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Sample records for application au formaldehyde

  1. Formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Pontén, Ann; Bruze, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is the American Contact Dermatitis Society Contact Allergen of the Year for 2015. The exposure is widespread, and contact allergy might be difficult to suspect in the individual dermatitis patient. The relevance of contact allergy to formaldehyde might also be difficult to evaluate. Recently, however, several studies have been performed aimed at enhancing the patch test technique and evaluating the clinical relevance of contact allergy to formaldehyde. The patch test concentration of formaldehyde has been recommended by the European Environmental Contact Dermatitis Research Group to be 2.0%, that is, the dose of 0.60 mg/cm (wt/vol) instead of 1.0%, which is the concentration previously used for the baseline series in most countries. Without causing any more irritant reactions, the patch test concentration of 2.0% detects twice as many contact allergies and enables the diagnosis of formaldehyde-allergic patients who otherwise would have been missed. The studies that underpin the decision were performed in Europe and partly in the United States. The Finn Chamber patch test system was used. The allergen dose per area was kept uniform with a micropipette. This report describes the background for routinely using formaldehyde 2.0% instead of 1.0% and for using a micropipette when applying the test solution. PMID:25581665

  2. Formaldehyde

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formaldehyde ; CASRN 50 - 00 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  3. The microcapsule-type formaldehyde scavenger: the preparation and the application in urea-formaldehyde adhesives.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongyun; Qiu, Teng; Guo, Longhai; Ye, Jun; Li, Xiaoyu

    2015-08-15

    The limitation and regulation of formaldehyde emissions (FE) now shows great importance in wood-based materials such as plywood and particle board manufactured for building and furnishing materials. The widely used formaldehyde-based adhesives are one of the main sources of FE from the wood products. In this work, a new kind of long-term effective formaldehyde scavenger in the microcapsule form was prepared by using an intra-liquid desiccation method. The characterizations of the capsule (UC) were performed including the morphologies, the yields, the loading efficiency as well as its sustained-release of urea in aqueous conditions. The prepared UC could be integrated in urea-formaldehyde resins by simply physical blending, and the mixtures were available to be applied as the adhesives for the manufacture of plywood. The bonding strength (BS) and the FE of the bonded plywood in both short (3h) and long (12 week) period were evaluated in detail. It was found that the FE profile of the plywood behaved following a duple exponential law within 12 week. The addition of UC in the adhesive can effectively depress the FE of the plywood not only in a short period after preparation but also in a long-term period during its practical application. The slow released urea would continuously suppress the emission of toxic formaldehyde in a sustained manner without obviously deteriorating on the BS of the adhesives. PMID:25855565

  4. A rapid formaldehyde assay using purpald reagent: application under periodation conditions.

    PubMed

    Quesenberry, M S; Lee, Y C

    1996-02-01

    Measurement of formaldehyde is encountered in a broad range of applications including the wine and alcohol industry and environmental pollution surveillance. In carbohydrate structural chemistry, frequent use is made of formaldehyde by periodate oxidation of terminal vicinal diols. Popular methods for the detection of formaldehyde use reagents such as chromotropic acid (4,5-dihydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulfonic acid) or acetylacetone. The chromotropic acid method requires heating of the sample under strongly acidic conditions, which is undesirable in many applications. The acetylacetone method yields a yellow color product, and is less specific and sensitive (Mimura et al., J. Hyg. Chem. 22, 39-41, 1976). The reaction of formaldehyde with Purpald (4-amino-3-hydrazino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole) works under alkaline conditions at room temperature, and the sensitivity is superior to other methods. The color development by this reagent, however, requires oxidation of the adduct with hydrogen peroxide, air oxygen, or dilute periodate. We found that low levels of periodate, commonly used to oxidize specifically terminal vicinal diols to yield formaldehyde, are compatible with color development with the Purpald reagent. We have investigated the conditions required for use of the Purpald reagent, especially in conjunction with periodate oxidation reactions. We have used the assay either in test tubes or with microplates, attaining sensitivity of as little as 1 nmol formaldehyde. PMID:8742081

  5. Thermodynamics of the formaldehyde-water and formaldehyde-ice systems for atmospheric applications.

    PubMed

    Barret, Manuel; Houdier, Stephan; Domine, Florent

    2011-01-27

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a species involved in numerous key atmospheric chemistry processes that can significantly impact the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Since gaseous HCHO is soluble in water, the water droplets of clouds and the ice crystals of snow exchange HCHO with the gas phase and the partitioning of HCHO between the air, water, and ice phases must be known to understand its chemistry. This study proposes thermodynamic formulations for the partitioning of HCHO between the gas phase and the ice and liquid water phases. A reanalysis of existing data on the vapor-liquid equilibrium has shown the inadequacy of the Henry's law formulation, and we instead propose the following equation to predict the mole fraction of HCHO in liquid water at equilibrium, X(HCHO,liq), as a function of the partial pressure P(HCHO) (Pa) and temperature T (K): X(HCHO,liq) = 1.700 × 10(-15) e((8014/T))(P(HCHO))(1.105). Given the paucity of data on the gas-ice equilibrium, the solubility of HCHO and the diffusion coefficient (D(HCHO)) in ice were measured by exposing large single ice crystals to low P(HCHO). Our recommended value for D(HCHO) over the temperature range 243-266 K is D(HCHO) = 6 × 10(-12) cm(2) s(-1). The solubility of HCHO in ice follows the relationship X(HCHO,ice) = 9.898 × 10(-13) e((4072/T))(P(HCHO))(0.803). Extrapolation of these data yields the P(HCHO) versus 1/T phase diagram for the H(2)O-HCHO system. The comparison of our results to existing data on the partitioning of HCHO between the snow and the atmosphere in the high arctic highlights the interplay between thermodynamic equilibrium and kinetics processes in natural systems. PMID:21171657

  6. Passive samplers for ambient ozone, formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide: Indoor, outdoor, and personal exposure applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, D.; Grosjean, E.

    1994-12-31

    Time-integrated measurements of air pollutants have many applications in the context of regulations pertaining to indoor air quality, outdoor (ambient) monitoring, and personal exposure assessment. For several years, the passive samplers developed at DGA have been applied to cost-effective measurements of parts per billion levels of ozone, formaldehyde and sulfur dioxide. Examples of applications will be described. These include (a) formaldehyde measurements in indoor settings including museums, public buildings and personal exposure; (b) ozone measurements indoor (museums, cultural heritage buildings) and outdoor (Class 1 Wilderness areas; air quality surveys in Europe, Canada and Latin America, long-term monitoring of ozone exposure in forests) and (c) surveys of ambient levels of sulfur dioxide in several eastern European countries.

  7. Synthesis of Fe3O4@phenol formaldehyde resin core-shell nanospheres loaded with Au nanoparticles as magnetic FRET nanoprobes for detection of thiols in living cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Xu, Qi-Zhi; Jin, Sheng-Yu; Zhao, Yang; Lu, Yang; Xu, Xue-Wei; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2012-01-23

    A magnetic, sensitive, and selective fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe for detection of thiols in living cells was designed and prepared. The FRET probe consists of an Fe(3)O(4) core, a green-luminescent phenol formaldehyde resin (PFR) shell, and Au nanoparticles (NPs) as FRET quenching agent on the surface of the PFR shell. The Fe(3)O(4) NPs were used as the core and coated with green-luminescent PFR nanoshells by a simple hydrothermal approach. Au NPs were then loaded onto the surface of the PFR shell by electric charge absorption between Fe(3)O(4)@PFR and Au NPs after modifying the Fe(3)O(4)@PFR nanocomposites with polymers to alter the charge of the PFR shell. Thus, a FRET probe can be designed on the basis of the quenching effect of Au NPs on the fluorescence of Fe(3)O(4)@PFR nanocomposites. This magnetic and sensitive FRET probe was used to detect three kinds of primary biological thiols (glutathione, homocysteine, and cysteine) in cells. Such a multifunctional fluorescent probe shows advantages of strong magnetism for sample separation, sensitive response for sample detection, and low toxicity without injury to cellular components. PMID:22190410

  8. Application of toxicogenomic profiling to evaluate effects of benzene and formaldehyde: from yeast to human

    PubMed Central

    McHale, Cliona M.; Smith, Martyn T.; Zhang, Luoping

    2014-01-01

    Genetic variation underlies a significant proportion of the individual variation in human susceptibility to toxicants. The primary current approaches to identify gene–environment (GxE) associations, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and candidate gene association studies, require large exposed and control populations and an understanding of toxicity genes and pathways, respectively. This limits their application in the study of GxE associations for the leukemogens benzene and formaldehyde, whose toxicity has long been a focus of our research. As an alternative approach, we applied innovative in vitro functional genomics testing systems, including unbiased functional screening assays in yeast and a near-haploid human bone marrow cell line (KBM7). Through comparative genomic and computational analyses of the resulting data, we have identified human genes and pathways that may modulate susceptibility to benzene and formaldehyde. We have validated the roles of several genes in mammalian cell models. In populations occupationally exposed to low levels of benzene, we applied peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptomics and chromosome-wide aneuploidy studies (CWAS) in lymphocytes. In this review of the literature, we describe our comprehensive toxicogenomic approach and the potential mechanisms of toxicity and susceptibility genes identified for benzene and formaldehyde, as well as related studies conducted by other researchers. PMID:24571325

  9. Raman spectra of methane, ethylene, ethane, dimethyl ether, formaldehyde and propane for combustion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnotti, G.; KC, U.; Varghese, P. L.; Barlow, R. S.

    2015-09-01

    Spontaneous Raman scattering measurements of temperature and major species concentration in hydrocarbon-air flames require detailed knowledge of the Raman spectra of the hydrocarbons present when fuels more complex than methane are used. Although hydrocarbon spectra have been extensively studied at room temperature, there are no data available at higher temperatures. Quantum mechanical calculations, when available are not sufficiently accurate for combustion applications. This work presents experimental measurements of spontaneous Stokes-Raman scattering spectra of methane, ethylene, ethane, dimethyl ether, formaldehyde and propane in the temperature range 300-860 K. Raman spectra from heated hydrocarbons jets have been collected with a higher resolution than is generally employed for Raman measurements in combustion applications. A set of synthetic spectra have been generated for each hydrocarbon, providing the basis for extrapolation to higher temperatures. The spectra provided here will enable simultaneous measurements of multiple hydrocarbons in flames. This capability will greatly extend the range of applicability of Raman measurements in combustion applications. In addition, the experimental spectra provide a validation dataset for quantum mechanical models.

  10. Synthesis, Characterization and Applications of New Nonmetallic Photocatalysts -- Resorcinol Formaldehyde Resin and Boron Carbon Oxynitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ting

    This thesis describes the synthesis, characterization and applications of two kinds of nonmetallic photocatalysts: resorcinol formaldehyde (RF) resin and boron carbon oxynitride (BCNO). Part I: Catalyst-free hydrothermal method was developed to synthesize RF resin. It started with a solution containing only resorcinol and formaldehyde. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (13C-NMR) spectrometer and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. The particle size (diameter: 100nm-4microm) of RF the spheres was controlled by changing the concentration of the reactants. With increasing particle size, visible light absorption of the product was also increased. These RF spheres could degrade Rhodamine B and generate OH radicals under visible light irradiation. Besides, highly concentrated starting reactants would form large macroporous gel instead of individual particles. This kind of gel could be easily shaped to dishes and tubes, which could be used in filtration and degradation of air pollutants. Part II: The BCNO was prepared by heating a mixture of boric acid, melamine and PEG in atmosphere. The optical properties of the products were measured by UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy with integrating sphere. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) patterns indicated that all BCNO compounds had the turbostratic boron nitride (t-BN) structure. Meanwhile, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) were used to determine the chemical composition of the catalyst. The BCNO could be identified as t-BN with N atoms partly substituted by O and C atoms. The degree of substitution affected its photocatalytic properties. Perdew--Burke--Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange model was introduced to simulate the density of state (DOS) of BCNO using these supercells. Simulation results indicated that C and O substitution induced occupied impurity states in the gap region which modified the band

  11. Fe/Au Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sra, Amandeep; Leslie-Pelecky, Diandra

    2009-10-01

    The physical properties of nanoparticles, including size, composition and surface chemistry, greatly influence biological and pharmacological properties and, ultimately, their clinical applications. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are widely used for applications such as MRI contrast agents, drug delivery via magnetic targeting and hyperthermia due to their chemical stability and biocompatibility; however, enhancing the saturation magnetization (Ms) of nanoparticles would produce greater sensitivity. Our design strategy involves a bottom-up wet chemistry approach to the synthesis of Fe nanoparticles. Specific advantages of Fe are the high value of Ms (210 emu/g in bulk) coupled with low toxicity; however, Fe nanoparticles must be protected from oxidation, which causes a dramatic reduction in Ms. To circumvent oxidation, Fe nanoparticles are coated with a Au shell that prevents the oxidation of the magnetic core and also provides the nanoparticles with plasmonic properties for optical stimulation. Ligands of various functionalities can be introduced through the well established Au-thiol surface chemistry for different biomedical applications while maintaining the magnetic functionality of the Fe core. In this presentation, we will discuss the physical, chemical and magnetic properties of our Fe/Au nanoparticles and their resistance to oxidation.

  12. Bright, NIR-emitting Au23 from Au25: characterization and applications including biolabeling.

    PubMed

    Muhammed, Madathumpady Abubaker Habeeb; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Pal, Samir Kumar; Kumar, R C Arun; Paul, Soumya; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai Vyomakesannair; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2009-10-01

    A novel interfacial route has been developed for the synthesis of a bright-red-emitting new subnanocluster, Au(23), by the core etching of a widely explored and more stable cluster, Au(25)SG(18) (in which SG is glutathione thiolate). A slight modification of this procedure results in the formation of two other known subnanoclusters, Au(22) and Au(33). Whereas Au(22) and Au(23) are water soluble and brightly fluorescent with quantum yields of 2.5 and 1.3 %, respectively, Au(33) is organic soluble and less fluorescent, with a quantum yield of 0.1 %. Au(23) exhibits quenching of fluorescence selectively in the presence of Cu(2+) ions and it can therefore be used as a metal-ion sensor. Aqueous- to organic-phase transfer of Au(23) has been carried out with fluorescence enhancement. Solvent dependency on the fluorescence of Au(23) before and after phase transfer has been studied extensively and the quantum yield of the cluster varies with the solvent used. The temperature response of Au(23) emission has been demonstrated. The inherent fluorescence of Au(23) was used for imaging human hepatoma cells by employing the avidin-biotin interaction. PMID:19711391

  13. 29 CFR 1915.1048 - Formaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Formaldehyde. 1915.1048 Section 1915.1048 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Formaldehyde. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  14. 29 CFR 1915.1048 - Formaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Formaldehyde. 1915.1048 Section 1915.1048 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Formaldehyde. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  15. 29 CFR 1915.1048 - Formaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Formaldehyde. 1915.1048 Section 1915.1048 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Formaldehyde. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  16. 29 CFR 1915.1048 - Formaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Formaldehyde. 1915.1048 Section 1915.1048 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Formaldehyde. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.1048 - Formaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Formaldehyde. 1915.1048 Section 1915.1048 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED... Formaldehyde. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under this section are identical...

  18. New formaldehyde base disinfectants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, R.; Lindell, K. F.

    1973-01-01

    Preparations of formaldehyde in various organic liquids - ethylene glycol, glycerol, and propylene glycol - serve as effective disinfectants towards microbial vegetative cells and spores. This disinfection is a temperature-dependent process and is manifest when these formaldehyde base disinfectants are dissolved in water. The irritating vapors associated with formaldehyde disinfection are not present in either of these new formaldehyde base disinfectants or in aqueous solutions of them.

  19. A method for treating wastewater containing formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Hesham R; Rashed, I G

    2002-02-01

    Many industrial activities utilise formaldehyde as a key chemical in organic synthesis including: synthesis of special chemicals such as pentaerythritol and ethylene glycol, synthetic resins, paper products, medicinal products and drugs and others, too numerous to mention. Therefore, effluents arising from these applications may contain significant amounts of formaldehyde. In a biodegradation experiments of a wastewater sample containing formaldehyde ranging from 31.5 to 125 mg/l, residual formalin (a solution of formaldehyde gas in water) ranging from 40% to 85%, respectively, was found at the end of the run (16 d) showing the inhibition effect of formalin which increased with the increase in formalin concentration. The biodegradation of formalin decreased significantly at concentrations higher than 300 mg/l. A method to convert formaldehyde to an easily biodegradable substance is herein described. In the commercial manufacture of resins from phenol and formalin the reaction is never completely quantitative. As a result during the dehydration stage phenol and formalin are distilled from the wastewater. Phenol is toxic to several biochemical reactions. However, biological transformation of phenol to a non-toxic entity is possible through specialized microbes. Transformation of phenol is inhibited by the presence of formaldehyde. Biotransformation of phenol in a wastewater containing high concentrations of formaldehyde started shortly after treating the wastewater with calculated amounts of sodium sulphite. Sodium sulphite is believed to react with formaldehyde forming sodium formaldehyde bisulphite, which is not only non-toxic to microorganisms but also a biodegradable substance. From the DO measurements before and after the addition of sodium sulphite, the authors noticed that the dissolved oxygen in a wastewater containing formaldehyde is not affected by the addition of the calculated amount of sodium sulphite, which is just enough to consume the measured amount

  20. Shape-controlled synthesis of Au-Pd bimetallic nanocrystals for catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Gong, Jinlong

    2016-07-21

    Au-Pd nanostructured materials have been recognized as important heterogeneous catalysts in various reactions, due to their superior activities caused by the ensemble and ligand effects. In recent years, shape-controlled synthesis of noble metal nanocrystals (NCs) provided a brand-new insight for improving the performance of catalysts. The electronic properties and catalytic activities of Au-Pd NCs could be optimized by tuning their shape and composition engineering. This review describes recent progress in the design and synthesis of shape-controlled Au-Pd bimetallic NCs and their emerging catalytic applications. The review starts with a general discussion of various applications of Au-Pd catalysts and the significance of preparing shape-controlled Au-Pd NCs, followed by an overview of synthetic strategies for two different structures of Au-Pd bimetallic catalysts: a core-shell structure and an alloy structure. We also put forward the key factors for the preparation of Au-Pd core-shell and alloy structures. Additionally, we discussed the unique optical properties and structural effects of shape-controlled Au-Pd NCs. These recent advancements in the methodology development of Au-Pd bimetallic NCs offer numerous insights for generating Au-Pd NCs with a number of unique geometries in the future. Furthermore, the systematic synthesis of core-shell or alloy structures would provide insights for the preparation of other bimetallic NCs. PMID:27095006

  1. The characteristics of Au:VO2 nanocomposite thin film for photo-electricity applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yabin; Na, Jie; He, Fan; Zhou, Yueliang

    2013-08-01

    Au nanoparticles have been fabricated on normal glass substrates using nanosphere lithography (NSL) method. Vanadium dioxide has been deposited on Au/glass by reactive radio frequency (rf) magnetron sputtering. The structure and composition were determined by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. Electrical and optical properties of bare VO2 and Au:VO2 nanocomposite thin films were measured. Typical hysteresis behavior and sharp phase transition were observed. Nanopartical Au could effectively reduce the transition temperature to 40 °C. The transmittance spectrum for both Au:VO2 nanocomposite thin film shows high transmittance under transition temperature and low transmittance above transition temperature. The characteristics present the Au:VO2 nanocomposite thin film can be used for applications, such as “smart window” or “laser protector”.

  2. Thermal stability of Mo/Au bilayers for TES applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Borderías, María; Fernández-Martínez, Iván; Fàbrega, Lourdes; Camón, Agustín; Gil, Oscar; González-Arrabal, Raquel; Sesé, Javier; Costa-Krämer, José Luis; Warot-Fonrose, Bénédicte; Serin, Virginie; Briones, Fernando

    2012-09-01

    Mo/Au bilayers are among the most suitable materials to be used as transition-edge sensors (TES) in cryogenic microcalorimeters and bolometers, developed, among other fields, for space missions. For this purpose the thermal stability of TES at temperatures below 150 °C is a critical issue. We report on the dependence of functional properties (superconducting critical temperature, residual resistance and α) as well as on microstructure, chemical composition and interface quality for optimized high quality Mo/Au bilayers on annealing temperature and time. Data show that the functional properties of the bilayers remain stable at T < 150 °C, but changes in microstructure, interface quality and functional properties were observed for layers heated at T ≥ 200 °C. Microstructural and chemical composition data suggest that the measured changes in residual resistance ratio (RRR) and TC at T ≥ 200 °C are mainly due to an increase in the average Au grain size and to Au migration along the Mo grain boundaries at the Au/Mo interface. A way to stabilize the functional properties of the Mo/Au bilayers against temperature enhancements is proposed.

  3. Formaldehyde risk assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We would like to comment on the paper by Crump et al. (2008), ‘Sensitivity analysis of biologically motivated model for formaldehyde-induced respiratory cancer in humans’. We are authors of the formaldehyde cancer risk assessment described in Conolly et al. (2003, 2004) that is t...

  4. Optical Detection of Formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patty, Kira D.; Gregory, Don A.

    2008-01-01

    The potential for buildup .of formaldehyde in closed space environments poses a direct health hazard to personnel. The National Aeronautic Space Agency (NASA) has established a maximum permitted concentration of 0.04 ppm for 7 to 180 days for all space craft. Early detection is critical to ensure that formaldehyde levels do not accumulate. above these limits. New sensor technologies are needed to enable real time,in situ detection in a compact and reusable form factor. Addressing this need,research into the use of reactive fluorescent dyes which reversibly bind to formaldehyde (liquid or gas) has been conducted to support the development of a formaldehyde.sensor. In the presence of formaldehyde the dyes' characteristic fluorescence peaks shift providing the basis for an optical detection. Dye responses to formaldehyde exposure were characterized; demonstrating the optical detection of formaldehyde in under 10 seconds and down to concentrations of 0.5 ppm. To .incorporate the dye .in.an optical sensor device requires. a means of containing and manipulating the dye. Multiple form factors using two dissimilar sbstrates were considered to determine a suitable configuration. A prototype sensor was demonstrated and considerations for a field able sensor were presented. This research provides a necessary first step toward the development of a compact, reusable; real time optical formaldehyde sensor suitable for use in the U.S. space program,

  5. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard Walter

    1992-01-01

    Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepa from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porsity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity.

  6. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1992-01-14

    Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepared from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porosity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity. 3 figs.

  7. Formaldehyde in Our Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojanlatva, Ansa; Weeks, Charlie A.

    During the energy crisis of the early 1970s, there was a drive to conserve energy in every segment of society. Citizens were encouraged to insulate their homes and tighten them up to avoid loss of energy. One of the products to emerge from this crisis was urea formaldehyde foam insulation. (Urea formaldehyde is a well-known agent for preserving…

  8. The formaldehyde dilemma.

    PubMed

    Salthammer, Tunga

    2015-06-01

    The IARC's 2004 classification of formaldehyde as a human carcinogen has led to intensive discussion on scientific and regulatory levels. In June 2014, the European Union followed and classified formaldehyde as a cause of cancer. This automatically triggers consequences in terms of emission minimization and the health-related assessment of building and consumer products. On the other hand, authorities are demanding and authorizing technologies and products which can release significant quantities of formaldehyde into the atmosphere. In the outdoor environment, this particularly applies to combusting fuels. The formation of formaldehyde through photochemical smog has also been a recognized problem for years. Indoors there are various processes which can contribute to increased formaldehyde concentrations. Overall, legislation faces a dilemma: primary sources are often over-regulated while a lack of consideration of secondary sources negates the regulations' effects. PMID:25772784

  9. Microbial Formaldehyde Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy J. Donohue

    2004-12-09

    This project analyzed how cells sense and generate energy from formaldehyde oxidation. Formaldehyde is a toxin that is produced naturally, chemically or by metabolism of a wide variety of methyl-containing compounds. Our goals are to identify how cells sense the presence of this toxic compound and determine how they generate energy and nutrients from the oxidation of formaldehyde. This research capitalizes on the role of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides glutathione dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (GSH FDH) in a formaldehyde oxidation pathway that is apparently found in a wide variety of microbes, plants and animals. Thus, our findings illustrate what is required for a large variety of cells to metabolize this toxic compound. A second major focus of our research is to determine how cells sense the presence of this toxic compound and control the expression of gene products required for its detoxification.

  10. Formaldehyde and skin tumorigenesis in Sencar mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, O.H.

    1988-01-01

    Previous experiments involving topical applications of formaldehyde on hairless mouse skin were repeated with SENCAR mice, which are bred for maximum sensitivity to chemical tumorigenesis. Most experimental groups consisted of 32 mice. Topical skin applications of either 100 ..mu..l acetone of about 200 ..mu..l 4% formaldehyde in water twice weekly, resulted in two tumor-bearing animals, each with one small, benign papilloma. A group of 96 mice, treated once with 51.2 ..mu..g DMBA in acetone, developed a total of 107 tumors in 40 tumor-bearing animals. Thus, DMBA is a strong, complete tumorigen also in SENCAR mice. Animals given 51.2 ..mu..g DMBA first and then treated twice weekly with 1% formaldehyde developed a total of 30 tumors in 8 tumor-bearing animals, whereas mice given 51.2 ..mu..g DMBA first, followed by twice weekly treatment with 4% formaldehyde, developed 51 tumors in 15 animals. When two widely accepted, statistical methods were used, there was no significant difference between the groups treated once with DMBA alone and that treated once with DMBA followed by 4% formaldehyde. The results in SENCAR mice confirm that formaldehyde has no skin tumorigenic or carcinogenic potency of its own. It seems doubtful whether it may act as a very weak enhancer of DMBA-induced tumorigenesis, but it has no significant influence on DMBA-induced carcinogenesis.

  11. Effect of Au nanorods on potential barrier modulation in morphologically controlled Au@Cu2O core-shell nanoreactors for gas sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Sanjit Manohar; Rai, Prabhakar; Raj, Sudarsan; Chon, Bum-Soo; Park, Kyung-Kuen; Yu, Yeon-Tae

    2014-05-28

    In this work, Au@Cu2O core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by simple solution route and applied for CO sensing applications. Au@Cu2O core-shell NPs were formed by the deposition of 30-60 nm Cu2O shell layer on Au nanorods (NRs) having 10-15 nm width and 40-60 nm length. The morphology of Au@Cu2O core-shell NPs was tuned from brick to spherical shape by tuning the pH of the solution. In the absence of Au NRs, cubelike Cu2O NPs having ∼200 nm diameters were formed. The sensor having Au@Cu2O core-shell layer exhibited higher CO sensitivity compared to bare Cu2O NPs layer. Tuning of morphology of Au@Cu2O core-shell NPs from brick to spherical shape significantly lowered the air resistance. Transition from p- to n-type response was observed for all devices below 150 °C. It was demonstrated that performance of sensor depends not only on the electronic sensitization of Au NRs but also on the morphology of the Au@Cu2O core-shell NPs. PMID:24779525

  12. A general analytical model for formaldehyde and VOC emission/sorption in single-layer building materials and its application in determining the characteristic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jianyin; Liu, Cong; Zhang, Yinping

    2012-02-01

    A general analytical model for characterizing emission and sorption of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in single-layer building materials is developed. Compared with traditional models, the present model can be applicable for four kinds of typical physical processes, i.e., emission in ventilated and airtight chambers, and sorption in these two types of chambers. Based on the general analytical model, a novel method is proposed to determine the characteristic parameters (the diffusion coefficient, Dm, and the material/air partition coefficient, K) of formaldehyde and VOC sorption in ventilated and airtight chambers. It establishes a linear relationship between the logarithm of dimensionless excess concentration and sorption time, and the Dm and K can be conveniently obtained from the slope and intercept of the regression line. The results of applying the present model are compared with the experimental data in the literature. The good agreement between them not only validates the model but also demonstrates that the measured characteristic parameters are accurate and reliable. The general analytical model should prove useful for unified characterization and prediction of emission/sorption in building materials as well as for parameter measurement.

  13. Enzymatic deposition of Au nanoparticles on the designed electrode surface and its application in glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongfang; Liu, Ruixiao; Sheng, Qinglin; Zheng, Jianbin

    2011-02-01

    This paper reported the enzymatic deposition of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the designed 3-mercapto-propionic acid/glucose oxidase/chitosan (MPA/GOD/Chit) modified glassy carbon electrode and its application in glucose detection. Chit served as GOD immobilization matrix and interacted with MPA through electrostatic attraction. AuNPs, without nano-seeds presented on the electrode surface, was produced through the glucose oxidase catalyzed oxidation of glucose. The mechanism of production of AuNPs was confirmed to be that enzymatic reaction products H(2)O(2) in the solution reduce gold complex to AuNPs. The characterizations of the electrode modified after each assembly step was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy showed the average particle size of the AuNPs is 40nm with a narrow particle size distribution. The content of AuNPs on the electrode surfaces was measured by differential pulse stripping voltammetry. The electrochemical signals on voltammogram showed a linear increase with the glucose concentration in the range of 0.010-0.12mM with a detection limit of 4μM. This provided a method to the determination of glucose. PMID:21115279

  14. Highly selective ratiometric fluorescent probe for Au3+ and its application to bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Young; Kim, Gun-Hee; Guo, Zhiqian; Lee, Hye Yeon; Swamy, K M K; Pai, Jaeyoung; Shin, Seunghoon; Shin, Injae; Yoon, Juyoung

    2013-11-15

    The 4-propargylamino-1,8-naphthalimide based fluorescent probe 1 has been explored as a sensor for selective detection of Au(3+). 4-Amino-1,8-naphthalimides, that possess typical intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) electronic characteristics, have been widely used as versatile platforms for fluorescent probes. The newly designed probe 1 contains a propargylamine moiety at C-4 of the naphthalimide chromophore that reacts with Au(3+) to generate a product that has distinctly different electronic properties from 1. Specifically, the probe undergoes a remarkable change in its absorption spectrum upon addition of Au(3+) that is associated with a distinct color change from yellow to light pink. In addition, a blue shift of ca. 56 nm also takes place in the emission spectra of the probe. Consequently, 1 serves as a reaction-based sensor or so called chemodosimeter for Au(3+). Importantly, surfactants enhance the rate of reaction of 1 with Au(3+), thus, enhancing its use as a real time sensor. Finally, the results of studies probing its application to bioimaging of Au(3+) in live cells show that the probe 1 has a unique ability to sense Au(3+) in cells and, in particular, in lipid droplets within cells. PMID:23810913

  15. Synthesis and biosensor application of Ag@Au bimetallic nanoparticles based on localized surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodselahi, T.; Arsalani, S.; Neishaboorynejad, T.

    2014-05-01

    This work demonstrates a simple method for synthesizing gold-silver bimetallic nanoparticles (Ag@Au BNPs). Ag@Au BNPs on the carbon thin film are prepared by co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-PECVD using acetylene gas and gold-silver target. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that Au and Ag NPs with FCC crystal structure are formed in our samples. From AFM image and data, average particles size of gold and silver are estimated to be about 5 and 8 nm, respectively. XRD profile and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy indicate that Ag NPs in Ag@Au BNPs composite have a more chemical activity with respect to bare Ag NPs. Biosensor application of Ag@Au BNPs without probe immobilization is introduced too. The change in LSPR absorption peak of Ag@Au BNPs in presence of DNA primer decamer (ten-deoxycytosine) at fM concentrations is investigated. The LSPR absorption peak of Au NPs has a blue shift and the LSPR absorption peak of Ag NPs has a red shift by addition of DNA primer and under DNA exposure up to 1 h. Our sample shows a good response to low concentration of DNA and has a short response time. Both of these are prerequisite for applying this sample as LSPR biosensor chip.

  16. Microfabricated Formaldehyde Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Flueckiger, Jonas; Ko, Frank K.; Cheung, Karen C.

    2009-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a volatile organic compound that is widely used in textiles, paper, wood composites, and household materials. Formaldehyde will continuously outgas from manufactured wood products such as furniture, with adverse health effects resulting from prolonged low-level exposure. New, microfabricated sensors for formaldehyde have been developed to meet the need for portable, low-power gas detection. This paper reviews recent work including silicon microhotplates for metal oxide-based detection, enzyme-based electrochemical sensors, and nanowire-based sensors. This paper also investigates the promise of polymer-based sensors for low-temperature, low-power operation. PMID:22291561

  17. Application of Cryopreserved Fibroblast Culture with Au Nanoparticles to Treat Burns.

    PubMed

    Volkova, Nataliia; Yukhta, Mariia; Pavlovich, Olena; Goltsev, Anatoliy

    2016-12-01

    The aim was to investigate a possibility of using the cryopreserved human culture of fibroblasts (CrHFC) with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to treat experimental burns in rats.The third-degree burns were modeled in white male rats. All the animals with burns were divided into three experimental groups: control group with no wound treatment; group 1 was composed of animals with CrHFC application; and group 2 consisted of those with CrHFC and AuNPs (6 μg/ml) application to a burn surface the next day after the injury. The CrHFC was applied to the methylcellulose gel in a dose of 5 × 10(4) of viable cells per 1 cm(2) of the burn. The animals were removed from the experiment on day 21 after the treatment.The CrHFC use alone and with AuNPs to the surface of burns stimulated the wound healing compared with the control. The effect of using CrHFC was less pronounced compared to the CrHFC application with AuNPs. It was reflected in a slower recovery of burns and moderate lymphocytic infiltration of granulation tissue. Immunofluorescent analysis emphasized that the use of CrHFC with AuNPs accelerated the skin synthetic processes and was helpful in recovering type I and III collagen content on day 21 after therapy.The results were likely related primarily to the unique structure and antimicrobial properties of AuNPs. Our experimental study of the effect of CrHFC with AuNPs application on regenerative processes in burns gives some pre-conditions to the following advanced bio- and nanotechnology developments. PMID:26762263

  18. Virus-templated Au and Au/Pt Core/shell Nanowires and Their Electrocatalytic Activitives for Fuel Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    LEE, YOUJIN; KIM, JUNHYUNG; YUN, DONG SOO; NAM, YOON SUNG; SHAO-HORN, YANG; BELCHER, ANGELA M.

    2014-01-01

    A facile synthetic route was developed to make Au nanowires (NWs) from surfactant-mediated bio-mineralization of a genetically engineered M13 phage with specific Au binding peptides. From the selective interaction between Au binding M13 phage and Au ions in aqueous solution, Au NWs with uniform diameter were synthesized at room temperature with yields greater than 98 % without the need for size selection. The diameters of Au NWs were controlled from 10 nm to 50 nm. The Au NWs were found to be active for electrocatalytic oxidation of CO molecules for all sizes, where the activity was highly dependent on the surface facets of Au NWs. This low-temperature high yield method of preparing Au NWs was further extended to the synthesis of Au/Pt core/shell NWs with controlled coverage of Pt shell layers. Electro-catalytic studies of ethanol oxidation with different Pt loading showed enhanced activity relative to a commercial supported Pt catalyst, indicative of the dual functionality of Pt for the ethanol oxidation and Au for the anti-poisoning component of Pt. These new one-dimensional noble metal NWs with controlled compositions could facilitate the design of new alloy materials with tunable properties. PMID:24910712

  19. Effect of natural compounds on reducing formaldehyde emission from plywood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Shigehisa; Matsushima, Erica; Kitao, Nahoko; Tokunaga, Hiroshi; Ando, Masanori; Otsubo, Yasufumi

    The effects of natural compounds on reducing formaldehyde emission from plywood were investigated. Urea, catechin and vanillin were examined as the natural formaldehyde reducers. The microemission cell, with an internal volume of 35 ml, the maximum exposed test surface area of 177 cm 2 and an air purge flow rate of 50 ml min -1, was used to measure specific emission rate (SER). In the case of no reducer treatment, formaldehyde emission from plywood was fast and SERs were 4.4 mg m -2 h -1 at 30 °C and 15 mg m -2 h -1 at 60 °C. When this plywood was treated with the natural compounds, the SERs of formaldehyde were decreased at all temperatures. In the case of urea treatment, the SERs of formaldehyde decreased to 0.30 mg m -2 h -1 at 30 °C and 0.65 mg m -2 h -1 at 60 °C. When the urea treatment was applied to the inside of kitchen cabinet (made from plywood; 270 cm wide, 60 cm deep, 250 cm high), the concentration of formaldehyde was reduced substantially from 1600 to 130 μg m -3. The reducing effect of formaldehyde continued during the observation period (6 months), with a mean concentration of 100 μg m -3. Reducers in the plywood would react with released formaldehyde. Application of natural compounds such as urea, catechin and vanillin could provide a simple and effective approach for suppressing formaldehyde emission from plywood.

  20. Development of melamine-formaldehyde resin microcapsules with low formaldehyde emission suited for seed treatment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huizhu; Li, Guangxing; Yang, Lijuan; Yan, Xiaojing; Yang, Daibin

    2015-04-01

    To reduce the application frequency and improve the efficacy of insecticides, melamine-formaldehyde (MF) resin microcapsules suited for seed treatment containing a mixture of fipronil and chlorpyrifos were prepared by in situ polymerization. A formaldehyde/melamine molar ratio of 4:1 yielded microcapsules with the smallest size and the most narrow size distribution. The level of unreacted formaldehyde in the microcapsule suspension increased proportionally with the F/M molar ratio. When the MF resin microcapsule suspension was used as a seed treatment to coat peanut seeds, the unreacted formaldehyde did not significantly inhibit the seedling emergence, but the ongoing release of formaldehyde generated from the degradation of MF resins played an important role in inhibiting emergence. Melamine was shown to be an effective formaldehyde scavenger that mitigated this inhibition when it was incorporated within the microcapsule wall. Field experiments showed that MF-resin-encapsulated mixtures of fipronil and chlorpyrifos have much greater efficacies against white grubs than the conventional formulation. PMID:25734968

  1. Au dotted magnetic network nanostructure and its application for on-site monitoring femtomolar level pesticide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianxi; Guo, Xiaoyu; Wang, Hui; Fu, Shuyue; Yu, Jie; Wen, Ying; Yang, Haifeng

    2014-04-01

    A novel magnetically responsive and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) active nanocomposite is designed and prepared by direct grafting of Au nanoparticles onto the surface of magnetic network nanostructure (MNN) with the help of a nontoxic and environmentally friendly reagent of inositol hexakisphosphate shortly named as IP6. The presence of IP6 as a stabilizer and a bridging agent could weave Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) into magnetic network nanostructure, which is easily dotted with Au nanoparticles (Au NPs). It has been shown firstly that the huge Raman enhancement of Au-MNN is reached by an external magnetic collection. Au-MNN presenting the large surface and high detection sensitivity enables it to exhibit multifunctional applications involving sufficient adsorption of dissolved chemical species for enrichment, separation, as well as a Raman amplifier for the analysis of trace pesticide residues at femtomolar level by a portable Raman spectrometer. Therefore, such multifunctional nanocomposites can be developed as a smart and promising nanosystem that integrates SERS approach with an easy assay for concentration by an external magnet for the effective on-site assessments of agricultural and environmental safety. PMID:24130070

  2. [Allergic contact dermatitis caused by formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasers].

    PubMed

    Latorre, N; Silvestre, J F; Monteagudo, A F

    2011-03-01

    Formaldehyde is a colorless gas with a pungent odor that is widely used as a preservative in toiletries and cosmetics and in products for household and industrial use. Both formaldehyde itself and substances that can release it are a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis. This condition often becomes chronic, given that these allergens are found nearly everywhere and it is difficult for patients to avoid them completely. This article reviews the sources of exposure to formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasers and the clinical manifestations of allergen exposure. We also review current debates and recent developments and propose guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with formaldehyde contact dermatitis. PMID:21338980

  3. Formaldehyde: an analysis of its respiratory, cutaneous, and immunologic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bardana, E.J. Jr.; Montanaro, A. )

    1991-06-01

    Formaldehyde is truly ubiquitous in our ecology and continuing important commercial applications. Most of us have daily contact with this chemical. The most significant outdoor source of this chemical is gasoline and diesel fuel combustion. The primary indoor source is combustion of tobacco products. Formaldehyde is associated with a disagreeable odor that can produce annoyance symptoms and at higher concentrations can be a transient and completely reversible irritant to the eyes and mucous membranes of the respiratory tract. It is so soluble and rapidly metabolized that it rarely reaches the lower respiratory tract to inflict damage. The exception is in cigarette smokers who actively inhale. Formaldehyde may on rare occasions induce bronchial asthma at relatively high exposure doses. There are no conclusive studies that prove the development of de novo IgE-mediated respiratory tract symptoms secondary to inhalation of formaldehyde vapors. The approach to formaldehyde-induced symptoms should be one of careful documentation of objective physiologic changes.147 references.

  4. Formaldehyde: an analysis of its respiratory, cutaneous, and immunologic effects.

    PubMed

    Bardana, E J; Montanaro, A

    1991-06-01

    Formaldehyde is truly ubiquitous in our ecology and continuing important commercial applications. Most of us have daily contact with this chemical. The most significant outdoor source of this chemical is gasoline and diesel fuel combustion. The primary indoor source is combustion of tobacco products. Formaldehyde is associated with a disagreeable odor that can produce "annoyance" symptoms and at higher concentrations can be a transient and completely reversible irritant to the eyes and mucous membranes of the respiratory tract. It is so soluble and rapidly metabolized that it rarely reaches the lower respiratory tract to inflict damage. The exception is in cigarette smokers who actively inhale. Formaldehyde may on rare occasions induce bronchial asthma at relatively high exposure doses. There are no conclusive studies that prove the development of de novo IgE-mediated respiratory tract symptoms secondary to inhalation of formaldehyde vapors. The approach to formaldehyde-induced symptoms should be one of careful documentation of objective physiologic changes. PMID:2048760

  5. Air Mass Factor Formulation for Spectroscopic Measurements from Satellites: Application to Formaldehyde Retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Paul I.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Chance, Kelly; Martin, Randall V.; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Bey, Isabelle; Yantosca, Robert; Fiore, Arlene; Li, Qinbin

    2004-01-01

    We present a new formulation for the air mass factor (AMF) to convert slant column measurements of optically thin atmospheric species from space into total vertical columns. Because of atmospheric scattering, the AMF depends on the vertical distribution of the species. We formulate the AMF as the integral of the relative vertical distribution (shape factor) of the species over the depth of the atmosphere, weighted by altitude-dependent coefficients (scattering weights) computed independently from a radiative transfer model. The scattering weights are readily tabulated, and one can then obtain the AMF for any observation scene by using shape factors from a three dimensional (3-D) atmospheric chemistry model for the period of observation. This approach subsequently allows objective evaluation of the 3-D model with the observed vertical columns, since the shape factor and the vertical column in the model represent two independent pieces of information. We demonstrate the AMF method by using slant column measurements of formaldehyde at 346 nm from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment satellite instrument over North America during July 1996. Shape factors are cumputed with the Global Earth Observing System CHEMistry (GEOS-CHEM) global 3-D model and are checked for consistency with the few available aircraft measurements. Scattering weights increase by an order of magnitude from the surface to the upper troposphere. The AMFs are typically 20-40% less over continents than over the oceans and are approximately half the values calculated in the absence of scattering. Model-induced errors in the AMF are estimated to be approximately 10%. The GEOS-CHEM model captures 50% and 60% of the variances in the observed slant and vertical columns, respectively. Comparison of the simulated and observed vertical columns allows assessment of model bias.

  6. Green synthesis and applications of Au-Ag bimetallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena Kumari, M.; Jacob, John; Philip, Daizy

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports for the first time the synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles at room temperature using the fruit juice of pomegranate. Simultaneous reduction of gold and silver ions in different molar ratios leads to the formation of alloy as well as core-shell nanostructures. The nanoparticles have been characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The synthesized alloy particles are used as catalysts in the reduction of 2-, 3-, 4-nitrophenols to the corresponding amines and in the degradation of methyl orange. The reduction kinetics for all the reactions follows pseudo-first order. The rate constants follow the order k4-nitrophenol < k2-nitrophenol < k3-nitrophenol. Thermal conductivity is measured as a function of volume fraction and it is observed that the incorporation of the alloy nanoparticles enhances the thermal conductivity of the base fluid (water) showing nanofluid application. The nitric oxide and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity shown by the nanoparticles promise the potential application in biomedical field.

  7. Green synthesis and applications of Au-Ag bimetallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Meena Kumari, M; Jacob, John; Philip, Daizy

    2015-02-25

    This paper reports for the first time the synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles at room temperature using the fruit juice of pomegranate. Simultaneous reduction of gold and silver ions in different molar ratios leads to the formation of alloy as well as core-shell nanostructures. The nanoparticles have been characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The synthesized alloy particles are used as catalysts in the reduction of 2-, 3-, 4-nitrophenols to the corresponding amines and in the degradation of methyl orange. The reduction kinetics for all the reactions follows pseudo-first order. The rate constants follow the order k4-nitrophenolapplication. The nitric oxide and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity shown by the nanoparticles promise the potential application in biomedical field. PMID:25218228

  8. Colloidal Au-enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging: application in a DNA hybridization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manera, M. G.; Spadavecchia, J.; Taurino, A.; Rella, R.

    2010-03-01

    The detection of the DNA hybridization mechanism using monodispersed gold nanoparticles as labels is an interesting alternative to increase the sensitivity of the SPR imaging technique. DNA-modified Au nanoparticles (DNA-Au NPs) containing single-stranded (ss) portions of DNA were prepared by monitoring their monolayer formation by UV-vis spectroscopy. The hybridization process between specific thio-oligonucleotides immobilized on the DNA-Au NPs and the corresponding complementary strands is reported and compared with the traditional hybridization process on properly self-assembled thin gold films deposited on glass substrates. A remarkable signal amplification is observed, following the incorporation of colloidal Au into a SPR biosensing experiment, resulting in an increased SPR response to DNA-DNA interactions. In particular Fusarium thiolated DNA (5'HS poly(T)15ATC CCT CAA AAA CTG CCG CT-3) and trichothecenes complementary DNA (5'-AGC GGC AGT TTT TGA GGG AT-3') sequences have been explored due to their possible application to agro-industry for the control of food quality.

  9. Large coincidence lattice on Au/Fe3O4 incommensurate structure for spintronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Noval, Alvaro; Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Salas-Colera, Eduardo; Serrano, Aida; Rubio-Marcos, Fernando; Castro, Germán R.

    2015-11-01

    The design of metallic hybrid systems for spintronics has been widely studied during the past decade, motivated by the promising technological applications of these materials. Nevertheless, the importance of preserving the native structure and properties of the interfaces is often ignored. Here, we present the fabrication of nanocrystalline Au (0 0 1) onto a single oriented Fe3O4 (0 0 1) thin film as a promising hybrid system to develop spintronic devices by growing Au over the Fe3O4 by using a simple one-pot Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) approach. The structural coupling between Au nanocrystals and Fe3O4 layer results in the development of an incommensurate structure based on a coincidence lattice of order 35, which preserves the intrinsic properties of the Au nanocrystals, the Fe3O4 matrix and the interface between them. The general strategy described in the present work preserves the structure and main intrinsic properties of the constituting materials, being a fundamental issue for the future development of spintronic devices.

  10. Au/(Ti-W) and Au/Cr metallization of chemically vapor-deposited diamond substrates for multichip module applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, Ilango; Malshe, A. P.; Naseem, H. A.; Brown, W. D.

    1994-12-01

    Since diamond obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has an extremely high thermal conductivity, it holds great promise in solving thermal management problems in high performance multichip modules (MCMs). Consequently, there is a need to develop a reliable metallization system for CVD diamond. Refractory metals such as Ti, Mo, Ta and W are known to form adhering carbide layers at high temperatures. Also, transition metals such as Cr, Ni and Ni-Cr are widely used in other MCM technologies involving Si, AlN, SiC and alumina substrates. In the work reported here, adherent Au/Cr and Au/(Ti-W) metallization systems were produced at low temperatures using d.c. magnetron sputtering and electron beam evaporation techniques. Adhesion at low temperature is essential since CVD diamond could lose its thermal and electrical properties at high temperatures. Furthermore, interaction between metal layers may cause an increase in conductor trace resistivity and delamination. Adhesion was measured using a Sebastian V-A thin film stud pull tester. The deposition parameters were optimized to give maximum adhesion using a statistical design software package, echip. In the case of the sputtered metallization, pre-sputter cleaning of diamond surface improved adhesion significantly. Values above 9 klbf/sq in were obtained in the case of Au/(Ti-W) and 11.8 klbf/sq in in the case of Au/Cr. Post-deposition annealing was performed in nitrogen ambient to investigate the effect of post-metallization processing on adhesion and also to test for any possible interaction between the metals at high temperatures. Annealing temperatures were limited to 450 C since MCM substrates are seldom exposed to temperatures higher than these. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis indicated outdiffusion of W through Au at 400 deg C. No interdiffusion was observed in the case of Au/Cr as per optical microscopy and EDS analysis. Auger electron spectroscopy results indicate interaction between the

  11. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  12. Synthesis, characterization and application of Au-198 nanoparticles as radiotracer for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Sunil; Pant, H J; Biswal, Jayashree; Samantray, J S; Sharma, V K; Dash, Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes synthesis and characterization of radioactive gold nanoparticles ((198)Au-NPs), and explores their utility as a radiotracer for tracing an aqueous phase in a continuous laboratory-scale bubble column at ambient conditions. The performance of the (198)Au-NPs as a radiotracer was compared with the results obtained with a conventional radiotracer i.e. bromine-82 ((82)Br) as ammonium bromide and found to be identical. A tank-in-series with backmixing model (TISBM) was used to simulate the RTDs of the aqueous phase and characterize flow in the bubble column. PMID:26897465

  13. Mo6S3I6-Au composites: synthesis, conductance, and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renyun; Hummelgård, Magnus; Dvorsek, Damjan; Mihailovic, Dragan; Olin, Håkan

    2010-08-15

    A single-step, premixing method was used to directly deposit gold nanoparticles on Mo(6)S(3)I(6) (MSI) molecular wire bundles. Gold nanoparticles with different sizes and densities were coated on the MSI by changing the concentration of the gold containing salt, HAuCl(4). TEM, SEM, and EDX characterization showed deposition of gold nanoparticles on the MSI nanowire surface. The electrical resistance of these MSI-Au composites was more than 100 times lower than that for pure MSI, and was mainly dependent on the density of the deposited gold nanoparticles. Furthermore, we immobilized thiol group-labeled oligonucleotide on the composites and then hybridized with a fully matched sequence. The resistance of the MSI-Au composites increased during the thiol step, while it decreased by hybridizing, due to the conductance difference between single- and double-stranded DNA chains. These results indicate that this new kind of MSI-Au composite could be used as a platform for different applications, including biosensors. PMID:20494366

  14. Ionic liquid functionalized graphene/Au nanocomposites and its application for electrochemical immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Chen, Xia; Ma, Zhanfang

    2013-10-15

    In this work, a new nanocomposite, which was composed of ionic liquid functionalized graphene sheet (IL-GS) loaded gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), was prepared. The IL-GS was directly synthesized by the electrochemical exfoliation of graphite in ionic liquid (IL). Due to the modification of the IL, IL-GS can not only be dispersed easily in aqueous solution to form a homogeneous colloidal suspension of individual sheet, but also exhibits an improved conductivity. Meanwhile, the loaded AuNPs on the nanocomposites can increase the specific surface area to capture a large amount of antibodies as well as improve the capability of electron transfer. The IL-GS-Au nanocomposites were successfully employed for the fabrication of a facile and sensitive electrochemical immunosensor. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was used as a model protein. The proposed immunosensor exhibits a wide linear detection range (LDR) from 1 fg mL⁻¹ to 100 ng mL⁻¹, and an ultralow limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1 fg mL⁻¹ (S/N=3). In addition, for the detection of clinical serum samples, it is well consistent with the data determined by the developed immunoassay and ELISA, indicating that the immunosensor provides a possible application for the detection of CEA in clinical diagnostics. PMID:23644143

  15. Ellagic Acid Directed Growth of Au-Pt Bimetallic Nanoparticles and Their Catalytic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnaby, Stacey N.; Sarker, Nazmul H.; Banerjee, Ipsita A.

    2013-02-01

    In this work, we report the facile formation of bimetallic nanoparticles of Au-Pt in the presence of the plant polyphenol ellagic acid (EA). It was found that EA formed micro-fibrillar assemblies, which aggregated into micro-bundles under aqueous conditions. Those micro-bundles acted as templates for the growth of Au nanoparticles, as well as bimetallic Au-Pt nanoparticles biomimetically. At higher concentrations of EA, it was observed that in addition to forming fibrous micro-bundles, columnar assemblies of EA were formed in the presence of the metal nanoparticles. The formation of the assemblies was found to be concentration dependent. It appears that upon binding to metal ions and subsequent formation of the nanoparticles, morphological changes occur in the case of EA assemblies. The morphological changes observed were probed by electron microscopy. Further, the ability of the materials to degrade the toxic aromatic nitro compound 2-methoxy-4-nitroaniline was explored, where 50% degradation was observed within 15 min, indicating that such hybrid materials may have potential applications in environmental remediation.

  16. Plasmonic effects of au/ag bimetallic multispiked nanoparticles for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manisha; Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Vinogradova, Ekaterina; Ayon, Arturo A

    2014-09-10

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the use of plasmons, that is, free electron oscillations in conductors, to boost the performance of both organic and inorganic thin film solar cells. This has been driven by the possibility of employing thin active layers in solar cells in order to reduce materials costs, and is enabled by significant advances in fabrication technology. The ability of surface plasmons in metallic nanostructures to guide and confine light in the nanometer scale has opened up new design possibilities for solar cell devices. Here, we report the synthesis and characterization of highly monodisperse, reasonably stable, multipode Au/Ag bimetallic nanostructures using an inorganic additive as a ligand for photovoltaic applications. A promising surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect has been observed for the synthesized bimetallic Au/Ag multispiked nanoparticles, which compare favorably well with their Au and Ag spherical nanoparticle counterparts. The synthesized plasmonic nanostructures were incorporated on the rear surface of an ultrathin planar c-silicon/organic polymer hybrid solar cell, and the overall effect on photovoltaic performance was investigated. A promising enhancement in solar cell performance parameters, including both the open circuit voltage (VOC) and short circuit current density (JSC), has been observed by employing the aforementioned bimetallic multispiked nanoparticles on the rear surface of solar cell devices. A power conversion efficiency (PCE) value as high as 7.70% has been measured in a hybrid device with Au/Ag multispiked nanoparticles on the rear surface of an ultrathin, crystalline silicon (c-Si) membrane (∼ 12 μm). This value compares well to the measured PCE value of 6.72% for a similar device without nanoparticles. The experimental observations support the hope for a sizable PCE increase, due to plasmon effects, in thin-film, c-Si solar cells in the near future. PMID:25137194

  17. Catalytic process for formaldehyde oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); D'Ambrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing formaldehyde to carbon dioxide and water without the addition of energy. A mixture of formaldehyde and an oxidizing agent (e.g., ambient air containing formaldehyde) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  18. Sporostatic and sporocidal properties of aqueous formaldehyde.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, R.; David, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    Aqueous formaldehyde is shown to exert both sporostatic and sporocidal effects on Bacillus subtilis spores. The sporostatic effect is a result of the reversible inhibition of spore germination occasioned by aqueous formaldehyde; the sporocidal effect is due to the temperature-dependent inactivation of these spores in aqueous formaldehyde. The physicochemical state of formaldehyde in solution provides a framework with which to interpret both the sporostatic and sporocidal properties of aqueous formaldehyde.

  19. Photoabsorption in formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, P. W.; Langhoff, S. R.; Corcoran, C. T.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the vertical electronic dipole excitation and ionization spectra in molecular formaldehyde are reported. The investigations relied on configuration-interaction calculations and moment-theory techniques. A double-zeta basis of contracted Gaussian-lobe functions supplemented with appropriate polarization and bond functions was used to construct Fock spectra in C(2 nu) symmetry for certain states near the ground state equilibrium geometry. The ionization energies, discrete vertical transition frequencies, and oscillator strengths for occupied and vertical Fock orbitals are in general accord with experimental determinations and other theoretical calculations. Stieltjes and Chebyshev vertical electronic photoionization profiles were calculated and found to be in good agreement with appropriately averaged photoionization-mass spectrometric measurements of the cross section for parent H2CO(+) ion production.

  20. Synthesis of a water-soluble thiourea-formaldehyde (WTF) resin and its application to immobilize the heavy metal in MSWI fly ash.

    PubMed

    Liu, She-Jiang; Guo, Yu-Peng; Yang, Hong-Yang; Wang, Shen; Ding, Hui; Qi, Yun

    2016-11-01

    Because of the high concentrations of heavy metals, municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash is classified as a hazardous waste, which need to be treated to avoid damaging the environment. A novel water-soluble thiourea-formaldehyde (WTF) resin was synthesized by two step reactions (hydroxymethylation reaction and condensation reaction) in the laboratory. Synthetic conditions, removal of free formaldehyde in the resin and the ability of immobilization heavy metals in the MSWI fly ash were studied. The possible molecular structure of the resin was also discussed by elemental analysis and FTIR spectra. Experimental results showed that the synthesis conditions of WTF resin were the formaldehyde/thiourea (T/F) mole ratio of 2.5:1, hydroxymethylation at pH 7.0-8.0 and 60 °C for 30min, and condensation of at pH 4.5-5.0 and 80 °C. In addition, the end point of condensation reaction was measured by turbidity point method. The result of elemental analysis and FTIR spectra indicated that thiourea functional group in the WTF resin chelated the heavy metal ions. Melamine can efficiently reduce the free formaldehyde content in the resin from 8.5% to 2%. The leaching test showed that the immobilization rates of Cr, Pb and Cd were 96.5%, 92.0% and 85.8%, respectively. Leaching concentrations of Cr, Pb and Cd in the treated fly ash were decreased to 0.08 mg/L, 2.44 mg/L and 0.23 mg/L, respectively. The MSWI fly ash treated by WTF resin has no harm to the environment. PMID:27497309

  1. Genotoxic effects in occupational exposure to formaldehyde: A study in anatomy and pathology laboratories and formaldehyde-resins production

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background According to the Report on Carcinogens, formaldehyde ranks 25th in the overall U.S. chemical production, with more than 5 million tons produced each year. Given its economic importance and widespread use, many people are exposed to formaldehyde environmentally and/or occupationally. Presently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies formaldehyde as carcinogenic to humans (Group 1), based on sufficient evidence in humans and in experimental animals. Manyfold in vitro studies clearly indicated that formaldehyde can induce genotoxic effects in proliferating cultured mammalian cells. Furthermore, some in vivo studies have found changes in epithelial cells and in peripheral blood lymphocytes related to formaldehyde exposure. Methods A study was carried out in Portugal, using 80 workers occupationally exposed to formaldehyde vapours: 30 workers from formaldehyde and formaldehyde-based resins production factory and 50 from 10 pathology and anatomy laboratories. A control group of 85 non-exposed subjects was considered. Exposure assessment was performed by applying simultaneously two techniques of air monitoring: NIOSH Method 2541 and Photo Ionization Detection equipment with simultaneously video recording. Evaluation of genotoxic effects was performed by application of micronucleus test in exfoliated epithelial cells from buccal mucosa and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Results Time-weighted average concentrations not exceeded the reference value (0.75 ppm) in the two occupational settings studied. Ceiling concentrations, on the other hand, were higher than reference value (0.3 ppm) in both. The frequency of micronucleus in peripheral blood lymphocytes and in epithelial cells was significantly higher in both exposed groups than in the control group (p < 0.001). Moreover, the frequency of micronucleus in peripheral blood lymphocytes was significantly higher in the laboratories group than in the factory workers (p < 0.05). A moderate positive

  2. Nanocomposite of Au Nanoparticles/Helical Carbon Nanofibers and Application in Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Mumu; Cui, Rongjing; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Genhua; Lin, Wang; Yu, Lingjun

    2015-06-01

    A combined sol-gel/hydrogen reduction method has been developed for the mass production of helical carbon nanofibers (HCNFs) by the pyrolysis of acetylene at 425 degrees C in the presence of NiO nanoparticles. The synthesized HCNFs were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The helical-structured carbon nanofibers have a large specific surface area and excellent biocompatibility. A novel enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor was then successfully fabricated based on the nanocomposites containing HCNFs and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The results indicated that the Au/HCNFs nanocomposites exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity to the reduction of H2O2, offering a wide linear range from 1.0 μM to 3157 μM with a detection limit as low as 0.46 μM. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant of the biosensor was 0.61 mM. The as-fabricated biosensor showed a rapid and sensitive amperometric response to hydrogen peroxide with acceptable preparation reproducibility and excellent stability. Because of their low cost and high stability, these novel HCNFs represent seem to be a kind of promising biomaterial and may find wide new applications in scopes such as biocatalysis, immunoassay, environmental monitoring and so on. PMID:26369097

  3. Formaldehyde Gas Sensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Po-Ren; Tzeng, Chun-Ta; Ke, Ming-Tsun; Lee, Chia-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Many methods based on spectrophotometric, fluorometric, piezoresistive, amperometric or conductive measurements have been proposed for detecting the concentration of formaldehyde in air. However, conventional formaldehyde measurement systems are bulky and expensive and require the services of highly-trained operators. Accordingly, the emergence of sophisticated technologies in recent years has prompted the development of many microscale gaseous formaldehyde detection systems. Besides their compact size, such devices have many other advantages over their macroscale counterparts, including a real-time response, a more straightforward operation, lower power consumption, and the potential for low-cost batch production. This paper commences by providing a high level overview of the formaldehyde gas sensing field and then describes some of the more significant real-time sensors presented in the literature over the past 10 years or so. PMID:23549368

  4. Visualization of Molecular Orbitals: Formaldehyde

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olcott, Richard J.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a computer program that plots a solid" representation of molecular orbital charge density which can be used to analyze wave functions of molecules. Illustrated with diagrams for formaldehyde. (AL)

  5. Preparation of Ag/Au bimetallic nanostructures and their application in surface-enhanced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Ye, Yanyan; Zhang, Wenhui; Ren, Zebin; Huo, Yiping; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-11-01

    An effective substrate for surface-enhanced fluorescence, which consists of cluster Ag/Au bimetallic nanostructures on a copper surface, was synthesized via a multi-stage galvanic replacement reaction of a Ag cluster in a chlorauric acid (HAuCl4) solution at room temperature. The fabricated silver/gold bimetallic cluster were found to yield large surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) enhancement factors for rhodamine 6G probe molecules deposited on the substrate, and also the fluorescence efficiency is critically dependent on the period of nanostructure growth. With the help of proper control reaction conditions, such as the reaction time, and concentration of reaction solutions, the maximum fluorescence enhanced effect was obtained. Therefore, the bimetallic nanostructure substrate also can be adapted to studies in SEF, which will expand the application of SEF. PMID:25691287

  6. Does formaldehyde induce aneuploidy?

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Kühner, Stefanie; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Schütz, Petra

    2011-11-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) was tested for a potential aneugenic activity in mammalian cells. We employed tests to discriminate between aneugenic and clastogenic effects in accordance with international guidelines for genotoxicity testing. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus test (CBMNT) in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with a pan-centromeric probe was performed with cultured human lymphocytes and the human A549 lung cell line. FA induced micronuclei (MN) in binuclear cells of both cell types under standard in vitro test conditions following the OECD guideline 487. FISH analysis revealed that the vast majority of induced MN were centromere negative, thus indicating a clastogenic effect. A similar result was obtained for MN induced by γ-irradiation, whereas the typical aneugens colcemid (COL) and vincristine (VCR) predominantly induced centromere-positive MN. Furthermore, COL and VCR clearly enhanced the MN frequency in mononuclear lymphocytes in the CBMNT, whereas such an effect was not observed for γ-irradiation and FA. In experiments with the Chinese hamster V79 cell line, the aneugens COL and VCR clearly increased the frequency of tetraploid second division metaphases, whereas FA did not cause such an effect. Altogether, our results confirm the clastogenicity of FA in cultured mammalian cells but exclude a significant aneugenic activity. PMID:21804075

  7. Kinetically controlled synthesis of Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters and catalytic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongdong; Wang, Jin; Liu, Chao; Li, Zhimin; Li, Gao

    2016-05-01

    We here explore a kinetically controlled synthetic protocol for preparing solvent-solvable Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters which are isolated from polydispersed gold nanoclusters by solvent extraction and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The as-obtained Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters are determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, in conjunction with UV-vis spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). However, Au99(SPh)42, instead of Au102(SPh)44, is yielded when the polydispersed gold nanoclusters are etched in the presence of excess thiophenol under thermal conditions (e.g., 80 °C). Interestingly, the Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters also can convert to Au99(SPh)42 with equivalent thiophenol ligands, evidenced by the analyses of UV-vis and MALDI mass spectrometry. Finally, the TiO2-supported Au102(SPh)44 nanocluster catalyst is investigated in the selective oxidation of sulfides into sulfoxides by the PhIO oxidant and gives rise to high catalytic activity (e.g., 80-99% conversion of R-S-R' sulfides with 96-99% selectivity for R-S(&z.dbd;O)-R' sulfoxides). The Au102(SPh)44/TiO2 catalyst also shows excellent recyclability in the sulfoxidation process.We here explore a kinetically controlled synthetic protocol for preparing solvent-solvable Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters which are isolated from polydispersed gold nanoclusters by solvent extraction and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The as-obtained Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters are determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, in conjunction with UV-vis spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). However, Au99(SPh)42, instead of Au102(SPh)44, is yielded when the polydispersed gold nanoclusters are etched in the presence of excess thiophenol under thermal conditions (e.g., 80 °C). Interestingly, the Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters also can convert to Au99(SPh)42 with equivalent

  8. Pd-on-Au Supra-nanostructures Decorated Graphene Oxide: An Advanced Electrocatalyst for Fuel Cell Application.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yingzhou; Dandapat, Anirban; Chen, Liming; Huang, Youju; Sasson, Yoel; Lin, Zhenyu; Zhang, Jiawei; Guo, Longhua; Chen, Tao

    2016-08-30

    We report a very easy and effective approach for synthesizing unique palladium-on-gold supra-nanostructure (Au@Pd-SprNS)-decorated graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets. The SprNSs comprising Au nanorods as core and a unique close-packed assembly of tiny anisotropic Pd nanoparticles (NPs) as shell were homogeneously distributed on the GO surface via electrostatic self-assembly. Compared with the traditional one-pot method for synthesis of metal NPs on GO sheets, the size and shape of core-shell Au@Pd SprNSs can be finely controlled and uniformly distributed on the GO carrier. Interestingly, this Au@Pd-SprNSs/GO nanocomposite displayed high electrocatalytic activities toward the oxidation of methanol, ethanol, and formic acid, which can be attributed to the abundance of intrinsic active sites including high density of atomic steps, ledges and kinks, Au-Pd heterojunctions and cooperative action of the two metals of the SprNSs. Additionally, uniform dispersion of the SprNSs over the GO nanosheets prevent agglomeration between the SprNSs, which is of great significance to enhance the long-term stability of catalyst. This work will introduce a highly efficient Pd-based nanoelectrocatalyst to be used in fuel cell application. PMID:27482606

  9. The Mechanism of the Formaldehyde Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, M. G.

    1982-01-01

    Provides background information and problems with the formaldehyde clock reaction, including comparisons of experimental clock times reported in the literature and conditions for the reliable use of the formaldehyde clock based on a method discussed. (JN)

  10. Formaldehyde Stress Responses in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nathan H.; Djoko, Karrera Y.; Veyrier, Frédéric J.; McEwan, Alastair G.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde is the simplest of all aldehydes and is highly cytotoxic. Its use and associated dangers from environmental exposure have been well documented. Detoxification systems for formaldehyde are found throughout the biological world and they are especially important in methylotrophic bacteria, which generate this compound as part of their metabolism of methanol. Formaldehyde metabolizing systems can be divided into those dependent upon pterin cofactors, sugar phosphates and those dependent upon glutathione. The more prevalent thiol-dependent formaldehyde detoxification system is found in many bacterial pathogens, almost all of which do not metabolize methane or methanol. This review describes the endogenous and exogenous sources of formaldehyde, its toxic effects and mechanisms of detoxification. The methods of formaldehyde sensing are also described with a focus on the formaldehyde responsive transcription factors HxlR, FrmR, and NmlR. Finally, the physiological relevance of detoxification systems for formaldehyde in bacterial pathogens is discussed. PMID:26973631

  11. Formaldehyde Stress Responses in Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nathan H; Djoko, Karrera Y; Veyrier, Frédéric J; McEwan, Alastair G

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde is the simplest of all aldehydes and is highly cytotoxic. Its use and associated dangers from environmental exposure have been well documented. Detoxification systems for formaldehyde are found throughout the biological world and they are especially important in methylotrophic bacteria, which generate this compound as part of their metabolism of methanol. Formaldehyde metabolizing systems can be divided into those dependent upon pterin cofactors, sugar phosphates and those dependent upon glutathione. The more prevalent thiol-dependent formaldehyde detoxification system is found in many bacterial pathogens, almost all of which do not metabolize methane or methanol. This review describes the endogenous and exogenous sources of formaldehyde, its toxic effects and mechanisms of detoxification. The methods of formaldehyde sensing are also described with a focus on the formaldehyde responsive transcription factors HxlR, FrmR, and NmlR. Finally, the physiological relevance of detoxification systems for formaldehyde in bacterial pathogens is discussed. PMID:26973631

  12. Formaldehyde exposures from tobacco smoke: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Godish, T

    1989-01-01

    Reports of formaldehyde levels in mainstream, sidestream, and environmental tobacco smoke from nine studies are reviewed. Considerable disparity exists between formaldehyde production rates determined from mainstream-sidestream studies and those reporting levels in environmental tobacco smoke. Tobacco smoke does not appear to increase vapor-phase formaldehyde levels significantly in indoor environments, but formaldehyde exposure in mainstream smoke may pose a risk of upper respiratory system cancer and increase the risk of cancer in smokers. PMID:2665532

  13. Formaldehyde reactions in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Federman, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    The low-pressure reactions of formaldehyde (H2CO) with D(+), D2(+), D3(+), and He(+) are studied by the ion-cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potential loss processes for formaldehyde in cores of dark interstellar clouds. The deuterated reactants represent direct analogs for protons. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels have been measured. Charge transfer is observed to be the dominant reaction of H2CO with D(+), D2(+), and He(+) ions. Only the D3(+) reaction exhibits a proton-transfer channel. All reactions proceed at rate coefficients near the collision limit. Proton-deuteron exchange reactions are found to be inefficient processes in the formaldehyde system.

  14. Kinetically controlled synthesis of Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters and catalytic application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongdong; Wang, Jin; Liu, Chao; Li, Zhimin; Li, Gao

    2016-05-21

    We here explore a kinetically controlled synthetic protocol for preparing solvent-solvable Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters which are isolated from polydispersed gold nanoclusters by solvent extraction and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The as-obtained Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters are determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, in conjunction with UV-vis spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). However, Au99(SPh)42, instead of Au102(SPh)44, is yielded when the polydispersed gold nanoclusters are etched in the presence of excess thiophenol under thermal conditions (e.g., 80 °C). Interestingly, the Au102(SPh)44 nanoclusters also can convert to Au99(SPh)42 with equivalent thiophenol ligands, evidenced by the analyses of UV-vis and MALDI mass spectrometry. Finally, the TiO2-supported Au102(SPh)44 nanocluster catalyst is investigated in the selective oxidation of sulfides into sulfoxides by the PhIO oxidant and gives rise to high catalytic activity (e.g., 80-99% conversion of R-S-R' sulfides with 96-99% selectivity for R-S([double bond, length as m-dash]O)-R' sulfoxides). The Au102(SPh)44/TiO2 catalyst also shows excellent recyclability in the sulfoxidation process. PMID:26758553

  15. Electrical performance of Ti-ZnO-Au thin film composite structure for device application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Priyanka; Singh, Jitendra; Das, Surajit; Desai, J. V.; Akhtar, Jamil

    2016-04-01

    Thin film layers of Au/Ti approximately 2200 Å thick and ZnO approximately 2.24 µm thick were sputtered sequentially onto silicon dioxide coated <100> Si-wafer. Conventional wisdom confirms the adhesion of gold over zinc oxide (ZnO) by an intermediate layer of titanium for better adhesion. But, in Au/Ti/ZnO/Au/Ti structure, it was observed that with the passing of time the gold diffused into ZnO thin film at room temperature, making a very low resistance between the two gold layers eventually making a conductive path in ZnO. Therefore, electrical connectivity was found between the metal layers. A detailed experimental analysis has been carried out in support of the observed Au diffusion. In the present work, reliability of Ti/Au metallisation and anomalous electrical behavior due to gold diffusion has been studied.

  16. Home Is Where the Formaldehyde Is.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godish, Thad

    1983-01-01

    Discusses indoor air pollution in general and formaldehyde in particular, citing major sources of formaldehyde in home building materials and home furnishings. Also describes a laboratory procedure necessary to test for formaldehyde levels in the air and in materials. Includes list of equipment required. (JM)

  17. A Short Review on Photocatalytic Degradation of Formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Tasbihi, Minoo; Bendyna, Joanna K; Notten, Peter H L; Hintzen, H T

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays, it is a great challenge to eliminate toxic and harmful organic pollutants from air and water. This paper reviews the role of TiO2 as a photocatalyst, light source and photoreactor in the particular case of removal of formaldehyde using the photocatalytic reaction by titanium dioxide (TiO2) in aqueous and gaseous systems. The reaction mechanisms of the photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous formaldehyde are given. We also present a detailed review of published articles on photocatalytic degradation of formaldehyde by modified titanium dioxide doped with foreign species such as metal and non-metal components. We point out the most prospective developments of the photocatalyst compositions for the future potential commercial applications. PMID:26716192

  18. Studies on adsorption of formaldehyde in zirconium phosphate-glyphosates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuejuan; Yi, Jianjun; Xu, Qinghong

    2011-01-01

    In our previous work [22], a kind of layered compound of zirconium phosphate-glyphosate (ZrGP) was synthesized. Its large surface area (445 m 2/g) indicates this compound has possible application in adsorptions. In this paper, adsorption to formaldehyde in ZrGP and mechanisms of the adsorption were studied carefully. Balance time of adsorption (about 6 h) and largest adsorbed amount (7.8%) were found when adsorption temperature was at 40 °C and pH value of adsorption environment was about 3.0. H-bonds were found existing between molecules of formaldehyde and ZrGP, and formaldehyde molecules could exist in ZrGP stably.

  19. Woodstoves, formaldehyde, and respiratory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tuthill, R.W.

    1984-12-01

    Telephone interviews were completed in Western Massachusetts in April 1983 for 399 households (91.5 percent) in a random sample of households with elementary school children. Woodstoves were used in 64.7 percent of the homes, but such use was not associated with acute respiratory illness. However, formaldehyde exposure was significantly related, with a risk ratio of 2.4 (95 percent confidence interval 1.7-3.4). New construction/remodeling and new upholstered furniture had additive effects. Neither woodstove use nor formaldehyde exposure were significantly associated with asthma, chronic bronchitis, or allergies.

  20. Photoionization of methanol and formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warneck, P.

    1971-01-01

    Photoions produced in methanol and formaldehyde by radiation in the spectral region 450-1150 A were analyzed mass spectrometrically, and their relative yields were determined as a function of wavelength. First ionization potentials were determined, and the ion yield curves were interpreted in terms of ionization processes in conjunction with other data. Fragment ions were detected on mass numbers of 31, 30, 29, 15, and 14 for methanol, and 29, 2, and 1 for formaldehyde. The associated appearance potentials were determined and were used to calculate heats of formation of the ions CH2OH(+) and HCO(+), and the radicals CH3, CH2, and HCO.

  1. Crystallographic investigation of Au nanoparticles embedded in a SrTiO3 thin film for plasmonics applications by means of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincini, Davide; Mazzoli, Claudio; Bernhardt, Hendrik; Katzer, Christian; Schmidl, Frank; Uschmann, Ingo; Detlefs, Carsten

    2015-03-01

    Self-organized monocrystalline Au nanoparticles with potential applications in plasmonics are grown in a SrTiO3 matrix by a novel two-step deposition process. The crystalline preferred orientation of these Au nanoparticles is investigated by synchrotron hard x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles preferentially align with the (111) direction along the substrate normal (001), whereas two in-plane orientations are found with [ 110 ] SrTiO3 ∥ [ 110 ] Au and [ 100 ] SrTiO3 ∥ [ 110 ] Au . Additionally, a smaller diffraction signal from nanoparticles with the (001) direction parallel to the substrate normal (001) is observed; once again, two in-plane orientations are found, with [ 100 ] SrTiO3 ∥ [ 100 ] Au and [ 100 ] SrTiO3 ∥ [ 110 ] Au . The populations of the two in-plane orientations are found to depend on the thickness of the gold film deposited in the first step of the growth.

  2. Formaldehyde in Insulation: Villain or Innocent Bystander?

    PubMed Central

    Lees, R. E. M.

    1983-01-01

    When urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) deteriorates, it produces an off-gas mixture whose major constituent is formaldehyde. Most investigative studies of UFFI have concentrated on formaldehyde. Health concerns fall into three groups: irritant characteristics, allergenic capabilities and potential carcinogenicity. Except for the first of these, formaldehyde's hazard potential is not clear. The extent to which formaldehyde may be responsible for UFFI's evil reputation is explored in this paper but the degree to which either substance is a real threat to health still appears to open to debate. PMID:21283296

  3. Controlling formaldehyde emissions with boiler ash.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Jennifer; Abu-Daabes, Malyuba; Banerjee, Sujit

    2005-07-01

    Fluidized wood ash reduces formaldehyde in air from about 20 to <1 ppmv. Methanol is removed to a much lower extent. The efficiency of formaldehyde reduction increases with increasing moisture content of the ash. Sorption of formaldehyde to ash can be substantially accounted for by partitioning to the water contained in the ash followed by rate-controlling binding to the ash solids. Adsorption occurs at temperatures of up to 165 degrees C; oxidation predominates thereafter. It is proposed that formaldehyde could be stripped from an air stream in a fluidized bed containing ash, which could then be returned to a boiler to incinerate the formaldehyde. PMID:16053116

  4. Formaldehyde monitor for automobile exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easley, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    Device makes use of microwave spectral absorption in low-Q resonant Stark cell, and indications are that ultimate sensitivity of instrument is within 100 parts per billion of formaldehyde. Microwave source is very small and requires only six-volt dc bias for operation. Coarse tuning is accomplished mechanically and fine tuning by adjusting dc-bias voltage.

  5. Report of the Federal Panel on Formaldehyde.

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The Federal Panel on Formaldehyde concluded that definitive experiments exist which demonstrate the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of formaldehyde under laboratory conditions. Formaldehyde induces both gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations in a variety of test systems. Inhalation of formaldehyde causes cancer of the nose in rats. The concentrations of formaldehyde in inhaled air that caused nasal cancer in Fisher 344 rats are within the same order of magnitude as those to which humans may be exposed. The data presently available do not permit a direct assessment of the carcinogenicity of formaldehyde to man. Epidemiologic studies on exposed human populations are in progress and may further clarify the situation. Other experimental and human studies on toxic effects such as teratogenicity and reproductive disorders are as yet inadequate for a health risk assessment. The CIIT 24 month study on animal carcinogenicity has not yet been completely evaluated. Additional data are expected on the effects of prolonged exposure to lower doses of formaldehyde and on the possible carcinogenicity of formaldehyde in the mouse. The panel recommends that, for a comprehensive health risk assessment, further experiments be conducted on the effects of other modes of exposure (ingestion and skin penetration), the effects in humans, and on the pharmacokinetics of formaldehyde in man and animals and the possible role for formaldehyde in reproductive and chronic respiratory disorders. It is the conclusion of the panel that formaldehyde should be presumed to pose a carcinogenic risk to humans. PMID:6977445

  6. Facile Synthesis of Quasi-One-Dimensional Au/PtAu Heterojunction Nanotubes and Their Application as Catalysts in an Oxygen-Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kai; Liu, Jiawei; Zhang, Huan; Huang, Zhao; Lu, Zhicheng; Foda, Mohamed F; Li, Tingting; Han, Heyou

    2015-05-11

    An intermediate-template-directed method has been developed for the synthesis of quasi-one-dimensional Au/PtAu heterojunction nanotubes by the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Au on Te/Pt core-shell nanostructures in aqueous solution. The synthesized porous Au/PtAu bimetallic nanotubes (PABNTs) consist of porous tubular framework and attached Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). The reaction intermediates played an important role in the preparation, which fabricated the framework and provided a localized reducing agent for the reduction of the Au and Pt precursors. The Pt7 Au PABNTs showed higher electrocatalytic activity and durability in the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M HClO4 than porous Pt nanotubes (PtNTs) and commercially available Pt/C. The mass activity of PABNTs was 218 % that of commercial Pt/C after an accelerated durability test. This study demonstrates the potential of PABNTs as highly efficient electrocatalysts. In addition, this method provides a facile strategy for the synthesis of desirable hetero-nanostructures with controlled size and shape by utilizing an intermediate template. PMID:25833689

  7. Fabrication of Te and Te-Au Nanowires-Based Carbon Fiber Fabrics for Antibacterial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ting-Mao; Ke, Yi-Yun; Tsao, Yu-Hsiang; Li, Ying-Chun; Lin, Zong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria that give rise to diseases every year remain a major health concern. In recent years, tellurium-based nanomaterials have been approved as new and efficient antibacterial agents. In this paper, we developed the approach to directly grow tellurium nanowires (Te NWs) onto commercial carbon fiber fabrics and demonstrated their antibacterial activity. Those Te NWs can serve as templates and reducing agents for gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) to deposit. Three different Te-Au NWs with varied concentration of Au NPs were synthesized and showed superior antibacterial activity and biocompability. These results indicate that the as-prepared carbon fiber fabrics with Te and Te-Au NWs can become antimicrobial clothing products in the near future. PMID:26861380

  8. A Room-Temperature Operation Formaldehyde Sensing Material Printed Using Blends of Reduced Graphene Oxide and Poly(methyl methacrylate)

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Wen-Yu; Yang, Sung-Yuan; Wu, Wen-Jong; Lin, Chih-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates a printable blending material, i.e., reduced graphene oxide (RGO) mixed with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), for formaldehyde sensing. Based on experimental results, 2% RGO/10% PMMA is an optimal ratio for formaldehyde detection, which produced a 30.5% resistance variation in response to 1000 ppm formaldehyde and high selectivity compared to different volatile organic compounds (VOCs), humidity, CO, and NO. The demonstrated detection limit is 100 ppm with 1.51% resistance variation. Characterization of the developed formaldehyde sensing material was performed by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Based on Raman spectroscopy, the basic sensing mechanism is the band distortion of RGO due to blending with PMMA and the adsorption of formaldehyde. This work establishes insights into the formaldehyde sensing mechanism and explores a potential printable sensing material for diverse applications. PMID:26580624

  9. Formaldehyde in hair straightening products: rapid ¹H NMR determination and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Kuballa, Thomas; Mildau, Gerd; Kratz, Evamaria; Keck-Wilhelm, Andrea; Tschiersch, Christopher; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2013-04-01

    Despite official regulations, the illegal use of formaldehyde-containing or releasing hair straightening products has become a popular practice in Europe and high contents of formaldehyde in such products have been reported. In this study, a methodology utilizing (1)H NMR spectroscopy has been developed to measure the concentration of formaldehyde in hair straightening products. For sample preparation, a dilution and alkaline hydrolysis is required. The total formaldehyde content can then be quantified by a distinct peak of the CH2 group of the methanediol molecule in the δ4.84-4.82 ppm range. The developed methodology was applied for the analysis of 10 hair straightening products. Seven of these products contained detectable amounts of formaldehyde that were higher than the maximum allowed concentration of 0.2%. The formaldehyde content of these products was found to be in the range 0.42-5.83% with an average concentration of 1.46%. The accuracy and reliability of the NMR results were confirmed by the EU reference photometric method. The air formaldehyde concentrations after application of hair straightening products were estimated in ranges 20-423 ppm and 1-18 ppm (for 1 and 24 m(3) salon volume). A probabilistic exposure estimation using Monte Carlo simulation found the average formaldehyde concentration to be 6 ppm (standard deviation 15 ppm). All exposure scenarios considerably exceeded the safe level of 0.1 ppm. Our findings confirmed that the risk of cosmetic formulations with formaldehyde above 0.2% is not negligible, as these products may facilitate considerable exposure of formaldehyde for consumers especially for salon workers. PMID:23216202

  10. Au nanostructure arrays for plasmonic applications: annealed island films versus nanoimprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Lopatynskyi, Andrii M; Lytvyn, Vitalii K; Nazarenko, Volodymyr I; Guo, L Jay; Lucas, Brandon D; Chegel, Volodymyr I

    2015-01-01

    This paper attempts to compare the main features of random and highly ordered gold nanostructure arrays (NSA) prepared by thermally annealed island film and nanoimprint lithography (NIL) techniques, respectively. Each substrate possesses different morphology in terms of plasmonic enhancement. Both methods allow such important features as spectral tuning of plasmon resonance position depending on size and shape of nanostructures; however, the time and cost is quite different. The respective comparison was performed experimentally and theoretically for a number of samples with different geometrical parameters. Spectral characteristics of fabricated NSA exhibited an expressed plasmon peak in the range from 576 to 809 nm for thermally annealed samples and from 606 to 783 nm for samples prepared by NIL. Modelling of the optical response for nanostructures with typical shapes associated with these techniques (parallelepiped for NIL and semi-ellipsoid for annealed island films) was performed using finite-difference time-domain calculations. Mathematical simulations have indicated the dependence of electric field enhancement on the shape and size of the nanoparticles. As an important point, the distribution of electric field at so-called 'hot spots' was considered. Parallelepiped-shaped nanoparticles were shown to yield maximal enhancement values by an order of magnitude greater than their semi-ellipsoid-shaped counterparts; however, both nanoparticle shapes have demonstrated comparable effective electrical field enhancement values. Optimized Au nanostructures with equivalent diameters ranging from 85 to 143 nm and height equal to 35 nm were obtained for both techniques, resulting in the largest electrical field enhancement. The application of island film thermal annealing method for nanochips fabrication can be considered as a possible cost-effective platform for various surface-enhanced spectroscopies; while the NIL-fabricated NSA looks like more effective for

  11. Au nanostructure arrays for plasmonic applications: annealed island films versus nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatynskyi, Andrii M.; Lytvyn, Vitalii K.; Nazarenko, Volodymyr I.; Guo, L. Jay; Lucas, Brandon D.; Chegel, Volodymyr I.

    2015-03-01

    This paper attempts to compare the main features of random and highly ordered gold nanostructure arrays (NSA) prepared by thermally annealed island film and nanoimprint lithography (NIL) techniques, respectively. Each substrate possesses different morphology in terms of plasmonic enhancement. Both methods allow such important features as spectral tuning of plasmon resonance position depending on size and shape of nanostructures; however, the time and cost is quite different. The respective comparison was performed experimentally and theoretically for a number of samples with different geometrical parameters. Spectral characteristics of fabricated NSA exhibited an expressed plasmon peak in the range from 576 to 809 nm for thermally annealed samples and from 606 to 783 nm for samples prepared by NIL. Modelling of the optical response for nanostructures with typical shapes associated with these techniques (parallelepiped for NIL and semi-ellipsoid for annealed island films) was performed using finite-difference time-domain calculations. Mathematical simulations have indicated the dependence of electric field enhancement on the shape and size of the nanoparticles. As an important point, the distribution of electric field at so-called `hot spots' was considered. Parallelepiped-shaped nanoparticles were shown to yield maximal enhancement values by an order of magnitude greater than their semi-ellipsoid-shaped counterparts; however, both nanoparticle shapes have demonstrated comparable effective electrical field enhancement values. Optimized Au nanostructures with equivalent diameters ranging from 85 to 143 nm and height equal to 35 nm were obtained for both techniques, resulting in the largest electrical field enhancement. The application of island film thermal annealing method for nanochips fabrication can be considered as a possible cost-effective platform for various surface-enhanced spectroscopies; while the NIL-fabricated NSA looks like more effective for sensing of

  12. Stabilization of AuNPs by monofunctional triazole linked to ferrocene, ferricenium, or coumarin and applications to synthesis, sensing, and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Zhao, Pengxiang; Igartua, María E; Rapakousiou, Amalia; Salmon, Lionel; Moya, Sergio; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2014-11-01

    Monofunctional triazoles linked to ferrocene, ferricenium, or coumarin (Cou), easily synthesized by copper-catalyzed azide alkyne (CuAAC) "click" reactions between the corresponding functional azides and (trimethylsilyl)acetylene followed by silyl group deprotection, provide a variety of convenient neutral ligands for the stabilization of functional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in polar organic solvents. These triazole (trz)-AuNPs are very useful toward a variety of applications to synthesis, sensing, and catalysis. Both ferrocenyl (Fc) and isostructural ferricenium linked triazoles give rise to AuNP stabilization, although by different synthetic routes. Indeed, the first direct synthesis and stabilization of AuNPs by ferricenium are obtained by the reduction of HAuCl4 upon reaction with a ferrocene derivative, AuNP stabilization resulting from a synergy between electrostatic and coordination effects. The ferricenium/ferrocene trz-AuNP redox couple is fully reversible, as shown by cyclic voltammograms that were recorded with both redox forms. These trz-AuNPs are stable for weeks in various polar solvents, but at the same time, the advantage of trz-AuNPs is the easy substitution of neutral trz ligands by thiols and other ligands, giving rise to applications. Indeed, this ligand substitution of trz at the AuNP surface yields a stable Fc-terminated nanogold-cored dendrimer upon reaction with a Fc-terminated thiol dendron, substitution of Cou-linked trz with cysteine, homocysteine, and glutathione provides remarkably efficient biothiol sensing, and a ferricenium-linked trz-AuNP catalyst is effective for NaBH4 reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol. In this catalytic example, the additional electrostatic AuNP stabilization modulates the reaction rate and induction time. PMID:25363304

  13. Composition-selective fabrication of ordered intermetallic Au-Cu nanowires and their application to nano-size electrochemical glucose detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Si-In; Eom, Gayoung; Kang, Mijeong; Kang, Taejoon; Lee, Hyoban; Hwang, Ahreum; Yang, Haesik; Kim, Bongsoo

    2015-06-01

    Bimetallic nanostructures can provide distinct and improved physicochemical properties by the coupling effect of the two metal components, making them promising materials for a variety of applications. Herein, we report composition-selective fabrication of ordered intermetallic Au-Cu nanowires (NWs) by two-step chemical vapor transport method and their application to nano-electrocatalytic glucose detection. Ordered intermetallic Au3Cu and AuCu3 NWs are topotaxially fabricated by supplying Cu-containing chemicals to pre-synthesized single-crystalline Au NW arrays. The composition of fabricated Au-Cu NWs can be selected by changing the concentration of Cu-containing species. Interestingly, Au3Cu NW electrodes show unique electrocatalytic activity for glucose oxidation, allowing us to detect glucose without interference from ascorbic acid. Such interference-free detection of glucose is attributed to the synergistic effect, induced by incorporation of Cu in Au. We anticipate that Au3Cu NWs could show possibility as efficient nano-size electrochemical glucose sensors and the present fabrication method can be employed to fabricate valuable ordered intermetallic nanostructures.

  14. Composition-selective fabrication of ordered intermetallic Au-Cu nanowires and their application to nano-size electrochemical glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-In; Eom, Gayoung; Kang, Mijeong; Kang, Taejoon; Lee, Hyoban; Hwang, Ahreum; Yang, Haesik; Kim, Bongsoo

    2015-06-19

    Bimetallic nanostructures can provide distinct and improved physicochemical properties by the coupling effect of the two metal components, making them promising materials for a variety of applications. Herein, we report composition-selective fabrication of ordered intermetallic Au-Cu nanowires (NWs) by two-step chemical vapor transport method and their application to nano-electrocatalytic glucose detection. Ordered intermetallic Au3Cu and AuCu3 NWs are topotaxially fabricated by supplying Cu-containing chemicals to pre-synthesized single-crystalline Au NW arrays. The composition of fabricated Au-Cu NWs can be selected by changing the concentration of Cu-containing species. Interestingly, Au3Cu NW electrodes show unique electrocatalytic activity for glucose oxidation, allowing us to detect glucose without interference from ascorbic acid. Such interference-free detection of glucose is attributed to the synergistic effect, induced by incorporation of Cu in Au. We anticipate that Au3Cu NWs could show possibility as efficient nano-size electrochemical glucose sensors and the present fabrication method can be employed to fabricate valuable ordered intermetallic nanostructures. PMID:26016531

  15. Corrosion Protection of Al/Au/ZnO Anode for Hybrid Cell Application.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Gymama; Stevens, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Effective protection of power sources from corrosion is critical in the development of abiotic fuel cells, biofuel cells, hybrid cells and biobateries for implantable bioelectronics. Corrosion of these bioelectronic devices result in device inability to generate bioelectricity. In this paper Al/Au/ZnO was considered as a possible anodic substrate for the development of a hybrid cell. The protective abilities of corrosive resistant aluminum hydroxide and zinc phosphite composite films formed on the surface of Al/Au/ZnO anode in various electrolyte environments were examined by electrochemical methods. The presence of phosphate buffer and physiological saline (NaCl) buffer allows for the formation of aluminum hyrdroxide and zinc phosphite composite films on the surface of the Al/Au/ZnO anode that prevent further corrosion of the anode. The highly protective films formed on the Al/Au/ZnO anode during energy harvesting in a physiological saline environment resulted in 98.5% corrosion protective efficiency, thereby demonstrating that the formation of aluminum hydroxide and zinc phosphite composite films are effective in the prevention of anode corrosion during energy harvesting. A cell assembly consisting of the Al/Au/ZnO anode and platinum cathode resulted in an open circuit voltage of 1.03 V. A maximum power density of 955.3 mW/ cm² in physiological saline buffer at a cell voltage and current density of 345 mV and 2.89 mA/ cm², respectively. PMID:26580661

  16. Corrosion Protection of Al/Au/ZnO Anode for Hybrid Cell Application

    PubMed Central

    Slaughter, Gymama; Stevens, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Effective protection of power sources from corrosion is critical in the development of abiotic fuel cells, biofuel cells, hybrid cells and biobateries for implantable bioelectronics. Corrosion of these bioelectronic devices result in device inability to generate bioelectricity. In this paper Al/Au/ZnO was considered as a possible anodic substrate for the development of a hybrid cell. The protective abilities of corrosive resistant aluminum hydroxide and zinc phosphite composite films formed on the surface of Al/Au/ZnO anode in various electrolyte environments were examined by electrochemical methods. The presence of phosphate buffer and physiological saline (NaCl) buffer allows for the formation of aluminum hyrdroxide and zinc phosphite composite films on the surface of the Al/Au/ZnO anode that prevent further corrosion of the anode. The highly protective films formed on the Al/Au/ZnO anode during energy harvesting in a physiological saline environment resulted in 98.5% corrosion protective efficiency, thereby demonstrating that the formation of aluminum hydroxide and zinc phosphite composite films are effective in the prevention of anode corrosion during energy harvesting. A cell assembly consisting of the Al/Au/ZnO anode and platinum cathode resulted in an open circuit voltage of 1.03 V. A maximum power density of 955.3 μW/ cm2 in physiological saline buffer at a cell voltage and current density of 345 mV and 2.89 mA/ cm2, respectively. PMID:26580661

  17. Nonlinear stability of solar type 3 radio bursts. 2: Application to observations near 1 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Smith, R. A.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1978-01-01

    A set of rate equations including strong turbulence effects and anomalous resitivity are solved using parmeters which model several solar type 3 bursts. Exciter distributions observed at 1 AU are excitation of the linear bump-in-tail instability, amplifying Langmuir waves above the threshold for the oscillating two stream instability (OTSI). The OTSI, and the attendant anomalous resistivity produce a rapid spectral transfer of Langmuir waves to short wavelengths, out of resonance with the electron exciter. Further energy loss of the beam is thus precluded. The various parameters needed to model the bursts are extrapolated inside 1 AU with similar results. Again, the OTSI is excited and decouples the electron beam from the Langmuir radiation. Reabsorption of the Langmuir waves by the beam is shown to be unimportant in all cases, even at 0.1 AU. The theory provides a natural explanation for the observed realationship between radio flux, and the electron flux.

  18. Cyclotron produced 198gAu, a potential radionuclide for diagnostic and therapeutic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Haba, Hiromitsu; Kassim, Hasan Abu

    2016-02-01

    Production cross-sections of the natPt(d,x)198Au reactions have been measured from a 24-MeV deuteron energy down to the threshold by using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. Only a partial agreement is obtained with the existing literature data and the theoretical data extracted from the TENDL-2013 library. Physical thick target yield for the 198Au radionuclide was deduced using the measured cross-sections, and found a general agreement with the directly measured yield available in the literature. This study reveals that a low deuteron energy (<15 MeV) cyclotron and an enriched 198Pt (100%) target could be used to obtain 198Au in no carrier added form.

  19. Production of radio-gold 199Au for diagnostic and therapeutic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Haba, Hiromitsu; Kassim, Hasan Abu

    2016-01-01

    Production cross-sections of the natPt(d,x)199Au reactions have been measured from a 24-MeV deuteron energy down to the threshold by using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. Only a partial agreement is obtained with the existing literature data. Theoretical data extracted from the TENDL-2013 library shows large discrepancy with the measured ones. Physical thick target yield for the 199Au radionuclide was deduced using the measured cross-sections, and found a general agreement with the directly measured yield available in the literature. This study reveals that a low deuteron energy (<15 MeV) cyclotron and an enriched 198Pt (100%) target could be used to obtain 199Au in no carrier added form.

  20. Controlled preparation of Au/Ag/SnO2 core-shell nanoparticles using a photochemical method and applications in LSPR based sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Na; Ye, Chen; Polavarapu, Lakshminarayana; Xu, Qing-Hua

    2015-05-01

    A photochemical method for the controlled preparation of core-shell Au/Ag/SnO2 nanorods (NRs) and nanospheres (NSs) has been developed based on photo-induced electron transfer processes in the plasmonic metal-semiconductor system. Au/AgNR/SnO2 and Au/AgNS/SnO2 were prepared by the UV irradiation of a mixture of mesoporous SnO2 coated AuNRs, or AuNSs, and AgNO3, in which AgNO3 was reduced by electrons transferred from the photo-excited mesoporous SnO2 (semiconductor) to the gold (metal). This method allows precise control over the composition and optical properties of the obtained nanoparticles. The LSPR refractive index sensitivity of the obtained Au/AgNR/SnO2 nanoparticles has been optimized to obtain a refractive index sensitivity of ~442 nm RIU-1. The optimized nanoparticles were subsequently chosen for the LSPR based sensing of glutathione (GSH) with the limit of detection of ~7.5 × 10-7 M. This photochemical method allows the controlled preparation of various Au/Ag/SnO2 nanoparticles to adjust their LSPR to suit various applications.A photochemical method for the controlled preparation of core-shell Au/Ag/SnO2 nanorods (NRs) and nanospheres (NSs) has been developed based on photo-induced electron transfer processes in the plasmonic metal-semiconductor system. Au/AgNR/SnO2 and Au/AgNS/SnO2 were prepared by the UV irradiation of a mixture of mesoporous SnO2 coated AuNRs, or AuNSs, and AgNO3, in which AgNO3 was reduced by electrons transferred from the photo-excited mesoporous SnO2 (semiconductor) to the gold (metal). This method allows precise control over the composition and optical properties of the obtained nanoparticles. The LSPR refractive index sensitivity of the obtained Au/AgNR/SnO2 nanoparticles has been optimized to obtain a refractive index sensitivity of ~442 nm RIU-1. The optimized nanoparticles were subsequently chosen for the LSPR based sensing of glutathione (GSH) with the limit of detection of ~7.5 × 10-7 M. This photochemical method allows

  1. Au-coated ZnO nanostructures for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dikovska, A O; Nedyalkov, N N; Imamova, S E; Atanasova, G B; Atanasov, P A

    2012-03-31

    Thin ZnO nanostructured films were produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies. The experimental conditions used for preparation of the samples were chosen to obtain different types of ZnO nanostructures. The Raman spectra of rhodamine 6G (R6G) were measured at an excitation wavelength of 785 nm after coating the ZnO nanostructures with a thin Au layer. The influence of the surface morphology on the Raman signal obtained from the samples was investigated. High SERS signal enhancement was observed from all Au-coated ZnO nanostructures.

  2. Collisional excitation of interstellar formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.; Garrison, B. J.; Lester, W. A., Jr.; Miller, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Previous calculations for rates of excitation of ortho-H2CO by collisions with He have been extended to higher rotational levels and kinetic temperatures to 80 K. Rates for para-H2CO have also been computed. Pressure-broadening widths for several spectral lines have been obtained from these calculations and are found to agree with recent data within the experimental uncertainty of 10%. Excitation of formaldehyde by collisions with H2 molecules is also discussed.

  3. Microencapsulated fragrances in melamine formaldehyde resins.

    PubMed

    Bône, Stéphane; Vautrin, Claire; Barbesant, Virginie; Truchon, Stéphane; Harrison, Ian; Geffroy, Cédric

    2011-01-01

    The process for making melamine formaldehyde microcapsules containing fragrant oil is well-known. Recently, this technology has been used to enhance the olfactory performance on fabrics. However keeping the fragrance in the capsule during storage, improving the olfactory benefit and releasing a low amount of formaldehyde is highly challenging. To answer these challenges, Givaudan has developed its own melamine formaldehyde microcapsule, called Mechacaps, which is described in this article. PMID:21528653

  4. Formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Part 2. Patch test relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy, experimental provocation tests, amount of formaldehyde released, and assessment of risk to consumers allergic to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Anton; White, Ian R; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann; Lensen, Gerda; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan

    2010-01-01

    This is the second part of an article on formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics. The patch test relationship between the releasers in cosmetics to formaldehyde contact allergy is reviewed and it is assessed whether products preserved with formaldehyde-releasers may contain enough free formaldehyde to pose a threat to individuals with contact allergy to formaldehyde. There is a clear relationship between positive patch test reactions to formaldehyde-releasers and formaldehyde contact allergy: 15% of all reactions to 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol and 40-60% of the reactions to the other releasers are caused by a reaction to the formaldehyde in the test material. There is only fragmented data on the amount of free formaldehyde in cosmetics preserved with formaldehyde donors. However, all releasers (with the exception of 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol, for which adequate data are lacking) can, in the right circumstances of concentration and product composition, release >200 p.p.m. formaldehyde, which may result in allergic contact dermatitis. Whether this is actually the case in any particular product cannot be determined from the ingredient labelling. Therefore, we recommend advising patients allergic to formaldehyde to avoid leave-on cosmetics preserved with quaternium-15, diazolidinyl urea, DMDM hydantoin, or imidazolidinyl urea, acknowledging that many would tolerate some products. PMID:20136876

  5. In vitro model for decontamination of human skin: formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Zhai, H; Barbadillo, S; Hui, X; Maibach, H I

    2007-04-01

    Decontamination of a chemical from skin is often an emergency measure. This study utilized an in vitro model to compare the decontamination capacity of three model decontaminant solutions (tap water, isotonic saline, and hypertonic saline). Human cadaver skin was dosed (approximately 0.25 microg on 3 cm(2) per skin) with radio-labeled [(14)C]-formaldehyde. After a defined exposure time (1, 3, and 30 min post-dosing, respectively), the surface skin was washed three times (4ml per time) with each solution. After washing, the skin was stripped with tape discs twice. Lastly, the wash solutions, strippings, receptor fluid, and remainder of skin were liquid scintillation analyzer counted to determine the amounts of formaldehyde. Additionally, an evaporation test at different exposure times (1min, 3min, 15min, 30min, and 60min, respectively) was conducted to monitor formaldehyde % evaporation. There were no statistical differences among these groups except isotonic saline, at 3min post-exposure (in wash solutions), showed a significantly difference (p<0.05) when compared to tap water. Formaldehyde % evaporation increased linearly with extending application times, and were 7.7%, 13.6%, 19.7%, 24.4%, and 35.9% (1min, 3min, 15min, 30min, and 60min, respectively). This data suggests that isotonic saline may be effective in removing formaldehyde from skin. However, results from this model need validation in vivo. The model may provide a facile and robust method of accelerating knowledge of decontamination mechanism and lead to enhanced efficacy. PMID:17123683

  6. Direct Cross-Linking of Au/Ag Alloy Nanoparticles into Monolithic Aerogels for Application in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaonan; Esteves, Richard J Alan; Nahar, Lamia; Nowaczyk, Jordan; Arachchige, Indika U

    2016-05-25

    The direct cross-linking of Au/Ag alloy nanoparticles (NPs) into high surface area, mesoporous Au/Ag aerogels via chemical oxidation of the surface ligands is reported. The precursor alloy NPs with composition-tunable morphologies were produced by galvanic replacement of the preformed Ag hollow NPs. The effect of Au:Ag molar ratio on the NP morphology and surface plasmon resonance has been thoroughly investigated and resulted in smaller Au/Ag alloy NPs (4-8 nm), larger Au/Ag alloy hollow NPs (40-45 nm), and Au/Ag alloy hollow particles decorated with smaller Au NPs (2-5 nm). The oxidative removal of surfactant ligands, followed by supercritical drying, is utilized to construct large (centimeter to millimeter) self-supported Au/Ag alloy aerogels. The resultant assemblies exhibit high surface areas (67-73 m(2)/g), extremely low densities (0.051-0.055 g/cm(3)), and interconnected mesoporous (2-50 nm) networks, making them of great interest for a number of new technologies. The influence of mesoporous gel morphology on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been studied using Rhodamine 101 (Rd 101) as the probe molecule. The alloy aerogels exhibit SERS signal intensities that are 10-42 times higher than those achieved from the precursor Au/Ag alloy NPs. The Au/Ag alloy aerogel III exhibits SERS sensing capability down to 1 nM level. The increased signal intensities attained for alloy aerogels are attributed to highly porous gel morphology and enhanced surface roughness that can potentially generate a large number of plasmonic hot spots, creating efficient SERS substrates for future applications. PMID:27142886

  7. Approximate treatment of semicore states in GW calculations with application to Au clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Xian, Jiawei; Baroni, Stefano; Umari, P.

    2014-03-28

    We address the treatment of transition metal atoms in GW electronic-structure calculations within the plane-wave pseudo-potential formalism. The contributions of s and p semi-core electrons to the self-energy, which are essential to grant an acceptable accuracy, are dealt with using a recently proposed scheme whereby the exchange components are treated exactly at the G{sub 0}W{sub 0} level, whereas a suitable approximation to the correlation components is devised. This scheme is benchmarked for small gold nano-clusters, resulting in ionization potentials, electron affinities, and density of states in very good agreement with those obtained from calculations where s and p semicore states are treated as valence orbitals, and allowing us to apply this same scheme to clusters of intermediate size, Au{sub 20} and Au{sub 32}, that would be otherwise very difficult to deal with.

  8. Highly narrow nanogap-containing Au@Au core-shell SERS nanoparticles: size-dependent Raman enhancement and applications in cancer cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chongya; Shen, Jianlei; Yan, Juan; Zhong, Jian; Qin, Weiwei; Liu, Rui; Aldalbahi, Ali; Zuo, Xiaolei; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; He, Dannong

    2016-01-28

    Cellular imaging technologies employing metallic surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) tags have gained much interest toward clinical diagnostics, but they are still suffering from poor controlled distribution of hot spots and reproducibility of SERS signals. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of high narrow nanogap-containing Au@Au core-shell SERS nanoparticles (GCNPs) for the identification and imaging of proteins overexpressed on the surface of cancer cells. First, plasmonic nanostructures are made of gold nanoparticles (∼15 nm) coated with gold shells, between which a highly narrow and uniform nanogap (∼1.1 nm) is formed owing to polyA anchored on the Au cores. The well controlled distribution of Raman reporter molecules, such as 4,4'-dipyridyl (44DP) and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), are readily encoded in the nanogap and can generate strong, reproducible SERS signals. In addition, we have investigated the size-dependent SERS activity of GCNPs and found that with the same laser wavelength, the Raman enhancement discriminated between particle sizes. The maximum Raman enhancement was achieved at a certain threshold of particle size (∼76 nm). High narrow nanogap-containing Au@Au core-shell SERS tags (GCTs) were prepared via the functionalization of hyaluronic acid (HA) on GCNPs, which recognized the CD44 receptor, a tumor-associated surface biomarker. And it was shown that GCTs have a good targeting ability to tumour cells and promising prospects for multiplex biomarker detection. PMID:26701141

  9. ZnO/Au-based surface plasmon resonance for CO2 gas sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuryadi, Ratno; Mayasari, Rina Dewi

    2016-01-01

    We fabricate surface plasmon resonance (SPR) device using a modified ZnO/Au-Kretschmann configuration to investigate the possibility of using ZnO for CO2 gas sensing at room temperature. Here, nanostructured ZnO/Au layer was deposited on the flat surface of the prism and then gas chamber was placed on the ZnO/Au surface to observe the gas response. The ZnO structures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. We found that ZnO structures have two types of nanostructures, i.e., individual nanorods and flower-like structures, which have hexagonal crystal structure. The ZnO nanorod has a diameter ranged from 200 to 300 nm and length ranged from 3 to 5 μm. The effect of gas response is demonstrated by a shift of SPR spectra and a change in light reflectance. It is found that the adsorption of gas molecules on the ZnO nanorods produces the shift of SPR angle to the lower light incident angle. A consistent sensing behavior over repetitive circles is also demonstrated.

  10. Formaldehyde concentrations in biology department teaching facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Korky, J.K.; Schwarz, S.R.; Lustigman, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    As students and faculty in the biological sciences can attest, low grade exposure to formaldehyde by skin contact and inhalation during dissection is quite irritating. Health effects noted upon exposure to formaldehyde at concentrations of 0.1 to 5 ppm are burning of the eyes, lacrimation, and general irritation to the upper respiratory passages. Symptoms reported for higher exposures, 10 to 20 ppm, include coughing, tightening of the chest, headache and palpitation of the heart. Long exposures at 50 to 100 ppm or more might result in pulmonary edema, pneumonitis, and even death. There is also concern with regard to potential long term detrimental effects. Formaldehyde has been cited as a possible carcinogen in animals. It is a known mutagen in laboratory experimental systems involving Drosophilia, grasshoppers, flowering plants, fungi and bacteria. Animal testing has led investigators to postulate that the primary damage resulting from formaldehyde exposure may involve DNA synthesis and ribosomal RNA transcription. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (NIOSH) investigators have been studying occupational exposure to formaldehyde for over a decade in a variety of industries. This study was undertaken to assess formaldehyde concentrations in biology department dissecting facilities in the 1982-1983 academic year in order if routine dissection produces levels of formaldehyde which were unsafe according to NIOSH and OSHA standards. Chronic formaldehyde exposure is cause for greater concern than incidental exposure.

  11. Formaldehyde monitoring program: development of sampling and analysis procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T. G.; Hawthorne, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    This report outlines the scope and goals of the formaldehyde analysis program being carried out in Health and Safety Research Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission. The outline of the sampling and analysis techniques under consideration, with reference to a time frame for developmental work and field application, is discussed. The complexity of the different techniques is addressed in instances where technical staff would be requird for accurate operation of the instrumentation.

  12. Effect of an ozone-generating air-purifying device on reducing concentrations of formaldehyde in air

    SciTech Connect

    Esswein, E.J.; Boeniger, M.F.

    1994-02-01

    Formaldehyde, an air contaminant found in many indoor air investigations, poses distinct occupational exposure hazards in certain job categories (e.g., mortuary science) but is also of concern when found or suspected in office buildings and homes. A variety of air-purifying devices (APDs) are currently available or marketed for application to reduce or remove concentrations of a variety of indoor air pollutants through the use of ozone as a chemical oxidant. An investigation was conducted to determine if concentrations of formaldehyde similar to those found in industrial hygiene evaluations of funeral homes could be reduced with the use of an ozone-generating APD. An ozone-generating APD was placed in an exposure chamber and formaldehyde-containing embalming solution was allowed to evaporate naturally, creating peak and mean chamber concentrations of 2.5 and 1.3 ppm, respectively. Continuous-reading instruments were used to sample for formaldehyde and ozone. Active sampling methods were also used to sample simultaneously for formaldehyde and a possible reactant product, formic acid. Triplicate measurements were made in each of three evaluations: formaldehyde alone, ozone alone, and formaldehyde and ozone combined. Concentrations of formaldehyde were virtually identical with and without 0.5 ppm ozone. No reduction in formaldehyde concentration was found during a 90-minute evaluation using ozone at this concentration with peak and average concentrations of approximately 2.5 and 1.3 ppm formaldehyde, respectively. The results of this investigation suggest that the use of ozone is ineffective in reducing concentrations of formaldehyde. Because ozone has demonstrated health hazards, and is a regulated air contaminant in both the occupational and ambient environment, the use of ozone as an air purification agent in indoor air does not seem warranted. 25 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Electrooxidation of formaldehyde based on nickel-palladium modified ordered mesoporous silicon.

    PubMed

    Miao, Fengjuan; Tao, Bairui

    2013-04-01

    Nickel and palladium nanoparticles were finely dispersed on ordered mesoporous silicon microchannels plate (MCP) by electroless plating. The structure and composition of the resulting Ni-Pd/Si MCP were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS). The electrocatalystic properties of Ni-Pd/Si MCP electrode for formaldehyde oxidation have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The results show that Ni-Pd/Si MCP has a higher catalytic activity and better steady-state behavior for formaldehyde oxidation. This may be attributed to the synergistic property of high dispersion of Nickel and Palladium nanoparticles and particular properties of mesoporous Si MCP. The present study shows a promising choice of Ni-Pd nanoparticles supported by mesoporous silicon as effective electrocatalyst for formaldehyde electrooxidation in alkaline medium. The results imply that the Ni-Pd/Si MCP nanocomposite has good potential application in formaldehyde fuel cells and sensors. PMID:23763207

  14. Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence Behavior of Au nanoparticles-hybridized Pb (II) metal-organic framework and its application in selective sensing hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongmin; Li, Xiaojian; Yan, Tao; Li, Yan; Liu, Haiyang; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Dan; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor based on Au nanoparticles-hybridized Pb (II)-β-cyclodextrin (Pb-β-CD) metal-organic framework for detecting hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was developed. Pb-β-CD shows excellent ECL behavior and unexpected reducing ability towards Au ions. Au nanoparticles could massively form on the surface of Pb-β-CD (Au@Pb-β-CD) without use of any additional reducing agent. In the presence of coreactant K2S2O8, the ECL emission of Pb-β-CD was enhanced by the formation of Au nanoparticles. Cr(VI) can collisionally quench the ECL behavior of Au@Pb-β-CD/S2O8(2-) system and the detection mechanism was investigated. This ECL sensor is found to have a linear response in the range of 0.01-100 μM and a low detection limit of 3.43 nM (S/N = 3) under the optimal conditions. These results suggest that metal-organic framework Au@Pb-β-CD has great potential in extending the application in the ECL field as an efficient luminophore. PMID:26902375

  15. Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence Behavior of Au nanoparticles-hybridized Pb (II) metal-organic framework and its application in selective sensing hexavalent chromium

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongmin; Li, Xiaojian; Yan, Tao; Li, Yan; Liu, Haiyang; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Dan; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) sensor based on Au nanoparticles-hybridized Pb (II)-β-cyclodextrin (Pb-β-CD) metal-organic framework for detecting hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was developed. Pb-β-CD shows excellent ECL behavior and unexpected reducing ability towards Au ions. Au nanoparticles could massively form on the surface of Pb-β-CD (Au@Pb-β-CD) without use of any additional reducing agent. In the presence of coreactant K2S2O8, the ECL emission of Pb-β-CD was enhanced by the formation of Au nanoparticles. Cr(VI) can collisionally quench the ECL behavior of Au@Pb-β-CD/S2O82− system and the detection mechanism was investigated. This ECL sensor is found to have a linear response in the range of 0.01–100 μM and a low detection limit of 3.43 nM (S/N = 3) under the optimal conditions. These results suggest that metal-organic framework Au@Pb-β-CD has great potential in extending the application in the ECL field as an efficient luminophore. PMID:26902375

  16. Formaldehyde Absorption toward W51

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Smoot, G.F.; Bennett, C.L.; Petuchowski, S.J.

    1988-04-01

    We have measured formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) absorption toward the HII region complex W51A (G49.5-0.4) in the 6 cm and 2 cm wavelength rotational transitions with angular resolution of approximately 4 inch. The continuum HII region shows a large, previously undetected shell structure 5.5 pc along the major axis. We observe no H{sub 2}CO emission in regions of low continuum intensity. The absorption, converted to optical depth, shows a higher degree of clumping than previous maps at lower resolution. The good S/N of the maps allows accurate estimation of the complicated line profiles, showing some of the absorbing clouds to be quite patchy. We list the properties of the opacity spectra for a number of positions both in the clumps and in the more diffuse regions of the absorbing clouds, and derive column densities for the 1{sub 11} and 2{sub 12} rotational levels of ortho-formaldehyde.

  17. Study of the nucleation and growth of antibiotic labeled Au NPs and blue luminescent Au8 quantum clusters for Hg2+ ion sensing, cellular imaging and antibacterial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Puneet; Singh, Dheeraj K.; Sadhu, Subha; Poddar, Pankaj

    2015-11-01

    Herein, we report a detailed experimental study supported by DFT calculations to understand the mechanism behind the synthesis of cefradine (CFD - an antibiotic) labeled gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) by employing CFD as both a mild reducing and capping agent. The analysis of the effect of growth conditions reveals that a higher concentration of HAuCl4 results in the formation of an increasing fraction of anisotropic structures, higher temperature leads to the formation of quasi-spherical particles instead of anisotropic ones, and larger pH leads to the formation of much smaller particles. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) results show that when the pH of the reaction medium increases from 4 to 6, the reduction potential of CFD increases which leads to the synthesis of nanoparticles (in a pH 4 reaction) to quantum clusters (in a pH 6 reaction). The MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry results of supernatant of the pH 6 reaction indicate the formation of [Au8(CFD)2S6] QCs which show fluorescence at ca. 432 nm with a Stokes shift of ca. 95 nm. The blue luminescence from Au8 QCs was applied for sensing of Hg2+ ions on the basis of an aggregation-induced fluorescence quenching mechanism and offers good selectivity and a high sensitivity with a limit of detection ca. 2 nM which is lower than the detection requirement of 10 nM by the U.S. EPA and 30 nM by WHO for drinking water. We have also applied the sensing probe to detect Hg2+ ions in bacterial samples. Further, we have investigated the antibacterial property of as-synthesized Au NPs using MIC, growth curve and cell survival assay. The results show that Au NPs could reduce the cell survival very efficiently rather than the cell growth in comparison to the antibiotic itself. The scanning electron microscopy study shows the degradation and blebbing of the bacterial cell wall upon exposure with Au NPs which was further supported by fluorescence microscopy results. These Au NPs did not show reactive oxygen species generation. We believe

  18. Optical properties of random alloys: application to CuAu and NiPt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Saha, Kamal; Mookerjee, Abhijit

    2005-07-01

    In an earlier paper we presented a formulation for the calculation of the configuration-averaged optical conductivity in random alloys. Our formulation is based on the augmented-space theorem introduced by one of us (Mookerjee 1973 J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 6 1340). In this communication we shall combine the augmented space methodology with the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital technique (TB-LMTO) to study the optical conductivities of two alloys, CuAu and NiPt.

  19. Highly narrow nanogap-containing Au@Au core-shell SERS nanoparticles: size-dependent Raman enhancement and applications in cancer cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chongya; Shen, Jianlei; Yan, Juan; Zhong, Jian; Qin, Weiwei; Liu, Rui; Aldalbahi, Ali; Zuo, Xiaolei; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai; He, Dannong

    2016-01-01

    Cellular imaging technologies employing metallic surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) tags have gained much interest toward clinical diagnostics, but they are still suffering from poor controlled distribution of hot spots and reproducibility of SERS signals. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of high narrow nanogap-containing Au@Au core-shell SERS nanoparticles (GCNPs) for the identification and imaging of proteins overexpressed on the surface of cancer cells. First, plasmonic nanostructures are made of gold nanoparticles (~15 nm) coated with gold shells, between which a highly narrow and uniform nanogap (~1.1 nm) is formed owing to polyA anchored on the Au cores. The well controlled distribution of Raman reporter molecules, such as 4,4'-dipyridyl (44DP) and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), are readily encoded in the nanogap and can generate strong, reproducible SERS signals. In addition, we have investigated the size-dependent SERS activity of GCNPs and found that with the same laser wavelength, the Raman enhancement discriminated between particle sizes. The maximum Raman enhancement was achieved at a certain threshold of particle size (~76 nm). High narrow nanogap-containing Au@Au core-shell SERS tags (GCTs) were prepared via the functionalization of hyaluronic acid (HA) on GCNPs, which recognized the CD44 receptor, a tumor-associated surface biomarker. And it was shown that GCTs have a good targeting ability to tumour cells and promising prospects for multiplex biomarker detection.Cellular imaging technologies employing metallic surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) tags have gained much interest toward clinical diagnostics, but they are still suffering from poor controlled distribution of hot spots and reproducibility of SERS signals. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of high narrow nanogap-containing Au@Au core-shell SERS nanoparticles (GCNPs) for the identification and imaging of proteins overexpressed on

  20. Asymmetric Aldol Reaction with Formaldehyde: a Challenging Process.

    PubMed

    Meninno, Sara; Lattanzi, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    The asymmetric aldol reaction with formaldehyde is a fundamental carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction in organic synthesis, as well as in the quest of the origin of life, as it is thought to have been the first "molecular brick" involved in the synthetic path to complex sugars. Products of aldol reactions, i.e., the β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds, are versatile building blocks used to access a great variety of functionalised molecules. The employment of formaldehyde, as a C1 symmetric electrophile, in aldol reactions can be likely considered the most challenging, yet simplest, process to introduce a hydroxymethyl group in an asymmetric fashion. In this account, an overview of the progress achieved in the asymmetric metal- and organocatalysed aldol reaction, using readily available formalin or paraformaldehyde sources, is illustrated. Our recent contribution to this area, with the application of asymmetric hydroxymethylation in cascade processes for the synthesis of γ-butyrolactones, is also shown. PMID:27328802

  1. Formaldehyde asthma--rare or overlooked

    SciTech Connect

    Nordman, H.; Keskinen, H.; Tuppurainen, M.

    1985-01-01

    A total of 230 persons who had been exposed to formaldehyde and suffered from asthma-like respiratory symptoms were examined between January 1, 1977, and May 31, 1983. All the subjects had a bronchial provocation test with formaldehyde. On the basis of the medical and occupational history of the patients, the specific bronchial provocation test, and other test results, 12 cases were considered to be caused by specific sensitization to formaldehyde. All subjects had been exposed occupationally. An exposure period of between 1 mo and 19 yr preceded the onset of symptoms. Three persons displayed no bronchial hyperreactivity as assessed with a histamine or metacholine provocation test. Eleven of the 12 reactions were triggered by about 2.5 mg/m3 and one reaction by about 1.2 mg/m3 of formaldehyde. The late reaction in 1 patient was completely blocked by the inhalation of 100 micrograms of beclomethasone di-isoproprionate before the challenge with formaldehyde. Seventy-one of the 218 subjects who did not react when they were challenged with formaldehyde demonstrated bronchial hyperreactivity. The authors conclude that formaldehyde asthma, although apparently a rare disease, is under reported. Removal from exposure has a favorable effect on the symptoms. Low domestic exposures, however, may maintain the symptoms in individuals already sensitized.

  2. Formaldehyde Exposures in a University Anatomy Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Kyle William

    Air sampling studies were conducted within a university anatomical laboratory during the embalmment of a cadaver in order to determine if dangerous concentrations of formaldehyde existed. Three air sampling studies were conducted in the anatomical laboratory on three separate days that a cadaver was being embalmed. Samples were collected and analyzed using the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Sampling and Analytical Methods: Method 52. Each air sampling study sampled for short term exposure limit (STEL) and time weighted mean (TWA) breathing zone formaldehyde concentrations as well as area TWA formaldehyde concentrations. A personal aldehyde monitor was also used in each air sampling study to sample for breathing zone formaldehyde concentrations. Measured TWA mean exposures to formaldehyde ranged from 0.15--1.3 parts per million (ppm), STEL formaldehyde exposures ranged from 0.019--0.64 ppm, and eight-hour TWAs ranged from 0.03 to 3.6 ppm. All 8-hour TWA formaldehyde concentrations sampled in the anatomy laboratory during an embalmment were less than the permissible exposure limit (PEL) required by OSHA.

  3. Mechanistic study on formaldehyde-induced hepatotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Strubelt, O.; Younes, M.; Pentz, R.; Kuehnel, W. )

    1989-01-01

    In isolated, hemoglobin-free perfused livers of fasted rats, formaldehyde at an initial concentration of 10 mmol/l produced toxicity as evidenced by a release of enzymes (GPT, SDH) and of glutathione (mainly GSSG) into the perfusate, an accumulation of calcium in the liver, and a depletion of hepatic glatathione. Formaldehyde also led to an enhanced release of malondialdehyde into the perfusate, indicating peroxidative processes and decreased hepatic oxygen consumption by about 50-70%. The electron microscopic investigation of formaldehyde-exposed livers showed a destruction of the mitochondria (ruptured membranes, loss of the cristae) and some damage of the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Feeding the rats prior to surgery attenuated the hepatotoxic effects of 10 mmol/l formaldehyde. At an initial concentration of 3 mmol/l, formaldehyde did not release enzymes from livers of fed or fasted rats but only from whose glutathione content had been depleted by treatment with phorone (250 mg/kg ip 2 h earlier). Formaldehyde liberated glucose and lactate from the livers of fed but not from those of fasted rats, indicating anaerobic energy supply in the fed state. The hepatotoxic action of formaldehyde is not due to its metabolism to formate or to the 10% methanol added as a stabilizing agent to the commercially available 37% solution named formalin.

  4. Hybridized doxorubicin-Au nanospheres exhibit enhanced near-infrared surface plasmon absorption for photothermal therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jialin; Wang, Zuhua; Li, Qingpo; Liu, Fei; Du, Yongzhong; Yuan, Hong; Hu, Fuqiang; Wei, Yinghui; You, Jian

    2015-03-19

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) employs photosensitizing agents, which are taken up by cells and generate heat when irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) light, to enable the photoablation of cancer cells. High absorption in the NIR region is crucial for a photosensitizing agent to achieve efficient PTT. Different combinations between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent agents always influence their spectrum properties. Herein, we fabricated a novel combination of a fluorescent agent (doxorubicin, DOX, also a popular chemotherapeutic agent) with gold nanospheres by synthesizing hybridized DOX-Au nanospheres (DAuNS), where a part of the DOX molecules and Au co-formed a hybridized matrix as the shell and the remaining DOX molecules precipitated as the core. The unique structure of DAuNS induced interesting changes in the characteristics including spectrum properties, morphology, drug loading and antitumor activity. We observed that DAuNS exhibited a significantly enhanced surface plasmon absorption in the NIR region, inducing a more efficient photothermal conversion and stronger tumor-cell killing ability under NIR laser irradiation. In addition, our study presents a new and simple platform to load a drug into nanoparticles. DAuNS could be a promising nanoparticle with the "two punch" efficacy of PTT and chemotherapy and could be used in clinical applications due to its controllable synthesis, small size, and narrow size distribution. PMID:25757809

  5. Cu2O and Au/Cu2O particles: surface properties and applications in glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Won, Yu-Ho; Stanciu, Lia A

    2012-01-01

    In this work we investigated the surface and facet-dependent catalytic properties of metal oxide particles as well as noble metal/metal oxide heterogeneous structures, with cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O) and Au/Cu(2)O being selected as model systems. As an example of application, we explored the potential of these materials in developing electrocatalytic devices. Cu(2)O particles were synthesized in various shapes, then used for testing their morphology-dependent electrochemical properties applied to the detection of glucose. While we did not attempt to obtain the best detection limit reported to date, the octahedral and hexapod Cu(2)O particles showed reasonable detection limits of 0.51 and 0.60 mM, respectively, which are physiologically relevant concentrations. However, detection limit seems to be less affected by particle shapes than sensitivity. Heterogeneous systems where Au NPs were deposited on the surface of Cu(2)O particles were also tested with similar results in terms of the effect of surface orientation. PMID:23201983

  6. Cu2O and Au/Cu2O Particles: Surface Properties and Applications in Glucose Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yu-Ho; Stanciu, Lia A.

    2012-01-01

    In this work we investigated the surface and facet-dependent catalytic properties of metal oxide particles as well as noble metal/metal oxide heterogeneous structures, with cuprous oxide (Cu2O) and Au/Cu2O being selected as model systems. As an example of application, we explored the potential of these materials in developing electrocatalytic devices. Cu2O particles were synthesized in various shapes, then used for testing their morphology-dependent electrochemical properties applied to the detection of glucose. While we did not attempt to obtain the best detection limit reported to date, the octahedral and hexapod Cu2O particles showed reasonable detection limits of 0.51 and 0.60 mM, respectively, which are physiologically relevant concentrations. However, detection limit seems to be less affected by particle shapes than sensitivity. Heterogeneous systems where Au NPs were deposited on the surface of Cu2O particles were also tested with similar results in terms of the effect of surface orientation. PMID:23201983

  7. Formaldehyde preparation methods for pressure and temperature dependent laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Müller, D.; Rieger, S.; Schmidl, G.; Triebel, W.; Paa, W.

    2015-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an excellent tracer for the early phase of ignition of hydrocarbon fuels and can be used, e.g., for characterization of single droplet ignition. However, due to its fast thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures and pressures, the determination of concentration fields from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements is difficult. In this paper, we address LIF measurements of this important combustion intermediate using a calibration cell. Here, formaldehyde is created from evaporation of paraformaldehyde. We discuss three setups for preparation of formaldehyde/air mixtures with respect to their usability for well-defined heating of formaldehyde/air mixtures. The "basic setup" uses a resist heater around the measurement cell for investigation of formaldehyde near vacuum conditions or formaldehyde/air samples after sequential admixing of air. The second setup, described for the first time in detail here, takes advantage of a constant flow formaldehyde/air regime which uses preheated air to reduce the necessary time for gas heating. We used the constant flow system to measure new pressure dependent LIF excitation spectra in the 343 nm spectral region (414 absorption band of formaldehyde). The third setup, based on a novel concept for fast gas heating via excitation of SF6 (chemically inert gas) using a TEA (transverse excitation at atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser, allows to further minimize both gas heating time and thermal decomposition. Here, an admixture of CO2 is served for real time temperature measurement based on Raman scattering. The applicability of the fast laser heating system has been demonstrated with gas mixtures of SF6 + air, SF6 + N2, as well as SF6 + N2 + CO2 at 1 bar total pressure.

  8. Formaldehyde preparation methods for pressure and temperature dependent laser-induced fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Burkert, A; Müller, D; Rieger, S; Schmidl, G; Triebel, W; Paa, W

    2015-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an excellent tracer for the early phase of ignition of hydrocarbon fuels and can be used, e.g., for characterization of single droplet ignition. However, due to its fast thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures and pressures, the determination of concentration fields from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements is difficult. In this paper, we address LIF measurements of this important combustion intermediate using a calibration cell. Here, formaldehyde is created from evaporation of paraformaldehyde. We discuss three setups for preparation of formaldehyde/air mixtures with respect to their usability for well-defined heating of formaldehyde/air mixtures. The "basic setup" uses a resist heater around the measurement cell for investigation of formaldehyde near vacuum conditions or formaldehyde/air samples after sequential admixing of air. The second setup, described for the first time in detail here, takes advantage of a constant flow formaldehyde/air regime which uses preheated air to reduce the necessary time for gas heating. We used the constant flow system to measure new pressure dependent LIF excitation spectra in the 343 nm spectral region (41 (4) absorption band of formaldehyde). The third setup, based on a novel concept for fast gas heating via excitation of SF6 (chemically inert gas) using a TEA (transverse excitation at atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser, allows to further minimize both gas heating time and thermal decomposition. Here, an admixture of CO2 is served for real time temperature measurement based on Raman scattering. The applicability of the fast laser heating system has been demonstrated with gas mixtures of SF6 + air, SF6 + N2, as well as SF6 + N2 + CO2 at 1 bar total pressure. PMID:26724008

  9. Urea formaldehyde foam: a dangerous insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Keough, C.

    1980-12-01

    Insulating a home with urea formaldehyde foam can lead to severe health problems due to poisoning from formaldehyde gas. Respiratory problems, allergies, memory loss, and mental problems can result from exposure to foam insulation fumes. Research is now under way at the Chemical Industry Inst., Univ. of Washington, and other institutions to learn more about the health effects of formaldehyde foam and to develop possible remedies to these problems. Several states are either banning or controlling the use of this type of home insulation.

  10. Novel electrochemical redox-active species: one-step synthesis of polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd and its application for multiplexed immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liyuan; Feng, Feng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2015-11-01

    Electrochemical redox-active species play crucial role in electrochemically multiplexed immunoassays. A one-pot method for synthesizing four kinds of new electrochemical redox-active species was reported using HAuCl4 and Na2PdCl4 as dual oxidating agents and aniline derivatives as monomers. The synthesized polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd composites, namely poly(N-methyl-o-benzenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-o-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd and poly(3,3’,5,5’-tetramethylbenzidine)-Au/Pd, exhibited electrochemical redox activity at -0.65 V, -0.3 V, 0.12 V, and 0.5 V, respectively. Meanwhile, these composites showed high H2O2 electrocatalytic activity because of the presence of Au/Pd. The as-prepared composites were used as electrochemical immunoprobes in simultaneous detection of four tumor biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA199), carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA724), and alpha fetoprotein (AFP)). This immunoassay shed light on potential applications in simultaneous gastric cancer (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, CA724) and liver cancer diagnosis (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, AFP). The present strategy to the synthesize redox species could be easily extended to other polymers such as polypyrrole derivatives and polythiophene derivatives. This would be of great significance in the electrochemical detection of more analytes.

  11. Novel electrochemical redox-active species: one-step synthesis of polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd and its application for multiplexed immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyuan; Feng, Feng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical redox-active species play crucial role in electrochemically multiplexed immunoassays. A one-pot method for synthesizing four kinds of new electrochemical redox-active species was reported using HAuCl4 and Na2PdCl4 as dual oxidating agents and aniline derivatives as monomers. The synthesized polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd composites, namely poly(N-methyl-o-benzenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-o-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd and poly(3,3’,5,5’-tetramethylbenzidine)-Au/Pd, exhibited electrochemical redox activity at −0.65 V, −0.3 V, 0.12 V, and 0.5 V, respectively. Meanwhile, these composites showed high H2O2 electrocatalytic activity because of the presence of Au/Pd. The as-prepared composites were used as electrochemical immunoprobes in simultaneous detection of four tumor biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA199), carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA724), and alpha fetoprotein (AFP)). This immunoassay shed light on potential applications in simultaneous gastric cancer (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, CA724) and liver cancer diagnosis (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, AFP). The present strategy to the synthesize redox species could be easily extended to other polymers such as polypyrrole derivatives and polythiophene derivatives. This would be of great significance in the electrochemical detection of more analytes. PMID:26577799

  12. Crystallographic investigation of Au nanoparticles embedded in a SrTiO{sub 3} thin film for plasmonics applications by means of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pincini, Davide; Mazzoli, Claudio; Bernhardt, Hendrik; Katzer, Christian; Schmidl, Frank; Uschmann, Ingo; Detlefs, Carsten

    2015-03-14

    Self-organized monocrystalline Au nanoparticles with potential applications in plasmonics are grown in a SrTiO{sub 3} matrix by a novel two-step deposition process. The crystalline preferred orientation of these Au nanoparticles is investigated by synchrotron hard x-ray diffraction. Nanoparticles preferentially align with the (111) direction along the substrate normal (001), whereas two in-plane orientations are found with [110]{sub SrTiO{sub 3}}∥[110]{sub Au} and [100]{sub SrTiO{sub 3}}∥[110]{sub Au}. Additionally, a smaller diffraction signal from nanoparticles with the (001) direction parallel to the substrate normal (001) is observed; once again, two in-plane orientations are found, with [100]{sub SrTiO{sub 3}}∥[100]{sub Au} and [100]{sub SrTiO{sub 3}}∥[110]{sub Au}. The populations of the two in-plane orientations are found to depend on the thickness of the gold film deposited in the first step of the growth.

  13. 78 FR 34795 - Formaldehyde; Third-Party Certification Framework for the Formaldehyde Standards for Composite...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ..., automotive, and food and consumer products. The standards used in third-party certification are typically... TPCs and their formaldehyde emissions testing laboratories. EPA would exercise authority to...

  14. Enhanced Formaldehyde Detoxification by Overexpression of Glutathione-Dependent Formaldehyde Dehydrogenase from Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Achkor, Hakima; Díaz, Maykelis; Fernández, M. Rosario; Biosca, Josep Antoni; Parés, Xavier; Martínez, M. Carmen

    2003-01-01

    The ADH2 gene codes for the Arabidopsis glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH), an enzyme involved in formaldehyde metabolism in eukaryotes. In the present work, we have investigated the potential role of FALDH in detoxification of exogenous formaldehyde. We have generated a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mutant strain (sfa1Δ) by in vivo deletion of the SFA1 gene that codes for the endogenous FALDH. Overexpression of Arabidopsis FALDH in this mutant confers high resistance to formaldehyde added exogenously, which demonstrates the functional conservation of the enzyme through evolution and supports its essential role in formaldehyde metabolism. To investigate the role of the enzyme in plants, we have generated Arabidopsis transgenic lines with modified levels of FALDH. Plants overexpressing the enzyme show a 25% increase in their efficiency to take up exogenous formaldehyde, whereas plants with reduced levels of FALDH (due to either a cosuppression phenotype or to the expression of an antisense construct) show a marked slower rate and reduced ability for formaldehyde detoxification as compared with the wild-type Arabidopsis. These results show that the capacity to take up and detoxify high concentrations of formaldehyde is proportionally related to the FALDH activity in the plant, revealing the essential role of this enzyme in formaldehyde detoxification. PMID:12913179

  15. Resorcinol-formaldehyde and carbon aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Alviso, C.T.; Pekela, R.W.; Gross, J.; Lu, X.; Caps, R.; Fricke, J

    1996-04-01

    Aerogels are a unique class of materials possessing an open-cell structure with ultrafine cells/pores (<100nm), high surface area (400--1100 m{sup 2}/g), and a solid matrix composed of interconnected particles, fibers, or platelets with characteristic dimensions of 10nm. Although monolithic aerogels are ideal candidates for many applications (e.g. transparent window insulation), current processing methods have limited their introduction into the commercial marketplace. Our research focuses on the formation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogel microspheres which offer an attractive alternative to monolith production. An inverse emulsion polymerization is used to produce these spherical gel particles which undergo solvent exchange followed by supercritical drying with carbon dioxide. This process yields aerogel microspheres (10--80{mu} diameter) which can be used as loosely packed powders, compression molded into near-net shapes using a polymer binder, or used as additives in conventional foaming operations to produce new aerogel composites with superior thermal properties. The emulsification procedure, thermal characterization, mechanical properties, and potential applications of RF aerogel microspheres will be discussed.

  16. Facile Synthesis of Au-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles and Their Application in Bacteria Detection via a SERS Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junfeng; Wu, Xuezhong; Wang, Chongwen; Rong, Zhen; Ding, Hongmei; Li, Hui; Li, Shaohua; Shao, Ningsheng; Dong, Peitao; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2016-08-10

    This study proposes a facile method for synthesis of Au-coated magnetic nanoparticles (AuMNPs) core/shell nanocomposites with nanoscale rough surfaces. MnFe2O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were first modified with a uniform polyethylenimine layer (2 nm) through self-assembly under sonication. The negatively charged Au seeds were then adsorbed on the surface of the MnFe2O4 NPs through electrostatic interaction for Au shell formation. Our newly developed sonochemically assisted hydroxylamine seeding growth method was used to grow the adsorbed gold seeds into large Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) to form a nanoscale rough Au shell. Au-coated magnetic nanoparticles (AuMNPs) were obtained from the intermediate product (Au seeds decorated magnetic core) under sonication within 5 min. The AuMNPs were highly uniform in size and shape and exhibited satisfactory surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity and strong magnetic responsivity. PATP was used as a probe molecule to evaluate the SERS performance of the synthesized AuMNPs with a detection limit of 10(-9) M. The synthesized AuMNPs were conjugated with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antibody for bacteria capture and separation. The synthesized plasmonic AuNR-DTNB NPs, whose LSPR wavelength was adjusted to the given laser excitation wavelength (785 nm), were conjugated with S. aureus antibody to form a SERS tag for specific recognition and report of the target bacteria. S. aureus was indirectly detected through SERS based on sandwich-structured immunoassay, with a detection limit of 10 cells/mL. Moreover, the SERS intensity at Raman peak of 1331 cm(-1) exhibited a linear relationship to the logarithm of bacteria concentrations ranging from 10(1) cells/mL to 10(5) cells/mL. PMID:27420923

  17. Design of highly sensitive and selective Au@NiO yolk-shell nanoreactors for gas sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Rai, Prabhakar; Yoon, Ji-Wook; Jeong, Hyun-Mook; Hwang, Su-Jin; Kwak, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jong-Heun

    2014-07-21

    Au@NiO yolk-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by simple solution route and applied for efficient gas sensor towards H₂S gas. Carbon encapsulated Au (Au@C core-shell) NPs were synthesized by glucose-assisted hydrothermal method, whereas Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs were synthesized by precipitation method using Au@C core-shell NPs as a template. Sub-micrometer Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs were formed having 50-70 nm Au NPs at the periphery of NiO shell (10-20 nm), which was composed of 6-12 nm primary NiO particles. Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs showed higher response for H2S compared to other interfering gases (ethanol, p-xylene, NH₃, CO and H₂). The maximum response was 108.92 for 5 ppm of H₂S gas at 300 °C, which was approximately 19 times higher than that for the interfering gases. The response of Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs to H₂S was approximately 4 times higher than that of bare NiO hollow nanospheres. Improved performance of Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs was attributed to hollow spaces that allowed the accessibility of Au NPs to gas molecules. It was suggested that adsorption of H₂S on Au NPs resulted in the formation of sulfide layer, which possibly lowered its work function, and therefore tuned the electron transfer from Au to NiO rather NiO to Au, which leaded to increase in resistance and therefore response. PMID:24933405

  18. A brief review of control measures for indoor formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T.G.

    1988-01-01

    Indoor environments contain a variety of consumer and construction products that emit formaldehyde (CH/sub 2/O) vapor. The strongest CH/sub 2/O emitters are typically particleboard underlayment and industrial particleboard, hardwood plywood paneling, urea-formaldehyde foam insulation, and medium density fiberboard, all of which contain urea-formaldehyde (UF) resins. The contribution of individual products to indoor CH/sub 2/O levels depends on several parameters, including the quantity and age of the product, building ventilation rate, presence of permeation barriers, temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), and CH/sub 2/O vapor concentration resulting from all of the CH/sub 2/O emitters (1,3-8). Combustion sources (e.g., kerosene heaters, gas stoves and cigarettes), carpet and carpet padding, resilient flooring (e.g., linoleum), gypsum board, non-apparel and apparel textiles, ceiling tiles, fibrous glass insulation and softwood plywood subflooring are generally weak emitters that do not contribute significantly to steady-state, indoor CH/sub 2/O levels. Control measures exist to reduce CH/sub 2/O emissions from consumer and construction products during their manufacturer and in post-installation applications. This note summarized the effectiveness of the following subset of post-installation control measures: product aging, installations of permeation barriers (i.e., flooring) and increased building ventilation. 14 refs.

  19. Health and Environmental Effects Profile for Formaldehyde

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Health and Environmental Effects Profile for formaldehyde was prepared by the Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office, Cincinnati, OH for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response to support listings of hazardous cons...

  20. HETEROGENOUS PHOTOREACTION OF FORMALDEHYDE WITH HYDROXYL RADICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric heterogeneous photoreactions occur between formaldehyde and hydroxyl radicals to produce formic acid. hese photoreactions not only occur in clouds, but also in other tropospheric hydrometeors such as precipitation and dew droplets. xperiments were performed by irradia...

  1. Contribution of formaldehyde to respiratory cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, N; Levine, R J; Albert, R E; Blair, A E; Griesemer, R A; Landrigan, P J; Stayner, L T; Swenberg, J A

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews the available data on the carcinogenicity of formaldehyde from experimental and epidemiologic studies and makes recommendations for further research. Two definitive chronic inhalation bioassays on rodents have demonstrated that formaldehyde produces nasal cancer in rats and mice at 14 ppm and in rats at 6 ppm, which is within the domain of present permissible human exposure (8-hr time-weighted average of 3 ppm, a 5 ppm ceiling, and a 10 ppm short-term exposure limit). Biochemical and physiologic studies in rats have shown that inhaled formaldehyde can depress respiration, inhibit mucociliary clearance, stimulate cell proliferation, and crosslink DNA and protein in the nasal mucosa. No deaths from nasal cancer have been reported in epidemiologic studies of cohorts exposed to formaldehyde, but three case-control studies suggest the possibility of increased risk. Although excesses of lung cancer deaths have been observed in some studies at industrial plants with formaldehyde exposure, uncertainties in interpretation limit the evaluation of these findings. Excess cancers of the brain and of lymphatic and hematopoietic tissues have been reported in certain studies of industrial groups and in most studies of formaldehyde-exposed professionals, but whether these excesses are related to formaldehyde exposure is not known. Several properties of formaldehyde pose unique problems for future research: the mechanisms responsible for its nonlinear response; its probable mechanism of carcinogenic action as a cross-linking agent; its formation in tissues as a normal metabolite; its possible action as a promoter and/or a cocarcinogen; and the importance of glutathione as a host defense at low exposure. PMID:3830109

  2. Report on the Consensus Workshop on Formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    1984-12-01

    The Consensus Workshop on Formaldehyde consisted of bringing together scientists from academia, government, industry and public interest groups to address some important toxicological questions concerning the health effects of formaldehyde. The participants in the workshop, the Executive Panel which coordinated the meeting, and the questions posed, all were chosen through a broadly based nomination process in order to achieve as comprehensive a consensus as possible. The subcommittees considered the toxicological problems associated with formaldehyde in the areas of exposure, epidemiology, carcinogenicity/histology/genotoxicity, immunology/sensitization/irritation, structure activity/biochemistry/metabolism, reproduction/teratology, behavior/neurotoxicity/psychology and risk estimation. Some questions considered included the possible human carcinogenicity of formaldehyde, as well as other human health effects, and the interpretation of pathology induced by formaldehyde. These reports, plus introductory material on the procedures used in setting up the Consensus Workshop are presented here. Additionally, there is included a listing of the data base that was made available to the panel chairmen prior to the meeting and was readily accessible to the participants during their deliberations in the meeting. This data base, since it was computerized, was also capable of being searched for important terms. These materials were supplemented by information brought by the panelists. The workshop has defined the consensus concerning a number of major points in formaldehyde toxicology and has identified a number of major deficits in understanding which are important guides to future research. PMID:6525992

  3. Report on the Consensus Workshop on Formaldehyde.

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The Consensus Workshop on Formaldehyde consisted of bringing together scientists from academia, government, industry and public interest groups to address some important toxicological questions concerning the health effects of formaldehyde. The participants in the workshop, the Executive Panel which coordinated the meeting, and the questions posed, all were chosen through a broadly based nomination process in order to achieve as comprehensive a consensus as possible. The subcommittees considered the toxicological problems associated with formaldehyde in the areas of exposure, epidemiology, carcinogenicity/histology/genotoxicity, immunology/sensitization/irritation, structure activity/biochemistry/metabolism, reproduction/teratology, behavior/neurotoxicity/psychology and risk estimation. Some questions considered included the possible human carcinogenicity of formaldehyde, as well as other human health effects, and the interpretation of pathology induced by formaldehyde. These reports, plus introductory material on the procedures used in setting up the Consensus Workshop are presented here. Additionally, there is included a listing of the data base that was made available to the panel chairmen prior to the meeting and was readily accessible to the participants during their deliberations in the meeting. This data base, since it was computerized, was also capable of being searched for important terms. These materials were supplemented by information brought by the panelists. The workshop has defined the consensus concerning a number of major points in formaldehyde toxicology and has identified a number of major deficits in understanding which are important guides to future research. PMID:6525992

  4. Precisely controlled resorcinol-formaldehyde resin coating for fabricating core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Shengjie; Zang, Jun; Xu, Chaofa; Zheng, Ming-Sen; Dong, Quan-Feng; Sun, Daohua; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2013-07-01

    This work provides a facile one-step sol-gel route to synthesize high-quality resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin coated nanocomposites that can be further used to fabricate desired carbon nanostructures. Colloidal particles with different morphologies and sizes can be coated with high-quality RF resin shells by the proposed cationic surfactant assisted RF resin coating strategy. The as-synthesized RF resin coated nanocomposites are ideal candidates for selective synthesis of core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures. Based on the carboxylic functional RF resin coating, graphitic carbon nanostructures can also be synthesized by employing the graphitization catalyst. The as-synthesized carbon nanostructures show the advantageous performances in several applications. Hollow carbon spheres are potential electrode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. Hollow graphitic spheres are promising catalyst supports for oxygen reduction reaction. And yolk-shell structured Au@HCS nanoreactors with ultrathin shells exhibit high catalytic activity and recyclability in confined catalysis.This work provides a facile one-step sol-gel route to synthesize high-quality resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin coated nanocomposites that can be further used to fabricate desired carbon nanostructures. Colloidal particles with different morphologies and sizes can be coated with high-quality RF resin shells by the proposed cationic surfactant assisted RF resin coating strategy. The as-synthesized RF resin coated nanocomposites are ideal candidates for selective synthesis of core-shell, hollow, and yolk-shell carbon nanostructures. Based on the carboxylic functional RF resin coating, graphitic carbon nanostructures can also be synthesized by employing the graphitization catalyst. The as-synthesized carbon nanostructures show the advantageous performances in several applications. Hollow carbon spheres are potential electrode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. Hollow graphitic

  5. Formaldehyde sensor using non-dispersive UV spectroscopy at 340nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, J. J.; Hodgkinson, J.; Saffell, J. R.; Tatam, R. P.

    2014-05-01

    Formaldehyde is a volatile organic compound that exists as a gas at room temperature. It is hazardous to human health causing irritation of the eyes, nose and throat, headaches, limited pulmonary function and is a potential human carcinogen. Sources include incomplete combustion, numerous modern building materials and vehicle fumes. Here we describe a simple method for detecting formaldehyde using low resolution non-dispersive UV absorption spectroscopy for the first time. A two channel system has been developed, making use of a strong absorption peak at 339nm and a neighbouring region of negligible absorption at 336nm as a reference. Using a modulated UV LED as a light source and narrowband filters to select the desired spectral bands, a simple detection system was constructed that was specifically targeted at formaldehyde. A minimum detectable absorbance of 4.5 × 10-5 AU was estimated (as ΔI/I0), corresponding to a limit of detection of approximately 6.6 ppm for a 195mm gas cell, with a response time of 20s. However, thermally-induced drift in the LED spectral output caused this to deteriorate over longer time periods to around 30 ppm or 2 × 10-4 AU.

  6. Hybridized doxorubicin-Au nanospheres exhibit enhanced near-infrared surface plasmon absorption for photothermal therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jialin; Wang, Zuhua; Li, Qingpo; Liu, Fei; Du, Yongzhong; Yuan, Hong; Hu, Fuqiang; Wei, Yinghui; You, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) employs photosensitizing agents, which are taken up by cells and generate heat when irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) light, to enable the photoablation of cancer cells. High absorption in the NIR region is crucial for a photosensitizing agent to achieve efficient PTT. Different combinations between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent agents always influence their spectrum properties. Herein, we fabricated a novel combination of a fluorescent agent (doxorubicin, DOX, also a popular chemotherapeutic agent) with gold nanospheres by synthesizing hybridized DOX-Au nanospheres (DAuNS), where a part of the DOX molecules and Au co-formed a hybridized matrix as the shell and the remaining DOX molecules precipitated as the core. The unique structure of DAuNS induced interesting changes in the characteristics including spectrum properties, morphology, drug loading and antitumor activity. We observed that DAuNS exhibited a significantly enhanced surface plasmon absorption in the NIR region, inducing a more efficient photothermal conversion and stronger tumor-cell killing ability under NIR laser irradiation. In addition, our study presents a new and simple platform to load a drug into nanoparticles. DAuNS could be a promising nanoparticle with the ``two punch'' efficacy of PTT and chemotherapy and could be used in clinical applications due to its controllable synthesis, small size, and narrow size distribution.Photothermal therapy (PTT) employs photosensitizing agents, which are taken up by cells and generate heat when irradiated with near-infrared (NIR) light, to enable the photoablation of cancer cells. High absorption in the NIR region is crucial for a photosensitizing agent to achieve efficient PTT. Different combinations between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent agents always influence their spectrum properties. Herein, we fabricated a novel combination of a fluorescent agent (doxorubicin, DOX, also a popular chemotherapeutic agent) with gold

  7. Formation of core-shell Au@Ag nanorods induced by catecholamines: A comparative study and an analytical application.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, M V; Apyari, V V; Dmitrienko, S G; Garshev, A V

    2016-09-14

    Gold nanorods (AuNRs) stabilized by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) were synthesized and an interaction of catecholamines (CAs) with silver ions in the presence of the obtained AuNRs was studied. The reaction results into formation of core-shell Au@Ag nanorods (Au@AgNRs) and leads to a hypsochromic shift of the long-wave surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band in the absorption spectrum of AuNRs. The influence of a CA structure, excess of CTAB, interaction time, pH, concentration of AuNRs, silver ions and CAs on this interaction was studied. Based on correlation of the NRs spectral characteristics with the concentration of CAs, a method for spectrophotometric determination of dobutamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine with detection limits 27, 18, 16 and 13 μg L(-1), respectively, has been developed. The method can be applied to the analysis of medicines. PMID:27566354

  8. Rapid synthesis and characterization of hybrid ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods for high performance, low temperature NO2 gas sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnuvelu, Dinesh Veeran; Pullithadathil, Biji; Prasad, Arun K.; Dhara, Sandip; Ashok, Anuradha; Mohamed, Kamruddin; Tyagi, Ashok Kumar; Raj, Baldev

    2015-11-01

    A rapid synthesis route for hybrid ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods has been realized for ultrasensitive, trace-level NO2 gas sensor applications. ZnO nanorods and hybrid ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods are structurally analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Optical characterization using UV-visible (UV-vis), photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectroscopies elucidate alteration in the percentage of defect and charge transport properties of ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods. The study reveals the accumulation of electrons at metal-semiconductor junctions leading to upward band bending for ZnO and thus favors direct electron transfer from ZnO to Au nanoclusters, which mitigates charge carrier recombination process. The operating temperature of ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods based sensor significantly decreased to 150 °C compared to alternate NO2 sensors (300 °C). Moreover, a linear sensor response in the range of 0.5-5 ppm of NO2 concentration was observed with a lowest detection limit of 500 ppb using conventional electrodes. The defects with deep level, observed in ZnO nanorods and hybrid ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods influences local electron density, which in-turn indirectly influence the gas sensing properties. The ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods based sensor exhibited good selectivity toward NO2 and was found to be very stable.

  9. EFFECTS OF FORMALDEHYDE AND PARTICLE-BOUND FORMALDEHYDE ON LUNG MACROPHAGE FUNCTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. George Jakab and associates exposed mice to varying levels (ranging from 0.5 to 15 parts per million [ppm]) of formaldehyde alone or to formaldehyde (5 and 2.5 ppm) mixed with carbon black particles. Carbon black particles were chosen because of their similarity to comb...

  10. Formaldehyde as hypothetical primer of biohomochirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldanskii, Vitalii I.

    1996-07-01

    One of the most intriguing and crucial problems of the prebiotic evolution and the origin of life is the explanation of the origin of biohomochirality. A scheme of conversions originated by formaldehyde (FA) as hypothetical primer of biohomochirality is proposed. The merit of FA as executor of this function is based -inter alia - on the distinguished role of FA as one of the earliest and simplest molecules in both warm, terrestrial and cold, extraterrestrial scenarios of the origin of life. The confirmation of the role of FA as primer of biohomochirality would support the option of an RNA world as an alternative to the protein world. The suggested hypothesis puts forward for the first time a concrete sequence of chemical reactions which can lead to biohomochirality. The spontaneous breaking of the mirror symmetry is secured by the application of the well-known Frank scheme (combination of autocatalysis and ``annihilation'' of L and D enantiomers) to the series of interactions of FA ``trimers'' (i.e. C3H6O3 compounds) of (aaa), (apa) and (app) types, where the monomeric groups (a) means ``achirons'' (a=CHn, n>=2 and C=M, M=C,O) and (p) mean ``prochirons'' (p=HC*OM, M=H,C).

  11. Graphene decorated with PtAu alloy nanoparticles: facile synthesis and promising application for formic acid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Liao, Honggang; Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Yin, Geping; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-03-01

    PtAu alloy nanoparticles (~ 3.2 nm in diameter) are synthesized in poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) aqueous solution and uniformly dispersed on graphene nanosheets. PtAu/graphene exhibits high electrocatalytic activity and stability for formic acid oxidation, which is attributed to the high dispersion of PtAu nanoparticles and the specific interaction between PtAu and graphene, indicating a promising catalyst for direct formic acid fuel cells. The facile method can be readily extended to the synthesis of other alloy nanoparticles.

  12. Fabrication of hierarchical core-shell Au@ZnO heteroarchitectures initiated by heteroseed assembly for photocatalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yao; Zhou, Yanjie; Li, Jie; Ma, Jie; Shi, Donglu; Chen, Junhong; Yang, Jinhu

    2014-03-15

    Three dimensional dandelion-like hierarchical core-shell Au@ZnO heteroarchitectures with ZnO nanorods grown radially on Au nanoparticle (NP) cores have been successfully prepared with a high yield via a simple solution method involving heteroseed-induced nucleation and subsequent heteroepitaxial growth processes. Briefly, mercaptopropionic acid (MA) modified Au NPs were synthesized beforehand and served as nucleation centers for primary ZnO seed generation and Au@ZnO heteroseed formation. Then an epitaxial growth of ZnO nanorods (ZnO NRs) on the Au@ZnO heteroseeds resulted in the formation of Au@ZnO dandelions. The photocatalytic properties of as-prepared Au@ZnO dandelions were evaluated through rhodamine B (RhB) photodegradation under UV irradiation. The result showed that the Au@ZnO dandelions had improved photocatalytic performance compared with pure ZnO NRs and hybrids of ZnO NRs/Au NPs, due likely to the synergistic effect of the metal-semiconductor heterojunction and the unique dandelion-like hierarchical core-shell structure. PMID:24461832

  13. Formaldehyde absorption toward W51

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Petuchowski, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    Formaldehyde (H2CO) absorption toward the H II region complex W51A (G49.5 - 0.4) in the 6 cm and 2 cm wavelength rotational transitions has been measured with angular resolution of about 0.15 pc. The continuum H II region shows a large, previously undetected shell structure 5.5 pc along the major axis. The absorption, converted to optical depth, shows a higher degree of clumping throughout the map than previous maps at lower resolution; in particular, two narrow regions of enhanced opacity are observed. The absorption in the velocity range 64-67 km/s LSR extends over most of the region, with an observed velocity gradient of 5.2 km/s pc. The opacity structure largely parallels the velocity structure, with a ridge of enhanced opacity to the north of the highest velocity feature. The S/N of the maps allows accurate modeling of the spectral profiles. Nine distinct clumps in the foreground clouds have been identified and parametrized, and column densities for the 1(11) and 2(12) rotational levels of orthoformaldehyde have been derived.

  14. Formaldehyde OMI operational retrieval upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Abad, G.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.

    2013-05-01

    Total column of formaldehyde (HCHO), a proxy for biogenic emissions, can be observed from satellites using the ultraviolet region of the spectrum. The operational HCHO retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the AURA satellite, part of NASA's A-train constellation of Earth Observing satellites, are described. The operational retrieval, based on a basic optical absorption spectroscopy (BOAS) algorithm, has been affected by the degradation of the instrument especially from 2008 onwards. The most significant problems are the unrealistic increasing high background concentrations of HCHO retrieved from OMI and the row anomaly. An upgrade for the original operational algorithm is therefore needed to ensure its trend quality and to account for these difficulties. The strategies implemented to deal with the instrumental degradation are presented here. Air mass factors (AMFs) in the current fitting window show significant wavelength dependence. Fitting uncertainties can potentially be improved by including shorter wavelengths as long as the AMFs wavelength dependence is taken into account. As part of these improvements a look-up table of wavelength-dependent AMFs have been calculated. Using this new table it is possible to retrieve the HCHO total column directly, weighting the HCHO cross sections with the wavelength-dependent AMFs. Additionally, the pixels affected by the row anomaly are now flagged in the level 2 data generated with the upgraded algorithm.

  15. One-Pot Synthesis of Monodisperse Noble Metal @ Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (M@RF) and M@Carbon Core-Shell Nanostructure and Their Catalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peipei; Xu, Yong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xuchun; Zhang, Qiao

    2015-10-27

    We demonstrate that noble metal @ RF core-shell nanostructures can be obtained through a facile one-pot synthesis approach in the absence of any additional surfactants. Monodisperse metal@RF core-shell nanostructures can be produced within 1 h on a large scale. Both the core size and shell thickness can be readily tuned by altering the reaction parameters. Systematic studies reveal that resorcinol could have several functions: it could act as a reactant to form RF resin, and it also could passivate the surface of metallic nanoparticles to prevent them from aggregating. Additionally, for the first time, our results suggest that resorcinol may act as a reducing agent that can reduce metal salts to form metal nanoparticles. The core-shell nanoparticles can be carbonized into M@carbon nanostructures, which have shown great performance in the catalytic hydrogenation of chlorobenzene. This work not only will help to achieve the controllable synthesis of noble metal@RF resin and M@carbon core-shell nanostructures but also will promote research into other RF-based nanostructures and their catalytic applications. PMID:26434608

  16. Design of highly sensitive and selective Au@NiO yolk-shell nanoreactors for gas sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Prabhakar; Yoon, Ji-Wook; Jeong, Hyun-Mook; Hwang, Su-Jin; Kwak, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Jong-Heun

    2014-06-01

    Au@NiO yolk-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by simple solution route and applied for efficient gas sensor towards H2S gas. Carbon encapsulated Au (Au@C core-shell) NPs were synthesized by glucose-assisted hydrothermal method, whereas Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs were synthesized by precipitation method using Au@C core-shell NPs as a template. Sub-micrometer Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs were formed having 50-70 nm Au NPs at the periphery of NiO shell (10-20 nm), which was composed of 6-12 nm primary NiO particles. Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs showed higher response for H2S compared to other interfering gases (ethanol, p-xylene, NH3, CO and H2). The maximum response was 108.92 for 5 ppm of H2S gas at 300 °C, which was approximately 19 times higher than that for the interfering gases. The response of Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs to H2S was approximately 4 times higher than that of bare NiO hollow nanospheres. Improved performance of Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs was attributed to hollow spaces that allowed the accessibility of Au NPs to gas molecules. It was suggested that adsorption of H2S on Au NPs resulted in the formation of sulfide layer, which possibly lowered its work function, and therefore tuned the electron transfer from Au to NiO rather NiO to Au, which leaded to increase in resistance and therefore response.Au@NiO yolk-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by simple solution route and applied for efficient gas sensor towards H2S gas. Carbon encapsulated Au (Au@C core-shell) NPs were synthesized by glucose-assisted hydrothermal method, whereas Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs were synthesized by precipitation method using Au@C core-shell NPs as a template. Sub-micrometer Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs were formed having 50-70 nm Au NPs at the periphery of NiO shell (10-20 nm), which was composed of 6-12 nm primary NiO particles. Au@NiO yolk-shell NPs showed higher response for H2S compared to other interfering gases (ethanol, p-xylene, NH3, CO and H2). The maximum response was 108.92 for 5 ppm

  17. Evidence for chemical and cellular reactivities of the formaldehyde releaser bronopol, independent of formaldehyde release.

    PubMed

    Kireche, Mustapha; Peiffer, Jean-Luc; Antonios, Diane; Fabre, Isabelle; Giménez-Arnau, Elena; Pallardy, Marc; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre; Ourlin, Jean-Claude

    2011-12-19

    Formaldehyde and formaldehyde releasers are widely used preservatives and represent an important group of skin sensitizers. Formaldehyde is very often suspected to be the sensitizing agent of formaldehyde-releasers; however, many reported clinical cases of contact allergy to these molecules such as bronopol (2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol) indicate negative skin reactions to formaldehyde suggesting a more complex mechanism. The aim of this study was to compare the chemical reactivity and biological activity of formaldehyde with those of two formaldehyde releasers: 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol and 1,3-dimethylol-5,5-dimethylhydantoin. A key step in the sensitization to chemicals is the formation of the hapten-protein antigenic complex via covalent binding between the chemical sensitizer and amino acids in proteins. The chemical reactivity of the three compounds was thus addressed using (13)C NMR analysis of adduct formation upon incubation with a set of nucleophilic amino acids. The biological activity was measured in two in vitro models based on dendritic cells and a monocytic cell line (CD34-DC and THP-1 model) through monitoring of a panel of biomarkers. The results obtained show that 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol produces low amount of free formaldehyde in physiological buffers but that its degradation generates various molecules including 2-bromoethanol. In addition, 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol also generates adducts with amino acids, not observed with formaldehyde alone, that could be explained by the reactivity of 2-bromoethanol. In parallel, in a cellular approach using the human monocytic THP-1 cell line, 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol activates THP-1 cells at concentrations that are not correlated to simple formaldehyde release. This observation is confirmed in the more physiological model CD34-DC. Moreover, in the THP-1 model, the expression profiles of several biomarkers are specific to 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol. Finally, the use in the

  18. Naphthalimide derived fluorescent probes with turn-on response for Au(3+) and the application for biological visualization.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Qiu, Yanxin; Zhang, Jianjian; Zhu, Xinyue; Zhu, Bin; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Haixia

    2016-09-15

    The 4-N,N-dimethyl-1,8-naphthalimide based fluorescent probes have been explored for selective detection of Au(3+). Both probes show a pronounced fluorescence enhancement response to Au(3+). Hydroxy is introduced as ligand of Au(3+) for Probe 1 and the newly designed Probe 2 contains an alkyne moiety to recognize Au(3+) through an irreversible C≡C bond hydrolysis reaction. Probe 1 exhibits higher performance such as faster response, lower detection limit of 0.050μM and the better responsive effect in 99.5% water system compared with most of probes published. The Probe 2 displays high stability to pH, suitable water solubility, wider linear range (0-100μM) to Au(3+), and live-cells imaging with low cytotoxicity. PMID:27135938

  19. Synthesis and characterization of Cu2O/Au and its application in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X. H.; Ma, J. Q.; Ge, H. G.

    2015-08-01

    Monodispersed Cu2O spherical colloids with diameter of about 300 nm were prepared by a facile additive-assisted complex-precursor solution method. Core-shell structure Cu2O/Au composites, constructed by spherical Cu2O core and Au nanoparticles shell, were obtained via galvanic replacement method. The morphology, microstructure and optical properties of the Cu2O/Au composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra and ultraviolet-visible absorption. The results showed that Au NPs with an average size of 12 nm were uniformly distributed on the surface of the Cu2O spheres with size about 300 nm. Cu2O/Au composites exhibit high catalytic activity toward 4-NP reduction at room temperature.

  20. Comparison of two formaldehyde administration methods of in ovo-injected eggs.

    PubMed

    Steinlage, Sara J Throne; Sander, Jean E; Wilson, Jeanna L

    2002-01-01

    Formaldehyde administration in the hatchery can be very useful in decreasing microbial numbers. However, its use is controversial because of the adverse effects that can occur to chicks and people. This study was designed to look at alternative methods of application of formaldehyde in the hatchery. In addition, the study compared the effects of these methods of application on in ovo-and non-in ovo-injected eggs. All in ovo-injected eggs were given diluent only with no vaccine or antibiotic added. In hatchers containing both in ovo-injected eggs and non-in ovo-injected eggs, formaldehyde was administered two ways, dose (DOSE) and constant rate infusion (CRI). In the DOSE hatcher, 12 ml of formaldehyde was administered at one time every 12 hr, whereas in the CRI hatcher, the same volume was administered at a rate of 1 ml/hr over a 12-hr period. A control (CONT) hatcher received 12 ml of distilled water at the same time that the DOSE hatcher was given formaldehyde. In the DOSE hatcher, a peak concentration of formaldehyde of 102 ppm was reached. The CRI was maintained at approximately 20 ppm of formaldehyde. At pipping, the aerosol bacterial load in the hatchers receiving formaldehyde (DOSE, 130 colony-forming units [CFU]/m3; CRI, 82.5 CFU/m3) was significantly less than in the CONT hatcher (235 CFU/m3). At hatch, the CRI (337.5 CFU/m3) was not able to control bacterial levels and only the DOSE hatcher (150 CFU/m3) had a significantly lower aerosol bacterial count. The CRI non-in ovo-injected eggs (93.39%) had a significantly higher percentage of hatch of fertile compared with non-in ovo-injected eggs exposed to water (84.27%). In ovo-injected eggs in CONT and DOSE treatment groups contained significantly higher percentages of visual contamination than non-in on-injected eggs in the same hatchers. This difference had numerical significance only in the treatment groups within the CRI hatcher. The chicks were then placed into replicate treatment groups and grown for 14

  1. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro biocompatibility study of Au/TMC/Fe3O4 nanocomposites as a promising, nontoxic system for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Kashanian, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Summary The unique properties and applications of iron oxide and Au nanoparticles have motivated researchers to synthesize and optimize a combined nanocomposite containing both. By using various polymers such as chitosan, some of the problems of classic core–shell structures (such as reduced saturation magnetization and thick coating) have been overcome. In the present study, chitosan and one of its well-known derivatives, N-trimethylchitosan (TMC), were applied to construct three-layer nanocomposites in an Au/polymer/Fe3O4 system. It was demonstrated that replacement of chitosan with TMC reasonably improved the properties of the final nanocomposites including their size, magnetic behavior and thermal stability. Moreover, the results of the MTT assay showed no significant cytotoxicity effect when the Au/TMC/Fe3O4 nanocomposites were applied in vitro. These TMC-containing magnetic nanoparticles are well-coated by Au nanoparticles and have good biocompatibility and can thus play the role of a platform or a label in various fields of application, especially the biomedical sciences and biosensors. PMID:26425418

  2. Formaldehyde content of atmospheric aerosol.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kei; Yunoki, Satoru; Yanaga, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-06-17

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a highly soluble polar molecule with a large sticking coefficient and thus likely exists in both gaseous and particulate forms. Few studies, however, address particulate HCHO (HCHO(p)). Some report that HCHO(p) concentrations (obtained only with long duration sampling) are very low. The lack of data partly reflects the difficulty of specifically measuring HCHO(p). Long duration filter sampling may not produce meaningful results for a variety of reasons. In this work, gaseous HCHO (HCHO(g)) and (HCHO(p)) were, respectively, collected with a parallel plate wet denuder (PPWD) followed by a mist chamber/hydrophilic filter particle collector (PC). The PPWD quantitatively removed HCHO(g) and the PC then collected the transmitted aerosol. The collected HCHO from either device was alternately analyzed by Hantzsch reaction-based continuous flow fluorometry. Each gas and particle phase measurement took 5 min each, with a 10 min cycle. The limits of detection were 0.048 and 0.0033 μg m(-3), respectively, for HCHO(g) and HCHO(p). The instrument was deployed in three separate campaigns in a forest station in western Japan in March, May, and July of 2013. Based on 1296 data pairs, HCHO(p), was on the average, 5% of the total HCHO. Strong diurnal patterns were observed, with the HCHO(p) fraction peaking in the morning. The relative humidity dependence of the partition strongly suggests that it is driven by the liquid water content of the aerosol phase. However, HCHO(p) was 100× greater than that expected from Henry's law. We propose that the low water activity in the highly saline droplets lead to HCHO oligomerization. PMID:24857706

  3. Production of Melamine-Formaldehyde PCM Microcapsules with Ammonia Scavenger used for Residual Formaldehyde Reduction.

    PubMed

    Sumiga, Boštjan; Knez, Emil; Vrtačnik, Margareta; Ferk-Savec, Vesna; Starešinič, Marica; Boh, Bojana

    2011-03-01

    Paraffinic phase change materials (PCM) were microencapsulated by in situ polymerization of melamine-formaldehyde prepolymers. Partly methylated trimethylolmelamine was used as an aminoaldehyde prepolymer for the microcapsule wall, a styrene-maleic acid anhydride copolymer as an emulsifier and modifying agent, and ammonia as a scavenger for reducing residual formaldehyde. For the determination of residual formaldehyde in a ppm concentration range, EDANA and malachite green analytical methods were studied, and the EDANA 210.1-99 was applied for the determination of residual formaldehyde in 25 samples of microcapsules, produced in a 200-L reactor. A linear correlation was observed between the added ammonia scavenger concentration and the reduction of residual formaldehyde concentration. Compared with 0.45% (4500 ppm) formaldehyde in a non-treated microcapsule suspension, with ammonia scavenger concentrations 0.80, 0.90 and 1.35%, the concentration of residual formaldehyde dropped to 0.27, 0.20 and 0.09% (i.e. 2700, 2000 and 900 ppm), respectively. Morphological characterisation of microcapsules by SEM and microcapsule wall permeability measurements by gravimetry / mass loss at an elevated temperature (135 °C) suggested that ammonia positively contributed to the wall elasticity / durability, while microcapsules with no ammonia scavenger added tended to have more brittle walls, and were more prone to cracking. PMID:24061938

  4. Formation of formaldehyde and peroxides by air oxidation of high purity polyoxyethylene surfactants.

    PubMed

    Bergh, M; Magnusson, K; Nilsson, J L; Karlberg, A T

    1998-07-01

    Ethoxylated alcohols are non-ionic surfactants. The majority are used in household cleaners, laundry products, toiletries and in industrial and institutional cleaners. In previous studies, an ethoxylated non-ionic surfactant of technical quality showed allergenic activity in guinea pig experiments. Chemical analysis revealed a content of formaldehyde, a well-known contact allergen, and peroxides in the surfactant. Most cases of occupational contact dermatitis are considered to be of irritant origin, caused by contact with water and surfactants, but if allergenic autoxidation products can be formed, allergic contact dermatitis cannot be excluded. The sensitizing potential of a chemically defined high purity ethoxylated alcohol was investigated and oxidation under various storage and handling conditions was studied for this and a homologous product. The pure surfactant showed no significant allergenic activity on predictive testing in guinea pigs. When ethoxylated alcohols were stored in the refrigerator, their deterioration was limited. At room temperature, their content of peroxides and formaldehyde increased with time. Levels of formaldehyde above those capable of causing positive patch test reactions were found. Since such surfactants have wide applications, resulting exposure to formaldehyde could be more frequent than is generally realized, contributing to persistence of dermatitis in individuals allergic to formaldehyde. PMID:9686972

  5. Evaluation of possible health risk associated with occupational exposure to formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargova, Maria; Janota, Stanislav; Karelova, Jarmila; Barancokova, Maria; Sulcova, Margita

    1993-03-01

    Widespread us of formaldehyde in a variety of applications is known to result in appreciable exposure of workers and large segments of the general population. Because of possible genotoxic and immunotoxic effects, we investigated the health condition of people occupationally exposed to formaldehyde in a plant in which woodsplinter materials are manufactured. The concentration of formaldehyde in the workplace was greater than the average and peak concentrations of formaldehyde in Czechoslovakia (0.5 mg/m3 and 1 mg/m3 respectively). Selected parameters of genotoxicity (cytogenetic analysis, nucleolus test) and immunotoxocity (serum immunoglobulin G, A, M; complement C3, C4; alpha-1-anti-trypsine, alpha-2 macroglobulin, ceruloplasmin, transferrin, prealbumin, orosomucoid levels) were determined. The results of the evaluation of mitotic indices and the blastogen transformation point to an effect of the exposure to formaldehyde on r-RNA synthesis inhibition and lymphocyte maturation decrease. The frequency of aberrant cells in the peripheral blood lymphocytes was increased in both, exposed and control group and was above 1.2 - 2% of aberrant cells observed in the normal population in Czechoslovakia. There was no significant differences in the values of natural immunity and specific humoral immunity. Significant differences were observed in the values of mitogen-induced proliferation of lymphocytes between the exposed and the matching and background control groups. These changes are considered to be sensitive indicators of the potential effects on the integrity of a more important immunologic function.

  6. Porous Nickel Oxide Film Sensor for Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cindemir, U.; Topalian, Z.; Österlund, L.; Granqvist, C. G.; Niklasson, G. A.

    2014-11-01

    Formaldehyde is a volatile organic compound and a harmful indoor pollutant contributing to the "sick building syndrome". We used advanced gas deposition to fabricate highly porous nickel oxide (NiO) thin films for formaldehyde sensing. The films were deposited on Al2O3 substrates with prefabricated comb-structured electrodes and a resistive heater at the opposite face. The morphology and structure of the films were investigated with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Porosity was determined by nitrogen adsorption isotherms with the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method. Gas sensing measurements were performed to demonstrate the resistive response of the sensors with respect to different concentrations of formaldehyde at 150 °C.

  7. Exposure to formaldehyde: effects of pulmonary function

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandersson, R.; Kolmodin-Hedman, B.; Hedenstierna, G.

    1982-09-01

    Forty-seven subjects exposed to formaldehyde (mean air concentration 0.45 mg/m/sup 3/) and 20 unexposed subjects, all of whom were employed at a carpentry shop, were studied with regard to symptoms and pulmonary function. Symptoms involving eyes and throat as well as chest oppression were significantly more common in the exposed subjects than in the unexposed controls. Spirometry and single breath nitrogen washout were normal Monday morning before exposure to formaldehyde. A reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec by an average of 0.2 L (P = .002), percent forced expiratory volume by 2% (P = .04), maximum midexpiratory flow by 0.3 L/sec (P = .04) and an increase in closing volume in percentage of vital capacity by 3.4% (P = .002) were seen after a day of work and exposure to formaldehyde, suggesting bronchoconstriction. Smokers and nonsmokers displayed similar changes in spirometry and nitrogen washout.

  8. Self-Sufficient Formaldehyde-to-Methanol Conversion by Organometallic Formaldehyde Dismutase Mimic.

    PubMed

    van der Waals, Dominic; Heim, Leo E; Vallazza, Simona; Gedig, Christian; Deska, Jan; Prechtl, Martin H G

    2016-08-01

    The catalytic networks of methylotrophic organisms, featuring redox enzymes for the activation of one-carbon moieties, can serve as great inspiration in the development of novel homogeneously catalyzed pathways for the interconversion of C1 molecules at ambient conditions. An imidazolium-tagged arene-ruthenium complex was identified as an effective functional mimic of the bacterial formaldehyde dismutase, which provides a new and highly selective route for the conversion of formaldehyde to methanol in absence of any external reducing agents. Moreover, secondary amines are reductively methylated by the organometallic dismutase mimic in a redox self-sufficient manner with formaldehyde acting both as carbon source and reducing agent. PMID:27380865

  9. 24 CFR 3280.309 - Health Notice on formaldehyde emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Health Notice on formaldehyde... Construction Requirements § 3280.309 Health Notice on formaldehyde emissions. (a) Each manufactured home shall have a Health Notice on formaldehyde emissions prominently displayed in a temporary manner in...

  10. The effect of clothing care activities on textile formaldehyde content.

    PubMed

    Novick, Rachel M; Nelson, Mindy L; McKinley, Meg A; Anderson, Grace L; Keenan, James J

    2013-01-01

    Textiles are commonly treated with formaldehyde-based residues that may potentially induce allergic contact dermatitis in sensitive individuals. This study examined the initial formaldehyde content in clothing and resulting changes due to care activities. Twenty clothing articles were examined and 17 of them did not have detectable levels of formaldehyde. One shirt contained a formaldehyde concentration of 3172 ppm, and two pairs of pants had formaldehyde concentrations of 1391 ppm and 86 ppm. The two highest results represent formaldehyde levels that are up to 40-fold greater than international textile regulations. The two items with the greatest formaldehyde content were washed and dried in a manner similar to that used by consumers, including hand and machine washing in hot or cold water followed by air or machine drying. The washing and drying procedures reduced formaldehyde levels to between 26 and 72% of untreated controls. Differences in the temperature or type of washing and drying did not result in a clear trend in the subsequent formaldehyde content. In addition, samples were hot ironed, which did not affect the formaldehyde content as significantly. Understanding the formaldehyde content in clothing and its potential reduction through care activities may be useful for manufacturers and formaldehyde-sensitive individuals. PMID:24053365

  11. STATUS OF IODINE IN FORMALDEHYDE-PRESERVED MILK - REVISITED

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of formaldehyde as a preservative for milk prior to radiochemical analysis for 131I was studied. Results suggest that the formaldehyde concentration is critical and that at low formaldehyde concentrations (<0.5 M) significant protein binding of iodine occurs. Various a...

  12. Developing a Reference Material for Formaldehyde Emissions Testing; Final Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to formaldehyde has been shown to produce broad and potentially severe adverse human health effects. With ubiquitous formaldehyde sources in the indoor environment, formaldehyde concentrations in indoor air are usually higher than outdoors, ranging from 10 to 4000 μg/m3....

  13. Chemical Characterization of Phenol/Formaldehyde Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brayden, T. H.

    1986-01-01

    Report discusses tests of commercial phenol/formaldehyde resins to establish relationships among composition before use, behavior during curing, and strength after curing. Resin used in carbon/carbon laminates. In curing process, two molecules of phenol joined together in sequence of reactions involving molecule of formaldehyde. Last step of sequence, molecule of water released. Sequence repeats until one of ingredients used up, leaving solidified thermoset plastic. Issues to be resolved: number and relative abundances of ingredients, presence of certain chemical groups, heat-producing ability of resin, and range of molecular weights present.

  14. DNA-templated synthesis of PtAu bimetallic nanoparticle/graphene nanocomposites and their application in glucose biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Jing; Wang, Wen-Min; Lu, Li-Min; Bai, Ling; Qiu, Xin-Lan

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) is demonstrated to functionalize graphene (GR) and to further guide the growth of PtAu bimetallic nanoparticles (PtAuNPs) on GR with high densities and dispersion. The obtained nanocomposites (PtAuNPs/ss-DNA/GR) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), and electrochemical techniques. Then, an enzyme nanoassembly was prepared by self-assembling glucose oxidase (GOD) on PtAuNP/ss-DNA/GR nanocomposites (GOD/PtAuNPs/ss-DNA/GR). The nanocomposites provided a suitable microenvironment for GOD to retain its biological activity. The direct and reversible electron transfer process between the active site of GOD and the modified electrode was realized without any extra electron mediator. Thus, the prepared GOD/PtAuNP/ss-DNA/GR electrode was proposed as a biosensor for the quantification of glucose. The effects of pH, applied potential, and temperature on the performance of the biosensor were discussed in detail and were optimized. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed a linearity with glucose concentration in the range of 1.0 to 1,800 μM with a detection limit of 0.3 μM (S/N = 3). The results demonstrate that the developed approach provides a promising strategy to improve the sensitivity and enzyme activity of electrochemical biosensors.

  15. An enhanced photocatalytic response of nanometric TiO2 wrapping of Au nanoparticles for eco-friendly water applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Viviana; Impellizzeri, Giuliana; Romano, Lucia; Scuderi, Mario; Brundo, Maria V.; Bergum, Kristin; Zimbone, Massimo; Sanz, Ruy; Buccheri, Maria A.; Simone, Francesca; Nicotra, Giuseppe; Svensson, Bengt G.; Grimaldi, Maria G.; Privitera, Vittorio

    2014-09-01

    We propose a ground-breaking approach by an upside-down vision of the Au/TiO2 nano-system in order to obtain an enhanced photocatalytic response. The system was synthesized by wrapping Au nanoparticles (~8 nm mean diameter) with a thin layer of TiO2 (~4 nm thick). The novel idea of embedding Au nanoparticles with titanium dioxide takes advantage of the presence of metal nanoparticles, in terms of electron trapping, without losing any of the TiO2 exposed surface, so as to favor the photocatalytic performance of titanium dioxide. A complete structural characterization was made by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The remarkable photocatalytic performance together with the stability of the nano-system was demonstrated by degradation of the methylene blue dye in water. The non-toxicity of the nano-system was established by testing the effect of the material on the reproductive cycle of Mytilus galloprovincialis in an aquatic environment. The originally synthesized material was also compared to conventional TiO2 with Au nanoparticles on top. The latter system showed a dispersion of Au nanoparticles in the liquid environment, due to their instability in the aqueous solution that clearly represents an environmental contamination issue. Thus, the results show that nanometric TiO2 wrapping of Au nanoparticles has great potential in eco-friendly water/wastewater purification.

  16. DNA-templated synthesis of PtAu bimetallic nanoparticle/graphene nanocomposites and their application in glucose biosensor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) is demonstrated to functionalize graphene (GR) and to further guide the growth of PtAu bimetallic nanoparticles (PtAuNPs) on GR with high densities and dispersion. The obtained nanocomposites (PtAuNPs/ss-DNA/GR) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), and electrochemical techniques. Then, an enzyme nanoassembly was prepared by self-assembling glucose oxidase (GOD) on PtAuNP/ss-DNA/GR nanocomposites (GOD/PtAuNPs/ss-DNA/GR). The nanocomposites provided a suitable microenvironment for GOD to retain its biological activity. The direct and reversible electron transfer process between the active site of GOD and the modified electrode was realized without any extra electron mediator. Thus, the prepared GOD/PtAuNP/ss-DNA/GR electrode was proposed as a biosensor for the quantification of glucose. The effects of pH, applied potential, and temperature on the performance of the biosensor were discussed in detail and were optimized. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed a linearity with glucose concentration in the range of 1.0 to 1,800 μM with a detection limit of 0.3 μM (S/N = 3). The results demonstrate that the developed approach provides a promising strategy to improve the sensitivity and enzyme activity of electrochemical biosensors. PMID:24572068

  17. Non-centrosymmetric Au-SnO2 hybrid nanostructures with strong localization of plasmonic for enhanced photocatalysis application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Liao, Lei; Zhang, Shaofeng; Zhou, Juan; Xiao, Xiangheng; Ren, Feng; Sun, Lingling; Dai, Zhigao; Jiang, Changzhong

    2013-06-21

    We present an innovative approach to the production of sub-100 nm hollow Au-SnO2 hybrid nanospheres, employing a low-cost, surfactant-free and environmentally friendly solution-based route. The hollow hybrid nanostructures were synthesized using a seed-mediated hydrothermal method, which can be divided into two stages: (1) formation of multicore-shell Au@SnO2 nanoparticles (NPs) and (2) thermal diffusion and ripening to form hollow Au-SnO2 hybrid NPs. The morphology, optical properties and formation mechanism were determined by a collection of joint techniques. Photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) in the liquid phase served as a probe reaction to evaluate the activity of the as-prepared hollow hybrid Au-SnO2 NPs under the irradiation of both visible light and ultraviolet light. Significantly, the as-obtained Au-SnO2 hybrid nanostructures exhibited enhanced visible light or UV photocatalytic abilities, remarkably superior to commercial pure SnO2 products and P25 TiO2, mainly owing to the effective electron hole separation at the SnO2-Au interfaces and strong localization of plasmonic near-fields effects. PMID:23685533

  18. Unusual formaldehyde-induced hypersensitivity in two schoolgirls

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B. ); Hanna, W.T.; Painter, P.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Two schoolgirls developed a syndrome resembling Henoch-Schonlein purpura while attending a recently opened school insulated with urea-formaldehyde foam (UFFI). Skin rashes and swellings were accompanied by bizarre, blue-green discoloration of the skin. Subsequent investigations by county, state and federal authorities, and low measured concentrations of formaldehyde, prompted initial conclusions that in-school formaldehyde exposures were not responsible for the girls' problems. Subsequent controlled exposures to UFFI and formaldehyde while in hospital elicited the whole cascade of symptoms. The chronology of the onset and amplification of systems make it probable that the formaldehyde exposures precipitating the girls' hypersensitivity, occurred in the school. 3 refs.

  19. Optoelectrical Cooling of Formaldehyde to Sub-Millikelvin Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeppenfeld, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Due to their strong long-range dipole-dipole interactions and large number of internal states, polar molecules cooled to ultracold temperatures enable fascinating applications ranging from ultracold chemistry to investigation of dipolar quantum gases. However, realizing a simple and general technique to cool molecules to ultracold temperatures, akin to laser cooling of atoms, has been a formidable challenge. We present results for opto-electrical Sisyphus cooling applied to formaldehyde (H2 CO). In this generally applicable cooling scheme, molecules repeatedly move up and down electric field gradients of a trapping potential in different rotational states to efficiently extract kinetic energy. A total of about 300,000 molecules are thereby cooled by a factor of 1000 to 400uK, resulting in a record-large ensemble of ultracold molecules. In addition to cooling of the motional degrees of freedom, optical pumping via a vibrational transition allows us to control the internal rotational state. We thereby achieve a purity of over 80% of formaldehyde molecules in a single rotational M-sublevel. Our experiment provides an excellent starting point for precision spectroscopy and investigation of ultracold collisions.

  20. Edible carbohydrates from formaldehyde in a spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    The autocatalytic nature of the base catalyzed condensation of formaldehyde to formose sugars is eliminated by using as a cocatalyst, an aldose, or ketose having an alpha-hydrogen. This is more strongly complexed by base than is formaldehyde and the cocatalyst and sugar products accumulate as catalyst complexes instead of formaldehyde. Because of the presence of alpha-hydrogen atoms in cocatalysts and formose sugars, their removal by cross Cannizzaro reaction of complexed sugars does not occur, so the formose reaction behaves autocatalytically due to this accumulation. It is believed that a given catalytic formose complex is not a discrete complexed sugar, but rather, a scrambled dynamic mixture of sugars having weakened structures. The sugar complexes derive from a common salt-like formaldehyde complex, which, because of the absence of alpha-hydrogen, has a greater tendency to undergo Cannizzaro reaction, rather than formose condensation. Because of this, the Cannizzaro reaction can proceed without measurable formose condensation. The reverse is not possible.

  1. CHRONIC RESPIRATORY EFFECTS OF INDOOR FORMALDEHYDE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relation of chronic respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function to formaldehyde (HCHO) in homes was studied in a sample of 298 children (6 - 15 years of age) and 613 adults. CHO measurements were made with passive samplers two one-week periods. ata on chronic cough and phlegm...

  2. Gypsum Wallboard as a sink for formaldehyde

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) has been of special concern as an indoor air pollutant because of its presence in a wide range of consumer products and its adverse health effects. Materials acting as HCHO sinks, such as painted gypsum wallboard, can become emission sources. However, adsorpti...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.1148 - Formaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Formaldehyde. 1926.1148 Section 1926.1148 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1148...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.1148 - Formaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Formaldehyde. 1926.1148 Section 1926.1148 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1148...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.1148 - Formaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Formaldehyde. 1926.1148 Section 1926.1148 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1148...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.1148 - Formaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Formaldehyde. 1926.1148 Section 1926.1148 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1148...

  7. A passive sampler for airborne formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosjean, Daniel; Williams, Edwin L.

    A simple, inexpensive passive sampler is described that is capable of reliable measurements of formaldehyde at the parts per billion (ppb) levels relevant to indoor and outdoor air quality. The passive sampler consists of a modified dual filter holder in which the upper stage serves as the diffusion barrier, the lower stage includes a 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)-coated filter which collects formaldehyde, and the space between the two stages serve as the diffusion gap. The measured sampling rate, 18.8 ± 1.8 ml min -1, was determined in experiments involving sampling of ppb levels of formaldehyde with the passive sampler and with DNPH-coated C 18 cartridges and agrees well with the value of 19.4 ± 2.0 ml min -1 calculated from theory. The measured sampling rate was independent of formaldehyde concentration (16-156 ppb) and sampling duration (1.5-72 h). The precision of the measurements for colocated passive samplers averaged 8.6% in purified and indoor air (office and museums) and 10.2% in photochemically polluted outdoor air. With a 1.2-μm pore size Teflon filter as the diffusion barrier, the detection limit is 32 ppb h, e.g. 4 ppb in an 8-h sample, 1.3 ppb in a 24-h sample, and so on. Perceived advantages and limitations of the sampler are discussed including flexibility, cost effectiveness and possible negative bias at high ambient levels of ozone.

  8. Electrospinning formaldehyde cross-linked zein solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to develop zein fibers with improved physical properties and solvent resistance, formaldehyde was used as the cross-linking reagent before spinning. The cross-linking reaction was carried out in either acetic acid or ethanolic-HCl where the amount of cross-linking reagent was between 1 and...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.1148 - Formaldehyde.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Formaldehyde. 1926.1148 Section 1926.1148 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1926.1148...

  10. Application de la methode des sous-groupes au calcul Monte-Carlo multigroupe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicolas

    This thesis is dedicated to the development of a Monte Carlo neutron transport solver based on the subgroup (or multiband) method. In this formalism, cross sections for resonant isotopes are represented in the form of probability tables on the whole energy spectrum. This study is intended in order to test and validate this approach in lattice physics and criticality-safety applications. The probability table method seems promising since it introduces an alternative computational way between the legacy continuous-energy representation and the multigroup method. In the first case, the amount of data invoked in continuous-energy Monte Carlo calculations can be very important and tend to slow down the overall computational time. In addition, this model preserves the quality of the physical laws present in the ENDF format. Due to its cheap computational cost, the multigroup Monte Carlo way is usually at the basis of production codes in criticality-safety studies. However, the use of a multigroup representation of the cross sections implies a preliminary calculation to take into account self-shielding effects for resonant isotopes. This is generally performed by deterministic lattice codes relying on the collision probability method. Using cross-section probability tables on the whole energy range permits to directly take into account self-shielding effects and can be employed in both lattice physics and criticality-safety calculations. Several aspects have been thoroughly studied: (1) The consistent computation of probability tables with a energy grid comprising only 295 or 361 groups. The CALENDF moment approach conducted to probability tables suitable for a Monte Carlo code. (2) The combination of the probability table sampling for the energy variable with the delta-tracking rejection technique for the space variable, and its impact on the overall efficiency of the proposed Monte Carlo algorithm. (3) The derivation of a model for taking into account anisotropic

  11. Toxic effects of formaldehyde on the urinary system

    PubMed Central

    İnci, Mehmet; Zararsız, İsmail; Davarcı, Mürsel; Görür, Sadık

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a chemical substance with a pungent odor that is highly soluble in water and occurs naturally in organisms. Formaldehyde, when taken into organisms, is metabolized into formic acid in the liver and erythrocytes and is then excreted, either with the urine and feces or via the respiratory system. Form-aldehyde is widely used in the industrial and medical fields, and employees in these sectors are frequently exposed to it. Anatomists and medical students are affected by formaldehyde gas during dissection lessons. Because full protection from formaldehyde is impossible for employees in industrial plants using this chemical and for workers in laboratory conditions, several measures can be implemented to prevent and/or reduce the toxic effects of formaldehyde. In this review, we aimed to identify the toxic effects of formaldehyde on the urinary system. PMID:26328078

  12. Photoinduced ultrafast charge separation in colloidal 2-dimensional CdSe/CdS-Au hybrid nanoplatelets and corresponding application in photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Himani; Kumar, Yogesh; Dana, Jayanta; Satpati, Biswarup; Ghosh, Hirendra N; Deka, Sasanka

    2016-08-25

    Multicomponent hybrid nanocrystals (HNC) consisting of a semiconductor and metallic domains are an important class of nanostructured materials demonstrating useful applications and interesting basic knowledge. In this scenario, Au nanoparticle (NP) islands of ∼2 nm have been grown on unique two dimensional (2D) CdSe/CdS core@shell hexagonal nanoheteroplatelets of 20 nm diameter to form unprecedented 2D CdSe/CdS-Au HNCs and detailed optical characterization has been carried out to determine the dimensionality based electron transfer dynamics on the ultrafast scale. Steady state optical absorption studies show that upon growing Au NPs onto the 2D nanoplates, a new band appears in the red region of the spectra (500-800 nm), which suggests a strong interaction between the exciton of the core-shell and the plasmon of the metal NPs. Fluorescence studies showed the quenching of emission of the semiconductor domains upon the growth of the metallic domains. Detailed optical and TRPL studies suggested efficient charge transfer from the 2D CdSe/CdS to the Au domains, irrespective of excitation wavelength. Femtosecond transient absorption studies suggest that the electron transfer from the 2D hybrid nanocrystals to the metal domain is on an ultrafast time scale (∼800 fs). No evidence is observed for charge transfer from the 2 nm Au domains to the semiconductor seeds. The broad absorption in the visible region of the hybrid nanocrystals and the ultrafast charge transfer facilitates very efficient photo-catalytic reactions under direct sun light, as a case study. PMID:27533050

  13. Low temperature synthesis of RGO-Au nanocomposite with apparently reduced time and its application as a chemical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuz Johra, Fatima; Jung, Woo-Gwang

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, a reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-Au nanocomposites (NC) is synthesized at a low temperature by refluxing without a surfactant. Transmission electron microscopy suggests that Au nanoparticles (NPs) 10-20 nm in size are dispersed on the RGO thin film. X-ray diffraction study, UV-vis spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the reduction of graphene oxide (GO). This RGO-Au NC shows an excellent ability to detect Cr(VI) by electrochemical sensing, with good responses to both current and voltage. A glassy carbon electrode modified with the NC shows a significant voltammetric reduction peak. The voltammetric detection ability is highly dependent on the pH of the electrolyte. The large surface area of RGO's porous structure and the electroactive Au NPs both allow free exchange of reaction intermediates, resulting in significantly enhanced Cr(VI) reduction activity. The RGO-Au electrode shows a good linear response in a range of Cr(VI) concentrations from 10 to 800 μM and a high sensitivity of 0.0146 μA μM-1 with a 2.10 μM detection limit.

  14. A novel glucose biosensor platform based on Ag@AuNPs modified graphene oxide nanocomposite and SERS application.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Atar, Necip; Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Eryılmaz, Merve; Torul, Hilal; Tamer, Uğur; Boyacı, Ismail Hakkı; Ustündağ, Zafer

    2013-09-15

    This study represents a novel template demonstration of a glucose biosensor based on mercaptophenyl boronic acid (MBA) terminated Ag@AuNPs/graphene oxide (Ag@AuNPs-GO) nanomaterials. The nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The TEM image shows that Ag@AuNPs in the nanocomposite is in the range of diameters of 10-20 nm. The nanocomposite was used for the determination of glucose through the complexation between boronic acid and diol groups of glucose. Thus, a novel glucose biosensor was further fabricated by immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD) into MBA terminated Ag@AuNPs-GO nanocomposite film (MBA-Ag@AuNPs-GO). The linearity range of glucose was obtained as 2-6mM with detection limit of 0.33 mM. The developed biosensor was also applied successfully for the determination of glucose in blood samples. The concentration value of glucose in blood samples was calculated to be 1.97±0.002 mM from measurements repeated for six times. PMID:23816220

  15. Layered sphere-shaped TiO₂ capped with gold nanoparticles on structural defects and their catalysis of formaldehyde oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunyan; Pang, Guanglong; He, Guangzhi; Li, Yang; He, Chi; Hao, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a one-step method for the synthesis of Au/TiO2 nanosphere materials, which were formed by layered deposition of multiple anatase TiO2 nanosheets. The Au nanoparticles were stabilized by structural defects in each TiO2 nanosheet, including crystal steps and edges, thereby fixing the Au-TiO2 perimeter interface. Reactant transfer occurred along the gaps between these TiO2 nanosheet layers and in contact with catalytically active sites at the Au-TiO2 interface. The doped Au induced the formation of oxygen vacancies in the Au-TiO2 interface. Such vacancies are essential for generating active oxygen species (*O(-)) on the TiO2 surface and Ti(3+) ions in bulk TiO2. These ions can then form Ti(3+)-O(-)-Ti(4+) species, which are known to enhance the catalytic activity of formaldehyde (HCHO) oxidation. These studies on structural and oxygen vacancy defects in Au/TiO2 samples provide a theoretical foundation for the catalytic mechanism of HCHO oxidation on oxide-supported Au materials. PMID:26899647

  16. Eco-friendly synthesis of TiO2, Au and Pt doped TiO2 nanoparticles for dye sensitized solar cell applications and evaluation of toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, K.; Kumaraguru, S.; Bhakyaraj, K.; Thirumal, S.; Arumugam, A.

    2016-04-01

    Driven by the demand of pure TiO2, Au and Pt doped TiO2 NPs were successfully synthesized using Terminalia arjuna bark extract. The eco-friendly synthesized NPs were characterized by UV-Vis-DRS, ATR-FT-IR, PL, XRD, Raman, SEM with EDX and TEM analysis. The synthesized NPs were investigation for dye sensitized solar cell applications. UV-Vis-Diffused Reflectance Spectra clearly showed that the expected TiO2 inter band absorption below 306 nm, incorporation of gold shows surface plasma resonant (SPR) near 555 nm and platinum incorporated TiO2 NPs shows absorbance at 460 nm. The energy conversion efficiency for Au doped TiO2 NPs when compared to pure and Pt doped TiO2 NPs. In addition to that, Au noble metal present TiO2 matrix and an improve open-circuit voltage (Voc) of DSSC. Synthesized NPs was evaluated into antibacterial and antifungal activities by disk diffusion method. It is observed that NPs have not shown any activities in all tested bacterial and fungal strains. In this eco-friendly synthesis method to provide non toxic and environmental friendly nanomaterials can be used for solar energy device application.

  17. Low temperature activation of Au/Ti getter film for application to wafer-level vacuum packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming; Moulin, Johan; Lani, Sébastien; Hallais, Géraldine; Renard, Charles; Bosseboeuf, Alain

    2015-03-01

    Non-evaporable getter (NEG) thin films based on alloys of transition metals have been studied by various authors for vacuum control in wafer-level packages of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS). These materials have typically a relatively high activation temperature (300-450 °C) which is incompatible with some temperature sensitive MEMS devices. In this work we investigate the potential of Au/Ti system with a thin or ultrathin non oxidizable Au layer as a low activation temperature getter material. In this bilayer system, gettering activation is produced by thermal outdiffusion of titanium atoms through the gold film. The outdiffusion kinetics of titanium was modelled and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) at various temperatures. Results confirm that Au/Ti bilayer is a promising getter material for wafer-level packaging with an activation temperature below 300 °C for 1 h annealing time.

  18. Ayty: a New Line-List for Hot Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Refaie, Ahmed Faris; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yachmenev, Andrey

    2015-06-01

    The ExoMol [1] project aims at providing spectroscopic data for key molecules that can be used to characterize the atmospheres of exoplanets and cool stars. Formaldehyde (H2CO) is of growing importance in studying and modelling terrestrial atmospheric chemistry and dynamics. It also has relevance in astrophysical phenomena that include interstellar medium abundance, proto-planetary and cometary ice chemistry and masers from extra-galactic sources. However there gaps in currently available absolute intensities and a lack of higher rotational excitations that makes it unfeasible to accurately model high temperature systems such as hot Jupiters. Here we present AYTY [2], a new line list for formaldehyde applicable to temperatures up to 1500 K. AYTY contains almost 10 million states reaching rotational excitations up to J=70 and over 10 billion transitions at up to 10 000 cm-1. The line list was computed using the variational ro-vibrational solver TROVE with a refined ab-initio potential energy surface and dipole moment surface. J.~Tennyson and S.~N. Yurchenko MNRAS, 425:21--33, 2012. A.~F. Al-Refaie, S.~N. Yurchenko, A.~Yachmenev, and J.~Tennyson MNRAS, 2015.

  19. Formaldehyde assay by capacitance versus voltage and impedance measurements using bi-layer bio-recognition membrane.

    PubMed

    Ben Ali, M; Korpan, Y; Gonchar, M; El'skaya, A; Maaref, M A; Jaffrezic-Renault, N; Martelet, C

    2006-12-15

    A novel formaldehyde sensitive biosensor based on bacterial formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) as a bio-recognition element has been developed. The bio-recognition membrane had bi-layer architecture and consisted of FDH, cross-linked with albumin, and of the cofactor NAD at a high concentration level (first layer). The second layer was a negatively charged Nafion membrane, which prevented a leakage of negatively charged NAD molecules from the bio-membrane. As transducers, gold electrodes SiO(2)/Si/SiO(2)/Ti/Au and electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor Si/SiO(2) (EIS) structures have been used. Changes in capacitance and impedance properties of the bio-recognition membrane have been used for monitoring formaldehyde concentration in a bulk solution. It has been shown that formaldehyde can be detected within a concentration range from 1 microM to 20mM depending on the type of transduction used, with a detection limit of 1 and 100 microM for gold-based and EIS-based transducers, respectively. PMID:16516460

  20. Comparison of some morphological and absorption properties of the nanoparticles Au/TiO2 embedded films prepared by different technologies on the substrates for application in the plasmonic solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Khac An; Thuy Nguyen, Thi; Huong Nguyen, Thi Mai; Nguyen, Duy Thien

    2015-03-01

    The nanoparticle Au/TiO2 embedded system plays a very important role in the plasmonic solar cell. The features of the nanoparticle embedded system will determine light enhancement, light absorption, scattering and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), aiming to enhance the efficiency of the plasmatic solar cell. The characterizations of nanoparticles Au/TiO2 embedded system consist of many parameters: the sizes of nanoparticles (Au, TiO2), the weight ratio of Au to TiO2, the thickness of the single layer or multilayer of Au/TiO2, the arrangements of Au and TiO2 nanoparticles in integrated-matrix system, the light absorption, scattering and LSPR capacities of the Au/TiO2 system. These parameters, however, depend on the technological conditions, the structure of plasmonic solar cell as well as the used substrate materials. This paper presents some technological developments for nanoparticles Au/TiO2 embedded systems by different methods, including the preparation of the mixer Au/TiO2 solutions and fabrication of the nanoparticle Au/TiO2 systems with different Au percentages on several substrates (glass/ITO and AAO(Al)/Si…), and measured results of the morphological, structural and optical properties using FESEM, EDX, UV-vis spectroscopy. The comparisons of experiment results between different technology conditions and substrates (glass/ITO, AAO(Al)/Si…) are also shown and discussed with the aim of choosing the suitable technological process and technological conditions for application in the plasmonic solar cell.

  1. Formation of Formaldehyde and Glyoxal From The Toluene + Oh Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkamer, R.; Wirtz, K.; Platt, U.

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are emitted into the urban atmosphere mostly as part of au- tomobile exhaust. Toluene thereby is the single most abundant aromatic compound emitted into the atmosphere. Despite the importance of aromatic hydrocarbon oxi- dation for the formation of photooxidants from urban plumes the oxidation mech- anism of aromatic hydrocarbons is far from being understood.Considerable progress has been made in recent years concerning our understanding of the ring-retaining path- ways, while major uncertainties remain to be linked with the operative ring-cleavage mechanisms. The representation of the aromatic oxidation in presently used chemical transport models (CTM) is estimated a major uncertainty for these models. This work presents data on formaldehyde (HCHO) and glyoxal, which are two impor- tant ring-cleavage products from the the toluene + OH reaction. While glyoxal was observed to form as a high yield primary product (Volkamer et al., JPC A, 2001, 105, 7865-7874) the formation of HCHO is observed delayed, i.e. as a secondary prod- uct. The temporal behaviour of glyoxal and HCHO concentrations allowed to con- clude that short lived stable intermediate compounds must form upon ring-cleavage of toluene. With an approximate lifetime of the order of ten minutes, these highly reac- tive intermediate compounds are likely to be a significant radical source. Atmospheric implications of the results are adressed.

  2. Magnetic gold nanocatalyst (nanocat-Fe–Au): catalytic applications for the oxidative esterification and hydrogen transfer reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    An efficient and sustainable protocol is described for the oxidative esterification of aldehydes and the reduction of aromatic nitro compounds that uses magnetically separable and reusable maghemite-supported gold nanocatalyst (nanocat-Fe-Au) under mild conditions. The complex ch...

  3. Effect of Relative Humidity on Formaldehyde Decontamination

    PubMed Central

    Spiner, David R.; Hoffman, Robert K.

    1971-01-01

    Death rate studies were conducted to determine the effect of varying the concentration, humidity, and type of surface on the sporicidal activity of formaldehyde gas. Washed and unwashed spores were similarly exposed to detect the influence of residual nutrient growth medium upon the rate of kill. The results indicated that the sporicidal activity of formaldehyde gas varies directly with its concentration. Relative humidities (RH) over 50% proved essential for sterility. Spores on a porous surface (cotton cloth) were more readily killed at lower RH than those on a nonporous surface (glass). The reverse occurred at very high RH. At 75% RH, the unwashed spores on glass were killed faster than the washed spores. Images PMID:5002898

  4. Formaldehyde in envelopes of interstellar dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Federman, S. R.; Allen, M.

    1991-01-01

    Observed formaldehyde column densities of 1 x 10 to the 12th - 3 x 10 to the 13th/sq cm in cloud envelopes along lines of sight with A(V) = 1-4 mag can not be explained with the current understanding of interstellar gas phase chemistry. However, these column densities can be reproduced by a simple time-dependent model in which H2CO is supplied to the gas phase by the erosion of icy grain mantles. The release of H2CO from the grain mantles must occur on time scales comparable to the time scales for mixing from the cloud interior to the cloud envelope. Thus, in low-density regions of clouds, it appears that formaldehyde is the second molecule whose gas phase source is primarily ejection from grains. This simple model suggests understanding gas phase steady state in clouds on macroscopic, rather than microscopic, spatial scales.

  5. Formaldehyde-exposure characterization in garment-manufacturing plants: a composite summary of three in-depth industrial-hygiene surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, L.J.; Stayner, L.T.; Blade, L.M.; Halperin, W.; Keenlyside, R.

    1987-01-01

    The extent of exposure to formaldehyde was investigated at three garment manufacturing facilities using fabrics pretreated with a formaldehyde-based resin system. Two of the facilities (in Georgia) operated on a two-shift basis with approximately 1000 and 500 workers; one facility (in Pennsylvania) operated on a one-shift basis and had approximately 600 workers. The facilities cut and sewed men's dress shirts from treated fabric. Measured exposures to formaldehyde, respirable dust, and organic cleaning solvent vapors were all below the applicable American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values and Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limits.

  6. Preparation of Au-polydopamine functionalized carbon encapsulated Fe3O4 magnetic nanocomposites and their application for ultrasensitive detection of carcino-embryonic antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lei; Yan, Tao; Li, Yan; Gao, Jian; Wang, Qi; Hu, Lihua; Wu, Dan; Wei, Qin; Du, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A novel carbon encapsulated Fe3O4 nanoparticles embedded in two-dimensional (2D) porous graphitic carbon nanocomposites (Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites) were synthesized by situ synthesis strategy, which provided a sensor platform owing to a large aspect ratio and porous structure. Polydopamine (PDA) were modified on the surface of Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites through self-polymerization of dopamine, acting as both the reductant and template for one-step synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The prepared Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites show ferromagnetic features, extremely excellent electron transfer, large specific surface area and excellent dispersing property. These are conducive to the electrochemical signal output and the immobilization of antibody. In this work, a highly label-free sensitive magnetic immunosensor was developed based on Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites for the detection of carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA). The magnetic glassy carbon electrode was used to fix the Au/PDA/Fe3O4@C@PGC nanocomposites with the help of magnetic force. Under the optimal conditions, the immunosensor exhibited a wide linear range (0.001 ng/mL–20.0 ng/mL), a low detection limit (0.33 pg/mL), good reproducibility, selectivity and acceptable stability. The proposed sensing strategy may provide a potential application in the detection of other cancer biomarkers. PMID:26868035

  7. Formaldehyde exposure affects growth and metabolism of common bean

    SciTech Connect

    Mutters, R.G.; Madore, M. ); Bytnerowicz, A. )

    1993-01-01

    Recent state and federal directives have slated a substantial increase in the use of methanol as an alternative to gasoline in both fleet and private vehicles in the coming decade. The incomplete combustion of methanol produces formaldehyde vapor, and catalytic converter technology that completely oxidizes formaldehyde has yet to be developed. The approach of this study was to use a range of methanol concentrations encompassing levels currently found or that may occur in the future in the ambient air of some heavily polluted areas to test the potential phytotoxicity of formaldehyde. The study had the following objectives: (1) design and build a formaldehyde vapor generator with sufficient capacity for long-term plant fumigations; (2) determine growth response of common bean to formaldehyde; (3) evaluate physiological and biochemical changes of bean plants associated with formaldehyde exposures. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part II. The effects of temperature and humidity on free formaldehyde, extractable formaldehyde, formaldehyde emission, and physical characteristics of the foam

    SciTech Connect

    Schutte, W.C.; Cole, R.S.; Frank, C.W.; Long, K.R.

    1981-02-01

    Results of testing with two products of urea-formaldehyde based foams are described. Results of three products have previously been reported. Methods for detection and quantitative determination of formaldehyde, design of the experimental chambers, and the procedures are described. Samples of Product D were monitored for about 29 days and samples of Product E were monitored for 60 days in chambers and results are tabulated for formaldehyde emission. Additional tests performed on the two products are: extractable formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); free formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); comparison of free formaldehyde concentration; density (high and low temperature conditions); shrinkage (high and low temperature conditions). Control panels were constructed to simulate a wall in a home and observations were made and compared with results of the experimental products.

  9. Determination of Formaldehyde in Cigarette Smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jon W.; Ngim, Kenley K.; Eiserich, Jason P.; Yeo, Helen C. H.; Shibamoto, Takayuki; Mabury, Scott A.

    1997-09-01

    Formaldehdye is considered a hazardous air pollutant with numerous sources that include environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). With the increasing interest regarding ETS and public health the measurement of formaldehyde readily lends itself to a laboratory experiment comparing methods of analysis. This experiment involves the collection, derivatization, extraction, and analysis of formaldehyde from cigarette smoke using two methods. Formaldehyde is extracted from smoke and derivitized with a solution of 2,4-DNPH with subsequent cleanup by solid-phase extraction and analysis of the hydrazone by HPLC with UV detection; additionally a solution of cysteamine yields the corresponding thiazolidine derivative that is liquid/liquid extracted and subsequently analyzed by either GC with NPD or FPD (sulfur mode). Reasonable agreement among the methods was obtained by lab demonstrators with spike recoveries yielding 94.7 + 6.8 (n=5) and 89.2 (n = 4) % for NPD and FPD, respectively while HPLC spiked recoveries were 83.6 + 3.2 (n = 5) %; mean class spike recoveries ranged from 80-100%. Student results (in mg/cigarette) from smoke samples were similar to literature values with 163.2 + 69.2 (n = 7) and 149.4 (n = 7) % for NPD and FPD, respectively; the HPLC result was significantly lower at 45.1 + 23.7(n = 7) with losses presumably due to hydrazone precipitating from the smoke extracted solution. Students particularly benefited from the "real world" nature of the analysis and the experience evaluating disparate methods of determining a common analyte.

  10. Health and environmental effects profile for formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    The Health and Environmental Effects Profile for formaldehyde was prepared by the Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office, Cincinnati, OH for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response to support listings of hazardous constituents of a wide range of waste streams under Section 3001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and to provide health-related limits for emergency actions under Section 101 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Both published literature and information obtained from Agency program office files were evaluated as they pertained to potential human health, aquatic life, and environmental effects of hazardous-waste constituents. Quantitative estimates are presented, provided sufficient data are available. Existing data are insufficient to determine an Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) or a carcinogenic potency factor for formaldehyde. The Reportable Quantity (RQ) value of 1, 10, 100, 1000, or 5000 pounds is used to determine the quantity of a hazardous substance for which notification is required in the event of a release as specified by CERCLA based on chronic toxicity. The RQ value for formaldehyde is 10.

  11. Importance of formaldehyde in cloud chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adewuyi, Y. G.; Cho, S.-Y.; Tsay, R.-P.; Carmichael, G. R.

    1984-01-01

    A physical-chemical model which is an extension of that of Hong and Carmichael (1983) is used to investigate the role of formaldehyde in cloud chemistry. This model takes into account the mass transfer of SO2, O3, NH3, HNO3, H2O2, CO2, HCl, HCHO, O2, OH and HO2 into cloud droplets and their subsequent chemical reactions. The model is used to assess the importance of S(IV)-HCHO adduct formation, the reduction of H2O2 by HCHO, HCHO-free radical interactions, and the formation of HCOOH in the presence of HCHO in cloud droplets. Illustrative calculations indicate that the presence of HCHO inhibits sulfate production rate in cloud droplets. The direct inhibition of sulfate production rate in cloudwater due to nucleophilic addition of HSO3(-) to HCHO(aq) to form hydroxymethanesulfonate is generally low for concentrations of HCHO typical of ambient air. However, inhibition of sulfate production due to formaldehyde-free radical interactions in solution can be important. These formaldehyde-free radical reactions can also generate appreciable quantities of formic acid.

  12. Tailored synthesis of photoactive TiO ₂ nanofibers and Au/TiO ₂ nanofiber composites: structure and reactivity optimization for water treatment applications.

    PubMed

    Nalbandian, Michael J; Greenstein, Katherine E; Shuai, Danmeng; Zhang, Miluo; Choa, Yong-Ho; Parkin, Gene F; Myung, Nosang V; Cwiertny, David M

    2015-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanofibers with tailored structure and composition were synthesized by electrospinning to optimize photocatalytic treatment efficiency. Nanofibers of controlled diameter (30-210 nm), crystal structure (anatase, rutile, mixed phases), and grain size (20-50 nm) were developed along with composite nanofibers with either surface-deposited or bulk-integrated Au nanoparticle cocatalysts. Their reactivity was then examined in batch suspensions toward model (phenol) and emerging (pharmaceuticals, personal care products) pollutants across various water qualities. Optimized TiO2 nanofibers meet or exceed the performance of traditional nanoparticulate photocatalysts (e.g., Aeroxide P25) with the greatest reactivity enhancements arising from (i) decreasing diameter (i.e., increasing surface area), (ii) mixed phase composition [74/26 (±0.5) % anatase/rutile], and (iii) small amounts (1.5 wt %) of surface-deposited, more so than bulk-integrated, Au nanoparticles. Surface Au deposition consistently enhanced photoactivity by 5- to 10-fold across our micropollutant suite independent of their solution concentration, behavior that we attribute to higher photocatalytic efficiency from improved charge separation. However, the practical value of Au/TiO2 nanofibers was limited by their greater degree of inhibition by solution-phase radical scavengers and higher rate of reactivity loss from surface fouling in nonidealized matrixes (e.g., partially treated surface water). Ultimately, unmodified TiO2 nanofibers appear most promising for use as reactive filtration materials because their performance was less influenced by water quality, although future efforts must increase the strength of TiO2 nanofiber mats to realize such applications. PMID:25582552

  13. Validation of an HPLC method on short columns to assay ketoconazole and formaldehyde in shampoo.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Minh Nguyet A; Tallieu, L; Plaizier-Vercammen, J; Massart, D L; Vander Heyden, Y

    2003-04-24

    An HPLC method to determine simultaneously ketoconazole and formaldehyde in an anti-dandruff shampoo, originally developed on a long column, was transferred to two short columns with similar stationary phase properties, but with a length of at the most 30% of the initial one. Using the conventional column as reference, the fast HPLC methods on the short columns were validated. The validation characteristics consisted of selectivity, linearity range, precision (repeatability and time-different intermediate precision), bias and robustness. For the ketoconazole assay, linearity for peak area was found in the concentration range up to 0.20 mg/ml. For formaldehyde, two calibration ranges (0-10 x 10(-5) and 0-10 x 10(-4)%) were linear, both for peak area and height. The assays for both ketoconazole and formaldehyde in these ranges showed no bias and an acceptable precision, although the precision found with the short columns was slightly worse than with the long one. The robustness tests were performed applying a Plackett-Burman design. For the ketoconazole assay, 6 factors were examined in a 12 experiments design and for formaldehyde, 11 factors in 16 experiments. The methods were found to be robust. Despite the somewhat less good precision the transfer seems to be successful and the obtained assays on the short columns are applicable for fast routine analysis. PMID:12852444

  14. Determination of formaldehyde in food and feed by an in-house validated HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Wahed, P; Razzaq, Md A; Dharmapuri, S; Corrales, M

    2016-07-01

    Formalin is carcinogenic and is detrimental to public health. The illegal addition of formalin (37% formaldehyde and 14% methanol) to foods to extend their shelf-life is considered to be a common practice in Bangladesh. The lack of accurate methods and the ubiquitous presence of formaldehyde in foods make the detection of illegally added formalin challenging. With the aim of helping regulatory authorities, a sensitive high performance liquid chromatography method was validated for the quantitative determination of formaldehyde in mango, fish and milk. The method was fit-for-purpose and showed good analytical performance in terms of specificity, linearity, precision, recovery and robustness. The expanded uncertainty was <35%. The validated method was applied to screen samples of fruits, vegetables, fresh fish, milk and fish feed collected from different local markets in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Levels of formaldehyde in food samples were compared with published data. The applicability of the method in different food matrices might mean it has potential as a reference standard method. PMID:26920321

  15. 40 CFR 721.9480 - Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9480 Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted... chemical substance identified generically as resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9480 - Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9480 Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted... chemical substance identified generically as resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9480 - Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9480 Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted... chemical substance identified generically as resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9480 - Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9480 Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted... chemical substance identified generically as resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin...

  19. Formaldehyde and LeukemiA: Epidemiology, Potential Mechanisms and Implications for Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde is widely used in the United States and other countries. Occupational and environmental exposures to formaldehyde may be associated with an increased risk of leukemia in exposed individuals. However, risk assessment of formaldehyde and leukemia has been challenging ...

  20. Exposure to formaldehyde and its potential human health hazards.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Jahan, Shamin Ara; Lee, Jong-Tae

    2011-10-01

    A widely used chemical, formaldehyde is normally present in both indoor and outdoor air. The rapid growth of formaldehyde-related industries in the past two decades reflects the result of its increased use in building materials and other commercial sectors. Consequently, formaldehyde is encountered almost every day from large segments of society due to its various sources. Many governments and agencies around the world have thus issued a series of standards to regulate its exposure in homes, office buildings, workshops, public places, and food. In light of the deleterious properties of formaldehyde, this article provides an overview of its market, regulation standards, and human health effects. PMID:22107164

  1. Formaldehyde crosslinking: a tool for the study of chromatin complexes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A; Frey, Brian L; Smith, Lloyd M; Auble, David T

    2015-10-30

    Formaldehyde has been used for decades to probe macromolecular structure and function and to trap complexes, cells, and tissues for further analysis. Formaldehyde crosslinking is routinely employed for detection and quantification of protein-DNA interactions, interactions between chromatin proteins, and interactions between distal segments of the chromatin fiber. Despite widespread use and a rich biochemical literature, important aspects of formaldehyde behavior in cells have not been well described. Here, we highlight features of formaldehyde chemistry relevant to its use in analyses of chromatin complexes, focusing on how its properties may influence studies of chromatin structure and function. PMID:26354429

  2. A simple approach to the synthesis of eccentric Au@SiO2 Janus nanostructures and their catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Yang, Di; Hu, Huicheng; Chen, Lei; Xu, Yong; Qu, Lili; Yang, Peipei; Zhang, Qiao

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method to synthesize eccentric Au@SiO2 Janus nanoparticles. By simply tuning the concentration of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP), the surface of gold nanoparticle can be partially or fully wrapped with the amphiphilic ligand. As a result, Janus nanoparticle or concentric core-shell nanostructures can be obtained, respectively. A systematic study has been carried out to confirm the function of PVP molecules. The as-prepared Janus nanoparticle can act as a catalyst to catalyze the reduction of 4-nitrophenol, while the core-shell nanostructure is not active due to the coverage of dense silica shell. This work provides a robust and scalable method to produce Au@SiO2 Janus nanoparticles.

  3. Adsorption between TC-stabilized AuNPs and the phosphate group: application of the PTP1B activity assay.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jun; Wang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Li, Defeng; Zhang, Juan; Sun, Lizhou

    2015-12-01

    Based on the adsorption between tetracycline (TC) and phosphate groups, a general colorimetric method is explored in this work by using TC-stabilized gold nanoparticles (TC/AuNPs) and 4-aminophenyl phosphate-functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (APP/MNPs). Taking protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as an example, 4-aminophenyl phosphate (APP) can be hydrolyzed into 4-aminophenol (AP) by PTP1B, resulting in the disappearance of the phosphate group on the outer layer of MNPs and the loss of corresponding adsorptive ability. Upon addition of TC/AuNP solution, TC/AuNPs will remain in the supernatant solution after magnetic separation and a high absorbance value can be observed. So PTP1B activity is related to the concentrations of TC/AuNPs in the supernatant solution. In this work, the enzyme activity can be determined at levels as low as 0.0885 U mL(-1) and over a linear detection range as wide as 0.1 U mL(-1) to 0.9 U mL(-1). Moreover, using the proposed method, the inhibition effect of betulinic acid (BA) and sodium orthovanadate (Na3VO4) on PTP1B activity can be tested with IC50 values of 30 μM and 4 μM, respectively. Therefore, a universal platform for the accurate colorimetric analysis of kinase and phosphatase activities can be established through the adsorption between TC and phosphate groups. PMID:26523458

  4. Electronic Characterization of Au/DNA/ITO Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Diode and Its Application as a Radiation Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA molecules expressed as double-stranded (DSS) negatively charged polymer plays a significant role in electronic states of metal/silicon semiconductor structures. Electrical parameters of an Au/DNA/ITO device prepared using self-assembly method was studied by using current–voltage (I-V) characteristic measurements under alpha bombardment at room temperature. The results were analyzed using conventional thermionic emission model, Cheung and Cheung’s method and Norde’s technique to estimate the barrier height, ideality factor, series resistance and Richardson constant of the Au/DNA/ITO structure. Besides demonstrating a strongly rectifying (diode) characteristic, it was also observed that orderly fluctuations occur in various electrical parameters of the Schottky structure. Increasing alpha radiation effectively influences the series resistance, while the barrier height, ideality factor and interface state density parameters respond linearly. Barrier height determined from I–V measurements were calculated at 0.7284 eV for non-radiated, increasing to about 0.7883 eV in 0.036 Gy showing an increase for all doses. We also demonstrate the hypersensitivity phenomena effect by studying the relationship between the series resistance for the three methods, the ideality factor and low-dose radiation. Based on the results, sensitive alpha particle detectors can be realized using Au/DNA/ITO Schottky junction sensor. PMID:26799703

  5. Electronic Characterization of Au/DNA/ITO Metal-Semiconductor-Metal Diode and Its Application as a Radiation Sensor.

    PubMed

    Al-Ta'ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Amin, Yusoff Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA molecules expressed as double-stranded (DSS) negatively charged polymer plays a significant role in electronic states of metal/silicon semiconductor structures. Electrical parameters of an Au/DNA/ITO device prepared using self-assembly method was studied by using current-voltage (I-V) characteristic measurements under alpha bombardment at room temperature. The results were analyzed using conventional thermionic emission model, Cheung and Cheung's method and Norde's technique to estimate the barrier height, ideality factor, series resistance and Richardson constant of the Au/DNA/ITO structure. Besides demonstrating a strongly rectifying (diode) characteristic, it was also observed that orderly fluctuations occur in various electrical parameters of the Schottky structure. Increasing alpha radiation effectively influences the series resistance, while the barrier height, ideality factor and interface state density parameters respond linearly. Barrier height determined from I-V measurements were calculated at 0.7284 eV for non-radiated, increasing to about 0.7883 eV in 0.036 Gy showing an increase for all doses. We also demonstrate the hypersensitivity phenomena effect by studying the relationship between the series resistance for the three methods, the ideality factor and low-dose radiation. Based on the results, sensitive alpha particle detectors can be realized using Au/DNA/ITO Schottky junction sensor. PMID:26799703

  6. Embryo toxicity and teratogenicity of formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, J D; Kilburn, K H

    2001-01-01

    C-14 formaldehyde crosses the placenta and enters fetal tissues. The incorporated radioactivity is higher in fetal organs (i.e., brain and liver) than in maternal tissues. The incorporation mechanism has not been studied fully, but formaldehyde enters the single-carbon cycle and is incorporated as a methyl group into nucleic acids and proteins. Also, formaldehyde reacts chemically with organic compounds (e.g., deoxyribonucleic acid, nucleosides, nucleotides, proteins, amino acids) by addition and condensation reactions, thus forming adducts and deoxyribonucleic acid-protein crosslinks. The following questions must be addressed: What adducts (e.g., N-methyl amino acids) are formed in the blood following formaldehyde inhalation? What role do N-methyl-amino adducts play in alkylation of nuclear and mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid, as well as mitochondrial peroxidation? The fact that the free formaldehyde pool in blood is not affected following exposure to the chemical does not mean that formaldehyde is not involved in altering cell and deoxyribonucleic acid characteristics beyond the nasal cavity. The teratogenic effect of formaldehyde in the English literature has been sought, beginning on the 6th day of pregnancy (i.e., rodents) (Saillenfait AM, et al. Food Chem Toxicol 1989, pp 545-48; Martin WJ. Reprod Toxicol 1990, pp 237-39; Ulsamer AG, et al. Hazard Assessment of Chemicals; Academic Press, 1984, pp 337-400; and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Toxicological Profile of Formaldehyde; ATSDR, 1999 [references 1-4, respectively, herein]). The exposure regimen is critical and may account for the differences in outcomes. Pregnant rats were exposed (a) prior to mating, (b) during mating, (c) or during the entire gestation period. These regimens (a) increased embryo mortality; (b) increased fetal anomalies (i.e., cryptochordism and aberrant ossification centers); (c) decreased concentrations of ascorbic acid; and (d) caused abnormalities in enzymes of

  7. Comparison of the effects of formaldehyde and gaseous ozone on HBV-contaminated hospital quilts

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dan; Li, Ziqiong; Jia, Bei; Che, Xiaoqiong; Song, Tianshuang; Huang, Wenxiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Besides being highly infectious, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide. In hospital settings, it is easy for the environment and quilts to be contaminated by HBV patient blood and body fluids. Therefore, HBV can be transmitted to other patients via contaminated environmental surfaces or quilts, resulting in an HBV nosocomial infection. Formaldehyde and ozone are commonly used disinfectants that may influence this infectious situation. Objective: To investigate the clinical effectiveness of formaldehyde and gaseous ozone for the terminal cleaning of hospital quilts contaminated by HBV. Methods: Thin cloth and thick cotton soaked with the serum from high HBV copy number patients were prepared and disinfected using formaldehyde fumigation and gaseous ozone at different times. The copy numbers of HBV DNA in the HBV-contaminated cloth and cotton samples were measured quantitatively with fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: When gaseous ozone was used to disinfect HBV-contaminated quilts for 23 minutes (min), 36 min, 49 min, and 90 min, the HBV DNA copy number displayed no significant decrease compared with the copy number before disinfection (P > 0.05). In comparison, the copy number of the HBV DNA in the cloth group decreased significantly (P < 0.05) after formaldehyde fumigation disinfection for 1 hour (h), and there was no difference when longer times and increased concentrations were used. In the thick cotton group, there was also a significant decrease (P < 0.05) of the HBV DNA copy numbers, but the decrease was not as dramatic. In addition, in this group, the disinfection effect observed at 4 h was the strongest. Conclusions: The application of ozone to disinfect HBV-contaminated hospital quilts possibly has no effect, whereas, formaldehyde oxide fumigation effectively reduced HBV copy numbers. PMID:26770591

  8. BLM protein mitigates formaldehyde-induced genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Anuradha; Owen, Nichole; Juarez, Eleonora; McCullough, Amanda K.

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a reactive aldehyde that has been classified as a class I human carcinogen by the International Agency for Cancer Research. There are growing concerns over the possible adverse health effects related to the occupational and environmental human exposures to formaldehyde. Although formaldehyde-induced DNA and protein adducts have been identified, the genomic instability mechanisms and the cellular tolerance pathways associated with formaldehyde exposure are not fully characterized. This study specifically examines the role of a genome stability protein, Bloom (BLM) in limiting formaldehyde-induced cellular and genetic abnormalities. Here, we show that in the absence of BLM protein, formaldehyde-treated cells exhibited increased cellular sensitivity, an immediate cell cycle arrest, and an accumulation of chromosome radial structures. In addition, live-cell imaging experiments demonstrated that formaldehyde-treated cells are dependent on BLM for timely segregation of daughter cells. Both wild-type and BLM-deficient formaldehyde-treated cells showed an accumulation of 53BP1 and γH2AX foci indicative of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, relative to wild-type cells, the BLM-deficient cells exhibited delayed repair. In response to formaldehyde exposure, we observed co-localization of 53BP1 and BLM foci at the DSB repair site, where ATM-dependent accumulation of formaldehyde-induced BLM foci occurred after the recruitment of 53BP1. Together, these findings highlight the significance of functional interactions among ATM, 53BP1, and BLM proteins as responders associated with the repair and tolerance mechanisms induced by formaldehyde. PMID:25770783

  9. Respiratory response to formaldehyde and off-gas of urea formaldehyde foam insulation.

    PubMed Central

    Day, J H; Lees, R E; Clark, R H; Pattee, P L

    1984-01-01

    In 18 subjects, 9 of whom had previously complained of various nonrespiratory adverse effects from the urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) in their homes, pulmonary function was assessed before and after exposure in a laboratory. On separate occasions formaldehyde, 1 part per million (ppm), and UFFI off-gas yielding a formaldehyde concentration of 1.2 ppm, were delivered to each subject in an environmental chamber for 90 minutes and a fume hood for 30 minutes respectively. None of the measures of pulmonary function used (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second or maximal midexpiratory flow rate) showed any clinically or statistically significant response to the exposure either immediately after or 8 hours after its beginning. There were no statistically significant differences between the responses of the group that had previously complained of adverse effects and of the group that had not. There was no evidence that either formaldehyde or UFFI off-gas operates as a lower airway allergen or important bronchospastic irritant in this heterogeneous population. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6388780

  10. Influence of Precision of Emission Characteristic Parameters on Model Prediction Error of VOCs/Formaldehyde from Dry Building Material

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wenjuan; Xiong, Jianyin; Zhang, Yinping

    2013-01-01

    Mass transfer models are useful in predicting the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde from building materials in indoor environments. They are also useful for human exposure evaluation and in sustainable building design. The measurement errors in the emission characteristic parameters in these mass transfer models, i.e., the initial emittable concentration (C0), the diffusion coefficient (D), and the partition coefficient (K), can result in errors in predicting indoor VOC and formaldehyde concentrations. These errors have not yet been quantitatively well analyzed in the literature. This paper addresses this by using modelling to assess these errors for some typical building conditions. The error in C0, as measured in environmental chambers and applied to a reference living room in Beijing, has the largest influence on the model prediction error in indoor VOC and formaldehyde concentration, while the error in K has the least effect. A correlation between the errors in D, K, and C0 and the error in the indoor VOC and formaldehyde concentration prediction is then derived for engineering applications. In addition, the influence of temperature on the model prediction of emissions is investigated. It shows the impact of temperature fluctuations on the prediction errors in indoor VOC and formaldehyde concentrations to be less than 7% at 23±0.5°C and less than 30% at 23±2°C. PMID:24312497

  11. Pt@AuNPs integrated quantitative capillary-based biosensors for point-of-care testing application.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ze; Fu, Qiangqiang; Yu, Shiting; Sheng, Liangrong; Xu, Meng; Yao, Cuize; Xiao, Wei; Li, Xiuqing; Tang, Yong

    2016-11-15

    Current diagnostic technologies primarily rely on bulky and costly analytical instruments. Therefore, cost-effective and portable diagnosis tools that can be used for point-of-care tests (POCT) are highly desirable. In this study, we report a cost-effective, portable capillary-based biosensor for quantitative detection of biomarkers by the naked eye. This capillary-based biosensor was tested by measuring the distance of blue ink movement, which was directly correlated with the oxygen (O2) produced by efficient core-shell Pt@Au nanoparticles (Pt@AuNPs) catalysts decomposed hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). By linking the Pt@AuNPs with antibodies, capillary-based biosensor sandwich immunoassays were constructed. The concentrations of the target proteins were positively correlated with the distances of ink movement. To demonstrate their performance, the biosensors were used to detect the cancer biomarker sprostate-specific antigen (PSA) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The linear detection range (LDR) of the capillary-based biosensor for detecting PSA was from 0.02 to 2.5ng/mL, and the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.017ng/mL. LDR of the biosensor for detecting CEA was from 0.063 to 16ng/mL, and the LOD was 0.044ng/mL. For detection of PSA and CEA in clinical serum samples, the detection results of the capillary-based biosensor were well correlate with the results from of chemiluminescence immunoassays (CLIAs). Thus, the capillary-based biosensor may potentially be a useful strategy for point-of-care testing, in addition to being portable and cost effective. PMID:27240013

  12. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1989-10-10

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer clusters. The covalent crosslinking of these clusters produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density [<=]100 mg/cc; cell size [<=]0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 [angstrom]. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  13. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1991-01-01

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer "Clusters". The covalent crosslinking of these "clusters" produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density.ltoreq.100 mg/cc; cell size .ltoreq.0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100.circle.. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  14. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, R.W.

    1988-05-26

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer ''clusters''. The covalent crosslinking of these ''clusters'' produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density less than or equal to100 mg/cc; cell size less than or equal to0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent,dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 A/degree/. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Low density, resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    The polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde under alkaline conditions results in the formation of surface functionalized polymer "clusters". The covalent crosslinking of these "clusters" produces gels which when processed under supercritical conditions, produce low density, organic aerogels (density .ltoreq.100 mg/cc; cell size .ltoreq.0.1 microns). The aerogels are transparent, dark red in color and consist of interconnected colloidal-like particles with diameters of about 100 .ANG.. These aerogels may be further carbonized to form low density carbon foams with cell size of about 0.1 micron.

  16. Low temperature steam and formaldehyde sterilization.

    PubMed

    Robertshaw, R G

    1983-09-01

    A standard low temperature steam/formaldehyde autoclave was tested according to the manufacturer's instructions, using a range of test pieces containing Bacillus stearothermophilus spores as the challenge organism. There were failures in killing the challenge organism and the reasons for these are discussed. A description of modifications made to the autoclave is given together with details of an improved operating cycle. The performance of the modified autoclave was greatly improved and conditions were established for reliable and consistent sterilization of all the test pieces. A commercially produced prototype autoclave similarly modified also showed effective sterilization. PMID:6195245

  17. Effect of Formaldehyde on Asthmatic Response to Inhaled Allergen Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ezratty, Véronique; Bonay, Marcel; Neukirch, Catherine; Orset-Guillossou, Gaëlle; Dehoux, Monique; Koscielny, Serge; Cabanes, Pierre-André; Lambrozo, Jacques; Aubier, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Background Exposure to formaldehyde may lead to exacerbation of asthma. Objectives Our aim in this study was to investigate whether exposure to a low level (500 μg/m3) of formaldehyde enhances inhaled allergen responses. Methods Twelve subjects with intermittent asthma and allergy to pollen were exposed, at rest, in a double-blind crossover study to either formaldehyde or purified air for 60 min. The order of exposure to formaldehyde and air-only was randomized, and exposures were separated by 2 weeks. We also performed an allergen inhalation challenge after each exposure. Airway responsiveness to methacholine and lower airway inflammation (induced sputum) were assessed 8 hr after allergen challenge. Results The median dose of allergen producing a 15% decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (PD15FEV1) was 0.80 IR (index of reactivity) after formaldehyde exposure compared with 0.25 IR after air-only exposure (p = 0.06). Formaldehyde exposure did not affect allergen-induced increase in responsiveness to methacholine (p = 0.42). We found no formaldehyde-associated effect on the airway inflammatory response, in particular the eosinophilic inflammatory response, induced by the allergen challenge 8 hr before. Conclusion In this study, exposure to 500 μg/m3 formaldehyde had no significant deleterious effect on airway allergen responsiveness of patients with intermittent asthma; we found a trend toward a protective effect. PMID:17384766

  18. Gold nanowired: a linear (Au25)(n) polymer from Au25 molecular clusters.

    PubMed

    De Nardi, Marco; Antonello, Sabrina; Jiang, De-en; Pan, Fangfang; Rissanen, Kari; Ruzzi, Marco; Venzo, Alfonso; Zoleo, Alfonso; Maran, Flavio

    2014-08-26

    Au25(SR)18 has provided fundamental insights into the properties of clusters protected by monolayers of thiolated ligands (SR). Because of its ultrasmall core, 1 nm, Au25(SR)18 displays molecular behavior. We prepared a Au25 cluster capped by n-butanethiolates (SBu), obtained its structure by single-crystal X-ray crystallography, and studied its properties both experimentally and theoretically. Whereas in solution Au25(SBu)18(0) is a paramagnetic molecule, in the crystal it becomes a linear polymer of Au25 clusters connected via single Au-Au bonds and stabilized by proper orientation of clusters and interdigitation of ligands. At low temperature, [Au25(SBu)18(0)]n has a nonmagnetic ground state and can be described as a one-dimensional antiferromagnetic system. These findings provide a breakthrough into the properties and possible solid-state applications of molecular gold nanowires. PMID:25088331

  19. Measurement of formaldehyde H{sub 2}CO concentration in air using diode vertical-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zaslavskii, V Ya; Nadezhdinskii, Aleksandr I; Ponurovskii, Ya Ya; Chernin, S M

    2011-01-31

    A two-channel gas-analysing spectrometer is developed using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) ({lambda}=1.79 {mu}m) and a multi-pass cell (total optical length 39 m) for studying the absorption spectra and measuring the background concentration of formaldehyde. High-resolution absorption spectra of formaldehyde are obtained within the VCSEL frequency tuning range ({lambda} {approx}1.79 {mu}m). Changing the background concentration of H{sub 2}CO, the sensitivity limit of the gas analyser is estimated. (laser applications)

  20. Determination of tritiated formaldehyde in effluents from tritium facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Belot, Y.; Camus, H.; Marini, T. )

    1992-03-01

    Recent observations suggested that formal-dehyde can be incorporated in vegetation at a very high rate. In this paper, the authors develop a methodology for determining tritiated formaldehyde (CHTO) in gaseous effluent containing HTO and HT as dominant species. CHTO being very soluble in water is collected in a solution of carrier formaldehyde. This carrier is necessary for precipitating for formaldehyde derivative of dimedone and collecting it by filtration. The precipitate, which contains the formaldehyde hydrogens, is freed from exchangeable tritium, dried in oven, and combusted to water for tritium determination. CHTO can thus be separated from HTO with a high efficiency, leading to the possibility of determining accurately 1 Bq of CHTO in as much as 5 {times} 10{sup 4} Bq of HTO. The methodology has been applied in preliminary experiments to determine the ratio of CHTO to HTO in effluent from a tritium-handling facility and effluent released from solid miscellaneous wastes.

  1. Chromogenic Detection of Aqueous Formaldehyde Using Functionalized Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, Sameh; Pascual, Lluı́s; Licchelli, Maurizio; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Gil, Salvador; Costero, Ana M; Sancenón, Félix

    2016-06-15

    Silica nanoparticles functionalized with thiol reactive units and bulky polar polyamines were used for the selective colorimetric detection of formaldehyde. The reaction of thiols groups in the nanoparticles surface with a squaraine dye resulted in loss of the π-conjugation of the chromophores, and the subsequent bleaching of the solution. However, when formaldehyde was present in the suspension, the thiol-squaraine reaction was inhibited and a chromogenic response was observed. A selective response to formaldehyde was observed only when the thiol and polyamine groups were anchored to the silica surface. The observed selective response was ascribed to the fact that bulky polyamines generate a highly polar environment around thiols, which were only able to react with the small and polar formaldehyde, but not with other aldehydes. The sensing nanoparticles showed a limit of detection (LOD) for formaldehyde of 36 ppb in water. PMID:27250594

  2. Imaging Surface Reactions of Formaldehyde on TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenrong; Tang, Miru; Wang, Zhi-Tao; Ke, Zhu; Xia, Yaobiao; Park, Kenneth; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Dohnálek, Zdenek; Ge, Qingfeng

    2015-03-01

    Formaldehyde is involved in many surface catalytic and photo-catalytic reactions on metal oxides. We studied surface reactions of formaldehyde on reduced TiO2(110) surfaces using variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT). STM images taken from a same area at various temperatures clearly show that formaldehyde preferentially adsorbs on the bridge-bonded oxygen vacancy (VO) defect sites. Bias-dependent STM images suggest the bonding configurations of the Ti-bound CH2O and the VO-bound CH2O. The isothermal time dependent images show the rotation of VO-bound CH2O and the two diffusion channels of formaldehyde at different temperatures. We also directly observed the formation of formaldehyde dimmer.

  3. Application of Au-Sn eutectic bonding in hermetic radio-frequency microelectromechanical system wafer level packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Choa, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Woonbae; Hwang, Junsik; Ham, Sukjin; Moon, Changyoul

    2006-03-01

    Development of packaging is one of the critical issues toward realizing commercialization of radio-frequency-microelectromechanical system (RF-MEMS) devices. The RF-MEMS package should be designed to have small size, hermetic protection, good RF performance, and high reliability. In addition, packaging should be conducted at sufficiently low temperature. In this paper, a low-temperature hermetic wafer level packaging scheme for the RF-MEMS devices is presented. For hermetic sealing, Au-Sn eutectic bonding technology at temperatures below 300°C is used. Au-Sn multilayer metallization with a square loop of 70 µm in width is performed. The electrical feed-through is achieved by the vertical through-hole via filling with electroplated Cu. The size of the MEMS package is 1 mm × 1 mm × 700 µm. The shear strength and hermeticity of the package satisfies the requirements of MIL-STD-883F. Any organic gases or contamination are not observed inside the package. The total insertion loss for the packaging is 0.075 dB at 2 GHz. Furthermore, the robustness of the package is demonstrated by observing no performance degradation and physical damage of the package after several reliability tests.

  4. Fixed-frequency and Frequency-agile (au, HTS) Microstrip Bandstop Filters for L-band Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saenz, Eileen M.; Subramanyam, Guru; VanKeuls, Fred W.; Chen, Chonglin; Miranda, Felix A.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, we report on the performance of a highly selective, compact 1.83 x 2.08 cm(exp 2) (approx. 0.72 x 0.82 in(exp 2) microstrip line bandstop filter of YBa2CU3O(7-delta) (YBCO) on LaAlO3 (LAO) substrate. The filter is designed for a center frequency of 1.623 GHz for a bandwidth at 3 dB from reference baseline of less than 5.15 MHz, and a bandstop rejection of 30 dB or better. The design and optimization of the filter was performed using Zeland's IE3D circuit simulator. The optimized design was used to fabricate gold (Au) and High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS) versions of the filter. We have also studied an electronically tunable version of the same filter. Tunability of the bandstop characteristics is achieved by the integration of a thin film conductor (Au or HTS) and the nonlinear dielectric ferroelectric SrTiO3 in a conductor/ferroelectric/dielectric modified microstrip configuration. The performance of these filters and comparison with the simulated data will be presented.

  5. Partially-irreversible sorption of formaldehyde in five polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Wei; Cox, Steven S.; Zhao, Xiaomin; Frazier, Charles E.; Little, John C.

    2014-12-01

    Due to its environmental ubiquity and concern over its potential toxicity, the mass-transfer characteristics of formaldehyde are of critical importance to indoor air quality research. Previous studies have suggested that formaldehyde mass transfer in polymer is partially irreversible. In this study, mechanisms that could cause the observed irreversibility were investigated. Polycarbonate and four other polymeric matrices were selected and subjected to formaldehyde sorption/desorption cycles. Mass transfer of formaldehyde was partially irreversible in all cases, and three potential mechanisms were evaluated. First, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analysis was used to investigate possible formaldehyde polymerization on polymer surfaces. ATR-FTIR showed no detectable paraformaldehyde or formaldehyde on the film surfaces that had been exposed to formaldehyde and air. ATR-FTIR did detect aliphatic acids suggesting oxidation had occurred on film surfaces as a result of exposure to formaldehyde. However, additional study suggested that air is not the primary cause for irreversibility. Second, statistical physics theory was tested as a possible explanation. According to this theory, reversible and irreversible sorption could be taking place simultaneously. The irreversible fraction should be constant during sorption and the fraction could be determined by performing a complete sorption/desorption test. The sorption/desorption data was consistent with this theory. Third, chemisorption was considered as another possible cause for irreversibility. Extraction/fluorimetry testing of post-sorption and post-desorption polymer films showed measurable quantities of formaldehyde suggesting that some of the chemisorbed formaldehyde was reversible at the higher extraction temperature. Further quantitative study on chemical reaction products is needed.

  6. Aβ seeds resist inactivation by formaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Fritschi, Sarah K.; Cintron, Amarallys; Ye, Lan; Mahler, Jasmin; Bühler, Anika; Baumann, Frank; Neumann, Manuela; Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Hammarström, Per; Walker, Lary C.; Jucker, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral β-amyloidosis can be exogenously induced by the intracerebral injection of brain extracts containing aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ) into young, pre-depositing Aβ precursor protein- (APP) transgenic mice. Previous work has shown that the induction involves a prion-like seeding mechanism in which the seeding agent is aggregated Aβ itself. Here we report that the β-amyloid-inducing activity of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain tissue or aged APP-transgenic mouse brain tissue is preserved, albeit with reduced efficacy, after formaldehyde fixation. Moreover, spectral analysis with amyloid conformation-sensitive luminescent conjugated oligothiophene dyes reveals that the strain-like properties of aggregated Aβ are maintained in fixed tissues. The resistance of Aβ seeds to inactivation and structural modification by formaldehyde underscores their remarkable durability, which in turn may contribute to their persistence and spread within the body. The present findings can be exploited to establish the relationship between the molecular structure of Aβ aggregates and the variable clinical features and disease progression of AD even in archived, formalin-fixed autopsy material. PMID:25193240

  7. Formaldehyde exposure and acute health effects study

    SciTech Connect

    Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.; Michaud, J.P.; Bronnimann, D. )

    1989-01-01

    To assess the effects of formaldehyde exposures on health, exposure groups were defined using baseline exposure and health questionnaires. Formaldehyde concentrations were poorly correlated with these exposure classifications, perhaps due to the time delay between classification and monitoring. The 151 households reported here had a mean HCHO concentration of 35 (S.E. 1.5 and median 30) {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Passive samplers prepared in our lab were calibrated in a chamber to derive an estimated sampling rate of 0.311 {mu}g/(mg {center dot} m{sup {minus}3} {center dot} hr). They were also compared to commercially available samplers inside of the homes, with a correlation coefficient of 0.896 and mean difference of 2.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. In this report of initial findings from an ongoing study, daily symptoms and peak expiratory flow measurements were compared with an HCHO exposure classification based on the median measured concentrations. None of the symptoms groups were related to HCHO exposure when controlling for age and sex. There was a significant relationship between HCHO exposure and variability in peak expiratory flows that was dependent on age group. It may be especially important to assess the variability in reactive individuals and children to determine the short-term effects of HCHO exposures and possible long-term consequences.

  8. Aβ seeds resist inactivation by formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Fritschi, Sarah K; Cintron, Amarallys; Ye, Lan; Mahler, Jasmin; Bühler, Anika; Baumann, Frank; Neumann, Manuela; Nilsson, K Peter R; Hammarström, Per; Walker, Lary C; Jucker, Mathias

    2014-10-01

    Cerebral β-amyloidosis can be exogenously induced by the intracerebral injection of brain extracts containing aggregated β-amyloid (Aβ) into young, pre-depositing Aβ precursor protein- (APP) transgenic mice. Previous work has shown that the induction involves a prion-like seeding mechanism in which the seeding agent is aggregated Aβ itself. Here we report that the β-amyloid-inducing activity of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue or aged APP-transgenic mouse brain tissue is preserved, albeit with reduced efficacy, after formaldehyde fixation. Moreover, spectral analysis with amyloid conformation-sensitive luminescent conjugated oligothiophene dyes reveals that the strain-like properties of aggregated Aβ are maintained in fixed tissues. The resistance of Aβ seeds to inactivation and structural modification by formaldehyde underscores their remarkable durability, which in turn may contribute to their persistence and spread within the body. The present findings can be exploited to establish the relationship between the molecular structure of Aβ aggregates and the variable clinical features and disease progression of AD even in archived, formalin-fixed autopsy material. PMID:25193240

  9. ACTION OF FORMALDEHYDE ON ENZYMES AND ON CERTAIN PBOTEIDS

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, C. L.; Novy, F. G.

    1899-01-01

    The following general conclusions may be drawn from the preceding work: Fibrin is altered by formaldehyde and is then less easily digested by pepsin and by trypsin. Papaïn is apparently unable to digest fibrin even when this is exposed to very weak formaldehyde (1:1000) for a very short time. The casein of milk, on contact with formaldehyde, undergoes rapid alteration and is as a result not coagulated by rennet, or but very slowly. Such altered casein, like similar fibrin, is not readily digested by the proteolytic ferments. The longer the formaldehyde acts on casein and on fibrin the more marked is the result. Pepsin is not affected by a one per cent solution of formaldehyde, even when the mixture has stood for four weeks. Even a five per cent solution of formaldehyde acting for three weeks has no effect on pepsin. Contrary results obtained by others are due to an alteration of the fibrin by the formaldehyde. A putrid solution of pepsin in distilled water one month old digests fibrin as readily as a fresh solution. Rennet is not affected even by a four per cent solution of formaldehyde acting for several weeks. The absence of coagulation at times is due to the action of formaldehyde on the casein of the milk and not on the rennet ferment. Papaïn is very quickly altered by formaldehyde, even in very dilute solution. Moreover, it is unable to digest fibrin that has been exposed to the action of a very dilute solution of formaldehyde for a short time. Trypsin is altered by formaldehyde to such an extent that digestion of fibrin will not take place, or but very slowly. The extent to which trypsin is affected by formaldehyde depends largely upon the amount of organic matter present, as well as on the amount of ferment in the solution. Amylopsin is not destroyed by very dilute solutions of formaldehyde, but stronger solutions decrease the activity of the ferment, and if used in sufficient concentration will destroy it completely. Ptyalin, like the diastatic ferment of

  10. Precursor polymers for the carbon coating of Au@ZnO multipods for application as active material in lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Oschmann, Bernd; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Mueller, Franziska; Bresser, Dominic; Lieberwirth, Ingo; Tremel, Wolfgang; Passerini, Stefano; Zentel, Rudolf

    2015-06-01

    The synthesis of statistical and block copolymers based on polyacrylonitrile, as a source for carbonaceous materials, and thiol-containing repeating units as inorganic nanoparticle anchoring groups is reported. These polymers are used to coat Au@ZnO multipod heteroparticles with polymer brushes. IR spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy prove the successful binding of the polymer onto the inorganic nanostructures. Thermogravimetric analysis is applied to compare the binding ability of the block and statistical copolymers. Subsequently, the polymer coating is transformed into a carbonaceous (partially graphitic) coating by pyrolysis. The obtained carbon coating is characterized by Raman spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The benefit of the conformal carbon coating of the Au@ZnO multipods regarding its application as lithium-ion anode material is revealed by performing galvanostatic cycling, showing a highly enhanced and stabilized electrochemical performance of the carbon-coated particles (still 831 mAh g(-1) after 150 cycles) with respect to the uncoated ones (only 353 mAh g(-1) after 10 cycles). PMID:25598387