Science.gov

Sample records for applied diffractive optics

  1. MERTIS: geometrical calibration of thermal infrared optical system by applying diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, M.; Baumbach, D.; Buder, M.; Börner, A.; Grießbach, D.; Peter, G.; Santier, E.; Säuberlich, T.; Schischmanow, A.; Schrader, S.; Walter, I.

    2015-09-01

    Geometrical sensor calibration is essential for space applications based on high accuracy optical measurements, in this case for the thermal infrared push-broom imaging spectrometer MERTIS. The goal is the determination of the interior sensor orientation. A conventional method is to measure the line of sight for a subset of pixels by single pixel illumination with collimated light. To adjust angles, which define the line of sight of a pixel, a manipulator construction is used. A new method for geometrical sensor calibration is using Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE) in connection with laser beam equipment. Diffractive optical elements (DOE) are optical microstructures, which are used to split an incoming laser beam with a dedicated wavelength into a number of beams with well-known propagation directions. As the virtual sources of the diffracted beams are points at infinity, the resulting image is invariant against translation. This particular characteristic allows a complete geometrical sensor calibration with only one taken image avoiding complex adjustment procedures, resulting in a significant reduction of calibration effort. We present a new method for geometrical calibration of a thermal infrared optical system, including an thermal infrared test optics and the MERTIS spectrometer bolometer detector. The fundamentals of this new approach for geometrical infrared optical systems calibration by applying diffractive optical elements and the test equipment are shown.

  2. Multifocus microscopy with precise color multi-phase diffractive optics applied in functional neuronal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, Sara; Ilic, Rob; Wisniewski, Jan; Mehl, Brian; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Davanco, Marcelo; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Hajj, Bassam; Jin, Xin; Pulupa, Joan; Cho, Christine; Mir, Mustafa; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Darzacq, Xavier; Nollmann, Marcelo; Dahan, Maxime; Wu, Carl; Lionnet, Timothée; Liddle, J. Alexander; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2016-01-01

    Multifocus microscopy (MFM) allows high-resolution instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) imaging and has been applied to study biological specimens ranging from single molecules inside cells nuclei to entire embryos. We here describe pattern designs and nanofabrication methods for diffractive optics that optimize the light-efficiency of the central optical component of MFM: the diffractive multifocus grating (MFG). We also implement a “precise color” MFM layout with MFGs tailored to individual fluorophores in separate optical arms. The reported advancements enable faster and brighter volumetric time-lapse imaging of biological samples. In live microscopy applications, photon budget is a critical parameter and light-efficiency must be optimized to obtain the fastest possible frame rate while minimizing photodamage. We provide comprehensive descriptions and code for designing diffractive optical devices, and a detailed methods description for nanofabrication of devices. Theoretical efficiencies of reported designs is ≈90% and we have obtained efficiencies of > 80% in MFGs of our own manufacture. We demonstrate the performance of a multi-phase MFG in 3D functional neuronal imaging in living C. elegans. PMID:27231594

  3. Multifocus microscopy with precise color multi-phase diffractive optics applied in functional neuronal imaging.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Sara; Ilic, Rob; Wisniewski, Jan; Mehl, Brian; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Davanco, Marcelo; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Hajj, Bassam; Jin, Xin; Pulupa, Joan; Cho, Christine; Mir, Mustafa; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Darzacq, Xavier; Nollmann, Marcelo; Dahan, Maxime; Wu, Carl; Lionnet, Timothée; Liddle, J Alexander; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2016-03-01

    Multifocus microscopy (MFM) allows high-resolution instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) imaging and has been applied to study biological specimens ranging from single molecules inside cells nuclei to entire embryos. We here describe pattern designs and nanofabrication methods for diffractive optics that optimize the light-efficiency of the central optical component of MFM: the diffractive multifocus grating (MFG). We also implement a "precise color" MFM layout with MFGs tailored to individual fluorophores in separate optical arms. The reported advancements enable faster and brighter volumetric time-lapse imaging of biological samples. In live microscopy applications, photon budget is a critical parameter and light-efficiency must be optimized to obtain the fastest possible frame rate while minimizing photodamage. We provide comprehensive descriptions and code for designing diffractive optical devices, and a detailed methods description for nanofabrication of devices. Theoretical efficiencies of reported designs is ≈90% and we have obtained efficiencies of > 80% in MFGs of our own manufacture. We demonstrate the performance of a multi-phase MFG in 3D functional neuronal imaging in living C. elegans. PMID:27231594

  4. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  5. Digital diffractive optics: Have diffractive optics entered mainstream industry yet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard; Hejmadi, Vic

    2010-05-01

    When a new technology is integrated into industry commodity products and consumer electronic devices, and sold worldwide in retail stores, it is usually understood that this technology has then entered the realm of mainstream technology and therefore mainstream industry. Such a leap however does not come cheap, as it has a double edge sword effect: first it becomes democratized and thus massively developed by numerous companies for various applications, but also it becomes a commodity, and thus gets under tremendous pressure to cut down its production and integration costs while not sacrificing to performance. We will show, based on numerous examples extracted from recent industry history, that the field of Diffractive Optics is about to undergo such a major transformation. Such a move has many impacts on all facets of digital diffractive optics technology, from the optical design houses to the micro-optics foundries (for both mastering and volume replication), to the final product integrators or contract manufacturers. The main causes of such a transformation are, as they have been for many other technologies in industry, successive technological bubbles which have carried and lifted up diffractive optics technology within the last decades. These various technological bubbles have been triggered either by real industry needs or by virtual investment hype. Both of these causes will be discussed in the paper. The adjective ""digital"" in "digital diffractive optics" does not refer only, as it is done in digital electronics, to the digital functionality of the element (digital signal processing), but rather to the digital way they are designed (by a digital computer) and fabricated (as wafer level optics using digital masking techniques). However, we can still trace a very strong similarity between the emergence of micro-electronics from analog electronics half a century ago, and the emergence of digital optics from conventional optics today.

  6. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

  7. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-05-21

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

  8. Issues in Optical Diffraction Theory

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Klaus D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on unresolved or poorly documented issues pertaining to Fresnel’s scalar diffraction theory and its modifications. In Sec. 2 it is pointed out that all thermal sources used in practice are finite in size and errors can result from insufficient coherence of the optical field. A quarter-wave criterion is applied to show how such errors can be avoided by placing the source at a large distance from the aperture plane, and it is found that in many cases it may be necessary to use collimated light as on the source side of a Fraunhofer experiment. If these precautions are not taken the theory of partial coherence may have to be used for the computations. In Sec. 3 it is recalled that for near-zone computations the Kirchhoff or Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals are applicable, but fail to correctly describe the energy flux across the aperture plane because they are not continuously differentiable with respect to the assumed geometrical field on the source side. This is remedied by formulating an improved theory in which the field on either side of a semi-reflecting screen is expressed as the superposition of mutually incoherent components which propagate in the opposite directions of the incident and reflected light. These components are defined as linear combinations of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals, so that they are rigorous solutions of the wave equation as well as continuously differentiable in the aperture plane. Algorithms for using the new theory for computing the diffraction patterns of circular apertures and slits at arbitrary distances z from either side of the aperture (down to z = ± 0.0003 λ) are presented, and numerical examples of the results are given. These results show that the incident geometrical field is modulated by diffraction before it reaches the aperture plane while the reflected field is spilled into the dark space. At distances from the aperture which are large compared to the wavelength λ these field expressions are

  9. Spectral diffraction efficiency characterization of broadband diffractive optical elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Junoh; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Diffractive optical elements, with their thin profile and unique dispersion properties, have been studied and utilized in a number of optical systems, often yielding smaller and lighter systems. Despite the interest in and study of diffractive elements, the application has been limited to narrow spectral bands. This is due to the etch depths, which are optimized for optical path differences of only a single wavelength, consequently leading to rapid decline in efficiency as the working wavelength shifts away from the design wavelength. Various broadband diffractive design methodologies have recently been developed that improve spectral diffraction efficiency and expand the working bandwidth of diffractive elements. We have developed diffraction efficiency models and utilized the models to design, fabricate, and test two such extended bandwidth diffractive designs.

  10. Microbeam High Angular Resolution Diffraction Applied to Optoelectronic Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kazimirov, A.; Bilderback, D. H.; Sirenko, A. A.; Cai, Z.-H.; Lai, B.

    2007-01-19

    Collimating perfect crystal optics in a combination with the X-ray focusing optics has been applied to perform high angular resolution microbeam diffraction and scattering experiments on micron-size optoelectronic devices produced by modern semiconductor technology. At CHESS, we used capillary optics and perfect Si/Ge crystal(s) arrangement to perform X-ray standing waves, high angular-resolution diffraction and high resolution reciprocal space mapping analysis. At the APS, 2ID-D microscope beamline, we employed a phase zone plate producing a beam with the size of 240 nm in the horizontal plane and 350 nm in the vertical (diffraction) plane and a perfect Si (004) analyzer crystal to perform diffraction analysis of selectively grown InGaAsP and InGaAlAs-based waveguides with arc sec angular resolution.

  11. Diffractive optical element for optical data storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Unno, N.; Akamatsu, H.; Yamada, K.; Taniguchi, J.; Yamamoto, M.

    2013-05-01

    The diffractive optical element (DOE) has the transformation function of wavefront, and its applications are forming or homogenization of beam, and aberration correction, and so on. In this study, we evaluate possibility as storage application of the DOE. The optical data storage using the DOE is thought of as a kind of holographic data storage (HDS). In the HDS, digital data is recorded and read out as modulated 2-dimensional page data, instead of bit-by-bit recording in conventional optical storages. Therefore, HDS actualize high data transfer rate. We design and optimize phase distribution of the DOE using the iterative method with regularization. In the optimization process, we use iterative Fourier transform algorithm (IFTA) that is known as Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm. At this time, the regularization method is adopted to suppress minute oscillation of the diffraction pattern. Designed and optimized DOE is fabricated by ultraviolet (UV) nanoimprinting technology. High productivity can be expected by adopting nanoimprinting technology. DOEs are duplicated on the silicon (Si) substrate as reflection-type elements. Fabricated DOE is evaluated in the experiment. We verify that DOE for optical data storage can be actualized through our approach.

  12. Diffraction optics for terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltse, James C.

    2004-09-01

    Conventional lenses are important components for many terahertz applications, but ordinary lenses are very difficult to fabricate for short-focal lengths. Multi-level phase-corrected zoned lens antennas have been investigated with particular application at terahertz wavelengths. These zoned lenses (or diffractive optics) give better performance than ordinary lenses, and because of their planar construction are easier and cheaper to fabricate. The depths of cut needed for a grooved zone plate are quite small, even when materials with low dielectric constants are used. Zoned lenses have been built and tested at various frequencies from 100 GHz to 1.5 THz, with phase correction levels of half-wave, quarter-wave, or eighth-wavelength. The inherent losses in transparent materials increase monotonically over this frequency range. Typical low-loss materials include polystyrene, polyethylene, Teflon, polycarbonate, polystyrene foam, foamed polyethylene, low density polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), TPX, quartz, sapphire, and silicon. Low dielectric-constant materials are normally preferred to reduce reflection and attenuation losses. Techniques for cutting or milling the materials to small dimensions are important, because at 1.0 THz an eighth-wavelength correction for silicon is only 15 μm. Another characteristic of zoned diffraction optics is their frequency behavior. Previous investigations have considered their bandwidth dependence and quasi-periodic extended frequency response for a specified focal length. As frequency changes, the focal point moves along the axis of the zoned lens. An analysis is given to explain this effect.

  13. Sub-wavelength diffractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.E.; Wendt, J.R.; Vawter, G.A.

    1998-03-01

    This report represents the completion of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate sub-wavelength surface relief structures fabricated by direct-write e-beam technology as unique and very high-efficiency optical elements. A semiconductor layer with sub-wavelength sized etched openings or features can be considered as a layer with an effective index of refraction determined by the fraction of the surface filled with semiconductor relative to the fraction filled with air or other material. Such as a layer can be used to implement planar gradient-index lenses on a surface. Additionally, the nanometer-scale surface structures have diffractive properties that allow the direct manipulation of polarization and altering of the reflective properties of surfaces. With this technology a single direct-write mask and etch can be used to integrate a wide variety of optical functions into a device surface with high efficiencies; allowing for example, direct integration of polarizing optics into the surface with high efficiencies; allowing for example, direct integration of polarizing optics into the surfaces of devices, forming anti-reflection surfaces or fabricating high-efficiency, high-numerical aperture lenses, including integration inside vertical semiconductor laser cavities.

  14. Diffractive optical element in materials testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvennoinen, Raimo V. J.; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    1998-09-01

    The object of this paper is to present a sensor based on diffractive optics that can be applied for the materials testing. The present sensor, which is based on the use of a computer-generated hologram (CGH) exploits the holographic imagery. The CGH-sensor was introduced for inspection of surface roughness and flatness of metal surfaces. The results drawn out by the present sensor are observed to be in accordance with the experimental data. Together with the double exposure holographic interferometry (DEHI) and digital electronic speckle pattern interferometry (DSPI) in elasticity inspection, the sensor was applied for the investigations of surface quality of opaque fragile materials, which are pharmaceutical compacts. The optical surface quality was observed to be related to the porosity of the pharmaceutical tablets. The CGH-sensor was also applied for investigations of optical quality of thin films as PLZT ceramics and coating of pharmaceutical compacts. The surfaces of PLZT samples showed fluctuations in optical curvature, and wedgeness for all the cases studied. For pharmaceutical compacts, the optical signals were observed to depend to a great extent on the optical constants of the coatings and the substrates, and in addition to the surface porosity under the coating.

  15. Diffraction gratings for optical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Patrick P.

    The following document summarizes a journey through the world of diffraction gratings, covering topics such as their history, fabrication, metrology, and uses in some of the most precise scientific experiments ever proposed. Though diffraction gratings have long been used for spectroscopy and pulse compression, it was not until recently that researchers have explored their ability to split and recombine single-frequency CW laser sources for high-precision interferometry. Gravitational-wave detection, one of the most challenging sensing applications to date, is being investigated by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) projects. Future generations of LIGO and LISA detectors may incorporate gratings as key optical components. This thesis describes the ways gratings can improve interferometer performance by simplifying thermal management and discusses the essential challenges that must be overcome before they can be adopted. The use of gratings requires new interferometer geometries. We show cases where these can be implemented simply and compactly. Gravitational-wave interferometry imposes many requirements on grating components. Using improved metrology methods, we demonstrate that large dielectric gratings with uniformly high efficiency can be fabricated and validated. In particular, we measure the diffraction efficiency of two 20-cm-scale gratings over their entire apertures. The values taken from across their surfaces collectively had means and standard deviations of mu = 99.293% and sigma = 0.164%, and mu =99.084% and sigma =0.079%. We also present simplified models of thermal distortions in gratings, and show them to be in good agreement with measurements conducted by a wavefront sensor. Special focus is given to experimental demonstrations that have achieved highly precise measurements of translational and rotational motion, also known as displacement and angular sensing. For the former

  16. Diffraction-based optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for wavelength-based processing of a light beam. A light beam, produced at a chemical or physical reaction site and having at least first and second wavelengths, ?1 and ?2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide first and second diffracted beams, which are received and analyzed in terms of wavelength and/or time at two spaced apart light detectors. In a second embodiment, light from first and second sources is diffracted and compared in terms of wavelength and/or time to determine if the two beams arise from the same source. In a third embodiment, a light beam is split and diffracted and passed through first and second environments to study differential effects. In a fourth embodiment, diffracted light beam components, having first and second wavelengths, are received sequentially at a reaction site to determine whether a specified reaction is promoted, based on order of receipt of the beams. In a fifth embodiment, a cylindrically shaped diffraction grating (uniform or chirped) is rotated and translated to provide a sequence of diffracted beams with different wavelengths. In a sixth embodiment, incident light, representing one or more symbols, is successively diffracted from first and second diffraction gratings and is received at different light detectors, depending upon the wavelengths present in the incident light.

  17. High diffraction efficiency of three-layer diffractive optics designed for wide temperature range and large incident angle.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shan; Cui, Qingfeng; Piao, Mingxu; Zhao, Lidong

    2016-05-01

    A mathematical model of diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency affected by environment temperature change and incident angle for three-layer diffractive optics with different dispersion materials is put forward, and its effects are analyzed. Taking optical materials N-FK5 and N-SF1 as the substrates of multilayer diffractive optics, the effect on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency with intermediate materials POLYCARB is analyzed with environment temperature change as well as incident angle. Therefore, three-layer diffractive optics can be applied in more wide environmental temperature ranges and larger incident angles for refractive-diffractive hybrid optical systems, which can obtain better image quality. Analysis results can be used to guide the hybrid imaging optical system design for optical engineers. PMID:27140370

  18. Diffraction efficiency analysis for multi-level diffractive optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, I.A.

    1995-11-01

    Passive optical components can be broken down into two main groups: Refractive elements and diffractive elements. With recent advances in manufacturing technologies, diffractive optical elements are becoming increasingly more prevalent in optical systems. It is therefore important to be able to understand and model the behavior of these elements. In this report, we present a thorough analysis of a completely general diffractive optical element (DOE). The main goal of the analysis is to understand the diffraction efficiency and power distribution of the various modes affected by the DOE. This is critical to understanding cross talk and power issues when these elements are used in actual systems. As mentioned, the model is based on a completely general scenario for a DOE. This allows the user to specify the details to model a wide variety of diffractive elements. The analysis is implemented straightforwardly in Mathematica. This report includes the development of the analysis, the Mathematica implementation of the model and several examples using the Mathematical analysis tool. It is intended that this tool be a building block for more specialized analyses.

  19. Perturbation approach applied to modal diffraction methods.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Joerg; Hehl, Karl

    2011-05-01

    Eigenvalue computation is an important part of many modal diffraction methods, including the rigorous coupled wave approach (RCWA) and the Chandezon method. This procedure is known to be computationally intensive, accounting for a large proportion of the overall run time. However, in many cases, eigenvalue information is already available from previous calculations. Some of the examples include adjacent slices in the RCWA, spectral- or angle-resolved scans in optical scatterometry and parameter derivatives in optimization. In this paper, we present a new technique that provides accurate and highly reliable solutions with significant improvements in computational time. The proposed method takes advantage of known eigensolution information and is based on perturbation method. PMID:21532698

  20. Diffractive optics for compact flat panel displays. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.; DeLong, K.

    1997-04-29

    Three years ago LLNL developed a practical method to dramatically reduce the chromatic aberration in single element diffractive imaging lenses. High efficiency, achromatic imaging lenses have been fabricated for human vision correction. This LDRD supported research in applying our new methods to develop a unique, diffraction-based optical interface with solid state, microelectronic imaging devices. Advances in microelectronics have led to smaller, more efficient components for optical systems. There have, however, been no equivalent advances in the imaging optics associated with these devices. The goal of this project was to replace the bulky, refractive optics in typical head-mounted displays with micro-thin diffractive optics to directly image flat-panel displays into the eye. To visualize the system think of the lenses of someone`s eyeglasses becoming flat-panel displays. To realize this embodiment, we needed to solve the problems of large chromatic aberrations and low efficiency that are associated with diffraction. We have developed a graceful tradeoff between chromatic aberrations and the diffractive optic thickness. It turns out that by doubling the thickness of a micro-thin diffractive lens we obtain nearly a two-times improvement in chromatic performance. Since the human eye will tolerate one diopter of chromatic aberration, we are able to achieve an achromatic image with a diffractive lens that is only 20 microns thick, versus 3 mm thickness for the comparable refractive lens. Molds for the diffractive lenses are diamond turned with sub-micron accuracy; the final lenses are cast from these molds using various polymers. We thus retain both the micro- thin nature of the diffractive optics and the achromatic image quality of refractive optics. During the first year of funding we successfully extended our earlier technology from 1 cm diameter optics required for vision applications up to the 5 cm diameter optics required for this application. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Scalar limitations of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric G.; Hochmuth, Diane; Moharam, M. G.; Pommet, Drew

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, scalar limitations of diffractive optic components are investigated using coupled wave analyses. Results are presented for linear phase gratings and fanout devices. In addition, a parametric curve is given which correlates feature size with scalar performance.

  2. Bayesian inversion for optical diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayasso, H.; Duchêne, B.; Mohammad-Djafari, A.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, optical diffraction tomography is considered as a non-linear inverse scattering problem and tackled within the Bayesian estimation framework. The object under test is a man-made object known to be composed of compact regions made of a finite number of different homogeneous materials. This a priori knowledge is appropriately translated by a Gauss-Markov-Potts prior. Hence, a Gauss-Markov random field is used to model the contrast distribution whereas a hidden Potts-Markov field accounts for the compactness of the regions. First, we express the a posteriori distributions of all the unknowns and then a Gibbs sampling algorithm is used to generate samples and estimate the posterior mean of the unknowns. Some preliminary results, obtained by applying the inversion algorithm to laboratory controlled data, are presented.

  3. Spatiotemporal optical pulse transformation by a resonant diffraction grating

    SciTech Connect

    Golovastikov, N. V.; Bykov, D. A. Doskolovich, L. L. Soifer, V. A.

    2015-11-15

    The diffraction of a spatiotemporal optical pulse by a resonant diffraction grating is considered. The pulse diffraction is described in terms of the signal (the spatiotemporal incident pulse envelope) passage through a linear system. An analytic approximation in the form of a rational function of two variables corresponding to the angular and spatial frequencies has been obtained for the transfer function of the system. A hyperbolic partial differential equation describing the general form of the incident pulse envelope transformation upon diffraction by a resonant diffraction grating has been derived from the transfer function. A solution of this equation has been obtained for the case of normal incidence of a pulse with a central frequency lying near the guided-mode resonance of a diffraction structure. The presented results of numerical simulations of pulse diffraction by a resonant grating show profound changes in the pulse envelope shape that closely correspond to the proposed theoretical description. The results of the paper can be applied in creating new devices for optical pulse shape transformation, in optical information processing problems, and analog optical computations.

  4. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  5. Optimization Algorithm for Designing Diffractive Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo, Viviana A.; Orozco, Ricardo Amézquita

    2008-04-01

    Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are commonly used in many applications such as laser beam shaping, recording of micro reliefs, wave front analysis, metrology and many others where they can replace single or multiple conventional optical elements (diffractive or refractive). One of the most versatile way to produce them, is to use computer assisted techniques for their design and optimization, as well as optical or electron beam micro-lithography techniques for the final fabrication. The fundamental figures of merit involved in the optimization of such devices are both the diffraction efficiency and the signal to noise ratio evaluated in the reconstructed wave front at the image plane. A design and optimization algorithm based on the error—reduction method (Gerchberg and Saxton) is proposed to obtain binary discrete phase-only Fresnel DOEs that will be used to produce specific intensity patterns. Some experimental results were obtained using a spatial light modulator acting as a binary programmable diffractive phase element. Although the DOEs optimized here are discrete in phase, they present an acceptable signal noise relation and diffraction efficiency.

  6. Optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit

    PubMed Central

    Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past century the resolution of far-field optical microscopes, which rely on propagating optical modes, was widely believed to be limited because of diffraction to a value on the order of a half-wavelength λ∕2 of the light used. Although immersion microscopes had slightly improved resolution on the order of λ∕2n, the increased resolution was limited by the small range of refractive indices, n, of available transparent materials. We are experiencing quick demolition of the diffraction limit in optical microscopy. Over the past few years numerous nonlinear optical microscopy techniques based on photoswitching and saturation of fluorescence demonstrated far-field resolution of 20 to 30 nm. The latest exciting example of these techniques has been demonstrated by Huang et al. [Science 319, 810–813 (2008)]. Moreover, recent progress in metamaterials indicates that artificial optical media can be created, which do not exhibit the diffraction limit. Resolution of linear “immersion” microscopes based on such metamaterials appears limited only by losses, which can be compensated by gain media. Thus, optical microscopy is quickly moving towards the 10 nm resolution scale, which should bring about numerous revolutionary advances in biomedical imaging. PMID:19404465

  7. Overview Of Diffractive Optics At Honeywell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, J. Allen

    1988-05-01

    Interest in holographic, or diffractive, optics has been rekindled in the last few years with demonstrated advances in three areas: computer-aided design (CAD) tools, VLSI lithographic and dry etching processes, and mathematical modeling of diffractive elements.1 The availability of CAD tools and electron-beam lithography led first to the emergence of computer-generated holography (CGH). CGH work at Honeywell was started and brought to maturity by Arnold2 in 1980-1983. However, because of the inherently low diffraction efficiency (-10%), lithographic CGHs have found a place in only a relatively few practical applications, such as testing diamond turned aspherics, and thus CGHs have not been widely accepted within industry. The first step in changing this situation came in the 1970s with numerical approaches to rigorously solve the vector field equations for diffraction from blazed gratings.3 The extensive numerical results from these models not only showed that high diffraction efficiencies are possible with etched surface profiles, but also indicated the sensitivity to various profile configurations and design parameters. Veldkamp et al.1,4'-'61 at MIT Lincoln Laboratories have taken the final step necessary to establish the practical feasibility of diffractive optics by using reactive ion etching techniques to produce the surface profiles prescribed by the numerical models and delineated by CGH lithographic masks. With this combined approach, they have demonstrated the feasibility of high-efficiency diffractive elements for a variety of diverse applications, such as the CO2 laser radar telescope,4 coherent beam addition of laser diode arrays,5 and on-axis, broadband, aspheric lens elements for infrared imagers.6 These elements are fabricated using well-established VLSI lithographic and dry etching techniques. Moreover, the ability to replicate each diffractive element provides the potential for high-volume, low-cost producibility. With this precedent, Honeywell

  8. Integrated Diffractive Optics for Surface Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streed, Erik; Ghadimi, Moji; Blums, Valdis; Norton, Benjamin; Connor, Paul; Amini, Jason; Volin, Curtis; Lobino, Mirko; Kielpinski, David

    2016-05-01

    Photonic interconnects are a bottleneck to achieving large-scale trapped ion quantum computing. We have modified a Georgia Tech Research Institute microwave chip trap by using e-beam lithography to write reflective diffractive collimating optics (80 μm x 127 μm, f=58.6 μm, λ=369.5nm) on the center electrode. The optics have an NA of 0.55 x 0.73, capturing 13.2% of the solid angle. To evaluate the optics 174Yb+ was loaded by isotope selective photo-ionization from a thermal oven and then shuttled to imaging sites. Near diffraction limited sub-wavelength ion images were obtained with an observed spot sized FWHM of 338 nm x 268 nm vs. a diffraction limit of 336 nm x 257 nm. The total photon collection efficiency was measured to be 5.2+/-1.2%. Coupling into a single mode fiber of up to 2.0+/-0.6% was observed, limited by mismatch in the coupling optics. Image mode quality indicates coupling up to 4% may be possible. Funding from Australian Research Council and IARPA.

  9. Optical diffraction by inhomogeneous volume objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Gustavo; Lencina, Alberto; Tebaldi, Myrian; Bolognini, Nestor

    2008-08-01

    Electromagnetic waves propagation research in volume media increases considerably in the last years. The study evolved from thick hologram gratings, Bragg and Raman-Nath diffraction regimes up to current research in photonics materials. Usually differential methods are employed to account for the light transmitted for volume media. In our proposal, we develop a simple and versatile integral method to calculate the diffracted field provided the media refractive index has low variations in a wavelength scale. In fact, starting from first principles, we obtain a modified version of the Fresnel propagator of the scalar diffraction theory. Our method is valid for some kind of magnetic, dielectric and absorbent inhomogeneous media. In particular, for TE (TM) fields, we can study media where the permittivity (permeability) gradient is perpendicular to the electric (magnetic) field and its permeability (permittivity) is constant. To validate the approach, we applied it to (in) homogeneous media having well known diffraction properties.

  10. Transmissive Diffractive Optical Element Solar Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, Richard; Moynihan, Philip; Price, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Solar-thermal-radiation concentrators in the form of transmissive diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have been proposed as alternatives to mirror-type solar concentrators now in use. In comparison with functionally equivalent mirror-type solar concentrators, the transmissive, diffractive solar concentrators would weigh and cost less, and would be subject to relaxed mechanical tolerances. A DOE concentrator would be made from a thin, flat disk or membrane of a transmissive material having a suitable index of refraction. By virtue of its thinness, the DOE concentrator would have an areal mass density significantly less than that of a functionally equivalent conventional mirror. The DOE concentrator would have a relatively wide aperture--characterized by a focal-length/aperture-diameter ratio ('f number') on the order of 1. A kinoform (a surface-relief phase hologram) of high diffractive order would be microfabricated onto one face of the disk. The kinoform (see figure) would be designed to both diffract and refract incident solar radiation onto a desired focal region, without concern for forming an image of the Sun. The high diffractive order of this kinoform (in contradistinction to the low diffractive orders of some other kinoforms) would be necessary to obtain the desired f number of 1, which, in turn, would be necessary for obtaining a desired concentration ratio of 2,500 or greater. The design process of optimizing the concentration ratio of a proposed DOE solar concentrator includes computing convolutions of the optical bandwidth of the Sun with the optical transmission of the diffractive medium. Because, as in the cases of other non-imaging, light-concentrating optics, image quality is not a design requirement, the process also includes trading image quality against concentration ratio. A baseline design for one example calls for an aperture diameter of 1 m. This baseline design would be scalable to a diameter as large as 10 m, or to a smaller diameter for a

  11. Diffraction smoothing aperture for an optical beam

    DOEpatents

    Judd, O'Dean P.; Suydam, Bergen R.

    1976-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an aperture for an optical beam having an irregular periphery or having perturbations imposed upon the periphery to decrease the diffraction effect caused by the beam passing through the aperture. Such apertures are particularly useful with high power solid state laser systems in that they minimize the problem of self-focusing which frequently destroys expensive components in such systems.

  12. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  13. Diffractive interference optical analyzer (DiOPTER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Harish; Prasad, Vishnu; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    This report demonstrates a method for high-resolution refractometric measurements using, what we have termed as, a Diffractive Interference Optical Analyzer (DiOpter). The setup consists of a laser, polarizer, a transparent diffraction grating and Si-photodetectors. The sensor is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk refractive index changes. In these setups, the differential read-out of the diffracted orders suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6x10-7 RIU was achieved in glass. This work focuses on devices with integrated sample well, made on low-cost PDMS. As the detection methodology is experimentally straightforward, it can be used across a wide array of applications, ranging from detecting changes in surface adsorbates via binding reactions to estimating refractive index (and hence concentration) variations in bulk samples. An exciting prospect of this technique is the potential integration of this device to smartphones using a simple interface based on transmission mode configuration. In a transmission configuration, we were able to achieve an LoD of 4x10-4 RIU which is sufficient to explore several applications in food quality testing and related fields. We are envisioning the future of this platform as a personal handheld optical analyzer for applications ranging from environmental sensing to healthcare and quality testing of food products.

  14. Two diffusion photopolymer for sharp diffractive optical elements recording.

    PubMed

    Gallego, S; Fernández, R; Márquez, A; Ortuño, M; Neipp, C; Gleeson, M R; Sheridan, J T; Beléndez, A

    2015-07-15

    Photopolymers as recording media are widely used in optical applications. In such materials, changes in the phase of the transmittance function are generated during exposure due to refractive index and thickness modulations. These changes arise primarily as a consequence of photopolymerization and mass transport processes. Characterizing polymers' performance, for example, quantifying the value of monomer diffusion, is therefore very important. Applying index matching, the volume and surface optical effect are separated in an acrylamide/polyvinylalcohol (AA/PVA) material. Using a simplified model that includes the effects of the holes produced during polymerization, both hole and monomer diffusion are analyzed. The analysis presented indicates higher material sensitivity than previously estimated. The results also indicate the possibility of recording sharper diffractive optical elements profiles, like blazed gratings, having diffraction efficiencies higher than 80%. PMID:26176434

  15. Printing colour at the optical diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Karthik; Duan, Huigao; Hegde, Ravi S; Koh, Samuel C W; Wei, Jennifer N; Yang, Joel K W

    2012-09-01

    The highest possible resolution for printed colour images is determined by the diffraction limit of visible light. To achieve this limit, individual colour elements (or pixels) with a pitch of 250 nm are required, translating into printed images at a resolution of ∼100,000 dots per inch (d.p.i.). However, methods for dispensing multiple colourants or fabricating structural colour through plasmonic structures have insufficient resolution and limited scalability. Here, we present a non-colourant method that achieves bright-field colour prints with resolutions up to the optical diffraction limit. Colour information is encoded in the dimensional parameters of metal nanostructures, so that tuning their plasmon resonance determines the colours of the individual pixels. Our colour-mapping strategy produces images with both sharp colour changes and fine tonal variations, is amenable to large-volume colour printing via nanoimprint lithography, and could be useful in making microimages for security, steganography, nanoscale optical filters and high-density spectrally encoded optical data storage. PMID:22886173

  16. Advanced X-ray diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Comamala, J.; Jefimovs, K.; Pilvi, T.; Ritala, M.; Sarkar, S. S.; Solak, H. H.; Guzenko, V. A.; Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; Raabe, J.; Tzvetkov, G.; Fink, R. H.; Grolimund, D.; Borca, C. N.; Kaulich, B.; David, C.

    2009-09-01

    X-ray microscopy greatly benefits from the advances in x-ray optics. At the Paul Scherrer Institut, developments in x-ray diffractive optics include the manufacture and optimization of Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) and diffractive optical elements for both soft and hard x-ray regimes. In particular, we demonstrate here a novel method for the production of ultra-high resolution FZPs. This technique is based on the deposition of a zone plate material (iridium) onto the sidewalls of a prepatterned template structure (silicon) by atomic layer deposition. This approach overcomes the limitations due to electron-beam writing of dense patterns in FZP fabrication and provides a clear route to push the resolution into sub-10 nm regime. A FZP fabricated by this method was used to resolve test structures with 12 nm lines and spaces at the scanning transmission x-ray microscope of the PolLux beamline of the Swiss Light Source at 1.2 keV photon energy.

  17. Using multiple diffractive optical elements in infrared lens design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, R. Lawrence; High, Martin; Strnad, Vladimir

    1999-07-01

    Many IR lenses include Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) which have been incorporated to reduce the lens complexity and/or the tolerance sensitivity. In many cases the diffractive surface includes an asphere to achieve further aberration correction. For complex lens systems such as IR multi-FOV and IR zoom lenses there is a strong motivation to use multiple diffractive optical elements. This paper reviews the performance impact and productivity advantages of using multiple diffractive optical elements in an IR lens.

  18. Athermalization and thermal characteristics of multilayer diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju; Xue, Changxi

    2015-11-20

    A mathematical model to analyze the thermal characteristics of the multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) is presented with consideration of the thermal characteristics for the refractive optical elements and single-layer diffractive optical elements. The analysis process of athermalization for MLDOEs by using the opto-thermal expansion coefficient of optical materials is given. Meanwhile, the microstructure heights of surface relief MLDOEs, the optical path difference, and the polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency with the ambient temperature changed are analyzed. The analysis results can be used to guide an athermalization design for the hybrid refractive-diffractive optical systems with MLDOEs. PMID:26836521

  19. MERTIS: using diffractive optical elements for geometrical calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, M.; Griessbach, D.; Säuberlich, T.; Scheele, M.; Schischmanow, A.

    2010-09-01

    Geometrical sensor calibration is essential for space applications based on high accuracy optical measurements, in this case for MERTIS. The goal is the determination of interiour sensor parameters. A conventional method is to measure the line of sight for a subset of pixels by single pixel illumination with collimated light. To adjust angles which define the line of sight of a pixel a manipulator construction is used. A new method for geometrical sensor calibration is presented using Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE) in connection with laser beam equipment. This method is especially used for 2D-sensor array systems but can also be applied to the thermal infrared push-broom imaging spectrometer MERTIS. Diffractive optical elements (DOE) are optical microstructures which are used to split an incoming laser beam with a dedicated wavelength into a number of beams with well-known propagation directions. As the virtual sources of the diffracted beams are points at infinity, the object to be imaged is similar to the starry sky which gives an image invariant against translation. This particular feature allows a complete geometrical sensor calibration with one image avoiding complex adjustment procedures which means a significant reduction of calibration effort.

  20. Diffractive optical element embedded in silver-doped nanocomposite glass.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Lauren A H; Wackerow, Stefan; Hourd, Andrew C; Gillespie, W Allan; Seifert, Gerhard; Abdolvand, Amin

    2012-09-24

    A diffractive optical element is fabricated with relative ease in a glass containing spherical silver nanoparticles 30 to 40 nm in diameter and embedded in a surface layer of thickness ~10 μm. The nanocomposite was sandwiched between a mesh metallic electrode with a lattice constant 2 μm, facing the nanoparticle containing layer and acting as an anode, and a flat metal electrode as cathode. Applying moderate direct current electric potentials of 0.4 kV and 0.6 kV at an elevated temperature of 200 °C for 30 minutes across the nanocomposites led to the formation of a periodic array of embedded structures of metallic nanoparticles. The current-time dynamics of the structuring processes, optical analyses of the structured nanocomposites and diffraction pattern of one such fabricated element are presented. PMID:23037407

  1. Discussion of the finite element method in optical diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobera, Julia; Coupland, Jeremy

    2006-04-01

    In Optical Diffraction Tomography (ODT) the refractive index is reconstructed from images with different illuminating wavefronts. In most cases the Born approximation is assumed, although this limits the applicability of the technique to weak-scattering problems. In this work we examine the scattering problem from first principles beginning from the Helmholtz equation that governs scalar diffraction and wave propagation. We demonstrate the use of the Born approximation and show typical errors when it is applied in practice. Solution of the Helmholtz equation using a Finite Element Method (FEM) with an appropriate Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC) is described, and a non-linear optimization technique, the Conjugate Gradient Method (CGM), previously proposed for microwave imaging, is applied to the inverse problem.

  2. Design of diffractive optical surfaces within the SMS design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes-Lopes, João.; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C.

    2015-08-01

    The Simultaneous Multiple Surface (SMS) method was initially developed as a design method in Nonimaging Optics and later, the method was extended for designing Imaging Optics. We present the extension of the SMS method to design diffractive optical surfaces. This method involves the simultaneous calculation of N/2 diffractive surfaces, using the phase-shift properties of diffractive surfaces as an extra degree of freedom, such that N one-parameter wavefronts can be perfectly coupled. Moreover, the SMS method for diffractive surfaces is a direct method, i.e., it is not based in multi-parametric optimization techniques. Representative diffractive systems designed by the SMS method are presented.

  3. Implementation of ordinary and extraordinary beams interference by application of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khonina, S. N.; Karpeev, S. V.; Morozov, A. A.; Paranin, V. D.

    2016-07-01

    We apply diffractive optical elements in problems of transformation of Bessel beams in a birefringent crystal. Using plane waves expansion we show a significant interference between the ordinary and extraordinary beams due to the energy transfer in the orthogonal transverse components in the nonparaxial mode. A comparative analysis of the merits and lack of diffractive and refractive axicons in problems of formation non-paraxial Bessel beams has shown the preferability of diffractive optics application in crystal optics. The transformation of uniformly polarised Bessel beams in the crystal of Iceland spar in the nonparaxial mode by application of a diffractive axicon is investigated numerically and experimentally.

  4. The effect of machining error on the diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Long; Xue, Changxi; Yang, Hongfang; Nie, Xin

    2014-08-01

    According to the expression of the phase delay and diffraction efficiency of the diffractive optical elements(DOEs), the expression of diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element with the tilt and decenter error in fabrication process was presented in this paper. Analysis results show, in the wavelength band of 501nm-554nm, the cycle of 500μm, the center wavelength of 521nm, when the tilt angleα increases form 0° to9.8° , the diffraction efficiency is above 99%; when the tilt angleα increases form 9.8° to 29.7° , diffraction efficiency is above 92.5%; when the tilt angleα is above 29.7° , the diffraction efficiency declines rapidly, diffraction efficiency is 0 when the tilt angleα is above 58° . When the decenter Δ increases form 0nm to 21.6μm,the diffraction efficiency is above 98%; when the decenter Δ increases form 21.6nm to 63.3μm, the diffraction efficiency is above 90%; when the decenter Δ is above 63.3μm, the diffraction efficiency declines rapidly, diffraction efficiency is 0 when the he decenter Δ is above 241.7μm. To sum up the results of analysis,mathematical analysis model of the relationship between the decenter and tilt error of diffractive optical element in processing and the diffraction efficiency can be used to guide the design of the refraction and diffractive hybrid optical system comprising the diffractive optical element.

  5. Optical system storage design with diffractive optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostuk, Raymond K.; Haggans, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    Optical data storage systems are gaining widespread acceptance due to their high areal density and the ability to remove the high capacity hard disk from the system. In magneto-optical read-write systems, a small rotation of the polarization state in the return signal from the MO media is the signal which must be sensed. A typical arrangement used for detecting these signals and correcting for errors in tracking and focusing on the disk is illustrated. The components required to achieve these functions are listed. The assembly and alignment of this complex system has a direct impact on cost, and also affects the size, weight, and corresponding data access rates. As a result, integrating these optical components and improving packaging techniques is an active area of research and development. Most designs of binary optic elements have been concerned with optimizing grating efficiency. However, rigorous coupled wave models for vector field diffraction from grating surfaces can be extended to determine the phase and polarization state of the diffracted field, and the design of polarization components. A typical grating geometry and the phase and polarization angles associated with the incident and diffracted fields are shown. In our current stage of work, we are examining system configurations which cascade several polarization functions on a single substrate. In this design, the beam returning from the MO disk illuminates a cascaded grating element which first couples light into the substrate, then introduces a quarter wave retardation, then a polarization rotation, and finally separates s- and p-polarized fields through a polarization beam splitter. The input coupler and polarization beam splitter are formed in volume gratings, and the two intermediate elements are zero-order elements.

  6. Tolerance analysis of multilayer diffractive optics based on polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shan; Cui, Qingfeng; Piao, Mingxu

    2015-11-10

    Multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) can achieve high diffraction efficiency for broadband wavelength. Polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE) is the key concern for evaluating diffraction efficiency over the waveband. The modulation transfer function of a hybrid refractive-diffractive optical system is directly affected by the PIDE. The relationship between PIDE and continuous manufacturing errors for microstructure heights and periodic widths of MLDOEs is studied theoretically in this paper, and an example of MLDOEs is discussed in the visible waveband. The analysis results can be used for manufacturing error control in microstructure heights and periodic widths. PMID:26560782

  7. Fabrication and applications of large aperture diffractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S; Britten, J B; Hyde, R; Rushford, M; Summers, L; Toeppen, J

    2002-02-19

    Large aperture diffractive optics are needed in high power laser applications to protect against laser damage during operation and in space applications to increase the light gathering power and consequently the signal to noise. We describe the facilities we have built for fabricating meter scale diffractive optics and discuss several examples of these.

  8. Diffractive Elements in the Optical System: Successes, Challenges, and Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greisukh, G. I.; Ezhov, E. G.; Levin, I. A.; Kazin, S. V.; Stepanov, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Correction of aberrations is regarded as one of the most successful applications of diffractive optical elements in the optical system. The ways of overcoming these negative properties of the diffractive elements as spherochromatism and power spectral selectivity are presented. Using the technique given in this paper, a compact plastic-lens refractive-diffractive objective, which can operate in a wide spectral range including the visible and near-infrared radiation, has been designed.

  9. Diffractive optics technology and the NASA Geostationary Earth Observatory (GEO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, G. Michael; Michaels, Robert L.; Faklis, Dean

    1992-01-01

    Diffractive (or binary) optics offers unique capabilities for the development of large-aperture, high-performance, light-weight optical systems. The Geostationary Earth Observatory (GEO) will consist of a variety of instruments to monitor the environmental conditions of the earth and its atmosphere. The aim of this investigation is to analyze the design of the GEO instrument that is being proposed and to identify the areas in which diffractive (or binary) optics technology can make a significant impact in GEO sensor design. Several potential applications where diffractive optics may indeed serve as a key technology for improving the performance and reducing the weight and cost of the GEO sensors have been identified. Applications include the use of diffractive/refractive hybrid lenses for aft-optic imagers, diffractive telescopes for narrowband imaging, subwavelength structured surfaces for anti-reflection and polarization control, and aberration compensation for reflective imaging systems and grating spectrometers.

  10. Diffractive optical elements for transformation of modes in lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Arun K.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Armstrong, James P.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-09-01

    Spatial mode conversion modules are described, with the capability of efficiently transforming a given optical beam profile, at one plane in space into another well-defined optical beam profile at a different plane in space, whose detailed spatial features and symmetry properties can, in general, differ significantly. The modules are comprised of passive, high-efficiency, low-loss diffractive optical elements, combined with Fourier transform optics. Design rules are described that employ phase retrieval techniques and associated algorithms to determine the necessary profiles of the diffractive optical components. System augmentations are described that utilize real-time adaptive optical techniques for enhanced performance as well as power scaling.

  11. Diffractive optical elements for transformation of modes in lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Arun K; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Armstrong, James P.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2016-06-21

    Spatial mode conversion modules are described, with the capability of efficiently transforming a given optical beam profile, at one plane in space into another well-defined optical beam profile at a different plane in space, whose detailed spatial features and symmetry properties can, in general, differ significantly. The modules are comprised of passive, high-efficiency, low-loss diffractive optical elements, combined with Fourier transform optics. Design rules are described that employ phase retrieval techniques and associated algorithms to determine the necessary profiles of the diffractive optical components. System augmentations are described that utilize real-time adaptive optical techniques for enhanced performance as well as power scaling.

  12. Resonant diffraction gratings for spatial differentiation of optical beams

    SciTech Connect

    Golovastikov, N V; Bykov, D A; Doskolovich, L L

    2014-10-31

    Diffraction of a two-dimensional optical beam from a resonant diffraction grating is considered. It is shown that at certain resonance parameters the diffraction grating allows for spatial differentiation and integration of the incident beam. The parameters of the diffraction grating for spatial differentiation of optical beams in the transmission geometry are calculated. It is shown that the differentiating diffraction grating allows the conversion of the two-dimensional beam into the two-dimensional Hermite – Gaussian mode. The presented results of numerical modelling are in good agreement with the proposed theoretical description. The use of the considered resonant diffraction gratings is promising for solving the problems of all-optical data processing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  13. Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory applied to terrain diffraction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitteker, J. H.

    1990-09-01

    Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory is adapted to the problem of finding the diffraction attenuation at VHF and UHF over terrain profiles of arbitrary shape. Approximations are based on the assumptions of small wavelength and small diffraction angles. As a preliminary step, the theory is applied to the multiple-knife-edge problem. The field is found as a function of height above each knife edge in turn. In an application of Huygens' principle, an integration over the field above one knife edge provides the field at any point above the next. This formulation is equivalent to knife-edge formulations used in the past. Then each pair of neighboring knife edges is bridged with an imperfectly reflecting plane surface, representing the terrain. Huygens' principle is used again for the reflected wave, neglecting backscatter. The field found in this way is accurate for a good reflector but not a poor one. An analytical comparison shows agreement with rigorous diffraction theory for the problem of a plane wave incident on a perfectly reflecting wedge. Numerical comparisons with rigorous diffraction theory for a spherical Earth and for a small-radius hill (approximated with linear segments) show agreement to within 1.5 dB for the parameters chosen.

  14. Comparison of geometrical and diffraction optical transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Virendra N.; Díaz, José Antonio

    2015-09-01

    The geometrical and diffraction point-spread functions of an optical imaging system have been reviewed and compared in the past [V. N. Mahajan, "Comparison of geometrical and diffraction point-spread functions," SPIE Proc. 3729, 434-445 (1999)]. In this paper, we review and compare its corresponding optical transfer functions. While the truth lies with the diffraction OTF, it is considered easier and quicker to calculate the geometrical OTF, especially for large aberrations. We briefly describe the theory of the two OTFs, and explore the range of spatial frequencies and the magnitude of the primary aberrations over which the geometrical OTF may provide a reasonable approximation of the diffraction OTF.

  15. Diffractive optical interconnected multichip module: Demonstration and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, James Edward, Jr.

    2000-07-01

    Growth in the optical telecom and datacom industries is requiting new methods of manufacture in order to increase quantities by an order of magnitude while decreasing cost. An optical manufacturing approach utilizing wafer scale optics and integration of wafer scale electronics has potential of solving some of these manufacturing issues. An optical interconnected multichip module (OIMCM) is designed and manufactured to prove the technology. This OIMCM consists of integrated CMOS photodetectors, flip-chip compatible laser array chips, high efficiency diffractive optics, and flip-chip self- alignment for precision alignment of 1-2μm. A method to design a single diffractive surface to operate over a 25nm range in wavelength, typical of the variation in a laser diode, is presented. Also of importance is operation of optical systems over a temperature range. A novel method to athermalize an optical system with a laser diode is presented which utilizes a refractive surface and diffractive surface.

  16. Optical loss due to diffraction by concentrator Fresnel lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, Thorsten Nitz, Peter

    2014-09-26

    Fresnel lenses are widely used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems as a primary optical element. They focus sunlight on small solar cells or on the entrance apertures of secondary optical elements. A Fresnel lens consists of several prism rings and diffraction by these prism rings is unavoidable. Some of the light that would reach a designated target area according to geometric optics will miss it due to diffraction. This diffraction loss may be of relevant magnitude for CPV applications. The results of published analytical calculations are evaluated, discussed, and compared to computer simulations and measurements.

  17. Optical-diffraction method for determining crystal orientation

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1982-05-07

    Disclosed is an optical diffraction technique for characterizing the three-dimensional orientation of a crystal sample. An arbitrary surface of the crystal sample is texture etched so as to generate a pseudo-periodic diffraction grating on the surface. A laser light beam is then directed onto the etched surface, and the reflected light forms a farfield diffraction pattern in reflection. Parameters of the diffraction pattern, such as the geometry and angular dispersion of the diffracted beam are then related to grating shape of the etched surface which is in turn related to crystal orientation. This technique may be used for examining polycrystalline silicon for use in solar cells.

  18. Analysis and optimal design of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudnaya, Svetlana

    1999-12-01

    The problem we study arose in an industrial application. For an optical system, Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE) are used to produce a certain light intensity pattern in the near field. Of our particular interest is an Inverse problem: given a target image, determine the DOE configuration, e.g. thickness, that would produce this image. The problem can be complicated by specific constraints such as finite number of thickness levels that the DOE can have. Diffraction theory and Green's function approach are applied to construct a mathematical model for the light propagating through the DOE. Asymptotic methods of stationary phase and multiple-scale analysis are used to derive analytic solutions for periodic and quasi-periodic cases. These analytical expressions do not involve integration, save computational resources, and allow us to solve the Inverse problem analytically. Numerical results for particular applications are presented. The Inverse problem can be posed a large optimization problem with finite discrete variables, which can not be solved by traditional methods. We propose Genetic Algorithms based on analogies to natural evolution and representing a combination of random and directed search. A modification of the method that suits better to our problem, the Micro-Genetic Algorithm (MGA), is proposed. The MGA operates on a small set of potential solutions and restarts, using an adaptive mutation scheme, each time the local convergence is achieved. We prove convergence for the MGA using the Markov chain analysis. Numerical results of the MGA optimization are provided.

  19. Design of infrared diffractive telescope imaging optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, ZhouFeng; Hu, BingLiang; Yin, QinYe; Xie, YongJun; Kang, FuZeng; Wang, YanJun

    2015-10-01

    Diffractive telescope is an updated imaging technology, it differs from conventional refractive and reflective imaging system, which is based on the principle of diffraction image. It has great potential for developing the larger aperture and lightweight telescope. However, one of the great challenges of design this optical system is that the diffractive optical element focuses on different wavelengths of light at different point in space, thereby distorting the color characteristics of image. In this paper, we designs a long-wavelength infrared diffractive telescope imaging system with flat surface Fresnel lens and cancels the infrared optical system chromatic aberration by another flat surface Fresnel lens, achieving broadband light(from 8μm-12μm) to a common focus with 4.6° field of view. At last, the diffuse spot size and MTF function provide diffractive-limited performance.

  20. Beyond the diffraction limit via optical amplification.

    PubMed

    Kellerer, Aglaé N; Ribak, Erez N

    2016-07-15

    In a previous article [Astron. Astrophys.561, A118 (2014)], we suggested a method to overcome the diffraction limit behind a telescope. We discuss and extend recent numerical simulations and test whether it is indeed possible to use photon amplification to enhance the angular resolution of a telescope or a microscope beyond the diffraction limit. An essential addition is the proposal to select events with an above-average ratio of stimulated to spontaneous photons. The analysis shows that the diffraction limit of a telescope is surpassed by a factor of 10 for an amplifier gain of 200, if the analysis is restricted to a tenth of the incoming astronomical photons. A gain of 70 is sufficient with a hundredth of the photons. More simulations must be performed to account for the bunching of spontaneous photons. PMID:27420490

  1. Tunable diffractive optical elements on various electro active polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döring, Sebastian; Kollosche, Matthias; Hildebrandt, Niko; Stumpe, Joachim; Kofod, Guggi

    2010-05-01

    An innovative approach for voltage-tunable optical gratings based on dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs) using electro active polymers is presented. Sinusoidal surface gratings, holographically written into azobenzene containing films, are transferred via nanoimprinting to DEAs of different carrier materials. We demonstrate that the surface relief deformation depends on the mechanical and geometrical properties of the actuators. The tested DEAs were made using commercially available elastomers, including a tri-block copolymer poly-styrene-ethylene-butadiene-styrene (SEBS), a silicone polydimethylsiloxane rubber (PDMS) and commonly used polyacrylic glue. The polyacrylic glue is ready to use, whereas the SEBS and the PDMS precursors have to be processed into thin films via different casting methods. The DEA material was pre-stretched, fixed to a stiff frame and coated with stretchable electrodes in appropriate designs. Since the actuation strain of the DEA depends strongly upon the conditions such as material properties, pre-stretch and geometry, the desired voltage-controllable deformations can be optimized during manufacturing of the DEA and also in the choice of materials in the grating transfer process. A full characterization of the grating deformation includes measurements of the grating pitch and depth modulation, plus the change of the diffraction angle and efficiency. The structural surface distortion was characterized by measuring the shape of the transmitted and diffracted laser beam with a beam profiling system while applying an electro-mechanical stress to the grating. Such surface distortions may lead to decreasing diffraction efficiency and lower beam quality. With properly chosen manufacturing parameters, we found a period shift of up to 9 % in a grating with 1 μm pitch. To describe the optical behavior, a model based on independently measured material parameters is presented.

  2. Optical diffractive elements for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikula, Grzegorz; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej; Makowski, Michal; Sypek, Maciej

    2005-09-01

    We present a class of diffractive elements that can be used in medical applications. We describe their physical properties, in particular the point spread functions and modulation transfer functions. Our analyses consist of the detailed numerical simulations. The obtained results correspond to the different setup parameters and confirm usefulness of such structures in medical aspect, especially in presbyopia treatment.

  3. Diffraction from tunable periodic structures: application for the determination of electro-optic coefficients.

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Wood, L T; Miller, J H

    2001-11-01

    We discuss a method for measuring electro-optic coefficients by measuring diffraction from a tunable grating. The method involves measuring the changes in the diffraction pattern of a reflection grating, where applied electric fields of alternating direction induce changes in the index of refraction through the electro-optic effect. For certain geometries, these applied fields cause period-doubling effects that produce new peaks in the diffraction pattern. Numerically calculated diffraction patterns are presented for the assumptions of both homogeneous and inhomogeneous fields. Peak splitting, as a function of both the number of slits illuminated and the induced change in the index of refraction, is observed and discussed. Finally, the usefulness of our method for the measurement of electro-optic coefficients is discussed. PMID:18364844

  4. DiffractX: A Simulation Toolbox for Diffractive X-ray Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selin, M.; Bertilson, M.; Nilsson, D.; von Hofsten, O.; Hertz, H. M.; Vogt, U.

    2011-09-01

    X-ray wavefront propagation is a powerful technique when simulating the performance of x-ray optical components. Using various numerical methods, interesting parameters such as focusing capability and efficiency can be investigated. Here we present the toolbox DiffractX, implemented in MATLAB. It contains many different wave propagation methods for the simulation of diffractive x-ray optics, including Fresnel propagation, the finite difference method (FDM), the thin object approximation, the rigorous coupled wave theory (RCWT), and the finite element method (FEM). All tools are accessed through a graphical interface, making the design of simulations fast and intuitive, even for users with little or no programming experience. The tools have been utilized to characterize realistic as well as idealized optical components. This will aid further developments of diffractive x-ray optics.

  5. Dual focus diffractive optical element with extended depth of focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Katsuhiro; Shimizu, Isao

    2014-09-01

    A dual focus property and an extended depth of focus were verified by a new type of diffractive lens displaying on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices. This type of lens is useful to read information on multilayer optical discs and tilted discs. The radial undulation of the phase groove on the diffractive lens gave the dual focus nature. The focal extension was performed by combining the dual focus lens with the axilens that was invented for expanding the depth of focus. The number of undulations did not affect the intensity along the optical axis but the central spot of the diffraction pattern.

  6. Optical-image transfer through a diffraction-compensating metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Kivijärvi, Ville; Nyman, Markus; Shevchenko, Andriy; Kaivola, Matti

    2016-05-01

    Cancellation of optical diffraction is an intriguing phenomenon enabling optical fields to preserve their transverse intensity profiles upon propagation. In this work, we introduce a metamaterial design that exhibits this phenomenon for three-dimensional optical beams. As an advantage over other diffraction-compensating materials, our metamaterial is impedance-matched to glass, which suppresses optical reflection at the glass-metamaterial interface. The material is designed for beams formed by TM-polarized plane-wave components. We show, however, that unpolarized optical images with arbitrary shapes can be transferred over remarkable distances in the material without distortion. We foresee multiple applications of our results in integrated optics and optical imaging. PMID:27137594

  7. Active learning in optics and photonics: Fraunhofer diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalila, H.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Lahmar, S.; Dhouaidi, Z.; Majdi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    "Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP), funded by UNESCO within its Physics Program framework with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE (Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers), aimed to helps and promotes a friendly and interactive method in teaching optics using simple and inexpensive equipment. Many workshops were organized since 2005 the year when Z. BenLakhdar, whom is part of the creators of ALOP, proposed this project to STO (Société Tunisienne d'Optique). These workshops address several issues in optics, covering geometrical optics, wave optics, optical communication and they are dedicated to both teachers and students. We focus this lecture on Fraunhofer diffraction emphasizing the facility to achieve this mechanism in classroom, using small laser and operating a slit in a sheet of paper. We accompany this demonstration using mobile phone and numerical modeling to assist in the analysis of the diffraction pattern figure.

  8. Optical laue diffraction on photonic structures designed by laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samusev, K. B.; Rybin, M. V.; Lukashenko, S. Yu.; Limonov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals with square symmetry C 4v were obtained using the laser lithography method. The structure of these samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Optical Laue diffraction for monochromatic light was studied experimentally depending on the incidence angle of laser beam and lattice constant. Interpretation of the observed diffraction patterns is given in the framework of the Laue diffraction mechanism for an one-dimensional chain of scattering elements. Red thresholds for different diffraction orders were determined experimentally and theoretically. The results of calculations are in an excellent agreement with experiment.

  9. Optical theorem for acoustic non-diffracting beams and application to radiation force and torque

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustical and optical non-diffracting beams are potentially useful for manipulating particles and larger objects. An extended optical theorem for a non-diffracting beam was given recently in the context of acoustics. The theorem relates the extinction by an object to the scattering at the forward direction of the beam’s plane wave components. Here we use this theorem to examine the extinction cross section of a sphere centered on the axis of the beam, with a non-diffracting Bessel beam as an example. The results are applied to recover the axial radiation force and torque on the sphere by the Bessel beam. PMID:24049681

  10. Linearization of an annular image by using a diffractive optic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthys, Donald R.

    1996-01-01

    The goal for this project is to develop the algorithms for fracturing the zones defined by the mapping transformation, and to actually produce the binary optic in an appropriate setup. In 1984 a side-viewing panoramic viewing system was patented, consisting of a single piece of glass with spherical surfaces which produces a 360 degree view of the region surrounding the lens which extends about 25 degrees in front of and 20 degrees behind the lens. The system not only produces images of good quality, it is also afocal, i.e., images stay in focus for objects located right next to the lens as well as those located far from the lens. The lens produced a panoramic view in an annular shaped image, and so the lens was called a PAL (panoramic annular lens). When applying traditional measurements to PAL images, it is found advantageous to linearize the annular image. This can easily be done with a computer and such a linearized image can be produced within about 40 seconds on current microcomputers. However, this process requires a frame-grabber and a computer, and is not real-time. Therefore, it was decided to try to perform this linearization optically by using a diffractive optic.

  11. Dedicated software for diffractive optics design and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firsov, A.; Brzhezinskaya, M.; Firsov, A.; Svintsov, A.; Erko, A.

    2013-03-01

    An efficient software package for the structure design and simulation of imaging properties of diffraction optical elements has been developed. It operates with point source and consists of: the ZON software, to calculate the structure of an optical element in transmission and reflection; the KRGF software, to simulate the diffraction properties of an ideal optical element with point source; the DS software, to calculate the diffraction properties by taking into consideration material and shadowing effects. Optional software allows simulation with a real non-point source. Zone plate thickness profile, source shape as well as substrate curvature are considered in this calculation. This is especially important for the diffractive focusing elements and gratings at a total external reflection, given that the lateral size of the structure can be up to 1 m. The program package can be used in combination with the Nanomaker software to prepare data for ion and e-beam surface modifications and corrections.

  12. Stratified Diffractive Optic Approach for Creating High Efficiency Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.; Nordin, Gregory P.

    1998-01-01

    Gratings with high efficiency in a single diffracted order can be realized with both volume holographic and diffractive optical elements. However, each method has limitations that restrict the applications in which they can be used. For example, high efficiency volume holographic gratings require an appropriate combination of thickness and permittivity modulation throughout the bulk of the material. Possible combinations of those two characteristics are limited by properties of currently available materials, thus restricting the range of applications for volume holographic gratings. Efficiency of a diffractive optic grating is dependent on its approximation of an ideal analog profile using discrete features. The size of constituent features and, consequently, the number that can be used within a required grating period restricts the applications in which diffractive optic gratings can be used. These limitations imply that there are applications which cannot be addressed by either technology. In this paper we propose to address a number of applications in this category with a new method of creating high efficiency gratings which we call stratified diffractive optic gratings. In this approach diffractive optic techniques are used to create an optical structure that emulates volume grating behavior. To illustrate the stratified diffractive optic grating concept we consider a specific application, a scanner for a space-based coherent wind lidar, with requirements that would be difficult to meet by either volume holographic or diffractive optic methods. The lidar instrument design specifies a transmissive scanner element with the input beam normally incident and the exiting beam deflected at a fixed angle from the optical axis. The element will be rotated about the optical axis to produce a conical scan pattern. The wavelength of the incident beam is 2.06 microns and the required deflection angle is 30 degrees, implying a grating period of approximately 4 microns

  13. Phase encryption of biometrics in diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E G; Brasher, J D

    1996-08-15

    A new technique for the optical encoding of images is presented. The method of generalized projections is used to design diffractive optical elements for the phase encryption of biometrics for security applications. The encryption algorithm converges rapidly, and the decryption is seen to be secure and tolerant to additive noise. PMID:19876322

  14. Phase encryption of biometrics in diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. G.; Brasher, J. D.

    1996-08-01

    A new technique for the optical encoding of images is presented. The method of generalized projections is used to design diffractive optical elements for the phase encryption of biometrics for security applications. The encryption algorithm converges rapidly, and the decryption is seen to be secure and tolerant to additive noise.

  15. Diffractive optical element with same diffraction pattern for multicolor light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengzhu; Wang, Qixia; Gu, Huarong; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The wavelength-division multiplexing technique can be utilized in visible light communication to increase the channel capacity when a multicolor mixed white LED is used as light source. In such an application, the illumination area of LEDs should be invariant to the incident wavelength, so as to decrease interference within the adjacent regions. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be used in the optical transmitter system to shape the diffraction patterns into polygons. However, traditional DOEs illuminated by a multicolor mixed white LED would result into diffraction patterns with unequal sizes. In this paper, a hybrid algorithm which combines particle swarm optimization with a genetic algorithm is proposed for multicolor oriented DOEs design. A DOE is designed and fabricated for blue and red LEDs, and experimental results show that diffraction patterns with rather good uniformity as well as quasi-equal size for red and blue LEDs are obtained. PMID:26835636

  16. Nonreciprocal optical diffraction by a single layer of gyromagnetic cylinders.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tian-Jing; Li, Teng-Fei; Yang, Mu; Cui, Hai-Xu; Guo, Qing-Hua; Cao, Xue-Wei; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-13

    We study the diffraction of optical waves by a single layer of gyromagnetic cylinders. We show that a nonvanishing rotating dipole momentum is excited in a single gyromagnetic cylinder because of the classic analog of the Zeeman effect on photonic angular momentum states (PAMSs). Consequently, different collective dipole modes are excited in a gyromagnetic cylinder array at opposite incident angles. Nonreciprocal optical diffraction effects can be observed, where the transmission and reflection coefficients depend on the sign of the incident angle. A novel phenomenon of nonreciprocal negative directional transmission is demonstrated and numerically analyzed. This work highlights the potential of PAMSs in manipulating the propagation of optical waves for various applications. PMID:24515014

  17. Photoacoustic tomography: Ultrasonically beating optical diffusion and diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihong

    2014-03-01

    A decade of research has pushed photoacoustic computed tomography to the forefront of molecular-level imaging, notes SPIE Fellow Lihong Wang (Washington University, St. Louis) in his plenary talk, "Photoacoustic Tomography: Ultrasonically Beating Optical Diffusion and Diffraction." Modern optical microscopy has resolution and diffraction limitations. But noninvasive functional photoacoustic computed tomography has overcome this limit, offering deep penetration with optical contrast and ultrasonic resolution of 1 cm depth or more -- up to 7 cm of penetration in some cases, such as evaluating sentinel lymph nodes for breast cancer staging. This opens up applications in whole body imaging, brain function, oxygen saturation, label-free cell analysis, and noninvasive cancer biopsies.

  18. Diffractive Optics From Self-Assembled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Zachary H.

    2002-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for assembling tiles into a variable spaced grating, the one-dimensional analog of a Fresnel zone plate. The algorithm supports multi-level gratings. The x-ray properties of such a grating, assumed to be constructed from DNA are estimated, leading to the conclusion that thick structures may be useful for intermediate energy x rays, but that thin structures for soft x rays are best used as disposable masks. The diffraction of cold, coherent atoms is a plausible application for single layer stencils.

  19. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part I - progress in the patent landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Robert

    2013-12-01

    In the last 20 years, diffractive optics experienced a strong research interest and was in the center of many development projects in applied optics. To offer a side view for optical engineers, here, we discuss selected, business-related aspects of the current status of the transfer process to bring diffractive optics into commercial products. The contribution is divided into two parts. Here, in part I, we focus on the patent landscape of diffractive optics with a closer look on the temporal development and the distribution over main players. As an important result, currently, new strong patent activities are observed especially in the context of imaging systems. In the second part, the business volumes of selected market segments are discussed.

  20. Role of photonic angular momentum states in nonreciprocal diffraction from magneto-optical cylinder arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Tian-Jing; Wu, Li-Ting; Yang, Mu; Guo, Rui-Peng; Cui, Hai-Xu; Chen, Jing

    2014-07-15

    Optical eigenstates in a concentrically symmetric resonator are photonic angular momentum states (PAMSs) with quantized optical orbital angular momentums (OAMs). Nonreciprocal optical phenomena can be obtained if we lift the degeneracy of PAMSs. In this article, we provide a comprehensive study of nonreciprocal optical diffraction of various orders from a magneto-optical cylinder array. We show that nonreciprocal diffraction can be obtained only for these nonzero orders. Role of PAMSs, the excitation of which is sensitive to the directions of incidence, applied magnetic field, and arrangement of the cylinders, are studied. Some interesting phenomena such as a dispersionless quasi-omnidirectional nonreciprocal diffraction and spikes associated with high-OAM PAMSs are present and discussed.

  1. Diffractive optical element for creating visual 3D images.

    PubMed

    Goncharsky, Alexander; Goncharsky, Anton; Durlevich, Svyatoslav

    2016-05-01

    A method is proposed to compute and synthesize the microrelief of a diffractive optical element to produce a new visual security feature - the vertical 3D/3D switch effect. The security feature consists in the alternation of two 3D color images when the diffractive element is tilted up/down. Optical security elements that produce the new security feature are synthesized using electron-beam technology. Sample optical security elements are manufactured that produce 3D to 3D visual switch effect when illuminated by white light. Photos and video records of the vertical 3D/3D switch effect of real optical elements are presented. The optical elements developed can be replicated using standard equipment employed for manufacturing security holograms. The new optical security feature is easy to control visually, safely protected against counterfeit, and designed to protect banknotes, documents, ID cards, etc. PMID:27137530

  2. Diffraction efficiency sensitivity to oblique incident angle for multilayer diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongfang; Xue, Changxi; Li, Chuang; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Ran

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between diffraction efficiency of multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) and arbitrary incident angle was numerically analyzed with the effective area method. The method is based on the shield effect between two elements of MLDOEs; a generalized diffraction efficiency formulation was obtained in a wide range of tilt angles, which overcame the limitations of scalar diffraction theory when the period width of MLDOEs is taken into account. A detailed comparison of the proposed effective area method with the scalar diffraction theory is numerically presented for MLDOEs. The validity of the proposed method is verified by comparison with the rigorous electromagnetic analysis method, especially the finite-difference time-domain method. The analysis results show that the shield effect augments with the increase of the incident angles; the effect of incident angles on MLDOEs with finite period widths is more noticeable than that with large period widths. PMID:27607291

  3. Diffraction-limited high-finesse optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.; Oemrawsingh, Sumant S. R.; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2010-04-15

    High-quality optical cavities with wavelength-sized end mirrors are important to the growing field of micro-optomechanical systems. We present a versatile method for calculating the modes of diffraction limited optical cavities and show that it can be used to determine the effect of a wide variety of cavity geometries and imperfections. Additionally, we show these calculations agree remarkably well with FDTD simulations for wavelength-sized optical modes, even though our method is based on the paraxial approximation.

  4. The impact of novel 3D diffraction optics development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Loechel, Heike; Siewert, Frank; Erko, Alexei

    2013-05-01

    Dedicated diffractive VUV- and X-ray optical elements are essential for future developments in synchrotron instrumentation and methods like e.g. time-resolved spectroscopy. The quality of optical components like gratings or diffractive focusing elements matters directly to the results achievable. On the other hand the availability of such optical components is very limited at present. In this contribution we report on the development of new methods of time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy based on novel 3D diffractive optical elements (DOE) with a unique combination of properties. Such optical elements are of highest interest for application in modern synchrotron facilities like Free Electron Lasers (FELs) as well as for laboratory facilities with high harmonic generators (HHG). The project includes theoretical work as well as the development of a dedicated technology, including metrology, to manufacture such type of optics for applications in atomic, molecular and condensed matter physics. The here discussed type of optics was successfully implemented for soft-X-ray-application at the femto-second-slicing beamline at BESSY II storage ring of the Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin. DOE are expected to be important components in beamlines at upcoming new high brilliance X-ray sources such as FELs. The application of DOE`s allows to reduce the number of optical elements in a beamline. Thus allow to provide the highest possible transmission and flux as well as preserving the unique properties of FEĹs, like wave-front and coherence.

  5. Optical refractometry based on Fresnel diffraction from a phase wedge.

    PubMed

    Tavassoly, M Taghi; Saber, Ahad

    2010-11-01

    A method that utilizes the Fresnel diffraction of light from the phase step formed by a transparent wedge is introduced for measuring the refractive indices of transparent solids, liquids, and solutions. It is shown that, as a transparent wedge of small apex angle is illuminated perpendicular to its surface by a monochromatic parallel beam of light, the Fresnel fringes, caused by abrupt change in refractive index at the wedge lateral boundary, are formed on a screen held perpendicular to the beam propagation direction. The visibility of the fringes varies periodically between zero and 1 in the direction normal to the wedge apex. For a known or measured apex angle, the wedge refractive index is obtained by measuring the period length by a CCD. To measure the refractive index of a transparent liquid or solution, the wedge is installed in a transparent rectangle cell containing the sample. Then, the cell is illuminated perpendicularly and the visibility period is measured. By using modest optics, one can measure the refractive index at a relative uncertainty level of 10(-5). There is no limitation on the refractive index range. The method can be applied easily with no mechanical manipulation. The measuring apparatus can be very compact with low mechanical and optical noises. PMID:21042389

  6. Optical metrology for immersed diffractive multifocal ophthalmic intracorneal lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankam, P.; Lépine; Castignoles, F.; Chavel, P.

    2012-09-01

    This paper deals with the optical characterization of diffractive multifocal Intra-Corneal Lenses (ICLs) that we have developed in order to correct presbyopia. These diffractive multifocal lenses are made of a very soft material (permeable to oxygen and nutrients), with a thickness smaller than 100 μm and require liquid immersion. As a consequence, most of the conventional metrology methods are unsuited for their characterization. We developed specific setups to measure diffractive efficiencies and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) adapted to such components. Experimental results are in good agreement with Zema's simulations. For the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that optical characterization is devoted to the ICLs. Furthermore, most of the IOL's optical characterizations are focused on far vision MTF and don't assess the near vision MTF, which we study in this paper.

  7. Design and Analysis of Single and Cascaded Diffractive Optical Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Eric Gordon

    The design of complex diffractive optical elements requires both a mathematical formulation of the problem and the appropriate optimization method. The mathematical formulations are very complex, since in some circumstances scalar based strategies are acceptable, whereas, in other cases exact solutions to Maxwell's equations are required. Once the mathematical formulations are coupled with the appropriate optimization algorithms, then the design of single and cascaded diffractive optical elements can be exploited. This Dissertation develops the mathematical framework for diffractive optics utilizing scalar based design and exact solutions to complex periodic dielectric structures. Additionally, a new method of optimization is introduced which is based on the foundations of genetics. This methodology is used to design unique elements for wavefront splitting, polarization filtering, and wavelength filtering. An additional algorithm is developed for scalar based solutions using variants of existing methods, resulting in some interesting designs concerning data encryption and beam shaping.

  8. Optical Alignment and Diffraction Analysis for AIRES: An Airborne Infrared Echelle Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The optical design is presented for a long-slit grating spectrometer known as AIRES (Airborne InfraRed Echelle Spectrometer). The instrument employs two gratings in series: a small order sorter and a large steeply blazed echelle. The optical path includes four pupil and four field stops, including two narrow slits. A detailed diffraction analysis is performed using GLAD by Applied Optics Research to evaluate critical trade-offs between optical throughput, spectral resolution, and system weight and volume. The effects of slit width, slit length, oversizing the second slit relative to the first, on- vs off-axis throughput, and clipping at the pupil stops and other optical elements are discussed.

  9. Optical Tweezers for Sample Fixing in Micro-Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Amenitsch, H.; Rappolt, M.; Sartori, B.; Laggner, P.; Cojoc, D.; Ferrari, E.; Garbin, V.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, Ch.

    2007-01-19

    In order to manipulate, characterize and measure the micro-diffraction of individual structural elements down to single phospholipid liposomes we have been using optical tweezers (OT) combined with an imaging microscope. We were able to install the OT system at the microfocus beamline ID13 at the ESRF and trap clusters of about 50 multi-lamellar liposomes (< 10 {mu}m large cluster). Further we have performed a scanning diffraction experiment with a 1 micrometer beam to demonstrate the fixing capabilities and to confirm the size of the liposome cluster by X-ray diffraction.

  10. Optical cryptography topology based on a three-dimensional particle-like distribution and diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, coherent diffractive imaging has been considered as a promising alternative for information retrieval instead of conventional interference methods. Coherent diffractive imaging using the X-ray light source has opened up a new research perspective for the measurement of non-crystalline and biological specimens, and can achieve unprecedentedly high resolutions. In this paper, we show how a three-dimensional (3D) particle-like distribution and coherent diffractive imaging can be applied for a study of optical cryptography. An optical multiple-random-phase-mask encoding approach is used, and the plaintext is considered as a series of particles distributed in a 3D space. A topology concept is also introduced into the proposed optical cryptosystem. During image decryption, a retrieval algorithm is developed to extract the plaintext from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed optical cryptography topology are also analyzed. PMID:21643154

  11. Research on the Design of an Optical Information Storage Sensing System Using a Diffractive Optical Element

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuemin; Hao, Qun; Hou, Jianbo; Li, Xiangping; Ma, Jianshe; Gu, Min

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a compact optical information storage sensing system. Applications of this system include longitudinal surface plasmon resonance detection of gold nanorods with a single femtosecond laser in three-dimensional space as well as data storage. A diffractive optical element (DOE) is applied in the system to separate the recording-reading beam from the servo beam. This allows us to apply a single laser and one objective lens in a single optical path for the servo beam and the recording-reading beam. The optical system has a linear region of 8 λ, which is compatible with current DVD servo modules. The wavefront error of the optical system is below 0.03 λrms. The minimum grating period of the DOE is 13.4 μm, and the depth of the DOE is 1.2 μm, which makes fabrication of it possible. The DOE is also designed to conveniently control the layer-selection process, as there is a linear correlation between the displacement of the DOE and the layer-selection distance. The displacement of DOE is in the range of 0–6.045 mm when the thickness of the layer-selection is 0.3 mm. Experiments were performed and the results have been verified. PMID:24217360

  12. Diffractive micro-optical element with nonpoint response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, Victor A.; Golub, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    Common-use diffractive lenses have microrelief zones in the form of simple rings that provide only an optical power but do not contain any image information. They have a point-image response under point-source illumination. We must use a more complicated non-point response to focus a light beam into different light marks, letter-type images as well as for optical pattern recognition. The current presentation describes computer generation of diffractive micro- optical elements with complicated curvilinear zones of a regular piecewise-smooth structure and grey-level or staircase phase microrelief. The manufacture of non-point response elements uses the steps of phase-transfer calculation and orthogonal-scan masks generation or lithographic glass etching. Ray-tracing method is shown to be applicable in this task. Several working samples of focusing optical elements generated by computer and photolithography are presented. Using the experimental results we discuss here such applications as laser branding.

  13. A vectorial ray-based diffraction integral for optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Birk

    2015-09-01

    The propagation of coherent laser light in optical systems is simulated by the vectorial ray-based diffraction integral (VRBDI) method which utilizes vectorial diffraction theory, ray aiming, differential ray tracing and matrix optics. On a global scale the method is not restricted to the paraxial approximation, whereas it is properly used for a local representation of the wavefront close to an aimed detection location. First, the field of a monochromatic continuous wave on an input plane is decomposed into spherical or plane wave components. Then, these components are represented by aimed ray tubes and traced through an optical system. Finally, the contributions are added coherently on an output plane whose position has to be chosen according to ray-aiming requirements. Provided that the apertures in the optical system are large with respect to the wavelength the results are fairly accurate.

  14. Large Aperture Multiplexed Diffractive Lidar Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rallison, Richard D.; Schwemmer, Geary K. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We have delivered only 2 or 3 UV Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) thus far and have fallen short of the intended goal in size and in dual wavelength function. Looking back, it has been fortuitous that we even made anything work in the UV region. It was our good fortune to discover that the material we work with daily was adequate for use at 355 nm, if well rinsed during processing. If we had stuck to our original plan of etching in small pieces of fused silica, we would still be trying to make the first small section in our ion mill, which is not yet operational. The original plan was far too ambitious and would take another 2 years to complete beginning where we left off this time. In order to make a HOE for the IR as well as the UV we will likely have to learn to sensitize some film to the 1064 line and we have obtained sensitizer that is reported to work in that region already. That work would also take an additional year to complete.

  15. Diffractive optical elements for the production of synthetic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Sinclair, M.B.; Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J.

    1997-03-01

    We demonstrate that computer-generated diffractive optical elements can be used to synthesize the infrared spectra of real compounds. In particular, we describe a modified phase-retrieval algorithm that we have used to design diffractive elements of this type and we present experimental results for a diffractive optic which is capable of synthesizing the infrared spectrum of HF between 3600 cm{sup -1} and 4300 cm{sup -1}. The reflection-mode diffractive optic consists of 4096 lines, each 4.5 {mu}m wide, at 16 discrete depths relative to the substrate (from 0 to 1.2 {mu}m), and was fabricated on a silicon wafer using anisotropic reactive ion-beam etching in a four-mask-level process. We propose the use of such elements to replace reference cells in a new type of correlation spectroscopy that we call {open_quotes}holographic correlation spectroscopy.{close_quotes} Storage of a large number of diffractive elements, each producing a synthetic spectrum corresponding to a different target compound, in compact disk-like format, will allow a spectrometer of this type to rapidly determine the composition of unknown samples. Further, this approach can be used to perform correlation-based measurements of hazardous or transient species, for which conventional correlation spectroscopy is impractical.

  16. Optical properties and diffraction effects in opal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Balestreri, Alessandra; Andreani, Lucio Claudio; Agio, Mario

    2006-09-01

    Optical properties of fcc opals oriented along the [111] direction are calculated by means of a scattering-matrix approach based on approximating each sphere with cylindrical slices. The use of a plane-wave basis in each layer allows distinguishing zero-order reflection and transmission from higher-order (diffraction) spectra. Optical spectra at large values of the angle of incidence indicate the presence of diffraction effects and of polarization mixing along the LW orientation. Reflectance and transmittance in the high-energy region show a rich spectral dependence and compare reasonably well with recent experimental observations on polystyrene opals. Diffraction spectra as a function of the number of layers display an oscillatory behavior, pointing to the existence of a Pendellösung phenomenon, related to the exchange of energy between two propagating modes in the investigated three-dimensional photonic crystal. This phenomenon could be observed in transmittance experiments on high-quality opals with controlled thickness. PMID:17025760

  17. Teaching Diffraction with Hands-On Optical Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Although the observation of optical spectra is common practice in physics classes, students are usually limited to a passive, qualitative observation of nice colours. This paper discusses a diffraction-based spectrometer that allows students to take quantitative measurements of spectral bands. Students can build it within minutes from generic…

  18. Optical Simulation of Debye-Scherrer Crystal Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logiurato, F.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe and discuss simple, inexpensive optical experiments used to simulate x-ray and electron diffraction according to the Debye-Scherrer theory. The experiment can be used to address, at the high school level, important subjects related to fundamental quantum and solid-state physics.

  19. Diffractive Optical Elements based in Diamond Like Carbon (DLC) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparvoli, M. Marina; Mansano, Ronaldo D.

    2008-04-01

    In this work was developed a Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) based in amorphous hydrogenated carbon (Diamond Like Carbon) films. DOEs can be built in large scale with high reproducibility and eliminating almost stages used in optical elements tradicional fabrication, as abrasion and burnishing. These devices had been built by the etching of DLC deposited by sputtering process. The characterizations of these devices are realized by optical analyzes with a 633 nm HeNe laser. The DLC films roughness and etch rate after process were measured by high step meter.

  20. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin. PMID:27255427

  1. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Rodolfo I; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin. PMID:27255427

  2. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin.

  3. Gaussian beam diffraction in inhomogeneous media: solution in frame of complex geometrical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsov, Yu. A.; Berczynski, P.

    2005-09-01

    The method of paraxial complex geometrical optics is presented to describe Gaussian beam diffraction in arbitrary smoothly inhomogeneous media, including lens-like media. The method modifies and specifies the results by Babic' (1968), Kirpichnikova (1971), Cerveny, Popov, Psencik (1982), Cerveny (1983, 2001), Timofeev (1995) and Pereverzev (1996) as applied to the optical problems. The method of paraxial complex geometrical optics reduces the problem of Gaussian beam diffraction in inhomogeneous media to the solution of the system of the ordinary differential equations of first order, which can be readily calculated numerically by the Runge-Kutta method. Thereby the paraxial complex geometrical optics radically simplifies description of Gaussian beam diffraction in inhomogeneous media as compared to the numerical methods of wave optics. By the way of example the known analytical solution for Gaussianbeam diffraction both in a free space and in lens-like medium (Bornatici, Maj 2003) are presented. It is pointed out, that the method of paraxial complex geometrical optics turns out to be equivalent to the solutions of the abridged parabolic wave equation.

  4. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  5. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  6. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  7. New approach to imaging spectroscopy using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Massie, Mark A.

    1997-10-01

    Over the past several years, Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed several hyperspectral imagers using diffractive optics as the dispersive media. This new approach has been patented and demonstrated in numerous field tests. PAT has developed hyperspectral cameras in the visible, mid-wave IR and is currently under contrast to the Air Force to develop a dual band hyperspectral lens for simultaneous spectral imaging in both the mid-wave and long- wave IR. The development of these cameras over the years have been sponsored by internal research and development, contracts from the Air Force Phillips Lab., Air Force Wright Labs Armament Division, BMDO and by the Office of Naval Research. Numerous papers have been presented in the past describing the performance of these various hyperspectral cameras. The purpose of this paper is to describe the theory behind the image multi-spectral sensing (IMSS) used in these hyperspectral cameras. IMSS utilizes a very simple optical design that enables a robust and low cost hyper-spectral imaging instrument. The IMSS is a dispersive spectrometer using a single diffractive optical element for both imaging and dispersion. The lens is tuned for a single wavelength giving maximum diffraction efficiency at that wavelength and high efficiency throughout the spectral band-pass of the camera. The diffractive optics disperse the light along the optical axis as opposed to perpendicular to the axis in conventional dispersive spectrometers. A detector array is used as the sensing medium and the spectral images are rad out electronically. POst processing is used to reduce spectral cross talk and to spatially sharpen the spectral images.

  8. Applied optics in the automotive industry.

    PubMed

    Preston, B W

    1969-09-01

    A general discussion of the interrelated subjects of vision, illumination, marking systems, signaling devices, materials, and components as found in the automotive industry is included in this article. Optics as applied in supporting industries, such as the lighting, metal, glass, paint, plastics, and fabrics industries are also discussed. A few examples of optics in these industries as applied to product development and productioncontrol are presented and illustrated. PMID:20072517

  9. Linear systems approach to simulation of optical diffraction.

    PubMed

    Lambert, A J; Fraser, D

    1998-12-01

    The diffractive processes within an optical system can be simulated by computer to compute the diffraction-altered electric-field distribution at the output of the system from the electric-field distribution at the input. In the paraxial approximation the system can be described by an ABCD ray matrix whose elements in turn can be used to simplify the computation such that only a single computational step is required. We describe two rearrangements of such computations that allow the simulation to be expressed in a linear systems formulation, in particular using the fast-Fourier-transform algorithm. We investigate the sampling requirements for the kernel-modifying function or chirp that arises. We also use the special properties of the chirp to determine the spreading imposed by the diffraction. This knowledge can be used to reduce the computation if only a limited region of either the input or the output is of interest. PMID:18301681

  10. On effective and optical resolutions of diffraction data sets.

    PubMed

    Urzhumtseva, Ludmila; Klaholz, Bruno; Urzhumtsev, Alexandre

    2013-10-01

    In macromolecular X-ray crystallography, diffraction data sets are traditionally characterized by the highest resolution dhigh of the reflections that they contain. This measure is sensitive to individual reflections and does not refer to the eventual data incompleteness and anisotropy; it therefore does not describe the data well. A physically relevant and robust measure that provides a universal way to define the `actual' effective resolution deff of a data set is introduced. This measure is based on the accurate calculation of the minimum distance between two immobile point scatterers resolved as separate peaks in the Fourier map calculated with a given set of reflections. This measure is applicable to any data set, whether complete or incomplete. It also allows characterizion of the anisotropy of diffraction data sets in which deff strongly depends on the direction. Describing mathematical objects, the effective resolution deff characterizes the `geometry' of the set of measured reflections and is irrelevant to the diffraction intensities. At the same time, the diffraction intensities reflect the composition of the structure from physical entities: the atoms. The minimum distance for the atoms typical of a given structure is a measure that is different from and complementary to deff; it is also a characteristic that is complementary to conventional measures of the data-set quality. Following the previously introduced terms, this value is called the optical resolution, dopt. The optical resolution as defined here describes the separation of the atomic images in the `ideal' crystallographic Fourier map that would be calculated if the exact phases were known. The effective and optical resolution, as formally introduced in this work, are of general interest, giving a common `ruler' for all kinds of crystallographic diffraction data sets. PMID:24100312

  11. Processing and error compensation of diffractive optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunlong; Wang, Zhibin; Zhang, Feng; Qin, Hui; Li, Junqi; Mai, Yuying

    2014-09-01

    Diffractive optical element (DOE) shows high diffraction efficiency and good dispersion performance, which makes the optical system becoming light-weight and more miniature. In this paper, the design, processing, testing, compensation of DOE are discussed, especially the analyzing of compensation technology which based on the analyzing the DOE measurement date from Taylor Hobson PGI 1250. In this method, the relationship between shadowing effect with diamond tool and processing accuracy are analyzed. According to verification processing on the Taylor Hobson NANOFORM 250 lathe, the results indicate that the PV reaches 0.539 micron, the surface roughness reaches 4nm, the step position error is smaller than λ /10 and the step height error is less than 0.23 micron after compensation processing one time.

  12. Image reconstruction algorithms for DOIS: a diffractive optic image spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Denise M.; Whitcomb, Kevin J.

    1996-06-01

    The diffractive optic imaging spectrometer, DOIS, is a compact, economical, rugged, programmable, multi-spectral imager. The design implements a conventional CCD camera and emerging diffractive optical element (DOE) technology in an elegant configuration, adding spectroscopy capabilities to current imaging systems (Lyons 1995). This paper reports on the visible prototype DOIS that was designed, fabricated and characterized. Algorithms are presented for simulation and post-detection processing with digital image processing techniques. This improves the spectral resolution by removing unwanted blurred components from the spectral images. DOIS is a practical image spectrometer that can be built to operate at ultraviolet, visible or infrared wavelengths for applications in surveillance, remote sensing, law enforcement, environmental monitoring, laser communications, and laser counter intelligence.

  13. Velocity filtering applied to optical flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1990-01-01

    Optical flow is a method by which a stream of two-dimensional images obtained from a forward-looking passive sensor is used to map the three-dimensional volume in front of a moving vehicle. Passive ranging via optical flow is applied here to the helicopter obstacle-avoidance problem. Velocity filtering is used as a field-based method to determine range to all pixels in the initial image. The theoretical understanding and performance analysis of velocity filtering as applied to optical flow is expanded and experimental results are presented.

  14. Three-Dimensional Displacement Measurement Using Diffractive Optic Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Cole, Helen J.; Shepherd, Robert L.; Ashley Paul R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces a powerful new optical method which utilizes diffractive optic interferometry (DOI) to measure both in-plane and out-of-plane displacement with variable sensitivity using the same optical system. Sensitivity is varied by utilizing various combinations of the different wavefronts produced by a conjugate pair of binary Optical elements; a transmission grating is used to produce several illumination beams while a reflective grating replicated on the surface of a specimen, provides the reference for the undeformed state. A derivation of the equations which govern the method is included along with a discussion Of the experimental tests conducted to verify the theory. Overall, the results are excellent, with experimental data agreeing to within a few percent of the theoretical predictions.

  15. Photochromic point-diffraction interferometer for optical testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintavalla, Martino; Pariani, Giorgio; Crimi, Giuseppe; Bianco, Andrea; Bertarelli, Chiara

    2012-09-01

    The principles for the realization of rewritable point-diffraction interferometers (PDIs) based on photochromic polyurethane films are described. Pinholes of variable sizes (diameter from 4 to 40 μm) have been optically written onto photochromic substrates converting locally the material from the colored to the uncolored form. The PDIs have been mounted in an interferometric setup and different reflective optics have been tested. By a controlled bleaching of the semi-transparent area around the pinhole, an optimal visibility in the interferograms is reached. Under this conditions several tests of reliability of the interferometer have been carried out.

  16. Simultaneous multicolor image formation with a single diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Levy, U; Marom, E; Mendlovic, D

    2001-08-01

    A design for a novel diffractive optical element (DOE) that can reconstruct three different intensity patterns when it is illuminated by three different wavelengths is presented. If the chosen wavelengths are red, green, and blue, full-color reconstruction capability is obtained. Reconstruction is achieved in the near field (Fresnel domain). Computer simulation results as well as experimental evidence are presented, proving the capabilities of this novel DOE design procedure. PMID:18049545

  17. Teaching diffraction with hands-on optical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Although the observation of optical spectra is common practice in physics classes, students are usually limited to a passive, qualitative observation of nice colours. This paper discusses a diffraction-based spectrometer that allows students to take quantitative measurements of spectral bands. Students can build it within minutes from generic low-cost materials. The spectrometer’s simple, didactic design allows students to fully comprehend the underlying physical concepts and to engage in a discussion of measurement errors and uncertainties.

  18. Cascaded diffractive optical elements for improved multiplane image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gülses, A Alkan; Jenkins, B Keith

    2013-05-20

    Computer-generated phase-only diffractive optical elements in a cascaded setup are designed by one deterministic and one stochastic algorithm for multiplane image formation. It is hypothesized that increasing the number of elements as wavefront modulators in the longitudinal dimension would enlarge the available solution space, thus enabling enhanced image reconstruction. Numerical results show that increasing the number of holograms improves quality at the output. Design principles, computational methods, and specific conditions are discussed. PMID:23736247

  19. Analysis of Contribution from Edge Radiation to Optical Diffraction Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    C. Liu, P. Evtushenko, A. Freyberger, C. Liu, A.H. Lumpkin

    2009-05-01

    Beam size measurement with near-field optical diffraction radiation (ODR) has been carried out successfully at CEBAF. The ODR station is installed on the Hall-A beam line after eight bending magnets. The ODR images were affected by an unexpected radiation. Some calculations for analyzing the source of the radiation will be presented. Furthermore, two schemes will be proposed to alleviate the contamination.

  20. Applied possibilities for x-ray diffraction interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raransky, M. D.; Struk, J. M.; Fodchuk, Igor M.; Shafraniuk, V. P.; Raransky, A. M.

    1995-11-01

    Among existing x ray diffraction diagnostics nonperfections of crystals the specific location take methods are based on use of x-ray dynamic diffraction effects. From them the most sensitive are based on interferention. The Pendellosung and Moire fringes methods arise in consequence of coherent dynamic interaction of wave fields in single crystals. One of the main advantages of the Moire method is the extraordinary high sensitivity to insignificant deformations of crystal lattice ((Delta) d/d approximately 10-8) and atomic planes turns ((delta) approximately 0.01'). Created by a method of x-ray diffraction Moire the unique phase magnification permits us to directly observe the nuclear rows of crystal lattice. Until recently the attention of researchers attracted, basically, precise measurements of refraction parameters and dispersion amendments to nuclear scattering amplitudes, measurement of movy with large accuracy and refinement of Avogadro number, and the creation of new multi crystal interferometers. At the same time, little opportunities of x-ray interferometry at research of crystal structure defects were used. For the first time the opportunity of definition by method x-ray diffraction Moire of Burgers vectors of individual dislocation was demonstrated by M. Hart, Christiansen has studied the series of 60 degree(s) dislocation in Si on Moire images. Tensions in Si, caused by Ar ions implantation, were defined in the work. The purpose, which the authors of given reviews pursue consists in demonstration of new opportunities of x-ray three crystal interferometry in the investigation of single and complex defects.

  1. Optical properties of X-rays--dynamical diffraction.

    PubMed

    Authier, André

    2012-01-01

    The first attempts at measuring the optical properties of X-rays such as refraction, reflection and diffraction are described. The main ideas forming the basis of Ewald's thesis in 1912 are then summarized. The first extension of Ewald's thesis to the X-ray case is the introduction of the reciprocal lattice. In the next step, the principles of the three versions of the dynamical theory of diffraction, by Darwin, Ewald and Laue, are given. It is shown how the comparison of the dynamical and geometrical theories of diffraction led Darwin to propose his extinction theory. The main optical properties of X-ray wavefields at the Bragg incidence are then reviewed: Pendellösung, shift of the Bragg peak, fine structure of Kossel lines, standing waves, anomalous absorption, paths of wavefields inside the crystal, Borrmann fan and double refraction. Lastly, some of the modern applications of the dynamical theory are briefly outlined: X-ray topography, location of adsorbed atoms at crystal surfaces, optical devices for synchrotron radiation and X-ray interferometry. PMID:22186282

  2. Sub-diffraction-limited optical imaging with superlens and hyperlens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyesog

    Optical microscopy has been the most widely used imaging tool in various research disciplines for the last century. However, it has fundamental resolution limit called the Diffraction Limit, which prevents it from observing objects smaller than half of the wavelength. This is caused by the inability of lenses, which are located at far field of the objects, to detect high spatial frequency information encoded in evanescent waves which decay away in the near field. Along with modern technological advancements especially in the field of nanotechnology, numerous innovative ideas sprung up in the past several decades in efforts to break the diffraction barrier and achieve nano-scale optical imaging. The most popular method up to date uses near-field scanning scheme which tends to be very slow and impractical for real-time imaging. Other methods require rather complex imaging optics and multiple measurements of the same sample. So far, true far-field and real-time sub-diffraction-limited optical imaging method is yet to be developed. Here I report new imaging schemes, Superlensing (Near and Far-field superlens) and Hyperlensing, which are capable of not only imaging beyond the Diffraction Limit in resolution but making real-time imaging possible. The Superlens enhances evanescent waves through surface plasmon (SP) resonance. The Far-field Superlens (FSL) scatters them into the far-field and the detected information is then used to numerically reconstruct high resolution image. Hyperlens concept utilizes unusual electromagnetic properties of metamaterials to deliver high spatial frequency information directly into the far-field. It magnifies nano-scale objects just enough for optical microscope to image and no post-imaging process is needed. In this dissertation, detailed experiment designs including nano-fabrication of the superlens and the hyperlens structures were proposed and the first ever imaging results were presented. The resolving power beyond the Diffraction

  3. Advanced simulations of optical transition and diffraction radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumeyr, T.; Billing, M. G.; Bobb, L. M.; Bolzon, B.; Bravin, E.; Karataev, P.; Kruchinin, K.; Lefevre, T.; Mazzoni, S.

    2015-04-01

    Charged particle beam diagnostics is a key task in modern and future accelerator installations. The diagnostic tools are practically the "eyes" of the operators. The precision and resolution of the diagnostic equipment are crucial to define the performance of the accelerator. Transition and diffraction radiation (TR and DR) are widely used for electron beam parameter monitoring. However, the precision and resolution of those devices are determined by how well the production, transport and detection of these radiation types are understood. This paper reports on simulations of TR and DR spatial-spectral characteristics using the physical optics propagation (POP) mode of the Zemax advanced optics simulation software. A good consistency with theory is demonstrated. Also, realistic optical system alignment issues are discussed.

  4. LINC-NIRVANA: cryogenic optics for diffraction limited beam combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizenberger, Peter; Baumeister, Harald; Herbst, Tom; Zhang, Xianyu

    2012-09-01

    LINC-NIRVANA is an interferometric imaging camera, which combines the two 8.4 m telescopes of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The instrument operates in the wavelength range from 1.1 μm to 2.4 μm, covering the J, H and K-band, respectively. The beam combining camera (NIRCS) offers the possibility to achieve diffraction limited images with the special resolution of a 23 m telescope. The optics are designed to deliver a 10 arcsec × 10 arcsec field of view with 5 mas resolution. In this paper we describe the evolution of the cryogenic optics, from design and manufacturing to verification. Including the argumentation for decisions we made in order to present a sort of guideline for large cryo-optics. We also present the alignment and testing strategies at a detailed level.

  5. Dedicated spectrometers based on diffractive optics: design, modelling and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhaugen, O.; Johansen, I.-R.; Bakke, K. A. H.; Fismen, B. G.; Nicolas, S.

    The described design of diffractive optical elements for low cost IR-spectrometers gives a built-in wavelength reference and allows 'spectral arithmetic' to be implemented in the optical performance of the DOE. The diffractive element combines the function of the lenses and the grating and eliminates the need for alignment of those components in the standard scanned grating spectrometer design. The element gives out a set of foci, each with one spectral component, which are scanned across a detector, thus relaxing the demands for scan angle control. It can thus be regarded as an alternative solution to a beam splitter and band pass filter instrument. Software tools have been designed to ease the adaptation of the design to different applications. To model the performance of the spectrometers we have implemented a scalar Rayleigh-Sommerfeldt diffraction model. The gold-coated elements are produced by injection moulding using a compact disc (CD) moulding technique and mould inlays mastered by e-beam lithography. The optimized selection of wavelength bands and the classification of the measured signal use a combination of principal component analysis and robust statistical methods. Typical applications will be material characterization of recycled plastics and gas monitoring. Spectrometers for two different applications have been built and tested. Comparisons between the design goals and the measured performance have been made and show good agreements.

  6. LINC-NIRVANA: Diffraction limited optics in cryogenic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizenberger, Peter; Baumeister, Harald; Fopp, Patrick; Herbst, Tom; Laun, Werner; Mohr, Lars; Moreno-Ventas, Javier

    2014-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA is an instrument combining the two 8.4 m telescopes of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) coherently, in order to achieve the optical resolution of the 23 meter baseline. For this interferometric instrument concept, the common beam combination requires diffraction limited optical performance. The optics, realized as a Cassegrain telescope design, consists of aluminum mirrors, designed and manufactured to fulfill the challenging specifications required for interferometric imaging. Due to the science wavelength range from 1 μm to 2.4 μm, covering the J, H and K band of the atmosphere, the complete beam combiner including the optics is operated in cryogenic environment at 60 Kelvin. Here, we demonstrate the verification of the optical performance at this temperature for classical in-coherent and coherent illumination. We outline the test setup and present the achieved results of wavefront error for the individual beams and fringe contrast for the interferometric point spread function. This paper continues the already presented integration of the interferometric camera with the focus on the performance of the cryogenic optics.

  7. Diffraction tomography applied to simulated ultrasound through breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, David H.

    2002-11-01

    Diffraction tomography is used to obtain images of sound speed and attenuation of a slice of breast tissue obtained from the Visible Woman data set. Simulated ultrasound data was generated using an acoustic propagation code run on the ASCI Blue Pacific computer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Data was generated for a slice of healthy tissue, and a slice with simulated lesions to determine the ability of the imaging method to detect various abnormalities in the breast. In addition, the time reversal operator for the slice was constructed from the data and the eigenfunctions backpropagated into the slice as first suggested by Mast [Mast, Nachman, and Waag, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102(2)] to identify structures associated with each time reversal mode for both the healthy tissue and tissue with lesions.

  8. High throughput optoelectronic smart pixel systems using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Hao

    1999-12-01

    algorithm to design Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) having higher uniformity and better signal-to-noise ratio. The algorithm is based on nonlinear least-square optimization procedures and phase-shifting quantization scheme to minimize the reconstruction error of DOEs. We also describe a modified diffractive microlens design algorithm to overcome linewidth limitations in fabrication while achieving higher numerical aperture and better power efficiency. Several diffractive optical devices used in our smart pixel systems, including microlens arrays and spot array generators, are designed by these algorithms, and have been fabricated and characterized for system integration.

  9. Light coupling into an optical microcantilever by an embedded diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Zinoviev, K; Dominguez, C; Plaza, J A; Cadarso, V; Lechuga, L M

    2006-01-10

    By measuring the excitation efficiency of an optical waveguide on a diffraction grating one can accurately register the changes in the incidence angle of the exciting light beam. This phenomenon was applied to detect ultrasmall deflections of silicon dioxide cantilevers of submicrometer thickness that were fabricated with corrugation on top to act as diffraction grating couplers. The power of light coupled into the cantilevers was monitored with a conventional photodetector and modulated using mechanical vibration of the cantilever, thus changing the spatial orientation of the coupler with respect to the incident light beam. The technique can be considered as an alternative to the methods known for detection of cantilever deflection. PMID:16422154

  10. Single-pulse x-ray diffraction using polycapillary optics for in situ dynamic diffraction.

    PubMed

    Maddox, B R; Akin, M C; Teruya, A; Hunt, D; Hahn, D; Cradick, J; Morgan, D V

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic use of single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) at pulsed power facilities can be challenging due to factors such as the high flux and brightness requirements for diffraction and the geometric constraints of experimental platforms. By necessity, the x-ray source is usually positioned very close, within a few inches of the sample. On dynamic compression platforms, this puts the x-ray source in the debris field. We coupled x-ray polycapillary optics to a single-shot needle-and-washer x-ray diode source using a laser-based alignment scheme to obtain high-quality x-ray diffraction using a single 16 ns x-ray pulse with the source >1 m from the sample. The system was tested on a Mo sample in reflection geometry using 17 keV x-rays from a Mo anode. We also identified an anode conditioning effect that increased the x-ray intensity by 180%. Quantitative measurements of the x-ray focal spot produced by the polycapillary yielded a total x-ray flux on the sample of 3.3 ± 0.5 × 10(7) molybdenum Kα photons. PMID:27587130

  11. Numerical study of grating-assisted optical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chaumet, Patrick C.; Belkebir, Kamal; Sentenac, Anne

    2007-07-15

    We study the resolution of an optical diffraction tomography system in which the objects are either in an homogeneous background or deposited onto a glass prism, a prism surmounted by a thin metallic film or a prism surmounted by a metallic film covered by a periodically nanostructured dielectric layer. For all these configurations, we present an inversion procedure that yields the map of the relative permittivity of the objects from their diffracted far field. When multiple scattering can be neglected, we show that the homogeneous, prism, and metallic film configurations yield a resolution about {lambda}/4 while the grating substrate yields a resolution better than {lambda}/10. When Born approximation fails, we point out that it is possible to neglect the coupling between the object and the substrate and account solely for the multiple scattering within the objects to obtain a satisfactory reconstruction. Last, we present the robustness of our inversion procedure to noise.

  12. The diffraction limit of an optical spectrum analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobrodov, V. G.; Tymchik, G. S.; Kolobrodov, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    This article examines a systematic error that occurs in optical spectrum analyzers and is caused by Fresnel approximation. The aim of the article is to determine acceptable errors of spatial frequency measurement in signal spectrum. The systematic error of spatial frequency measurement has been investigated on the basis of a physical and mathematical model of a coherent spectrum analyzer. It occurs as a result of the transition from light propagation in free space to Fresnel diffraction. Equations used to calculate absolute and relative measurement errors depending on a diffraction angle have been obtained. It allows us to determine the limits of the spectral range according to the given relative error of the spatial frequency measurement.

  13. The application of diffractive optical elements in the optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, D. I.; Tsyganok, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    The article investigates the possibility of using diffractive optical elements on an example of the kinoform in the optical coherence tomography (OCT). The article gives a brief overview of modern methods of research in the OCT, the expediency of development hyperchromatic lenses for spectral OCT systems. The authors made the aberration analysis of diffractive optical element (DOE), conducted a review of its application, and the DOE proposed to use in the example of a kinoform as the main force component of the hyperchromatic lens. In conclusion, the article provides examples of developed hybrid lenses for two spectral ranges, lens transmittance analysis and the assessment of their adaptability.

  14. Optical diffraction tomography: accuracy of an off-axis reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostencka, Julianna; Kozacki, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    Optical diffraction tomography is an increasingly popular method that allows for reconstruction of three-dimensional refractive index distribution of semi-transparent samples using multiple measurements of an optical field transmitted through the sample for various illumination directions. The process of assembly of the angular measurements is usually performed with one of two methods: filtered backprojection (FBPJ) or filtered backpropagation (FBPP) tomographic reconstruction algorithm. The former approach, although conceptually very simple, provides an accurate reconstruction for the object regions located close to the plane of focus. However, since FBPJ ignores diffraction, its use for spatially extended structures is arguable. According to the theory of scattering, more precise restoration of a 3D structure shall be achieved with the FBPP algorithm, which unlike the former approach incorporates diffraction. It is believed that with this method one is allowed to obtain a high accuracy reconstruction in a large measurement volume exceeding depth of focus of an imaging system. However, some studies have suggested that a considerable improvement of the FBPP results can be achieved with prior propagation of the transmitted fields back to the centre of the object. This, supposedly, enables reduction of errors due to approximated diffraction formulas used in FBPP. In our view this finding casts doubt on quality of the FBPP reconstruction in the regions far from the rotation axis. The objective of this paper is to investigate limitation of the FBPP algorithm in terms of an off-axis reconstruction and compare its performance with the FBPJ approach. Moreover, in this work we propose some modifications to the FBPP algorithm that allow for more precise restoration of a sample structure in off-axis locations. The research is based on extensive numerical simulations supported with wave-propagation method.

  15. All-optical switching of diffraction gratings infiltrated with dye-doped liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetta, D. E.; Vita, F.; Simoni, F.

    2010-12-01

    We report the realization and the characterization of an all-optical switching device based on a transmission grating recorded in a polymeric substrate infiltrated with a methyl red-doped liquid crystal. The properties of this highly nonlinear mixture are exploited to modulate the diffraction of the grating by a pump beam when a static electric field is applied. The behavior of the device is in agreement with the existing model for methyl red-doped liquid crystals.

  16. Technology Development of Stratified Volume Diffractive Optics for Waveguide Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.

    2000-01-01

    Stratified Volume Diffractive Optical Elements (SVDOE) appear to be viable as high-efficiency waveguide couplers. Preliminary design studies were conducted under this task to provide initial device parameters for evaluation. However, these designs should be revisited prior to fabrication of a device for testing. The emphasis of this task has been development and implementation of fabrication procedures necessary for SVDOE'S, namely alignment of grating layers, Including offsets, to within required tolerances. Progress in this area Indicates that the alignment technique chosen is viable and tolerances have been reached that allow reasonable performance ranges. Approaches have been identified to improve alignment tolerances even further.

  17. Aplanatic grazing incidence diffraction grating: a new optical element

    SciTech Connect

    Hettrick, M.C.

    1986-09-15

    We present the theory of a grazing incidence reflection grating capable of imaging at submicron resolution. The optic is mechanically ruled on a spherical or cylindrical surface with varied groove spacings, delivering diffraction-limited response and a wide field of view at a selected wavelength. Geometrical aberrations are calculated on the basis of Fermat's principle, revealing significant improvements over a grazing incidence mirror. Aplanatic and quasi-aplanatic versions of the grating have applications in both imaging and scanning microscopes, microprobes, collimators, and telescopes. A 2-D crossed system of such gratings, similar to the grazing incidence mirror geometry of Kirkpatrick and Baez, could potentially provide spatial resolutions of --200 A.

  18. Optical fiber alignment using cleaved-edge diffracted light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Louis C.; Bergeron, Patrick; Duguay, Michel A.; Ouellette, Francois; Tetu, Michel

    1993-08-01

    We describe a simple technique for aligning optical fibers prior to fusion splicing. The technique relies on the fact that well-cleaved fiber ends have extremely sharp edges. By making the narrow pencil of light emerging from one fiber scan laterally over the entrance face of a second fiber, and by monitoring the light diffracted past its sharp edges, we can locate precisely the geometric center of the output fiber. With this technique, we have aligned fiber cores with a mean lateral offset of 0.81 micrometers , the major part of this offset caused by the eccentricity of the core relative to the cladding's circular perimeter.

  19. Multilevel micro-structuring of glassy carbon for precision glass molding of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Plöger, Sven; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    A consumer market for diffractive optical elements in glass can only be created if high efficient elements are available at affordable prices. In diffractive optics the efficiency and optical properties increases with the number of levels used, but in the same way the costs are multiplied by the number if fabrication steps. Replication of multilevel diffractive optical elements in glass would allow cost efficient fabrication but a suitable mold material is needed. Glassy carbon shows a high mechanical strength, thermal stability and non-sticking adhesion properties, which makes it an excellent candidate as mold material for precision compression molding of low and high glass-transition temperature materials. We introduce an 8 level micro structuring process for glassy carbon molds with standard photolithography and a Ti layer as hard mask for reactive ion etching. The molds were applied to thermal imprinting onto low and high transition temperature glass. Optical performance was tested for the molded samples with different designs for laser beamsplitters. The results show a good agreement to the design specification. Our result allow us to show limitations of our fabrication technique and we discussed the suitability of precision glass molding for cost efficient mass production with a high quality.

  20. Diffractive optics with high Bragg selectivity: volume holographic optical elements in Bayfol® HX photopolymer film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, Friedrich-Karl; Fäcke, Thomas; Hagen, Rainer; Hönel, Dennis; Orselli, Enrico; Rewitz, Christian; Rölle, Thomas; Walze, Günther

    2015-09-01

    For a long time volume Holographic Optical Elements (vHOE) have been discussed as an alternative, but were hampered by a lack of suitable materials. They provide several benefits over surface corrugated diffractive optical element like high diffraction efficiency due to their ability to reconstruct a single diffraction order, freedom of optical design by freely setting the replay angles and adjusting their bandwidth by a selection of the vHOE's thickness. Additional interesting features are related to their high Bragg selectivity providing transparent films for off-Bragg illumination. In this paper we report on our newly developed photopolymer film technology (Bayfol® HX) that uniquely requires no post processing after holographic exposure. We explain the governing non-local polymerization driven diffusion process leading to an active mass transport triggered by constructive interference. Key aspects of the recording process and their impact on index modulation formation is discussed. The influence on photopolymer film thickness on the bandwidth is shown. A comparison between coupled wave theory (CWT) simulation and experimental results is given. There are two basic recording geometries: reflection and transmission vHOEs. We explain consequences of how to record them properly and discuss in more detail the special challenges in transmission hologram recording. Here beam ratio and customization of photopolymer film properties can be applied most beneficially to achieve highest diffraction efficiency.

  1. Superresolution technology applied to optical discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Changhe; Luo, Hongxin

    2005-09-01

    Smaller focal points are essential for the development of the next-generation optical disc. The size of focal point depends on the diffraction effect that is dependant on the numerical aperture of a lens and the wavelength of light. However, increase of the numerical aperture and decrease of the light wavelength will be ultimately limited due to the technical difficulty of fabricating a too-high NA lens and the too-short wavelength laser. In this paper, we report another approach of using the superresolution technology to compress the size of the so-called Airy spot for the next-generation optical disc, which is independent on the wavelength of laser. The superresolution phase plates are designed and fabricated with a microoptics technique. When such a phase plate is inserted into the optical system, the central spot at the focal plane of a lens is decreased to be 0.8 times of the Airy pattern, implying the possibility of reading higher storage density of optical discs. The most attractive feature is that the phase plate can be mass-produced at a very low cost, compared with the high cost of the high-numerical lens and/or the short wavelength laser. The disadvantages are that the inserted phase plate will induce the slight circular sidelobes around the central sport, so that it consumes a little more laser energy. The shortcoming could be overcome with suitable amendment. We have fabricated the phase plates with the surface-relief profile on a normal glass for phase modulation. Experimental results of superresolution effect with a low numerical aperture (NA=0.1) and a high-numerical lens (NA=0.8) are reported, which are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. Superresolution technique should be highly interesting as a novel technique of the next-generation pickup head for reading the high storage of the optical discs.

  2. Microbial Diffraction Gratings as Optical Detectors for Heavy Metal Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Matsos, Helen; Brittain, Andrew; Obenhuber, Don; Cronise, Raymond; Armstrong, Shannon

    1996-01-01

    As a significant industrial pollutant, cadmium is implicated as the cause of itai-itai disease. For biological detection of cadmium toxicity, an assay device has been developed using the motile response of the protozoa species, Tetrahymena pyriformis. This mobile protozoa measures 50 microns in diameter, swims at 10 body lengths per second, and aggregates into macroscopically visible patterns at high organism concentrations. The assay demonstrates a Cd(+2) sensitivity better than 1 micro-M and a toxicity threshold to 5 micro-M, thus encouraging the study of these microbial cultures as viable pollution detectors. Using two-dimensional diffraction patterns within a Tetrahymena culture, the scattered light intensity varies with different organism densities (population counts). The resulting density profile correlates strongly with the toxic effects at very low dosages for cadmium (less than 5 ppm) and then for poison protection directly (with nickel and copper antagonists competing with cadmium absorption). In particular, copper dosages as low as 0.1-0.5 mM Cu have shown protective antagonism against cadmium, have enhanced density variability for cultures containing 1 mM Cd(+2) and therefore have demonstrated the sensitivity of the optical detection system. In this way, such microbial diffraction patterns give a responsive optical measure of biological culture changes and toxicity determination in aqueous samples of heavy metals and industrial pollutants.

  3. Theory of optical ellipsometric measurements from muscle diffraction studies.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Y; Baskin, R J

    1988-01-01

    A theory of optical ellipsometry describing the complete phase shift and ellipticity of light diffracted from a single muscle fiber is developed. We show that both the phase shift information, described commonly by the birefringence of the fiber, and the ellipticity information, described by the differential polarizability ratio, are necessary to provide a complete picture of the complex contributions to the total optical anisotropy spectra from a diffraction pattern derived from the striated muscle cell. Both form and intrinsic contributions play significant roles in either the birefringence measurement or the differential field ratio measurement. However, we show that their relative weights in these two measured quantities are different, and measuring both of these parameters is necessary to obtain a more complete assessment of the cross-bridge structure and dynamics. The theoretical results have been tested for three different situations: solvent index matching, passive stretch of a resting fiber, and cross-bridge changes under isometric conditions. Comparisons between experimental data and simple model calculations provide much information regarding cross-bridge orientation and structure. PMID:3207822

  4. Generalized optical ABCD theorem and its application to the diffraction integral calculation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chaoying; Tan, Weihan; Guo, Qizhi

    2004-11-01

    We generalize the transfer matrix ABCD theorem for paraxial rays of the optical system to skew rays propagated off axis, whether or not the system possesses rotational symmetry. Furthermore, we apply the generalized ABCD theorem to evaluate the diffraction integral matrix elements A-D expressed in terms of the angle eikonal T, with the primary aberrations included. Finally, analysis and numerical calculation are given for propagation of a light beam through the optical system in the case in which spherical aberration and coma are present. PMID:15535373

  5. Wavelength-division multiplexed optical integrated circuit with vertical diffraction grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Forouhar, Siamak (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A semiconductor optical integrated circuit for wave division multiplexing has a semiconductor waveguide layer, a succession of diffraction grating points in the waveguide layer along a predetermined diffraction grating contour, a semiconductor diode array in the waveguide layer having plural optical ports facing the succession of diffraction grating points along a first direction, respective semiconductor diodes in the array corresponding to respective ones of a predetermined succession of wavelengths, an optical fiber having one end thereof terminated at the waveguide layer, the one end of the optical fiber facing the succession of diffraction grating points along a second direction, wherein the diffraction grating points are spatially distributed along the predetermined contour in such a manner that the succession of diffraction grating points diffracts light of respective ones of the succession of wavelengths between the one end of the optical fiber and corresponding ones of the optical ports.

  6. Large Diffractive Optics for GEo-Based Earth Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R A

    2003-09-11

    in diameter, building ten-fold larger ones for GEO applications (let alone delivering and operating them there) presents major difficulties. However, since the challenges of fielding large platforms in GEO are matched by the benefits of continuous coverage, we propose a program to develop such optical platforms. In this section, we will examine a particular form of large aperture optic, using a flat diffractive lens instead of the more conventional curved reflectors considered elsewhere in this report. We will discuss both the development of this type of large aperture optics, as well as the steps necessary to use it for GEO-based Earth surveillance. In a later section of this report we will discuss another use for large diffractive optics, their application for global-reach laser weapons.

  7. Optical color-image encryption in the diffractive-imaging scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yi; Wang, Zhipeng; Pan, Qunna; Gong, Qiong

    2016-02-01

    By introducing the theta modulation technique into the diffractive-imaging-based optical scheme, we propose a novel approach for color image encryption. For encryption, a color image is divided into three channels, i.e., red, green and blue, and thereafter these components are appended by redundant data before being sent to the encryption scheme. The carefully designed optical setup, which comprises of three 4f optical architectures and a diffractive-imaging-based optical scheme, could encode the three plaintexts into a single noise-like intensity pattern. For the decryption, an iterative phase retrieval algorithm, together with a filter operation, is applied to extract the primary color images from the diffraction intensity map. Compared with previous methods, our proposal has successfully encrypted a color rather than grayscale image into a single intensity pattern, as a result of which the capacity and practicability have been remarkably enhanced. In addition, the performance and the security of it are also investigated. The validity as well as feasibility of the proposed method is supported by numerical simulations.

  8. Spin-to-orbit conversion at acousto-optic diffraction of light: conservation of optical angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Skab, Ihor; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic diffraction of light in optically active cubic crystals is analyzed from the viewpoint of conservation of optical angular momentum. It is shown that the availability of angular momentum in the diffracted optical beam can be necessarily inferred from the requirements of angular momentum conservation law. As follows from our analysis, a circularly polarized diffracted wave should bear an orbital angular momentum. The efficiency of the spin-to-orbit momentum conversion is governed by the efficiency of acousto-optic diffraction. PMID:22505104

  9. Applications of optical holography to applied mechanics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprahamian, R.

    1972-01-01

    This paper provides a brief summary of applications of optical holography and holographic interferometry to applied solid mechanics. Basic equations commonly used in fringe interpretation are described and used to reduce the data contained on holographic interferograms. A comparison of data obtained holographically with analytical prediction is given wherever possible. Applications contained herein include front surface physics, study of bomb breakup, transverse wave propagation, study of mode shapes of panels at elevated temperatures, nondestructive testing, and vibration analysis.

  10. Diffractive optical elements for generating arbitrary line foci

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mait, Joseph N.; Prather, Dennis W.; Vandergracht, Joseph; Tayag, Tristan J.

    1993-01-01

    The key optical component in the architecture of the linearly variable magnification telescope presented here is a conical lens. This architecture has application to Doppler radar processing and to wavelet processing. Unfortunately, the unique surface profile of a conical lens does not allow traditional grinding techniques to be used for fabrication; therefore, its fabrication is considered custom. In addition to the requirement of custom fabrication, a refractive conical lens introduces phase aberrations that are intrinsic to its conic shape. Further, due to the large prismatic component of the lens, the variable magnification telescope architecture is off-axis. To overcome the fabrication and application difficulties of a refractive lens, we consider the construction of a hybrid diffractive-refractive lens.

  11. Investigation of diffractive optical element femtosecond laser machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrol, Grégoire R.; Ciceron, Adline; Twardowski, Patrice; Pfeiffer, Pierre; Flury, Manuel; Mermet, Frédéric; Lecler, Sylvain

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an explorative study on the machining of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in transparent materials using a femtosecond laser source. A simple form of DOE, a binary phase grating with a period of 20.85 μm (σ = 0.5 μm), a groove depth and width of 0.7 μm (σ = 0.2 μm) and 8.8 μm (σ = 0.5 μm) respectively, was successfully machined in BK7. The topographic characteristics were measured by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The processing was carried out on high precision stages with an ultrafast fibre laser (350 fs) emitting a 343 nm pulse focused onto the sample with a stationary microscope objective. A diffracted efficiency of 27%, obtained with a spectro goniometer, was corroborated by the theoretical results obtained by the Fourier modal method (FMM), taking into account the measured topographic values. These encouraging results demonstrate that high-speed femtosecond laser manufacturing of DOE in bulk glasses can be achieved, opening the way to rapid prototyping of multi-layered-DOEs.

  12. Miniaturization of an interferometric distance sensor employing diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukourakis, Nektarios; Kuschmierz, Robert; Bohling, Michael; Jahns, Jürgen; Fischer, Andreas; Czarske, Jürgen W.

    2014-08-01

    In order to improve safety, lifetime and energy efficiency of turbo machines, the behavior of the turbine blades has to be monitored during operation. This is a great challenge for metrology, since small, robust and non-contact position measurement techniques are required that offer both micrometer accuracy and microsecond temporal resolution. The Laser-Doppler-Distance (LDD) -Sensor proved to be an adequate technique to perform such measurements. However, the usage in turbo machines requires a miniaturized and temperature-stable sensor-head. In this paper we introduce a miniaturized design of the LDD-sensor that is based on common-path detection. First results indicated that the numerical aperture of the common-path detection is small in comparison to former implementations that used separate paths for illumination and detection. We find that decreasing the numerical aperture strongly increases the systematic measurement uncertainty. For this purpose a novel diffractive optical element containing a diffracting-lens was designed and used to increase the numerical aperture of the common-path detection without affecting the sensor size. Experiments prove that the new element reduces the relative systematic measurement uncertainty by a factor of ten. The mean systematic position measurement uncertainty amounts to Δzmean≈16 μm. The resulting sensor has dimensions of 25×25×60 mm3, offers temperature-stability and achieves micrometer resolution.

  13. Improvement of the signal integrity in diffractive optical encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard; Mueller, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    We are presenting several techniques to improve the quality of the signals in diffractive optics encoders, for either linear and rotational encoders. We have developed previously various hybrid incremental/absolute disk based rotary diffractive encoders architectures. While the binary signals for absolute encoding were usually of sufficiently good quality to retrieve the entire Gray code signal over the desired resolutions (10, 12 or 14 bits), the quality and integrity of the sinusoidal signals for the incremental part of the encoder needed to be improved, since these are the signals allowing the encoder to go to much higher interpolated resolutions (20 bits or over). A good precision over the interpolated signals assumes very accurate sinusoidal profiles form the raw signals. Strong interpolation can only be done on high quality sinusoidal native signals (also referred to as pulses per revolution or PPR). A typical high resolution incremental encoder might provide 12 to 16 native sinusoidal PPRs, but the interpolation over these signals can reach way over 20 bits of resolution if the signals are of good quality.

  14. Diffractive and geometric optical systems characterization with the Fresnel Gaussian shape invariant.

    PubMed

    Cywiak, Moisés; Servín, Manuel; Morales, Arquímedes

    2011-01-31

    Full characterization of optical systems, diffractive and geometric, is possible by using the Fresnel Gaussian Shape Invariant (FGSI) previously reported in the literature. The complex amplitude distribution in the object plane is represented by a linear superposition of complex Gaussians wavelets and then propagated through the optical system by means of the referred Gaussian invariant. This allows ray tracing through the optical system and at the same time allows calculating with high precision the complex wave-amplitude distribution at any plane of observation. This method is similar to conventional ray tracing additionally preserving the undulatory behavior of the field distribution. That is, we are propagating a linear combination of Gaussian shaped wavelets; keeping always track of both, the ray trajectory, and the wave phase of the whole complex optical field. This technique can be applied in a wide spectral range where the Fresnel diffraction integral applies including visible, X-rays, acoustic waves, etc. We describe the technique and we include one-dimensional illustrative examples. PMID:21369004

  15. Diffractive optical variable image devices generated by maskless interferometric lithography for optical security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, José M.

    2011-05-01

    In optical security (protection against forgery and counterfeit of products and documents) the problem is not exact reproduction but the production of something sufficiently similar to the original. Currently, Diffractive Optically Variable Image Devices (DOVID), that create dynamic chromatic effects which may be easily recognized but are difficult to reproduce, are often used to protect important products and documents. Well known examples of DOVID for security are 3D or 2D/3D holograms in identity documents and credit cards. Others are composed of shapes with different types of microstructures yielding by diffraction to chromatic dynamic effects. A maskless interferometric lithography technique to generate DOVIDs for optical security is presented and compared to traditional techniques. The approach can be considered as a self-masking focused holography on planes tilted with respect to the reference optical axes of the system, and is based on the Scheimpflug and Hinge rules. No physical masks are needed to ensure optimum exposure of the photosensitive film. The system built to demonstrate the technique relies on the digital mirrors device MOEMS technology from Texas Instruments' Digital Light Processing. The technique is linear on the number of specified colors and does not depend either on the area of the device or the number of pixels, factors that drive the complexity of dot-matrix based systems. The results confirmed the technique innovation and capabilities in the creation of diffractive optical elements for security against counterfeiting and forgery.

  16. Hadron Optics: Diffraction Patterns in Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S

    2006-05-16

    We show that the Fourier transform of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) amplitude with respect to the skewness variable {zeta} provides a unique way to visualize the light-front wavefunctions (LFWFs) of the target state in the boost-invariant longitudinal coordinate space variable ({sigma} = P{sup +}y{sup -}/2). The results are analogous to the diffractive scattering of a wave in optics in which the dependence of the amplitude on {sigma} measures the physical size of the scattering center of a one-dimensional system. If one combines this longitudinal transform with the Fourier transform of the DVCS amplitude with respect to the transverse momentum transfer {Delta}{sup {perpendicular}}, one can obtain a complete three-dimensional description of hadron optics at fixed light-front time {tau} = t + z/c. As a specific example, we utilize the quantum fluctuations of a fermion state at one loop in QED to obtain the behavior of the DVCS amplitude for electron-photon scattering. We then simulate the wavefunctions for a hadron by differentiating the above LFWFs with respect to M{sup 2} and study the corresponding DVCS amplitudes in {sigma} space.

  17. Diffraction patterns and nonlinear optical properties of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majles Ara, M. H.; Dehghani, Z.; Sahraei, R.; Daneshfar, A.; Javadi, Z.; Divsar, F.

    2012-03-01

    Stable gold nanoparticles have been prepared by using soluble starch as both the reducing and stabilizing agents; this reaction was carried out at 40 °C for 5 h. The obtained gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and z-scan technique. The size of these nanoparticles was found to be in the range of 12-22 nm as analyzed using transmission electron micrographs. The optical properties of gold nanoparticles have been measured showing the surface plasmon resonance. The second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties were investigated by using a continuous-wave (CW) He-Ne laser beam with a wavelength of 632.8 nm at three different incident intensities by means of single beam techniques. The nonlinear refractive indices of gold nanoparticles were obtained from close aperture z-scan in order of 10-7 cm2/W. Then, they were compared with diffraction patterns observed in far-field. The nonlinear absorption of these nanoparticles was obtained from open aperture z-scan technique. The values of nonlinear absorption coefficient are obtained in order of 10-1 cm/W.

  18. Ultra-high accuracy optical testing: creating diffraction-limitedshort-wavelength optical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Denham, Paul E.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Gullikson, Eric M.; Jackson, KeithH.; Anderson, Erik H.; Taylor, John S.; Sommargren, Gary E.; Chapman,Henry N.; Phillion, Donald W.; Johnson, Michael; Barty, Anton; Soufli,Regina; Spiller, Eberhard A.; Walton, Christopher C.; Bajt, Sasa

    2005-08-03

    Since 1993, research in the fabrication of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical imaging systems, conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has produced the highest resolution optical systems ever made. We have pioneered the development of ultra-high-accuracy optical testing and alignment methods, working at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, and pushing wavefront-measuring interferometry into the 2-20-nm wavelength range (60-600 eV). These coherent measurement techniques, including lateral shearing interferometry and phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) have achieved RMS wavefront measurement accuracies of 0.5-1-{angstrom} and better for primary aberration terms, enabling the creation of diffraction-limited EUV optics. The measurement accuracy is established using careful null-testing procedures, and has been verified repeatedly through high-resolution imaging. We believe these methods are broadly applicable to the advancement of short-wavelength optical systems including space telescopes, microscope objectives, projection lenses, synchrotron beamline optics, diffractive and holographic optics, and more. Measurements have been performed on a tunable undulator beamline at LBNL's Advanced Light Source (ALS), optimized for high coherent flux; although many of these techniques should be adaptable to alternative ultraviolet, EUV, and soft x-ray light sources. To date, we have measured nine prototype all-reflective EUV optical systems with NA values between 0.08 and 0.30 (f/6.25 to f/1.67). These projection-imaging lenses were created for the semiconductor industry's advanced research in EUV photolithography, a technology slated for introduction in 2009-13. This paper reviews the methods used and our program's accomplishments to date.

  19. Holographically recorded photopolymer diffractive optical element for holographic and electronic speckle-pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guntaka, Sridhar Reddy; Toal, Vincent; Martin, Suzanne

    2002-12-01

    A diffractive optical element is described that can be used to implement a very simple self-aligning electronic speckle-pattern interferometer and holographic interferometer that requires only a laser source and a camera in the optical setup.

  20. Surface micro-structuring of glassy carbon for precision glass molding of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2014-09-01

    Glassy carbon is used nowadays for a variety of applications because of its mechanical strength, thermal stability and non-sticking adhesion properties. This makes it also a suitable candidate as mold material for precision compression molding of low and high glass-transition temperature materials. To fabricate molds for diffractive optics a highresolution structuring technique is needed. We introduce a process that allows the micro-structuring of glassy carbon by reactive ion etching. Key parameters such as uniformity, surface roughness, edge definition and lateral resolution are discussed. They are the most relevant parameters for a stamp in optical applications. The use of titanium as a hard mask makes it possible to achieve a reasonable selectivity of 4:1, which has so far been one of the main problems in microstructuring of glassy carbon. We investigate the titanium surface structure with its 5-10 nm thick layer of TiO2 grains and its influence on the shape of the hard mask. In our fabrication procedure we were able to realize optically flat diffractive structures with slope angles of more than 80° at typical feature sizes of 5 μm and at 700 nm depth. The fabricated glassy carbon molds were applied to thermal imprinting onto different glasses. Glassy carbon molds with 1 mm thickness were tested with binary optical structures. Our experiments show the suitability of glassy carbon as molds for cost efficient mass production with a high quality.

  1. Simultaneous multispectral framing infrared camera using an embedded diffractive optical lenslet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    2011-06-01

    Recent advances in micro-optical element fabrication using gray scale technology have opened up the opportunity to create simultaneous multi-spectral imaging with fine structure diffractive lenses. This paper will discuss an approach that uses diffractive optical lenses configured in an array (lenslet array) and placed in close proximity to the focal plane array which enables a small compact simultaneous multispectral imaging camera [1]. The lenslet array is designed so that all lenslets have a common focal length with each lenslet tuned for a different wavelength. The number of simultaneous spectral images is determined by the number of individually configured lenslets in the array. The number of spectral images can be increased by a factor of 2 when using it with a dual-band focal plane array (MWIR/LWIR) by exploiting multiple diffraction orders. In addition, modulation of the focal length of the lenslet array with piezoelectric actuation will enable spectral bin fill-in allowing additional spectral coverage while giving up simultaneity. Different lenslet array spectral imaging concept designs are presented in this paper along with a unique concept for prefiltering the radiation focused on the detector. This approach to spectral imaging has applications in the detection of chemical agents in both aerosolized form and as a liquid on a surface. It also can be applied to the detection of weaponized biological agent and IED detection in various forms from manufacturing to deployment and post detection during forensic analysis.

  2. Numerical simulation of optical vortex propagation and reflection by the methods of scalar diffraction theory

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Nikolay V; Pavlov, Pavel V; Malov, A N

    2013-06-30

    Using the equations of scalar diffraction theory we consider the formation of an optical vortex on a diffractive optical element. The algorithms are proposed for simulating the processes of propagation of spiral wavefronts in free space and their reflections from surfaces with different roughness parameters. The given approach is illustrated by the results of numerical simulations. (propagation of wave fronts)

  3. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  4. Programmable diffractive optical elements for extending the depth of focus in ophthalmic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Lenny A.; Millán, María. S.; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Kołodziejczyk, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The depth of focus (DOF) defines the axial range of high lateral resolution in the image space for object position. Optical devices with a traditional lens system typically have a limited DOF. However, there are applications such as in ophthalmology, which require a large DOF in comparison to a traditional optical system, this is commonly known as extended DOF (EDOF). In this paper we explore Programmable Diffractive Optical Elements (PDOEs), with EDOF, as an alternative solution to visual impairments, especially presbyopia. These DOEs were written onto a reflective liquid cystal on silicon (LCoS) spatial light modulator (SLM). Several designs of the elements are analyzed: the Forward Logarithmic Axicon (FLAX), the Axilens (AXL), the Light sword Optical Element (LSOE), the Peacock Eye Optical Element (PE) and Double Peacock Eye Optical Element (DPE). These elements focus an incident plane wave into a segment of the optical axis. The performances of the PDOEs are compared with those of multifocal lenses. In all cases, we obtained the point spread function and the image of an extended object. The results are presented and discussed.

  5. From Cartesian to polar: a new POLICRYPS geometry for realizing circular optical diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Alj, Domenico; Caputo, Roberto; Umeton, Cesare

    2014-11-01

    We report on the realization of a liquid crystal (LC)-based optical diffraction grating showing a polar symmetry of the director alignment. This has been obtained as a natural evolution of the POLICRYPS technique, which enables the realization of highly efficient, switchable, planar diffraction gratings. Performances exhibited in the Cartesian geometry are extended to the polar one by exploiting the spherical aberration produced by simple optical elements. This enables producing the required highly stable polar pattern that allows fabricating a circular optical diffraction grating. Results are promising for their possible application in fields in which a rotational structure of the optical beam is needed. PMID:25361314

  6. Multiple-Zone Diffractive Optic Element for Laser Ranging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    A diffractive optic element (DOE) can be used as a beam splitter to generate multiple laser beams from a single input laser beam. This technology has been recently used in LRO s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument to generate five laser beams that measure the lunar topography from a 50-km nominal mapping orbit (see figure). An extension of this approach is to use a multiple-zone DOE to allow a laser altimeter instrument to operate over a wider range of distances. In particular, a multiple-zone DOE could be used for applications that require both mapping and landing on a planetary body. In this case, the laser altimeter operating range would need to extend from several hundred kilometers down to a few meters. The innovator was recently involved in an investigation how to modify the LOLA instrument for the OSIRIS asteroid mapping and sample return mission. One approach is to replace the DOE in the LOLA laser beam expander assembly with a multiple-zone DOE that would allow for the simultaneous illumination of the asteroid with mapping and landing laser beams. The proposed OSIRIS multiple-zone DOE would generate the same LOLA five-beam output pattern for high-altitude topographic mapping, but would simultaneously generate a wide divergence angle beam using a small portion of the total laser energy for the approach and landing portion of the mission. Only a few percent of the total laser energy is required for approach and landing operations as the return signal increases as the inverse square of the ranging height. A wide divergence beam could be implemented by making the center of the DOE a diffractive or refractive negative lens. The beam energy and beam divergence characteristics of a multiple-zone DOE could be easily tailored to meet the requirements of other missions that require laser ranging data. Current single-zone DOE lithographic manufacturing techniques could also be used to fabricate a multiple-zone DOE by masking the different DOE zones during

  7. Optical beam shaping and diffraction free waves: A variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, John A.; Venkataramani, Shankar C.; Durfee, Charles G.; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the problem of shaping radially symmetric annular beams into desired intensity patterns along the optical axis. Within the Fresnel approximation, we show that this problem can be expressed in a variational form equivalent to the one arising in phase retrieval. Using the uncertainty principle we prove various rigorous lower bounds on the functional; these lower bounds estimate the L2 error for the beam shaping problem in terms of the design parameters. We also use the method of stationary phase to construct a natural ansatz for a minimizer in the short wavelength limit. We illustrate the implications of our results by applying the method of stationary phase coupled with the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm to beam shaping problems arising in the remote delivery of beams and pulses.

  8. Large-scale optical diffraction tomography for inspection of optical plastic lenses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    Herein is presented an optical diffraction tomography (ODT) technique for measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) maps of optical plastic lenses. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used to measure multiple complex optical fields of a plastic lens immersed in RI-matching oil at various rotational orientations. From this, ODT was used to reconstruct a 3-D RI distribution of the plastic lens with unprecedented RI sensitivity (Δn=4.21×10(-5) and high resolution (12.8 μm). As a demonstration, 3-D RI distributions of a 2 mm-diameter borosilicate sphere and a 5 mm-diameter plastic lens were reconstructed. Defects in the lens, generated by pulsed laser ablation, were also detected using the present method. PMID:26974084

  9. An optical metamaterial with simultaneously suppressed optical diffraction and surface reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivijärvi, V.; Nyman, M.; Shevchenko, A.; Kaivola, M.

    2016-03-01

    Diffraction-free propagation of light has been demonstrated in free space for Bessel-like beams and for arbitrary beams in specially designed photonic crystals and metamaterials. The phenomenon is called self-collimation in photonic crystals and canalization in metamaterials, as the approaches to obtaining the effect are different. In both cases, however, diffraction-free propagation of light is achieved by making the dispersion surface of the material at a given frequency flat. In photonic crystals this is done by tuning the unit-cell dimensions close to the band-gap regime, and in metamaterials by tuning a hyperbolic-type metamaterial towards its transition to an ordinary elliptical metamaterial. In this work, we propose an alternative way to suppress optical diffraction in a metamaterial by adjusting the anisotropy of the finite-sized three-dimensional metamolecules and the material’s spatial dispersion. The approach allows matching the wave impedance of the material to that of the surrounding medium in a wide range of incidence angles and thereby also suppressing optical reflection from the material’s surface.

  10. Optical devices combining an organic semiconductor crystal with a two-dimensional inorganic diffraction grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Takenori; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2016-02-01

    We have fabricated optical devices using an organic semiconductor crystal as an emission layer in combination with a two-dimensional (2D) inorganic diffraction grating used as an optical cavity. We formed the inorganic diffraction grating by wet etching of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) under a 2D cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) diffraction grating used as a mask. The COC diffraction grating was fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. The AZO diffraction grating was composed of convex prominences arranged in a triangular lattice. The organic crystal placed on the AZO diffraction grating indicated narrowed peaks in its emission spectrum under ultraviolet light excitation. These are detected parallel to the crystal plane. The peaks were shifted by rotating the optical devices around the normal to the crystal plane, which reflected the rotational symmetries of the triangular lattice through 60°.

  11. Planar super-oscillatory lens for sub-diffraction optical needles at violet wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guanghui; Rogers, Edward T. F.; Roy, Tapashree; Adamo, Giorgio; Shen, Zexiang; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-01-01

    Planar optical lenses are fundamental elements of miniaturized photonic devices. However, conventional planar optical lenses are constrained by the diffraction limit in the optical far-field due to the band-limited wavevectors supported by free-space and loss of high-spatial-frequency evanescent components. As inspired by Einstein's radiation ‘needle stick', electromagnetic energy can be delivered into an arbitrarily small solid angle. Such sub-diffraction optical needles have been numerically investigated using diffractive optical elements (DOEs) together with specially polarized optical beams, but experimental demonstration is extremely difficult due to the bulky size of DOEs and the required alignment precision. Planar super-oscillatory lenses (SOLs) were proposed to overcome these constraints and demonstrated that sub-diffraction focal spots can actually be formed without any evanescent waves, making far-field, label-free super-resolution imaging possible. Here we extend the super-oscillation concept into the vectorial-field regime to work with circularly polarized light, and experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a circularly polarized optical needle with sub-diffraction transverse spot size (0.45λ) and axial long depth of focus (DOF) of 15λ using a planar SOL at a violet wavelength of 405 nm. This sub-diffraction circularly polarized optical needle has potential applications in circular dichroism spectroscopy, super-resolution imaging, high-density optical storage, heat-assisted magnetic recording, nano-manufacturing and nano-metrology. PMID:25208611

  12. Diffractive optics fabricated by direct write methods with an electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, Bernard; Zaleta, David; Daschner, Walter; Urquhart, Kris; Stein, Robert; Lee, Sing H.

    1993-01-01

    State-of-the-art diffractive optics are fabricated using e-beam lithography and dry etching techniques to achieve multilevel phase elements with very high diffraction efficiencies. One of the major challenges encountered in fabricating diffractive optics is the small feature size (e.g. for diffractive lenses with small f-number). It is not only the e-beam system which dictates the feature size limitations, but also the alignment systems (mask aligner) and the materials (e-beam and photo resists). In order to allow diffractive optics to be used in new optoelectronic systems, it is necessary not only to fabricate elements with small feature sizes but also to do so in an economical fashion. Since price of a multilevel diffractive optical element is closely related to the e-beam writing time and the number of etching steps, we need to decrease the writing time and etching steps without affecting the quality of the element. To do this one has to utilize the full potentials of the e-beam writing system. In this paper, we will present three diffractive optics fabrication techniques which will reduce the number of process steps, the writing time, and the overall fabrication time for multilevel phase diffractive optics.

  13. Optical Diffraction in Close Proximity to Plane Apertures. II. Comparison of Half-Plane Diffraction Theories

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Klaus D.

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy and physical significance of the classical Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Kirchhoff diffraction integrals are assessed in the context of Sommerfeld’s rigorous theory of half-plane diffraction and Maxwell’s equations. It is shown that the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals are in satisfactory agreement with Sommerfeld’s theory in most of the positive near zone, except at sub-wavelength distances from the screen. On account of the bidirectional nature of diffraction by metallic screens the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals themselves cannot be used for irradiance calculations, but must first be resolved into their forward and reverse components and it is found that Kirchhoff’s integral is the appropriate measure of the forward irradiance. Because of the inadequate boundary conditions assumed in their derivation the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Kirchhoff integrals do not correctly describe the flow of energy through the aperture.

  14. Development of a Compact Optical-MEMS Scanner with Integrated VCSEL Light Source and Diffractive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Krygowski, Thomas W.; Reyes, David; Rodgers, M. Steven; Smith, James H.; Warren, Mial; Sweatt, William; Blum-Spahn, Olga; Wendt, Joel R.; Asbill, Randy

    1999-06-30

    In this work the design and initial fabrication results are reported for the components of a compact optical-MEMS laser scanning system. This system integrates a silicon MEMS laser scanner, a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) and passive optical components. The MEMS scanner and VCSEL are mounted onto a fused silica substrate which serves as an optical interconnect between the devices. Two Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are etched into the fused silica substrate to focus the VCSEL beam and increase the scan range. The silicon MEMS scanner consists of an actuator that continuously scans the position of a large polysilicon gold-coated shuttle containing a third DOE. Interferometric measurements show that the residual stress in the 500 {micro}m x 1000 {micro}m shuttle is extremely low, with a maximum deflection of only 0.18{micro}m over an 800 {micro}m span for an unmetallized case and a deflection of 0.56{micro}m for the metallized case. A conservative estimate for the scan range is {approximately}{+-}4{degree}, with a spot size of about 0.5 mm, producing 50 resolvable spots. The basic system architecture, optical and MEMS design is reported in this paper, with an emphasis on the design and fabrication of the silicon MEMS scanner portion of the system.

  15. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuyu

    2012-12-31

    difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation.

  16. Tolerancing of single point diamond turned diffractive optical elements and optical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, R. F.

    2007-10-01

    Single point diamond turning has an increasing importance with the production of the surfaces for different optical systems such as infrared systems, prototype production of mobile phone cameras or head mounted displays with plastic lenses or master manufacturing for the injection moulding of plastic lenses for mass products. Tolerances which occur during single point diamond turning of aspheric surfaces and diffractive elements or during polar coordinate laser plotting of Computer-generated holograms will be treated. In both cases we expect similar tolerances, because the work piece is rotated in both diamond turning and laser plotting. The purpose is to understand the typical tolerances and to simulate their influence to the aberrations in the optical system.

  17. Research of the new optical diffractive super-resolution element of the two-photon microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng; Zhu, Yu; Duan, Guanghong

    2006-11-01

    The new optical diffractive superresolution element (DSE) is being applied to improve the microfabrication radial superresolution in the two-photon three-dimension (3D) microfabrication system, which appeared only a few years ago and can provide the ability to confine photochemical and physical reactions to the order of laser wavelength in three dimensions. The design method of the DSE is that minimizing M if the lowest limit S l of the S and the highest limit G u of the G is set, where Liu [1] explained the definition of the S, M and G. Simulation test result proved that the microfabrication radial superresolution can be improved by the new optical DSE. The phenomenon can only be interpreted as the intensity of high-order and side of the zero-order diffraction peaks have been clapped under the twophoton absorption (TPA) polymerization threshold. In a word the polymerized volume can be chosen because the S l and the G u is correspondingly adjustable, even if the laser wavelength, objective lens and the photosensitive resin is fixed for a given two-photon microfabrication system. That means the radial superresolution of the two-photon microfabrication can be chosen.

  18. Diffractive optics for combined spatial- and mode- division demultiplexing of optical vortices: design, fabrication and optical characterization.

    PubMed

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Romanato, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light has attracted growing interest as a new degree of freedom for signal channel multiplexing in order to increase the information transmission capacity in today's optical networks. Here we present the design, fabrication and characterization of phase-only diffractive optical elements (DOE) performing mode-division (de)multiplexing (MDM) and spatial-division (de)multiplexing (SDM) at the same time. Samples have been fabricated with high-resolution electron-beam lithography patterning a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) resist layer spun over a glass substrate. Different DOE designs are presented for the sorting of optical vortices differing in either OAM content or beam size in the optical regime, with different steering geometries in far-field. These novel DOE designs appear promising for telecom applications both in free-space and in multi-core fibers propagation. PMID:27094324

  19. Diffractive optics for combined spatial- and mode- division demultiplexing of optical vortices: design, fabrication and optical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Romanato, Filippo

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade, the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light has attracted growing interest as a new degree of freedom for signal channel multiplexing in order to increase the information transmission capacity in today’s optical networks. Here we present the design, fabrication and characterization of phase-only diffractive optical elements (DOE) performing mode-division (de)multiplexing (MDM) and spatial-division (de)multiplexing (SDM) at the same time. Samples have been fabricated with high-resolution electron-beam lithography patterning a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) resist layer spun over a glass substrate. Different DOE designs are presented for the sorting of optical vortices differing in either OAM content or beam size in the optical regime, with different steering geometries in far-field. These novel DOE designs appear promising for telecom applications both in free-space and in multi-core fibers propagation.

  20. Diffractive optics for combined spatial- and mode- division demultiplexing of optical vortices: design, fabrication and optical characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Romanato, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light has attracted growing interest as a new degree of freedom for signal channel multiplexing in order to increase the information transmission capacity in today’s optical networks. Here we present the design, fabrication and characterization of phase-only diffractive optical elements (DOE) performing mode-division (de)multiplexing (MDM) and spatial-division (de)multiplexing (SDM) at the same time. Samples have been fabricated with high-resolution electron-beam lithography patterning a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) resist layer spun over a glass substrate. Different DOE designs are presented for the sorting of optical vortices differing in either OAM content or beam size in the optical regime, with different steering geometries in far-field. These novel DOE designs appear promising for telecom applications both in free-space and in multi-core fibers propagation. PMID:27094324

  1. Bragg diffraction of light by ultrasonic waves in planargyrotrophic optical waveguides in an external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, G.V.

    1995-09-01

    Features of Bragg diffraction of light by two-partial surface ultrasonic waves in planar gyrotropic optical waveguides placed in an external electric field are considered. General expressions for complex vector amplitudes of diffracted fields are presented. It is shown that the diffracted waves have elliptic polarization, the ellipticity being determined by the linear anisotropy of the waveguide structure, the anisotropy induced by an external electric field, the anisotropy of photoelasticity, and the crystal gyrotropy. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Magdich, L N; Yushkov, K B; Voloshinov, V B

    2009-04-30

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 {mu}m. (light modulation)

  3. Design and experiments of combined diffractive optical element for virtual displays and indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinokov, Sergey B.; Ruchkina, Maria A.; Sagatelyan, Gaik R.; Solomashenko, Artem B.; Zherdev, Alexander Y.

    2015-05-01

    Combined diffractive optical elements, which perform the functions of deflection, focusing or transformation of wave fronts and together with the spectral-angular selection of the incident polychromatic radiation, obtained on a single substrate, the method of their design and fabrication are described. The combination of four-level diffraction grating with plasmon meander diffraction grating as a spectral filter that have a bandwidth that varies with the angle of incidence are investigated for use in virtual displays and indicators.

  4. Programmable diffractive optical element using a multichannel lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate phase modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, James A.; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    1995-07-01

    We introduce a programmable diffractive optical element based on an electro-optic phased array implemented with a multichannel lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate phase modulator. The design and fabrication procedures are outlined, along with an experimental demonstration of the device. Experimental results from a 16-channel device operating with a 2 pi voltage of 300 V demonstrate selective beam steering. The programmable diffractive optical element allows for efficient, high-speed high-resolution random-access optical beam steering over a continuous scanning range.

  5. Tunable Diffractive Optical Elements Based on Shape-Memory Polymers Fabricated via Hot Embossing.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Senta; Meier, Tobias; Reinhard, Maximilian; Röhrig, Michael; Schneider, Marc; Heilig, Markus; Kolew, Alexander; Worgull, Matthias; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2016-04-13

    We introduce actively tunable diffractive optical elements fabricated from shape-memory polymers (SMPs). By utilizing the shape-memory effect of the polymer, at least one crucial attribute of the diffractive optical element (DOE) is tunable and adjustable subsequent to the completed fabrication process. A thermoplastic, transparent, thermoresponsive polyurethane SMP was structured with diverse diffractive microstructures via hot embossing. The tunability was enabled by programming a second, temporary shape into the diffractive optical element by mechanical deformation, either by stretching or a second embossing cycle at low temperatures. Upon exposure to the stimulus heat, the structures change continuously and controllable in a predefined way. We establish the novel concept of shape-memory diffractive optical elements by illustrating their capabilities, with regard to tunability, by displaying the morphing diffractive pattern of a height tunable and a period tunable structure, respectively. A sample where an arbitrary structure is transformed to a second, disparate one is illustrated as well. To prove the applicability of our tunable shape-memory diffractive optical elements, we verified their long-term stability and demonstrated the precise adjustability with a detailed analysis of the recovery dynamics, in terms of temperature dependence and spatially resolved, time-dependent recovery. PMID:26998646

  6. Realization of binary radial diffractive optical elements by two-photon polymerization technique.

    PubMed

    Osipov, Vladimir; Pavelyev, Vladimir; Kachalov, Denis; Zukauskas, Albertas; Chichkov, Boris

    2010-12-01

    Application of the two-photon polymerization (2PP) technique for the fabrication of submicron-size relief of radial binary diffractive optical elements (DOE's) is studied. Binary DOE's for the formation of special longitudinal intensity distribution (axial light segment) are realized. Interferometric investigations of the diffractive relief produced by the 2PP-technique and investigations of optical properties of the formed elements are presented. Results of computer simulations are in good agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:21164925

  7. Near-field focusing of an optical wave by diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu E.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the investigation results for spatially-localised light structures (photonic nanojets) under near-field optical radiation scattering on phase diffraction gratings. Main parameters of photonic nanojets from gratings with sawtooth, rectangular and hemispherical groove profiles are obtained by numerical electrodynamic simulation. It is found that by varying a period, degree of filling, groove shape and parameters of optically contrast coating of the diffraction grating one can control the characteristics of the produced photonic jets in a wide range.

  8. Dielectric barrier discharges applied for optical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, S.; Schütz, A.; Klute, F. D.; Kratzer, J.; Franzke, J.

    2016-09-01

    The present review reflects the importance of dielectric barrier discharges for optical spectrometric detection in analytical chemistry. In contrast to usual discharges with a direct current the electrodes are separated by at least one dielectric barrier. There are two main features of the dielectric barrier discharges: they can serve as dissociation and excitation devices as well as ionization sources, respectively. This article portrays various application fields of dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry used for elemental and molecular detection with optical spectrometry.

  9. A complete digital optics applied to digital holographic microscopy: application to chromatic aberration compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomb, Tristan; Charrière, Florian; Kühn, Jonas; Montfort, Frédéric; Depeursinge, Christian

    2007-06-01

    In optics, optical elements are used to transform, to filter or to process physical wavefronts in order to magnify images, compensate for aberration or to suppress unwanted diffracted order for example. Because digital holography provides numerical wavefronts, we developed a digital optics, involving numerical elements such as numerical lenses and pinholes, to mimic numerically what is usually done physically, with the advantage to be able to define any shape for these elements and to place them everywhere without obstruction problems. We demonstrate that automatic and non-automatic procedures allow diffracted order or parasitic interferences filtering, compensation for aberration and image distortion, and control of position and magnification of reconstructed wavefront. We apply this digital optics to compensate for chromatic aberration in multi-wavelength holography in order to have perfect superposition between wavefronts reconstructed from digital hologram recorded with different wavelengths. This has a great importance for synthetic wavelength digital holography or tomographic digital holography that use multiple wavelengths.

  10. MEMS-based diffractive optical-beam-steering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, David A.; Duewer, Bruce E.; Chaudhury, Som; Wilson, John M.; Tucker, John; Eksi, Umut; Franzon, Paul D.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents some results from phase-1 research into developing a beam steerer based on micro-mechanical diffractive elements. The position of these elements is electrostatically controlled, to allow dynamic programming of a 2D phase function. Feasibility prototypes were constructed in the MUMPs polysilicon surface micromachine process.

  11. A discrimination analysis for unsupervised feature selection via optic diffraction principle.

    PubMed

    Padungweang, Praisan; Lursinsap, Chidchanok; Sunat, Khamron

    2012-10-01

    This paper proposes an unsupervised discrimination analysis for feature selection based on a property of the Fourier transform of the probability density distribution. Each feature is evaluated on the basis of a simple observation motivated by the concept of optical diffraction, which is invariant under feature scaling. The time complexity is O(mn), where m is number of features and n is number of instances when being applied directly to the given data. This approach is also extended to deal with data orientation, which is the direction of data alignment. Therefore, the discrimination score of any transformed space can be used for evaluating the original features. The experimental results on several real-world datasets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:24808004

  12. Diffractive optical element with asymmetric microrelief for creating visual security features.

    PubMed

    Goncharsky, Alexander; Goncharsky, Anton; Durlevich, Svyatoslav

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a new security feature for visual control of the authenticity of optical security features - the change of the images when the optical element is turned by 180 degrees ("switch-180°"). The diffractive optical element has an asymmetric microrelief structure resulting from the asymmetry of the scattering pattern. The phase function of the diffractive optical element is computed in terms of Fresnel's scalar wave model. We developed efficient algorithms for computing the structure of flat optical elements to produce the switch effect. A sample of flat optical element for the "switch-180" effect has been developed using electron-beam lithography. The effectiveness of the development is illustrated by the photos and the video captured from a real sample. The visual "switch-180°" effect is easy to control allowing secure anti-counterfeit protection of the optical security feature developed. The new security feature is already used to protect IDs and excise stamps. PMID:26561188

  13. Fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements for an Integrated Compact Optical-MEMS Laser Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    WENDT,JOEL R.; KRYGOWSKI,T.W.; VAWTER,GREGORY A.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; WARREN,MIAL E.; REYES,DAVID NMN

    2000-07-13

    The authors describe the microfabrication of a multi-level diffractive optical element (DOE) onto a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) as a key element in an integrated compact optical-MEMS laser scanner. The DOE is a four-level off-axis microlens fabricated onto a movable polysilicon shuttle. The microlens is patterned by electron beam lithography and etched by reactive ion beam etching. The DOE was fabricated on two generations of MEMS components. The first generation design uses a shuttle suspended on springs and displaced by a linear rack. The second generation design uses a shuttle guided by roller bearings and driven by a single reciprocating gear. Both the linear rack and the reciprocating gear are driven by a microengine assembly. The compact design is based on mounting the MEMS module and a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) onto a fused silica substrate that contains the rest of the optical system. The estimated scan range of the system is {+-}4{degree} with a spot size of 0.5 mm.

  14. About diffusers and their importance in diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrowski, Frank; Schimmel, Hagen

    2006-08-01

    With their introduction of diffused illumination Leith and Upatnieks introduced one the most essential inventions in holography and in modern optical engineering in general. They observed for the first time the enormous capability of utilizing the phase of a light field in a random-like manner for manipulating its characteristics when propagating in space. The use of phase freedom beyond lens-like manipulations in optical engineering was born. We like to place their invention into a broader context and discuss its enormous impact on most actual developments in optical engineering.

  15. Enhancement of RIE: etched Diffractive Optical Elements surfaces by using Ion Beam Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J.; Bischoff, Ch.; Rädel, U.; Grau, M.; Wallrabe, U.; Völklein, F.

    2015-09-01

    Shaping of laser light intensities by using Diffractive Optical Elements allows the adaption of the incident light to its application. Fused silica is used where for example UV-light or high temperatures are mandatory. For high diffraction efficiency the quality of the etched surface areas is important. The investigation of different process parameters for Ion Beam and Reactive Ion Etching reveals that only Ion Beam Etching provides surfaces with optical quality. Measurements of the influence of the surface quality on the diffraction efficiencies prove that the surfaces generated by Reactive Ion Etching are not suitable. Due to the high selectivity of the process Reactive Ion Etching is nevertheless a reasonable choice for the fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements. To improve the quality of the etched surfaces a post processing with Ion Beam Etching is developed. Simulations in MATLAB display that the angle dependent removal of the surface during the Ion Beam Etching causes a smoothing of the surface roughness. The positive influence of a post processing on the diffraction efficiency is outlined by measurements. The ion beam post processing leads to an increase of the etching depth. For the fabrication of high efficient Diffractive Optical Elements this has to be taken into account. The relation is investigated and transferred to the fabrication of four-level gratings. Diffraction efficiencies up to 78 % instead of the ideal 81 % underline the practicability of the developed post processing.

  16. Design and fabrication for the diffractive optical element of an infrared system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changcheng; Li, Shenghui; Li, Yong; Wang, Bin

    2009-05-01

    A diffractive/refractive system with a relative aperture of f/4.0, the EFL of 150mm at 3.7-4.8μm is designed. A diffractive optical element (DOE) is fabricated by means of diamond turning on a conic substrate of the Germanium lens in this system. The characteristics of the diffractive optical element are analyzed in the software of Diffsys. And the zone radius of DOE and step height are detected by profilometry and result is produced. Test results of DOE are coincided with the design figures and the DOE has tiny surface error and high diffractive efficiency. Result of Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for the system is tested by Ealing and the tested value is closely approximate to diffractive limit. The DOE has better behaviour of chromatic aberration and athermalization.

  17. Design of diffractive optical surfaces within the nonimaging SMS design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes-Lopes, João.; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C.

    2015-09-01

    The Simultaneous Multiple Surface (SMS) method was initially developed as a design method in Nonimaging Optics and later, the method was extended for designing Imaging Optics. We show an extension of the SMS method to diffractive surfaces. Using this method, diffractive kinoform surfaces are calculated simultaneously and through a direct method, i. e. it is not based in multi-parametric optimization techniques. Using the phase-shift properties of diffractive surfaces as an extra degree of freedom, only N/2 surfaces are needed to perfectly couple N one parameter wavefronts. Wavefronts of different wavelengths can also be coupled, hence chromatic aberration can be corrected in SMS-based systems. This method can be used by combining and calculating simultaneously both reflective, refractive and diffractive surfaces, through direct calculation of phase and refractive/reflective profiles. Representative diffractive systems designed by the SMS method are presented.

  18. Sub-cellular quantitative optical diffraction tomography with digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrière, Florian; Kühn, Jonas; Colomb, Tristan; Cuche, Etienne; Marquet, Pierre; Depeursinge, Christian

    2007-02-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is an interferometric technique, providing quantitative mapping of the phase shift induced by semi-transparent microscopic specimens, such as cells, with sub-wavelength resolution along the optical axis. Thanks to actual PCs and CCDs, DHM provides nowadays cost-effective instruments for real-time measurements at very high acquisition rates, with sub-micron transverse resolution. However, DHM phase images do not reveal the threedimensional (3D) internal distribution of refractive index, but a phase shift resulting from a mean refractive index (RI) integrated over the cellular thickness. Standard optical diffraction tomography (ODT) techniques can be efficiently applied to reveal internal structures and to measure 3D RI spatial distributions, by recording 2D DHM phase data for different sample orientations or illumination beam direction, in order to fill up entirely the Ewald sphere in the Fourier space. The 3D refractive index can then be reconstructed, even in the direct space with backpropagation algorithms or from the Fourier space with inverse Fourier transform. The presented technique opens wide perspectives in 3D cell imaging: the DHM-based micro-tomography furnishes invaluable data on the cell components optical properties, potentially leading to information about organelles intracellular distribution. Results obtained on biological specimens will be presented. Morphometric measurements can be extracted from the tomographic data, by detection based on the refractive index contrast within the 3D reconstructions. Results and perspectives about sub-cellular organelles identification inside the cell will also be exposed.

  19. Nanostructured diffractive optical devices for soft X-ray microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambach, D.; Peuker, M.; Schneider, G.

    2001-07-01

    The new transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) installed at the BESSY II electron storage ring uses an off-axis transmission zone plate (OTZ) as diffractive and focusing element of the condenser-monochromator setup. A high resolution micro-zone plate (MZP) forms a magnified image on a CCD-detector. Both, the OTZ with an active area of up to 24 mm2 and the MZP with zone widths as small as 25 nm are generated by a process including electron beam lithography (EBL), dry etching and subsequent electroplating of nickel on top of silicon membrane substrates with about 100- 150 nm thickness. The combination of a larger zone width and the usage of nickel zone structures allows to increase the diffraction efficiency of the condenser element at least by a factor of 3 compared to the earlier used KZP7 condenser zone plate in the TXM at BESSY I. Groove diffraction efficiencies of 21.6% and 14.7% were measured for MZP objectives with 40 and 25 nm outermost zone width, respectively.

  20. Thermal Weapon Sight (TWS) AN/PAS-13 diffractive optics designed for producibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. Steven; Chen, Chungte W.; Spande, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The Thermal Weapon Sight (TWS) program is a manportable 3-5 micrometer forward-looking-infrared (FLIR) rifle sight. The manportable nature requires that the optics modules be lightweight, low cost and compact while maximizing performance. These objectives were met with diffractive optics. TWS promises to be the first FLIR sensor to incorporate kinoform surfaces in full scale production.

  1. (Optical characterization techniques applied to ceramic oxides)

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, M.M.

    1990-10-15

    The traveler collaborated with M.J.M. Leask, J.M. Baker, B. Bleaney, and others at the Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford University, Oxford, UK, to Study Tetragonal rare-earth phosphates and vanadates by optical and magnetic spectroscopy. This work is related to similar studies that have been performed at ORNL by the Synthesis and Properties of Novel Materials Group in the Solid State Division.

  2. Optical double-image cryptography based on diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2011-10-10

    In this paper, we propose a method using structured-illumination-based diffractive imaging with a laterally-translated phase grating for optical double-image cryptography. An optical cryptosystem is designed, and multiple random phase-only masks are placed in the optical path. When a phase grating is laterally translated just before the plaintexts, several diffraction intensity patterns (i.e., ciphertexts) can be correspondingly obtained. During image decryption, an iterative retrieval algorithm is developed to extract plaintexts from the ciphertexts. In addition, security and advantages of the proposed method are analyzed. Feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are demonstrated by numerical simulation results. PMID:22015370

  3. Optical characterization of fully programmable MEMS diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Zamkotsian, F; Timotijevic, B; Lockhart, R; Stanley, R P; Lanzoni, P; Luetzelschwab, M; Canonica, M; Noell, W; Tormen, M

    2012-11-01

    We have fabricated and characterized fully programmable diffraction gratings consisting of 64 silicon micro-mirrors. The mirrors are 700µm long and 50µm wide with a fill factor of 90%. They are actuated electrostatically and move down by 1.25μm while showing negligible cross-talk and bowing as small as 0.14μm over 700μm. Extinction ratio up to 100 has been achieved by adjusting only 3 adjacent micro-mirrors. The gratings could operate either as light modulators up to 5μm or spectra generators up to 2.5μm. PMID:23187343

  4. Fabrication error analysis for diffractive optical elements used in a lithography illumination system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Fang; Song, Qiang; Zeng, Aijun; Zhu, Jing; Huang, Huijie

    2015-04-01

    With the constant shrinking of printable critical dimensions in photolithography, off-axis illumination (OAI) becomes one of the effective resolution-enhancement methods facing these challenges. This, in turn, is driving much more strict requirements, such as higher diffractive efficiency of the diffractive optical elements (DOEs) used in the OAI system. Since the design algorithms to optimize DOEs' phase profile are improved, the fabrication process becomes the main limiting factor leading to energy loss. Tolerance analysis is the general method to evaluate the fabrication accuracy requirement, which is especially useful for highly specialized deep UV applications with small structures and tight tolerances. A subpixel DOE simulation model is applied for tolerance analysis of DOEs by converting the abstractive fabrication structure errors into quantifiable subpixel phase matrices. Adopting the proposed model, four kinds of fabrication errors including misetch, misalignment, feature size error, and feature rounding error are able to be investigated. In the simulation experiments, systematic fabrication error studies of five typical DOEs used in 90-nm scanning photolithography illumination system are carried out. These results are valuable in the range of high precision DOE design algorithm and fabrication process optimization.

  5. Local improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio for diffractive optical elements designed by unidirectional optimization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Martin; Winfield, Richard J.

    2002-12-01

    We present a straightforward method to design multilevel phase-only diffractive optical elements with a locally improved signal-to-noise ratio in the reconstruction. The method is generally applicable to all unidirectional design schemes, such as direct search, simulated annealing, or genetic optimization. As the shape and the location of the desired low noise areas are supplied by a bit map file the method allows for the design of basically any two-dimensional low noise area. The improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio that may be achieved is considerable but also entails reduced diffraction efficiency. The suggested method is applied to different beam-splitter design examples. All examples are calculated with the scalar diffraction approximation in the far field.

  6. Diffractive focusing optics design at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Firsov, Anatoly; Svintsov, Alexander; Erko, Alexei

    2014-09-01

    X-ray laser facilities are being constructed all over the world: Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in California, RIKEN X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SPring-8 in Japan, European XFEL in Germany etc. XFEL is the next-generation (4th) light source. However, the number of such experimental facilities (SRS and FEL) is quite limited. At the same time, relatively small vacuum ultraviolet laboratories with impulse sources [High Harmonic Generators (HHG)] allow one conduct in-house research. This makes the research community directly involved in experiments with time resolution much wider. The latest radiation sources and modern physical experiments require application of the newest diffractive elements. Such diffractive elements are required for implementation of experiments with time resolution using synchrotron radiation sources or high harmonics generators. For example, valence state evolution or molecules dissociation in time-resolved investigation. Modern experiments like this might require implementation of time resolution in femto - (10-15) and even atto- (10-18) seconds.

  7. Diffraction microgratings as a novel optical biosensing platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikova, Tatiana V.; Danilov, Pavel A.; Gonchukov, Sergey A.; Yermachenko, Valery M.; Ionin, Andrey A.; Khmelnitskii, Roman A.; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Nguyen, Trang T. H.; Rudenko, Andrey A.; Saraeva, Irina N.; Svistunova, Tatiana S.; Zayarny, Dmitry A.

    2016-07-01

    Using a micro-hole grating in a supported silver film as a laser-fabricated novel optical platform for surface-enhanced IR absoprtion/reflection spectroscopy, characteristic absorption bands of Staphylococcus aureus, in particular, its buried carotenoid fragments, were detected in FT-IR spectra with 10-fold analytical enhancement, paving the way for the spectral express-identification of pathogenic microorganisms.

  8. Quantum Optics, Diffraction Theory, and Elementary Particle Physics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-10-06

    Physical optics has expanded greatly in recent years. Though it remains part of the ancestry of elementary particle physics, there are once again lessons to be learned from it. I shall discuss several of these, including some that have emerged at CERN and Brookhaven.

  9. Optical diffraction in ordered VO2 nanoparticle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Rene; Feldman, Leonard; Haglund, Richard

    2006-03-01

    The potential of oxide electronic materials as multifunctional building blocks is one of the driving concepts of the field. In this presentation, we show how nanostructured particle arrays with long-range order can be used to modulate an optical response through exploiting the metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide. Arrays of VO2 nanoparticles with long-range order were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition in an arbitrary pattern defined by focused ion-beam lithography. The interaction of light with the nanoparticles is controlled by the nanoparticle size, spacing and geometrical arrangement and by switching between the metallic and semiconducting phases of VO2. In addition to the near-infrared surface plasmon response observed in previous VO2 studies, the VO2 nanoparticle arrays exhibit size-dependent optical resonances in the visible region that likewise show an enhanced optical contrast between the semiconducting and metallic phases. The collective optical response as a function of temperature gives rise to an enhanced scattering state during the evolving phase transition, while the incoherent coupling between the nanoparticles produces an order-disorder-order transition.

  10. Design and fabrication of diffractive microlens and analysis of optical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Li, Bin; Wei, Ming-yue; Zhang, Xin-yu; Xie, Chang-Sheng; Zhang, Tian-xu

    2010-10-01

    The method for designing diffractive microlens with micro-nano-scale structural features, through iterative angular spectrum algorithm, and fabricating diffractive microlens by single-step photolithography and a wet etching process, based on standard micro-nano-technology, was presented. Surface morphology testing shows that the diffractive microlens fabricated is composed of multi-step continuous relief structures with the feature height in the micrometer range, the distribution of the surface micro-nano-structures is circular symmetry, and the transition between the circular rings is smooth. A large number of fine structures with micro-nano-scale features can be clearly observed in the scanning electron microscope on the surface of the diffractive microlens. Surface roughness data tested shows that the surface roughness of fabricated diffractive microlens is in the nanometer range, which has reached the level of optical mirror. The optical aperture is in the micrometer range. The characteristics of the micro-structures on the surface and the optical aperture can be set and arranged flexibly by the iterative angular spectrum algorithm, according to the characteristics and parameters of the incident and outgoing beam. The results of optical characteristics measurement show that the diffractive microlens can focus incident red laser into a very small bright focal spot, and the phenomenon of focusing and defocusing is obvious. The analysis of beam quality shows that the intensity distribution and size of the focal-spot is in accord with pre-calculated results. The fabricated diffractive microlens indicates a very high diffraction efficiency. The experimental results demonstrate that the performances of the diffractive microlens can be further improved by modifying the design algorithm and optimizing the manufacture craft.

  11. Controllable design of super-oscillatory planar lenses for sub-diffraction-limit optical needles.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jinshuai; Yuan, Weizheng; Yu, Yiting; Zhu, Yechuan; Wu, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Sub-diffraction-limit optical needle can be created by a binary amplitude mask through tailoring the interference of diffraction beams. In this paper, a controllable design of super-oscillatory planar lenses to create sub-diffraction-limit optical needles with the tunable focal length and depth of focus (DOF) is presented. As a high-quality optical needle is influenced by various factors, we first propose a multi-objective and multi-constraint optimization model compromising all the main factors to achieve a needle with the prescribed characteristics. The optimizing procedure is self-designed using the Matlab programming language based on the genetic algorithm (GA) and fast Hankel transform algorithm. Numerical simulations show that the optical needles' properties can be controlled accurately. The optimized results are further validated by the theoretical calculation with the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral. The sub-diffraction-limit optical needles can be used in wide fields such as optical nanofabrication, super-resolution imaging, particle acceleration and high-density optical data storage. PMID:26906769

  12. Routing of deep-subwavelength optical beams without reflection and diffraction using infinitely anisotropic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catrysse, Peter B.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-03-01

    Media that are described by extreme electromagnetic parameters, such as very large/small permittivity/permeability, have generated significant fundamental and applied interest in recent years. Notable examples include epsilon-near-zero, ultra-low refractive-index, and ultra-high refractive-index materials. Many photonic structures, such as waveguides, lenses, and photonic band gap materials, benefit greatly from the large index contrast provided by such media. In this paper, I discuss our recent work on media with infinite anisotropy, i.e., infinite permittivity (permeability) in one direction and finite in the other directions. As an illustration of the unusual optical behaviors that result from infinite anisotropy, I describe efficient light transport in deep-subwavelength apertures filled with infinitely anisotropic media. I then point out some of the opportunities that exist for controlling light at the nano-scale using infinitely anisotropic media by themselves. First, I show that a single medium with infinite anisotropy enables diffraction-free propagation of deep-subwavelength beams. Next, I demonstrate interfaces between two infinitely anisotropic media that are impedancematched for complete deep-subwavelength beams and enable reflection-free routing with zero bend radius that is entirely free from diffraction effects even when deep-subwavelength information is encoded on the beams. These behaviors indicate an unprecedented possibility to use media with infinite anisotropy to manipulate beams with deepsubwavelength features, including complete images. To illustrate physical realizability, I demonstrate a metamaterial design using existing materials in a planar geometry, which can be implemented using well-established nanofabrication techniques. This approach provides a path to deep-subwavelength routing of information-carrying beams and far-field imaging unencumbered by diffraction and reflection.

  13. Optical correlator techniques applied to robotic vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hine, Butler P., III; Reid, Max B.; Downie, John D.

    1991-01-01

    Vision processing is one of the most computationally intensive tasks required of an autonomous robot. The data flow from a single typical imaging sensor is roughly 60 Mbits/sec, which can easily overload current on-board processors. Optical correlator-based processing can be used to perform many of the functions required of a general robotic vision system, such as object recognition, tracking, and orientation determination, and can perform these functions fast enough to keep pace with the incoming sensor data. We describe a hybrid digital electronic/analog optical robotic vision processing system developed at Ames Research Center to test concepts and algorithms for autonomous construction, inspection, and maintenance of space-based habitats. We discuss the system architecture design and implementation, its performance characteristics, and our future plans. In particular, we compare the performance of the system to a more conventional all digital electronic system developed concurrently. The hybrid system consistently outperforms the digital electronic one in both speed and robustness.

  14. Direct-write diffracting tubular optical components using femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Ben; Bellouard, Yves

    2014-03-01

    Over the last decade, femtosecond lasers have been used extensively for the fabrication of optical elements via direct writing and in combination with chemical etching. These processes have been an enabling technology for manufacturing a variety of devices such as waveguides, fluidic channels, and mechanical components. Here, we present high quality micro-scale optical components buried inside various glass substrates such as soda-lime glass or fused silica. These components consist of high-precision, simple patterns with tubular shapes. Typical diameters range from a few microns to one hundred microns. With the aid of high-bandwidth, high acceleration flexure stages, we achieve highly symmetric pattern geometries, which are particularly important for achieving homogeneous stress distribution within the substrate. We model the optical properties of these structures using beam propagation simulation techniques and experimentally demonstrate that such components can be used as cost-effective, low-numerical aperture lenses. Additionally, we investigate their capability for studying the stress-distribution induced by the laser-affected zones and possible related densification effects.

  15. Optical Modulation of the Diffraction Efficiency in an Indoline Azobenzene/Amorphous Polycarbonate Film.

    PubMed

    Williams, G V M; Do, My T T; Middleton, A; Raymond, S G; Bhuiyan, M D H; Kay, A J

    2016-12-01

    We have made a diffraction grating in an indoline azobenzene/amorphous polycarbonate film by two-beam interference at 532 nm that periodically photodegrades the indoline azobenzene dye. Subsequent illumination of the film with 532-nm light into the trans-isomer band leads to trans-cis isomerization in the indoline azobenzene dye and results in a decrease in the trans-isomer band absorption coefficient. This causes the diffraction efficiency to decrease when probed at 655 nm. The diffraction efficiency returns to its original value when the 532-nm light is blocked by thermal relaxation from the indoline azobenzene cis-isomer to the trans-isomer. Thus, we have been able to optically modulate the diffraction efficiency in a thin film diffraction grating. PMID:27416904

  16. Optical Modulation of the Diffraction Efficiency in an Indoline Azobenzene/Amorphous Polycarbonate Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. V. M.; Do, My T. T.; Middleton, A.; Raymond, S. G.; Bhuiyan, M. D. H.; Kay, A. J.

    2016-07-01

    We have made a diffraction grating in an indoline azobenzene/amorphous polycarbonate film by two-beam interference at 532 nm that periodically photodegrades the indoline azobenzene dye. Subsequent illumination of the film with 532-nm light into the trans-isomer band leads to trans- cis isomerization in the indoline azobenzene dye and results in a decrease in the trans-isomer band absorption coefficient. This causes the diffraction efficiency to decrease when probed at 655 nm. The diffraction efficiency returns to its original value when the 532-nm light is blocked by thermal relaxation from the indoline azobenzene cis-isomer to the trans-isomer. Thus, we have been able to optically modulate the diffraction efficiency in a thin film diffraction grating.

  17. Development of Coherent X-ray Diffraction Apparatus with Kirkpatrick-Baez Mirror Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Y.; Tsutsumi, R.; Mimura, H.; Matsuyama, S.; Nishino, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamauchi, K.

    2011-09-09

    To realize coherent x-ray diffraction microscopy with higher spatial resolution, it is necessary to increase the density of x-ray photons illuminated onto the sample. In this study, we developed a coherent x-ray diffraction apparatus with Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics. By using mirrors fabricated by elastic emission machining, a high-density coherent x-ray beam was produced. In a demonstration experiment using a silver nanocube as a sample, a high-contrast coherent x-ray diffraction pattern was observed over a wide-q range. This proves that both the density and the degree of coherence of the focused beam were high.

  18. Diffractive optics based on modulated subwavelength-domain V-ridge gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Gaurav; Verhoeven, Antonie; Vartiainen, Ismo; Roussey, Matthieu; Kuittinen, Markku; Tervo, Jani; Turunen, Jari

    2016-08-01

    We study the properties of reflection-type V-ridge gratings in the subwavelength domain and describe a method to realize diffractive optical elements by using such gratings as signal carriers. In particular, we utilize a coding scheme based on position modulation of a high-frequency V-ridge carrier grating. We design and demonstrate beam splitting elements using this coding scheme, electron-beam lithography, anisotropic wet etching of silicon, hot embossing of polymer, and metal deposition. These elements have the outstanding property of operating over a large spectral range from 406 to 520 nm. The measured diffraction patterns show excellent agreement with theoretical results given by rigorous diffraction theory.

  19. How optics and photonics is simply applied in agriculture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun

    2013-06-01

    This paper highlights based on author's experience how optics and photonics is applied in Thai agriculture. These include spectral imaging based systems and mobile applications that have been implemented in the last 5 years for rice, fishery, and sericulture. Brief review of optics and photonics in agriculture will also be introduced.

  20. All-optical atom surface traps implemented with one-dimensional planar diffractive microstructures.

    PubMed

    Alloschery, O; Mathevet, R; Weiner, J; Lezec, H J

    2006-12-25

    We characterize the loading, containment and optical properties of all-optical atom traps implemented by diffractive focusing with one-dimensional (1D) microstructures milled on gold films. These on-chip Fresnel lenses with focal lengths of the order of a few hundred microns produce optical-gradient-dipole traps. Cold atoms are loaded from a mirror magneto-optical trap (MMOT) centered a few hundred microns above the gold mirror surface. Details of loading optimization are reported and perspectives for future development of these structures are discussed. PMID:19532148

  1. Influence of the photopolymer properties in the fabrication of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Sergi; Fernández, Roberto; Márquez, Andrés.; Martínez, Francisco J.; Neipp, Cristian; Ortuño, Manuel; Francés, Jorge; Beléndez, Augusto; Pascual, Inmaculada

    2014-09-01

    A wide range of chemical compositions are possible to design photopolymers. These materials are also appealing for diffractive and holographic applications due to their capability to modulate the refractive index and/or the thickness when illuminated. Some of the most interesting applications for photopolymers are the optical data storage, security systems, surface relief photo-embossing, diffractive and refractive optical elements, holographic elements, solar concentrators, optical detectors and hybrid optoelectronic 3-D circuitry. Looking for an optimized chemical composition for each application many different photopolymers compositions may be needed enabling a variety of materials properties: materials with low or high rates of monomer diffusion, low or high values of shrinkage, long or short length of polymer chains and low or high light absorption. In parallel many models are presented in order to predict the photopolymers recording and the post exposure evolution. In this work we use one of these experimentally checked models to study the influence of the material characteristics in the final diffractive optical element recorded in the material. We study the changes in the surface relief and in the refractive index in order to understand the importance of each material property in the final diffractive optical element recorded.

  2. Education in applied and instrumental optics at the University of Helsinki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenman, Folke

    1997-12-01

    The teaching of applied and instrumental optics at the University of Helsinki Department of Physics originally grew out of the needs of the research group of molecular physics as a basis for the experimental work in the group. The training program starts with a one-year course for senior undergraduates and graduates comprising geometrical optics, eikonal theory, image forming components, matrix methods, optical instruments, the optics of laser beams, radiometry and photometry, ray tracing methods, optics of anisotropic media, diffraction theory, general image formation theory and Fourier optics. The course starts from fundamentals, but the mathematical level is kept adequate for serious work. Further applications are treated in courses on molecular spectroscopy, where ruled and holographic diffraction gratings (both plane and spherical), interferometric spectroscopy and imaging properties of spectral equipment are treated. Aspects of image analysis, information in optics, signal-to-noise ratio, etc. are treated in separate courses on Fourier method and digital spectral analysis. The applicability of optical techniques to various fields of physics and engineering and the analogies with them are especially brought out. Experimental and calculational and skills are stressed throughout. Computer programming is introduced as an indispensable tool for the optics practitioner, and the students are required to write programs of their own. The students gain practical experience, e.g., by working in the molecular physics group. Close cooperation is maintained with other research groups in laser physics, ultrasonics and physical chemistry. The training in optics has proved very useful, with students frequently ending up working in the industry on optics and spectroscopy problems. Parts of these courses have also been given at other universities and to engineers and scientists working in the industry.

  3. Measuring In-Plane Displacements with Variable Sensitivity Using Diffractive Optic Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Robert L.; Gilbert, John A.; Cole, Helen J.; Ashley, Paul R.

    1998-01-01

    This paper introduces a method called diffractive optic interferometry (DOI) which allows in-plane displacement components to be measured with variable sensitivity. DOI relies on binary optical elements fabricated as phase-type Dammann gratings which produce multiple diffraction orders of nearly equal intensity. Sensitivity is varied by combining the different wavefronts produced by a conjugate pair of these binary optical elements; a transmission element is used to produce several illumination beams while a reflective element, replicated on the surface of a specimen, provides the reference for the undeformed state. The steps taken to design and fabricate these binary optical elements are described. The specimen grating is characterized, and tested on a disk subjected to diametrical compression. Overall, the results are excellent, with experimental data agreeing to within a few percent of the theoretical predictions.

  4. Teaching applied optics at the Univ. of Minho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F. M.

    1995-10-01

    In this communication we make a brief presentation of the branch of Applied Optics of the University of Mihno's undergraduate course of Applied Physics. The course of Applied Physics began in the year 1988/89. Previously we had just a course devoted to the formation of future physics and chemistry teachers at high school level. The Applied Physics course specialized in Optics appeared due to the growth of the physics department and due to request from the industry. The Applied Physics course has two specialization's on the field of applied optics: Optometry; and Optics and Lasers. The topics covered in the two first years of the course ar common to the two branches. On the second semester of the third year the students must choose between either one. The number of students on the Optometry branch was usually almost four times the number of Applied Optics and Lasers students. Nevertheless this tendency is rapidly changing. A short analysis of the result obtained will be presented focusing on last couple of years' advances. Presented will also be the results of an inquest made on students's opinions about the quality of the course, and their own performance and expectations.

  5. Trends in optical coherence tomography applied to medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    The number of publications on optical coherence tomography (OCT) continues to double every three years. Traditionally applied to imaging the eye, OCT is now being extended to fields outside ophthalmology and optometry. Widening its applicability, progress in the core engine of the technology, and impact on development of novel optical sources, make OCT a very active and rapidly evolving field. Trends in the developments of different specific devices, such as optical sources, optical configurations and signal processing will be presented. Encompassing studies on both the configurations as well as on signal processing themes, current research in Kent looks at combining spectral domain with time domain imaging for long axial range and simultaneous imaging at several depths. Results of the collaborative work of the Applied Optics Group in Kent with organisers of this conference will be presented, with reference to 3D monitoring of abfraction.

  6. Fabrication of gray-scale masks and diffractive optical elements with LDW glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolkov, Victor P.; Malyshev, Anatoly I.; Poleshchuk, Alexander G.; Cherkashin, Vadim V.; Tiziani, Hans J.; Pruss, Christof; Schoder, Thomas; Westhauser, Johann; Wu, Chuck

    2001-11-01

    In the last years the application of gray-scale masks (GSM) for diffractive optics manufacturing attracts attention because of cost-effective possibility to produce a lot of diffractive elements on hard and heat-resistant thermally stable substrates. Direct laser writing of GSMs and fabrication of diffractive optical elements are effectively realized with application of LDW-glass (material for Laser Direct Write from CANYON MATERIALS, Inc). An important advantage of this material is the real-time change of transmittance in a single-step process without liquid development. It is shown that optimal transmittance range in which track width is not more than 1 micrometers is from 5-10% (transmittance of unexposed area) to 60-65% for LDW-glass type I having thinner colored layer. Power modulation and surroundings dependent peculiarities of direct laser writing on LDW-glass are discussed. Results of fabrication of diffractive optical elements using LDW-glass masks are presented. Among several types of LDW glasses studied the advantages of new GS-11 glass are elaborated. Application of GS-11 glass for GSMs allowed to fabricate blazed diffractive structures with backward slope width of 0.8 micrometers .

  7. Approach to improve beam quality of inter-satellite optical communication system based on diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liying; Yu, Jianjie; Ma, Jing; Yang, Yuqiang; Li, Mi; Jiang, Yijun; Liu, Jianfeng; Han, Qiqi

    2009-04-13

    For inter-satellite optical communication transmitter with reflective telescope of two-mirrors on axis, a large mount of the transmitted energy will be blocked by central obscuration of the secondary mirror. In this paper, a novel scheme based on diffractive optical element (DOE) is introduced to avoid it. This scheme includes one diffractive beam shaper and another diffractive phase corrector, which can diffract the obscured part of transmitted beam into the domain unobscured by the secondary mirror. The proposed approach is firstly researched with a fixed obscuration ratio of 1/4. Numerical simulation shows that the emission efficiency of new figuration is 99.99%; the beam divergence from the novel inter-satellite optical communication transmitter is unchanged; and the peak intensity of receiver plane is increased about 31% compared with the typical configuration. Then the intensy patterns of receiver plane are analyzed with various obscuration ratio, the corresponding numerical modelling reveals that the intensity patterns with various obscuration ratio are nearly identical, but the amplify of relative peak intensity is getting down with the growth of obscuration ratio. This work can improve the beam quality of inter-satellite optical communication system without affecting any other functionality. PMID:19365457

  8. Optical asymmetric watermarking using modified wavelet fusion and diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehra, Isha; Nishchal, Naveen K.

    2015-05-01

    In most of the existing image encryption algorithms the generated keys are in the form of a noise like distribution with a uniform distributed histogram. However, the noise like distribution is an apparent sign indicating the presence of the keys. If the keys are to be transferred through some communication channels, then this may lead to a security problem. This is because; the noise like features may easily catch people's attention and bring more attacks. To address this problem it is required to transfer the keys to some other meaningful images to disguise the attackers. The watermarking schemes are complementary to image encryption schemes. In most of the iterative encryption schemes, support constraints play an important role of the keys in order to decrypt the meaningful data. In this article, we have transferred the support constraints which are generated by axial translation of CCD camera using amplitude-, and phase- truncation approach, into different meaningful images. This has been done by developing modified fusion technique in wavelet transform domain. The second issue is, in case, the meaningful images are caught by the attacker then how to solve the copyright protection. To resolve this issue, watermark detection plays a crucial role. For this purpose, it is necessary to recover the original image using the retrieved watermarks/support constraints. To address this issue, four asymmetric keys have been generated corresponding to each watermarked image to retrieve the watermarks. For decryption, an iterative phase retrieval algorithm is applied to extract the plain-texts from corresponding retrieved watermarks.

  9. Design and analysis of diffractive optical elements for flattening of single modal Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Kewei; Huang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Wumei; Xing, Tingwen

    2012-10-01

    A design method of diffractive optical element is presented for converting a single modal Gaussian beam into a flat-top beam in the far field of the source. The design is based on geometrical method and modified Gerchberg-Saxton method. Geometrical method derives from the conservation of energy and the constant optical path length. This method could supply initial phase distribution of the modified Gerchberg-Saxton method. To find the optimization design results, the modified Gerchberg-Saxton method is important to choose the feedback factor to increase the convergent speed. In addition, tolerances and limitations of such elements result in a reduction of the diffraction efficiency and as a result of stray light. Further study indicates that deviation of the laser wavelength, incident beam, and observation plane can greatly influence flat-top beam shaping quality. On the basis of theoretical and experimental results, limitations for the application of diffractive beam shaping elements are investigated.

  10. Influence of phase delay profile on diffraction efficiency of liquid crystal optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lin; Zhang, Jian; Wu, Li Ying

    2009-06-01

    The hardware structure and driving voltage of liquid crystal optical phased array (LCOPA) devices determine the produced phase delay characteristics. The phase delay profile influences directly the device's diffraction efficiency. In this paper, a sawtooth-shaped phase delay model of LCOPA was proposed to analyze quantitatively the influence factors of diffraction efficiency employing Fourier optics theory. Analysis results show that flyback region size is the main factor that affects diffraction efficiency. The influence extent varies with different maximum-phase-delays and grating periods. There exists an optimized curve between maximum-phase-delay and flyback region, and between maximum-phase-delay and grating period, individually. The smaller the grating period is or the larger the flyback region is, the more evident the optimization effect becomes, and the maximum increase ratio is up to 16%. Some feasible experiments were done to test theoretical analysis, and the experimental results agreed with the analysis results.

  11. Highly efficient acousto-optic diffraction in Sn2P2S6 crystals.

    PubMed

    Martynyuk-Lototska, I Yu; Mys, O G; Grabar, A A; Stoika, I M; Vysochanskii, Yu M; Vlokh, R O

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the acousto-optic (AO) diffraction in Sn2P2S6 crystals and found that they manifest high values of an AO figure of merit. The above crystals may therefore be used as highly efficient materials in different AO applications. PMID:18157276

  12. Nanofabrication of diffractive optics for soft X-ray and atom beam focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehbein, S.

    2003-03-01

    Nanostructuring processes are described for manufacturing diffractive optics for the condensermonochromator set-up of the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) and for the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the BESSY II electron storage ring in Berlin. Furthermore, a process for manufacturing freestanding nickel zone plates for helium atom beam focusing experiments is presented.

  13. Optical diffraction by the microstructure of the wing of a moth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, D. J.; Smit, J. E.; Lee, M. E.; Möller, A.

    1995-09-01

    On the wing of the moth Trichoplusia orichalcea a prominent, apparently highly reflective, golden spot can be seen. Scales from this area of the wing exhibit a regular microstructure resembling a submicrometer herringbone pattern. We show that a diffraction process from this structure is responsible for the observed optical properties, such as directionality, brightness variations, polarization, and color.

  14. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  15. Rejuvenation in scale-free optics and enhanced diffraction cancellation life-time.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, J; Conti, C; Agranat, A J; DelRe, E

    2012-11-19

    We demonstrate rejuvenation in scale-free optical propagation. The phenomenon is caused by the non-ergodic relaxation of the dipolar glass that mediates the photorefractive nonlinearity in compositionally-disordered lithium-enriched potassium-tantalate-niobate (KTN:Li). We implement rejuvenation to halt aging in the dipolar glass and extend the duration of beam diffraction cancellation. PMID:23187594

  16. Modified Method of Increasing of Reconstruction Quality of Diffractive Optical Elements Displayed with LC SLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, V. V.; Cheremkhin, P. A.; Erkin, I. Yu.; Evtikhiev, N. N.; Starikov, R. S.; Starikov, S. N.

    Modified method of increasing of reconstruction quality of diffractive optical elements (DOE) displayed with liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulators (SLM) is presented. Method is based on optimization of DOE synthesized with conventional method by application of direct search with random trajectory method while taking into account LC SLM phase fluctuations. Reduction of synthesis error up to 88% is achieved.

  17. Optimizing diffraction efficiency for transmission holographic optical elements with HARMAN holographic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven L.; Harvey, Karen; Richardson, Martin; Blyth, Jeff

    2011-02-01

    HARMAN technology's new holographic emulsions; red sensitive and green sensitive assisted by smaller grain sizes, novel sensitization and coating technology have been shown to achieve high diffraction efficiencies and narrow band reconstruction capabilities. Authors demonstrate processing optimizations and material behavior characteristics for Transmission image Masters as well as Holographic Optical Elements (HOE's).

  18. Method for studying the phase function in tunable diffraction optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Paranin, V D; Tukmakov, K N

    2014-04-28

    A method for studying the phase function in tunable diffraction optical elements is proposed, based on measurement of the transmission of interelectrode gaps. The mathematical description of the method, which is approved experimentally, is developed. The instrumental error effects are analysed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  19. Visible-band testbed projector with a replicated diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Chen, C B; Hegg, R G; Johnson, W T; King, W B; Rock, D F; Spande, R

    1999-12-01

    Raytheon has designed, fabricated, and tested a diffractive-optical-element-based (DOE-based) testbed projector for direct and indirect visual optical applications. By use of a low-cost replicated DOE surface from Rochester Photonics Corporation for color correction the projector optics bettered the modular transfer function of an equivalent commercial camera lens. The testbed demonstrates that a practical DOE-based optical system is suitable for both visual applications (e.g., head-mounted displays) and visual projection (e.g., tactical sensors). The need for and the proper application of DOE's in visual optical systems, the nature and the performance of the projector optical design, and test results are described. PMID:18324257

  20. Edge diffraction of optical-vortex beams formed by means of the fork hologram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernykh, Aleksey; Bekshaev, Aleksandr; Khoroshun, Anna; Mikhaylovskaya, Lidiya; Akhmerov, Aleksandr; Mohammed, Kadhim A.

    2015-11-01

    We present the experimental and numerical study of the transverse profile for a beam obtained by the screen-edge diffraction of optical-vortex (OV) Kummer beams with topological charges 1, 2 and 3, generated with the help of a "fork" hologram. The main results concern the behavior of the secondary OVs formed in the diffracted beam due to splitting of the incident multicharged OV into a set of single-charged ones. When the screen edge moves across the incident beam, OVs in every cross section of the diffracted beam describe complicated spiral-like trajectories, which distinctly manifests the screw-like nature and the energy circulation in the OV beam. At certain conditions, positions of the separate OVs as well as their mutual configuration (singular skeleton of the diffracted beam) shows high sensitivity to the screen edge dislocation with respect to the incident beam axis. This can be used for remote measurements of small displacements and deformations.

  1. Long-baseline optical intensity interferometry. Laboratory demonstration of diffraction-limited imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D.

    2015-08-01

    Context. A long-held vision has been to realize diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometer baselines. This will enable imaging of stellar surfaces and their environments, and reveal interacting gas flows in binary systems. An opportunity is now opening up with the large telescope arrays primarily erected for measuring Cherenkov light in air induced by gamma rays. With suitable software, such telescopes could be electronically connected and also used for intensity interferometry. Second-order spatial coherence of light is obtained by cross correlating intensity fluctuations measured in different pairs of telescopes. With no optical links between them, the error budget is set by the electronic time resolution of a few nanoseconds. Corresponding light-travel distances are approximately one meter, making the method practically immune to atmospheric turbulence or optical imperfections, permitting both very long baselines and observing at short optical wavelengths. Aims: Previous theoretical modeling has shown that full images should be possible to retrieve from observations with such telescope arrays. This project aims at verifying diffraction-limited imaging experimentally with groups of detached and independent optical telescopes. Methods: In a large optics laboratory, artificial stars (single and double, round and elliptic) were observed by an array of small telescopes. Using high-speed photon-counting solid-state detectors and real-time electronics, intensity fluctuations were cross-correlated over up to 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, producing coherence maps across the interferometric Fourier-transform plane. Results: These interferometric measurements were used to extract parameters about the simulated stars, and to reconstruct their two-dimensional images. As far as we are aware, these are the first diffraction-limited images obtained from an optical array only linked by electronic software, with no optical connections between the

  2. Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R.

    1997-12-01

    Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

  3. Vector fuzzy control iterative algorithm for the design of sub-wavelength diffractive optical elements for beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yong; Hu, Jiasheng; Wu, Kenan

    2009-08-01

    The vector fuzzy control iterative algorithm (VFCIA) is proposed for the design of phase-only sub-wavelength diffractive optical elements (SWDOEs) for beam shaping. The vector diffraction model put forward by Mansuripur is applied to relate the field distributions between the SWDOE plane and the output plane. Fuzzy control theory is used to decide the constraint method for each iterative process of the algorithm. We have designed a SWDOE that transforms a circular flat-top beam to a square irradiance pattern. Computer design results show that the SWDOE designed by the VFCIA can produce better results than the vector iterative algorithm (VIA). And the finite difference time-domain method (FDTD), a rigorous electromagnetic analysis technique, is used to analyze the designed SWDOE for further confirming the validity of the proposed method.

  4. LIGHT MODULATION: Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdich, L. N.; Yushkov, K. B.; Voloshinov, V. B.

    2009-04-01

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 μm.

  5. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part II - size estimations for selected markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Robert

    2014-04-01

    In a series of two contributions, decisive business-related aspects of the current process status to transfer research results on diffractive optical elements (DOEs) into commercial solutions are discussed. In part I, the focus was on the patent landscape. Here, in part II, market estimations concerning DOEs for selected applications are presented, comprising classical spectroscopic gratings, security features on banknotes, DOEs for high-end applications, e.g., for the semiconductor manufacturing market and diffractive intra-ocular lenses. The derived market sizes are referred to the optical elements, itself, rather than to the enabled instruments. The estimated market volumes are mainly addressed to scientifically and technologically oriented optical engineers to serve as a rough classification of the commercial dimensions of DOEs in the different market segments and do not claim to be exhaustive.

  6. Signatures of spatial inversion asymmetry of an optical lattice observed in matter-wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Claire K.; Barter, Thomas H.; Leung, Tsz Him; Okano, Masayuki; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M.

    2016-05-01

    The structure of a two-dimensional honeycomb optical lattice potential with small inversion asymmetry is characterized using coherent diffraction of 87 Rb atoms. We demonstrate that even a small potential asymmetry, with peak-to-peak amplitude of <= 2 . 3 % of the overall lattice potential, can lead to pronounced inversion asymmetry in the momentum-space diffraction pattern. The observed asymmetry is explained quantitatively by considering both Kaptiza-Dirac scattering in the Raman-Nath regime, and also either perturbative or full-numerical treatment of the band structure of a periodic potential with a weak inversion symmetry breaking term. Our results have relevance both for the experimental development of coherent atom optics and also for the proper interpretation of time-of-flight assays of atomic materials in optical lattices. This work was supported by the NSF and the AFOSR through the MURI program.

  7. Optically controlled dense current structures driven by relativistic plasma aperture-induced diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; Gray, Ross J.; King, Martin; Dance, Rachel J.; Wilson, Robbie; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Capdessus, Remi; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The collective response of charged particles to intense fields is intrinsic to plasma accelerators and radiation sources, relativistic optics and many astrophysical phenomena. Here we show that a relativistic plasma aperture is generated in thin foils by intense laser light, resulting in the fundamental optical process of diffraction. The plasma electrons collectively respond to the resulting laser near-field diffraction pattern, producing a beam of energetic electrons with a spatial structure that can be controlled by variation of the laser pulse parameters. It is shown that static electron-beam and induced-magnetic-field structures can be made to rotate at fixed or variable angular frequencies depending on the degree of ellipticity in the laser polarization. The concept is demonstrated numerically and verified experimentally, and is an important step towards optical control of charged particle dynamics in laser-driven dense plasma sources.

  8. Evaluation of Diffraction Efficiency and Image Quality in Optical Reconstruction of Digital Fresnel Holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtikhiev, N. N.; Starikov, S. N.; Cheremkhin, P. A.; Kurbatova, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate diffraction efficiency and image quality in the process of optical reconstruction of the digital holograms, which are displayed on spatial light modulators (SLM) with 2 and 256 brightness levels. The dependences of the above-mentioned parameters on the ratio between the intensities of the object and reference waves during recording of digital holograms are found. Numerically synthesized digital Fresnel holograms were used for modeling of the optical image retrieval. The results of the analysis were used to determine the ratios of intensities of the object and reference waves, at which the best ratios of diffraction efficiency and quality of the optically reconstructed images are achieved in the cases of using the amplitude and phase SLMs.

  9. Analytical description of 3D optical pulse diffraction by a phase-shifted Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Golovastikov, Nikita V; Bykov, Dmitry A; Doskolovich, Leonid L; Soifer, Victor A

    2016-08-22

    Diffraction of a three-dimensional (3D) spatiotemporal optical pulse by a phase-shifted Bragg grating (PSBG) is considered. The pulse diffraction is described in terms of signal transmission through a linear system with a transfer function determined by the reflection or transmission coefficient of the PSBG. Resonant approximations of the reflection and transmission coefficients of the PSBG as functions of the angular frequency and the in-plane component of the wave vector are obtained. Using these approximations, a hyperbolic partial differential equation (Klein-Gordon equation) describing a general class of transformations of the incident 3D pulse envelope is derived. A solution to this equation is found in the form of a convolution integral. The presented rigorous simulation results fully confirm the proposed theoretical description. The obtained results may find application in the design of new devices for spatiotemporal pulse shaping and for optical information processing and analog optical computing. PMID:27557167

  10. Signatures of spatial inversion asymmetry of an optical lattice observed in matter-wave diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C. K.; Barter, T. H.; Leung, T.-H.; Daiss, S.; Stamper-Kurn, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    The structure of a two-dimensional honeycomb optical lattice potential with small inversion asymmetry is characterized using coherent diffraction of 87Rb atoms. We demonstrate that even a small potential asymmetry, with peak-to-peak amplitude of ≤2.3 % of the overall lattice potential, can lead to pronounced inversion asymmetry in the momentum-space diffraction pattern. The observed asymmetry is explained quantitatively by considering both Kapitza-Dirac scattering in the Raman-Nath regime and also either perturbative or full-numerical treatment of the band structure of a periodic potential with a weak inversion-symmetry-breaking term. Our results have relevance for both the experimental development of coherent atom optics and the proper interpretation of time-of-flight assays of atomic materials in optical lattices.

  11. Fabrication of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube or Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays for Optical Diffraction Gratings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong; Kim, Sun Il; Cho, Seong-Ho; Hwang, Sungwoo; Lee, Young Hee; Hur, Jaehyun

    2015-11-01

    We report on new fabrication methods for a transparent, hierarchical, and patterned electrode comprised of either carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorods. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorod arrays were fabricated by either chemical vapor deposition or hydrothermal growth, in combination with photolithography. A transparent conductive graphene layer or zinc oxide seed layer was employed as the transparent electrode. On the patterned surface defined using photoresist, the vertically grown carbon nanotubes or zinc oxides could produce a concentrated electric field under applied DC voltage. This periodic electric field was used to align liquid crystal molecules in localized areas within the optical cell, effectively modulating the refractive index. Depending on the material and morphology of these patterned electrodes, the diffraction efficiency presented different behavior. From this study, we established the relationship between the hierarchical structure of the different electrodes and their efficiency for modulating the refractive index. We believe that this study will pave a new path for future optoelectronic applications. PMID:26726580

  12. Optical diffraction by two-dimensional photonic structures with hexagonal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samusev, K. B.; Rybin, M. V.; Lukashenko, S. Yu.; Belov, P. A.; Limonov, M. F.

    2016-07-01

    Photonic structures with hexagonal symmetry have been prepared by the additive technology of two-photon laser lithography, and their optical properties have been investigated. The structure of the samples has been examined using scanning electron microscopy. The calculations have been performed for the optical diffraction in the Born approximation of the scattering theory for structures with a limited number of scatterers. The images formed in the monochromatic light on a flat screen located behind the sample have been calculated. The diffraction patterns on the screen have C 6 v symmetry and consist of three straight lines intersecting at an angle of 120° and hyperbolas, the number of which is a multiple of six. An important feature of these diffraction patterns is the superstructure, i.e., the partition of straight lines and hyperbolas into individual diffraction reflections, the number of which is determined by the number of scatterers of a particular sample. The results of the experimental investigation of the diffraction patterns completely coincide with the calculated data, including the number and arrangement of the superstructure reflections.

  13. Fabrication of continuous diffractive optical elements using a fast tool servo diamond turning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jingbo; Li, Lei; Naples, Neil; Sun, Tao; Yi, Allen Y.

    2013-07-01

    Continuous diffractive optical elements (CDOEs) can be used for laser-beam reshaping, pattern generation and can help reduce large angle scattering. Lithography, the method for the production of binary diffractive surfaces, is not suitable for fabrication of CDOEs. Diamond turning using fast tool servo, on the other hand, is a non-cleanroom method for generating continuous microstructures with high precision and efficiency. In this paper, an algorithm for designing CDOEs is introduced. The moving least-squares (MLS) method is then used to obtain the local fitting equation of the diffractive surface. Based on the MLS fitting equation, the selection of diamond cutting tool geometries (including the tool nose radius, rake angle and clearance angle) is discussed and a tool nose radius compensation algorithm is included. This algorithm is a general method for the diamond turning of complex surfaces that can be represented by a point cloud. Surface measurements and diffractive patterns generated on test samples have shown that continuous diffractive surfaces were successfully machined. In the future, CDOEs can be machined on an optical mold surface for high-volume industrial production using methods such as injection molding.

  14. Gaussian beam diffraction in inhomogeneous and nonlinear media: analytical and numerical solutions by complex geometrical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berczyński, Paweł; Kravtsov, Yury A.; Żeglinski, Grzegorz

    2008-09-01

    The method of paraxial complex geometrical optics (CGO) is presented, which describes Gaussian beam diffraction in arbitrary smoothly inhomogeneous media, including lens-like waveguides. By way of an example, the known analytical solution for Gaussian beam diffraction in free space is presented. Paraxial CGO reduces the problem of Gaussian beam diffraction in inhomogeneous media to the system of the first order ordinary differential equations, which can be readily solved numerically. As a result, CGO radically simplifies the description of Gaussian beam diffraction in inhomogeneous media as compared to the numerical methods of wave optics. For the paraxial on-axis Gaussian beam propagation in lens-like waveguide, we compare CGO solutions with numerical results for finite differences beam propagation method (FD-BPM). The CGO method is shown to provide 50-times higher rate of calculation then FD-BPM at comparable accuracy. Besides, paraxial eikonal-based complex geometrical optics is generalized for nonlinear Kerr type medium. This paper presents CGO analytical solutions for cylindrically symmetric Gaussian beam in Kerr type nonlinear medium and effective numerical solutions for the self-focusing effect of Gaussian beam with elliptic cross section. Both analytical and numerical solutions are shown to be in a good agreement with previous results, obtained by other methods.

  15. Visualization of the birth of an optical vortex using diffraction from a triangular aperture.

    PubMed

    Mourka, A; Baumgartl, J; Shanor, C; Dholakia, K; Wright, E M

    2011-03-28

    The study and application of optical vortices have gained significant prominence over the last two decades. An interesting challenge remains the determination of the azimuthal index (topological charge) ℓ of an optical vortex beam for a range of applications. We explore the diffraction of such beams from a triangular aperture and observe that the form of the resultant diffraction pattern is dependent upon both the magnitude and sign of the azimuthal index and this is valid for both monochromatic and broadband light fields. For the first time we demonstrate that this behavior is related not only to the azimuthal index but crucially the Gouy phase component of the incident beam. In particular, we explore the far field diffraction pattern for incident fields incident upon a triangular aperture possessing non-integer values of the azimuthal index ℓ. Such fields have a complex vortex structure. We are able to infer the birth of a vortex which occurs at half-integer values of ℓ and explore its evolution by observations of the diffraction pattern. These results demonstrate the extended versatility of a triangular aperture for the study of optical vortices. PMID:21451601

  16. Optical Imaging of Nonuniform Ferroelectricity and Strain at the Diffraction Limit.

    PubMed

    Vlasin, Ondrej; Casals, Blai; Dix, Nico; Gutiérrez, Diego; Sánchez, Florencio; Herranz, Gervasi

    2015-01-01

    We have imaged optically the spatial distributions of ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity at the diffraction limit. Contributions to the birefringence from electro-optics--linked to ferroelectricity--as well as strain--arising from converse piezoelectric effects--have been recorded simultaneously in a BaTiO3 thin film. The concurrent recording of electro-optic and piezo-optic mappings revealed that, far from the ideal uniformity, the ferroelectric and piezoelectric responses were strikingly inhomogeneous, exhibiting significant fluctuations over the scale of the micrometer. The optical methods here described are appropriate to study the variations of these properties simultaneously, which are of great relevance when ferroelectrics are downscaled to small sizes for applications in data storage and processing. PMID:26522345

  17. Optical Imaging of Nonuniform Ferroelectricity and Strain at the Diffraction Limit

    PubMed Central

    Vlasin, Ondrej; Casals, Blai; Dix, Nico; Gutiérrez, Diego; Sánchez, Florencio; Herranz, Gervasi

    2015-01-01

    We have imaged optically the spatial distributions of ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity at the diffraction limit. Contributions to the birefringence from electro-optics –linked to ferroelectricity– as well as strain –arising from converse piezoelectric effects– have been recorded simultaneously in a BaTiO3 thin film. The concurrent recording of electro-optic and piezo-optic mappings revealed that, far from the ideal uniformity, the ferroelectric and piezoelectric responses were strikingly inhomogeneous, exhibiting significant fluctuations over the scale of the micrometer. The optical methods here described are appropriate to study the variations of these properties simultaneously, which are of great relevance when ferroelectrics are downscaled to small sizes for applications in data storage and processing. PMID:26522345

  18. Uniform diffracted fields from a perfectly conducting cylindrical reflector with modified theory of physical optics.

    PubMed

    Yalçın, Uğur; Sarnık, Mücahit

    2013-01-01

    The uniform diffracted fields are calculated on PEC cylindrical reflector by Modified Theory of Physical Optics (MTPO). It is aimed to convert the noncontinuous solution to a continuous solution by finding a uniform equation which does not contain any expression converging to 0 in the denominator part. Three axioms of MTPO theory are used to construct the integral equations for the perfectly electrically conducting surface application. The "edge-point" technique is used to find the diffracted field, and uniform solution is to be found via "detour parameter(s)." Finally, the obtained results are to be compared with the nonuniform ones, numerically. PMID:23766679

  19. Localization and migration of phase singularities in the edge-diffracted optical-vortex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekshaev, Aleksandr; Chernykh, Aleksey; Khoroshun, Anna; Mikhaylovskaya, Lidiya

    2016-02-01

    When a circularly-symmetric light beam with optical vortex (OV) diffracts at an opaque screen with the sharp edge, the OV core is displaced from the beam axis and, in case of the m-charged incident OV, decomposed into |m| single-charged ones. By means of numerical simulations and based on examples of incident beams with topological charges |m| = 1, 2, 3 we show that, while the screen edge monotonously advances towards the beam axis, the OVs in the diffracted beam cross section move away from the incident beam axis along spiral-like trajectories. The trajectories contain fine structure details that reflect the nature and peculiar spatial configuration of the diffracting beam. For the Kummer beams’ diffraction, the trajectories contain self-crossings and regions of ‘backward’ rotation (loops); in the case of Laguerre-Gaussian beams, the trajectories are smoother. The numerical results are supported by analytical approximations and conform to experiments. The general shape of the trajectories and their local behavior show high sensitivity to the diffraction conditions (spatial structure of the diffracting beam, its disposition with respect to the screen edge, etc), which can be used in diverse metrological applications.

  20. Characterization of Electrodeposited Gold and Palladium Nanowire Gratings with Optical Diffraction Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Aaron R.; Nishi, Naoya; Wen, Jia; Yang, Fan; Xiang, Chengxiang; Penner, Reginald M.; Corn, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Parallel arrays of either Au or Pd nanowires were fabricated on glass substrates via the electrochemical process of lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) and then characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a series of optical diffraction measurements at 633 nm. Nanowires with widths varying from 25 nm to 150 nm were electrodeposited onto nanoscale Ni surfaces created by the undercut etching of a photoresist pattern on a planar substrate. Using a simple transmission grating geometry, up to 60 diffraction orders were observed from the nanowire gratings, with separate oscillatory intensity patterns appearing in the even and odd diffraction orders. The presence of these intensity oscillations is attributed to LPNE array fabrication process, which creates arrays with alternating interwire spacings of distances d+Δ and d−Δ , where d = 25 μm and the asymmetry Δ varied from 0 to 3.5 μm. The amount of asymmetry could be controlled by varying the LPNE undercut etching time during the creation of the nanoscale Ni surfaces. The Fourier transform of a mathematical model of the nanowire array was used to predict the diffraction intensity patterns and quantitatively determine Δ for any grating. Additional sensitivity and an expanded diffraction order range were obtained through the use of external reflection (ER) and total internal reflection (TIR) diffraction geometries. PMID:19537714

  1. Optimal design of multilayer diffractive optical elements with effective area method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongfang; Xue, Changxi; Li, Chuang; Wang, Ju

    2016-03-01

    The effective area method is described to design high-efficiency multiplayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) with finite feature sizes for wide wave band. This method is presented with consideration of the shield effect between two elements of MLDOEs, and the optimal surface relief heights of MLDOEs are calculated with the effective area method. Then the comparisons of diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for MLDOEs with different period widths are described and simulated with the effective area method and scalar diffraction theory (SDT). Finally, the design results of MLDOEs obtained by SDT and the effective area method are compared by a rigorous electromagnetic analysis method, specifically, the finite-difference time-domain method. These results show that the limits of SDT for MLDOEs, ascertain and quantify the greatest sources of the diffraction efficiency loss due to the shield effect. The design results of the effective area method can obtain higher polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency than that of the SDT when the period width of MLDOEs is taken into account. PMID:26974629

  2. Diffraction limited focal spot in the interaction chamber using phase retrieval adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefaudeux, Nicolas; Lavergne, Emeric; Monchoce, Sylvain; Levecq, Xavier

    2014-03-01

    In order to provide the end user with a diffraction limited collimated beam, adaptive optics phase correction systems are now a standard feature of ultra intense laser facilities. Generally speaking, these systems are based on a deformable mirror controlled in closed loop configuration in order to correct the aberrations of the beam measured by the wavefront sensor. Such implementation corrects for most of the aberrations of the laser. However, the aberrations of the optical elements located downstream of the wavefront sensor are not measured and therefore not corrected by the adaptive optics loop while they are degrading the final focal spot. We present an improved correction strategy and results based on a combination of both usual closed loop and phase retrieval in order to reach the diffraction limit at the focal spot inside the interaction chamber. The off axis parabola alignment camera located at the focal spot is used in combination of the deformable mirror and wavefront sensor to get images of the focal spot. The residual aberrations of the focal spot are measured by a Phase Retrieval algorithm using the acquired focal spot images. Then the adaptive optics loop is run in order to precompensate for these aberrations, which leads to diffraction limited focal spot in the interaction chamber.

  3. Optical pendulum effect in one-dimensional diffraction-thick porous silicon based photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, V. B. Svyakhovskiy, S. E.; Maydykovskiy, A. I.; Murzina, T. V.; Mantsyzov, B. I.

    2015-11-21

    We present the realization of the multiperiodic optical pendulum effect in 1D porous silicon photonic crystals (PhCs) under dynamical Bragg diffraction in the Laue scheme. The diffraction-thick PhC contained 360 spatial periods with a large variation of the refractive index of adjacent layers of 0.4. The experiments reveal switching of the light leaving the PhC between the two spatial directions, which correspond to Laue diffraction maxima, as the fundamental wavelength or polarization of the incident light is varied. A similar effect can be achieved when the temperature of the sample or the intensity of the additional laser beam illuminating the crystal are changed. We show that in our PhC structures, the spectral period of the pendulum effect is down to 5 nm, while the thermal period is about 10 °C.

  4. Diffractive Optical Analysis for Refractive Index Sensing using Transparent Phase Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Kumawat, Nityanand; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    We report the implementation of a micro-patterned, glass-based photonic sensing element that is capable of label-free biosensing. The diffractive optical analyzer is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk as well as surface refractive index changes. The differential read-out suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6 × 10−7 was achieved with this technique with scope for further improvement. PMID:26578408

  5. Perfect optical vortex array with controllable diffraction order and topological charge.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shiyao; Wang, Tonglu; Gao, Chunqing

    2016-09-01

    We have demonstrated a holographic grating, the far-field diffraction pattern of which is a perfect optical vortex (POV) array. The diffraction order, as well as the topological charge of each spot in the array, is controllable. By setting different parameters when designing the hologram, the spot in different diffraction orders will be changed, resulting in the variance of the POV array. During the experiment, we uploaded holograms of different design on a phase-only spatial light modulator. We then observed POV arrays with different dimensions and topological charges using a CCD camera, which fit well with the simulation. This technique provides the possibility to generate multiple POVs simultaneously, and can be used in domains where multiple POVs are of high interest such as orbital angular momentum multiplexed fiber data transmission systems. PMID:27607508

  6. Comparative Analysis of Time and Spatially Multiplexed Diffractive Optical Elements in a Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Antonio; Moreno, Ignacio; Sánchez-López, María M.

    2008-03-01

    We present a very simple method of generating time-multiplexed optical diffractive elements. We use a commercially available ferroelectric liquid crystal device originally designed to visualize colour images by sequentially displaying the three red, green, and blue (RGB) colour channels. We substitute the original light emitting diode (LED) light source by monochromatic illumination. Then we generate a three time-multiplexed diffractive element simply by addressing a colour RGB image where each colour component corresponds to a different diffractive screen. We carry out computer simulations in order to compare this simple time multiplexing technique with various spatial multiplexing techniques proposed in the literature. We numerically evaluate the different methods in terms of light efficiency, noise level and the quality of the hologram reconstruction. We provide experimental results that verify the simulations and show the advantage of using the time multiplexing technique.

  7. Exact solution for four-order acousto-optic Bragg diffraction with arbitrary initial conditions.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Ron; Koslover, Deborah; Poon, Ting-Chung

    2009-03-01

    An exact solution to the four-order acousto-optic (AO) Bragg diffraction problem with arbitrary initial conditions compatible with exact Bragg angle incident light is developed. The solution, obtained by solving a 4th-order differential equation, is formalized into a transition matrix operator predicting diffracted light orders at the exit of the AO cell in terms of the same diffracted light orders at the entrance. It is shown that the transition matrix is unitary and that this unitary matrix condition is sufficient to guarantee energy conservation. A comparison of analytical solutions with numerical predictions validates the formalism. Although not directly related to the approach used to obtain the solution, it was discovered that all four generated eigenvalues from the four-order AO differential matrix operator are expressed simply in terms of Euclid's Divine Proportion. PMID:19252607

  8. Optical pendulum effect in one-dimensional diffraction-thick porous silicon based photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. B.; Svyakhovskiy, S. E.; Maydykovskiy, A. I.; Murzina, T. V.; Mantsyzov, B. I.

    2015-11-01

    We present the realization of the multiperiodic optical pendulum effect in 1D porous silicon photonic crystals (PhCs) under dynamical Bragg diffraction in the Laue scheme. The diffraction-thick PhC contained 360 spatial periods with a large variation of the refractive index of adjacent layers of 0.4. The experiments reveal switching of the light leaving the PhC between the two spatial directions, which correspond to Laue diffraction maxima, as the fundamental wavelength or polarization of the incident light is varied. A similar effect can be achieved when the temperature of the sample or the intensity of the additional laser beam illuminating the crystal are changed. We show that in our PhC structures, the spectral period of the pendulum effect is down to 5 nm, while the thermal period is about 10 °C.

  9. Optical methods of stress analysis applied to cracked components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    After briefly describing the principles of frozen stress photoelastic and moire interferometric analyses, and the corresponding algorithms for converting optical data from each method into stress intensity factors (SIF), the methods are applied to the determination of crack shapes, SIF determination, crack closure displacement fields, and pre-crack damage mechanisms in typical aircraft component configurations.

  10. Applying of digital signal processing to optical equisignal zone system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraev, Anton A.; Timofeev, Aleksandr N.; Gusarov, Vadim F.

    2015-05-01

    In this work we are trying to assess the application of array detectors and digital information processing to the system with the optical equisignal zone as a new method of evaluating of optical equisignal zone position. Peculiarities of optical equisignal zone formation are described. The algorithm of evaluation of optical equisignal zone position is applied to processing on the array detector. This algorithm enables to evaluate as lateral displacement as turning angles of the receiver relative to the projector. Interrelation of parameters of the projector and the receiver is considered. According to described principles an experimental set was made and then characterized. The accuracy of position evaluation of the equisignal zone is shown dependent of the size of the equivalent entrance pupil at processing.

  11. Applied study of optical interconnection link in computer cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ge; Tian, Jindong; Zhang, Nan; Jing, Wencai; Li, Haifeng

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, some study results to apply fiber link to a computer cluster are presented. The research is based on a ring network topology for a cluster system, which is connected by gigabit/s virtual parallel optical fiber link (VPOFLink) and its driver is for Linux Operating System, the transmission protocol of VPOFLink is compliant with Ethernet standard. We have studied the effect of different types of motherboard on transmission rate of the VPOFLink, and have analyzed the influence of optical interconnection network topology and computer networks protocol on the performance of this optical interconnection computer cluster. The round-trip transmission bandwidth of the VPOFLink have been tested, and the factors that limit transmission bandwidth, such as modes of forwarding data packets in the optical interconnection ring networks, and the size of the link buffer etc., are investigated.

  12. Integrated diffractive optical mode converter for fiber-to-waveguide coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Si; Yan, Ying-Bai; Yi, De-Er; Jin, Guo-Fan; Wu, Min-Xian

    2003-07-01

    An integrated diffractive optical mode converter, which can be integrated into planar lightwave circuits (PLCs), consisting of a diffractive optical element (DOE) and a slab waveguide is presented for fiber-to-waveguide coupling. The DOE is designed using iterative phase retrieval algorithm. In the iterative algorithm, we introduce a new modification of far-field amplitude constraint to provide very high mode conversion quality. Compared with previously published mode converters, the scheme is more universal because it is applicable for any waveguide structure. In simulation, coupling losses lower than 0.12 dB have been reached for all the discussed waveguides. The converter is shown to be polarization-insensitive and applicable in multi-wavelength PLCs. And the tolerance on axis misalignment has been investigated.

  13. Three-dimensional display utilizing a diffractive optical element and an active matrix liquid crystal display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Gregory P.; Jones, Michael W.; Kulick, Jeffrey H.; Lindquist, Robert G.; Kowel, Stephen T.

    1996-12-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of the first real-time autostereoscopic 3D display based on the partial pixel 3D display architecture. The primary optical components of the 3D display are an active-matrix liquid crystal display and a diffractive optical element (DOE). The display operates at video frame rates and is driven with a conventional VGA signal. 3D animations with horizontal motion parallax are readily viewable as sets of stereo images. Formation of the virtual viewing slits by diffraction from the partial pixel apertures is experimentally verified. The measured contrast and perceived brightness of the display are excellent, but there are minor flaws in image quality due to secondary images. The source of these images and how they may be eliminated is discussed. The effects of manufacturing-related systematic errors in the DOE are also analyzed.

  14. Two-Photon Microscopy with Diffractive Optical Elements and Spatial Light Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Brendon O.; Nikolenko, Volodymyr; Araya, Roberto; Peterka, Darcy S.; Woodruff, Alan; Yuste, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy is often performed at slow frame rates due to the need to serially scan all points in a field of view with a single laser beam. To overcome this problem, we have developed two optical methods that split and multiplex a laser beam across the sample. In the first method a diffractive optical element (DOE) generates a fixed number of beamlets that are scanned in parallel resulting in a corresponding increase in speed or in signal-to-noise ratio in time-lapse measurements. The second method uses a computer-controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) to generate any arbitrary spatio-temporal light pattern. With an SLM one can image or photostimulate any predefined region of the image such as neurons or dendritic spines. In addition, SLMs can be used to mimic a large number of optical transfer functions including light path corrections as adaptive optics. PMID:20859526

  15. At-wavelength interferometry of high-NA diffraction-limited EUV optics

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick; Rekawa, Senajith; Denham, Paul; Liddle, J. Alexander; Anderson, Erik; Jackson, Keith; Bokor, Jeffrey; Attwood, David

    2003-08-01

    Recent advances in all-reflective diffraction-limited optical systems designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography have pushed numerical aperture (NA) values from 0.1 to 0.3, providing Rayleigh resolutions of 27-nm. Worldwide, several high-NA EUV optics are being deployed to serve in the development of advanced lithographic techniques required for EUV lithography, including the creation and testing of new, high-resolution photoresists. One such system is installed on an undulator beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. Sub{angstrom}-accuracy optical testing and alignment techniques, developed for use with the previous generations of EUV lithographic optical systems, are being extended for use at high NA. Considerations for interferometer design and use are discussed.

  16. Electro-optic sampling for time resolving relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Scoby, C. M.; Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.; Gutierrez, M.; Tran, T.

    2009-01-22

    The Pegasus laboratory at UCLA features a state-of-the-art electron photoinjector capable of producing ultrashort (<100 fs) high-brightness electron bunches at energies of 3.75 MeV. These beams recently have been used to produce static diffraction patterns from scattering off thin metal foils, and it is foreseen to take advantage of the ultrashort nature of these bunches in future pump-probe time-resolved diffraction studies. In this paper, single shot 2-d electro-optic sampling is presented as a potential technique for time of arrival stamping of electron bunches used for diffraction. Effects of relatively low bunch charge (a few 10's of pC) and modestly relativistic beams are discussed and background compensation techniques to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio are explored. From these preliminary tests, electro-optic sampling is suitable to be a reliable nondestructive time stamping method for relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction at the Pegasus lab.

  17. Optical-precision alignment of diffraction grating mold in moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joh, D.

    1992-01-01

    A high-precision optical method is presented for aligning diffraction grating molds with the edges of specimens in moire interferometry. The alignment fixture is simple and convenient to operate. The conventional method of grating-mold alignment has a wide band of uncertainty in the range of error which is not compatible with the required precision of high-sensitivity moire interferometry. Following a description of the alignment technique, both the single-edge and parallel-edge guide bar optical alignment methods are introduced and compared.

  18. Study of an ultrafast analog-to-digital conversion scheme based on diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Johansson, M; Löfving, B; Hård, S; Thylén, L; Mokhtari, M; Westergren, U; Pala, C

    2000-06-10

    A potentially ultrafast optical analog-to-digital (A/D) converter scheme is proposed and was partly studied experimentally. In the A/D converter scheme the input signal controls the wavelength of a diode laser, whose output beam is incident on a grating. The beam from the grating hits a diffractive optical element in an array. The wavelength determines which element is illuminated. Each element fans out a unique spot-pattern bit code to be read out in parallel by individual detectors. In the experiment all patterns but one from 64 array elements were read out correctly. PMID:18345212

  19. Diffraction-free optical beam propagation with near-zero phase variation in extremely anisotropic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Yang, Xiaodong; Wang, Wei; Gao, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Extremely anisotropic metal-dielectric multilayer metamaterials are designed to have the effective permittivity tensor of a transverse component (parallel to the interfaces of the multilayer) with zero real part and a longitudinal component (normal to the interfaces of the multilayer) with ultra-large imaginary part at the same wavelength, including the optical nonlocality analysis based on the transfer-matrix method. The diffraction-free deep-subwavelength optical beam propagation with near-zero phase variation in the designed multilayer stack due to the near-flat iso-frequency contour is demonstrated and analyzed, including the effects of the multilayer period and the material loss.

  20. Feasibility of optical diffraction radiation for a non-invasive low-emittance beam diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakawa, J.; Hayano, H.; Kubo, K.; Kuroda, S.; Terunuma, N.; Kuriki, M.; Okugi, T.; Naito, T.; Araki, S.; Potylitsyn, A.; Naumenko, G.; Karataev, P.; Potylitsyna, N.; Vnukov, I.; Hirose, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Muto, T.; Ikezawa, M.; Shibata, Y.

    2001-10-01

    A "proof-of-principle" experiment on the optical diffraction radiation (ODR) as a single-pulse beam profile monitor is planned using an electron beam extracted from the KEK-ATF damping ring. The main goals of this experiment are the following: (i) To measure the yield and the angular distributions of the optical diffraction radiation from a large-size target at different wavelengths, impact parameters and beam characteristics for a comparison with analogous characteristics of optical transition radiation from a foil with identical optical parameters and for a verification of the model assumption (perfectly conducting semi-infinite target). (ii) To investigate the ODR angular distributions from a tilted target with a slit for observing the interference effects. (iii) To compare the results obtained by simulations based on classical approaches, taking into account the optical characteristics of the equipment and the beam parameters. (iv) To estimate the prospects of using ODR as a new non-invasive tool for ultrarelativistic beams. We estimated that the ODR photon yield in 10% bandwidth for 500 nm is about 10 6 photons/bunch with an impact parameter of 100 μm. This indicates that the ODR monitor is a promising candidate for single-pulse beam-profile measurements, and that it will be an extremely useful instrument for future linear colliders (JLC, NLC, TESLA and CLIC).

  1. Throughput of diffraction-limited field optics systems for infrared and millimetric telscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, R.H.; Winston, R.

    1982-05-15

    Telescopes for submillimeter wavelengths have point spread functions some millimeters or centimeters in diameter, but the detectors may be only fractions of a millimeter in size. Thus a field aperture and collecting optics are needed. We show how to optimize the aperture by a calculation of the effects of diffraction on signal and resolution as a function of size of the collecting aperture. Our calculations are compared to experimental results from observations of Mars at submillimeter wavelengths.

  2. Simulations for diffraction limited near-infrared adaptive optics systems on the AOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Louarn, Miska; Glindemann, A.; Hubin, N.; Marchetti, E.; Madec, P.-Y.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, we simulate different possibilities to upgrade the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) of the VLT, to reach the diffraction limit in the near infrared. We present simulations of Ground Layer AO, Laser Tomography AO, Multi-Conjugate AO, Dual AO and a hybrid system which is a simplified version of MCAO. We describe the strengths and weaknesses of each approach and summarize the studies to be still carried out.

  3. Hybrid refractive/diffractive optical system design for light and compact uncooled longwave infrared imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Bai, Yu; Luo, Jianjun

    2012-10-01

    Compares with traditional optics,the difractive optical element(DOE) has unique property of minus dispersion.The special state can be used in the optical system to improve performance,lighten weight and reduce volume effectively.In the paper,an infrared optical system with DOE for LWIR thermal imager is proposed.The primary optical parameters of thermal imager are wavelength range 8.0- 12.0μm,effective focal length (EFL) 150 mm,f/numbe 1.0 and field of view 8.58 degrees.The system uses uncooled infrared detector with 320×240 pixels and 45μm pixel size. The f/number matches the sensitivity range of detector array. The infrared optical system is designed by CODE-V optical design software.It is consisted of two lens,the materials of the two lenses are Germanium.The DOE is fabricated on the convex of the first lens and it can be fabricated by diamond turning technology.The imaging quafity of the optical system approached to diffraction limit.The value of modulation transfer function (MTF) at Nyquist frequency(11lp/mm) is great than 0.78.

  4. Uniformity of reshaped beam by diffractive optical elements with light-emitted diode illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mengzhu; Gu, Huarong; Wang, Qixia; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2015-10-01

    Due to its low energy consumption, high efficiency and fast switching speed, light-emitted diode (LED) has been used as a new light source in optical wireless communication. To ensure uniform lighting and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) during the data transmission, diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be employed as optical antennas. Different from laser, LED has a low temporal and spatial coherence. And its impacts upon the far-field diffraction patterns of DOEs remain unclear. Thus the mathematical models of far-field diffraction intensity for LED with a spectral bandwidth and source size are first derived in this paper. Then the relation between source size and uniformity of top-hat beam profile for LEDs either considering the spectral bandwidth or not are simulated. The results indicate that when the size of LED is much smaller than that of reshaped beam, the uniformity of reshaped beam obtained by light source with a spectral bandwidth is significantly better than that by a monochromatic light. However, once the size is larger than a certain threshold value, the uniformity of reshaped beam of two LED models are almost the same, and the influence introduced by spectral bandwidth can be ignored. Finally the reshaped beam profiles are measured by CCD camera when the areas of LED are 0.5×0.5mm2 and 1×1mm2. And the experimental results agree with the simulations.

  5. Monitoring Volumetric Changes in Silicon Thin-Film Anodes through In Situ Optical Diffraction Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duay, Jonathon; Schroder, Kjell W; Murugesan, Sankaran; Stevenson, Keith J

    2016-07-13

    A high-resolution in situ spectroelectrochemical optical diffraction experiment has been developed to understand the volume expansion/contraction process of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film anodes. Electrodes consisting of 1D transmissive gratings of silicon have been produced through photolithographic methods. After glovebox assembly in a home-built Teflon cell, monitoring of the diffraction efficiency of these gratings during the lithiation/delithiation process is performed using an optical microscope equipped with a Bertrand lens. When the diffraction efficiency along with optical constants obtained from in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry is utilized, volume changes of the active materials can be deduced. Unlike transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy characterization methods of observing silicon's volume expansion, this experiment allows for real-time monitoring of the volume change at charge/discharge cycles greater than just the first few along with an experimental environment that directly mimics that of a real battery. This technique shows promising results that provide needed insight into understanding the lithium alloying reaction and subsequent induced capacity fade during the cycling of alloying anodes in lithium-ion batteries. PMID:27311132

  6. Gold nanoparticle-polydimethylsiloxane films reflect light internally by optical diffraction and Mie scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunklin, Jeremy R.; Forcherio, Gregory T.; Roper, D. Keith

    2015-08-01

    Optical properties of polymer films embedded with plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) are important in many implementations. In this work, optical extinction by polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films containing gold (Au) NPs was enhanced at resonance compared to AuNPs in suspensions, Beer-Lambert law, or Mie theory by internal reflection due to optical diffraction in 16 nm AuNP-PDMS films and Mie scattering in 76 nm AuNP-PDMS films. Resonant extinction per AuNP for 16 nm AuNPs with negligible resonant Mie scattering was enhanced up to 1.5-fold at interparticle separation (i.e., Wigner-Seitz radii) comparable to incident wavelength. It was attributable to diffraction through apertures formed by overlapping electric fields of adjacent, resonantly excited AuNPs at Wigner-Seitz radii equal to or less than incident wavelengths. Resonant extinction per AuNP for strongly Mie scattering 76 nm AuNPs was enhanced up to 1.3-fold at Wigner-Seitz radii four or more times greater than incident wavelength. Enhanced light trapping from diffraction and/or scattering is relevant to optoelectronic, biomedical, and catalytic activity of substrates embedded with NPs.

  7. Special diffractive elements for optical trapping fabricated on optical fiber tips using the focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Guerreiro, A.; Viegas, J.; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, spiral phase lenses and Fresnel zone lenses for beam tailoring, fabricated on the tip of optical fibers, are reported. The spiral phase lenses allow tailoring the fundamental guided mode, a Gaussian beam, into a Laguerre - Gaussian profile without using additional optical elements. Whereas, the Fresnel lenses are used as focusing systems. The lenses are fabricated using Focused Ion Beam milling, enabling high resolution in the manufacturing process. The output optical intensity profiles matching the numerical simulations are presented and analyzed.

  8. Applying simulation to optimize plastic molded optical parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworski, Matthew; Bakharev, Alexander; Costa, Franco; Friedl, Chris

    2012-10-01

    Optical injection molded parts are used in many different industries including electronics, consumer, medical and automotive due to their cost and performance advantages compared to alternative materials such as glass. The injection molding process, however, induces elastic (residual stress) and viscoelastic (flow orientation stress) deformation into the molded article which alters the material's refractive index to be anisotropic in different directions. Being able to predict and correct optical performance issues associated with birefringence early in the design phase is a huge competitive advantage. This paper reviews how to apply simulation analysis of the entire molding process to optimize manufacturability and part performance.

  9. Modeling electron density distributions from X-ray diffraction to derive optical properties: constrained wavefunction versus multipole refinement.

    PubMed

    Hickstein, Daniel D; Cole, Jacqueline M; Turner, Michael J; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2013-08-14

    The rational design of next-generation optical materials requires an understanding of the connection between molecular structure and the solid-state optical properties of a material. A fundamental challenge is to utilize the accurate structural information provided by X-ray diffraction to explain the properties of a crystal. For years, the multipole refinement has been the workhorse technique for transforming high-resolution X-ray diffraction datasets into the detailed electron density distribution of crystalline material. However, the electron density alone is not sufficient for a reliable calculation of the nonlinear optical properties of a material. Recently, the X-ray constrained wavefunction refinement has emerged as a viable alternative to the multipole refinement, offering several potential advantages, including the calculation of a wide range of physical properties and seeding the refinement process with a physically reasonable starting point. In this study, we apply both the multipole refinement and the X-ray constrained wavefunction technique to four molecules with promising nonlinear optical properties and diverse structural motifs. In general, both techniques obtain comparable figures of merit and generate largely similar electron densities, demonstrating the wide applicability of the X-ray constrained wavefunction method. However, there are some systematic differences between the electron densities generated by each technique. Importantly, we find that the electron density generated using the X-ray constrained wavefunction method is dependent on the exact location of the nuclei. The X-ray constrained wavefunction refinement makes smaller changes to the wavefunction when coordinates from the Hartree-Fock-based Hirshfeld atom refinement are employed rather than coordinates from the multipole refinement, suggesting that coordinates from the Hirshfeld atom refinement allow the X-ray constrained wavefunction method to produce more accurate wavefunctions. We

  10. Modeling electron density distributions from X-ray diffraction to derive optical properties: Constrained wavefunction versus multipole refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickstein, Daniel D.; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Turner, Michael J.; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2013-08-01

    The rational design of next-generation optical materials requires an understanding of the connection between molecular structure and the solid-state optical properties of a material. A fundamental challenge is to utilize the accurate structural information provided by X-ray diffraction to explain the properties of a crystal. For years, the multipole refinement has been the workhorse technique for transforming high-resolution X-ray diffraction datasets into the detailed electron density distribution of crystalline material. However, the electron density alone is not sufficient for a reliable calculation of the nonlinear optical properties of a material. Recently, the X-ray constrained wavefunction refinement has emerged as a viable alternative to the multipole refinement, offering several potential advantages, including the calculation of a wide range of physical properties and seeding the refinement process with a physically reasonable starting point. In this study, we apply both the multipole refinement and the X-ray constrained wavefunction technique to four molecules with promising nonlinear optical properties and diverse structural motifs. In general, both techniques obtain comparable figures of merit and generate largely similar electron densities, demonstrating the wide applicability of the X-ray constrained wavefunction method. However, there are some systematic differences between the electron densities generated by each technique. Importantly, we find that the electron density generated using the X-ray constrained wavefunction method is dependent on the exact location of the nuclei. The X-ray constrained wavefunction refinement makes smaller changes to the wavefunction when coordinates from the Hartree-Fock-based Hirshfeld atom refinement are employed rather than coordinates from the multipole refinement, suggesting that coordinates from the Hirshfeld atom refinement allow the X-ray constrained wavefunction method to produce more accurate wavefunctions. We

  11. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions. PMID:26561090

  12. Autofocus by Bayes Spectral Entropy Applied to Optical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Podlech, Steffen

    2016-02-01

    This study introduces a passive autofocus method based on image analysis calculating the Bayes spectral entropy (BSE). The method is applied to optical microscopy and together with the specific construction of the opto-mechanical unit, it allows the analysis of large samples with complicated surfaces without subsampling. This paper will provide a short overview of the relevant theory of calculating the normalized discrete cosine transform when analyzing obtained images, in order to find the BSE measure. Furthermore, it will be shown that the BSE measure is a strong indicator, helping to determine the focal position of the optical microscope. To demonstrate the strength and robustness of the microscope system, tests have been performed using a 1951 USAF test pattern resolution chart determining the in focus position of the microscope. Finally, this method and the optical microscope system is applied to analyze an optical grating (100 lines/mm) demonstrating the detection of the focal position. The paper concludes with an outlook of potential applications of the presented system within quality control and surface analysis. PMID:26758956

  13. Composite axilens-axicon diffractive optical elements for generation of ring patterns with high focal depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmavarapu, Raghu; Vijayakumar, A.; Brunner, R.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2016-03-01

    A binary Fresnel Zone Axilens (FZA) is designed for the infinite conjugate mode and the phase profile of a refractive axicon is combined with it to generate a composite Diffractive Optical Element (DOE). The FZA designed for two focal lengths generates a line focus along the propagation direction extending between the two focal planes. The ring pattern generated by the axicon is focused through this distance and the radius of the ring depends on the propagation distance. Hence, the radius of the focused ring pattern can be tuned, during the design process, within the two focal planes. The integration of the two functions was carried out by shifting the location of zones of FZA with respect to the phase profile of the refractive axicon resulting in a binary composite DOE. The FZAs and axicons were designed for different focal depth values and base angles respectively, in order to achieve different ring radii within the focal depth of each element. The elements were simulated using scalar diffraction formula and their focusing characteristics were analyzed. The DOEs were fabricated using electron beam direct writing and evaluated using a fiber coupled diode laser. The tunable ring patterns generated by the DOEs have prospective applications in microdrilling as well as microfabrication of circular diffractive and refractive optical elements.

  14. Imaging regenerating bone tissue based on neural networks applied to micro-diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Campi, G.; Pezzotti, G.; Fratini, M.; Ricci, A.; Burghammer, M.; Cancedda, R.; Mastrogiacomo, M.; Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A.

    2013-12-16

    We monitored bone regeneration in a tissue engineering approach. To visualize and understand the structural evolution, the samples have been measured by X-ray micro-diffraction. We find that bone tissue regeneration proceeds through a multi-step mechanism, each step providing a specific diffraction signal. The large amount of data have been classified according to their structure and associated to the process they came from combining Neural Networks algorithms with least square pattern analysis. In this way, we obtain spatial maps of the different components of the tissues visualizing the complex kinetic at the base of the bone regeneration.

  15. Diffractive optics in large sizes: computer-generated holograms (CGH) based on Bayfol HX photopolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, Friedrich-Karl; Fäcke, Thomas; Hagen, Rainer; Hönel, Dennis; Kleinschmidt, Tim Patrick; Orselli, Enrico; Rewitz, Christian; Rölle, Thomas; Walze, Günther

    2015-03-01

    Volume Holographic Optical Elements (vHOE) offer angular and spectral Bragg selectivity that can be tuned by film thickness and holographic recording conditions. With the option to integrate complex optical function in a very thin plastic layer formerly heavy refractive optics can be made thin and lightweight especially for large area applications like liquid crystal displays, projection screens or photovoltaic. Additionally their Bragg selectivity enables the integration of several completely separated optical functions in the same film. The new instant developing photopolymer film (Bayfol® HX) paves the way towards new cost effective diffractive large optics, due to its easy holographic recording and environmental stability. A major bottleneck for large area applications has been the master hologram recording which traditionally needs expensive, large high precision optical equipment and high power laser with long coherence length. Further the recording setup needs to be rearranged for a change in optical design. In this paper we describe an alternative method for large area holographic master recording, using standard optics and low power lasers in combination with an x, y-translation stage. In this setup small sub-holograms generated by a phase only spatial light modulator (SLM) are recorded next to each other to generate a large size vHOE. The setup is flexible to generate various types of HOEs without the need of a change in the mechanical and optical construction by convenient SLM programming. One Application example and parameter studies for printed vHOEs based on Bayfol® HX Photopolymer will be given.

  16. Stratified Volume Diffractive Optical Elements as Low-Mass Coherent Lidar Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.; Nordin, Gregory P.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Transmissive scanning elements for coherent laser radar systems are typically optical wedges, or prisms, which deflect the lidar beam at a specified angle and are then rotated about the instrument optical axis to produce a scan pattern. The wedge is placed in the lidar optical system subsequent to a beam-expanding telescope, implying that it has the largest diameter of any element in the system. The combination of the wedge diameter and asymmetric profile result in the element having very large mass and, consequently, relatively large power consumption required for scanning. These two parameters, mass and power consumption, are among the instrument requirements which need to be minimized when designing a lidar for a space-borne platform. Reducing the scanner contributions in these areas will have a significant effect on the overall instrument specifications, Replacing the optical wedge with a diffraction grating on the surface of a thin substrate is a straight forward approach with potential to reduce the mass of the scanning element significantly. For example, the optical wedge that will be used for the SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment (SPARCLE) is approximately 25 cm in diameter and is made from silicon with a wedge angle designed for 30 degree deflection of a beam operating at approx. 2 micrometer wavelength. The mass of this element could be reduced by a factor of four by instead using a fused silica substrate, 1 cm thick, with a grating fabricated on one of the surfaces. For a grating to deflect a beam with a 2 micrometer wavelength by 30 degrees, a period of approximately 4 micrometers is required. This is small enough that fabrication of appropriate high efficiency blazed or multi-phase level diffractive optical gratings is prohibitively difficult. Moreover, bulk or stratified volume holographic approaches appear impractical due to materials limitations at 2 micrometers and the need to maintain adequate wavefront quality. In order to avoid the

  17. Multi-level diffractive optical elements produced by excimer laser ablation of sol-gel.

    PubMed

    Neiss, Estelle; Flury, Manuel; Mager, Loïc; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Fort, Alain; Montgomery, Paul; Gérard, Philippe; Fontaine, Joël; Robert, Stéphane

    2008-09-01

    Material ablation by excimer laser micromachining is a promising approach for structuring sol-gel materials as we demonstrate in the present study. Using the well-known direct etching technique, the behaviour of different hybrid organic/inorganic self-made sol-gel materials is examined with a KrF* laser. Ablated depths ranging from 0.1 to 1.5 microm are obtained with a few laser pulses at low fluence (< 1 J/cm(2)). The aim is to rapidly transfer surface relief multi-level diffractive patterns in such a substrate, without intermediate steps. The combination with the 3D profilometry technique of coherence probe microscopy permits to analyse the etching process with the aim of producing multi-level Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). Examples of four-level DOEs with 10 microm square elementary cells are presented, as well as their laser reconstructions in the infrared. PMID:18773015

  18. Analysis of the disturbing diffraction orders of computer-generated holograms used for testing optical aspherics.

    PubMed

    Lindlein, N

    2001-06-01

    Aspheric surfaces are increasingly used in the design of high-quality optical imaging systems. Therefore accurate testing methods for aspherics are also necessary. One possibility is to use a computer-generated hologram (CGH) as a part of a null lens in an interferometric testing device. However, CGHs normally have more than one diffraction order, thus causing disturbing areas in the interferogram. Here a simple approximative analytical expression is given for the spatial frequencies of the disturbing light in the interferogram coming from the different diffraction orders of the CGH. This expression also enables one to calculate the size and the shape of the disturbing areas in the interferogram. Some design examples for CGHs are given in an application of the expression. PMID:18357287

  19. Visualizing detecting low-frequency underwater acoustic signals by means of optical diffraction.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yao; Miao, Runcai; Su, Xiaoming; Chen, Hua

    2016-03-10

    A novel and simple technique based on the light diffraction effect for visualization of low-frequency underwater acoustic waves (LFUAWs) in real time has been developed in this paper. A cylindrical object has been put on the surface of the water. A low-frequency underwater longitudinal wave can be generated into a water surface transversal capillary wave around the cylinder by our technique. Modulating the phase of a laser beam reflected from a water surface by surface acoustic waves (SAWs) realizes the acousto-optic effect. Then, a steady and visible diffraction pattern is experimentally observed. A physical model of the SAW is established to verify the feasibility of our technique. An analytical expression of wavelength, wave amplitude, and excitation frequency has been derived to study the physical properties of LFUAWs, and it explains the experimental phenomenon very well. As a result, the technique is effective, easy, and practical for visualizing LFUAWs and has significance for applications. PMID:26974797

  20. SURPHEX (tm): New dry photopolymers for replication of surface relief diffractive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvartsman, Felix P.

    1993-01-01

    High efficiency, deep groove, surface relief Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE) with various optical functions can be recorded in a photoresist using conventional interferometric holographic and computer generated photolithographic recording techniques. While photoresist recording media are satisfactory for recording individual surface relief DOE, a reliable and precise method is needed to replicate these diffractive microstructures to maintain the high aspect ratio in each replicated DOE. The term 'high aspect ratio' means that the depth of a groove is substantially greater, i.e. 2, 3, or more times greater, than the width of the groove. A new family of dry photopolymers SURPHEX was developed recently at Du Pont to replicate such highly efficient, deep groove DOE's. SURPHEX photopolymers are being utilized in Du Pont's proprietary Dry Photopolymer Embossing (DPE) technology to replicate with very high degree of precision almost any type of surface relief DOE. Surfaces relief microstructures with width/depth aspect ratio of 1:20 (0.1 micron/2.0 micron) were faithfully replicated by DPE technology. Several types of plastic and glass/quartz optical substrates can be used for economical replication of DOE.

  1. Diffractive optics development using a modified stack-and-draw technique.

    PubMed

    Pniewski, Jacek; Kasztelanic, Rafal; Nowosielski, Jedrzej M; Filipkowski, Adam; Piechal, Bernard; Waddie, Andrew J; Pysz, Dariusz; Kujawa, Ireneusz; Stepien, Ryszard; Taghizadeh, Mohammad R; Buczynski, Ryszard

    2016-06-20

    We present a novel method for the development of diffractive optical elements (DOEs). Unlike standard surface relief DOEs, the phase shift is introduced through a refractive index variation achieved by using different types of glass. For the fabrication of DOEs we use a modified stack-and-draw technique, originally developed for the fabrication of photonic crystal fibers, resulting in a completely flat element that is easy to integrate with other optical components. A proof-of-concept demonstration of the method is presented-a two-dimensional binary optical phase grating in the form of a square chessboard with a pixel size of 5 μm. Two types of glass are used: low refractive index silicate glass NC21 and high refractive index lead-silicate glass F2. The measured diffraction characteristics of the fabricated component are presented and it is shown numerically and experimentally that such a DOE can be used as a fiber interconnector that couples light from a small-core fiber into the several cores of a multicore fiber. PMID:27409122

  2. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers with diffraction-based integrated optical displacement detection.

    PubMed

    Hall, Neal A; Lee, Wook; Degertekin, F Levent

    2003-11-01

    Capacitive detection limits the performance of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) by providing poor sensitivity below megahertz frequencies and limiting acoustic power output by imposing constraints on the membrane-substrate gap height. In this paper, an integrated optical interferometric detection method for CMUTs, which provides high displacement sensitivity independent of operation frequency and device capacitance, is reported. The method also enables optoelectronics integration in a small volume and provides optoelectronic isolation between transmit and receive electronics. Implementation of the method involves fabricating CMUTs on transparent substrates and shaping the electrode under each individual CMUT membrane in the form of an optical diffraction grating. Each CMUT membrane thus forms a phase-sensitive optical diffraction grating structure that is used to measure membrane displacements down to 2 x 10(-4) A/square root(Hz) level in the dc to 2-MHz range. Test devices are fabricated on quartz substrates, and ultrasonic array imaging in air is performed using a single 4-mm square CMUT consisting of 19 x 19 array of membranes operating at 750 kHz. PMID:14682641

  3. Modelling of diffraction grating based optical filters for fluorescence detection of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Kovačič, M; Krč, J; Lipovšek, B; Topič, M

    2014-07-01

    The detection of biomolecules based on fluorescence measurements is a powerful diagnostic tool for the acquisition of genetic, proteomic and cellular information. One key performance limiting factor remains the integrated optical filter, which is designed to reject strong excitation light while transmitting weak emission (fluorescent) light to the photodetector. Conventional filters have several disadvantages. For instance absorbing filters, like those made from amorphous silicon carbide, exhibit low rejection ratios, especially in the case of small Stokes' shift fluorophores (e.g. green fluorescent protein GFP with λ exc = 480 nm and λ em = 510 nm), whereas interference filters comprising many layers require complex fabrication. This paper describes an alternative solution based on dielectric diffraction gratings. These filters are not only highly efficient but require a smaller number of manufacturing steps. Using FEM-based optical modelling as a design optimization tool, three filtering concepts are explored: (i) a diffraction grating fabricated on the surface of an absorbing filter, (ii) a diffraction grating embedded in a host material with a low refractive index, and (iii) a combination of an embedded grating and an absorbing filter. Both concepts involving an embedded grating show high rejection ratios (over 100,000) for the case of GFP, but also high sensitivity to manufacturing errors and variations in the incident angle of the excitation light. Despite this, simulations show that a 60 times improvement in the rejection ratio relative to a conventional flat absorbing filter can be obtained using an optimized embedded diffraction grating fabricated on top of an absorbing filter. PMID:25071964

  4. OPTICAL WAVEPACKETS (OPTICAL BULLETS): A NEW DIFFRACTION FREE FORM OF LIGHT TRAVEL

    SciTech Connect

    D. FUNK; J. NICHOLSON; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We conducted studies of the propagation of self-confined packets of light or ''Optical Bullets'' through air. These packets are self-forming and require no active optics. At the present time, theoretical explanations provide an incomplete description of this process. Generation of these pulses requires a light source of sufficient energy and with a short enough pulse-width that the intensity exceeds a critical wavelength dependent value. We used a Ti:Sapphire based system to generate the pulses and we observed pulse-splitting and chirp-dependent control of the formation of these filaments. In addition, we developed a novel algorithm for extracting the phase and electric field of these pulses using Frequency Resolved Optical Gating coupled to genetic algorithms for pulse retrieval.

  5. Performance improvements of MOEMS-based diffractive arrays: address isolation and optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaman, Ganesh; Madison, Seth; Sano, Michael; Castracane, James

    2005-01-01

    Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) have found a variety of applications in fields such as telecommunications, spectroscopy and display technology. MOEMS-based optical switching is currently under investigation for the increased flexibility that such devices provide for reconfiguration of the I/O network for inter-chip communication applications. This potential not only adds an additional degree of freedom for adjustment of transmitter/receiver links but also allows for fine alignment of individual channels in the network link. Further, this use of diffractive arrays for specific applications combines beam steering/adjustment capabilities with the inherent wavelength dependence of the diffractive approach for channel separation and de-multiplexing. Research and development has been concentrated on the progression from single MOEMS components to parallel arrays integrated with optical source arrays for a successful feasibility demonstration. Successful development of such an approach will have a major impact of the next generation communication protocols. This paper will focus on the current status of the MOEMS research program for Free Space Optical inter-chip communication at the College of NanoScale Science and Engineering, University at Albany-SUNY (CNSE). New versions of diffractive arrays stemming from the basic MEMS Compound Grating (MCG; patent #5,999,319) have been produced through various fabrication methods including the MUMPs process1. Most MEMS components relying on electrostatic actuation tend to require high actuation voltages (>20V) compared to the typical 5V levels prevalent in conventional integrated circuits. The specific goal is to yield improved performance while minimizing the power consumption of the components. Structural modifications through the variation in the ruling/electrode spacing distance and array wiring layout through individually addressable gratings have been studied to understand effects on the actuation voltage and

  6. Optical analogues for massless dirac particles and conical diffraction in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Zeuner, J M; Efremidis, N K; Keil, R; Dreisow, F; Christodoulides, D N; Tünnermann, A; Nolte, S; Szameit, A

    2012-07-13

    We demonstrate that light propagating in an appropriately designed lattice can exhibit dynamics akin to that expected from massless relativistic particles as governed by the one-dimensional Dirac equation. This is accomplished by employing a waveguide array with alternating positive and negative effective coupling coefficients, having a band structure with two intersecting minibands. Through this approach optical analogues of massless particle-antiparticle pairs are experimentally realized. One-dimensional conical diffraction is also observed for the first time in this work. PMID:23030159

  7. Design of an Optical Diffraction Radiation Beam Size Monitor at SLAC FETB

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Yasuo; Cline, D.; Zhou, F.; Tobiyama, M.; Urakawa, J.; Bolton, P.R.; Ross, M.C.; Hamatsu, R.; Karataev, P.V.; Muto, T.; Aryshev, A.S.; Naumenko, G.A.; Potylitsyn, A.P.; /UCLA /KEK, Tsukuba /SLAC /Tokyo Metropolitan U., Math. Dept. /Tomsk Polytechnic U.

    2008-03-17

    We design a single bunch transverse beam size monitor which will be tested to measure the 28.5 GeV electron/positron beam at the SLAC FFTB beam line. The beam size monitor uses the CCD images of the interference pattern of the optical diffraction radiation from two slit edges which are placed close to the beam path. In this method, destruction of the accelerated electron/positron beam bunches due to the beam size monitoring is negligible, which is vital to the operation of the Linear Collider project.

  8. Polarization-independent light-dispersing device based on diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amako, J.; Fujii, E.

    2015-03-01

    We report a light-dispersing device comprised of two transmission gratings and a wave plate. The gratings split the light incident at the Bragg angle into two orthogonally polarized components. The wave plate, which is placed between the gratings, functions as a polarization converter for oblique illumination. Appropriate assembly of these optical parts results in efficient diffraction of the unpolarized light with high spectral resolution. Using coupled-wave theories and Mueller matrix analysis, we constructed a device with a grating period of 400 nm for the spectral range of 680 ± 50 nm. We verified the proposed polarization-independent light-dispersing concept from the evaluation of this device.

  9. Overview of nonintercepting beam-size monitoring with optical diffraction radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, Alex H.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The initial demonstrations over the last several years of the use of optical diffraction radiation (ODR) as nonintercepting electron-beam-parameter monitors are reviewed. Developments in both far-field imaging and near-field imaging are addressed for ODR generated by a metal plane with a slit aperture, a single metal plane, and two-plane interferences. Polarization effects and sensitivities to beam size, divergence, and position will be discussed as well as a proposed path towards monitoring 10-micron beam sizes at 25 GeV.

  10. Far field diffraction of an optical vortex beam by a fork-shaped grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Lyubomir; Topuzoski, Suzana; Stefanov, Ivan; Janicijevic, Ljiljana; Dreischuh, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    In this work we report experimental data confirming the analytically predicted transformation of the topological charge (TC) of an input optical vortex (OV) beam, generated by means of fork-shaped binary computer-generated hologram (CGH), after a second fork-shaped binary CGH. The final TC of the vortex is confirmed to be equal to the TC of the incident beam plus the diffraction order (with its sign) times the TC encoded in the binary grating. The radii of the transformed OVs in the far field also are found to agree fairly well with these predicted by the analytical theory.

  11. Diffractive optical elements on non-flat substrates using electron beam lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present disclosure describes a technique for creating diffraction gratings on curved surfaces with electron beam lithography. The curved surface can act as an optical element to produce flat and aberration-free images in imaging spectrometers. In addition, the fabrication technique can modify the power structure of the grating orders so that there is more energy in the first order than for a typical grating. The inventors noticed that by using electron-beam lithography techniques, a variety of convex gratings that are well-suited to the requirements of imaging spectrometers can be manufactured.

  12. Breaking the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in fiber-optical two-photon fluorescence endoscopy by an azimuthally-polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Gu, Min; Kang, Hong; Li, Xiangping

    2014-01-01

    Although fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy has been recognized as a potential high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in vivo, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction nature to a few micrometers due to the low numerical aperture of an endoscopic objective. On the other hand, stimulated emission depletion (STED) achieved by a circularly-polarized vortex beam has been used to break the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in a bulky microscope. It has been a challenge to apply the STED principle to a fiber-optical two-photon endoscope as a circular polarization state cannot be maintained due to the birefringence of a fiber. Here, we demonstrate the first fiber-optical STED two-photon endoscope using an azimuthally-polarized beam directly generated from a double-clad fiber. As such, the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy can be broken by a factor of three. Our new accomplishment has paved a robust way for high-resolution in vivo biomedical studies. PMID:24406685

  13. Breaking the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in fiber-optical two-photon fluorescence endoscopy by an azimuthally-polarized beam

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Min; Kang, Hong; Li, Xiangping

    2014-01-01

    Although fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy has been recognized as a potential high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in vivo, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction nature to a few micrometers due to the low numerical aperture of an endoscopic objective. On the other hand, stimulated emission depletion (STED) achieved by a circularly-polarized vortex beam has been used to break the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in a bulky microscope. It has been a challenge to apply the STED principle to a fiber-optical two-photon endoscope as a circular polarization state cannot be maintained due to the birefringence of a fiber. Here, we demonstrate the first fiber-optical STED two-photon endoscope using an azimuthally-polarized beam directly generated from a double-clad fiber. As such, the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy can be broken by a factor of three. Our new accomplishment has paved a robust way for high-resolution in vivo biomedical studies. PMID:24406685

  14. Polarization-independent light-dispersing optical device consisting of two diffraction gratings and a waveplate.

    PubMed

    Amako, J; Fujii, E

    2014-06-10

    We report on a light-dispersing device consisting of two transmission gratings and a waveplate. The gratings separate two orthogonal polarization components of light incident at the Bragg angle. The waveplate, which is sandwiched between the gratings, functions as a polarization converter for oblique light incidence. With these optical parts suitably integrated, the resulting device efficiently diffracts unpolarized light with high spectral resolution. Using coupled-wave theories and Mueller matrix analysis, we constructed a device for a wavelength range of 680±50  nm with a 400 nm grating period. From the characterization of this optical device, we validated the proposed polarization-independent, light-dispersing concept. PMID:24921129

  15. Tolerancing of diffraction-limited Kirkpatrick-Baez synchrotron beamline optics for extreme-ultraviolet metrology.

    PubMed

    Naulleau, P P; Goldberg, K A; Batson, P J; Jeong, S; Underwood, J H

    2001-08-01

    The recent interest in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography has led to the development of an array of at-wavelength metrologies implemented on synchrotron beamlines. These beamlines commonly use Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) systems consisting of two perpendicular, elliptically bent mirrors in series. To achieve high-efficiency focusing into a small spot, unprecedented fabrication and assembly tolerance is required of these systems. Here we present a detailed error-budget analysis and develop a set of specifications for diffraction-limited performance for the K-B optic operating on the EUV interferometry beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. The specifications are based on code v modeling tools developed explicitly for these optical systems. Although developed for one particular system, the alignment sensitivities presented here are relevant to K-B system designs in general. PMID:18360402

  16. Transition operators in electromagnetic-wave diffraction theory. II - Applications to optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahne, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    The theory developed by Hahne (1992) for the diffraction of time-harmonic electromagnetic waves from fixed obstacles is briefly summarized and extended. Applications of the theory are considered which comprise, first, a spherical harmonic expansion of the so-called radiation impedance operator in the theory, for a spherical surface, and second, a reconsideration of familiar short-wavelength approximation from the new standpoint, including a derivation of the so-called physical optics method on the basis of quasi-planar approximation to the radiation impedance operator, augmented by the method of stationary phase. The latter includes a rederivation of the geometrical optics approximation for the complete Green's function for the electromagnetic field in the presence of a smooth- and a convex-surfaced perfectly electrically conductive obstacle.

  17. Optical cryptosystem based on phase-truncated Fresnel diffraction and transport of intensity equation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenggong; He, Wenqi; Wu, Jiachen; Peng, Xiang

    2015-04-01

    A novel optical cryptosystem based on phase-truncated Fresnel diffraction (PTFD) and transport of intensity equation (TIE) is proposed. By using the phase truncation technique, a phase-encoded plaintext could be encrypted into a real-valued noise-like intensity distribution by employing a random amplitude mask (RAM) and a random phase mask (RPM), which are regarded as two secret keys. For decryption, a generalized amplitude-phase retrieval (GAPR) algorithm combined with the TIE method are proposed to recover the plaintext with the help of two keys. Different from the current phase-truncated-based optical cryptosystems which need record the truncated phase as decryption keys, our scheme do not need the truncated phase because of the introducing of the TIE method. Moreover, the proposed scheme is expected to against existing attacks. A set of numerical simulation results show the feasibility and security of the proposed method. PMID:25968722

  18. The optical length effect, diffraction pattern and thermal lensing of Disperse Orange 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmani, S.; Ara, M. H. Majles

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear responses of an azo dye, Disperse Orange 25 (DO25), are investigated under two irradiation of continuous Lasers at 532 and 632 nm wavelengths and the third order refractive index is measured by use of Z-scan technique. At 632 nm wavelength (far from the absorption peak), the close z-scan plots show that this material has a very good nonlinear response with negative sign indicating self-defocusing. The effect of optical length and concentration of samples in nonlinear responses have been investigated experimentally. Also, the radius variation at far field observed due to thermal lens effect. Finally, at other wavelength, 532 nm (near from the absorption peak), the nonlinear optical responses increase sharply so the diffraction rings appear and the numbers of rings increase with the incident laser power.

  19. Off-axis collimation of diode laser beams by means of single-element holographic diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miler, M.; Pala, J.; Aubrecht, I.; Hradil, M.

    2006-09-01

    Principles of single-element holographic diffractive optics for collimation of diode laser beams with a large divergence, an elliptic cross-section, and astigmatism are presented. Holographic off-axis transformation enables collimation of the beam in two variants: one with a perpendicular input beam and an oblique output beam, and the other with the beams arranged vice-versa. Diffraction due to an elliptic aperture is analyzed. Inspection of experimental samples demonstrates an agreement with theory in the case of diffraction limited focal pattern and shows increase of astigmatism with the departure from diffraction only limitation.

  20. Characterization of Differential Toll-Like Receptor Responses below the Optical Diffraction Limit**

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Jesse S.; Carson, Bryan D.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Many membrane receptors are recruited to specific cell surface domains to form nanoscale clusters upon ligand activation. This step appears to be necessary to initiate signaling, including pathways in innate immune system activation. However, virulent pathogens such as Yersinia pestis (the causative agent of plague) are known to evade innate immune detection, in contrast to similar microbes (such as E. coli) that elicit a robust response. This disparity has been partly attributed to the structure of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the bacterial cell wall, which are recognized by the innate immune receptor TLR4. As such, we hypothesized that nanoscale differences would exist between the spatial clustering of TLR4 upon binding of LPS derived from Y. pestis and E. coli. Although optical imaging can provide exquisite details of the spatial organization of biomolecules, there is a mismatch between the scale at which receptor clustering occurs (<300 nm) and the optical diffraction limit (>400 nm). The last decade has seen the emergence of super-resolution imaging methods that effectively break the optical diffraction barrier to yield truly nanoscale information in intact biological samples. This study reports the first visualizations of TLR4 distributions on intact cells at image resolutions of <30 nm using a novel, dual-color stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) technique. This methodology permits distinction between receptors containing bound LPS from those without at the nanoscale. Importantly, we also show that LPS derived from immuno-stimulatory bacteria resulted in significantly higher LPS-TLR4 cluster sizes and a nearly two-fold greater ligand/receptor colocalization as compared to immuno-evading LPS. PMID:22807232

  1. Unified optomechanical modeling: thermo-elastic stability of a fiber optic diffractive encoding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatheway, Alson E.

    2015-09-01

    A common mechanical failure in optical systems is inadequate stability in the supporting structure. Thermal stability is crucial for maintaining the alignment of the optical elements and achieving adequate optical performance as the environmental temperature changes. It is the responsibility of the mechanical engineer to provide adequate stability in the mechanical design. Optical engineers assume that their large-displacement non-linear codes are required to analyze the perturbations caused by mechanical deflections. However, the permitted deflections of the optical elements are usually quite small, on the order of microns for structures of meter-sized dimensions. For perturbations of this magnitude it may be shown that a non-linear solver is not required for engineering accuracies. In fact, it can be argued that the optical functions are more linear than the solid mechanics functions, of which the finite element method itself is but a linear simplification. Unified optomechanical modeling provides a vehicle for tracing offending image motions to particular optical elements and their supporting structure. The unified modeling method imports the optical elements' imaging properties into a finite element structural model of the optical system. It convolves the elements' motions and their optical properties in a single optomechanical modeling medium, unifying them. This provides the engineer with a tool that discloses each element's contribution to the offending motions of the image on the detector. This paper presents the theory of unified optomechanical modeling as applied to the thermal stability of the optical image in a Nastran1 finite element model. The steps used in developing a unified optomechanical model are described in detail. Comparisons of the unified modeling technique to both analytical and empirical validation studies are shown.

  2. Double-fiber electric current measurements applying thermal-lens-coupled magneto-optical effect in ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongjie; Chen, Xiaowei; Yuan, Suihua

    1998-08-01

    The optical current transformer (OCT) reported in the past decades is mainly based on the traditional principle of Faraday rotation effect. Presented is a new type of OCT based on a new physical effect, the thermal lens coupled magneto-optical effect in ferrofluid. The use of optical array in the measuring system made the instrument complicated and expensive. This paper proposes applying double fibers to detect the current-corresponding variation of light intensity of the diffraction rings to simplify the instrumental structure. The fluctuations of the laser beam were eliminated by differential optical paths. Results obtained showed a DC measurement accuracy of 1 percent with a dynamic range of 0-500 angstrom, extendible to 2000 angstrom. All experiments were computerized. The set-up can also be applied to measure AC currents with similar qualities to the DC case.

  3. Optical vortex generation with a “fork” hologram under conditions of high-angle diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekshaev, A.; Orlinska, O.; Vasnetsov, M.

    2010-05-01

    Spatial characteristics of the optical-vortex (OV) beams created during the Gaussian beam diffraction by a grating with groove bifurcation are analyzed theoretically and numerically. In contrast to previous works, condition of small-angle diffraction is no longer required and the diffracted beam can be strongly deformed. This causes the intensity profile rotation and the high-order OV decomposition into a set of secondary single-charged OVs. These effects are studied quantitatively and confronted with similar properties of a Laguerre-Gaussian beam that undergoes astigmatic telescopic transformation. In contrast to the latter case, the secondary OVs do not lie on a single straight line within the beam cross section, and morphology parameters of the individual secondary OVs carried by the same beam are, in general, different. Conditions for maximum relative separation of the secondary OVs with respect to the beam transverse size are specified. The results can be used for practical generation of OV beams and OV arrays with prescribed properties.

  4. Focusing and imaging properties of diffractive optical elements with star-ring topological structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong; Zhang, Yanli; Sun, Meizhi

    2015-08-01

    A kind of diffractive optical elements (DOE) with star-ring topological structure is proposed and their focusing and imaging properties are studied in detail. The so-called star-ring topological structure denotes that a large number of pinholes distributed in many specific zone orbits. In two dimensional plane, this structure can be constructed by two constrains, one is a mapping function, which yields total potential zone orbits, corresponding to the optical path difference (OPD); the other is a switching sequence based on the given encoded seed elements and recursion relation to operate the valid zone orbits. The focusing and imaging properties of DOE with star-ring topological structure are only determined by the aperiodic sequence, and not relevant to the concrete geometry structure. In this way, we can not only complete the traditional symmetrical DOE, such as circular Dammam grating, Fresnel zone plates, photon sieves, and their derivatives, but also construct asymmetrical elements with anisotropic diffraction pattern. Similarly, free-form surface or three dimensional DOE with star-ring topological structure can be constructed by the same method proposed. In consequence of smaller size, lighter weight, more flexible design, these elements may allow for some new applications in micro and nanphotonics.

  5. Mechanical characterization of nanowires based on optical diffraction images of the bent shape.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Mikio; Tobe, Ryohei

    2009-08-01

    A mechanical characterization technique for nanowires (NWs) longer than approximately 10 microm is proposed, based on optical microscopic observations under bending test. Low flexural rigidity of NWs often results in large deflection, which rules out the use of linear beam theory; however, the largely bent shape is optically visible as a diffraction image under transmitted illumination. The NW standing on a rod-like substrate was deflected by means of a micro-cantilever, where interactive forces, such as van der Waals forces, provide sufficient adhesion for fixing the free end of the NW. The reactive force was measured from the cantilever deflection and detected by a laser interferometer. The luminance profile of the diffraction image provided a good measure of the NW diameter. Inverse analysis using geometrically nonlinear mechanics for the bent shape enabled successful evaluation of the Young's modulus. In addition, a fracture test was conducted by manipulating the cantilever for intense deformation of the NW, such as buckling. The maximum curvature was observed at the freely suspended part of the bent NW where fracture was assured. The bending strength was determined from observation of the curvature at the fracture. Examples for CuO NWs of 40 nm to 190 nm in diameter indicated dependence of the Young's modulus and strength on the NW diameter. PMID:19928119

  6. Diffraction-based optical sensor detection system for capture-restricted environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandekar, Rahul M.; Nikulin, Vladimir V.

    2008-04-01

    The use of digital cameras and camcorders in prohibited areas presents a growing problem. Piracy in the movie theaters results in huge revenue loss to the motion picture industry every year, but still image and video capture may present even a bigger threat if performed in high-security locations. While several attempts are being made to address this issue, an effective solution is yet to be found. We propose to approach this problem using a very commonly observed optical phenomenon. Cameras and camcorders use CCD and CMOS sensors, which include a number of photosensitive elements/pixels arranged in a certain fashion. Those are photosites in CCD sensors and semiconductor elements in CMOS sensors. They are known to reflect a small fraction of incident light, but could also act as a diffraction grating, resulting in the optical response that could be utilized to identify the presence of such a sensor. A laser-based detection system is proposed that accounts for the elements in the optical train of the camera, as well as the eye-safety of the people who could be exposed to optical beam radiation. This paper presents preliminary experimental data, as well as the proof-of-concept simulation results.

  7. Wave dislocations in the diffraction pattern of a higher-order optical catastrophe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores a partial unfolding of the canonical three-dimensional diffraction field associated with the optical catastrophe X9 with modulus K = -6. A practical realization would be the focal region of a thin lens created by setting a drop of water on a horizontal glass slide and constraining its perimeter to be square. The pattern of caustics formed around the focus is a twisted and ribbed double trumpet with 4-fold symmetry. Like all diffraction catastrophes the essential structure is based on a pattern of line singularities (wave dislocations or optical vortices) on which the amplitude is zero and the phase is indeterminate. The caustic is encircled on the outside, and in the focal plane, by a highly puckered and non-circular ring and a forest of other dislocations. Far from the axis these are organized by the planar group 3m, despite the 4-fold symmetry. On the inside, the dislocation lines form a curved quasi-periodic lattice of small, nearly planar, nearly circular, rings based on the tetragonal space group I4mm. There are similarities to the pattern for the elliptic umbilic catastrophe, and, just as in that case, far from the focus the inner rings in lines close to the ribs of the caustic eventually join together to become the straight inner dislocations of the Pearcey pattern for the cusp. But the way in which this transition is accomplished, which involves four simultaneous reconnections, is quite different for the two catastrophes. Further, in the elliptic (and hyperbolic) umbilic catastrophes diffraction splits the focal spot longitudinally; in X9 with K = -6 it does not.

  8. Diffraction image formation in optical systems with polarization aberrations. II - Amplitude response matrices for rotationally symmetric systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1991-01-01

    In the previous paper in this series (McGuire and Chipman, 1990), a formulation was established for the calculation and analysis of diffraction image quality in polarizing optical systems illuminated with partially polarized, partially coherent light. In the present paper, the effect of second- and fourth-order polarization aberrations on the image plane diffraction patterns are examined. The amplitude response matrix is calculated for optical systems with small numerical apertures. Numerical results are presented for optical systems with circular apertures for three of the aberration types.

  9. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography applied to intervertebral disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matcher, Stephen J.; Winlove, Peter; Gangnus, Sergei V.

    2003-07-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) is a powerful new optical imaging modality that is sensitive to the birefringence properties of tissues. It thus has potential applications in studying the large-scale ordering of collagen fibers within connective tisues and changes related to pathology. As a tissue for study by PSOCT, intervertebral disk respresents an interesting system as the collagen organization is believed to show pronounced variations with depth, on a spatial scale of about 100 μm. We have used a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system to measure the birefringence properties of bovine caudal intervertebral disk and compared this with equine flexor tendon. The result for equine tendon, δ = (3.0 +/- 0.5)x10-3 at 1.3 μm, is in broad agreement with values reported for bovine tendon, while bovine intervertebral disk displays a birefringence of about half this, δ = 1.2 x 10-3 at 1.3 μm. While tendon appears to show a uniform fast-axis over 0.8 mm depth, intervertebral disk shows image contrast at all orientations relative to a linearly polarized input beam, suggesting a variation in fast-axis orientation with depth. These initial results suggest that PSOCT could be a useful tool to study collagen organization within this tissue and its variation with applied load and disease.

  10. Nanointaglio fabrication of optical lipid multilayer diffraction gratings with applications in biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Troy Warren

    The dynamic self-organization of lipids in biological systems is a highly regulated process that enables the compartmentalization of living systems at microscopic and nanoscopic levels. Exploiting the self-organization and innate biofunctionality of lyotropic liquid crystalline phospholipids, a novel nanofabrication process called "nanointaglio" was invented in order to rapidly and scalably integrate lipid nanopatterns onto the surface. The work presented here focuses on using nanointaglio fabricated lipid diffraction micro- and nanopatterns for the development of new sensing and bioactivity studies. The lipids are patterned as diffraction gratings for sensor functionality. The lipid multilayer gratings operate as nanomechanical sensor elements that are capable of transducing molecular binding to fluid lipid multilayers into optical signals in a label free manner due to shape changes in the lipid nanostructures. To demonstrate the label free detection capabilities, lipid nanopatterns are shown to be suitable for the integration of chemically different lipid multilayer gratings into a sensor array capable of distinguishing vapors by means of an optical nose. Sensor arrays composed of six different lipid formulations are integrated onto a surface and their optical response to three different vapors (water, ethanol and acetone) in air as well as pH under water is monitored as a function of time. Principal component analysis of the array response results in distinct clustering, indicating the suitability of the arrays for distinguishing these analytes. Importantly, the nanointaglio process used is capable of producing lipid gratings out of different materials with sufficiently uniform heights for the fabrication of an optical nose. A second main application is demonstrated for the study of membrane binding proteins. Although in vitro methods for assaying the catalytic activity of individual enzymes are well established, quantitative methods for assaying the kinetics of

  11. Athermal design of hybrid refractive/harmonic diffractive optical system for far-infrared multi-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ying; Sun, Qiang; Lu, Zhenwu; Yue, Jinying; Zhang, Hu; Zhu, Rui

    2009-05-01

    In order to get enough information about the target, avoid big chromatic aberration as a result of wide spectrum and the complexity of optical system and adapt different special environment temperature, a hybrid refractive/ harmonic diffractive optical system in far-infrared multi-band is described in the paper. This diffractive optical system has been designed an athermalized multi-band imaging system with harmonic diffractive element in 15-50μm spectrum, based on larger 1dispersion capability and particular thermal dispersive power of harmonic diffractive element. Then, at the temperature range from 0°C to 40°C, this design can simultaneously meet with all requirements of the imaging system in five harmonic wave bands, including15.8-16.2μm, 18.5-20μm, 23-25μm, 30.5-33.5μm and 46-50μm. In each harmonic wave band, the magnification changes as a function of wavelength, which creates image registration error. To compensate this shortcoming, a zoom optical system is designed with three lenses by means of optical two- component method. The design results show that the hybrid refractive/harmonic diffractive optical system can realize athermalized and achromatic design, and the zoom optical system makes half image height at 3.53mm in every harmonic wave band and still realizes aberration compensation action. In the five harmonic wave bands, each optical transfer function approaches the diffraction limit at ambient temperature range of 0°C to 40°C. Finally, the system realizes the requirements of portability, mini-type and ease for fabrication.

  12. An optical super-microscope for far-field, real-time imaging beyond the diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alex M H; Eleftheriades, George V

    2013-01-01

    Optical microscopy suffers from a fundamental resolution limitation arising from the diffractive nature of light. While current solutions to sub-diffraction optical microscopy involve combinations of near-field, non-linear and fine scanning operations, we hereby propose and demonstrate the optical super-microscope (OSM) - a superoscillation-based linear imaging system with far-field working and observation distances - which can image an object in real-time and with sub-diffraction resolution. With our proof-of-principle prototype we report a point spread function with a spot size clearly reduced from the diffraction limit, and demonstrate corresponding improvements in two-point resolution experiments. Harnessing a new understanding of superoscillations, based on antenna array theory, our OSM achieves far-field, sub-diffraction optical imaging of an object without the need for fine scanning, data post-processing or object pre-treatment. Hence the OSM can be used in a wide variety of imaging applications beyond the diffraction limit, including real-time imaging of moving objects. PMID:23612684

  13. An Optical Super-Microscope for Far-field, Real-time Imaging Beyond the Diffraction Limit

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alex M. H.; Eleftheriades, George V.

    2013-01-01

    Optical microscopy suffers from a fundamental resolution limitation arising from the diffractive nature of light. While current solutions to sub-diffraction optical microscopy involve combinations of near-field, non-linear and fine scanning operations, we hereby propose and demonstrate the optical super-microscope (OSM) – a superoscillation-based linear imaging system with far-field working and observation distances – which can image an object in real-time and with sub-diffraction resolution. With our proof-of-principle prototype we report a point spread function with a spot size clearly reduced from the diffraction limit, and demonstrate corresponding improvements in two-point resolution experiments. Harnessing a new understanding of superoscillations, based on antenna array theory, our OSM achieves far-field, sub-diffraction optical imaging of an object without the need for fine scanning, data post-processing or object pre-treatment. Hence the OSM can be used in a wide variety of imaging applications beyond the diffraction limit, including real-time imaging of moving objects. PMID:23612684

  14. Optical Trapping Techniques Applied to the Study of Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morss, Andrew J.

    Optical tweezers allow for manipulating micron-sized objects using pN level optical forces. In this work, we use an optical trapping setup to aid in three separate experiments, all related to the physics of the cellular membrane. In the first experiment, in conjunction with Brian Henslee, we use optical tweezers to allow for precise positioning and control of cells in suspension to evaluate the cell size dependence of electroporation. Theory predicts that all cells porate at a transmembrane potential VTMof roughly 1 V. The Schwann equation predicts that the transmembrane potential depends linearly on the cell radius r, thus predicting that cells should porate at threshold electric fields that go as 1/r. The threshold field required to induce poration is determined by applying a low voltage pulse to the cell and then applying additional pulses of greater and greater magnitude, checking for poration at each step using propidium iodide dye. We find that, contrary to expectations, cells do not porate at a constant value of the transmembrane potential but at a constant value of the electric field which we find to be 692 V/cm for K562 cells. Delivering precise dosages of nanoparticles into cells is of importance for assessing toxicity of nanoparticles or for genetic research. In the second experiment, we conduct nano-electroporation—a novel method of applying precise doses of transfection agents to cells—by using optical tweezers in conjunction with a confocal microscope to manipulate cells into contact with 100 nm wide nanochannels. This work was done in collaboration with Pouyan Boukany of Dr. Lee's group. The small cross sectional area of these nano channels means that the electric field within them is extremely large, 60 MV/m, which allows them to electrophoretically drive transfection agents into the cell. We find that nano electroporation results in excellent dose control (to within 10% in our experiments) compared to bulk electroporation. We also find that

  15. Multi-wavelength speckle reduction for laser pico-projectors using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Weston H.

    Personal electronic devices, such as cell phones and tablets, continue to decrease in size while the number of features and add-ons keep increasing. One particular feature of great interest is an integrated projector system. Laser pico-projectors have been considered, but the technology has not been developed enough to warrant integration. With new advancements in diode technology and MEMS devices, laser-based projection is currently being advanced for pico-projectors. A primary problem encountered when using a pico-projector is coherent interference known as speckle. Laser speckle can lead to eye irritation and headaches after prolonged viewing. Diffractive optical elements known as diffusers have been examined as a means to lower speckle contrast. Diffusers are often rotated to achieve temporal averaging of the spatial phase pattern provided by diffuser surface. While diffusers are unable to completely eliminate speckle, they can be utilized to decrease the resultant contrast to provide a more visually acceptable image. This dissertation measures the reduction in speckle contrast achievable through the use of diffractive diffusers. A theoretical Fourier optics model is used to provide the diffuser's stationary and in-motion performance in terms of the resultant contrast level. Contrast measurements of two diffractive diffusers are calculated theoretically and compared with experimental results. In addition, a novel binary diffuser design based on Hadamard matrices will be presented. Using two static in-line Hadamard diffusers eliminates the need for rotation or vibration of the diffuser for temporal averaging. Two Hadamard diffusers were fabricated and contrast values were subsequently measured, showing good agreement with theory and simulated values. Monochromatic speckle contrast values of 0.40 were achieved using the Hadamard diffusers. Finally, color laser projection devices require the use of red, green, and blue laser sources; therefore, using a

  16. Advances in design and testing of limited angle optical diffraction tomographysystem for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuś, A.; Makowski, P.; Kujawińska, M.

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography has been steadily proving its potential to study one of the hot topics in modern cell biology -- 3D dynamic changes in cells' morphology represented with refractive index values. In this technique digital holography is combined with tomographic reconstruction and thus it is necessary to provide projections acquired at different viewing directions. Usually the Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration is used and while the object beam performs scanning, the reference beam is in most cases stationary. This approach either limits possible scanning strategies or requires additional mechanical movement to be introduced in the reference beam. On the other hand, spiral or grid scanning is possible in alternative common-path or Michelson configurations. However, in this case there is no guarantee that a specimen is sparse enough for the object to interfere with an object-free part of the beam. In this paper we present a modified version of Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based tomographic microscope, in which both object and reference beam are subject to scanning using one scanning device only thus making any scanning scenario possible. This concept is realized with a custom-built optical system in the reference beam and is appropriate for mechanical as well as optical scanning. Usually, the tomographic reconstruction setups and algorithms are verified using a microsphere phantom, which is not enough to test the influence of the distribution of the projections. In this work we propose a more complex calibration object created using two-photon polymerization.

  17. Non-diffracting beam synthesis used for optical trapping and delivery of sub-micron objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čižmár, Tomáš; Kollárov, Věra; Šiler, Martin; Jákl, Petr; Bouchal, Zdeněk; Garcés-Chávez, Veneranda; Dholakia, Kishan; Zemánek, Pavel

    2006-04-01

    We demonstrate the use of interference between non-diffracting Bessel beams (BB) to generate a system of optical traps. They offer sub-micron particle confinement, delivery and organization over a distance of hundreds of μm. We analyze system of two identical counter-propagating BBs and the case of two co-propagating BBs with different propagation constants separately. In both of these cases, the interference results in periodic on-axis intensity oscillations involving particle confinement. Altering the phase of one of the interfering beams, the whole structure of optical traps can be shifted axially. Implementing this conveyor belt enables the particle delivery over the whole distance where the optical traps are strong enough for particle confinement. Experimentally we succeeded with generation of both of these systems. In case of two counter-propagating BBs we observed a strong sub-micron particle confinement, while in case of co-propagating BBs the confinement was observed only with help of fluid flow against the radiation pressure of both beams.

  18. Generalized methodology for modeling and simulating optical interconnection networks using diffraction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louri, Ahmed; Major, Michael C.

    1995-07-01

    Research in the field of free-space optical interconnection networks has reached a point where simula-tors and other design tools are desirable for reducing development costs and for improving design time. Previously proposed methodologies have only been applicable to simple systems. Our goal was to develop a simulation methodology capable of evaluating the performance characteristics for a variety of different free-space networks under a range of different configurations and operating states. The proposed methodology operates by first establishing the optical signal powers at various locations in the network. These powers are developed through the simulation by diffraction analysis of the light propagation through the network. After this evaluation, characteristics such as bit-error rate, signal-to-noise ratio, and system bandwidth are calculated. Further, the simultaneous evaluation of this process for a set of component misalignments provides a measure of the alignment tolerance of a design. We discuss this simulation process in detail as well as provide models for different optical interconnection network components.

  19. Multifunctional diffractive optical elements for the generation of higher order Bessel-like-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, A.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2015-01-01

    Higher Order Bessel Beams (HOBBs) have many useful applications in optical trapping experiments. The generation of HOBBs is achieved by illuminating an axicon by a Laguerre-Gaussian beam generated by a spiral phase plate. It can also be generated by a Holographic Optical Element (HOE) containing the functions of the Spiral Phase Plate (SPP) and an axicon. However the HOBB's large focal depth reduces the intensity at each plane. In this paper, we propose a multifunctional Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) containing the functions of a SPP, axicon and a Fresnel Zone Lens (FZL) to generate higher efficiency higher order Bessel-like-beams with a reduced focal depth. The functions of a SPP and a FZL were combined by shifting the location of zones of FZL in a spiral fashion. The resulting element is combined with an axicon by modulo-2π phase addition technique. The final composite element contains the functions of SPP, FZL and axicon. The elements were designed with different topological charges and fabricated using electron beam direct writing. The elements were tested and the generation of a higher order Bessel-like-beams is confirmed. Besides, the elements also generated high quality donut beams at two planes equidistant from the focal plane of the FZL.

  20. Electron backscatter diffraction applied to lithium sheets prepared by broad ion beam milling.

    PubMed

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Zaghib, Karim; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Due to its very low hardness and atomic number, pure lithium cannot be prepared by conventional methods prior to scanning electron microscopy analysis. Here, we report on the characterization of pure lithium metallic sheets used as base electrodes in the lithium-ion battery technology using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray microanalysis using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) after the sheet surface was polished by broad argon ion milling (IM). No grinding and polishing were necessary to achieve the sufficiently damage free necessary for surface analysis. Based on EDS results the impurities could be characterized and EBSD revealed the microsctructure and microtexture of this material with accuracy. The beam damage and oxidation/hydration resulting from the intensive use of IM and the transfer of the sample into the microscope chamber was estimated to be <50 nm. Despite the fact that the IM process generates an increase of temperature at the specimen surface, it was assumed that the milling parameters were sufficient to minimize the heating effect on the surface temperature. However, a cryo-stage should be used if available during milling to guaranty a heating artefact free surface after the milling process. PMID:25280344

  1. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Samusev, Kirill B.; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters. PMID:27491952

  2. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure.

    PubMed

    Rybin, Mikhail V; Samusev, Kirill B; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu; Kivshar, Yuri S; Limonov, Mikhail F

    2016-01-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters. PMID:27491952

  3. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Samusev, Kirill B.; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2016-08-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters.

  4. Turbulence profiling methods applied to ESO's adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Javier; Béchet, Clémentine; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Gonté, Frédéric; Kolb, Johann; Le Louarn, Miska; Neichel, Benoît; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Guesalaga, Andrés.

    2014-07-01

    Two algorithms were recently studied for C2n profiling from wide-field Adaptive Optics (AO) measurements on GeMS (Gemini Multi-Conjugate AO system). They both rely on the Slope Detection and Ranging (SLODAR) approach, using spatial covariances of the measurements issued from various wavefront sensors. The first algorithm estimates the C2n profile by applying the truncated least-squares inverse of a matrix modeling the response of slopes covariances to various turbulent layer heights. In the second method, the profile is estimated by deconvolution of these spatial cross-covariances of slopes. We compare these methods in the new configuration of ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF), a high-order multiple laser system under integration. For this, we use measurements simulated by the AO cluster of ESO. The impact of the measurement noise and of the outer scale of the atmospheric turbulence is analyzed. The important influence of the outer scale on the results leads to the development of a new step for outer scale fitting included in each algorithm. This increases the reliability and robustness of the turbulence strength and profile estimations.

  5. Applications of Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral in linear and nonlinear optics: a didactic introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilla, V.; Costa, G. G. G.; Catunda, Tomaz

    2001-08-01

    In nonlinear optics, the Gaussian beam intensity profile, I(r) exp(-2r2/w2) generates a refractive index profile (Delta) n(r), and consequently a phase profile. Depending on the magnitude of the phase profile, rings structures can be observed in the beam far field intensity profile, the so-called Transverse Self Phase Modulation effect. In this work, we calculated these rings formation due to thermal and Kerr non linearities, using the Fresnel- Kirchhoff diffraction integral. In the case of Kerr nonlinearity, the refractive index profile is also Gaussian since n(r) equals n0 + n2I(r). However, due to the effect of heat diffusion, in the case of thermal nonlinearity the refractive index profile is broader than I(r).

  6. Generation of mask patterns for diffractive optical elements using Mathematica{sup T}{sup M}

    SciTech Connect

    OShea, D.C.

    1996-07-01

    The generation of binary and grayscale masks used in the fabrication of diffractive optical elements is usually performed using a proprietary piece of software or a computer-aided drafting package. Once the pattern is computed or designed, it must be output to a plotting or imaging system that will produce a reticle plate. This article describes a number of short Mathematica modules that can be used to generate binary and grayscale patterns in a PostScript-compatible format. Approaches to ensure that the patterns are directly related to the function of the element and the design wavelength are discussed. A procedure to preserve the scale of the graphic output when it is transferred to another application is given. Examples of surfaces for a 100 mm effective focal length lens and an Alvarez surface are given. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Detailed optical characterization of a near diffraction limited xenon fluoride laser

    SciTech Connect

    Londono, C. ); Smith, M.J.; Trainor, D.W.; Itzkan, I. ); Berggren, R. ); Fulghum, S.F. )

    1988-12-01

    A 1 m gain length, electron beam pumped xenon fluoride laser (lambda = 353, 351 nm) utilizing two laser mixtures of lean and rich NF/sub 3/, with Xe and balance Ne, was operated with a confocal unstable resonator with magnification of 2.24. The resultant beam quality was diagnosed with both shearing interferometry to measure near-field phase and far-field focal spot evaluation techniques. These measurements resulted in a beam quality of <1.15 times the diffraction limit with no evidence of the wide angle energy loss. This laser device was fully characterized with regard to electron beam deposition uniformity, transient refractive index effects, and optical quality of the resonator and diagnostic components.

  8. Optimizing Monocapillary Optics for Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Fluorescence Imaging, and Spectroscopy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bilderback, Donald H.; Kazimirov, Alexander; Gillilan, Richard; Cornaby, Sterling; Woll, Arthur; Zha, Chang-Sheng; Huang Rong

    2007-01-19

    A number of synchrotron x-ray applications such as powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells, microbeam protein crystallography, x-ray fluorescence imaging, etc. can benefit from using hollow glass monocapillary optics to improve the flux per square micron on a sample. We currently draw glass tubing into the desired elliptical shape so that only one-bounce under total reflection conditions is needed to bring the x-ray beam to a focus at a 25 to 50 mm distance beyond the capillary tip. For modest focal spot sizes of 10 to 20 microns, we can increase the intensity per square micron by factors of 10 to 1000. We show some of the results obtained at CHESS and Hasylab with capillaries focusing 5 to 40 keV radiation, their properties, and how even better the experimental results could be if more ideal capillaries were fabricated in the future.

  9. Optimizing Monocapillary Optics for Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Fluorescence Imaging, and Spectroscopy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilderback, Donald H.; Kazimirov, Alexander; Gillilan, Richard; Cornaby, Sterling; Woll, Arthur; Zha, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Rong

    2007-01-01

    A number of synchrotron x-ray applications such as powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells, microbeam protein crystallography, x-ray fluorescence imaging, etc. can benefit from using hollow glass monocapillary optics to improve the flux per square micron on a sample. We currently draw glass tubing into the desired elliptical shape so that only one-bounce under total reflection conditions is needed to bring the x-ray beam to a focus at a 25 to 50 mm distance beyond the capillary tip. For modest focal spot sizes of 10 to 20 microns, we can increase the intensity per square micron by factors of 10 to 1000. We show some of the results obtained at CHESS and Hasylab with capillaries focusing 5 to 40 keV radiation, their properties, and how even better the experimental results could be if more ideal capillaries were fabricated in the future.

  10. Optical image encryption using equal modulus decomposition and multiple diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Areeba; Mehra, Isha; Nishchal, Naveen K.

    2016-08-01

    The equal modulus decomposition (EMD) is a novel asymmetric cryptosystem based on coherent superposition which was proposed to resist the specific attack. In a subsequent work, the scheme was shown to be vulnerable to specific attack. In this paper, we counter the vulnerability through an encoding technique which uses multiple diffraction intensity pattern recordings as the input to the EMD setup in the gyrator domain. This allows suppression of the random phase mask in the EMD path. As a result, the proposed scheme achieves resistance to specific attack. The simulation results and the security analysis demonstrate that EMD based on multiple intensity pattern recording is an effective optical asymmetric cryptosystem suitable for securing data and images.

  11. High resolution double-sided diffractive optics for hard X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mohacsi, Istvan; Vartiainen, Ismo; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Karvinen, Petri; Guzenko, Vitaliy A; Müller, Elisabeth; Färm, Elina; Ritala, Mikko; Kewish, Cameron M; Somogyi, Andrea; David, Christian

    2015-01-26

    The fabrication of high aspect ratio metallic nanostructures is crucial for the production of efficient diffractive X-ray optics in the hard X-ray range. We present a novel method to increase their structure height via the double-sided patterning of the support membrane. In transmission, the two Fresnel zone plates on the two sides of the substrate will act as a single zone plate with added structure height. The presented double-sided zone plates with 30 nm smallest zone width offer up to 9.9% focusing efficiency at 9 keV, that results in a factor of two improvement over their previously demonstrated single-sided counterparts. The increase in efficiency paves the way to speed up X-ray microscopy measurements and allows the more efficient utilization of the flux in full-field X-ray microscopy. PMID:25835837

  12. A novel approach to label-free sensing: diffractive optics technology (dot).

    PubMed

    Houle, Jean-François; Inc, Axela

    2009-09-01

    Label-free detection methods have played a very significant role in drug design and refinement. They have been used primarily during secondary screening and for in-depth characterization of biomolecular interactions. Misconceptions about the accessibility of these platforms, since they often require specialized training, throughput and robustness in complex media have hampered their adoption in the earliest phases of discovery not to mention their significant and unrealized potential in qualifying reagents for high throughput screening or during novel assay development. A new wave of more cost effective, robust and accessible platforms has made significant inroads, demonstrating that significant information can be derived from these methods all along the drug discovery research continuum. One of these recent entrants, the dotLab System uses diffractive optics technology (dot) to detect biomolecular interactions and can be used for a wide variety of applications in the study of a broad spectrum of biological analytes including proteins, DNA and even microorganisms. PMID:19531011

  13. Toward the optical "magic carpet": reducing the divergence of a light sheet below the diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Golub, Ilya; Chebbi, Brahim; Golub, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    In 3D, diffraction-free or Bessel beams are well known and have found applications in diverse fields. An analog in 2D, or pseudonondiffracting (PND) beams, is a nontrivial problem, and existing methods suffer from deficiencies. For example, Airy beams are not highly localized, some PND beams have significant side lobes, and a cosine beam has to be truncated by a very narrow aperture thus discarding most of the energy. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that it is possible to generate a quasi-nondiffracting 2D light beam in a simple and efficient fashion. This is achieved by placing a mask consisting of a pair of double slits on a cylindrical lens. The applications include light sheet microscopy/optical sectioning and particle manipulation. PMID:26512534

  14. Fin stress and pitch measurement using X-ray diffraction reciprocal space maps and optical scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, A. C.; Medikonda, M.; Muthinti, G. R.; Kamineni, V. K.; Fronheiser, J.; Wormington, M.; Peterson, B.; Race, J.

    2013-04-01

    Although fin metrology presents many challenges, the single crystal nature of the fins also provides opportunities to use a combination of measurement methods to determine stress and pitch. While the diffraction of light during a scatterometry measurement is well known, X-ray diffraction from a field (array) of single crystal silicon fins can also provide important information. Since some fins have Si1-xGex alloys at the top of the fin, determination of the presence of stress relaxation is another critical aspect of fin characterization. Theoretical studies predict that the bi-axially stressed crystal structure of pseudomorphic alloy films will be altered by the fin structure. For example, one expects it will be different along the length of the fin vs the width. Reciprocal space map (RSM) characterization can provide a window in the stress state of fins as well as measure pitch walking and other structural information. In this paper, we describe the fundamentals of how RSMs can be used to characterize the pitch of an array of fins as well as the stress state. We describe how this impacts the optical properties used in scatterometry measurement.

  15. Increasing reconstruction quality of diffractive optical elements displayed with LC SLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2015-03-01

    Phase liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulators (SLM) are actively used in various applications. However, majority of scientific applications require stable phase modulation which might be hard to achieve with commercially available SLM due to its consumer origin. The use of digital voltage addressing scheme leads to phase temporal fluctuations, which results in lower diffraction efficiency and reconstruction quality of displayed diffractive optical elements (DOE). Due to high periodicity of fluctuations it should be possible to use knowledge of these fluctuations during DOE synthesis to minimize negative effect. We synthesized DOE using accurately measured phase fluctuations of phase LC SLM "HoloEye PLUTO VIS" to minimize its negative impact on displayed DOE reconstruction. Synthesis was conducted with versatile direct search with random trajectory (DSRT) method in the following way. Before DOE synthesis begun, two-dimensional dependency of SLM phase shift on addressed signal level and time from frame start was obtained. Then synthesis begins. First, initial phase distribution is created. Second, random trajectory of consecutive processing of all DOE elements is generated. Then iterative process begins. Each DOE element sequentially has its value changed to one that provides better value of objective criterion, e.g. lower deviation of reconstructed image from original one. If current element value provides best objective criterion value then it left unchanged. After all elements are processed, iteration repeats until stagnation is reached. It is demonstrated that application of SLM phase fluctuations knowledge in DOE synthesis with DSRT method leads to noticeable increase of DOE reconstruction quality.

  16. Diffraction limited observations of flux concentrations and sunspot finestructure using adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, T. R.

    2003-05-01

    We present diffraction limited observations of magnetic flux concentrations and penumbral and umbral fine structure within an active region observed at disk center. We recorded g-band images, magnetograms, dopplergrams and narrow-band filtergrams using the Universal Birefringened Filter (UBF) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). The adaptive optics system at the DST was used to achieve diffraction limited long exposure imaging with high signal-to-noise. The main results can be summarized as follows: Strong and spatially narrow downflows are observed at the edge of magnetic structures such as flux tubes, pores and the sunspot umbra. Flux concentrations observed as bright points in intensity expand by about 30-40% from a height close to where the continuum is formed and the height of formation for the g-band. For the particular sunspot observed and at a low altitude in the photosphere we find strong evidence for what appears to be vigorous, small-scale convection patterns in parts of the umbra and a light bridge. We observe extremely narrow (<0.2") channels or sheets of downflowing plasma. We are able to identify individual penumbral fibrils in our data and find a small bright (hot) upflow and a more vertical field structure at the filament "head" near the umbral boundary. The field and flow turn to a nearly horizontal, dark structure within only about 0.2 arcsec. We compare our results with theoretical model predictions.

  17. Malayaite ceramic pigments: A combined optical spectroscopy and neutron/X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Cruciani, Giuseppe; Dondi, Michele; Ardit, Matteo; Lyubenova, Teodora Stoyanova; Carda, Juan B.; Matteucci, Francesco; Costa, Anna L.

    2009-08-05

    Ceramic pigments based on the Cr-doped malayaite structure were synthesized by solid state reaction and characterized by optical spectroscopy and combined X-ray and neutron powder diffraction in order to elucidate the still unclear chromium substitution mechanisms. The results show that coloration is actually due to simultaneous occurrence of Cr{sup 4+} and Cr{sup 3+} ions in the crystal lattice. Spectroscopy data confirm that Cr{sup 4+} is replacing Sn{sup 4+} in the octahedral site and, in minor amount, Si{sup 4+} in the tetrahedral site. In addition, neutron powder diffraction data suggest that Cr{sup 3+} substitution for octahedral Sn{sup 4+} is charge balanced by the formation of oxygen vacancies with no preference over the different oxygen sites. Upon incorporation of Cr ion, the SnO{sub 6} octahedra exhibit an off-centre displacement of central cation which in turn induces a rearrangement of both the octahedral and tetrahedral coordination shells.

  18. Multiconjugate adaptive optics applied to an anatomically accurate human eye model.

    PubMed

    Bedggood, P A; Ashman, R; Smith, G; Metha, A B

    2006-09-01

    Aberrations of both astronomical telescopes and the human eye can be successfully corrected with conventional adaptive optics. This produces diffraction-limited imagery over a limited field of view called the isoplanatic patch. A new technique, known as multiconjugate adaptive optics, has been developed recently in astronomy to increase the size of this patch. The key is to model atmospheric turbulence as several flat, discrete layers. A human eye, however, has several curved, aspheric surfaces and a gradient index lens, complicating the task of correcting aberrations over a wide field of view. Here we utilize a computer model to determine the degree to which this technology may be applied to generate high resolution, wide-field retinal images, and discuss the considerations necessary for optimal use with the eye. The Liou and Brennan schematic eye simulates the aspheric surfaces and gradient index lens of real human eyes. We show that the size of the isoplanatic patch of the human eye is significantly increased through multiconjugate adaptive optics. PMID:19529172

  19. Novel cost-effective process for the replication of hybrid diffractive/refractive optical elements in silica glass

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L.C.; Nogues, J.L.; Moreshead, B.

    1998-08-01

    This CRADA between Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Contractor) and GELTECH, Inc. (Participant) has demonstrated the feasibility of producing hybrid diffractive/refractive optics by a replication process which lends itself to high-volume, low-cost production. The program has built unpon unique capabilities of the Contractor and the Participant to achieve this demonstration. The Contractor has extensive experience and unique capabilities in the technology of single point diamong turning for optical components. The Participant has achieved unique success in the development of manufacturing processes for high-quality silica optical components using sol-gel technology. The merging of these two leading technologies has provided a synergism resulting in the demonstration of a manufacturing technology for cost-effective, high-volume production of silica glass precision hybrid optical components. Hybrid optical components are systems that integrate diffractive optical surfaces into lenses, resulting in designs that minimize the aberrations that degrade image quality without the need for additional glass elements. This reduces the cost, weight, and complexity of the system, while improving the overall optical efficiency. Previous applications of hybrid optical components have been primarily for infra-red applications, where diamond-turned germanium or silicon optics have been used. Hybrid optics for use in the visible have been limited to laboratory curiosities that were directly turned into plastic substrates. Through this CRADA the authors have achieved a manufacturing process for producing high quality silica glass hybrid lenses in an way that lends itself to mass production.

  20. Effects of nonlinearity on the optical diffraction of Bose-Einstein condensates: Direct integration of optically coupled multicomponent Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Taro; Ohtake, Yoshiyuki; Kondo, Jun-ichi; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2011-02-15

    We investigate in detail the effects of nonlinearity on optical diffraction of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). By directly integrating the optically coupled two-component Gross-Pitaevskii equation in real space-time, comprehensive analyses of BEC optical diffraction phenomena are done under various conditions of light-pulse irradiation, total number of BEC atoms, etc., without using the adiabatic elimination approximation for an atomic excited state. Calculation results for the optical diffraction of {sup 87}Rb BECs revealed that (1) the effect of nonlinearity on the atomic states causes the ''nonkinetic'' nonlinear effect in the Raman-Nath regime of diffraction, while the dynamics of BEC atoms due to the nonlinearity-induced repulsive forces works dominantly to produce the ''kinetic'' nonlinear effect in the Bragg regime of diffraction; (2) nonlinearity reduces the amplitude and frequency of the two-photon Rabi oscillation between BEC stationary and moving states, suggesting limitations in implementing the BEC Mach-Zehnder interferometer; and (3) the observed nonlinear effects are free from kinetic effects of the atomic excited state and not responsible for the optical transition process.

  1. Design and fabrication of a diffractive optical element as a spectrum-splitting solar concentrator for lateral multijunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qingli; Wang, Jinze; Quan, Baogang; Zhang, Qiulin; Zhang, Dongxiang; Li, Dongmei; Meng, Qingbo; Pan, Li; Wang, Yanqin; Yang, Guozhen

    2013-04-10

    We have designed a single thin planar diffractive optical element (DOE) based on the principle of diffractive optics to simultaneously split and concentrate the incident light into several energy ranges for lateral multijunction solar cells. A prototype with the maximum thickness of 6.95 μm and 32 quantized levels in depth was fabricated by photolithographic technology. The spectrum-splitting and concentrating performance of the prototype, which were measured quantitatively, show good agreement with the simulation results. As mass production of a DOE can be produced by imprint technology, our design provides a feasible means for low-cost, large-scale, and high-efficiency photovoltaic applications. PMID:23670760

  2. Diffraction analysis and evaluation of several focus- and track-error detection schemes for magneto-optical disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Mansuripur, M.

    1992-01-01

    A commonly used tracking method on pre-grooved magneto-optical (MO) media is the push-pull technique, and the astigmatic method is a popular focus-error detection approach. These two methods are analyzed using DIFFRACT, a general-purpose scalar diffraction modeling program, to observe the effects on the error signals due to focusing lens misalignment, Seidel aberrations, and optical crosstalk (feedthrough) between the focusing and tracking servos. Using the results of the astigmatic/push-pull system as a basis for comparison, a novel focus/track-error detection technique that utilizes a ring toric lens is evaluated as well as the obscuration method (focus error detection only).

  3. Spatial optical modulator (SOM): high-density diffractive laser projection display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, SangKyeong; Song, JongHyeong; Yeo, InJae; Choi, YoonJoon; Yurlov, Victor; An, SeungDo; Park, HeungWoo; Yang, HaengSeok; Lee, YeongGyu; Han, KyuBum; Shyshkin, Ihar; Lapchuk, Anatoliy; Oh, KwanYoung; Ryu, SeungWon; Jang, JaeWook; Park, ChangSu; Kim, ChunGi; Kim, SunKi; Kim, EungJu; Woo, KiSuk; Yang, JeongSuong; Kim, EuiJoong; Kim, JooHong; Byun, SungHo; Lee, SeungWoo; Lim, OhkKun; Cheong, JongPil; Hwang, YoungNam; Byun, GiYoung; Kyoung, JeHong; Yoon, SangKee; Lee, JaeKwang; Lee, TaeWon; Hong, SeokKee; Hong, YoonShik; Park, DongHyun; Kang, JungChul; Shin, WooChul; Lee, SungIl; Oh, SungKyung; Song, ByungKi; Kim, HeeYeoun; Koh, ChongMann; Ryu, YungHo; Lee, HyunKee; Baek, YoungKi

    2007-02-01

    A new type of diffractive spatial optical modulators, named SOM, has been developed by Samsung Electro-Mechanics for laser projection display. It exhibit inherent advantages of fast response time and high-performance light modulation, suitable for high quality embedded laser projection displays. The calculated efficiency and contrast ratio are 75 % and 800:1 respectively in case of 0 th order, 67 % and 1000:1 respectively in case of +/-1st order. The response time is as fast as 0.7 μs. Also we get the displacement of 400 nm enough to display full color with single panel in VGA format, as being 10 V driven. Optical module with VGA was successfully demonstrated for its potential applications in mobile laser projection display such as cellular phone, digital still camera and note PC product. Electrical power consumption is less than 2 W, volume is less than 13 cc. Brightness is enough to watch TV and movie in the open air, being variable up to 6 lm. Even if it's optimal diagonal image size is 10 inch, image quality does not deteriorate in the range of 5 to 50 inch because of the merit of focus-free. Due to 100 % fill factor, the image is seamless so as to be unpleasant to see the every pixel's partition. High speed of response time can make full color display with 24-bit gray scale and cause no scan line artifact, better than any other devices.

  4. Response characteristics of laser diffraction particle size analyzers - Optical sample volume extent and lens effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    The response characteristics of laser diffraction particle sizing instruments were studied theoretically and experimentally. In particular, the extent of optical sample volume and the effects of receiving lens properties were investigated in detail. The experimental work was performed with a particle size analyzer using a calibration reticle containing a two-dimensional array of opaque circular disks on a glass substrate. The calibration slide simulated the forward-scattering characteristics of a Rosin-Rammler droplet size distribution. The reticle was analyzed with collection lenses of 63 mm, 100 mm, and 300 mm focal lengths using scattering inversion software that determined best-fit Rosin-Rammler size distribution parameters. The data differed from the predicted response for the reticle by about 10 percent. A set of calibration factor for the detector elements was determined that corrected for the nonideal response of the instrument. The response of the instrument was also measured as a function of reticle position, and the results confirmed a theoretical optical sample volume model presented here.

  5. Multicomponent measurements of the Jefferson Lab energy recovery linac electron beam using optical transition and diffraction radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, M. A.; Fiorito, R. B.; Shkvarunets, A. G.; O'Shea, P. G.; Benson, S. V.; Douglas, D.; Evtushenko, P.; Jordan, K.

    2008-08-01

    High brightness electron accelerators, such as energy recovery linacs (ERL), often have complex particle distributions that can create difficulties in beam transport as well as matching to devices such as wigglers used to generate radiation from the beam. Optical transition radiation (OTR), OTR interferometry (OTRI), and optical diffraction-transition radiation interferometry (ODTRI) have proven to be effective tools for diagnosing both the spatial and angular distributions of charged particle beams. OTRI and ODTRI have been used to measure rms divergences, and optical transverse phase space mapping has been demonstrated using OTRI. In this work we present the results of diagnostic experiments using OTR and optical diffraction radiation conducted at the Jefferson Laboratory’s 115 MeV ERL which show the presence of two separate components within the beam’s spatial and angular distributions. By assuming a correlation between the spatial and angular features, we estimate an rms emittance value for each of the two components.

  6. Micromachined diffraction based optical microphones and intensity probes with electrostatic force feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicen, Baris

    Measuring acoustic pressure gradients is critical in many applications such as directional microphones for hearing aids and sound intensity probes. This measurement is especially challenging with decreasing microphone size, which reduces the sensitivity due to small spacing between the pressure ports. Novel, micromachined biomimetic microphone diaphragms are shown to provide high sensitivity to pressure gradients on one side of the diaphragm with low thermal mechanical noise. These structures have a dominant mode shape with see-saw like motion in the audio band, responding to pressure gradients as well as spurious higher order modes sensitive to pressure. In this dissertation, integration of a diffraction based optical detection method with these novel diaphragm structures to implement a low noise optical pressure gradient microphone is described and experimental characterization results are presented, showing 36 dBA noise level with 1mm port spacing, nearly an order of magnitude better than the current gradient microphones. The optical detection scheme also provides electrostatic actuation capability from both sides of the diaphragm separately which can be used for active force feedback. A 4-port electromechanical equivalent circuit model of this microphone with optical readout is developed to predict the overall response of the device to different acoustic and electrostatic excitations. The model includes the damping due to complex motion of air around the microphone diaphragm, and it calculates the detected optical signal on each side of the diaphragm as a combination of two separate dominant vibration modes. This equivalent circuit model is verified by experiments and used to predict the microphone response with different force feedback schemes. Single sided force feedback is used for active damping to improve the linearity and the frequency response of the microphone. Furthermore, it is shown that using two sided force feedback one can significantly suppress

  7. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P.; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick–Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions. PMID:27097853

  8. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P.; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-04-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick–Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions.

  9. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions. PMID:27097853

  10. Diffraction-limited upgrade to ARGOS: the LBT's ground-layer adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Michael; Busoni, Lorenzo; Durney, Olivier; Esposito, Simone; Gässler, Wolfgang; Gasho, Victor; Rabien, Sebastian; Rademacher, Matt

    2010-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is now operating with the first of two permanently installed adaptive secondary mirrors, and the first of two complementary near-IR instruments called LUCIFER is operational as well. The ARGOS laser-guided ground-layer adaptive optics (GLAO) system, described elsewhere at this conference1, will build on this foundation to deliver the highest resolution over the 4 arc min wide-field imaging and multi-object spectroscopic modes of LUCIFER. In this paper, we describe a planned upgrade to ARGOS which will supplement the Rayleigh-based GLAO system with sodium laser guide stars (LGS) to fulfill the telescope's diffraction-limited potential. In its narrow-field mode of 30 arc sec, LUCIFER will deliver imaging at the Nyquist limit of the individual 8.4 m apertures down to J band and long-slit spectroscopy with resolution up to 40,000. In addition, the LBT Interferometer2 (LBTI) will cophase the two apertures, offering imaging at the diffraction limit of the 22.8 m baseline at wavelengths from 1.2 to 20 μm. In the first phase of the upgrade, a 10 W sodium LGS will be added to each half of the LBT, using the same launch telescopes mounted behind the two secondary mirrors as the Rayleigh LGS. The upgrade will rely on other components of the ARGOS infrastructure such as acquisition and guiding, and fast tip-tilt cameras. New wavefront sensors will be added to LUCIFER and LBTI. In the upgrade's second phase, the sodium and Rayleigh LGS will be used together in a hybrid tomographic sensing system. This configuration will offer the advantage that a single tip-tilt star will continue to be sufficient even for MCAO operation3, which is planned with LBT's LINC-NIRVANA instrument4,5.

  11. Center for Applied Optics Studies: an investment in Indiana's future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, Delbert J., II; Khorana, Brij M.

    1992-05-01

    To understand the involvement of the State of Indiana with the Center for Applied Optics at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, it is best to start with an explanation of the Indiana Corporation for Science and Technology (CST), its basic charter and its programs. Established in 1982 as a private not-for-profit corporation, CST was formed to promote economic development within the State of Indiana. Two programs that were initially a part of CST's charter and supported with state dollars were a seed capital investment program, aimed at developing new products and processes, and the establishment of university centers of technology development. The former was conceived to create jobs and new, technologically advanced industries in Indiana. The latter was an attempt to encourage technology transfer from the research laboratories of the state universities to the production lines of Indiana industry. Recently, CST has undergone a name change to the Indiana Business Modernization and Technology Corporation (BMT) and adopted an added responsibility of proactive assistance to small- and medium-sized businesses in order to enhance the state's industrial competitiveness.

  12. Non-Harmonic Analysis Applied to Optical Coherence Tomography Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xu; Uchida, Tetsuya; Hirobayashi, Shigeki; Chong, Changho; Morosawa, Atsushi; Totsuka, Koki; Suzuki, Takuya

    2012-02-01

    A new processing technique called non-harmonic analysis (NHA) is proposed for optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Conventional Fourier-domain OCT employs the discrete Fourier transform (DFT), which depends on the window function and length. The axial resolution of the OCT image, calculated by using DFT, is inversely proportional to the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the wavelength range. The FWHM of wavelength range is limited by the sweeping range of the source in swept-source OCT and it is limited by the number of CCD pixels in spectral-domain OCT. However, the NHA process does not have such constraints; NHA can resolve high frequencies irrespective of the window function and the frame length of the sampled data. In this study, the NHA process is described and it is applied to OCT imaging. It is compared with OCT images based on the DFT. To demonstrate the benefits of using NHA for OCT, we perform OCT imaging with NHA of an onion skin. The results reveal that NHA can achieve an image resolution equivalent that of a 100-nm sweep range using a significantly reduced wavelength range. They also reveal the potential of using this technique to achieve high-resolution imaging without using a broadband source. However, the long calculation times required for NHA must be addressed if it is to be used in clinical applications.

  13. Limited-angle hybrid optical diffraction tomography system with total-variation-minimization-based reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauze, Wojciech; Kuś, Arkadiusz; Kujawinska, Malgorzata

    2015-05-01

    The case of diffraction tomography with limited angle of projections is discussed from the algorithmic and experimental points of view. To reconstruct a three-dimensional distribution of refractive index of a micro-object under study, we use a hybrid approach based on the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) enhanced by a compressed sensing reconstruction technique. It enables us to apply the standard computed tomography algorithms (which assume that the rays are traveling in straight lines through the object) for phase data obtained by means of digital holography. We present the results of analysis of a phantom and real objects obtained by applying SART with anisotropic total variation (ATV) minimization. The real data are acquired from an experimental setup based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration. Also, it is proven that in the case of simulated data, the limited number of projections captured in a limited angular range can be compensated by a higher number of iterations of the algorithm. We also show that the SART + ATV method applied for experimental data gives better results than the data replenishment algorithm.

  14. Optical and resonant X-ray diffraction studies of molecular arrangements in several liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Suntao

    Using optical and x-ray techniques, we have studied several selected liquid crystal compounds formed by three types of molecules: rod-like; hockey-stick-shaped and bent-core-shaped molecules. This thesis describes four research projects. The first one is a study of the molecular arrangements in freestanding films of three chiral compounds showing no-layer-shrinkage behavior above their bulk SmA-SmC* transition temperatures. Upon cooling under a proper electric field, novel nonplanar-anticlinic-synclinic and nonplanar-synclinic transitions have been observed in two compounds. Increasing electric field can induce a rare transition from a synclinic to an anticlinic structure. Results from both x-ray diffraction and optical studies indicate that different molecular packing arrangements exist within the Sm A phase window. The second project is to investigate three achiral meta-substituted three-ring compounds. These compounds exhibit two different tilted smectic phases, Sm C1 and SmC2. A recent paper has reported that mirror symmetry is broken in one of these compounds. However, no mirror symmetry breaking has been observed in our studies of the same compound. Our studies of another two compounds confirmed previous results that the Sm C1 and SmC2 phases are Sm C and SmCA, respectively. Thirdly, we confirmed the SM C*FI2 -SmC* phase sequence reversal in one liquid crystal compound and specially prepared binary mixtures. This phase sequence reversal was predicted by a recent phenomenological model. Moreover, the temperature range for the SM C*FI2 phase increases significantly in the mixture suggesting that such a phase sequence may exist in other compounds. The last project is to study the B2 phase formed by bent-core molecules using polarization-analyzed resonant x-ray diffraction. The B2 phase has three possible arrangements which show a two-layer unit cell. We analyzed the polarization of the resonant peaks at different Bragg orders. By comparing a theoretical

  15. Design of dual-FOV refractive/diffractive LWIR optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-ping; Wang, Ling-jie; Zhang, Xin

    2007-12-01

    An infrared-optical zoom system using binary element is proposed in this paper. The two main advantages of the zoom system introducing here are: bigger F-number and lower cost. The primary optical properties are: F/#=1,zoom ratio =1:4,and dual field are 26.6°and 5.6°respectively. Wider field of view is used for search and the smaller one is used for imaging details. This system uses un-cooled infrared detector with 320×240 pixels and 45μm pixel size. The F-number matches the sensitivity range of the detector array. Three aspects are considered during design process to make the system more satisfactory and more achievable. First, the manner of zoom is accomplished by exchanging tow lenses into the smaller field of view system layout. The lens exchange manner faces the requirement of simple system structure and good image quality in both focal points. It can also make the system more feasible in the alignment process than mechanical-zooming manner and optical-zooming manner; Second, binary element is used to correct the chromatical aberration by taking the advantage of negative dispersion characteristics and the cost of the system is lower than that of conventional ones with Zinc Selenide (Znse) material at the same level. In the binary element is rotational symmetric with one step which is easy to fabricate; Others, in order to balance 5th spherical aberration, 5th coma aberration and 5th astigmatic aberration, high-order asphere surfaces with 2th order to 10thorder are also hired in the system. Asphere surface is useful in compressing the system and improving optical system transmittance. This kind asphere surface is on industrial level featuring low cost and easy to fabricate. It is shown that good image quality can achieved by implementing five Germanium lenses and the transmittance of system is 72%. All aberrations are diffraction-limited, both spherical aberration and astigmatic aberration are corrected. When the field of view(FOV) is 26.6°and the focal

  16. Performance evaluation of gratings applied by genetic algorithm for the real-time optical interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jin-Seon; Kim, Nam; Suh, HoHyung; Jeon, Seok Hee

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, gratings to apply for the optical interconnection are designed using a genetic algorithm (GA) for a robust and efficient schema. The real-time optical interconnection system architecture is composed with LC-SLM, CCD array detector, IBM-PC, He-Ne laser, and Fourier transform lens. A pixelated binary phase grating is displayed on LC-SLM and could interconnect incoming beams to desired output spots freely by real-time. So as to adapt a GA for finding near globally-cost solutions, a chromosome is coded as a binary integer of length 32 X 32, the stochastic tournament method for decreasing the stochastic sampling error is performed, and a single-point crossover having 16 X 16 block size is used. The characteristics on the several parameters are analyzed in the desired grating design. Firstly, as the analysis of the effect on the probability of crossover, a designed grating when the probability of crossover is 0.75 has a 74.7[%] high diffraction efficiency and a 1.73 X 10-1 uniformity quantitatively, where the probability of mutation is 0.001 and the population size is 300. Secondly, on the probability of mutation, a designed grating when the probability of mutation is 0.001 has a 74.4[%] high efficiency and a 1.61 X 10-1 uniformity quantitatively, where the probability of crossover is 1.0 and the population size is 300. Thirdly, on the population size, a designed grating when the population size is 300 and the generation is 400 has above 74[%] diffraction efficiency, where the probability of mutation is 0.001 and the probability of crossover is 1.0.

  17. Design of single layer subwavelength diffractive optical element (G-Fresnel) for spectrum splitting and beam concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarazanchi, Abbas; Gerard, Philippe; Ambs, Pierre; Meyrueis, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    There is an increasing demand for optical elements having the functionalities of hybrid devices, such as the combination of a Fresnel lens and a diffraction grating. These new devices can be used in many applications, such as in optical spectrometers, optical precision measurement systems and diffractive optical systems for enhancing the efficiency of third generation photovoltaic solar cells. There is also a growing need for developments of a cost-effective technology to fabricate compact optical devices. Therefore the motivation of our project is to find a new model of the G-Fresnel (i.e. grating and Fresnel lens) taking into account the utilization of the electromagnetic theory for the rigorous analysis of its behavior. In this paper, a novel method is proposed and employed to design a G-Fresnel device that has only one structure layer with subwavelength features, and that focuses and separates different bands of light spectra in the same focal plane. The device performance has been studied through the use of rigorous electromagnetic theory, by using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) for the study of the near field and the Angular Spectrum Method (ASM) for the study of the propagation in the far field. The optimal design of the G-Fresnel profiles depends on the profile of the Fresnel lenses that minimize the longitude chromatic aberration, and also on the diffraction grating with high first order diffraction efficiency. The verification of the G-Fresnel model that we propose shows high diffraction efficiency and a good performance in separation for a broadband light spectrum. This promising G-Fresnel model could be used to increase the efficiency of third generation photovoltaic cells.

  18. Optimisation of the diffractive optical element for snapshot spectral imaging used in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, R.; Arnold, T.; De Biasio, M.; McGunnigle, G.; Rogojanu, R.; Steiner, G. E.; Hermerschmidt, A.

    2012-03-01

    Snapshot approaches address various possibilities to acquire the spectral and spatial information of a scene within a single camera frame. One advantage over the classical push broom or staring imager approaches is that the temporal inconsistency between consecutive scan lines in first case or between the acquired monochromatic images in the second case is avoided. However, this has to be paid by some effort to rearrange or reconstruct the explicit spectral cube from the entangled raw data in the single camera frame. Besides others, the utilization of a diffractive optical element (DOE) is one such snapshot approach (CTIS - computed tomography imaging spectrometer). The DOE is used to create an optical transfer function that projects both the spectral and spatial information of a scene onto a sensor array and a reconstruction algorithm is used that recovers the spectral cube from the dispersed image pattern. The design of the DOE is crucial for the overall system performance as the absolute transmission efficiency of the zeroth and first order versus the relative efficiency between the two over the required wavelength range are difficult to optimize if the limited dynamic range of a real camera is considered. We describe the optimization of such a DOE for the wavelength range from 400 to 780nm and the required reconstruction algorithm to recover the spectral cube from the entangled snapshot image. The described snapshot approach has been evaluated using experiments to assess the spatial and spectral resolution using diffuse reflectance standards. Additionally the results achieved using the described setup for multi-color in-situ fluorescence hybridized preparations (M-FISH) are discussed.

  19. Optical fiber smart structures applied to secure containers

    SciTech Connect

    Sliva, P.; Gordon, N.R.; Stahl, K.A.; Simmon, K.L.; Anheier, N.C.

    1994-07-01

    A prototype secure container was prepared that uses continually monitored optical fiber as the smart structure. A small ({approx}7.6 cm {times} 10.2 cm {times} 12.7 cm), matchbox-shaped container consisting of an inner drawer within an outer shell was fabricated from polymer resin. The optical fiber was sandwiched between additional non-optical, strength-promoting fibers and embedded into the polymer. The additional non-optical fiber provides strength to the container, protects the optical fiber from damage, hides the fiber and acts as a decoy. The optical fiber was wound with a winding density such that a high probability of fiber damage would be expected if the container was penetrated.

  20. Optical diffraction tomography in fluid velocimetry: the use of a priori information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobera, J.; Coupland, J. M.

    2008-07-01

    Holographic particle image velocimetry (HPIV) has been used successfully to make three-dimensional, three-component flow measurements from holographic recordings of seeded fluid. It is clear that measurements can only be made in regions that contain particles, but simply adding more seeding results in poor quality images due to the effects of multiple scattering. In this paper, we describe optical diffraction tomography (ODT) techniques and consider its use as a means to overcome the problems of multiple scattering in HPIV. We consider several approaches to tomographic reconstruction that are essentially based on linear and nonlinear combinations of holographic reconstructions of the scattered fields observed under varied illuminating conditions. We show that linear reconstruction provides images of highest fidelity, but none of the methods properly accounts for the effects of multiple scattering. We go on to consider nonlinear optimization methods in ODT that attempt to minimize the error between the scattered field computed from an estimate of the particle distribution and that measured in practice. We describe an optimization procedure that is based on the conjugated gradient method (CGM) that makes use of a priori information (the size and refractive index of the seeding particles) to effectively reduce the problem to that of finding the set of particle locations. Some 2D numerical experiments are computed and some promising results are shown.

  1. Quantification of neurotoxic effects on individual neuron cells using optical diffraction tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jonghee; Yang, Su-a.; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease that causes symptoms of postural instability and slowness of movement. Neurodegeneration in dopaminergic neurons at the substantia nigra has been reported as pathologic features, however, detailed mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are still remain unclear. To investigate a neurodegenerative process, various imaging tools including phase contrast microscopy, electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy are utilized. However, these imaging methods provide qualitative information and require invasive approaches such as the use of fluorescence agents or chemical fixation procedures that disturb normal physiological conditions of neuron cells. In order to quantify the neurodegenerative process in a non-invasive manner, we exploited optical diffraction tomography (ODT). ODT is a 3D quantitative phase imaging method that measures 3D refractive index (RI) distributions of a sample which provide quantitative structural (volume, surface area, sphericity) and biochemical (protein concentration, total cellular dry mass) information. We investigated neurotoxic effects of MPP+ on SH-SY5Y cells by using quantitative information obtained from 3D RI distributions. We also performed temporal measurements of 3D RI distributions of an individual SH-SY5Y cell to analyze neurotoxic effects on intracellular vesicle dynamics.

  2. Large-aperture continuous-phase diffractive optical element for beam transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qiaofeng; Yan, Yingbai; Jin, Guofan; Wu, Minxian

    1999-11-01

    Beam transform, such as to obtain uniform focal spot with flat top, steep edge, low side lobes and high light efficiency, can be realized well by diffractive optical element (DOE). The DOE has many advantages, such as high light efficiency and strong phase distribution design flexibility. To increase the light efficiency and decrease large-angle scattering, continuous phase DOE should be used. The phase design is competed by a kind of multi-resolution hybrid algorithm based on hill-climbing and simulated annealing, which exploits sufficiently strong convergence ability of the hill climbing and global optimization potential of the simulated annealing. A kind of phase distribution with good geometrical structure and diameter 80 mm is obtained by choosing disturbance function, receipt and refused probability and so on. The simulated results show that the light efficiency is more than 95 percent, and the non-uniformity is less than 5 percent. Because the etching depth is direct proportion to the exposure time, to obtain continuous phase DOE, a kind of hollowed-out mask, namely gray-scale mask is used to control exposure time of each are. The mask is manufactured by linear cutting machine. The continuous phase DOE with diameter 80mm is fabricated by ion-etching with the mask. Finally, the tolerance of manufacturing error including depth error and alignment error are analyzed.

  3. Label-free identification of white blood cell using optical diffraction tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Min-hyeok; Kang, Suk-Jo; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    White blood cells (WBC) have crucial roles in immune systems which defend the host against from disease conditions and harmful invaders. Various WBC subsets have been characterized and reported to be involved in many pathophysiologic conditions. It is crucial to isolate a specific WBC subset to study its pathophysiological roles in diseases. Identification methods for a specific WBC population are rely on invasive approaches, including Wright-Gimesa staining for observing cellular morphologies and fluorescence staining for specific protein markers. While these methods enable precise classification of WBC populations, they could disturb cellular viability or functions. In order to classify WBC populations in a non-invasive manner, we exploited optical diffraction tomography (ODT). ODT is a three-dimensional (3-D) quantitative phase imaging technique that measures 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions of individual WBCs. To test feasibility of label-free classification of WBC populations using ODT, we measured four subtypes of WBCs, including B cell, CD4 T cell, CD8 T cell, and natural killer (NK) cell. From measured 3-D RI tomograms of WBCs, we obtain quantitative structural and biochemical information and classify each WBC population using a machine learning algorithm.

  4. Diffraction limited gamma-ray optics using Fresnel lenses for micro-arc second angular resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, G.; von Ballmoos, P.; Gehrels, N.; Krzmanic, J.

    2003-03-01

    Refractive indices at gamma-ray wavelengths are such that material thicknesses of the order of millimeters allow the phase of a wavefront to be changed by up to 2π . Thus a phase Fresnel lens can be made from a simple profiled thin disk of, for example, aluminium or plastic. Such a lens can easily have a collecting area of several square meters and an efficiency >90%. Ordinary engineering tolerances allow the manufacture of a lens which can be diffraction limited in the pico-meter wavelength band (up to ˜MeV) and thus provides a simple optical system with angular resolution better than a micro arc second i.e. the resolution necessary to resolve structures on the scale of the event horizon of super-massive black holes in AGN. However the focal length of such a lens is very long - up to a million km. Nevertheless studies have shown that a mission `Fresnel' using a detector and a phase Fresnel lens on two station-keeping spacecraft separated by such a distance is feasible. Results from these studies and work on other proof of concept studies are presented.

  5. Three-dimensional diffractive micro- and nano-optical elements fabricated by electron-beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divliansky, Ivan B.; Johnson, Eric G.

    2007-02-01

    The broad development of the micro- and nano-technologies in the past few years increased the need of techniques capable of fabricating sub-micron structures with arbitrary surface profiles. Out of the several fabrication approaches (HEBS lithography, laser writing, etc.) the electron beam writing stands out as the one capable of the highest resolution, superior alignment accuracy and very small surface roughness. These characteristics make the technique greatly applicable in the fields of photonics and micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems (MOEMS). Here we describe the specificity of fabricating 3D diffractive micro- and nano-optical elements using Leica EBPG 5000+ electron beam system. Parameters like speed of writing, dose accumulation, pattern writing specifics, etc. affect greatly the electronbeam resist properties and the desired 3D profile. We present data that can be used to better understand the different dependencies and therefore achieve better profile and surface roughness management. The results can be useful in future developments in the areas of integrated photonic circuits and MOEMS.

  6. Single crystal x-ray diffraction: optical and micro hardness studies on chalcone derivative single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crasta, Vincent; Ravindrachary, V.; Bhajantri, R. F.; Naveen, S.; Shridar, M. A.; Shashidhara Prasad, J.

    2005-08-01

    1-(4-methylphenyl)-3-(4- N, N dimethyl amino phenyl)-2-propen-1-one, a chalcone derivative nonlinear optical material has been synthesized by standard method. FT-IR and NMR spectral studies have been performed to confirm the molecular structure of the synthesized compound. The single crystals up to a dimension of 13 x 9 x 3 mm3 were grown by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were transparent in the entire visible region and absorbs in the UV-region. The refractive index has been measured using a He-Ne laser. The grown crystals have been subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction studies to determine the crystal structure and hence the cell parameters of the crystal. From this study it is found that this compound crystallizes in orthorhombic system with a space group P212121 and corresponding lattice parameters are, a = 7.3610(13) Å, b = 11.651(2) Å, c = 17.6490(17) Å. The Kurtz powder second harmonic generation test shows that the compound is a potential candidate for Photonic application. The micro hardness test on these crystals were carried out and the load dependence hardness was observed

  7. Multilevel diffractive optical element manufacture by excimer laser ablation and halftone masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quentel, Francois; Fieret, Jim; Holmes, Andrew S.; Paineau, Sylvain

    2001-06-01

    A novel method is presented to manufacture multilevel diffractive optical elements (DOEs) in polymer by single- step KrF excimer laser ablation using a halftone mask. The DOEs have a typical pixel dimension of 5 micrometers and are up to 512 by 512 pixels in size. The DOEs presented are Fresnel lenses and Fourier computer generated holograms, calculated by means of a conventional iterative Fourier transform algorithm. The halftone mask is built up as an array of 5 micrometers -square pixels, each containing a rectangular or L- shaped window on an opaque background. The mask is imaged onto the polymer with a 5x, 0.13 NA reduction lens. The pixels are not resolved by the lens, so they behave simply as attenuators, allowing spatial variation of the ablation rate via the window size. The advantages of halftone mask technology over other methods, such as pixel-by-pixel ablation and multi-mask overlay, are that it is very fast regardless of DOE size, and that no high-precision motion stages and alignment are required. The challenges are that the halftone mask is specific to the etch curve of the polymer used, that precise calibration of each grey-level is required, and that the halftone mask must be calculated specifically for the imaging lens used. This paper describes the design procedures for multilevel DOEs and halftone masks, the calibration of the various levels, and some preliminary DOE test results.

  8. Space bandwidth product enhancement of holographic display using high-order diffraction guided by holographic optical element.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Jeong, Jinsoo; Lee, Dukho; Yeom, Jiwoon; Jang, Changwon; Lee, Seungjae; Lee, Byoungho

    2015-12-28

    A space bandwidth product (SBP) enhancement method for holographic display using high-order diffraction of a spatial light modulator (SLM) is proposed. Among numerous high order diffraction terms, the plus-minus first and the zeroth are adopted and guided by holographic optical elements (HOEs) to an identical direction with the same intensity. By using a set of electro-shutters synchronized with corresponding order component, the system acts as if three SLMs are tiled in the horizontal direction. To confirm the feasibility of using HOE as the guiding optics for the system, several optical characteristics of the recording material are measured before using them. Furthermore, a computer generated hologram algorithm is proposed for compensating the wavefront distortion caused by use of the HOE. The demonstrated system achieves a three-fold increase in SBP of a single SLM. The results are verified experimentally. PMID:26831985

  9. Characterization of X-Ray Diffraction System with a Microfocus X-Ray Source and a Polycapillary Optic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Marshall, Joy K.; Ciszak, Ewa; Ponomarev, Igor

    2000-01-01

    We present here an optimized microfocus x-ray source and polycapillary optic system designed for diffraction of small protein crystals. The x-ray beam is formed by a 5.5mm focal length capillary collimator coupled with a 40 micron x-ray source operating at 46Watts. Measurements of the x-ray flux, the divergence and the spectral characteristics of the beam are presented, This optimized system provides a seven fold greater flux than our recently reported configuration [M. Gubarev, et al., J. of Applied Crystallography (2000) 33, in press]. We now make a comparison with a 5kWatts rotating anode generator (Rigaku) coupled with confocal multilayer focusing mirrors (Osmic, CMF12- 38Cu6). The microfocus x-ray source and polycapillary collimator system delivers 60% of the x-ray flux from the rotating anode system. Additional ways to improve our microfocus x-ray system, and thus increase the x-ray flux will be discussed.

  10. Fast frequency hopping codes applied to SAC optical CDMA network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Shin-Pin

    2015-06-01

    This study designed a fast frequency hopping (FFH) code family suitable for application in spectral-amplitude-coding (SAC) optical code-division multiple-access (CDMA) networks. The FFH code family can effectively suppress the effects of multiuser interference and had its origin in the frequency hopping code family. Additional codes were developed as secure codewords for enhancing the security of the network. In considering the system cost and flexibility, simple optical encoders/decoders using fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and a set of optical securers using two arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) demultiplexers (DeMUXs) were also constructed. Based on a Gaussian approximation, expressions for evaluating the bit error rate (BER) and spectral efficiency (SE) of SAC optical CDMA networks are presented. The results indicated that the proposed SAC optical CDMA network exhibited favorable performance.

  11. Dynamic holography for optical interconnections. II. Routing holograms with predictable location and intensity of each diffraction order.

    PubMed

    Tan, K L; Warr, S T; Manolis, I G; Wilkinson, T D; Redmond, M M; Crossland, W A; Mears, R J; Robertson, B

    2001-01-01

    An analysis of dynamic phase-only holograms, described by fractional notation and recorded onto a pixelated spatial light modulator (SLM) in a reconfigurable optical beam-steering switch, is presented. The phase quantization and arrangement of the phase states and the SLM pixelation and dead-space effects are decoupled, expressed analytically, and simulated numerically. The phase analysis with a skip-rotate rule reveals the location and intensity of each diffraction order at the digital replay stage. The optical reconstruction of the holograms recorded onto SLM's with rectangular pixel apertures entails sinc-squared scaling, which further reduces the intensity of each diffraction order. With these two factors taken into account, the highest values of the nonuniform first-order diffraction efficiencies are expected to be 33%, 66%, and 77% for two-, four-, and and eight-level one-dimensional holograms with a 90% linear pixel fill factor. The variation of the first-order diffraction efficiency and the relative replay intensities were verified to within 1 dB by performing the optical reconstruction of binary phase-only holograms recorded onto a ferroelectric liquid crystal on a silicon SLM. PMID:11151999

  12. Optical fiber diameter measurement by the diffraction method with digital processing of the light scattering indicatrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokodii, N. G.; Natarova, A. O.

    2016-07-01

    Relations between the position of the first diffraction minima and the fiber diameter are derived based on the solution of the problem of electromagnetic wave diffraction on a transparent fiber with a circular cross section. The obtained formulas are used to measure the fiber diameter. The diffraction pattern is recorded with a digital camera. The obtained image is digitally processed to determine the positions of the first two scattering indicatrix minima.

  13. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  14. Visual outcomes and optical quality after implantation of a diffractive multifocal toric intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangfei; Zhao, Ming; Shi, Yuhua; Yang, Liping; Lu, Yan; Huang, Zhenping

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated the visual function after implantation of a multifocal toric intraocular lenses (IOLs). Materials and Methods: This study involved 10 eyes from eight cataract patients with corneal astigmatism of 1.0 diopter (D) or higher who had received phacoemulsification with implantation of an AcrySof IQ ReSTOR Toric IOL. Six-month evaluations included visual acuity, spherical equivalent (SE), defocus curve, residual astigmatism, IOL rotation, contrast sensitivity (CS), wavefront aberrations, modulation transfer function (MTF), and patient satisfaction assessments. Results: At 6 months postoperatively, uncorrected distance visual acuity (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution) was 0.09 ± 0.04, corrected distance visual acuity was 0.02 ± 0.11, and uncorrected near visual acuity was 0.12 ± 0.07. The mean SE was −0.095 ± 0.394 D (±0.50 D in 90%). Refractive astigmatism at the 6-month follow-up visit was significantly reduced to 0.35 ± 0.32 D from 1.50 ± 0.41 D presurgery (P < 0.05). The mean IOL axis rotation was 3.20 ± 1.55°. Postoperative CS levels were high. Postoperative total order aberrations (TOAs), lower-order aberrations (LOAs), higher-order aberrations (HOAs), and spherical aberrations were decreased compared with preoperative values (P < 0.05). At 3 months postoperatively, TOAs, LOAs, and HOAs with a 3 mm pupil diameter as well as TOAs, LOAs, and astigmatism aberrations with a 5 mm pupil diameter were statistically lower than those at 1-month post surgery, but without subsequent significant changes (P > 0.05). There was an increase in MTF results between preoperative and postoperative evaluations at all spatial frequencies. Conclusions: The diffractive multifocal toric IOL is able to provide a predictable astigmatic correction with apparently outstanding levels of optical quality after implantation. PMID:27221680

  15. Methodology for optimal in situ alignment and setting of bendable optics for diffraction-limited focusing of soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merthe, Daniel J.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; McKinney, Wayne R.; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Anderson, Erik; Smith, Brian V.; Domning, Edward E.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate a comprehensive and broadly applicable methodology for the optimal in situ configuration of bendable soft x-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The mirrors used for this application are preset at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory prior to beamline installation. The in situ methodology consists of a new technique for simultaneously setting the height and pitch angle of each mirror. The benders of both mirrors were then optimally tuned in order to minimize ray aberrations to a level below the diffraction-limited beam waist size of 200 nm (horizontal) × 100 nm (vertical). After applying this methodology, we measured a beam waist size of 290 nm (horizontal) × 130 nm (vertical) with 1 nm light using the Foucault knife-edge test. We also discuss the utility of using a grating-based lateral shearing interferometer with quantitative wavefront feedback for further improvement of bendable optics.

  16. Methodology for optimal in situ alignment and setting of bendable optics for nearly diffraction-limited focusing of soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merthe, Daniel J.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; McKinney, Wayne R.; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Anderson, Erik H.; Smith, Brian V.; Domning, Edward E.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a comprehensive and broadly applicable methodology for the optimal in situ configuration of bendable soft x-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The mirrors used for this application are preset at the Advanced Light Source Optical Metrology Laboratory prior to beamline installation. The in situ methodology consists of a new technique for simultaneously setting the height and pitch angle of each mirror. The benders of both mirrors were then optimally tuned in order to minimize ray aberrations to a level below the diffraction-limited beam waist size of 200 nm (horizontal)×100 nm (vertical). After applying this methodology, we measured a beam waist size of 290 nm (horizontal)×130 nm (vertical) with 1 nm light using the Foucault knife-edge test. We also discuss the utility of using a grating-based lateral shearing interferometer with quantitative wavefront feedback for further improvement of bendable optics.

  17. Tunable nano-wrinkling of chiral surfaces: Structure and diffraction optics.

    PubMed

    Rofouie, P; Pasini, D; Rey, A D

    2015-09-21

    Periodic surface nano-wrinkling is found throughout biological liquid crystalline materials, such as collagen films, spider silk gland ducts, exoskeleton of beetles, and flower petals. These surface ultrastructures are responsible for structural colors observed in some beetles and plants that can dynamically respond to external conditions, such as humidity and temperature. In this paper, the formation of the surface undulations is investigated through the interaction of anisotropic interfacial tension, swelling through hydration, and capillarity at free surfaces. Focusing on the cellulosic cholesteric liquid crystal (CCLC) material model, the generalized shape equation for anisotropic interfaces using the Cahn-Hoffman capillarity vector and the Rapini-Papoular anchoring energy are applied to analyze periodic nano-wrinkling in plant-based plywood free surfaces with water-induced cholesteric pitch gradients. Scaling is used to derive the explicit relations between the undulations' amplitude expressed as a function of the anchoring strength and the spatially varying pitch. The optical responses of the periodic nano-structured surfaces are studied through finite difference time domain simulations indicating that CCLC surfaces with spatially varying pitch reflect light in a wavelength higher than that of a CCLC's surface with constant pitch. This structural color change is controlled by the pitch gradient through hydration. All these findings provide a foundation to understand structural color phenomena in nature and for the design of optical sensor devices. PMID:26395722

  18. Tunable nano-wrinkling of chiral surfaces: Structure and diffraction optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rofouie, P.; Pasini, D.; Rey, A. D.

    2015-09-01

    Periodic surface nano-wrinkling is found throughout biological liquid crystalline materials, such as collagen films, spider silk gland ducts, exoskeleton of beetles, and flower petals. These surface ultrastructures are responsible for structural colors observed in some beetles and plants that can dynamically respond to external conditions, such as humidity and temperature. In this paper, the formation of the surface undulations is investigated through the interaction of anisotropic interfacial tension, swelling through hydration, and capillarity at free surfaces. Focusing on the cellulosic cholesteric liquid crystal (CCLC) material model, the generalized shape equation for anisotropic interfaces using the Cahn-Hoffman capillarity vector and the Rapini-Papoular anchoring energy are applied to analyze periodic nano-wrinkling in plant-based plywood free surfaces with water-induced cholesteric pitch gradients. Scaling is used to derive the explicit relations between the undulations' amplitude expressed as a function of the anchoring strength and the spatially varying pitch. The optical responses of the periodic nano-structured surfaces are studied through finite difference time domain simulations indicating that CCLC surfaces with spatially varying pitch reflect light in a wavelength higher than that of a CCLC's surface with constant pitch. This structural color change is controlled by the pitch gradient through hydration. All these findings provide a foundation to understand structural color phenomena in nature and for the design of optical sensor devices.

  19. Tunable nano-wrinkling of chiral surfaces: Structure and diffraction optics

    SciTech Connect

    Rofouie, P.; Rey, A. D.; Pasini, D.

    2015-09-21

    Periodic surface nano-wrinkling is found throughout biological liquid crystalline materials, such as collagen films, spider silk gland ducts, exoskeleton of beetles, and flower petals. These surface ultrastructures are responsible for structural colors observed in some beetles and plants that can dynamically respond to external conditions, such as humidity and temperature. In this paper, the formation of the surface undulations is investigated through the interaction of anisotropic interfacial tension, swelling through hydration, and capillarity at free surfaces. Focusing on the cellulosic cholesteric liquid crystal (CCLC) material model, the generalized shape equation for anisotropic interfaces using the Cahn-Hoffman capillarity vector and the Rapini-Papoular anchoring energy are applied to analyze periodic nano-wrinkling in plant-based plywood free surfaces with water-induced cholesteric pitch gradients. Scaling is used to derive the explicit relations between the undulations’ amplitude expressed as a function of the anchoring strength and the spatially varying pitch. The optical responses of the periodic nano-structured surfaces are studied through finite difference time domain simulations indicating that CCLC surfaces with spatially varying pitch reflect light in a wavelength higher than that of a CCLC’s surface with constant pitch. This structural color change is controlled by the pitch gradient through hydration. All these findings provide a foundation to understand structural color phenomena in nature and for the design of optical sensor devices.

  20. Data reduction pipeline for OSIRIS, the new NIR diffraction-limited imaging field spectrograph for the Keck adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbe, Alfred; Gasaway, Tom; Song, Inseok; Iserlohe, Christof; Weiss, Jason; Larkin, James E.; Barczys, Matthew; Lafreniere, David

    2004-09-01

    OSIRIS is a near infrared diffraction limited imaging field spectrograph under development for the Keck observatory adaptive optics system and scheduled for commissioning in fall 2004. Based upon lenslet pupil imaging, diffraction grating, and a 2Kx2K Hawaii2 HgCdTe array, OSIRIS is a highly efficient instrument at the forefront of today's technology. OSIRIS will deliver per readout up to 4096 diffraction limited spectra in a complex interleaved format, requiring new challenges to be met regarding user interaction and data reduction. A data reduction software package is under development, aiming to provide the observer with a facility instrument allowing him to concentrate on science rather than dealing with instrumental as well as telescope and atmosphere related effects. Together with OSIRIS, a pipeline for basic data reduction will be provided for a new Keck instrument for the first time. A status report is presented here together with some aspects of the data reduction pipeline.

  1. Observation of optical second-harmonic generation in porous-silicon-based photonic crystals in the Laue diffraction scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, D. A.; Svyakhovskiy, S. E.; Dergacheva, L. V.; Bushuev, V. A.; Mantsyzov, B. I.; Murzina, T. V.

    2016-05-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) in the Laue scheme of the dynamical Bragg diffraction in one-dimensional photonic crystal (PhC) is studied. The experiments are performed for partially annealed porous-silicon PhC containing 250 periods of the structure. Our measurements confirm that the phase-matched optical SHG is observed under the Bragg conditions, which is evidenced by a narrow angular and spectral distribution of the diffracted SHG outgoing the PhC. This is confirmed by both the analytical description of the SHG process performed in the two-wave approximation, and by direct calculations of the PhC dispersion curves for the fundamental and SHG wavelengths by the revised plane wave method. Possible types of phase- and quasi-phase-matching realized in the studied PhC under the Laue diffraction scheme are discussed.

  2. 3D laser inspection of fuel assembly grid spacers for nuclear reactors based on diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finogenov, L. V.; Lemeshko, Yu A.; Zav'yalov, P. S.; Chugui, Yu V.

    2007-06-01

    Ensuring the safety and high operation reliability of nuclear reactors takes 100% inspection of geometrical parameters of fuel assemblies, which include the grid spacers performed as a cellular structure with fuel elements. The required grid spacer geometry of assembly in the transverse and longitudinal cross sections is extremely important for maintaining the necessary heat regime. A universal method for 3D grid spacer inspection using a diffractive optical element (DOE), which generates as the structural illumination a multiple-ring pattern on the inner surface of a grid spacer cell, is investigated. Using some DOEs one can inspect the nomenclature of all produced grids. A special objective has been developed for forming the inner surface cell image. The problems of diffractive elements synthesis, projecting optics calculation, adjusting methods as well as calibration of the experimental measuring system are considered. The algorithms for image processing for different constructive elements of grids (cell, channel hole, outer grid spacer rim) and the experimental results are presented.

  3. Subreflector extension for improved efficiencies in Cassegrain antennas - GTD/PO analysis. [Geometrical Theory of Diffraction/Physical Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1986-01-01

    Both offset and symmetric Cassegrain reflector antennas are used in satellite and ground communication systems. It is known that the subreflector diffraction can degrade the performance of these reflectors. A geometrical theory of diffraction/physical optics analysis technique is used to investigate the effects of the extended subreflector, beyond its optical rim, on the reflector efficiency and far-field patterns. Representative numerical results are shown for an offset Cassegrain reflector antenna with different feed illumination tapers and subreflector extensions. It is observed that for subreflector extensions as small as one wavelength, noticeable improvements in the overall efficiencies can be expected. Useful design data are generated for the efficiency curves and far-field patterns.

  4. Sub-wavelength optical diffraction and photoacoustic metrologies for the characterisation of nanoimprinted structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehoe, T.; Bryner, J.; Reboud, V.; Kehagias, N.; Landis, S.; Gourgon, C.; Vollmann, J.; Dual, J.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2008-03-01

    We report on the use of two original techniques for the quality evaluation of nanoimprint lithography with 50 nm feature size: sub-wavelength blazed diffraction gratings and photoacoustic metrology. Sub-wavelength diffraction has been used to characterise nanoscale structures by studying the diffraction patterns of visible wavelengths of light from gratings which are made up of features below the diffraction limit. Diffraction efficiencies of the diffracted orders are related to the nanoscale line-widths, heights and defects of the gratings. A stamp of a sub-wavelength blazed grating was fabricated by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching in silicon and imprinted by NIL with different tools. Measured diffraction efficiencies agree with those from finite difference time domain simulations and we demonstrated the possibility to distinguish diffraction patterns from successfully imprinted gratings and those with a defect. The photoacoustic method has been used for the first time to study nanoimprint polymers. Signals were obtained from the top and bottom interfaces of polymer layers with aluminium and silicon, respectively, and thicknesses calculated from the time of flight of the acoustic wave and modelling physical parameters of the polymers, agree well with those measured by profilometry.

  5. Compact acousto-optic modulator operatingin the purely Raman - Nath diffraction regime as a phase modulator in FM spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N; Epikhin, V M

    2010-08-03

    We report fabrication of a new acousto-optic modulator (AOM-RN) operating purely in the Raman - Nath diffraction regime. This device can be used as an external phase modulator in frequency-modulation (FM) optical heterodyne spectroscopy for fast and broadband frequency control of diode lasers. The AOM-RN design is significantly simplified, and its dimensions are minimised due to a decrease (by almost an order of magnitude in comparison with the existing AOMs) in the acousto-optic interaction length and the absence of impedance matching circuit. The FM spectroscopy based on AOM-RN makes it possible to analyse both absorption and dispersion properties of optical resonances under study; this possibility is shown by the example of saturated-absorption resonances in cesium vapour. The possibility of detecting coherent population trapping resonances using FM spectroscopy with AOM-RN as an external phase modulator is experimentally demonstrated.

  6. Optical design of low glare luminaire applied for tunnel light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, M. S.; Lee, X. H.; Lo, Y. C.; Sun, C. C.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, a low glare and high-efficient tunnel lighting design which consists of a cluster light-emitting diode and a free-form lens is presented. Most of the energy emitted from the proposed luminaire is transmitted onto the surface of the road in front of drivers, and the probability that the energy is emitted directly into drivers' eyes is low. Compared with traditional fluorescent lamps, the proposed luminaire, of which the optical utilization factor, optical efficiency, and uniformity are, respectively, 44%, 92.5%, and 0.72, performs favorably in traffic safety, energy saving, and glare reduction.

  7. Polarization converter for higher-order laser beams using a single binary diffractive optical element as beam splitter.

    PubMed

    Khonina, Svetlana N; Karpeev, Sergey V; Alferov, Sergey V

    2012-06-15

    We propose a new approach to generating a pair of initial beams for a polarization converter that operates by summing up two opposite-sign circularly polarized beams. The conjugated pairs of vortex beams matched with laser modes are generated using binary diffractive optical elements (DOEs). The same binary element simultaneously serves two functions: a beam shaper and a beam splitter. Two proposed optical arrangements are compared in terms of alignment complexity and energy efficiency. The DOEs in question have been designed and fabricated. Natural experiments that demonstrate the generation of vector higher-order cylindrical beams have been conducted. PMID:22739916

  8. Optically diffracting hydrogels for screening kinase activity in vitro and in cell lysate: impact of material and solution properties.

    PubMed

    MacConaghy, Kelsey I; Chadly, Duncan M; Stoykovich, Mark P; Kaar, Joel L

    2015-03-17

    Optically diffracting films based on hydrogel-encapsulated crystalline colloidal arrays have considerable utility as sensors for detecting enzymaticphosphorylation and, thus, in screening small molecule modulators of kinases. In this work, we have investigated the impact of hydrogel properties, as well as the role of the ionic character of the surrounding environment, on the optical sensitivity of kinase responsive crystalline colloidal array-containing hydrogels. In agreement with a model of hydrogel swelling, the optical sensitivity of such materials increased as the shear modulus and the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter between polymer and solvent decreased. Additionally, elimination of extraneous charges in the polymer backbone by exploiting azide-alkyne click chemistry to functionalize the hydrogels with a peptide substrate for protein kinase A further enhanced the sensitivity of the optically diffracting films. Increasing peptide concentration and, in turn, immobilized charge within the hydrogel network was shown to increase the optical response over a range of ionic strength conditions. Ultimately, we showed that, by tuning the hydrogel and solution properties, as little as 0.1 U/μL protein kinase A could be detected in short reaction times (i.e., 2 h), which is comparable to conventional biochemical kinase assays. We further showed that this approach can be used to detect protein kinase A activity in lysate from HEK293 cells. The sensitivity of the resulting films, coupled with the advantages of photonic crystal based sensors (e.g., label free detection), makes this approach highly attractive for screening enzymatic phosphorylation. PMID:25714913

  9. Characterization of photoresist and simulation of a developed resist profile for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Rak; Sierchio, Justin; Zaverton, Melissa; Kim, Youngsik; Milster, Tom D.

    2012-02-01

    We have characterized a photoresist used for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements in terms of Dill's and Mack's model parameters. The resist model parameters were employed for the simulations of developed resist profiles for sawtooth patterns executed by solving the Eikonal equation with the fast-marching method. The simulated results were shown to be in good agreement with empirical data.

  10. Multilayer graphene stacks grown by different methods-thickness measurements by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarczyk, M. Kowalski, G.; Kępa, H.; Grodecki, K.; Drabińska, A.; Strupiński, W.

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Optical absorption estimates of the thickness of graphene multi layer stacks (number of graphene layers) are presented for three different growth techniques. The objective of this work was focused on comparison and reconciliation of the two already widely used methods for thickness estimates (Raman and Absorption) with the calibration of the X-ray method as far as Scherer constant K is concerned and X-ray based Wagner-Aqua extrapolation method.

  11. Applied nonlinear optics in the journal 'Quantum Electronics'

    SciTech Connect

    Grechin, Sergei G; Dmitriev, Valentin G; Chirkin, Anatolii S

    2011-12-31

    A brief historical review of the experimental and theoretical works on nonlinear optical frequency conversion (generation of harmonics, up- and down-conversion, parametric oscillation), which have been published in the journal 'Quantum Electronics' for the last 40 years, is presented.

  12. Geometric and Applied Optics, Science (Experimental): 5318.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Robert C.

    This unit of instruction presents a laboratory-oriented course which relates the sources and behaviors of light to man's control and uses of light. Successful completion of Algebra I and Plane Geometry is strongly recommended as indicators of success. The course is recommended if the student plans further studies in science, optical technology, or…

  13. Investigation of mechanical stress applied to the optical modular cables at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdin, Vladimir A.; Voronkov, Andrey A.; Alekhin, Ivan N.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the investigate of mechanical loadings applied to the optical cables module structure at low temperatures. Mechanical loads experienced by the optical cable in the process of construction of fiber-optic communication lines, and in the course of their operation, are major factors affecting the reliability and service life optical cable. Over the past few years, optical cable modular design greatly supplanted other modifications, so in this article addresses the evaluation of mechanical loads applied to the modular design cables at low temperatures.

  14. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    A new crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a combination of controlled humid air and polymer glue for crystal coating. This method is particularly useful when applied to fragile protein crystals that are known to be sensitive to subtle changes in their physicochemical environment. Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection.

  15. Diamond turned master molds for bulk casting of sol-gel silica diffractive optical elements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L.C.; Nogues, J.L.; Moreshead, B.

    1997-08-01

    This CRADA has combined the resources of a national laboratory and an innovative small company to investigate the production of diffractive lenses in silica glass, using diamond turned master molds. The method for producing these lenses combines the unique characteristics of the sol-gel silica replication process, pioneered by Geltech, with the state-of-the-art diamond turning expertise of the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT). A conventional lens focuses light by using a curved surface to refract (or bend) the incoming light so that it will form an image. These lenses are usually thick glass elements with one or both surfaces shaped into convex or concave spherical shapes. Traditionally, these lenses are produced by grinding and polishing the glass to the desired shape. Light can also be focused using the phenomenon of diffraction, rather than refraction. A lens of this type uses precision microscopic surface features to bend the light so that it forms an image. The result is a lens that is thinner and lighter than its refractive counterpart. Production of diffractive lenses requires the ability to accurately produce the precision microscopic features necessary to achieve controlled diffraction. Diffractive lenses have, for the most part, been limited to infra-red applications because the manufacturing technologies available have not enabled their use at visible wavelengths. Except in limited applications, these lenses have remained laboratory curiosities, because they must be individually produced by diamond turning infra-red optical materials. Geltech`s sol-gel silica replication process offers the opportunity to mass produce diffractive lenses in high quality silica glass. These lenses can be produced by diamond turning the necessary precision microscopic surface features into master surfaces that are replicated into intermediate molds. These molds are then used to produce a batch of diffractive lenses using the sol-gel process.

  16. Anomalous interference pattern in the penumbra region of optical Gaussian beam diffraction on a metallic cylinder.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, V N; Strokovsky, G A

    1993-05-20

    The diffraction pattern in the penumbra region from a metallic cylinder of radius p illuminated by a focused Gaussian beam waist of the half-width w approximately rho is experimentally studied. The observed correlation of band structure distortions in the diffraction pattern with calibrated deformations of the Gaussian beam by an opaque obstacle (which is called a label) is considered to be anomalous from the viewpoint of wave (interference) phenomena. The alternative (corpuscular) interpretation of diffracted light distribution, which is represented as a bundle of partially overlapping noninterfering beams propagating in discrete directions and preserving geometric similarity to the disturbed incident beams, is discussed. PMID:20820447

  17. Applying fiber optical methods for toxicological testing in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerz, Holger K.; Buchholz, Rainer; Emmrich, Frank; Fink, Frank; Geddes, Clive L.; Pfeifer, Lutz; Raabe, Ferdinand; Scheper, Thomas-Helmut; Ulrich, Elizabeth; Marx, Uwe

    1999-04-01

    The new medical developments, e.g. immune therapy, patient oriented chemotherapy or even gene therapy, create a questionable doubt to the further requirement of animal test. Instead the call for humanitarian reproductive in vitro models becomes increasingly louder. Pharmaceutical usage of in vitro has a long proven history. In cancer research and therapy, the effect of chemostatica in vitro in the so-called oncobiogram is being tested; but the assays do not always correlate with in vivo-like drug resistance and sensitivity. We developed a drug test system in vitro, feasible for therapeutic drug monitoring by the combination of tissue cultivation in hollow fiber bioreactors and fiber optic sensors for monitoring the pharmaceutical effect. Using two fiber optic sensors - an optical oxygen sensor and a metabolism detecting Laserfluoroscope, we were able to successfully monitor the biological status of tissue culture and the drug or toxic effects of in vitro pharmaceutical testing. Furthermore, we developed and patented a system for monitoring the effect of minor toxic compounds which can induce Sick Building Syndrome.

  18. The development of optical model and diffraction parameters inversion for tissues with fence structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jiancheng; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Chunyong; He, Anzhi

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, spatial distributions of light emitting from slice chicken muscle tissue and sub-skin fatty tissue are measured on experiment. Experimental results indicate that muscle tissue have better diffraction ability, therefore, muscle tissue can't be treated as a kind of highly scattering medium simply and the traditional radiative transfer theory is not suitable for describing its light transporting properties. In order to calculate light transporting in muscle tissues, traditional radiative transfer theory is modified and diffraction effects are considered in the model. The muscle tissue is regarded as a synthesis of scattering, diffraction and absorption. According to the modified theoretical model, numerical calculations are executed for chicken muscle tissues and the results are well matched with experimental measurements. Moreover, based on the modified model, the inversions of the diffractions parameters such as the wavelength of the refractive index fluctuation are also discussed simply.

  19. Role of diffractive optical elements in the design of mid-wave infrared zoom lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudyma, Russell M.

    1993-08-01

    The advantages of hybrid refractive/diffractive components in medium wave infrared (MWIR) zooms are illustrated through the use of design examples. The examples illustrate that hybrids may be used to simplify the construction of achromatic or athermal zoom groups.

  20. Optical Diffraction in Close Proximity to Plane Apertures. I. Boundary-Value Solutions for Circular Apertures and Slits

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Klaus D.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the classical Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Kirchhoff boundary-value diffraction integrals are solved in closed form for circular apertures and slits illuminated by normally incident plane waves. The mathematical expressions obtained involve no simplifying approximations and are free of singularities, except in the aperture plane itself. Their use for numerical computations was straightforward and provided new insight into the nature of diffraction in the near zone where the Fresnel approximation does not apply. The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals were found to be very similar to each other, so that polarization effects appear to be negligibly small. On the other hand, they differ substantially at sub-wavelength differences from the aperture plane and do not correctly describe the diffracted field as an analytical continuation of the incident geometrical field.

  1. Low cost and high performance GPON, GEPON and RFoG optical network pentaplexer module design using diffractive grating approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, I.-Ju; Chi, Chang-Chia; Tarn, Chen-Wen

    2016-01-01

    A new architecture of a pentaplexer transceiver module which can be used in GPON/GEPON and RFoG triple play optical networks with supporting of the multiple optical wavelengths of 1310 nm, 1490 nm, 1550 nm, 1610 nm, and 1650 nm, is proposed. By using diffractive grating elements combing with market readily available GRIN (Gradient-Index) lens, grating, mirrors, beamsplitter, LDs (Laser Diodes), and PDs (Photodetectors), the proposed design have the advantages of low cost, high efficiency/performance, easy design and manufacturing, over the contemporary triplex transceivers which are made of multilayer filters or waveguides that increase the complexity of manufacturing and reduce the performance efficiency. With the proposed design, a pentaplexer system can accommodate GPON/GEPON, RFoG, and monitoring integration services, total five optical wavelength channels into a hybrid-integrated TO-CAN package platform with sufficient efficiency.

  2. Optically confined polarized resonance Raman studies in identifying crystalline orientation of sub-diffraction limited AlGaN nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Sivadasan, A. K. Patsha, Avinash; Dhara, Sandip

    2015-04-27

    An optical characterization tool of Raman spectroscopy with extremely weak scattering cross section tool is not popular to analyze scattered signal from a single nanostructure in the sub-diffraction regime. In this regard, plasmonic assisted characterization tools are only relevant in spectroscopic studies of nanoscale object in the sub-diffraction limit. We have reported polarized resonance Raman spectroscopic (RRS) studies with strong electron-phonon coupling to understand the crystalline orientation of a single AlGaN nanowire of diameter ∼100 nm. AlGaN nanowire is grown by chemical vapor deposition technique using the catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid process. The results are compared with the high resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis. As a matter of fact, optical confinement effect due to the dielectric contrast of nanowire with respect to that of surrounding media assisted with electron-phonon coupling of RRS is useful for the spectroscopic analysis in the sub-diffraction limit of 325 nm (λ/2N.A.) using an excitation wavelength (λ) of 325 nm and near ultraviolet 40× far field objective with a numerical aperture (N.A.) value of 0.50.

  3. Use of rigorous vector coupled-wave theory for designing and tolerancing surface-relief diffractive components for magneto-optical heads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggans, Charles W.; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    1991-01-01

    A rigorous coupled wave model is presented, experimentally validated, and used for tolerancing surface relief diffractive elements. Applications of the model in the design and tolerancing of components for magneto optical (M-O) data storage heads are investigated.

  4. Validation and qualification of surface-applied fibre optic strain sensors using application-independent optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schukar, Vivien G.; Kadoke, Daniel; Kusche, Nadine; Münzenberger, Sven; Gründer, Klaus-Peter; Habel, Wolfgang R.

    2012-08-01

    Surface-applied fibre optic strain sensors were investigated using a unique validation facility equipped with application-independent optical reference systems. First, different adhesives for the sensor's application were analysed regarding their material properties. Measurements resulting from conventional measurement techniques, such as thermo-mechanical analysis and dynamic mechanical analysis, were compared with measurements resulting from digital image correlation, which has the advantage of being a non-contact technique. Second, fibre optic strain sensors were applied to test specimens with the selected adhesives. Their strain-transfer mechanism was analysed in comparison with conventional strain gauges. Relative movements between the applied sensor and the test specimen were visualized easily using optical reference methods, digital image correlation and electronic speckle pattern interferometry. Conventional strain gauges showed limited opportunities for an objective strain-transfer analysis because they are also affected by application conditions.

  5. Theory for Gaussian beam diffraction in 2D inhomogeneous medium, based on the eikonal form of complex geometrical optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berczynski, P.; Kravtsov, Yu. A.

    2004-10-01

    A simple and effective method to describe Gaussian beams propagation and diffraction in arbitrary smoothly inhomogeneous 2D medium has been developed based on the eikonal form of complex geometrical optics. The method assumes the eikonal equation can be solved in paraxial approximation in curvilinear frame of references, connected with the central ray. The Riccati-type ordinary differential equation is derived for complex parameter characterizing the Gaussian beam width and phase front curvature. The same parameter was proved to define both the modulus and the argument of the complex amplitude. As a result, the problem of the Gaussian beam diffraction in inhomogeneous media has been reduced to the solution of the ordinary differential equation of the first order, which can be readily calculated numerically for arbitrary profile of dielectric permittivity.

  6. Extremely asymmetric diffraction as a method of determining magneto-optical constants for X-rays near absorption edges

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, M. A.; Repchenko, Yu. L.; Smekhova, A. G.; Dumesnil, K.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.

    2015-06-15

    The spectral dependence of the Bragg peak position under conditions of extremely asymmetric diffraction has been analyzed in the kinematical and dynamical approximations of the diffraction theory. Simulations have been performed for the L{sub 3} absorption edge of yttrium in a single-crystal YFe{sub 2} film; they have shown that the magneto-optical constants (or, equivalently, the dispersion corrections to the atomic scattering factor) for hard X-rays can be determined from this dependence. Comparison with the experimental data obtained for a Nb(4 nm)/YFe{sub 2}(40 nm〈110〉)/Fe(1.5 nm)/Nb(50 nm)/sapphire sample at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has been made.

  7. Optical study of a spectrum splitting solar concentrator based on a combination of a diffraction grating and a Fresnel lens

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, Céline Habraken, Serge; Loicq, Jérôme; Thibert, Tanguy

    2015-09-28

    This paper presents recent improvements of our new solar concentrator design for space application. The concentrator is based on a combination of a diffraction grating (blazed or lamellar) coupled with a Fresnel lens. Thanks to this diffractive/refractive combination, this optical element splits spatially and spectrally the light and focus approximately respectively visible light and IR light onto electrically independent specific cells. It avoid the use of MJs cells and then also their limitations like current matching and lattice matching conditions, leading theoretically to a more tolerant system. The concept is reminded, with recent optimizations, ideal and more realistic results, and the description of an experimental realization highlighting the feasibility of the concept and the closeness of theoretical and experimental results.

  8. Extremely asymmetric diffraction as a method of determining magneto-optical constants for X-rays near absorption edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, M. A.; Repchenko, Yu. L.; Smekhova, A. G.; Dumesnil, K.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.

    2015-06-01

    The spectral dependence of the Bragg peak position under conditions of extremely asymmetric diffraction has been analyzed in the kinematical and dynamical approximations of the diffraction theory. Simulations have been performed for the L 3 absorption edge of yttrium in a single-crystal YFe2 film; they have shown that the magneto-optical constants (or, equivalently, the dispersion corrections to the atomic scattering factor) for hard X-rays can be determined from this dependence. Comparison with the experimental data obtained for a Nb(4 nm)/YFe2(40 nm<110>)/Fe(1.5 nm)/Nb(50 nm)/sapphire sample at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has been made.

  9. Antenna Gain Enhancement and Beamshaping using a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbitt, Christopher

    Dielectric and metamaterial lenses have been designed for gain enhancement and beam shaping. The motivation for this work came from a commercially available slotted waveguide antenna with a dielectric lens that shapes the beam and enhances the gain only in the azimuth plane. When two of these antennas, each with a dielectric lens, are stacked as an array to form the sum and difference patterns the elevation plane gain is low and the beam width too wide to be acceptable for radar applications. The objective of the present work is to design a diffractive optical element (DOE) lens for gain enhancement gain and beam shaping. As compared to other available lenses it is much thinner, lighter and easily machined. The DOE lens is made from rexolite which has a dielectric constant of 2.53. The DOE lens is composed of a series of zones which focus the light at a certain focal length. The phase is the same everywhere on each zone at the focal point. The phase difference between neighboring zones is 2pi, resulting in a constructive interference at the focus. These zones are able to focus the radiation from an antenna in order to enhance the gain and shape the beam. The design parameters include the lens diameter, number of zones, the center zone thickness for a particular frequency and refractive index of the dielectric material. A comprehensive study has been performed in CST Microwave Studio to illustrate the properties of the DOE lens. The focusing property for image formation is verified by a plane wave excitation. Lenses have been designed and tested at different frequencies and with varying design parameters. Gain enhancement and beam shaping are illustrated by modeling the DOE lens in CST and placing it in front of different antennas. This work presents lenses for 10GHz and 40GHz horn antennas, a 3GHz slotted waveguide antenna array, and a 10GHz microstrip patch arrays. Beam shaping and focusing is clearly illustrated for each type of antenna. It is seen that the size

  10. Micro-optics for simultaneous multi-spectral imaging applied to chemical/biological and IED detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    2012-06-01

    Using diffractive micro-lenses configured in an array and placed in close proximity to the focal plane array will enable a small compact simultaneous multispectral imaging camera. This approach can be applied to spectral regions from the ultraviolet (UV) to the long-wave infrared (LWIR). The number of simultaneously imaged spectral bands is determined by the number of individually configured diffractive optical micro-lenses (lenslet) in the array. Each lenslet images at a different wavelength determined by the blaze and set at the time of manufacturing based on application. In addition, modulation of the focal length of the lenslet array with piezoelectric or electro-static actuation will enable spectral band fill-in allowing hyperspectral imaging. Using the lenslet array with dual-band detectors will increase the number of simultaneous spectral images by a factor of two when utilizing multiple diffraction orders. Configurations and concept designs will be presented for detection application for biological/chemical agents, buried IED's and reconnaissance. The simultaneous detection of multiple spectral images in a single frame of data enhances the image processing capability by eliminating temporal differences between colors and enabling a handheld instrument that is insensitive to motion.

  11. Apply lightweight recognition algorithms in optical music recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Viet-Khoi; Nguyen, Hai-Dang; Nguyen-Khac, Tung-Anh; Tran, Minh-Triet

    2015-02-01

    The problems of digitalization and transformation of musical scores into machine-readable format are necessary to be solved since they help people to enjoy music, to learn music, to conserve music sheets, and even to assist music composers. However, the results of existing methods still require improvements for higher accuracy. Therefore, the authors propose lightweight algorithms for Optical Music Recognition to help people to recognize and automatically play musical scores. In our proposal, after removing staff lines and extracting symbols, each music symbol is represented as a grid of identical M ∗ N cells, and the features are extracted and classified with multiple lightweight SVM classifiers. Through experiments, the authors find that the size of 10 ∗ 12 cells yields the highest precision value. Experimental results on the dataset consisting of 4929 music symbols taken from 18 modern music sheets in the Synthetic Score Database show that our proposed method is able to classify printed musical scores with accuracy up to 99.56%.

  12. Applying hafnia mixtures to enhance the laser-induced damage threshold of coatings for third-harmonic generation optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, Mathias; Jensen, Lars O.; Ehlers, Henrik; Bruns, Stefan; Vergöhl, Michael; Burdack, Peer; Ristau, Detlev

    2012-11-01

    The generation of third harmonic radiation (THG) is required for many pulsed solid-state laser applications in industry and science. In this contribution, the coatings for two necessary optical components, dichroic mirrors and nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals are in the focus of investigation. Because of the high bulk damage threshold lithium triborate (LBO) crystals are applied for this study. HfO2/SiO2 mixtures are employed as high refractive index material to improve the power handling capability of the multilayers. All coatings are produced by ion beam sputtering (IBS) using a zone target assembly for the deposition of material mixtures. The atomic composition and the oxidation ratio of different HfO2/SiO2 mixtures are analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The influence of different deposition temperatures and post annealing on the optical properties and the amorphous micro structure of the films is investigated by UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The laser induced damage thresholds at 355 nm wavelength for nanosecond pulse durations are measured in a 10,000on1 experiment according with the standard ISO21254. Furthermore, the optical components are tested under real application conditions.

  13. Optical pressure sensor based on the combined system of a variable liquid lens and a point diffraction interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Arellano, Anmi; Gómez-García, Manuel; Acosta, Eva

    2011-09-01

    In this work we present an experimental proposal for an efficient optical pressure sensor based on a Variable Liquid Lens (VLL) and a modified Point Diffraction Interferometer (PDI). The working principle of the proposed sensor relies on the fact that a pressure variation induces a change in the lens curvature and hence in its focal length which can be tracked and measured with the interferometer. The pressure is then measured by recording and processing the interferometric images. The calibration of the sensor in this proposal demonstrated a working range of 0-26 kPa with an accuracy of less than 0.1 kPa in the whole range.

  14. Manufacture of Large-Aperture Diffractive Optics and Ultrathin Optics for High-Power Laser and Space Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Britten, J A

    2002-01-18

    We have developed equipment and technology for fabricating submicron pitch, high-efficiency diffraction gratings over meter-scale apertures that are used for pulse compression in ultrafast systems around the world. We have also developed wet-etch figuring (WEF) to generate arbitrary continuous contours on ultrathin glass substrates in a closed loop process. The current and future states of these technologies will be discussed.

  15. Evidence of native oxides on the capping and substrate of Permalloy gratings by magneto-optical spectroscopy in the zeroth- and first-diffraction orders

    SciTech Connect

    Antos, Roman; Mistrik, Jan; Yamaguchi, Tomuo; Visnovsky, Stefan; Demokritov, Sergej O.; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2005-06-06

    Magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy in the zeroth- and first-diffraction orders at polar magnetization is applied to Permalloy wire gratings deposited on Si substrates and protected by Cr capping. The experimental MOKE data are compared with data simulated using the local modes method. The extensive simulations of the MOKE spectroscopic parameters exhibit significant sensitivity to t(Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and t(SiO{sub 2}), the thicknesses of native oxide layers developed on the capping and the substrate, respectively. The approach may be useful for monitoring the basic micromagnetic properties of small elements with nanometer-scale resolution, as well as for monitoring the deposition processes and aging of magnetic nanostructures in magnetic recording and magnetic random access memory technologies.

  16. Directly laser-written integrated photonics devices including diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Ramme, Mark; Richardson, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-written integrated devices involving Fresnel Zone Plates (FZPs) and waveguide arrays are demonstrated as built-in optical couplers. These structures were fabricated in borosilicate glass using a direct laser writing technique. The optical properties of these integrated photonic structures were investigated using CW lasers and high-resolution CCDs. For a single FZP coupled to a single waveguide, the overall coupling efficiency was 9%. A multiplexed optical coupler composed of three FZP layers was demonstrated to couple three waveguides simultaneously in a waveguide array. Structures of this type can be used as platforms for multichannel waveguide coupling elements or as microfluidic sensors that require higher light collecting efficiency.

  17. Diffraction-unlimited optical imaging of unstained living cells in liquid by electron beam scanning of luminescent environmental cells.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hideki T; Kasaya, Takeshi; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Hiroshi

    2013-11-18

    An environmental cell with a 50-nm-thick cathodoluminescent window was attached to a scanning electron microscope, and diffraction-unlimited near-field optical imaging of unstained living human lung epithelial cells in liquid was demonstrated. Electrons with energies as low as 0.8 - 1.2 kV are sufficiently blocked by the window without damaging the specimens, and form a sub-wavelength-sized illumination light source. A super-resolved optical image of the specimen adhered to the opposite window surface was acquired by a photomultiplier tube placed below. The cells after the observation were proved to stay alive. The image was formed by enhanced dipole radiation or energy transfer, and features as small as 62 nm were resolved. PMID:24514332

  18. New long trace profiler based on phase plate diffraction for optical metrology of SSRF

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Danhua; Xiao Tiqiao; Du Guohao; Wen Li; Luo Hongxin; Xia Shaojian; Xu Hongjie

    2006-09-15

    A long trace profiler LTP-1200, with a novel f-{theta} system based on phase plate diffraction and a scanning range up to 1200 mm, has been developed at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The central dark line in the diffraction pattern generated by a {pi} phase plate is taken as the positioning benchmark. A magnet levitated linear rail with very high accuracy is used. A granite bench is employed to reduce deformation due to self-gravity of the rail. The focused diffraction pattern is recorded with an area charge-coupled device. The generalized regression neural network algorithm is adopted to improve the beam positioning precision. The static stability of LTP-1200 in 5 h is 0.14 {mu}rad, and the repeatability reaches 0.05 {mu}rad in a common laboratory without any special control of temperature, air turbulence, etc. Calibration tests were carried out with a high precision autocollimator and a standard spherical mirror, respectively. Results show the high performance and reliability of the LTP-1200.

  19. Data Reduction Pipeline for OSIRIS, the new NIR Diffraction Limited Imaging Field Spectrometer for the Keck Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krabbe, Alfred; Gasaway, Thomas M.; Weiss, Jason; Larkin, James E.; Barczys, Matthew; Quirrenbach, Andreas; LaFreniere, David

    2002-12-01

    OSIRIS is a near infrared diffraction limited imaging field spectrometer under development for the Keck observatory adaptive optics system. Based upon lenslet pupil imaging, diffraction grating, and a 2K×2K Hawaii2 HgCdTe array, OSIRIS is a highly efficient instrument at the forefront of today"s technology. OSIRIS will deliver per readout up to 4096 diffraction limited spectra in a complex interleaved format, requiring new challenges to be met regarding user interaction and data reduction. A data reduction software package is under development, aiming to provide the observer with a facility instrument allowing him to concentrate on science rather than dealing with instrumental as well as telescope and atmosphere related effects. Together with OSIRIS, a pipeline for basic data reduction will be provided for a new Keck instrument for the first time. Some aspects of the data reduction pipeline will be presented here. The OSIRIS instrument as such, the astronomical background as well as other software tools were presented elsewhere on this conference.

  20. Modeling of molecular healing for micro-laser welding of plastics with diffractive optical elements as spatial modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewell, David A.

    This work demonstrated, developed and characterized a new and novel technique for plastics welding using diffractive optics. Using diffractive elements laser beams were reshaped into various geometries that could be used for simultaneous welding of plastic in through transmission infrared welding. This novel technique also included the use of standard optics for resizing diffractive images for microwelding of complex geometries. In addition, new molecular healing models that accurately predict weld size and quality (degree of healing) were developed. The ability to quickly and economically form microwelds is critical to the development and commercialization of polymer-based MEMS and micro-fluidic devices. Thermoplastics offer significant advantages in the fields of biomedical engineering, communications, and in particular applications related to Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). For example, the low manufacturing costs of polymers may allow industry to fabricate disposable MEMS. Rapid, consistent, and inexpensive assembly or packaging is critical to the commercialization of polymer-based MEMS. One method of joining that offers great promise of success for MEMS devices is Through Transmission Infrared (TTIr) welding. TTIr works by passing a laser through one of the components to be joined and focusing it on the second, which has an absorbing material (such as carbon black) added to it. In the following studies, diffractive optics were used to reshape a laser beam into complex shapes for TTIr welding of plastics. These complex image shapes were then resized to micron-scale for micro-welding of plastics. Another task of this work was to gain a better understanding of molecular healing so that micro-welds could be better understood. Because minimum weld size is affected by competing driving forces, namely thermal conductivity and molecular diffusion, these forces were studied. For example, as time increases heat conduction results in an increase in weld size

  1. Educational Software for Interference and Optical Diffraction Analysis in Fresnel and Fraunhofer Regions Based on MATLAB GUIs and the FDTD Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances, J.; Perez-Molina, M.; Bleda, S.; Fernandez, E.; Neipp, C.; Belendez, A.

    2012-01-01

    Interference and diffraction of light are elementary topics in optics. The aim of the work presented here is to develop an accurate and cheap optical-system simulation software that provides a virtual laboratory for studying the effects of propagation in both time and space for the near- and far-field regions. In laboratory sessions, this software…

  2. Moiré reducing two-dimensional diffractive optical low-pass filter made from molded plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakohira, Yosuke; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Okada, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    A two dimensional sinusoid diffraction grating is developed for a moiré-reducing low-pass filter. Typical display units have image pixels arranged systematically in two dimensions, with non-illuminating regions between the image pixels. Using a conventional lens to view this display, the image pixels and the region between the pixels are both magnified, and the resulting image is unpleasant to the human eye, especially with color displays, called the screen door effect. This pixel problem is typically solved with a low-pass filter using a diffraction grating. However, depending on the period of the diffraction grating compared to the period of the image pixels, moiré can be seen. In recent years, organic electroluminescence displays with a small fill factor are growing popular, but such displays are usually more prone to the screen door effect and moiré. With conventional optical low-pass filters, only the pixel pitch in the vertical and horizontal directions are taken into account, but this is insufficient with small fill-factor pixels, and consideration for various diagonal periods is needed. A two dimensional sinusoid structure diffraction grating is developed for a moiré-reducing low-pass filter. The angle of the grating with the image pixel arrangement, the distance between the display and the grating, the grating depth, and the grating period are all chosen appropriately, and take into account multiple non-adjacent diagonal image pixel periods for all colors, consequently reducing moiré and the screen door effect. We present the calculations and evaluation results from plastic samples made by lithography tooled molds.

  3. Confined blue iridescence by a diffracting microstructure: an optical investigation of the Cynandra opis butterfly.

    PubMed

    Brink, D J; Lee, M E

    1999-09-01

    When illuminated and viewed along certain well-defined directions, segments on the wings of the butterfly Cynandra opis shows a striking violet-blue to blue-green. We quantify the spectral and the directional properties of these areas of the wings of the insect. Electron microscopy shows that wing scales from these iridescent regions of the wings contain two gratinglike microstructures crossed at right angles. Application of the diffraction theory, as formulated by the Stratton-Silver-Chu integral, to the microstructure can explain all the important features observed experimentally. PMID:18324029

  4. Contact printing of Bragg gratings in optical fibers: rigorous diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Hegedus, Z S

    1997-01-01

    The fabrication of Bragg gratings inside the core of single-mode optical fibers has been greatly simplified by the application of contact printing [Appl. Phys. Lett. 62, 1035 (1993)]. According to this technique, the fiber is placed in proximity to an appropriate phase grating, which is illuminated with nominally monochromatic UV light. The transmitted light is redistributed into an ideally sinusoidal variation of optical intensity (more properly, irradiance), which is imprinted into the core as a result of photoinduced refractive index changes. In accordance with normal practice in this field, intensity is used instead of optical intensity throughout the text. The main advantage of such a writing method, apart from its simplicity, is that the illumination source need not be highly coherent. Rigorous analysis of this method is given with a new phase grating design. PMID:18250665

  5. Integrated device with diffractive polarization components for a magneto-optical disk head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggans, Charles W.; Fujita, Teruo; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    1992-01-01

    The optical components in the detection train of a conventional magneto-optical (MO) disk head include a half-wave plate and a polarization beamsplitter. These polarization components are bulky and require specialized mounting hardware. In order to realize a more compact head, we propose that these elements be replaced by an integrated device composed of cascaded volume and surface-relief gratings. Herein, the proposed system is described in detail for the individual elements, theoretical and prototype element performance are compared, and the operational tolerances of these elements are discussed.

  6. Getting lucky with adaptive optics: diffraction-limited resolution in the visible with current AO systems on large and small telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, N. M.; Dekany, R. G.; Mackay, C. D.; Moore, A. M.; Britton, M. C.; Velur, V.

    2008-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated diffraction-limited resolution imaging in the visible on the 5m Palomar Hale telescope. The new LAMP instrument is a Lucky Imaging backend camera for the Palomar AO system. Typical resolutions of 35-40 mas with Strehls of 10-20% were achieved at 700nm, and at 500nm the FWHM resolution was as small as 42 milliarcseconds. In this paper we discuss the capabilities and design challenges of such a system used with current and near future AO systems on a variety of telescopes. In particular, we describe the designs of two planned Lucky Imaging + AO instruments: a facility instrument for the Palomar 200" AO system and its PALM3K upgrade, and a visible-light imager for the CAMERA low-cost LGS AO system planned for the Palomar 60" telescope. We introduce a Monte Carlo simulation setup that reproduces the observed PSF variability behind an adaptive optics system, and apply it to predict the performance of 888Cam and CAMERA. CAMERA is predicted to achieve diffraction-limited resolution at wavelengths as short as 350 nm. In addition to on-axis resolution improvements we discuss the results of frame selection with the aim of improving other image parameters such as isoplanatic patch sizes, showing that useful improvements in image quality can be made by Lucky+AO even with very temporally and spatially undersampled data.

  7. New light-trapping concept by means of several optical components applied to compact holographic 3D concentration solar module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamarín Villegas, Ayalid M.; Pérez López, Francisco J.; Calo López, Antonio; Rodríguez San Segundo, Hugo-José

    2014-05-01

    A new light-trapping concept is presented, which joins broad bandwidth volume phase reflection holograms (VPRH) working together with three other optical components: specifically designed three-dimensional (3D) cavities, Total Internal Reflection (TIR) within an optical medium, and specular reflection by means of a highly reflective surface. This concept is applied to the design and development of both low concentration photovoltaic (LCPV) and solar thermal modules reaching a concentration factor of up to 3X. Higher concentrations are feasible for use in concentrated solar power (CSP) devices. The whole system is entirely made of polymeric materials (except for the solar cells or fluid carrying pipes), thus reducing cost by up to 40%. The module concentrates solar light onto solar cells - or fluid carrying pipes - with no need for active tracking of the sun, covering the whole seasonal and daily incident angle spectrum while it also minimizes optical losses. In this work we analyze the first experimentally measured optical characteristics and performance of VPRH in dichromated gelatin film (DCG) in our concept. The VPRH can reach high diffraction efficiencies (˜98%, ignoring Fresnel reflection losses). Thanks to specifically designed raw material, coating and developing process specifications, also very broad selective spectral (higher than 300 nm) and angular bandwidths (˜+20º) per grating are achieved. The VPRH was optimized to use silicon solar cells, but designs for other semiconductor devices or for fluid heating are feasible. The 3D shape, the hologram's and reflective surface's optical quality, the TIR effect and the correct coupling of all the components are key to high performance of the concentration solar module.

  8. Experimental modules covering imaging, diffraction, Fourier optics and polarization based on a liquid-crystal cell SLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    In close collaboration with four German universities, we have developed tutorials for experiments based on a transmissive liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). The experimental tutorials are grouped in six project modules, which cover a wide range of phenomena and have different levels of difficulty. At a basic level, students can investigate the SLM in its probably most well-known application as an image-generating element in a simple optical projector setup. At more advanced levels, the application as an adaptive optical element can be investigated in three different projects covering wave-optical phenomena. The fields covered include Fourier Optics using the SLM as a dynamic fan-out beam-splitter or kinoform, Computer-Generated Holography and basic Interferometry. For the support of these projects, software was developed which permits the generation of adaptive optical structures by the student with a user-friendly interface, while the underlying algorithms are explained in the theoretical tutorial. The modulation of the light by the twisted-neumatic liquid crystal cells of the SLM can be investigated in the two most advanced projects. In the first one, the parameters of the cell and the components of its Jones matrix can be derived from transmission measurements with rotatable polarizers at a number of different wavelengths. This project gives insight to the Jones matrix calculus at the level required for the analysis. In the second one, the complex-valued transmission of the SLM is determined by measuring the diffraction efficiency of dynamically addressed Ronchi gratings.

  9. The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager: Diffraction limited imaging at visible wavelengths with large ground-based telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crass, Jonathan; Mackay, Craig; King, David; Rebolo-López, Rafael; Labadie, Lucas; Puga, Marta; Oscoz, Alejandro; González Escalera, Victor; Pérez Garrido, Antonio; López, Roberto; Pérez-Prieto, Jorge; Rodríguez-Ramos, Luis; Velasco, Sergio; Villó, Isidro

    2015-01-01

    One of the continuing challenges facing astronomers today is the need to obtain ever higher resolution images of the sky. Whether studying nearby crowded fields or distant objects, with increased resolution comes the ability to probe systems in more detail and advance our understanding of the Universe. Obtaining these high-resolution images at visible wavelengths however has previously been limited to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) due to atmospheric effects limiting the spatial resolution of ground-based telescopes to a fraction of their potential. With HST now having a finite lifespan, it is prudent to investigate other techniques capable of providing these kind of observations from the ground. Maintaining this capability is one of the goals of the Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager (AOLI).Achieving the highest resolutions requires the largest telescope apertures, however, this comes at the cost of increased atmospheric distortion. To overcome these atmospheric effects, there are two main techniques employed today: adaptive optics (AO) and lucky imaging. These techniques individually are unable to provide diffraction limited imaging in the visible on large ground-based telescopes; AO currently only works at infrared wavelengths while lucky imaging reduces in effectiveness on telescopes greater than 2.5 metres in diameter. The limitations of both techniques can be overcome by combing them together to provide diffraction limited imaging at visible wavelengths on the ground.The Adaptive Optics Lucky Imager is being developed as a European collaboration and combines AO and lucky imaging in a dedicated instrument for the first time. Initially for use on the 4.2 metre William Herschel Telescope, AOLI uses a low-order adaptive optics system to reduce the effects of atmospheric turbulence before imaging with a lucky imaging based science detector. The AO system employs a novel type of wavefront sensor, the non-linear Curvature Wavefront Sensor (nlCWFS) which provides

  10. Diffraction Effects in a Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical study of diffraction effects in the AIRES optical system using GLAD by Applied Optics Research. AIRES (or Airborne Infrared Echelle Spectrometer) employs two gratings in series. The small, first-order (i.e., predisperser) grating sorts orders for the large, high-order echelle grating, thus providing moderately high spectral resolution over 3.6 octaves in wavelength. The AIRES' optical design includes three field stops (i.e., a circular aperture and two long, narrow slits) and four pupil stops. A detailed diffraction analysis is required to evaluate critical trade-offs between spectral resolution, optical throughput, detector background, scattered light, and system size and weight. Such an analysis must consider diffraction effects at the pupil stops (edge diffraction), at the field stops (spatial filtering), and at intermediate positions where other optical elements are located. The effects of slit width, slit length, oversizing of the second slit relative to the first, baffling at the Lyot stop and subsequent pupil stops, and the necessity for oversizing other optical elements are presented and discussed. It is found that for narrow slits, the downstream energy distribution is significantly broadened relative to that for large slits, where telescope diffraction dominates, leading to significantly more light loss than anticipated, unless other key optical elements are oversized. The importance of performing a proper diffraction analysis is emphasized and the suitability of GLAD for this task is discussed.

  11. Diffractive optical elements with an increased angular and wavelength range of operation for application in solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, H.; Naydenova, I.; Martin, S.

    2015-05-01

    A holographic device characterised by a large angular and wavelength range of operation is under development. It aims to improve the efficiency of solar energy concentration in solar cells. The aim of this study is to increase the angular and wavelength range of the gratings by stacking three layers of high efficiency gratings on top of each other so that light from a moving source, such as the sun, is collected from a broad range of angles. In order to increase the angle and the wavelength range of operation of the holographic device, low spatial frequency of holographic recording is preferable. Recording at low spatial frequency requires a photopolymer material with unique properties, such as fast monomer/monomers diffusion rate/rates. An acrylamide-based photopolymer developed at the Centre for Industrial and Engineering Optics has been used in this study. This material has fast diffusion rates and has previously demonstrated very good performance at low spatial frequency, where gratings of 90% diffraction efficiency at 300 lines/ mm spatial frequency were recorded in layers of 75 μm thickness. This paper will study the angular selectivity of a device consisting of stacked layer of Difftactive Optical Elements ( DOEs) recorded at range of angles at spatial frequency of 300 lines/mm with recording intensity of 1 mW/cm2. The optical recording process and the properties of the multilayer structure are described and discussed.

  12. Experimental scrambling and noise reduction applied to the optical encryption of QR codes.

    PubMed

    Barrera, John Fredy; Vélez, Alejandro; Torroba, Roberto

    2014-08-25

    In this contribution, we implement two techniques to reinforce optical encryption, which we restrict in particular to the QR codes, but could be applied in a general encoding situation. To our knowledge, we present the first experimental-positional optical scrambling merged with an optical encryption procedure. The inclusion of an experimental scrambling technique in an optical encryption protocol, in particular dealing with a QR code "container", adds more protection to the encoding proposal. Additionally, a nonlinear normalization technique is applied to reduce the noise over the recovered images besides increasing the security against attacks. The opto-digital techniques employ an interferometric arrangement and a joint transform correlator encrypting architecture. The experimental results demonstrate the capability of the methods to accomplish the task. PMID:25321236

  13. X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness studies of gas nitrided titanium alloys and titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W. Haji Mat Don, M.A.; Mohamed, A.; Wu, X.; Siliang, B.; Zhecheva, A.

    2008-03-15

    Thermochemical surface gas nitriding of {beta}21s, Timetal 205 and a Ti-Al alloy was conducted using differential scanning calorimeter equipment, in nominally pure nitrogen at 850 deg. C and 950 deg. C ({beta}21s), 730 deg. C and 830 deg. C (Timetal 205), and 950 deg. C and 1050 deg. C (Ti-Al) for 1 h, 3 h and 5 h. X-ray diffraction analyses showed new phases formed in the nitrided layer, depending on the alloy and the time and the temperature of nitriding. Microstructures were analyzed using optical microscopy. Cross-sectional microhardness profiles of cross-sectional samples after nitriding were obtained using a Knoop indenter.

  14. Broadband 7-fs diffractive-optic-based 2D electronic spectroscopy using hollow-core fiber compression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaonan; Dostál, Jakub; Brixner, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate noncollinear coherent two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy for which broadband pulses are generated in an argon-filled hollow-core fiber pumped by a 1-kHz Ti:Sapphire laser. Compression is achieved to 7 fs duration (TG-FROG) using dispersive mirrors. The hollow fiber provides a clean spatial profile and smooth spectral shape in the 500-700 nm region. The diffractive-optic-based design of the 2D spectrometer avoids directional filtering distortions and temporal broadening from time smearing. For demonstration we record data of cresyl-violet perchlorate in ethanol and use phasing to obtain broadband absorptive 2D spectra. The resulting quantum beating as a function of population time is consistent with literature data. PMID:27607681

  15. Design of the mirror optical systems for coherent diffractive imaging at the SPB/SFX instrument of the European XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, Richard J.; Aquila, Andrew; Samoylova, Liubov; Mancuso, Adrian P.

    2016-07-01

    The high degree of spatial coherence and extreme pulse energies available at x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) sources naturally support coherent diffractive imaging applications. In order to optimally exploit these unique properties, the optical systems at XFELs must be highly transmissive, focus to appropriate sizes matched to the scale of samples to be investigated and must minimally perturb the wavefront of the XFEL beam. We present the design and simulated performance of two state-of-the-art Kirkpatrik–Baez mirror systems that form the primary foci of the single particles, clusters and biomolecules and serial femtosecond crystallography (SPB/SFX) instrument of the European XFEL. The two systems, presently under construction, will produce 1 μm and 100 nm scale foci across a 3–16 keV photon energy range. Targeted applications include coherent imaging of weakly scattering, often biological, specimens.

  16. Experiment evaluation of speckle suppression efficiency of 2D quasi-spiral M-sequence-based diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Lapchuk, A; Pashkevich, G A; Prygun, O V; Yurlov, V; Borodin, Y; Kryuchyn, A; Korchovyi, A A; Shylo, S

    2015-10-01

    The quasi-spiral 2D diffractive optical element (DOE) based on M-sequence of length N=15 is designed and manufactured. The speckle suppression efficiency by the DOE rotation is measured. The speckle suppression coefficients of 10.5, 6, and 4 are obtained for green, violet, and red laser beams, respectively. The results of numerical simulation and experimental data show that the quasi-spiral binary DOE structure can be as effective in speckle reduction as a periodic 2D DOE structure. The numerical simulation and experimental results show that the speckle suppression efficiency of the 2D DOE structure decreases approximately twice at the boundaries of the visible range. It is shown that a replacement of this structure with the bilateral 1D DOE allows obtaining the maximum speckle suppression efficiency in the entire visible range of light. PMID:26479664

  17. Large deflection angle, high-power adaptive fiber optics collimator with preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Chen, Zilun; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2016-05-15

    We report on the development of a monolithic adaptive fiber optics collimator, with a large deflection angle and preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality, that has been tested at a maximal output power at the 300 W level. Additionally, a new measurement method of beam quality (M2 factor) is developed. Experimental results show that the deflection angle of the collimated beam is in the range of 0-0.27 mrad in the X direction and 0-0.19 mrad in the Y direction. The effective working frequency of the device is about 710 Hz. By employing the new measurement method of the M2 factor, we calculate that the beam quality is Mx2=1.35 and My2=1.24, which is in agreement with the result from the beam propagation analyzer and is preserved well with the increasing output power. PMID:27176966

  18. Development of a multipurpose vacuum chamber for serial optical and diffraction experiments with free electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rajkovic, I.; Hallmann, J.; Gruebel, S.; More, R.; Quevedo, W.; Petri, M.; Techert, S.

    2010-04-15

    In this paper we present a development of a multipurpose vacuum chamber which primal function is to be used in pump/probe experiments with free electron laser (FEL) radiation. The chamber is constructed for serial diffraction and serial spectroscopy allowing a fast exchange of samples during the measurement process. For the fast exchange of samples, liquid jet systems are used. Both applications, utilizing soft x-ray FEL pulses as pump and optical laser pulses as probe and vice versa are documented. Experiments with solid samples as well as the liquid jet samples are presented. When working with liquid jets, a system of automatically refilled liquid traps for capturing liquids has been developed in order to ensure stable vacuum conditions. Differential pumping stages are placed in between the FEL beamline and the experimental chamber so that working pressure in the chamber can be up to four orders of magnitude higher than the pressure in the FEL beamline.

  19. Development of a multipurpose vacuum chamber for serial optical and diffraction experiments with free electron laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Rajkovic, I; Hallmann, J; Grübel, S; More, R; Quevedo, W; Petri, M; Techert, S

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we present a development of a multipurpose vacuum chamber which primal function is to be used in pump/probe experiments with free electron laser (FEL) radiation. The chamber is constructed for serial diffraction and serial spectroscopy allowing a fast exchange of samples during the measurement process. For the fast exchange of samples, liquid jet systems are used. Both applications, utilizing soft x-ray FEL pulses as pump and optical laser pulses as probe and vice versa are documented. Experiments with solid samples as well as the liquid jet samples are presented. When working with liquid jets, a system of automatically refilled liquid traps for capturing liquids has been developed in order to ensure stable vacuum conditions. Differential pumping stages are placed in between the FEL beamline and the experimental chamber so that working pressure in the chamber can be up to four orders of magnitude higher than the pressure in the FEL beamline. PMID:20441366

  20. Optical diffraction tomography using a digital micromirror device for stable measurements of 4D refractive index tomography of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Taeho; Yoon, Jonghee; Hong, Kihyun; Park, Jinah; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an interferometric microscopy technique capable of measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of transparent samples. Multiple 2-D holograms of a sample illuminated with various angles are measured, from which 3-D RI map of the sample is reconstructed via the diffraction theory. ODT has been proved as a powerful tool for the study of biological cells, due to its non-invasiveness, label-free and quantitative imaging capability. Recently, our group has demonstrated that a digital micromirror device (DMD) can be exploited for fast and precise control of illumination beams for ODT. In this work, we systematically study the precision and stability of the ODT system equipped with a DMD and present measurements of 3-D and 4-D RI maps of various types of live cells including human red blood cells, white blood cells, hepatocytes, and HeLa cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the effective visualization of 3-D RI maps of live cells utilizing the measured information about the values and gradient of RI tomograms.

  1. Experiment definition phase shuttle laboratory LDRL-10.6 experiment. [applying optical communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The 10.6 microns laser data relay link (LDRL 10.6) program was directed to applying optical communications to NASA's wideband data transmission requirements through the 1980's. The LDRL consists of a transmitter on one or more low earth orbit satellites with an elliptical orbit satellite receivers. Topics discussed include: update of the LDRL design control table to detail the transmitter optical chain losses and to incorporate the change to a reflective beam pre-expander; continued examination of the link establishment sequence, including its dependence upon spacecraft stability; design of the transmitter pointing and tracking control system; and finalization of the transmitter brassboard optical and mechanical design.

  2. Optical dipole mirror for cold atoms based on a metallic diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Kawalec, Tomasz; Bartoszek-Bober, Dobrosława; Panaś, Roman; Fiutowski, Jacek; Pławecka, Aleksandra; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2014-05-15

    We report on the realization of a plasmonic dipole mirror for cold atoms based on a metallic grating coupler. A cloud of atoms is reflected by the repulsive potential generated by surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited on a reflection gold grating by a 780 nm laser beam. Experimentally and numerically determined mirror efficiencies are close to 100%. The intensity of SPPs above a real grating coupler and the atomic trajectories, as well as the momentum dispersion of the atom cloud being reflected, are computed. A suggestion is given as to how the plasmonic mirror might serve as an optical atom chip. PMID:24978240

  3. Profiling individual human red blood cells using common-path diffraction optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngchan; Shim, Hyoeun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, Hyunjoo; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Yongkeun

    2014-10-01

    Due to its strong correlation with the pathophysiology of many diseases, information about human red blood cells (RBCs) has a crucial function in hematology. Therefore, measuring and understanding the morphological, chemical, and mechanical properties of individual RBCs is a key to understanding the pathophysiology of a number of diseases in hematology, as well as to opening up new possibilities for diagnosing diseases in their early stages. In this study, we present the simultaneous and quantitative measurement of the morphological, chemical, and mechanical parameters of individual RBCs employing optical holographic microtomography. In addition, it is demonstrated that the correlation analyses of these RBC parameters provide unique information for distinguishing and understanding diseases.

  4. Profiling individual human red blood cells using common-path diffraction optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngchan; Shim, Hyoeun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, HyunJoo; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    Due to its strong correlation with the pathophysiology of many diseases, information about human red blood cells (RBCs) has a crucial function in hematology. Therefore, measuring and understanding the morphological, chemical, and mechanical properties of individual RBCs is a key to understanding the pathophysiology of a number of diseases in hematology, as well as to opening up new possibilities for diagnosing diseases in their early stages. In this study, we present the simultaneous and quantitative measurement of the morphological, chemical, and mechanical parameters of individual RBCs employing optical holographic microtomography. In addition, it is demonstrated that the correlation analyses of these RBC parameters provide unique information for distinguishing and understanding diseases. PMID:25322756

  5. Numerical analysis of first-order acousto-optic Bragg diffraction of profiled optical beams using open-loop transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Monish R.; Almehmadi, Fares S.

    2014-03-01

    In standard acousto-optic Bragg analysis, the incident light and sound beams are assumed to be uniform plane waves (with constant profiles) leading to the results based on standard weak interaction theory. As a follow-up to earlier work dealing with nonuniform incident optical beams, we revisit the problem of Bragg diffraction under nonuniform profiles, and include Gaussian, third-order Hermite-Gaussian, and zeroth-order Bessel profiles in our investigation, along with a few others. The first-order diffracted beam is examined (using a transfer function formalism based on angular spectra) under several parametric limits [such as the Klein-Cook parameter Q, the effective profile width, and the optical phase-shift parameter (α) in the sound cell]. Wherever feasible, the numerical results are compared with analytic theory. The scattered first-order profile output versus the optical phase-shift appears to maintain behavior similar to the known first-order characteristics (sin2 in intensity) encountered for the uniform incident beam case. It is observed, however, that such conformity exists seemingly only at relatively small values of Q (typically about 20 to 50). At higher Qs, on the other hand (where one would otherwise expect behavior closer to standard Bragg theory based on large Qs), it is found that the first-order intensity deviates substantially from the expected sin2- (or related) pattern. This deviation actually becomes more severe at even higher Qs. Additionally, the output profiles at higher Qs are also found to be distorted relative to the incident profiles. These results, though anomalous, are nevertheless generally compatible with earlier studies. Based on the transfer function theory, it is also known that for very large optical phase shifts (i.e., when α goes to infinity), the scattered first-order output for a Gaussian profile undergoes an axial (spatial) shift past the output plane of the sound cell. This predicted result is corroborated in our

  6. Dynamical Bragg diffraction of optical pulses in photonic crystals in the Laue geometry: Diffraction-induced splitting, selective compression, and focusing of pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Skorynin, A. A. Bushuev, V. A.; Mantsyzov, B. I.

    2012-07-15

    A theory for the dynamical Bragg diffraction of a spatially confined laser pulse in a linear photonic crystal with a significant modulation of the refractive index in the Laue geometry has been developed. The diffraction-induced splitting of a spatially confined pulse into the Borrmann and anti-Borrmann pulses localized in different regions of the photonic crystal and characterized by different dispersion laws is predicted. The selective compression or focusing of one of these pulses with the simultaneous broadening or defocusing of the other pulse is shown to be possible.

  7. Transient optical diffraction of GaN/aqueous interfaces: Interfacial carrier mobility dependence on surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, Hoang Q.; Pollock, Kevin L.; Cuk, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    While charge transport and surface reactivity have thus far been treated as independent phenomena, the interfacial carrier mobility could be highly dependent on reaction intermediates that carry localized charge and can hop from site to site along the surface. Here, we demonstrate the use of surface sensitive transient optical grating spectroscopy to measure this lateral, interfacial carrier diffusivity at surfaces with different reactivity. We find that for n-GaN, for which substantial charge transfer occurs during equilibration with the water oxidation reaction, the interfacial hole diffusivity increases from air by a factor greater than two under 0.1 M HBr and 0.1 M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolytes.

  8. Optoelectronic face recognition system using diffractive optical elements: design and evaluation of compact parallel joint transform correlator (COPaC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodate, Kashiko; Watanabe, Eriko; Inaba, Rieko

    2001-12-01

    Individual identification based on biological characteristics such as fingerprint, iris and countenance is regarded as a highly essential technique in security systems. As a simple and rapid recognition system satisfying required performance, we have proposed an opto-electronic system, which combines a parallel joint transform correlator (PJTC) with a personal computer. In this paper, the PJTC method using a new design multiple diffractive optical element as a Fourier transform lens was reviewed and proved to be one of the most practical optical computers for face recognition. Furthermore, based on these first trial results, we proposed the design and fabrication of a portable type compact PJTC (COPaC), of which the size is 23 X 15 X 16.3 cm3 and the weight is 4 kg. We obtained its high accuracy performance for one-to-one correlation using 300 front facial images in a database and proved its practicability. Additionally we performed experiments on ID-less discrimination of twins who look alike for human eyes. Successful recognition rate was obtained, indicating its excellent performance and feasibility.

  9. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    SciTech Connect

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  10. Field Test of Fiber-Optic Voltage and Current Sensors Applied to Gas Insulated Substation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Y.; Abe, Y.; Kuwahara, H.; Yoshinaga, K.

    1986-08-01

    The fiber-optic voltage and current sensors applied for 84kV three phase type gas insulated substation (GIS) were tested in order to see the advantages of these sensors practically in adverse field condition. The application technologies and field endurance test results of the sensors are described in this paper.

  11. Recent experiments with liquid gallium cooling of crystal diffraction optics (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.; Lee, W.; Macrander, A.; Mills, D.; Rogers, S. )

    1992-01-01

    The x-ray beams for the next generation of synchrotrons will contain much more power (1--10 kW) than is available at present day facilities. Cooling the first optical components in these beam lines will require the best cooling technology that one can bring to bear. Argonne continues to pioneer the use of liquid metals as the cooling fluid and has adopted liquid gallium as the liquid metal of choice. Its low melting point, 29.7 {degree}C and its very low vapor pressure make it an easy fluid to handle and its high thermal conductivity and heat capacity make it an excellent cooling fluid. A series of experiments were performed during April 1991 with the wiggler beam at the F2 station of the CHESS facility at Cornell to investigate the cooling of large areas of high power. Two types of cooling crystal geometries were tested, one where the cooling channels were core-drilled just below the surface of the crystal and a second where slots were cut into the crystal just below the surface with a diamond saw. Both crystals performed well with beam powers up to 1050 W and power densities of up to 14.5 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence.

  12. Diffractive 3D XUV optics at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Firsov, Alexander; Erko, Alexei

    2014-09-01

    The 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional variable line spacing (VLS) gratings based on total external reflection give the unique possibility for spectroscopy and focusing in application to 4th and 5th generation synchrotron sources. We focus on the elaboration of novel approaches for design and fabrication of 3D VLS working in the entire energy range, from THz to hard X-rays. These optical elements have unique combination of properties and can operate at all XUV sources including Free Electron Lasers (FELs), Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) and High Harmonic Generators (HHGs). Such 3D DOEs are able to cover the energy range of up to 20 keV with energy resolution λ/Δλ ≥ 1000 for soft x-ray and λ/Δλ ≥ 10000 for hard x-ray. We fabricate 3D VLS for time-resolved spectroscopy (energy range 100 - 2000 eV, 7500-9500 eV), FELs and ERLs (energy range up to 3 keV), and HHGs (energy range 10 - 200 eV).

  13. Efficient E-Beam Lithography Exposure Strategies for Diffractive X-ray Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzenko, V. A.; Romijn, J.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gorelick, S.; David, C.

    2011-09-01

    Exposure of structures with rotational symmetry by means of electron beam lithography is not trivial, because the e-beam writers are usually designed to deal with the data defined in Cartesian coordinates. Fabrication of circular nanostructures like Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) for x-ray microscopy applications requires exposures with resolution well below 1 nm. Therefore, special attention has to be paid to the efficient exposure data preparation, which will guarantee required precision and allow keeping the exposure time low. In this article, we describe in detail an optimized strategy that was applied for exposure of FZPs by the Vistec EBPG5000Plus e-beam lithography tool. Direct programming of exposure files allowed us to use fully the capabilities of this e-beam writer to expose efficiently and reproducibly FZPs with desired characteristics in both positive and negative tone resists.

  14. Optical simulation of three-dimensional x-ray diffraction using two-dimensional lattices and a Fabry-Perot etalon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, W.

    2013-03-01

    The basic experimental setup of a Fabry-Perot etalon between a collimating and a focusing lens is modified by introducing 2D rectangular lattices between the etalon and the collimating lens. Consequently, the irradiance of the interference fringes on a screen in the focal plane of the focusing lens changes and is modified by the diffraction pattern of the 2D lattice. The constructive interference directions resulting from both the etalon and the diffraction by the 2D lattice have to correlate in order to obtain maximum irradiance. Considering this experiment in a didactical context and analysing how a 2D rectangular lattice is seen through the etalon, the investigation provides us with the concept of an optical space containing a row of virtual 2D lattices. Due to the partially reflecting plane surfaces of the etalon, different virtual images of the 2D lattice form a 3D lattice with a tetragonal or orthorhombic structure. As an optical interface, the simple setup with a 2D lattice and an etalon models a 3D lattice. Using a laser, the diffraction pattern of a 2D lattice and etalon can be used to optically simulate 3D x-ray diffraction. The experiments can be included wherever undergraduate or graduate students have to follow up Laue's formulation of x-ray diffraction.

  15. Diffraction of a Gaussian beam in a three-dimensional smoothly inhomogeneous medium: an eikonal-based complex geometrical-optics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berczynski, Pawel; Bliokh, Konstantin Yu.; Kravtsov, Yuri A.; Stateczny, Andrzej

    2006-06-01

    We present an ab initio account of the paraxial complex geometrical optics (CGO) in application to scalar Gaussian beam propagation and diffraction in a 3D smoothly inhomogeneous medium. The paraxial CGO deals with quadratic expansion of the complex eikonal and reduces the wave problem to the solution of ordinary differential equations of the Riccati type. This substantially simplifies the description of Gaussian beam diffraction as compared with full-wave or parabolic (quasi-optics) equations. For a Gaussian beam propagating in a homogeneous medium or along the symmetry axis in a lenslike medium, the CGO equations possess analytical solutions; otherwise, they can be readily solved numerically. As a nontrivial example we consider Gaussian beam propagation and diffraction along a helical ray in an axially symmetric waveguide medium. It is shown that the major axis of the beam's elliptical cross section grows unboundedly; it is oriented predominantly in the azimuthal (binormal) direction and does not obey the parallel-transport law.

  16. Three-dimensionally modulated anisotropic structure for diffractive optical elements created by one-step three-beam polarization holographic photoalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Kotaro; Sakamoto, Moritsugu; Noda, Kohei; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    A diffractive optical element with a three-dimensional liquid crystal (LC) alignment structure for advanced control of polarized beams was fabricated by a highly efficient one-step photoalignment method. This study is of great significance because different two-dimensional continuous and complex alignment patterns can be produced on two alignment films by simultaneously irradiating an empty glass cell composed of two unaligned photocrosslinkable polymer LC films with three-beam polarized interference beam. The polarization azimuth, ellipticity, and rotation direction of the diffracted beams from the resultant LC grating widely varied depending on the two-dimensional diffracted position and the polarization states of the incident beams. These polarization diffraction properties are well explained by theoretical analysis based on Jones calculus.

  17. Visual and optical performance of diffractive multifocal intraocular lenses with different haptic designs: 6 month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengmeng; Corpuz, Christine Carole C; Fujiwara, Megumi; Tomita, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the visual acuity outcomes and optical performances of eyes implanted with two diffractive multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) models with either a plate haptic design or a modified-C design. Methods This retrospective study comprised cataract patients who were implanted with either a plate haptic multifocal IOL model (AcrivaUD Reviol BB MFM 611 [VSY Biotechnology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands], group 1) or a modified-C haptic multifocal IOL model (AcrivaUD Reviol BB MF 613 [VSY Biotechnology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands], group 2) between June 2012 and May 2013. The 6 month postoperative visual acuity, refraction, defocus curve, contrast sensitivity, and wave-front aberration were evaluated and compared between these eyes, using different IOL models. Results One hundred fifty-eight eyes of 107 patients were included in this study. Significant improvement in visual acuities and refraction was found in both groups after cataract surgery (P<0.01). The visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were statistically better in group 1 than in group 2 (P<0.01). No statistically significant difference in the corneal higher-order aberrations was found between the two groups (P>0.05). However, the ocular higher-order aberrations in group 2 were significantly greater than in group 1 (P<0.05). Conclusion At 6 months postoperatively, both AcrivaUD Reviol BB MFM 611 IOL and AcrivaUD Reviol BB MF 613 IOL achieved excellent visual and refractive outcomes. The multifocal IOL model with plate haptic design resulted in better optical performances than that with the modified-C haptic design. PMID:24868143

  18. Applying LED in full-field optical coherence tomography for gastrointestinal endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bor-Wen; Wang, Yu-Yen; Juan, Yu-Shan; Hsu, Sheng-Jie

    2015-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become an important medical imaging technology due to its non-invasiveness and high resolution. Full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) is a scanning scheme especially suitable for en face imaging as it employs a CMOS/CCD device for parallel pixels processing. FF-OCT can also be applied to high-speed endoscopic imaging. Applying cylindrical scanning and a right-angle prism, we successfully obtained a 360° tomography of the inner wall of an intestinal cavity through an FF-OCT system with an LED source. The 10-μm scale resolution enables the early detection of gastrointestinal lesions, which can increase detection rates for esophageal, stomach, or vaginal cancer. All devices used in this system can be integrated by MOEMS technology to contribute to the studies of gastrointestinal medicine and advanced endoscopy technology.

  19. Two-dimensional null subspace algorithm applied for blind optical images deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovskiy, Andrey; Goriachkin, Oleg

    2016-03-01

    The article deals with the image blind identification algorithm applied for optical images restoration. The proposed solution is based on the polynomial transform of the signals and allows to reduce multichannel blind image identification to the linear equation solving with the number of equations, equal to the number of the unknown PSF samples. The outcome of the simulation for different SNR is examined during the simulation; the real images, restored by the proposed algorithm are shown.

  20. OPTICAL correlation identification technology applied in underwater laser imaging target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Guang-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Ge, Wei-Long

    2011-11-01

    The underwater laser imaging detection is an effective method of detecting short distance target underwater as an important complement of sonar detection. With the development of underwater laser imaging technology and underwater vehicle technology, the underwater automatic target identification has gotten more and more attention, and is a research difficulty in the area of underwater optical imaging information processing. Today, underwater automatic target identification based on optical imaging is usually realized with the method of digital circuit software programming. The algorithm realization and control of this method is very flexible. However, the optical imaging information is 2D image even 3D image, the amount of imaging processing information is abundant, so the electronic hardware with pure digital algorithm will need long identification time and is hard to meet the demands of real-time identification. If adopt computer parallel processing, the identification speed can be improved, but it will increase complexity, size and power consumption. This paper attempts to apply optical correlation identification technology to realize underwater automatic target identification. The optics correlation identification technology utilizes the Fourier transform characteristic of Fourier lens which can accomplish Fourier transform of image information in the level of nanosecond, and optical space interconnection calculation has the features of parallel, high speed, large capacity and high resolution, combines the flexibility of calculation and control of digital circuit method to realize optoelectronic hybrid identification mode. We reduce theoretical formulation of correlation identification and analyze the principle of optical correlation identification, and write MATLAB simulation program. We adopt single frame image obtained in underwater range gating laser imaging to identify, and through identifying and locating the different positions of target, we can improve

  1. OPTICAL correlation identification technology applied in underwater laser imaging target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Guang-tao; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Ge, Wei-long

    2012-01-01

    The underwater laser imaging detection is an effective method of detecting short distance target underwater as an important complement of sonar detection. With the development of underwater laser imaging technology and underwater vehicle technology, the underwater automatic target identification has gotten more and more attention, and is a research difficulty in the area of underwater optical imaging information processing. Today, underwater automatic target identification based on optical imaging is usually realized with the method of digital circuit software programming. The algorithm realization and control of this method is very flexible. However, the optical imaging information is 2D image even 3D image, the amount of imaging processing information is abundant, so the electronic hardware with pure digital algorithm will need long identification time and is hard to meet the demands of real-time identification. If adopt computer parallel processing, the identification speed can be improved, but it will increase complexity, size and power consumption. This paper attempts to apply optical correlation identification technology to realize underwater automatic target identification. The optics correlation identification technology utilizes the Fourier transform characteristic of Fourier lens which can accomplish Fourier transform of image information in the level of nanosecond, and optical space interconnection calculation has the features of parallel, high speed, large capacity and high resolution, combines the flexibility of calculation and control of digital circuit method to realize optoelectronic hybrid identification mode. We reduce theoretical formulation of correlation identification and analyze the principle of optical correlation identification, and write MATLAB simulation program. We adopt single frame image obtained in underwater range gating laser imaging to identify, and through identifying and locating the different positions of target, we can improve

  2. Diffraction described by virtual particle momentum exchange: the "diffraction force"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    Particle diffraction can be described by an ensemble of particle paths determined through a Fourier analysis of a scattering lattice where the momentum exchange probabilities are defined at the location of scattering, not the point of detection. This description is compatible with optical wave theories and quantum particle models and provides deeper insights to the nature of quantum uncertainty. In this paper the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Fresnel-Kirchoff theories are analyzed for diffraction by a narrow slit and a straight edge to demonstrate the dependence of particle scattering on the distance of virtual particle exchange. The quantized momentum exchange is defined by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and is consistent with the formalism of QED. This exchange of momentum manifests the "diffraction force" that appears to be a universal construct as it applies to neutral and charged particles. This analysis indicates virtual particles might form an exchange channel that bridges the space of momentum exchange.

  3. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection. PMID:27410900

  4. Deformation and collapse of the higher-order optical vortices obtained by large-angle diffraction in computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekshaev, Aleksandr; Orlinska, Oksana

    2009-10-01

    Spatial characteristics of the optical-vortex (OV) beams created during the Gaussian beam diffraction by a grating with groove bifurcation are analyzed theoretically and numerically. In contrast to previous works, condition of small-angle diffraction is no longer required and the diffracted beam can be strongly deformed. This causes the intensity profile rotation and the high-order OV decomposition into a set of secondary single-charged OVs. These effects are studied quantitatively and confronted with similar properties of a Laguerre-Gaussian beam that undergoes astigmatic telescopic transformation. In contrast to the latter case, the secondary OVs do not lie on a single straight line within the beam cross section, and morphology parameters of the individual secondary OVs carried by the same beam are, in general, different. The results can be used for practical generation of OV beams and OV arrays with prescribed properties.

  5. Threshold thickness for applying diffusion equation in thin tissue optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunyao; Zhu, Jingping; Cui, Weiwen; Nie, Wei; Li, Jie; Xu, Zhenghong

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the suitability of the semi-infinite model of the diffusion equation when using diffuse optical imaging (DOI) to image thin tissues with double boundaries. Both diffuse approximation and Monte Carlo methods were applied to simulate light propagation in the thin tissue model with variable optical parameters and tissue thicknesses. A threshold value of the tissue thickness was defined as the minimum thickness in which the semi-infinite model exhibits the same reflected intensity as that from the double-boundary model and was generated as the final result. In contrast to our initial hypothesis that all optical properties would affect the threshold thickness, our results show that only absorption coefficient is the dominant parameter and the others are negligible. The threshold thickness decreases from 1 cm to 4 mm as the absorption coefficient grows from 0.01 mm-1 to 0.2 mm-1. A look-up curve was derived to guide the selection of the appropriate model during the optical diagnosis of thin tissue cancers. These results are useful in guiding the development of the endoscopic DOI for esophageal, cervical and colorectal cancers, among others.

  6. Temperature and pressure fiber-optic sensors applied to minimally invasive diagnostics and therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Caroline; Pinet, Éric

    2006-02-01

    We present how fiber-optic temperature or pressure sensors could be applied to minimally invasive diagnostics and therapies. For instance a miniature pressure sensor based on micro-optical mechanical systems (MOMS) could solve most of the problems associated with fluidic pressure transduction presently used for triggering purposes. These include intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) therapy and other applications requiring detection of fast and/or subtle fluid pressure variations such as for intracranial pressure monitoring or for urology diagnostics. As well, miniature temperature sensors permit minimally invasive direct temperature measurement in diagnostics or therapies requiring energy transfer to living tissues. The extremely small size of fiber-optic sensors that we have developed allows quick and precise in situ measurements exactly where the physical parameters need to be known. Furthermore, their intrinsic immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) allows for the safe use of EMI-generating therapeutic or diagnostic equipments without compromising the signal quality. With the trend of ambulatory health care and the increasing EMI noise found in modern hospitals, the use of multi-parameter fiber-optic sensors will improve constant patient monitoring without any concern about the effects of EMI disturbances. The advantages of miniature fiberoptic sensors will offer clinicians new monitoring tools that open the way for improved diagnostic accuracy and new therapeutic technologies.

  7. A uniform geometrical optics and an extended uniform geometrical theory of diffraction for evaluating high frequency EM fields near smooth caustics and composite shadow boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinides, E. D.; Marhefka, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniform geometrical optics (UGO) and an extended uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (EUTD) are developed for evaluating high frequency electromagnetic (EM) fields within transition regions associated with a two and three dimensional smooth caustic of reflected rays and a composite shadow boundary formed by the caustic termination or the confluence of the caustic with the reflection shadow boundary (RSB). The UGO is a uniform version of the classic geometrical optics (GO). It retains the simple ray optical expressions of classic GO and employs a new set of uniform reflection coefficients. The UGO also includes a uniform version of the complex GO ray field that exists on the dark side of the smooth caustic. The EUTD is an extension of the classic uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) and accounts for the non-ray optical behavior of the UGO reflected field near caustics by using a two-variable transition function in the expressions for the edge diffraction coefficients. It also uniformly recovers the classic UTD behavior of the edge diffracted field outside the composite shadow boundary transition region. The approach employed for constructing the UGO/EUTD solution is based on a spatial domain physical optics (PO) radiation integral representation for the fields which is then reduced using uniform asymptotic procedures. The UGO/EUTD analysis is also employed to investigate the far-zone RCS problem of plane wave scattering from two and three dimensional polynomial defined surfaces, and uniform reflection, zero-curvature, and edge diffraction coefficients are derived. Numerical results for the scattering and diffraction from cubic and fourth order polynomial strips are also shown and the UGO/EUTD solution is validated by comparison to an independent moment method (MM) solution. The UGO/EUTD solution is also compared with the classic GO/UTD solution. The failure of the classic techniques near caustics and composite shadow boundaries is clearly

  8. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum and in situ hemozoin crystals using optical diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, HyeOk; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    We present high-resolution optical tomographic images of human red blood cells (RBC) parasitized by malaria-inducing Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-RBCs. Three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) tomograms are reconstructed by recourse to a diffraction algorithm from multiple two-dimensional holograms with various angles of illumination. These 3-D RI tomograms of Pf-RBCs show cellular and subcellular structures of host RBCs and invaded parasites in fine detail. Full asexual intraerythrocytic stages of parasite maturation (ring to trophozoite to schizont stages) are then systematically investigated using optical diffraction tomography algorithms. These analyses provide quantitative information on the structural and chemical characteristics of individual host Pf-RBCs, parasitophorous vacuole, and cytoplasm. The in situ structural evolution and chemical characteristics of subcellular hemozoin crystals are also elucidated.

  9. X-Ray Diffraction Pattern and Optical Properties Of Disperse Red-1 Thin Films Deposited By Electric Field Assisted PVD Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenas, D. R.; Herman, Herman; Siregar, R. E.; Tjia, M. O.

    2010-07-01

    Disperse Red-1 (DR1) films have been prepared by Electric field-assisted Physical Vapor Deposition (E-PVD) method at various external electric field strengths on the ITO substrate. The resulted films were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy and the optical properties are investigated by Reflectometric and ATR measurements. The XRD data show growing diffraction peaks with increasing electric field corresponding to increasing number of molecules deposited with the head-to-tail stacking along the molecular chain. Further, the reflectometer data show a rising trend of the optical refractive index of the films produced with increasing electric field. This result is consistent with the frequency shift of SPR (Surface Plasmon Resonance) measured by ATR method.

  10. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum and in situ hemozoin crystals using optical diffraction tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, HyeOk; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Dasari, Ramachandra R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We present high-resolution optical tomographic images of human red blood cells (RBC) parasitized by malaria-inducing Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-RBCs. Three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) tomograms are reconstructed by recourse to a diffraction algorithm from multiple two-dimensional holograms with various angles of illumination. These 3-D RI tomograms of Pf-RBCs show cellular and subcellular structures of host RBCs and invaded parasites in fine detail. Full asexual intraerythrocytic stages of parasite maturation (ring to trophozoite to schizont stages) are then systematically investigated using optical diffraction tomography algorithms. These analyses provide quantitative information on the structural and chemical characteristics of individual host Pf-RBCs, parasitophorous vacuole, and cytoplasm. The in situ structural evolution and chemical characteristics of subcellular hemozoin crystals are also elucidated. PMID:23797986

  11. Ultrafast spin-state photoswitching in a crystal and slower consecutive processes investigated by femtosecond optical spectroscopy and picosecond X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Collet, Eric; Moisan, Nicolas; Baldé, Chérif; Bertoni, Roman; Trzop, Elzbieta; Laulhé, Claire; Lorenc, Maciej; Servol, Marina; Cailleau, Hervé; Tissot, Antoine; Boillot, Marie-Laure; Graber, Timothy; Henning, Robert; Coppens, Philip; Buron-Le Cointe, Marylise

    2013-02-20

    We report the spin state photo-switching dynamics in two polymorphs of a spin-crossover molecular complex triggered by a femtosecond laser flash, as determined by combining femtosecond optical pump-probe spectroscopy and picosecond X-ray diffraction techniques. The light-driven transformations in the two polymorphs are compared. Combining both techniques and tracking how the X-ray data correlate with optical signals allow understanding of how electronic and structural degrees of freedom couple and play their role when the switchable molecules interact in the active crystalline medium. The study sheds light on crossing the border between femtochemistry at the molecular scale and femtoswitching at the material scale.

  12. Harmonic diffractive lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.W.; Sommargren, G.E.

    1995-05-10

    The harmonic diffractive lens is a diffractive imaging lens for which the optical path-length transition between adjacent facets is an integer multiple {ital m} of the design wavelength {lambda}{sub 0}. The total lens thickness in air is {ital m}{lambda}{sub 0}/({ital n} {minus} 1), which is {ital m} times thicker than the so-called modulo 2{pi} diffractive lens. Lenses constructed in this way have hybrid properties of both refractive and diffractive lenses. Such a lens will have a diffraction-limited, common focus for a number of discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum. A 34.75-diopter, 6-mm-diameter lens is diamond turned in aluminum and replicated in optical materials. The sag of the lens is 23 {mu}m. Modulation transfer function measurements in both monochromatic and white light verify the performance of the lens. The lens approaches the diffraction limit for 10 discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum.

  13. Applied electro-optics educational and training program with multiple entrance and exit pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Patricia; Zhou, Feng; Zilic, Dorothy

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents an innovative hands-on training program designed to create a pipeline of highly-skilled technical workers for today's workforce economy. The 2+2+2 Pennsylvania Integrated Workforce Leadership Program in Electro-Optics prepares students for a career in this new high-tech field. With seamless transition from high school into college, the program offers the versatility of multiple entrance and exit pathways. After completion of each educational level, students can exit the program with various skill levels, including certificates, an associate's degree, or a bachelor's degree. Launched by Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) in partnership with Lenape Vocational School (Lenape), the 2+2+2 educational pathway program was implemented to promote early training of high-school students. During the first level, students in their junior and/or senior year enroll in four Electro-Optics courses at Lenape. Upon completion of these courses and an Advanced Placement Equivalency course with an appropriate exam score, students can earn a certificate from Lenape for the 15+ credits, which also can be articulated into IUP's associate degree program in Electro-Optics. During the second level, students can earn an associate's degree in Electro-Optics, offered only at the IUP Northpointe Campus. After completion of the Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.), students are prepared to enter the workforce as senior technicians. During the third level, students who have completed the Associate of Science (A.S.) in Electro-Optics have the opportunity to matriculate at IUP's Indiana Campus to earn a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in Applied Physics with a track in Electro-Optics. Hence, the name 2+2+2 refers to getting started in high school, continuing the educational experience with an associate's degree program, and optionally moving on to a bachelor's degree. Consequently, students move from one educational level to the next with advanced credits toward the next

  14. Applying UV cameras for SO2 detection to distant or optically thick volcanic plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kern, Christoph; Werner, Cynthia; Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A. Jeff; Lübcke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) camera systems represent an exciting new technology for measuring two dimensional sulfur dioxide (SO2) distributions in volcanic plumes. The high frame rate of the cameras allows the retrieval of SO2 emission rates at time scales of 1 Hz or higher, thus allowing the investigation of high-frequency signals and making integrated and comparative studies with other high-data-rate volcano monitoring techniques possible. One drawback of the technique, however, is the limited spectral information recorded by the imaging systems. Here, a framework for simulating the sensitivity of UV cameras to various SO2 distributions is introduced. Both the wavelength-dependent transmittance of the optical imaging system and the radiative transfer in the atmosphere are modeled. The framework is then applied to study the behavior of different optical setups and used to simulate the response of these instruments to volcanic plumes containing varying SO2 and aerosol abundances located at various distances from the sensor. Results show that UV radiative transfer in and around distant and/or optically thick plumes typically leads to a lower sensitivity to SO2 than expected when assuming a standard Beer–Lambert absorption model. Furthermore, camera response is often non-linear in SO2 and dependent on distance to the plume and plume aerosol optical thickness and single scatter albedo. The model results are compared with camera measurements made at Kilauea Volcano (Hawaii) and a method for integrating moderate resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy data with UV imagery to retrieve improved SO2 column densities is discussed.

  15. Beyond the diffraction limit of optical/IR interferometers. I. Angular diameter and rotation parameters of Achernar from differential phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domiciano de Souza, A.; Hadjara, M.; Vakili, F.; Bendjoya, P.; Millour, F.; Abe, L.; Carciofi, A. C.; Faes, D. M.; Kervella, P.; Lagarde, S.; Marconi, A.; Monin, J.-L.; Niccolini, G.; Petrov, R. G.; Weigelt, G.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Spectrally resolved long-baseline optical/IR interferometry of rotating stars opens perspectives to investigate their fundamental parameters and the physical mechanisms that govern their interior, photosphere, and circumstellar envelope structures. Aims: Based on the signatures of stellar rotation on observed interferometric wavelength-differential phases, we aim to measure angular diameters, rotation velocities, and orientation of stellar rotation axes. Methods: We used the AMBER focal instrument at ESO-VLTI in its high-spectral resolution mode to record interferometric data on the fast rotator Achernar. Differential phases centered on the hydrogen Br γ line (K band) were obtained during four almost consecutive nights with a continuous Earth-rotation synthesis during ~5 h/night, corresponding to ~60° position angle coverage per baseline. These observations were interpreted with our numerical code dedicated to long-baseline interferometry of rotating stars. Results: By fitting our model to Achernar's differential phases from AMBER, we could measure its equatorial radius Req = 11.6 ± 0.3 R⊙, equatorial rotation velocity Veq = 298 ± 9 km s-1, rotation axis inclination angle i = 101.5 ± 5.2°, and rotation axis position angle (from North to East) PArot = 34.9 ± 1.6°. From these parameters and the stellar distance, the equatorial angular diameter ⌀eq of Achernar is found to be 2.45 ± 0.09 mas, which is compatible with previous values derived from the commonly used visibility amplitude. In particular, ⌀eq and PArot measured in this work with VLTI/AMBER are compatible with the values previously obtained with VLTI/VINCI. Conclusions: The present paper, based on real data, demonstrates the super-resolution potential of differential interferometry for measuring sizes, rotation velocities, and orientation of rotating stars in cases where visibility amplitudes are unavailable and/or when the star is partially or poorly resolved. In particular, we showed

  16. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis. PMID:26979685

  17. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-01

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  18. Multi-spectral optical simulation system applied in hardware-in-the-loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hong; Lei, Jie; Gao, Yang; Liu, Yang

    2009-07-01

    The Multi-spectral simulation system has been constructed at Beijing Simulation Center (BSC) for hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) testing of optical and infrared seekers, in single-band and dual-band, or even multi-band. This multi-spectral simulation facility consists primarily of several projectors and a wide-angular simulation mechanism, the projector technologies utilized at BSC include a broadband point source collimator, a laser echo simulator and a visible scene projection system. These projectors can be used individually with the wide-angular simulation mechanism, or any combination of both or all of three can be used according to different needs. The configuration and performance of each technology are reviewed in the paper. Future plans include two IR imaging projectors which run at high frame frequency. The multi-spectral optical simulation system has been successfully applied for visible and IR imaging seekers testing in HWIL simulation. The laser echo simulator hardware will be applied soon.

  19. DBR tapered diode laser at 1030 nm with nearly diffraction-limited narrowband emission and 12.7 W of optical output power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, André; Fricke, Jörg; Bugge, Frank; Brox, Olaf; Erbert, Götz; Sumpf, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Nearly diffraction-limited emission from a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) tapered diode laser is presented. Intrinsic wavelength stabilization is achieved with a 3rd order DBR grating manufactured by electron beam lithography. At a heatsink temperature of 15°C an optical output power of 12.7 W with an electro-optical efficiency > 40% is obtained. The corresponding emission wavelength is 1030.57 nm and spectral bandwidths of 0.02 nm are measured over the whole power range. At 10.5 W of optical power 8.1 W are contained in the central lobe. The measured beam propagation ratio and brightness are 1.1 (1/e2) and 700 MWcm-2 sr-1, respectively. With these parameters, the laser is suitable for applications such as non-linear frequency conversion.

  20. Fabrication of NIL templates and diffractive optical elements using the new Vistec SB4050 VSB e-beam writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butschke, Joerg; Irmscher, Mathias; Koepernik, Corinna; Martens, Stephan; Sailer, Holger; Schnabel, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    Targeting mass production of nanostructures, nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is one of the most cost-effective ways to do so. One of the most critical topics is the pattern quality of the imprint master template. Therefore the new Vistec SB4050 VSB e-beam writer has been evaluated regarding its capability for state-of-the-art NIL template and DOE making. Equipped with a new air bearing stage the tool can expose a wide variety of substrates including large and heavy ones. For 9035 substrates a placement accuracy of 9nm (3sigma) as well as an overlay accuracy of 7nm (3sigma) with a mean error below 2nm has been achieved. Targeting for minimum feature size, a resolution below 30nm has been achieved for both, dense lines and holes pattern even using CAR. In addition, 3D structuring capability has been proved by applying GenISys' Layout Beamer calibrated for an appropriate negative tone resist. Further investigation has been done on shot count optimization regarding circular holes respective pillars. Using a feature size dependent segmentation, writing time reduction could be achieved keeping the original feature shape. Besides screening of typical tool parameter an application driven evaluation has been done by fabricating different type of templates based on silicon and quartz. 2D and 3D features have been realized. Furthermore holograms have been fabricated and proved for their performance by optical measurements.