Science.gov

Sample records for application results performed

  1. Results of data base management system parameterized performance testing related to GSFC scientific applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carchedi, C. H.; Gough, T. L.; Huston, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a variety of tests designed to demonstrate and evaluate the performance of several commercially available data base management system (DBMS) products compatible with the Digital Equipment Corporation VAX 11/780 computer system are summarized. The tests were performed on the INGRES, ORACLE, and SEED DBMS products employing applications that were similar to scientific applications under development by NASA. The objectives of this testing included determining the strength and weaknesses of the candidate systems, performance trade-offs of various design alternatives and the impact of some installation and environmental (computer related) influences.

  2. Performance testing and analysis results of AMTEC cells for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, C.A.; Barkan, A.; Hendricks, T.J.; Rasmussen, J.; Sievers, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    Testing and analysis has shown that AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Conversion) (Weber, 1974) cells can reach the performance (power) levels required by a variety of space applications. The performance of an AMTEC cell is highly dependent on the thermal environment to which it is subjected. A guard heater assembly has been designed, fabricated, and used to expose individual AMTEC cells to various thermal environments. The design and operation of the guard heater assembly will be discussed. Performance test results of an AMTEC cell operated under guard heated conditions to simulate an adiabatic cell wall thermal environment are presented. Experimental data and analytic model results are compared to illustrate validation of the model. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. RTD fluxgate performance for application in magnetic label-based bioassay: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ando, B; Ascia, A; Baglio, S; Bulsara, A R; Trigona, C; In, V

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic bioassay is becoming of great interest in several application including magnetic separation, drug delivery, hyperthermia treatments, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic labelling. The latter can be used to localize bio-entities (e.g. cancer tissues) by using magnetic markers and high sensitive detectors. To this aim SQUIDs can be adopted, however this result in a quite sophisticated and complex method involving high cost and complex set-up. In this paper, the possibility to adopt RTD fluxgate magnetometers as alternative low cost solution to perform magnetic bio-sensing is investigated. Some experimental results are shown that encourage to pursue this approach in order to obtain simple devices that can detect a certain number of magnetic particles accumulated onto a small surface such to be useful for diagnosis purposes. PMID:17946280

  4. HEP (hydraulic, electronic, pneumatic) pumping unit: performance characteristics, potential applications, and field trial results

    SciTech Connect

    Jesperson, P.J.; Laidlaw, R.N.; Scott, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    THe HEP pumping unit constitutes an alternative to the familiar beam pumping unit as a means of transferring energy from the prime mover to the sucker rod string of a pumping well. This paper addresses some basic concepts which are part of the HEP system design and describes some of the resultant unit performance characteristics. The potential for enhancement of pumping well operations utilizing the high degree of control over rod string motion attainable with the HEP system, is discussed together with the results of a number of field trials and some plans for further unit evaluation and development. A lift capacity comparison with conventional beam pumping units is also included. 8 refs.

  5. Performance results of a 300-degree linear phase modulator for spaceborne communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mysoor, N. R.; Mueller, R. O.

    1993-01-01

    A phase modulator capable of large linear phase deviation, low loss, and wide band operation with good thermal stability was developed for deep space spacecraft transponder (DST) applications at X-band (8.415 GHz) and Ka-band (32 GHz) downlinks. The design uses a two-stage circulator-coupled reflection phase shifter with constant gamma hyperabrupt varactors and an efficient modulator driver circuit to obtain a phase deviation of +/-2.5 rad with better than 8 percent linearity. The measured insertion loss is 6.6 dB +/- 0.35 dB at 8415 MHz. Measured carrier and relative sideband amplitudes resulting from phase modulation by sine wave and square modulating functions agree well with the predicted results.

  6. Compute Server Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockdale, I. E.; Barton, John; Woodrow, Thomas (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Parallel-vector supercomputers have been the workhorses of high performance computing. As expectations of future computing needs have risen faster than projected vector supercomputer performance, much work has been done investigating the feasibility of using Massively Parallel Processor systems as supercomputers. An even more recent development is the availability of high performance workstations which have the potential, when clustered together, to replace parallel-vector systems. We present a systematic comparison of floating point performance and price-performance for various compute server systems. A suite of highly vectorized programs was run on systems including traditional vector systems such as the Cray C90, and RISC workstations such as the IBM RS/6000 590 and the SGI R8000. The C90 system delivers 460 million floating point operations per second (FLOPS), the highest single processor rate of any vendor. However, if the price-performance ration (PPR) is considered to be most important, then the IBM and SGI processors are superior to the C90 processors. Even without code tuning, the IBM and SGI PPR's of 260 and 220 FLOPS per dollar exceed the C90 PPR of 160 FLOPS per dollar when running our highly vectorized suite,

  7. The LBB methodology application results performed on the safety related piping of NPP V-1 in Jaslovske Bohunice

    SciTech Connect

    Kupca, L.; Beno, P.

    1997-04-01

    A broad overview of the leak before break (LBB) application to the Slovakian V-1 nuclear power plant is presented in the paper. LBB was applied to the primary cooling circuit and surge lines of both WWER 440 type units, and also used to assess the integrity of safety related piping in the feed water and main steam systems. Experiments and calculations performed included analyses of stresses, material mechanical properties, corrosion, fatigue damage, stability of heavy component supports, water hammer, and leak rates. A list of analysis results and recommendations are included in the paper.

  8. Performance, Accountability, and Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Peter F.

    1992-01-01

    Although technology might greatly increase school performance, the economics will be hard to manage and explain to a tax-paying public. As in hospitals, technology is an expensive investment that will not replace people. Schooling's true challenge is not handling machinery but creating a multicultural society. To succeed, schools must emphasize…

  9. Effect of the application of an electric field on the performance of a two-phase loop device: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creatini, F.; Di Marco, P.; Filippeschi, S.; Fioriti, D.; Mameli, M.

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade, the continuous development of electronics has pointed out the need for a change in mind with regard to thermal management. In the present scenario, Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs) are novel promising two-phase passive heat transport devices that seem to meet all present and future thermal requirements. Nevertheless, PHPs governing phenomena are quite unique and not completely understood. In particular, single closed loop PHPs manifest several drawbacks, mostly related to the reduction of device thermal performance and reliability, i.e. the occurrence of multiple operational quasi-steady states. The present research work proposes the application of an electric field as a technique to promote the circulation of the working fluid in a preferential direction and stabilize the device operation. The tested single closed loop PHP is made of a copper tube with an inner tube diameter equal to 2.00 mm and filled with pure ethanol (60% filling ratio). The electric field is generated by a couple of wire-shaped electrodes powered with DC voltage up to 20 kV and laid parallel to the longitudinal axis of the glass tube constituting the adiabatic section. Although the electric field intensity in the working fluid region is weakened both by the polarization phenomenon of the working fluid and by the interposition of the glass tube, the experimental results highlight the influence of the electric field on the device thermal performance and encourage the continuation of the research in this direction.

  10. [The applicability of results].

    PubMed

    Marín-León, I

    2015-11-01

    The ultimate aim of the critical reading of medical literature is to use the scientific advances in clinical practice or for innovation. This requires an evaluation of the applicability of the results of the studies that have been published, which begins with a clear understanding of these results. When the studies do not provide sufficient guarantees of rigor in design and analysis, the conditions necessary for the applicability of the results are not met; however, the fact that the results are reliable is not enough to make it worth trying to use their conclusions. This article explains how carrying out studies in experimental or artificial conditions often moves them away from the real conditions in which they claim to apply their conclusions. To evaluate this applicability, the article proposes evaluating a set of items that will enable the reader to determine the likelihood that the benefits and risks reported in the studies will yield the least uncertainty in the clinical arena where they aim to be applied. PMID:26454562

  11. Brush Seals for Cryogenic Applications: Performance, Stage Effects, and Preliminary Wear Results in LN2 and LH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Walker, James F.; Perkins, H. Douglas; Hoopes, Joan F.; Williamson, G. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Brush seals are compliant contacting seals and have significantly lower leakage than labyrinth seals in gas turbine applications. Their long life and low leakage make them candidates for use in rocket engine turbopumps. Brush seals, 50.8 mm (2 in.) in diameter with a nominal 127-micron (0.005-in.) radial interference, were tested in liquid nitrogen (LN2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) at shaft speeds up to 35,000 and 65,000 rpm, respectively, and at pressure drops up to 1.21 MPa (175 psid) per brush. A labyrinth seal was also tested in liquid nitrogen to provide a baseline. The LN2 leakage rate of a single brush seal with an initial radial shaft interference of 127 micron (0.005 in.) measured one-half to one-third the leakage rate of a 12-tooth labyrinth seal with a radial clearance of 127 micron (0.005 in.). Two brushes spaced 7.21 micron (0.248 in.) apart leaked about one-half as much as a single brush, and two brushes tightly packed together leaked about three-fourths as much as a single brush. The maximum measured groove depth on the Inconel 718 rotor with a surface finish of 0.81 micron (32 microinch) was 25 micron (0.0010 in.) after 4.3 hr of shaft rotation in liquid nitrogen. The Haynes-25 bristles wore approximately 25 to 76 micron (0.001 to 0.003 in.) under the same conditions. Wear results in liquid hydrogen were significantly different. In liquid hydrogen the rotor did not wear, but the bristle material transferred onto the rotor and the initial 127 micron (0.005 in.) radial interference was consumed. Relatively high leakage rates were measured in liquid hydrogen. More testing is required to verify the leakage performance, to validate and calibrate analysis techniques, and to determine the wear mechanisms. Performance, staging effects, and preliminary wear results are presented.

  12. Communicating Performance Assessments Results - 13609

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The F-Area Tank Farms (FTF) and H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR), Liquid Waste Operations contractor at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). The FTF and HTF are active radioactive waste storage and treatment facilities consisting of 51 carbon steel waste tanks and ancillary equipment such as transfer lines, evaporators and pump tanks. Performance Assessments (PAs) for each Tank Farm have been prepared to support the eventual closure of the underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. PAs provide the technical bases and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements for final closure of the Tank Farms. The Tank Farms are subject to a number of regulatory requirements. The State regulates Tank Farm operations through an industrial waste water permit and through a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Closure documentation will include State-approved Tank Farm Closure Plans and tank-specific closure modules utilizing information from the PAs. For this reason, the State of South Carolina and the EPA must be involved in the performance assessment review process. The residual material remaining after tank cleaning is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005. PAs are performance-based, risk-informed analyses of the fate and transport of FTF and HTF residual wastes following final closure of the Tank Farms. Since the PAs serve as the primary risk assessment tools in evaluating readiness for closure, it is vital that PA conclusions be communicated effectively. In the course of developing the FTF and HTF PAs, several lessons learned have emerged regarding communicating PA results. When communicating PA results it is

  13. The Applications of Mindfulness with Students of Secondary School: Results on the Academic Performance, Self-concept and Anxiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Clemente; Mañas, Israel; Cangas, Adolfo J.; Gallego, José

    The aim of the present research is to verify the impact of a mindfulness programme on the levels academic performance, self-concept and anxiety, of a group of students in Year 1 at secondary school. The statistical analyses carried out on the variables studied showed significant differences in favour of the experimental group with regard to the control group in all the variables analysed. In the experimental group we can observe a significant increase of academic performance as well as an improvement in all the self-concept dimensions, and a significant decrease in anxiety states and traits. The importance and usefulness of mindfulness techniques in the educative system is discussed.

  14. Performance Application Programming Interface

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2005-10-31

    PAPI is a programming interface designed to provide the tool designer and application engineer with a consistent interface and methodology for use of the performance counter hardware found in most major microprocessors. PAPI enables software engineers to see, in near real time, the relation between software performance and processor events. This release covers the hardware dependent implementation of PAPI version 3 for the IBM BlueGene/L (BG/L) system.

  15. Initial Results from an Energy-Aware Airborne Dynamic, Data-Driven Application System Performing Sampling in Coherent Boundary-Layer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frew, E.; Argrow, B. M.; Houston, A. L.; Weiss, C.

    2014-12-01

    The energy-aware airborne dynamic, data-driven application system (EA-DDDAS) performs persistent sampling in complex atmospheric conditions by exploiting wind energy using the dynamic data-driven application system paradigm. The main challenge for future airborne sampling missions is operation with tight integration of physical and computational resources over wireless communication networks, in complex atmospheric conditions. The physical resources considered here include sensor platforms, particularly mobile Doppler radar and unmanned aircraft, the complex conditions in which they operate, and the region of interest. Autonomous operation requires distributed computational effort connected by layered wireless communication. Onboard decision-making and coordination algorithms can be enhanced by atmospheric models that assimilate input from physics-based models and wind fields derived from multiple sources. These models are generally too complex to be run onboard the aircraft, so they need to be executed in ground vehicles in the field, and connected over broadband or other wireless links back to the field. Finally, the wind field environment drives strong interaction between the computational and physical systems, both as a challenge to autonomous path planning algorithms and as a novel energy source that can be exploited to improve system range and endurance. Implementation details of a complete EA-DDDAS will be provided, along with preliminary flight test results targeting coherent boundary-layer structures.

  16. Application Process Improvement Yields Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holesovsky, Jan Paul

    1995-01-01

    After a continuing effort to improve its grant application process, the department of medical microbiology and immunology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is submitting many more applications and realizing increased funding. The methods and strategy used to make the process more efficient and effective are outlined. (Author/MSE)

  17. Improving performance via mini-applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Crozier, Paul Stewart; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Numrich, Robert W.; Williams, Alan B.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Keiter, Eric Richard; Rajan, Mahesh; Willenbring, James M.; Doerfler, Douglas W.; Heroux, Michael Allen

    2009-09-01

    Application performance is determined by a combination of many choices: hardware platform, runtime environment, languages and compilers used, algorithm choice and implementation, and more. In this complicated environment, we find that the use of mini-applications - small self-contained proxies for real applications - is an excellent approach for rapidly exploring the parameter space of all these choices. Furthermore, use of mini-applications enriches the interaction between application, library and computer system developers by providing explicit functioning software and concrete performance results that lead to detailed, focused discussions of design trade-offs, algorithm choices and runtime performance issues. In this paper we discuss a collection of mini-applications and demonstrate how we use them to analyze and improve application performance on new and future computer platforms.

  18. SARDA HITL Simulations: System Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Gautam

    2012-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of the 2012 SARDA human-in-the-loop simulation, and presents a summary of system performance results from the simulation, including delay, throughput and fuel consumption

  19. Initial Performance Results on IBM POWER6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subbash; Talcott, Dale; Jespersen, Dennis; Djomehri, Jahed; Jin, Haoqiang; Mehrotra, Piysuh

    2008-01-01

    The POWER5+ processor has a faster memory bus than that of the previous generation POWER5 processor (533 MHz vs. 400 MHz), but the measured per-core memory bandwidth of the latter is better than that of the former (5.7 GB/s vs. 4.3 GB/s). The reason for this is that in the POWER5+, the two cores on the chip share the L2 cache, L3 cache and memory bus. The memory controller is also on the chip and is shared by the two cores. This serializes the path to memory. For consistently good performance on a wide range of applications, the performance of the processor, the memory subsystem, and the interconnects (both latency and bandwidth) should be balanced. Recognizing this, IBM has designed the Power6 processor so as to avoid the bottlenecks due to the L2 cache, memory controller and buffer chips of the POWER5+. Unlike the POWER5+, each core in the POWER6 has its own L2 cache (4 MB - double that of the Power5+), memory controller and buffer chips. Each core in the POWER6 runs at 4.7 GHz instead of 1.9 GHz in POWER5+. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of a dual-core Power6 based IBM p6-570 system, and we compare its performance with that of a dual-core Power5+ based IBM p575+ system. In this evaluation, we have used the High- Performance Computing Challenge (HPCC) benchmarks, NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB), and four real-world applications--three from computational fluid dynamics and one from climate modeling.

  20. Cascade Distiller System Performance Testing Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Pensinger, Stuart; Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2014-01-01

    The Cascade Distillation System (CDS) is a rotary distillation system with potential for greater reliability and lower energy costs than existing distillation systems. Based upon the results of the 2009 distillation comparison test (DCT) and recommendations of the expert panel, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) project advanced the technology by increasing reliability of the system through redesign of bearing assemblies and improved rotor dynamics. In addition, the project improved the CDS power efficiency by optimizing the thermoelectric heat pump (TeHP) and heat exchanger design. Testing at the NASA-JSC Advanced Exploration System Water Laboratory (AES Water Lab) using a prototype Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) wastewater processor (Honeywell d International, Torrance, Calif.) with test support equipment and control system developed by Johnson Space Center was performed to evaluate performance of the system with the upgrades as compared to previous system performance. The system was challenged with Solution 1 from the NASA Exploration Life Support (ELS) distillation comparison testing performed in 2009. Solution 1 consisted of a mixed stream containing human-generated urine and humidity condensate. A secondary objective of this testing is to evaluate the performance of the CDS as compared to the state of the art Distillation Assembly (DA) used in the ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). This was done by challenging the system with ISS analog waste streams. This paper details the results of the AES WRP CDS performance testing.

  1. Performance results for a hybrid coding system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, L. B.

    1971-01-01

    Results of computer simulation studies of the hybrid pull-up bootstrap decoding algorithm, using a constraint length 24, nonsystematic, rate 1/2 convolutional code for the symmetric channel with both binary and eight-level quantized outputs. Computational performance was used to measure the effect of several decoder parameters and determine practical operating constraints. Results reveal that the track length may be reduced to 500 information bits with small degradation in performance. The optimum number of tracks per block was found to be in the range from 7 to 11. An effective technique was devised to efficiently allocate computational effort and identify reliably decoded data sections. Long simulations indicate that a practical bootstrap decoding configuration has a computational performance about 1.0 dB better than sequential decoding and an output bit error rate about .0000025 near the R sub comp point.

  2. NGI performance for teleradiology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogel, Greg T.; Huang, H. K.; Cao, Fei; Zhou, Zheng; Dey, Partha S.; Gill, Michael J.; Liu, Brent J.

    2002-05-01

    Tele-medical imaging applications require low cost, and high-speed backbone wide area networks (WAN) to carry large amount of imaging data for rapid turn around interpretation. Current low cost commercially WAN is too slow for medical imaging applications, while high speed WAN is too costly. The next generation Internet (NGI) or Internet2 is federal initiatives for the integration of higher speed backbone communication networks (up to 2.4 Gbits/sec) as a means to replace the current inadequate Internet for many applications including medical imaging. This paper describes our preliminary experience of connecting to Internet2 for teleradiology application. A case study is given for the NGI WAN connection between Childrens Hospital Los Angeles and National Library of Medicine. NGI WAN performance for different image modalities, measured in throughput rate and application response time, were obtained and then compared to the T1 WAN connection between Childrens Hospital Los Angeles and Saint John's Health Center Santa Monica.

  3. Demystifying Results-Based Performance Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorjani, Hamid

    Many evaluators are convinced that Results-based Performance Measurement (RBPM) is an effective tool to improve service delivery and cost effectiveness in both public and private sectors. Successful RBPM requires self-directed and cross-functional work teams and the supporting infrastructure to make it work. There are many misconceptions and…

  4. LDEF Materials Results for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F. (Compiler); Gregory, John (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    These proceedings describe the application of LDEF data to spacecraft and payload design, and emphasize where space environmental effects on materials research and development is needed as defined by LDEF data. The LDEF six years of exposure of materials has proven to be by far the most comprehensive source of information ever obtained on the long-term performance of materials in the space environment. The conference provided a forum for materials scientists and engineers to review and critically assess the LDEF results from the standpoint of their relevance, significance, and impact on spacecraft design practice. The impact of the LDEF findings on materials selection and qualification, and the needs and plans for further study, were addressed from several perspectives. Many timely and needed changes and modifications in external spacecraft materials selection have occurred as a result of LDEF investigations.

  5. Managing for Results--Linking Performance Measures and Budgets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, William L.; Fountain, James R., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The Government Accounting Standards Board notion of service efforts and accomplishments reporting is one step in a process of managing for results that includes strategic planning, development and use of performance measures of managing ongoing programs, and outputs to budgetary appropriation. Reports a trial application to one school district.…

  6. SOAR Telescope: 4-meter high-performance-mount performance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Michael; Krabbendam, Victor; Schumacher, German; Delgadillo, Juan C.

    2004-09-01

    The 4.1-meter SOuthern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope mount and drive systems have been commissioned and are in routine operation. The telescope mount, the structure and its full drive systems, was fully erected and tested at the factory prior to reassembly and commissioning at the observatory. This successful approach enabled complete integration, from a concrete pier to a pointing and tracking telescope, on the mountain, in a rapid 3-month period. The telescope mount with its high instrument payload and demanding efficiency requirements is an important component for the success of the SOAR scientific mission. The SOAR mount utilizes rolling element bearings for both azimuth and elevation support, counter torqued sets of gear motors on azimuth and two frameless torque motors built into the elevation axles. Tracking jitter and its associated spectra, pointing errors and their sources, bearing friction and servo performances are critical criteria for this mount concept and are important factors in achieving the mission. This paper addresses the performance results obtained during the integration, commissioning, and first light periods of the telescope mount system.

  7. CF6 jet engine performance deterioration results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. J.; Humerickhouse, C. E.; Paas, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of the performance baseline from the flight planning manual as a reference to measure changes in cruise fuel flow rates was discussed. For the CF6-6D engine, the introduction of design changes for performance and durability reasons was seen to introduce an average increment relative to this baseline of 3.2% WFM increase at Nl, 2.5% Fn increase at Nl, 0.8% specific fuel consumption (SFC) increase at Fn, and 7 C EGT increase at Nl, while maintaining sufficient SFC margin of the delivered airplane. The effect of revenue service deterioration and performance restoration relative to the reference was shown to be an adder on top of these design effects. A schematic of typical CF6-6D performance through revenue service and airline maintenance is presented in terms of percent cruise SFC relative to an airline datum point (average level upon entering revenue service). The typical changes in SFC margin are shown for airline revenue service through for installations and refurbishments.

  8. Beryllium for fusion application - recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomutov, A.; Barabash, V.; Chakin, V.; Chernov, V.; Davydov, D.; Gorokhov, V.; Kawamura, H.; Kolbasov, B.; Kupriyanov, I.; Longhurst, G.; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Shestakov, V.

    2002-12-01

    The main issues for the application of beryllium in fusion reactors are analyzed taking into account the latest results since the ICFRM-9 (Colorado, USA, October 1999) and presented at 5th IEA Be Workshop (10-12 October 2001, Moscow Russia). Considerable progress has been made recently in understanding the problems connected with the selection of the beryllium grades for different applications, characterization of the beryllium at relevant operational conditions (irradiation effects, thermal fatigue, etc.), and development of required manufacturing technologies. The key remaining problems related to the application of beryllium as an armour in near-term fusion reactors (e.g. ITER) are discussed. The features of the application of beryllium and beryllides as a neutron multiplier in the breeder blanket for power reactors (e.g. DEMO) in pebble-bed form are described.

  9. Kristallin-I performance assessment: First results

    SciTech Connect

    Zuidema, P.; McKinley, I.G.; Smith, P.A.; Curti, E.; Klos, R.; Hugi, M.; Niemeyer, M.

    1993-12-31

    The Kristallin-I performance assessment indicates that the Swiss concept for disposal of vitrified HLW deep in the crystalline basement of Northern Switzerland will offer sufficient safety. This conclusion is based on a scenario analysis and an associated consequence analysis using an extensive model chain. The planned system of engineered barriers is shown to be particularly robust and ensures that most of the radionuclide inventory decays to insignificance in the near-field--both in the base case and in most altered evolution scenarios. The geosphere barrier can also be very effective, but conclusive demonstration of this places strong requirements on characterization of the geosphere. The radiological impact on hypothetical individuals inhabiting the groundwater discharge area is estimated by calculating doses via a variety of exposure pathways, following dilution, transport and accumulation in the biosphere. Detailed evaluation of perturbations of the base case scenario and of altered evolution scenarios is currently ongoing.

  10. Roll-up of validation results to a target application.

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, Richard Guy

    2013-09-01

    Suites of experiments are preformed over a validation hierarchy to test computational simulation models for complex applications. Experiments within the hierarchy can be performed at different conditions and configurations than those for an intended application, with each experiment testing only part of the physics relevant for the application. The purpose of the present work is to develop methodology to roll-up validation results to an application, and to assess the impact the validation hierarchy design has on the roll-up results. The roll-up is accomplished through the development of a meta-model that relates validation measurements throughout a hierarchy to the desired response quantities for the target application. The meta-model is developed using the computation simulation models for the experiments and the application. The meta-model approach is applied to a series of example transport problems that represent complete and incomplete coverage of the physics of the target application by the validation experiments.

  11. Graphics performance in rich Internet applications.

    PubMed

    Hoetzlein, Rama C

    2012-01-01

    Rendering performance for rich Internet applications (RIAs) has recently focused on the debate between using Flash and HTML5 for streaming video and gaming on mobile devices. A key area not widely explored, however, is the scalability of raw bitmap graphics performance for RIAs. Does Flash render animated sprites faster than HTML5? How much faster is WebGL than Flash? Answers to these questions are essential for developing large-scale data visualizations, online games, and truly dynamic websites. A new test methodology analyzes graphics performance across RIA frameworks and browsers, revealing specific performance outliers in existing frameworks. The results point toward a future in which all online experiences might be GPU accelerated. PMID:24806992

  12. Data Access Performance Through Parallelization and Vectored Access: Some Results

    SciTech Connect

    Furano, Fabrizio; Hanushevsky, Andrew; /SLAC

    2011-11-10

    High Energy Physics data processing and analysis applications typically deal with the problem of accessing and processing data at high speed. Recent studies, development and test work have shown that the latencies due to data access can often be hidden by parallelizing them with the data processing, thus giving the ability to have applications which process remote data with a high level of efficiency. Techniques and algorithms able to reach this result have been implemented in the client side of the Scalla/xrootd system, and in this contribution we describe the results of some tests done in order to compare their performance and characteristics. These techniques, if used together with multiple streams data access, can also be effective in allowing to efficiently and transparently deal with data repositories accessible via a Wide Area Network.

  13. Performance and test results of a regulated magnetron pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, C.R.; Warren, D.S.

    1998-12-31

    This paper describes the test results and performance of a 5.0-kV, 750-mA, regulated current pulser used to drive an Hitachi model 2M130 2,425-MHz magnetron. The magnetron is used to modulate the plasma in a particle accelerator injector. In this application, precise and stable rf power is crucial to extract a stable and accurate particle beam. A 10-kV high-voltage triode vacuum tube with active feedback is used to control the magnetron current and output rf power. The pulse width may be varied from as little as ten microseconds to continuous duty by varying the width of a supplied gate pulse. The output current level can be programmed between 10 and 750 mA. Current regulation and accuracy are better than 1%. The paper discusses the overall performance of the pulser and magnetron including anode current and rf power waveforms, linearity compliance, and vacuum tube performance.

  14. Predicting Test Performance: A Content Valid Approach to Screening Applicants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannone, Ronald D.

    1984-01-01

    Examined the validity of a rationally developed biographical questionnaire for predicting content valid test performance for electrician applicants (N=221). Results showed that the utility of the questionnaire in screening applicant populations was both statistically and practically significant. (LLL)

  15. Honeywell Cascade Distiller System Performance Testing Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargusingh, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recover and purify water through physiochemical processes is crucial for realizing long-term human space missions, including both planetary habitation and space travel. Because of their robust nature, distillation systems have been actively pursued as one of the technologies for water recovery. The Cascade Distillation System (CDS) is a vacuum rotary distillation system with potential for greater reliability and lower energy costs than existing distillation systems. The CDS was previously under development through Honeywell and NASA. In 2009, an assessment was performed to collect data to support down-selection and development of a primary distillation technology for application in a lunar outpost water recovery system. Based on the results of this testing, an expert panel concluded that the CDS showed adequate development maturity, TRL-4, together with the best product water quality and competitive weight and power estimates to warrant further development. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) worked to address weaknesses identified by The Panel; namely bearing design and heat pump power efficiency. Testing at the NASA-JSC Advanced Exploration System Water Laboratory (AES Water Lab) using a prototype Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) wastewater processor (Honeywell International, Torrance, Calif.) with test support equipment and control system developed by Johnson Space Center was performed to evaluate performance of the system with the upgrades. The CDS will also have been challenged with ISS analog waste streams and a subset of those being considered for Exploration architectures. This paper details interim results of the AES WRP CDS performance testing.

  16. Automatic Energy Schemes for High Performance Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sundriyal, Vaibhav

    2013-01-01

    Although high-performance computing traditionally focuses on the efficient execution of large-scale applications, both energy and power have become critical concerns when approaching exascale. Drastic increases in the power consumption of supercomputers affect significantly their operating costs and failure rates. In modern microprocessor architectures, equipped with dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) and CPU clock modulation (throttling), the power consumption may be controlled in software. Additionally, network interconnect, such as Infiniband, may be exploited to maximize energy savings while the application performance loss and frequency switching overheads must be carefully balanced. This work first studies two important collective communication operations, all-to-all and allgather and proposes energy saving strategies on the per-call basis. Next, it targets point-to-point communications to group them into phases and apply frequency scaling to them to save energy by exploiting the architectural and communication stalls. Finally, it proposes an automatic runtime system which combines both collective and point-to-point communications into phases, and applies throttling to them apart from DVFS to maximize energy savings. The experimental results are presented for NAS parallel benchmark problems as well as for the realistic parallel electronic structure calculations performed by the widely used quantum chemistry package GAMESS. Close to the maximum energy savings were obtained with a substantially low performance loss on the given platform.

  17. New results on averaging theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cândido, Murilo R.; Llibre, Jaume

    2016-08-01

    The usual averaging theory reduces the computation of some periodic solutions of a system of ordinary differential equations, to find the simple zeros of an associated averaged function. When one of these zeros is not simple, i.e., the Jacobian of the averaged function in it is zero, the classical averaging theory does not provide information about the periodic solution associated to a non-simple zero. Here we provide sufficient conditions in order that the averaging theory can be applied also to non-simple zeros for studying their associated periodic solutions. Additionally, we do two applications of this new result for studying the zero-Hopf bifurcation in the Lorenz system and in the Fitzhugh-Nagumo system.

  18. Software Engineering Laboratory Ada performance study: Results and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Eric W.; Stark, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    The SEL is an organization sponsored by NASA/GSFC to investigate the effectiveness of software engineering technologies applied to the development of applications software. The SEL was created in 1977 and has three organizational members: NASA/GSFC, Systems Development Branch; The University of Maryland, Computer Sciences Department; and Computer Sciences Corporation, Systems Development Operation. The goals of the SEL are as follows: (1) to understand the software development process in the GSFC environments; (2) to measure the effect of various methodologies, tools, and models on this process; and (3) to identify and then to apply successful development practices. The activities, findings, and recommendations of the SEL are recorded in the Software Engineering Laboratory Series, a continuing series of reports that include the Ada Performance Study Report. This paper describes the background of Ada in the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), the objectives and scope of the Ada Performance Study, the measurement approach used, the performance tests performed, the major test results, and the implications for future FDD Ada development efforts.

  19. Performing Japanese Business Culture: Developing Sociolinguistic Competence through "Application Performance."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakajima, Setsuko

    "Application Performance," a supplemental drill in the Japanese language program at Oregon State University, is described as a way to develop students' communicative competence. The approach is a type of role play, with pairs of students preparing a dialogue according to a situation provided by the instructor and then performed in class.…

  20. 5 CFR 430.309 - Using performance results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Using performance results. 430.309 Section 430.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.309 Using performance results. (a)...

  1. 5 CFR 430.309 - Using performance results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Using performance results. 430.309 Section 430.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.309 Using performance results. (a)...

  2. 5 CFR 430.309 - Using performance results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Using performance results. 430.309 Section 430.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.309 Using performance results. (a)...

  3. 5 CFR 430.309 - Using performance results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Using performance results. 430.309 Section 430.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.309 Using performance results. (a)...

  4. 5 CFR 430.309 - Using performance results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Using performance results. 430.309 Section 430.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.309 Using performance results. (a)...

  5. Use of Continuous Integration Tools for Application Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Vergara Larrea, Veronica G; Joubert, Wayne; Fuson, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    High performance computing systems are becom- ing increasingly complex, both in node architecture and in the multiple layers of software stack required to compile and run applications. As a consequence, the likelihood is increasing for application performance regressions to occur as a result of routine upgrades of system software components which interact in complex ways. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of continuous integration tools for application performance monitoring on HPC systems. In addition, this paper also describes a prototype system for application perfor- mance monitoring based on Jenkins, a Java-based continuous integration tool. The monitoring system described leverages several features in Jenkins to track application performance results over time. Preliminary results and lessons learned from monitoring applications on Cray systems at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility are presented.

  6. Neutron spectroscopy results of JET high-performance plasmas and extrapolations to DT performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hellesen, C.; Andersson Sunden, E.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Weiszflog, M.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    In a fusion reactor with high energy gain, the fusion power will be mainly thermonuclear (THN). Measurements of the THN neutron rate are a good performance indicator of a fusion plasma, requiring neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) measurements to distinguish thermal and nonthermal contributions. We report here on recent NES results from JET high-performance plasmas with high fractions (about 65%) of THN emission. The analysis is made with a framework for analyzing NES data, taking into account THN reactions and beam-target reactions. The results are used to extrapolate to the equivalent DT rates. Finally, we discuss the applicability of using NES in the deuterium phase of ITER, both for the extrapolations to ITER's future DT performance as well as for the measurements of confined energetic ions.

  7. Neutron spectroscopy results of JET high-performance plasmas and extrapolations to DT performance.

    PubMed

    Hellesen, C; Andersson Sundén, E; Conroy, S; Ericsson, G; Eriksson, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Weiszflog, M

    2010-10-01

    In a fusion reactor with high energy gain, the fusion power will be mainly thermonuclear (THN). Measurements of the THN neutron rate are a good performance indicator of a fusion plasma, requiring neutron emission spectroscopy (NES) measurements to distinguish thermal and nonthermal contributions. We report here on recent NES results from JET high-performance plasmas with high fractions (about 65%) of THN emission. The analysis is made with a framework for analyzing NES data, taking into account THN reactions and beam-target reactions. The results are used to extrapolate to the equivalent DT rates. Finally, we discuss the applicability of using NES in the deuterium phase of ITER, both for the extrapolations to ITER’s future DT performance as well as for the measurements of confined energetic ions. PMID:21058461

  8. Implementing Adaptive Performance Management in Server Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yan; Gorton, Ian

    2007-06-11

    Performance and scalability are critical quality attributes for server applications in Internet-facing business systems. These applications operate in dynamic environments with rapidly fluctuating user loads and resource levels, and unpredictable system faults. Adaptive (autonomic) systems research aims to augment such server applications with intelligent control logic that can detect and react to sudden environmental changes. However, developing this adaptive logic is complex in itself. In addition, executing the adaptive logic consumes processing resources, and hence may (paradoxically) adversely affect application performance. In this paper we describe an approach for developing high-performance adaptive server applications and the supporting technology. The Adaptive Server Framework (ASF) is built on standard middleware services, and can be used to augment legacy systems with adaptive behavior without needing to change the application business logic. Crucially, ASF provides built-in control loop components to optimize the overall application performance, which comprises both the business and adaptive logic. The control loop is based on performance models and allows systems designers to tune the performance levels simply by modifying high level declarative policies. We demonstrate the use of ASF in a case study.

  9. Performance monitoring of parallel scientific applications

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, David

    2005-05-01

    This paper introduces an infrastructure for efficiently collecting performance profiles from parallel HPC codes. Integrated Performance Monitoring (IPM) brings together multiple sources of performance metrics into a single profile that characterizes the overall performance and resource usage of the application. IPM maintains low overhead by using a unique hashing approach which allows a fixed memory footprint and minimal CPU usage. IPM is open source, relies on portable software technologies and is scalable to thousands of tasks.

  10. Application performation evaluation of the HTMT architecture.

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Judson, I. R.; Stevens, R.

    2004-02-23

    In this report we summarize findings from a study of the predicted performance of a suite of application codes taken from the research environment and analyzed against a modeling framework for the HTMT architecture. We find that the inward bandwidth of the data vortex may be a limiting factor for some applications. We also find that available memory in the cryogenic layer is a constraining factor in the partitioning of applications into parcels. The architecture in several examples may be inadequately exploited; in particular, applications typically did not capitalize well on the available computational power or data organizational capability in the PIM layers. The application suite provided significant examples of wide excursions from the accepted (if simplified) program execution model--in particular, by required complex in-SPELL synchronization between parcels. The availability of the HTMT-C emulation environment did not contribute significantly to the ability to analyze applications, because of the large gap between the available hardware descriptions and parameters in the modeling framework and the types of data that could be collected via HTMT-C emulation runs. Detailed analysis of application performance, and indeed further credible development of the HTMT-inspired program execution model and system architecture, requires development of much better tools. Chief among them are cycle-accurate simulation tools for computational, network, and memory components. Additionally, there is a critical need for a whole system simulation tool to allow detailed programming exercises and performance tests to be developed. We address three issues in this report: (1) The landscape for applications of petaflops computing; (2) The performance of applications on the HTMT architecture; and (3) The effectiveness of HTMT-C as a tool for studying and developing the HTMT architecture. We set the scene with observations about the course of application development as petaflops

  11. Results of advanced battery technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1992-09-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies [Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid]. These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R&D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R&D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  12. Results of advanced batter technology evaluations for electric vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric-vehicle operating conditions at the Analysis Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL) of Argonne National Laboratory. The ADL results provide insight Into those factors that limit battery performance and life. The ADL facilities include a test laboratory to conduct battery experimental evaluations under simulated application conditions and a post-test analysis laboratory to determine, In a protected atmosphere if needed, component compositional changes and failure mechanisms. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted during 1991--1992 on both single cells and multi-cell modules that encompass eight battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS (M=metal), Ni/MH, Ni/Cd, Ni/Zn, Ni/Fe, Zn/Br, and Pb-acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division, and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ADL provides a common basis for battery performance characterization and life evaluations with unbiased application of tests and analyses. The results help identify the most-promising R D approaches for overcoming battery limitations, and provide battery users, developers, and program managers with a measure of the progress being made in battery R D programs, a comparison of battery technologies, and basic data for modeling.

  13. A novel application classification and its impact on network performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Huang, Ning; Sun, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yue

    2016-07-01

    Network traffic is believed to have a significant impact on network performance and is the result of the application operation on networks. Majority of current network performance analysis are based on the premise that the traffic transmission is through the shortest path, which is too simple to reflect a real traffic process. The real traffic process is related to the network application process characteristics, involving the realistic user behavior. In this paper, first, an application can be divided into the following three categories according to realistic application process characteristics: random application, customized application and routine application. Then, numerical simulations are carried out to analyze the effect of different applications on the network performance. The main results show that (i) network efficiency for the BA scale-free network is less than the ER random network when similar single application is loaded on the network; (ii) customized application has the greatest effect on the network efficiency when mixed multiple applications are loaded on BA network.

  14. Performance test results of a low cost GPS time and frequency monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyatt, R. C.; Asjkaee, K.

    1984-01-01

    Final prototype and pilot production performance test results was presented on a single channel C/A code GPS receiver that was optimized for time and frequency applications. Timing accuracy and stability test results are presented, as well as position determination results. Timing accuracy, timing stability, frequency stability, position accuracy and position stability are presented in the results.

  15. High Performance Fortran for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush; Zima, Hans; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of High Performance Fortran (HPF) for important classes of algorithms employed in aerospace applications. HPF is a set of Fortran extensions designed to provide users with a high-level interface for programming data parallel scientific applications, while delegating to the compiler/runtime system the task of generating explicitly parallel message-passing programs. We begin by providing a short overview of the HPF language. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the efficient use of HPF for applications involving multiple structured grids such as multiblock and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) codes as well as unstructured grid codes. We focus on the data structures and computational structures used in these codes and on the high-level strategies that can be expressed in HPF to optimally exploit the parallelism in these algorithms.

  16. High Performance Databases For Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, James C.; Grimshaw, Andrew S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal for this task is to develop an Extensible File System (ELFS). ELFS attacks the problem of the following: 1. Providing high bandwidth performance architectures; 2. Reducing the cognitive burden faced by applications programmers when they attempt to optimize; and 3. Seamlessly managing the proliferation of data formats and architectural differences. The approach for ELFS solution consists of language and run-time system support that permits the specification on a hierarchy of file classes.

  17. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Rotor Alone Aerodynamic Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Woodward, Richard P.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of an isolated fan or rotor alone model was measured in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9- by 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel as part of the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test conducted at NASA Glenn. The Source Diagnostic Test was conducted to identify the noise sources within a wind tunnel scale model of a turbofan engine and quantify their contribution to the overall system noise level. The fan was part of a 1/5th scale model representation of the bypass stage of a current technology turbofan engine. For the rotor alone testing, the fan and nacelle, including the inlet, external cowl, and fixed area fan exit nozzle, were modeled in the test hardware; the internal outlet guide vanes located behind the fan were removed. Without the outlet guide vanes, the velocity at the nozzle exit changes significantly, thereby affecting the fan performance. As part of the investigation, variations in the fan nozzle area were tested in order to match as closely as possible the rotor alone performance with the fan performance obtained with the outlet guide vanes installed. The fan operating performance was determined using fixed pressure/temperature combination rakes and the corrected weight flow. The performance results indicate that a suitable nozzle exit was achieved to be able to closely match the rotor alone and fan/outlet guide vane configuration performance on the sea level operating line. A small shift in the slope of the sea level operating line was measured, which resulted in a slightly higher rotor alone fan pressure ratio at take-off conditions, matched fan performance at cutback conditions, and a slightly lower rotor alone fan pressure ratio at approach conditions. However, the small differences in fan performance at all fan conditions were considered too small to affect the fan acoustic performance.

  18. Application of data mining in performance measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Michael F. S.; Chung, Walter W.; Wong, Tai Sun

    2001-10-01

    This paper proposes a structured framework for exploiting data mining application for performance measures. The context is set in an airline company is illustrated for the use of such framework. The framework takes in consideration of how a knowledge worker interacts with performance information at the enterprise level to support them to make informed decision in managing the effectiveness of operations. A case study of applying data mining technology for performance data in an airline company is illustrated. The use of performance measures is specifically applied to assist in the aircraft delay management process. The increasingly dispersed and complex operations of airline operation put much strain on the part of knowledge worker in using search, acquiring and analyzing information to manage performance. One major problem faced with knowledge workers is the identification of root causes of performance deficiency. The large amount of factors involved in the analyze the root causes can be time consuming and the objective of applying data mining technology is to reduce the time and resources needed for such process. The increasing market competition for better performance management in various industries gives rises to need of the intelligent use of data. Because of this, the framework proposed here is very much generalizable to industries such as manufacturing. It could assist knowledge workers who are constantly looking for ways to improve operation effectiveness through new initiatives and the effort is required to be quickly done to gain competitive advantage in the marketplace.

  19. Results of model intercomparison : predicted vs. measured system performance.

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Joshua S.

    2010-10-01

    This is a blind modeling study to illustrate the variability expected between PV performance model results. Objectives are to answer: (1) What is the modeling uncertainty; (2) Do certain models do better than others; (3) How can performance modeling be improved; and (4) What are the sources of uncertainty? Some preliminary conclusions are: (1) Large variation seen in model results; (2) Variation not entirely consistent across systems; (3) Uncertainty in assigning derates; (4) Discomfort when components are not included in database - Is there comfort when the components are in the database?; and (5) Residual analysis will help to uncover additional patterns in the models.

  20. Magnetic Gimbal Proof-of-Concept Hardware performance results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Keith O.

    1993-01-01

    The Magnetic Gimbal Proof-of-Concept Hardware activities, accomplishments, and test results are discussed. The Magnetic Gimbal Fabrication and Test (MGFT) program addressed the feasibility of using a magnetic gimbal to isolate an Electro-Optical (EO) sensor from the severe angular vibrations induced during the firing of divert and attitude control system (ACS) thrusters during space flight. The MGFT effort was performed in parallel with the fabrication and testing of a mechanically gimballed, flex pivot based isolation system by the Hughes Aircraft Missile Systems Group. Both servo systems supported identical EO sensor assembly mockups to facilitate direct comparison of performance. The results obtained from the MGFT effort indicate that the magnetic gimbal exhibits the ability to provide significant performance advantages over alternative mechanically gimballed techniques.

  1. Magnetic Gimbal Proof-of-Concept Hardware performance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Keith O.

    The Magnetic Gimbal Proof-of-Concept Hardware activities, accomplishments, and test results are discussed. The Magnetic Gimbal Fabrication and Test (MGFT) program addressed the feasibility of using a magnetic gimbal to isolate an Electro-Optical (EO) sensor from the severe angular vibrations induced during the firing of divert and attitude control system (ACS) thrusters during space flight. The MGFT effort was performed in parallel with the fabrication and testing of a mechanically gimballed, flex pivot based isolation system by the Hughes Aircraft Missile Systems Group. Both servo systems supported identical EO sensor assembly mockups to facilitate direct comparison of performance. The results obtained from the MGFT effort indicate that the magnetic gimbal exhibits the ability to provide significant performance advantages over alternative mechanically gimballed techniques.

  2. Demonstrating Results: An Introduction to the Government Performance and Results Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Postsecondary Education, Washington, DC. Higher Education Programs.

    This guide explains the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) as it is being implemented by the Department of Education's Office of Higher Education Programs (HEP). It is intended to assist HEP grantees understand the requirements and implications of GPRA, advise them of the benefits resulting from effective planning and performance…

  3. First performance results of the Phobos silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernegger, H.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hołyński, R.; Hofman, D. J.; Holzman, B.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michalowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Steinberg, P.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2001-11-01

    The Phobos experiment concluded its first year of operation at RHIC taking data in Au-Au nucleus collisions at s nn=65 GeV and 130 GeV/ nucleon pair. First preliminary results of the performances of our silicon detectors in the experiment are summarized. The Phobos experiment uses silicon pad detectors for both tracking and multiplicity measurements. The silicon sensors vary strongly in their pad geometry. In this paper, we compare the signal response, the signal uniformity and signal-to-noise performance as measured in the experiment for the different geometries. Additionally, we investigate effects of very high channel occupancy on the signal response.

  4. Simulation of centrifugal compressor transient performance for process plant applications

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougal, I.; Elder, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a theoretical model capable of simulating centrifugal compressor transient performance (including compressor surge) is detailed. Simulation results from a Fortran computer program are compared with measured compressor transient data. Good simulation of compressor transients between stable operating points, and compressor presurge flow oscillations has been obtained. General application criteria are presented for the geometric distribution of model elements within a compressor system. Model applications and future work are outlined.

  5. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C. Edward; Klee, Paul M.

    1997-01-10

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted.

  6. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Hybrid Power Management (HPM) Program Resulted in Several New Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid Power Management (HPM) is the innovative integration of diverse, state-of-the-art power devices in an optimal configuration for space and terrestrial applications. The appropriate application and control of the various power devices significantly improves overall system performance and efficiency. The advanced power devices include ultracapacitors, fuel cells, and photovoltaics. HPM has extremely wide potential with applications from nanowatts to megawatts. Applications include power generation, transportation systems, biotechnology systems, and space power systems. HPM has the potential to significantly alleviate global energy concerns, improve the environment, and stimulate the economy.

  8. The XRS Low Temperature Cryogenic System: Ground Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breon, Susan; Sirron, Peter; Boyle, Robert; Canavan, Ed; DiPirro, Michael; Serlemitsos, Aristides; Tuttle, James; Whitehouse, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is part of the Astro-E mission scheduled to launch early in 2000. Its cryogenic system is required to cool a 32-element square array of x-ray microcalorimeters to 60-65 mK over a mission lifetime of at least 2 years. This is accomplished using an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) contained within a two-stage superfluid helium/solid neon cooler. Goddard Space Flight Center is providing the ADR and helium dewar. The flight system was assembled in Sept. 1997 and subjected to extensive thermal performance tests. This paper presents test results at both the system and component levels. In addition, results of the low temperature topoff performed in Japan with the engineering unit neon and helium dewars are discussed.

  9. Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Even though new homes constructed with hydronic heat comprise only 3% of the market (US Census Bureau 2009), of the 115 million existing homes in the United States, almost 14 million of those homes (11%) are heated with steam or hot water systems according to 2009 US Census data. Therefore, improvements in hydronic system performance could result in significant energy savings in the US.

  10. Technique for Establishing Personnel Performance Standards (TEPPS). Volume III. Results of Navy User Test. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Russel L.; And Others

    The results of a test application of TEPPS (Technique for Establishing Personnel Performance Standards) by a Navy analyst team are described in this report. TEPPS is a general systems analysis tool which includes a mathematical model for evaluating man-machine systems. The test results are interpreted both by the system's developers and by the…

  11. SP-100 fuel pin performance: Results from irradiation testing

    SciTech Connect

    Makenas, B.J.; Paxton, D.M.; Vaidyanathan, S.; Hoth, C.W.

    1993-09-01

    A total of 86 experimental fuel pins with various fuel, liner, and cladding candidate materials have been irradiated in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor as part of the SP-100 fuel pin irradiation testing program. Postirradiation examination results from these fuel pin are key in establishing performance correlations and demonstrating the lifetime and safety of the reactor fuel system. This paper provides a brief description of the in-reactor fuel pin tests and presents the most recent irradiation data on the performance of wrought rhenium (Re) liner material and high density UN fuel at goal burnup of 6 atom percent (at. %). It also provides an overview of the significant variety of other fuel/liner/cladding combinations which were irradiated as part of this program and which may be of interest to more advanced efforts.

  12. Performance results of a digital test signal generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez-Luaces, B. O.; Marina, M.; Parham, B.

    1993-01-01

    Performance results of a digital test signal-generator hardware-demonstration unit are reported. Capabilities available include baseband and intermediate frequency (IF) spectrum generation, for which test results are provided. Repeatability in the setting of a given signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when a baseband or an IF spectrum is being generated ranges from 0.01 dB at high SNR's or high data rates to 0.3 dB at low data rates or low SNR's. Baseband symbol SNR and carrier SNR (Pc/No) accuracies of 0.1 dB were verified with the built-in statistics circuitry. At low SNR's that accuracy remains to be fully verified. These results were confirmed with measurements from a demodulator synchronizer assembly for the baseband spectrum generation, and with a digital receiver (Pioneer 10 receiver) for the IF spectrum generation.

  13. A High Performance Image Data Compression Technique for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Pen-Shu; Venbrux, Jack

    2003-01-01

    A highly performing image data compression technique is currently being developed for space science applications under the requirement of high-speed and pushbroom scanning. The technique is also applicable to frame based imaging data. The algorithm combines a two-dimensional transform with a bitplane encoding; this results in an embedded bit string with exact desirable compression rate specified by the user. The compression scheme performs well on a suite of test images acquired from spacecraft instruments. It can also be applied to three-dimensional data cube resulting from hyper-spectral imaging instrument. Flight qualifiable hardware implementations are in development. The implementation is being designed to compress data in excess of 20 Msampledsec and support quantization from 2 to 16 bits. This paper presents the algorithm, its applications and status of development.

  14. Persistent GMTI surveillance: theoretical performance bounds and some experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam; Damini, Anthony; Wang, Kai

    2010-04-01

    In certain operational radar modes, slow ground moving targets are detected over several processing intervals using space-time adaptive processing. This enables use of Bayesian filtering and smoothing algorithms for estimation of time-varying moving target parameters. In this paper, some Bayesian filtering algorithms are investigated. The Craḿer-Rao bounds based on subsets of radar measurements (range, angle and Doppler) are derived for typical maneuvering targets and compared against simulated results from Bayesian filters. The performance is also evaluated using real data obtained from DRDC Ottawa's XWEAR radar.

  15. The Advanced Photon Source: Performance and results from early operation

    SciTech Connect

    Moncton, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is now providing researchers with extreme-brilliance undulator radiation in the hard x-ray region of the spectrum. All technical facilities and components are operational and have met design specifications. Fourteen research teams, occupying 20 sectors on the APS experiment hall floor, are currently installing beamline instrumentation or actively taking data. An overview is presented for the first operational years of the Advanced Photon Source. Emphasis is on the performance of accelerators and insertion devices, as well as early scientific results and future plans.

  16. Shell coal gasification plant (SCGP-1) environmental performance results

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, W.V.; Baker, D.C.; Tijm, P.J.A. )

    1991-07-01

    Environmental studies in slip-stream process development units at SCGP-1, Shell's advanced coal gasification demonstration plant, located near Houston, Texas, have demonstrated that the gas and water effluents from the Shell Coal Gasification Process (SCGP) are environmentally benign on a broad slate of coals. This report presents the results of those environmental studies. It contains two major subjects, which describe, respectively, the experiments on gas treating and the experiments on water treating. Gas treatment focused on the performance of aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and sulfinol-M. 8 refs., 24 figs., 13 tabs.

  17. Performance Analysis of Web Applications Based on User Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quanshu; Ye, Hairong; Ding, Zuohua

    This paper proposes a method to conduct performance eanalysis of web applications. The behavior model is firstly built from log file after user navigation, then an extended state diagram is extracted from this log file, finally multiple Markov model is cooperated to this state diagram and the performance analysis can be obtained from the Markov model. Five indexes are used to measure the performance and they are: service response time, service path length, service utilization, service implementation rate and access error rate. Our performance analysis result will provide a suggestion to improve the design of web applications and optimize the services. A case study of Zhejiang Chess web site has been used to demonstrate the advantage of our method.

  18. Performance and applications of the UVscope instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Catalano, O.; Giarrusso, S.; La Rosa, G.; Segreto, A.; Agnetta, G.; Biondo, B.; Mangano, A.; Russo, F.; Billotta, S.

    2011-12-01

    UVscope is a portable multi-pixels photon detector developed at IASF-Pa to support experimental activities in the high-energy astrophysics and cosmic rays field. The instrument, working in single photon counting mode, is designed to directly measure light flux in the wavelengths range 300-650 nm. Thanks to its features and operational flexibility, the instrument can be used in a wide field of applications where the knowledge of the environmental luminosity is required, as in the characterization of sites for ground-based Cherenkov and fluorescence telescopes, and for crosscalibration of their cameras. The present version of UVscope is based on a Multi Anode Photo Multiplier Tube and it is completed by a motorized mount and a filter wheel which allow to make low-light measurements, at programmed pointing directions and at different filter wavelengths. In this paper, the instrument is firstly presented in all its components; then the procedures adopted for its absolute and relative calibration are detailed. The performance of UVscope is evaluated and, finally, current and planned scientific applications are described.

  19. Video performance for high security applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Connell, Jack C.; Norman, Bradley C.

    2010-06-01

    The complexity of physical protection systems has increased to address modern threats to national security and emerging commercial technologies. A key element of modern physical protection systems is the data presented to the human operator used for rapid determination of the cause of an alarm, whether false (e.g., caused by an animal, debris, etc.) or real (e.g., a human adversary). Alarm assessment, the human validation of a sensor alarm, primarily relies on imaging technologies and video systems. Developing measures of effectiveness (MOE) that drive the design or evaluation of a video system or technology becomes a challenge, given the subjectivity of the application (e.g., alarm assessment). Sandia National Laboratories has conducted empirical analysis using field test data and mathematical models such as binomial distribution and Johnson target transfer functions to develop MOEs for video system technologies. Depending on the technology, the task of the security operator and the distance to the target, the Probability of Assessment (PAs) can be determined as a function of a variety of conditions or assumptions. PAs used as an MOE allows the systems engineer to conduct trade studies, make informed design decisions, or evaluate new higher-risk technologies. This paper outlines general video system design trade-offs, discusses ways video can be used to increase system performance and lists MOEs for video systems used in subjective applications such as alarm assessment.

  20. Premium performance heating oil - Part 2, Field trial results

    SciTech Connect

    Jetter, S.M.; Hoskin, D.; McClintock, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    Limited field trial results of a heating oil additive package developed to minimize unscheduled maintenance indicate that it achieves its goal of keeping heating oil systems cleaner. The multifunctional additive package was developed to provide improved fuel oxidation stability, improved corrosion protection, and dispersency. This combination of performance benefits was chosen because we believed it would retard the formation of sludge, as well as allow sludge already present to be carried through the system without fouling the fuel system components (dispersency should keep sludge particles small so they pass through the filtering system). Since many unscheduled maintenance calls are linked to fouling of the fuel filtering system, the overall goal of this technology is to reduce these maintenance calls. Photographic evidence shows that the additive package not only reduces the amount of sludge formed, but even removes existing sludge from filters and pump strainers. This {open_quotes}clean-up{close_quotes} performance is provided trouble free: we found no indication that nozzle/burner performance was impaired by dispersing sludge from filters and pump strainers. Qualitative assessments from specific accounts that used the premium heating oil also show marked reductions in unscheduled maintenance.

  1. An Application-Based Performance Characterization of the Columbia Supercluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Djomehri, Jahed M.; Hood, Robert; Jin, Hoaqiang; Kiris, Cetin; Saini, Subhash

    2005-01-01

    Columbia is a 10,240-processor supercluster consisting of 20 Altix nodes with 512 processors each, and currently ranked as the second-fastest computer in the world. In this paper, we present the performance characteristics of Columbia obtained on up to four computing nodes interconnected via the InfiniBand and/or NUMAlink4 communication fabrics. We evaluate floating-point performance, memory bandwidth, message passing communication speeds, and compilers using a subset of the HPC Challenge benchmarks, and some of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks including the multi-zone versions. We present detailed performance results for three scientific applications of interest to NASA, one from molecular dynamics, and two from computational fluid dynamics. Our results show that both the NUMAlink4 and the InfiniBand hold promise for application scaling to a large number of processors.

  2. New Performance and Reliability Results of the Thales HEMP Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornfeld, G.; Koch, N.; Harmann, H.

    2004-10-01

    Electric Propulsion (EP), attracts in the last years an increasing interest for all types of space applications as for instance the north/south station-keeping and orbit transfer of commercial GEO-stationary satellites, the drag compensation for LEO- and MEO- satellites and constellations and navigation for scientific interplanetary missions. Reasons for that, as summarised in [1], are: - The propellant mass savings compared with chemical thrusters in the order of more than 90%. - The increasing availability of sufficient electric power on board of satellites (today >10 kW). - The demonstrated in orbit performance and life over more than 10 years of various thruster types (Hall effect thrusters, ion thrusters, arc jets). A new concept of a High Efficiency Multi-stage Plasma (HEMP) thruster to be used for satellite and space probe orbit control and navigation has recently been developed by THALES Electron Devices GmbH in Ulm. In the framework of a 3 year feasibility study sponsored by the German Space Agency DLR the HEMP thruster concept has been successfully realised. Not only its feasibility but very promising unique features have been verified by direct thrust measurements performed at ONERA, Palaiseau, in March 2003 and at University of Gießen in July 2003. Aside the clear advantage of a plasma confinement, which eliminates discharge chamber wall erosion, the HEMP thruster has shown performance characteristics already comparable to those of state-of-the-art grid and Hall-effect thrusters which are being developed for more than 40 years. At the test in the large vacuum chamber at the University of Gießen, the HEMP thruster model DM6 demonstrated for instance a maximum thrust of 139 mN, corresponding to an electric propulsion world record thrust density of 36mN/cm2 at a specific impulse of 3230 s and a total efficiency of 40% at the same operating point. Furthermore, the thermal efficiency (conversion from electric power into kinetic beam power) reached a unique

  3. GPM Avionics Module Heat Pipes Design and Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura; DeChristopher, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. The GPM core satellite carries an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites. Through improved measurements of precipitation globally, the GPM mission will help to advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle, improve forecasting of extreme events that cause natural hazards and disasters, and extend current capabilities in using accurate and timely information of precipitation to directly benefit society. The avionics module on the core satellite contains a number of electronics boxes which are cooled by a network of aluminum/ammonia heat pipes and a honeycomb radiator which contains thirteen embedded aluminum/ammonia heat pipes. All heat pipes were individually tested by the vendor (Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc.) prior to delivery. Following delivery to NASA, the flight avionics radiator and the flight spare transport heat pipes were mounted to flight-like test structure and a system level thermal vacuum test was performed. This test, which used simulators in place of all electronics boxes, was done to verify the operation of the thermal control system as a whole. This presentation will discuss the design of the avionics module heat pipes, and then discuss performance tests results for the individual heat pipes prior to delivery and for the system level thermal vacuum test. All heat pipes met their performance requirements. However, it was found that the power was too low in some instances to start all of the smaller radiator spreader heat pipes when they were tested in a reflux configuration (which is the nominal test configuration). Although this lowered the efficiency of the radiator somewhat, it did not impact the operating

  4. Theoretical performance of cross-wind axis turbines with results for a catenary vertical axis configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. J.; Stephens, M. V.; Dagenhart, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A general analysis capable of predicting performance characteristics of cross-wind axis turbines was developed, including the effects of airfoil geometry, support struts, blade aspect ratio, windmill solidity, blade interference and curved flow. The results were compared with available wind tunnel results for a catenary blade shape. A theoretical performance curve for an aerodynamically efficient straight blade configuration was also presented. In addition, a linearized analytical solution applicable for straight configurations was developed. A listing of the computer program developed for numerical solutions of the general performance equations is included in the appendix.

  5. Enhancement of perfluoropolyether boundary lubrication performance: I. Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Ajayi, O. O.; Goodell, A. J.; Wedeven, L. D.; Devine, E.; Premore, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    A ball bearing simulator operating under starved conditions was used to evaluate the boundary lubrication performance of a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) Krytox 143 AB. Several approaches to enhance boundary lubrication were studied. These included: (1) soluble boundary additives, (2) bearing surface modifications, (3) 'run-in' surface films, and (4) ceramic bearing components. In addition, results were compared with two non-perfluorinated liquid lubricant formulations. Based on these preliminary tests, the following tentative conclusions can be made: (1) substantial improvements in boundary lubrication performance were observed with a beta-diketone boundary additive and a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) liquid surface pretreatment; (2) the use of rough Si3N4 balls (Ra = 40 micro-in) also provided substantial improvement but with concomitant abrasive wear; (3) marginal improvements were seen with two boundary additives (a phosphine and a phosphatriazine) and a neat (100%) fluid (a carboxylic acid terminated PFPE); and surface pretreatments with a synthetic hydrocarbon, a PTFE coating, and TiC coated 440C and smooth Si3N4 balls (R(sub a) less than 1 micro-in); and (4) two non-PFPE lubricant formulations (a PAO and a synthetic hydrocarbon) yielded substantial improvements.

  6. The Role of Leadership in Safety Performance and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caravello, Halina E.

    Employee injury rates in U.S. land-based operations in the energy industry are 2 to 3 times higher relative to other regions in the world. Although a rich literature exists on drivers of safety performance, no previous studies investigated factors influencing this elevated rate. Leadership has been identified as a key contributor to safety outcomes and this grounded theory study drew upon the full range leadership model, situational leadership, and leader-member exchange theories for the conceptual framework. Leadership aspects influencing safety performance were investigated through guided interviews of 27 study participants; data analyses included open and axial coding, and constant comparisons identified higher-level categories. Selective coding integrated categories into the theoretical framework that developed the idealized, transformational leader traits motivating safe behaviors of leading by example, expressing care and concern for employees' well-being, celebrating successes, and communicating the importance of safety (other elements included visibility and commitment). Employee and supervisor participants reported similar views on the idealized leader traits, but low levels of these qualities may be driving elevated injury rates. Identifying these key elements provides the foundation to creating strategies and action plans enabling energy sector companies to prevent employee injuries and fatalities in an industry where tens of thousands of employees are subjected to significant hazards and elevated risks. Creating safer workplaces for U.S. employees by enhancing leaders' skills, building knowledge, and improving behaviors will improve the employees' and their families' lives by reducing the pain and suffering resulting from injuries and fatalities.

  7. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  8. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  9. CMS tracking performance results from early LHC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2010-11-24

    The first LHC pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV were recorded by the CMS detector in December 2009. The trajectories of charged particles produced in the collisions were reconstructed using the all-silicon Tracker and their momenta were measured in the 3.8 T axial magnetic field. Results from the Tracker commissioning are presented including studies of timing, efficiency, signal-to-noise, resolution, and ionization energy. Reconstructed tracks are used to benchmark the performance in terms of track and vertex resolutions, reconstruction of decays, estimation of ionization energy loss, as well as identification of photon conversions, nuclear interactions, and heavy-flavour decays.

  10. Multimedia application performance on a WiMAX network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halepovic, Emir; Ghaderi, Majid; Williamson, Carey

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we use experimental measurements to study the performance of multimedia applications over a commercial IEEE 802.16 WiMAX network. Voice-over-IP (VoIP) and video streaming applications are tested. We observe that the WiMAX-based network solidly supports VoIP. The voice quality degradation compared to high-speed Ethernet is only moderate, despite higher packet loss and network delays. Despite different characteristics of the uplink and the downlink, call quality is comparable for both directions. On-demand video streaming performs well using UDP. Smooth playback of high-quality video/audio clips at aggregate rates exceeding 700 Kbps is achieved about 63% of the time, with low-quality playback periods observed only 7% of the time. Our results show that WiMAX networks can adequately support currently popular multimedia Internet applications.

  11. Accounting for results: how conservation organizations report performance information.

    PubMed

    Rissman, Adena R; Smail, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Environmental program performance information is in high demand, but little research suggests why conservation organizations differ in reporting performance information. We compared performance measurement and reporting by four private-land conservation organizations: Partners for Fish and Wildlife in the US Fish and Wildlife Service (national government), Forest Stewardship Council-US (national nonprofit organization), Land and Water Conservation Departments (local government), and land trusts (local nonprofit organization). We asked: (1) How did the pattern of performance reporting relationships vary across organizations? (2) Was political conflict among organizations' principals associated with greater performance information? and (3) Did performance information provide evidence of program effectiveness? Based on our typology of performance information, we found that most organizations reported output measures such as land area or number of contracts, some reported outcome indicators such as adherence to performance standards, but few modeled or measured environmental effects. Local government Land and Water Conservation Departments reported the most types of performance information, while local land trusts reported the fewest. The case studies suggest that governance networks influence the pattern and type of performance reporting, that goal conflict among principles is associated with greater performance information, and that performance information provides unreliable causal evidence of program effectiveness. Challenging simple prescriptions to generate more data as evidence, this analysis suggests (1) complex institutional and political contexts for environmental program performance and (2) the need to supplement performance measures with in-depth evaluations that can provide causal inferences about program effectiveness. PMID:25549998

  12. Accounting for Results: How Conservation Organizations Report Performance Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissman, Adena R.; Smail, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Environmental program performance information is in high demand, but little research suggests why conservation organizations differ in reporting performance information. We compared performance measurement and reporting by four private-land conservation organizations: Partners for Fish and Wildlife in the US Fish and Wildlife Service (national government), Forest Stewardship Council—US (national nonprofit organization), Land and Water Conservation Departments (local government), and land trusts (local nonprofit organization). We asked: (1) How did the pattern of performance reporting relationships vary across organizations? (2) Was political conflict among organizations' principals associated with greater performance information? and (3) Did performance information provide evidence of program effectiveness? Based on our typology of performance information, we found that most organizations reported output measures such as land area or number of contracts, some reported outcome indicators such as adherence to performance standards, but few modeled or measured environmental effects. Local government Land and Water Conservation Departments reported the most types of performance information, while local land trusts reported the fewest. The case studies suggest that governance networks influence the pattern and type of performance reporting, that goal conflict among principles is associated with greater performance information, and that performance information provides unreliable causal evidence of program effectiveness. Challenging simple prescriptions to generate more data as evidence, this analysis suggests (1) complex institutional and political contexts for environmental program performance and (2) the need to supplement performance measures with in-depth evaluations that can provide causal inferences about program effectiveness.

  13. Applications of parallel supercomputers: Scientific results and computer science lessons

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.C.

    1989-07-12

    Parallel Computing has come of age with several commercial and inhouse systems that deliver supercomputer performance. We illustrate this with several major computations completed or underway at Caltech on hypercubes, transputer arrays and the SIMD Connection Machine CM-2 and AMT DAP. Applications covered are lattice gauge theory, computational fluid dynamics, subatomic string dynamics, statistical and condensed matter physics,theoretical and experimental astronomy, quantum chemistry, plasma physics, grain dynamics, computer chess, graphics ray tracing, and Kalman filters. We use these applications to compare the performance of several advanced architecture computers including the conventional CRAY and ETA-10 supercomputers. We describe which problems are suitable for which computers in the terms of a matching between problem and computer architecture. This is part of a set of lessons we draw for hardware, software, and performance. We speculate on the emergence of new academic disciplines motivated by the growing importance of computers. 138 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Instruction-level performance modeling and characterization of multimedia applications

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Cameron, K.W.

    1999-06-01

    One of the challenges for characterizing and modeling realistic multimedia applications is the lack of access to source codes. On-chip performance counters effectively resolve this problem by monitoring run-time behaviors at the instruction-level. This paper presents a novel technique of characterizing and modeling workloads at the instruction level for realistic multimedia applications using hardware performance counters. A variety of instruction counts are collected from some multimedia applications, such as RealPlayer, GSM Vocoder, MPEG encoder/decoder, and speech synthesizer. These instruction counts can be used to form a set of abstract characteristic parameters directly related to a processor`s architectural features. Based on microprocessor architectural constraints and these calculated abstract parameters, the architectural performance bottleneck for a specific application can be estimated. Meanwhile, the bottleneck estimation can provide suggestions about viable architectural/functional improvement for certain workloads. The biggest advantage of this new characterization technique is a better understanding of processor utilization efficiency and architectural bottleneck for each application. This technique also provides predictive insight of future architectural enhancements and their affect on current codes. In this paper the authors also attempt to model architectural effect on processor utilization without memory influence. They derive formulas for calculating CPI{sub 0}, CPI without memory effect, and they quantify utilization of architectural parameters. These equations are architecturally diagnostic and predictive in nature. Results provide promise in code characterization, and empirical/analytical modeling.

  15. An Analysis of Performance Enhancement Techniques for Overset Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, J. J.; Biswas, R.; Potsdam, M.; Strawn, R. C.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The overset grid methodology has significantly reduced time-to-solution of high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations about complex aerospace configurations. The solution process resolves the geometrical complexity of the problem domain by using separately generated but overlapping structured discretization grids that periodically exchange information through interpolation. However, high performance computations of such large-scale realistic applications must be handled efficiently on state-of-the-art parallel supercomputers. This paper analyzes the effects of various performance enhancement techniques on the parallel efficiency of an overset grid Navier-Stokes CFD application running on an SGI Origin2000 machine. Specifically, the role of asynchronous communication, grid splitting, and grid grouping strategies are presented and discussed. Results indicate that performance depends critically on the level of latency hiding and the quality of load balancing across the processors.

  16. Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, L.; Faakye, O.

    2013-10-01

    Even though new homes constructed with hydronic heat comprise only 3% of the market (US Census Bureau 2009), of the 115 million existing homes in the United States, almost 14 million of those homes (11%) are heated with steam or hot water systems according to 2009 US Census data. Therefore, improvements in hydronic system performance could result in significant energy savings in the US. When operating properly, the combination of a gas-fired condensing boiler with baseboard convectors and an indirect water heater is a viable option for high-efficiency residential space heating in cold climates. Based on previous research efforts, however, it is apparent that these types of systems are typically not designed and installed to achieve maximum efficiency. Furthermore, guidance on proper design and commissioning for heating contractors and energy consultants is hard to find and is not comprehensive. Through modeling and monitoring, CARB sought to determine the optimal combination(s) of components - pumps, high efficiency heat sources, plumbing configurations and controls - that result in the highest overall efficiency for a hydronic system when baseboard convectors are used as the heat emitter. The impact of variable-speed pumps on energy use and system performance was also investigated along with the effects of various control strategies and the introduction of thermal mass.

  17. Performance evaluation and clinical applications of 3D plenoptic cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Ryan; Shademan, Azad; Opfermann, Justin; Leonard, Simon; Kim, Peter C. W.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-06-01

    The observation and 3D quantification of arbitrary scenes using optical imaging systems is challenging, but increasingly necessary in many fields. This paper provides a technical basis for the application of plenoptic cameras in medical and medical robotics applications, and rigorously evaluates camera integration and performance in the clinical setting. It discusses plenoptic camera calibration and setup, assesses plenoptic imaging in a clinically relevant context, and in the context of other quantitative imaging technologies. We report the methods used for camera calibration, precision and accuracy results in an ideal and simulated surgical setting. Afterwards, we report performance during a surgical task. Test results showed the average precision of the plenoptic camera to be 0.90mm, increasing to 1.37mm for tissue across the calibrated FOV. The ideal accuracy was 1.14mm. The camera showed submillimeter error during a simulated surgical task.

  18. Performance of underfloor air distribution: Results of a field study

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas

    2004-09-02

    Underfloor air distribution (UFAD) is a new method of supplying heated or cooled air throughout a building. Reported advantages of UFAD include easy relocation of air supply diffusers, energy savings, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). We measured several aspects of the performance of an UFAD system installed in a medium-size office building. The measured air change effectiveness was very close to unity, which is comparable to that measured in buildings with typical overhead air distribution. The pollutant removal efficiency for carbon dioxide was 13 percent higher than expected in a space with well-mixed air, suggesting a 13 percent reduction in exposures to occupant generated pollutants. The increase in indoor air temperatures with height above the floor was only 1 to 2 C (2-4 F). This amount of thermal stratification could reduce the sensible energy requirements for cooling of outdoor air by approximately 10 percent. The occupants level of satisfaction with thermal conditions w as well above average and this high satisfaction rating could possibly be due, in all or part, to the use of a UFAD system. The results of this study provide some evidence of moderate energy and IAQ-related benefits of UFAD. Before general conclusions are drawn, the benefits need to be confirmed in other studies.

  19. An application for delivering field results to mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanta, A.; Hloupis, G.; Vallianatos, F.; Rust, D.

    2009-04-01

    Mobile devices (MD) such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and Smartphones expand the ability of Internet communication between remote users. In particular these devices have the possibility to interact with data centres in order to request and receive information. For field surveys MDs used primarily for controlling instruments (in case of field measurements) or for entering data needed for later processing (e.g damage description after a natural hazard). It is not unusual in areas with high interest combined measurements took place. The results from these measurements usually stored in data servers and their publicity is driven mainly by web-based applications. Here we present a client / server application capable of displaying the results of several measurements for a specific area to a MD. More specific, we develop an application than can present to the screen of the MD the results of existing measurements according to the position of the user. The server side hosted at data centre and uses a relational data base (including the results), a SMS/MMS gateway and a receiver daemon application waiting for messages from MDs. The client side runs on MD and is a simple menu driven application which asks the user to enter the type of requested data and the geographical coordinates. In case of embedded GPS receiver, coordinates automatically derived from the receiver. Then a message is sent to server which responds with the results. In case of absence of Internet communication the application can switched to common Short/Multimedia Messaging Systems: the client request data using SMS and the server responds with MMS. We demonstrate the application using results from TEM, VES and HVSR measurements Acknowledgements Work of authors AK, GH and FV is partially supported by the EU-FP6-SSA in the frame of project "CYCLOPS: CYber-Infrastructure for CiviL protection Operative ProcedureS"

  20. Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts Casing Connection on 7" Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Watts

    1999-08-01

    Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This particular test required the application of a variety of loads including axial tension and compression, internal pressure (gas), external pressure (water), bending and both low and elevated temperature. These loads were used to determine the sealing and structural limits of the connection. The connection design tested had tapered threads with 10 threads per inch. A square thread form and a round thread form were tested. The square thread form had a 2{sup o} load flank and 15{sup o} stab flank. The round thread had a 0{sup o} load flank and 20{sup o} stab flank. Most of the testing was performed on the round thread form. Both a coupled connection design and an integral connection design were tested. The coupling was a pin by pin (male) thread, with the pipe having a box (female) thread. Both designs have outside and inside diameters that are flush with the pipe body. Both designs also contain a small external shoulder. The test procedure selected for this evaluation was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test was performed with four coupled samples and included most of these loads. Two integral samples were also included for limit load testing ISO makeup/breakout tests are divided into three types--initial makeup, IML1, repeated makeup within the same sample, MBL, and repeated makeup using several samples called round robin, RR. IMU and MBL were performed in this project. The ISO sealing and structural procedure is divided into four primary tests and identified as Series A, B, C and Limit Load (failure

  1. Government Performance and Results Act: Performance plan FY 1999, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fuches, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) strategic plan [NUREG-1614, Vol. 1, September 1997] establishes a strategic framework that will guide future decision-making and will help the NRC continue to meet its responsibility for protecting public health and safety, promoting the common defense and security, and protecting the environment. This performance plan complements the agency`s strategic plan by setting annual goals with measurable target levels of performance for FY 1999, as required by the Government Performance and Results Act. No significant contribution was made to the preparation of the performance plan by any non-Federal entity. However, a contractor was used to help facilitate discussions and resolution of issues. Within six months after the close of FY 1999, the NRC will submit to the President and the Congress a report on program performance for FY 1999. This performance report will review the success of the agency in achieving the performance goals established for FY 1999. Where those goals have been achieved, the underlying assumptions and strategies will be examined to ensure that continued applicability is warranted in the future. If any of the FY 1999 performance goals are not met, the agency will conduct a thorough analysis of why it did not meet the goal and the actions necessary to meet-the goal in the future. One result of this analysis will be the documentation of plans and schedules for achieving the established performance goal. If the analysis should indicate that the performance goal is impractical or infeasible, the performance report will document why that is the case and what action is recommended.

  2. High-performance computing for airborne applications

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather M; Manuzzato, Andrea; Fairbanks, Tom; Dallmann, Nicholas; Desgeorges, Rose

    2010-06-28

    Recently, there has been attempts to move common satellite tasks to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAVs are significantly cheaper to buy than satellites and easier to deploy on an as-needed basis. The more benign radiation environment also allows for an aggressive adoption of state-of-the-art commercial computational devices, which increases the amount of data that can be collected. There are a number of commercial computing devices currently available that are well-suited to high-performance computing. These devices range from specialized computational devices, such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and digital signal processors (DSPs), to traditional computing platforms, such as microprocessors. Even though the radiation environment is relatively benign, these devices could be susceptible to single-event effects. In this paper, we will present radiation data for high-performance computing devices in a accelerated neutron environment. These devices include a multi-core digital signal processor, two field-programmable gate arrays, and a microprocessor. From these results, we found that all of these devices are suitable for many airplane environments without reliability problems.

  3. Mental performance in extreme environments: results from a performance monitoring study during a 438-day spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Manzey, D; Lorenz, B; Poljakov, V

    1998-04-01

    During their stay in a space habitat, astronauts are exposed to many different stressors that may entail detrimental effects on mood and performance. In order to monitor the effects of the space environment on different human information processing functions during an extraordinary long-term space mission, the cognitive. visuo-motor and time-sharing performance of one Russian cosmonaut was repeatedly assessed (29 times) during his 438-day stay in space. The performance tasks used were chosen from the AGARD-STRES battery and included grammatical reasoning, Sternberg memory-search, unstable tracking, and a dual-tasks consisting of unstable tracking with concurrent memory-search. In addition to performance assessment, several subjective ratings concerning mood and workload were collected. Comparisons of pre-flight, in-flight, post-flight and two follow-up assessments 6 months after the mission revealed, (1) no impairments of basic cognitive functions during the flight, (2) clear impairments of mood, feelings of raised workload, and disturbances of tracking performance and time-sharing during the first 3 weeks in space and the first 2 weeks after return to Earth, (3) an impressive stability of mood and performance during the second to fourteenth month in space, where mood and performance had returned to pre-flight baseline level, and (4) no long-lasting performance deficits at follow-up assessments. From these results it is concluded that the first 3 weeks of long-term spaceflights and the first 2 weeks back on Earth represent critical periods where adverse effects on attentional processes are to be expected, induced by the demands to adjust to the extreme environmental changes. The stability of mood and performance observed after successful adaptation to the space environment indicates that mental efficiency and emotional state can be maintained on a level as high as on Earth even during extraordinary long-term space missions. PMID:9557591

  4. High-performance insulator structures for accelerator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Sanders, D.M.; Stoddard, R.D.; Trimble, D.O.; Elizondo, J.; Krogh, M.L.; Wieskamp, T.F.

    1997-05-01

    A new, high gradient insulator technology has been developed for accelerator systems. The concept involves the use of alternating layers of conductors and insulators with periods of order 1 mm or less. These structures perform many times better (about 1.5 to 4 times higher breakdown electric field) than conventional insulators in long pulse, short pulse, and alternating polarity applications. We describe our ongoing studies investigating the degradation of the breakdown electric field resulting from alternate fabrication techniques, the effect of gas pressure, the effect of the insulator-to-electrode interface gap spacing, and the performance of the insulator structure under bi-polar stress.

  5. Understanding and Application of Performance Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Im, Byung-Bin

    2000-01-01

    Points to weaknesses of traditional tests and comments on the theoretical background and necessity of performance assessment. Presents specific information on performance assessment and provides assessment examples. (Author/VWL)

  6. Performance of catalyzed hydrazine in field applications

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, T.B.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of newly developed oxygen scavengers for boilers is often compared to sulfite and hydrazine. Catalyzed hydrazine out-performs hydrazine and might be preferred when catalyzed sulfite cannot be used. Data from a Midwest Utility confirms that, under field conditions, catalyzed hydrazine out-performance hydrazine and carbohydrazine when feedwater oxygen and iron levels were critical. Catalyzed hydrazine might be preferred when high performance and economics are the primary concerns.

  7. Network latency and operator performance in teleradiology applications.

    PubMed

    Stahl, J N; Tellis, W; Huang, H K

    2000-08-01

    Teleradiology applications often use an interactive conferencing mode with remote control mouse pointers. When a telephone is used for voice communication, latencies of the data network can create a temporal discrepancy between the position of the mouse pointer and the verbal communication. To assess the effects of this dissociation, we examined the performance of 5 test persons carrying out simple teleradiology tasks under varying simulated network conditions. When the network latency exceeded 400 milliseconds, the performance of the test persons dropped, and an increasing number of errors were made. This effect was the same for constant latencies, which can occur on the network path, and for variable delays caused by the Nagle algorithm, an internal buffering scheme used by the TCP/IP protocol. Because the Nagle algorithm used in typical TCP/IP implementations causes a latency of about 300 milliseconds even before a data packet is sent, any additional latency in the network of 100 milliseconds or more will result in a decreased operator performance in teleradiology applications. These conditions frequently occur on the public Internet or on overseas connections. For optimal performance, the authors recommend bypassing the Nagle algorithm in teleradiology applications. PMID:15359750

  8. Coolerado 5 Ton RTU Performance: Western Cooling Challenge Results (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, E.; Slayzak, S.

    2010-11-01

    The Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC) developed a set of criteria for test conditions, minimum energy, and water use performance for prototype cooling equipment and identified these conditions as indicative of western state climates.

  9. Using International Test Results To Improve Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Nelly

    1999-01-01

    Examines international assessments, like the Third International Mathematics and Science Study, and what they can tell about how well Canadian students perform relative to other participating jurisdictions and how well jurisdictions do on different assessments at different points in time. Discusses uses of international comparisons to inform…

  10. Building America System Research Results. Innovations for High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-05-01

    This report provides a summary of key lessons learned from the first 10 years of the Building America program and also included a summary of the future challenges that must be met to reach the program’s long term performance goals.

  11. How to Improve Performance Results in Your District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genck, Fredric H.

    1987-01-01

    School performance measures developed by a public management institute have improved learning, confidence, cost effectiveness, teamwork, and accountability among students and teachers in Illinois districts. A model measures learning, parent and teacher satisfaction, and cost. Zion, Lake Forest, and North Chicago districts made substantial gains…

  12. Pathway to Results: Pay for Performance in Denver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Denise A.; Gratz, Donald B.; Helms, Barbara J.; Slotnik, William J.; Smith, Maribeth

    In 1999, Colorado's Denver Public schools initiated the Pay for Performance pilot, which links teacher compensation to student achievement. Researchers examined its impact on achievement by comparing three measures of student achievement across pilot and control schools; teacher objectives; school, teacher, and student factors which impact…

  13. Perkins Core Performance Measures: Results and Targets, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHewitt, Earl R.; Taylor, Garry

    This document describes the Virginia Community College System (VCCS) Core Indicators for the Perkins III Core Performance Standards and Measures. Core indicators and measures include: (1) student attainment, measured by academic and technical skills; (2) completion, measured by graduation rate; (3) placement and persistence, measured by placement,…

  14. Composition Instruction and Cognitive Performance: Results of a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugos, Jennifer; Jacobs, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a composition program, Composers in Public Schools (CiPS), on cognitive skills essential for academic success. The underlying hypothesis is that composition instruction will promote creative expression and increase performance on music-specific skills such as music reading, as well as foster…

  15. Multiphase pumping: indoor performance test and oilfield application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangling; Zhu, Hongwu; Zhang, Shousen; Li, Jifeng

    2009-12-01

    Multiphase pumping is essentially a means of adding energy to the unprocessed effluent which enables the liquid and gas mixture to be transported over a long distances without prior separation. A reduction, consolidation, or elimination of the production infrastructure, such as separation equipments and offshore platforms can be developed more economically. Also it successfully lowed the backpressure of wells, revived dead wells and improved the production and efficiency of oilfield. This paper reviews the issues related to indoor performance test and an oilfield application of the helico-axial multiphase pump designed by China University of Petroleum (Beijing). Pump specification and its hydraulic design are given. Results of performance testing under different condition, such as operational speed and gas volume fraction (GVF) etc are presented. Experimental studies on combination of theoretical analysis showed the multiphase pump satisfies the similitude rule, which can be used in the development of new MPP design and performance prediction. Test results showed that rising the rotation speed and suction pressure could better its performance, pressure boost improved, high efficiency zone expanding and the flow rate related to the optimum working condition increased. The pump worked unstable as GVF increased to a certain extent and slip occurred between two phases in the pump, creating surging and gas lock at a high GVF. A case of application in Nanyang oilfield is also studied.

  16. Multiphase pumping: indoor performance test and oilfield application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangling; Zhu, Hongwu; Zhang, Shousen; Li, Jifeng

    2010-03-01

    Multiphase pumping is essentially a means of adding energy to the unprocessed effluent which enables the liquid and gas mixture to be transported over a long distances without prior separation. A reduction, consolidation, or elimination of the production infrastructure, such as separation equipments and offshore platforms can be developed more economically. Also it successfully lowed the backpressure of wells, revived dead wells and improved the production and efficiency of oilfield. This paper reviews the issues related to indoor performance test and an oilfield application of the helico-axial multiphase pump designed by China University of Petroleum (Beijing). Pump specification and its hydraulic design are given. Results of performance testing under different condition, such as operational speed and gas volume fraction (GVF) etc are presented. Experimental studies on combination of theoretical analysis showed the multiphase pump satisfies the similitude rule, which can be used in the development of new MPP design and performance prediction. Test results showed that rising the rotation speed and suction pressure could better its performance, pressure boost improved, high efficiency zone expanding and the flow rate related to the optimum working condition increased. The pump worked unstable as GVF increased to a certain extent and slip occurred between two phases in the pump, creating surging and gas lock at a high GVF. A case of application in Nanyang oilfield is also studied.

  17. High accuracy fine-pointing system - Breadboard performances and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazilleau, Y.; Moreau, B.; Betermier, J. M.; Boutemy, J. C.

    A fine pointing system designed according to the requirements of the Semiconductor Laser Intersatellite Link Experiment 1989 (SILEX 1989) is described, with particular attention given to the synthesis of the final breadboarding. The study includes all the pointing functions where the pointing, acquisition, and tracking (PAT) functions are associated with different FOVs. The laboratory model consists of a complete pointing system with two CCD sensors for detection, two general-scanning single-axis actuators, and the overall control electronics. Each major PAT function of the laboratory model was separately tested, giving all the major impacts for the future PAT applications concerning mechanical margins, optical aberrations, sensor linearity, and servoloop communications.

  18. Biobased grease with improved oxidation performance for industrial application.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Brajendra K; Adhvaryu, Atanu; Perez, Joseph M; Erhan, Sevim Z

    2006-10-01

    Vegetable oils have significant potential as a base fluid and a substitute for mineral oil for grease formulation. This paper describes the preparation of biobased grease with high oxidative stability and a composition useful for industrial, agriculture/farming equipment, and forestry applications. The process utilizes more oxidatively stable epoxy vegetable oils as the base fluid, metal-soap thickener, and several specialty chemicals identified to address specific applications. Performance characteristics of greases used for industrial and automotive applications are largely dependent on the hardness and the oxidative stability of grease. Grease hardness was determined using standard test methods, and their oxidative stabilities were determined using pressurized differential scanning calorimetry and rotary bomb oxidation tests. Wear data were generated using standard test methods in a four-ball test geometry. Results indicate that grease developed with this method can deliver at par or better performance properties (effective lubrication, wear protection, corrosion resistance, friction reduction, heat removal, etc.) than existing mineral oil-based greases currently used in similar trades. Therefore, developed greases can be a good substitute for mineral oil-based greases in industrial, agriculture, forestry, and marine applications. PMID:17002427

  19. Scientific Application Performance on Candidate PetaScalePlatforms

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, Leonid; Canning, Andrew; Carter, Jonathan; Iancu, Costin; Lijewski, Michael; Kamil, Shoaib; Shalf, John; Shan, Hongzang; Strohmaier, Erich; Ethier, Stephane; Goodale, Tom

    2007-01-01

    After a decade where HEC (high-end computing) capability was dominated by the rapid pace of improvements to CPU clock frequency, the performance of next-generation supercomputers is increasingly differentiated by varying interconnect designs and levels of integration. Understanding the tradeoffs of these system designs, in the context of high-end numerical simulations, is a key step towards making effective petascale computing a reality. This work represents one of the most comprehensive performance evaluation studies to date on modern HEC systems, including the IBM Power5, AMD Opteron, IBM BG/L, and Cray X1E. A novel aspect of our study is the emphasis on full applications, with real input data at the scale desired by computational scientists in their unique domain. We examine six candidate ultra-scale applications, representing a broad range of algorithms and computational structures. Our work includes the highest concurrency experiments to date on five of our six applications, including 32K processor scalability for two of our codes and describe several successful optimizations strategies on BG/L, as well as improved X1E vectorization. Overall results indicate that our evaluated codes have the potential to effectively utilize petascale resources; however, several applications will require reengineering to incorporate the additional levels of parallelism necessary to achieve the vast concurrency of upcoming ultra-scale systems.

  20. Fan Performance Testing and Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Results for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Vogel, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    An advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for the space suit will require a small, robust, and energyefficient system to transport the ventilation gas through the space suit for lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations. A trade study identified and compared ventilation transport technologies in commercial, military, and space applications to determine which technologies could be adapted for EVA use. Based on the trade study results, five commercially available, 24-volt fans were selected for performance testing at various pressures and flow rates. Measured fan parameters included fan delta-pressures, input voltages, input electrical currents, and in some cases motor windings electrical voltages and currents. In addition, a follow-on trade study was performed to identify oxygen compatibility issues and assess their impact on fan design. This paper outlines the results of the fan performance characterization testing, as well as the results from the oxygen compatibility assessment.

  1. Fan Performance Testing and Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Results for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.; Paul, Heather L.; Vogel, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    An advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for the space suit will require a small, robust, and energy-efficient system to transport the ventilation gas through the space suit for lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations. A trade study identified and compared ventilation transport technologies in commercial, military, and space applications to determine which technologies could be adapted for EVA use. Based on the trade study results, five commercially available, 24volt fans were selected for performance testing at various pressures and flow rates. Measured fan parameters included fan delta-pressures, input voltages, input electrical currents, and in some cases motor windings electrical voltages and currents. In addition, a follow-on trade study was performed to identify oxygen compatibility issues and assess their impact on fan design. This paper outlines the results of the fan performance characterization testing, as well as the results from the oxygen compatibility assessment.

  2. High-performance monolithic CMOS detectors for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Pe, Olivier; Tulet, Michel; Davancens, Robert; Larnaudie, Franck; Vignon, Bruno; Magnan, Pierre; Farre, Jean A.; Corbiere, Franck; Martin-Gonthier, Philippe

    2001-12-01

    During the last 10 years, research about CMOS image sensors (also called APS - Active Pixel Sensors) has been intensively carried out, in order to offer an alternative to CCDs as image sensors. This is particularly the case for space applications as CMOS image sensors feature characteristics which are obviously of interest for flight hardware: parallel or semi-parallel architecture, on chip control and processing electronics, low power dissipation, high level of radiation tolerance... Many image sensor companies, institutes and laboratories have demonstrated the compatibility of CMOS image sensors with consumer applications: micro-cameras, video-conferencing, digital- still cameras. And recent designs have shown that APS is getting closer to the CCD in terms of performance level. However, he large majority of the existing products do not offer the specific features which are required for many space applications. ASTRIUM and SUPAERO/CIMI have decided to work together in view of developing CMOS image sensors dedicated to space business. After a brief presentation of the team organization for space image sensor design and production, the latest results of a high performances 512 X 512 pixels CMOS device characterization are presented with emphasis on the achieved electro-optical performance. Finally, the on going and short-term coming activities of the team are discussed.

  3. Performance Evaluation of Three Distributed Computing Environments for Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatoohi, Rod; Weeratunga, Sisira; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We present performance results for three distributed computing environments using the three simulated CFD applications in the NAS Parallel Benchmark suite. These environments are the DCF cluster, the LACE cluster, and an Intel iPSC/860 machine. The DCF is a prototypic cluster of loosely coupled SGI R3000 machines connected by Ethernet. The LACE cluster is a tightly coupled cluster of 32 IBM RS6000/560 machines connected by Ethernet as well as by either FDDI or an IBM Allnode switch. Results of several parallel algorithms for the three simulated applications are presented and analyzed based on the interplay between the communication requirements of an algorithm and the characteristics of the communication network of a distributed system.

  4. Heat exchanger performance calculations for enhanced-tube condenser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The lack of a prediction method is sometimes used for the rejection of enhanced tubes for some condenser applications even though there is ample data from single-tube condensing experiments. Three methods are discussed that can be used to rate and/or size these multitube units based on the single-tube experimental results. The Kern vertical-number correction appears to be quite adequate for most operating conditions, the exceptions being large sizes and/or deep vacuum operation. The bundle-factor method is preferred for these applications; however, field test results are required to obtain this factor. If performance data are not available, pointwise or numerical methods are required but special care must be taken to insure that the adverse effects of noncondensable gas pockets and the saturation-temperature depression are properly addressed.

  5. Heat exchanger performance calculations for enhanced-tube condenser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.

    1992-07-01

    The lack of a prediction method is sometimes used for the rejection of enhanced tubes for some condenser applications even though there is ample data from single-tube condensing experiments. Three methods are discussed that can be used to rate and/or size these multitube units based on the single-tube experimental results. The Kern vertical-number correction appears to be quite adequate for most operating conditions, the exceptions being large sizes and/or deep vacuum operation. The bundle-factor method is preferred for these applications; however, field test results are required to obtain this factor. If performance data are not available, pointwise or numerical methods are required but special care must be taken to insure that the adverse effects of noncondensable gas pockets and the saturation-temperature depression are properly addressed.

  6. High performance nickel electrodes for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adanuvor, Prosper K.; Pearson, Johnnie A.; Miller, Brian; Tatarchuk, Bruce; Britton, Doris L.

    1995-01-01

    The specific energy density and the performance of nickel electrodes are generally limited by the electrode microstructure and the nature of the active material within the electrode matrix. Progress is being made in our laboratory in a collaborative effort with NASA-LEWIS Research Center to develop lighter weight, mechanically stable and highly efficient nickel electrodes for aerospace applications. Our approach is based on an electrode microstructure fabricated from a mixture of nickel fibers as small as 2 micro m diameter and cellulose fibers. Results will be presented to show the optimum conditions for impregnating this electrode microstructure with nickel hydroxide active material. Performance data in half-cell tests and cycle life data will also be presented. The flexibility of this electrode microstructure and the significant advantages it offers in terms of weight and performance will be demonstrated, in particular its ability to accept charge at high rates and to discharge at high rates.

  7. Aquarius Radiometer Performance: Early On-Orbit Calibration and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; LeVine, David M.; Yueh, Simon H.; Wentz, Frank; Ruf, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D observatory was launched into a 657-km altitude, 6-PM ascending node, sun-synchronous polar orbit from Vandenberg, California, USA on June 10, 2011. The Aquarius instrument was commissioned two months after launch and began operating in mission mode August 25. The Aquarius radiometer meets all engineering requirements, exhibited initial calibration biases within expected error bars, and continues to operate well. A review of the instrument design, discussion of early on-orbit performance and calibration assessment, and investigation of an on-going calibration drift are summarized in this abstract.

  8. Performance and results of the NAOS visible wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Rousset, Gérard; Dorn, Reinhold J.; Cavadore, Cyril; Charton, Julien; Cumani, Claudio; Fusco, Thierry; Hubin, Norbert N.; Kern, Pierre Y.; Lizon, Jean-Luis; Magnard, Yves; Puget, Pascal; Rabaud, Didier; Rabou, Patrick; Stadler, Eric

    2003-02-01

    The NAOS adaptive optics system was installed in December 2001 on the Nasmyth focus of the ESO VLT. It includes two wavefront sensors: one is working at IR wavelength analysis and the other at visible wavelengths. This paper describes the NAOS Visible Wave Front Sensor based on a Shack-Hartman principle and its performances as measured on the sky. This wavefront sensor includes within a continuous flow liquid nitrogen cryostat: 1) a low noise fast readout CCD camera controlled by the ESO new generation CCD system FIERA using a fast frame rate EEV/Marconi CCD-50 focal plane array. This 128×128 pixels focal plane array has a readout noise of 3 e- at 50 kilopixel/sec/port. FIERA provides remotely controlled readout modes with optional binning, windowing and flexible integration time. 2) two remotely exchangeable micro-lens arrays (14×14 and 7×7 micro-lenses) cooled at the CCD temperature ( -100 °C) within the cryostat. The CCD array is directly located in the micro lenses focal plane at a few millimeters apart without relay optics. 3) Additional opto-mechanical functions are also provided (atmospheric dispersion compensator, flux level control, field of view limitation). On sky performances of the wavefront sensor are presented. Adaptive Optics corrections was obtained with a reference star as faint as a visible magnitude 17 with a band-path of 40 Hz in close loop.

  9. Description and Flight Performance Results of the WASP Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pauw, J. F.; Steffens, L. E.; Yuska, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    A general description of the design and construction of the WASP sounding rocket and of the performance of its first flight are presented. The purpose of the flight test was to place the 862-pound (391-kg) spacecraft above 250 000 feet (76.25 km) on free-fall trajectory for at least 6 minutes in order to study the effect of "weightlessness" on a slosh dynamics experiment. The WASP sounding rocket fulfilled its intended mission requirements. The sounding rocket approximately followed a nominal trajectory. The payload was in free fall above 250 000 feet (76.25 km) for 6.5 minutes and reached an apogee altitude of 134 nautical miles (248 km). Flight data including velocity, altitude, acceleration, roll rate, and angle of attack are discussed and compared to nominal performance calculations. The effect of residual burning of the second stage motor is analyzed. The flight vibration environment is presented and analyzed, including root mean square (RMS) and power spectral density analysis.

  10. Results of a 24-inch Hybrid Motor Performance Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Joseph D.; Coleman, Hugh W.

    1998-01-01

    The subscale (11 and 24-inch) hybrid motors at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have been used as versatile and cost effective testbeds for developing new technology. Comparisons between motor configuration, ignition systems, feed systems, fuel formulations, and nozzle materials have been carried out without detailed consideration as to haw "good" the motor performance data were. For the 250,000 lb/thrust motor developed by the Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program consortium, this shortcoming is particularly risky because motor performance will likely be used as put of a set of downselect criteria to choose between competing ignition and feed systems under development. This analysis directly addresses that shortcoming by applying uncertainty analysis techniques to the experimental determination of the characteristic velocity, theoretical characteristic velocity, and characteristic velocity efficiency for a 24-inch motor firing. With the adoption of fuel-lined headends, flow restriction, and aft mixing chambers, state of the an 24-inch hybrid motors have become very efficient However, impossibly high combustion efficiencies (some computed as high as 108%) have been measured in some tests with 11-inch motors. This analysis has given new insight into explaining how these efficiencies were measured to be so high, and into which experimental measurements contribute the most to the overall uncertainty.

  11. System description and initial performance results for beamlet

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Murray, J.R.; Campbell, J.H.

    1996-06-01

    The Department of Energy has proposed to design and construct a National Ignition Facility (NIF) for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. This facility will contain a frequency-tripled, Nd:Glass laser system capable of irradiating fusion targets at an energy and power of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW. The laser output pulse contains most of the energy, where the low-intensity leading foot is 15-20 ns long and the final high-intensity pulse is 3-4 ns long. The laser will have 192 independent {open_quotes}beamlets,{close_quotes} each having a final square clear aperture of 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} and an output beam area slightly smaller than the clear aperture. A Conceptual Design Report (CDR), prepared in May 1994, discusses the laser and facility design in detail. The authors have constructed and are now testing a scientific prototype of a single beamlet of the proposed NIF laser. The purpose of these tests is to show that the novel features proposed for the NIF laser design will perform as projected and that the laser is ready for final engineering design. The final dimensions and component arrangements for NIF will differ somewhat from the scientific prototype, but the differences are sufficiently small that tests on the prototype can be used to demonstrate performance essentially equivalent to a NIF beamlet.

  12. The Palomar Transient Factory: System Overview, Performance, and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ofek, Eran O.; Quimby, Robert M.; Nugent, Peter E.; Surace, Jason; Grillmair, Carl C.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Bildsten, Lars; Brown, Tim; Cenko, S. Bradley; Ciardi, David; Croner, Ernest; Djorgovski, S. George; van Eyken, Julian; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fox, Derek B.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Hale, David; Hamam, Nouhad; Helou, George; Henning, John; Howell, D. Andrew; Jacobsen, Janet; Laher, Russ; Mattingly, Sean; McKenna, Dan; Pickles, Andrew; Poznanski, Dovi; Rahmer, Gustavo; Rau, Arne; Rosing, Wayne; Shara, Michael; Smith, Roger; Starr, Dan; Sullivan, Mark; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Zolkower, Jeff

    2009-12-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is a fully-automated, wide-field survey aimed at a systematic exploration of the optical transient sky. The transient survey is performed using a new 8.1 square degree camera installed on the 48 inch Samuel Oschin telescope at Palomar Observatory; colors and light curves for detected transients are obtained with the automated Palomar 60 inch telescope. PTF uses 80% of the 1.2 m and 50% of the 1.5 m telescope time. With an exposure of 60 s the survey reaches a depth of mg' ≈ 21.3 and mR ≈ 20.6 (5σ, median seeing). Four major experiments are planned for the five-year project: (1) a 5 day cadence supernova search; (2) a rapid transient search with cadences between 90 s and 1 day (3) a search for eclipsing binaries and transiting planets in Orion; and (4) a 3π sr deep H-alpha survey. PTF provides automatic, real-time transient classification and follow-up, as well as a database including every source detected in each frame. This paper summarizes the PTF project, including several months of on-sky performance tests of the new survey camera, the observing plans, and the data reduction strategy. We conclude by detailing the first 51 PTF optical transient detections, found in commissioning data.

  13. Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory's Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

  14. Key results of battery performance and life tests at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    DeLuca, W.H.; Gillie, K.R.; Kulaga, J.E.; Smaga, J.A.; Tummillo, A.F.; Webster, C.E.

    1991-12-31

    Advanced battery technology evaluations are performed under simulated electric vehicle operating conditions at Argonne National Laboratory`s & Diagnostic Laboratory (ADL). The ADL provide a common basis for both performance characterization and life evaluation with unbiased application of tests and analyses. This paper summarizes the performance characterizations and life evaluations conducted in 1991 on twelve single cells and eight 3- to 360-cell modules that encompass six battery technologies (Na/S, Li/MS, Ni/MH, Zn/Br, Ni/Fe, and Pb-Acid). These evaluations were performed for the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Division. The results measure progress in battery R & D programs, compare battery technologies, and provide basic data for modeling and continuing R & D to battery users, developers, and program managers.

  15. Imaging of Venus from Galileo: Early results and camera performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belton, M.J.S.; Gierasch, P.; Klaasen, K.P.; Anger, C.D.; Carr, M.H.; Chapman, C.R.; Davies, M.E.; Greeley, R.; Greenberg, R.; Head, J.W.; Neukum, G.; Pilcher, C.B.; Veverka, J.; Fanale, F.P.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Pollock, J.B.; Morrison, D.; Clary, M.C.; Cunningham, W.; Breneman, H.

    1992-01-01

    Three images of Venus have been returned so far by the Galileo spacecraft following an encounter with the planet on UT February 10, 1990. The images, taken at effective wavelengths of 4200 and 9900 A??, characterize the global motions and distribution of haze near the Venus cloud tops and, at the latter wavelength, deep within the main cloud. Previously undetected markings are clearly seen in the near-infrared image. The global distribution of these features, which have maximum contrasts of 3%, is different from that recorded at short wavelengths. In particular, the "polar collar," which is omnipresent in short wavelength images, is absent at 9900 A??. The maximum contrast in the features at 4200 A?? is about 20%. The optical performance of the camera is described and is judged to be nominal. ?? 1992.

  16. High performance CLSM field mixing and pumping test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendran, N.; Langton, C.A.

    1997-05-14

    An improved low bleed water CLSM mix was field tested on May 13, 1997 at the Throop portable auger batching plant. Production and pumping tests were very successful. The four cubic yards of material pumped into a ply wood form where it flowed 48 feet (the entire length of the form). The CLSM slurry was very uniform, self leveling, cohesive, showed no segregation, and had no bleed water. Properties of the High Performance CLSM were the same for material collected at the auger and at the end of the pipeline except for the air content which was 5.5% at the auger and 3.2% at the end of the pipeline. This is exactly what was expected and indicates that this CLSM is easy to mix and pump in the Throop/BSRI equipment. CLSM Mix TW-10 is recommended for Tank Closure based on the field batching and pumping tests.

  17. First CUORE-0 Performance Results and Status of CUORE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonica, L.; Artusa, D. R.; Avignone, F. T.; Azzolini, O.; Balata, M.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Bloxham, T.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Cai, X. Z.; Camacho, A.; Cao, X.; Capelli, S.; Carbone, L.; Cardani, L.; Carrettoni, M.; Casali, N.; Chiesa, D.; Chott, N.; Clemenza, M.; Cosmelli, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Dafinei, I.; Dally, A.; Datskov, V.; De Biasi, A.; Deninno, M. M.; Di Domizio, S.; di Vacri, M. L.; Ejzak, L.; Faccini, R.; Fang, D. Q.; Farach, H. A.; Faverzani, M.; Fernandes, G.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Franceschi, M. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Goett, J.; Gorla, P.; Gotti, C.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Han, K.; Heeger, K. M.; Huang, H. Z.; Kadel, R.; Kazkaz, K.; Keppel, G.; Kogler, L.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lenz, D.; Li, Y. L.; Ligi, C.; Liu, X.; Ma, Y. G.; Maiano, C.; Maino, M.; Martinez, M.; Maruyama, R. H.; Mei, Y.; Moggi, N.; Morganti, S.; Napolitano, T.; Newman, S.; Nisi, S.; Nones, C.; Norman, E. B.; Nucciotti, A.; O'Donnell, T.; Orio, F.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Piperno, G.; Pira, C.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Rampazzo, V.; Rimondi, F.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Sala, E.; Sangiorgio, S.; Scielzo, N. D.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Taffarello, L.; Tenconi, M.; Terranova, F.; Tian, W. D.; Tomei, C.; Trentalange, S.; Ventura, G.; Vignati, M.; Wang, B. S.; Wang, H. W.; Wielgus, L.; Wilson, J.; Wise, T.; Woodcraft, A.; Zanotti, L.; Zarra, C.; Zhu, B. X.; Zucchelli, S.

    2014-09-01

    The CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay in Te. Observation of the process would unambiguously establish that neutrinos are Majorana particles as well as provide information about the absolute neutrino mass scale and mass hierarchy.The CUORE setup will consist of an array of 988 tellurium dioxide crystals (containing 206 kg of Te in total), operated as bolometers at a temperature of 10 mK. The experiment is now under construction at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy. As a first step towards CUORE, a tower (CUORE-0) has been assembled and is taking data. Here a detailed description of the CUORE-0 tower and its performance is reported. The status of the CUORE experiment and its expected sensitivity will then be discussed.

  18. Performance results of the ICON FUV sealed tube converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, N. T.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Curtis, T.; Jelinsky, S.; McPhate, J.; Tedesco, J.

    2015-09-01

    The ICON Far Ultra Violet Imaging Spectrograph (ICON FUV) instrument includes one sealed tube microchannel plate (MCP) converter for each of two (135.6 nm and 157 nm wavelength) channels. These are each integrated with a CCD camera assembly to provide ICON FUV's sensor systems. The ICON FUV sealed tube converters have a 27mm active area and include a double MCP stack with a cesium iodide (CsI) photocathode, a magnesium fluoride (MgF2) input window, a ceramic and Kovar brazed mechanical structure and a phosphor output screen. Performance characteristics are measured for each detector throughout manufacturing and before shipping and include the collection of gain-voltage data, pulse height distributions, flat field images of the output window, background count rates and images, quantum efficiency curves and resolution characteristics. The design and testing of the ICON FUV sealed tube converters are described here.

  19. High Performance Magnetic Bearings for Aero Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Knospe, C. R.; Williams, R. D.; Lewis, D. W.; Barrett, L. E.; Maslen, E. H.; Humphris, R. R.

    1997-01-01

    Several previous annual reports were written and numerous papers published on the topics for this grant. That work is not repeated here in this final report. Only the work completed in the final year of the grant is presented in this final report. This final year effort concentrated on power loss measurements in magnetic bearing rotors. The effect of rotor power losses in magnetic bearings are very important for many applications. In some cases, these losses must be minimized to maximize the length of time the rotating machine can operate on a fixed energy or power supply. Examples include aircraft gas turbine engines, space devices, or energy storage flywheels. In other applications, the heating caused by the magnetic bearing must be removed. Excessive heating can be a significant problem in machines as diverse as large compressors, electric motors, textile spindles, and artificial heart pumps.

  20. Railgun hybrid armatures, experimental results and performance characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Roger; Keefer, Dennis; Sedghinasab, Ahad

    1991-01-01

    Six hybrid armature designs were evaluated in the UTSI one-centimeter square-bore railgun. Advanced diagnostic instrumentation was used to determine the characteristics of hybrid armatures which include a compound armature (current in plasma brushes to the metal armature followed by a plasma armature). The hybrid armatures were compact, with shorter current distributions than plasma armatures as measured with both optical and electromagnetic probes. Although the results are preliminary, due to the limited geometries investigated, the results are very encouraging. The short (less than one-bore-diameter) hybrids demonstrated efficiencies equal to or greater than plasma armatures and good armature stability.

  1. Environmentalism, Performance and Applications: Uncertainties and Emancipations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heddon, Deirdre; Mackey, Sally

    2012-01-01

    This introductory article for a themed edition on environmentalism provides a particular context for those articles that follow, each of which engages with different aspects of environmentalism and performance in community-related settings. Responding to the proposition of Bottoms that there is a lacuna in the field of applied drama and…

  2. Performance and Results of the NAOS Visible Wavefront Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, P.; Dorn, R. J.; Rousset, G.; Cavadore, C.; Charton, J.; Cumani, C.; Fusco, T.; Hubin, N.; Kern, P.; Lizon, J. L.; Magnard, Y.; Puget, P.; Rabaud, D.; Rabou, P.; Stadler, E.

    The Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS) was installed in December 2001 on the Nasmyth focus of the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). It includes two wavefront sensors: one operates at IR wavelengths, the other at visible wavelengths. This paper describes the NAOS visible wavefront sensor based on a Shack-Hartmann principle. This wavefront sensor unit includes: 1) A continuous flow liquid nitrogen cryostat and a low noise fast readout CCD camera controlled by the ESO new generation CCD system FIERA using a fast frame rate EEV/Marconi CCD-50. This 128´128 pixels split frame transfer device has a readout noise of 3 e- at 50 Kpix/sec/port. FIERA provides remotely controlled readout modes with optional binning, windowing and flexible integration time. 2) Two remotely exchangeable micro-lens arrays (14´14 and 7´7 micro-lenses) cooled to the CCD temperature ( -100 °C). The CCD array is directly located in the micro lenses focal plane, only a few millimeters apart without any relay optics. Additional opto-mechanical functions are also provided (atmospheric dispersion compensator, flux level control, field of view limitation). On-sky performances of the wavefront sensor are presented. Adaptive optics corrections were obtained with a reference star as faint as visible magnitude 17. The maximum achievable band-path is 35 Hz at 0 dB for the open loop transfer function.

  3. Planck early results. II. The thermal performance of Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Baker, M.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhandari, P.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borders, J.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bowman, B.; Bradshaw, T.; Bréelle, E.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cabella, P.; Camus, P.; Cantalupo, C. M.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chambelland, J. P.; Charra, J.; Charra, M.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chiang, C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Collaudin, B.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Crook, M.; Cuttaia, F.; Damasio, C.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dolag, K.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Fourmond, J.-J.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Gavila, E.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guyot, G.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Israelsson, U.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lami, P.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Lee, R.; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maciaszek, T.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melot, F.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Mora, J.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nash, A.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, D.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Prézeau, G.; Prina, M.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Stassi, P.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, C.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Wilson, P.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zhang, B.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    The performance of the Planck instruments in space is enabled by their low operating temperatures, 20 K for LFI and 0.1 K for HFI, achieved through a combination of passive radiative cooling and three active mechanical coolers. The scientific requirement for very broad frequency coverage led to two detector technologies with widely different temperature and cooling needs. Active coolers could satisfy these needs; a helium cryostat, as used by previous cryogenic space missions (IRAS, COBE, ISO, Spitzer, AKARI), could not. Radiative cooling is provided by three V-groove radiators and a large telescope baffle. The active coolers are a hydrogen sorption cooler (<20 K), a 4He Joule-Thomson cooler (4.7 K), and a 3He-4He dilution cooler (1.4 K and 0.1 K). The flight system was at ambient temperature at launch and cooled in space to operating conditions. The HFI bolometer plate reached 93 mK on 3 July 2009, 50 days after launch. The solar panel always faces the Sun, shadowing the rest of Planck, andoperates at a mean temperature of 384 K. At the other end of the spacecraft, the telescope baffle operates at 42.3 K and the telescope primary mirror operates at 35.9 K. The temperatures of key parts of the instruments are stabilized by both active and passive methods. Temperature fluctuations are driven by changes in the distance from the Sun, sorption cooler cycling and fluctuations in gas-liquid flow, and fluctuations in cosmic ray flux on the dilution and bolometer plates. These fluctuations do not compromise the science data.

  4. Deployer Performance Results for the TSS-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Leland S.; Geiger, Ronald V.

    1995-01-01

    Performance of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) Deployer during the STS-46 mission (July and August 1992) is analyzed in terms of hardware operation at the component and system level. Although only a limited deployment of the satellite was achieved (256 meters vs 20 kilometers planned), the mission served to verify the basic capability of the Deployer to release, control and retrieve a tethered satellite. - Deployer operational flexibility that was demonstrated during the flight is also addressed. Martin Marietta was the prime contractor for the development of the Deployer, under management of the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The satellite was provided by Alenia, Torino, Italy under contract to the Agencia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). Proper operation of the avionics components and the majority of mechanisms was observed during the flight. System operations driven by control laws for the deployment and retrieval of the satellite were also successful for the limited deployment distance. Anomalies included separation problems for one of the two umbilical connectors between the Deployer and satellite, tether jamming (at initial Satellite fly-away and at a deployment distance of 224 meters), and a mechanical interference which prevented tether deployment beyond 256 meters. The Deployer was used in several off-nominal conditions to respond to these anomalies, which ultimately enabled a successful satellite retrieval and preservation of hardware integrity for a future re-flight. The paper begins with an introduction defining the significance of the TSS-1 mission. The body of the paper is divided into four major sections: (1) Description of Deployer System and Components, (2) Deployer Components/Systems Demonstrating Successful Operation, (3) Hardware Anomalies and Operational Responses, and (4) Design Modifications for the TSS-1R Re-flight Mission. Conclusions from the TSS-1 mission, including lessons learned are presented at the end of the

  5. SCExAO: First Results and On-Sky Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; McElwain, Michael; Thalmann, Christian; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present new on-sky results for the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics imager (SCExAO) verifying and quantifying the contrast gain enabled by key components: the closed-loop coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor (CLOWFS) and focal plane wavefront control ("speckle nulling"). SCExAO will soon be coupled with a high-order, Pyramid wavefront sensor which will yield greater than 90% Strehl ratio and enable 10(exp 6) -10(exp 7) contrast at small angular separations allowing us to image gas giant planets at solar system scales. Upcoming instruments like VAMPIRES, FIRST, and CHARIS will expand SCExAO's science capabilities.

  6. SCExAO: First Results and On-Sky Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; McElwain, Michael; Thalmann, Christian; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    We present new on-sky results for the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics imager (SCExAO) verifying and quantifying the contrast gain enabled by key components: the closed-loop coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor (CLOWFS) and focal plane wavefront control (``speckle nulling''). SCExAO will soon be coupled with a high-order, Pyramid wavefront sensor which will yield > 90% Strehl ratio and enable 106-107 contrast at small angular separations allowing us to image gas giant planets at solar system scales. Upcoming instruments like VAMPIRES, FIRST, and CHARIS will expand SCExAO's science capabilities.

  7. Results from the first 4 years of pay for performance.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Susan D

    2010-01-01

    Some of the lessons hospitals that have participated in the Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration project have learned include: the need to tie in quality-of-care initiatives to the organization's strategic plan and to incentive plans for all employees, from executives on down; the value in allowing hospital physicians to "own" quality improvement initiatives; the importance of making results of the initiative available to all staff; the benefit of creating best-practice teams to address improvements in specific clinical areas. PMID:20088476

  8. Performance Degradation of Cryocoolers for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhyankar, Nandu; Roberts, Tom; Davis, Thom; Tomlinson, B. J.

    2004-06-01

    The Cryogenic Cooling Technology Group at the US Air Force Research Laboratory supports development of prototype cryocoolers to meet Department of Defense requirements for space surveillance and target detection. Some coolers have shown deterioration in performance during the detailed laboratory characterization and endurance evaluation. Some of them have shown anomalies due to material choice, contamination, manufacturing defects, or some yet unknown factors. The degradation is either manifested gradually, such as due to leaks, or abruptly, such as vibration-noise. The general causes and concerns for space cryocooler performance degradation are presented in the beginning followed by case studies of some of the developmental coolers, given in order to communicate lessons learned to the cryocooler community.

  9. High-performance microlasers enable display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eric B.; Hargis, David E.; Bergstedt, Robert; Dion, Al; Hurtado, Randy; Solone, Paul J.

    1999-08-01

    Recent advances in compact, air-cooled, diode-pumped solid- state visible microlasers have enabled the development of portable laser display systems. In addition to the added benefits of large color gamut, invariant color accuracy, image uniformity, high contrast, and large depth of focus inherent in the microlaser design, the reliability of these all-solid state red-green-blue (RGB) sources make them attractive for display applications. Compact, multi-watt laser modules have been demonstrated for use as a high brightness 'laser light engine' for replacing arc lamps in LCD/DMD type display configurations. Using this 'backlit' approach, a microlaser- based projector has been demonstrated, providing greater than 500 lumens at 1280 X 1024 resolution using reflective AMLCD light valves. Also being developed is an airborne tactical HMD system wherein the laser module is remotely coupled to a subtractive color LCD assembly through an optical fiber to provide a more than 24,000,000 (twenty-four million) cd/m2 luminance for illuminating the LCD assembly. This technology could be applied to a variety of cockpit displays providing sunlight readable illumination for both head-down and head-up backlit display configurations. The advantages of the microlaser technology will enable further applications in other military platforms such as command and control centers, simulators and HMDs. Longer term potential includes high end CAD workstations, entertainment systems, and electronic cinema.

  10. EEG applications for sport and performance.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Trevor; Steffert, Tony; Ros, Tomas; Leach, Joseph; Gruzelier, John

    2008-08-01

    One approach to understanding processes that underlie skilled performing has been to study electrical brain activity using electroencephalography (EEG). A notorious problem with EEG is that genuine cerebral data is often contaminated by artifacts of non-cerebral origin. Unfortunately, such artifacts tend to be exacerbated when the subject is in motion, meaning that obtaining reliable data during exercise is inherently problematic. These problems may explain the limited number of studies using EEG as a methodological tool in the sports sciences. This paper discusses how empirical studies have generally tackled the problem of movement artifact by adopting alternative paradigms which avoid recording during actual physical exertion. Moreover, the specific challenges that motion presents to obtaining reliable EEG data are discussed along with practical and computational techniques to confront these challenges. Finally, as EEG recording in sports is often underpinned by a desire to optimise performance, a brief review of EEG-biofeedback and peak performance studies is also presented. A knowledge of practical aspects of EEG recording along with the advent of new technology and increasingly sophisticated processing models offer a promising approach to minimising, if perhaps not entirely circumventing, the problem of obtaining reliable EEG data during motion. PMID:18682293

  11. Performance measurement and modeling of component applications in a high performance computing environment : a case study.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Robert C.; Ray, Jaideep; Malony, A.; Shende, Sameer; Trebon, Nicholas D.

    2003-11-01

    We present a case study of performance measurement and modeling of a CCA (Common Component Architecture) component-based application in a high performance computing environment. We explore issues peculiar to component-based HPC applications and propose a performance measurement infrastructure for HPC based loosely on recent work done for Grid environments. A prototypical implementation of the infrastructure is used to collect data for a three components in a scientific application and construct performance models for two of them. Both computational and message-passing performance are addressed.

  12. Performance of the VLT Planet Finder SPHERE. II. Data analysis and results for IFS in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, D.; Gratton, R.; Zurlo, A.; Vigan, A.; Claudi, R. U.; Alberi, M.; Antichi, J.; Baruffolo, A.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Costille, A.; Desidera, S.; Dohlen, K.; Fantinel, D.; Feldt, M.; Fusco, T.; Giro, E.; Henning, T.; Kasper, M.; Langlois, M.; Maire, A.-L.; Martinez, P.; Moeller-Nilsson, O.; Mouillet, D.; Moutou, C.; Pavlov, A.; Puget, P.; Salasnich, B.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Sissa, E.; Turatto, M.; Udry, S.; Vakili, F.; Waters, R.; Wildi, F.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: We present the performance of the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) of SPHERE, the high-contrast imager for the ESO VLT telescope designed to perform imaging and spectroscopy of extrasolar planets, obtained from tests performed at the Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble facility during the integration phase of the instrument. Methods: The tests were performed using the instrument software purposely prepared for SPHERE. The output data were reduced applying the SPHERE data reduction and handling software, adding an improved spectral deconvolution procedure. To this aim, we prepared an alternative procedure for the spectral subtraction exploiting the principal component analysis algorithm. Moreover, a simulated angular differential imaging procedure was also implemented to estimate how the instrument performed once this procedure was applied at telescope. The capability of the IFS to faithfully retrieve the spectra of the detected faint companions was also considered. Results: We found that the application of the updated version of the spectral deconvolution procedure alone, when the algorithm throughput is properly taken into account, gives us a 5σ limiting contrast of the order of 5 × 10-6 or slightly better. The further application of the angular differential imaging procedure on these data should allow us to improve the contrast by one order of magnitude down to around 7 × 10-7 at a separation of 0.3 arcsec. The application of a principal component analysis procedure that simultaneously uses spectral and angular data gives comparable results. Finally, we found that the reproducibility of the spectra of the detected faint companions is greatly improved when angular differential imaging is applied in addition to the spectral deconvolution.

  13. High performance zinc anode for battery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, John E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved zinc anode for use in a high density rechargeable alkaline battery is disclosed. A process for making the zinc electrode comprises electrolytic loading of the zinc active material from a slightly acidic zinc nitrate solution into a substrate of nickel, copper or silver. The substrate comprises a sintered plaque having very fine pores, a high surface area, and 80-85 percent total initial porosity. The residual porosity after zinc loading is approximately 25-30%. The electrode of the present invention exhibits reduced zinc mobility, shape change and distortion, and demonstrates reduced dendrite buildup cycling of the battery. The disclosed battery is useful for applications requiring high energy density and multiple charge capability.

  14. High-Performance Energy Applications and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Barton

    2014-05-19

    The Paradyn project has a history of developing algorithms, techniques, and software that push the cutting edge of tool technology for high-end computing systems. Under this funding, we are working on a three-year agenda to make substantial new advances in support of new and emerging Petascale systems. The overall goal for this work is to address the steady increase in complexity of these petascale systems. Our work covers two key areas: (1) The analysis, instrumentation and control of binary programs. Work in this area falls under the general framework of the Dyninst API tool kits. (2) Infrastructure for building tools and applications at extreme scale. Work in this area falls under the general framework of the MRNet scalability framework. Note that work done under this funding is closely related to work done under a contemporaneous grant, “Foundational Tools for Petascale Computing”, SC0003922/FG02-10ER25940, UW PRJ27NU.

  15. Eight Pulse Performance of DARHT Axis II - Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, Martin E.

    2015-12-08

    The DARHT-II accelerator produces a 1.65-kA, 17-MeV beam in a 1600-ns pulse. Standard operation of the DARHT Axis II accelerator involves extracting four short pulses from the 1.6 us long macro-pulse produced by the LIA. The four short pulses are extracted using a fast kicker in combination with a quadrupole septum magnet and then transported for several meters to a high-Z material target for conversion to x-rays for radiography. The ability of the DARHT Axis 2 kicker to produce more than the standard four pulse format has been previously demonstrated. This capability was developed to study potential risks associated with beam transport during an initial commissioning phase at low energy (8 MeV) and low current (1.0 kA).The ability of the kicker to deliver more than four pulses to the target has been realized for many years. This note describes the initial results demonstrating this capability.

  16. 7X performance results - final report : ASCI Red vs Red Storm.

    SciTech Connect

    Dinge, Dennis C.; Davis, Michael E.; Haskell, Karen H.; Ballance, Robert A.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony; Stevenson, Joel O.; Noe, John P.

    2011-04-01

    The goal of the 7X performance testing was to assure Sandia National Laboratories, Cray Inc., and the Department of Energy that Red Storm would achieve its performance requirements which were defined as a comparison between ASCI Red and Red Storm. Our approach was to identify one or more problems for each application in the 7X suite, run those problems at multiple processor sizes in the capability computing range, and compare the results between ASCI Red and Red Storm. The first part of this report describes the two computer systems, the applications in the 7X suite, the test problems, and the results of the performance tests on ASCI Red and Red Storm. During the course of the testing on Red Storm, we had the opportunity to run the test problems in both single-core mode and dual-core mode and the second part of this report describes those results. Finally, we reflect on lessons learned in undertaking a major head-to-head benchmark comparison.

  17. Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

  18. High performance computing applications in neurobiological research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Cheng, Rei; Doshay, David G.; Linton, Samuel W.; Montgomery, Kevin; Parnas, Bruce R.

    1994-01-01

    The human nervous system is a massively parallel processor of information. The vast numbers of neurons, synapses and circuits is daunting to those seeking to understand the neural basis of consciousness and intellect. Pervading obstacles are lack of knowledge of the detailed, three-dimensional (3-D) organization of even a simple neural system and the paucity of large scale, biologically relevant computer simulations. We use high performance graphics workstations and supercomputers to study the 3-D organization of gravity sensors as a prototype architecture foreshadowing more complex systems. Scaled-down simulations run on a Silicon Graphics workstation and scale-up, three-dimensional versions run on the Cray Y-MP and CM5 supercomputers.

  19. 3-dimensional auditory displays: development, applications, and performance.

    PubMed

    McKinley, R L; Erickson, M A; D'Angelo, W R

    1994-05-01

    Virtual or 3-D audio display technology has become a reality. This type of system has the capability of synthesizing signals presented over headphones that give the user the illusion that the sound is emanating from some external location. The development of this technology, its applications, and its performance in both laboratory and flight test situations are presented. Potential fighter aircraft applications include threat location warning, wingman location indication, spatially separated multi-channel communications, and audio target location indications. The laboratory performance data show an average localization error in azimuth of approximately 5 degrees, a minimum audible angle of approximately 5 degrees, and a speech intelligibility improvement of up to 28%. Flight test results demonstrated successful audio cued target acquisition, a subjective decrease in target acquisition times, a subjective improvement in speech intelligibility, a subjective increase in situational awareness, and a subjective decrease in pilot workload. A summary of both laboratory and flight test results is presented in addition to recommendations for future research. PMID:8018076

  20. Active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) performance and life test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Hastings, Arthur R., Jr.; Draper, Russell S.; Ghosh, Amalkumar; Prache, Olivier; Wacyk, Ihor; Ali, Tariq; Khayrullin, Ilyas

    2011-06-01

    The US Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. Through research and development programs from 2007 to 2010 with the US Government, eMagin made additional improvements in OLED life and developed the first SXGA (1280 X 1024 triad pixels) OLED microdisplay. US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life and performance tests on these displays, publishing results at the 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010 SPIE Defense and Security Symposia1,2,3,4. Life and performance tests have continued through 2010, and this data will be presented along with a recap of previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems: where good fits are made, and where further development might be desirable.

  1. Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) performance and life test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Hastings, Arthur R., Jr.; Draper, Russell S.; Lum, Alden K.; Ghosh, Amalkumar P.; Prache, Olivier; Wacyk, Ihor

    2010-04-01

    The US Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XLTM devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. Through Research and Development programs from 2007 to 2009 with the US Government, eMagin made additional improvements in OLED life and developed the first SXGA (1280 × 1024 triad pixels) OLED microdisplay. US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life and performance tests on these displays, publishing results at the 2007, 2008, and 2009 SPIE Defense and Security Symposia1,2,3. Life and performance tests have continued through 2009, and this data will be presented along with a recap of previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems: where good fits are made, and where further development might be desirable.

  2. Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) performance and life test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Hastings, Arthur R., Jr.; Draper, Russell S.; Ghosh, Amalkumar; Prache, Olivier; Wacyk, Ihor

    2012-06-01

    The US Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. Through Research and Development programs from 2007 to 2011 with the US Government, eMagin made additional improvements in OLED life and developed the first SXGA (1280 X 1024 triad pixels) and WUXGA (1920 X 1200) OLED microdisplays. US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life and performance tests on these displays, publishing results at the 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2007 SPIE Defense, Security and Sensing Symposia1,2,3,4,5. Life and performance tests have continued through 2012, and this data will be presented along with a recap of previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems by determining where good fits are made and where further development might be desirable.

  3. Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) performance and life test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Botkin, Michael E.; Draper, Russell S.; Coletta, Jason

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. Through Research and Development programs from 2007 to 2012 with the U.S. Government, eMagin made additional improvements in OLED life and developed the first SXGA (1280 X 1024 with triad pixels) and WUXGA (1920 X 1200 with triad pixels) OLED microdisplays. US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life and performance tests on these displays, publishing results at the 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2007 SPIE Defense, Security and Sensing Symposia. Life and performance tests have continued through 2013, and this data will be presented along with a comparison to previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems, where good fits are made, and where further development might be desirable.

  4. Performance optimization of scientific applications on emerging architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dursun, Hikmet

    The shift to many-core architecture design paradigm in computer market has provided unprecedented computational capabilities. This also marks the end of the free-ride era---scientific software must now evolve with new chips. Hence, it is of great importance to develop large legacy-code optimization frameworks to achieve an optimal system architecture-algorithm mapping that maximizes processor utilization and thereby achieves higher application performance. To address this challenge, this thesis studies and develops scalable algorithms for leveraging many-core resources optimally to improve the performance of massively parallel scientific applications. This work presents a systematic approach to optimize scientific codes on emerging architectures, which consists of three major steps: (1) Develop a performance profiling framework to identify application performance bottlenecks on clusters of emerging architectures; (2) explore common algorithmic kernels in a suite of real world scientific applications and develop performance tuning strategies to provide insight into how to maximally utilize underlying hardware; and (3) unify experience in performance optimization to develop a top-down optimization framework for the optimization of scientific applications on emerging high-performance computing platforms. This thesis makes the following contributions. First, we have designed and implemented a performance analysis methodology for Cell-accelerated clusters. Two parallel scientific applications---lattice Boltzmann (LB) flow simulation and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation---are analyzed and valuable performance insights are gained on a Cell processor based PlayStation3 cluster as well as a hybrid Opteron+Cell based cluster similar to the design of Roadrunner---the first petaflop supercomputer of the world. Second, we have developed a novel parallelization framework for finite-difference time-domain applications. The approach is validated in a seismic

  5. Analysis and performance of subsonic ejectors for pulsatile flow applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, J.G.; Liburdy, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    This study looks at the application of ejectors to four-stroke engines. The goal is to develop a system of exhaust gas emission control by premixing exhaust gas with fresh atmospheric air. The constraints on the system include relatively low pressure pulsatile flow of the primary gas, geometric constraints (small size), significant density differences between the two fluid streams and possible large back-pressure operating conditions. A model is applied to the ejector application to pulsatile flow based on a global control volume analysis. The model constrains the operating conditions based on conservation of mass, momentum and energy for incompressible flow conditions. The time dependent effects are modeled by including a representative inertia term in the momentum equation based on quasi-steady conditions. The results are used to illustrate the operating characteristics for a small four-stroke engine application. The sensitivity of operation to the operating and design parameters of the system are illustrated. In particular, the effects of the pulsatile flow on the operation are shown to increase the performance under certain operating conditions. The model simulation is compared to some data available in the literature.

  6. Titanium as reactor material for SCWO applications. First experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Boukis, N.; Friedrich, C.; Dinjus, E.

    1998-12-31

    According to literature data, nickel base alloys are not sufficiently corrosion resistant in chloride bearing SCWO environments. Titanium was proposed several times as a suitable material for the construction of a corrosion resistant reactor. Titanium does not show the required mechanical strength for high temperature high pressure applications and it can only be used to form liners for an SCWO apparatus. Therefore, pressure tubes made of alloy 625 were lined with titanium grade 2. Additionally corrosion tests with coupons made of titanium grades 2, 5, 7, 12 and {beta}-C were performed. The coupons were placed inside an alumina-lined reactor. Materials were exposed to simulated SCWO feeds consisting of water, oxygen and HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, or H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Experimental temperatures were up to 600 C, pressures up to 27 MPa and experimental times up to 200 hours. Corrosion in chloride containing solution is low. In the presence of sulfate or phosphate, corrosion of titanium grade 2 becomes severe. For these environments an upper limit of the corrosion rate could be estimated.

  7. The results of application studies for space nuclear power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isenberg, L.; Mcgraw, K.; Mankins, J.; Mondt, J.; Olivieri, J.

    1987-01-01

    The results are summarized of the studies over the last several years to identify and characterize potential applications for the SP-100 space nuclear reactor power system in powering spacecraft. SP-100 is a space power system based on a fast spectrum nuclear reactor with thermoelectric power conversion and liquid metal and heat pipe thermal transport. SP-100 reactor systems are designed to provide electric power with user designated characteristics at levels in the range from 10 to 1000 kWe. The use of nuclear reactors such as SP-100 as a power source provides a potential means of providing uninterrupted electrical power as required for many of todays space missions within acceptable cost and safety constraints.

  8. Characterizing exposures and neurobehavioral performance in Egyptian adolescent pesticide applicators

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ahmed A.; Abdel-Rasoul, Gaafar; Lasarev, Michael; Hendy, Olfat; Olson, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents may have occupational exposure to pesticides. Although previous studies examining prenatal pesticide exposure have identified neurobehavioral deficits in children, there are limited studies examining the impact of occupational exposure in children. The objectives of this study are to estimate exposures to the organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF), by measuring urinary levels of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), a specific CPF metabolite, and blood cholinesterase (ChE) activities and to characterize neurobehavioral performance in adolescents working as seasonal pesticide applicators and non-applicator controls. A neurobehavioral test battery, consisting of 14 tests, was used to assess a broad range of functions. Applicators performed worse than controls on the majority of tests. Principal component analysis was used to reduce the number of outcome variables and two components, focused on reasoning-short-term memory and attention-executive functioning, showed significant deficits in applicators compared to non-applicators. Elevated metabolite levels were found in the applicators compared to the non-applicators, confirming CPF exposure in the applicators. Although this study is limited by a small sample size, it provides preliminary evidence of moderate CPF exposures, decreased blood ChE in some applicators and decreased neurobehavioral performance in an adolescent working population. PMID:24833556

  9. LDEF materials results for spacecraft applications: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Compiler); Dooling, D. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    To address the challenges of space environmental effects, NASA designed the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for an 18-month mission to expose thousands of samples of candidate materials that might be used on a space station or other orbital spacecraft. LDEF was launched in April 1984 and was to have been returned to Earth in 1985. Changes in mission schedules postponed retrieval until January 1990, after 69 months in orbit. Analyses of the samples recovered from LDEF have provided spacecraft designers and managers with the most extensive data base on space materials phenomena. Many LDEF samples were greatly changed by extended space exposure. Among even the most radially altered samples, NASA and its science teams are finding a wealth of surprising conclusions and tantalizing clues about the effects of space on materials. Many were discussed at the first two LDEF results conferences and subsequent professional papers. The LDEF Materials Results for Spacecraft Applications Conference was convened in Huntsville to discuss implications for spacecraft design. Already, paint and thermal blanket selections for space station and other spacecraft have been affected by LDEF data. This volume synopsizes those results.

  10. Performance characteristics of the Cray X1 and their implicationsfor application performance tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Hogzhang; Strohmaier, Erich

    2004-05-11

    During the last decade the scientific computing community has optimized many applications for execution on superscalar computing platforms. The recent arrival of the Japanese Earth Simulator has revived interest in vector architectures especially in the US. It is important to examine how to port our current scientific applications to the new vector platforms and how to achieve high performance. The success of porting these applications will also influence the acceptance of new vector architectures. In this paper, we first investigate the memory performance characteristics of the Cray X1, a recently released vector platform, and determine the most influential performance factors. Then, we examine how to optimize applications tuned on superscalar platforms for the Cray X1 using its performance characteristics as guidelines. Finally, we evaluate the different types of optimizations used, the effort for their implementations, and whether they provide any performance benefits when ported back to superscalar platforms.

  11. Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts WW Casing Connection on 7" Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Watts

    2000-02-01

    Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his ''WW'' threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This work was a continuation of testing performed by SES as reported in August of 1999. The connection design tested was identified as ''WW''. The samples were all integral (no coupled connections) and contained a wedge thread form with 90{sup o} flank angles relative to the pipe centerline. The wedge thread form is a variable width thread that primarily engages on the flanks. This thread form provides very high torque capacity and good stabbing ability and makeup. The test procedure selected for one of the samples was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections, which is currently going through the ISO acceptance process. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test procedure was performed with one sample. Four samples were tested to failure. Table 1 contains a summary of the tasks performed by SES. The project started with the delivery of test samples by Mr. Watts. Pipe from the previous round of tests was used for the new samples. Figure 1 shows the structural and sealing results relative to the pipe body. Sample 1 was used to determine the torque capacity of the connection. Torque was applied to the capacity of SES's equipment which was 28,424 ft-lbs. From this, an initial recommended torque range of 7,200 to 8,800 ft-lbs. was selected. The sample was disassembled and while there was no galling observed in the threads, the end of the pin had collapsed inward. Sample 2 received three makeups. Breakouts 1 and 2 also had collapsing of the pin end, with no thread galling. From these make/breaks, it was decided to reduce the amount of lubricant

  12. High Performance Computing Software Applications for Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, C.; Schumacher, P.; Matson, C.; Chun, F.; Duncan, B.; Borelli, K.; Desonia, R.; Gusciora, G.; Roe, K.

    The High Performance Computing Software Applications Institute for Space Situational Awareness (HSAI-SSA) has completed its first full year of applications development. The emphasis of our work in this first year was in improving space surveillance sensor models and image enhancement software. These applications are the Space Surveillance Network Analysis Model (SSNAM), the Air Force Space Fence simulation (SimFence), and physically constrained iterative de-convolution (PCID) image enhancement software tool. Specifically, we have demonstrated order of magnitude speed-up in those codes running on the latest Cray XD-1 Linux supercomputer (Hoku) at the Maui High Performance Computing Center. The software applications improvements that HSAI-SSA has made, has had significant impact to the warfighter and has fundamentally changed the role of high performance computing in SSA.

  13. Architecture independent performance characterization andbenchmarking for scientific applications

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Shan, Hongzhang

    2004-08-31

    A simple, tunable, synthetic benchmark with a performance directly related to applications would be of great benefit to the scientific computing community. In this paper, we present a novel approach to develop such a benchmark. The initial focus of this project is on data access performance of scientific applications. First a hardware independent characterization of code performance in terms of address streams is developed. The parameters chosen to characterize a single address stream are related to regularity, size, spatial, and temporal locality. These parameters are then used to implement a synthetic benchmark program that mimics the performance of a corresponding code. To test the validity of our approach we performed experiments using five test kernels on six different platforms. The performance of most of our test kernels can be approximated by a single synthetic address stream. However in some cases overlapping two address streams is necessary to achieve a good approximation.

  14. Spiral microstrip hyperthermia applicators: technical design and clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Samulski, T V; Fessenden, P; Lee, E R; Kapp, D S; Tanabe, E; McEuen, A

    1990-01-01

    Spiral microstrip microwave (MW) antennas have been developed and adapted for use as clinical hyperthermia applicators. The design has been configured in a variety of forms including single fixed antenna applicators, multi-element arrays, and mechanically scanned single or paired antennas. The latter three configurations have been used to allow an expansion of the effective heating area. Specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions measured in phantom have been used to estimate the depth and volume of effective heating. The estimates are made using the bioheat equation assuming uniformly perfused tissue. In excess of 500 treatments of patients with advanced or recurrent localized superficial tumors have been performed using this applicator technology. Data from clinical treatments have been analyzed to quantify the heating performance and verify the suitability of these applicators for clinical use. Good microwave coupling efficiency together with the compact applicator size have proved to be valuable clinical assets. PMID:2298626

  15. Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED)-XL performance and life test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Hastings, Arthur R., Jr.; Draper, Russell S.; Lum, Alden K.; Ghosh, Amalkumar P.; Prache, Olivier; Wacyk, Ihor

    2009-05-01

    The US Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life tests on these displays, finding over 200% lifetime improvement for the OLED-XL devices over the standard OLED displays, publishing results at the 2007 and 2008 SPIE Defense and Security Symposia1,2. In 2008, eMagin Corporation made additional improvements on the lifetime of their displays and developed the first SXGA (1280 × 1024 triad pixels) OLED microdisplay. A summary of the life and performance tests run at CERDEC NVESD will be presented along with a recap of previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems: where good fits are made, and where further development might be desirable.

  16. JT9D performance deterioration results from a simulated aerodynamic load test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Stromberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of testing to identify the effects of simulated aerodynamic flight loads on JT9D engine performance are presented. The test results were also used to refine previous analytical studies on the impact of aerodynamic flight loads on performance losses. To accomplish these objectives, a JT9D-7AH engine was assembled with average production clearances and new seals as well as extensive instrumentation to monitor engine performance, case temperatures, and blade tip clearance changes. A special loading device was designed and constructed to permit application of known moments and shear forces to the engine by the use of cables placed around the flight inlet. The test was conducted in the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft X-Ray Test Facility to permit the use of X-ray techniques in conjunction with laser blade tip proximity probes to monitor important engine clearance changes. Upon completion of the test program, the test engine was disassembled, and the condition of gas path parts and final clearances were documented. The test results indicate that the engine lost 1.1 percent in thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), as measured under sea level static conditions, due to increased operating clearances caused by simulated flight loads. This compares with 0.9 percent predicted by the analytical model and previous study efforts.

  17. JT9D performance deterioration results from a simulated aerodynamic load test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Stromberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the results of testing to identify the effects of simulated aerodynamic flight loads on JT9D engine performance. The test results were also used to refine previous analytical studies on the impact of aerodynamic flight loads on performance losses. To accomplish these objectives, a JT9D-7AH engine was assembled with average production clearances and new seals as well as extensive instrumentation to monitor engine performance, case temperatures, and blade tip clearance changes. A special loading device was designed and constructed to permit application of known moments and shear forces to the engine by the use of cables placed around the flight inlet. The test was conducted in the Pratt and Whitney Aircraft X-Ray Test Facility to permit the use of X-ray techniques in conjunction with laser blade tip proximity probes to monitor important engine clearance changes. Upon completion of the test program, the test engine was disassembled, and the condition of gas path parts and final clearances were documented. The test results indicate that the engine lost 1.1 percent in thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), as measured under sea level static conditions, due to increased operating clearances caused by simulated flight loads. This compares with 0.9 percent predicted by the analytical model and previous study efforts.

  18. Mathematical literacy in Plant Physiology undergraduates: results of interventions aimed at improving students' performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, Francisca; Sanz, Amparo

    2013-09-01

    The importance of mathematical literacy in any scientific career is widely recognized. However, various studies report lack of numeracy and mathematical literacy in students from various countries. In the present work, we present a detailed study of the mathematical literacy of Spanish undergraduate students of Biology enrolled in a Plant Physiology course. We have performed individual analyses of results obtained during the period 2000-2011, for questions in the examinations requiring and not requiring mathematical skills. Additionally, we present the outcome of two interventions introduced with the aim of helping students improve their prospects for success in the course. Our results confirm previous research showing students' deficiencies in mathematical skills. However, the scores obtained for mathematical questions in the examinations are good predictors of the final grades attained in Plant Physiology, as there are strong correlations at the individual level between results for questions requiring and not requiring mathematical skills. The introduction of a laboratory session devoted to strengthening the application of students' previously acquired mathematical knowledge did not change significantly the results obtained for mathematical questions. Since mathematical abilities of students entering university have declined in recent years, this intervention may have helped to maintain students' performance to a level comparable to that of previous years. The outcome of self-assessment online tests indicates that although Mathematics anxiety is lower than during examinations, the poor results obtained for questions requiring mathematical skills are, at least in part, due to a lack of self-efficacy.

  19. Applications Performance on NAS Intel Paragon XP/S - 15#

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Simon, Horst D.; Copper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division received an Intel Touchstone Sigma prototype model Paragon XP/S- 15 in February, 1993. The i860 XP microprocessor with an integrated floating point unit and operating in dual -instruction mode gives peak performance of 75 million floating point operations (NIFLOPS) per second for 64 bit floating point arithmetic. It is used in the Paragon XP/S-15 which has been installed at NAS, NASA Ames Research Center. The NAS Paragon has 208 nodes and its peak performance is 15.6 GFLOPS. Here, we will report on early experience using the Paragon XP/S- 15. We have tested its performance using both kernels and applications of interest to NAS. We have measured the performance of BLAS 1, 2 and 3 both assembly-coded and Fortran coded on NAS Paragon XP/S- 15. Furthermore, we have investigated the performance of a single node one-dimensional FFT, a distributed two-dimensional FFT and a distributed three-dimensional FFT Finally, we measured the performance of NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) on the Paragon and compare it with the performance obtained on other highly parallel machines, such as CM-5, CRAY T3D, IBM SP I, etc. In particular, we investigated the following issues, which can strongly affect the performance of the Paragon: a. Impact of the operating system: Intel currently uses as a default an operating system OSF/1 AD from the Open Software Foundation. The paging of Open Software Foundation (OSF) server at 22 MB to make more memory available for the application degrades the performance. We found that when the limit of 26 NIB per node out of 32 MB available is reached, the application is paged out of main memory using virtual memory. When the application starts paging, the performance is considerably reduced. We found that dynamic memory allocation can help applications performance under certain circumstances. b. Impact of data cache on the i860/XP: We measured the performance of the BLAS both assembly coded and Fortran

  20. Using high-performance networks to enable computational aerosciences applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1992-01-01

    One component of the U.S. Federal High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP) is the establishment of a gigabit network to provide a communications infrastructure for researchers across the nation. This gigabit network will provide new services and capabilities, in addition to increased bandwidth, to enable future applications. An understanding of these applications is necessary to guide the development of the gigabit network and other high-performance networks of the future. In this paper we focus on computational aerosciences applications run remotely using the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility located at NASA Ames Research Center. We characterize these applications in terms of network-related parameters and relate user experiences that reveal limitations imposed by the current wide-area networking infrastructure. Then we investigate how the development of a nationwide gigabit network would enable users of the NAS facility to work in new, more productive ways.

  1. Performance Thresholds for Application of MEMS Inertial Sensors in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smit, Geoffrey N.

    1995-01-01

    We review types of inertial sensors available and current usage of inertial sensors in space and the performance requirements for these applications. We then assess the performance available from micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) devices, both in the near and far term. Opportunities for the application of these devices are identified. A key point is that although the performance available from MEMS inertial sensors is significantly lower than that achieved by existing macroscopic devices (at least in the near term), the low cost, low size, and power of the MEMS devices opens up a number of applications. In particular, we show that there are substantial benefits to using MEMS devices to provide vibration, and for some missions, attitude sensing. In addition, augmentation for global positioning system (GPS) navigation systems holds much promise.

  2. Cost-Effective Hyperspectral Transmissometers for Oceanographic Applications: Performance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Pérez, Marta; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Torrecilla, Elena; Piera, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of inexpensive, compact hyperspectral transmissometers broadens the research capabilities of oceanographic applications. These developments have been achieved by incorporating technologies such as micro-spectrometers as detectors as well as light emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources. In this study, we evaluate the performance of the new commercial LED-based hyperspectral transmissometer VIPER (TriOS GmbH, Rastede, Germany), which combines different LEDs to emulate the visible light spectrum, aiming at the determination of attenuation coefficients in coastal environments. For this purpose, experimental uncertainties related to the instrument stability, the effect of ambient light and derived temperature, and salinity correction factors are analyzed. Our results identify some issues related to the thermal management of the LEDs and the contamination of ambient light. Furthermore, the performance of VIPER is validated against other transmissometers through simultaneous field measurements. It is demonstrated that VIPER provides a compact and cost-effective alternative for beam attenuation measurements in coastal waters, but it requires the consideration of several optimizations. PMID:26343652

  3. Performance Analysis of Multilevel Parallel Applications on Shared Memory Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jost, Gabriele; Jin, Haoqiang; Labarta, Jesus; Gimenez, Judit; Caubet, Jordi; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we describe how to apply powerful performance analysis techniques to understand the behavior of multilevel parallel applications. We use the Paraver/OMPItrace performance analysis system for our study. This system consists of two major components: The OMPItrace dynamic instrumentation mechanism, which allows the tracing of processes and threads and the Paraver graphical user interface for inspection and analyses of the generated traces. We describe how to use the system to conduct a detailed comparative study of a benchmark code implemented in five different programming paradigms applicable for shared memory

  4. Performance Evaluation of FPGA-Based Biological Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Storaasli, Olaf O; Yu, Weikuan; Strenski, Dave; Maltby, Jim

    2007-01-01

    On the forefront of recent HPC innovations are Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), which promise to accelerate calculations by one or more orders of magnitude. The performance of two Cray XD1 systems with Virtex-II Pro 50 and Virtex-4 LX160 FPGAs, were evaluated using a computational biological human genome comparisons program. This paper describes scalable, parallel, FPGA-accelerated results for the FASTA application ssearch34, using the Smith-Waterman algorithm for DNA, RNA and protein sequencing contained in the OpenFPGA benchmark suite. Results indicate typical Cray XD1 FPGA speedups of 50x (Virtex-II Pro 50) and 100x (Virtex-4 LX160) compared to a 2.2 GHz Opteron. Similar speedups are expected for the DRC RPU110-L200 modules (Virtex-4 LX200), which fit in an Opteron socket, and selected by Cray for its XT Supercomputers. The FPGA programming challenges, human genome benchmarking, and data verification of results, are discussed.

  5. End-to-end network/application performance troubleshooting methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenji; Bobyshev, Andrey; Bowden, Mark; Crawford, Matt; Demar, Phil; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Grigoriev, Maxim; Petravick, Don; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The computing models for HEP experiments are globally distributed and grid-based. Obstacles to good network performance arise from many causes and can be a major impediment to the success of the computing models for HEP experiments. Factors that affect overall network/application performance exist on the hosts themselves (application software, operating system, hardware), in the local area networks that support the end systems, and within the wide area networks. Since the computer and network systems are globally distributed, it can be very difficult to locate and identify the factors that are hurting application performance. In this paper, we present an end-to-end network/application performance troubleshooting methodology developed and in use at Fermilab. The core of our approach is to narrow down the problem scope with a divide and conquer strategy. The overall complex problem is split into two distinct sub-problems: host diagnosis and tuning, and network path analysis. After satisfactorily evaluating, and if necessary resolving, each sub-problem, we conduct end-to-end performance analysis and diagnosis. The paper will discuss tools we use as part of the methodology. The long term objective of the effort is to enable site administrators and end users to conduct much of the troubleshooting themselves, before (or instead of) calling upon network and operating system 'wizards,' who are always in short supply.

  6. An Approach to Performance Prediction for Parallel Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ipek, E; de Supinski, B R; Schulz, M; McKee, S A

    2005-05-17

    Accurately modeling and predicting performance for large-scale applications becomes increasingly difficult as system complexity scales dramatically. Analytic predictive models are useful, but are difficult to construct, usually limited in scope, and often fail to capture subtle interactions between architecture and software. In contrast, we employ multilayer neural networks trained on input data from executions on the target platform. This approach is useful for predicting many aspects of performance, and it captures full system complexity. Our models are developed automatically from the training input set, avoiding the difficult and potentially error-prone process required to develop analytic models. This study focuses on the high-performance, parallel application SMG2000, a much studied code whose variations in execution times are still not well understood. Our model predicts performance on two large-scale parallel platforms within 5%-7% error across a large, multi-dimensional parameter space.

  7. Texas Assessment of Academic Skills and TEAMS Exit Level. Student Performance Results, October 1990. Volume 2. Performance by School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    This report of the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) Student Performance Results lists performance results on the TAAS and the Texas Educational Assessment of Minimum Skills (TEAMS), an exit examination, alphabetically by school district for each grade level tested (grades 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 for the TAAS and grades 11 and 12 for the initial…

  8. Clinical results of Perftoran application: present and future.

    PubMed

    Maevsky, Eugene; Ivanitsky, Genrih; Bogdanova, Ludmila; Axenova, Olga; Karmen, Natalia; Zhiburt, Eugene; Senina, Raisa; Pushkin, Sergey; Maslennikov, Igor; Orlov, Andrey; Marinicheva, Irina

    2005-01-01

    Clinical experience of Perftoran (commercial drug of low concentrated perfluorocheminal emulsion) applications is presented in some statistical data and in brief analysis of clinical trials and following clinical studies described in the Russian scientific literature. Observed data allow us to suppose that Perftoran facilitates oxygen delivery together with remaining red blood cells at blood replacements and will have more wider area for application than just a blood substitute. Its infusion alleviates symptoms of ischemia at different types of occlusion vessels disease, improves grafting in plastic surgery, diminishes inflammation and prevents rejection of transplants, activates detoxication functions of liver, inhibits retro-virus infection development. Local PF applications is able to accelerate wounds and ulcers healing. PMID:15768564

  9. Invariant Measures for Dissipative Dynamical Systems: Abstract Results and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekroun, Mickaël D.; Glatt-Holtz, Nathan E.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we study certain invariant measures that can be associated to the time averaged observation of a broad class of dissipative semigroups via the notion of a generalized Banach limit. Consider an arbitrary complete separable metric space X which is acted on by any continuous semigroup { S( t)} t ≥ 0. Suppose that { S( t)} t ≥ 0 possesses a global attractor {{A}}. We show that, for any generalized Banach limit LIM T → ∞ and any probability distribution of initial conditions {{m}_0}, that there exists an invariant probability measure {{m}}, whose support is contained in {{A}}, such that intX \\varphi(x) d{m}(x) = \\underset{t rightarrow infty}LIM1/T int_0^T int_X \\varphi(S(t) x) d{m}_0(x) dt, for all observables φ living in a suitable function space of continuous mappings on X. This work is based on the framework of Foias et al. (Encyclopedia of mathematics and its applications, vol 83. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2001); it generalizes and simplifies the proofs of more recent works (Wang in Disc Cont Dyn Syst 23(1-2):521-540, 2009; Lukaszewicz et al. in J Dyn Diff Eq 23(2):225-250, 2011). In particular our results rely on the novel use of a general but elementary topological observation, valid in any metric space, which concerns the growth of continuous functions in the neighborhood of compact sets. In the case when { S( t)} t ≥ 0 does not possess a compact absorbing set, this lemma allows us to sidestep the use of weak compactness arguments which require the imposition of cumbersome weak continuity conditions and thus restricts the phase space X to the case of a reflexive Banach space. Two examples of concrete dynamical systems where the semigroup is known to be non-compact are examined in detail. We first consider the Navier-Stokes equations with memory in the diffusion terms. This is the so called Jeffery's model which describes certain classes of viscoelastic fluids. We then consider a family of neutral delay differential

  10. Vectorization of an applicative language: Current results and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Cann, D.C.

    1990-11-01

    The most important and challenging problem facing researchers today is the effective use of parallel processors. Few would deny that the biggest obstacle is the inadequacy of current software tools -- an inadequacy born of imperative programming. As an alternative, applicative and functional programming languages provide a cleaner and simpler parallel programming model. They hide architectural idiosyncrasies, guarantee determinancy, enforce software engineering principles, and in many ways simplify compilation. Regrettably these languages have acquired a reputation for inefficiency. In this report, we show that applicative programs do not require special hardware for efficient execution, and with little effort can automatically exploit concurrent and vector processors. 17 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the puritymore » requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.« less

  12. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the purity requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.

  13. An Integrated Architecture for Aircraft Engine Performance Monitoring and Fault Diagnostics: Engine Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Aidan W.; Simon, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based architecture for performance trend monitoring and gas path fault diagnostics designed for analyzing streaming transient aircraft engine measurement data. The technique analyzes residuals between sensed engine outputs and model predicted outputs for fault detection and isolation purposes. Diagnostic results from the application of the approach to test data acquired from an aircraft turbofan engine are presented. The approach is found to avoid false alarms when presented nominal fault-free data. Additionally, the approach is found to successfully detect and isolate gas path seeded-faults under steady-state operating scenarios although some fault misclassifications are noted during engine transients. Recommendations for follow-on maturation and evaluation of the technique are also presented.

  14. An Integrated Architecture for Aircraft Engine Performance Monitoring and Fault Diagnostics: Engine Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Aidan W.; Simon, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based architecture for performance trend monitoring and gas path fault diagnostics designed for analyzing streaming transient aircraft engine measurement data. The technique analyzes residuals between sensed engine outputs and model predicted outputs for fault detection and isolation purposes. Diagnostic results from the application of the approach to test data acquired from an aircraft turbofan engine are presented. The approach is found to avoid false alarms when presented nominal fault-free data. Additionally, the approach is found to successfully detect and isolate gas path seeded-faults under steady-state operating scenarios although some fault misclassifications are noted during engine transients. Recommendations for follow-on maturation and evaluation of the technique are also presented.

  15. Multimethod communication for high-performance metacomputing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Geisler, J.; Tuecke, S.; Kesselman, C.

    1996-12-31

    Metacomputing systems use high-speed networks to connect supercomputers, mass storage systems, scientific instruments, and display devices with the objective of enabling parallel applications to access geographically distributed computing resources. However, experience shows that high performance often can be achieved only if applications can integrate diverse communication substrates, transport mechanisms, and protocols, chosen according to where communication is directed, what is communicated, or when communication is performed. In this article, we describe a software architecture that addresses this requirement. This architecture allows multiple communication methods to be supported transparently in a single application, with either automatic or user-specified selection criteria guiding the methods used for each communication. We describe an implementation of this architecture, based on the Nexus communication library, and use this implementation to evaluate performance issues. The implementation supported a wide variety of applications in the I-WAY metacomputing experiment at Supercomputing 95; we use one of these applications to provide a quantitative demonstration of the advantages of multimethod communication in a heterogeneous networked environment.

  16. Extending NASA Research Results to Benefit Society: Rapid Prototyping for Coastal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glorioso, Mark V.; Miller, Richard L.; Hall, Callie M.; McPherson, Terry R.

    2006-01-01

    The mission of the NASA Applied Sciences Program is to expand and accelerate the use of NASA research results to benefit society in 12 application areas of national priority. ONe of the program's major challenges is to perform a quick, efficient, and detailed review (i.e., prototyping) of the large number of combinations of NASA observations and results from Earth system models that may be used by a wide range of decision support tools. A Rapid Prototyping Capacity (RPC) is being developed to accelerate the use of NASA research results. Here, we present the conceptual framework of the Rapid Prototyping Capacity within the context of quickly assessing the efficacy of NASA research results and technologies to support the Coastal Management application. An initial RPC project designed to quickly evaluate the utility of moderate-resolution MODIS products for calibrating/validating coastal sediment transport models is also presented.

  17. High-performance nanoscale composite coatings for boiler applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branagan, D. J.; Breitsameter, M.; Meacham, B. E.; Belashchenko, V.

    2005-06-01

    In this article, we will show how unconventional nanoscale composite coatings can be formed using conventional wire-arc thermal spray systems. The as-sprayed SHS7170 wire-arc coatings are found to develop an amorphous matrix structure containing starburst-shaped boride and carbide crystallites with sizes ranging from 60 to 140 nm. After heating to temperatures above the peak crystalline temperature (566 °C), a solid/state transformation occurs that results in the formation of an intimate three-phase matrix structure consisting of the same complex boride and carbide phases, along with α-iron interdispersed on a structural scale from 60 to 110 nm. The nanocomposite microstructure contains clean grain boundaries, which are found to be extremely stable and resist coarsening throughout the range of temperatures found in boilers. Additionally, the properties of the coating are presented including the bond strength, hardness, bend resistance, and impact resistance. The sprayability, forgiveness, and repairability of the SHS7170 wire-arc coatings are explained in detail, with an emphasis on field applicability in boiler environments. The performance of the SHS7170 coatings in boiler environments is measured via elevated temperature-erosion experiments conducted at 300, 450, and 600 °C using bed ash from an operating circulating fluidized-bed combustor boiler, and the results are compared with those for existing boiler coatings.

  18. Indoor air quality standards of performance applications guide

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, R.J.; Dorgan, C.B.; Dorgan, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the development and application of standards of performance (SOPs) for HVAC and R equipment, plumbing systems, and building envelope systems in relation to maintaining acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ) in buildings. The utilization of the SOP procedure, developed in ASHRAE Research Project 853, will aid in the proper operation of systems and verify that acceptable building IAQ levels are obtained.

  19. Acoustic Particle Velocity Sensors: Design, Performance, and Applications Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Berliner, M.J.; Lindberg, J.F.

    1996-07-01

    These proceedings represent the papers presented at a workshop sponsored by the Office of Naval Research and the Acoustical Society of America. The topics discussed include designs, applications and performance of underwater acoustic sensors. There were 29 papers presented and all have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  20. Application of Data Collection Techniques by Human Performance Technology Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duan, Minjing

    2011-01-01

    By content-analyzing 22 published cases from a variety of professional and academic books and journals, this study examines the status quo of human performance technology (HPT) practitioners' application of five major data collection techniques in their everyday work: questionnaire, interview, focus group, observation, and document collection. The…

  1. Heat pumps for geothermal applications: availability and performance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reistad, G.M.; Means, P.

    1980-05-01

    A study of the performance and availability of water-source heat pumps was carried out. The primary purposes were to obtain the necessary basic information required for proper evaluation of the role of water-source heat pumps in geothermal energy utilization and/or to identify the research needed to provide this information. The Search of Relevant Literature considers the historical background, applications, achieved and projected performance evaluations and performance improvement techniques. The commercial water-source heat pump industry is considered in regard to both the present and projected availability and performance of units. Performance evaluations are made for units that use standard components but are redesigned for use in geothermal heating.

  2. Application of modified profile analysis to function testing of simulated CTOL transport touchdown-performance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, R. V.; Mckissick, B. T.

    1979-01-01

    The modification to the methodology of profile analysis to accommodate the testing of differences between two functions with a single test, rather than multiple tests at various values of the abscissa, is described and demonstrated for two sets of simulation-performance data. The first application was to a flight-simulation comparison of pilot-vehicle performance with a three-element refractive display to performance with a more widely used beam-splitter-reflective-mirror display system. The results demonstrate that the refractive system for out-the-window scene display provides equivalent performance to the reflective system. The second application demonstrates the detection of significant differences by modified profile-analysis procedures. This application compares the effects of two sets of pitch-axis force-feel characteristics on the sink rate at touchdown performance utilizing the refractive system. This experiment demonstrates the dependence of simulator sink-rate performance on force-feel characteristics.

  3. Systematic Performance Improvement--Refining the Space between Learning and Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrow, Jim; Berardinelli, Paula

    2003-01-01

    To demonstrate the impact of planned learning on company performance, direct relationships between training and systematic job performance improvements were observed. Results were used to refine Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation model with an intermediate level 3.5 (performance impact) between levels 3 (behavior) and 4 (results). (Contains 29…

  4. Calibration Modeling Methodology to Optimize Performance for Low Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollum, Raymond A.; Commo, Sean A.; Parker, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Calibration is a vital process in characterizing the performance of an instrument in an application environment and seeks to obtain acceptable accuracy over the entire design range. Often, project requirements specify a maximum total measurement uncertainty, expressed as a percent of full-scale. However in some applications, we seek to obtain enhanced performance at the low range, therefore expressing the accuracy as a percent of reading should be considered as a modeling strategy. For example, it is common to desire to use a force balance in multiple facilities or regimes, often well below its designed full-scale capacity. This paper presents a general statistical methodology for optimizing calibration mathematical models based on a percent of reading accuracy requirement, which has broad application in all types of transducer applications where low range performance is required. A case study illustrates the proposed methodology for the Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System that employs seven strain-gage based pressure transducers mounted on the heatshield of the Mars Science Laboratory mission.

  5. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary...

  6. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary...

  7. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary...

  8. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary...

  9. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary...

  10. Advancements and performance of iterative methods in industrial applications codes on CRAY parallel/vector supercomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, G.; Heroux, M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper will focus on recent work in two widely used industrial applications codes with iterative methods. The ANSYS program, a general purpose finite element code widely used in structural analysis applications, has now added an iterative solver option. Some results are given from real applications comparing performance with the tradition parallel/vector frontal solver used in ANSYS. Discussion of the applicability of iterative solvers as a general purpose solver will include the topics of robustness, as well as memory requirements and CPU performance. The FIDAP program is a widely used CFD code which uses iterative solvers routinely. A brief description of preconditioners used and some performance enhancements for CRAY parallel/vector systems is given. The solution of large-scale applications in structures and CFD includes examples from industry problems solved on CRAY systems.

  11. Achieving high sustained performance in an unstructured mesh CFD application

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E; Anderson, W K; Gropp, W D; Kaushik, D K; Smith, B F

    1999-12-10

    This paper highlights a three-year project by an interdisciplinary team on a legacy F77 computational fluid dynamics code, with the aim of demonstrating that implicit unstructured grid simulations can execute at rates not far from those of explicit structured grid codes, provided attention is paid to data motion complexity and the reuse of data positioned at the levels of the memory hierarchy closest to the processor, in addition to traditional operation count complexity. The demonstration code is from NASA and the enabling parallel hardware and (freely available) software toolkit are from DOE, but the resulting methodology should be broadly applicable, and the hardware limitations exposed should allow programmers and vendors of parallel platforms to focus with greater encouragement on sparse codes with indirect addressing. This snapshot of ongoing work shows a performance of 15 microseconds per degree of freedom to steady-state convergence of Euler flow on a mesh with 2.8 million vertices using 3072 dual-processor nodes of ASCI Red, corresponding to a sustained floating-point rate of 0.227 Tflop/s.

  12. An Experimental Evaluation of HVAC-Grade Carbon-Dioxide Sensors: Part 2, Performance Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Maxwell, Dr. Gregory

    2010-01-01

    This is the second paper in a four-part series reporting on the test and evaluation of typical carbon-dioxide sensors used in building HVAC applications. Fifteen models of NDIR HVAC-grade CO2 sensors were tested and evaluated to determine the accuracy, linearity, repeatability, and hysteresis of each sensor. This paper describes the performance of the sensors and provides a comparison with the manufacturers specifications. The sensors were tested at 40% relative humidity, 73oF (22.8oC) temperature, 14.70 psia (101.35 kPa) pressure, and at five different CO2 concentrations (400 ppm, 750 ppm, 1100 ppm, 1450 ppm, and 1800 ppm). The test results showed a wide variation in sensor performance among the various manufacturers and in some cases a wide variation among sensors of the same model. In all, 45 sensors were evaluated: three from each of the 15 models. Among the 15 models tested, eight models have a single-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, four models have a dual-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, and three models have a single-lamp, dual-wavelength configuration.

  13. Stent retriever technology: concept, application and initial results.

    PubMed

    Rohde, S; Bösel, J; Hacke, W; Bendszus, M

    2012-11-01

    Stent retrievers are increasingly used for flow restoration and thrombectomy in acute embolic stroke. First clinical results support the potential of these new devices, in particular the ability to rapidly restore flow and effectively retrieve clots from large intracranial arteries, with favorable clinical results in preliminary patient series. This article reviews the concept and technical aspects of this new technique of endovascular stroke treatment and summarizes the first clinical results. PMID:22131439

  14. Propulsion system performance resulting from an integrated flight/propulsion control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Garg, Sanjay

    1992-01-01

    Propulsion-system-specific results are presented from the application of the integrated methodology for propulsion and airframe control (IMPAC) design approach to integrated flight/propulsion control design for a 'short takeoff and vertical landing' (STOVL) aircraft in transition flight. The IMPAC method is briefly discussed and the propulsion system specifications for the integrated control design are examined. The structure of a linear engine controller that results from partitioning a linear centralized controller is discussed. The details of a nonlinear propulsion control system are presented, including a scheme to protect the engine operational limits: the fan surge margin and the acceleration/deceleration schedule that limits the fuel flow. Also, a simple but effective multivariable integrator windup protection scheme is examined. Nonlinear closed-loop simulation results are presented for two typical pilot commands for transition flight: acceleration while maintaining flightpath angle and a change in flightpath angle while maintaining airspeed. The simulation nonlinearities include the airframe/engine coupling, the actuator and sensor dynamics and limits, the protection scheme for the engine operational limits, and the integrator windup protection. Satisfactory performance of the total airframe plus engine system for transition flight, as defined by the specifications, was maintained during the limit operation of the closed-loop engine subsystem.

  15. High Performance Nickel Electrodes for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adanuvor, Prosper K.; Pearson, Johnnie A.; Miller, Brian; Tatarchuk, Bruce; Britton, Doris L.

    1996-01-01

    Performance characteristics such as efficiency, specific energy density and power density of nickel electrodes are generally limited by the electrode microstructure and nature of the active material within the electrode matrix. Progress is being made in our laboratory in a collaborative effort with NASA-Lewis Research Center to develop lighter weight, mechanically stable and highly efficient nickel electrodes for aerospace applications. Our approach is based on an electrode microstructure fabricated from a mixture of nickel fibers as small as 2 microns diameter and cellulose fibers. Performance data in flooded cell tests and cycle life data are presented. Performance characteristics are compared to other electrode microstructures such as the Fibrex Fiber mat and the Fibrex Powder substrate. The flexibility of our electrode microstructure and the significant advantages it offers in terms of weight and performance are demonstrated, in particular, its ability to accept charge at high rates and to discharge at high rates.

  16. INITIAL RESULTS FROM INVESTIGATIONS TO ENHANCE THE PERFORMANCE OF HIGH TEMPERATURE IRRADIATION-RESISTANT THERMOCOUPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Crepeau, John; Rempe, Joy; Wilkins, S. Curtis; Knudson, Darrell L.; Condie, Keith G.; Daw, Joshua

    2007-04-01

    New fuel, cladding, and structural materials offer the potential for safer and more economic energy from existing reactor and advanced nuclear reactor designs. However, insufficient data are available to characterize these materials in high temperature, radiation conditions. To evaluate candidate material performance, robust instrumentation is needed that can survive these conditions. However, traditional thermocouples either drift due to degradation at high temperatures (above 1100 °C) or due to transmutation of thermocouple components. Thermocouples are needed which can withstand both high temperature and high radiation environments. To address this instrumentation need, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently developed the design and evaluated the performance of a high temperature radiation-resistant thermocouple that contains commercially-available alloys of molybdenum and niobium (Rempe, 2006). Candidate thermocouple component materials were first identified based on their ability to withstand high temperature and radiation. Then, components were selected based on data obtained from materials interaction tests, ductility investigations, and resolution evaluations. Results from long duration (over 4000 hours) tests at high temperatures (up to 1400 °C) and thermal cycling tests demonstrate the stability and reliability of the INL-developed design. Tests in INL’s Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) are underway to demonstrate the in-pile performance of these thermocouples. However, several options have been identified that could further enhance the lifetime and reliability of the INL-developed thermocouples, allowing their use in higher temperature applications (up to at least 1700 °C). A joint University of Idaho (UI) and INL University Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (UNERI) is underway to investigate these options and ultimately, provide recommendations for an enhanced thermocouple design. This paper presents preliminary results from this UI/INL effort

  17. Performance assessment methodology as applied to the Greater Confinement Disposal site: Preliminary results of the third performance iteration

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.J.; Baer, T.A.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy has contracted Sandia National Laboratories to conduct a performance assessment of the Greater Confinement Disposal facility, Nevada. The performance assessment is an iterative process in which transport models are used to prioritize site characterization data collection. Then the data are used to refine the conceptual and performance assessment models. The results of the first two performance assessment iterations indicate that the site is likely to comply with the performance standards under the existing hydrologic conditions. The third performance iteration expands the conceptual model of the existing transport system to include possible future events and incorporates these processes in the performance assessment models. The processes included in the third performance assessment are climate change, bioturbation, plant uptake, erosion, upward advection, human intrusion and subsidence. The work completed to date incorporates the effects of bioturbation, erosion and subsidence in the performance assessment model. Preliminary analyses indicate that the development of relatively deep-rooting plant species at the site, which could occur due to climate change, irrigated farming or subsidence, poses the greatest threat to the site`s performance.

  18. High-performance polymeric materials for waveguide applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukh, Konstantin; Lipian, John-Henry; Mimna, Richard; Neal, Phillip S.; Ravikiran, R.; Rhodes, Larry F.; Shick, Robert A.; Zhao, Xiao-Mei

    2000-11-01

    The ever-increasing need for economical, reliable, and high- performance optical interconnects for telecommunication and data communication markets demands new innovative solutions. Polymer technology being developed at BFGoodrich is focused on satisfying this demand. It is based on proprietary polynorbornene polymers that exhibit excellent optical, thermal and mechanical properties essential for fabrication of reliable components for integrated optics. Typical polymer waveguide systems exhibit a tradeoff between thermal and optical performance. The uniqueness of the polynorbornene system is that these tradeoffs are minimized. The intrinsic properties of the polynorbornene system include low transmission loss (<0.1 dB/cm at 820 nm), wide spectral range (<0.4 dB/cm at 450 nm and <0.1 dB/cm at 515-870nm), low birefringence ((Delta) n(in plane)<10-5, (Delta) n(out of plane) <10-3 at 820 nm, consistent difference in index over a wide temperature range, long-term thermal stability (>2000 hours at 125 degree(s)C), high glass transition temperature (>280 degree(s)C), and low moisture absorption (<0.1%). The combination of these characteristics offers advantages over existing plastic materials for visible and near IR applications such as those used in the datacom market. Candidate materials have been identified as core and cladding components for optical waveguides. The refractive index of a typical core material is 1.53, and of a typical clad material, 1.50 at 820 nm. The difference in index between core and cladding is approximately 0.03 over a broad range of wavelength (515-870nm). Preliminary results indicate that the difference in index between core and cladding tracks with temperature, which is in line with out expectation since these polymers have similar structures at the molecular level. Fabrication of functional waveguides has been demonstrated using a conventional cast and cure process at the lab scale. Optical performance of the constituent materials and the

  19. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This

  20. Advances in the application of information technology to sport performance.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, Dario G; Katz, Larry; Hughes, Mike D; Bartlett, Roger M; McClements, Jim; Franks, Ian M

    2002-10-01

    This paper overviews the diverse information technologies that are used to provide athletes with relevant feedback. Examples taken from various sports are used to illustrate selected applications of technology-based feedback. Several feedback systems are discussed, including vision, audition and proprioception. Each technology described here is based on the assumption that feedback would eventually enhance skill acquisition and sport performance and, as such, its usefulness to athletes and coaches in training is critically evaluated. PMID:12363293

  1. Genetic algorithm based task reordering to improve the performance of batch scheduled massively parallel scientific applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Angel, Jordan; Brown, W. Michael

    2015-04-08

    The growth in size of networked high performance computers along with novel accelerator-based node architectures has further emphasized the importance of communication efficiency in high performance computing. The world's largest high performance computers are usually operated as shared user facilities due to the costs of acquisition and operation. Applications are scheduled for execution in a shared environment and are placed on nodes that are not necessarily contiguous on the interconnect. Furthermore, the placement of tasks on the nodes allocated by the scheduler is sub-optimal, leading to performance loss and variability. Here, we investigate the impact of task placement on themore » performance of two massively parallel application codes on the Titan supercomputer, a turbulent combustion flow solver (S3D) and a molecular dynamics code (LAMMPS). Benchmark studies show a significant deviation from ideal weak scaling and variability in performance. The inter-task communication distance was determined to be one of the significant contributors to the performance degradation and variability. A genetic algorithm-based parallel optimization technique was used to optimize the task ordering. This technique provides an improved placement of the tasks on the nodes, taking into account the application's communication topology and the system interconnect topology. As a result, application benchmarks after task reordering through genetic algorithm show a significant improvement in performance and reduction in variability, therefore enabling the applications to achieve better time to solution and scalability on Titan during production.« less

  2. Genetic algorithm based task reordering to improve the performance of batch scheduled massively parallel scientific applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Angel, Jordan; Brown, W. Michael

    2015-04-08

    The growth in size of networked high performance computers along with novel accelerator-based node architectures has further emphasized the importance of communication efficiency in high performance computing. The world's largest high performance computers are usually operated as shared user facilities due to the costs of acquisition and operation. Applications are scheduled for execution in a shared environment and are placed on nodes that are not necessarily contiguous on the interconnect. Furthermore, the placement of tasks on the nodes allocated by the scheduler is sub-optimal, leading to performance loss and variability. Here, we investigate the impact of task placement on the performance of two massively parallel application codes on the Titan supercomputer, a turbulent combustion flow solver (S3D) and a molecular dynamics code (LAMMPS). Benchmark studies show a significant deviation from ideal weak scaling and variability in performance. The inter-task communication distance was determined to be one of the significant contributors to the performance degradation and variability. A genetic algorithm-based parallel optimization technique was used to optimize the task ordering. This technique provides an improved placement of the tasks on the nodes, taking into account the application's communication topology and the system interconnect topology. As a result, application benchmarks after task reordering through genetic algorithm show a significant improvement in performance and reduction in variability, therefore enabling the applications to achieve better time to solution and scalability on Titan during production.

  3. Photovoltaic applications definition and photovoltaic system definition study in the agricultural sector. Volume 2: Technical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengel, R. W.; Nadolski, T. P.; Sparks, D. C.; Young, S. K.; Yingst, A.

    1980-05-01

    This volume describes the technical results of the study of potential photovoltaic (P/V) applications in US agriculture. The results presented address all technical aspects of the program and include a summary of agricultural energy consumption. The objectives of the technical effort reported were to: (1) identify and characterize agricultural energy demands that can effectively use P/V power systems; (2) develop effective P/V system designs for the four most promising applications; (3) determine performance and cost estimates for the designs; and (4) recommend systems for early test and demonstration and critical issues requiring further systems studies. The farms chosen for conceptual design include; (1) poultry layer farm, (2) hog production farm, (3) beef feedlot, and (4) year round vegetable farm.

  4. Gas dilution system results and application to acid rain utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley-Souders, K.; Geib, R.; Dunn, C.

    1997-12-31

    In 1997, the United States EPA will remove restrictions preventing acid rain utilities from using gas dilution systems for calibration or linearity studies for continuous emissions monitoring, Test Method 205 in 40CFR51 requires that a gas dilution system must produce calibration gases whose measured values are within {+-}2% of predicted values. This paper presents the evaluation of the Environics/CalMat 2020 Dilution System for use in calibration studies. Internal studies show that concentrations generated by this unit are within {+-}0.5% of predicted values. Studies are being conducted by several acid rain utilities to evaluate the Environics/CalMat system using single minor component calibration standards. In addition, an internally generated study is being performed to demonstrate the system`s accuracy using a multi-component gas mixture. Data from these tests will be presented in the final version of the paper.

  5. Urine Pretreatment Configuration and Test Results for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Stanley G.; Hutchens, Cindy F.; Rethke, Donald W.; Swartley, Vernon L.; Marsh, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Pretreatment of urine using Oxone and sulfuric acid is baselined in the International Space Station (ISS) waste water reclamation system to control odors, fix urea and control microbial growth. In addition, pretreatment is recommended for long term flight use of urine collection and two phase separation to reduce or eliminate fouling of the associated hardware and plumbing with urine precipitates. This is important for ISS application because the amount of maintenance time for cleaning and repairing hardware must be minimized. This paper describes the development of a chemical pretreatment system based on solid tablet shapes which are positioned in the urine collection hose and are dissolved by the intrained urine at the proper ratio of pretreatment to urine. Building upon the prior success of the developed and tested solid Oxone tablet a trade study was completed to confirm if a similar approach, or alternative, would be appropriate for the sulfuric acid injection method. In addition, a recommended handling and packaging approach of the solid tablets for long term, safe and convenient use on ISS was addressed. Consequently, the solid tablet concept with suitable packaging was identified as the Urine Pretreat / Prefilter Assembly (UPPA). Testing of the UPPA configuration confirmed the disolution rates and ratios required by ISS were achieved. This testing included laboratory controlled methods as well as a 'real world' test evaluation that occurred during the 150 day Stage 10 Water Recovery Test (WRT) conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  6. Fundamental results from microgravity cell experiments with possible commericial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, Charles M.; Fast, Thomas N.; Hinds, Williams E.; Schaefer, R. L.; Callahan, Paul X.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the major milestones are presented for studies in cell biology that were conducted by the Soviet Union and the United States in the upper layers of the atmosphere and in outer space for more than thirty-five years. The goals have changed as new knowledge is acquired and the priorities for the use of microgravity have shifted toward basic research and commercial applications. Certain details concerning the impact of microgravity on cell systems is presented. However, it needs to be emphasized that in planning and conducting microgravity experiments, there are some important prerequisites not normally taken into account. Apart from the required background knowledge of previous microgravity and ground-based experiments, the investigator should have the understanding of the hardware as a physical unit, the complete knowledge of its operation, the range of its capabilities and the anticipation of problems that may occur. Moreover, if the production of commercial products in space is to be manifested, data obtained from previous microgravity experiments must be used to optimize the design of flight hardware.

  7. Java Performance for Scientific Applications on LLNL Computer Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kapfer, C; Wissink, A

    2002-05-10

    Languages in use for high performance computing at the laboratory--Fortran (f77 and f90), C, and C++--have many years of development behind them and are generally considered the fastest available. However, Fortran and C do not readily extend to object-oriented programming models, limiting their capability for very complex simulation software. C++ facilitates object-oriented programming but is a very complex and error-prone language. Java offers a number of capabilities that these other languages do not. For instance it implements cleaner (i.e., easier to use and less prone to errors) object-oriented models than C++. It also offers networking and security as part of the language standard, and cross-platform executables that make it architecture neutral, to name a few. These features have made Java very popular for industrial computing applications. The aim of this paper is to explain the trade-offs in using Java for large-scale scientific applications at LLNL. Despite its advantages, the computational science community has been reluctant to write large-scale computationally intensive applications in Java due to concerns over its poor performance. However, considerable progress has been made over the last several years. The Java Grande Forum [1] has been promoting the use of Java for large-scale computing. Members have introduced efficient array libraries, developed fast just-in-time (JIT) compilers, and built links to existing packages used in high performance parallel computing.

  8. Metal vapor vacuum arc switching - Applications and results. [for launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cope, D.; Mongeau, P.

    1984-01-01

    The design of metal-vapor vacuum-arc switches (MVSs) for electromagnetic launchers is discussed, and preliminary results are presented for an experimental MVS. The general principles of triggered-vacuum-gap and vacuum-interrupter MVSs are reviewed, and the requirements of electromagnetic launchers are analyzed. High-current design problems such as electrode erosion, current sharing, magnetic effects, and thermal effects are examined. The experimental MVS employs stainless-steel flanges, a glass vacuum vessel, an adjustable electrode gap, autonomous internal magnetic-field coils, and a tungsten-pin trigger assembly. Some results from tests without magnetic augmentation are presented graphically.

  9. Towards understanding participatory processes: Framework, application and results.

    PubMed

    Hassenforder, Emeline; Smajgl, Alex; Ward, John

    2015-07-01

    Many scholars point out that in complex and contested decision-making and planning situations, participatory processes have clear advantages over "traditional" or non-participatory processes. Improving our understanding of which participatory process elements or combination of elements contribute to specific outcomes demands a comparative diagnosis of multiple case studies based on a systematic framework. This paper describes the theoretical foundation and application of a diagnostic framework developed for the description and comparative analysis of participatory processes. The framework for the Comparison of Participatory Processes (COPP) is composed of three dimensions: context, process, and outputs outcomes and impacts. For each dimension, a list of variables is provided, with associated selectable options. The framework also requires clarification of three monitoring and evaluation elements. The COPP framework is then applied to five participatory processes across five different contexts: three located in the Mekong basin in Southeast Asia and two in eastern Africa. The goal is to test first if the framework facilitates the development of a comprehensive and clear description of participatory processes, and second, if a diagnostic step can be facilitated by applying the descriptions in a cross-comparative analysis. The paper concludes that despite a few challenges, the COPP framework is sufficiently generic to derive clear and consistent descriptions. A sample of only five case studies restricts the derivation of robust insights. Nevertheless, three testable hypothesis were derived, which would need to be tested with a much larger sample of case studies in order to substantiate the efficacy of process characteristics and attributes. Ultimately, such hypotheses and subsequent analytical efforts would contribute to the advancement of this increasingly prominent research domain. PMID:25884891

  10. SR's reactor tank inspection program: UT development, application, and results

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, B. ); McKaig, M.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS) has the nation's only plutonium and tritium production reactors. All three reactors have been idle for more than a year so that a variety of modifications can be made. Modifications are being carried out to enhance safety and technical systems. A 1987 decision was made to develop an inspection capability which would allow volumetric inspection of the SRS reactor tanks for the purpose of life extension. The scope of this inspection was defined to address the heat affected zones (HAZ's) of the tanks' weldments for the presence of service induced flaws, i.e., intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). In order to be consistent with the existing practices and technology of the nuclear industry a state-of-the-art ultrasonic (UT) examination was chosen as the primary examination medium. Both ultrasonic and eddy current testing were selected as complementary methods for this application, since both can be configured to acquire test data remotely, and the test data can be digitized and stored for post-test analysis. Since intergranular stress corrosion cracking was believed to be the service-induced flaw most likely to occur adjacent to SRS's type 304 stainless steel reactor tank welds, the Savannah River Site's nondestructive testing specialists were faced with a unique challenge. Up to this point the major concentration of effort in the commercial nuclear world has been to apply ultrasonic testing techniques which were developed to detect and size IGSCC on the inside surface of piping with the search unit scanning on the outside surface of the pipe. Proven methods for detection and depth sizing IGSCC which initiated on the near surface (the surface in which the ultrasonic wave enters the metal) had not been established.

  11. Great Expectations, Mixed Results: Standards and Performance in Denver's New Public Schools, 2007-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    In conjunction with the Denver Plan instituted in 2005, Denver Public Schools (DPS) has embarked upon a consistent strategy of opening new schools in an effort to improve overall academic performance. DPS has pursued this strategy under several different paths: an annual request for proposals from charter school applicants; allowing current…

  12. High-performance IR detector modules for Army applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, H.; Breiter, R.; Rutzinger, S.; Schallenberg, T.; Wendler, J.; Ziegler, J.

    2013-06-01

    Since many years AIM delivers IR-modules for army applications like pilotage, weapon sights, UAVs or vehicle platforms. State-of-the-art 640x512, 15μm pitch detector modules are in production in manifold configurations optimized for specific key requirements on system level. This is possible due to a modular design, which is best suited to meet the diversity of system needs in army applications. Examples are optimization of detector-dewar length for gimbal applications, size weight and power reduction for UAVs or lifetime enhancement for vehicle platforms. In 2012 AIM presented first prototypes of megapixel detectors (1280x1024, 15μm pitch) for both spectral bands MWIR and LWIR. These large format detector arrays fulfill the demand for higher spatial resolution, which is requested for applications like rotorcraft pilotage, persistent surveillance or tasks like determination of threat level in personnel targets. Recently, a new tactical dewar has been developed for the 1280x1024 detector arrays. It is designed to withstand environmental stresses and, at the same time, to quest for a compact overall package. Furthermore, the idea of a modular design will be even more emphasized. Integration of different cooler types, like AIM's SX095 or rotary integral, will be possible without modification of the dewar. The paper will present development status of large format IR-modules at AIM as well as performance data and configuration considerations with respect to army applications.

  13. Test results of HTS magnet for SMES application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, J.; Majka, M.; Jaroszynski, L.; Janowski, T.; Kozak, S.; Kondratowicz – Kucewicz, B.; Wojtasiewicz, G.

    2010-06-01

    The magnet for a superconducting magnetic energy storage system (SMES) conducting cooled by SRDK-408 cryocooler is described in this paper. The superconducting magnet consists of 7 double-pancake coils made of Bi-2223 HTS tape with the inner and outer diameters 210 mm, 315 mm respectively and height of 191 mm. The inductance of the magnet is approximately 1 H. In this paper we report the design improvements and the measurement results taken at the cooling of the magnet.

  14. Characterization and application results of two magnetic nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Matei, Ecaterina; Predescu, Andra Mihaela; Predescu, Cristian; Sohaciu, Mirela Gabriela; Berbecaru, Andrei; Covaliu, Cristina Ileana

    2013-01-01

    The toxicity of heavy metals for the environment can be solved by using the adsorption properties of magnetic nanomaterials. These types of nanomaterials can remove pollutants, especially from wastewaters. This study was conducted to determine whether two magnetic nanomaterials can be used as adsorbents for heavy metals (Cr, Cd, Cu, Zn, and Ni) from aqueous solutions under acidic conditions. Qualitative and quantitative elemental information and structural and surface characteristics before and after use as adsorbents were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The obtained data showed a good correlation with the Langmuir adsorption model using the two magnetic nanomaterials in aqueous solutions. The crystalline structure of the FeO powder was identified with XRD. The TEM images of FeO nanoparticles indicated a good dispersion of particles of 85.5 nm. The SEM analysis for FeO-PAA (magnetite covered with sodium alginate) showed spherical particles of magnetite wrapped into the polymer with dimension of ∼200 nm. According to the adsorption Langmuir model, the removal efficiency for uncoated FeO decreased in order: Cr(VI) > Cu(II) > Zn(II) > Ni(II) > Cd(II). For the FeO-PAA nanocomposite (45% w/w Fe in a mass of polymer), the adsorption phenomena appears as follows: Cr(VI) > Cd(II) > Cu(II) ∼ Zn(II) > Ni(II). Langmuir parameters indicated a favorable monolayer adsorption at pH 2.5. The nanocomposite FeO-PAA can be used as an adsorbent with the same performance as uncoated FeO but with the advantage of stability under conditions where industrial wastewaters have an acidic pH. PMID:23673747

  15. Student perceptions of secondary science: A performance technology application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Belinda Rusnak

    The primary purpose of this study was to identify influences blocking or promoting science performance from the lived K-12 classroom experience. Human Performance Technology protocols were used to understand factors promoting or hindering science performance. The goal was to gain information from the individual students' perspective to enhance opportunities for stakeholders to improve the current state of performance in science education. Individual perspectives of 10 secondary science students were examined using grounded theory protocols. Findings include students' science learning behaviors are influenced by two major themes, environmental supports and individual learning behaviors. The three environmental support factors identified include the methods students receive instruction, students' opportunities to access informal help apart from formal instruction, and students' feelings of teacher likability. Additionally, findings include three major factors causing individual learners to generate knowledge in science. Factors reported include personalizing information to transform data into knowledge, customizing learning opportunities to maximize peak performance, and tapping motivational opportunities to persevere through complex concepts. The emergent theory postulated is that if a performance problem exists in an educational setting, then integrating student perspectives into the cause analysis opens opportunity to align interventions for influencing student performance outcomes. An adapted version of Gilbert's Behavioral Engineering Model is presented as an organizational tool to display the findings. The boundaries of this Performance Technology application do not extend to the identification, selection, design, or implementation of solutions to improved science performance. However, as stakeholders begin to understand learner perspectives then aligned decisions may be created to support learners of science in a direct, cost effective manner.

  16. Performance as a Function of Resultant Achievement Motivation (Perceived Ability) and Perceived Difficulty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukla, Andy

    1974-01-01

    Data confirmed Kukla's attributional theory of performance. When a task is perceived to be difficult, high resultant achievers perform better than low resultant achievers, whereas the low motive group proves to be superior to the high group when the task is perceived as easy. (Author/RK)

  17. Space Station WP-2 application of LDEF MLI results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Charles A.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Jones, Cherie A.

    1993-01-01

    The Cascaded Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Experiment, which was developed by Michael Grote of McDonnell Douglas Electronic Systems Company, was located in Tray F-9 of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), where it received atomic oxygen almost normal to its surface. The majority of the tray was covered by aluminized Kapton polyimide multilayer insulation (MLI), which showed substantial changes from atomic oxygen erosion. Most of the outermost Kapton layer of the MLI and the polyester scrim cloth under it were lost, and there was evidence of contaminant deposition which discolored the edges of the MLI blanket. Micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MM/OD) hits caused small rips in the MLI layers, and in some cases left cloudy areas where the vapor plume caused by a hit condensed on the next layer. The MLI was bent gradually through 90 deg at the edges to enclose the experiment, and the Kapton that survived along the curved portion showed the effects of atomic oxygen erosion at oblique angles. In spite of space environment effects over the period of the LDEF mission, the MLI blanket remained functional. The results of the analysis of LDEF MLI were used in developing the standard MLI blanket for Space Station Work Package-2 (WP-2). This blanket is expected to last 30 years when exposed to the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment constituents of atomic oxygen and MM/OD, which are the most damaging to MLI materials. The WP-2 standard blanket consists of an outer cover made from Beta-cloth glass fiber fabric which is aluminized on the interior surface, and an inner cover of 0.076-mm (0.003-in) double-side-aluminized perforated Kapton. The inner reflector layers are 0.0076-mm (0.0003-in) double-side aluminized, perforated Kapton separated by layers of Dacron polyester fabric. The outer cover was selected to be resistant to the LEO environment and durable enough to survive in orbit for 30 years. This paper describes the analyses of the LDEF MLI results, and how these

  18. Can plumes collapse?: Experimental results and applications to Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pears, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.

    2012-04-01

    Iceland has produced magma in a series of episodic events. From lava chemistry it has been inferred that the plume temperature decreased over the first 5 Myr by ~50°C and for the next 3 Myr following continental break up it continued to oscillate by ~25°C. Such data has been used to infer possible episodic collapse of the Iceland plume. Collapsing plumes are not common fluid dynamical features. In thermochemical plumes it is possible to achieve collapse by varying the relative buoyancy due to chemistry and due to temperature. In thermal plumes however, with a constant heat source we would expect plumes not to collapse but to not continue to rise after reaching a point of neutral buoyancy. We expect thermal plumes, like those Earth's bottom thermal boundary layer is capable of producing, to either rise to the surface or be deflected but not to collapse. We have designed an experimental setup to investigate the conditions that may lead to collapse in thermal plumes with constant heat sources. We used high-Prandtl number fluids with strongly temperature-dependent viscosities (Lyle Golden syrup and Liquidose 436) as analogues to Earth's high viscosity mantle in a cubic Plexiglas tank (26.5cm inner sides), heated by a circular 2cm diameter heater (flat with the base of the tank). We explored ΔTs between 3-60°C. The flow was visualized with shadowgraphs and an automated -3D Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) system to measure velocities. In Lyle's Golden Syrup collapse occurred at ΔTs as high as 8°C, while in Liquidose 436 the 8°C ΔT run showed only partial collapse. The difference is not unexpected given the different physical properties. Partial collapse was seen even for ΔTs as high as 50°C. Both complete and partial collapse manifested themselves as downwelling flow in the central part of the conduit. Collapse stopped in the hotter plumes when the downwelling fluid met the hottest part of the conduit. The observed results suggest that diffusive

  19. Can plumes collapse?: Experimental results and applications to Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pears, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Iceland has produced magma in a series of episodic events. From lava chemistry it has been inferred that the plume temperature decreased over the first 5 Myr by ~50°C and for the next 3 Myr following continental break up it continued to oscillate by ~25°C. Such data has been used to infer possible episodic collapse of the Iceland plume. Collapsing plumes are not common fluid dynamical features. In thermochemical plumes it is possible to achieve collapse by varying the relative buoyancy due to chemistry and due to temperature. In thermal plumes however, with a constant heat source we would expect plumes not to collapse but to not continue to rise after reaching a point of neutral buoyancy. We expect thermal plumes, like those Earth's bottom thermal boundary layer is capable of producing, to either rise to the surface or be deflected but not to collapse. We have designed an experimental setup to investigate the conditions that may lead to collapse in thermal plumes with constant heat sources. We used high-Prandtl number fluids with strongly temperature-dependent viscosities (Lyle Golden syrup and Liquidose 436) as analogues to Earth's high viscosity mantle in a cubic Plexiglas tank (26.5cm inner sides), heated by a circular 2cm diameter heater (flat with the base of the tank). We explored ΔTs between 3-60°C. The flow was visualized with shadowgraphs and an automated -3D Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) system to measure velocities. In Lyle's Golden Syrup collapse occurred at ΔTs as high as 8°C, while in Liquidose 436 the 8° ΔT run showed only partial collapse. The difference is not unexpected given the different physical properties. Partial collapse was seen even for ΔTs as high as 50°C. Both complete and partial collapse manifested themselves as downwelling flow in the central part of the conduit. Collapse stopped in the hotter plumes when the downwelling fluid met the hottest part of the conduit. The observed results suggest that diffusive

  20. Evaluating the potential of vortex-enhanced evaporator performance for refrigeration applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, M.C.; DeJong, N.C.; Jacobi, A.M.

    1996-12-31

    In many refrigeration systems, overall evaporator performance is limited by the heat transfer coefficients are inherently lower for single-phase gas flow than for the two-phase refrigerant flow. Therefore, it is important to identify air-side performance enhancements suitable for the low-Reynolds-number frosting conditions found in these applications. In this paper the results of a preliminary assessment of vortex-induced air-side heat transfer enhancement for refrigeration applications are reported. The results indicate that longitudinal vortices may significantly improve air-side thermal performance, leading to smaller heat exchangers for a fixed duty or to better thermal performance for a fixed heat exchanger envelope. Further research is recommended to evaluate the to-scale performance of vortex generators under frosting conditions.

  1. Satellite Communications for Aeronautical Applications: Recent research and Development Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Communications systems have always been a critical element in aviation. Until recently, nearly all communications between the ground and aircraft have been based on analog voice technology. But the future of global aviation requires a more sophisticated "information infrastructure" which not only provides more and better communications, but integrates the key information functions (communications, navigation, and surveillance) into a modern, network-based infrastructure. Satellite communications will play an increasing role in providing information infrastructure solutions for aviation. Developing and adapting satellite communications technologies for aviation use is now receiving increased attention as the urgency to develop information infrastructure solutions grows. The NASA Glenn Research Center is actively involved in research and development activities for aeronautical satellite communications, with a key emphasis on air traffic management communications needs. This paper describes the recent results and status of NASA Glenn's research program.

  2. Results from Binary Black Hole Simulations in Astrophysics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Present and planned gravitational wave observatories are opening a new astronomical window to the sky. A key source of gravitational waves is the merger of two black holes. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), in particular, is expected to observe these events with signal-to-noise ratio's in the thousands. To fully reap the scientific benefits of these observations requires a detailed understanding, based on numerical simulations, of the predictions of General Relativity for the waveform signals. New techniques for simulating binary black hole mergers, introduced two years ago, have led to dramatic advances in applied numerical simulation work. Over the last two years, numerical relativity researchers have made tremendous strides in understanding the late stages of binary black hole mergers. Simulations have been applied to test much of the basic physics of binary black hole interactions, showing robust results for merger waveform predictions, and illuminating such phenomena as spin-precession. Calculations have shown that merging systems can be kicked at up to 2500 km/s by the thrust from asymmetric emission. Recently, long lasting simulations of ten or more orbits allow tests of post-Newtonian (PN) approximation results for radiation from the last orbits of the binary's inspiral. Already, analytic waveform models based PN techniques with incorporated information from numerical simulations may be adequate for observations with current ground based observatories. As new advances in simulations continue to rapidly improve our theoretical understanding of the systems, it seems certain that high-precision predictions will be available in time for LISA and other advanced ground-based instruments. Future gravitational wave observatories are expected to make precision.

  3. Interim results from the characterization testing of the Engineering Development (EDM) rubidium clocks for satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Edward D., Jr.; Danzy, Fredrick

    1990-01-01

    Some interim results from the environmental testing program to evaluate the Engineering Design Model (EDM) of the EG and G Spaceborne Rubidium Clock are presented. This effort is in support of the Global Positioning System (GPS) BLOCK IIR program and is intended to characterize the performance of EG and G design for BLOCK IIR satellite applications. Two EG and G EDM units are currently under test at NRL's Clock Test Facility to measure the long-term frequency stability, drift, and frequency versus temperature characteristics.

  4. Results of radiation hardness tests and performance tests of the HS9008RH flash ADC

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, S.; Tarle, G. . Physics Dept.); Crawley, H.B.; McKay, R.; Meyer, W.T.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Thomas, W.D. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Ames Lab., IA )

    1994-08-01

    Results from tests characterizing the performance and radiation hardness of the HS9008RH flash analog to digital converter (FADC) are presented. These tests were performed primarily to evaluate the suitability of this device for use in the GEM Central Tracker at the SSC experiment. Basic performance characteristics and susceptibility of these characteristics to radiation were examined. Performance test results indicate that the device integral nonlinearity is sampling rate dependent and worsens rapidly above rate of 15 megasamples per second (MSPS). No degradation in performance of the device was observed after its exposure of up to 81 Mrad of 1.25 MeV [gamma] radiation from a [sup 60]Co source. Exposure of the device to a reactor fast neutron fluence (E > 100keV) of 5 [times] 10[sup 14]/cm[sup 2] resulted in no significant observed performance degradation as well.

  5. Application of terahertz radiation to soil measurements: initial results.

    PubMed

    Dworak, Volker; Augustin, Sven; Gebbers, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Developing soil sensors with the possibility of continuous online measurement is a major challenge in soil science. Terahertz (THz) electromagnetic radiation may provide the opportunity for the measurement of organic material density, water content and other soil parameters at different soil depths. Penetration depth and information content is important for a functional soil sensor. Therefore, we present initial research on the analysis of absorption coefficients of four different soil samples by means of THz transmission measurements. An optimized soil sample holder to determine absorption coefficients was used. This setup improves data acquisition because interface reflections can be neglected. Frequencies of 340 GHz to 360 GHz and 1.627 THz to 2.523 THz provided information about an existing frequency dependency. The results demonstrate the potential of this THz approach for both soil analysis and imaging of buried objects. Therefore, the THz approach allows different soil samples to be distinguished according to their different absorption properties so that relations among soil parameters may be established in future. PMID:22163737

  6. New results and applications for the quasioptical gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliflet, A. W.; Fischer, R. P.; Manheimer, W. M.

    1993-02-01

    The quasioptical gyrotron (QOG), which features an open resonator formed by a pair of spherical mirrors instead of the conventional gyrotron waveguide cavity, has been under development at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory as a tunable high power millimeterwave source for tokamak plasma heating, advanced radars, and power beaming. In the free running oscillator configuration, the QOG has produced a peak power of 6OOkW at a frequency of 120GHZ, and a peak efficiency of 12% at 200kW. Results have recently been obtained for a quasioptical gyroklystron (QOGK) realized by the addition of an open-mirror prebunching resonator driven by an 85GHz, 1.5kW Extended Interaction Oscillator. Efficiency enhancement by mode priming has been investigated, and efficiencies up to 19% have been obtained by increasing the detuning of the operating mode. An overall efficiency of 30% was obtained by the addition of a simple depressed collector. The high circulating power in the QOG resonator is currently being considered for use as an electromagnetic wiggler for compact IR free-electron lasers. The QOG is also promising as a source for an active sensor of upper atmosphere trace impurities.

  7. New results and applications for the quasioptical gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fliflet, Arne W.; Fischer, Richard P.; Manheimer, Wallace M.

    1993-07-01

    The quasi-optical gyrotron (QOG), which features an open resonator formed by a pair of spherical mirrors instead of the conventional gyrotron waveguide cavity, has been under development at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory as a tunable high power millimeter-wave source for tokamak plasma heating, advanced radars, and power beaming. Results have recently been obtained for a quasi-optical gyroklystron (QOGK) realized by the addition of an open-mirror prebunching resonator driven by an 85 GHz, 1.5 kW extended interaction oscillator. Efficiency enhancement by mode priming has been investigated, and efficiencies up to 19 percent have been obtained by increasing the frequency detuning of the operating mode. An overall efficiency of 30 percent was obtained by the addition of a simple depressed collector. Phase-locked operation was demonstrated at a power of 57 kW and efficiency of 16 percent. The high circulating power in the QOG resonator is currently being considered for use as an electromagnetic wiggler for compact infrared FELs. The QOG is also promising as a source for an active sensor of upper atmosphere trace impurities.

  8. Preliminary results for the design, fabrication, and performance of a backside-illuminated avalanche drift detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yun; Liang, Kun; Chen, Wen-Fei; Han, De-Jun

    2013-10-01

    The detection of low-level light is a key technology in various experimental scientific studies. As a photon detector, the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) has gradually become an alternative to the photomultiplier tube (PMT) in many applications in high-energy physics, astroparticle physics, and medical imaging because of its high photon detection efficiency (PDE), good resolution for single-photon detection, insensitivity to magnetic field, low operating voltage, compactness, and low cost. However, primarily because of the geometric fill factor, the PDE of most SiPMs is not very high; in particular, for those SiPMs with a high density of micro cells, the effective area is small, and the bandwidth of the light response is narrow. As a building block of the SiPM, the concept of the backside-illuminated avalanche drift detector (ADD) was first proposed by the Max Planck Institute of Germany eight years ago; the ADD is promising to have high PDE over the full energy range of optical photons, even ultraviolet light and X-ray light, and because the avalanche multiplication region is very small, the ADD is beneficial for the fabrication of large-area SiPMs. However, because of difficulties in design and fabrication, no significant progress had been made, and the concept had not yet been verified. In this paper, preliminary results in the design, fabrication, and performance of a backside-illuminated ADD are reported; the difficulties in and limitations to the backside-illuminated ADD are analyzed.

  9. An analytic performance model of disk arrays and its application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Edward K.; Katz, Randy H.

    1991-01-01

    As disk arrays become widely used, tools for understanding and analyzing their performance become increasingly important. In particular, performance models can be invaluable in both configuring and designing disk arrays. Accurate analytic performance models are desirable over other types of models because they can be quickly evaluated, are applicable under a wide range of system and workload parameters, and can be manipulated by a range of mathematical techniques. Unfortunately, analytical performance models of disk arrays are difficult to formulate due to the presence of queuing and fork-join synchronization; a disk array request is broken up into independent disk requests which must all complete to satisfy the original request. We develop, validate, and apply an analytic performance model for disk arrays. We derive simple equations for approximating their utilization, response time, and throughput. We then validate the analytic model via simulation and investigate the accuracy of each approximation used in deriving the analytical model. Finally, we apply the analytical model to derive an equation for the optimal unit of data striping in disk arrays.

  10. Application Specific Performance Technology for Productive Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Malony, Allen D.; Shende, Sameer

    2008-09-30

    Our accomplishments over the last three years of the DOE project Application- Specific Performance Technology for Productive Parallel Computing (DOE Agreement: DE-FG02-05ER25680) are described below. The project will have met all of its objectives by the time of its completion at the end of September, 2008. Two extensive yearly progress reports were produced in in March 2006 and 2007 and were previously submitted to the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR). Following an overview of the objectives of the project, we summarize for each of the project areas the achievements in the first two years, and then describe in some more detail the project accomplishments this past year. At the end, we discuss the relationship of the proposed renewal application to the work done on the current project.