory Testing Creates False Memories in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainerd, C. J.; Reyna, V. F.

    1996-01-01

    Two studies with 80 5- and 8-year olds found that initial recognition tests elevated children's false-memory responses on delayed tests, and that false-memory creation exceeded true-memory inoculation in 5- and 8-year olds, producing net loss of accuracy over time. (MDM)

  2. Effects of Non-Differential Exposure Misclassification on False Conclusions in Hypothesis-Generating Studies

    PubMed Central

    Burstyn, Igor; Yang, Yunwen; Schnatter, A. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Despite the theoretical success of obviating the need for hypothesis-generating studies, they live on in epidemiological practice. Cole asserted that “… there is boundless number of hypotheses that could be generated, nearly all of them wrong” and urged us to focus on evaluating “credibility of hypothesis”. Adopting a Bayesian approach, we put this elegant logic into quantitative terms at the study planning stage for studies where the prior belief in the null hypothesis is high (i.e., “hypothesis-generating” studies). We consider not only type I and II errors (as is customary) but also the probabilities of false positive and negative results, taking into account typical imperfections in the data. We concentrate on a common source of imperfection in the data: non-differential misclassification of binary exposure classifier. In context of an unmatched case-control study, we demonstrate—both theoretically and via simulations—that although non-differential exposure misclassification is expected to attenuate real effect estimates, leading to the loss of ability to detect true effects, there is also a concurrent increase in false positives. Unfortunately, most investigators interpret their findings from such work as being biased towards the null rather than considering that they are no less likely to be false signals. The likelihood of false positives dwarfed the false negative rate under a wide range of studied settings. We suggest that instead of investing energy into understanding credibility of dubious hypotheses, applied disciplines such as epidemiology, should instead focus attention on understanding consequences of pursuing specific hypotheses, while accounting for the probability that the observed “statistically significant” association may be qualitatively spurious. PMID:25337942

  3. Mechanical Components from Highly Recoverable, Low Apparent Modulus Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo, II (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor); Stanford, Malcolm K. (Inventor); DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A material for use as a mechanical component is formed of a superelastic intermetallic material having a low apparent modulus and a high hardness. The superelastic intermetallic material is conditioned to be dimensionally stable, devoid of any shape memory effect and have a stable superelastic response without irrecoverable deformation while exhibiting strains of at least 3%. The method of conditioning the superelastic intermetallic material is described. Another embodiment relates to lightweight materials known as ordered intermetallics that perform well in sliding wear applications using conventional liquid lubricants and are therefore suitable for resilient, high performance mechanical components such as gears and bearings.

  4. Dynamics of the Cosmological Apparent Horizon: Surface Gravity & Temperature

    E-print Network

    Alexis Helou

    2015-02-14

    In the context of thermodynamics applied to our cosmological apparent horizon, we explicit in greater details our previous work which established the Friedmann Equations from projection of Hayward's Unified First Law. In particular, we show that the dynamical Hayward-Kodama surface gravity is perfectly well-defined and is suitable for this derivation. We then relate this surface gravity to a physical notion of temperature, and show this has constant, positive sign for any kind of past-inner trapping horizons. Hopefully this will clarify the choice of temperature in a dynamical Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Roberston-Walker spacetime.

  5. The effects of emotional content and aging on false memories.

    PubMed

    Kensinger, Elizabeth A; Corkin, Suzanne

    2004-03-01

    After studying a list of words related to a nonpresented lure word, people often falsely recall or recognize the nonpresented lure. Older adults are particularly susceptible to these forms of false memories. The age-related false memory enhancement likely occurs because older adults do not encode, or later retrieve, items in enough detail to allow them to discriminate between presented words and other associated but nonpresented items. Pesta, Murphy, and Sanders (2001) suggested that the emotional salience of the lures may provide distinctiveness, so that individuals would be less likely to endorse an emotional lure as a studied item than to endorse a neutral lure. In the present investigation, young and older adults were less likely to falsely recall or recognize emotional, as compared with neutral, lures. Both age groups appeared capable of using the distinctiveness of the emotional lures to reduce, although not to eliminate, false recall and recognition. PMID:15259885

  6. The production of spontaneous false memories across childhood.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L; Peters, Maarten; Smeets, Tom; Moritz, Steffen

    2014-05-01

    We found evidence that the usual developmental trends in children's spontaneous false memories were eliminated using novel stimuli containing obvious themes. That is, children created more false memories than adults when scenes needed to be remembered. In Experiment 1, 7- and 8-year-olds had higher false memory rates than adults when using visual scenes. Experiment 2 showed that gist cuing could not account for this effect. In Experiment 3, children and adults received visual scenes and story contexts in which these scenes were embedded. For both types of stimuli, we found that children had the highest false memory rates. Our results indicate that the underlying theme of these scenes is easily identified, resulting in our developmental false memory trend. PMID:24448519

  7. The role of test structure in creating false memories.

    PubMed

    Coane, Jennifer H; McBride, Dawn M

    2006-07-01

    In the Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, studying lists of semantic associates results in high rates of false recognition of a nonpresented critical word. The present set of experiments was designed to measure the contribution of additional processing of list items at test to this false memory effect. The participants studied sets of lists and then performed a recognition task for each set. In three experiments, using this paradigm, we investigated false recognition when the number of studied list items presented at test (0, 6, or 12) was manipulated. In Experiments 2 and 3, false recognition of critical lures associated to both studied and nonstudied lists increased significantly as the number of list items included in the test increased. These results indicate that processes occurring at retrieval contribute to false memory effects found with the DRM paradigm. PMID:17128601

  8. Simulation study to characterize thermal infrared sensor false alarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabol, Bruce M.; Mixon, Harold D.

    1991-07-01

    That smart munitions false alarms result from randomly spaced fixed position discrete physical objects within the background is the standard assumption for false target treatment in several smart munitions performance and effectiveness models. This premise is tested in a simulation study which identifies specific terrain features causing a hypothetical thermal infrared smart munitions sensor to false alarm. The sensor configuration and the target detection algorithms are input to the Waterways Experiment Station (WES) smart munitions sensor model which is 'flown' over high resolution calibrated thermal imagery of several test sites for which there is ground truth. Target detection decisions in these target-free backgrounds are mapped into large-scale color aerial photographs taken simultaneously with the thermal imagery. False alarm-causing terrain features are identified from the aerial photographs and are characterized as a function of test site, time of day, and target acquisition algorithm used. Several important characteristics of thermal false alarms are formulated.

  9. Gain-Scheduled Fault Tolerance Control Under False Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jong-Yeob; Belcastro, Christine (Technical Monitor)

    2006-01-01

    An active fault tolerant control (FTC) law is generally sensitive to false identification since the control gain is reconfigured for fault occurrence. In the conventional FTC law design procedure, dynamic variations due to false identification are not considered. In this paper, an FTC synthesis method is developed in order to consider possible variations of closed-loop dynamics under false identification into the control design procedure. An active FTC synthesis problem is formulated into an LMI optimization problem to minimize the upper bound of the induced-L2 norm which can represent the worst-case performance degradation due to false identification. The developed synthesis method is applied for control of the longitudinal motions of FASER (Free-flying Airplane for Subscale Experimental Research). The designed FTC law of the airplane is simulated for pitch angle command tracking under a false identification case.

  10. False positives complicate ancient pathogen identifications using high-throughput shotgun sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identification of historic pathogens is challenging since false positives and negatives are a serious risk. Environmental non-pathogenic contaminants are ubiquitous. Furthermore, public genetic databases contain limited information regarding these species. High-throughput sequencing may help reliably detect and identify historic pathogens. Results We shotgun-sequenced 8 16th-century Mixtec individuals from the site of Teposcolula Yucundaa (Oaxaca, Mexico) who are reported to have died from the huey cocoliztli (‘Great Pestilence’ in Nahautl), an unknown disease that decimated native Mexican populations during the Spanish colonial period, in order to identify the pathogen. Comparison of these sequences with those deriving from the surrounding soil and from 4 precontact individuals from the site found a wide variety of contaminant organisms that confounded analyses. Without the comparative sequence data from the precontact individuals and soil, false positives for Yersinia pestis and rickettsiosis could have been reported. Conclusions False positives and negatives remain problematic in ancient DNA analyses despite the application of high-throughput sequencing. Our results suggest that several studies claiming the discovery of ancient pathogens may need further verification. Additionally, true single molecule sequencing’s short read lengths, inability to sequence through DNA lesions, and limited ancient-DNA-specific technical development hinder its application to palaeopathology. PMID:24568097

  11. False memories to emotional stimuli are not equally affected in right- and left-brain-damaged stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Buratto, Luciano Grüdtner; Zimmermann, Nicolle; Ferré, Perrine; Joanette, Yves; Fonseca, Rochele Paz; Stein, Lilian Milnitsky

    2014-10-01

    Previous research has attributed to the right hemisphere (RH) a key role in eliciting false memories to visual emotional stimuli. These results have been explained in terms of two right-hemisphere properties: (i) that emotional stimuli are preferentially processed in the RH and (ii) that visual stimuli are represented more coarsely in the RH. According to this account, false emotional memories are preferentially produced in the RH because emotional stimuli are both more strongly and more diffusely activated during encoding, leaving a memory trace that can be erroneously reactivated by similar but unstudied emotional items at test. If this right-hemisphere hypothesis is correct, then RH damage should result in a reduction in false memories to emotional stimuli relative to left-hemisphere lesions. To investigate this possibility, groups of right-brain-damaged (RBD, N=15), left-brain-damaged (LBD, N=15) and healthy (HC, N=30) participants took part in a recognition memory experiment with emotional (negative and positive) and non-emotional pictures. False memories were operationalized as incorrect responses to unstudied pictures that were similar to studied ones. Both RBD and LBD participants showed similar reductions in false memories for negative pictures relative to controls. For positive pictures, however, false memories were reduced only in RBD patients. The results provide only partial support for the right-hemisphere hypothesis and suggest that inter-hemispheric cooperation models may be necessary to fully account for false emotional memories. PMID:25129810

  12. No Apparent Polar Wander of Tarim Since the Carboniferous?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, S.; Chen, Y.; Gomez, J.; Courtillot, V.; Cogne, J.

    2005-12-01

    We report new Permian and Lower to Middle Jurassic paleomagnetic results from the Tarim Block. The Permian red beds pass the fold test, and all samples have reverse polarities, consistent with acquisition of magnetic remanence during the Kiaman Reversed Polarity Superchron. Lower to Middle Jurassic marly limestones also possess a magnetic component characterized by solely reverse polarities and a positive fold test. However, the solely reversed polarities pose a problem because the Lower to Middle Jurassic is thought to have one of the highest reversal frequencies in Earth`s history. Rock magnetic experiments argue for an early-diagenetic age for the magnetization. Together, these new results add to the plethora of paleomagnetic data for Tarim, which is represented by a quasi-continuous time sequence of paleomagnetic poles since the Permo-Carboniferous. After accounting for local vertical axis block rotations and inclination shallowing effects, we find that Tarim has experienced virtually no apparent polar wander since the Carboniferous. Tarim`s apparent polar wander path (APWP) is significantly different than the Eurasian APWP, and a comparison of the two imposes geologically unrealistic tectonic displacements. This leads to the Tarim APWP paradox: are most of the Tarim rocks overprinted, or is the Eurasian APWP not representative of the land east of the Ural Mountains? If the latter is true, then previous tectonic reconstructions must be reconsidered. If the former is true, then when/how can we rely on the paleomagnetic data?

  13. Pore fluid pressure, apparent friction, and Coulomb failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Simpson, R.W.; Hickman, S.H.; Lockner, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Many recent studies of stress-triggered seismicity rely on a fault failure model with a single free parameter, the apparent coefficient of friction, presumed to be a material constant with possible values 0 ? ?? ? 1. These studies may present a misleading view of fault strength and the role of pore fluid pressure in earthquake failure. The parameter ?? is intended to incorporate the effects of both friction and pore pressure, but is a material constant only if changes in pore fluid pressure induced by changes in stress are proportional to the normal stress change across the potential failure plane. Although specific models of fault zones permit such a relation, neither is it known that fault zones within the Earth behave this way, nor is this behavior expected in all cases. In contrast, for an isotropic homogeneous poroelastic model the pore pressure changes are proportional to changes in mean stress, ?? is not a material constant, and ?? ? ?? ? +?. Analysis of the change in Coulomb failure stress for tectonically loaded reverse and strike-slip faults shows considerable differences between these two pore pressure models, suggesting that such models might be distinguished from one another using observations of triggered seismicity (e.g., aftershocks). We conclude that using the constant apparent friction model exclusively in studies of Coulomb failure stress is unwise and could lead to significant errors in estimated stress change and seismic hazard.

  14. Neural correlates underlying true and false associative memories.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Nancy A; Johnson, Christina E; Peterson, Kristina M

    2014-07-01

    Despite the fact that associative memory studies produce a large number of false memories, neuroimaging analyses utilizing this paradigm typically focus only on neural activity mediating successful retrieval. The current study sought to expand on this prior research by examining the neural basis of both true and false associative memories. Though associative false memories are substantially different than those found in semantic or perceptual false memory paradigms, results suggest that associative false memories are mediated by similar neural mechanisms. Specifically, we found increased frontal activity that likely represents enhanced monitoring and evaluation compared to that needed for true memories and correct rejections. Results also indicated that true, and not false associative memories, are mediated by neural activity in the MTL, specifically the hippocampus. Finally, while activity in early visual cortex distinguished true from false memories, a lack of neural differences between hits and correct rejections failed to support previous findings suggesting that activity in early visual cortex represents sensory reactivation of encoding-related processing. PMID:24859815

  15. Resisting false recognition: An ERP study of lure discrimination.

    PubMed

    Morcom, Alexa M

    2015-10-22

    There is keen interest in what enables rememberers to differentiate true from false memories and which strategies are likely to be the most effective. This study measured electrical brain activity while healthy young adults performed a mnemonic discrimination task, deciding whether color pictures had been studied, were similar to studied pictures (lures), or were new. Between 500 and 800ms post-stimulus, event-related potentials (ERPs) for correctly recognized studied pictures and falsely recognized lures compared to those for correctly rejected novel items had a left centroparietal scalp distribution. This was typical of the parietal old/new effect associated with recollection, and in line with previous evidence that similar lures may elicit false or phantom recollection as opposed to just familiarity. There was no evidence of a parietal effect for correctly rejected lures as would be expected if recall-to-reject was used. The ERP old/new effects for lures also varied with individual differences in performance. Parietal effects for falsely recognized lures were larger in better performers, who successfully rejected a greater number of lures as "similar". The better performers also showed more pronounced right frontocentral old/new effects between 800 and 1100ms for correctly rejected and falsely recognized similar lures. The enhancement of false recollection in better performers implies false recognition of lures occurred only when more specific information was recovered about the study episodic. Together, the findings suggest reliance on recollection to decide that items were studied, supported by post-retrieval processing. PMID:26256253

  16. An examination of two-process theories of false recognition.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Jason; Gould, Christine

    2006-10-01

    Contemporary theories of false memory suggest there are two processes that combine to produce false memory: one that increases false memory (error-inflating processes) and one that counteracts false memory (error-editing processes). Two experiments using the DRM paradigm (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) explored the influence of manipulating the number of associates studied, study item presentation frequency, backward associative strength, and study time on error-inflating and error-editing processes separately by examining speeded and unspeeded recognition decisions. The results of these studies indicate that (1) increasing the number of associates studied primarily influenced error-inflating processes; (2) increasing backward associative strength increased error-inflating processes and impaired error-editing processes; (3) increasing study item presentation frequency increased both error-inflating and error-editing processes; and (4) increasing study time had a weak effect on error-editing processes. Further, the results of these studies suggest that comprehensive theories of false memory phenomena must propose the existence of two different factors: one that increases false memory and is available early in memory retrieval, and one that usually, but not always, decreases false memory and is available later in retrieval. PMID:16938694

  17. The relationship between DRM and misinformation false memories.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bi; Chen, Chuansheng; Loftus, Elizabeth F; Lin, Chongde; Dong, Qi

    2013-08-01

    This research investigated the relationship between false memories induced by two different paradigms (misinformation and Deese-Roediger-McDermott [DRM]). The misinformation effect refers to the phenomenon that a person's recollection of a witnessed event can be altered after exposure to misleading information about the event. DRM false memory represents the intrusion of words that are semantically related but not actually presented in the study session. Subjects (N = 432) completed both misinformation and DRM false memory tests. Results showed a small but significant correlation (r = .12, p = .02) between the misinformation and DRM false memories. Furthermore, using signal detection theory, we found that the discrimination ability index (d') was related to both the misinformation and DRM false memories (r = -.12 and -.13, p = .01), while the response bias was related only to DRM false memory (r = -.46, p < .001). These results suggest that misinformation and DRM false memories generally involve different mechanisms and that their shared mechanism may involve the global discrimination ability. PMID:23397226

  18. False recall and recognition of brand names increases over time.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, participants are presented with lists of associated words (e.g., bed, awake, night). Subsequently, they reliably have false memories for related but nonpresented words (e.g., SLEEP). Previous research has found that false memories can be created for brand names (e.g., Morrisons, Sainsbury's, Waitrose, and TESCO). The present study investigates the effect of a week's delay on false memories for brand names. Participants were presented with lists of brand names followed by a distractor task. In two between-subjects experiments, participants completed a free recall task or a recognition task either immediately or a week later. In two within-subjects experiments, participants completed a free recall task or a recognition task both immediately and a week later. Correct recall for presented list items decreased over time, whereas false recall for nonpresented lure items increased. For recognition, raw scores revealed an increase in false memory across time reflected in an increase in Remember responses. Analysis of Pr scores revealed that false memory for lures stayed constant over a week, but with an increase in Remember responses in the between-subjects experiment and a trend in the same direction in the within-subjects experiment. Implications for theories of false memory are discussed. PMID:22963741

  19. Negative Expertise: Comparing Differently Tenured Elder Care Nurses' Negative Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartmeier, Martin; Lehtinen, Erno; Gruber, Hans; Heid, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Negative expertise is conceptualised as the professional's ability to avoid errors during practice due to certain cognitive agencies. In this study, negative knowledge (i.e. knowledge about what is wrong in a certain context and situation) is conceptualised as one such agency. This study compares and investigates the negative knowledge of elder…

  20. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  1. [Negative pressure therapy: NPT].

    PubMed

    Maillard, H

    2015-01-01

    Negative pressure therapy or treatment (NPT) is used very frequently in hospitals in both surgical and medical departments. NPT consists of maintaining the wound surface at a pressure below ambient atmospheric pressure by means of a specially designed dressing attached to a depressurisation device as well as a system to drain exudate. NPT has been shown to be beneficial in increasing blood flow, thanks to feedback resulting from the decreased oxygen pressure, angiogenesis and reduction of the wound surface area. The French Health Authority (HAS) has issued recommendations for good use in a specific and limited series of applications. NPT may be used in post-traumatic or post-surgical wounds, burns, and in chronic wounds, such as bedsores and ulcers. It is also effective as an adjuvant treatment for infected wounds. In recent years, various different NPT devices have become commercially available. PMID:26249531

  2. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1984-12-04

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field. 14 figs.

  3. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-08-06

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  4. Structure and bioactivity of steroidal saponins isolated from the roots of Chamaelirium luteum (false unicorn).

    PubMed

    Challinor, Victoria L; Stuthe, Julia M U; Parsons, Peter G; Lambert, Lynette K; Lehmann, Reginald P; Kitching, William; De Voss, James J

    2012-08-24

    Phytochemical investigation of Chamaelirium luteum ("false unicorn") resulted in the isolation of 15 steroidal glycosides. Twelve of these (1, 2, 4-9, 11-13, and 15) are apparently unique to this species, and eight of these (6-9, 11-13, and 15) are previously unreported compounds; one (15) possesses a new steroidal aglycone. In addition, the absolute configuration of (23R,24S)-chiograsterol A (10) was defined, and its full spectroscopic characterization is reported for the first time. The structures and configurations of the saponins were determined using a combination of multistage mass spectrometry (MS(n)), 1D and 2D NMR experiments, and chemical degradation. The antiproliferative activity of nine compounds obtained in the present work, and eight related compounds generated in previous work, was compared in six human tumor cell lines, with aglycones 3 and 10 and related derivatives 16, 17, 19, and 20 all displaying significant antiproliferative activity. PMID:22880631

  5. Automated Astrophysical False Positive Analysis of Transiting Planet Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Timothy

    2015-08-01

    Beginning with Kepler, but continuing with K2 and TESS, transiting planet candidates are now found at a much faster rate than follow-up observations can be obtained. Thus, distinguishing true planet candidates from astrophysical false positives has become primarily a statistical exercise. I will describe a new publicly available open-source Python package for analyzing the astrophysical false positive probabilities of transiting exoplanet signals. In addition, I will present results of applying this analysis to both Kepler and K2 planet candidates, resulting in the probabilistic validation of thousands of exoplanets, as well as identifying many likely false positives.

  6. Negation, Polarity, and Deontic Modals

    E-print Network

    Iatridou, Sabine

    Universal deontic modals may vary with respect to whether they scope over or under negation. For instance, English modals like must and should take wide scope with respect to negation; modals like have to and need to take ...

  7. Meaning of the negative impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Conciauro, G.; Puglisi, M.

    1981-06-01

    It is shown that the negative real part of an input impedance does not mean instability of the related circuit. A negative real part of the input impedance means only that the concerned circuit is active.

  8. Condensed Matters Under Negative Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imre, Attila R.

    2011-07-01

    Condensed matters can be expanded into negative pressure states. Although these states are metastable, their long life-time makes them appropriate for experimental investigations. Some relevant behaviour of liquids and solids under negative pressure will be reviewed.

  9. A FALSE POSITIVE FOR OCEAN GLINT ON EXOPLANETS: THE LATITUDE-ALBEDO EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Abbot, Dorian S.; Voigt, Aiko

    2012-06-10

    Identifying liquid water on the surface of planets is a high priority, as this traditionally defines habitability. One proposed signature of oceans is specular reflection ('glint'), which increases the apparent albedo of a planet at crescent phases. We post-process a global climate model of an Earth-like planet to simulate reflected light curves. Significantly, we obtain glint-like phase variations even though we do not include specular reflection in our model. This false positive is the product of two generic properties: (1) for modest obliquities, a planet's poles receive less orbit-averaged stellar flux than its equator, so the poles are more likely to be covered in highly reflective snow and ice; and (2) we show that reflected light from a modest-obliquity planet at crescent phases probes higher latitudes than at gibbous phases, therefore a planet's apparent albedo will naturally increase at crescent phase. We suggest that this 'latitude-albedo effect' will operate even for large obliquities: in that case the equator receives less orbit-averaged flux than the poles, and the equator is preferentially sampled at crescent phase. Using rotational and orbital color variations to map the surfaces of directly imaged planets and estimate their obliquity will therefore be a necessary pre-condition for properly interpreting their reflected phase variations. The latitude-albedo effect is a particularly convincing glint false positive for zero-obliquity planets, and such worlds are not amenable to latitudinal mapping. This effect severely limits the utility of specular reflection for detecting oceans on exoplanets.

  10. 7 CFR 28.961 - False and misleading information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Cotton Fiber and Processing Tests Fiber and Processing Tests § 28.961 False and misleading information. The publication or...

  11. False alarm mitigation techniques for hyperspectral target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieper, M. L.; Manolakis, D.; Truslow, E.; Cooley, T.; Brueggeman, M.

    2013-05-01

    A challenging problem of major importance in hyperspectral imaging applications is the detection of subpixel objects of military and civilian interest. High false alarm thresholds are required to detect subpixel objects due to the large amount of surrounding background clutter. These high false alarm rates are unacceptable for military purposes, requiring the need for false alarm mitigation (FAM) techniques to weed out the objects of interest. The objective of this paper is to provide a comparison of the implementation of these FAM techniques and their inherent benefits in the whitened detection space. The widely utilized matched filter (MF) and adaptive cosine estimator (ACE) are both based on a linear mixing model (LMM) between a background and object class. The matched filter approximates the object abundance, and the ACE measures the model error. Each of these measurements provides inadequate object separation alone, but by using both the object abundance and model error, the objects can be separated from the false alarms.

  12. Cognitive neuroscience of false memory: the role of gist memory 

    E-print Network

    Bellamy, Katarina Jane

    2010-01-01

    This thesis explores the role of gist memory and gist representation in the formation of false recognition, specifically in the Deese, Roediger and McDermott Paradigm. We found that normal individuals displayed a range ...

  13. Effectiveness of false profile radiographs in detection of pelvic discontinuity.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Matthew C; Adler, Michael A; Trousdale, Robert T; Mabry, Tad M; Cabanela, Miguel E

    2012-08-01

    Pelvic dissociation is a rare but serious potential complication of total hip arthroplasty. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the false profile view compared with traditional radiographs in detecting pelvic dissociation. Ten cadaver pelves were skeletonized, and noncemented acetabular hip arthroplasty components were implanted. Anteroposterior, lateral, iliac oblique, and false profile radiographs were obtained before and after creating pelvic dissociations and analyzed in a blinded fashion. The sensitivity of the false profile view for detecting pelvic dissociation was 79% (confidence interval, 70-86), which was greater than the sensitivity for anteroposterior and lateral views. This difference was statistically significant. False profile views are a potentially valuable addition to the traditional radiographic evaluation of pelvic discontinuity in hip arthroplasty. PMID:22197289

  14. False memories in highly superior autobiographical memory individuals.

    PubMed

    Patihis, Lawrence; Frenda, Steven J; LePort, Aurora K R; Petersen, Nicole; Nichols, Rebecca M; Stark, Craig E L; McGaugh, James L; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2013-12-24

    The recent identification of highly superior autobiographical memory (HSAM) raised the possibility that there may be individuals who are immune to memory distortions. We measured HSAM participants' and age- and sex-matched controls' susceptibility to false memories using several research paradigms. HSAM participants and controls were both susceptible to false recognition of nonpresented critical lure words in an associative word-list task. In a misinformation task, HSAM participants showed higher overall false memory compared with that of controls for details in a photographic slideshow. HSAM participants were equally as likely as controls to mistakenly report they had seen nonexistent footage of a plane crash. Finding false memories in a superior-memory group suggests that malleable reconstructive mechanisms may be fundamental to episodic remembering. Paradoxically, HSAM individuals may retrieve abundant and accurate autobiographical memories using fallible reconstructive processes. PMID:24248358

  15. Animals in Education: Are We Prisoners of False Sentiment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minerney, Joseph D.

    1993-01-01

    Asserts that concerns over the use of animals in science education is confounded by the unworthy introduction of false sentiment by animal rights groups, which persist in ignoring the realities of biology. (PR)

  16. Retrieval Failure Contributes to Gist-Based False Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Scott A.; Robbins, Clifford A.; Gilmore, Adrian W.; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    People often falsely recognize items that are similar to previously encountered items. This robust memory error is referred to as gist-based false recognition. A widely held view is that this error occurs because the details fade rapidly from our memory. Contrary to this view, an initial experiment revealed that, following the same encoding conditions that produce high rates of gist-based false recognition, participants overwhelmingly chose the correct target rather than its related foil when given the option to do so. A second experiment showed that this result is due to increased access to stored details provided by reinstatement of the originally encoded photograph, rather than to increased attention to the details. Collectively, these results suggest that details needed for accurate recognition are, to a large extent, still stored in memory and that a critical factor determining whether false recognition will occur is whether these details can be accessed during retrieval. PMID:22125357

  17. The strategic nature of false recognition in the DRM paradigm.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael B; Guerin, Scott A; Wolford, George L

    2011-09-01

    The false memory effect produced by the Deese/Roediger & McDermott (DRM) paradigm is reportedly impervious to warnings to avoid false alarming to the critical lures (D. A. Gallo, H. L. Roediger III, & K. B. McDermott, 2001). This finding has been used as strong evidence against models that attribute the false alarms to a decision process (e.g., M. B. Miller & G. L. Wolford, 1999). In this report, the authors clarify their earlier article and suggest that subjects establish only 2 underlying criteria for a recognition judgment, a liberal criterion for items that seem to be related to 1 of the study list themes and a conservative criterion for items that do not seem to be related. They demonstrate that warnings designed on the basis of these underlying criteria are effective in significantly suppressing the false recognition effect, suggesting that strategic control of the retrieval response does play a role in the DRM paradigm. PMID:21767060

  18. 50 CFR 216.94 - False statements or endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.94 False statements or endorsements. Any person who knowingly and willfully makes a...

  19. 50 CFR 216.94 - False statements or endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.94 False statements or endorsements. Any person who knowingly and willfully makes a...

  20. 50 CFR 216.94 - False statements or endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.94 False statements or endorsements. Any person who knowingly and willfully makes a...

  1. 50 CFR 216.94 - False statements or endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.94 False statements or endorsements. Any person who knowingly and willfully makes a...

  2. 50 CFR 216.94 - False statements or endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Dolphin Safe Tuna Labeling § 216.94 False statements or endorsements. Any person who knowingly and willfully makes a...

  3. False memories in highly superior autobiographical memory individuals

    PubMed Central

    Patihis, Lawrence; Frenda, Steven J.; LePort, Aurora K. R.; Petersen, Nicole; Nichols, Rebecca M.; Stark, Craig E. L.; McGaugh, James L.; Loftus, Elizabeth F.

    2013-01-01

    The recent identification of highly superior autobiographical memory (HSAM) raised the possibility that there may be individuals who are immune to memory distortions. We measured HSAM participants’ and age- and sex-matched controls’ susceptibility to false memories using several research paradigms. HSAM participants and controls were both susceptible to false recognition of nonpresented critical lure words in an associative word-list task. In a misinformation task, HSAM participants showed higher overall false memory compared with that of controls for details in a photographic slideshow. HSAM participants were equally as likely as controls to mistakenly report they had seen nonexistent footage of a plane crash. Finding false memories in a superior-memory group suggests that malleable reconstructive mechanisms may be fundamental to episodic remembering. Paradoxically, HSAM individuals may retrieve abundant and accurate autobiographical memories using fallible reconstructive processes. PMID:24248358

  4. 7 CFR 1450.12 - Filing of false claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS BIOMASS CROP ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (BCAP) Common Provisions § 1450.12 Filing of false claims. (a) If CCC...

  5. The "False Memory" DefenseUsing Disinformation and Junk Science In and Out of Court.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, C L

    2000-01-01

    This article describes a seemingly sophisticated, but mostly contrived and often erroneous ?false memory? defense, and compares it in a brief review to what the science says about the effect of trauma on memory. Child sexual abuse is widespread and dissociative/traumatic amnesia for it is common. Accused, convicted and self-confessed child molesters and their advocates have crafted a strategy that tries to negate their abusive, criminal behavior, which we can call a ?false memory? defense. Each of 22 of the more commonly used components of this defense is described and discussed with respect to what the science says about them. Armed with this knowledge, survivors, their clinicians, and their attorneys will be better able to refute this defense of disinformation. PMID:17521991

  6. Children's false memory and true disclosure in the face of repeated questions.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Jennifer M; Alexander, Kristen Weede; Goodman, Gail S

    2008-07-01

    The current study was designed to investigate children's memory and suggestibility for events differing in valence (positive or negative) and veracity (true or false). A total of 82 3- and 5-year-olds were asked repeated questions about true and false events, either in a grouped order (i.e., all questions about a certain event asked consecutively) or in a nongrouped order (i.e., questions about a certain event were interspersed with questions about other events). Interviewer gender was also varied. Individual differences, including attachment style, inhibition, and behavioral adjustment, were examined as potential predictors of memory and suggestibility. Results revealed significant age, valence, and veracity effects on children's memory reports. Path analysis demonstrated that individual differences in behavioral problems and inhibitory ability predicted children's provision of inaccurate information. Implications for psychological theory and legal application are discussed. PMID:18061609

  7. Neural Correlates of True Memory, False Memory, and Deception

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Jiro; Suzuki, Maki; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Mori, Etsuro; Tsukada, Minoru; Fujii, Toshikatsu

    2008-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to determine whether neural activity can differentiate between true memory, false memory, and deception. Subjects heard a series of semantically related words and were later asked to make a recognition judgment of old words, semantically related nonstudied words (lures for false recognition), and unrelated new words. They were also asked to make a deceptive response to half of the old and unrelated new words. There were 3 main findings. First, consistent with the notion that executive function supports deception, 2 types of deception (pretending to know and pretending not to know) recruited prefrontal activity. Second, consistent with the sensory reactivation hypothesis, the difference between true recognition and false recognition was found in the left temporoparietal regions probably engaged in the encoding of auditorily presented words. Third, the left prefrontal cortex was activated during pretending to know relative to correct rejection and false recognition, whereas the right anterior hippocampus was activated during false recognition relative to correct rejection and pretending to know. These findings indicate that fMRI can detect the difference in brain activity between deception and false memory despite the fact that subjects respond with “I know” to novel events in both processes. PMID:18372290

  8. True and false memories, parietal cortex, and confidence judgments.

    PubMed

    Urgolites, Zhisen J; Smith, Christine N; Squire, Larry R

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have asked whether activity in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and the neocortex can distinguish true memory from false memory. A frequent complication has been that the confidence associated with correct memory judgments (true memory) is typically higher than the confidence associated with incorrect memory judgments (false memory). Accordingly, it has often been difficult to know whether a finding is related to memory confidence or memory accuracy. In the current study, participants made recognition memory judgments with confidence ratings in response to previously studied scenes and novel scenes. The left hippocampus and 16 other brain regions distinguished true and false memories when confidence ratings were different for the two conditions. Only three regions (all in the parietal cortex) distinguished true and false memories when confidence ratings were equated. These findings illustrate the utility of taking confidence ratings into account when identifying brain regions associated with true and false memories. Neural correlates of true and false memories are most easily interpreted when confidence ratings are similar for the two kinds of memories. PMID:26472645

  9. The role of articulatory suppression in immediate false recognition.

    PubMed

    Macé, Anne-Laure; Caza, Nicole

    2011-11-01

    False memory for critical lures has been widely documented in long-term memory using the Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm. Recent evidence suggests that false memory effects can also be found in short-term memory (STM), supporting models that assume a strong relationship between short-term and long-term memory processes. However, no study has examined the role of articulatory suppression on immediate false memory, even though phono-articulatory factors are critically involved in STM performance and are an intrinsic part of all STM accounts. The current study proposes a novel paradigm to assess false memory effects in a STM task under both silent and articulatory suppression conditions. Using immediate serial recognition, in which participants had to judge whether two successive mixed lists of six associated and non-associated words were matched, we examined true recognition of matching lists and false recognition of mismatching lists comprising a critical lure or unrelated distractor in two experiments. Results from both experiments indicated reduced true recognition of matching lists and greater false serial recognition of mismatching lists comprising a critical lure under articulatory suppression relative to silence. These findings provide further support for some current models of verbal short-term memory, which posit a strong relationship between short-term and long-term memory processes. PMID:22032514

  10. False Memory in Aging Resulting From Self-Referential Processing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Referencing the self is known to enhance accurate memory, but less is known about how the strategy affects false memory, particularly for highly self-relevant information. Because older adults are more prone to false memories, we tested whether self-referencing increased false memories with age. Method. In 2 studies, older and younger adults rated adjectives for self-descriptiveness and later completed a surprise recognition test comprised of words rated previously for self-descriptiveness and novel lure words. Lure words were subsequently rated for self-descriptiveness in order to assess the impact of self-relevance on false memory. Study 2 introduced commonness judgments as a control condition, such that participants completed a recognition test on adjectives rated for commonness in addition to adjectives in the self-descriptiveness condition. Results. Across both studies, findings indicate an increased response bias to self-referencing that increased hit rates for both older and younger adults but also increased false alarms as information became more self-descriptive, particularly for older adults. Discussion. Although the present study supports previous literature showing a boost in memory for self-referenced information, the increase in false alarms, especially in older adults, highlights the potential for memory errors, particularly for information that is strongly related to the self. PMID:23576449

  11. Sleep Reduces False Memory in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lo, June C.; Sim, Sam K. Y.; Chee, Michael W. L.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of post-learning sleep and sleep architecture on false memory in healthy older adults. Design: Balanced, crossover design. False memory was induced using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm and assessed following nocturnal sleep and following a period of daytime wakefulness. Post-learning sleep structure was evaluated using polysomnography (PSG). Setting: Sleep research laboratory. Participants: Fourteen healthy older adults from the Singapore-Longitudinal Aging Brain Study (mean age ± standard deviation = 66.6 ± 4.1 y; 7 males). Measurements and Results: At encoding, participants studied lists of words that were semantically related to non-presented critical lures. At retrieval, they made “remember”/“know” and “new” judgments. Compared to wakefulness, post-learning sleep was associated with reduced “remember” responses, but not “know” responses to critical lures. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the veridical recognition of studied words, false recognition of unrelated distractors, discriminability, or response bias between the sleep and the wake conditions. More post-learning slow wave sleep was associated with greater reduction in false memory. Conclusions: In healthy older adults, sleep facilitates the reduction in false memory without affecting veridical memory. This benefit correlates with the amount of slow wave sleep in the post-learning sleep episode. Citation: Lo JC; Sim SK; Chee MW. Sleep reduces false memory in healthy older adults. SLEEP 2014;37(4):665-671. PMID:24744453

  12. False-alarm characterization in hyperspectral gas-detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPietro, Robert S.; Truslow, Eric; Manolakis, Dimitris G.; Golowich, Steven E.; Lockwood, Ronald B.

    2012-09-01

    Chemical cloud detection using long-wave infrared (LWIR) hyperspectral-imaging sensors has many civilian and military applications, including chemical warfare threat mitigation, environmental monitoring, and emergency response. Current capabilities are limited by variation in background clutter as opposed to the physics of photon detection, and this makes the statistical characterization of clutter and clutter-induced false alarms essential to the design of practical systems. In this exploratory work, we use hyperspectral data collected both on the ground and in the air to spectrally and spatially characterize false alarms. Focusing on two widely-used detectors, the matched filter (MF) and the adaptive cosine estimator (ACE), we compare empirical false-alarm rates to their theoretical counterparts - detector output under Gaussian, t and t-mixture distributed data - and show that these models often underestimate false-alarm rates. Next, we threshold real detection maps and show that true detections and false alarms often exhibit very different spatial behavior. To exploit this difference and understand how spatial processing affects performance, the spatial behavior of false alarms must be understood. We take a first step in this direction by showing that, although the behavior may `look' quite random, it is not well captured by the complete-spatial-randomness model. Finally, we describe how our findings impact the design of real detection systems.

  13. An Apparently Classical Case Report of Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Della Marca, Giacomo; Vollono, Catello

    2015-10-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome is a rare, sporadic, congenital neurocutaneous syndrome, likely due to abnormal development of the cephalic microvasculature. Symptoms and signs depend on the extent and location of the venous dysplasia. We describe a case of a 33-year-old woman presenting with drug-resistant epilepsy, chronic headache, and recurring nonepileptic seizures. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans showed severe frontoparietal right hemisphere atrophy, prevalent right frontoparietal leptomeningeal enhancement, circumscribed angioma of the left rolandic sulcus, and prominent deep venous system. We report an apparently classical Sturge-Weber syndrome and hypothesize a shared pathophysiologic mechanism for clinical symptoms. We speculate that all the main symptoms observed in our patient could be the expression of a functional imbalance between the atrophic right hemisphere and the hyperexcitable left cortex. PMID:25392004

  14. Species-barrier-independent prion replication in apparently resistant species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Andrew F.; Joiner, Susan; Linehan, Jackie; Desbruslais, Melanie; Lantos, Peter L.; Collinge, John

    2000-08-01

    Transmission of prions between mammalian species is thought to be limited by a "species barrier," which depends on differences in the primary structure of prion proteins in the infecting inoculum and the host. Here we demonstrate that a strain of hamster prions thought to be nonpathogenic for conventional mice leads to prion replication to high levels in such mice but without causing clinical disease. Prions pathogenic in both mice and hamsters are produced. These results demonstrate the existence of subclinical forms of prion infection with important public health implications, both with respect to iatrogenic transmission from apparently healthy humans and dietary exposure to cattle and other species exposed to bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions. Current definitions of the species barrier, which have been based on clinical end-points, need to be fundamentally reassessed.

  15. A "fair sampling" perspective on an apparent violation of duality

    E-print Network

    Bolduc, Eliot; Miatto, Filippo M; Leuchs, Gerd; Boyd, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    In the event in which a quantum mechanical particle can pass from an initial state to a final state along two possible paths, the duality principle states that "the simultaneous observation of wave and particle behavior is prohibited". [M. O. Scully, B.-G. Englert, and H. Walther. Nature, 351:111-116, 1991.] emphasized the importance of additional degrees of freedom in the context of complementarity. In this paper, we show how the consequences of duality change when allowing for biased sampling, that is, postselected measurements on specific degrees of freedom of the environment of the two-path state. Our work contributes to the explanation of previous experimental apparent violations of duality [R. Menzel, D. Puhlmann, A. Heuer, and W. P. Schleich. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 109(24):9314-9319, 2012.] and opens up the way for novel experimental tests of duality.

  16. Solving the apparent diversity-accuracy dilemma of recommender systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Kuscsik, Zoltán; Liu, Jian-Guo; Medo, Matúš; Wakeling, Joseph Rushton; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Recommender systems use data on past user preferences to predict possible future likes and interests. A key challenge is that while the most useful individual recommendations are to be found among diverse niche objects, the most reliably accurate results are obtained by methods that recommend objects based on user or object similarity. In this paper we introduce a new algorithm specifically to address the challenge of diversity and show how it can be used to resolve this apparent dilemma when combined in an elegant hybrid with an accuracy-focused algorithm. By tuning the hybrid appropriately we are able to obtain, without relying on any semantic or context-specific information, simultaneous gains in both accuracy and diversity of recommendations. PMID:20176968

  17. Random variability explains apparent global clustering of large earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence of 5 Mw ? 8.5 earthquakes since 2004 has created a debate over whether or not we are in a global cluster of large earthquakes, temporarily raising risks above long-term levels. I use three classes of statistical tests to determine if the record of M ? 7 earthquakes since 1900 can reject a null hypothesis of independent random events with a constant rate plus localized aftershock sequences. The data cannot reject this null hypothesis. Thus, the temporal distribution of large global earthquakes is well-described by a random process, plus localized aftershocks, and apparent clustering is due to random variability. Therefore the risk of future events has not increased, except within ongoing aftershock sequences, and should be estimated from the longest possible record of events.

  18. An Apparent Paradox in Verification of Rainfall Estimates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciach, G. J.

    2009-05-01

    A problem that is a source of permanent cognitive confusion in comprehensive evaluations of different rainfall estimates is presented. The problem stems from the existence of two conditional biases (CB) inherent to the uncertainties of the estimates. The two CBs, called "CB type 1" and "CB type 2," are recognized by researchers familiar with the distribution-oriented framework for complete verification of hydrological and meteorological products. Although the mathematical definitions of the two CBs are clear, a reality check reveals that their meaningful interpretation is problematic. It can even result in self-contradictory conclusions suggesting both systematic overestimation and underestimation of strong rainfall by the same rainfall estimation products. A solution to this apparent paradox is discussed. This investigation is based on large data samples of different radar rainfall estimates and the corresponding highly accurate ground reference. Understanding the two CBs, their physical consequences and the fundamental inter-relations between them is essential for informed usage of these uncertainty characteristics.

  19. Timing of the apparent effects of cloud seeding.

    PubMed

    Lovasich, J L; Neyman, J; Scott, E L; Smith, J A

    1969-08-29

    The average hourly precipitation amounts, on 96 experimental days without cloud seeding in the Whitetop experiment, show a marked maximum between 4 and 7 o'clock in the afternoon, presumably reflecting the convection activity caused by heating of the ground occurring during an earlier period. No such maximum is observed on the 102 days with seeding. The hypothetical explanation presupposes that seeding with silver iodide creates early general cloudiness, which prevents ground temperatures from rising to levels usually attained on days without seeding. This hypothesis may explain not only the mechanism of the loss in rain in the Whitetop experiment, apparently induced by seeding, but also may explain certain phenomena noticed in the Grossversuch III experiment. PMID:17777000

  20. Plant-mediated 'apparent effects' between mycorrhiza and insect herbivores.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Lucy; Johnson, David

    2015-08-01

    Plants mediate indirect 'apparent' effects between above-ground herbivores and below-ground mutualistic mycorrhizal fungi. The herbivore-plant-mycorrhiza continuum is further complicated because signals produced by plants in response to herbivores can be transmitted to other plants via shared fungal networks below ground. Insect herbivores, such as aphids, probably affect the functioning of mycorrhizal fungi by changing the supply of recent photosynthate from plants to mycorrhizas, whereas there is evidence that mycorrhizas affect aphid fitness by changing plant signalling pathways, rather than only through improved nutrition. New knowledge of the transfer of signals through fungal networks between plant species means we now need a better understanding of how this process occurs in relation to the feeding preferences of herbivores to shape plant community composition and herbivore behaviour in nature. PMID:26190588

  1. Thermodynamics of Evolving Lorentzian Wormhole at Apparent and Event Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Ujjal; Jamil, Mubasher; Myrzakulov, Ratbay; Akbar, M.

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the non-static Lorentzian Wormhole model in presence of anisotropic pressure. We have presented some exact solutions of Einstein equations for anisotropic pressure case. Introducing two EoS parameters we have shown that these solutions give very rich dynamics of the universe yielding to the different expansion history of it in the r - direction and in the T - direction. The corresponding explicit forms of the shape function b( r) is presented.We have shown that the Einstein's field equations and unified first law are equivalent for the dynamical wormhole model. The first law of thermodynamics has been derived by using the Unified first law. The physical quantities including surface gravity and the temperature are derived for the wormhole. Here we have obtained all the results without any choice of the shape function. The validity of generalized second law (GSL) of thermodynamics has been examined at apparent and event horizons for the evolving Lorentzian wormhole.

  2. Too early? On the apparent conflict of astrobiology and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirkovic, Milan M.

    2006-06-01

    An interesting consequence of the modern cosmological paradigm is the spatial infinity of the universe. When coupled with naturalistic understanding of the origin of life and intelligence, which follows the basic tenets of astrobiology, and with some fairly incontroversial assumptions in the theory of observation selection effects, this infinity leads, as Ken Olum has recently shown, to a paradoxical conclusion. Olum's paradox is related, to the famous Fermi's paradox in astrobiology and SETI studies. We, hereby, present an evolutionary argument countering the apparent inconsistency, and show how, in the framework of a simplified model, deeper picture of the coupling between histories of intelligent/technological civilizations and astrophysical evolution of the Galaxy, can be achieved. This strategy has consequences of importance for both astrobiological studies and philosophy.

  3. Purification of sphingomyelinase to apparent homogeneity by using hydrophobic chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C S; Shankaran, P; Callahan, J W

    1981-01-01

    Placental sphingomyelinase has been purified to apparent homogeneity by a procedure that makes extensive use of hydrophobic interaction chromatography on sphingosylphosphocholine-CH-, octyl-, hexyl- and Blue-Sepharoses. Enzyme purification is about 10000- 14000-fold over starting extract with excellent yield (usually greater than 28%). Purification of bis-4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate phosphodiesterase activity generally paralleled that of sphingomyelinase during the final stages of the procedure. The enzyme also hydrolysed bis-p-nitrophenyl phosphate, but at a lower rate compared with bis-4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate. A single major protein was observed under non-denaturing conditions. Sphingomyelinase, denatured by reduction and alkylation, is composed of a major polypeptide chain with an apparent molecular weight of 89 100 on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. Two minor lower-molecular-weight components were consistently obtained at 47 500 and 30 700. These results were also obtained after maleoylation of the reduced and alkylated sample. The enzyme contains a blocked-N-terminal amino acid. An extensive search for contaminating enzymes revealed the presence of minor amounts of acid phosphatase, which were removed from the final enzyme sample. The highly purified enzyme is stable for several weeks when stored with Triton X-100 at 4 degrees C. The pure enzyme aggregates under denaturing and electrophoretic conditions and special care must be taken to ensure that hydrophobic bonding of the protein is decreased as much as possible. The reproducibility and large scale of this procedure should facilitate further study on the structure and kinetic properties of the enzyme. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:6274305

  4. Semantic processes leading to true and false memory formation in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Alonso, Pedro M.; Ghetti, Simona; Ramsay, Ian; Solomon, Marjorie; Yoon, Jong; Carter, Cameron S.; Ragland, J. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Encoding semantic relationships between items on word lists (semantic processing) enhances true memories, but also increases memory distortions. Episodic memory impairments in schizophrenia (SZ) are strongly driven by failures to process semantic relations, but the exact nature of these relational semantic processing deficits are not well understood. Here, we used a false memory paradigm to investigate the impact of implicit and explicit semantic processing manipulations on episodic memory in SZ. Thirty SZ and 30 demographically matched healthy controls (HC) studied Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) lists of semantically associated words. Half of the lists had strong implicit semantic associations and the remainder had low strength associations. Similarly, half of the lists were presented under “standard” instructions and the other half under explicit “relational processing” instructions. After study, participants performed recall and old/new recognition tests composed of targets, critical lures, and unrelated lures. HC exhibited higher true memories and better discriminability between true and false memory compared to SZ. High, versus low, associative strength increased false memory rates in both groups. However, explicit “relational processing” instructions positively improved true memory rates only in HC. Finally, true and false memory rates were associated with severity of disorganized and negative symptoms in SZ. These results suggest that reduced processing of semantic relationships during encoding in SZ may stem from an inability to implement explicit relational processing strategies rather than a fundamental deficit in the implicit activation and retrieval of word meanings from patients’ semantic lexicon. PMID:23623175

  5. Semantic processes leading to true and false memory formation in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Paz-Alonso, Pedro M; Ghetti, Simona; Ramsay, Ian; Solomon, Marjorie; Yoon, Jong; Carter, Cameron S; Ragland, J Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Encoding semantic relationships between items on word lists (semantic processing) enhances true memories, but also increases memory distortions. Episodic memory impairments in schizophrenia (SZ) are strongly driven by failures to process semantic relations, but the exact nature of these relational semantic processing deficits is not well understood. Here, we used a false memory paradigm to investigate the impact of implicit and explicit semantic processing manipulations on episodic memory in SZ. Thirty SZ and 30 demographically matched healthy controls (HC) studied Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) lists of semantically associated words. Half of the lists had strong implicit semantic associations and the remainder had low strength associations. Similarly, half of the lists were presented under "standard" instructions and the other half under explicit "relational processing" instructions. After study, participants performed recall and old/new recognition tests composed of targets, critical lures, and unrelated lures. HC exhibited higher true memories and better discriminability between true and false memory compared to SZ. High, versus low, associative strength increased false memory rates in both groups. However, explicit "relational processing" instructions positively improved true memory rates only in HC. Finally, true and false memory rates were associated with severity of disorganized and negative symptoms in SZ. These results suggest that reduced processing of semantic relationships during encoding in SZ may stem from an inability to implement explicit relational processing strategies rather than a fundamental deficit in the implicit activation and retrieval of word meanings from patients' semantic lexicon. PMID:23623175

  6. Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Heilmann, Christine; Peters, Georg

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The definition of the heterogeneous group of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) is still based on diagnostic procedures that fulfill the clinical need to differentiate between Staphylococcus aureus and those staphylococci classified historically as being less or nonpathogenic. Due to patient- and procedure-related changes, CoNS now represent one of the major nosocomial pathogens, with S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus being the most significant species. They account substantially for foreign body-related infections and infections in preterm newborns. While S. saprophyticus has been associated with acute urethritis, S. lugdunensis has a unique status, in some aspects resembling S. aureus in causing infectious endocarditis. In addition to CoNS found as food-associated saprophytes, many other CoNS species colonize the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals and are less frequently involved in clinically manifested infections. This blurred gradation in terms of pathogenicity is reflected by species- and strain-specific virulence factors and the development of different host-defending strategies. Clearly, CoNS possess fewer virulence properties than S. aureus, with a respectively different disease spectrum. In this regard, host susceptibility is much more important. Therapeutically, CoNS are challenging due to the large proportion of methicillin-resistant strains and increasing numbers of isolates with less susceptibility to glycopeptides. PMID:25278577

  7. Improved negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Delmore, J.E.

    1984-05-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reaccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200 to 500/sup 0/C for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  8. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Delmore, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reeccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200.degree. to 500.degree. for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

  9. Validation of triage criteria for deciding which apparently inebriated persons require emergency department care

    PubMed Central

    Flower, Keith; Post, Anneke; Sussman, Jeremy; Tangherlini, Niels; Mendelson, John; Pletcher, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Some 620,000 emergency department (ED) visits for acute alcohol intoxication occur annually in the U.S. A half to two-thirds of these appear to be uncomplicated, and might safely be triaged to management in non-ED settings. We hypothesized that consensus criteria would afford sensitive and specific triage. Methods: Paramedics collected data on 99 apparently inebriated persons en route to the ED. We retrospectively reviewed these patients’ ED charts to assess who actually required ED care. We then estimated sensitivity and specificity for proposed triage criteria that would have excluded patients from non-ED care: chest or abdominal pain, shortness of breath, suicidal ideation, abnormal vital signs or Glasgow Coma Scale, signs of head trauma, inability to ambulate, seizure, lacerations, fractures, or pregnancy. Results: Subjects were mostly male (89%), homeless (57%), and found on the street (81%); 17 appeared to require ED care, 39 were eligible for non-ED care, but 4 of these would have bounced back to the ED (negative predictive value 90%, sensitivity 76%, 95% CI: 50–93%; specificity 44%, 95% CI: 33–55). Paramedic opinion alone was highly specific (80%) but not very sensitive (41%). Lowering the pulse exclusion threshold from 130 to 83 would increase sensitivity to 100%, but decrease specificity to 22%. A simple post-hoc rule excluding those with age > 55 or pulse > 83 from non-ED care had high sensitivity (94%) and fair specificity (61%). The proposed criteria’s sensitivity and specificity varied (65–83% and 44–49%, respectively) depending on which ED services were considered optional (e.g., psychiatric consultation, EKG, IV fluids, etc). Conclusions: Most apparently inebriated individuals in this study did not require ED care, but prospective identification of these persons is a challenge. A low exclusion cutoff for tachycardia may improve sensitivity. PMID:20616108

  10. Merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy: diffusion-weighted imaging findings of brain.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Alpay; Sigirci, Ahmet; Kutlu, Ramazan; Aslan, Mehmet; Doganay, Selim; Yakinci, Cengiz

    2007-05-01

    Merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy is a rare genetic disease of childhood involving the central and peripheral nervous system. There were high signal intensities throughout the centrum semiovale, periventricular, and sub-cortical white matters on T2-weighted images in a 4-year-old girl with merosin-negative congenital muscular dystrophy. An apparent diffusion coefficient map revealed increased signal intensity and apparent diffusion coefficient values in the periventricular and deep white matters. It may be attributable to increased water content in the white matter because of an abnormal blood-brain barrier rather than to decreased or abnormal myelination. PMID:17690079

  11. A Theory of False Cognitive Expectancies in Airline Pilots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, Antonio I.

    The Theory of False Cognitive Expectancies was developed by studying high reliability flight operations. Airline pilots depend extensively on cognitive expectancies to perceive, understand, and predict actions and events. Out of 1,363 incident reports submitted by airline pilots to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Aviation Safety Reporting System over a year's time, 110 reports were found to contain evidence of 127 false cognitive expectancies in pilots. A comprehensive taxonomy was developed with six categories of interest. The dataset of 127 false expectancies was used to initially code tentative taxon values for each category. Intermediate coding through constant comparative analysis completed the taxonomy. The taxonomy was used for the advanced coding of chronological context-dependent visualizations of expectancy factors, known as strands, which depict the major factors in the creation and propagation of each expectancy. Strands were mapped into common networks to detect highly represented expectancy processes. Theoretical integration established 11 sources of false expectancies, the most common expectancy errors, and those conspicuous factors worthy of future study. The most prevalent source of false cognitive expectancies within the dataset was determined to be unconscious individual modeling based on past events. Integrative analyses also revealed relationships between expectancies and flight deck automation, unresolved discrepancies, and levels of situation awareness. Particularly noteworthy were the findings that false expectancies can combine in three possible permutations to diminish situation awareness and examples of how false expectancies can be unwittingly transmitted from one person to another. The theory resulting from this research can enhance the error coding process used during aircraft line oriented safety audits, lays the foundation for developing expectancy management training programs, and will allow researchers to proffer hypotheses for human testing using flight simulators.

  12. Negational categorization and intergroup behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chen-Bo; Phillips, Katherine W; Leonardelli, Geoffrey J; Galinsky, Adam D

    2008-06-01

    Individuals define themselves, at times, as who they are (e.g., a psychologist) and, at other times, as who they are not (e.g., not an economist). Drawing on social identity, optimal distinctiveness, and balance theories, four studies examined the nature of negational identity relative to affirmational identity. One study explored the conditions that increase negational identification and found that activating the need for distinctiveness increased the accessibility of negational identities. Three additional studies revealed that negational categorization increased outgroup derogation relative to affirmational categorization and the authors argue that this effect is at least partially due to a focus on contrasting the self from the outgroup under negational categorization. Consistent with this argument, outgroup derogation following negational categorization was mitigated when connections to similar others were highlighted. By distinguishing negational identity from affirmational identity, a more complete picture of collective identity and intergroup behavior can start to emerge. PMID:18391025

  13. Occult H. pylori infection partially explains ‘false-positive’ results of 13C-urea breath test

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Lázaro, María J; Lario, Sergio; Sánchez-Delgado, Jordi; Montserrat, Antònia; Quílez, Elisa M; Casalots, Alex; Suarez, David; Campo, Rafel; Brullet, Enric; Junquera, Félix; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Segura, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    Background In a previous study, UBiT-100?mg, (Otsuka, Spain), a commercial 13C-urea breath test omitting citric acid pre-treatment, had a high rate of false-positive results; however, it is possible that UBiT detected low-density ‘occult’ infection missed by other routine reference tests. We aimed to validate previous results in a new cohort and to rule out the possibility that false-positive UBiT were due to an ‘occult’ infection missed by reference tests. Methods Dyspeptic patients (n = 272) were prospectively enrolled and UBiT was performed, according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Helicobacter pylori infection was determined by combining culture, histology and rapid urease test results. We calculated UBiT sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (with 95% CI). In addition, we evaluated ‘occult’ H. pylori infection using two previously-validated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for urease A (UreA) and 16?S sequences in gastric biopsies. We included 44 patients with a false-positive UBiT, and two control groups of 25 patients each, that were positive and negative for all H. pylori tests. Results UBiT showed a false-positive rate of 17%, with a specificity of 83%. All the positive controls and 12 of 44 patients (27%) with false-positive UBiT were positive for all two PCR tests; by contrast, none of our negative controls had two positive PCR tests. Conclusions UBiT suffers from a high rate of false-positive results and sub-optimal specificity, and the protocol skipping citric acid pre-treatment should be revised; however, low-density ‘occult’ H. pylori infection that was undetectable by conventional tests accounted for around 25% of the ‘false-positive’ results. PMID:26535122

  14. Encoding- and retrieval-related brain activity underlying false recognition.

    PubMed

    Abe, Nobuhito; Fujii, Toshikatsu; Suzuki, Maki; Ueno, Aya; Shigemune, Yayoi; Mugikura, Shunji; Takahashi, Shoki; Mori, Etsuro

    2013-08-01

    We examined the neural activity associated with true and false recognition during both encoding and retrieval using the Remember/Know procedure to separate recollection (i.e., mental reinstatement of experienced events during which unique details of a memory are recalled) and familiarity (i.e., mental awareness that an event has been experienced previously without the unique details of the event) in recognition memory. Neuroimaging data at retrieval revealed that the right parahippocampal gyrus was activated during recollection-based true recognition compared with familiarity-based true recognition, indicating the item-specific retrieval of visual details. This effect in the right parahippocampal gyrus was not observed for false recognition. Contrary to our expectation, the reactivation effect in early visual cortex was not observed during true recognition, as opposed to false recognition. Neuroimaging data at encoding revealed that the right visual cortex (the right occipitotemporal sulcus) was activated during the encoding of items that yielded recollection-based true recognition compared with familiarity-based true recognition, indicating item-specific visual processing. This effect in the right visual cortex was not observed for false recognition. These results suggest that the subjective feeling of Remember/Know with respect to both veridical and false memories varies with the neural activity during both encoding and retrieval. PMID:23726799

  15. False recognition of facial expressions of emotion: causes and implications.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Dols, José-Miguel; Carrera, Pilar; Barchard, Kimberly A; Gacitua, Marta

    2008-08-01

    This article examines the importance of semantic processes in the recognition of emotional expressions, through a series of three studies on false recognition. The first study found a high frequency of false recognition of prototypical expressions of emotion when participants viewed slides and video clips of nonprototypical fearful and happy expressions. The second study tested whether semantic processes caused false recognition. The authors found that participants made significantly higher error rates when asked to detect expressions that corresponded to semantic labels than when asked to detect visual stimuli. Finally, given that previous research reported that false memories are less prevalent in younger children, the third study tested whether false recognition of prototypical expressions increased with age. The authors found that 67% of eight- to nine-year-old children reported nonpresent prototypical expressions of fear in a fearful context, but only 40% of 6- to 7-year-old children did so. Taken together, these three studies demonstrate the importance of semantic processes in the detection and categorization of prototypical emotional expressions. PMID:18729583

  16. [False memories and aging: age effects on predictive inferences].

    PubMed

    Gras, Doriane; Tardieu, Hubert; Nicolas, Serge

    2008-12-01

    To study false memories in older adults, a lot of experiments used the DRM paradigm (Deese, Roediger et McDermott). Most of the time, the results showed that older adults make more false memories than young adults. To test this hypothesis with a more ecological material, we used a situation of text reading. When we read a text, we activate predictive inferences, which are anticipations of what will happen next. We constructed short texts inducing predictive inferences (represented by a target word not presented) to study false memories in young and older adults. For example, in the text , the target word "sting" is not presented but represents the predictive inference. After the reading of the texts, we propose to the subjects a restitution task consisting in recalling texts with the first sentence as clue. Then, they made a recognition task composed of target words and lures; they had to say if they remembered having read these words in the texts. In these two tasks, the subjects tended to remember not presented target words, creating false memories. This effect was the same for the two age groups showing that, in an ecological situation like text reading, older persons make as many false memories as young adults. PMID:19087911

  17. Sleep fragmentation and false memories during pregnancy and motherhood.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Christiane; Diekelmann, Susanne; Alexander, Nina; Pustal, Anne; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2014-06-01

    Pregnant women, both before and after childbirth, frequently experience memory deficits and disrupted sleep. In the present study we assessed the relationship between false memory generation and fragmented sleep during pregnancy and motherhood. We tested 178 pregnant women and 58 female non-pregnant childless controls, during pregnancy (15-35th week of gestation) and again after childbirth (8-13th month). False memories were defined as memories of gist words that were semantically related to studied word lists but were not presented during learning of these lists in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm. Sleep was monitored by actigraphy in the home environment for seven consecutive nights. Compared to the controls, the group of pregnant women produced more false memories and displayed more fragmented sleep both during pregnancy and after childbirth. However, false memory generation was not correlated to measures of sleep fragmentation. These results show that pregnant women suffer from sleep fragmentation and a higher susceptibility to false memories, but leave open the question as to whether both phenomena are related. PMID:24589545

  18. False memory and importance: can we prioritize encoding without consequence?

    PubMed

    Bui, Dung C; Friedman, Michael C; McDonough, Ian M; Castel, Alan D

    2013-10-01

    Given the large amount of information that we encounter, we often must prioritize what information we attempt to remember. Although critical for everyday functioning, relatively little research has focused on how people prioritize the encoding of information. Recent research has shown that people can and do selectively remember information assigned with higher, relative to lower, importance. However, the mechanisms underlying this prioritization process and the consequences of these processes are still not well understood. In the present study, we sought to better understand these prioritization processes and whether implementing these processes comes at the cost of memory accuracy, by increasing false memories. We used a modified form of the Deese/Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, in which participants studied DRM lists, with each list paired with low, medium, or high point values. In Experiment 1, encoding higher values led to more false memories than did encoding lower values, possibly because prioritizing information enhanced relational processing among high-value words. In Experiment 2, disrupting relational processing selectively reduced false memories for high-value words. Finally, in Experiment 3, facilitating relational processing selectively increased false memories for low-value words. These findings suggest that while prioritizing information can enhance true memory, this process concomitantly increases false memories. Furthermore, the mechanism underlying these prioritization processes depends on the ability to successfully engage in relational processing. Thus, how we prioritize the encoding of incoming information can come at a cost in terms of accurate memory. PMID:23576217

  19. The psychodynamics of patients with false memory syndrome (FMS).

    PubMed

    Gardner, Richard A

    2004-01-01

    The False Memory Syndrome (FMS) diagnosis was very much in vogue from the late 1980s to the mid-1990s. It was an outgrowth of the belief held by many therapists that childhood sexual abuse was one of the most common causes of all forms of psychopathology. Although no longer in-vogue, the diagnosis is more recently being used for people who are falsely claiming that they were sexually abused by their priests. As was true in the earlier era, there were indeed many people who were sexually abused in childhood, but there were also many who were not and actually came to believe that they were, especially under the influence of therapists conducting "repressed memory therapy." Similarly, sexual abuse by priests has been a widespread phenomenon. Yet, there are still false accusers who are being led to believe by their overzealous therapists that they were indeed abused. As a psychoanalyst who has been asked to do forensic evaluations in many of these cases, I automatically ask myself questions about the psychodynamics of such falsely accusing patients. Here I describe those psychodynamic factors that I believe were operative in FMS cases, factors which in some cases apply to false sex abuse accusation against priests. Accordingly, this article is not simply of historical interest, but is still relevant and timely. PMID:15132191

  20. Deficient cognitive control fuels children's exuberant false allegations.

    PubMed

    Poole, Debra Ann; Dickinson, Jason J; Brubacher, Sonja P; Liberty, Allison E; Kaake, Amanda M

    2014-02-01

    In eyewitness studies as in actual investigations, a minority of children generate numerous false (and sometimes incredulous) allegations. To explore the characteristics of these children, we reinterviewed and administered a battery of tasks to 61 children (ages 4-9 years) who had previously participated in an eyewitness study where a man broke a "germ rule" twice when he tried to touch them. Performance on utilization, response conflict (Luria tapping), and theory of mind tasks predicted the number of false reports of touching (with age and time since the event controlled) and correctly classified 90.16% of the children as typical witnesses or exuberant (more than 3) false reporters. Results of a factor analysis pointed to a common process underlying performance on these tasks that accounted for 49% of the variability in false reports. Relations between task performance and testimony confirmed that the mechanisms underlying occasional intrusions are different from those that drive persistent confabulation and that deficient cognitive control fuels young children's exuberant false reports. PMID:24157217