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Sample records for applications part ii

  1. Nitric Oxide Release Part II. Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Alexis W.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A wide range of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing materials have emerged as potential therapeutics that exploit NO’s vast biological roles. Macromolecular NO-releasing scaffolds are particularly promising due to their ability to store and deliver larger NO payloads in a more controlled and effective manner compared to low molecular weight NO donors. While a variety of scaffolds (e.g., particles, dendrimers, and polymers/films) have been cleverly designed, the ultimate clinical utility of most NO-releasing macromolecules remains unrealized. Although not wholly predictive of clinical success, in vitro and in vivo investigations have enabled a preliminary evaluation of the therapeutic potential of such materials. Herein, we review the application of macromolecular NO therapies for cardiovascular disease, cancer, bacterial infections, and wound healing. PMID:22362384

  2. GSTARS computer models and their applications, Part II: Applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, F.J.M.; Yang, C.T.

    2008-01-01

    In part 1 of this two-paper series, a brief summary of the basic concepts and theories used in developing the Generalized Stream Tube model for Alluvial River Simulation (GSTARS) computer models was presented. Part 2 provides examples that illustrate some of the capabilities of the GSTARS models and how they can be applied to solve a wide range of river and reservoir sedimentation problems. Laboratory and field case studies are used and the examples show representative applications of the earlier and of the more recent versions of GSTARS. Some of the more recent capabilities implemented in GSTARS3, one of the latest versions of the series, are also discussed here with more detail. ?? 2008 International Research and Training Centre on Erosion and Sedimentation and the World Association for Sedimentation and Erosion Research.

  3. Generalized Interference Alignment—Part II: Application to Wireless Secrecy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Liangzhong; Lau, Vincent K. N.; Win, Moe Z.

    2016-05-01

    In contrast to its wired counterpart, wireless communication is highly susceptible to eavesdropping due to the broadcast nature of the wireless propagation medium. Recent works have proposed the use of interference to reduce eavesdropping capabilities in wireless wiretap networks. However, the concurrent effect of interference on both eavesdropping receivers (ERs) and legitimate receivers (LRs) has not been thoroughly investigated, and carefully engineering the network interference is required to harness the full potential of interference for wireless secrecy. This two part paper addresses this issue by proposing a generalized interference alignment (GIA) technique, which jointly designs the transceivers at the legitimate partners to impede the ERs without interfering with LRs. In Part I, we have established a theoretical framework for the GIA technique. In Part II, we will first propose an efficient GIA algorithm that is applicable to large-scale networks and then evaluate the performance of this algorithm in stochastic wireless wiretap network via both analysis and simulation. These results reveal insights into when and how GIA contributes to wireless secrecy.

  4. Strontium: Part II. Chemistry, Biological Aspects and Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britton, G. C.; Johnson, C. H.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews basic information on the Chemistry of strontium and its compounds. Explains biological aspects of strontium and its pharmaceutical applications. Highlights industrial application of strontium and its components. (ML)

  5. Chemical Applications of Graph Theory: Part II. Isomer Enumeration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Peter J.; Jurs, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the use of graph theory to aid in the depiction of organic molecular structures. Gives a historical perspective of graph theory and explains graph theory terminology with organic examples. Lists applications of graph theory to current research projects. (ML)

  6. Scientific Applications of the Apple Game Port: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratzlaff, Kenneth

    1984-01-01

    The Apple game port has two types of inputs: the paddle input and the button input. Scientific applications of these input-output units are discussed, examining analog inputs (potentiometers, thermistors, and photoresistors), single bit digital inputs, and single-bit outputs. (JN)

  7. [Polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Part II: application in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Pokorný, D; Fulín, P; Slouf, M; Jahoda, D; Landor, I; Sosna, A

    2010-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) is one of the up-to-date organic polymer thermoplastics with applications in orthopaedics and trauma medicine. This study presents a detailed analysis of its tests and applications in clinical medicine. A wide range of PEEK modifications and composites are commercially available, e.g., PEEK-Classix, PEEK-Optima, Endolign and Motis. They differ in their physical properties, which makes them suitable for different applications. Other forms, so-called PEEK bioactive composites, contain beta-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite. Research in this field is also concerned with the surface finish of this polymer thermoplastic and involves macroporous titanium and hydroxyapatite layers, or treatment with laser for an exactly defined surface structure. The clinical applications of PEEK and its composites include, in addition to components for spinal surgery, osteosynthesis plates, screws, intramedullary nails or external fixators, which are implants still at the stage of prototypes. In this review, attention is paid to the use of PEEK thermoplastics for joint replacement. Mid-term studies involving hundreds of patients have shown that, for instance, the VerSys Epoch Fullcoat Hip System (Zimmer) has a markedly lower stress-shielding effect. Carbon fibre-reinforced (CFR-PEEK) composites are used to make articulating components for total hip replacement. Their convenient properties allow for production of much thinner liners and an enlargement of the femoral head diameter, thus reducing the wear of joint implants. CFR-PEEK composites are particularly effective for hip resurfacing in which the Mitch PCR (Stryker) acetabular component has been used with good results. The MOTIS polymer acetabular cup (Invibio Ltd.) is another example. Further PEEK applications include the construction of finger-joint prostheses (Mathys AG), suture anchors (Stryker) and various kinds of augmentations (Medin). Based on the information obtained, the authors suggest

  8. An Occupation and Participation Approach to Reading Intervention (OPARI) Part II: Pilot Clinical Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grajo, Lenin C.; Candler, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The Occupation and Participation Approach to Reading Intervention (OPARI) is an intervention approach for children with reading difficulties that emphasizes reading as an important occupation of children. Part I presented the theoretical basis of the OPARI. Part II describes a pilot clinical application of the OPARI. Guided by Schkade and…

  9. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part II - size estimations for selected markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Robert

    2014-04-01

    In a series of two contributions, decisive business-related aspects of the current process status to transfer research results on diffractive optical elements (DOEs) into commercial solutions are discussed. In part I, the focus was on the patent landscape. Here, in part II, market estimations concerning DOEs for selected applications are presented, comprising classical spectroscopic gratings, security features on banknotes, DOEs for high-end applications, e.g., for the semiconductor manufacturing market and diffractive intra-ocular lenses. The derived market sizes are referred to the optical elements, itself, rather than to the enabled instruments. The estimated market volumes are mainly addressed to scientifically and technologically oriented optical engineers to serve as a rough classification of the commercial dimensions of DOEs in the different market segments and do not claim to be exhaustive.

  10. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the American…

  11. Surface-active phospholipid: a Pandora's box of clinical applications. Part II. Barrier and lubricating properties.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A

    2002-01-01

    In Part I, it was described how their configuration renders phospholipid molecules surface active and capable of acting at interfaces in addition to the liquid-air interface to which conventional theory has hitherto confined the study of 'surfactant' in the lung. Surface-active phospholipid (SAPL) appears no different to comparable surfactants studied in the physical sciences for the highly desirable properties that their adsorption (reversible binding) can impart to solid surfaces. In Part II, these properties are considered in sites where there is no air. Highly desirable properties include boundary lubrication (lubricity), release (antistick) and the ability of the strongly adsorbed and strongly cohesive SAPL linings to act as barriers against abrasion, corrosion and, possibly, against invasion by microorganisms. As the 'sealant', it could be the true barrier rather than the cells providing its mechanical support. Evidence is reviewed for SAPL providing the gastric mucosal barrier to acid in the stomach and preventing the digestion of Helicobacter pylori until that barrier is broken by bile in the duodenum, where H. pylori cause ulcers. The concept that SAPL provides effortless sliding of many tissues, including pleura, pericardium and peritoneum is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the load-bearing joints, where a deficiency has been associated with osteoarthritis. The ability of the same SAPL lining to perform multiple roles is discussed in relation to the peritoneum, where it could provide the lubricant/release agent preventing surgical adhesions, while imparting semipermeability to 'the membrane' vital for peritoneal dialysis. In each site, the prophylactic use of exogenous SAPL is discussed for its potential clinical applications. PMID:12036223

  12. Parallel Algorithms and Software for Nuclear, Energy, and Environmental Applications. Part II: Multiphysics Software

    SciTech Connect

    Derek Gaston; Luanjing Guo; Glen Hansen; Hai Huang; Richard Johnson; Dana Knoll; Chris Newman; Hyeong Kae Park; Robert Podgorney; Michael Tonks; Richard Williamson

    2012-09-01

    This paper is the second part of a two part sequence on multiphysics algorithms and software. The first [1] focused on the algorithms; this part treats the multiphysics software framework and applications based on it. Tight coupling is typically designed into the analysis application at inception, as such an application is strongly tied to a composite nonlinear solver that arrives at the final solution by treating all equations simultaneously. The application must also take care to minimize both time and space error between the physics, particularly if more than one mesh representation is needed in the solution process. This paper presents an application framework that was specifically designed to support tightly coupled multiphysics analysis. The Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) is based on the Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method combined with physics-based preconditioning to provide the underlying mathematical structure for applications. The report concludes with the presentation of a host of nuclear, energy, and environmental applications that demonstrate the efficacy of the approach and the utility of a well-designed multiphysics framework.

  13. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications.

    PubMed

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  14. A review of breast tomosynthesis. Part II. Image reconstruction, processing and analysis, and advanced applications

    PubMed Central

    Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Many important post-acquisition aspects of breast tomosynthesis imaging can impact its clinical performance. Chief among them is the reconstruction algorithm that generates the representation of the three-dimensional breast volume from the acquired projections. But even after reconstruction, additional processes, such as artifact reduction algorithms, computer aided detection and diagnosis, among others, can also impact the performance of breast tomosynthesis in the clinical realm. In this two part paper, a review of breast tomosynthesis research is performed, with an emphasis on its medical physics aspects. In the companion paper, the first part of this review, the research performed relevant to the image acquisition process is examined. This second part will review the research on the post-acquisition aspects, including reconstruction, image processing, and analysis, as well as the advanced applications being investigated for breast tomosynthesis. PMID:23298127

  15. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part II. High dose rate {sup 192}Ir sources

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Regina K. Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper discussed the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources. Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the {sup 192}Ir sources were completed with several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose measurements of the surface dose distributions and characteristic depth dose curves were completed in-phantom. Results: Theoretical dose distributions and depth dose curves were generated for each applicator and agreed well with the measured values. A method of output verification was created that allows users to determine the applicator-specific dose to water at the treatment surface based on a

  16. Recent developments in modeling of hot rolling processes: Part II - Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, Gerhard; Bambach, Markus; Seuren, Simon; Henke, Thomas; Lohmar, Johannes

    2013-05-01

    This publication gives a short overview of current developments in modeling and simulation of hot rolling processes of metals at the Institute of Metal Forming of RWTH Aachen University. It is based on the fundamentals treated in Part I also contained in this conference issue. It features applications in the field of fast on-line models, where a fast multi-stage rolling model and an analytical approach for predicting the through-thickness shear distribution are presented. In addition, a new concept for sensitivity analysis by automatic differentiation is introduced and discussed. Finally, applications of rolling simulations in the field of integrated computational materials engineering are presented with a focus on TWIP and linepipe steels as well as aluminum.

  17. A primer on marginal effects-part II: health services research applications.

    PubMed

    Onukwugha, E; Bergtold, J; Jain, R

    2015-02-01

    Marginal analysis evaluates changes in a regression function associated with a unit change in a relevant variable. The primary statistic of marginal analysis is the marginal effect (ME). The ME facilitates the examination of outcomes for defined patient profiles or individuals while measuring the change in original units (e.g., costs, probabilities). The ME has a long history in economics; however, it is not widely used in health services research despite its flexibility and ability to provide unique insights. This article, the second in a two-part series, discusses practical issues that arise in the estimation and interpretation of the ME for a variety of regression models often used in health services research. Part one provided an overview of prior studies discussing ME followed by derivation of ME formulas for various regression models relevant for health services research studies examining costs and utilization. The current article illustrates the calculation and interpretation of ME in practice and discusses practical issues that arise during the implementation, including: understanding differences between software packages in terms of functionality available for calculating the ME and its confidence interval, interpretation of average marginal effect versus marginal effect at the mean, and the difference between ME and relative effects (e.g., odds ratio). Programming code to calculate ME using SAS, STATA, LIMDEP, and MATLAB are also provided. The illustration, discussion, and application of ME in this two-part series support the conduct of future studies applying the concept of marginal analysis. PMID:25358482

  18. Lead-acid batteries in micro-hybrid applications. Part II. Test proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A. O.; Albers, J.; Weirather-Koestner, D.; Kabza, H.

    In the first part of this work [1] selected key parameters for applying lead-acid (LA) batteries in micro-hybrid power systems (MHPS) were investigated. Main results are integrated in an accelerated, comprehensive test proposal presented here. The test proposal aims at a realistic representation of the pSoC operation regime, which is described in Refs. [1,6]. The test is designed to be sensitive with respect to dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) at partially discharged state (critical for regenerative braking) and the internal resistance at high-rate discharge (critical for idling stop applications). First results are presented for up-to-date valve-regulated LA batteries with absorbent glass mat (AGM) separators. The batteries are close to the limits of the first proposal of pass/fail-criteria. Also flooded batteries were tested; the first out of ten units failed already.

  19. Field portable low temperature porous layer open tubular cryoadsorption headspace sampling and analysis part II: Applications.

    PubMed

    Harries, Megan; Bukovsky-Reyes, Santiago; Bruno, Thomas J

    2016-01-15

    This paper details the sampling methods used with the field portable porous layer open tubular cryoadsorption (PLOT-cryo) approach, described in Part I of this two-part series, applied to several analytes of interest. We conducted tests with coumarin and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (two solutes that were used in initial development of PLOT-cryo technology), naphthalene, aviation turbine kerosene, and diesel fuel, on a variety of matrices and test beds. We demonstrated that these analytes can be easily detected and reliably identified using the portable unit for analyte collection. By leveraging efficiency-boosting temperature control and the high flow rate multiple capillary wafer, very short collection times (as low as 3s) yielded accurate detection. For diesel fuel spiked on glass beads, we determined a method detection limit below 1 ppm. We observed greater variability among separate samples analyzed with the portable unit than previously documented in work using the laboratory-based PLOT-cryo technology. We identify three likely sources that may help explain the additional variation: the use of a compressed air source to generate suction, matrix geometry, and variability in the local vapor concentration around the sampling probe as solute depletion occurs both locally around the probe and in the test bed as a whole. This field-portable adaptation of the PLOT-cryo approach has numerous and diverse potential applications. PMID:26726934

  20. Optically pumped planar waveguide lasers: Part II: Gain media, laser systems, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grivas, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The field of optically pumped planar waveguide lasers has seen a rapid development over the last two decades driven by the requirements of a range of applications. This sustained research effort has led to the demonstration of a large variety of miniature highly efficient laser sources by combining different gain media and resonator geometries. One of the most attractive features of waveguide lasers is the broad range of regimes that they can operate, spanning from continuous wave and single frequency through to the generation of femtosecond pulses. Furthermore, their technology has experienced considerable advances to provide increased output power levels, deriving benefits from the relative immunity from the heat generated in the gain medium during laser operation and the use of cladding-pumped architectures. This second part of the review on optically pumped planar waveguide lasers provides a snapshot of the state-of-the-art research in this field in terms of gain materials, laser system designs, and as well as a perspective on the status of their application as real devices in various research areas.

  1. Rockets -- Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    If two rockets are identical except that one engine burns in one-tenth the time of the other (total impulse and initial fuel mass of the two engines being the same), which rocket will rise higher? Why? The answer to this question (part 1 response in v20 n6, p410, Sep 1982) is provided. (Author/JN)

  2. Application of WRF/Chem over East Asia: Part II. Model improvement and sensitivity simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Qiang; Duan, Fengkui; He, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    To address the problems and limitations identified through a comprehensive evaluation in Part I paper, several modifications are made in model inputs, treatments, and configurations and sensitivity simulations with improved model inputs and treatments are performed in this Part II paper. The use of reinitialization of meteorological variables reduces the biases and increases the spatial correlations in simulated temperature at 2-m (T2), specific humidity at 2-m (Q2), wind speed at 10-m (WS10), and precipitation (Precip). The use of a revised surface drag parameterization further reduces the biases in simulated WS10. The adjustment of only the magnitudes of anthropogenic emissions in the surface layer does not help improve overall model performance, whereas the adjustment of both the magnitudes and vertical distributions of anthropogenic emissions shows moderate to large improvement in simulated surface concentrations and column mass abundances of species in terms of domain mean performance statistics, hourly and monthly mean concentrations, and vertical profiles of concentrations at individual sites. The revised and more advanced dust emission schemes can help improve PM predictions. Using revised upper boundary conditions for O3 significantly improves the column O3 abundances. Using a simple SOA formation module further improves the predictions of organic carbon and PM2.5. The sensitivity simulation that combines all above model improvements greatly improves the overall model performance. For example, the sensitivity simulation gives the normalized mean biases (NMBs) of -6.1% to 23.8% for T2, 2.7-13.8% for Q2, 22.5-47.6% for WS10, and -9.1% to 15.6% for Precip, comparing to -9.8% to 75.6% for T2, 0.4-23.4% for Q2, 66.5-101.0% for WS10, and 11.4%-92.7% for Precip from the original simulation without those improvements. It also gives the NMBs for surface predictions of -68.2% to -3.7% for SO2, -73.8% to -20.6% for NO2, -8.8%-128.7% for O3, -61.4% to -26.5% for PM2

  3. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  4. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 2: Application to EBR-II Primary Sodium System and Related Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman; Collin J. Knight

    2006-03-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decontamination and decomissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidifed carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, USA. This report is Part 2 of a two-part report. This second report provides a supplement to the first report and describes the application of the humdidified carbon dioxide technique ("carbonation") to the EBR-II primary tank, primary cover gas systems, and the intermediate heat exchanger. Future treatment plans are also provided.

  5. Analytical applications of microbial fuel cells. Part II: Toxicity, microbial activity and quantification, single analyte detection and other uses.

    PubMed

    Abrevaya, Ximena C; Sacco, Natalia J; Bonetto, Maria C; Hilding-Ohlsson, Astrid; Cortón, Eduardo

    2015-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells were rediscovered twenty years ago and now are a very active research area. The reasons behind this new activity are the relatively recent discovery of electrogenic or electroactive bacteria and the vision of two important practical applications, as wastewater treatment coupled with clean energy production and power supply systems for isolated low-power sensor devices. Although some analytical applications of MFCs were proposed earlier (as biochemical oxygen demand sensing) only lately a myriad of new uses of this technology are being presented by research groups around the world, which combine both biological-microbiological and electroanalytical expertises. This is the second part of a review of MFC applications in the area of analytical sciences. In Part I a general introduction to biological-based analytical methods including bioassays, biosensors, MFCs design, operating principles, as well as, perhaps the main and earlier presented application, the use as a BOD sensor was reviewed. In Part II, other proposed uses are presented and discussed. As other microbially based analytical systems, MFCs are satisfactory systems to measure and integrate complex parameters that are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise, such as water toxicity (where the toxic effect to aquatic organisms needed to be integrated). We explore here the methods proposed to measure toxicity, microbial metabolism, and, being of special interest to space exploration, life sensors. Also, some methods with higher specificity, proposed to detect a single analyte, are presented. Different possibilities to increase selectivity and sensitivity, by using molecular biology or other modern techniques are also discussed here. PMID:24906984

  6. Practical oral sedation in dentistry. Part II--Clinical application of various oral sedatives and discussion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dominic P; Lu, Winston I

    2006-09-01

    This article presents a practical approach for safe oral sedation in the dental practice. When used properly, oral sedation can provide comfort and a calming treatment environment for patients whose fear inhibits them from securing needed dental care. In Part I, the authors provided information on medico-legal aspects of sedation, patient treatment recommendations, counseling, evaluation, monitoring, documentation, and proper discharge procedures. In this part, the reliable sedatives that have undergone years of clinical trials and have good records of safety and predictable results are presented. For each sedative, the description, formulation and dosage, onset, duration of sedation, and side effects are discussed. PMID:17052039

  7. On the whole spectrum of Timoshenko beams. Part II: further applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzani, Antonio; Stochino, Flavio; Turco, Emilio

    2016-04-01

    The problem of free vibrations of the Timoshenko beam model has been addressed in the first part of this paper. A careful analysis of the governing equations has shown that the vibration spectrum consists of two parts, separated by a transition frequency, which, depending on the applied boundary conditions, might be itself part of the spectrum. Here, as an extension, the case of a doubly clamped beam is considered. For both parts of the spectrum, the values of natural frequencies are computed and the expressions of eigenmodes are provided: this allows to acknowledge that the nature of vibration modes changes when moving across the transition frequency. This case is a meaningful example of more general ones, where the wave-numbers equation cannot be written in a factorized form and hence must be solved by general root-finding methods for nonlinear transcendental equations. These theoretical results can be used as further benchmarks for assessing the correctness of the numerical values provided by several numerical techniques, e.g. finite element models.

  8. Mathematical modeling of cement paste microstructure by mosaic pattern. Part II. Application

    SciTech Connect

    Tennis, P.D.; Xi, Y.; Jennings, H.M.

    1997-07-01

    A model based on mosaic pattern analysis is shown to have the potential to describe the complex shapes and spatial distribution of phases in the microstructures of multiphase materials. Several characteristics of both micrographs of portland cement pastes and images generated using the few parameters of the model are determined and, for the most part, agreement is good. The advantage is that spatial features of the microstructures can be captured by a few parameters. {copyright} {ital 1997 Materials Research Society.}

  9. Experimental investigation and numerical modeling of carbonation process in reinforced concrete structures Part II. Practical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Saetta, Anna V.; Vitaliani, Renato V

    2005-05-01

    The mathematical-numerical method developed by the authors to predict the corrosion initiation time of reinforced concrete structures due to carbonation process, recalled in Part I of this work, is here applied to some real cases. The final aim is to develop and test a practical method for determining the durability characteristics of existing buildings liable to carbonation, as well as estimating the corrosion initiation time of a building at the design stage. Two industrial sheds with different ages and located in different areas have been analyzed performing both experimental tests and numerical analyses. Finally, a case of carbonation-induced failure in a prestressed r.c. beam is presented.

  10. Retrieving Storm Electric Fields from Aircrfaft Field Mill Data: Part II: Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William; Mach, D. M.; Christian H. J.; Stewart, M. F.; Bateman M. G.

    2006-01-01

    The Lagrange multiplier theory developed in Part I of this study is applied to complete a relative calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the Lagrange multiplier method performs well in computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -1) and a 5 V m(sup -1) error in the mean fair-weather field function, the 3D storm electric field is retrieved to within an error of about 12%. A side constraint that involves estimating the detailed structure of the fair-weather field was also tested using computer simulations. For mill measurement errors of 1 V m(sup -l), the method retrieves the 3D storm field to within an error of about 8% if the fair-weather field estimate is typically within 1 V m(sup -1) of the true fair-weather field. Using this type of side constraint and data from fair-weather field maneuvers taken on 29 June 2001, the Citation aircraft was calibrated. Absolute calibration was completed using the pitch down method developed in Part I, and conventional analyses. The resulting calibration matrices were then used to retrieve storm electric fields during a Citation flight on 2 June 2001. The storm field results are encouraging and agree favorably in many respects with results derived from earlier (iterative) techniques of calibration.

  11. Application of Satellite Frost Forecast Technology to Other Parts of the United States Phase II: Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The history and status of University of Michigan and University of Pennsylvania involvement in determining if P-model for front prediction used in Florida is applicable to those geographic locations is reviewed. The possibility of using the S-model to develop a satellite front forecast system that can recall the distribution of temperatures during previous freezes from a particular area and bring that cold climate climatology to bear on present forecasts is discussed as well as a proposed GOES satellite downlink system to sectionalize the data used in Florida.

  12. Improving the response of accelerometers for automotive applications by using LMS adaptive filters: Part II.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Wilmar; de Vicente, Jesús; Sergiyenko, Oleg Y; Fernández, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the fast least-mean-squares (LMS) algorithm was used to both eliminate noise corrupting the important information coming from a piezoresisitive accelerometer for automotive applications, and improve the convergence rate of the filtering process based on the conventional LMS algorithm. The response of the accelerometer under test was corrupted by process and measurement noise, and the signal processing stage was carried out by using both conventional filtering, which was already shown in a previous paper, and optimal adaptive filtering. The adaptive filtering process relied on the LMS adaptive filtering family, which has shown to have very good convergence and robustness properties, and here a comparative analysis between the results of the application of the conventional LMS algorithm and the fast LMS algorithm to solve a real-life filtering problem was carried out. In short, in this paper the piezoresistive accelerometer was tested for a multi-frequency acceleration excitation. Due to the kind of test conducted in this paper, the use of conventional filtering was discarded and the choice of one adaptive filter over the other was based on the signal-to-noise ratio improvement and the convergence rate. PMID:22315579

  13. Maximum-likelihood methods in cryo-EM. Part II: application to experimental data

    PubMed Central

    Scheres, Sjors H.W.

    2010-01-01

    With the advent of computationally feasible approaches to maximum likelihood image processing for cryo-electron microscopy, these methods have proven particularly useful in the classification of structurally heterogeneous single-particle data. A growing number of experimental studies have applied these algorithms to study macromolecular complexes with a wide range of structural variability, including non-stoichiometric complex formation, large conformational changes and combinations of both. This chapter aims to share the practical experience that has been gained from the application of these novel approaches. Current insights on how to prepare the data and how to perform two- or three-dimensional classifications are discussed together with aspects related to high-performance computing. Thereby, this chapter will hopefully be of practical use for those microscopists wanting to apply maximum likelihood methods in their own investigations. PMID:20888966

  14. The Rossby Centre Regional Atmospheric Climate Model part II: application to the Arctic climate.

    PubMed

    Jones, Colin G; Wyser, Klaus; Ullerstig, Anders; Willén, Ulrika

    2004-06-01

    The Rossby Centre regional climate model (RCA2) has been integrated over the Arctic Ocean as part of the international ARCMIP project. Results have been compared to observations derived from the SHEBA data set. The standard RCA2 model overpredicts cloud cover and downwelling longwave radiation, during the Arctic winter. This error was improved by introducing a new cloud parameterization, which significantly improves the annual cycle of cloud cover. Compensating biases between clear sky downwelling longwave radiation and longwave radiation emitted from cloud base were identified. Modifications have been introduced to the model radiation scheme that more accurately treat solar radiation interaction with ice crystals. This leads to a more realistic representation of cloud-solar radiation interaction. The clear sky portion of the model radiation code transmits too much solar radiation through the atmosphere, producing a positive bias at the top of the frequent boundary layer clouds. A realistic treatment of the temporally evolving albedo, of both sea-ice and snow, appears crucial for an accurate simulation of the net surface energy budget. Likewise, inclusion of a prognostic snow-surface temperature seems necessary, to accurately simulate near-surface thermodynamic processes in the Arctic. PMID:15264599

  15. Estimation of Global 1km-grid Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Part II: Evaluations and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, K.; Sasai, T.; Kato, S.; Niwa, Y.; Saito, M.; Takagi, H.; Matsunaga, T.; Hiraki, K.; Maksyutov, S. S.; Yokota, T.

    2015-12-01

    Global terrestrial carbon cycle largely depends on a spatial pattern in land cover type, which is heterogeneously-distributed over regional and global scales. Many studies have been trying to reveal distribution of carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere for understanding global carbon cycle dynamics by using terrestrial biosphere models, satellite data, inventory data, and so on. However, most studies remained within several tens of kilometers grid spatial resolution, and the results have not been enough to understand the detailed pattern of carbon exchanges based on ecological community and to evaluate the carbon stocks by forest ecosystems in each countries. Improving the sophistication of spatial resolution is obviously necessary to enhance the accuracy of carbon exchanges. Moreover, the improvement may contribute to global warming awareness, policy makers and other social activities. We show global terrestrial carbon exchanges (net ecosystem production, net primary production, and gross primary production) with 1km-grid resolution. The methodology for these estimations are shown in the 2015 AGU FM poster "Estimation of Global 1km-grid Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Part I: Developing Inputs and Modelling". In this study, we evaluated the carbon exchanges in various regions with other approaches. We used the satellite-driven biosphere model (BEAMS) as our estimations, GOSAT L4A CO2 flux data, NEP retrieved by NICAM and CarbonTracer2013 flux data, for period from Jun 2001 to Dec 2012. The temporal patterns for this period were indicated similar trends between BEAMS, GOSAT, NICAM, and CT2013 in many sub-continental regions. Then, we estimated the terrestrial carbon exchanges in each countries, and could indicated the temporal patterns of the exchanges in large carbon stock regions.Global terrestrial carbon cycle largely depends on a spatial pattern of land cover type, which is heterogeneously-distributed over regional and global scales. Many

  16. Aerosol dry deposition on vegetative canopies. Part II: A new modelling approach and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Alexandre; Mailliat, Alain; Amielh, Muriel; Anselmet, Fabien

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the modelling of aerosol dry deposition on vegetation. It follows a companion article, in which a review of the current knowledge highlights the need for a better description of the aerosol behaviour within the canopy [Petroff, A., Mailliat, A., Amielh, M., Anselmet, F., 2008. Aerosol dry deposition on vegetative canopies. Part I: Review of present knowledge. Atmospheric Environment, in press, doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.09.043]. Concepts from multi-phase flow studies are used for describing the canopy medium and deriving a time and space-averaged aerosol balance equation and the associated deposition terms. The closure of the deposition terms follows an up-scaling procedure based on the statistical distribution of the collecting elements. This aerosol transport model is then applied in a stationary and mono-dimensional configuration and takes into account the properties of the vegetation, the aerosol and the turbulent flow. Deposition mechanisms are Brownian diffusion, interception, inertial and turbulent impactions, and gravitational settling. For each of them, a parameterisation of the particle collection is derived and the quality of their predictions is assessed by comparison with wind-tunnel deposition measurements on coniferous twigs [Belot, Y., Gauthier, D., 1975. Transport of micronic particles from atmosphere to foliar surfaces. In: De Vries, D.A., Afgan, N.H. (Eds.), Heat and Mass Transfer in the Biosphere. Scripta Book, Washington, DC, pp. 583-591; Belot, Y., 1977. Etude de la captation des polluants atmosphériques par les végétaux. CEA, R-4786, Fontenay-aux-Roses; Belot, Y., Camus, H., Gauthier, D., Caput, C., 1994. Uptake of small particles by canopies. The Science of the Total Environment 157, 1-6]. Under a real canopy configuration, the predictions of the aerosol transport model compare reasonably well with detailed on-site deposition measurements of Aitken mode particles [Buzorius, G., Rannik, Ü., M

  17. Robust detection of gearbox deterioration using compromised autoregressive modeling and Kolmogorov Smirnov test statistic. Part II: Experiment and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yimin; Mechefske, Chris K.

    2007-07-01

    Optimal maintenance decision analysis is heavily dependent on the accuracy of condition indicators. A condition indicator that is subject to such varying operating conditions as load is unable to provide precise condition information of the monitored object for making optimal operational maintenance decisions even if the maintenance program is established within a rigorous theoretical framework. For this reason, the performance of condition monitoring techniques applied to rotating machinery under varying load conditions has been a long-term concern and has attracted intensive research interest. Part I of this study proposed a novel technique based on adaptive autoregressive modeling and hypothesis tests. The method is able to automatically search for the optimal time-series model order and establish a compromised autoregressive model fitting based on the healthy gear motion residual signals under varying load conditions. The condition of the monitored gearbox is numerically represented by a modified Kolmogorov-Smirnov test statistic. Part II of this study is devoted to applications of the proposed technique to entire lifetime condition detection of three gearboxes with distinct physical specifications, distinct load conditions, and distinct failure modes. A comprehensive and thorough comparative study is conducted between the proposed technique and several counterparts. The detection technique is further enhanced by a proposed method to automatically identify and generate fault alerts with the aid of the Wilcoxon rank-sum test and thus requires no supervision from maintenance personnel. Experimental analysis demonstrated that the proposed technique applied to automatic identification and generation of fault alerts also features two highly desirable properties, i.e. few false alerts and early alert for incipient faults. Furthermore, it is found that the proposed technique is able to identify two types of abnormalities, i.e. strong ghost components abruptly

  18. Parts application handbook study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The requirements for a NASA application handbook for standard electronic parts are determined and defined. This study concentrated on identifying in detail the type of information that designers and parts engineers need and expect in a parts application handbook for the effective application of standard parts on NASA projects.

  19. Review of ultrasound image guidance in external beam radiotherapy part II: intra-fraction motion management and novel applications.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Tuathan; Bamber, Jeffrey; Fontanarosa, Davide; van der Meer, Skadi; Verhaegen, Frank; Harris, Emma

    2016-04-21

    Imaging has become an essential tool in modern radiotherapy (RT), being used to plan dose delivery prior to treatment and verify target position before and during treatment. Ultrasound (US) imaging is cost-effective in providing excellent contrast at high resolution for depicting soft tissue targets apart from those shielded by the lungs or cranium. As a result, it is increasingly used in RT setup verification for the measurement of inter-fraction motion, the subject of Part I of this review (Fontanarosa et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 R77-114). The combination of rapid imaging and zero ionising radiation dose makes US highly suitable for estimating intra-fraction motion. The current paper (Part II of the review) covers this topic. The basic technology for US motion estimation, and its current clinical application to the prostate, is described here, along with recent developments in robust motion-estimation algorithms, and three dimensional (3D) imaging. Together, these are likely to drive an increase in the number of future clinical studies and the range of cancer sites in which US motion management is applied. Also reviewed are selections of existing and proposed novel applications of US imaging to RT. These are driven by exciting developments in structural, functional and molecular US imaging and analytical techniques such as backscatter tissue analysis, elastography, photoacoustography, contrast-specific imaging, dynamic contrast analysis, microvascular and super-resolution imaging, and targeted microbubbles. Such techniques show promise for predicting and measuring the outcome of RT, quantifying normal tissue toxicity, improving tumour definition and defining a biological target volume that describes radiation sensitive regions of the tumour. US offers easy, low cost and efficient integration of these techniques into the RT workflow. US contrast technology also has potential to be used actively to assist RT by manipulating the tumour cell environment and by

  20. Review of ultrasound image guidance in external beam radiotherapy part II: intra-fraction motion management and novel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, Tuathan; Bamber, Jeffrey; Fontanarosa, Davide; van der Meer, Skadi; Verhaegen, Frank; Harris, Emma

    2016-04-01

    Imaging has become an essential tool in modern radiotherapy (RT), being used to plan dose delivery prior to treatment and verify target position before and during treatment. Ultrasound (US) imaging is cost-effective in providing excellent contrast at high resolution for depicting soft tissue targets apart from those shielded by the lungs or cranium. As a result, it is increasingly used in RT setup verification for the measurement of inter-fraction motion, the subject of Part I of this review (Fontanarosa et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 R77-114). The combination of rapid imaging and zero ionising radiation dose makes US highly suitable for estimating intra-fraction motion. The current paper (Part II of the review) covers this topic. The basic technology for US motion estimation, and its current clinical application to the prostate, is described here, along with recent developments in robust motion-estimation algorithms, and three dimensional (3D) imaging. Together, these are likely to drive an increase in the number of future clinical studies and the range of cancer sites in which US motion management is applied. Also reviewed are selections of existing and proposed novel applications of US imaging to RT. These are driven by exciting developments in structural, functional and molecular US imaging and analytical techniques such as backscatter tissue analysis, elastography, photoacoustography, contrast-specific imaging, dynamic contrast analysis, microvascular and super-resolution imaging, and targeted microbubbles. Such techniques show promise for predicting and measuring the outcome of RT, quantifying normal tissue toxicity, improving tumour definition and defining a biological target volume that describes radiation sensitive regions of the tumour. US offers easy, low cost and efficient integration of these techniques into the RT workflow. US contrast technology also has potential to be used actively to assist RT by manipulating the tumour cell environment and by

  1. A web application for cotton irrigation management on the U.S. southern high plains. Part II: Application design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A web-based application to help Southern High Plains cotton producers estimate profitability under center pivot irrigated production is described. The application’s crop modeling and general profit calculation approach are outlined in a preceding companion paper, while additional details of the prof...

  2. A Web Application for Cotton Irrigation Management on The US Southern High Plains. Part II: Application Design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A web-based application intended to help Southern High Plains cotton producers estimate profitability under center pivot irrigated production is described. The application’s crop modeling and general profit calculation approach are outlined in a preceding companion paper, while additional details of...

  3. Ausubel's Theory of Learning and its Application to Introductory Science Part II--Primary Science: An Ausubelian View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, J. A. G.

    1982-01-01

    In part 1 (SE 532 193) an outline of Ausubel's learning theory was given. The application of the theory to elementary school science is addressed in this part, clarifying what elementary science means and indicating how it relates to what may be expected to be already known by elementary school children. (Author/JN)

  4. Standards in neurosonology. Part II

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Tomasz; Luchowski, Piotr; Kozera, Grzegorz; Kaźmierski, Radosław; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents standards related to ultrasound imaging of the cerebral vasculature and structures. The aim of this paper is to standardize both the performance and description of ultrasound imaging of the extracranial and intracranial cerebral arteries as well as a study of a specific brain structure, i.e. substantia nigra hyperechogenicity. The following aspects are included in the description of standards for each ultrasonographic method: equipment requirements, patient preparation, study technique and documentation as well as the required elements of ultrasound description. Practical criteria for the diagnosis of certain pathologies in accordance with the latest literature were also presented. Furthermore, additional comments were included in some of the sections. Part I discusses standards for the performance, documentation and description of different ultrasound methods (Duplex, Doppler). Part II and III are devoted to standards for specific clinical situations (vasospasm, monitoring after the acute stage of stroke, detection of a right-to-left shunts, confirmation of the arrest of the cerebral circulation, an assessment of the functional efficiency of circle of Willis, an assessment of the cerebrovascular vasomotor reserve as well as the measurement of substantia nigra hyperechogenicity). PMID:27104002

  5. Understanding Radiation Thermometry. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risch, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    This document is a two-part course on the theory and practice of radiation thermometry. Radiation thermometry is the technique for determining the temperature of a surface or a volume by measuring the electromagnetic radiation it emits. This course covers the theory and practice of radiative thermometry and emphasizes the modern application of the field using commercially available electronic detectors and optical components. The course covers the historical development of the field, the fundamental physics of radiative surfaces, along with modern measurement methods and equipment.

  6. Pediatric cancer gone viral. Part II: potential clinical application of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 in children

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Gregory K; Beierle, Elizabeth A; Gillespie, George Yancey; Markert, James M; Waters, Alicia M; Chen, Chun-Yu; Denton, Nicholas L; Haworth, Kellie B; Hutzen, Brian; Leddon, Jennifer L; Streby, Keri A; Wang, Pin-Yi; Cripe, Timothy P

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic engineered herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) possess many biologic and functional attributes that support their use in clinical trials in children with solid tumors. Tumor cells, in an effort to escape regulatory mechanisms that would impair their growth and progression, have removed many mechanisms that would have protected them from virus infection and eventual virus-mediated destruction. Viruses engineered to exploit this weakness, like mutant HSV, can be safely employed as tumor cell killers, since normal cells retain these antiviral strategies. Many preclinical studies and early phase trials in adults demonstrated that oncolytic HSV can be safely used and are highly effective in killing tumor cells that comprise pediatric malignancies, without generating the toxic side effects of nondiscriminatory chemotherapy or radiation therapy. A variety of engineered viruses have been developed and tested in numerous preclinical models of pediatric cancers and initial trials in patients are underway. In Part II of this review series, we examine the preclinical evidence to support the further advancement of oncolytic HSV in the pediatric population. We discuss clinical advances made to date in this emerging era of oncolytic virotherapy. PMID:26436134

  7. Exploring Water Pollution. Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1975-01-01

    This is part two of a three part article related to the science activity of exploring environmental problems. Part one dealt with background information for the classroom teacher. Presented here is a suggested lesson plan on water pollution. Objectives, important concepts and instructional procedures are suggested. (EB)

  8. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part II: Application to Partial Differential Equations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.; Owen, Steven J.; Siefert, Christopher M.; Staten, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    A template-based generic programming approach was presented in Part I of this series of papers [Sci. Program. 20 (2012), 197–219] that separates the development effort of programming a physical model from that of computing additional quantities, such as derivatives, needed for embedded analysis algorithms. In this paper, we describe the implementation details for using the template-based generic programming approach for simulation and analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs). We detail several of the hurdles that we have encountered, and some of the software infrastructure developed to overcome them. We end with a demonstration where we present shape optimization and uncertaintymore » quantification results for a 3D PDE application.« less

  9. Use of modulated excitation signals in medical ultrasound. Part II: Design and performance for medical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Misaridis, Thanassis; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2005-02-01

    In the first paper, the superiority of linear FM signals was shown in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and robustness to tissue attenuation. This second paper in the series of three papers on the application of coded excitation signals in medical ultrasound presents design methods of linear FM signals and mismatched filters, in order to meet the higher demands on resolution in ultrasound imaging. It is shown that for the small time-bandwidth (TB) products available in ultrasound, the rectangular spectrum approximation is not valid, which reduces the effectiveness of weighting. Additionally, the distant range sidelobes are associated with the ripples of the spectrum amplitude and, thus, cannot be removed by weighting. Ripple reduction is achieved through amplitude or phase predistortion of the transmitted signals. Mismatched filters are designed to efficiently use the available bandwidth and at the same time to be insensitive to the transducer's impulse response. With these techniques, temporal sidelobes are kept below 60 to 100 dB, image contrast is improved by reducing the energy within the sidelobe region, and axial resolution is preserved. The method is evaluated first for resolution performance and axial sidelobes through simulations with the program Field II. A coded excitation ultrasound imaging system based on a commercial scanner and a 4 MHz probe driven by coded sequences is presented and used for the clinical evaluation of the coded excitation/compression scheme. The clinical images show a significant improvement in penetration depth and contrast, while they preserve both axial and lateral resolution. At the maximum acquisition depth of 15 cm, there is an improvement of more than 10 dB in the signal-to-noise ratio of the images. The paper also presents acquired images, using complementary Golay codes, that show the deleterious effects of attenuation on binary codes when processed with a matched filter, also confirmed by presented simulated images. PMID

  10. State-of-the-art aortic imaging: Part II - applications in transcatheter aortic valve replacement and endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Rengier, Fabian; Geisbüsch, Philipp; Schoenhagen, Paul; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Vosshenrich, Rolf; Karmonik, Christof; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Partovi, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) as well as thoracic and abdominal endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR and EVAR) rely on accurate pre- and postprocedural imaging. This review article discusses the application of imaging, including preprocedural assessment and measurements as well as postprocedural imaging of complications. Furthermore, the exciting perspective of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based on cross-sectional imaging is presented. TAVR is a minimally invasive alternative for treatment of aortic valve stenosis in patients with high age and multiple comorbidities who cannot undergo traditional open surgical repair. Given the lack of direct visualization during the procedure, pre- and peri-procedural imaging forms an essential part of the intervention. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for preprocedural planning. Routine postprocedural follow-up is performed by echocardiography to confirm treatment success and detect complications. EVAR and TEVAR are minimally invasive alternatives to open surgical repair of aortic pathologies. CTA constitutes the preferred imaging modality for both preoperative planning and postoperative follow-up including detection of endoleaks. Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent alternative to CT for postoperative follow-up, and is especially beneficial for younger patients given the lack of radiation. Ultrasound is applied in screening and postoperative follow-up of abdominal aortic aneurysms, but cross-sectional imaging is required once abnormalities are detected. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound may be as sensitive as CTA in detecting endoleaks. PMID:24429327

  11. X-pinch. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-06-01

    Results of experimental studies of the X-pinch since its invention and implementation in 1982 at the Lebedev Physical Institute are presented. The review consists of two parts. The first part briefly outlines the history of creation and studies of X-pinches, describes the diagnostic techniques and devices developed during these studies, and presents the main results obtained in studying the physical processes occurring in the X-pinch. The second part is devoted to the results of detailed studies of the spatial, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the X-pinch hot spot—the region where the highest plasma parameters are achieved and which is a source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. Some results of X-pinch simulations are also presented.

  12. X-pinch. Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S. A. Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.

    2015-06-15

    Results of experimental studies of the X-pinch since its invention and implementation in 1982 at the Lebedev Physical Institute are presented. The review consists of two parts. The first part briefly outlines the history of creation and studies of X-pinches, describes the diagnostic techniques and devices developed during these studies, and presents the main results obtained in studying the physical processes occurring in the X-pinch. The second part is devoted to the results of detailed studies of the spatial, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the X-pinch hot spot—the region where the highest plasma parameters are achieved and which is a source of X-ray emission with extreme parameters. Some results of X-pinch simulations are also presented.

  13. Roots/Routes: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Dalene M.

    2009-01-01

    This narrative acts as an articulation of a journey of many routes. Following Part I of the same research journey of rootedness/routedness, it debates the nature of transformation and transcendence beyond personal and political paradoxes informed by neoliberalism and related repressive globalizing discourses. Through a more personal, descriptive,…

  14. Local Area Networks: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessy, Raymond E., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses five approaches used by industry/colleges to provide local area network (LAN) capabilities in the analytical laboratory: (1) mixed baseband bus network coupled to a star net; (2) broadband bus network; (3) ring network; (4) star network coupled to broadband net; and (5) simple multiprocessor center. Part I (September issue) focused on…

  15. Playing It Safe: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penman, Kenneth A.; Niccolai, Frances R.

    1985-01-01

    Explains how to prevent outdoor sports injuries; discusses related litigation and specific cases involving playing field turf, tennis, skiing, and pools; and sets out facility design and maintenance considerations and recommendations. A sidebar provides information about injury insurance available to NCAA schools. Part I of this article appeared…

  16. California Emerging Technology Forum Part II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of the California Emerging Technology Forum Part II is to foster the removal of barriers for the development and use of clean technologies through the development of collaborative technology research projects on promising technologies. The collaborative technology resear...

  17. The PC Connection Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessy, Raymond E., Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses topics involved in the selection of an analog-to-digital (ADC) converter and associated front-end signal conditioning hardware. Reviews what types of ADC's are available, best type for particular application, conversion rates, amplification, filtering, noise, and compatibility issues. Suggests purchase strategy and supplies names and…

  18. Microcomputer basics. Part II. Software.

    PubMed

    Siguel, E N

    1984-01-01

    Microcomputers are invading every aspect of life including the practice of pathology. This second in a series of articles is designed to help neophytes make effective use of these new tools. A list of references, providing readers with more information on the subject of microcomputers and their applications to pathology, will be furnished at the conclusion of the series. PMID:10264834

  19. AERMOD: A DISPERSION MODEL FOR INDUSTRIAL SOURCE APPLICATIONS PART II: MODEL PERFORMANCE AGAINST 17 FIELD STUDY DATABASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formulations of the AMS/EPA Regulatory Model Improvement Committee's applied air dispersion model (AERMOD) are described. This is the second in a series of three articles. Part I describes the model's methods for characterizing the atmospheric boundary layer and complex ter...

  20. Talking about the Weather, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Allan A.

    1984-01-01

    This second part of a two-part article highlights some mathematics involved in the study of meteorology. Examples are given of the application of mathematics to the study of the atmosphere, with three problems discussed. (MNS)

  1. Epilepsy Care in Developing Countries: Part II of II

    PubMed Central

    Birbeck, Gretchen L

    2010-01-01

    Although 80% of people with epilepsy reside in resource poor, developing countries, epilepsy care in these regions remains limited and the majority of epilepsy patients go untreated. Cost-effective, sustainable epilepsy care services, delivering first-line antiepileptic drugs through established primary health care facilities, are needed to decrease these treatment gaps. Neurologists with local experience and knowledge of the culture, who are willing to serve as educators, policy advisors, and advocates, can make a difference. This is Part II of a two-part article. Part I reviewed the burden of epilepsy and the current state of resources for treatment in developing countries, while Part II will now discuss various aspects of care in these countries. PMID:20944819

  2. Entangled Cross-Linked Fibres for an Application as Core Material for Sandwich Structures - Part II: Analytical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezeix, L.; Poquillon, D.; Bouvet, C.

    2016-02-01

    Entangled cross-linked carbon, aramid and glass fibres were recently produced by epoxy spraying for an application as core material for sandwich panel. The Young's moduli in compression and tension have been previously measured and briefly summarized in this paper. To optimize the core structure, modelling of these properties has been achieved in the present paper. The cross-link fibres have a random orientation and the stiffness of the epoxy joint is modelled by a torsion spring. A parallel model is chosen for homogenisation. It was found that the experimentally estimated stiffness of these materials fits fairly well with the modelled ones.

  3. Three-dimensional chitin-based scaffolds from Verongida sponges (Demospongiae: Porifera). Part II: Biomimetic potential and applications.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, H; Steck, E; Ilan, M; Maldonado, M; Muricy, G; Bavestrello, G; Kljajic, Z; Carballo, J L; Schiaparelli, S; Ereskovsky, A; Schupp, P; Born, R; Worch, H; Bazhenov, V V; Kurek, D; Varlamov, V; Vyalikh, D; Kummer, K; Sivkov, V V; Molodtsov, S L; Meissner, H; Richter, G; Hunoldt, S; Kammer, M; Paasch, S; Krasokhin, V; Patzke, G; Brunner, E; Richter, W

    2010-08-01

    In order to evaluate the biomedical potential of three-dimensional chitinous scaffolds of poriferan origin, chondrocyte culturing experiments were performed. It was shown for the first time that freshly isolated chondrocytes attached well to the chitin scaffold and synthesized an extracellular matrix similar to that found in other cartilage tissue engineering constructs. Chitin scaffolds also supported deposition of a proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix of chondrocytes seeded bioconstructs in an in vivo environment. We suggest that chitin sponge scaffolds, apart from the demonstrated biomedical applications, are highly optimized structures for use as filtering systems, templates for biomineralization as well as metallization in order to produce catalysts. PMID:20478334

  4. Clinical application of shock wave therapy in musculoskeletal disorders: part II related to myofascial and nerve apparatus.

    PubMed

    Saggini, R; Di Stefano, A; Saggini, A; Bellomo, R G

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves have been widely recognized in literature as a biological regulator; accordingly we carried out a review on the effect of shock waves on the mesenchymal cells in their various expressions: bone, muscle, ligament and tendon tissue. To date, the application of Shock Wave Therapy (SWT) in musculoskeletal disorders has been primarily used in the treatment of tendinopathies (proximal plantar fasciopathy, lateral elbow tendinopathy, calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder, and patellar tendinopathy, etc.) and bone defects (delayed and non-union of bone fractures, avascular necrosis of femoral head, etc.). Although the mechanism of their therapeutic effects is still unknown, the majority of published papers have shown the positive and beneficial effects of using SWT as a treatment for musculoskeletal disorders, with a success rate ranging from 65% to 91%, while the complications are low or negligible. The purpose of this paper is to present the published data on the clinical application of SWT in the treatment of myofascial and nerve disorders. With the help of the relevant literature, in this paper we outline the indications and success rates of SWT, as well as the adequate SWT parameters (e.g., rate of impulses, energy flux density) defined according to the present state of knowledge. PMID:26753637

  5. High-intensity interval training, solutions to the programming puzzle. Part II: anaerobic energy, neuromuscular load and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Martin; Laursen, Paul B

    2013-10-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIT) is a well-known, time-efficient training method for improving cardiorespiratory and metabolic function and, in turn, physical performance in athletes. HIT involves repeated short (<45 s) to long (2-4 min) bouts of rather high-intensity exercise interspersed with recovery periods (refer to the previously published first part of this review). While athletes have used 'classical' HIT formats for nearly a century (e.g. repetitions of 30 s of exercise interspersed with 30 s of rest, or 2-4-min interval repetitions ran at high but still submaximal intensities), there is today a surge of research interest focused on examining the effects of short sprints and all-out efforts, both in the field and in the laboratory. Prescription of HIT consists of the manipulation of at least nine variables (e.g. work interval intensity and duration, relief interval intensity and duration, exercise modality, number of repetitions, number of series, between-series recovery duration and intensity); any of which has a likely effect on the acute physiological response. Manipulating HIT appropriately is important, not only with respect to the expected middle- to long-term physiological and performance adaptations, but also to maximize daily and/or weekly training periodization. Cardiopulmonary responses are typically the first variables to consider when programming HIT (refer to Part I). However, anaerobic glycolytic energy contribution and neuromuscular load should also be considered to maximize the training outcome. Contrasting HIT formats that elicit similar (and maximal) cardiorespiratory responses have been associated with distinctly different anaerobic energy contributions. The high locomotor speed/power requirements of HIT (i.e. ≥95 % of the minimal velocity/power that elicits maximal oxygen uptake [v/p(·)VO(2max)] to 100 % of maximal sprinting speed or power) and the accumulation of high-training volumes at high-exercise intensity (runners can

  6. Monte Carlo-based inverse model for calculating tissue optical properties. Part II: Application to breast cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Gregory M.; Zhu, Changfang; Breslin, Tara M.; Xu, Fushen; Gilchrist, Kennedy W.; Ramanujam, Nirmala

    2006-02-01

    The Monte Carlo-based inverse model of diffuse reflectance described in part I of this pair of companion papers was applied to the diffuse reflectance spectra of a set of 17 malignant and 24 normal-benign ex vivo human breast tissue samples. This model allows extraction of physically meaningful tissue parameters, which include the concentration of absorbers and the size and density of scatterers present in tissue. It was assumed that intrinsic absorption could be attributed to oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and beta-carotene, that scattering could be modeled by spheres of a uniform size distribution, and that the refractive indices of the spheres and the surrounding medium are known. The tissue diffuse reflectance spectra were evaluated over a wavelength range of 400-600 nm. The extracted parameters that showed the statistically most significant differences between malignant and nonmalignant breast tissues were hemoglobin saturation and the mean reduced scattering coefficient. Malignant tissues showed decreased hemoglobin saturation and an increased mean reduced scattering coefficient compared with nonmalignant tissues. A support vector machine classification algorithm was then used to classify a sample as malignant or nonmalignant based on these two extracted parameters and produced a cross-validated sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 92%, respectively.

  7. The application of multiple biophysical cues to engineer functional neocartilage for treatment of osteoarthritis. Part II: signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Brady, Mariea A; Waldman, Stephen D; Ethier, C Ross

    2015-02-01

    The unique mechanoelectrochemical environment of cartilage has motivated researchers to investigate the effect of multiple biophysical cues, including mechanical, magnetic, and electrical stimulation, on chondrocyte biology. It is well established that biophysical stimuli promote chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and maturation within "biological windows" of defined dose parameters, including mode, frequency, magnitude, and duration of stimuli (see companion review Part I: Cellular Response). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways activated in response to multiple biophysical stimuli remain to be elucidated. Understanding the mechanisms of biophysical signal transduction will deepen knowledge of tissue organogenesis, remodeling, and regeneration and aiding in the treatment of pathologies such as osteoarthritis. Further, this knowledge will provide the tissue engineer with a potent toolset to manipulate and control cell fate and subsequently develop functional replacement cartilage. The aim of this article is to review chondrocyte signal transduction pathways in response to mechanical, magnetic, and electrical cues. Signal transduction does not occur along a single pathway; rather a number of parallel pathways appear to be activated, with calcium signaling apparently common to all three types of stimuli, though there are different modes of activation. Current tissue engineering strategies, such as the development of "smart" functionalized biomaterials that enable the delivery of growth factors or integration of conjugated nanoparticles, may further benefit from targeting known signal transduction pathways in combination with external biophysical cues. PMID:25065615

  8. Physical and welding metallurgy of Gd-enriched austenitic alloys for spent nuclear fuel applications. Part II, nickel base alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Michael, Joseph Richard; Williams, David Brian; Dupont, John Neuman; Robino, Charles Victor

    2004-06-01

    The physical and welding a metallurgy of gadolinium- (Gd-) enriched Ni-based alloys has been examined using a combination of differential thermal analysis, hot ductility testing. Varestraint testing, and various microstructural characterization techniques. Three different matrix compositions were chosen that were similar to commercial Ni-Cr-Mo base alloys (UNS N06455, N06022, and N06059). A ternary Ni-Cr-Gd alloy was also examined. The Gd level of each alloy was {approx}2 wt-%. All the alloys initiated solidification by formation of primary austenite and terminated solidification by a Liquid {gamma} + Ni{sub 5}Gd eutectic-type reaction at {approx}1270 C. The solidification temperature ranges of the alloys varied from {approx}100 to 130 C (depending on alloy composition). This is a substantial reduction compared to the solidification temperature range to Gd-enriched stainless steels (360 to 400 C) that terminate solidification by a peritectic reaction at {approx}1060 C. The higher-temperature eutectic reaction that occurs in the Ni-based alloys is accompanied by significant improvements in hot ductility and solidification cracking resistance. The results of this research demonstrate that Gd-enriched Ni-based alloys are excellent candidate materials for nuclear criticality control in spent nuclear fuel storage applications that require production and fabrication of large amounts of material through conventional ingot metallurgy and fusion welding techniques.

  9. Multidimensional Riemann problem with self-similar internal structure. Part II - Application to hyperbolic conservation laws on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.; Dumbser, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Multidimensional Riemann solvers that have internal sub-structure in the strongly-interacting state have been formulated recently (D.S. Balsara (2012, 2014) [5,16]). Any multidimensional Riemann solver operates at the grid vertices and takes as its input all the states from its surrounding elements. It yields as its output an approximation of the strongly interacting state, as well as the numerical fluxes. The multidimensional Riemann problem produces a self-similar strongly-interacting state which is the result of several one-dimensional Riemann problems interacting with each other. To compute this strongly interacting state and its higher order moments we propose the use of a Galerkin-type formulation to compute the strongly interacting state and its higher order moments in terms of similarity variables. The use of substructure in the Riemann problem reduces numerical dissipation and, therefore, allows a better preservation of flow structures, like contact and shear waves. In this second part of a series of papers we describe how this technique is extended to unstructured triangular meshes. All necessary details for a practical computer code implementation are discussed. In particular, we explicitly present all the issues related to computational geometry. Because these Riemann solvers are Multidimensional and have Self-similar strongly-Interacting states that are obtained by Consistency with the conservation law, we call them MuSIC Riemann solvers. (A video introduction to multidimensional Riemann solvers is available on http://www.elsevier.com/xml/linking-roles/text/html". The MuSIC framework is sufficiently general to handle general nonlinear systems of hyperbolic conservation laws in multiple space dimensions. It can also accommodate all self-similar one-dimensional Riemann solvers and subsequently produces a multidimensional version of the same. In this paper we focus on unstructured triangular meshes. As examples of different systems of conservation laws we

  10. Shaping frequency response of a vibrating plate for passive and active control applications by simultaneous optimization of arrangement of additional masses and ribs. Part II: Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrona, Stanislaw; Pawelczyk, Marek

    2016-03-01

    It was shown in Part I that an ability to shape frequency response of a vibrating plate according to precisely defined demands has a very high practical potential. It can be used to improve acoustic radiation of the plate for required frequencies or enhance acoustic isolation of noise barriers and device casings. It can be used for both passive and active control. The proposed method is based on mounting several additional ribs and masses (passive and/or active) to the plate surface at locations followed from an optimisation process. In Part I a relevant model of such structure, as a function of arrangement of the additional elements was derived and validated. The model allows calculating natural frequencies and mode-shapes of the whole structure. The aim of this companion paper, Part II, is to present the second stage of the method. This is an optimization process that results in arrangement of the elements guaranteeing desired plate frequency response, and enhancement of controllability and observability measures. For that purpose appropriate cost functions, and constraints followed from technological feasibility are defined. Then, a memetic algorithm is employed to obtain a numerical solution with parameters of the arrangement. The optimization results are initially presented for simple cases to validate the method. Then, more complex scenarios are analysed with very special demands concerning the frequency response to present the full potential of the method. Subsequently, a laboratory experiment is presented and discussed. Finally, other areas of applications of the proposed method are shown and conclusions for future research are drawn.

  11. Construction of an Algorithm for Stem Recognition in the Hebrew Language. Application of Hebrew Morphology to Computer Techniques for Investigation of Word Roots. Final Report, Part II. Noun Reference Dictionary, Verbal Derivatives. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazewnik, Grainom

    This document comprises the first part of the section of the Noun Reference Dictionary concerned with nouns derived from verb roots. See AL 002 270 for Part II. The format of this section is the same as that described in AL 002 267 for the pure nominal section of the dictionary. Roots are indicated. For other related documents, see ED 019 668, AL…

  12. Rigorous model-based uncertainty quantification with application to terminal ballistics—Part II. Systems with uncontrollable inputs and large scatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M.; Lashgari, A.; Li, B.; McKerns, M.; Mihaly, J.; Ortiz, M.; Owhadi, H.; Rosakis, A. J.; Stalzer, M.; Sullivan, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    This Part II of this series is concerned with establishing the feasibility of an extended data-on-demand (XDoD) uncertainty quantification (UQ) protocol based on concentration-of-measure inequalities and martingale theory. Specific aims are to establish the feasibility of the protocol and its basic properties, including the tightness of the predictions afforded by the protocol. The assessment is based on an application to terminal ballistics and a specific system configuration consisting of 6061-T6 aluminum plates struck by spherical 440c stainless steel projectiles at ballistic impact speeds in the range of 2.4-2.8 km/s. The system's inputs are the plate thickness, plate obliquity and impact velocity. The perforation area is chosen as the sole performance measure of the system. The objective of the UQ analysis is to certify the lethality of the projectile, i.e., that the projectile perforates the plate with high probability over a prespecified range of impact velocities, plate thicknesses and plate obliquities. All tests were conducted at Caltech's Small Particle Hypervelocity Range (SPHIR), which houses a two-stage gas gun. A feature of this facility is that the impact velocity, while amenable to precise measurement, cannot be controlled precisely but varies randomly according to a known probability density function. In addition, due to a competition between petalling and plugging mechanisms for the material system under consideration, the measured perforation area exhibits considerable scatter. The analysis establishes the feasibility of the XDoD UQ protocol as a rigorous yet practical approach for model-based certification of complex systems characterized by uncontrollable inputs and noisy experimental data.

  13. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part 504—Fuel Price Computation (a) Introduction. This appendix provides the equations and...

  14. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part 504—Fuel Price Computation (a) Introduction. This appendix provides the equations and...

  15. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part 504—Fuel Price Computation (a) Introduction. This appendix provides the equations and...

  16. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part... example fuel price and inflation indices based on the latest data appearing in the Energy...

  17. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 504 - Fuel Price Computation

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel Price Computation II Appendix II to Part 504 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS Pt. 504, App. II Appendix II to Part... example fuel price and inflation indices based on the latest data appearing in the Energy...

  18. Recent advances in small bowel diseases: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Chopra, Angeli; Clandinin, Michael Tom; Freeman, Hugh

    2012-01-01

    As is the case in all areas of gastroenterology and hepatology, in 2009 and 2010 there were many advances in our knowledge and understanding of small intestinal diseases. Over 1000 publications were reviewed, and the important advances in basic science as well as clinical applications were considered. In Part II we review six topics: absorption, short bowel syndrome, smooth muscle function and intestinal motility, tumors, diagnostic imaging, and cystic fibrosis. PMID:22807605

  19. Diffuse Cystic Lung Disease. Part II.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nishant; Vassallo, Robert; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; McCormack, Francis X

    2015-07-01

    The diffuse cystic lung diseases have a broad differential diagnosis. A wide variety of pathophysiological processes spanning the spectrum from airway obstruction to lung remodeling can lead to multifocal cyst development in the lung. Although lymphangioleiomyomatosis and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis are perhaps more frequently seen in the clinic, disorders such as Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, follicular bronchiolitis, and light-chain deposition disease are increasingly being recognized. Obtaining an accurate diagnosis can be challenging, and management approaches are highly disease dependent. Unique imaging features, genetic tests, serum studies, and clinical features provide invaluable clues that help clinicians distinguish among the various etiologies, but biopsy is often required for definitive diagnosis. In part II of this review, we present an overview of the diffuse cystic lung diseases caused by lymphoproliferative disorders, genetic mutations, or aberrant lung development and provide an approach to aid in their diagnosis and management. PMID:25906201

  20. Part I. From the lab to the field: Recent developments in polymer coated ATR sensing for the determination of volatile organic compounds. Part II. From the field to the lab: Investigating IR signatures for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlowatz, Manfred

    Part I. Successful transition of polymer coated, ATR-FTIR sensor devices from a laboratory environment to real world field applications for detecting and quantifying VOCs in water is shown. Simultaneous, quantitative detection of BTX mixtures in water during enrichment into polymer coated ZnSe ATR elements has been performed. The obtained results showed accurate detection and quantification to the low ppb concentration region. Fiber-optic evanescent field measurement campaigns have been conducted at simulated field conditions during which concentration gradients of various VOCs in the mg/L range have been monitored successfully. The first test of an ATR based, polymer coated sensor system under real world field conditions, the chlorobenzene concentration in groundwater at mg/L levels was determined. An interesting aspect of these measurements was the experimental proof for the dependence of analyte extraction dynamics on the flow conditions of the sample matrix surrounding the extractive polymer membrane. The obtained results demonstrate that MIR evanescent field sensors are suitable for in-situ analysis at real world field conditions for environmental monitoring applications. Part II. Recently, measurements of disturbed soils have shown different spectral contrast in comparison to undisturbed soils. In this work first measurements at controlled laboratory conditions have been performed to investigate individual minerals of the soil matrix and their spectral characteristics under various environmental conditions. ATR spectroscopy has been applied to investigate multi-disperse quartz sand and mono-disperse soda lime glass spheres samples. For the investigation of spectral differences between pristine and disturbed quartz sand, a wetting/drying procedure with subsequent sample aerating has been developed. In addition to established differences in spectral contrast of disturbed and undisturbed soil, a strong spectral shift of absorption features was observed. When

  1. Biomechanics of the Sensor–Tissue Interface—Effects of Motion, Pressure, and Design on Sensor Performance and Foreign Body Response—Part II: Examples and Application

    PubMed Central

    Helton, Kristen L; Ratner, Buddy D; Wisniewski, Natalie A

    2011-01-01

    This article is the second part of a two-part review in which we explore the biomechanics of the sensor–tissue interface as an important aspect of continuous glucose sensor biocompatibility. Part I, featured in this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, describes a theoretical framework of how biomechanical factors such as motion and pressure (typically micromotion and micropressure) affect tissue physiology around a sensor and in turn, impact sensor performance. Here in Part II, a literature review is presented that summarizes examples of motion or pressure affecting sensor performance. Data are presented that show how both acute and chronic forces can impact continuous glucose monitor signals. Also presented are potential strategies for countering the ill effects of motion and pressure on glucose sensors. Improved engineering and optimized chemical biocompatibility have advanced sensor design and function, but we believe that mechanical biocompatibility, a rarely considered factor, must also be optimized in order to achieve an accurate, long-term, implantable sensor. PMID:21722579

  2. Quantum jumps in the PEMFC science and technology from the 1960s to the year 2000. Part II. Engineering, technology development and application aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costamagna, Paola; Srinivasan, Supramaniam

    The technology of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) has now reached the test-phase, and engineering development and optimization are vital in order to achieve to the next step of the evolution, i.e. the realization of commercial units. This paper highlights the most important technological progresses in the areas of (i) water and thermal management, (ii) scale-up from single cells to cell stacks, (iii) bipolar plates and flow fields, and (iv) fuel processing. Modeling is another aspect of the technological development, since modeling studies have significantly contributed to the understanding of the physico-chemical phenomena occurring in a fuel cell, and also have provided a valuable tool for the optimization of structure, geometry and operating conditions of fuel cells and stacks. The 'quantum jumps' in this field are reviewed, starting from the studies at the electrode level up to the stack and system size, with particular emphasis on (i) the 'cluster-network' model of perfluorosulfonic membranes, and the percolative dependence of the membrane proton conductivity on its water content, (ii) the models of charge and mass transport coupled to electrochemical reaction in the electrodes, and (iii) the models of water transport trough the membrane, which have been usefully applied for the optimization of water management of PEMFCs. The evolution of PEMFC applications is discussed as well, starting from the NASA's Gemini Space Flights to the latest developments of fuel cell vehicles, including the evolutions in the areas of portable power sources and residential and building applications.

  3. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... FUEL ECONOMY AND GREENHOUSE GAS EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App. II Appendix II to Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 261 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false II Appendix II to Part 261 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION AND LISTING OF HAZARDOUS WASTE Appendix II to Part 261...

  7. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 153 - Metric Units Used in Part 153

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Metric Units Used in Part 153 II Appendix II to Part 153 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Pt. 153, App. II Appendix II...

  8. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 153 - Metric Units Used in Part 153

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Metric Units Used in Part 153 II Appendix II to Part 153 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Pt. 153, App. II Appendix II...

  9. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 153 - Metric Units Used in Part 153

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Metric Units Used in Part 153 II Appendix II to Part 153 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Pt. 153, App. II Appendix II...

  10. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 153 - Metric Units Used in Part 153

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Metric Units Used in Part 153 II Appendix II to Part 153 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Pt. 153, App. II Appendix II...

  11. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 153 - Metric Units Used in Part 153

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Metric Units Used in Part 153 II Appendix II to Part 153 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Pt. 153, App. II Appendix II...

  12. Application of surface pressure measurements of O2-band differential absorption radar system in three-dimensional data assimilation on hurricane: Part II - A quasi-observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Qilong; Gong, Wei; Lin, Bing; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    This is the second part on assessing the impacts of assimilating various distributions of sea-level pressure (SLP) on hurricane simulations, using the Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) three dimensional variational data assimilation system (3DVAR). One key purpose of this series of study is to explore the potential of using remotely sensed sea surface barometric data from O2-band differential absorption radar system currently under development for server weather including hurricane forecasts. In this part II we further validate the conclusions of observational system simulation experiments (OSSEs) in the part I using observed SLP for three hurricanes that passed over the Florida peninsula. Three SLP patterns are tested again, including all available data near the Florida peninsula, and a band of observations either through the center or tangent to the hurricane position. Before the assimilation, a vortex SLP reconstruction technique is employed for the use of observed SLP as discussed in the part I. In agreement with the results from OSSEs, the performance of assimilating SLP is enhanced for the two hurricanes with stronger initial minimum SLP, leading to a significant improvement in the track and position relative to the control where no data are assimilated. On the other hand, however, the improvement in the hurricane intensity is generally limited to the first 24-48 h of integration, while a high resolution nested domain simulation, along with assimilation of SLP in the coarse domain, shows more profound improvement in the intensity. A diagnostic analysis of the potential vorticity suggests that the improved track forecasts are attributed to the combined effects of adjusting the steering wind fields in a consistent manner with having a deeper vortex, and the associated changes in the convective activity.

  13. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  14. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  15. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  16. 40 CFR Appendixes II-Iii to Part 264 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false II Appendixes II-III to Part 264 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Appendixes II-III...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... Appendix II to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  18. Critical appraisal: dental amalgam update--part II: biological effects.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael J; Swift, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Dental amalgam restorations have been controversial for over 150 years. In Part I of this Critical Appraisal, the clinical efficacy of dental amalgam was updated. Here in Part II, the biological effects of dental amalgam are addressed. PMID:24320063

  19. 30 CFR Appendix II to Subpart D of... - Appendix II to Subpart D of Part 18

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Appendix II to Subpart D of Part 18 II Appendix II to Subpart D of Part 18 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS ELECTRIC MOTOR-DRIVEN MINE EQUIPMENT AND ACCESSORIES Machines Assembled With Certified...

  20. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  1. 40 CFR Appendixes I-Ii to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false I Appendixes I-II to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendixes I-II to Part 268...

  2. Structure Learning and Statistical Estimation in Distribution Networks - Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Deka, Deepjyoti; Backhaus, Scott N.; Chertkov, Michael

    2015-02-13

    Limited placement of real-time monitoring devices in the distribution grid, recent trends notwithstanding, has prevented the easy implementation of demand-response and other smart grid applications. Part I of this paper discusses the problem of learning the operational structure of the grid from nodal voltage measurements. In this work (Part II), the learning of the operational radial structure is coupled with the problem of estimating nodal consumption statistics and inferring the line parameters in the grid. Based on a Linear-Coupled(LC) approximation of AC power flows equations, polynomial time algorithms are designed to identify the structure and estimate nodal load characteristics and/or line parameters in the grid using the available nodal voltage measurements. Then the structure learning algorithm is extended to cases with missing data, where available observations are limited to a fraction of the grid nodes. The efficacy of the presented algorithms are demonstrated through simulations on several distribution test cases.

  3. Computer Applications I & II. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This sequence of courses is designed to teach students how to use computers as a business and personal tool through the use of application software. Various jobs in computer-related fields are examined and employability skills, proper work habits, and leadership skills are taught. The major part of the guide consists of 18 units of instruction:…

  4. Water Pollution: Part I, Municipal Wastewaters; Part II, Industrial Wastewaters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, K. E. M.

    This publication is an annotated bibliography of municipal and industrial wastewater literature. This publication consists of two parts plus appendices. Part one is entitled Municipal Wastewaters and includes publications in such areas as health effects of polluted waters, federal policy and legislation, biology and chemistry of polluted water,…

  5. The applicability of the florida mandatory endorsement for sinkhole collapse coverage. Part II. Case history: Foundation settlement of a residential structure—was it a sinkhole?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomone, Willam G.

    1986-03-01

    The Winter Park sinkhole created publicity for sinkhole activity in the state of Florida. In fact, Florida requires insurance companies to provide sinkhole coverage to residential homeowners However, to receive payment on a sinkhole claim, the homeowner must have sustained “sinkhole loss” according to the definition presented in Florida statue §627 706 In this article, the author presents an analysis used to evaluate the applicability of the Florida Mandatory Endorsement for Sinkhole Collapse Coverage clause taken from Florida statute §627 706 for a residence located in Lakeland, Florida. Pertinent geologic and hydrologic information was reviewed, borings were drilled, laboratory tests were performed, and groundwater was monitored during the author's investigation. From the investigation, the author concluded that, although the residence was generally within an ancient sinkhole, the foundation settlement appeared to be influenced by compression of a peat layer found under part of the residence. It appears the compression of the peat occurred because of the induced loading on the peat from (1) seasonal groundwater fluctuation, (2) the structural loading of the residence on the foundation soils, and (3) the placement of fill before construction of the house Consequently, the Florida Mandatory Endorsement for Sinkhole Collapse Coverage clause was not applicable.

  6. PREREM: an interactive data preprocessing code for INREM II. Part I: user's manual. Part II: code structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, M.T.; Fields, D.E.

    1981-05-01

    PREREM is an interactive computer code developed as a data preprocessor for the INREM-II (Killough, Dunning, and Pleasant, 1978a) internal dose program. PREREM is intended to provide easy access to current and self-consistent nuclear decay and radionuclide-specific metabolic data sets. Provision is made for revision of metabolic data, and the code is intended for both production and research applications. Documentation for the code is in two parts. Part I is a user's manual which emphasizes interpretation of program prompts and choice of user input. Part II stresses internal structure and flow of program control and is intended to assist the researcher who wishes to revise or modify the code or add to its capabilities. PREREM is written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 System and much of the code will require revision before it can be run on other machines. The source program length is 950 lines (116 blocks) and computer core required for execution is 212 K bytes. The user must also have sufficient file space for metabolic and S-factor data sets. Further, 64 100 K byte blocks of computer storage space are required for the nuclear decay data file. Computer storage space must also be available for any output files produced during the PREREM execution. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

  7. Coal-fired power materials - Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, V.; Purgert, R.; Rawls, P.

    2008-09-15

    Part 1 discussed some general consideration in selection of alloys for advanced ultra supercritical (USC) coal-fired power plant boilers. This second part covers results reported by the US project consortium, which has extensively evaluated the steamside oxidation, fireside corrosion, and fabricability of the alloys selected for USC plants. 3 figs.

  8. A new laser vibrometry-based 2D selective intensity method for source identification in reverberant fields: part II. Application to an aircraft cabin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, G. M.; Martarelli, M.; Chiariotti, P.

    2010-07-01

    The selective intensity technique is a powerful tool for the localization of acoustic sources and for the identification of the structural contribution to the acoustic emission. In practice, the selective intensity method is based on simultaneous measurements of acoustic intensity, by means of a couple of matched microphones, and structural vibration of the emitting object. In this paper high spatial density multi-point vibration data, acquired by using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer, have been used for the first time. Therefore, by applying the selective intensity algorithm, the contribution of a large number of structural sources to the acoustic field radiated by the vibrating object can be estimated. The selective intensity represents the distribution of the acoustic monopole sources on the emitting surface, as if each monopole acted separately from the others. This innovative selective intensity approach can be very helpful when the measurement is performed on large panels in highly reverberating environments, such as aircraft cabins. In this case the separation of the direct acoustic field (radiated by the vibrating panels of the fuselage) and the reverberant one is difficult by traditional techniques. The work shown in this paper is the application of part of the results of the European project CREDO (Cabin Noise Reduction by Experimental and Numerical Design Optimization) carried out within the framework of the EU. Therefore the aim of this paper is to illustrate a real application of the method to the interior acoustic characterization of an Alenia Aeronautica ATR42 ground test facility, Alenia Aeronautica being a partner of the CREDO project.

  9. Biochemical Engineering. Part II: Process Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes types of industrial techniques involving biochemical products, specifying the advantages and disadvantages of batch and continuous processes, and contrasting biochemical and chemical engineering. See SE 506 318 for Part I. (AL)

  10. Fire prevention on airplanes. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabatier, J

    1929-01-01

    This part of the report presents a detailed examination of spark prevention, fire extinguishers, and fuel tank location and design. A continued program of investigations and research is also proposed.

  11. International Perspectives in Leadership Development: Part II.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    In the second part of this two-part series, leadership development perspectives are shared from the opening of the Penn Wharton China Center in Beijing. The symposium brought national leaders from Chinese academic settings and professional organizations together with thought leaders from the United States to discuss nursing leadership across the care continuum. Highlights of demographic shifts, clinical demands, and policy decisions are presented, with an eye toward future trends in professional development. PMID:26352039

  12. Electric injury, Part II: Specific injuries.

    PubMed

    Fish, R M

    2000-01-01

    Electric injury can cause disruption of cardiac rhythm and breathing, burns, fractures, dislocations, rhabdomyolysis, eye and ear injury, oral and gastrointestinal injury, vascular damage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, peripheral and spinal cord injury, and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy. Secondary trauma from falls, fires, flying debris, and inhalation injury can complicate the clinical picture. Diagnostic and treatment considerations for electric injuries are described in this article, which is the second part of a three-part series on electric injuries. PMID:10645833

  13. Getting in Taped, Part I and Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cundy, H. M.; Higgins, J.

    1971-01-01

    This article is in two parts: discussion of mathematical concepts involved in converting the reading from the tape-recorder counter which counts the turns of the run-off spool to that from the counter which counts turns of the take-up spool; calculating the length of tape run off when given the reading from the tape-recorder counter of the run-off…

  14. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... affecting Table II to part 150, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids... potential compatibility problems, this commodity is not assigned to a specific group in Figure 1 to 46 CFR part 150 (Compatibility Chart). 2 See Appendix I to 46 CFR part 150 (Exceptions to the Chart)....

  15. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... affecting Table II to part 150, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids... potential compatibility problems, this commodity is not assigned to a specific group in Figure 1 to 46 CFR part 150 (Compatibility Chart). 2 See Appendix I to 46 CFR part 150 (Exceptions to the Chart)....

  16. Moroccan Arabic Intermediate Reader, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alami, Wali A.; Hodge, Carlton T., Ed.

    The first section of this companion volume to "Moroccan Arabic Intermediate Reader, Part I" (AL 002 041) presents the Arabic script version of the pre-drills in Lessons IA-IIB in that volume. The second and major section comprises 20 lessons consisting of pre-drills, texts, notes, and questions. All material in this volume appears in Arabic script…

  17. A Fundamental Breakdown. Part II: Manipulative Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, J. Scott; Mohr, Derek J.

    2005-01-01

    In the May, 2005, issue of "TEPE," the "Research to Practice" section initiated a two-part series focused on assessing fundamental locomotor and manipulative skills. The series was generated in response to research by Pappa, Evanggelinou, & Karabourniotis (2005), recommending that curricular programming in physical education at the elementary…

  18. Searching LEXIS and WESTLAW: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Carl

    1986-01-01

    This second of a three-part series compares search features (i.e., truncation symbols, boolean operators, proximity operators, phrase searching, save searches) of two databases providing legal information. Search tips concerning charges and effective searching and tables listing functions of commands and proximity operators for both databases are…

  19. The Metis Nation--Part Two II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorian, John

    1978-01-01

    This article deals with historical events involving the Metis people from the time Manitoba entered the Confederation to the conclusion of the 1885 battle at Fish Creek near Batoche, Saskatchewan. Part I is in the Summer, 1978 issue of the Northian. (Author/RTS)

  20. Inquiry and Living History, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coatney, Sharon; Smalley, Rachel

    2006-01-01

    In the first part of this article, the authors introduced the living history program. This yearly, weeklong program features living portrayals of famous people, which becomes a catalyst for teaching curricular standards, as well as providing the spark for inquiry. Successful implementation of this program requires providing teachers with…

  1. Ultrasound guided chronic pain interventions (Part II).

    PubMed

    Akkaya, Taylan; Alptekin, Alp; Özkan, Derya

    2016-04-01

    Henceforth, ultrasonography (US) is an indispensible imaging technique in regional anesthesia practice. With the guidance of US, various invasive interventions in chronic pain pathologies of the musculoskeletal system, peripheral and neuroaxial pathologies has become possible. The management includes diagnostic blocks as weel as radiofrequency ablation and institution of neurolythic agents. During these algologic interventions we are able to see the target tissue, the dispersion of the drug and all nearby vascular structures. Besides these the US also protects the team from ionic radiation that one encounters when using flouroscopy of computed tomography. Latest publication in this field show that applicability of US in chronic pain syndromes is rapidly expanding with a good future. The additional equipment (echogenic needles, 3-D US etc.) will also expands its applications in algology practice. This review highlights different applications of US in chronic pain conditions. PMID:27225734

  2. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 86 - Temperature Schedules

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Temperature Schedules II Appendix II... to Part 86—Temperature Schedules (a) Ambient temperature cycle for the diurnal emission portion of the evaporative emission test (see § 86.133). Table I—Temperature Versus Time Sequence Use...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 265 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false II Appendix II to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES...

  4. PC'S AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING - PART II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this paper is to provide an example of the application of personal computers for water quality management in Green Bay, Wisconsin. he capabilities of the personal computer can help decision makers determine the level of remediation necessary to meet specified wat...

  5. Treatment of superficial mycoses: review - part II*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes-Filho, Fred; Quaresma-Santos, Maria Victória Pinto; Amorim, Adriana Gutstein da Fonseca; Schechtman, Regina Casz; Azulay, David Rubem

    2013-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections of the hair, skin and nails are a major cause of morbidity in the world. Choosing the right treatment is not always simple because of the possibility of drug interactions and side effects. The first part of the article discusses the main treatments for superficial mycoses - keratophytoses, dermatophytosis, candidiasis, with a practical approach to the most commonly-used topical and systemic drugs , referring also to their dosage and duration of use. Promising new, antifungal therapeutic alternatives are also highlighted, as well as available options on the Brazilian and world markets. PMID:24474103

  6. Short history of PACS (Part II: Europe).

    PubMed

    Lemke, Heinz U

    2011-05-01

    Although the concept of picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) was developed in Europe during the latter part of the 1970s, no working system was completed at that time. The first PACS implementations took place in the United States in the early 1980s, e.g. at Pennsylvania University, UCLA, and Kansas City University. Some more or less successful PACS developments also took place in Europe in the 1980s, particularly in the Netherlands, Belgium, Austria, the United Kingdom, France, Italy, Scandinavia, and Germany. Most systems could be characterized by their focus on a single department, such as radiology or nuclear medicine. European hospital-wide PACS with high visibility evolved in the early 1990s in London (Hammersmith Hospital) and Vienna (SMZO). These were followed during the latter part of the 1990s by approximately 10-20 PACS installations in each of the major industrialized countries of Europe. Wide-area PACS covering several health care institutions in a region are now in the process of being implemented in a number of European countries. Because of limitations of space some countries, for example, Denmark, Finland, Spain, Greece, as well as Eastern European countries, etc. could not be appropriately represented in this paper. PMID:21466932

  7. Applications of Delayed Fluorescence from Photosystem II

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ya; Tan, Jinglu

    2013-01-01

    While photosystem II (PSII) of plants utilizes light for photosynthesis, part of the absorbed energy may be reverted back and dissipated as long-term fluorescence (delayed fluorescence or DF). Because the generation of DF is coupled with the processes of forward photosynthetic activities, DF contains the information about plant physiological states and plant-environment interactions. This makes DF a potentially powerful biosensing mechanism to measure plant photosynthetic activities and environmental conditions. While DF has attracted the interest of many researchers, some aspects of it are still unknown because of the complexity of photosynthetic system. In order to provide a holistic picture about the usefulness of DF, it is meaningful to summarize the research on DF applications. In this short review, available literature on applications of DF from PSII is summarized. PMID:24351639

  8. [Seafood poisonings. Part II. Fish poisonings].

    PubMed

    Ciszowski, Krzysztof; Mietka-Ciszowska, Aneta

    2012-01-01

    Fish plays a significant role in human life, mainly as part of a balanced healthy diet and a good source of many of nutrients. However, contact with fish may be harmful or even life-threatening to man. Toxic effects, that fish exerts toward men (ichthyotoxism), result from envenomations by poison. ous fish equipped in venom apparatus (ichthyoacanthotoxism), direct contact with venom produced by skin glandules (ichthyocrinotoxism), or consuming fish containing toxins for nutritional purposes (ichthyosarcotoxism). In the present review, different fish-borne food poisonings are presented including their etiology, pathogenesis, symptomatology and treatment. In fact, the majority of fish poisonings are intoxications with toxins primary produced by bacteria, cyanobacteria and algae. These are consumed and accumulated in the food chain by herbivorous and predatory fish, that in turn may be a cause of poisonings in humans. PMID:23243919

  9. The sociogeometry of inequality: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2015-05-01

    The study of socioeconomic inequality is of prime economic and social importance, and the key quantitative gauges of socioeconomic inequality are Lorenz curves and inequality indices - the most notable of the latter being the popular Gini index. In this series of papers we present a sociogeometric framework to the study of socioeconomic inequality. In this part we focus on the gap between the rich and the poor, which is quantified by gauges termed disparity curves. We shift from disparity curves to disparity sets, define inequality indices in terms of disparity sets, and introduce and explore a collection of distance-based and width-based inequality indices stemming from the geometry of disparity sets. We conclude with mean-absolute-deviation (MAD) representations of the inequality indices established in this series of papers, and with a comparison of these indices to the popular Gini index.

  10. Has the tsunami arrived? Part II.

    PubMed

    Halverson, Dean; Glowac, Wayne

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare is an industry in the midst of significant change. After years of double-digit cost increases, the system has reached a tipping point. Where once only employers were heard crying out for change, the call is now coming from all levels of American society. The voice that is most important to effect change is the newest--that of the consumer. In part two of our overview of the healthcare tsunami, we hope to offer you some insights and practical ideas on how to improve the return on investment of your marketing. We believe those who work to understand the new market forces and react with insight will not just survive during the tsunami, they will thrive. PMID:19663358

  11. Biosimilars in Dermatology: Current Situation (Part II).

    PubMed

    Puig, L; Carretero, G; Daudén, E; Ferrándiz, C; Marrón, S E; Martorell, A; Pérez-Suárez, B; Rodriguez-Cerdeira, C; Ruiz-Villaverde, R; Sánchez-Carazo, J L; Velasco, M

    2015-09-01

    The first biosimilar version of a biologic agent used to treat psoriasis (infliximab) entered the Spanish market on February 16 of this year, and more biosimilars can be expected to follow in the coming months and years. Logically, this new situation will have economic repercussions and alter prescribing patterns among dermatologists. In this second part of the review, we will look at several somewhat contentious issues, such as the extrapolation of indications, interchangeability, and automatic substitution. We will also review the biosimilars with indications for psoriasis currently in the clinical development pipeline and assess their potential to offer comparable efficacy and safety to the reference product while contributing to the sustainability of the public health care system. PMID:26049964

  12. A Physicist for All Seasons: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Frank

    2013-06-01

    The second part of this interview covers Frank Oppenheimer's move to the University of California at Berkeley and wartime work at the Westinghouse Research Laboratories in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, at the electromagnetic-separation plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and at Los Alamos, New Mexico (1941-1945); his postwar research at Berkeley (1945-1947); his appointment at the University of Minnesota in 1947 and firing two years later after being required to testify before the House Un-American Activities Committee; his decade as a rancher in Colorado (1949-1959) and high-school science teacher toward the end of this period; his research at the University of Colorado in Boulder after 1959; his year as a Guggenheim Fellow at University College London in 1965; and his founding of the Exploratorium in San Francisco. California, in 1969. He also discusses his wartime relations with his older brother Robert and postwar events in Robert's life, including his Hearings before the Personnel Security Board of the Atomic Energy Commission in 1954.

  13. Overactive bladder - 18 years - Part II.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Jose Carlos; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Bezerra, Carlos A; Plata, Ivan Mauricio; Campos, Jose; Garrido, Gustavo Luis; Almeida, Fernando G; Averbeck, Marcio Augusto; Fornari, Alexandre; Salazar, Anibal; Dell'Oro, Arturo; Cintra, Caio; Sacomani, Carlos Alberto Ricetto; Tapia, Juan Pablo; Brambila, Eduardo; Longo, Emilio Miguel; Rocha, Flavio Trigo; Coutinho, Francisco; Favre, Gabriel; Garcia, Jose Antonio; Castano, Juan; Reyes, Miguel; Leyton, Rodrigo Eugenio; Ferreira, Ruiter Silva; Duran, Sergio; Lopez, Vanda; Reges, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome has been based on the use of oral medications with the purpose of reestablishing the detrusor stability. The recent better understanding of the urothelial physiology fostered conceptual changes, and the oral anticholinergics - pillars of the overactive bladder pharmacotherapy - started to be not only recognized for their properties of inhibiting the detrusor contractile activity, but also their action on the bladder afference, and therefore, on the reduction of the symptoms that constitute the syndrome. Beta-adrenergic agonists, which were recently added to the list of drugs for the treatment of overactive bladder, still wait for a definitive positioning - as either a second-line therapy or an adjuvant to oral anticholinergics. Conservative treatment failure, whether due to unsatisfactory results or the presence of adverse side effects, define it as refractory overactive bladder. In this context, the intravesical injection of botulinum toxin type A emerged as an effective option for the existing gap between the primary measures and more complex procedures such as bladder augmentation. Sacral neuromodulation, described three decades ago, had its indication reinforced in this overactive bladder era. Likewise, the electric stimulation of the tibial nerve is now a minimally invasive alternative to treat those with refractory overactive bladder. The results of the systematic literature review on the oral pharmacological treatment and the treatment of refractory overactive bladder gave rise to this second part of the review article Overactive Bladder - 18 years, prepared during the 1st Latin-American Consultation on Overactive Bladder. PMID:27176185

  14. DICOM: key concepts--part II.

    PubMed

    Kabachinski, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    The objective of these two installments of IT World was to give a general overview of DICOM and to take a look at different parts of the standard to get a sense of its main themes. We found that the standard provides a common reference for all developers but does not impose a single type of implementation. This allows for innovation. The standard is also built for flexibility, able to adapt to new modalities that have a need to communicate. The speedy acceptance of DICOM by the medical imaging industry is opening new possibilities for healthcare organizations to increase the quality while decreasing the cost of patient care. All of the DICOM networked supporting medical equipment as well as the organization's computer systems made by multiple original equipment manufacturers and located at one site or many sites can communicate by means of DICOM. This gives us the opportunity for medical images to be captured and communicated quicker. The result enables physicians to make diagnoses and treatment decisions sooner. It's all good stuff and even more reason why we should endeavor to understand the basics of DICOM. DICOM is here to stay! PMID:16111406

  15. Calculus of Elementary Functions, Part II. Student Text. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herriot, Sarah T.; And Others

    This course is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics, including algebra, axiomatic geometry, trigonometry, and analytic geometry. This text, Part II, contains material designed to follow Part I. Chapters included in this text are: (6) Derivatives of Exponential and Related Functions; (7) Area and…

  16. Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun (Part II)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duoos, Bridget A.

    2012-01-01

    Part I of Kick, Glide, Pole! Cross-Country Skiing Fun, which was published in last issue, discussed how to select cross-country ski equipment, dress for the activity and the biomechanics of the diagonal stride. Part II focuses on teaching the diagonal stride technique and begins with a progression of indoor activities. Incorporating this fun,…

  17. Correctional Training. Institution Familiarization. Part II: The Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Prisons (Dept. of Justice), Washington, DC.

    Designed to assist training coordinators in the initial institution familiarization training for new employees in correctional institutions, this manual consists of two documents: a training coordinator's guide (Part I - CE 017 285) and this document, the training program (Part II). Four training areas are treated: (1) an introduction consisting…

  18. Minimizing Glovebox Glove Breaches: PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Andrade, R.M.; Taylor, D. J.; Stimmel, J. J.; Zaelke, R. L.; Balkey, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    As a matter of good business practices, a team of glovebox experts from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been assembled to proactively investigate processes and procedures that minimize unplanned breaches in the glovebox, e.g., glove failures. A major part of this effort involves the review of glovebox glove failures that have occurred at the Plutonium Facility and at the Chemical and Metallurgy Research Facility. Information dating back to 1993 has been compiled from formal records. This data has been combined with information obtained from a baseline inventory of about 9,000 glovebox gloves. The key attributes tracked include those related to location, the glovebox glove, type and location of breaches, the worker, and the consequences resulting from breaches. This glovebox glove failure analysis yielded results in the areas of the ease of collecting this type of data, the causes of most glove failures that have occurred, the effectiveness of current controls, and recommendations to improve hazard control systems. As expected, a significant number of breaches involve high-risk operations such as grinding, hammering, using sharps (especially screwdrivers), and assembling equipment. Surprisingly, tasks such as the movement of equipment and material between gloveboxes and the opening of cans are also major contributions of breaches. Almost half the gloves fail within a year of their install date. The greatest consequence for over 90% of glovebox glove failures is alpha contamination of protective clothing. Personnel self-monitoring at the gloveboxes continues to be the most effective way of detecting glovebox glove failures. Glove failures from these tasks can be reduced through changes in procedures and the design of remote-handling apparatus. The Nuclear Materials Technology Division management uses this information to improve hazard control systems to reduce the number of unplanned breaches in the glovebox further. As a result, excursions of contaminants

  19. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 257 - Appendix II to Part 257

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CRITERIA FOR CLASSIFICATION OF SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES AND PRACTICES Pt. 257, App. II Appendix II... aerated pile or windrow composting methods, the solid waste is maintained at minimum operating conditions... methods or operating conditions may be acceptable if pathogens and vector attraction of the...

  20. Hypoelastic Soft Tissues: Part II: In-Plane Biaxial Experiments.

    PubMed

    Freed, Alan D; Einstein, Daniel R; Sacks, Michael S

    2010-08-01

    In Part I, a novel hypoelastic framework for soft-tissues was presented. One of the hallmarks of this new theory is that the well-known exponential behavior of soft-tissues arises consistently and spontaneously from the integration of a rate based formulation. In Part II, we examine the application of this framework to the problem of biaxial kinematics, which are common in experimental soft-tissue characterization. We confine our attention to an isotropic formulation in order to highlight the distinction between non-linearity and anisotropy. In order to provide a sound foundation for the membrane extension of our earlier hypoelastic framework, the kinematics and kinetics of in-plane biaxial extension are revisited, and some enhancements are provided. Specifically, the conventional stress-to-traction mapping for this boundary value problem is shown to violate the conservation of angular momentum. In response, we provide a corrected mapping. In addition, a novel means for applying loads to in-plane biaxial experiments is proposed. An isotropic, isochoric, hypoelastic, constitutive model is applied to an in-plane biaxial experiment done on glutaraldehyde treated bovine pericardium. The experiment is comprised of eight protocols that radially probe the biaxial plane. Considering its simplicity (two adjustable parameters) the model does a reasonably good job of describing the non-linear normal responses observed in these experimental data, which are more prevalent than are the anisotropic responses exhibited by this tissue. PMID:21394222

  1. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II... STANDARD Pt. 541, App. A-II Appendix A-II to Part 541—Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543...

  2. Multi-scale defect interactions in high-rate failure of brittle materials, Part II: Application to design of protection materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonge, Andrew L.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    Micromechanics based damage models, such as the model presented in Part I of this 2 part series (Tonge and Ramesh, 2015), have the potential to suggest promising directions for materials design. However, to reach their full potential these models must demonstrate that they capture the relevant physical processes. In this work, we apply the multiscale material model described in Tonge and Ramesh (2015) to ballistic impacts on the advanced ceramic boron carbide and suggest possible directions for improving the performance of boron carbide under impact conditions. We simulate both dynamic uniaxial compression and simplified ballistic loading geometries to demonstrate that the material model captures the relevant physics in these problems and to interrogate the sensitivity of the simulation results to some of the model input parameters. Under dynamic compression, we show that the simulated peak strength is sensitive to the maximum crack growth velocity and the flaw distribution, while the stress collapse portion of the test is partially influenced by the granular flow behavior of the fully damaged material. From simulations of simplified ballistic impact, we suggest that the total amount of granular flow (a possible performance metric) can be reduced by either a larger granular flow slope (more angular fragments) or a larger granular flow timescale (larger fragments). We then discuss the implications for materials design.

  3. Assessing the risk to green sturgeon from application of imidacloprid to control burrowing shrimp in Willapa Bay, Washington--Part II: controlled exposure studies.

    PubMed

    Frew, John A; Grue, Christian E

    2015-11-01

    The activities of 2 species of burrowing shrimp have a negative impact on the growth and survival of oysters reared on intertidal mudflats in Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor, Washington (USA). To maintain viable harvests, oyster growers proposed the application of the neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid onto harvested beds for the control of burrowing shrimp. In test applications, water column concentrations of imidacloprid were relatively low and dissipated rapidly. The foraging activities of the green sturgeon (listed in the US Endangered Species Act) could result in exposure to higher, more sustained imidacloprid concentrations within sediment porewater and from the consumption of contaminated shrimp. Controlled experiments were conducted using surrogate white sturgeon to determine acute and chronic effect concentrations, to examine overt effects at more environmentally realistic concentrations and durations of exposure, and to assess chemical depuration. The 96-h median lethal concentration was 124 mg L(-1) , and the predicted 35-d no-observed-adverse-effect concentration was 0.7 mg L(-1) . No overt effects were observed following environmentally relevant exposures. Imidacloprid half-life in plasma was greater than 32 h. Measured concentrations of imidacloprid in porewater were significantly lower than the derived acute and chronic effect concentrations for white sturgeon. Exposure risk quotients were calculated using the effect concentrations and estimated environmental exposure. The resulting values were considerably below the level of concern for direct effects from either acute or chronic exposure to an endangered species. PMID:26351255

  4. AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

  5. AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-17

    Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

  6. Generalized model of electromigration with 1:1 (analyte:selector) complexation stoichiometry: part II. Application to dual systems and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Müllerová, Ludmila; Dubský, Pavel; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2015-03-01

    Interactions among analyte forms that undergo simultaneous dissociation/protonation and complexation with multiple selectors take the shape of a highly interconnected multi-equilibrium scheme. This makes it difficult to express the effective mobility of the analyte in these systems, which are often encountered in electrophoretical separations, unless a generalized model is introduced. In the first part of this series, we presented the theory of electromigration of a multivalent weakly acidic/basic/amphoteric analyte undergoing complexation with a mixture of an arbitrary number of selectors. In this work we demonstrate the validity of this concept experimentally. The theory leads to three useful perspectives, each of which is closely related to the one originally formulated for simpler systems. If pH, IS and the selector mixture composition are all kept constant, the system is treated as if only a single analyte form interacted with a single selector. If the pH changes at constant IS and mixture composition, the already well-established models of a weakly acidic/basic analyte interacting with a single selector can be employed. Varying the mixture composition at constant IS and pH leads to a situation where virtually a single analyte form interacts with a mixture of selectors. We show how to switch between the three perspectives in practice and confirm that they can be employed interchangeably according to the specific needs by measurements performed in single- and dual-selector systems at a pH where the analyte is fully dissociated, partly dissociated or fully protonated. Weak monoprotic analyte (R-flurbiprofen) and two selectors (native β-cyclodextrin and monovalent positively charged 6-monodeoxy-6-monoamino-β-cyclodextrin) serve as a model system. PMID:25666498

  7. Clinical application of removable partial dentures using thermoplastic resin. Part II: Material properties and clinical features of non-metal clasp dentures.

    PubMed

    Fueki, Kenji; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Yatabe, Masaru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Arita, Masahiro; Ino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Toshikazu; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Komiyama, Osamu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hosoki, Maki; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo; Aita, Hideki; Ono, Takahiro; Kondo, Hisatomo; Tamaki, Katsushi; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Tsukasaki, Hiroaki; Fujisawa, Masanori; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-04-01

    This position paper reviews physical and mechanical properties of thermoplastic resin used for non-metal clasp dentures, and describes feature of each thermoplastic resin in clinical application of non-metal clasp dentures and complications based on clinical experience of expert panels. Since products of thermoplastic resin have great variability in physical and mechanical properties, clinicians should utilize them with careful consideration of the specific properties of each product. In general, thermoplastic resin has lower color-stability and higher risk for fracture than polymethyl methacrylate. Additionally, the surface of thermoplastic resin becomes roughened more easily than polymethyl methacrylate. Studies related to material properties of thermoplastic resin, treatment efficacy and follow-up are insufficient to provide definitive conclusions at this time. Therefore, this position paper should be revised based on future studies and a clinical guideline should be provided. PMID:24746524

  8. An integrated platform for directly widely-targeted quantitative analysis of feces part II: An application for steroids, eicosanoids, and porphyrins profiling.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuelin; Song, Qingqing; Li, Jun; Zheng, Jiao; Li, Chun; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Lingling; Jiang, Yong; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-08-19

    Steroids, especially bile acids, along with eicosanoids and porphyrins in feces play pivotal roles for the clinical diagnosis of various diseases. However, their reliable measurement is extensively obstructed by poor stability, structural diversity, broad content ranges, and tedious sample preparation protocols that account for a majority of the measurement errors. In current study, in-depth component screening was initially carried out by flexibly integrating diverse modes, such as predefined multiple reaction monitoring, stepped multiple ion monitoring, neutral loss scan, and precursor ion scan on a hybrid triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometer, which also provided MS(2) spectra via enhanced product ion experiments. Meanwhile, a hybrid ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometer served as a complementary tool by providing accurate mass spectral information. Afterwards, because authentic compounds were unavailable for most analytes, an online optimization strategy was then proposed to optimize parameters, including precursor-to-product ion transitions and spectrometric parameters, notably collision energy. Finally, direct analysis of all detected components in feces was carried out by employing a platform integrating online pressurized liquid extraction, turbulent flow chromatography, and LC-MS/MS, and applying those optimized parameters. Seventy-one compounds, including 52 steroids and 13 eicosanoids, together with 6 porphyrins, were found and annotated in a fecal pool, and then relatively quantified in various fecal matrices. The quantitative dataset was subjected for multivariate statistical analysis and significant differences were observed among the quantitative chemome profiles of the fecal matrices from different groups. The findings obtained in the two parts demonstrated that the analytical platform in combination with the work-flow is qualified for not only directly simultaneous measurement of diverse endogenous substances, but widely targeted

  9. Metropolitan-scale Transport and Dispersion from the New York World Trade Center Following September 11, 2001. Part II: An Application of the CALPUFF Plume Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilliam, Robert C.; Huber, Alan H.; Raman, Sethu

    2005-10-01

    Following the collapse of the New York World Trade Center (WTC) towers on September 11, 2001, Local, State, and Federal agencies initiated numerous air monitoring activities to better understand the ongoing impacts of emissions from the disaster. The collapse of the World Trade Center towers and associated fires that lasted for several weeks resulted at times in a noticeable plume of material that was dispersed around the Metropolitan New York City (NYC) area. In general, the plume was only noticeable for a short period of time following September 11, and only apparent close to the World Trade Center site. A study of the estimated pathway which the plume of WTC material would likely follow was completed to support the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s 2002 initial exposure assessments. In this study, the WTC emissions were simulated using the CALMET-CALPUFF model in order to examine the general spatial and temporal dispersion patterns over NYC. This paper presents the results of the CALPUFF plume model in terms of plume dilution and location, since the exact source strength remains unknown. Independent observations of PM2.5 are used to support the general dispersion features calculated by the model. Results indicate that the simulated plume matched well with an abnormal increase (600 1000% of normal) in PM2.5 two nights after the WTC collapse as the plume rotated north to southeast, towards parts of NYC. Very little if any evidence of the plume signature was noted during a similar flow scenario a week after September 11. This leads to the conclusion that other than areas within a few kilometers from the WTC site, the PM2.5 plume was not observable over NYC’s background concentration after the first few days.

  10. Recent Economic Perspectives on Political Economy, Part II*

    PubMed Central

    Dewan, Torun; Shepsle, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years some of the best theoretical work on the political economy of political institutions and processes has begun surfacing outside the political science mainstream in high quality economics journals. This two-part paper surveys these contributions from a recent five-year period. In Part I, the focus is on elections, voting and information aggregation, followed by treatments of parties, candidates, and coalitions. In Part II, papers on economic performance and redistribution, constitutional design, and incentives, institutions, and the quality of political elites are discussed. Part II concludes with a discussion of the methodological bases common to economics and political science, the way economists have used political science research, and some new themes and arbitrage opportunities. PMID:23606754

  11. Structure and properties of a rapidly solidified Al-Li-Mn-Zr alloy for high-temperature applications: Part II. spray atomization and deposition processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, Joseph

    1991-10-01

    A new Al-Li alloy containing 2.3 wt pct Li, 6.5 wt pct Mn, and 0.65 wt pet Zr for high-temperature applications has been processed by a rapid solidification (RS) technique (as compacts by spray atomization and deposition) and then thermomechanically treated by hot extrusion. As-received and thermomechanically treated deposits were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Phase analyses in the as-processed materials revealed the presence of two Mn phases (Al4Mn and Al6Mn), one Zr phase (Al3Zr), two Li phases (the stable AlLi and the metastable Al3Li), and the aAl solid solution with high excess in Mn solubility (up to close the nominal composition in the as-atomized powders). As-deposited and extruded pieces were given heating treatments at 430 °C and 530 °C. A two-step aging treatment was practiced, to check for the optimal (for tensile properties) aging procedure, which was found to be the following: solutioning at 430 °C for 1 hour and water quenching + a first-step aging at 120 °C for 12 hours + a second-step aging at 175 °C for 15 hours. The mechanical properties, at room and elevated temperatures, of the hot extruded deposits are compared, following the optimal solutioning and aging treatments. The room-temperature (RT) strength of the proposed alloy is distinctly better for the as-deposited specimens (highest yield strength, 320 MPa) than for the as-atomized (highest yield strength, 215 MPa), though less than 65 pct of the RT strength is conserved at 250 °C. Ultimate strengths are quite comparable (in the 420 to 470 MPa range). Ductilities at RTs are in the low 1.5 to 2.5 pct range and show no improvement over other Al-Li alloys.

  12. A statistical-dynamical scheme for reconstructing ocean forcing in the Atlantic. Part II: methodology, validation and application to high-resolution ocean models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minvielle, Marie; Cassou, Christophe; Bourdallé-Badie, Romain; Terray, Laurent; Najac, Julien

    2011-02-01

    underestimated. The main modes of interannual variability assessed through EOF are correctly reproduced for sea surface temperature, barotropic streamfunction and mixed layer depth both in terms of spatial structure and temporal evolution. Collectively, our results provide evidence that the statistical-dynamical scheme presented in this two-part study is an efficient and promising tool to infer oceanic changes (in particular those related to the wind-driven circulation) due to modifications in the large-scale atmospheric circulation. As a prerequisite, we have here validated the method for present-day climate; we encourage its use for climate change studies with some adaptations though.

  13. Studies of the pulse charge of lead-acid batteries for PV applications. Part II. Impedance of the positive plate revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchev, A.; Delaille, A.; Perrin, M.; Lemaire, E.; Mattera, F.

    In the second part of this publication series, dedicated to the pulse charge of the lead-acid battery, a special attention is paid to the impedance spectrum of the positive plate as a source for estimation of the electrostatic capacitance of the double layer (C dl) on the surface of the positive active mass. The impedance spectra were measured at open circuit for different states of charge (SoC) in H 2SO 4 with specific gravity 1.24 and 1.28 g ml -1. A substantial difference was observed in the impedance spectra of partially charged and partially discharged positive plates keeping the same value of the SOC. The impedance data were subjected to inductance error correction, followed by differential impedance analysis (DIA). Considering the results from DIA, the recently published equivalent circuits of the positive plate in charged and in discharged state and the gel-crystal model of the lead dioxide, we proposed a model of the positive plate in partial state of charge (PSoC). The analysis of the obtained experimental results using this model and DIA show that the double layer capacitance is not frequency distributed. The influence of the state of charge and state of health on the model parameters is discussed. One of the most interesting results is the dependence of C dl on SOC-it features a hysteresis at which the values of C dl during the charge are 5-6 times higher than the corresponding ones during the discharge. This result was discussed in terms of changes in the double layer structure considering the gel-crystal model of the lead dioxide. During the discharge in H 2SO 4 with specific gravity 1.28 g ml -1 a passivation process was detected as a high frequency pseudo-inductive loop in the Nyquist plots in PSoC. The passivation time constant is higher at 50-60% SOC and decreases to zero in the end of the discharge. During the charge in both electrolytes, pseudo-inductive time constant was observed too. It was attributed to the phenomena of the dehydration of Pb

  14. Acute dental pain, Part II: Diagnosis and emergency treatment.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, J R

    1990-09-01

    Part II of this two-part series differentiates and explores endodontic-related emergencies with reversible and irreversible pulpitis. Indications and contra-indications for vital pulp therapy are explained, and treatment is outlined. The inflammatory process involved in irreversible pulpal disease is summarized, and the clinical signs, symptoms, and treatment of irreversible pulpitis (with and without acute periradicular involvement, with pulp necrosis, and acute periradicular abscess with and without cellulitis) are discussed. PMID:2097056

  15. From Student to Teacher: Making the Second Cut Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quezada, Reyes

    2005-01-01

    Part I of this two-part article, published in the March 2004 issue, addressed five components of the employment process in order to "make the first cut" when seeking a teaching position. The purpose of this article (Part two) is to provide teacher candidates with the necessary skills to understand and navigate the application process and on up to…

  16. Ethical Research Practices: Collaborative Action Research, Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvin, Chris

    2004-01-01

    This is part II of a case study involving a large federally funded technology grant program implemented across several central Texas school districts and was followed by the researcher-participant at the university level as well as one of the campus sites. Many ethical research questions were raised during this study such as the use of participant…

  17. Predictors of Performance on National Board Examinations Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Michael W.

    1984-01-01

    In an investigation of the predictors of success on the dental National Board Examinations Part II, three studies were undertaken to test (1) the factual validity of a mock examination, (2) the usefulness of the mock examination as a predictor of board examination success, and (3) whether the third cross-validated the previous findings. (MSE)

  18. Guide to the Archives of International Organizations. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walne, Peter, Comp.

    This compilation forms Part II of the guide according to the plan conceived by a working party of the Section of Archivists of International Organisations of the International Council on Archives in 1974-1975. The directory provides access to national and other archive and manuscript repositories that maintain the archives of international…

  19. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... citations affecting Table II to part 150, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... peroxide solutions 1 Lactic acid 2 Long chain alkaryl sulfonic acid (C16-C60) 2 Magnesium chloride solution...-Dimethyldodecylamine Di-n-propylamine Diphenylamine, reaction product with 2,2,4-Trimethylpentene...

  20. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... citations affecting Table II to part 150, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... peroxide solutions 1 Lactic acid 2 Long chain alkaryl sulfonic acid (C16-C60) 2 Magnesium chloride solution...-Dimethyldodecylamine Di-n-propylamine Diphenylamine, reaction product with 2,2,4-Trimethylpentene...

  1. 46 CFR Table II to Part 150 - Grouping of Cargoes

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... II to part 150, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of... peroxide solutions 1 Lactic acid 2 Long chain alkaryl sulfonic acid (C16-C60) 2 Magnesium chloride solution...-Dimethyldodecylamine Di-n-propylamine Diphenylamine, reaction product with 2,2,4-Trimethylpentene...

  2. Application Programming in AWIPS II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smit, Matt; McGrath, Kevin; Burks, Jason; Carcione, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Since its inception almost 8 years ago, NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center has integrated NASA data into the National Weather Service's decision support system (DSS) the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). SPoRT has, in some instances, had to shape and transform data sets into various formats and manipulate configurations to visualize them in AWIPS. With the advent of the next generation of DSS, AWIPS II, developers will be able to develop their own plugins to handle any type of data. Raytheon is developing AWIPS II to be a more extensible package written mainly in Java, and built around a Service Oriented Architecture. A plugin architecture will allow users to install their own code modules, and (if all the rules have been properly followed) they will work hand-in-hand with AWIPS II as if it were originally built in. Users can bring in new datasets with existing plugins, tweak plugins to handle a nuance or desired new functionality, or create an entirely new visualization layout for a new dataset. SPoRT is developing plugins to ensure its existing NASA data will be ready for AWIPS II when it is delivered, and to prepare for the future of new instruments on upcoming satellites.

  3. Application of ultrasound in periodontics: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vivek K.; Mohan, Ranjana; Bains, Rhythm

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound offers great potential in development of a noninvasive periodontal assessment tool that would offer great yield real time information, regarding clinical features such as pocket depth, attachment level, tissue thickness, histological change, calculus, bone morphology, as well as evaluation of tooth structure for fracture cracks. In therapeutics, ultrasonic instrumentation is proven effective and efficient in treating periodontal disease. When used properly, ultrasound-based instrument is kind to the soft tissues, require less healing time, and are less tiring for the operator. Microultrasonic instruments have been developed with the aim of improving root-surface debridement. The dye/paper method of mapping ultrasound fields demonstrated cavitational activity in an ultrasonic cleaning bath. Piezosurgery resulted in more favorable osseous repair and remodeling in comparison with carbide and diamond burs. The effect of ultrasound is not limited to fracture healing, but that bone healing after osteotomy or osteodistraction could be stimulated as well. PMID:20142946

  4. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Calculations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Calculations II... Part 600—Sample Fuel Economy Calculations (a) This sample fuel economy calculation is applicable to... Highway Fuel Economy Test Procedure and calculation similar to that shown in paragraph (a) by...

  5. Construction of an Algorithm for Stem Recognition in the Hebrew Language. Application of Hebrew Morphology to Computer Techniques for Investigation of Word Roots. Final Report, Part II. Noun Reference Dictionary. Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazewnik, Grainom

    This Noun Reference Dictionary is divided into two sections: nouns derived from verb roots and those not so. The following features are noted in each entry: (1) class index; (2) occurrence in idiomatic expression; (3) part of speech; (4) declinability; (5) occurrence with prefixes "B,""K,""L," and "M," or not; (6) occurrence with definite article…

  6. Sensors, Volume 3, Part II, Chemical and Biochemical Sensors Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göpel, Wolfgang; Jones, T. A.; Kleitz, Michel; Lundström, Ingemar; Seiyama, Tetsuro

    1997-06-01

    'Sensors' is the first self-contained series to deal with the whole area of sensors. It describes general aspects, technical and physical fundamentals, construction, function, applications and developments of the various types of sensors. This is the second of two volumes focusing on chemical and biochemical sensors. It includes a detailed description of biosensors which often make use of transducer properties of the basic sensors and usually have additional biological components. This volume provides a unique overview of the applications, the possibilities and limitations of sensors in comparison with conventional instrumentation in analytical chemistry. Specific facettes of applications are presented by specialists from different fields including environmental, biotechnological, medical, or chemical process control. This book is an indispensable reference work for both specialits and newcomers, researchers and developers.

  7. Pharmacokinetic interactions with calcium channel antagonists (Part II).

    PubMed

    Schlanz, K D; Myre, S A; Bottorff, M B

    1991-12-01

    Since calcium channel antagonists are a diverse class of drugs frequently administered in combination with other agents, the potential for clinically significant pharmacokinetic drug interactions exists. These interactions occur most frequently via altered hepatic blood flow and impaired hepatic enzyme activity. Part I of the article, which appeared in the previous issue of the Journal, dealt with interactions between calcium antagonists and marker compounds, theophylline, midazolam, lithium, doxorubicin, oral hypoglycaemics and cardiac drugs. Part II examines interactions with cyclosporin, anaesthetics, carbamazepine and cardiovascular agents. PMID:1782739

  8. Probabilistic finite-state machines--part II.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Enrique; Thollard, Frank; de la Higuera, Colin; Casacuberta, Francisco; Carrasco, Rafael C

    2005-07-01

    Probabilistic finite-state machines are used today in a variety of areas in pattern recognition or in fields to which pattern recognition is linked. In Part I of this paper, we surveyed these objects and studied their properties. In this Part II, we study the relations between probabilistic finite-state automata and other well-known devices that generate strings like hidden Markov models and n-grams and provide theorems, algorithms, and properties that represent a current state of the art of these objects. PMID:16013751

  9. The Value of Imaging Part II: Value beyond Image Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Duong, Phuong-Anh T; Pastel, David A; Sadigh, Gelareh; Ballard, David; Sullivan, Joseph C; Bresnahan, Brian; Buch, Karen; Duszak, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Although image interpretation is an essential part of radiologists' value, there are other ways in which we contribute to patient care. Part II of the value of imaging series reviews current initiatives that demonstrate value beyond the image interpretation. Standardizing processes, reducing the radiation dose of our examinations, clarifying written reports, improving communications with patients and providers, and promoting appropriate imaging through decision support are all ways we can provide safer, more consistent, and higher quality care. As payers and policy makers push to drive value, research that demonstrates the value of these endeavors, or lack thereof, will become increasingly sought after and supported. PMID:26683509

  10. Care of the patient with chronic pain: part II.

    PubMed

    Wells-Federman, C L

    2000-01-01

    Chronic nonmalignant pain frequently results in significant physical, behavioral, psychological, social, and spiritual issues for patients and their families. It is often misunderstood and unsuccessfully managed. Advanced practice nurses who are knowledgeable about chronic pain and the complex biopsychosocial-spiritual needs of this patient population serve an important role in recognizing these patients and intervening appropriately in their care. The purpose of this two-part article is to provide that information. Part I [Clinical Excellence for Nurse Practitioners, 3 (4), 192-204] outlined the pathophysiology, assessment, biopsychosocial-spiritual aspects, and pharmacologic treatment of chronic pain. In Part II, a variety of nonpharmacologic and self-management interventions one can use in the primary care setting to treat these difficult health problems are introduced. PMID:11858295

  11. Section II Part D and adoption of foreign materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, M.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes the background, development, and structure of Section 2, Part D, of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Section 2 deals with materials, and Part D, in particular, contains tables of design values of materials for use in conjunction with the construction sections of the Code: Sections 1, 3, and 8. The arrangement of Section 2, Part D, will be described with particular emphasis on how the allowable stress and design stress intensity tables are organized. Additionally, changes to Section 2, Part D that have been authorized, and are presently being implemented, will be discussed. These include the new policy decision to permit incorporation of materials from organizations other than ASTM and AWS, and particularly from International organizations; the adoption of a new Appendix to Section 2, Part D, addressing metallurgical phenomena that are important to the selection and application of materials in Code construction; and the decision to develop a new Appendix to address dual marking and material substitution.

  12. Polycystic ovary syndrome: a review for dermatologists: Part II. Treatment.

    PubMed

    Buzney, Elizabeth; Sheu, Johanna; Buzney, Catherine; Reynolds, Rachel V

    2014-11-01

    Dermatologists are in a key position to treat the manifestations of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The management of PCOS should be tailored to each woman's specific goals, reproductive interests, and particular constellation of symptoms. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is recommended. In part II of this continuing medical education article, we present the available safety and efficacy data regarding treatments for women with acne, hirsutism, and androgenetic alopecia. Therapies discussed include lifestyle modification, topical therapies, combined oral contraceptives, antiandrogen agents, and insulin-sensitizing drugs. Treatment recommendations are made based on the current available evidence. PMID:25437978

  13. Aesthetic Pursuits: Windows, Frames, Words, Images--Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Ken

    2005-01-01

    In Part I of this study (Burke, 2005), the author presented the essentials of Image Presentation Theory--IPT--and its application to the analytical explication of various spatial designs in and psychological responses to images, from the illusions of depth in what is referred to as "windows" in cinema theory to the more patterned abstractions of…

  14. The "Pseudocommando" mass murderer: part II, the language of revenge.

    PubMed

    Knoll, James L

    2010-01-01

    In Part I of this article, research on pseudocommandos was reviewed, and the important role that revenge fantasies play in motivating such persons to commit mass murder-suicide was discussed. Before carrying out their mass shootings, pseudocommandos may communicate some final message to the public or news media. These communications are rich sources of data about their motives and psychopathology. In Part II of this article, forensic psycholinguistic analysis is applied to clarify the primary motivations, detect the presence of mental illness, and discern important individual differences in the final communications of two recent pseudocommandos: Seung-Hui Cho (Virginia Tech) and Jiverly Wong (Binghamton, NY). Although both men committed offenses that qualify them as pseudocommandos, their final communications reveal striking differences in their psychopathology. PMID:20542949

  15. Arm-free paraplegic standing--Part II: Experimental results.

    PubMed

    Matjacić, Z; Bajd, T

    1998-06-01

    In Part I, we proposed an approach for restoring unsupported standing to thoracic-level paraplegics. The theoretical analysis and simulation of an underactuated double inverted pendulum, representing the standing subject, showed that arm-free standing might be achieved. Here in Part II, we present the mechanical apparatus which we used in our experiments and experimental results from tests of the balance-control strategy. We demonstrate that an intact and a paraplegic subject could perform quiet standing with the ankle stiffness set to 8 Nm/degree or even less (the intact subject). Both were also able to recover from disturbances, imposed by the artificial ankle joint of the apparatus. Introducing cognitive auditory feedback greatly improved the standing abilities of both subjects. PMID:9631321

  16. The subthalamic nucleus part II: modelling and simulation of activity.

    PubMed

    Heida, Tjitske; Marani, Enrico; Usunoff, Kamen G

    2008-01-01

    Part I of The Subthalamic Nucleus (volume 198) (STN) accentuates the gap between experimental animal and human information concerning subthalamic development, cytology, topography and connections.The light and electron microscopical cytology focuses on the open nucleus concept and the neuronal types present in the STN. The cytochemistry encompasses enzymes, NO, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), calcium binding proteins, and receptors (dopamine, cannabinoid, opioid, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), serotonin, cholinergic, and calcium channels). The ontogeny of the subthalamic cell cord is also reviewed. The topography concerns the rat, cat, baboon and human STN. The descriptions of the connections are also given from a historical point of view. Recent tracer studies on the rat nigro-subthalamic connection revealed contralateral projections. This monograph (Part II of the two volumes) on the subthalamic nucleus (STN) starts with a systemic model of the basal ganglia to evaluate the position of the STN in the direct, indirect and hyperdirect pathways. A summary of in vitro studies is given, describing STN spontaneous activity as well as responses to depolarizing and hyperpolarizing inputs and high-frequency stimulation. STN bursting activity and the underlying ionic mechanisms are investigated. Deep brain stimulation used for symptomatic treatment of Parkinson's disease is discussed in terms of the elements that are influenced and its hypothesized mechanisms. This part of the monograph explores the pedunculopontine-subthalamic connections and summarizes attempts to mimic neurotransmitter actions of the pedunculopontine nucleus in cell cultures and high-frequency stimulation on cultured dissociated rat subthalamic neurons. STN cell models - single- and multi-compartment models and system-level models are discussed in relation to subthalamic function and dysfunction. Parts I and II are compared. PMID:18727495

  17. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being

  18. 31 CFR Appendix II(f) to Part 13 - Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Overhead and Administrative Costs II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13—Overhead and Administrative Costs Date: Select Only...

  19. 29 CFR Appendix II to Part 1918 - Tables for Selected Miscellaneous Auxiliary Gear (Mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tables for Selected Miscellaneous Auxiliary Gear (Mandatory) II Appendix II to Part 1918 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Pt. 1918, App. II Appendix II to Part...

  20. 19 CFR Annex II to Part 351 - Deadlines for Parties in Countervailing Administrative Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deadlines for Parties in Countervailing Administrative Reviews II Annex II to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex II Annex II to Part 351—Deadlines for...

  1. 19 CFR Annex II to Part 351 - Deadlines for Parties in Countervailing Administrative Reviews

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Deadlines for Parties in Countervailing Administrative Reviews II Annex II to Part 351 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ANTIDUMPING AND COUNTERVAILING DUTIES Pt. 351, Annex II Annex II to Part 351—Deadlines for...

  2. 5 CFR Appendix II to Part 1201 - Appropriate Regional or Field Office for Filing Appeals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appropriate Regional or Field Office for Filing Appeals II Appendix II to Part 1201 Administrative Personnel MERIT SYSTEMS PROTECTION BOARD ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURES PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES Pt. 1201, App. II Appendix II to Part 1201—Appropriate Regional or Field Office for Filing...

  3. 29 CFR Appendix II to Part 1918 - Tables for Selected Miscellaneous Auxiliary Gear (Mandatory)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tables for Selected Miscellaneous Auxiliary Gear (Mandatory) II Appendix II to Part 1918 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Pt. 1918, App. II Appendix II to Part...

  4. 31 CFR Appendix II(f) to Part 13 - Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overhead and Administrative Costs II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13—Overhead and Administrative Costs Date: Select Only...

  5. A Survey of Optometry Graduates to Determine Practice Patterns: Part II: Licensure and Practice Establishment Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleimann, Robert L.; Smith, Lee W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of Part II of a two-volume study of optometry graduates conducted by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry is presented. Part II includes the analysis of the graduates' licensure and practice establishment experiences. (MLW)

  6. 77 FR 60743 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040... Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Schedule F... Number: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040). Abstract: Schedule F, Part II and III (Form 1040)...

  7. Spontaneous "cures": Norman Reider's forgotten paper, part II.

    PubMed

    Boesky, Dale

    2014-04-01

    Part I of this paper combined an introduction to Norman Reider's original 1955 paper with a republication of the paper itself. Part II is a discussion of the complexities of a comparison of past and present psychoanalytic literature. The concept of enactment is proposed as one of many possible alternative views in considering Reider's notion of spontaneous "cures." A careful consideration of these spontaneous cures within the ordinary ups and downs of any psychoanalytic treatment sheds important light on our continuing confusion about how we define the term cure, and therefore about the nature of change during psychoanalytic treatment. This alternative perspective is only one of many plausible ones for present-day readers. The purpose of this republication is not to propose an explanation for "what really happened" with Reider and his patients; rather, it is to reconsider the fallacy of evaluating his paper outside its historical context and thereby failing to appreciate his courage in presenting what at the time were radical views. Questions about the complexity and confusion regarding cure and change require reexamination of the neglect of epistemology on the part of psychoanalysis in prolonging the confusion about distinguishing psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. PMID:24777370

  8. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted in-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 Manufacturers... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT...

  9. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted In-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 Manufacturers... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT...

  10. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted In-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II...-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 Manufacturers... TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT...

  11. Revision of the Genus Paratylenchus Micoletzky, 1922 and Descriptions of New Species. Part II of Three Parts

    PubMed Central

    Raski, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Part II covers species with average female stylet length of 22-38 μm. Seven new species are described and further observations are given on 12 other species. A key to the species covered in Parts I and II is included. Paratylenchus curvitatus van der Linde, 1938, is transferred to species inquirendae. PMID:19308171

  12. II: Through the Western Part of the City: Charlottenburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Dieter

    Until 1920 the city we now call Berlin was a collection of independent towns and villages — among them Charlottenburg, which was one of the most important and was the proud sister of Berlin, Prussia’s and Germany’s capital, where the wealthy and innovative bourgeoisie lived. Werner von Siemens, Germany’s pioneer in the modern electrical industry, was a prime example of that elite. His castle-like villa was located not far from today’s Ernst-Reuter-Platz at Otto-Suhr-Allee 10-16, and important parts of his enterprise expanded into the “meadows outside of Charlottenburg” during the second half of the 19th century. It was no accident that the efforts to unite Berlin’s two colleges for trade and construction (both founded around 1800) led to the foundation of a modern Technical College in Charlottenburg in 1879, today’s Technical University of Berlin. Its magnificent main building (figure 1), which was opened in 1882 by the German Emperor, was an expression of the great self-confidence of this new institution of higher learning and of Charlottenburg’s bourgeoisie. Although large parts of the building were destroyed by bombs during World War II, you can still get an impression of its monumentality from what survived at number 135 Strasse des 17. Juni.

  13. A Probabilistic Foundation of Elementary Particle Statistics. Part II.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Domenico; Garibaldi, Ubaldo

    The long history of ergodic and quasi-ergodic hypotheses provides the best example of the attempt to supply non-probabilistic justifications for the use of statistical mechanics in describing mechanical systems. In this paper we reverse the terms of the problem. We aim to show that accepting a probabilistic foundation of elementary particle statistics dispenses with the need to resort to ambiguous non-probabilistic notions like that of (in)distinguishability. In the quantum case, starting from suitable probability conditions, it is possible to deduce elementary particle statistics in a unified way. Following our approach Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics can also be deduced, and this deduction clarifies its status. Thus our primary aim in this paper is to give a mathematically rigorous deduction of the probability of a state with given energy for a perfect gas in statistical equilibrium; that is, a deduction of the equilibrium distributions for a perfect gas. A crucial step in this deduction is the statement of a unified statistical theory based on clearly formulated probability conditions from which the particle statistics follows. We believe that such a deduction represents an important improvement in elementary particle statistics, and a step towards a probabilistic foundation of statistical mechanics. The present Part II is devoted to this deduction. Part I presented the necessary tools. After the deduction of the probability of a state with given energy for a system in statistical equilibrium, we will propose in the last section a simple model giving an ergodic interpretation of the equilibrium distributions.

  14. Branch Flow Model: Relaxations and Convexification-Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Farivar, M; Low, SH

    2013-08-01

    We propose a branch flow model for the analysis and optimization of mesh as well as radial networks. The model leads to a new approach to solving optimal power flow (OPF) that consists of two relaxation steps. The first step eliminates the voltage and current angles and the second step approximates the resulting problem by a conic program that can be solved efficiently. For radial networks, we prove that both relaxation steps are always exact, provided there are no upper bounds on loads. For mesh networks, the conic relaxation is always exact but the angle relaxation may not be exact, and we provide a simple way to determine if a relaxed solution is globally optimal. We propose convexification of mesh networks using phase shifters so that OPF for the convexified network can always be solved efficiently for an optimal solution. We prove that convexification requires phase shifters only outside a spanning tree of the network and their placement depends only on network topology, not on power flows, generation, loads, or operating constraints. Part I introduces our branch flow model, explains the two relaxation steps, and proves the conditions for exact relaxation. Part II describes convexification of mesh networks, and presents simulation results.

  15. Reforming Science Education: Part II. Utilizing Kieran Egan's Educational Metatheory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Roland M.

    2009-04-01

    This paper is the second of two parts and continues the conversation which had called for a shift in the conceptual focus of science education towards philosophy of education, with the requirement to develop a discipline-specific “philosophy” of science education. In Part I, conflicting conceptions of science literacy were identified with disparate “visions” tied to competing research programs as well as school-based curricular paradigms. The impasse in the goals of science education and thereto, the contending views of science literacy, were themselves associated with three underlying fundamental aims of education (knowledge-itself; personal development; socialization) which, it was argued, usually undercut the potential of each other. During periods of “crisis-talk” and throughout science educational history these three aims have repeatedly attempted to assert themselves. The inability of science education research to affect long-term change in classrooms was correlated not only to the failure to reach a consensus on the aims (due to competing programs and to the educational ideologies of their social groups), but especially to the failure of developing true educational theories (largely neglected since Hirst). Such theories, especially metatheories, could serve to reinforce science education’s growing sense of academic autonomy and independence from socio-economic demands. In Part II, I offer as a suggestion Egan’s cultural-linguistic theory as a metatheory to help resolve the impasse. I hope to make reformers familiar with his important ideas in general, and more specifically, to show how they can complement HPS rationales and reinforce the work of those researchers who have emphasized the value of narrative in learning science.

  16. Targeted maximum likelihood based causal inference: Part II.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we provide a template for the practical implementation of the targeted maximum likelihood estimator for analyzing causal effects of multiple time point interventions, for which the methodology was developed and presented in Part I. In addition, the application of this template is demonstrated in two important estimation problems: estimation of the effect of individualized treatment rules based on marginal structural models for treatment rules, and the effect of a baseline treatment on survival in a randomized clinical trial in which the time till event is subject to right censoring. PMID:21731531

  17. Targeted Maximum Likelihood Based Causal Inference: Part II

    PubMed Central

    van der Laan, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we provide a template for the practical implementation of the targeted maximum likelihood estimator for analyzing causal effects of multiple time point interventions, for which the methodology was developed and presented in Part I. In addition, the application of this template is demonstrated in two important estimation problems: estimation of the effect of individualized treatment rules based on marginal structural models for treatment rules, and the effect of a baseline treatment on survival in a randomized clinical trial in which the time till event is subject to right censoring. PMID:21731531

  18. Pharmacokinetics and interactions of headache medications, part II: prophylactic treatments.

    PubMed

    Sternieri, Emilio; Coccia, Ciro Pio Rosario; Pinetti, Diego; Guerzoni, Simona; Ferrari, Anna

    2006-12-01

    The present part II review highlights pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (excluding those of minor severity) of medications used in prophylactic treatment of the main primary headaches (migraine, tension-type and cluster headache). The principles of pharmacokinetics and metabolism, and the interactions of medications for acute treatment are examined in part I. The overall goal of this series of two reviews is to increase the awareness of physicians, primary care providers and specialists regarding pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of headache medications. The aim of prophylactic treatment is to reduce the frequency of headache attacks using beta-blockers, calcium-channel blockers, antidepressants, antiepileptics, lithium, serotonin antagonists, corticosteroids and muscle relaxants, which must be taken daily for long periods. During treatment the patient often continues to take symptomatic drugs for the attack, and may need other medications for associated or new-onset illnesses. DDIs can, therefore, occur. As a whole, DDIs of clinical relevance concerning prophylactic drugs are a limited number. Their effects can be prevented by starting the treatment with low dosages, which should be gradually increased depending on response and side effects, while frequently monitoring the patient and plasma levels of other possible coadministered drugs with a narrow therapeutic range. Most headache medications are substrates of CYP2D6 (e.g., beta-blockers, antidepressants) or CYP3A4 (e.g., calcium-channel blockers, selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, corticosteroids). The inducers and, especially, the inhibitors of these isoenzymes should be carefully coadministered. PMID:17125412

  19. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    SciTech Connect

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  20. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 390 - Sample Capital Construction Fund Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. II Appendix II to Part 390—Sample Capital... Francisco, Calif. SS Brown, official No. 325111 ......do 265,000 dwt Owned 1974, Southern Shipyards,...

  1. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 390 - Sample Capital Construction Fund Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. II Appendix II to Part 390—Sample Capital... Francisco, Calif. SS Brown, official No. 325111 ......do 265,000 dwt Owned 1974, Southern Shipyards,...

  2. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 280 - List of Agencies Designated To Receive Notifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Notifications II Appendix II to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Connecticut (State Form), Hazardous Materials Management Unit, Department of Environmental Protection, State..., Environmental Protection Division, Underground Storage Tank Program, 3420 Norman Berry Drive, 7th...

  3. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 280 - List of Agencies Designated To Receive Notifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Notifications II Appendix II to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Connecticut (State Form), Hazardous Materials Management Unit, Department of Environmental Protection, State..., Environmental Protection Division, Underground Storage Tank Program, 3420 Norman Berry Drive, 7th...

  4. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 280 - List of Agencies Designated To Receive Notifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Notifications II Appendix II to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Connecticut (State Form), Hazardous Materials Management Unit, Department of Environmental Protection, State..., Environmental Protection Division, Underground Storage Tank Program, 3420 Norman Berry Drive, 7th...

  5. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 280 - List of Agencies Designated To Receive Notifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Notifications II Appendix II to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Connecticut (State Form), Hazardous Materials Management Unit, Department of Environmental Protection, State..., Environmental Protection Division, Underground Storage Tank Program, 3420 Norman Berry Drive, 7th...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 280 - List of Agencies Designated To Receive Notifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Notifications II Appendix II to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Connecticut (State Form), Hazardous Materials Management Unit, Department of Environmental Protection, State..., Environmental Protection Division, Underground Storage Tank Program, 3420 Norman Berry Drive, 7th...

  7. 10 CFR Appendix II to Part 1050 - DOE Form 3735.3-Foreign Travel Statement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Pub. L. 95-105, August 17, 1977) and DOE implementing regulations at 10 CFR part 1050. These... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false DOE Form 3735.3-Foreign Travel Statement II Appendix II to.... II Appendix II to Part 1050—DOE Form 3735.3—Foreign Travel Statement EC01OC91.041...

  8. Planar LTCC transformers for high voltage flyback converters: Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Schofield, Daryl; Schare, Joshua M., Ph.D.; Slama, George; Abel, David

    2009-02-01

    This paper is a continuation of the work presented in SAND2007-2591 'Planar LTCC Transformers for High Voltage Flyback Converters'. The designs in that SAND report were all based on a ferrite tape/dielectric paste system originally developed by NASCENTechnoloy, Inc, who collaborated in the design and manufacturing of the planar LTCC flyback converters. The output/volume requirements were targeted to DoD application for hard target/mini fuzing at around 1500 V for reasonable primary peak currents. High voltages could be obtained but with considerable higher current. Work had begun on higher voltage systems and is where this report begins. Limits in material properties and processing capabilities show that the state-of-the-art has limited our practical output voltage from such a small part volume. In other words, the technology is currently limited within the allowable funding and interest.

  9. IPCC Working Group II: Impacts and Adaptation Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulwarty, R. S.

    2007-12-01

    The IPCC (as opposed to the UN Framework Convention) defines climate change as" any change in climate over time, whether due to natural variability or as a result of human activity". The IPCC Working Group II (Impacts, Adaptation, Vulnerability) was charged with assessing the scientific, technical, environmental, economic, and social aspects of vulnerability to climate change, and, the negative and positive consequences for ecological systems, socio-economic sectors, and human health. The Working Group II report focused on the following issues for different sectors and regions (e.g. water, agriculture, biodiversity) and communities (coastal, island, etc.): · The role of adaptation in reducing vulnerability and impacts, · Assessment of adaptation capacity, options and constraints, and · Enhancing adaptation practice and operations. This presentation will address the following questions in the context of the results of the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report WG II: · What are the barriers, knowledge gaps, and opportunities for impacts assessments? · How are decisions about adaptation being made, and what types of adaptation strategies are being undertaken? · What are good adaptation practices and how are they learned over time? Examples will be drawn from the freshwater resources, small islands and adaptation chapters to which the presenter contributed. Many lessons have been identified but few have been implemented or evaluated over time. Adaptation occurs in the context of multiple stresses. Adaptation will be important in coping with early impacts in the near-term and continue to be important as our climate changes, regardless of how that change is derived. It is important to note that unmitigated climate change could, in the long term, exceed the capacity of different natural, managed and human systems to adapt. The assessment leads to the following conclusions: · Adaptation to climate change is already taking place, but on a limited basis · Adaptation measures

  10. Autism and EMF? Plausibility of a pathophysiological link part II.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Martha R; Sage, Cindy

    2013-06-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASCs) are defined behaviorally, but they also involve multileveled disturbances of underlying biology that find striking parallels in the physiological impacts of electromagnetic frequency and radiofrequency radiation exposures (EMF/RFR). Part I (Vol 776) of this paper reviewed the critical contributions pathophysiology may make to the etiology, pathogenesis and ongoing generation of behaviors currently defined as being core features of ASCs. We reviewed pathophysiological damage to core cellular processes that are associated both with ASCs and with biological effects of EMF/RFR exposures that contribute to chronically disrupted homeostasis. Many studies of people with ASCs have identified oxidative stress and evidence of free radical damage, cellular stress proteins, and deficiencies of antioxidants such as glutathione. Elevated intracellular calcium in ASCs may be due to genetics or may be downstream of inflammation or environmental exposures. Cell membrane lipids may be peroxidized, mitochondria may be dysfunctional, and various kinds of immune system disturbances are common. Brain oxidative stress and inflammation as well as measures consistent with blood-brain barrier and brain perfusion compromise have been documented. Part II of this paper documents how behaviors in ASCs may emerge from alterations of electrophysiological oscillatory synchronization, how EMF/RFR could contribute to these by de-tuning the organism, and policy implications of these vulnerabilities. It details evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction, immune system dysregulation, neuroinflammation and brain blood flow alterations, altered electrophysiology, disruption of electromagnetic signaling, synchrony, and sensory processing, de-tuning of the brain and organism, with autistic behaviors as emergent properties emanating from this pathophysiology. Changes in brain and autonomic nervous system electrophysiological function and sensory processing predominate, seizures

  11. Spectroscopic signatures of PETN: Part II. Detection in clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Rueda, Luz Marina; Herrera-Sandoval, Gloria M.; Mina, Nairmen; Castro-Rosario, Miguel E.; Briano, Julio G.; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2006-05-01

    Infrared Spectroscopy is a well established tool for standoff detection of chemical agents in military applications. Vibrational IR spectroscopic analysis can also be used in Chemical Point Detection mode and to the arena of explosives identification and detection when energetic compounds are in contact with soil. PETN is an important nitroaliphatic explosive for military applications. Due to its intrinsic explosive power, it can be used in laminar form or mixed with RDX to manufacture Semtex plastic explosive and in the fabrication of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). This investigation focused on the study of spectroscopic signatures of PETN in contact with soil. For this study, clay was mixed in different proportions with PETN. Detection of the vibrational signatures of PETN constitutes the central part of the investigation. The mixtures were submitted to the effect of water, acid and alkaline solutions, heat and deep UV light (234 nm) in order to establish the effect on these environmental parameters on the vibrational signatures of the explosive in the mixtures. The results reveal that the characteristic bands of PETN are highly persisted, degraded only by extreme conditions of UV radiation and exposure to high temperature for prolonged time. These results could be used in the development of sensitive sensors for detection of landmines, and improvised explosives devices (IDEs).

  12. 49 CFR Appendix A-Ii to Part 541 - Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted In-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lines With Antitheft Devices Which Are Exempted In-Part From the Parts-Marking Requirements of This Standard Pursuant to 49 CFR Part 543 A Appendix A-II to Part 541 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  13. NMG documentation. Part II. Programmer`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsch, F.N.; Dickinson, R.P. Jr.

    1996-07-01

    This is the 2nd of a 3-part report documenting NMG, the Numerical Mathematics Guide. This part is aimed at the programmer and contains Chapter 2, how it works. (Part I is aimed at the user of the system; Part III is aimed at the maintainer of NMG and will receive only limited distribution.)

  14. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... during idle at its warm idle speed as described in 40 CFR 1065.510. (b) Test nonhandheld engines with one... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  15. 46 CFR Appendix II to Part 390 - Sample Capital Construction Fund Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sample Capital Construction Fund Agreement II Appendix... PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. II Appendix II to Part 390—Sample Capital Construction Fund Agreement capital construction fund agreement with This Capital Construction Fund...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix II to Part 1054 - Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... during idle at its warm idle speed as described in 40 CFR 1065.510. (b) Test nonhandheld engines with one... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing II.... 1054, App. II Appendix II to Part 1054—Duty Cycles for Laboratory Testing (a) Test handheld...

  17. The new production theory for health care through clinical reengineering: a study of clinical guidelines--Part II.

    PubMed

    Sharp, J R

    1995-01-01

    In Part I of this two-part article, in the December 1994 issue of the journal, the author discussed the manufacturing theories of Peter Drucker in terms of their applicability for the health care field. He concluded that Drucker's four principles and practices of manufacturing--statistical quality control, manufacturing accounting, modular organization, and systems approach--do have application to the health care system. Clinical guidelines, a variation on the Drucker theory, are a specific example of the manufacturing process in health. The performance to date of some guidelines and their implications for the health care reform debate are discussed in Part II of the article. PMID:10139603

  18. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 110 - Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Formula (Sample) E Appendix E to Part 110 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY... COMMUTATION INSTEAD OF UNIFORMS FOR MEMBERS OF THE SENIOR RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS Pt. 110, App. E Appendix E to Part 110—Application of 4-Week Summer Field Training Formula (Sample) Zone I Zone II...

  19. Medicine at the crossroads. Part II. Summary of completed project

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    Medicine at the crossroads (a.k.a. The Future of Medicine) is an 8-part series of one-hour documentaries which examines the scientific and social forces that have shaped the practice of medicine around the world. The series was developed and produced over a five-year period and in eleven countries. Among the major issues examined in the series are the education of medical practitioners and the communication of medical issues. The series also considers the dilemmas of modern medicine, including the treatment of the elderly and the dying, the myth of the quick fix in the face of chronic and incurable diseases such as HIV, and the far-reaching implications of genetic treatments. Finally, the series examines the global progress made in medical research and application, as well as the questions remaining to be answered. These include not only scientific treatment, but accessibility and other critical topics affecting the overall success of medical advances. Medicine at the crossroads is a co-production of Thirteen/WNET and BBC-TV in association with Television Espafiola SA (RTVE) and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Stefan Moore of Thirteen/WNET and Martin Freeth of BBC-TV are series producers. George Page is executive in charge of medicine at the crossroads. A list of scholarly advisors and a program synopses is attached.

  20. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II.

  1. Embedded computer systems for control applications in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.B.; Start, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the embedded computer systems approach taken at Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) for non-safety related systems. The hardware and software structures for typical embedded systems are presented The embedded systems development process is described. Three examples are given which illustrate typical embedded computer applications in EBR-II.

  2. 20 CFR 801.3 - Applicability of this part to 20 CFR part 802.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability of this part to 20 CFR part 802. 801.3 Section 801.3 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION OF THE BOARD Introductory § 801.3 Applicability of this part to 20 CFR part 802. Part 802 of...

  3. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation, Cl. Thermoluminescence: Part II. Instrumentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manche, Emanuel P.

    1979-01-01

    Presents part two on the use of the detection of thermoluminescence as an analytical tool for the chemistry laboratory and allied science. This part discusses instrumentation used and investigates recent developments in instrumentation for thermoluminescence. (HM)

  4. Part I. The fire properties of polymer clay nanocomposites. Part II. Thermal rearrangement of donor-acceptor substituted cyclopropanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shengpei

    2003-08-01

    This work consists of two parts. Part I, which includes chapter 1--5, is focused on the fire properties of nanocomposites while part II deals with thermal rearrangement of the donor-acceptor cyclopropanes. In chapter 1 of the first part an introduction to the preparation of polymer-clay nanocomposites is provided along with their application to fire retardancy. Chapter 2 details the exfoliation process of clay using in situ polymerization; the results show that the exfoliation process is related to the monomer, the modified clay and the initiator. Chapter 3 concentrates on the preparation of nanocomposites by melt blending with polymer modified clays. Three different polymer modified clays (PS, PMMA and PBD modified clay) and six polymers (PS, HIPS, ABS, PMMA, PP and PE) are reported. The morphology, thermal stability, fire behavior and mechanical properties were studied. This research shows that the exfoliation process by melt blending is controlled by the types of interactions between the various polymers, the silicate surfaces and the organic modifier. The combination of polar polymer matrix and non-polar polymer modified clay with large d-spacing will be more likely to give the exfoliated nanocomposites. TGA-FTIR results show that the mechanism of degradation of polystyrene is changed in the presence of the clay. In order to better understand the effects of the organic modifier, PS surfactants with five different pendant groups, dimethylhexadecylamine, trimethylamine, dimethylbenzylamine, 1,2-dimethylimidizole and triphenylphosphine, were used and the results show that the degradation depends upon the pendant. Chapter 5 provides some suggestions for future work based upon this work. The synthesis of several new and previously reported donor-acceptor cyclopropanes is reported in part II. The study shows that the facility of the donor-acceptor cyclopropane ring cleavage is strongly influenced by the kind of activating substitutes on the cyclopropane ring, and the

  5. Sporting Goods. Part I: Hunting and Fishing Equipment and Part II: Athletic, Marine, and Camping Equipment. A Distributive Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Bill D., Comp.

    These manuals were prepared to introduce students to the fundamentals of hunting and fishing (Part I) and sports requiring athletic, marine and camping equipment (Part II). The sports salesman is in the position of offering a service to the customer, and he can best do so by understanding the sports and the variety of products which may be sold to…

  6. Coping With the Problems of a Technological Age, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This is another report in a series of programs dealing with the problems of a technological age. It is assumed that teachers will use both parts of this report. Part I deals with the problems of technology and how it affects our lives. It also discusses the energy crisis created, in part, by technology and deals specifically with coal and…

  7. Pulmonary physiology and the anesthetist--part II.

    PubMed

    Geelhoed, G W

    1980-04-01

    In part 1 of this three-part series, the author discussed the maintenance of cellular respiration and the function of the alveolar-capillary membrane. Part 2 deals with post-operative pulmonary problems, with a stress on the need to recognize and prevent these complications before their onset. PMID:7386135

  8. PROBABILITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR WASTE TANKS - PART II

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.; Edwards, T.

    2010-12-09

    As part of an ongoing study to evaluate the discontinuity in the corrosion controls at the SRS tank farm, a study was conducted this year to assess the minimum concentrations below 1 molar nitrate, see Figure 1. Current controls on the tank farm solution chemistry are in place to prevent the initiation and propagation of pitting and stress corrosion cracking in the primary steel waste tanks. The controls are based upon a series of experiments performed with simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks, namely ASTM A537 carbon steel (A537). During FY09, an experimental program was undertaken to investigate the risk associated with reducing the minimum molar nitrite concentration required to confidently inhibit pitting in dilute solutions (i.e., less than 1 molar nitrate). The experimental results and conclusions herein provide a statistical basis to quantify the probability of pitting for the tank wall exposed to various solutions with dilute concentrations of nitrate and nitrite. Understanding the probability for pitting will allow the facility to make tank-specific risk-based decisions for chemistry control. Based on previous electrochemical testing, a statistical test matrix was developed to refine and solidify the application of the statistical mixture/amount model to corrosion of A537 steel. A mixture/amount model was identified based on statistical analysis of recent and historically collected electrochemical data. This model provides a more complex relationship between the nitrate and nitrite concentrations and the probability of pitting than is represented by the model underlying the current chemistry control program, and its use may provide a technical basis for the utilization of less nitrite to inhibit pitting at concentrations below 1 molar nitrate. FY09 results fit within the mixture/amount model, and further refine the nitrate regime in which the model is applicable. The combination of visual observations and cyclic

  9. Review and update of the applications of organic petrology: Part 2, geological and multidisciplinary applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suarez-Ruiz, Isabel; Flores, Deolinda; Mendonça Filho, João Graciano; Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    The present paper is focused on organic petrology applied to unconventional and multidisciplinary investigations and is the second part of a two part review that describes the geological applications and uses of this branch of earth sciences. Therefore, this paper reviews the use of organic petrology in investigations of: (i) ore genesis when organic matter occurs associated with mineralization; (ii) the behavior of organic matter in coal fires (self-heating and self-combustion); (iii) environmental and anthropogenic impacts associated with the management and industrial utilization of coal; (iv) archeology and the nature and geographical provenance of objects of organic nature such as jet, amber, other artifacts and coal from archeological sites; and (v) forensic science connected with criminal behavior or disasters. This second part of the review outlines the most recent research and applications of organic petrology in those fields.

  10. A Conversation with William A. Fowler Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, John

    2005-06-01

    Physicist William A.Fowler initiated an experimental program in nuclear astrophysics after World War II. He recalls here the Steady State versus Big Bang controversy and his celebrated collaboration with Fred Hoyle and Geoffrey and Margaret Burbidge on nucleosynthesis in stars. He also comments on the shift away from nuclear physics in universities to large accelerators and national laboratories.

  11. Learning Objects, Type II Applications, and Embedded Pedagogical Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadanidis, George; Schindler, Karen

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we consider the extent to which learning objects that focus on higher level thinking might be seen as Type II applications, as defined by Maddux, Johnson, and Willis (2001). We conclude that learning objects are at best hybrid applications, with some Type I and some Type II characteristics. We also consider whether the educational…

  12. Mathematics for Junior High School, Volume II (Part 2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, R. D.; And Others

    This is part two of a two-part SMSG mathematics text for junior high school students. Key ideas emphasized are structure of arithmetic from an algebraic viewpoint, the real number system as a progressing development, and metric and non-metric relations in geometry. Chapter topics include real numbers, similar triangles, variation, non-metric…

  13. Mathematics for Junior High School, Volume II (Part 1).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, R. D.; And Others

    This is part one of a two-part SMSG mathematics text for junior high school students. Key ideas emphasized are structure of arithmetic from an algebraic viewpoint, the real number system as a progressing development, and metric and non-metric relations in geometry. Chapter topics include number line and coordinates, equations, scientific notation,…

  14. Reforming Science Education: Part II. Utilizing Kieran Egan's Educational Metatheory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Roland M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the second of two parts and continues the conversation which had called for a shift in the conceptual focus of science education towards philosophy of education, with the requirement to develop a discipline-specific "philosophy" of science education. In Part I, conflicting conceptions of science literacy were identified with…

  15. Selecting Instructional Materials: Part II. Matching Materials to Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talmage, Harriet

    1981-01-01

    Presents a three-phase process for selecting instructional materials: (1) screening materials; (2) matching screened materials to identified district characteristics and needs; and (3) decision-making. Part I of this three-part article appeared in "Curriculum Review," January 1981, pp9-14. (SJL)

  16. Individualized Instruction in Teacher Education. Part I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fall, Charles; And Others

    This two-part manual for college teachers of education is designed to provide information about individualized instruction along with resources for teaching a unit on it. Part 1, a general introduction to individualized instruction in teacher education, contains discussion of background historical development in the area of independent study;…

  17. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of ice supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O₃, SO₄²⁻, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO₂, and SO₂ over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on

  18. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of icemore » supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O₃, SO₄²⁻, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO₂, and SO₂ over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on whether the

  19. 19 CFR 205.1 - Applicability of part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....S. COMMERCE § 205.1 Applicability of part. This part 205 applies to functions and duties of the Commission under sections 131, 301(e)(3), and 503(a) of the Trade Act of 1974. For other applicable...

  20. 47 CFR 87.3 - Other applicable rule parts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... General Information § 87.3 Other applicable rule parts. Other applicable CFR title 47 parts include: (a... standards and procedures concerning marketing of radio frequency devices, and for obtaining...

  1. 19 CFR 201.1 - Applicability of part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Applicability of part. 201.1 Section 201.1 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES OF GENERAL APPLICATION § 201.1 Applicability of part. This part relates generally to functions and activities of the Commission under...

  2. 19 CFR 201.1 - Applicability of part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability of part. 201.1 Section 201.1 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION GENERAL RULES OF GENERAL APPLICATION § 201.1 Applicability of part. This part relates generally to functions and activities of the Commission under...

  3. Internal Auditing in Federal, State, and Local Governments (Part II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Susan; Wilson, Guy

    1981-01-01

    This second part of an annotated bibliography of reports, books, and journal articles concerned with internal auditing in government contexts reviews the available literature for an understanding of the types of internal audit, methods and practices, and other facets. (FM)

  4. Designing SoTL Studies--Part II: Practicality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartsch, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter suggests solutions to common practical problems in designing SoTL studies. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of different types of designs are discussed. [Part I available at EJ1029363.

  5. Astronomy Books of 1984: Part II--The Technical List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1985-01-01

    An annotated bibliography of astronomy books is presented. These books (most of which are designed for research astronomers and graduate students) demand substantial background in astronomy and physics. Nontechnical books are reviewed in part I (SE 537 910). (JN)

  6. 20 CFR 718.2 - Applicability of this part.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... version of Part 718 set forth in 20 CFR, parts 500 to end, edition revised as of April 1, 2010, applies to... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Applicability of this part. 718.2 Section 718... OR DEATH DUE TO PNEUMOCONIOSIS General § 718.2 Applicability of this part. (a) With the exception...

  7. 14 CFR 91.801 - Applicability: Relation to part 36.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... chapter. (b) Unless otherwise specified, as used in this subpart “part 36” refers to 14 CFR part 36... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applicability: Relation to part 36. 91.801... § 91.801 Applicability: Relation to part 36. (a) This subpart prescribes operating noise limits...

  8. Conformational behavior of insect pheromones and analogues. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koča, Jaroslav; Carlsen, Per H. J.

    1992-04-01

    The conformational potential energy surface paths of the sex pheromone, Ipsenol, to the Bark Beetle, Ips typographus, and of a series of analogues have been elucidated using the program DAISY. The following structures were calculated: 2-methyl-6-methylene-7-octen-4-ol (Ipsenol, ( II)), 2-methyl-6-methylene-2,7-octadiene-4-ol acetate ( III), 2-methyl-6-methylene-3,7-octadien-2-ol ( IV), 2-methyl-6-methylene-1,7-octadien-3-ol ( V), 5-(3-furanyl)-2-methyl-1-penten-3-ol ( VI) and 1-(3-furanyl)-4-methyl-3-penten-2-ol ( VII). As a measure of the conformational flexibility of the molecules the flexibility coefficients, f, were determined. The f values for the molecules were determined to be: II, 0.145; III, 0.144; IV, 1.240; V, 0.133; VI, 0.825; and VII, 0.451. The molecular mechanics method was used for energy calculations in conjunction with DAISY. Low-energy conformations (conformational channels) together with energy barriers for conformational changes are presented.

  9. Mental Retardation Grants; Part II, Research and Demonstration. Fiscal Year 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington, DC. Secretary's Committee on Mental Retardation.

    Part II of a two-part publication listing mental retardation grants awarded by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare in fiscal year 1968 (July 1, 1967, to June 30, 1968), the text includes grants awarded in the areas of research and demonstration. (Part I covers grants in training and construction.) Grants are arranged according to…

  10. Operational strategies for dispatchable combined cycle plants, Part II

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.P.; Landis, F.P.

    1996-11-01

    The Brush Cogeneration Facility is a dual-unit, combined cycle, cogeneration plant, operating in a dual cycling, automatically-dispatchable mode. Part I of this report described the contract, including automatic generation control (AGC) by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO), and the operation of Unit One. This part of the report covers the operation of Unit Two. Unit two is still in its operating infancy, but is showing that fuel efficiency and low emissions levels are not incompatible with cycling, load-following service. 1 fig.