Science.gov

Sample records for application purex storage

  1. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The PUREX Storage Tunnels are a mixed waste storage unit consisting of two underground railroad tunnels: Tunnel Number 1 designated 218-E-14 and Tunnel Number 2 designated 218-E-15. The two tunnels are connected by rail to the PUREX Plant and combine to provide storage space for 48 railroad cars (railcars). The PUREX Storage Tunnels provide a long-term storage location for equipment removed from the PUREX Plant. Transfers into the PUREX Storage Tunnels are made on an as-needed basis. Radioactively contaminated equipment is loaded on railcars and remotely transferred by rail into the PUREX Storage Tunnels. Railcars act as both a transport means and a storage platform for equipment placed into the tunnels. This report consists of part A and part B. Part A reports on amounts and locations of the mixed water. Part B permit application consists of the following: Facility Description and General Provisions; Waste Characteristics; Process Information; Groundwater Monitoring; Procedures to Prevent Hazards; Contingency Plan; Personnel Training; Exposure Information Report.

  2. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The Hanford Site is operated by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office. The PUREX Storage Tunnels are a storage unit located on the Hanford Site. The unit consists of two earth-covered railroad tunnels that are used for storage of process equipment (some containing dangerous waste) removed from the PUREX Plant. Radioactively contaminated equipment is loaded on railroad cars and remotely transferred into the tunnels for long-term storage. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and serves as a co-operator of the PUREX Storage Tunnels, the waste management unit addressed by this permit application. The PUREX Storage Tunnels Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Revision O) consists of both a Part A and Part B permit application and is based on information available as of August 31, 1990. An explanation of the Part A revision submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. In this Part A revision, the PUREX Storage Tunnels have been redesignated as a miscellaneous unit. The Part B consists of 15 chapters addressing the organization and content of the Part B checklist prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology.

  3. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The Hanford Site is operated by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office. The PUREX Storage Tunnels are a storage unit located on the Hanford Site. The unit consists of two earth-covered railroad tunnels that are used for storage of process equipment (some containing dangerous waste) removed from the PUREX Plant. Radioactively contaminated equipment is loaded on railroad cars and remotely transferred into the tunnels for long-term storage. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and serves as a co-operator of the PUREX Storage Tunnels, the waste management unit addressed by this permit application. This appendix contains Tunnel 1 Construction Specifications, HWS-5638, consisting of 49 pages.

  4. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, C. R.

    1997-09-08

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24).

  5. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.M.

    1997-09-08

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents Section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation is current as of April 1997.

  6. PUREX Storage Tunnels dangerous waste permit application. Revision 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The PUREX Storage Tunnels are a mixed waste storage unit consisting of two underground railroad tunnels: Tunnel Number 1 designated 218-E-14 and Tunnel Number 2 designated 218-E-15. The two tunnels are connected by rail to the PUREX Plant and combine to provide storage space for 48 railroad cars (railcars). The PUREX Storage Tunnels provide a long-term storage location for equipment removed from the PUREX Plant. Transfers into the PUREX Storage Tunnels are made on an as-needed basis. Radioactively contaminated equipment is loaded on railcars and remotely transferred by rail into the PUREX Storage Tunnels. Railcars act as both a transport means and a storage platform for equipment placed into the tunnels. This report consists of part A and part B. Part A reports on amounts and locations of the mixed water. Part B permit application consists of the following: Facility Description and General Provisions; Waste Characteristics; Process Information; Groundwater Monitoring; Procedures to Prevent Hazards; Contingency Plan; Personnel Training; Exposure Information Report.

  7. PUREX storage tunnels waste analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, C.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-10

    Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX Plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources.

  8. PUREX storage tunnels waste analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, C.R.

    1996-04-23

    Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX Plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources.

  9. PUREX storage tunnels waste analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, C.R.

    1995-10-16

    Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources

  10. PUREX Storage Tunnels waste analysis plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, M.J.

    1995-11-01

    Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous waste is managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Storage Tunnels used to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the PUREX Plant, as well as waste received from other on-site sources.

  11. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for deactivation of the PUREX storage tunnel number 2

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, R.E.

    1999-10-11

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Storage Tunnel Number 2 (hereafter referred to as the PUREX Tunnel) was built in 1964. Since that time, the PUREX Tunnel has been used for storage of radioactive and mixed waste. In 1991, the PUREX Plant ceased operations and was transitioned to deactivation. The PUREX Tunnel continued to receive PUREX Plant waste material for storage during transition activities. Before 1995, a decision was made to store radioactive and mixed waste in the PUREX Tunnel generated from other onsite sources, on a case-by-case basis. This notice of construction (NOC) describes the activities associated with the reactivation of the PUREX Tunnel ventilation system and the transfer of up to 3.5 million curies (MCi) of radioactive waste to the PUREX Tunnel from any location on the Hanford Site. The unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimated for the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI) is 5.6 E-2 millirem (mrem). The abated TEDE conservatively is estimated to account for 1.9 E-5 mrem to the MEI. The following text provides information requirements of Appendix A of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247 (requirements 1 through 18).

  12. PUREX Organic Waste Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    2002-12-12

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate solidification/stabilization as an alternative treatment technology for the organic phase of the SRS spent PUREX waste using simulated waste, and to evaluate waste forms prepared with actual spent organic PUREX waste for regulatory classification.

  13. Stabilization of Tank 33 and 35 Aqueous PUREX Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    2002-04-10

    Approximately 38,000 gallons of PUREX waste are currently stored in the New Solvent Storage Tanks (NSST), Tanks 33 and 35. The waste consists of both an organic and aqueous fraction. Solidification is currently being evaluated for the 24,800 gallons of organic PUREX waste.

  14. PUREX facility hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, L.N.

    1994-09-23

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. Operation of PUREX is the responsibility of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide the emergency planning technical basis for PUREX. DOE Order 5500.3A requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification. In October of 1990, WHC was directed to place PUREX in standby. In December of 1992 the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management authorized the termination of PUREX and directed DOE-RL to proceed with shutdown planning and terminal clean out activities. Prior to this action, its mission was to reprocess irradiated fuels for the recovery of uranium and plutonium. The present mission is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration at the PUREX facility and to preserve that condition for 10 years. The ten year time frame represents the typical duration expended to define, authorize and initiate follow-on decommissioning and decontamination activities.

  15. Industrial storage applications overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The implementation of a technology demonstration for the food processing industry, development and technology demonstrations for selected near-term, in-plant applications and advanced industrial applications of thermal energy storage are overviewed.

  16. PUREX new substation ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.E.

    1997-05-12

    This document is the acceptance test report (ATR) for the New PUREX Main and Minisubstations. It covers the factory and vendor acceptance and commissioning test reports. Reports are presented for the Main 5 kV substation building, the building fire system, switchgear, and vacuum breaker; the minisubstation control building and switch gear; commissioning test; electrical system and loads inspection; electrical utilities transformer and cable; and relay setting changes based on operational experience.

  17. Comparison of silver sorbents for application to radioiodine control at the PUREX process facility modification. [Iodine 129

    SciTech Connect

    Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Halko, B.T.

    1988-09-01

    In continued support of the design of the gaseous radioiodine control system for the PUREX Process Facility Modification (PFM), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted laboratory-scale measurements of the performance of four state-of-the-art sorbents for radioiodine in the dissolver offgas (DOG) of a nuclear reprocessing plant. The PFM is a new head-end treatment plant being designed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the PUREX Plant at the Hanford Site. The experiments performed measured the iodine effluent concentration from Norton silver mordenite (NAgZ), Linde silver mordenite (LAgZ), Linde silver faujasite (AgX), and silver nitrate-impregnated silicic acid (AgNO/sub 3/Si) during simulated normal operating conditions in the PFM after three shutdown/startup cycles, and during standby. At normal operating conditions the input gas is expected to have a dew point of 35/degree/C to 40/degree/C and contain 0.1 ..mu..mol I/L, 1 vol% NO, and 1 vol% NO /sub 2/. The sorbent bed would be at 150/degree/C. A shutdown/startup cycle consisted of eliminating iodine and NO/sub x/ from the input gas, cooling the bed to room temperature, stopping gas flow, and restarting the system. During standby conditions the input gas contained no iodine or NO/sub x/, the dew point was at 30/degree/C to 35/degree/C, and the bed temperature remained at 150/degree/C. This experimental study showed that 20 cm beds of NAgZ, LAgZ, and 18 wt% silver AgX could load up to 0.25 mmol I/g sorbent and routinely reduce the iodine concentration in a simulated PFM DOG from 0.1 ..mu..mol I/L to less than the target level of 10/sup /minus/5/ ..mu..mol I/L. In contrast, the AgNO/sub 3/Si unexpectedly failed to achieve this required level of performance, reducing the concentration on a routine basis only to 10/sup /minus/4/ to 10/sup /minus/2/ ..mu..mol I/L. 5 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Functional design criteria for the 242-A evaporator and PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction) Plant condensate interim retention basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cejka, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    This document contains the functional design criteria for a 26- million-gallon retention basin and 10 million gallons of temporary storage tanks. The basin and tanks will be used to store 242-A Evaporator process condensate, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process distillate discharge stream, and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate stream. Completion of the project will allow both the 242-A Evaporator and the PUREX Plant to restart. 4 refs.

  19. Next generation Purex modeling by way of parallel processing with high performance computers

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuth, S.F.

    1993-08-01

    The Plutonium and Uranium Extraction (Purex) process is the predominant method used worldwide for solvent extraction in reprocessing spent nuclear fuels. Proper flowsheet design has a significant impact on the character of the process waste. Past Purex flowsheet modeling has been based on equilibrium conditions. It can be shown for the Purex process that optimum separation does not necessarily occur at equilibrium conditions. The next generation Purex flowsheet models should incorporate the fundamental diffusion and chemical kinetic processes required to study time-dependent behavior. Use of parallel processing with high-performance computers will permit transient multistage and multispecies design calculations based on mass transfer with simultaneous chemical reaction models. This paper presents an applicable mass transfer with chemical reaction model for the Purex system and presents a parallel processing solution methodology.

  20. Purex: process and equipment performance

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Purex process is the solvent extraction system that uses tributyl phosphate as the extractant for separating uranium and plutonium from irradiated reactor fuels. Since the first flowsheet was proposed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1950, the process has endured for over 30 years with only minor modifications. The spread of the technology was rapid, and worldwide use or research on Purex-type processes was reported by the time of the 1955 Geneva Conference. The overall performance of the process has been so good that there are no serious contenders for replacing it soon. This paper presents: process description; equipment performance (mixer-settlers, pulse columns, rapid contactors); fission product decontamination; solvent effects (solvent degradation products); and partitioning of uranium and plutonium.

  1. Overview of energy storage applications

    SciTech Connect

    BOYES,JOHN D.

    2000-04-26

    Sandia National Laboratories has been studying Energy Storage Systems since the late 1970s. Sandia started by applying their defense program battery experience to larger stationary systems, eventually joining in the formation of the Utility Battery Group which has since evolved into the Energy Storage Association. Sandia's role, as a Department of Energy funded program is to look ahead at emerging technologies, perform early R and D and identify applications for Energy Storage Systems that offer significant benefit to the nation's electricity providers and users. In order to identify applications of energy storage, a two-phase Opportunities Analysis was conceptualized in FY94. Phase 1 of the project was completed and published in 1995 (SAND94-2605). Phase 2 of the project is an extension of Phase 1 to reexamine the identified applications in the dynamic environment of today. In a preliminary assessment of national benefits, SNL estimated that generation and transmission applications of storage could represent $17.2B in national benefits. In Phase 1 of the Opportunities Analysis, the T and D benefits were found to be significantly higher than previous estimates Phase 2 of the study, which began in late 1998, includes a refinement of the technical and economic understanding of the role of energy storage in the utility industry given the changing nature of the electricity provider industry. This is work in progress and current information is insufficient to estimate market size with a high degree of confidence, especially from a system supplier's perspective. Activity in Phase 2 has so far been primarily focused on the need to re-characterize the near and long-term utility application requirements for energy storage.

  2. Nanotechnology for Data Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; McCarthy, Brendan; Jabbour, Ghassan

    This chapter considers atomic force microscopy (AFM) as an enabling technology for data storage applications, considering already existing technologies such as hard disk drives (HDD), optical disk drives (ODD) and flash memories that currently dominate the nonvolatile data storage market, together with future devices based on magnetoresistive and phase change effects. The issue at hand is the question of whether the novel AFM-based storage, dubbed probe storage, can offer a competing approach to the currently available technologies by playing the role of a disruptive technology. Probe storage will be contrasted to HDD and ODD, which are purely mechanical as they are based on a rotating disk that uses just a single probe to address billions of bits of data, and nonvolatile random-access memory (RAM) that has no moving parts yet requires billions of interconnects. In particular, capacity, areal density, transfer rate, form factor and the cost of various data storage devices will be discussed and the unique opportunity offered by probe storage in employing massive parallelism will be outlined. It will be shown that probe storage bridges the gap between HDD, ODD and other nonvolatile RAM, drawing from the strength of each one of these and adding a significant attribute neither of these has; namely, the possibility of addressing a very large number of nanoscale bits of data in parallel. This chapter differs from the other chapters in this book in that it addresses the important issue of whether a given scientific effort, namely, probe storage, is mature enough to evolve into a commercially viable technology. The answer seems to indicate that there is indeed a huge niche in the data storage arena that such a technology is uniquely qualified to fill, which is large enough to justify a major investment in research and development. Indeed, as other chapters indicate, such an effort is developing at a rapid pace, with hopes of having a viable product within a few years.

  3. Nanotechnology for Data Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; McCarthy, Brendan; Jabbour, Ghassan E.

    This chapter considers atomic force microscopy (AFM) as an enabling technology for data storage applications, considering already existing technologies such as hard disk drives (HDD), optical disk drives (ODD) and Flash Memories that currently dominate the nonvolatile data storage market, together with future devices based on magnetoresistive and phase change effects. The issue at hand is the question of whether the novel AFM-based storage, dubbed "Probe Storage", can offer a competing approach to the currently available technologies by playing the role of a disruptive technology. Probe Storage will be contrasted to HDD and ODD who are purely mechanical, as they are based on a rotating disk that uses just a single probe to address billions of bits of data, and nonvolatile RAM that has no moving parts yet requires billions of interconnects. In particular, capacity, areal density, transfer rate, form factor and cost of various data storage devices will be discussed and the unique opportunity offered by Probe Storage in employing massive parallelism will be outlined. It will be shown that Probe Storage bridges the gap between HDD, ODD and other nonvolatile RAM, drawing from the strength of each one of these and adding a significant attribute neither of these has; namely, the possibility of addressing a very large number of nanoscale bits of data in parallel. This chapter differs from the other chapters in this book in that it addresses the important issue of whether a given scientific effort, namely, Probe Storage, is mature enough to evolve into a commercially viable technology. The answer seems to indicate that there indeed is a huge niche in the data storage arena that such a technology is uniquely qualified to fill, which is large enough to justify a major investment in research and development. Indeed, as other chapters indicate, such an effort is developing at a rapid pace, with hopes of having a viable product within a few years.

  4. Energy Storage for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Loyselle, Patricia L.; Hoberecht, Mark A.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Kohout, Lisa L.; Burke, Kenneth A.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has long been a major contributor to the development and application of energy storage technologies for NASAs missions and programs. NASA GRC has supported technology efforts for the advancement of batteries and fuel cells. The Electrochemistry Branch at NASA GRC continues to play a critical role in the development and application of energy storage technologies, in collaboration with other NASA centers, government agencies, industry and academia. This paper describes the work in batteries and fuel cell technologies at the NASA Glenn Research Center. It covers a number of systems required to ensure that NASAs needs for a wide variety of systems are met. Some of the topics covered are lithium-based batteries, proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, and nanotechnology activities. With the advances of the past years, we begin the 21st century with new technical challenges and opportunities as we develop enabling technologies for batteries and fuel cells for aerospace applications.

  5. PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, E.N. III

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the PUREX Deactivation Project is to establish a passively safe and environmentally secure configuration of PUREX at the Hanford Site, and to preserve that configuration for a 10-year horizon. The 10-year horizon is used to predict future maintenance requirements and represents they typical time duration expended to define, authorize, and initiate the follow-on Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities. This document was prepared to increase attention to worker safety issues during the deactivation project and, as such, identifies the documentation and programs associated with PUREX Deactivation Health and Safety.

  6. Utility energy storage applications studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenung, S.M.; Burns, C.

    1996-09-01

    The values of benefits and costs have been estimated for applying energy storage to three situations on the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation system. One situation is a valuable industrial customer requiring high quality, reliable power. The second situation is the need for reliable power at the end of a radial distribution feeder. The third situation is a case of thermal overload on a transmission line to a growing load in an environmentally sensitive location. The first case requires a small storage system (30 MJ); the second and third require relatively large systems (250 and 550 MWh, respectively). A variety of energy storage technologies was considered for each case. This paper presents the benefit/cost results for the technologies considered for each case. The technologies compared in this study are superconducting magnetics energy storage, batteries, flywheels, capacitors, compressed air energy storage, compressed air in vessels, and pumped hydro storage.

  7. Applications and challenges for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannberg, L. D.; Tomlinson, J. T.

    1991-04-01

    New thermal energy storage (TES) technologies are being developed and applied as society strives to relieve increasing energy and environmental stresses. Applications for these new technologies range from residential and district heating and cooling using waste and solar energy, to high-temperature energy storage for power production and industrial processes. In the last two decades there has been great interest and development of heat storage systems, primarily for residential and commercial buildings. While development has continued, the rate of advancement has slowed with current technology considered adequate for electrically charged heat storage furnaces. Use of chill storage for building diurnal cooling has received substantial development.

  8. Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drost, M. K.; Antoniak, Z. I.

    1992-04-01

    Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be decoupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

  9. Hydrogen Storage for Aircraft Applications Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Kohout, Lisa (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Advances in fuel cell technology have brought about their consideration as sources of power for aircraft. This power can be utilized to run aircraft systems or even provide propulsion power. One of the key obstacles to utilizing fuel cells on aircraft is the storage of hydrogen. An overview of the potential methods of hydrogen storage was compiled. This overview identifies various methods of hydrogen storage and points out their advantages and disadvantages relative to aircraft applications. Minimizing weight and volume are the key aspects to storing hydrogen within an aircraft. An analysis was performed to show how changes in certain parameters of a given storage system affect its mass and volume.

  10. Integrating safety and health during deactiviation: With lessons learned from PUREX

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-29

    This report summarizes an integrated safety and health approach used during facility deactivation activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility in Hanford, Washington. Resulting safety and health improvements and the potential, complex-wide application of this approach are discussed in this report through a description of its components and the impacts, or lessons-learned, of its use during the PUREX deactivation project. As a means of developing and implementing the integrated safety and health approach, the PUREX technical partnership was established in 1993 among the Office of Environment, Safety and Health`s Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5); the Office of Environmental Management`s Offices of Nuclear Material and Facility Stabilization (EM-60) and Compliance and Program Coordination (EM-20); the DOE Richland Operations Office; and the Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is believed that this report will provide guidance for instituting an integrated safety and health approach not only for deactivation activities, but for decommissioning and other clean-up activities as well. This confidence is based largely upon the rationality of the approach, often termed as common sense, and the measurable safety and health and project performance results that application of the approach produced during actual deactivation work at the PUREX Facility.

  11. Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V. Vasudeva

    2008-10-01

    This paper gives an Introduction to Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) systems and their applications along with an overview of their present status. Further a brief description to a Micro SMES/UPS system of 0.5 MJ capacity that was developed/tested at IIT, Kharagpur is also included.

  12. Optical storage: Financial management and budget applications

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.D.; Emrich, M.L.

    1988-10-01

    Recent optical storage technology advances have improved the micro-computer's ability to handle large quantities of data. This paper will explain the evolution of this technology including the state of the art. The factors involved in this evolution will be described, namely the division of research into three distinct areas: Compact Disk Read Only Memory (CD-ROM); Write Once Read Many (WORM); and Erasable Optical Storage (EOS). The future implications of these areas will be reported. In addition, practical applications that utilize optical media in the financial environment will be highlighted. 3 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs.

  13. Nanophase change for data storage applications.

    PubMed

    Shi, L P; Chong, T C

    2007-01-01

    Phase change materials are widely used for date storage. The most widespread and important applications are rewritable optical disc and Phase Change Random Access Memory (PCRAM), which utilizes the light and electric induced phase change respectively. For decades, miniaturization has been the major driving force to increase the density. Now the working unit area of the current data storage media is in the order of nano-scale. On the nano-scale, extreme dimensional and nano-structural constraints and the large proportion of interfaces will cause the deviation of the phase change behavior from that of bulk. Hence an in-depth understanding of nanophase change and the related issues has become more and more important. Nanophase change can be defined as: phase change at the scale within nano range of 100 nm, which is size-dependent, interface-dominated and surrounding materials related. Nanophase change can be classified into two groups, thin film related and structure related. Film thickness and clapping materials are key factors for thin film type, while structure shape, size and surrounding materials are critical parameters for structure type. In this paper, the recent development of nanophase change is reviewed, including crystallization of small element at nano size, thickness dependence of crystallization, effect of clapping layer on the phase change of phase change thin film and so on. The applications of nanophase change technology on data storage is introduced, including optical recording such as super lattice like optical disc, initialization free disc, near field, super-RENS, dual layer, multi level, probe storage, and PCRAM including, superlattice-like structure, side edge structure, and line type structure. Future key research issues of nanophase change are also discussed. PMID:17455476

  14. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Niemann, Michael U.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Phani, Ayala R.; Kumar, Ashok; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2008-01-01

    Nmore » anomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices.anostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes, TiS 2 / MoS 2 nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks are considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials may offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc.) and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined.« less

  15. Energy storage for wind-generator application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russel, F. M.

    1982-09-01

    A low-cost method was developed for storing energy and stiffening power supplied by wind generators. It involved inflatable, fabric-reinforced elastic liners buried underground and containing a fluid, probably water, at an intermediate pressure. The ground would be subject to elastic deformation and the method could be applicable to unstable ground such as deep sand, heterogeneous sedimentary or other unconsolidated deposits in remote locations or hostile environments. While the density of energy storage was considered low, compared with pumped-hydro systems, the technology could be attractive for developing countries.

  16. 76 FR 52649 - Golden Triangle Storage, Inc.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Golden Triangle Storage, Inc.; Notice of Application On August 5, 2011, Golden Triangle Storage, Inc. (Golden Triangle) filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  17. Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. Volume 2: Contributed Papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The solar thermal and the thermal and thermochemical energy storage programs are described as well as the technology requirements for both external (electrical) and internal (thermal, chemical) modes for energy storage in solar power plants. Specific technical issues addressed include thermal storage criteria for solar power plants interfacing with utility systems; optimal dispatch of storage for solar plants in a conventional electric grid; thermal storage/temperature tradeoffs for solar total energy systems; the value of energy storage for direct-replacement solar thermal power plants; systems analysis of storage in specific solar thermal power applications; the value of seasonal storage of solar energy; criteria for selection of the thermal storage system for a 10 MW(2) solar power plant; and the need for specific requirements by storage system development teams.

  18. Plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) end state basis for interim operation (BIO) for surveillance and maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    DODD, E.N.

    1999-05-12

    This Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) was developed for the PUREX end state condition following completion of the deactivation project. The deactivation project has removed or stabilized the hazardous materials within the facility structure and equipment to reduce the hazards posed by the facility during the surveillance and maintenance (S and M) period, and to reduce the costs associated with the S and M. This document serves as the authorization basis for the PUREX facility, excluding the storage tunnels, railroad cut, and associated tracks, for the deactivated end state condition during the S and M period. The storage tunnels, and associated systems and areas, are addressed in WHC-SD-HS-SAR-001, Rev. 1, PUREX Final Safety Analysis Report. During S and M, the mission of the facility is to maintain the conditions and equipment in a manner that ensures the safety of the workers, environment, and the public. The S and M phase will continue until the final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project and activities are begun. Based on the methodology of DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazards Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, the final facility hazards category is identified as hazards category This considers the remaining material inventories, form and distribution of the material, and the energies present to initiate events of concern. Given the current facility configuration, conditions, and authorized S and M activities, there are no operational events identified resulting in significant hazard to any of the target receptor groups (e.g., workers, public, environment). The only accident scenarios identified with consequences to the onsite co-located workers were based on external natural phenomena, specifically an earthquake. The dose consequences of these events are within the current risk evaluation guidelines and are consistent with the expectations for a hazards category 2

  19. 77 FR 14771 - UGI Storage Company; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission UGI Storage Company; Notice of Application Take notice that on February 29, 2012, UGI Storage Company (UGI Storage), having its principal place of business at 5665 Leesport...

  20. Thermal storage technologies for solar industrial process heat applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of thermal storage subsystems for the intermediate and high temperature (100 C to 600 C) solar industrial process heat generation is presented. Primary emphasis is focused on buffering and diurnal storage as well as total energy transport. In addition, advanced thermal storage concepts which appear promising for future solar industrial process heat applications are discussed.

  1. Battery energy storage and superconducting magnetic energy storage for utility applications: A qualitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Akhil, A.A.; Butler, P.; Bickel, T.C.

    1993-11-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management for an objective comparison of the merits of battery energy storage with superconducting magnetic energy storage technology for utility applications. Conclusions are drawn regarding the best match of each technology with these utility application requirements. Staff from the Utility Battery Storage Systems Program and the superconductivity Programs at Sandia National contributed to this effort.

  2. Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. Volume 1: Plenary Session Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The importance of the development of inexpensive and efficient thermal and thermochemical energy storage technology to the solar power program is discussed in a summary of workship discussions held to exchange information and plan for future systems. Topics covered include storage in central power applications such as the 10 MW-e demonstration pilot receiver to be constructed in Barstow, California; storage for small dispersed systems, and problems associated with the development of storage systems for solar power plants interfacing with utility systems.

  3. Nanostructured graphene nanoplatelets for energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monga, Anchita

    There is an increasing demand for high performance compact batteries for diverse applications ranging from portable electronics to electric automotive vehicles. This need has driven the direction of research towards newer materials, improved synthesis and architectured assembly. This research addresses the gravimetric and volumetric density challenges as well as the cost issues faced by energy storage devices by developing structured graphitic materials, aiming at better electrochemical performance, improved energy density and reduced cost. The few layer graphene nanoplatelets (GnP) used in this study can be produced from natural graphite in thicknesses from 1-10 nm and in widths from 0.3 to 50 microns via an acid intercalation/thermal exfoliation process. The GnP serves as an inexpensive alternative to carbon nanotubes and single graphene sheets. The ability to nanostructure GnP and tailor its inherent properties for lithium storage and electrical conductivity, allows it to be used for customized applications in three different lithium ion battery components viz., active anode material, current collector and conducting additive. Metal nanoparticle doped GnP in which nanosized metal particles are coated onto the GnP basal surface, have been assembled to make a 'pillared' nanostructure in which the particles maintain a fixed distance between adjacent GnPs facilitating improved transport and enhanced lithium storage capacity, especially at faster charge rates. Graphene nanoplatelets synthesized with different sizes of metal nanoparticles effectively create a nano-architectured GnP multilayer assembly with flexible interlayer spacing. The creation of a lithium ion battery anode with controllable GnP interlayer spacing facilitates lithium ion diffusion through the electrode, and this in turn leads to improved transport and enhanced capacity. Graphene nanoplatelets are also intrinsically excellent electrical conductors, which can be assembled into continuous conductive

  4. PUREX SAMCONS uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Blackaby, W.B.

    1997-10-07

    This Acceptance Test Report for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) Acceptance Test Procedure validates the operation of the UPS, all alarming and display functions and the ability of the UPS to supply power to the SAMCONS as designed. The proper installation of the PUREX SAMCONS Trailer UPS components and wiring will be systematically evaluated by performance of this procedure. Proper operation of the SAMCONS computer UPS will be verified by performance of a timed functional load test, and verification of associated alarms and trouble indications. This test procedure will be performed in the SAMCONS Trailer and will include verification of receipt of alarms at the SAMCONS computer stations. This test may be performed at any time after the completion of HNF-SD-CP-ATP-083, PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Acceptance Test Procedure, when computer display and alarm functions have been proven to operate correctly.

  5. 1997 project of the year, PUREX deactivation project

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, R.W.

    1998-02-13

    At the end of 1992, the PUREX and UO{sub 3} plants were deemed no longer necessary for the defense needs of the United States. Although no longer necessary, they were very costly to maintain in their post-operation state. The DOE embarked on a deactivation strategy for these plants to reduce the costs of providing continuous surveillance of the facilities and their hazards. Deactivation of the PUREX and UO{sub 3} plants was estimated to take 5 years and cost $222.5 million and result in an annual surveillance and maintenance cost of $2 million. Deactivation of the PUREX/UO{sub 3} plants officially began on October 1, 1993. The deactivation was 15 months ahead of the original schedule and $75 million under the original cost estimate. The annual cost of surveillance and maintenance of the plants was reduced to less than $1 million.

  6. Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Hummon, M.; Jenkin, T.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.; O'Malley, M.

    2013-05-01

    This analysis evaluates several operational benefits of electricity storage, including load-leveling, spinning contingency reserves, and regulation reserves. Storage devices were simulated in a utility system in the western United States, and the operational costs of generation was compared to the same system without the added storage. This operational value of storage was estimated for devices of various sizes, providing different services, and with several sensitivities to fuel price and other factors. Overall, the results followed previous analyses that demonstrate relatively low value for load-leveling but greater value for provision of reserve services. The value was estimated by taking the difference in operational costs between cases with and without energy storage and represents the operational cost savings from deploying storage by a traditional vertically integrated utility. The analysis also estimated the potential revenues derived from a merchant storage plant in a restructured market, based on marginal system prices. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials and incomplete capture of system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit provided to the system. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  7. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned: History

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S.

    1997-11-25

    In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status.

  8. Electric utility applications of hydrogen energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

    1997-10-15

    This report examines the capital cost associated with various energy storage systems that have been installed for electric utility application. The storage systems considered in this study are Battery Energy Storage (BES), Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) and Flywheel Energy Storage (FES). The report also projects the cost reductions that may be anticipated as these technologies come down the learning curve. This data will serve as a base-line for comparing the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen energy storage (HES) systems in the electric utility sector. Since pumped hydro or compressed air energy storage (CAES) is not particularly suitable for distributed storage, they are not considered in this report. There are no comparable HES systems in existence in the electric utility sector. However, there are numerous studies that have assessed the current and projected cost of hydrogen energy storage system. This report uses such data to compare the cost of HES systems with that of other storage systems in order to draw some conclusions as to the applications and the cost-effectiveness of hydrogen as a electricity storage alternative.

  9. Applications of cogeneration with thermal energy storage technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Somasundaram, S.; Katipamula, S.; Williams, H.R.

    1995-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the U.S. Department of Energy`s Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility-scale applications [utility thermal energy storage (UTES)]. Several of these storage technologies can be used in a new or an existing power generation facility to increase its efficiency and promote the use of the TES technology within the utility and the industrial sectors. The UTES project has included a study of both heat storage and cool storage systems for different utility-scale applications. The study reported here has shown that an oil/rock diurnal TES system, when integrated with a simple gas turbine cogeneration system, can produce on-peak power for $0.045 to $0.06 /kWh, while supplying a 24-hour process steam load. The molten salt storage system was found to be less suitable for simple as well as combined-cycle cogeneration applications. However, certain advanced TES concepts and storage media could substantially improve the performance and economic benefits. In related study of a chill TES system was evaluated for precooling gas turbine inlet air, which showed that an ice storage system could be used to effectively increase the peak generating capacity of gas turbines when operating in hot ambient conditions.

  10. Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, R.J.

    1980-04-01

    Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

  11. Cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications

    SciTech Connect

    Akhil, A.; Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

    1997-02-01

    Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.

  12. PUREX/UO{sub 3} deactivation project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Washenfelder, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    From 1955 through 1990, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) provided the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site with nuclear fuel reprocessing capability. It operated in sequence with the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant, which converted the PUREX liquid uranium nitrate product to solid UO{sub 3} powder. Final UO{sub 3} Plant operation ended in 1993. In December 1992, planning was initiated for the deactivation of PUREX and UO{sub 3} Plant. The objective of deactivation planning was to identify the activities needed to establish a passively safe, environmentally secure configuration at both plants, and ensure that the configuration could be retained during the post-deactivation period. The PUREX/UO{sub 3} Deactivation Project management plan represents completion of the planning efforts. It presents the deactivation approach to be used for the two plants, and the supporting technical, cost, and schedule baselines. Deactivation activities concentrate on removal, reduction, and stabilization of the radioactive and chemical materials remaining at the plants, and the shutdown of the utilities and effluents. When deactivation is completed, the two plants will be left unoccupied and locked, pending eventual decontamination and decommissioning. Deactivation is expected to cost $233.8 million, require 5 years to complete, and yield $36 million in annual surveillance and maintenance cost savings.

  13. Sampling and Analysis Plan for PUREX canyon vessel flushing

    SciTech Connect

    Villalobos, C.N.

    1995-03-01

    A sampling and analysis plan is necessary to provide direction for the sampling and analytical activities determined by the data quality objectives. This document defines the sampling and analysis necessary to support the deactivation of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility vessels that are regulated pursuant to Washington Administrative Code 173-303.

  14. 77 FR 73635 - Northwest Storage GP, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Northwest Storage GP, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on November 21, 2012, Northwest Storage GP, LLC. (Northwest) filed with the Federal Energy...

  15. 77 FR 8248 - Bluewater Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Bluewater Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on January 27, 2012, Bluewater Gas Storage, LLC (Bluewater), 333 Clay Street, Suite 1500, Houston,...

  16. 75 FR 47587 - Wabash Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Wabash Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application July 30, 2010. Take notice that on July 29, 2010, Wabash Gas Storage LLC (Petitioner), 1044 North 115th Street, Suite 400,...

  17. 75 FR 57011 - Tallulah Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Tallulah Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application September 9, 2010. Take notice that on August 31, 2010, Tallulah Gas Storage LLC (Tallulah), 10370 Richmond Avenue, Suite...

  18. 78 FR 15712 - Arlington Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Arlington Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on February 26, 2013, Arlington Storage Company, LLC (Arlington), Two Brush Creek Boulevard, Kansas...

  19. 75 FR 70727 - Perryville Gas Storage LLC ; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Perryville Gas Storage LLC ; Notice of Application November 10, 2010. Take notice that on November 5, 2010, Perryville Gas Storage LLC (Perryville), Three Riverway, Suite...

  20. 75 FR 21288 - Henry Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Henry Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application April 16, 2010. Take notice that on April 5, 2010, Henry Gas Storage LLC (HGS), 1010 Lamar, Suite 1720, Houston, Texas 77002, filed... section 7(c)(1)(B) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA), to perform specific temporary activity related to...

  1. Chemical hydrogen storage material property guidelines for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Semelsberger, Troy; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2015-04-01

    Chemical hydrogen storage is the sought after hydrogen storage media for automotive applications because of the expected low pressure operation (<20 atm), moderate temperature operation (<200 C), system gravimetric capacities (>0.05 kg H2/kg system), and system volumetric capacities (>0.05 kg H2/L system). Currently, the primary shortcomings of chemical hydrogen storage are regeneration efficiency, fuel cost and fuel phase (i.e., solid or slurry phase). Understanding the required material properties to meet the DOE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems is a critical knowledge gap in the hydrogen storage research community. This study presents a set of fluid-phase chemical hydrogen storage material property guidelines for automotive applications meeting the 2017 DOE technical targets. Viable material properties were determined using a boiler-plate automotive system design. The fluid phase chemical hydrogen storage media considered in this study were neat liquids, solutions, and non-settling homogeneous slurries. Material properties examined include kinetics, heats of reaction, fuel-cell impurities, gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities, and regeneration efficiency. The material properties, although not exhaustive, are an essential first step in identifying viable chemical hydrogen storage material propertiesdand most important, their implications on system mass, system volume and system performance.

  2. Chemical hydrogen storage material property guidelines for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semelsberger, Troy A.; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2015-04-01

    Chemical hydrogen storage is the sought after hydrogen storage media for automotive applications because of the expected low pressure operation (<20 atm), moderate temperature operation (<200 °C), system gravimetric capacities (>0.05 kg H2/kgsystem), and system volumetric capacities (>0.05 kg H2/Lsystem). Currently, the primary shortcomings of chemical hydrogen storage are regeneration efficiency, fuel cost and fuel phase (i.e., solid or slurry phase). Understanding the required material properties to meet the DOE Technical Targets for Onboard Hydrogen Storage Systems is a critical knowledge gap in the hydrogen storage research community. This study presents a set of fluid-phase chemical hydrogen storage material property guidelines for automotive applications meeting the 2017 DOE technical targets. Viable material properties were determined using a boiler-plate automotive system design. The fluid-phase chemical hydrogen storage media considered in this study were neat liquids, solutions, and non-settling homogeneous slurries. Material properties examined include kinetics, heats of reaction, fuel-cell impurities, gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities, and regeneration efficiency. The material properties, although not exhaustive, are an essential first step in identifying viable chemical hydrogen storage material properties-and most important, their implications on system mass, system volume and system performance.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Films for Energy Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozinda, Alina

    an original CNT height of 40 micrometers is measured to be 7.0 mF/cm2. To further increase the surface area of the energy storage electrode, a thin, conformal coating of amorphous silicon is deposited onto a vertically aligned carbon nanotube forest using low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). Various silicon film thickness depositions are tested as supercapacitor electrodes. A coating of 35 nm is shown to improve the specific capacitance by a factor of 2 as compared to a bare CNT electrode. For applications in which a larger operating voltage is desirable, the electrochemical window of the supercapacitor devices are increased by tailoring the electrolyte used. Using an ionic liquid electrolyte (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, or EMIM-BF4) improves the voltage window from 1 V (in aqueous electrolyte) to 4 V, yielding a power density from the range of 19 to 53 kW/kg. In addition, the CNT-Mo film is shown to outperform an activated carbon (AC) electrode in this ionic liquid in terms of volumetric capacitance by a factor of 12 (388 mF/cm3 versus 31 mF/cm3 for the CNT-Mo film and the AC, respectively). The cycling life of the film in ionic liquid at a number of current densities is also analyzed, and shown to be stable over 7000 charge-discharge cycles. Finally, the CNT-Mo film architecture is further utilized and tested as a lithium ion battery electrode. The high surface area, excellent CNT conductivities, and the extremely high lithium ion intercalation capacity of silicon all promise long-lived and energy-dense lithium ion electrodes. Preliminary results show high energy density of 4000 mAh/g initially. The value quickly drops to 600 mAh/g after 5 charge/discharge cycles and stay the same until failure after 15 cycles. Further studies into thinner silicon coatings and electrolyte selections may result in better performance and longer cycling life.

  4. Advanced energy storage for space applications: A follow-up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, Gerald; Surampudi, Subbarao

    1994-01-01

    Viewgraphs on advanced energy storage for space applications are presented. Topics covered include: categories of space missions using batteries; battery challenges; properties of SOA and advanced primary batteries; lithium primary cell applications; advanced rechargeable battery applications; present limitations of advanced battery technologies; and status of Li-TiS2, Ni-MH, and Na-NiCl2 cell technologies.

  5. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM EXTRACTION (PUREX) FACILITY ALARACT DEMONSTRATION FOR FILTER HOUSING

    SciTech Connect

    LEBARON GJ

    2008-11-25

    This document presents an As Low As Reasonably Achievable Control Technology (ALARACT) demonstration for evaluating corrosion on the I-beam supporting filter housing No.9 for the 291-A-l emission unit of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The PUREX facility is currently in surveillance and maintenance mode. During a State of Washington, Department of Health (WDOH) 291-A-l emission unit inspection, a small amount of corrosion was observed at the base of a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter housing. A series of internal and external inspections identified the source of the corrosion material as oxidation of a small section of one of the carbon steel I-beams that provides support to the stainless steel filter housing. The inspections confirmed the corrosion is isolated to one I-beam support location and does not represent any compromise of the structural support or filter housing integrity. Further testing and inspections of the support beam corrosion and its cause were conducted but did not determine the cause. No definitive evidence was found to support any degradation of the housing. Although no degradation of the housing was found, a conservative approach will be implemented. The following actions will be taken: (1) The current operating filter housing No.9 will be removed from service. (2) The only remaining available filter housings (No.1, No.2, and No.3) will be placed in service. These filter housings have new HEPA filters fitted with stainless steel frames and faceguards which were installed in the spring of 2007. (3) Filter housings No.5 and No.10 will be put on standby as backups. To document the assessment of the unit, a draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing was prepared, and informally provided to WDOH on August 7, 2008. A follow up WDOH response to the draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing questioned whether

  6. Scenery Storage Technology Application in Power Station System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hong; Geng, Hao; Feng, Lei; Xu, Xing

    Scenery storage technology can effectively utilize wind power and photovoltaic power generation in the natural complementary of energy and time, improve the reliability of power supply, has attracted more and more attention. At present, the scenery storage research in the field application of the technology is relatively small, based on the actual substation as the research object, put forward the scenery storage technology as substation load power supply three applications of lighting power, standby power station and DC system, and through the detailed implementation of the program design, investment analysis, research the scenery with the feasibility of electrical energy storage technology system application in station. To solve the weak power grid, substation remote and backward areas should not be from the outside to obtain reliable power supply problems, the station area electric system design provides a new way of thinking, which has important practical engineering value.

  7. Twelve Principles for Green Energy Storage in Grid Applications.

    PubMed

    Arbabzadeh, Maryam; Johnson, Jeremiah X; Keoleian, Gregory A; Rasmussen, Paul G; Thompson, Levi T

    2016-01-19

    The introduction of energy storage technologies to the grid could enable greater integration of renewables, improve system resilience and reliability, and offer cost effective alternatives to transmission and distribution upgrades. The integration of energy storage systems into the electrical grid can lead to different environmental outcomes based on the grid application, the existing generation mix, and the demand. Given this complexity, a framework is needed to systematically inform design and technology selection about the environmental impacts that emerge when considering energy storage options to improve sustainability performance of the grid. To achieve this, 12 fundamental principles specific to the design and grid application of energy storage systems are developed to inform policy makers, designers, and operators. The principles are grouped into three categories: (1) system integration for grid applications, (2) the maintenance and operation of energy storage, and (3) the design of energy storage systems. We illustrate the application of each principle through examples published in the academic literature, illustrative calculations, and a case study with an off-grid application of vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). In addition, trade-offs that can emerge between principles are highlighted. PMID:26629882

  8. Borehole data package for well 699-37-47A, PUREX Plant Cribs, CY 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, J.W.; Williams, B.A.; Spane, F.A.

    1997-02-01

    A new groundwater monitoring well (699-37-47A) was installed in 1996 as a downgradient well near the PUREX Plant Cribs Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility at Hanford. This document provides data from the well drilling and construction operations, as well as data from subsequent characterization of groundwater and sediment samples collected during the drilling process. The data include: well construction documentation, geologist`s borehole logs, results of laboratory analysis of groundwater samples collected during drilling and of physical tests conducted on sediment samples collected during drilling, borehole geophysics, and results of aquifer testing including slug tests and flowmeter analysis. This well (699-37-47A) was constructed in support of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-24-00H and interim milestone M-24-35 (Ecology et al. 1994), and was funded under Project W-152.

  9. Redox storage systems for solar applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Thaller, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    The NASA Redox energy storage system is described. The system is based on soluble aqueous iron and chromium chloride redox couples. The needed technology advances in the two elements (electrodes and membranes) that are key to its technological feasibility have been achieved and system development has begun. The design, construction, and test of a 1 kilowatt system integrated with a solar photovoltaic array is discussed.

  10. Building heating and cooling applications thermal energy storage program overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eissenberg, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal energy storage technology and development of building heating and cooling applications in the residential and commercial sectors is outlined. Three elements are identified to undergo an applications assessment, technology development, and demonstration. Emphasis is given to utility load management thermal energy system application where the stress is on the 'customer side of the meter'. Thermal storage subsystems for space conditioning and conservation means of increased thermal mass within the building envelope and by means of low-grade waste heat recovery are covered.

  11. PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrick, D.G.; Gerber, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility operated from 1956-1972, from 1983-1988, and briefly during 1989-1990 to produce for national defense at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Facility operated at the Hanford Site from 1952-1972, 1984-1988, and briefly in 1993. Both plants were ordered to permanent shutdown by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in December 1992, thus initiating their deactivation phase. Deactivation is that portion of a facility`s life cycle that occurs between operations and final decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This document details the history of events, and the lessons learned, from the time of the PUREX Stabilization Campaign in 1989-1990, through the end of the first full fiscal year (FY) of the deactivation project (September 30, 1994).

  12. Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

    2012-04-16

    Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

  13. PUREX (SAMCONS) uninterruptible power supply (UPS) acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Blackaby, W.B.

    1997-09-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure for the PUREX Surveillance and Monitoring and Control System (SAMCONS) Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) provides for testing and verifying the proper operation of the control panel alarms and trouble functions, the 6roper functioning of the AC inverter, ability of the battery supply to maintain the SAMCONS load for a minimum of two hours , and proper interaction with the SAMCONS Video graphic displays for alarm displays.

  14. Perspectives on energy storage wheels for space station application

    SciTech Connect

    Oglevie, R.E.

    1984-11-01

    Several of the issues of the workshop are addressed from the perspective of a potential Space Station developer and energy wheel user. Systems considerations are emphasized rather than component technology. The potential of energy storage wheel (ESW) concept is discussed. The current status of the technology base is described. Justification for advanced technology development is also discussed. The study concludes that energy storage in wheels is an attractive concept for immediate technology development and future Space Station application.

  15. An Isotope-Powered Thermal Storage unit for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisano, Michael E.; Rose, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    An Isotope-Powered Thermal Storage Unit (ITSU), that would store and utilize heat energy in a 'pulsed' fashion in space operations, is described. Properties of various radioisotopes are considered in conjunction with characteristics of thermal energy storage materials, to evaluate possible implementation of such a device. The utility of the unit is discussed in light of various space applications, including rocket propulsion, power generation, and spacecraft thermal management.

  16. Flowsheet for shear/leach processing of N Reactor fuel at PUREX

    SciTech Connect

    Enghusen, M.B.

    1995-04-13

    This document was originally prepared to support the restart of the PUREX plant using a new Shear/Leach head end process. However, the PUREX facility was shutdown and processing of the remaining N Reactor fuel is no longer considered an alternative for fuel disposition. This document is being issued for reference only to document the activities which were investigated to incorporate the shear/leach process in the PUREX plant.

  17. Test profiles for stationary energy-storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, P. C.; Cole, J. F.; Taylor, P. A.

    Evaluation of battery and other energy-storage technologies for stationary uses is progressing rapidly toward application-specific testing. This testing uses computer-based data acquisition and control equipment, active electronic loads and power supplies, and customized software, to enable sophisticated test regimes which simulate actual use conditions. These simulated-use tests provide more accurate performance and life evaluations than simple constant resistance or current testing regimes. Several organizations are cooperating to develop simulated-use tests for utility-scale storage systems, especially battery energy-storage systems (BESSs). Some of the tests use stepped constant-power charge and discharge regimes to simulate conditions created by electric utility applications such as frequency regulation (FR) and spinning reserve (SR). Other test profiles under development simulate conditions for the energy-storage component of remote-area power supplies (RAPSs) which include renewable and/or fossil-fuelled generators. Various RAPS applications have unique sets of service conditions that require specialized test profiles. Almost all RAPS tests and many tests that represent other stationary applications need, however, to simulate significant time periods that storage devices operate at low-to-medium states-of-charge without full recharge. Consideration of these and similar issues in simulated-use test regimes is necessary to predict effectively the responses of the various types of batteries in specific stationary applications. This paper describes existing and evolving stationary applications for energy-storage technologies and test regimes which are designed to simulate them. The paper also discusses efforts to develop international testing standards.

  18. Development of regenerable energy storage for space multimegawatt applications

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, M.

    1986-01-01

    A program has recently been initiated as a part of the national Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) to develop energy storage technology for space power applications. This program is jointly conducted by the Department of Energy and the Department of Defense. It is focused on the development of advanced technologies in regenerable energy storage that will be required for generation of multimegawatt levels of sprint power for SDI space missions. Energy storage technology considered in the program relate to devices that have a high specific capacity for energy storage, which can provide high levels of electric power on demand, and which may be recharged with electric power. The devices of principal interest are electrochemical batteries, chemical fuel cells, and electromechanical flywheels (the latter includes the motors and generators used to provide the electrical to mechanical coupling). The intent of the program is to resolve technical feasibility issues associated with an electrically regenerable energy storage system satisfying SDI needs. Specifically, energy storage technology will be developed through the proof-of-concept stage within the next six years that provides a specific power greater than 2.5 kW/kg with an energy storage density of at least 450 kJ/kg.

  19. PUREX/UO3 Facilities deactivation lessons learned history

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-09-19

    Disconnecting the criticality alarm permanently in June 1996 signified that the hazards in the PUREX (plutonium-uranium extraction) plant had been so removed and reduced that criticality was no longer a credible event. Turning off the PUREX criticality alarm also marked a salient point in a historic deactivation project, 1 year before its anticipated conclusion. The PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project began in October 1993 as a 5-year, $222.5- million project. As a result of innovations implemented during 1994 and 1995, the project schedule was shortened by over a year, with concomitant savings. In 1994, the innovations included arranging to send contaminated nitric acid from the PUREX Plant to British Nuclear Fuels, Limited (BNFL) for reuse and sending metal solutions containing plutonium and uranium from PUREX to the Hanford Site tank farms. These two steps saved the project $36.9- million. In 1995, reductions in overhead rate, work scope, and budget, along with curtailed capital equipment expenditures, reduced the cost another $25.6 million. These savings were achieved by using activity-based cost estimating and applying technical schedule enhancements. In 1996, a series of changes brought about under the general concept of ``reengineering`` reduced the cost approximately another $15 million, and moved the completion date to May 1997. With the total savings projected at about $75 million, or 33.7 percent of the originally projected cost, understanding how the changes came about, what decisions were made, and why they were made becomes important. At the same time sweeping changes in the cultural of the Hanford Site were taking place. These changes included shifting employee relations and work structures, introducing new philosophies and methods in maintaining safety and complying with regulations, using electronic technology to manage information, and, adopting new methods and bases for evaluating progress. Because these changes helped generate cost savings and were

  20. 76 FR 24018 - Storage Development Partners, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Storage Development Partners, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications On April 1, 2011, Storage Development Partners, LLC, filed an application for a preliminary...

  1. 76 FR 24017 - Storage Development Partners, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Storage Development Partners, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Competing Applications On April 1, 2011, Storage Development Partners, LLC, filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant...

  2. Electron trapping optical data storage system and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brower, Daniel; Earman, Allen; Chaffin, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    A new technology developed at Optex Corporation out-performs all other existing data storage technologies. The Electron Trapping Optical Memory (ETOM) media stores 14 gigabytes of uncompressed data on a single, double-sided 130 mm disk with a data transfer rate of up to 120 megabits per second. The disk is removable, compact, lightweight, environmentally stable, and robust. Since the Write/Read/Erase (W/R/E) processes are carried out photonically, no heating of the recording media is required. Therefore, the storage media suffers no deleterious effects from repeated W/R/E cycling. This rewritable data storage technology has been developed for use as a basis for numerous data storage products. Industries that can benefit from the ETOM data storage technologies include: satellite data and information systems, broadcasting, video distribution, image processing and enhancement, and telecommunications. Products developed for these industries are well suited for the demanding store-and-forward buffer systems, data storage, and digital video systems needed for these applications.

  3. Overview of Energy Storage Technologies for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao

    2006-01-01

    This presentations gives an overview of the energy storage technologies that are being used in space applications. Energy storage systems have been used in 99% of the robotic and human space missions launched since 1960. Energy storage is used in space missions to provide primary electrical power to launch vehicles, crew exploration vehicles, planetary probes, and astronaut equipment; store electrical energy in solar powered orbital and surface missions and provide electrical energy during eclipse periods; and, to meet peak power demands in nuclear powered rovers, landers, and planetary orbiters. The power source service life (discharge hours) dictates the choice of energy storage technology (capacitors, primary batteries, rechargeable batteries, fuel cells, regenerative fuel cells, flywheels). NASA is planning a number of robotic and human space exploration missions for the exploration of space. These missions will require energy storage devices with mass and volume efficiency, long life capability, an the ability to operate safely in extreme environments. Advanced energy storage technologies continue to be developed to meet future space mission needs.

  4. Trends in Concentrator, Receiver, and Storage Development for Terrestrial Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roschke, E. J.; Owen, W. A.; Menard, W. A.; Fujita, T.

    1984-01-01

    The experience gained and the technical trends of the DOE-sponsored terrestrial solar thermal power systems project are summarized with respect to concentrator and receiver/storage development. Relevance of this experience to space power applications, and the perceived critical barriers of this technology, are discussed. It is concluded that, despite different objectives, the terrestrial program provides a strong basis of expertise valuable to space power applications development.

  5. Third international workshop on ice storage for cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gorski, A.J.

    1986-04-01

    The third international workshop on ice storage for cooling applications which was informal and interactive in nature, was open to persons interested in all ice-growing technologies and in ice storage, both seasonal and diurnal. Presentations were made on some 20 topics, ranging from freezers in Alaska to ice cooling of commercial jet aircraft. Workshop tours included visits to ice-storage systems at Commonwealth Edison's facilities in Bolingbrook and Des Plaines Valley, the A.C. Neilsen builing in Northbrook, and the new State of Illinois Center in Chicago. The first workshop in the present series considered the future of ice storage and predicted applications in the agricultural sector, desalinization, and commercial ice production. Progress has been rapid in the intervening two years, and an important topic at the third workshop was the possible use of ''warm ices'' (clathrate hydrates) for energy storage. This report consists primarily of abstracts of presentations made at the workshop. Persons wishing to obtain further information about particular papers should contact the speakers directly; speakers' addresses and telephone numbers are listed in this report.

  6. Grapefruit gland oil composition is affected by wax application, storage temperature, and storage time.

    PubMed

    Sun, D; Petracek, P D

    1999-05-01

    The effect of wax application, storage temperature (4 or 21 degrees C), and storage time (14 or 28 days after wax application) on grapefruit gland oil composition was examined by capillary gas chromatography. Wax application decreases nonanal and nootkatone levels. beta-Pinene, alpha-phellandrene, 3-carene, ocimene, octanol, trans-linalool oxide, and cis-p-mentha-2,8-dien-1-ol levels increase, but limonene levels decrease, with temperature. Levels of alpha-pinene, limonene, linalool, citronellal, alpha-terpineol, neral, dodecanal, and alpha-humulene decrease with time. Levels of alpha-phellandrene, 3-carene, ocimene, and trans-linalool oxide increase with time. No compound level was affected by the interactive action of temperature and wax application, suggesting that these two factors cause grapefruit oil gland collapse (postharvest pitting) through means other than changing gland oil composition. Compounds that are toxic to the Caribbean fruit fly (alpha-pinene, limonene, alpha-terpineol, and some aldehydes) decrease with time, thus suggesting grapefruit becomes increasingly susceptible to the fly during storage. PMID:10552497

  7. FLYWHEEL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS WITH SUPERCONDUCTING BEARINGS FOR UTILITY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Michael Strasik; Mr. Arthur Day; Mr. Philip Johnson; Dr. John Hull

    2007-10-26

    This project’s mission was to achieve significant advances in the practical application of bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials to energy-storage systems. The ultimate product was planned as an operational prototype of a flywheel system on an HTS suspension. While the final prototype flywheel did not complete the final offsite demonstration phase of the program, invaluable lessons learned were captured on the laboratory demonstration units that will lead to the successful deployment of a future HTS-stabilized, composite-flywheel energy-storage system (FESS).

  8. Storage, transportation, and atomization of CWF for residential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grimanis, M.P.; Breault, R.W. ); Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C. )

    1991-11-01

    This project investigated the properties and behavior with regard to handling, storage, and atomization in small-scale applications of different CWFs (coal water fuels) prepared from different parent coals and various beneficiation techniques as well as consideration for bulk storage and distribution. The CWFs that were prepared included Upper Elkhorn No. 3, Illinois No. 6, and Upper Wyodak coal cleaned by heavy media separation. Also, several CWFs were prepared with Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal cleaned by heavy media separation with filtration, chemical cleaning, oil agglomeration, and froth flotation.

  9. TBP and diluent mass balances in the PUREX Plant at Hanford, 1955--1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sederburg, J.P.; Reddick, J.A.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop an estimate of the quantities of tributyl phosphate and diluent discharged in aqueous waste streams to the tank farms from the Hanford Purex Plant over its operating life. Purex was not the sole source of organics in the tank farms, but was a major contributor. Tributyl phosphate (TBP) and diluent, which changed from Shell E-2342{reg_sign} to Soltrol-170{reg_sign} and then to normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH), were organic chemicals used in the Purex solvent extraction process at Hanford to separate plutonium and uranium from spent nuclear fuels. This report is an estimate of the material balances for these chemicals in the Purex Plant at Hanford over its entire operating life. The Purex Plant had cold start up in November 1955 and shut down in 1990. It`s process used a solution of 30 vol% TBP in diluent.

  10. Engineered nanocomposites for energy storage, electrochromic, and anticorrosion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Huige

    Polymer nanocomposites exhibit unique properties that cannot be obtained each material acting alone. Till now, polymer nanocomposites have attracted significant research interest due to their promising potential for versatile applications ranging from environmental remediation, energy storage, electromagnetic (EM) absorption, sensing and actuation, transportation and safety, defense system, information industry, to novel catalysts, etc. Herein, innovative polymer nanocomposites for energy storage, energy saving, and anticorrosion applications have been synthesized, characterized, and evaluated. Specifically, conductive polymer, i.e., polyamine and polypyrrole, nanocomposites prepared via chemical or electrochemical oxidative polymerization techniques have been investigated for electrochemical supercapacitor electrode materials applications; Conductive polyurethane (PU) nanocomposite coatings filled with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) fabricated by employing an in situ surface-initiated-polymerization (SIP) method have been tested for corrosion prevention purpose.

  11. Material handling robot system for flow-through storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, James F.; Candiloro, Brian; Downer, James; Wiesman, Richard; Fallin, Larry; Smith, Ron

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development and planned implementation of a system of mobile robots for use in flow through storage applications. The robots are being designed with on-board embedded controls so that they can perform their tasks as semi-autonomous workers distributed within a centrally controlled network. On the storage input side, boxes will be identified by bar-codes and placed into preassigned flow through bins. On the shipping side, orders will be forwarded to the robots from a central order processing station and boxes will be picked from designated storage bins following proper sequencing to permit direct loading into trucks for shipping. Because of the need to maintain high system availability, a distributed control strategy has been selected. When completed, the system will permit robots to be dynamically reassigned responsibilities if an individual unit fails. On-board health diagnostics and condition monitoring will be used to maintain high reliability of the units.

  12. Synthesis of Ammonia Borane for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Heldebrant, David J.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Linehan, John C.; Autrey, Thomas

    2008-07-05

    A new synthetic procedure to make the condensed phase hydrogen storage material, ammonia borane (NH3BH3, abbreviated as AB), is described and compared with previous literature procedures. Ammonia borane with a gravimetric density ca. 194 gm H2/kg and a volumetric density ca. 146 H2/liter, is a promising chemical hydrogen storage material for fuel cell powered applications. The work shows that ammonium borohydride, NH4BH4, formed in situ by the metathesis of NH4X and MBH4 salts (M = Na, Li; X = Cl, F) in liquid NH3, can be induced to decompose in an organic ether to yield AB in near quantitative yield. The purity of the AB prepared by this one-pot synthetic strategy is sufficient to meet the thermal stability requirements for on-board hydrogen storage.

  13. 76 FR 15971 - Liberty Gas Storage, LLC and LA Storage, LLC; Notice of Joint Application for Abandonment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Liberty Gas Storage, LLC and LA Storage, LLC; Notice of Joint... Regulatory Commission (Commission) a joint application under section 7 for (i) Authorization from the.... Questions regarding the joint application may be directed to William Rapp, Counsel for Liberty and...

  14. Conducting Polymer Nanostructures: Template Synthesis and Applications in Energy Storage

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Lijia; Qiu, Hao; Dou, Chunmeng; Li, Yun; Pu, Lin; Xu, Jianbin; Shi, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Conducting polymer nanostructures have received increasing attention in both fundamental research and various application fields in recent decades. Compared with bulk conducting polymers, conducting polymer nanostructures are expected to display improved performance in energy storage because of the unique properties arising from their nanoscaled size: high electrical conductivity, large surface area, short path lengths for the transport of ions, and high electrochemical activity. Template methods are emerging for a sort of facile, efficient, and highly controllable synthesis of conducting polymer nanostructures. This paper reviews template synthesis routes for conducting polymer nanostructures, including soft and hard template methods, as well as its mechanisms. The application of conducting polymer mesostructures in energy storage devices, such as supercapacitors and rechargeable batteries, are discussed. PMID:20717527

  15. PUMA - a new mathematical model for the rapid calculation of steady-state concentration profiles in mixer-settler extraction, partitioning, and stripping contactors using the Purex process

    SciTech Connect

    Geldard, J.F.

    1986-11-01

    The mathematical basis for a computer code PUMA (Plutonium-Uranium-Matrix-Algorithm) is described. The code simulates steady-state concentration profiles of solvent extraction contactors used in the Purex process, directly without first generating the transient behavior. The computational times are reduced, with no loss of accuracy, by about tenfold over those required by codes that generate the steady-state profiles via transient state conditions. Previously developed codes that simulate the steady-state conditions directly are not applicable to partitioning contactors, whereas PUMA is applicable to all contactors in the Purex process. Since most difficulties are encountered with partitioning contactors when simulating steady-state profiles via transient state conditions, it is with these contactors that the greatest saving in computer times is achieved.

  16. Lithium Ion Cell Development for Photovoltaic Energy Storage Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Babinec, Susan

    2012-02-08

    with this material will be to maintain proven performance when this composite is coated onto a thicker electrode; as well the high temperature storage must meet application requirements. One continuing program challenge was the lack of specific performance variables for this PV application and so the low power requirements of PHEV/EV transportation markets were again used.

  17. Applications of thermal energy storage to process heat storage and recovery in the paper and pulp industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, J. H.; Hurley, P. J.; Martin, P. J.

    1978-01-01

    Applications of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) in a paper and pulp mill power house were studied as one approach to the transfer of steam production from fossil fuel boilers to waste fuel of (hog fuel) boilers. Data from specific mills were analyzed, and various TES concepts evaluated for application in the process steam supply system. Constant pressure and variable pressure steam accumulators were found to be the most attractive storage concepts for this application.

  18. Energy Storage Applications in Power Systems with Renewable Energy Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghofrani, Mahmoud

    In this dissertation, we propose new operational and planning methodologies for power systems with renewable energy sources. A probabilistic optimal power flow (POPF) is developed to model wind power variations and evaluate the power system operation with intermittent renewable energy generation. The methodology is used to calculate the operating and ramping reserves that are required to compensate for power system uncertainties. Distributed wind generation is introduced as an operational scheme to take advantage of the spatial diversity of renewable energy resources and reduce wind power fluctuations using low or uncorrelated wind farms. The POPF is demonstrated using the IEEE 24-bus system where the proposed operational scheme reduces the operating and ramping reserve requirements and operation and congestion cost of the system as compared to operational practices available in the literature. A stochastic operational-planning framework is also proposed to adequately size, optimally place and schedule storage units within power systems with high wind penetrations. The method is used for different applications of energy storage systems for renewable energy integration. These applications include market-based opportunities such as renewable energy time-shift, renewable capacity firming, and transmission and distribution upgrade deferral in the form of revenue or reduced cost and storage-related societal benefits such as integration of more renewables, reduced emissions and improved utilization of grid assets. A power-pool model which incorporates the one-sided auction market into POPF is developed. The model considers storage units as market participants submitting hourly price bids in the form of marginal costs. This provides an accurate market-clearing process as compared to the 'price-taker' analysis available in the literature where the effects of large-scale storage units on the market-clearing prices are neglected. Different case studies are provided to

  19. Development of thermal energy storage materials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Shukla, A; Sharma, Atul; Shukla, Manjari; Chen, C R

    2015-01-01

    The phase change materials (PCMs) have been utilized widely for solar thermal energy storage (TES) devices. The quality of these materials to remain at a particular temperature during solid-liquid, liquid-solid phase transition can also be utilized for many biomedical applications as well and has been explored in recent past already. This study reports some novel PCMs developed by them, along with some existing PCMs, to be used for such biomedical applications. Interestingly, it was observed that the heating/cooling properties of these PCMs enhance the quality of a variety of biomedical applications with many advantages (non-electric, no risk of electric shock, easy to handle, easy to recharge thermally, long life, cheap and easily available, reusable) over existing applications. Results of the present study are quite interesting and exciting, opening a plethora of opportunities for more work on the subject, which require overlapping expertise of material scientists, biochemists and medical experts for broader social benefits. PMID:26103988

  20. Wallboard with Latent Heat Storage for Passive Solar Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    2001-05-31

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin [melting point-23 C (73.5 F)] is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar and other applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten wax. Concentrations of wax in the combined product as high as 35% by weight can be achieved. Scale-up of the soaking process, from small laboratory samples to full-sized 4- by 8-ft sheets, has been successfully accomplished. The required construction properties of wallboard are maintained after impregnation, that is, it can be painted and spackled. Long-term, high-temperature exposure tests and thermal cycling tests showed no tendency of the paraffin to migrate within the wallboard, and there was no deterioration of thermal energy storage capacity. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to handle thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions and also by comparison with temperatures measured in wallboard during an experimentally generated thermal transient. Agreement between the model and known solution was excellent. Agreement between the model and thermal transient was good, only after the model was modified to allow the PCM to melt over a temperature range, rather than at a specific melting point. When the melting characteristics of the PCM (melting point, melting range, and heat of fusion), as determined from a differential scanning calorimeter plot, were used in the model, agreement between the model and transient data was very good. The confirmed computer model may now be used in conjunction with a building heating and cooling code to evaluate design parameters and operational characteristics of latent heat storage wallboard for passive solar applications.

  1. Modified Purex first-cycle extraction for neptunium recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, Binh; Moisy, Philippe; Baron, Pascal; Calor, Jean-Noel; Espinoux, Denis; Lorrain, Brigitte; Benchikouhne-Ranchoux, Magali

    2008-07-01

    A new PUREX first-cycle flowsheet was devised to enhance the extraction yield of neptunium at the extraction step of this cycle. Simulation results (using a qualified process-simulation tool), le d to raising the nitric acid concentration of the feed from 3 M to 4.5 M to allow extraction of more than 99% of the neptunium. This flowsheet was operated in the shielded process cell of ATALANTE facility using pulsed columns and mixer-settlers banks. A 15 kg quantity of genuine oxide fuel of average burn up of 52 GWd/t with cooling time of nearly five years was treated, and the neptunium extraction yield obtained was greater than 99.6%. (authors)

  2. Borated stainless steel application in spent-fuel storage racks

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.J.; Loomis, G.W.; Deltete, C.P.

    1992-06-01

    EPRI is continuing to investigate the application of borated stainless steel products within the commercial nuclear power industry through participation in code development and material testing. This effort provides documentation of the material properties of interest in design applications utilizing the borated stainless steel products as structural elements as well as serving as neutron absorbers. The properties of most concern in the design of spent fuel storage racks, shipping casks, and other containment type applications are the materials' ductility, tensile strength, corrosion resistance and resistance to degradation due to radiation and temperature. The data presented in this report indicate that practical designs can be achieved utilizing borated stainless steels and that the materials can be cost effectively applied.

  3. 78 FR 58529 - Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on September 4, 2013, Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC (Floridian Gas Storage... application under section 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and Part 157 of the Commission's...

  4. 76 FR 30340 - Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... waters owned by others without the owners' express permission. The proposed pumped storage project would... Energy Regulatory Commission Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted..., Reliable Storage 1 LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act,...

  5. A highly scalable and high-performance storage architecture for multimedia applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaobin; Xie, Changsheng; Fu, Xianglin; Cao, Qiang

    2002-12-01

    Due to the excitement of Internet and high bandwidth, there are more and more multimedia applications involving digital industry. However the storage and the real-time of the conventional storage architecture cannot cater for the requirements of continuous media. The most important storage architecture used in past is Direct Attached Storage (DAS) and RAID cabinet, and recently, both Network Attached Storage (NAS) and Storage Area Networks (SAN) are the alterative storage network topology. But as for the multimedia characters, there need more storage capacity and more simultaneous streams. In this paper, we have introduced a novel concept 'Unified Storage Network' (USN) to build efficient SAN over IP, to bridge the gap of NAS and SAN, furthermore to resolve the scalability problem of storage for multimedia applications.

  6. Wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    1991-05-01

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar and other applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten wax. Concentrations of wax in the combined product as high as 35% by weight can be achieved. Scale-up of the soaking process, from small laboratory samples to full-sized 4- by 8-ft sheets, has been successfully accomplished. The required construction properties of wallboard are maintained after impregnation, that is, it can be painted and spackled. Long-term, high-temperature exposure tests and thermal cycling tests showed no tendency of the paraffin to migrate within the wallboard, and there was no deterioration of thermal energy storage capacity. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to handle thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions and also by comparison with temperatures measured in wallboard during an experimentally generated thermal transient. Agreement between the model and known solution was excellent. Agreement between the model and thermal transient was good, only after the model was modified to allow the PCM to melt over a temperature range, rather than at a specific melting point. When the melting characteristics of the PCM, as determined from a differential scanning calorimeter plot, were used in the model, agreement between the model and transient data was very good. 11 refs., 25 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Storage, transportation, and atomization of CWF for residential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grimanis, M.P.; Breault, R.W.

    1991-06-01

    The properties and behavior with regard to handling, storage, and atomization in small-scale applications of different coal-water fuels (CWFs) prepared from different parent coals and various beneficiation techniques, were investigated. The CWFs that were prepared included Upper Elkhorn No. 3, Illinois No. 6, and Upper Wyodak coal cleaned by heavy media separation. Also, several CWFs were prepared with Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal cleaned by heavy media separation with filtration, chemical cleaning, oil agglomeration, and froth flotation. Pressure drop measurements in tubes and viscometer measurements were used to construct rheograms of the seven CWFs that were prepared for shear rates up to 1000 1/s. Analysis of each CWF included proximate, ultimate and ash fusion temperatures. A fully automatic demonstration storage facility was designed and fabricated. The viscosity at higher shear rates (150,000 1/s) will be measured in a capillary viscometer to determine the viscosity at shear rate typically obtained with atomizers. The demonstration storage/handling facility will be tested. A cost analysis of a residential facility will be conducted. The seven CWFs will be burned in the residential combustor developed by Tecogen under contract DE-AC22-87PC79650. 41 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Sensible heat storage technologies for solar thermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.; Dost, S.; Li, X.

    1997-07-01

    This study mainly deals with the sensible heat storage (SHS) systems and their performance evaluations. In this respect, a detailed investigation on the availability of SHS techniques for solar thermal applications, selection criteria of SHS systems, economics of SHS systems, main issues for evaluating SHS systems, the viability of SHS systems, environmental impacts of SHS systems and criteria for a SHS feasibility study, as well as energy saving options is presented. In addition, several definitions of energy and exergy efficiency for the performance of SHS systems are provided with an illustrative example.

  9. A Flywheel Energy Storage System Demonstration for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Kascak, Peter E.; Jansen, Ralph; Dever, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    A novel control algorithm for the charge and discharge modes of operation of a flywheel energy storage system for space applications is presented. The motor control portion of the algorithm uses sensorless field oriented control with position and speed estimates determined from a signal injection technique at low speeds and a back EMF technique at higher speeds. The charge and discharge portion of the algorithm use command feed-forward and disturbance decoupling, respectively, to achieve fast response with low gains. Simulation and experimental results are presented.

  10. Candidate thermal energy storage technologies for solar industrial process heat applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furman, E. R.

    1979-01-01

    A number of candidate thermal energy storage system elements were identified as having the potential for the successful application of solar industrial process heat. These elements which include storage media, containment and heat exchange are shown.

  11. Design Flexibility of Redox Flow Systems. [for energy storage applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Thaller, L. H.

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics inherent in Redox flow systems permit considerable latitude in designing systems for specific storage applications. The first of these characteristics is the absence of plating/deplating reactions with their attendant morphology changes at the electrodes. This permits a given Redox system to operate over a wide range of depths of discharge and charge/discharge rates. The second characteristic is the separation of power generating components (stacks) from the energy storage components (tanks). This results in cost effective system design, ease of system growth via modularization, and freedom from sizing restraints so that the whole spectrum of applications, from utilities down to single residence can be considered. The final characteristic is the commonality of the reactant fluids which assures that all cells at all times are receiving reactants at the same state of charge. Since no cell can be out of balance with respect to any other cell, it is possible for some cells to be charged while others are discharging, in effect creating a DC to DC transformer. It is also possible for various groups of cells to be connected to separate loads, thus supplying a range of output voltages. Also, trim cells can be used to maintain constant bus voltage as the load is changed or as the depth of discharge increases. The commonality of reactant fluids also permits any corrective measures such as rebalancing to occur at the system level instead of at the single cell level.

  12. Partitioning of actinides and fission products in highly-active raffinate from purex process by mixer-settlers

    SciTech Connect

    Ozawa, M.; Nemoto, S.; Togashi, A.; Kawata, T.; Onishi, K. )

    1992-12-01

    Batch, and counter-current flowsheet tests using mixer-settlers have been carried out in the chemical processing facility (CPF). Tokai-works, PNC. Counter-current experiments aim to provide the data for prediction of the Truex process applicability in actinides partitioning in high level liquid waste (HLLW) from the Purex process. Real highly-active (HA) raffinate from FBR spent fuel reprocessing experiments were used in these runs without adjusting the acidity. A mixed solvent composed of 0.2M CMPO in the purex solvent was employed as a Truex solvent. Some noteworthy behaviors for ruthenium were recognized; The rare earths and some fraction of ruthenium were coextracted to the actinides stream. Although they were stripped out by dilute nitric acid as expected, plutonium and some of ruthenium also remained in the organic phase during the stripping of americium. A peculiar extraction behavior of ruthenium of changing its D values stage by stage suggests a mixture of various kinds of complexes in the HA raffinate. A series of counter-current tests resulted in giving sufficiently low alpha contaminated waste giving DF's of over 10[sup 3] for major actinides separation, which will endorse the Truex process. In successive counter-current runs after 1992, an effort for the selective(Am/Np/Pu/U) stripping will be continued including the solvent cleanup step as one of the separation steps. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Optical Digital Disk Storage: An Application for News Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Mary Jo

    1988-01-01

    Describes the technology, equipment, and procedures necessary for converting a historical newspaper clipping collection to optical disk storage. Alternative storage systems--microforms, laser scanners, optical storage--are also retrieved, and the advantages and disadvantages of optical storage are considered. (MES)

  14. Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, N.

    1995-05-02

    This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD).

  15. Light metal alanates and amides for reversible hydrogen storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jun

    Hydrogen is undoubtedly one of the key alternatives to replace petroleum products as a clean energy carrier for both transportation and stationary applications. Although there have been numerous material systems studied as potential candidates for hydrogen storage applications, none of the materials known to date has demonstrated sufficient hydrogen capacity or efficiency in the required operating temperature ranges. There are still considerable opportunities for the discovery of new materials that could lead to advances in science as well as commercial technologies in this area. In this study, two new hydrogen-storage systems, i.e. alanate/amide and LiMgN, are investigated. Firstly, we found that if LiAlH4 and LiNH2 are allowed to react in a proper molar ratio, the LiH that forms as an intermediate product of the dehydrogenation of LiAlH4 can subsequently react with LiNH2 to release H2 at temperatures below 300°C, much lower than that without LiNH2. However, this system is only partially reversible. The difficulty of reversing the reaction is attributed to the irreversibility of the dehydrogenation reaction of LiAlH4 to Li3AlH6. Further experimental results showed that the reversible storage capacity of the combined alanate/amide material system is increased to 7.0 wt% under 300°C, if LiNH2 were reacted with Li3AlH6, instead of LiAlH4, in a 3:1 molar ratio. We also found that the re-formation of Li3AlH 6 depends strongly on the heating rate during the hydrogenation process. To improve the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the Li-Al-N-H systems, the reaction between Li3AlH6 and Mg(NH2) 2 was studied based on the understanding of the destabilizing effect of amide on alanates. The Li-Al-Mg-N-H system would have better kinetic properties than the Li-Al-N-H system due to the addition of Mg, based on the published research results on the comparison between the Li-Mg-N-H and Li-N-H systems. A reversible 6.2 wt% H2 storage capacity has been demonstrated under the

  16. Conventional wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solar applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kedl, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional wallboard impregnated with octadecane paraffin (Melting Point -- 73.5{degree}F) is being developed as a building material with latent heat storage for passive solar applications. Impregnation was accomplished simply by soaking the wallboard in molten paraffin. Concentrations of paraffin in the combined product as high as 35{percent} by weight were achieved. In support of this concept, a computer model was developed to describe thermal transport and storage by a phase change material (PCM) dispersed in a porous media. The computer model was confirmed by comparison with known analytical solutions where the PCM melts at a specific melting point. However, agreement between the model and an experimentally produced thermal transient involving impregnated wallboard was only good after the model was modified to allow the paraffin to melt over a temperature range. This was accomplished by replacing the heat of fusion with a triangular heat capacity relationship that mimics the triangular melt curve found through differential scanning calorimetry. When this change was made, agreement between the model and the experimental transient was very good. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  17. 77 FR 2715 - D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on December 29, 2011, D'Lo Gas Storage, LLC (D'Lo), 1002 East St. Mary Blvd., Lafayette, Louisiana 70503, filed in... D'Lo to construct, operate, and maintain a new natural gas storage project to be located in...

  18. 75 FR 8051 - Petal Gas Storage, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Petal Gas Storage, L.L.C.; Notice of Application February 12, 2010. Take notice that on January 29, 2010, Petal Gas Storage, L.L.C. (Petal), 1100 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas..., Vice President and Regulatory Counsel, Petal Gas Storage, L.L.C., 1100 Louisiana Street, Houston,...

  19. Nanoporous and Nanostructured Materials for Energy Storage and Sensor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Anh D.

    The major objective of this work is to design nanostructured and nanoporous materials targeting the special needs of the energy storage and sensing fields. Nanostructured and nanoporous materials are increasingly finding applications in many fields, including electrical energy storage and explosive sensing. The advancement of energy storage devices is important to the development of three fields that have strong effects on human society: renewable energy, transportation, and portable devices. More sensitive explosive sensors will help to prevent terrorism activities and boost national security. Hierarchically porous LiFePO4 (LFP)/C composites were prepared using a surfactant and colloidal crystals as dual templates. The surfactant serves as the template for mesopores and polymeric colloidal spheres serve as the template for macropores. The confinement of the surfactant-LFP-carbon precursor in the colloidal templates is crucial to suppress the fast crystallization of LFP and helps to maintain the ordered structure. The obtained composites with high surface areas and ordered porous structure showed excellent rate performance when used as cathode materials for LIBs, which will allow them to be used as a power source for EVs and HEVs. The synthesis of LiFePO 4 in three dimensionally confined spaces within the colloidal template resulted in the formation of spherical particles. Densely packed LiFePO 4 spheres in a carbon matrix were obtained by spin-casting the LFP-carbon precursor on a quartz substrate and then pyrolyzing it. The product showed high capacity and could be charged /discharged with very little capacity fading over many cycles. Three-dimensionally ordered mesoporous carbons were prepared from nano-sized silica sphere colloidal crystal templates. These materials with very high surface areas and ordered porous structure showed high capacitance and excellent rate capability when used as electrodes for supercapacitors. Mesoporous silica thin films of different

  20. Study of Early Transition Metal Carbides for Energy Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Agnese, Yohan

    An increase in energy and power density is needed to match the growing energy storage demands linked with the development of renewable energy production, and portable electronics. Several energy storage technologies exist including lithium-ion batteries, sodium-ion batteries, fuel cells and supercapacitors. These systems are mutually complementary. For example, supercapacitors can deliver high power densities whereas batteries can be used for high energy density applications. The first objective of this work was to investigate the electrochemical performances of a new family of 2-D materials called MXenes by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements and to propose new solutions to tackle the energy storage concern. To achieve this goal, several directions have been explored. The first part of the research focused on Ti3C 2-based MXenes behavior as electrode materials for supercapacitors in aqueous electrolytes. The charge storage mechanisms in basic and neutral aqueous electrolytes, investigated by X-ray diffraction, were demonstrated to be attributed to cations intercalation between Ti3C2 layers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy highlighted the contribution of oxygenated functional groups on surface redox reactions in sulfuric acid. High capacitances were achieved, up to 520 F/cm3 and 325 F/g. Then the electrochemical behaviors of MXenes in sodium-based organic electrolytes were explored. A new hybrid system of sodium-ion capacitor was proposed. It was demonstrated that V2C-based MXene electrodes were suitable to be used as positive electrodes with an operating potential from 1 V to 3.5 V vs. Na+/Na. Continuous intercalation and de-intercalation of sodium ions between the V2C layers during sodiation and desodiation were showed by X-ray diffraction. An asymmetric sodium-ion capacitor full cell was assembled using hard carbon as negative electrode and showed promising results, with a capacity of 50 mAh/g. The last part was focused on the

  1. Uranium for hydrogen storage applications : a materials science perspective.

    SciTech Connect

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Tewell, Craig R.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Kolasinski, Robert D.

    2010-08-01

    Under appropriate conditions, uranium will form a hydride phase when exposed to molecular hydrogen. This makes it quite valuable for a variety of applications within the nuclear industry, particularly as a storage medium for tritium. However, some aspects of the U+H system have been characterized much less extensively than other common metal hydrides (particularly Pd+H), likely due to radiological concerns associated with handling. To assess the present understanding, we review the existing literature database for the uranium hydride system in this report and identify gaps in the existing knowledge. Four major areas are emphasized: {sup 3}He release from uranium tritides, the effects of surface contamination on H uptake, the kinetics of the hydride phase formation, and the thermal desorption properties. Our review of these areas is then used to outline potential avenues of future research.

  2. Computational study of sodium magnesium hydride for hydrogen storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto Valle, Fernando Antonio

    Hydrogen offers considerable potential benefits as an energy carrier. However, safe and convenient storage of hydrogen is one of the biggest challenges to be resolved in the near future. Sodium magnesium hydride (NaMgH 3) has attracted attention as a hydrogen storage material due to its light weight and high volumetric hydrogen density of 88 kg/m3. Despite the advantages, hydrogen release in this material occurs at approximately 670 K, which is well above the operable range for on-board hydrogen storage applications. In this regard, hydrogen release may be facilitated by substitution doping of transition-metals. This dissertation describes first-principles computational methods that enable an examination of the hydrogen storage properties of NaMgH3. The novel contribution of this dissertation includes a combination of crystal, supercell, and surface slab calculations that provides new and relevant insights about the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of NaMgH3. First-principles calculations on the pristine crystal structure provide a starting reference point for the study of this material as a hydrogen storage material. To the best of our knowledge, it is reported for the first time that a 25% mol doping concentration of Ti, V, Cu, and Zn dopants reduce the reaction enthalpy of hydrogen release for NaMgH3. The largest decrease in the DeltaH(298 K) value corresponds to the Zn-doped model (67.97 kJ/(mol H2)). Based on cohesive energy calculations, it is reported that at the 6.25% mol doping concentration, Ti and Zn dopants are the only transition metals that destabilize the NaMgH3 hydride. In terms of hydrogen removal energy, it is quantified that the energy cost to remove a single H from the Ti-doped supercell model is 0.76 eV, which is lower with respect to the pristine model and other prototypical hydrogen storage materials. From the calculation of electronic properties such as density of states, electron density difference, and charge population analysis

  3. Nanostructures design and fabrication for magnetic storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yong

    The advent of nanofabrication technology offers capabilities in patterning materials and modifying the magnetic properties. The focus of this research is to design and fabricate magnetic nanostructures and understand the magnetic behavior modified by nanostructures, to generate new devices for magnetic storage applications. First, novel techniques have been successfully developed to fabricate nanostructures with different shapes and dimensions below the resolution limit of photolithography tool. Anisotropic nanostructures, diamonds and triangles, have been obtained by over-exposure technique; nano-rings, both centered and de-centered, have been obtained by lateral etch technique and ALD spacer mask technique. All these techniques are simple and use conventional photolithography. Large area, high density nanostructures have been obtained at low cost. Second, anisotropic nanostructures have been characterized correlated with simulation to understand the shape anisotropy effect on magnetic behavior. Coercivity change and angular dependent behavior result from pinning the magnet by the nanostructures and these have been explored. Dimensions of nanostructure also play an important role in changing the magnetic properties. Third, nano-rings have been characterized correlated with simulation to study the magnetic state switching process. Various dimensions of rings have been compared and have revealed that the vortex state in rings is affected by the dimensions of inner diameter, width and thickness. The shape anisotropy and magnetostatic energy play an important role in vortex state formation and maintenance. The interaction effect in ring array has also been explored for high density MRAM design application. Fourth, feasible design and fabrication of de-centered rings have been developed for vortex chirality control. The asymmetry in the de-centered rings controls the movement direction of the domain walls, leading to predictable vortex chirality. Finally, future

  4. 78 FR 39720 - Atmos Pipeline and Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Atmos Pipeline and Storage, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on June 14, 2013, Atmos Pipeline and Storage, LLC. (Atmos), filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission an application under section 7(b)...

  5. 76 FR 30327 - Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted..., Reliable Storage 1 LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act,...

  6. 76 FR 45251 - Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2011, Reliable Storage 1 LLC, filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power...

  7. 76 FR 45252 - Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted..., Reliable Storage 1 LLC, filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act,...

  8. 76 FR 45251 - Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted..., Reliable Storage 1 LLC, filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act,...

  9. 76 FR 30339 - Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted..., Reliable Storage 1 LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act,...

  10. 76 FR 30340 - Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted..., Reliable Storage 1 LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act,...

  11. 77 FR 9229 - Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted..., Reliable Storage 1 LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act,...

  12. 77 FR 5788 - PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on January 27, 2012, PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC (PetroLogistics), 4470 Bluebonnet... previously filed application in Docket No. CP11-50-000. Specifically, PetroLogistics request to amend...

  13. Disposition of PUREX facility tanks D5 and E6 uranium and plutonium solutions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, D.P.

    1993-12-01

    Approximately 9 kilograms of plutonium and 5 metric tons of uranium in a 1 molar nitric acid solution are being stored in two PUREX facility vessels, tanks D5 and E6. The plutonium was accumulated during cleanup activities of the plutonium product area of the PUREX facility. Personnel at PUREX recently completed a formal presentation to the Surplus Materials Peer Panel (SMPP) regarding disposition of the material currently in these tanks. The peer panel is a group of complex-wide experts who have been chartered by EM-64 (Office of Site and Facility Transfer) to provide a third party independent review of disposition decisions. The information presented to the peer panel is provided in the first section of this report. The panel was generally receptive to the information provided at that time and the recommendations which were identified.

  14. A brief history of the PUREX and UO{sub 3} facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.S.

    1993-11-01

    The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant, conceived during the early Cold War years, was a vehicle to increase significantly US nuclear weapons production capacity. The original PUREX Plant was a concrete rectangle 1,005 feet long and 61.5 feet wide. The shielding capacity of the concrete was designed so that personnel in non-regulated service areas would not receive radiation in excess of 0.1 millirem per hour. This report discusses the design of the PUREX Plant, the production chronology, projects and equipment changes, equipment decontamination and reuse, waste management, and contamination events that have occurred during the operation of the plant. Additionally, the development and history of the Uranium Trioxide Plant are also covered.

  15. Evaluation of thermal-storage concepts for solar cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, P. J.; Morehouse, J. H.; Choi, M. K.; White, N. M.; Scholten, W. B.

    1981-10-01

    Various configuration concepts for utilizing thermal energy storage to improve the thermal and economic performance of solar cooling systems for buildings were analyzed. The storge concepts evaluated provide short-term thermal storge via the bulk containment of water or salt hydrates. The evaluations were made for both residential-size cooling systems (3-ton) and small commercial-size cooling systems (25-ton). The residential analysis considers energy requirements for space heating, space cooling and water heating, while the commercial building analysis is based only on energy requirements for space cooling. The commercial building analysis considered a total of 10 different thermal storage/solar systems, 5 each for absorption and Rankine chiller concepts. The residential analysis considered 4 thermal storage/solar systems, all utilizing an absorption chiller. The trade-offs considered include: cold-side versus hot-side storage, single vs multiple stage storage, and phase-change vs sensible heat storage.

  16. ADAPTING A CERTIFIED SHIPPING PACKAGE FOR STORAGE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.

    2012-06-05

    For years shipping packages have been used to store radioactive materials at many DOE sites. Recently, the K-Area Material Storage facility at the Savannah River Site became interested in and approved the Model 9977 Shipping Package for use as a storage package. In order to allow the 9977 to be stored in the facility, there were a number of evaluations and modifications that were required. There were additional suggested modifications to improve the performance of the package as a storage container that were discussed but not incorporated in the design that is currently in use. This paper will discuss the design being utilized for shipping and storage, suggested modifications that have improved the storage configuration but were not used, as well as modifications that have merit for future adaptations for both the 9977 and for other shipping packages to be used as storage packages.

  17. Conceptual design of thermal energy storage systems for near-term electric utility applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, E. W.

    1980-01-01

    Promising thermal energy storage systems for midterm applications in conventional electric utilities for peaking power generation are evaluated. Conceptual designs of selected thermal energy storage systems integrated with conventional utilities are considered including characteristics of alternate systems for peaking power generation, viz gas turbines and coal fired cycling plants. Competitive benefit analysis of thermal energy storage systems with alternate systems for peaking power generation and recommendations for development and field test of thermal energy storage with a conventional utility are included. Results indicate that thermal energy storage is only marginally competitive with coal fired cycling power plants and gas turbines for peaking power generation.

  18. Application of electrochemical energy storage in solar thermal electric generation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, R.; Krauthamer, S.; Frank, H.

    1982-01-01

    This paper assesses the status, cost, and performance of existing electrochemical energy storage systems, and projects the cost, performance, and availability of advanced storage systems for application in terrestrial solar thermal electric generation. A 10 MWe solar plant with five hours of storage is considered and the cost of delivered energy is computed for sixteen different storage systems. The results indicate that the five most attractive electrochemical storage systems use the following battery types: zinc-bromine (Exxon), iron-chromium redox (NASA/Lewis Research Center, LeRC), sodium-sulfur (Ford), sodium-sulfur (Dow), and zinc-chlorine (Energy Development Associates, EDA).

  19. Electrochemical energy storage systems for solar thermal applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauthamer, S.; Frank, H.

    1980-01-01

    Existing and advanced electrochemical storage and inversion/conversion systems that may be used with terrestrial solar-thermal power systems are evaluated. The status, cost and performance of existing storage systems are assessed, and the cost, performance, and availability of advanced systems are projected. A prime consideration is the cost of delivered energy from plants utilizing electrochemical storage. Results indicate that the five most attractive electrochemical storage systems are the: iron-chromium redox (NASA LeRC), zinc-bromine (Exxon), sodium-sulfur (Ford), sodium-sulfur (Dow), and zinc-chlorine (EDA).

  20. The Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, Paul; Jorgenson, Jennie; Hummon, Marissa; Jenkin, Thomas; Palchak, David; Kirby, Brendan; Ma, Ookie; O'Malley, Mark

    2013-05-01

    This analysis evaluates several operational benefits of electricity storage, including load-leveling, spinning contingency reserves, and regulation reserves. Storage devices were simulated in a utility system in the western United States, and the operational costs of generation was compared to the same system without the added storage. This operational value of storage was estimated for devices of various sizes, providing different services, and with several sensitivities to fuel price and other factors. Overall, the results followed previous analyses that demonstrate relatively low value for load-leveling but greater value for provision of reserve services. The value was estimated by taking the difference in operational costs between cases with and without energy storage and represents the operational cost savings from deploying storage by a traditional vertically integrated utility. The analysis also estimated the potential revenues derived from a merchant storage plant in a restructured market, based on marginal system prices. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials and incomplete capture of system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit provided to the system. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  1. Value of Energy Storage for Grid Applications (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Hummon, M.; Jenkin, T.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.; O'Malley, M.

    2013-06-01

    This analysis evaluates several operational benefits of electricity storage, including load-leveling, spinning contingency reserves, and regulation reserves. Storage devices were simulated in a utility system in the western United States, and the operational costs of generation was compared to the same system without the added storage. This operational value of storage was estimated for devices of various sizes, providing different services, and with several sensitivities to fuel price and other factors. Overall, the results followed previous analyses that demonstrate relatively low value for load-leveling but greater value for provision of reserve services. The value was estimated by taking the difference in operational costs between cases with and without energy storage and represents the operational cost savings from deploying storage by a traditional vertically integrated utility. The analysis also estimated the potential revenues derived from a merchant storage plant in a restructured market, based on marginal system prices. Due to suppression of on-/off-peak price differentials and incomplete capture of system benefits (such as the cost of power plant starts), the revenue obtained by storage in a market setting appears to be substantially less than the net benefit provided to the system. This demonstrates some of the additional challenges for storage deployed in restructured energy markets.

  2. Exchange coupling and its applications in magnetic data storage.

    PubMed

    Li, Kebin; Wu, Yihong; Guo, Zaibing; Zheng, Yuankai; Han, Guchang; Qiu, Jinjun; Luo, Ping; An, Lihua; Zhou, Tiejun

    2007-01-01

    The continuing scaling of magnetic recording is facing more and more scientific and technological challenges because both the read sensor and recording bit are approaching sub-50 nm regime with the ever increasing areal density in hard disk drives. One of the key and indispensable elements for both high-sensitivity sensors and high-density media is the exchange bias between a ferromagnetic and an antiferromagnetic layer or the exchange coupling between two ferromagnets via a non-magnetic spacer. In the nanometer regime, the exchange coupling between ferromagnet and antiferromagnet or two ferromagnets through a conductive spacer is governed by the intergrain exchange interaction which has its origin in electron spins. Interlayer exchange coupling in multilayer or trilayer essentially originates from the quantum confinement effect. In this paper, we first review the physical origin and various theoretical models of the two types of exchange couplings, followed by a review of the applications of the exchange bias and interlayer exchange coupling in data storage with emphasis on the advanced read sensor and advanced media including perpendicular media and patterned media. PMID:17455474

  3. Carbon Nanomaterials for Energy Storage, Actuators and Environmental Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chengwei

    Carbon nanomaterials have caught tremendous attention in the last few decades due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Tremendous effort has been made to develop new synthesis techniques for carbon nanomaterials and investigate their properties for different applications. In this work, carbon nanospheres (CNSs), carbon foams (CF), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were studied for various applications, including water treatment, energy storage, actuators, and sensors. A facile spray pyrolysis synthesis technique was developed to synthesize individual CNSs with specific surface area (SSA) up to 1106 m2/g. The hollow CNSs showed adsorption of up to 300 mg rhodamine B dye per gram carbon, which is more than 15 times higher than that observed for conventional carbon black. They were also evaluated as adsorbents for removal of arsenate and selenate from water and displayed good binding to both species, outperforming commercial activated carbons for arsenate removal in pH > 8. When evaluated as supercapacitor electrode materials, specific capacitances of up to 112 F/g at a current density of 0.1 A/g were observed. When used as Li-ion battery anode materials, the CNSs achieved a discharge capacity of 270 mAh/g at a current density of 372 mA/g (1C), which is 4-fold higher than that of commercial graphite anode. Carbon foams were synthesized using direct pyrolysis and had SSA up to 2340 m2/g. When used as supercapacitor electrode materials, a specific capacitance up to 280 F/g was achieved at current density of 0.1 A/g and remained as high as 207 F/g, even at a high current density of 10 A/g. A printed walking robot was made from common plastic films and coatings of SWNTs. The solid-state thermal bimorph actuators were multifunctional energy transducers powered by heat, light, or electricity. The actuators were also investigated for photo/thermal detection. Electrochemical actuators based on MnO2 were also studied for potential underwater applications

  4. Graphene and graphene-based materials for energy storage applications.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jixin; Yang, Dan; Yin, Zongyou; Yan, Qingyu; Zhang, Hua

    2014-09-10

    With the increased demand in energy resources, great efforts have been devoted to developing advanced energy storage and conversion systems. Graphene and graphene-based materials have attracted great attention owing to their unique properties of high mechanical flexibility, large surface area, chemical stability, superior electric and thermal conductivities that render them great choices as alternative electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage systems. This Review summarizes the recent progress in graphene and graphene-based materials for four energy storage systems, i.e., lithium-ion batteries, supercapacitors, lithium-sulfur batteries and lithium-air batteries. PMID:24431122

  5. Inertial energy storage for advanced space station applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Tassel, K. E.; Simon, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    Because the NASA Space Station will spend approximately one-third of its orbital time in the earth's shadow, depriving it of solar energy and requiring an energy storage system to meet system demands, attention has been given to flywheel energy storage systems. These systems promise high mechanical efficiency, long life, light weight, flexible design, and easily monitored depth of discharge. An assessment is presently made of three critical technology areas: rotor materials, magnetic suspension bearings, and motor-generators for energy conversion. Conclusions are presented regarding the viability of inertial energy storage systems and of problem areas requiring further technology development efforts.

  6. Applications of mutant yeast strains with low glycogen storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Schubert, W. W.; Stokes, B. O.

    1981-01-01

    Several strains of Hansenula polymorpha were selected for possible low glycogen storage characteristics based on a selective I2 staining procedure. The levels of storage carbohydrates in the mutant strains were found to be 44-70% of the levels in the parent strain for cultures harvested in stationary phase. Similar differences generally were not found for cells harvested in exponential phase. Yeast strains deficient in glycogen storage capability are valuable in increasing the relative protein value of microbial biomass and also may provide significant cost savings in substrate utilization in fermentative processes.

  7. High temperature metal hydrides as heat storage materials for solar and related applications.

    PubMed

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 degrees C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

  8. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    PubMed Central

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

  9. Investigation of storage system designs and techniques for optimizing energy conservation in integrated utility systems. Volume 2: (Application of energy storage to IUS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of energy storage devices to any energy system depends on the performance and cost characteristics of the larger basic system. A comparative assessment of energy storage alternatives for application to IUS which addresses the systems aspects of the overall installation is described. Factors considered include: (1) descriptions of the two no-storage IUS baselines utilized as yardsticks for comparison throughout the study; (2) discussions of the assessment criteria and the selection framework employed; (3) a summary of the rationale utilized in selecting water storage as the primary energy storage candidate for near term application to IUS; (4) discussion of the integration aspects of water storage systems; and (5) an assessment of IUS with water storage in alternative climates.

  10. Applications of thermal energy storage in the cement industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeger, F. A.; Beshore, D. G.; Miller, F. M.; Gartner, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    In the manufacture of cement, literally trillions of Btu's are rejected to the environment each year. The purpose of this feasibility study program was to determine whether thermal energy storage could be used to conserve or allow alternative uses of this rejected energy. This study identifies and quantifies the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, established use of this energy, investigates various storage system concepts, and selects energy conservation systems for further study. Thermal performance and economic analyses are performed on candidate storage systems for four typical cement plants representing various methods of manufacturing cement. Through the use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 10 to the 13th power Btu/year, or an equivalent on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for further development.

  11. 77 FR 19279 - Long Canyon Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Long Canyon Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application... section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act (FPA), proposing to study the feasibility of the Long Canyon Pumped Storage Project to be located near the town of Moab, Grand County, Utah. The ] project would...

  12. 76 FR 41235 - Tres Palacios Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Tres Palacios Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on July 5, 2011, Tres Palacios Gas Storage LLC (TPGS), Two Brush Creek Blvd., Suite 200, Kansas...

  13. 75 FR 35007 - Wyckoff Gas Storage Company LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Wyckoff Gas Storage Company LLC; Notice of Application June 15, 2010. On June 10, 2010, Wyckoff Gas Storage Company, LLC, (``Wyckoff''), 6733 South Yale, Tulsa, OK...

  14. 78 FR 77445 - Tres Palacios Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Tres Palacios Gas Storage LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on December 6, 2013, Tres Palacios Gas Storage LLC (Tres Palacios) 700 Louisiana Street, Suite 2060,...

  15. 75 FR 52937 - Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application August 20, 2010. Take notice that on August 6, 2010, Turtle Bayou Gas Storage Company, LLC (Turtle Bayou), One Office... caverns and related facilities to be located in Chambers and Liberty Counties, Texas. Turtle Bayou...

  16. 76 FR 544 - PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application December 28, 2010. Take notice that on December 14, 2010, PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC (PetroLogistics... parallel PetroLogistics' existing header; (3) constructing two new compressor units, totaling...

  17. 77 FR 20618 - PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on March 22, 2012, PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC (PetroLogistics), 4470 Bluebonnet Blvd..., and CP07-429-000, as amended in Docket No. CP10-66-000. Specifically, PetroLogistics request to...

  18. 75 FR 49917 - PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application August 3, 2010. Take notice that on July 21, 2010, PetroLogistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC (PetroLogistics), 4470..., measuring, and appurtenant facilities in order to connect the cavern to PetroLogistics' existing...

  19. 77 FR 23241 - Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on March 30, 2012, Floridian Natural Gas Storage Company, LLC (FGS), 1000 Louisiana Street... section 7 of the Natural Gas Act (NGA) and Part 157 of the Commission's regulations to amend...

  20. 75 FR 8318 - Petrologistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Petrologistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC; Notice of Application February 17, 2010. Take notice that on February 12, 2010, Petrologistics Natural Gas Storage, LLC (Petrologistics... to section 7(c) of the Natural Gas Act (NGA), to amend its Certificate of Public Convenience...

  1. 76 FR 50724 - Sawgrass Storage, L.L.C.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Sawgrass Storage, L.L.C.; Notice of Application Take notice that on July 27, 2011, Sawgrass Storage, L.L.C. (Sawgrass), having its principal place of business at 3333...

  2. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.C.

    1994-04-01

    This permit application for the 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility consists for 15 chapters. Topics of discussion include the following: facility description and general provisions; waste characteristics; process information; personnel training; reporting and record keeping; and certification.

  3. NSSDC Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor); Blasso, L. G. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This report contains copies of nearly all of the technical papers and viewgraphs presented at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications. This conference served as a broad forum for the discussion of a number of important issues in the field of mass storage systems. Topics include magnetic disk and tape technologies, optical disk and tape, software storage and file management systems, and experiences with the use of a large, distributed storage system. The technical presentations describe, among other things, integrated mass storage systems that are expected to be available commercially. Also included is a series of presentations from Federal Government organizations and research institutions covering their mass storage requirements for the 1990s.

  4. NSSDC Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Ben (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor); Blasso, L. G. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    This report contains copies of nearly all of the technical papers and viewgraphs presented at the NSSDC Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Application. This conference served as a broad forum for the discussion of a number of important issues in the field of mass storage systems. Topics include the following: magnetic disk and tape technologies; optical disk and tape; software storage and file management systems; and experiences with the use of a large, distributed storage system. The technical presentations describe, among other things, integrated mass storage systems that are expected to be available commercially. Also included is a series of presentations from Federal Government organizations and research institutions covering their mass storage requirements for the 1990's.

  5. Thermodynamic Properties of Organometallic Dihydrogen Complexes for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrecht, David Gregory

    appropriate ranges for hydrogen storage applications. Simulated thermodynamic values for Fe complexes were found to significantly underestimate experimental behavior, demonstrating the importance of the magnetic spin state of the molecule to hydrogen binding properties.

  6. Workshop on compact storage ring technology: applications to lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-30

    Project planning in the area of x-ray lithography is discussed. Three technologies that are emphasized are the light source, the lithographic technology, and masking technology. The needs of the semiconductor industry in the lithography area during the next decade are discussed, particularly as regards large scale production of high density dynamic random access memory devices. Storage ring parameters and an overall exposure tool for x-ray lithography are addressed. Competition in this area of technology from Germany and Japan is discussed briefly. The design of a storage ring is considered, including lattice design, magnets, and beam injection systems. (LEW)

  7. BALLISTICS TESTING OF THE 9977 SHIPPING PACKAGE FOR STORAGE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-06

    Radioactive materials are stored in a variety of locations throughout the DOE complex. At the Savannah River Site (SRS), materials are stored within dedicated facilities. Each of those facilities has a documented safety analysis (DSA) that describes accidents that the facility and the materials within it may encounter. Facilities at the SRS are planning on utilizing the certified Model 9977 Shipping Package as a long term storage package and one of these facilities required ballistics testing. Specifically, in order to meet the facility DSA, the radioactive materials (RAM) must be contained within the storage package after impact by a .223 caliber round. In order to qualify the Model 9977 Shipping Package for storage in this location, the package had to be tested under these conditions. Over the past two years, the Model 9977 Shipping Package has been subjected to a series of ballistics tests. The purpose of the testing was to determine if the 9977 would be suitable for use as a storage package at a Savannah River Site facility. The facility requirements are that the package must not release any of its contents following the impact in its most vulnerable location by a .223 caliber round. A package, assembled to meet all of the design requirements for a certified 9977 shipping configuration and using simulated contents, was tested at the Savannah River Site in March of 2011. The testing was completed and the package was examined. The results of the testing and examination are presented in this paper.

  8. Summary of State-of-the-Art Power Conversion Systems for Energy Storage Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Atcitty, S.; Gray-Fenner, A.; Ranade, S.

    1998-09-01

    The power conversion system (PCS) is a vital part of many energy storage systems. It serves as the interface between the storage device, an energy source, and an AC load. This report summarizes the results of an extensive study of state-of-the-art power conversion systems used for energy storage applications. The purpose of the study was to investigate the potential for cost reduction and performance improvement in these power conversion systems and to provide recommendations for fiture research and development. This report provides an overview of PCS technology, a description of several state-of-the-art power conversion systems and how they are used in specific applications, a summary of four basic configurations for l:he power conversion systems used in energy storage applications, a discussion of PCS costs and potential cost reductions, a summary of the stancku-ds and codes relevant to the technology, and recommendations for future research and development.

  9. Small form factor (SFF) optical data storage devices for mobile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Pil; Park, No-Cheol; Kim, Chul-Jin

    2005-09-01

    There are two basic requirements in the field of optical storage data devices. The first is the demand for the improvement of memory capacity to manage the increased data capacity in personal and official purposes. The second is the demand for small sized optical storage devices for mobile multimedia digital electronics, including digital camera, PDA and mobile phones. To summarize, for the sake of mobile applications, it is necessary to develop optical data storage devices which have simultaneously a large capacity and a small size. Small form factor optical disk drive (SFF ODD) is expected to become a good match for mobile applications due its advantages over other devices in cost and removability. Nowadays, many companies and research institutes including universities cooperate together in the research on SFF ODD and other related optical storage devices. Due such active researches, it is expected that SFF ODD will be widely used in mobile applications in the very near future.

  10. Application of buffer thermal energy storage to an Air Brayton Solar Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strumpf, H. J.; Barr, K. P.

    1982-02-01

    The application of latent heat buffer thermal energy (TES) storage to a point focusing solar receiver equipped with an air Brayton engine is discussed. The 85-kw(th) Air Brayton Solar Receiver (ABSR) and Mod "O" engine were used as a baseline system. The operating life of a Brayton engine depends, in general, upon the number of start-stop cycles. The main advantage of buffer thermal energy storage is that it enables the engine to continue running during periods of cloud cover, thus reducing the number of engine shutdowns and increasing engine life. To demonstrate the effect of buffer thermal energy storage on engine operation, a computer program was written for complete transient/steady/state Brayton cycle performance. The solar insolation input was minute by minute data. The results indicated that thermal storage can afford a significant decrease in the number of engine shutdowns as compared to operating without thermal storage. It was also found that the number of shutdowns does not continuously decrease as the storage material weight increases. In fact, there appears to be an optimum weight for minimizing the number of shutdowns. It was also indicated that the economic viability of buffer thermal energy storage is largely a function of the achievable engine life. At low predicted life, thermal storage is economically attractive; for highly reliable, long lived engines, thermal storage is not economical.

  11. Review of power quality applications of energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    Swaminathan, S.; Sen, R.K.

    1997-05-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage Systems Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories contracted Sentech, Inc., to assess the impact of power quality problems on the electricity supply system. This report contains the results of several studies that have identified the cost of power quality events for electricity users and providers. The large annual cost of poor power quality represents a national inefficiency and is reflected in the cost of goods sold, reducing US competitiveness. The Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Program takes the position that mitigation merits the attention of not only the DOE but affected industries as well as businesses capable of assisting in developing solutions to these problems. This study represents the preliminary stages of an overall strategy by the ESS Program to understand the magnitude of these problems so as to begin the process of engaging industry partners in developing solutions.

  12. Composite latent/sensible energy storage media for high-temperature industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, M.

    1984-01-01

    An advanced thermal energy storage media concept is being developed for industrial process and reject heat applications. This composite medium consists of a phase-change carbonate salt, supported and immobilized within a submicron-sized capillary structure of a particulate ceramic matrix of porous sintered ceramic. Immobilization of the molten salt within the ceramic structure permits operation of the composite pellets, bricks or other shapes in direct contact with compatible fluids. Energy storage occurs in both sensible and latent forms with the composite providing higher energy storage densities than standard sensible heat storage systems. This paper describes the composite latent/sensible media concept and its potential advantage over state-ofthe-art systems. Current development activities concerning media stability and fabrication are described. Economic viability of the concept, especially in comparison to extant sensible heat storage systems, is also presented.

  13. Purex Plant gaseous iodine-129 control capability and process development requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Evoniuk, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the ability of the Purex Plant to effectively control iodine-129 emissions. Based on historical evidence, the current Purex Plant iodine control system appears capable of meeting the goal of limiting gaseous iodine-129 emissions at the point of discharge to levels stipulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) for an uncontrolled area. Expected decontamination factors (DF`s) with the current system will average about 100 and will be above the calculated DF`s of 2.2 and 87 required to meet DOE yearly average concentration limits for controlled and uncontrolled areas respectively, but below the calculated DF of 352 required for meeting the proposed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mass emission limit. Chemical costs for maintaining compliance with the DOE limits will be approximately $166 per metric ton of fuel processed (based on a silver nitrate price of $12.38/oz). Costs will increase in proportion to increases in silver prices.

  14. Hydrogen Storage Materials for Mobile and Stationary Applications: Current State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Lai, Qiwen; Paskevicius, Mark; Sheppard, Drew A; Buckley, Craig E; Thornton, Aaron W; Hill, Matthew R; Gu, Qinfen; Mao, Jianfeng; Huang, Zhenguo; Liu, Hua Kun; Guo, Zaiping; Banerjee, Amitava; Chakraborty, Sudip; Ahuja, Rajeev; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois

    2015-09-01

    One of the limitations to the widespread use of hydrogen as an energy carrier is its storage in a safe and compact form. Herein, recent developments in effective high-capacity hydrogen storage materials are reviewed, with a special emphasis on light compounds, including those based on organic porous structures, boron, nitrogen, and aluminum. These elements and their related compounds hold the promise of high, reversible, and practical hydrogen storage capacity for mobile applications, including vehicles and portable power equipment, but also for the large scale and distributed storage of energy for stationary applications. Current understanding of the fundamental principles that govern the interaction of hydrogen with these light compounds is summarized, as well as basic strategies to meet practical targets of hydrogen uptake and release. The limitation of these strategies and current understanding is also discussed and new directions proposed. PMID:26033917

  15. PUREX environmental radiological surveillance - preoperational and operational support program conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sula, M.J.; Price, K.R.

    1983-10-01

    This report describes the radiological environmental sampling program that is being conducted at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in support of resumed operation of the PUREX fuel processing plant. The report also summarizes preoperational radiological environmental data collected to date. The activities described herein are part of the ongoing Hanford Environmental Surveillance Program, operated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the DOE.

  16. Application of MCNP{trademark} to storage facility dose rate assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, W.T.; Roberts, R.R.; Estes, G.P.; Taylor, W.M.

    1996-12-31

    The MCNP code is widely used in the determination of neutral particle dose rate analyses. In this paper we examine the application of MCNP to several storage facilities containing special nuclear material, SNM, wherein the neutron dose rate is the primary quantity of interest. In particular, we describe the special geometry, modeling assumptions, and physics considerations encountered in each of three applications.

  17. Technical Assessment of Compressed Hydrogen Storage Tank Systems for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Thanh; Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Peng, J. -K; Kromer, Matt; Lasher, Stephen; McKenney, Kurtis; Law, Karen; Sinha, Jayanti

    2010-09-01

    This technical report describes DOE's assessment of the performance and cost of compressed hydrogen storage tank systems for automotive applications. The on-board performance (by Argonne National Lab) and high-volume manufacturing cost (by TIAX LLC) were estimated for compressed hydrogen storage tanks. The results were compared to DOE's 2010, 2015, and ultimate full fleet hydrogen storage targets. The Well-to-Tank (WTT) efficiency as well as the off-board performance and cost of delivering compressed hydrogen were also documented in the report.

  18. (Thermal energy storage technologies for heating and cooling applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, J.J.

    1990-12-19

    Recent results from selected TES research activities in Germany and Sweden under an associated IEA annex are discussed. In addition, several new technologies for heating and cooling of buildings and automobiles were reviewed and found to benefit similar efforts in the United states. Details of a meeting with Didier-Werke AG, a leading German ceramics manufacturer who will provide TES media necessary for the United States to complete field tests of an advanced high temperature latent heat storage material, are presented. Finally, an overview of the December 1990 IEA Executive Committee deliberations on TES is presented.

  19. Hydrogen storage for vehicular applications: Technology status and key development areas

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.L.; Handrock, J.L.

    1994-04-01

    The state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage technology is reviewed, including gaseous, liquid, hydride, surface adsorbed media, glass microsphere, chemical reaction, and liquid chemical technologies. The review of each technology includes a discussion of advantages, disadvantages, likelihood of success, and key research and development activities. A preferred technological path for the development of effective near-term hydrogen storage includes both cur-rent DOT qualified and advanced compressed storage for down-sized highly efficient but moderate range vehicles, and liquid storage for fleet vehicle applications. Adsorbate media are also suitable for fleet applications but not for intermittent uses. Volume-optimized transition metal hydride beds are also viable for short range applications. Long-term development of coated nanoparticulate or metal matrix high conductivity magnesium alloy, is recommended. In addition, a room temperature adsorbate medium should be developed to avoid cryogenic storage requirements. Chemical storage and oxidative schemes present serious obstacles which must be addressed for these technologies to have a future role.

  20. Experimental analysis of Hybridised Energy Storage Systems for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Wasim; Engstrom, Timothy; Marinescu, Monica; Green, Nick; Taylor, Nigel; Offer, Gregory J.

    2016-08-01

    The requirements of the Energy Storage System (ESS) for an electrified vehicle portfolio consisting of a range of vehicles from micro Hybrid Electric Vehicle (mHEV) to a Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV) vary considerably. To reduce development cost of an electrified powertrain portfolio, a modular system would ideally be scaled across each vehicle; however, the conflicting requirements of a mHEV and BEV prevent this. This study investigates whether it is possible to combine supercapacitors suitable for an mHEV with high-energy batteries suitable for use in a BEV to create a Hybridised Energy Storage System (HESS) suitable for use in a HEV. A passive HESS is found to be capable of meeting the electrical demands of a HEV drive cycle; the operating principles of HESSs are discussed and factors limiting system performance are explored. The performance of the HESS is found to be significantly less temperature dependent than battery-only systems, however the heat generated suggests a requirement for thermal management. As the HESS degrades (at a similar rate to a specialised high-power-battery), battery resistance rises faster than supercapacitor resistance; as a result, the supercapacitor provides a greater current contribution, therefore the energy throughput, temperature rise and degradation of the batteries is reduced.

  1. Natural Carbonation of Peridotite and Applications for Carbon Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, E.; Kelemen, P.; Matter, J.

    2009-05-01

    Natural carbonation of peridotite in the Samail Ophiolite of Oman is surprisingly rapid and could be further enhanced to provide a safe, permanent method of CO2 storage through in situ formation of carbonate minerals. Carbonate veins form by low-temperature reaction between peridotite and groundwater in a shallow weathering horizon. Reaction with peridotite drives up the pH of the water, and extensive travertine terraces form where this groundwater emerges at the surface in alkaline springs. The potential sink for CO2 in peridotite is enormous: adding 1wt% CO2 to the peridotite in Oman could consume 1/4 of all atmospheric carbon, and several peridotite bodies of comparable size exist throughout the world. Thus carbonation rate and cost, not reservoir size, are the limiting factors on the usefulness of in situ mineral carbonation of peridotite for carbon storage. The carbonate veins in Oman are much younger than previously believed, yielding average 14C ages of 28,000 years. Age data plus estimated volumes of carbonate veins and terraces suggest 10,000 to 100,000 tons per year of CO2 are consumed by these peridotite weathering reactions in Oman. This rate can be enhanced by drilling, hydraulic fracture, injecting CO2-rich fluid, and increasing reaction temperature. Drilling and hydraulic fracture can increase volume of peridotite available for reaction. Additional fracture may occur due to the solid volume increase of the carbonation reaction, and field observations suggest that such reaction-assisted fracture may be responsible for hierarchical carbonate vein networks in peridotite. Natural carbonation of peridotite in Oman occurs at low pCO2, resulting in partial carbonation of peridotite, forming magnesite and serpentine. Raising pCO2 increases carbonation efficiency, forming of magnesite + talc, or at complete carbonation, magnesite + quartz, allowing ˜30wt% CO2 to be added to the peridotite. Increasing the temperature to 185°C can improve the reaction rate by

  2. Lignin Based Carbon Materials for Energy Storage Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori; Rios, Orlando; Johs, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of Li-ion battery technology into electric and hybrid electric vehicles and portable electronic devices such as smart phones, laptops and tablets, creates a demand for efficient, economic and sustainable materials for energy storage. However, the high cost and long processing time associated with manufacturing battery-grade anode and cathode materials are two big constraints for lowering the total cost of batteries and environmentally friendly electric vehicles. Lignin, a byproduct of the pulp and paper industry and biorefinery, is one of the most abundant and inexpensive natural biopolymers. It can be efficiently converted to low cost carbon fibers with optimal properties for use as anode materials. Recent developments in the preparation of lignin precursors and conversion to carbon fiber-based anode materials have created a new class of anode materials with excellent electrochemical characteristics suitable for immediate use in existing Li- or Na-ion battery technologies.

  3. Method and apparatus for thermal energy storage. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.

    1975-08-19

    A method and apparatus for storing energy by converting thermal energy to potential chemically bound energy in which a first metal hydride is heated to dissociation temperature, liberating hydrogen gas which is compressed and reacted with a second metal to form a second metal hydride while releasing thermal energy. Cooling the first metal while warming the second metal hydride to dissociation temperature will reverse the flow of hydrogen gas back to the first metal, releasing additional thermal energy. The method and apparatus are particularly useful for the storage and conversion of thermal energy from solar heat sources and for the utilization of this energy for space heating purposes, such as for homes or offices.

  4. Nanostructured Materials for Advanced Electrochemical Energy Storage Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Benjamin E.

    This dissertation discusses work aimed at developing and improving nanostructured materials for electrochemical energy storage, specifically electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs) and lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). This was achieved through a combination of templating, precursor selection, and heteroatom doping to control the morphology and composition of the materials for improved performance in both types of energy storage. The first part of the thesis discusses EDLCs. First, a new method to produce soft-templated carbon materials is described. This process allows for improved production of mesoporous carbon made through soft templating. The work continues with using ionic liquids to dope nitrogen into hard templated mesoporous carbon. This led to a 40% improvement in specific capacitance due to improved conductivity. The section concludes with an investigation of physical and electrochemical properties of twelve ionic liquid electrolytes to determine which parameters are most important to achieve a high energy density. The second part discusses my work on LIBs, starting with a design of a low-cost electrochemical cell for in-situ X-ray diffraction monitoring during galvanostatic cycling. It continues with the development of a novel cathode material, Li8ZrO6, with a high lithium content. In this material, the redox activity is localized on oxygen atoms. Li8ZrO6 displays initial capacities higher than those of commercial materials but has large polarization. The capacity is further improved with transition metal doping, leading to a final specific capacity of over 175 mAh/g after 140 cycles at a rate of C/5.

  5. 76 FR 30936 - West Maui Pumped Storage Water Supply, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... Maui Pumped Storage Project, which would use effluent water from the existing West Maui sewage... Energy Regulatory Commission West Maui Pumped Storage Water Supply, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit... April 1, 2011, West Maui Pumped Storage Water Supply, LLC, filed an application for a preliminary...

  6. Magnetic domain wall shift registers for data storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Dan; O'Brien, L.; Zeng, H. T.; Lewis, E. R.; Petit, D.; Sampaio, J.; Thevenard, L.; Cowburn, R. P.

    2009-03-01

    Data storage devices based on magnetic domain walls (DWs) propagating through permalloy (Py) nanowires have been proposed [Allwood et al. Science 309, 1688 (2005), S. S. Parkin, US Patent 6,834,005 (2004)] and have attracted a great deal of attention. We experimentally demonstrate such a device using shift registers constructed from magnetic NOT gates used in combination with a globally applied rotating magnetic field. We have demonstrated data writing, propagation, and readout in individually addressable Py nanowires 90 nm wide and 10 nm thick. Electrical data writing is achieved using the Oersted field due to current pulses in gold stripes (4 μm wide, 150 nm thick), patterned on top of and perpendicular to the nanowires. The conduit-like properties of the nanowires allow the propagation of data sequences over distances greater than 100 μm. Using spatially resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements we can directly detect the propagation of single DWs in individual nanostructures without requiring data averaging. Electrical readout was demonstrated by detecting the presence of DWs at deliberately introduced pinning sites in the wire.

  7. Storage and production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Rita

    The increased utilization of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells as an alternative to internal combustion engines is expected to increase the demand for hydrogen, which is used as the energy source in these systems. The objective of this work is to develop and test new methods for the storage and production of hydrogen for fuel cells. Six ligand-stabilized hydrides were synthesized and tested as hydrogen storage media for use in portable fuel cells. These novel compounds are more stable than classical hydrides (e.g., NaBH4, LiAlH4) and react to release hydrogen less exothermically upon hydrolysis with water. Three of the compounds produced hydrogen in high yield (88 to 100 percent of the theoretical) and at significantly lower temperatures than those required for the hydrolysis of NaBH4 and LiAlH4. However, a large excess of water and acid were required to completely wet the hydride and keep the pH of the reaction medium neutral. The hydrolysis of the classical hydrides with steam can overcome these limitations. This reaction was studied in a flow reactor and the results indicate that classical hydrides can be hydrolyzed with steam in high yields at low temperatures (110 to 123°C) and in the absence of acid. Although excess steam was required, the pH of the condensed steam was neutral. Consequently, steam could be recycled back to the reactor. Production of hydrogen for large-scale transportation fuel cells is primarily achieved via the steam reforming, partial oxidation or autothermal reforming of natural gas or the steam reforming of methanol. However, in all of these processes CO is a by-product that must be subsequently removed because the Pt-based electrocatalyst used in the fuel cells is poisoned by its presence. The direct cracking of methane over a Ni/SiO2 catalyst can produce CO-free hydrogen. In addition to hydrogen, filamentous carbon is also produced. This material accumulates on the catalyst and eventually deactivates it. The Ni/SiO2 catalyst

  8. Analysis Tools for Sizing and Placement of Energy Storage for Grid Applications - A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Michael G.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sadovsky, Artyom; DeSteese, John G.

    2010-09-24

    The purpose of this report was to review pertinent literature and studies that might reveal models capable of optimizing the siting, sizing and economic value of energy storage in the future smart grid infrastructure. Energy storage technology and utility system deployment have been subjects of intense research and development for over three decades. During this time, many models have been developed that consider energy storage implementation in the electric power industry and other applications. Nevertheless, this review of literature discovered no actual models and only a few software tools that relate specifically to the application environment and expected requirements of the evolving smart grid infrastructure. This report indicates the existing need for such a model and describes a pathway for developing it.

  9. 76 FR 45252 - Reliable Storage 1 LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... theTennessee Valley Authority. Applicant Contact: Ramya Swaminathan, Free Flow Power Corporation, 239... surface area of 128.6 acres and an 7,914.4 acre-foot storage capacity; (3) a 180-foot-high, 1,248-foot- long earth embankment dam creating; (4) a lower reservoir with a surface area of 101 acres and an...

  10. 40 CFR 266.205 - Standards applicable to the storage of solid waste military munitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards applicable to the storage of solid waste military munitions. 266.205 Section 266.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS...

  11. 76 FR 70440 - Table Mountain Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Mountain Hydro, LLC., 1210 W. Franklin St., Ste. 2, Boise, ID 83702; phone (208) 246-9925. FERC Contact... Energy Regulatory Commission Table Mountain Pumped Storage Project; Notice of Preliminary Permit... September 14, 2011, Table Mountain Hydro, LLC, Arizona, filed an application for a preliminary...

  12. Ammonia emissions factors from broiler litter in barns, storage, and after land application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia (NH3) emissions from poultry litter can cause high levels of NH3 in poultry rearing facilities, as well as atmospheric pollution. The objectives of this study were to: (1) measure NH3 emissions from litter in broiler houses, during storage and following land application, and (2) conduct a m...

  13. Land Application of Wastes: An Educational Program. Climate and Wastewater Storage - Module 8, Objectives, and Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, W. W.; And Others

    This module discusses the hydrologic considerations that apply to land application of wastes. These are precipitation, infiltration and percolation, evapotranspiration, runoff, and groundwater. Climatic considerations that relate to wastewater storage are also discussed. Particular emphasis is given to wastewater flow, precipitation, evaporation,…

  14. Issues Involved in Developing Integrated Optical Jukebox Storage Systems for Customized Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augsburger, Wayne; McNary, Larry

    1992-01-01

    Suggests a process for evaluating and planning integrated optical jukebox storage systems. Considerations regarding architecture and system performance are summarized, and a modeling program for tailoring system response to specific applications is presented. Five robotics algorithms are examined to illustrate different hardware configurations.…

  15. Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) and Battery Management System (BMS) for Grid-Scale Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lawder, M. T.; Suthar, B.; Northrop, P. W. C.; De, S.; Hoff, C. M.; Leitermann, O.; Crow, M. L.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Subramanian, V. R.

    2014-05-07

    The current electric grid is an inefficient system that wastes significant amounts of the electricity it produces because there is a disconnect between the amount of energy consumers require and the amount of energy produced from generation sources. Power plants typically produce more power than necessary to ensure adequate power quality. By taking advantage of energy storage within the grid, many of these inefficiencies can be removed. Advanced modeling is required when using battery energy storage systems (BESS) for grid storage in order to accurately monitor and control the storage system. Battery management systems (BMS) control how the storage system will be used and a BMS that utilizes advanced physics-based models will offer for much more robust operation of the storage system. The paper outlines the current state of the art for modeling in BMS and the advanced models required to fully utilize BMS for both lithium-ion batteries and vanadium redox-flow batteries. In addition, system architecture and how it can be useful in monitoring and control is discussed. A pathway for advancing BMS to better utilize BESS for grid-scale applications is outlined.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles: synthesis, functionalization, and applications in bioimaging and magnetic energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Natalie A.; Peng, Sheng; Cheng, Kai; Sun, Shouheng

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review summarizes the recent advances in the chemical synthesis and potential applications of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles. After a brief introduction to nanomagnetism, the review focuses on recent developments in solution phase syntheses of monodisperse MFe2O4, Co, Fe, CoFe, FePt and SmCo5 nanoparticles. The review further outlines the surface, structural, and magnetic properties of these nanoparticles for biomedicine and magnetic energy storage applications. PMID:19690734

  17. Super-capacitor and Thin Film Battery Hybrid Energy Storage for Energy Harvesting Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wensi; Wang, Ningning; Vinco, Alessandro; Siddique, Rashid; Hayes, Mike; O'Flynn, Brendan; O'Mathuna, Cian

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the design of hybrid energy storage unit (HESU) for energy harvesting applications using super-capacitor and thin film battery (TFB). The power management circuits of this hybrid energy storage unit are proposed to perform "smart" charge/discharge control in order to optimize the HESU from the perspectives of energy loss due to leakage current and equivalent series resistance (ESR). This paper shows the characterizations of ESUs for energy harvesting powered wireless sensor networks (WSN) applications. A new design of power management circuits is proposed in order to utilize the low ESR characteristics of super-capacitor and the low leakage current characteristics of the TFB in the hybrid energy storage. The average power loss due to leakage current is measured at 38μW in the proposed system. When Compared to the super-capacitor energy storage with the similar capacity, the proposed hybrid energy storage unit reduces the leakage power by approximately 45% whilst maintains a similar (<100 mΩ) ESR.

  18. Investigation of modified graphene for energy storage applications.

    PubMed

    Shuvo, Mohammad Arif Ishtiaque; Khan, Md Ashiqur Rahaman; Karim, Hasanul; Morton, Philip; Wilson, Travis; Lin, Yirong

    2013-08-28

    Lithium-ion batteries (LIB) have been receiving extensive attention because of the high specific energy density for wide applications such as electronic vehicles, commercial mobile electronics, and military applications. In LIB, graphite is the most commonly used anode material; however, lithium-ion intercalation in graphite is limited, hindering the battery charge rate and capacity. To overcome this obstacle, nanostructured anode assembly has been extensively studied to increase the lithium-ion diffusion rate. Among these approaches, high specific surface area metal oxide nanowires connecting nanostructured carbon materials accumulation have shown propitious results for enhanced lithium intercalation. Recently, nanowire/graphene hybrids were developed for the enhancement of LIB performance; however, almost all previous efforts employed nanowires on graphene in a random fashion, which limited lithium-ion diffusion rate. Therefore, we demonstrate a new approach by hydrothermally growing uniform nanowires on graphene aerogel to further improve the performance. This nanowire/graphene aerogel hybrid not only uses the high surface area of the graphene aerogel but also increases the specific surface area for electrode-electrolyte interaction. Therefore, this new nanowire/graphene aerogel hybrid anode material could enhance the specific capacity and charge-discharge rate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) are used for materials characterization. Battery analyzer and potentio-galvanostat are used for measuring the electrical performance of the battery. The testing results show that nanowire graphene hybrid anode gives significantly improved performance compared to graphene anode. PMID:23806171

  19. 76 FR 10578 - Cuffs Run Pumped Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Cuffs Run Pumped Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application... 18, 2010, Cuffs Run Pumped Storage, LLC filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of the Cuffs Run Pumped...

  20. 76 FR 8729 - Bison Peak Pumped Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Bison Peak Pumped Storage, LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2010, the Bison Peak Pumped Storage, LLC., filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act (FPA), proposing to study the feasibility of the Bison Peak...

  1. 76 FR 62399 - Bison Peak Pumped Storage, LLC.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Bison Peak Pumped Storage, LLC.; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application..., 2011, the Bison Peak Pumped Storage, LLC., filed an application for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act (FPA), proposing to study the feasibility of the Bison Peak...

  2. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of Purex solvent

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

    1984-05-21

    A process has been developed for the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from acidic waste solutions, and for the separation of these values from fission product and other values, which utilizes a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N, N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides, in combination with a phase modifier to form an extraction solution. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

  3. Partitioning of actinides from high level waste of PUREX origin using octylphenyl-N,N{prime}-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO)-based supported liquid membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanujam, A.; Dhami, P.S.; Gopalakrishnan, V.; Dudwadkar, N.L.; Chitnis, R.R.; Mathur, J.N.

    1999-06-01

    The present studies deal with the application of the supported liquid membrane (SLM) technique for partitioning of actinides from high level waste of PUREX origin. The process uses a solution of octylphenyl-N,N{prime}-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) in n-dodecane as a carrier with a polytetrafluoroethylene support and a mixture of citric acid, formic acid, and hydrazine hydrate as the receiving phase. The studies involve the investigation of such parameters as carrier concentration in SLM, acidity of the feed, and the feed composition. The studies indicated good transport of actinides like neptunium, americium, and plutonium across the membrane from nitric acid medium. A high concentration of uranium in the feed retards the transport of americium, suggesting the need for prior removal of uranium from the waste. The separation of actinides from uranium-lean simulated samples as well as actual high level waste has been found to be feasible using the above technique.

  4. ACCELERATORS: Preliminary application of turn-by-turn data analysis to the SSRF storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian-Hui; Zhao, Zhen-Tang

    2009-07-01

    There is growing interest in utilizing the beam position monitor turn-by-turn (TBT) data to debug accelerators. TBT data can be used to determine the linear optics, coupled optics and nonlinear behaviors of the storage ring lattice. This is not only a useful complement to other methods of determining the linear optics such as LOCO, but also provides a possibility to uncover more hidden phenomena. In this paper, a preliminary application of a β function measurement to the SSRF storage ring is presented.

  5. Solid-state structures and properties of scandium hydride; hydrogen storage and switchable mirrors application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodja, Khadidja; Bouhadda, Youcef; Seddik, Larbi; Benyelloul, Kamel

    2016-05-01

    First-principles calculation has been performed on the rare earth hydride ScH2 for hydrogen storage and switchable mirror applications, using the pseudo-potentials and plane waves based on the density-functional theory (DFT). The electronic and structural properties are studied within both local-density and generalized gradient approximations for exchange energy. The formation energy and the optical properties have been investigated and discussed. Our calculated results are generally in good agreement with theoretical and experimental data. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  6. Densities of some molten fluoride salt mixtures suitable for heat storage in space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Liquid densities were determined for a number of fluoride salt mixtures suitable for heat storage in space power applications, using a procedure that consisted of measuring the loss of weight of an inert bob in the melt. The density apparatus was calibrated with pure LiF and NaF at different temperatures. Density data for safe binary and ternary fluoride salt eutectics and congruently melting intermediate compounds are presented. In addition, a comparison was made between the volumetric heat storage capacity of different salt mixtures.

  7. CANE FIBERBOARD DEGRADATION WITHIN THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE DURING LONG-TERM STORAGE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.; Dunn, K.; Hackney, B.

    2013-06-19

    The 9975 shipping package is used as part of the configuration for long-term storage of special nuclear materials in the K Area Complex at the Savannah River Site. The cane fiberboard overpack in the 9975 package provides thermal insulation, impact absorption and criticality control functions relevant to this application. The Savannah River National Laboratory has conducted physical, mechanical and thermal tests on aged fiberboard samples to identify degradation rates and support the development of aging models and service life predictions in a storage environment. This paper reviews the data generated to date, and preliminary models describing degradation rates of cane fiberboard in elevated temperature – elevated humidity environments.

  8. Organotin polymeric dielectrics for energy-storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Huan; Kumar, Arun; Wang, Chenchen; Baldwin, Aaron; Ma, Rui; Sotzing, Gregory; Ramprasad, Rampi

    2014-03-01

    We present a first-principles study on a family of organotin polymers which are based on -COO-Sn(CH3)2-OCC-(CH2)n as the repeating unit (here n = 0 - 10). Among several members of this family which were recently synthesized, poly(dimethyltin glutarate) (corresponding to n = 3), is a promising candidate for high energy-density materials.[1] Given that the composition of each polymer is provided, we use the minima-hopping method to predict their stable structures. While the structural motifs predicted for these polymers are observed in several related existing polymers, other calculated physical properties, e.g., band gap Eg and dielectric constant ɛ, agree well with the experimental data obtained for the synthesized members. Comparing to polypropylene, the standard material for high energy-density applications, these polymers have smaller calculated Eg but significantly higher calculated ɛ. Overall, this whole family of organotin polymers are all promising for the purpose of capacitively storing energy. Our work is supported by the Office of Naval Research through the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI).

  9. Analysis of H2 storage needs for early market non-motive fuel cell applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Moreno, Marcina; Arienti, Marco; Pratt, Joseph William; Shaw, Leo; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-03-01

    Hydrogen fuel cells can potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the United States dependence on foreign oil, but issues with hydrogen storage are impeding their widespread use. To help overcome these challenges, this study analyzes opportunities for their near-term deployment in five categories of non-motive equipment: portable power, construction equipment, airport ground support equipment, telecom backup power, and man-portable power and personal electronics. To this end, researchers engaged end users, equipment manufacturers, and technical experts via workshops, interviews, and electronic means, and then compiled these data into meaningful and realistic requirements for hydrogen storage in specific target applications. In addition to developing these requirements, end-user benefits (e.g., low noise and emissions, high efficiency, potentially lower maintenance costs) and concerns (e.g., capital cost, hydrogen availability) of hydrogen fuel cells in these applications were identified. Market data show potential deployments vary with application from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of units.

  10. Hydrogen Research for Spaceport and Space-Based Applications: Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Transport. Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Tim; Balaban, Canan

    2008-01-01

    The activities presented are a broad based approach to advancing key hydrogen related technologies in areas such as fuel cells, hydrogen production, and distributed sensors for hydrogen-leak detection, laser instrumentation for hydrogen-leak detection, and cryogenic transport and storage. Presented are the results from research projects, education and outreach activities, system and trade studies. The work will aid in advancing the state-of-the-art for several critical technologies related to the implementation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Activities conducted are relevant to a number of propulsion and power systems for terrestrial, aeronautics and aerospace applications. Hydrogen storage and in-space hydrogen transport research focused on developing and verifying design concepts for efficient, safe, lightweight liquid hydrogen cryogenic storage systems. Research into hydrogen production had a specific goal of further advancing proton conducting membrane technology in the laboratory at a larger scale. System and process trade studies evaluated the proton conducting membrane technology, specifically, scale-up issues.

  11. Applications for activated carbons from waste tires: Natural gas storage and air pollution control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brady, T.A.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Natural gas storage for natural gas vehicles and the separation and removal of gaseous contaminants from gas streams represent two emerging applications for carbon adsorbents. A possible precursor for such adsorbents is waste tires. In this study, activated carbon has been developed from waste tires and tested for its methane storage capacity and SO2 removal from a simulated flue-gas. Tire-derived carbons exhibit methane adsorption capacities (g/g) within 10% of a relatively expensive commercial activated carbon; however, their methane storage capacities (Vm/Vs) are almost 60% lower. The unactivated tire char exhibits SO2 adsorption kinetics similar to a commercial carbon used for flue-gas clean-up. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  12. High capacity hydrogen storage materials: attributes for automotive applications and techniques for materials discovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Sudik, Andrea; Wolverton, Christopher; Siegel, Donald J

    2010-02-01

    Widespread adoption of hydrogen as a vehicular fuel depends critically upon the ability to store hydrogen on-board at high volumetric and gravimetric densities, as well as on the ability to extract/insert it at sufficiently rapid rates. As current storage methods based on physical means--high-pressure gas or (cryogenic) liquefaction--are unlikely to satisfy targets for performance and cost, a global research effort focusing on the development of chemical means for storing hydrogen in condensed phases has recently emerged. At present, no known material exhibits a combination of properties that would enable high-volume automotive applications. Thus new materials with improved performance, or new approaches to the synthesis and/or processing of existing materials, are highly desirable. In this critical review we provide a practical introduction to the field of hydrogen storage materials research, with an emphasis on (i) the properties necessary for a viable storage material, (ii) the computational and experimental techniques commonly employed in determining these attributes, and (iii) the classes of materials being pursued as candidate storage compounds. Starting from the general requirements of a fuel cell vehicle, we summarize how these requirements translate into desired characteristics for the hydrogen storage material. Key amongst these are: (a) high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen density, (b) thermodynamics that allow for reversible hydrogen uptake/release under near-ambient conditions, and (c) fast reaction kinetics. To further illustrate these attributes, the four major classes of candidate storage materials--conventional metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, complex hydrides, and sorbent systems--are introduced and their respective performance and prospects for improvement in each of these areas is discussed. Finally, we review the most valuable experimental and computational techniques for determining these attributes, highlighting how an approach that

  13. A study of the applicability/compatibility of inertial energy storage systems to future space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weldon, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    The applicability/compatibility of inertial energy storage systems like the homopolar generator (HPG) and the compensated pulsed alternator (CPA) to future space missions is explored. Areas of CPA and HPG design requiring development for space applications are identified. The manner in which acceptance parameters of the CPA and HPG scale with operating parameters of the machines are explored and the types of electrical loads which are compatible with the CPA and HPG are examined. Potential applications including the magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster, pulsed data transmission, laser ranging, welding and electromagnetic space launch are discussed.

  14. Development and validation of a slurry model for chemical hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Pires, Richard P.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) is developing models for hydrogen storage systems for fuel cell-based light duty vehicle applications for a variety of promising materials. These transient models simulate the performance of the storage system for comparison to the DOE's Technical Targets and a set of four drive cycles. PNNL developed models to simulate the performance and suitability of slurry-based chemical hydrogen storage materials. The storage systems of both a representative exothermic system based on ammonia borane and an endothermic system based on alane were developed and modeled in Simulink®. Once complete, the reactor and radiator components of the model were validated with experimental data. The system design parameters were adjusted to allow the model to successfully meet a highway cycle, an aggressive cycle, a cold-start cycle, and a hot drive cycle. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was performed to identify the range of material properties where these DOE targets and drive cycles could be met. Materials with a heat of reaction >11 kJ mol-1 H2 generated and a slurry hydrogen capacity of >11.4% will meet the on-board efficiency and gravimetric capacity targets, respectively.

  15. dCache with tape storage for High Energy Physics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, A.; Enge, R.; Fransham, K.; Kolb, E.; Leavett-Brown, C.; Leske, D.; Lewall, K.; Reitsma, H.; Rempel, E.; Sobie, R.

    2010-04-01

    An interface between dCache and the local Tivoli Storage Manager (TSM) tape storage facility has been developed at the University of Victoria (UVic) for High Energy Physics (HEP) applications. The interface is responsible for transferring the data from disk pools to tape and retrieving data from tape to disk pools. It also checks the consistency between the PNFS filename space and the TSM database. The dCache system, consisting of a single admin node with two pool nodes, is configured to have two read pools and one write pool. The pools are attached to the TSM storage that has a capacity of about 100TB. This system is being used in production at UVic as part of a Tier A site for BaBar Tau analysis. An independent dCache system is also in production for the storage element (SE) of the ATLAS experiment as a part of Canadian Tier-2 sites. This system does not currently employ a tape storage facility, however, it can be added in the future.

  16. Small Form Factor Information Storage Devices for Mobile Applications in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Pil; Park, No-Cheol; Kim, Chul-Jin

    Recently, the ubiquitous environment in which anybody can reach a lot of information data without any limitations on the place and time has become an important social issue. There are two basic requirements in the field of information storage devices which have to be satisfied; the first is the demand for the improvement of memory capacity to manage the increased data capacity in personal and official purposes. The second is the demand for new development of information storage devices small enough to be applied to mobile multimedia digital electronics, including digital camera, PDA and mobile phones. To summarize, for the sake of mobile applications, it is necessary to develop information storage devices which have simultaneously a large capacity and a small size. Korea possesses the necessary infrastructure for developing such small sized information storage devices. It has a good digital market, major digital companies, and various research institutes. Nowadays, many companies and research institutes including university cooperate together in the research on small sized information storage devices. Thus, it is expected that small form factor optical disk drives will be commercialized in the very near future in Korea.

  17. Dynamic modeling of hybrid energy storage systems coupled to photovoltaic generation in residential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclay, James D.; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    A model of a photovoltaic (PV) powered residence in stand-alone configuration was developed and evaluated. The model assesses the sizing, capital costs, control strategies, and efficiencies of reversible fuel cells (RFC), batteries, and ultra-capacitors (UC) both individually, and in combination, as hybrid energy storage devices. The choice of control strategy for a hybrid energy storage system is found to have a significant impact on system efficiency, hydrogen production and component utilization. A hybrid energy storage system comprised of batteries and RFC has the advantage of reduced cost (compared to using a RFC as the sole energy storage device), high system efficiency and hydrogen energy production capacity. A control strategy that preferentially used the RFC before the battery in meeting load demand allows both grid independent operation and better RFC utilization compared to a system that preferentially used the battery before the RFC. Ultra-capacitors coupled with a RFC in a hybrid energy storage system contain insufficient energy density to meet dynamic power demands typical of residential applications.

  18. Development and Validation of a Slurry Model for Chemical Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Pires, Richard P.; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2014-07-25

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) is developing models for hydrogen storage systems for fuel cell-based light duty vehicle applications for a variety of promising materials. These transient models simulate the performance of the storage system for comparison to the DOE’s Technical Targets and a set of four drive cycles. The purpose of this research is to describe the models developed for slurry-based chemical hydrogen storage materials. The storage systems of both a representative exothermic system based on ammonia borane and endothermic system based on alane were developed and modeled in Simulink®. Once complete the reactor and radiator components of the model were validated with experimental data. The model was then run using a highway cycle, an aggressive cycle, cold-start cycle and hot drive cycle. The system design was adjusted to meet these drive cycles. A sensitivity analysis was then performed to identify the range of material properties where these DOE targets and drive cycles could be met. Materials with a heat of reaction greater than 11 kJ/mol H2 generated and a slurry hydrogen capacity of greater than 11.4% will meet the on-board efficiency and gravimetric capacity targets, respectively.

  19. Innovative applications of energy storage in a restructured electricity marketplace : Phase III final report : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect

    Eyer, James M.; Erdman, Bill; Iannucci, Joseph J., Jr.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes Phase III of a project entitled Innovative Applications of Energy Storage in a Restructured Electricity Marketplace. For this study, the authors assumed that it is feasible to operate an energy storage plant simultaneously for two primary applications: (1) energy arbitrage, i.e., buy-low-sell-high, and (2) to reduce peak loads in utility ''hot spots'' such that the utility can defer their need to upgrade transmission and distribution (T&D) equipment. The benefits from the arbitrage plus T&D deferral applications were estimated for five cases based on the specific requirements of two large utilities operating in the Eastern U.S. A number of parameters were estimated for the storage plant ratings required to serve the combined application: power output (capacity) and energy discharge duration (energy storage). In addition to estimating the various financial expenditures and the value of electricity that could be realized in the marketplace, technical characteristics required for grid-connected distributed energy storage used for capacity deferral were also explored.

  20. The Design and Application of Data Storage System in Miyun Satellite Ground Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiping; Su, Yan; Zhang, Hongbo; Liu, Bin; Yao, Meijuan; Zhao, Shu

    2015-04-01

    China has launched Chang'E-3 satellite in 2013, firstly achieved soft landing on moon for China's lunar probe. Miyun satellite ground station firstly used SAN storage network system based-on Stornext sharing software in Chang'E-3 mission. System performance fully meets the application requirements of Miyun ground station data storage.The Stornext file system is a sharing file system with high performance, supports multiple servers to access the file system using different operating system at the same time, and supports access to data on a variety of topologies, such as SAN and LAN. Stornext focused on data protection and big data management. It is announced that Quantum province has sold more than 70,000 licenses of Stornext file system worldwide, and its customer base is growing, which marks its leading position in the big data management.The responsibilities of Miyun satellite ground station are the reception of Chang'E-3 satellite downlink data and management of local data storage. The station mainly completes exploration mission management, receiving and management of observation data, and provides a comprehensive, centralized monitoring and control functions on data receiving equipment. The ground station applied SAN storage network system based on Stornext shared software for receiving and managing data reliable.The computer system in Miyun ground station is composed by business running servers, application workstations and other storage equipments. So storage systems need a shared file system which supports heterogeneous multi-operating system. In practical applications, 10 nodes simultaneously write data to the file system through 16 channels, and the maximum data transfer rate of each channel is up to 15MB/s. Thus the network throughput of file system is not less than 240MB/s. At the same time, the maximum capacity of each data file is up to 810GB. The storage system planned requires that 10 nodes simultaneously write data to the file system through 16

  1. Studies in support of an SNM cutoff agreement: The PUREX exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Stanbro, W.D.; Libby, R.; Segal, J.

    1995-07-01

    On September 23, 1993, President Clinton, in a speech before the United Nations General Assembly, called for an international agreement banning the production of plutonium and highly enriched uranium for nuclear explosive purposes. A major element of any verification regime for such an agreement would probably involve inspections of reprocessing plants in Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty weapons states. Many of these are large facilities built in the 1950s with no thought that they would be subject to international inspection. To learn about some of the problems that might be involved in the inspection of such large, old facilities, the Department of Energy, Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation, sponsored a mock inspection exercise at the PUREX plant on the Hanford Site. This exercise examined a series of alternatives for inspections of the PUREX as a model for this type of facility at other locations. A series of conclusions were developed that can be used to guide the development of verification regimes for a cutoff agreement at reprocessing facilities.

  2. Pressure Relief Devices for High-Pressure Gaseous Storage Systems: Applicability to Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kostival, A.; Rivkin, C.; Buttner, W.; Burgess, R.

    2013-11-01

    Pressure relief devices (PRDs) are viewed as essential safety measures for high-pressure gas storage and distribution systems. These devices are used to prevent the over-pressurization of gas storage vessels and distribution equipment, except in the application of certain toxic gases. PRDs play a critical role in the implementation of most high-pressure gas storage systems and anyone working with these devices should understand their function so they can be designed, installed, and maintained properly to prevent any potentially dangerous or fatal incidents. As such, the intention of this report is to introduce the reader to the function of the common types of PRDs currently used in industry. Since high-pressure hydrogen gas storage systems are being developed to support the growing hydrogen energy infrastructure, several recent failure incidents, specifically involving hydrogen, will be examined to demonstrate the results and possible mechanisms of a device failure. The applicable codes and standards, developed to minimize the risk of failure for PRDs, will also be reviewed. Finally, because PRDs are a critical component for the development of a successful hydrogen energy infrastructure, important considerations for pressure relief devices applied in a hydrogen gas environment will be explored.

  3. Harmonics suppression in electromagnets with application to the ALS storage ring corrector magnet design

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.D.

    1991-01-28

    This memo presents an analytical development for prediction of skew harmonics in a iron core C-magnet to due arbitrarily positioned electromagnet coils. A structured approach is presented for the suppression of an arbitrary number of harmonic components to arbitrarily low values. Application of the analytical harmonic strength calculations coupled to the structured harmonic suppression approach is presented in the context of the design of the ALS storage ring corrector magnets.

  4. Technical Assessment of Organic Liquid Carrier Hydrogen Storage Systems for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Hua, T. Q.; Peng, J. -K; Kromer, M.; Lasher, S.; McKenney, K.; Law, K.; Sinha, J.

    2011-06-21

    In 2007-2009, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted a technical assessment of organic liquid carrier based hydrogen storage systems for automotive applications, consistent with the Program’s Multiyear Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. This joint performance (ANL) and cost analysis (TIAX) report summarizes the results of this assessment. These results should be considered only in conjunction with the assumptions used in selecting, evaluating, and costing the systems discussed here and in the Appendices.

  5. 242-A Evaporator/plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) effluent treatment facility (ETF) nonradioactive air emission test report

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-10

    This report shows the methods used to test the stack gas outlet concentration and emission rate of Volatile Organic Compounds as Total Non-Methane Hydrocarbons in parts per million by volume,grams per dry standard cubic meter, and grams per minute from the PUREX ETF stream number G6 on the Hanford Site. Test results are shown in Appendix B.1.

  6. Super-capacitor energy storage for micro-satellites: Feasibility and potential mission applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Tatsuo; Underwood, Craig

    2013-04-01

    Small satellites, weighting between 100 and 200 kg, have witnessed increasing use for a variety of space applications including remote sensing constellations and technology demonstrations. The energy storage/stored power demands of most spacecraft, including small satellites, are currently accommodated by rechargeable batteries—typically nickel-cadmium cells (specific energy of 50 Wh kg-1), or more recently lithium-ion cells (150 Wh kg-1). High energy density is a primary concern for spacecraft energy storage design, and these batteries have been sufficient for most applications. However, constraints on the allowable on-board battery size have limited peak power performance such that the maximum power supply capability of small satellites currently ranges between only 70 and 200 W. This relatively low maximum power limits the capabilities of small satellites in terms of payload design and selection. In order to enhance these satellites' power performance, the research reported in this paper focused on the implementation of super-capacitors as practical rechargeable energy storage medium, and as an alternative to chemical batteries. Compared to batteries, some super-capacitors are able to supply high power at high energy-efficiency, but unfortunately they still have a very low energy density (5-30 Wh kg-1). However, the provision of this high power capability would considerably widen the range of small satellite applications.

  7. 10 CFR 72.103 - Geological and seismological characteristics for applications for dry cask modes of storage on or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Geological and seismological characteristics for applications for dry cask modes of storage on or after October 16, 2003. 72.103 Section 72.103 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND...

  8. 10 CFR 72.103 - Geological and seismological characteristics for applications for dry cask modes of storage on or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Geological and seismological characteristics for applications for dry cask modes of storage on or after October 16, 2003. 72.103 Section 72.103 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND...

  9. 10 CFR 72.103 - Geological and seismological characteristics for applications for dry cask modes of storage on or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Geological and seismological characteristics for applications for dry cask modes of storage on or after October 16, 2003. 72.103 Section 72.103 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND...

  10. Status and Challenges in Electrochemical Energy Storage Technologies for Stationary Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo

    2010-08-06

    There are a number of EES technologies that exist and are potential candidates for the stationary applications. Among the most promising ones are batteries that store electrical energy via electrochemical conversion and release it according to demands. But all the exiting battery technologies are facing challenges in cost and performance for the particular applications. To advance the technology and accelerate market penetration requires substantial progress in advanced materials and chemistries, along with design and engineering. Given this is a relative new field to the materials community, this issue JOM includes a topic on the stationary electrical energy storage, with focus on the needs, requirements and status and challenges in technologies.

  11. Systems Modeling of Chemical Hydride Hydrogen Storage Materials for Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

    2011-10-05

    A fixed bed reactor was designed, modeled and simulated for hydrogen storage on-board the vehicle for PEM fuel cell applications. Ammonia Borane (AB) was selected by DOE's Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) as the initial chemical hydride of study because of its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to {approx}16% by weight for the release of {approx}2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions. The design evaluated consisted of a tank with 8 thermally isolated sections in which H2 flows freely between sections to provide ballast. Heating elements are used to initiate reactions in each section when pressure drops below a specified level in the tank. Reactor models in Excel and COMSOL were developed to demonstrate the proof-of-concept, which was then used to develop systems models in Matlab/Simulink. Experiments and drive cycle simulations showed that the storage system meets thirteen 2010 DOE targets in entirety and the remaining four at greater than 60% of the target.

  12. Synthesis and Engineering Materials Properties of Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Young Joon; Westman, Matthew P.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Chun, Jaehun; Ronnebro, Ewa

    2015-09-01

    Among candidates for chemical hydrogen storage in PEM fuel cell automotive applications, ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) is considered to be one of the most promising materials due to its high practical hydrogen content of 14-16 wt%. This material is selected as a surrogate chemical for a hydrogen storage system. For easier transition to the existing infrastructure, a fluid phase hydrogen storage material is very attractive and thus, we investigated the engineering materials properties of AB in liquid carriers for a chemical hydrogen storage slurry system. Slurries composed of AB and high temperature liquids were prepared by mechanical milling and sonication in order to obtain stable and fluidic properties. Volumetric gas burette system was adopted to observe the kinetics of the H2 release reactions of the AB slurry and neat AB. Viscometry and microscopy were employed to further characterize slurries engineering properties. Using a tip-sonication method we have produced AB/silicone fluid slurries at solid loadings up to 40wt% (6.5wt% H2) with viscosities less than 500cP at 25°C.

  13. Theoretical investigation of the borazine-melamine polymer as a novel candidate for hydrogen storage applications.

    PubMed

    Dabbagh, Hossein A; Shahraki, Maryam; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2014-06-14

    Ab initio calculations and molecular dynamic simulation were employed to study the interaction of molecular hydrogen with the borazine-melamine polymer (BMP) in order to explore its potential for hydrogen storage applications. The calculations were performed using the long range corrected version of density functional theory, the Coulomb-attenuating method (CAM-B3LYP) and the second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). The results showed that the average adsorption energy per hydrogen is about -0.7 and -0.3 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2/6-311+G(d,p) and CAMB3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) levels of theory, respectively. The adsorption energies were corrected for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) by the counterpoise method. It was found that the hydrogen storage capacity of the BMP is about 6.49 wt%, which is close to the values reported for the other selected materials for the hydrogen storage in the literature. The maximum number of hydrogen molecules, which were adsorbed by the BMP building block, is about ten. Molecular dynamic simulation was performed to assess the potential of BMP for hydrogen storage. PMID:24736673

  14. Application of new and novel fracture stimulation technologies to enhance the deliverability of gas storage wells

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    Based on the information presented in this report, our conclusions regarding the potential for new and novel fracture stimulation technologies to enhance the deliverability of gas storage wells are as follows: New and improved gas storage well revitalization methods have the potential to save industry on the order of $20-25 million per year by mitigating deliverability decline and reducing the need for costly infill wells Fracturing technologies have the potential to fill this role, however operators have historically been reluctant to utilize this approach due to concerns with reservoir seal integrity. With advanced treatment design tools and methods, however, this risk can be minimized. Of the three major fracturing classifications, namely hydraulic, pulse and explosive, two are believed to hold potential to gas storage applications (hydraulic and pulse). Five particular fracturing technologies, namely tip-screenout fracturing, fracturing with liquid carbon dioxide, and fracturing with gaseous nitrogen, which are each hydraulic methods, and propellant and nitrogen pulse fracturing, which are both pulse methods, are believed to hold potential for gas storage applications and will possibly be tested as part of this project. Field evidence suggests that, while traditional well remediation methods such as blowing/washing, mechanical cleaning, etc. do improve well deliverability, wells are still left damaged afterwards, suggesting that considerable room for further deliverability enhancement exists. Limited recent trials of hydraulic fracturing imply that this approach does in fact provide superior deliverability results, but further RD&D work is needed to fully evaluate and demonstrate the benefits and safe application of this as well as other fracture stimulation technologies.

  15. DNA hybrid dielectric film devices for energy storage and bioelectronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Donna M.; Venkat, Narayanan; Ouchen, Fahima; Singh, Kristi M.; Smith, Steven R.; Grote, James G.

    2013-10-01

    DNA biopolymer hybrids have been investigated for energy storage applications and also as potential high k gate dielectrics in bioelectronics applications such as BioFETs. DNA-based hybrid films incorporating sol-gel-derived ceramics have shown strong promise as insulating dielectrics for high voltage capacitor applications. Our studies of DNA-CTMA complex/sol-gel hybrid thin film devices have demonstrated reproducibility and stability in temperature-and frequency-dependent dielectric properties as well as reliability in DC voltage breakdown measurements, attaining values consistently in the 300 - 350 V/um range. We have also investigated DNA-inorganic hybrids by ex situ blending of aqueous solutions of DNA with high k ceramics such as BaTiO3 and TiO2. These systems are currently being investigated as potential gate dielectrics for BioFETs by virtue of their relatively high dielectric constant, high DC electrical resistivity, and lower leakage currents than pristine DNA. Functionally layered devices have also been designed, fabricated and characterized to determine any added benefit in dielectric applications. The electrical/dielectric characteristics of DNA and DNA-CTMA with sol-gel-derived ceramics, high k ceramic fillers, and in layered devices were examined to determine their effect on vital dielectric parameters for energy storage and bioelectronics applications.

  16. Proceedings of the NSSDC Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, Kim; Blasso, Len (Editor); Lipscomb, Ann (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The proceedings of the National Space Science Data Center Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies for Space and Earth Science Applications held July 23 through 25, 1991 at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center are presented. The program includes a keynote address, invited technical papers, and selected technical presentations to provide a broad forum for the discussion of a number of important issues in the field of mass storage systems. Topics include magnetic disk and tape technologies, optical disk and tape, software storage and file management systems, and experiences with the use of a large, distributed storage system. The technical presentations describe integrated mass storage systems that are expected to be available commercially. Also included is a series of presentations from Federal Government organizations and research institutions covering their mass storage requirements for the 1990's.

  17. Applications of differential algebra to single-particle dynamics in storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.

    1991-09-01

    Recent developments in the use of differential algebra to study single-particle beam dynamics in charged-particle storage rings are the subject of this paper. Chapter 2 gives a brief review of storage rings. The concepts of betatron motion and synchrotron motion, and their associated resonances, are introduced. Also introduced are the concepts of imperfections, such as off-momentum, misalignment, and random and systematic errors, and their associated corrections. The chapter concludes with a discussion of numerical simulation principles and the concept of one-turn periodic maps. In Chapter 3, the discussion becomes more focused with the introduction of differential algebras. The most critical test for differential algebraic mapping techniques -- their application to long-term stability studies -- is discussed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 presents a discussion of differential algebraic treatment of dispersed betatron motion. The paper concludes in Chapter 6 with a discussion of parameterization of high-order maps.

  18. Application of modular vault dry storage to Public Service of Colorado-Fort St. Vrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lehr, M. ); Ealing, C.J. ); Agarwal, B.K. )

    1990-05-01

    This paper discusses NRC approval for the first dry vault storage system to be submitted for nonsite specific design approval. It describes the first site specific application of the FW/GEC modular vault dry store (MVDS) for the Public Service of Colorado---Fort St. Vrain site. The decision to permanently shut down the Fort St. Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor provides the need to store on site 1,482 irradiated fuel blocks and a quantity of other reactor core components categorized as greater than Class C wastes. The MVDS system has been selected for the safe storage of these items in a facility designed to receive, store and discharge fuel to the repository totally independent from the original reactor facilities.

  19. Electrodeposited reduced-graphene oxide/cobalt oxide electrodes for charge storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Gómez, A.; Eugénio, S.; Duarte, R. G.; Silva, T. M.; Carmezim, M. J.; Montemor, M. F.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, electrochemically reduced-graphene oxide/cobalt oxide composites for charge storage electrodes were prepared by a one-step pulsed electrodeposition route on stainless steel current collectors and after that submitted to a thermal treatment at 200 °C. A detailed physico-chemical characterization was performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The electrochemical response of the composite electrodes was studied by cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge curves and related to the morphological and phase composition changes induced by the thermal treatment. The results revealed that the composites were promising materials for charge storage electrodes for application in redox supercapacitors, attaining specific capacitances around 430 F g-1 at 1 A g-1 and presenting long-term cycling stability.

  20. Impedance and self-discharge mechanism studies of nickel metal hydride batteries for energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenhua; Zhu, Ying; Tatarchuk, Bruce

    2013-04-01

    Nickel metal hydride battery packs have been found wide applications in the HEVs (hybrid electric vehicles) through the on-board rapid energy conservation and efficient storage to decrease the fossil fuel consumption rate and reduce CO2 emissions as well as other harmful exhaust gases. In comparison to the conventional Ni-Cd battery, the Ni-MH battery exhibits a relatively higher self-discharge rate. In general, there are quite a few factors that speed up the self-discharge of the electrodes in the sealed nickel metal hydride batteries. This disadvantage eventually reduces the overall efficiency of the energy conversion and storage system. In this work, ac impedance data were collected from the nickel metal hydride batteries. The self-discharge mechanism and battery capacity degradation were analyzed and discussed for further performance improvement.

  1. ICPSEF: a user's manual for the computer mathematical model of the ICPP purex solvent extraction system

    SciTech Connect

    Bendixsen, C L

    1982-11-01

    A computer-based mathematical program, ICPSEF, was developed for the first-cycle extraction system at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). At the ICPP, spent nuclear fuels are processed to recover unfissioned uranium. The uranium is recovered from aqueous solutions in a pulse column, solvent extraction system using tributyl phosphate (TBP) solvent (purex process). A previously developed SEPHIS-MOD4 computer program was added to and modified to provide a model for the ICPP system. Major modifications included addition of: (1) partial theoretical stages to permit more accurate modeling of ICPP columns, (2) modeling ammonium hydroxide neutralization of nitric acid in a scrubbing column, and (3) equilibrium data for 5 to 10 vol % TBP. The model was verified by comparison with actual operating data. Detailed instructions for using the ICPSEF model and sample results of the model are included.

  2. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of purex solvent

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Kalina, Dale G.

    1986-01-01

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous solutions with an extraction solution containing an organic extractant having the formula: ##STR1## where .phi. is phenyl, R.sup.1 is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R.sup.2 is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms and phase modifiers in a water-immiscible hydrocarbon diluent. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions.

  3. Health0hazard evaluation report HETA 84-132-1703, Purex Industrial Division, Marion, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, R.L.; Aw, T.C.

    1986-06-01

    Due to reports of employee symptoms of headaches, irritation of the nose, throat and respiratory tract, and muscular weakness, possible chemical exposures during the manufacturing and packaging of various institutional and janitorial maintenance chemicals and allied products at the Purex Industrial Division Facility, Ohio were evaluated. Long-term personal breathing zone air samples revealed: acetone, 104 milligrams/cubic meter (mg/m/sup 3/) to 939 mg/m/sup 3/; ammonia, not detectable to 68.8 mg/m/sup 3/; ethanolamine, 1.5 mg/m/sup 3/; methylene-chloride, 171 to 561 mg/m/sup 3/; sodium-hydroxide, 0.4 to 1.3 mg/m/sup 3/; and styrene, 6.0 to 66.9 mg/m/sup 3/. No detectable airborne concentrations of butyl cellosolve formaldehyde, or morpholine were found. The author concludes that during the survey, employees were overexposed to ammonia and methylene-chloride.

  4. Controllability of plutonium concentration for FBR fuel at a solvent extraction process in the PUREX process

    SciTech Connect

    Enokida, Youichi; Kitano, Motoki; Sawada, Kayo

    2013-07-01

    Typical Purex solvent extraction systems for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel have a feed material containing dilute, 1% in weight, plutonium, along with uranium and fission products. Current reprocessing proposals call for no separation of the pure plutonium. The work described in this paper studied, by computer simulation, the fundamental feasibility of preparing a 20% concentrated plutonium product solution from the 1% feed by adjusting only the feed rates and acid concentrations of the incoming streams and without the addition of redox reagents for the plutonium. A set of process design flowsheets has been developed to realize a concentrated plutonium solution of a 20% stream from the dilute plutonium feed without using redox reagents. (authors)

  5. Recent studies related to head-end fuel processing at the Hanford PUREX plant

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    This report presents the results of studies addressing several problems in the head-end processing (decladding, metathesis, and core dissolution) of N Reactor fuel elements in the Hanford PUREX plant. These studies were conducted over 2 years: FY 1986 and FY 1987. The studies were divided into three major areas: 1) differences in head-end behavior of fuels having different histories, 2) suppression of /sup 106/Ru volatilization when the ammonia scrubber solution resulting from decladding is decontaminated by distillation prior to being discharged, and 3) suitability of flocculating agents for lowering the amount of transuranic (TRU) element-containing solids that accompany the decladding solution to waste. 16 refs., 43 figs.

  6. Method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions by modification of Purex solvent

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

    1986-03-04

    A process is described for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous solutions with an extraction solution containing an organic extractant having the formula as shown in a diagram where [phi] is phenyl, R[sup 1] is a straight or branched alkyl or alkoxyalkyl containing from 6 to 12 carbon atoms and R[sup 2] is an alkyl containing from 3 to 6 carbon atoms and phase modifiers in a water-immiscible hydrocarbon diluent. The addition of the extractant to the Purex process extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate in normal paraffin hydrocarbon diluent, will permit the extraction of multivalent lanthanide and actinide values from 0.1 to 12.0 molar acid solutions. 6 figs.

  7. Synthesis of graphene nanomaterials and their application in electrochemical energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Guoping

    The need to store and use energy on diverse scales in a modern technological society necessitates the design of large and small energy systems, among which electrical energy storage systems such as batteries and capacitors have attracted much interest in the past several decades. Supercapacitors, also known as ultracapacitors, or electrochemical capacitors, with fast power delivery and long cycle life are complementing or even replacing batteries in many applications. The rapid development of miniaturized electronic devices has led to a growing need for rechargeable micro-power sources with high performance. Among different sources, electrochemical micro-capacitors or micro-supercapacitors provide higher power density than their counterparts and are gaining increased interest from the research and engineering communities. Rechargeable Li ion batteries with high energy and power density, long cycling life, high charge-discharge rate (1C - 3C) and safe operation are in high demand as power sources and power backup for hybrid electric vehicles and other applications. In the present work, graphene-based graphene materials have been designed and synthesized for electrochemical energy storage applications, e.g., conventional supercapacitors (macro-supercapacitors), microsupercapacitors and lithium ion batteries. Factors influencing the formation and structure of graphitic petals grown by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on oxidized silicon substrates were investigated through process variation and materials analysis. Insights gained into the growth mechanism of these graphitic petals suggest a simple scribing method can be used to control both the location and formation of petals on flat Si substrates. Transitional metal oxides and conducting polymers have been coated on the graphitic petal-based electrodes by facile chemical methods for multifunctional energy storage applications. Detailed electrochemical characterization (e.g., cyclic voltammetry and

  8. Measurement of achievable plutonium decontamination from gallium by means of PUREX solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E.D.; Campbell, D.O.; Felker, L.K.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the work described herein was to measure, experimentally, the achievable decontamination of plutonium from gallium by means of the PUREX solvent extraction process. Gallium is present in surplus weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) at a concentration of approximately 1 wt%. Plans are to dispose of surplus WG-Pu by converting it to UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. However, the presence of high concentrations of gallium in plutonium is a potential corrosion problem during the process of MOX fuel irradiation. The batch experiments performed in this study were designed to measure the capability of the PUREX solvent extraction process to separate gallium from plutonium under idealized conditions. Radioactive tracing of the gallium with {sup 72}Ga enabled the accurate measurement of low concentrations of extractable gallium. The experiments approximated the proposed flowsheet for WG-Pu purification, except that only one stage was used for each process: extraction, scrubbing, and stripping. With realistic multistage countercurrent systems, much more efficient separations are generally obtained. The gallium decontamination factor (DF) obtained after one extraction stage was about 3 x 10{sup 6}. After one scrub stage, all gallium measurements were less than the detection limit, which corresponded to DFs >5 x 10{sup 6}. All these values exceed a 10{sup 6} DF needed to meet a hypothetical 10-ppb gallium impurity limit in MOX fuel. The results of this study showed no inherent or fundamental problem with regard to removing gallium from plutonium.

  9. Prediction equations for corrosion rates of a A-537 and A-516 steels in Double Shell Slurry, Future PUREX, and Hanford Facilities Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Divine, J.R.; Bowen, W.M.; Mackey, D.B.; Bates, D.J.; Pool, K.H.

    1985-06-01

    Even though the interest in the corrosion of radwaste tanks goes back to the mid-1940's when waste storage was begun, and a fair amount of corrosion work has been done since then, the changes in processes and waste types have outpaced the development of new data pertinent to the new double shell tanks. As a consequence, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) began a development of corrosion data on a broad base of waste compositions in 1980. The objective of the program was to provide operations personnel with corrosion rate data as a function of waste temperature and composition. The work performed in this program examined A-537 tank steel in Double Shell Slurry and Future PUREX Wastes, at temperatures between 40 and 180/sup 0/C as well as in Hanford Facilities Waste at 25 and 50/sup 0/C. In general, the corrosion rates were less than 1 mpy (0.001 in./y) and usually less than 0.5 mpy. Excessive corrosion rates (>1 mpy) were only found in dilute waste compositions or in concentrated caustic compositions at temperatures above 140/sup 0/C. Stress corrosion cracking was only observed under similar conditions. The results are presented as polynomial prediction equations with examples of the output of existing computer codes. The codes are not provided in the text but are available from the authors. 12 refs., 5 figs., 19 tabs.

  10. Borated stainless steel application in spent-fuel storage racks. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.J.; Loomis, G.W.; Deltete, C.P.

    1992-06-01

    EPRI is continuing to investigate the application of borated stainless steel products within the commercial nuclear power industry through participation in code development and material testing. This effort provides documentation of the material properties of interest in design applications utilizing the borated stainless steel products as structural elements as well as serving as neutron absorbers. The properties of most concern in the design of spent fuel storage racks, shipping casks, and other containment type applications are the materials` ductility, tensile strength, corrosion resistance and resistance to degradation due to radiation and temperature. The data presented in this report indicate that practical designs can be achieved utilizing borated stainless steels and that the materials can be cost effectively applied.