Science.gov

Sample records for applied social sciences

  1. Applied social science for environmental planning

    SciTech Connect

    Millsap, W.

    1983-01-01

    As regions and communities are increasingly affected by the projects, programs, and policies of disparate government and private groups, the skills of social scientists are being called on to aid in the environmental planning process. This volume presents accounts of the many ways in which the social sciences are contributing to environmental planning. The authors address the transition from theory to practice in environmental planning, local-level contributions to the planning process, socioeconomic development and planning needs, and socioenvironmental planning and mitigation procedures.

  2. Teaching Social Science Research: An Applied Approach Using Community Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, M. Janice; And Others

    A four-week summer project for 100 rural tenth graders in the University of Alabama's Biomedical Sciences Preparation Program (BioPrep) enabled students to acquire and apply social sciences research skills. The students investigated drinking water quality in three rural Alabama counties by interviewing local officials, health workers, and…

  3. Teaching Social Science Research: An Applied Approach Using Community Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, M. Janice; And Others

    A four-week summer project for 100 rural tenth graders in the University of Alabama's Biomedical Sciences Preparation Program (BioPrep) enabled students to acquire and apply social sciences research skills. The students investigated drinking water quality in three rural Alabama counties by interviewing local officials, health workers, and…

  4. Revisioning Applied Social Sciences in Chicano/a Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Adela

    2001-01-01

    Many contemporary Chicana/o scholars have contributed to Chicano studies by focusing their research on social sciences applied to Mexican Americans. Strands of important research that intersect with Chicano studies are reviewed in the areas of psychology, political science, economics, sociology, public health, and education. Communications between…

  5. Measuring and Maximising Research Impact in Applied Social Science Research Settings. Good Practice Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanwick, John; Hargreaves, Jo

    2012-01-01

    This guide describes the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) approach to measuring impact using examples from its own case studies, as well as showing how to maximise the impact of applied social science research. Applied social science research needs to demonstrate that it is relevant and useful both to public policy and…

  6. The Need for Applied Social Science Research in Mental Retardation: A Preliminary Memorandum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dybwad, Gunnar

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, originally published in 1959, the author, at the time executive director of the National Association for Retarded Children, offers his thoughts on applied social science research in mental retardation. The editor's introduction notes that Dybwad sets forth a research agenda which was extremely forward looking in 1959 and remains…

  7. The Contribution of Applied Social Sciences to Obesity Stigma-Related Public Health Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bombak, Andrea E.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is viewed as a major public health concern, and obesity stigma is pervasive. Such marginalization renders obese persons a “special population.” Weight bias arises in part due to popular sources' attribution of obesity causation to individual lifestyle factors. This may not accurately reflect the experiences of obese individuals or their perspectives on health and quality of life. A powerful role may exist for applied social scientists, such as anthropologists or sociologists, in exploring the lived and embodied experiences of this largely discredited population. This novel research may aid in public health intervention planning. Through these studies, applied social scientists could help develop a nonstigmatizing, salutogenic approach to public health that accurately reflects the health priorities of all individuals. Such an approach would call upon applied social science's strengths in investigating the mundane, problematizing the “taken for granted” and developing emic (insiders') understandings of marginalized populations. PMID:24782921

  8. Applying Sociology to Policy: Social Science and the Environmental Impact Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenburg, William R.; Keating, Kenneth M.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews legal requirements for use of social science expertise in environmental impact statements and reasons for the general failure to include such input. Explores possibilities for improving social science involvement including legal challenges, cooperation with environmental and public interest groups, objective research, and more adversarial…

  9. Applying Sociology to Policy: Social Science and the Environmental Impact Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenburg, William R.; Keating, Kenneth M.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews legal requirements for use of social science expertise in environmental impact statements and reasons for the general failure to include such input. Explores possibilities for improving social science involvement including legal challenges, cooperation with environmental and public interest groups, objective research, and more adversarial…

  10. Social Science at the Center for Adaptive Optics: Synergistic Systems of Program Evaluation, Applied Research, Educational Assessment, and Pedagogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goza, B. K.; Hunter, L.; Shaw, J. M.; Metevier, A. J.; Raschke, L.; Espinoza, E.; Geaney, E. R.; Reyes, G.; Rothman, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the interaction of four elements of social science as they have evolved in concert with the Center for Adaptive Optics Professional Development Program (CfAO PDP). We hope these examples persuade early-career scientists and engineers to include social science activities as they develop grant proposals and carry out their research. To frame our discussion we use a metaphor from astronomy. At the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), the CfAO PDP and the Educational Partnership Center (EPC) are two young stars in the process of forming a solar system. Together, they are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust made up of program evaluation, applied research, educational assessment, and pedagogy. An idea from the 2001 PDP intensive workshops program evaluation developed into the Assessing Scientific Inquiry and Leadership Skills (AScILS) applied research project. In iterative cycles, AScILS researchers participated in subsequent PDP intensive workshops, teaching social science while piloting AScILS measurement strategies. Subsequent "orbits" of the PDP program evaluation gathered ideas from the applied research and pedagogy. The denser regions of this disk of social science are in the process of forming new protoplanets as tools for research and teaching are developed. These tools include problem-solving exercises or simulations of adaptive optics explanations and scientific reasoning; rubrics to evaluate the scientific reasoning simulation responses, knowledge regarding inclusive science education, and student explanations of science/engineering inquiry investigations; and a scientific reasoning curriculum. Another applied research project is forming with the design of a study regarding how to assess engineering explanations. To illustrate the mutual shaping of the cross-disciplinary, intergenerational group of educational researchers and their projects, the paper ends with a description of the professional trajectories of some of the researchers involved in this complex solar system.

  11. Applying Authentic Learning to Social Science: A Learning Design for an Inter-Disciplinary Sociology Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borthwick, Fiona; Lefoe, Gerry; Bennett, Sue; Huber, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    As universities move towards more vocationally oriented courses, students expect pedagogic practices that make closer ties to potential workplaces. The pedagogical approach of authentic learning is well suited to this purpose as it proposes an apprenticeship-type model and a model that brings simulated work tasks into the classroom. In the social…

  12. NASA Applied Sciences Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Sue M.; Haynes, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's strategic Goals: a) Develop a balanced overall program of science, exploration, and aeronautics consistent with the redirection of human spaceflight program to focus on exploration. b) Study Earth from space to advance scientific understanding and meet societal needs. NASA's partnership efforts in global modeling and data assimilation over the next decade will shorten the distance from observations to answers for important, leading-edge science questions. NASA's Applied Sciences program will continue the Agency's efforts in benchmarking the assimilation of NASA research results into policy and management decision-support tools that are vital for the Nation's environment, economy, safety, and security. NASA also is working with NOAH and inter-agency forums to transition mature research capabilities to operational systems, primarily the polar and geostationary operational environmental satellites, and to utilize fully those assets for research purposes.

  13. Quality in applied science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sten, T.

    1993-12-01

    Science is in many senses a special kind of craft and only skilled craftsmen are able to distinguish good work from bad. Due to the variation in approaches, methods and even philosophical basis, it is nearly impossible to derive a general set of quality criteria for scientific work outside specific research traditions. Applied science introduces a new set of quality criteria having to do with the application of results in practical situations and policy making. A scientist doing basic research relates mainly to the scientific community of which he is a member, while in applied contract research the scientist has to consider the impact of his results both for the immediate users and upon interest groups possibly being affected. Application thus raises a whole new set of requirements having to do with business ethics, policy consequences and societal ethics in general.

  14. Social Work and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehlert, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Interest has grown in the past few years about the place of social work in science. Questions remain, such as whether social work should be considered a science, and if so, where it fits into the constellation of sciences. This article attempts to shed light on these questions. After briefly considering past and present constructions of science…

  15. Social Work and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehlert, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Interest has grown in the past few years about the place of social work in science. Questions remain, such as whether social work should be considered a science, and if so, where it fits into the constellation of sciences. This article attempts to shed light on these questions. After briefly considering past and present constructions of science…

  16. The science in social science

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, H. Russell

    2012-01-01

    A recent poll showed that most people think of science as technology and engineering—life-saving drugs, computers, space exploration, and so on. This was, in fact, the promise of the founders of modern science in the 17th century. It is less commonly understood that social and behavioral sciences have also produced technologies and engineering that dominate our everyday lives. These include polling, marketing, management, insurance, and public health programs. PMID:23213222

  17. Security Science as an Applied Science?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Clifton

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of a security science degree as the emerging applied science of the protection of individuals and assets. Proposes the themes of physical, electronic, information security and facility management as scientific applications for the course. (Author/MM)

  18. Oregon Social Sciences Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    The study of the social sciences includes: history, civics, geography, and economics to prepare students for responsible citizenship. The Oregon state standards for social sciences sets out common curriculum goals, content standards, information for Benchmark 1 (grade three), Benchmark 2 (grade five), Benchmark 3 (grade eight), and Certificate of…

  19. Applied Science in Cuba.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jeffrey L.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various topics and issues related to the scientific enterprise in Cuba. Notes that Cuban science is emphasizing biotechnology and research on the island's chief crop (sugarcane), although hampered by limited personnel and lack of modern laboratory equipment. (JN)

  20. Advancing the Interdisciplinary Collaborative Health Team Model: Applying Democratic Professionalism, Implementation Science, and Therapeutic Alliance to Enact Social Justice Practice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This essay reframes the interdisciplinary collaborative health team model by proposing the application of 3 foundational pillars-democratic professionalism, implementation science, and therapeutic alliance to advance this practice. The aim was to address challenges to the model, enhance their functional capacity, and explicate and enact social justice practices to affect individual health outcomes while simultaneously addressing health inequities. The pillars are described and examples from the author's dissertation research illustrate how the pillars were used to bring about action. Related theories, models, and frameworks that have negotiation, capacity building, collaboration, and knowledge/task/power sharing as central concepts are presented under each of the pillars. PMID:26244478

  1. Subject Information Resources: A Guide to Information Resources in Selected Subject Areas of the Humanities, the Social Sciences, and Pure and Applied Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Janine, Ed.

    Intended for use in courses in information resources at Kuring-gai College of Advanced Education, this guide approaches information resources by subject, building on previous information resources courses which concentrated on format. Resources for selected disciplines within the broad subject areas of the humanities, the social sciences, and pure…

  2. Social Science: Course Proposal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Charles Gene

    A proposal is presented for a Community College of Philadelphia course surveying basic social science skills and information, including scientific method, map usage, evolution, native peoples, social groups, and U.S. Government. Following a standard cover form, a statement of purpose for the course indicates that it is designed to provide…

  3. Toward an Applied Administrative Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Roger L. M.

    1983-01-01

    A study of 65 articles from the 1981 volumes of "Administrative Science Quarterly" and "Harvard Business Review," using smallest space analysis, found that the few studies adopting subjective (instead of objective) approaches to analyzing organizational change were most likely to provide a basis for an applied administrative science. (Author/RW)

  4. Quantum Social Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haven, Emmanuel; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Preface; Part I. Physics Concepts in Social Science? A Discussion: 1. Classical, statistical and quantum mechanics: all in one; 2. Econophysics: statistical physics and social science; 3. Quantum social science: a non-mathematical motivation; Part II. Mathematics and Physics Preliminaries: 4. Vector calculus and other mathematical preliminaries; 5. Basic elements of quantum mechanics; 6. Basic elements of Bohmian mechanics; Part III. Quantum Probabilistic Effects in Psychology: Basic Questions and Answers: 7. A brief overview; 8. Interference effects in psychology - an introduction; 9. A quantum-like model of decision making; Part IV. Other Quantum Probabilistic Effects in Economics, Finance and Brain Sciences: 10. Financial/economic theory in crisis; 11. Bohmian mechanics in finance and economics; 12. The Bohm-Vigier Model and path simulation; 13. Other applications to economic/financial theory; 14. The neurophysiological sources of quantum-like processing in the brain; Conclusion; Glossary; Index.

  5. The Social Sciences in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanuki, Joji

    1975-01-01

    This article relates a brief historical background of social sciences in Japan, the institutional framework of social science education and research, and major issues and perspectives for the development of the social scinces. (ND)

  6. Whereto, the Social Studies: Social Studies or the Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver, James P.

    This paper defines, inquires into the relationships, and analyzes the terms social sciences and social studies. Too often social studies are a simplified instructional adaptation from the social sciences in which curricular decisions are made on the basis of dictates of the social science disciplines and of college prerequisites. A social studies…

  7. Towards "open applied" Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, C. R.; Schildhauer, M.

    2014-12-01

    Concepts of open science -- in the context of cyber/digital technology and culture -- could greatly benefit applied and secondary Earth science efforts. However, international organizations (e.g., environmental agencies, conservation groups and sustainable development organizations) that are focused on applied science have been slow to incorporate open practices across the spectrum of scientific activities, from data to decisions. Myriad benefits include transparency, reproducibility, efficiency (timeliness and cost savings), stakeholder engagement, direct linkages between research and environmental outcomes, reduction in bias and corruption, improved simulation of Earth systems and improved availability of science in general. We map out where and how open science can play a role, providing next steps, with specific emphasis on applied science efforts and processes such as environmental assessment, synthesis and systematic reviews, meta-analyses, decision support and emerging cyber technologies. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the organizations for which they work and/or represent.

  8. Social Science Exploratory. Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise.

    This Idaho Social Science Exploratory course of study applies standards-based content knowledge and skills to an enhanced investigation of geography, history, entrepreneurism, and civic engagement at an eighth-grade level. The exploratory course draws upon the disciplines to emphasize concepts and generalizations from the social sciences, promotes…

  9. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 52, June, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Judith L., Ed.

    Included in this annotated bibliography are entries on the role of the social sciences in the discipline of forestry. Four major categories of entries are included: (1) social science applied to forestry at large; (2) social science applied to forestry's productive agents; (3) social science applied to forest production; and (4) social science…

  10. Trimodernism and Social Sciences: A Note

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Joel C.

    2012-01-01

    The issues of premodern, modern, and postmodern can often confuse the social scientists because so much is drawn from modernism as the foundation of the social methodologies. Briefly, the author would like to differentiate the three modernism philosophies and indicate how a coalition of the three may apply to social sciences.

  11. Manifesto of computational social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, R.; Gilbert, N.; Bonelli, G.; Cioffi-Revilla, C.; Deffuant, G.; Kertesz, J.; Loreto, V.; Moat, S.; Nadal, J.-P.; Sanchez, A.; Nowak, A.; Flache, A.; San Miguel, M.; Helbing, D.

    2012-11-01

    The increasing integration of technology into our lives has created unprecedented volumes of data on society's everyday behaviour. Such data opens up exciting new opportunities to work towards a quantitative understanding of our complex social systems, within the realms of a new discipline known as Computational Social Science. Against a background of financial crises, riots and international epidemics, the urgent need for a greater comprehension of the complexity of our interconnected global society and an ability to apply such insights in policy decisions is clear. This manifesto outlines the objectives of this new scientific direction, considering the challenges involved in it, and the extensive impact on science, technology and society that the success of this endeavour is likely to bring about.

  12. Symbolic Interaction and Applied Social Research

    PubMed Central

    Kotarba, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    In symbolic interaction, a traditional yet unfortunate and unnecessary distinction has been made between basic and applied research. The argument has been made that basic research is intended to generate new knowledge, whereas applied research is intended to apply knowledge to the solution of practical (social and organizational) problems. I will argue that the distinction between basic and applied research in symbolic interaction is outdated and dysfunctional. The masters of symbolic interactionist thought have left us a proud legacy of shaping their scholarly thinking and inquiry in response to and in light of practical issues of the day (e.g., Znaniecki, and Blumer). Current interactionist work continues this tradition in topical areas such as social justice studies. Applied research, especially in term of evaluation and needs assessment studies, can be designed to serve both basic and applied goals. Symbolic interaction provides three great resources to do this. The first is its orientation to dynamic sensitizing concepts that direct research and ask questions instead of supplying a priori and often impractical answers. The second is its orientation to qualitative methods, and appreciation for the logic of grounded theory. The third is interactionism’s overall holistic approach to interfacing with the everyday life world. The primary illustrative case here is the qualitative component of the evaluation of an NIH-funded, translational medical research program. The qualitative component has provided interactionist-inspired insights into translational research, such as examining cultural change in medical research in terms of changes in the form and content of formal and informal discourse among scientists; delineating the impact of significant symbols such as "my lab" on the social organization of science; and appreciating the essence of the self-concept "scientist" on the increasingly bureaucratic and administrative identities of medical researchers. This component has also contributed to the basic social scientific literature on complex organizations and the self. PMID:25221375

  13. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 44, October 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauby, Anne, Comp.

    This document presents a selected bibliography of books, journal articles, and pamphlets relating to forestry. Entries are classified into five major categories including: Social science applied to forestry, social science applied to forestry's productive agents, social science applied to forest production, social science applied to manufacturing,…

  14. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 44, October 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauby, Anne, Comp.

    This document presents a selected bibliography of books, journal articles, and pamphlets relating to forestry. Entries are classified into five major categories including: Social science applied to forestry, social science applied to forestry's productive agents, social science applied to forest production, social science applied to manufacturing,…

  15. Social Science and Institutional Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Robert R.

    With the growth of the social sciences, there has been increasing interest in use of their products to shed light on, and solve, some of the pressing social problems of our society. This monograph, the first in a series of studies on social change, reports on an analysis of applications of social change theory and research to programs of…

  16. Implementing an Applied Science Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Presson, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The work implied in the NASA Applied Science Program requires a delicate balancing act for the those doing it. At the implementation level there are multiple tensions intrinsic to the program. For example each application of an existing product to a decision support process requires deep knowledge about the data and deep knowledge about the decision making process. It is highly probable no one person has this range of knowledge. Otherwise the decision making process would already be using the data. Therefore, a team is required. But building a team usually requires time, especially across agencies. Yet the program mandates efforts of relatively short duration. Further, those who know the data are scientists, which makes them essential to the program. But scientists are evaluated on their publication record. Anything which diverts a scientist from the research for his next publication is an anathema to him and potential death to their career. Trying to get another agency to use NASA data does not strike most scientists as material inherently suitable for publication. Also, NASA wishes to rapidly implement often substantial changes to another agency's process. For many reasons, such as budget and program constraints, speed is important. But the owner of a decision making process is tightly constrained, usually by law, regulation, organization and custom. Changes when made are slow, cautious, even hesitant, and always done according a process specific to the situation. To manage this work MSFC must balance these and other tensions. Some things we have relatively little control over, such as budget. These we try to handle by structural techniques. For example by insisting all of our people work on multiple projects simultaneously we inherently have diversification of funding for all of our people. In many cases we explicitly use some elements of tension to be productive. For example the need for the scientists to constantly publish is motivation to keep tasks short and to the immediate point. As another example, the DSS agency and it personnel are treated as integral to the effort at every step. Thus, their ways of doing things, their problems and their assets become part of the solution. MSFC also manages the Applied Science work' within a strategic framework.' First, the scientists are necessarily at the core of all of this work as well as all of the work within the larger' organization. We therefore strive to keep a roughly 50-50 balance between the work done on tasks funded directly by the research side of NASA's Science Mission Directorate and funding from the applied side. Done at both the organization level and the level of the individual, this keeps the scientist both happy and productive over the long term. We also try diligently to remove as much burden from the scientist as practical by employing people such as the authors and others to do tasks not requiring; scientific knowledge. We also have designed our effort to take full use of external partners. We actively seek and support, including fund, people from multiple organizations to join us as committed collaborators. In this we use today's money and today's problem to help us diversify and strengthen for tomorrow. MSFC also considers the Applied Science work holistically. Each element is viewed as a step in a larger process. At a management level we can chose to emphasize or encourage certain areas which service long term goals. Thus, if we think work in a particular area should be developed, we can start with the smaller, less costly elements and grow.

  17. Communicating science in social settings

    PubMed Central

    Scheufele, Dietram A.

    2013-01-01

    This essay examines the societal dynamics surrounding modern science. It first discusses a number of challenges facing any effort to communicate science in social environments: lay publics with varying levels of preparedness for fully understanding new scientific breakthroughs; the deterioration of traditional media infrastructures; and an increasingly complex set of emerging technologies that are surrounded by a host of ethical, legal, and social considerations. Based on this overview, I discuss four areas in which empirical social science helps clarify intuitive but sometimes faulty assumptions about the social-level mechanisms of science communication and outline an agenda for bench and social scientists—driven by current social-scientific research in the field of science communication—to guide more effective communication efforts at the societal level in the future. PMID:23940341

  18. Social Anthropology and Social Science History

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the 1970s, when the social science history movement emerged in the United States, leading to the founding of the Social Science History Association, a simultaneous movement arose in which historians looked to cultural anthropology for inspiration. Although both movements involved historians turning to social sciences for theory and method, they reflected very different views of the nature of the historical enterprise. Cultural anthropology, most notably as preached by Clifford Geertz, became a means by which historians could find a theoretical basis in the social sciences for rejecting a scientific paradigm. This article examines this development while also exploring the complex ways cultural anthropology has embraced—and shunned—history in recent years. PMID:26549914

  19. Social Security: Applying for Benefits

    MedlinePLUS

    ... work incentives can be found on the Social Security web site at: www.ssa.gov In addition, there ... your benefits. These are detailed on the Social Security web site at: www.ssa.gov If you are ...

  20. Whitehead and Social Science: The Use of Social Science Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klausner, Samuel Z.

    This paper attempts to reformulate some assumptions of contemporary social science so that its knowledge becomes directly applicable in social action. A schema is presented for the interpretation of social experience in which sociological, anthropological, and psychological knowledge and knowledge of the physical and biological world enter into a…

  1. The Soviet applied information sciences in a time of change

    SciTech Connect

    Bengston, J.; Cronin, R.R.; Davidson, R.B.

    1991-07-01

    The Foreign Applied Sciences Assessment Center (FASAC) conducts reviews of selected areas of foreign basic and applied science by US scientists who are technically expert and active in the fields reviewed. Several of the FASAC assessments of Soviet science have involved various aspects of the information sciences, including enabling technologies and applications, as well as the core information sciences. This report draws upon those FASAC assessment reports, the expert judgment of some of the authors of those reports, and other public sources to characterize the current state of the information sciences in the Soviet Union and the effects of information science capabilities upon other areas of Soviet science and technology. This report also provides estimates of the likely effect of the political and social reforms underway in the Soviet Union on future Soviet progress in the information sciences and, at a more general level, in science and technology. 41 refs., 7 tabs.

  2. Applied Social Discipline Research or Social Policy Research: The Emergence of a Professional Paradigm in Social Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van de Vall, Mark; Bolas, Cheryl

    This paper compares and contrasts two types of social research--policy-oriented research (practical and/or applied social discipline research) and academic social science research (theory-oriented experimental research). Data are based on 120 projects of social policy research conducted in The Netherlands in the areas of industrial and labor…

  3. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 43, June 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauby, Anne, Comp.

    This compilation represents a selected bibliography of the social sciences in forestry, including economic, historic, sociological, and business aspects. Five major categories are included: (1) social science applied to forestry at large; (2) social science applied to forestry's productive agents; (3) social science applied to forest production;…

  4. Science, Semantics, and Social Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemke, J. L.

    Social semiotics suggests that social and cultural formations, including the language and practice of science and the ways in which new generations and communities advance them, develop as an integral part of the evolution of social ecosystems. Some recent models of complex dynamic systems in physics, chemistry, and biology focus more on the…

  5. The Behavioral and Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Herbert A.

    1980-01-01

    This article reviews some recent technical progress in the social sciences and three frontier areas including evolutionary theory as related to sociobiology, the theory of human rational choice, and cognitive science. These areas offer explanations for broad areas of human behavior. (Author/SA)

  6. Putting the Social Sciences into Science Communication Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocking, S. Holly

    Although the social sciences have become legitimate sources of science news, many journalism instructors of science communication do not believe the social sciences warrant special or required attention in their courses. This is unfortunate, for the social sciences are important enough and different enough to require both their inclusion and…

  7. Ecological modeling for applied science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Forrest; Lobitz, Brad; Turner, Woody; Sheffner, Edwin; Haynes, John

    Ecological modeling is becoming an increasingly important tool for uniting biological observations with remote sensing and ground-based data networks to develop predictive tools for resource management and human health.The availability of over three petabytes of data from the NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) alone provides an unprecedented opportunity to develop Earth science applications for decision support. In combination with data networks such as the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Climate Data Center, the nonprofit NatureServe's network of biological inventories, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and many others, there is a vast wealth of Earth observation data on parameters as diverse as land cover, sea surface temperature, precipitation, species distribution, and disease occurrence.

  8. Science and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Kohl S.

    2008-01-01

    The author was born and raised in rural, northern Mississippi. He went to a local school, the North Pontotoc Attendance Center, from first grade on. The author was always interested in math and science, but, then, he was interested in most all subjects. The expected path that his friends and siblings had followed was clear: attend a junior college…

  9. Disintegrating Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrow, Charles

    1982-01-01

    Argues that social scientists convey the impression of rational behavior by means of self-serving research techniques. Concludes that their artificially constructed order masks the disorder of everyday existence and that they should have tolerance for human frailties. (Author/WD)

  10. Applying Social Psychological Concepts Outside the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Jessica L.; Wichman, Aaron L.

    2005-01-01

    This article evaluates a writing assignment in which social psychology students gathered examples from outside the classroom (e.g., cartoons, movies) and analyzed them with course material. Compared to a control group, students who completed the assignment learned that it was easier to apply social psychology to the real world. A follow-up survey…

  11. Applying Social Psychological Concepts Outside the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Jessica L.; Wichman, Aaron L.

    2005-01-01

    This article evaluates a writing assignment in which social psychology students gathered examples from outside the classroom (e.g., cartoons, movies) and analyzed them with course material. Compared to a control group, students who completed the assignment learned that it was easier to apply social psychology to the real world. A follow-up survey…

  12. NASA's Applied Sciences for Water Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doorn, Bradley; Toll, David; Engman, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The Earth Systems Division within NASA has the primary responsibility for the Earth Science Applied Science Program and the objective to accelerate the use of NASA science results in applications to help solve problems important to society and the economy. The primary goal of the Earth Science Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, assimilation of new observations, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. This paper discusses one of the major problems facing water resources managers, that of having timely and accurate data to drive their decision support tools. It then describes how NASA?s science and space based satellites may be used to overcome this problem. Opportunities for the water resources community to participate in NASA?s Water Resources Applications Program are described.

  13. University Rankings and Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real…

  14. History of the Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cravens, Hamilton

    1985-01-01

    Reviews the history of the social sciences in America, indicating that the field is still chiefly a collection of topics, albeit important ones such as mental hospitals, child development, and eugenics. Also indicates that although source materials are vast, synthetic overviews are needed in a number of areas. (JN)

  15. The Business of Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternlieb, George

    1977-01-01

    Asserts that the social science business is here to stay. The use of survey research, of invoking the learned as a form of symbolic action, of obfuscating the realities of limited budget and limited throughput and limited drive by "researching the problem," all provide a flywheel that shows every sign not merely of stability but of acceleration.…

  16. University Rankings and Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    University rankings widely affect the behaviours of prospective students and their families, university executive leaders, academic faculty, governments and investors in higher education. Yet the social science foundations of global rankings receive little scrutiny. Rankings that simply recycle reputation without any necessary connection to real…

  17. Social Sciences in Forestry - A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 58.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Judith L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Presented is a bibliography of publications related to the application of the social sciences to various aspects of forestry. The major categories under which documents are classified involve social science as it applies to: 1) forestry in general; 2) forestry's productive agents; 3) forest production; 4) manufacturing; and 5) marketing, trade,…

  18. Social Sciences in Forestry - A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 58.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Judith L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Presented is a bibliography of publications related to the application of the social sciences to various aspects of forestry. The major categories under which documents are classified involve social science as it applies to: 1) forestry in general; 2) forestry's productive agents; 3) forest production; 4) manufacturing; and 5) marketing, trade,…

  19. 77 FR 55863 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied... Subcommittee reports to the Earth Science Subcommittee Committee of the NASA Advisory Council. The Meeting will... --Earth Science Data Latency Study Preliminary Update --Capacity Building Assessment Report and...

  20. Teaching Social Topics in Science Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2000-01-01

    Many examples of social topics such as global warming can be integrated into any introductory science class easily. Presents suggestions for integrating science and social topics, particularly the issues of transportation and energy use. (ASK)

  1. Benford's Law Applies to Online Social Networks.

    PubMed

    Golbeck, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Benford's Law states that, in naturally occurring systems, the frequency of numbers' first digits is not evenly distributed. Numbers beginning with a 1 occur roughly 30% of the time, and are six times more common than numbers beginning with a 9. We show that Benford's Law applies to social and behavioral features of users in online social networks. Using social data from five major social networks (Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, Pinterest, and LiveJournal), we show that the distribution of first significant digits of friend and follower counts for users in these systems follow Benford's Law. The same is true for the number of posts users make. We extend this to egocentric networks, showing that friend counts among the people in an individual's social network also follows the expected distribution. We discuss how this can be used to detect suspicious or fraudulent activity online and to validate datasets. PMID:26308716

  2. Analyzing the Scientific Evolution of Social Work Using Science Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez, Ma Angeles; Cobo, Manuel Jesús; Herrera, Manuel; Herrera-Viedma, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This article reports the first science mapping analysis of the social work field, which shows its conceptual structure and scientific evolution. Methods: Science Mapping Analysis Software Tool, a bibliometric science mapping tool based on co-word analysis and h-index, is applied using a sample of 18,794 research articles published from…

  3. Analyzing the Scientific Evolution of Social Work Using Science Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez, Ma Angeles; Cobo, Manuel Jesús; Herrera, Manuel; Herrera-Viedma, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This article reports the first science mapping analysis of the social work field, which shows its conceptual structure and scientific evolution. Methods: Science Mapping Analysis Software Tool, a bibliometric science mapping tool based on co-word analysis and h-index, is applied using a sample of 18,794 research articles published from…

  4. Social Science Docket, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Alan, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    A joint publication of the New York and New Jersey State Councils for the Social Studies, "Social Science Docket" presents K-12 teachers with resources covering the social science disciplines, including history, economics, political science, sociology, geography, anthropology, and psychology. Each issue includes theme-related and non-themed…

  5. A Framework for Social Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert; And Others

    This behavioral science-based framework for a social studies curriculum stresses an interdisciplinary inquiry approach to the scientific study of human behavior. It is based on a model developed by the Michigan Social Science Education Project and published by Science Research Associates. The concepts of social psychology are used to integrate the…

  6. Social Science Evidence in Court Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, William E.

    1977-01-01

    Can social science data be used in judicial decision-making? Suggests that social science data is less important in judicial decision-making in the field of constitutional law than most persons think and considers the more controversial issue of whether courts should be considering cases which might require or produce social science evidence.…

  7. Social sciences and social problems: The next century

    SciTech Connect

    Smelser, N.J.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents his views in three areas: (1) Looking toward the next century, with an eye to identifying the lines of social change and the ranges of social problems we can expect. (2) Sketching an inherited and persistent view of the application of social-science to social problems. (3) Revision of views in light of understanding social problems and how social-science knowledge bears on them. 7 refs.

  8. Social Sciences and Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between technology and society is a subject of continuing interest, because technological change and its effects confront and challenge society. College students are especially interested in technological change, knowing that they must cope with the pervasive and escalating effect of wide-ranging technological change. The space shuttle represents a technological change. The book's role is to serve as a resource for college faculty and students who are or will be interested in the social science implications of space technology. The book is designed to provide introductory material on a variety of space social topics to help faculty and students pursue teaching, learning, and research. Space technologies, perspectives on individual disciplines (economics, history, international law, philosophy, political science, psychology, and sociology) and interdiscipline approaches are presented.

  9. The ICPSR and Social Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendell G.

    2008-01-01

    The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), a unit within the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, is the world's largest social science data archive. The data sets in the ICPRS database give the social sciences librarian/subject specialist an opportunity of providing value-added bibliographic…

  10. The ICPSR and Social Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendell G.

    2008-01-01

    The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), a unit within the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, is the world's largest social science data archive. The data sets in the ICPRS database give the social sciences librarian/subject specialist an opportunity of providing value-added bibliographic…

  11. Science, Society, and Social Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, K. S.; Lohwater, T.

    2009-12-01

    The increased use of social networking is changing the way that scientific societies interact with their members and others. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) uses a variety of online networks to engage its members and the broader scientific community. AAAS members and non-members can interact with AAAS staff and each other on AAAS sites on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter, as well as blogs and forums on the AAAS website (www.aaas.org). These tools allow scientists to more readily become engaged in policy by providing information on current science policy topics as well as methods of involvement. For example, members and the public can comment on policy-relevant stories from Science magazine’s ScienceInsider blog, download a weekly policy podcast, receive a weekly email update of policy issues affecting the scientific community, or watch a congressional hearing from their computer. AAAS resource websites and outreach programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/) and Science Careers (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org) also provide tools for scientists to become more personally engaged in communicating their findings and involved in the policy process.

  12. Applied Developmental Science: An Advanced Textbook. The SAGE Program on Applied Developmental Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Richard M., Ed.; Jacobs, Fraincine, Ed.; Wertlieb, Donald, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This course textbook has been adapted from the four-volume "Handbook of Applied Developmental Science" (SAGE 2003), a work that offers a detailed roadmap for action and research in ensuring positive child, youth, and family development. In 20 chapters, "Applied Developmental Science: An Advanced Textbook" brings together theory and application…

  13. Applied Developmental Science: An Advanced Textbook. The SAGE Program on Applied Developmental Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Richard M., Ed.; Jacobs, Fraincine, Ed.; Wertlieb, Donald, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This course textbook has been adapted from the four-volume "Handbook of Applied Developmental Science" (SAGE 2003), a work that offers a detailed roadmap for action and research in ensuring positive child, youth, and family development. In 20 chapters, "Applied Developmental Science: An Advanced Textbook" brings together theory and application…

  14. Populations, Natural Selection, and Applied Organizational Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvey, Bill; Aldrich, Howard

    1983-01-01

    Deficiencies in existing models in organizational science may be remedied by applying the population approach, with its concepts of taxonomy, classification, evolution, and population ecology; and natural selection theory, with its principles of variation, natural selection, heredity, and struggle for existence, to the idea of organizational forms…

  15. The Behavioral and Social Sciences Survey: Mathematical Sciences and Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruskal, William, Ed.

    This book, one of a series prepared in connection with the Behavioral and Social Sciences Survey (BASS) conducted between 1967 and 1969, deals with problems of statistics, mathematics, and computation as they related to the social sciences. Chapter 1 shows how these subjects help in their own ways for studying learning behavior with irregular…

  16. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 48, February 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauby, Anne, Ed.

    Compiled is a selected bibliography of social sciences in forestry, including economic, historic, sociological, and business aspects. Five major inclusive categories are the following: social science applied to forestry at large, applied to forestry's productive agents, applied to forest production, applied to manufacturing, and applied to…

  17. Social Sciences in Forestry, a Current Selected Bibliography, No. 38, October 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Amy, Comp.

    Compiled is a selected bibliography of social sciences in forestry, including economic, historic, sociological, and business aspects. Five major inclusive categories are the following: social science applied to forestry at large, applied to forestry's productive agents, applied to forest production, applied to manufacturing, and applied to…

  18. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 46, June 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauby, Anne, Ed.

    This document is a selected bibliography of social sciences in forestry. It includes five major categories: (1) social science applied to forestry at large; (2) applied to forestry's production agents; (3) applied to forest production; (4) applied to manufacturing; and (5) applied to marketing, trade and demand for forest output. The booklet has a…

  19. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 41, October 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts, Cindy, Comp.

    Compiled is a selected bibliography of social sciences in forestry, including economic, historic, sociological, and business aspects. Five major inclusive categories are the following: social science applied to forestry at large, applied to forestry's productive agents, applied to forest production, applied to manufacturing, and applied to…

  20. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 42, February 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Joan, Comp.

    Compiled is a selected bibliography of social sciences in forestry, including economic, historic, sociological, and business aspects. Five major inclusive categories are the following: social science applied to forestry at large, applied to forestry's productive agents, applied to forest production, applied to manufacturing, and applied to…

  1. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 40, June 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Amy, Comp.

    Compiled is a selected bibliography of social sciences in forestry, including economic, historic, sociological, and business aspects. Five major inclusive categories are the following: social science applied to forestry at large, applied to forestry's productive agents, applied to forest production, applied to manufacturing, and applied to…

  2. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 48, February 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauby, Anne, Ed.

    Compiled is a selected bibliography of social sciences in forestry, including economic, historic, sociological, and business aspects. Five major inclusive categories are the following: social science applied to forestry at large, applied to forestry's productive agents, applied to forest production, applied to manufacturing, and applied to…

  3. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 46, June 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauby, Anne, Ed.

    This document is a selected bibliography of social sciences in forestry. It includes five major categories: (1) social science applied to forestry at large; (2) applied to forestry's production agents; (3) applied to forest production; (4) applied to manufacturing; and (5) applied to marketing, trade and demand for forest output. The booklet has a…

  4. Mechanistic models in computational social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Liljeros, Fredrik

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative social science is not only about regression analysis or, in general, data inference. Computer simulations of social mechanisms have an over 60 years long history. They have been used for many different purposes—to test scenarios, to test the consistency of descriptive theories (proof-of-concept models), to explore emergent phenomena, for forecasting, etc. In this essay, we sketch these historical developments, the role of mechanistic models in the social sciences and the influences from the natural and formal sciences. We argue that mechanistic computational models form a natural common ground for social and natural sciences, and look forward to possible future information flow across the social-natural divide.

  5. Social Science Collaboration with Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Elizabeth; Renauld, Mia; Edelstein, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Social science research has been central in documenting and analyzing community discovery of environmental exposure and consequential processes. Collaboration with environmental health science through team projects has advanced and improved our understanding of environmental health and justice. Objective We sought to identify diverse methods and topics in which social scientists have expanded environmental health understandings at multiple levels, to examine how transdisciplinary environmental health research fosters better science, and to learn how these partnerships have been able to flourish because of the support from National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). Methods We analyzed various types of social science research to investigate how social science contributes to environmental health. We also examined NIEHS programs that foster social science. In addition, we developed a case study of a community-based participation research project in Akwesasne in order to demonstrate how social science has enhanced environmental health science. Results Social science has informed environmental health science through ethnographic studies of contaminated communities, analysis of spatial distribution of environmental injustice, psychological experience of contamination, social construction of risk and risk perception, and social impacts of disasters. Social science–environmental health team science has altered the way scientists traditionally explore exposure by pressing for cumulative exposure approaches and providing research data for policy applications. Conclusions A transdisciplinary approach for environmental health practice has emerged that engages the social sciences to paint a full picture of the consequences of contamination so that policy makers, regulators, public health officials, and other stakeholders can better ameliorate impacts and prevent future exposure. Citation Hoover E, Renauld M, Edelstein MR, Brown P. 2015. Social science collaboration with environmental health. Environ Health Perspect 123:1100–1106; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409283 PMID:25966491

  6. Science in History, Volume 4: The Social Sciences, Conclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernal, J. D.

    This volume, the last of four, includes parts seven and eight of the eight parts in the series. Part Seven deals with the sciences of society which are described as the latest and most imperfect of the sciences. It is doubtful if, in their present form, they can be called sciences at all. The historical development of the social sciences is traced…

  7. Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch : Integrating Social, Behavioral, Economic and Biological Sciences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2010-01-01

    The Fort Collins Science Center's Policy Analysis and Science Assistance (PASA) Branch is a team of approximately 22 scientists, technicians, and graduate student researchers. PASA provides unique capabilities in the U.S. Geological Survey by leading projects that integrate social, behavioral, economic, and biological analyses in the context of human-natural resource interactions. Resource planners, managers, and policymakers in the U.S. Departments of the Interior (DOI) and Agriculture (USDA), State and local agencies, as well as international agencies use information from PASA studies to make informed natural resource management and policy decisions. PASA scientists' primary functions are to conduct both theoretical and applied social science research, provide technical assistance, and offer training to advance performance in policy relevant research areas. Management and research issues associated with human-resource interactions typically occur in a unique context, involve difficult to access populations, require knowledge of both natural/biological science in addition to social science, and require the skill to integrate multiple science disciplines. In response to these difficult contexts, PASA researchers apply traditional and state-of-the-art social science methods drawing from the fields of sociology, demography, economics, political science, communications, social-psychology, and applied industrial organization psychology. Social science methods work in concert with our rangeland/agricultural management, wildlife, ecology, and biology capabilities. The goal of PASA's research is to enhance natural resource management, agency functions, policies, and decision-making. Our research is organized into four broad areas of study.

  8. Preparing Community College Teachers of Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Raymond C.

    1972-01-01

    An interdisciplinary doctoral degree program to prepare community college social science teachers is described. The program includes academic course work, summer practicums, internship, and comprehensive examinations. (RN)

  9. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 49, June 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauby, Anne, Ed.

    Compiled is a selected bibliography of social sciences in forestry, including economic, historic, sociological, and business aspects. Five major inclusive categories are the following: (1) social science applied to forestry at large; (2) applied to forestry's productive agents; (3) applied to forest production; (4) applied to manufacturing; and…

  10. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 49, June 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauby, Anne, Ed.

    Compiled is a selected bibliography of social sciences in forestry, including economic, historic, sociological, and business aspects. Five major inclusive categories are the following: (1) social science applied to forestry at large; (2) applied to forestry's productive agents; (3) applied to forest production; (4) applied to manufacturing; and…

  11. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 45, February 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauby, Anne, Ed.

    This document presents a selected bibliography of social sciences in forestry, including economic, historical, sociological, and business aspects. Bibliographies are arranged in five categories: (1) social sciences applied to forestry at large; (2) applied to forest production; (3) applied to forest products; (4) applied to manufacturing; and (5)…

  12. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 55, June 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Judith L., Ed.

    Documents which address the interface between forestry and the social sciences comprise this annotated bibliography. The publications described are grouped under five headings: (1) social science applied to forestry at large; (2) applied to forestry's productive agents; (3) applied to forest production; (4) applied to manufacturing; and (5)…

  13. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 45, February 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauby, Anne, Ed.

    This document presents a selected bibliography of social sciences in forestry, including economic, historical, sociological, and business aspects. Bibliographies are arranged in five categories: (1) social sciences applied to forestry at large; (2) applied to forest production; (3) applied to forest products; (4) applied to manufacturing; and (5)…

  14. International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemle, Ludovic Dan; Jiang, Yiwen

    2014-03-01

    The International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2013) took place in Wuhan, P R China from 26-27 October 2013 at the Military Economics Academy. The conference is regularly organized, alternately in Romania and in P R China, by ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara, Romania, and Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, P R China, with the aim to serve as a platform for the exchange of information between various areas of applied sciences, and to promote the communication between the scientists of different nations, countries and continents. The conference has been organized for the first time in 15-16 June 2012 at the Engineering Faculty of Hunedoara, Romania. The topics of the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues: Economical sciences Engineering sciences Fundamental sciences Medical sciences The conference gathered qualified researchers whose expertise can be used to develop new engineering knowledge that has applicability potential in economics, defense, medicine, etc. The number of registered participants was nearly 90 from 5 countries. During the two days of the conference 4 invited and 36 oral talks were delivered. A few of the speakers deserve a special mention: Mircea Octavian Popoviciu, Academy of Romanian Scientist — Timişoara Branch, Correlations between mechanical properties and cavitation erosion resistance for stainless steels with 12% chromium and variable contents of nickel; Carmen Eleonora Hărău, ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara, SWOT analysis of Romania's integration in EU; Ding Hui, Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, Design and engineering analysis of material procurement mobile operation platform; Serban Rosu, University of Medicine and Pharmacy ''Victor Babeş'' Timişoara, Cervical and facial infections — a real life threat, among others. Based on the work presented at the conference, 14 selected papers are included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. These papers present new researches in the various fields of materials engineering, mechanical engineering, computers engineering, mathematical engineering and clinical engineering. It's our great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering to the scientific community to promote further researches in these areas. We sincerely hope that the papers published in this volume will contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the respective fields. All papers published in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) have been peer reviewed through processes administered by the editors of the ICAS2013 proceedings, Ludovic Dan Lemle and Yiwen Jiang. Special thanks should be directed to the organizing committee for their tremendous efforts in organizing the conference: General Chair Zhou Laixin, Military Economics Academy of Wuhan Co-chairs Du Qifa, Military Economics Academy of Wuhan Serban Viorel-Aurel, ''Politehnica'' University of Timişoara Fen Youmei, Wuhan University Lin Pinghua, Huazhong University of Science and Technology Members Lin Darong, Military Economics Academy of Wuhan Guo Zhonghou, Military Economics Academy of Wuhan Sun Honghong, Military Economics Academy of Wuhan Liu Dong, Military Economics Academy of Wuhan We thank the authors for their contributions and we would also like to express our gratitude everyone who contributed to this conference, especially for the generous support of the sponsor: micromega S C Micro-Mega HD S A Ludovic Dan Lemle and Yiwen Jiang Coordinators of the Scientific Committee of ICAS2013 Deatails of organizers and members of the scientific commmittee are available in the PDF

  15. Archaeology as a social science.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael E; Feinman, Gary M; Drennan, Robert D; Earle, Timothy; Morris, Ian

    2012-05-15

    Because of advances in methods and theory, archaeology now addresses issues central to debates in the social sciences in a far more sophisticated manner than ever before. Coupled with methodological innovations, multiscalar archaeological studies around the world have produced a wealth of new data that provide a unique perspective on long-term changes in human societies, as they document variation in human behavior and institutions before the modern era. We illustrate these points with three examples: changes in human settlements, the roles of markets and states in deep history, and changes in standards of living. Alternative pathways toward complexity suggest how common processes may operate under contrasting ecologies, populations, and economic integration. PMID:22547811

  16. Archaeology as a social science

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael E.; Feinman, Gary M.; Drennan, Robert D.; Earle, Timothy; Morris, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Because of advances in methods and theory, archaeology now addresses issues central to debates in the social sciences in a far more sophisticated manner than ever before. Coupled with methodological innovations, multiscalar archaeological studies around the world have produced a wealth of new data that provide a unique perspective on long-term changes in human societies, as they document variation in human behavior and institutions before the modern era. We illustrate these points with three examples: changes in human settlements, the roles of markets and states in deep history, and changes in standards of living. Alternative pathways toward complexity suggest how common processes may operate under contrasting ecologies, populations, and economic integration. PMID:22547811

  17. 75 FR 60484 - NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied Sciences Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council; Science Committee; Earth Science Subcommittee; Applied... Advisory Group. This Subcommittee reports to the Earth Science Subcommittee Committee of the NASA Advisory.... --Report from Earth Science Subcommittee Meeting. It is imperative that the meeting be held on these...

  18. From global change science to action with social sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, C. P.; Mooney, Sian; Allen, D.; Beller-Simms, Nancy; Fish, T.; Grambsch, A.; Hohenstein, W.; Jacobs, Kathy; Kenney, Melissa A.; Lane, Meredith A.; Langner, L.; Larson, E.; McGinnis, D. L.; Moss, Richard H.; Nichols, L. G.; Nierenberg, Claudia; Seyller, E. A.; Stern, Paul; Winthrop, R.

    2014-08-01

    US efforts to integrate social and biophysical sciences to address the issue of global change exist within a wider movement to understand global change as a societal challenge and to inform policy. Insights from the social sciences can help transform global change research into action.

  19. Social Science Review: Consultants' Report and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Lester; And Others

    A group of consultants conducted a program review to evaluate the quality of social science programs in the state university system of Florida and made recommendations for improvements within the existing resource base and about program needs should new resources become available. An overview of social sciences in the system is followed by…

  20. The Multinational Version of Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gareau, Frederick H.

    1983-01-01

    The multinational social science approach is juxtaposed against the international Western approach. Multinational social science emphasizes indigenization and the exploitation of the periphery by the center in economic relations. Its cornerstone is dependency theory, which stresses the global structure of power as the cause of underdevelopment in…

  1. Social Science Research Serving Rural America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miron, Mary, Ed.

    This collection of articles provides an overview of some of the recent social science research projects performed by state agricultural experiment stations. The examples highlight social science's contribution to problem-solving in rural business, industry, farming, communities, government, education, and families. The following programs are…

  2. Social Sciences and the Unity of Truth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franck, Matthew J.

    2002-01-01

    Criticisms of the various social sciences from within their ranks are not a new thing, but recent years have seen such criticisms reach a pitch that make them hard to ignore. What they seem to have in common is the charge that this or that social science has become an enterprise that serious people have trouble taking seriously, because the most…

  3. Teaching Science with the Social Studies of Science for Equity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederman, Muriel

    Integrating the social studies of science into science education would make explicit the cultures of science, which have been revealed by historians, philosophers, sociologists, and feminist science scholars. These cultures include the institutions of science, the interaction of science and the society in which it is practiced, and the internal culture of science. This pedagogy may be a route to increasing equity in science, by giving women and members of other under-represented groups an appreciation of the factors causing their alienation from the enterprise and the tools to change science for social justice. In this article, I present the theoretical basis of this position, along with the implementation strategies and preliminary assessment for a sophomore level biology course based on this perspective.

  4. A guide to understanding social science research for natural scientists.

    PubMed

    Moon, Katie; Blackman, Deborah

    2014-10-01

    Natural scientists are increasingly interested in social research because they recognize that conservation problems are commonly social problems. Interpreting social research, however, requires at least a basic understanding of the philosophical principles and theoretical assumptions of the discipline, which are embedded in the design of social research. Natural scientists who engage in social science but are unfamiliar with these principles and assumptions can misinterpret their results. We developed a guide to assist natural scientists in understanding the philosophical basis of social science to support the meaningful interpretation of social research outcomes. The 3 fundamental elements of research are ontology, what exists in the human world that researchers can acquire knowledge about; epistemology, how knowledge is created; and philosophical perspective, the philosophical orientation of the researcher that guides her or his action. Many elements of the guide also apply to the natural sciences. Natural scientists can use the guide to assist them in interpreting social science research to determine how the ontological position of the researcher can influence the nature of the research; how the epistemological position can be used to support the legitimacy of different types of knowledge; and how philosophical perspective can shape the researcher's choice of methods and affect interpretation, communication, and application of results. The use of this guide can also support and promote the effective integration of the natural and social sciences to generate more insightful and relevant conservation research outcomes. PMID:24962114

  5. Science In a Social CONtext: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addinell, Sue, Comp.; Solomon, Joan, Comp.

    Science In a Social CONtext is a series of eight books based on the project SISCON-in-Schools. The books provide a new course in science and society for general studies at sixth-form level. The course has been specially designed to make scientific problems accessible to the non-scientist, as well as to explain the social aspects of science to the…

  6. Science In a Social CONtext: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addinell, Sue, Comp.; Solomon, Joan, Comp.

    Science In a Social CONtext is a series of eight books based on the project SISCON-in-Schools. The books provide a new course in science and society for general studies at sixth-form level. The course has been specially designed to make scientific problems accessible to the non-scientist, as well as to explain the social aspects of science to the…

  7. Social and Economic Analysis Branch: integrating policy, social, economic, and natural science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Rudy; Walters, Katie D.

    2015-01-01

    The Fort Collins Science Center's Social and Economic Analysis Branch provides unique capabilities in the U.S. Geological Survey by leading projects that integrate social, behavioral, economic, and natural science in the context of human–natural resource interactions. Our research provides scientific understanding and support for the management and conservation of our natural resources in support of multiple agency missions. We focus on meeting the scientific needs of the Department of the Interior natural resource management bureaus in addition to fostering partnerships with other Federal and State managers to protect, restore, and enhance our environment. The Social and Economic Analysis Branch has an interdisciplinary group of scientists whose primary functions are to conduct both theoretical and applied social science research, provide technical assistance, and offer training to support the development of skills in natural resource management activities. Management and research issues associated with human-resource interactions typically occur in a unique context and require knowledge of both natural and social sciences, along with the skill to integrate multiple science disciplines. In response to these challenging contexts, Social and Economic Analysis Branch researchers apply a wide variety of social science concepts and methods which complement our rangeland/agricultural, wildlife, ecology, and biology capabilities. The goal of the Social and Economic Analysis Branch's research is to enhance natural-resource management, agency functions, policies, and decisionmaking.

  8. Strategic research in the social sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Bainbridge, W.S.

    1995-12-31

    The federal government has identified a number of multi-agency funding initiatives for science in strategic areas, such as the initiatives on global environmental change and high performance computing, that give some role to the social sciences. Seven strategic areas for social science research are given with potential for federal funding: (1) Democratization. (2) Human Capital. (3) Administrative Science. (4) Cognitive Science. (5) High Performance Computing and Digital Libraries. (6) Human Dimensions of Environmental Change. and (7) Human Genetic Diversity. The first two are addressed in detail and the remainder as a group. 10 refs.

  9. FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C.

    1991-11-01

    The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

  10. Community centrality and social science research.

    PubMed

    Allman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Community centrality is a growing requirement of social science. The field's research practices are increasingly expected to conform to prescribed relationships with the people studied. Expectations about community centrality influence scholarly activities. These expectations can pressure social scientists to adhere to models of community involvement that are immediate and that include community-based co-investigators, advisory boards, and liaisons. In this context, disregarding community centrality can be interpreted as failure. This paper considers evolving norms about the centrality of community in social science. It problematises community inclusion and discusses concerns about the impact of community centrality on incremental theory development, academic integrity, freedom of speech, and the value of liberal versus communitarian knowledge. Through the application of a constructivist approach, this paper argues that social science in which community is omitted or on the periphery is not failed science, because not all social science requires a community base to make a genuine and valuable contribution. The utility of community centrality is not necessarily universal across all social science pursuits. The practices of knowing within social science disciplines may be difficult to transfer to a community. These practices of knowing require degrees of specialisation and interest that not all communities may want or have. PMID:26440071

  11. Community centrality and social science research

    PubMed Central

    Allman, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Community centrality is a growing requirement of social science. The field's research practices are increasingly expected to conform to prescribed relationships with the people studied. Expectations about community centrality influence scholarly activities. These expectations can pressure social scientists to adhere to models of community involvement that are immediate and that include community-based co-investigators, advisory boards, and liaisons. In this context, disregarding community centrality can be interpreted as failure. This paper considers evolving norms about the centrality of community in social science. It problematises community inclusion and discusses concerns about the impact of community centrality on incremental theory development, academic integrity, freedom of speech, and the value of liberal versus communitarian knowledge. Through the application of a constructivist approach, this paper argues that social science in which community is omitted or on the periphery is not failed science, because not all social science requires a community base to make a genuine and valuable contribution. The utility of community centrality is not necessarily universal across all social science pursuits. The practices of knowing within social science disciplines may be difficult to transfer to a community. These practices of knowing require degrees of specialisation and interest that not all communities may want or have. PMID:26440071

  12. Applied Behavior Analysis is a Science and, Therefore, Progressive.

    PubMed

    Leaf, Justin B; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Ala'i-Rosales, Shahla; Ross, Robert K; Smith, Tristram; Weiss, Mary Jane

    2016-02-01

    Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is a science and, therefore, involves progressive approaches and outcomes. In this commentary we argue that the spirit and the method of science should be maintained in order to avoid reductionist procedures, stifled innovation, and rote, unresponsive protocols that become increasingly removed from meaningful progress for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We describe this approach as progressive. In a progressive approach to ABA, the therapist employs a structured yet flexible process, which is contingent upon and responsive to child progress. We will describe progressive ABA, contrast it to reductionist ABA, and provide rationales for both the substance and intent of ABA as a progressive scientific method for improving conditions of social relevance for individuals with ASD. PMID:26373767

  13. The Ethical Challenges of Socially Responsible Science

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.; Elliott, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Social responsibility is an essential part of the responsible conduct of research that presents difficult ethical questions for scientists. Recognizing one’s social responsibilities as a scientist is an important first step toward exercising social responsibility, but it is only the beginning, since scientists may confront difficult value questions when deciding how to act responsibly. Ethical dilemmas related to socially responsible science fall into at least three basic categories: 1) dilemmas related to problem selection, 2) dilemmas related to publication and data sharing, and 3) dilemmas related to engaging society. In responding to these dilemmas, scientists must decide how to balance their social responsibilities against other professional commitments and how to avoid compromising their objectivity. In this article, we will examine the philosophical and ethical basis of social responsibility in science, discuss some of the ethical dilemmas related to exercising social responsibility, and make five recommendations to help scientists deal with these issues. PMID:26193168

  14. The Ethical Challenges of Socially Responsible Science.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Elliott, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Social responsibility is an essential part of the responsible conduct of research that presents difficult ethical questions for scientists. Recognizing one's social responsibilities as a scientist is an important first step toward exercising social responsibility, but it is only the beginning, since scientists may confront difficult value questions when deciding how to act responsibly. Ethical dilemmas related to socially responsible science fall into at least three basic categories: 1) dilemmas related to problem selection, 2) dilemmas related to publication and data sharing, and 3) dilemmas related to engaging society. In responding to these dilemmas, scientists must decide how to balance their social responsibilities against other professional commitments and how to avoid compromising their objectivity. In this article, we will examine the philosophical and ethical basis of social responsibility in science, discuss some of the ethical dilemmas related to exercising social responsibility, and make five recommendations to help scientists deal with these issues. PMID:26193168

  15. New Books for the Social Science Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Michael L.

    1976-01-01

    The article reviews new elementary and secondary classroom materials in social studies. Topics treated by the instructional materials include values, China, legal education, the bicentennial celebration, black women, and science fiction. (Author/RM)

  16. Science Education in Two-Year Colleges: Interdisciplinary Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckwith, Miriam M.

    Anthropology and interdisciplinary social sciences (ISS) education at two-year colleges are examined as revealed in a study of science education conducted by the Center for the Study of Community Colleges that involved a review of the literature, an examination of the catalogs and class schedules from 175 institutions, and a survey of 1,125…

  17. Social Workers' Applied Communication Skills: A Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaksa, James A.; Flynn, John P.

    A study sought to determine the extent to which social workers were called upon to engage in applied communication tasks and to determine various perceptions that social workers held of their responsibilities in the area of applied communication. The 500 respondents selected from a list of Michigan-licensed certified social workers filled out…

  18. Social science in a water observing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braden, John B.; Brown, Daniel G.; Dozier, Jeff; Gober, Patricia; Hughes, Sara M.; Maidment, David R.; Schneider, Sandra L.; Schultz, P. Wesley; Shortle, James S.; Swallow, Stephen K.; Werner, Carol M.

    2009-11-01

    We set forth an argument for the integration of social science research with natural science and engineering research in major research infrastructure investments addressing water science. A program of integrated observation of water resources offers great opportunities to address several environmental "grand challenges" identified by the National Research Council, including climate variability, institutions and resource use, and land use dynamics, and their importance for hydrologic forecasting. We argue that such a program has the potential to advance both water science and the contributing disciplines. However, to realize this potential, it is essential to recognize that social science requires critical infrastructure funding on the scale of advanced research facilities in the natural sciences and engineering.

  19. Research Component - Social Sciences and Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Michael J.

    Both the social studies and humanities have imitated the sciences in 2 respects: in methodology, i.e., a passion for counting, documentation, exactitude, analysis, and critical exchanges that often border on the petulant; and in degree of specialization to the extent that the humanities are even more specialized than the sciences. This…

  20. Ethics and Social Responsibility in Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazer, M. J., Ed.; Kornhauser, A., Ed.

    Questions of ethics and social responsibility are considered by many to be important issues in science education. Teachers are being exposed to the difficult task of dealing with global problems and values. This book contains papers which deal with this apparent dilemma, raising questions about the responsibilities of science educators in the…

  1. Arctic Social Sciences: Opportunities in Arctic Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arctic Research Consortium of the United States, Fairbanks, AK.

    The U.S. Congress passed the Arctic Research and Policy Act in 1984 and designated the National Science Foundation (NSF) the lead agency in implementing arctic research policy. In 1989, the parameters of arctic social science research were outlined, emphasizing three themes: human-environment interactions, community viability, and rapid social…

  2. Network analysis in the social sciences.

    PubMed

    Borgatti, Stephen P; Mehra, Ajay; Brass, Daniel J; Labianca, Giuseppe

    2009-02-13

    Over the past decade, there has been an explosion of interest in network research across the physical and social sciences. For social scientists, the theory of networks has been a gold mine, yielding explanations for social phenomena in a wide variety of disciplines from psychology to economics. Here, we review the kinds of things that social scientists have tried to explain using social network analysis and provide a nutshell description of the basic assumptions, goals, and explanatory mechanisms prevalent in the field. We hope to contribute to a dialogue among researchers from across the physical and social sciences who share a common interest in understanding the antecedents and consequences of network phenomena. PMID:19213908

  3. The Master's in Social Sciences and Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boddy, Francis M.

    Three general levels of degrees can be categorized in some general sense: the bachelor's program emphasizes the simple ideas about social systems in the social sciences and the basic ideas about the development of value systems and the appreciation of values in the humanities; master's degrees, at least in the major institutions, are often…

  4. Old Fears Haunt New Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, David

    2008-01-01

    In September 1965, not long after news broke about a Pentagon-sponsored program to study social conflict in South America, the Social Science Research Council played host to a meeting on overseas research. Feelings were raw. Opposition to the Vietnam War was mounting, and many scholars worried that the Pentagon's studies of conflict and…

  5. A Resource Guide on Social Science Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Merced

    The resource guide lists and describes over 100 professional and vocational occupations available to migrant youth in the area of the social sciences. Occupations are organized in eight major categories: social or public service, including protective services; government service; transportation; public utilities; education; communication;…

  6. Social Science Disciplines. Fundamental for Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLendon, Johathan C., Ed.

    This guide is written for the social studies curriculum developer interested in developing a structured multidisciplinary program based on the concepts, methodology, and structure of social science disciplines and history. Seven 15-29 page chapters are included on each discipline: Anthropology and Psychology, by Charles R. Berryman; Economics, by…

  7. Network Analysis in Comparative Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vera, Eugenia Roldan; Schupp, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    This essay describes the pertinence of Social Network Analysis (SNA) for the social sciences in general, and discusses its methodological and conceptual implications for comparative research in particular. The authors first present a basic summary of the theoretical and methodological assumptions of SNA, followed by a succinct overview of its…

  8. What Future for Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrag, Francis

    2004-01-01

    Each of the authors discussed in this review essay deplores the attempts of scholars in the human sciences to ape their colleagues in the natural sciences and economics. Their criticisms are not dissimilar, nor are they without merit, but it is important to ask the following questions: What would they offer in its place? What kind of…

  9. What Future for Social Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrag, Francis

    2004-01-01

    Each of the authors discussed in this review essay deplores the attempts of scholars in the human sciences to ape their colleagues in the natural sciences and economics. Their criticisms are not dissimilar, nor are they without merit, but it is important to ask the following questions: What would they offer in its place? What kind of…

  10. Citizenship and Social Justice in Urban Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emdin, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This article describes, and then applies a newly developed framework for classroom citizenship as an entry point into addressing social justice issues in urban science classrooms. The author provides in-depth descriptions of cogenerative dialogues, coteaching, and cosmopolitanism (3Cs), and presents this triad of tools as an approach to…

  11. Kinetic exchange models: From molecular physics to social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarca, Marco; Chakraborti, Anirban

    2013-08-01

    We discuss several multi-agent models that have their origin in the kinetic exchange theory of statistical mechanics and have been recently applied to a variety of problems in the social sciences. This class of models can be easily adapted for simulations in areas other than physics, such as the modeling of income and wealth distributions in economics and opinion dynamics in sociology.

  12. Citizenship and Social Justice in Urban Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emdin, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This article describes, and then applies a newly developed framework for classroom citizenship as an entry point into addressing social justice issues in urban science classrooms. The author provides in-depth descriptions of cogenerative dialogues, coteaching, and cosmopolitanism (3Cs), and presents this triad of tools as an approach to…

  13. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 50, October 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Judith L., Ed.

    This collection of annotated entries is designed to direct interested readers to literature sources dealing with the role of the social sciences in the field of forestry. The collection is organized by sections dealing with the topic from general to specific. Sections include: Social Science Applied to Forestry at Large; Applied to Forestry's…

  14. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 50, October 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Judith L., Ed.

    This collection of annotated entries is designed to direct interested readers to literature sources dealing with the role of the social sciences in the field of forestry. The collection is organized by sections dealing with the topic from general to specific. Sections include: Social Science Applied to Forestry at Large; Applied to Forestry's…

  15. Science, Skepticism, and Applied Behavior Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Normand, Matthew P

    2008-01-01

    Pseudoscientific claims concerning medical and psychological treatments of all varieties are commonplace. As behavior analysts, a sound skeptical approach to our science and practice is essential. The present paper offers an overview of science and skepticism and discusses the relationship of skepticism to behavior analysis, with an emphasis on the types of issues concerning behavior analysts in practice. PMID:22477687

  16. [Research activities in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period April 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995.

  17. Research in Applied Mathematics, Fluid Mechanics and Computer Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1998 through March 31, 1999.

  18. Contributions of Social Science to Innovation and Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tornatzky, Louis G.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Discusses social science as an aid to decision making, as a source of social technology, and as a tool for understanding innovation and productivity. Identifies factors that limit the utilization of social science in innovation and productivity research. (GC)

  19. Disaster Preparedness and Response: Applied Exposure Science

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2007, the ISEA, predecessor to ISES, held a special roundtable to discuss lessons learned for exposure science during and following environmental disasters, especially the 9/11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina. Since then, environmental agencies have been involved in responses to...

  20. Rhetorical Principles Applied to Social Studies: Two Articles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crismore, Avon

    1991-01-01

    Includes a preface and two articles: "Rhetoric in Action: Roger's Social Studies Classroom" and "Rhetorical Understandings for Social Studies Teachers." Details how one teacher applies rhetorical principles to teaching, so that student learning, enjoyment, and motivation increase. Focuses on the definitions and principles of rhetoric as they apply…

  1. Repositioning social science in natural hazards research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, S. N.

    2009-04-01

    The classical view of social science held by the scientific natural hazards community is that social science is needed in two possible ways: (1) to help with the communication of understanding of natural hazards, grounded in an assumed knowledge deficit or the ‘deficit model' in which it is ‘the public that are assumed to be "deficient", while science is "sufficient" ' (Sturgis and Allum, 2004); or (2) to develop the policy changes needed to address the implications of natural hazards research for human populations. In both of these, social science becomes bolted on to natural hazards research, rather than fully integrated through the research process. In this paper, and using the example of flood risk management, I will show that these two approaches are fundamentally flawed, requiring a radical reformulation of the relationship between natural science and social science, grounded in new interdisciplinary ways of working. My argument has two directions. The first will demonstrate why the reformulation is needed, based upon changing societal expectations over entitlement to scientific knowledge (e.g. Freedom of Information), as well as new emphases on digital dissemination and access to scientists and scientific findings. Taken together, I will present evidence that these drivers are enabling those who live with natural hazards to become much more involved in challenging the assumptions and methods of hazards researchers. Natural hazards research is now subject to much more vociferous scrutiny. The second direction will illustrate how we have responded to this by developing new interdisciplinary ways of doing natural hazards research in which social science methods and public involvement are embedded throughout the research process, from the beginning, during project formulation and framing, through to the end, during delivery of solutions. Rather than public involvement becoming a hindrance to delivering better flood risk management, I will show that the integration of both conventional scientific knowledge with lay or vernacular knowledge, throughout the research process, produces risk management solutions that are more sustainable and more realistic than those that have been attempted before.

  2. Applying colour science in colour design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming Ronnier

    2006-06-01

    Although colour science has been widely used in a variety of industries over the years, it has not been fully explored in the field of product design. This paper will initially introduce the three main application fields of colour science: colour specification, colour-difference evaluation and colour appearance modelling. By integrating these advanced colour technologies together with modern colour imaging devices such as display, camera, scanner and printer, some computer systems have been recently developed to assist designers for designing colour palettes through colour selection by means of a number of widely used colour order systems, for creating harmonised colour schemes via a categorical colour system, for generating emotion colours using various colour emotional scales and for facilitating colour naming via a colour-name library. All systems are also capable of providing accurate colour representation on displays and output to different imaging devices such as printers.

  3. Applied climate science: the risk management route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    While several Masters programmes on climate science exist in the British Isles, until recently there has been little regard for the requirements of business, local government and the insurance market in the provision of postgraduate taught programmes. This talk will discuss the issue of climate change risk management as a way of embedding climate science into the decision-making protocols for commercial and governmental organisations. It will outline several issues for business decision-making that have implications for climate change. These include: climate sensitivity, model uncertainty and rapid climate change. The experience of developing and running the MSc in Climate Change and Risk management at Exeter University will be used to highlight these issues.

  4. The Science of Social Work and Its Relationship to Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastas, Jeane W.

    2014-01-01

    As John Brekke has observed, social work does not use the word "science" to define itself, suggesting a need to articulate a science of social work. This article discusses the science of social work and its relationship to social work practice in the United States, arguing that a "rapprochement" between practice and science…

  5. From Big Data to Knowledge in the Social Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Bradford W.; Moser, Richard P.; Riley, William T.

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenges associated with high-volume, diverse datasets is whether synthesis of open data streams can translate into actionable knowledge. Recognizing that challenge and other issues related to these types of data, the National Institutes of Health developed the Big Data to Knowledge or BD2K initiative. The concept of translating “big data to knowledge” is important to the social and behavioral sciences in several respects. First, a general shift to data-intensive science will exert an influence on all scientific disciplines, but particularly on the behavioral and social sciences given the wealth of behavior and related constructs captured by big data sources. Second, science is itself a social enterprise; by applying principles from the social sciences to the conduct of research, it should be possible to ameliorate some of the systemic problems that plague the scientific enterprise in the age of big data. We explore the feasibility of recalibrating the basic mechanisms of the scientific enterprise so that they are more transparent and cumulative; more integrative and cohesive; and more rapid, relevant, and responsive. PMID:26294799

  6. [The teaching of social sciences in health: between practice and theory].

    PubMed

    Barros, Nelson Filice de

    2014-04-01

    The models of teaching social sciences and clinical practice are insufficient for the needs of practical-reflective teaching of social sciences applied to health. The scope of this article is to reflect on the challenges and perspectives of social science education for health professionals. In the 1950s the important movement bringing together social sciences and the field of health began, however weak credentials still prevail. This is due to the low professional status of social scientists in health and the ill-defined position of the social sciences professionals in the health field. It is also due to the scant importance attributed by students to the social sciences, the small number of professionals and the colonization of the social sciences by the biomedical culture in the health field. Thus, the professionals of social sciences applied to health are also faced with the need to build an identity, even after six decades of their presence in the field of health. This is because their ambivalent status has established them as a partial, incomplete and virtual presence, requiring a complex survival strategy in the nebulous area between social sciences and health. PMID:24820588

  7. Teaching Science-Related Social Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Offers a brief introduction and resource list on teaching about science-related social issues. Provides three complete lesson plans for elementary, middle school, and high school use. The topics covered in the lessons are energy production and consumption in the United States; nuclear power concepts, issues, and controversies; and the arms race.…

  8. Michael Polanyi and the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poirier, Maben Walter

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author attempts three things: (a) to describe the main beliefs of the "continental empiricist" epistemology that dominated the study of the social sciences in North America since the mid 1930s; (b) to speak of the influence of this epistemology on the dominant or mainstream school in the study of politics; and (c) to propose a…

  9. The Behavioral and Social Sciences Survey: Anthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Allan H., Ed.; Fischer, John L., Ed.

    This book is one of a series prepared in connection with the Survey of Behavioral and Social Sciences (BASS) conducted between 1967 and 1969. The primary goal of the report is to provide a balanced statement of the past accomplishments, present status, and future prospects of anthropology. Although selective, the report attempts a great deal: 1)…

  10. Survey Nonresponse Bias in Social Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Surveys continue to be one of the primary research methods in social science research, as they have been useful for exploring subjects ranging from attitudes and intentions to motivations and behaviors, to name but a few. Notwithstanding, response rates in survey research continue to decline despite the development of more systematic procedures to…

  11. Does Social Background Influence Political Science Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiruneh, Gizachew

    2013-01-01

    This paper tests a hypothesized linear relationship between social background and final grades in several political science courses that I taught at the University of Central Arkansas. I employ a cross-sectional research design and ordinary least square (OLS) estimators to test the foregoing hypothesis. Relying on a sample of up to 204…

  12. Validity and Reliability in Social Science Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drost, Ellen A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the author aims to provide novice researchers with an understanding of the general problem of validity in social science research and to acquaint them with approaches to developing strong support for the validity of their research. She provides insight into these two important concepts, namely (1) validity; and (2) reliability, and…

  13. Research Methods in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somekh, Bridget, Ed.; Lewin, Cathy, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This book is intended as a resource and an indispensable companion to welcome educators into the community of social science research. While it is recognized that some methodological frameworks are incompatible with others, the overarching premise of the book is to indicate how a wide range of researchers choose a methodology and methods which are…

  14. Research Methods in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somekh, Bridget, Ed.; Lewin, Cathy, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This book is intended as a resource and an indispensable companion to welcome educators into the community of social science research. While it is recognized that some methodological frameworks are incompatible with others, the overarching premise of the book is to indicate how a wide range of researchers choose a methodology and methods which are…

  15. Guidelines for Articulation in the Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    Presents guidelines for the establishment of policies needed to articulate the social science programs offered in high school with those offered in two-year colleges. Focuses on subject matter, the educational needs of transfer and terminal students, students' backgrounds, instructional enrichment, teaching methods, transfer of credit, and…

  16. Virtual Games in Social Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Jose M. Cuenca; Caceres, Myriam J. Martin

    2010-01-01

    The new technologies make the appearance of highly motivating and dynamic games with different levels of interaction possible, in which large amounts of data, information, procedures and values are included which are intimately bound with the social sciences. We set out from the hypothesis that videogames may become interesting resources for their…

  17. Caveat Lector: Reviewing Popular Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hixson, Vivian Scott

    1981-01-01

    Discusses problems with reviews and criticisms of popular social science books: the quality and background of reviewers, the difficulty of distinguishing between fact and opinion, and the scarcity of competent reviewers. Analyzes reviews of Robert Ardrey's "African Genesis" and "The Territorial Imperative," Konrad Lorenz's "On Aggression," and…

  18. Africa: A Social Studies and Science Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holboke, Kathy; And Others

    This packet was designed to help teachers maximize a visit to a zoo's Africa exhibit. The packet provides two levels of activities, grades 3-5, and grades 6-8, for use before, during and after the visit. Activities are designed to enhance skills taught in science, social studies, language arts, reading, art, and math. A multi-grade background…

  19. Michael Polanyi and the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poirier, Maben Walter

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author attempts three things: (a) to describe the main beliefs of the "continental empiricist" epistemology that dominated the study of the social sciences in North America since the mid 1930s; (b) to speak of the influence of this epistemology on the dominant or mainstream school in the study of politics; and (c) to propose a…

  20. The Behavioral and Social Sciences Survey: Anthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Allan H., Ed.; Fischer, John L., Ed.

    This book is one of a series prepared in connection with the Survey of Behavioral and Social Sciences (BASS) conducted between 1967 and 1969. The primary goal of the report is to provide a balanced statement of the past accomplishments, present status, and future prospects of anthropology. Although selective, the report attempts a great deal: 1)…

  1. Does Social Background Influence Political Science Grades?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiruneh, Gizachew

    2013-01-01

    This paper tests a hypothesized linear relationship between social background and final grades in several political science courses that I taught at the University of Central Arkansas. I employ a cross-sectional research design and ordinary least square (OLS) estimators to test the foregoing hypothesis. Relying on a sample of up to 204…

  2. Virtual Games in Social Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Jose M. Cuenca; Caceres, Myriam J. Martin

    2010-01-01

    The new technologies make the appearance of highly motivating and dynamic games with different levels of interaction possible, in which large amounts of data, information, procedures and values are included which are intimately bound with the social sciences. We set out from the hypothesis that videogames may become interesting resources for their…

  3. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 39, February 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Amy, Comp.

    Contained in this publication is a selected bibliography of the social sciences in forestry. Material is grouped within a subject matter classification scheme which covers social sciences applied to forestry at large, forestry's productive agents, forest production, manufacturing, and marketing, trade, and demand for forest output. This…

  4. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 51, February, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Judith L., Ed.

    This is a bibliography of social sciences in forestry which includes the topics of social science applied to forestry at large, forestry's productive agents, forest production manufacturing, and marketing, trade, and demand for forest output. Each entry is described briefly and listed alphabetically by author. Sources include many professional…

  5. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 51, February, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Judith L., Ed.

    This is a bibliography of social sciences in forestry which includes the topics of social science applied to forestry at large, forestry's productive agents, forest production manufacturing, and marketing, trade, and demand for forest output. Each entry is described briefly and listed alphabetically by author. Sources include many professional…

  6. Applying Cognitive Science Principles to Improve Retention of Science Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rebecca; Ray, Jenna; Gooklasian, Paula

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether three student-centred strategies influenced retention of science vocabulary words among 7th grade students. Two of the strategies (drawing pictures and talking about the definition of the terms) were developed to involve the students in more constructive and interactive exercises when compared to the technique that was in…

  7. NASA's Applied Sciences: Natural Disasters Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jason L.

    2010-01-01

    Fully utilize current and near-term airborne and spaceborne assets and capabilities. NASA spaceborne instruments are for research but can be applied to natural disaster response as appropriate. NASA airborne instruments can be targeted specifically for disaster response. Could impact research programs. Better flow of information improves disaster response. Catalog capability, product, applicable disaster, points of contact. Ownership needs to come from the highest level of NASA - unpredictable and irregular nature of disasters requires contingency funding for disaster response. Build-in transfer of applicable natural disaster research capabilities to operational functionality at other agencies (e.g., USFS, NOAA, FEMA...) at the outset, whenever possible. For the Decadal Survey Missions, opportunities exist to identify needs and requirements early in the mission design process. Need to understand additional needs and commitments for meeting the needs of the disaster community. Opportunity to maximize disaster response and mitigation from the Decadal Survey Missions. Additional needs or capabilities may require agency contributions.

  8. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 57. Special Appendix: Theses and Dissertations in Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Judith L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Documents which address the interface between forestry and the social sciences comprise this annotated bibliography. A subject-matter classification scheme is used to group publications by subheadings under five major heading: (1) social science applied to forestry at large; (2) applied to forestry's productive agents; (3) applied to forest…

  9. Social Sciences Framework 1974: Third Time's a Charm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampler, Dave

    1974-01-01

    The author presents the third framework for social sciences curriculum to circulate in California since 1968. Goals are presented for a K-12 social science program which utilizes an interdisciplinary approach and a process-oriented curriculum. (HMD)

  10. Technology as "Applied Science": A Serious Misconception that Reinforces Distorted and Impoverished Views of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gil-Perez, Daniel; Vilches, Amparo; Fernandez, Isabel; Cachapuz, Antonio; Praia, Joao; Valdes, Pablo; Salinas, Julia

    2005-01-01

    The current consideration of technology as "applied science", this is to say, as something that comes "after" science, justifies the lack of attention paid to technology in science education. In our paper we question this simplistic view of the science-technology relationship, historically rooted in the unequal appreciation of intellectual and…

  11. Welding As Science: Applying Basic Engineering Principles to the Discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum provides sample problems illustrating ways in which basic engineering science has been applied to the discipline of welding. Perhaps inferences may be drawn regarding optimal approaches to particular welding problems, as well as for the optimal education for welding engineers. Perhaps also some readers may be attracted to the science(s) of welding and may make worthwhile contributions to the discipline.

  12. Political diversity will improve social psychological science.

    PubMed

    Duarte, José L; Crawford, Jarret T; Stern, Charlotta; Haidt, Jonathan; Jussim, Lee; Tetlock, Philip E

    2015-01-01

    Psychologists have demonstrated the value of diversity - particularly diversity of viewpoints - for enhancing creativity, discovery, and problem solving. But one key type of viewpoint diversity is lacking in academic psychology in general and social psychology in particular: political diversity. This article reviews the available evidence and finds support for four claims: (1) Academic psychology once had considerable political diversity, but has lost nearly all of it in the last 50 years. (2) This lack of political diversity can undermine the validity of social psychological science via mechanisms such as the embedding of liberal values into research questions and methods, steering researchers away from important but politically unpalatable research topics, and producing conclusions that mischaracterize liberals and conservatives alike. (3) Increased political diversity would improve social psychological science by reducing the impact of bias mechanisms such as confirmation bias, and by empowering dissenting minorities to improve the quality of the majority's thinking. (4) The underrepresentation of non-liberals in social psychology is most likely due to a combination of self-selection, hostile climate, and discrimination. We close with recommendations for increasing political diversity in social psychology. PMID:25036715

  13. Applied Behavior Analysis Is a Science And, Therefore, Progressive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaf, Justin B.; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Ala'i-Rosales, Shahla; Ross, Robert K.; Smith, Tristram; Weiss, Mary Jane

    2016-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is a science and, therefore, involves progressive approaches and outcomes. In this commentary we argue that the spirit and the method of science should be maintained in order to avoid reductionist procedures, stifled innovation, and rote, unresponsive protocols that become increasingly removed from meaningful…

  14. Applied Science and Research Applications: Recent Research Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Applied Science and Research Applications.

    This report contains abstracts of new technical reports and other documents resulting from research supported by the directorate for Applied Science and Research Applications of the National Science Foundation. Research reports from current programs include work in the areas of public policy and regulation; public service delivery and urban…

  15. Alternative Strategies for Teaching Access to Social Science Research Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newmark, Laura Christopher

    This study discusses the problems of conceptual and bibliographic access to the literature of the social sciences. The study is intended to assist both professionals and students who are conducting social science research. Part I examines conceptual access and search strategies. It traces the flow of social science information from original…

  16. A Half-Century of the "International Social Science Journal."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Morpurgo, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the history of the "International Social Science Journal," formerly the "International Social Science Bulletin," as on its 50th year. Focuses on the editorial history, quality control, multilingual production, the various types of authors, the language and style of the material, evolution of themes, and discussion of social sciences. (CMK)

  17. The Social Sciences as a Domain of Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Forrest H.

    The author claims that the nature of the social sciences is to combine interpretive and empirical approaches in an attempt to understand human thought and behavior. He views the domain of social sciences as being different from that of the humanities or the natural sciences. Social scientists test interpretations by considering the extent to which…

  18. The Behavioral and Social Sciences: Outlook and Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

    A joint effort of two committees of the National Academy of Sciences and the Social Science Research Council produced this report on the state of the behavioral science disciplines. The emphasis is on outlining what has developed in the social sciences since World War II, what the likely trends will be in the future, and in making some…

  19. The Behavioral and Social Sciences: Outlook and Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC.

    A joint effort of two committees of the National Academy of Sciences and the Social Science Research Council produced this report on the state of the behavioral science disciplines. The emphasis is on outlining what has developed in the social sciences since World War II, what the likely trends will be in the future, and in making some…

  20. Project Calliope: Science and Social Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    We present the 'Project Calliope' picosatellite to explore how to use social media to initiate, fund, and engage in scientific research. 'Project Calliope' is a sonified ionospheric detector being launched in 2010 on the "TubeSat" platform. It has no federal or academic contribution, and relies on 'citizen scientists' and such 'citizen journalist' channels as ScientificBlogging.com for its technical and infrastructure support. The fundamental question of whether good science can come from small packages has a mixed answer. We put forth the 'Science2.0' concept of science as play, provide a method for engaging individuals as contributors, discuss the pros and cons of operating a research project with full transparency, and present preliminary K12 outreach results.

  1. The Role of the History of Science in the Understanding of Social Darwinism and Eugenics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowler, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The link between science and society is examined by studying the application of evolution theories and genetics to human affairs. Described are the ways in which biological theories have been applied to social issues. (KR)

  2. Role of Social Networks in Developing Religious and Social Values of the Students of the World Islamic Sciences & Education University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Mosa, Nosiba Ali

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the role of Social Networks in the social and religious values of The World Islamic Sciences & Education University students. The study applied the survey and descriptive Approach. The population of the study represents all BA students who enrolled in the first academic semester for the year 2014-2015. The sample of…

  3. Physics and social science — The approach of synergetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidlich, Wolfgang

    1991-05-01

    Universally applicable methods originating in statistical physics and synergetics are combined with concepts from social science in order to set up and to apply a model construction concept for the quantitative description of a broad class of collective dynamical phenomena within society. Starting from the decisions of individuals and introducing the concept of dynamical utilities, probabilistic transition rates between attitudes and actions can be constructed. The latter enter the central equation of motion, i.e. the master equation, for the probability distribution over the possible macroconfigurations of society. From the master equation the equations of motion for the expectation values of the macrovariables of society can be derived. These equations are in general nonlinear. Their solutions may include stationary solutions, limit cycles and strange attractors, and with varying trend parameters also phase transitions between different modes of social behaviour can be described. The general model construction approach is subsequently applied to characteristic examples from different social sciences, such as sociology, demography, regional science and economics. These examples refer to collective political opinion formation, to interregional migration of interactive populations, to settlement formation on the micro-, meso- and macroscale, and to nonlinear nonequilibrium economics, including market instabilities.

  4. Connecting Science and Society: Basic Research in the Service of Social Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnert, Gerhard

    2007-03-01

    A flawed dichotomy of basic versus applied science (or of ``curiosity-driven'' vs. ``mission-oriented'' science) pervades today's thinking about science policy. This talk argues for the addition of a third mode of scientific research, called Jeffersonian science. Whereas basic science, as traditionally understood, is a quest for the unknown regardless of societal needs, and applied science is known science applied to known needs, Jeffersonian science is the quest for the unknown in the service of a known social need. It is research in an identified area of basic scientific ignorance that lies at the heart of a social problem. The talk discusses the conceptual foundations and then provides some case examples of Jeffersonian-type science initiatives, such as the Lewis and Clark Expedition, initiated by Thomas Jefferson (which led us to call this mode of research Jeffersonian), research conducted under the auspices of the National Institutes of Health, and a science policy project by President Jimmy Carter and his Science Adviser, Frank Press, in the late 1970s. Because the concept of Jeffersonian science explicitly ties basic research to the social good, one of the potential benefits of adding a Jeffersonian dimension to our thinking about science is that it might make science careers more attractive to women and underrepresented minorities.

  5. PREFACE: International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemle, Ludovic Dan; Jiang, Yiwen

    2015-06-01

    The International Conference on Applied Sciences (ICAS2014) took place in Hunedoara, Romania from 2-4 October 2014 at the Engineering Faculty of Hunedoara. The conference takes place alternately in Romania and in P.R. China and is organized by "Politehnica" University of Timisoara, Romania, and Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, P.R. China, with the aim to serve as a platform for exchange of information between various areas of applied sciences and to promote the communication between scientists of different nations, countries and continents. The topics of the conference covered a comprehensive spectrum of issues: 1. Economical Sciences 2. Engineering Sciences 3. Fundamental Sciences 4. Medical Sciences The conference gathered qualified researchers whose expertise can be used to develop new engineering knowledge that has the potential for application in economics, defense, medicine, etc. There were nearly 100 registered participants from six countries, and four invited and 56 oral talks were delivered during the two days of the conference. Based on the work presented at the conference, selected papers are included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. These papers present new research in the various fields of Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Computer Engineering, and Mathematical Engineering. It is our great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering to the scientific community to promote further research in these areas. We sincerely hope that the papers published in this volume will contribute to the advancement of knowledge in their respective fields.

  6. Benford’s Law Applies to Online Social Networks

    PubMed Central

    Golbeck, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Benford’s Law states that, in naturally occurring systems, the frequency of numbers’ first digits is not evenly distributed. Numbers beginning with a 1 occur roughly 30% of the time, and are six times more common than numbers beginning with a 9. We show that Benford’s Law applies to social and behavioral features of users in online social networks. Using social data from five major social networks (Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus, Pinterest, and LiveJournal), we show that the distribution of first significant digits of friend and follower counts for users in these systems follow Benford’s Law. The same is true for the number of posts users make. We extend this to egocentric networks, showing that friend counts among the people in an individual’s social network also follows the expected distribution. We discuss how this can be used to detect suspicious or fraudulent activity online and to validate datasets. PMID:26308716

  7. NASA'S Water Resources Element Within the Applied Sciences Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, David; Doorn, Bradley; Engman, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Earth Systems Division has the primary responsibility for the Applied Science Program and the objective to accelerate the use of NASA science results in applications to help solve problems important to society and the economy. The primary goal of the NASA Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, assimilation of new observations, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. This paper discusses major problems facing water resources managers, including having timely and accurate data to drive their decision support tools. It then describes how NASA's science and space based satellites may be used to overcome this problem. Opportunities for the water resources community to participate in NASA's Water Resources Applications Program are described.

  8. Research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized and abstracts of published reports are presented. The major categories of the ICASE research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  9. Summaries of the FY 1981 applied mathematical sciences research program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    Applied Mathematical Sciences serves as the DOE focal point for monitoring and advancing the state of the art in mathematics, statistics, and computer science. Several DOE mission programs develop and refine specific techniques from the applied mathematical sciences applicable to their immediate needs. In contrast, Applied Mathematical Sciences concentrates on more broadly based, continuing needs throughout the DOE community. Emphasis is placed on research basic to the analysis, development, and use of large-scale computational models; the management and analysis of large, complex collections of information; and the effective use of DOE computing resources. The purpose of this research is not to improve existing technologies and methodologies, but rather to render them obsolete. Each part of the Applied Mathematical Sciences activity has been designed with the help and advice of leading mathematicians and computer scientists from universities, industry, and DOE laboratories to assure the broadest and greatest impact on the nation's energy R and D enterprise. Many of them are expert in industry's needs in the relevant areas. Close liaison is maintained with other federal agencies in the selection of areas of emphasis and of individual research tasks. This is high leverage research. In favorable cases, the results may be of great benefit simultaneously to a number of different energy technologies. The requested increase will be an exceptionally sound investment.

  10. Response: Social Work, Science, Social Impact--Crafting an Integrative Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nurius, Paula S.; Kemp, Susan P.

    2012-01-01

    Shifts in the ways that science is being undertaken and marshaled toward social change argue for a new kind of professional competence. Taking the view that the science of social work is centrally about the relationship of research to social impact, the authors extend Fong's focus on transdisciplinary and translational approaches to science

  11. Response: Epistemological Issues of Social Work Science as a Translational Action Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goppner, Hans-Jurgen

    2012-01-01

    A science-based practice should be caring, there is no dissent about this. But why a social work science? Until now "things are fine," and practice seems to be getting on very well without it!? It is claimed that there is no alternative in its own interest. Social work needs social work science because of the epistemological issues linked to the…

  12. Technology as `Applied Science': A Serious Misconception that Reinforces Distorted and Impoverished Views of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Pérez, Daniel; Vilches, Amparo; Fernández, Isabel; et al.

    The current consideration of technology as "applied science", this is to say, as something that comes "after" science, justifies the lack of attention paid to technology in science education. In our paper we question this simplistic view of the science-technology relationship, historically rooted in the unequal appreciation of intellectual and manual work, and we try to show how the absence of the technological dimension in science education contributes to a naïve and distorted view of science which deeply affects the necessary scientific and technological literacy of all citizens.

  13. NASA Applied Sciences Program Rapid Prototyping Results and Conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, E. L.

    2007-12-01

    NASA's Applied Sciences Program seeks to expand the use of Earth science research results to benefit current and future operational systems tasked with making policy and management decisions. The Earth Science Division within the Science Mission Directorate sponsors over 1000 research projects annually to answer the fundamental research question: How is the Earth changing and what are the consequences for life on Earth? As research results become available, largely from satellite observations and Earth system model outputs, the Applied Sciences Program works diligently with scientists and researchers (internal and external to NASA) , and other government agency officials (USDA, EPA, CDC, DOE, US Forest Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service, DHS, USAID) to determine useful applications for these results in decision-making, ultimately benefiting society. The complexity of Earth science research results and the breadth of the Applied Sciences Program national priority areas dictate a broad scope and multiple approaches available to implement their use in decision-making. Over the past five years, the Applied Sciences Program has examined scientific and engineering practices and solicited the community for methods and steps that can lead to the enhancement of operational systems (Decision Support Systems - DSS) required for decision-making. In November 2006, the Applied Sciences Program launched an initiative aimed at demonstrating the applicability of NASA data (satellite observations, models, geophysical parameters from data archive centers) being incorporated into decision support systems and their related environments at a low cost and quick turnaround of results., i.e. designed rapid prototyping. Conceptually, an understanding of Earth science research (and results) coupled with decision-making requirements and needs leads to a demonstration (experiment) depicting enhancements or improvements to an operational decisions process through the use of NASA data. Five NASA centers (GSFC, LaRC, SSC, MSFC, ARC) participated and are currently conducting fifteen prototyping experiments covering eight of the twelve national priority applications - Energy, Coastal, Carbon, and Disaster Management; Agricultural Efficiency, Aviation, Air Quality, and Ecological Forecasting. Results from six experiments will be discussed highlighting purpose, expected results, enhancement to the decision-making process achieved, and the potential plans for future collaboration and sustainable projects.

  14. The Passive Voice and Social Values in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Daniel D.

    2002-01-01

    Claims that two social values in science--falsifiability of scientific theories and cooperation among scientists--determine use of passives in scientific communication. Concludes that educators must help science students understand how the social values in science are embodied in scientific passives and help them gain insights into how scientists…

  15. Social Science Research on Biotechnology and Agriculture: A Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buttel, Frederick H.

    1989-01-01

    Examines trends in social science research on biotechnology and agriculture. Discusses role of private industry's biotechnology "hype" in defining social science research policy in universities. Suggests that widespread promotion of biotechnology as "revolutionary" contributed to lack of academic scrutiny. Examines social impact of agricultural…

  16. Social Science Libraries Section. Special Libraries Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on social science documentation and information services presented at the 1982 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Problems in the Availability of Some Social Science Publications," a discussion by Maurice B. Line (United Kingdom) of bibliographic control of fugitive literature in the social…

  17. Bridging social and geo-sciences data with GIS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmi, O.; Hayden, M.

    2009-12-01

    Society and climate are co-evolving in a manner that could place more vulnerable populations at risk from exposure to weather and climate stresses. Understanding risks and vulnerabilities to weather hazards and climate change requires an interdisciplinary approach, that includes information about weather, climate, the natural and built environment and social processes and characteristics. Recent advances in GIS science and technology and developments in interoperability standards provide opportunities for innovative coupling of geo- and social sciences data and model outputs in GIS systems. This presentation will provide an overview of research directions for integrating the geo- and social sciences applied to extreme weather events and climate change, and discuss challenges of conducting interdisciplinary spatial research at various scales of analysis. We will explore linkages between quantitative and qualitative data for a more comprehensive understanding of local-level vulnerability and adaptive capacity. A methodology for coupling household-level survey data, collected in 2009 in Phoenix, AZ, with municipal and regional-scale spatial vulnerability models will be presented.

  18. Student Empowerment in an Environmental Science Classroom: Toward a Framework for Social Justice Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimick, Alexandra Schindel

    2012-01-01

    Social justice education is undertheorized in science education. Given the wide range of goals and purposes proposed within both social justice education and social justice science education scholarship, these fields require reconciliation. In this paper, I suggest a student empowerment framework for conceptualizing teaching and learning social…

  19. An Experimenting College of Environmental and Applied Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Ted F.; Fenner, Peter

    1975-01-01

    The programs of the College of Environmental and Applied Sciences at Governors State University have competency-based curricula emphasizing individualized and self-paced learning within an interdisciplinary framework. This article describes the instructional programs, student contract procedure, cooperative education venture, intercollege…

  20. 78 FR 77502 - NASA Applied Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Applied Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and... Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, as amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA..., 2014, 8:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., Local Time. ADDRESSES: NASA Headquarters, Room 3P40, 300 E Street...

  1. Social science. Publication bias in the social sciences: unlocking the file drawer.

    PubMed

    Franco, Annie; Malhotra, Neil; Simonovits, Gabor

    2014-09-19

    We studied publication bias in the social sciences by analyzing a known population of conducted studies--221 in total--in which there is a full accounting of what is published and unpublished. We leveraged Time-sharing Experiments in the Social Sciences (TESS), a National Science Foundation-sponsored program in which researchers propose survey-based experiments to be run on representative samples of American adults. Because TESS proposals undergo rigorous peer review, the studies in the sample all exceed a substantial quality threshold. Strong results are 40 percentage points more likely to be published than are null results and 60 percentage points more likely to be written up. We provide direct evidence of publication bias and identify the stage of research production at which publication bias occurs: Authors do not write up and submit null findings. PMID:25170047

  2. Applying principles from safety science to improve child protection.

    PubMed

    Cull, Michael J; Rzepnicki, Tina L; O'Day, Kathryn; Epstein, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Child Protective Services Agencies (CPSAs) share many characteristics with other organizations operating in high-risk, high-profile industries. Over the past 50 years, industries as diverse as aviation, nuclear power, and healthcare have applied principles from safety science to improve practice. The current paper describes the rationale, characteristics, and challenges of applying concepts from the safety culture literature to CPSAs. Preliminary efforts to apply key principles aimed at improving child safety and well-being in two states are also presented. PMID:24199329

  3. A New Way of Thinking about Social Location in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmaus, Warren

    2008-01-01

    The Durkheimian concept of the density of social relationships may prove more fruitful than the historical materialist notion of a social hierarchy for thinking about the social location of epistemic agents in science. To define a scientist's social location in terms of the density of her professional relationships with other scientists permits us…

  4. The Social Sciences in the Schools: Purpose, Trends, Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risinger, C. Frederick, Ed.; Beversdorf, Anne, Ed.

    Twenty-six social studies educators participated in a conference at Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, in summer 1978 to ascertain the status and goals of social studies education. Specifically, conference participants examined recent social science research, explored curriculum development, and developed social studies classroom…

  5. How to Teach for Social Justice: Lessons from "Uncle Tom's Cabin" and Cognitive Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracher, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The author explains how principles of cognitive science can help teachers of literature use texts as a means of increasing students' commitment to social justice. Applying these principles to a particular work, Uncle Tom's Cabin, he calls particular attention to the relationship between cognitive science and literary schemes for building reader…

  6. Integrating social and physical sciences in water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Jay R.

    2015-08-01

    Water management has always required more than physical science. This paper reviews the accomplishments of integrating social with physical sciences for water management in the last 50 years. Particular successes are highlighted to illustrate how fundamentals from both physical science and social science have been brought together to improve the performance of water management systems. Some forward-looking lessons for managing practical and academic interdisciplinary research for water management are also provided.

  7. The Lived Experience of Applied Science Graduates Who Complete the Applied Baccalaureate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kujawa, Tricia A.

    2012-01-01

    The enrollment and transfer behaviors of college students are diverse. As a result college students travel various pathways to the baccalaureate degree. The purpose of this qualitative study was to better understand the lived experience of students who entered higher education through an associate of applied science (AAS) program and then…

  8. The Lived Experience of Applied Science Graduates Who Complete the Applied Baccalaureate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kujawa, Tricia A.

    2012-01-01

    The enrollment and transfer behaviors of college students are diverse. As a result college students travel various pathways to the baccalaureate degree. The purpose of this qualitative study was to better understand the lived experience of students who entered higher education through an associate of applied science (AAS) program and then…

  9. Applying social learning theory to childhood and adolescent firesetting: can it lead to serial murder?

    PubMed

    Singer, Stephen D; Hensley, Christopher

    2004-08-01

    Despite the fact that serial murder has existed for centuries, it has been given little academic attention in the social science literature. Existing studies have primarily examined the motivational factors involved in the commission of serial murder. However, research examining the childhood and adolescent backgrounds of serial murderers is scant. Based on three case studies of serial murderers, this study contributes to the existing literature by exploring the possible link between childhood and/or adolescent fire setting and adult serial murder by applying social learning theory. PMID:15245657

  10. Associate of Science and Associate of Applied Science: Assured Academic Success? Another Source?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Linda J.; Harden, Harold D.

    In 1989, a study was conducted at the University of West Florida (UWF) to explore the success rate of Associate of Science (AS) and Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree recipients at the college. Although the AS and AAS degrees were originally designed as terminal degrees leading to immediate employment, recipients today are discovering that…

  11. NASA'S Water Resources Element Within the Applied Sciences Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toll, David; Doorn, Bradley; Engman, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Applied Sciences Program works within NASA Earth sciences to leverage investment of satellite and information systems to increase the benefits to society through the widest practical use of NASA research results. Such observations provide a huge volume of valuable data in both near-real-time and extended back nearly 50 years about the Earth's land surface conditions such as land cover type, vegetation type and health, precipitation, snow, soil moisture, and water levels and radiation. Observations of this type combined with models and analysis enable satellite-based assessment of numerous water resources management activities. The primary goal of the Earth Science Applied Science Program is to improve future and current operational systems by infusing them with scientific knowledge of the Earth system gained through space-based observation, model results, and development and deployment of enabling technologies, systems, and capabilities. Water resources is one of eight elements in the Applied Sciences Program and it addresses concerns and decision making related to water quantity and water quality. With increasing population pressure and water usage coupled with climate variability and change, water issues are being reported by numerous groups as the most critical environmental problems facing us in the 21st century. Competitive uses and the prevalence of river basins and aquifers that extend across boundaries engender political tensions between communities, stakeholders and countries. Mitigating these conflicts and meeting water demands requires using existing resources more efficiently. The potential crises and conflicts arise when water is competed among multiple uses. For example, urban areas, environmental and recreational uses, agriculture, and energy production compete for scarce resources, not only in the Western U.S. but throughout much of the U.S. but also in many parts of the world. In addition to water availability issues, water quality related problems are seriously affecting human health and our environment. The NASA Water Resources Program Element works to use NASA products to address these critical issues.

  12. Science Education and Human Rights: Explorations into Critical Social Consciousness and Postmodern Science Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Todd E.; Eichinger, John

    1999-01-01

    Human-rights education can be realized in the science classroom. Taught from a critical postmodern perspective, science can serve the interest of social justice while embracing a teaching dialectic fostering critical social consciousness. First, science educators must examine scientific theory's role in promoting both human welfare and injustice.…

  13. Student Empowerment in an Environmental Science Classroom: Toward a Framework for Social Justice Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimick, Alexandra Schindel

    2012-01-01

    Social justice education is undertheorized in science education. Given the wide range of goals and purposes proposed within both social justice education and social justice science education scholarship, these fields require reconciliation. In this paper, I suggest a student empowerment framework for conceptualizing teaching and learning social…

  14. The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durosinmi, Brenda Braxton

    2011-01-01

    The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations Since 1974 Federal regulations have governed the use of human subjects in biomedical and social science research. The regulations are known as the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, and often referred to as the "Common Rule" because 18 Federal…

  15. Effective Pedagogy in Social Sciences. Educational Practices Series-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnema, Claire; Aitken, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    This booklet is a synthesis of research on social sciences teaching that has been shown to have a positive effect on a range of desirable student outcomes: cognitive, skills, participatory and affective outcomes. Education in the social sciences plays an important role in developing students' sense of identity and influencing the ways in which…

  16. Effective Pedagogy in Social Sciences. Educational Practices Series-23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnema, Claire; Aitken, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    This booklet is a synthesis of research on social sciences teaching that has been shown to have a positive effect on a range of desirable student outcomes: cognitive, skills, participatory and affective outcomes. Education in the social sciences plays an important role in developing students' sense of identity and influencing the ways in which…

  17. Kant or Marx? Philosophy and the Origins of Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaff, Lawrence A.

    The origins of social science as a discipline are analyzed in terms of the German scientific community before 1920, which tended to define itself according to the theories of Karl Marx or Immanuel Kant. Following a brief introduction about the nature of social science debates in intellectual Germany, section 2 of the paper considers whether the…

  18. Teaching and Learning about Science and Social Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benne, Kenneth D.; Birnbaum, Max

    This monograph explores aspects of science and technology in contemporary society and suggests methods for teaching about social policy issues which have resulted from scientific and technological developments. Section one offers an argument for teaching about science and social policy; surveys the sociology, politics, and history of contemporary…

  19. Algebraic Systems: Applications in the Behavioral and Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirshfeld, Stephen F.; Bart, William M.

    A variety of uses of algebra in the behavioral and social sciences is provided along with descriptions of several algebraic systems. This volume is intended to be a sourcebook for theoretical conceptualizations for professionals in the behavioral and social sciences. This publication with its emphasis on description, application, and utility…

  20. Teaching Gifted Students Social Sciences in Grades Seven Through Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Office of Curriculum Services.

    Intended for use by teachers, consultants and administrators, the booklet discusses social science instruction for gifted students in grades 7-9. An introductory section provides an overview of goals and parameters of the social sciences (psychology, sociology, and anthropology). The scientific research process is described in terms of five steps,…

  1. The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durosinmi, Brenda Braxton

    2011-01-01

    The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations Since 1974 Federal regulations have governed the use of human subjects in biomedical and social science research. The regulations are known as the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, and often referred to as the "Common Rule" because 18 Federal…

  2. Instructional Technologies in Social Science Instruction in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louw, Johann; Brown, Cheryl; Muller, Johan; Soudien, Crain

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the results of a survey and a description of instructional technologies in place in the social sciences in South African Universities. Lecturers in the social sciences reported a well-established practice of information and communication technologies (ICTs) use for general purposes (although frequent use tended to be for email…

  3. Science/Technology/Society in the Social Studies. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Phillip A.

    The current trend to include the relationships of science and technology to human societies in the social studies curriculum is the focus of this ERIC Digest. The Digest discusses: (1) major themes in education on science/technology/society (STS); (2) the rationale for emphasizing STS in the social studies; and (3) how to include STS in the…

  4. The Chesapeake College Social Science Exposition and Fair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Conway

    1982-01-01

    Describes the development, planning, costs, and benefits of Chesapeake College's Annual Social Sciences Exposition and Fair--an interdisciplinary social sciences program encouraging secondary-level students from five Maryland counties to study areas of American and world history, American government, economics, cultural and physical geography,…

  5. Information Geography: A Bridge between Engineering and the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paradiso, Maria

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the metaphor of engineering and the social sciences located on either side of a chasm and connected by the bridge of information geography. Information geography is not an integral part of engineering and is a new field within geography, a social science discipline. The specialty of information geography is one of the newest in…

  6. The Reformed Social Sciences to Reform the University: Mission Impossible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Davydd J.; Levin, Morten

    2008-01-01

    The core argument is that social science must re-examine its mission and praxis in order to be a significant player in future higher education. This article reviews the results and prospects arising from a four-year international project. Originating in Greenwood and Levin's concern about the social sciences, the project, funded by the Ford…

  7. Instructional Technologies in Social Science Instruction in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louw, Johann; Brown, Cheryl; Muller, Johan; Soudien, Crain

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the results of a survey and a description of instructional technologies in place in the social sciences in South African Universities. Lecturers in the social sciences reported a well-established practice of information and communication technologies (ICTs) use for general purposes (although frequent use tended to be for email…

  8. Teaching Media Studies as High School Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuggle, C. A.; Sneed, Don; Wulfemeyer, K. Tim

    2000-01-01

    Finds that a large majority of high school social science teachers in two of the nation's largest school districts believe that: students should be taught how to be informed media consumers; the social science curriculum is the appropriate place for that instruction; and while they feel qualified to teach about the media, they have received little…

  9. Kant or Marx? Philosophy and the Origins of Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaff, Lawrence A.

    The origins of social science as a discipline are analyzed in terms of the German scientific community before 1920, which tended to define itself according to the theories of Karl Marx or Immanuel Kant. Following a brief introduction about the nature of social science debates in intellectual Germany, section 2 of the paper considers whether the…

  10. PREFACE: International Conference on Applied Sciences 2015 (ICAS2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemle, Ludovic Dan; Jiang, Yiwen

    2016-02-01

    The International Conference on Applied Sciences ICAS2015 took place in Wuhan, China on June 3-5, 2015 at the Military Economics Academy of Wuhan. The conference is regularly organized, alternatively in Romania and in P.R. China, by Politehnica University of Timişoara, Romania, and Military Economics Academy of Wuhan, P.R. China, with the joint aims to serve as a platform for exchange of information between various areas of applied sciences, and to promote the communication between the scientists of different nations, countries and continents. The topics of the conference cover a comprehensive spectrum of issues from: >Economical Sciences and Defense: Management Sciences, Business Management, Financial Management, Logistics, Human Resources, Crisis Management, Risk Management, Quality Control, Analysis and Prediction, Government Expenditure, Computational Methods in Economics, Military Sciences, National Security, and others... >Fundamental Sciences and Engineering: Interdisciplinary applications of physics, Numerical approximation and analysis, Computational Methods in Engineering, Metallic Materials, Composite Materials, Metal Alloys, Metallurgy, Heat Transfer, Mechanical Engineering, Mechatronics, Reliability, Electrical Engineering, Circuits and Systems, Signal Processing, Software Engineering, Data Bases, Modeling and Simulation, and others... The conference gathered qualified researchers whose expertise can be used to develop new engineering knowledge that has applicability potential in Engineering, Economics, Defense, etc. The number of participants was 120 from 11 countries (China, Romania, Taiwan, Korea, Denmark, France, Italy, Spain, USA, Jamaica, and Bosnia and Herzegovina). During the three days of the conference four invited and 67 oral talks were delivered. Based on the work presented at the conference, 38 selected papers have been included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. These papers present new research in the various fields of Materials Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Computers Engineering, and Electrical Engineering. It's our great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering to the scientific community to promote further research in these areas. We sincerely hope that the papers published in this volume will contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the respective fields.

  11. Statistical Structures Underlying Quantum Mechanics and Social Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Ron

    2007-08-01

    Common observations of the unpredictability of human behavior and the influence of one question on the answer to another suggest social science experiments are probabilistic and may be mutually incompatible with one another, characteristics attributed to quantum mechanics (as distinguished from classical mechanics). This paper examines this superficial similarity in depth using the Foulis-Randall Operational Statistics language. In contradistinction to physics, social science deals with complex, open systems for which the set of possible experiments is unknowable and outcome interference is a graded phenomenon resulting from the ways the human brain processes information. It is concluded that social science is, in some ways, “less classical” than quantum mechanics, but that generalized “quantum” structures may provide appropriate descriptions of social science experiments. Specific challenges to extending “quantum” structures to social science are identified.

  12. Social Sciences in Forestry, A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 53, October 1980. Cumulative Author Index for 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Judith L., Ed.

    Presented is a bibliography of over 300 publications related to the application of the social sciences to various aspects of forestry. The major categories under which documents are classified involve social science as it applies to: (1) forestry in general; (2) forestry's productive agents; (3) forest production; (4) manufacturing; and (5)…

  13. Social media & stem cell science: examining the discourse.

    PubMed

    Adams, Amy; Lomax, Geoffrey; Santarini, Anthony

    2011-11-01

    Research suggests that the representation of scientific and medical issues in the traditional media such as newspapers, TV and radio is an important determinant of public opinion and related public policy outcomes, particularly with regard to attitudes toward stem cell research. With the emergence of social media, the discursive space around public policy issues has expanded to include a new demographic of media consumer who is directly involved in political action. However, little is known about the influence of social media on scientific public policy conversations. We analyzed Twitter posts on two topics relating to stem cell science and policy according to the originator and tone of the tweet, and whether the tweet was intended to be neutral or to further a stated policy position. This analysis provides a means for clarifying the role of social media in influencing public opinion of policy issues such as stem cell research and offers organizations a better understanding of how to more effectively apply social media to advancing their stem cell policy positions. PMID:21999274

  14. Evolution and the Human Population. Science In a Social CONtext.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Joan

    Science In a Social CONtext is a series of eight books based on the project SISCON-in-Schools. The books provide a new course in science and society for general studies at sixth-form level. The course has been specially designed to make scientific problems accessible to the non-scientist, as well as to explain the social aspects of science to the…

  15. Ways of Living. Science In a Social CONtext.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Joan

    Science In a Social CONtext is a series of eight books based on the project SISCON-in-Schools. The books provide a new course in science and society for general studies at sixth-form level. The course has been specially designed to make scientific problems accessible to the non-scientist, as well as to explain the social aspects of science to the…

  16. Evolution and the Human Population. Science In a Social CONtext.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Joan

    Science In a Social CONtext is a series of eight books based on the project SISCON-in-Schools. The books provide a new course in science and society for general studies at sixth-form level. The course has been specially designed to make scientific problems accessible to the non-scientist, as well as to explain the social aspects of science to the…

  17. Ways of Living. Science In a Social CONtext.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Joan

    Science In a Social CONtext is a series of eight books based on the project SISCON-in-Schools. The books provide a new course in science and society for general studies at sixth-form level. The course has been specially designed to make scientific problems accessible to the non-scientist, as well as to explain the social aspects of science to the…

  18. Social Sciences in Asia I: Bangladesh, Iran, Malaysia, Pakistan, Thailand. Reports and Papers in the Social Sciences, No. 32.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    Part of a series which provides overviews of social science research and teaching in UNESCO member nations, the document focuses on Bangladesh, Iran, Malaysia, Pakistan, and Thailand. One chapter is devoted to each of the five nations. Chapter I discusses social science teaching at major universities in Bangladesh and recommends that research…

  19. A Social Science Guide for Communication on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St John, C.; Marx, S.; Markowitz, E.

    2014-12-01

    Researchers from the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions (CRED) published "The Psychology of Climate Change Communication: A Guide for Scientists, Journalists, Educators, Political Aides, and the Interested Public" in 2009. This landmark guide provided climate change communicators a synthesis of the social science research that was pertinent to understanding how people think about climate change and how the practice could be improved. In the fall of 2014 this guide will be rereleased, with a new title, and in a partnership between CRED and ecoAmerica. The updated guide addresses how and why Americans respond in certain ways to climate change and explains how communicators can apply best practices to their own work. The guide, which includes research from a range of social science fields including psychology, anthropology, communications, and behavioral economics, is designed to be useful for experienced and novice communicators alike. Included in the guide are strategies to boost engagement, common mistakes to avoid, and best practices that organizations around the world have used to meaningfully engage individuals and groups on climate change. The proposed presentation will provide an overview of the main findings and tips from the 2014 climate change communication guide. It will provide a deeper look at a few of the key points that are crucial for increasing audience engagement with climate change including understanding how identity shapes climate change, how to lead with solutions, and how to bring the impacts of climate change close to home. It will highlight tips for motivating positive behavior change that will lead people down the path toward solutions. Finally, it will address the benefits and challenges associated with producing a communication guide and insight into synthesizing social science research findings into a usable format for a variety of audiences.

  20. The Social Sciences and Geographic Education: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, John M., Ed.; And Others

    This book brings together articles by educators, geographers, social scientists, and those whose competence and interests cross two or more of these fields. Geography as a discipline has played an important part in social studies/social science education. These chapters are representative of current thinking on many facets of the interaction among…

  1. The Social Sciences and Geographic Education: A Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, John M., Ed.; And Others

    This book brings together articles by educators, geographers, social scientists, and those whose competence and interests cross two or more of these fields. Geography as a discipline has played an important part in social studies/social science education. These chapters are representative of current thinking on many facets of the interaction among…

  2. Social Psychology, Social Science, and Economics: Twentieth Century Progress and Problems, Twenty-First Century Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Stimulated by social scientists' and especially social psychologists' contributions during World War II, as well as by America's post-war economic and population growth, the period from 1945 to 1970 was widely viewed as a "Golden Age" for American social science. Interdisciplinary social psychology arguably was in the vanguard of these…

  3. Social Psychology, Social Science, and Economics: Twentieth Century Progress and Problems, Twenty-First Century Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Stimulated by social scientists' and especially social psychologists' contributions during World War II, as well as by America's post-war economic and population growth, the period from 1945 to 1970 was widely viewed as a "Golden Age" for American social science. Interdisciplinary social psychology arguably was in the vanguard of these…

  4. Evaluation of Life Sciences and Social Sciences Course Books in Term of Societal Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aykac, Necdet

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate primary school Life Sciences (1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades) and Social Sciences (4th, 5th, and 6th grades) course books in terms of gender discrimination. This study is a descriptive study aiming to evaluate the primary school Life Sciences (1st, 2nd, 3rd grades) and Social Sciences (4th, 5th, and 6th grades) course books…

  5. Evaluation of Life Sciences and Social Sciences Course Books in Term of Societal Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aykac, Necdet

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate primary school Life Sciences (1st, 2nd, and 3rd grades) and Social Sciences (4th, 5th, and 6th grades) course books in terms of gender discrimination. This study is a descriptive study aiming to evaluate the primary school Life Sciences (1st, 2nd, 3rd grades) and Social Sciences (4th, 5th, and 6th grades) course books…

  6. Social epidemiology and complex system dynamic modelling as applied to health behaviour and drug use research

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Sandro; Hall, Chris; Kaplan, George A

    2009-01-01

    A social epidemiologic perspective considers factors at multiple levels of influence (e.g., social networks, neighborhoods, states) that may individually or jointly affect health and health behaviour. This provides a useful lens through which to understand the production of health behaviours in general, and drug use in particular. However, the analytic models that are commonly applied in population health sciences limit the inference we are able to draw about the determination of health behaviour by factors, likely interrelated, across levels of influence. Complex system dynamic modelling techniques may be useful in enabling the adoption of a social epidemiologic approach in health behaviour and drug use research. We provide an example of a model that aims to incorporate factors at multiple levels of influence in understanding drug dependence. We conclude with suggestions about future directions in the field and how such models may serve as virtual laboratories for policy experiments aimed at improving health behaviour. PMID:18930649

  7. The DEVELOP Program as a Unique Applied Science Internship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skiles, J. W.; Schmidt, C. L.; Ruiz, M. L.; Cawthorn, J.

    2004-12-01

    The NASA mission includes "Inspiring the next generation of explorers" and "Understanding and protecting our home planet". DEVELOP students conduct research projects in Earth Systems Science, gaining valuable training and work experience, which support accomplishing this mission. This presentation will describe the DEVELOP Program, a NASA human capital development initiative, which is student run and student led with NASA scientists serving as mentors. DEVELOP began in 1998 at NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia and expanded to NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi and Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama in 2002. NASA's Ames Research Center in California began DEVELOP activity in 2003. DEVELOP is a year round activity. High school through graduate school students participate in DEVELOP with students' backgrounds encompassing a wide variety of academic majors such as engineering, biology, physics, mathematics, computer science, remote sensing, geographic information systems, business, and geography. DEVELOP projects are initiated when county, state, or tribal governments submit a proposal requesting students work on local projects. When a project is selected, science mentors guide students in the application of NASA applied science and technology to enhance decision support tools for customers. Partnerships are established with customers, professional organizations and state and federal agencies in order to leverage resources needed to complete research projects. Student teams are assigned a project and are responsible for creating an inclusive project plan beginning with the design and approach of the study, the timeline, and the deliverables for the customer. Project results can consist of student papers, both team and individually written, face-to-face meetings and seminars with customers, presentations at national meetings in the form of posters and oral papers, displays at the Western and Southern Governors' Associations, and visualizations produced by the students. Projects have included Homeland Security in Virginia, Energy Management in New Mexico, Water Management in Mississippi, Air Quality Management in Alabama, Invasive Species mapping in Nevada, Public Health risk assessment in California, Disaster Management in Oklahoma, Agricultural Efficiency in South Dakota, Coastal Management in Louisiana and Carbon Management in Oregon. DEVELOP students gain experience in applied science, computer technology, and project management. Several DEVELOP projects will be demonstrated and discussed during this presentation. DEVELOP is sponsored by the Applications Division of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  8. 25 CFR 20.600 - Who can apply for financial assistance or social services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who can apply for financial assistance or social services... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Administrative Procedures § 20.600 Who can apply for financial assistance or social services? (a) You can apply for financial assistance or social services...

  9. 25 CFR 20.600 - Who can apply for financial assistance or social services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who can apply for financial assistance or social services... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Administrative Procedures § 20.600 Who can apply for financial assistance or social services? (a) You can apply for financial assistance or social services...

  10. 25 CFR 20.600 - Who can apply for financial assistance or social services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who can apply for financial assistance or social services... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Administrative Procedures § 20.600 Who can apply for financial assistance or social services? (a) You can apply for financial assistance or social services...

  11. 25 CFR 20.600 - Who can apply for financial assistance or social services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Who can apply for financial assistance or social services... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Administrative Procedures § 20.600 Who can apply for financial assistance or social services? (a) You can apply for financial assistance or social services...

  12. 25 CFR 20.600 - Who can apply for financial assistance or social services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who can apply for financial assistance or social services... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Administrative Procedures § 20.600 Who can apply for financial assistance or social services? (a) You can apply for financial assistance or social services...

  13. Future of Applied Watershed Science at Regional Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Lee; Miller, Daniel; Lanigan, Steve; Reeves, Gordon

    2009-05-01

    The Internet-driven evolution of communication and science technologies coincides with a parallel evolution in environmental policy and natural resource management. Resource managers must deal increasingly with land use and conservation plans applied at large spatial scales (watersheds, landscapes, states, regions) involving multiple interacting agencies and stakeholders. Many federal, state, and private organizations have similar objectives, questions, and data and analysis needs. This is motivating the development of community-supported watershed databases and analysis systems of common structure and function across large geographic areas. Numerous state and regional analysis systems are targeting natural resource issues involving management of forests, freshwater fishes, wildlife, and water quality and supply.

  14. Finding Citations to Social Work Literature: The Relative Benefits of Using "Web of Science," "Scopus," or "Google Scholar"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Elaine M. Lasda

    2012-01-01

    Past studies of citation coverage of "Web of Science," "Scopus," and "Google Scholar" do not demonstrate a consistent pattern that can be applied to the interdisciplinary mix of resources used in social work research. To determine the utility of these tools to social work researchers, an analysis of citing references to well-known social work…

  15. Computer Simulation in the Social Sciences/Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Daniel L.

    Computers are beginning to be used more frequently as instructional tools in secondary school social studies. This is especially true of "new social studies" programs; i.e., programs which subordinate mere mastery of factual content to the recognition of and ability to deal with the social imperatives of the future. Computer-assisted instruction…

  16. 77 FR 62538 - Advisory Committee for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... of the Assistant Director, Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences, National Science... recommendations to the National Science Foundation on major goals and policies pertaining to Social, Behavioral... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE...

  17. Bad Science and Its Social Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeidler, Dana L.; Sadler, Troy D.; Berson, Michael J.; Fogelman, Aimee L.

    2002-01-01

    Investigates three types of bad science: (1) cultural prejudice based on scientific errors (polygenism, phrenology, reification through intelligence testing); (2) unethical science (Tuskegee syphilis experiments, tobacco companies and research); and (3) unwitting errors (pesticides, chlorofluorocarbons). (Contains 50 references.) (SK)

  18. The Social Sciences as Continuous with Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherryholmes, Cleo H.

    W. V. O. Quine's analysis of the analytic and synthetic distinction is discussed. The implications of his argument for science are stated as: (1) the importance of formal logic and proofs in science is reduced; (2) the importance of rhetoric in science is recognized; (3) the meaning of words cannot be fixed, and nonexistent identities between…

  19. Economics in History and the Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joint Council on Economic Education, New York, NY.

    Papers presented by social scientists at a 1974 Joint Council seminar designed to assist authors and publishers in improving existing materials or developing new texts in social studies are reproduced in this volume. The seven papers focus on how to integrate economics into elementary and secondary social studies and history courses. The first…

  20. Shaping a Science of Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brekke, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Social workers provide more social services to populations across the life span than any other human service profession, including psychiatry, nursing, and psychology. The scientific methodologies and the scientific knowledge relevant to social services have expanded dramatically in the last 30 years. Using the two indicators of the total number…

  1. Reasoning in Science and Social Science. A Service for Vermont Schools and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agne, Russell M., Ed.

    Science and social studies teachers can use these sample learning activities to teach reasoning skills in grades 5-9. The publication was developed by a group which provides information and assistance to Vermont educators of science and social studies in the fifth through the ninth grades with a focus on the teaching and learning of reasoning…

  2. Applying Quantitative Genetic Methods to Primate Social Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brent, Lauren J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, behavioral ecologists have applied quantitative genetic methods to investigate the evolution of behaviors in wild animal populations. The promise of quantitative genetics in unmanaged populations opens the door for simultaneous analysis of inheritance, phenotypic plasticity, and patterns of selection on behavioral phenotypes all within the same study. In this article, we describe how quantitative genetic techniques provide studies of the evolution of behavior with information that is unique and valuable. We outline technical obstacles for applying quantitative genetic techniques that are of particular relevance to studies of behavior in primates, especially those living in noncaptive populations, e.g., the need for pedigree information, non-Gaussian phenotypes, and demonstrate how many of these barriers are now surmountable. We illustrate this by applying recent quantitative genetic methods to spatial proximity data, a simple and widely collected primate social behavior, from adult rhesus macaques on Cayo Santiago. Our analysis shows that proximity measures are consistent across repeated measurements on individuals (repeatable) and that kin have similar mean measurements (heritable). Quantitative genetics may hold lessons of considerable importance for studies of primate behavior, even those without a specific genetic focus. PMID:24659839

  3. Comments on an Interdisciplinary Social Science Approach for Conservation Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Daniel H.

    1970-01-01

    Management of natural resources requires value analysis and social science information as well as technical knowledge. Analyzes concepts contributed by different disciplines and builds a multidisciplinary conceptual framework for decision making. (EB)

  4. Standing at the crossroads: Identity and recognition of the Applied Science Technologist in British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roemer, Thomas

    Modern technical education in British Columbia has been affected by two societal trends: in industry, engineering technology evolved as a discipline to bridge the increasing chasm between the process-oriented skill sets of tradespersons/technicians, and the declarative knowledge focus of engineering; in education, the provincial college and institute system was created to address the need for a new post-secondary credential situated between trades certificates and university degrees. The Applied Science Technologist arguably forms the intersection of these two concepts. Almost forty years after its inception, it is timely to ask if the original model has matured into a distinct occupational category in industry, education, and in the public mind. The thesis proposes three environments, the Formative, Market and Public Domain, respectively. Interviews, surveys and personal experience afforded insights into the dynamics of these domains with respect to a fledgling occupational category, while the socio-philosophical concepts of culture, habitus and social imaginary provide the tools to interpret the findings. The thesis postulates that an emerging occupational category will not only challenge existing cultures and habitus, but that over time it will influence the imaginaries of each domain and society as a whole. Ultimately, the occupational category will be truly successful only when the general public is able to distinguish it from related disciplines. Charles Taylor's writings on multiculturalism are used to discuss identity and recognition of the Applied Science Technologist in each domain while Pierre Bourdieu's perspectives on the existence of habitus and self-proliferating elites form the framework to examine the relationships between technologists and engineers. Taylor's theory of multiple concurrent social imaginaries guides the comparison of divergent expectations among academic, career and vocational instructors at British Columbia's colleges. The thesis concludes with recommendations for the sustainability of the Applied Science Technologist as distinct occupational category. Keywords. engineering technology; community college; diploma; recognition; identity; social imaginaries

  5. Quantum mechanics and the social sciences: After hermeneutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heelan, Patrick A.

    1995-04-01

    Quantum mechanics is interpreted, in the spirit of Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg, as about physical objects in so far as these are revealed by and within the local, social, and historical process of measurement. An analysis of the hermeneutical aspect of quantum mechanical measurement reveals close analogues with the hermeneutical social/historical sciences. The hermeneutical analysis of science requires the move from the epistemological attitude to an ontological one.

  6. The Psychological and Social Sciences Research Support Programs of the National Science Foundation: A Background Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Science and Technology.

    Offered in response to a request for background information from the Congressional Subcommittee on Science, Research, and Technology, the document presents a report of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) support for social and psychological sciences research. Major objectives of the report are to review the origins of NSF support programs;…

  7. Skills for caring: valuing knowledge of applied science in nursing.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, David

    The purpose of this article is to consider the implications of over-emphasizing the role of the nurse in terms of interpersonal relationships and emotional engagement. It seeks to explain why nurses are frequently more comfortable with the relational aspects of their work and less comfortable with their many tangible contributions. It examines why nurses often undervalue their considerable knowledge of applied science. It also evaluates why a change in attitude is necessary, and why nurses should enhance and give more prominence to their technical knowledge and skills. Finally, it includes a brief examination of current trends in nurse recruitment and retention, and their implications for the future of the profession in respect of the balance between interpersonal and technical skills. PMID:18414295

  8. Team Experiences for Science and Social Studies Preservice Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlbaw, Lynn M.; Borowiec, Jonathan B.; James, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    Describes how senior-level, preservice teacher certification candidates in secondary science and social science methods classes work in teams to prepare instructional materials on a community-based issue (such as the effect of the deposition of arsenic in a creek and small city lake). Argues that such projects provide valuable learning experiences…

  9. Integrating the Teaching of Science and Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, Thomas; Voss, Burton

    Examples of the interface of science and society are offered as several persuasive reasons for integrating science and social studies curriculum in elementary and secondary schools. These reasons include: (1) the search for new personal and societal values as a result of scientific and technological development in prolonging human life, in…

  10. Social Issues: The Potential Contribution of Primary Science and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skamp, Keith

    1987-01-01

    While the secondary curriculum is often considered an appropriate focus for future-directed studies, elementary science and technology education can contribute significantly to the socialization process. Science education can also help shape youngsters' attitudes and capacity to understand and influence scientific and technological impacts on…

  11. Team Experiences for Science and Social Studies Preservice Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burlbaw, Lynn M.; Borowiec, Jonathan B.; James, Robert K.

    2001-01-01

    Describes how senior-level, preservice teacher certification candidates in secondary science and social science methods classes work in teams to prepare instructional materials on a community-based issue (such as the effect of the deposition of arsenic in a creek and small city lake). Argues that such projects provide valuable learning experiences…

  12. Computerized Simulation in the Social Sciences: A Survey and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garson, G. David

    2009-01-01

    After years at the periphery of the social sciences, simulation is now emerging as an important and widely used tool for understanding social phenomena. Through simulation, researchers can identify causal effects, specify critical parameter estimates, and clarify the state of the art with respect to what is understood about how processes evolve…

  13. Phenomenology and Symbolic Interactionism: Recommendations for Social Science Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karen S.

    Commonalities between the philosophical perspectives of Alfred Schatz, a European phenomenologist, and George Herbert Mead, the father of symbolic interactionism, are discussed, and the two men's potential significance in social science research is examined. Both men were concerned with the question of the nature of social action, believing that…

  14. Science Fiction in Social Education: Exploring Consequences of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Lance E.

    2013-01-01

    An NCSS Technology Position Statement and Guidelines, published in 2006 (an updated version is published in this issue of "Social Education"), affirms that social studies students should critically examine relations between technology and society. This article describes how teachers can use science fiction to introduce critical questions…

  15. The Relationship between Method and Validity in Social Science Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKinnon, David; And Others

    An endless debate in social science research focuses on whether or not there is a philosophical basis for justifying the application of scientific methods to social inquiry. A review of the philosophies of various scholars in the field indicates that there is no single procedure for arriving at a valid statement in a scientific inquiry. Natural…

  16. Report of the Action Committee on Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schein, Martin W.

    The term "agricultural social sciences" is introduced and refers to the areas of agricultural economics, rural sociology, agricultural business, farm and ranch management, and agricultural administration. The report discusses the colleges of agriculture of the future, the college students of the future, and the future agricultural social scientist…

  17. Energy: A Bibliography of Social Science and Related Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Denton E.; And Others

    This bibliography contains 2,124 listings pertaining primarily to the social factors involved with energy. Some entries report physical energy information as it relates to social science analysis. Entries are listed by author with a subject index for cross reference. Subject categories include: aesthetic, humanistic, and literary; agriculture;…

  18. Integrating Science-Technology-Society into Social Studies Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marker, Gerald W.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses whether science-technology-society (STS) belongs in the elementary and secondary social studies curriculum, presenting strategies for integration. The article suggests social studies already contains topics that can help students grasp concepts about STS, noting the infusion of an STS perspective is important given society's dependence…

  19. Shaping Social Work Science: What Should Quantitative Researchers Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Shenyang

    2015-01-01

    Based on a review of economists' debates on mathematical economics, this article discusses a key issue for shaping the science of social work--research methodology. The article describes three important tasks quantitative researchers need to fulfill in order to enhance the scientific rigor of social work research. First, to test theories using…

  20. Kindergarten. History-Social Science: A Brief Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern County Superintendent of Schools, Bakersfield, CA.

    This handbook outlines the kindergarten course entitled "Myself and Others in My World." A statement of the California philosophy of history-social science education precedes the handbook's three sections. The first two sections present major goals of the program, an overview of social studies content for grades K-6, and a chart of areas of study…

  1. Energy: A Bibliography of Social Science and Related Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Denton E.; And Others

    This bibliography contains 2,124 listings pertaining primarily to the social factors involved with energy. Some entries report physical energy information as it relates to social science analysis. Entries are listed by author with a subject index for cross reference. Subject categories include: aesthetic, humanistic, and literary; agriculture;…

  2. Computerized Simulation in the Social Sciences: A Survey and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garson, G. David

    2009-01-01

    After years at the periphery of the social sciences, simulation is now emerging as an important and widely used tool for understanding social phenomena. Through simulation, researchers can identify causal effects, specify critical parameter estimates, and clarify the state of the art with respect to what is understood about how processes evolve…

  3. Phenomenology and Symbolic Interactionism: Recommendations for Social Science Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karen S.

    Commonalities between the philosophical perspectives of Alfred Schatz, a European phenomenologist, and George Herbert Mead, the father of symbolic interactionism, are discussed, and the two men's potential significance in social science research is examined. Both men were concerned with the question of the nature of social action, believing that…

  4. Science Fiction in Social Education: Exploring Consequences of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Lance E.

    2013-01-01

    An NCSS Technology Position Statement and Guidelines, published in 2006 (an updated version is published in this issue of "Social Education"), affirms that social studies students should critically examine relations between technology and society. This article describes how teachers can use science fiction to introduce critical questions…

  5. Shaping Social Work Science: What Should Quantitative Researchers Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Shenyang

    2015-01-01

    Based on a review of economists' debates on mathematical economics, this article discusses a key issue for shaping the science of social work--research methodology. The article describes three important tasks quantitative researchers need to fulfill in order to enhance the scientific rigor of social work research. First, to test theories using…

  6. Social Science Instructional Guides: High School (Grades 9-12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Carl; And Others

    The guide, part of a social science learning continuum from first through twelfth grades, contains outlines for two-semester social studies courses for grades 9-12. Three components comprise each section: time allocations for units, instructional objectives, and a content outline. The Grade 9 course, Cultures of the Non-Western World, contains…

  7. Social Science Instructional Guides: High School (Grades 9-12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Carl; And Others

    The guide, part of a social science learning continuum from first through twelfth grades, contains outlines for two-semester social studies courses for grades 9-12. Three components comprise each section: time allocations for units, instructional objectives, and a content outline. The Grade 9 course, Cultures of the Non-Western World, contains…

  8. Reforming Science Education. Social Perspectives & Personal Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    Science education reform is an ongoing process. In recent years many have begun to look not only to teachers for change, but they are also insisting on the involvement of administrators, parents, community members, and some business organizations to bring about this change. This book presents facts and insights regarding science education reform…

  9. Puritan Day: A Social Science Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schur, Joan Brodsky

    2007-01-01

    Most students assume that a thriving society runs smoothly because people abide by the laws. But there are various informal, as well as formal, means of social control such as gossip, ridicule, and shame that function even in complex societies to achieve social control, or conformity to group norms. Good teaching ideas have the potential to lead…

  10. Valuing Diversity in the Social Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowl, Marion

    2005-01-01

    This article examines how universities engage with what students from mature, non-A-level backgrounds bring with them to the curricula of social policy, social work and community and youth work courses of study. It draws on participatory research undertaken with a group of non-traditional entrants to university. The "stories" of three students are…

  11. Counting Costs: A Social Science Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Harold D.

    1978-01-01

    The author briefly outlines a socially-based accounting system which evaluates not only economic but also social and aesthetic variables in arriving at a quantification of the benefits and costs of any action or failure to act. This system is designed to provide an additional tool in decision-making. (Author/MA)

  12. SOCIAL SCIENCE EDUCATION CONSORTIUM. PUBLICATION 106, ANTHROPOLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOHANNAN, PAUL

    A CURRICULUM GUIDE OUTLINES THE MAJOR CONCEPTS, STRUCTURE, AND METHODS OF ANTHROPOLOGY FOR GRADES K-6. THE FOLLOWING UNIT AREAS ARE INCLUDED--(1) NEEDS AND NEED SATISFACTION, (2) HUMAN PERSONALITY, (3) SOCIAL GROUPS, (4) SOCIAL NETWORKS, (5) HUMAN CULTURE, (6) CHANGE AND EVOLUTION, AND (7) CURRENT CULTURAL CHANGES. A SUMMARY CHART PRESENTS A FLOW…

  13. Learning to teach science for social justice in urban schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Purvi

    This study looks at how beginner teachers learn to teach science for social justice in urban schools. The research questions are: (1) what views do beginner teachers hold about teaching science for social justice in urban schools? (2) How do beginner teachers' views about teaching science for social justice develop as part of their learning? In looking at teacher learning, I take a situative perspective that defines learning as increased participation in a community of practice. I use the case study methodology with five teacher participants as the individual units of analysis. In measuring participation, I draw from mathematics education literature that offers three domains of professional practice: Content, pedagogy and professional identity. In addition, I focus on agency as an important component of increased participation from a social justice perspective. My findings reveal two main tensions that arose as teachers considered what it meant to teach science from a social justice perspective: (1) Culturally responsive teaching vs. "real" science and (2) Teaching science as a political act. In negotiating these tensions, teachers drew on a variety of pedagogical and conceptual tools offered in USE that focused on issues of equity, access, place-based pedagogy, student agency, ownership and culture as a toolkit. Further, in looking at how the five participants negotiated these tensions in practice, I describe four variables that either afforded or constrained teacher agency and consequently the development of their own identity and role as socially just educators. These four variables are: (1) Accessing and activating social, human and cultural capital, (2) reconceptualizing culturally responsive pedagogical tools, (3) views of urban youth and (4) context of participation. This study has implications for understanding the dialectical relationship between agency and social justice identity for beginner teachers who are learning how to teach for social justice. Also, it suggests teacher agency as an important domain of professional practice when measuring teacher learning from a situative perspective.

  14. Methods Matter: Improving Causal Inference in Educational and Social Science Research: A Review Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eide, Eric R.; Showalter, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Professors Richard J. Murnane and John B. Willett set out to capitalize on recent developments in education data and methodology by attempting to answer the following questions: How can new methods and data be applied most effectively in educational and social science research? What kinds of research designs are most appropriate? What kinds of…

  15. Methods Matter: Improving Causal Inference in Educational and Social Science Research: A Review Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eide, Eric R.; Showalter, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Professors Richard J. Murnane and John B. Willett set out to capitalize on recent developments in education data and methodology by attempting to answer the following questions: How can new methods and data be applied most effectively in educational and social science research? What kinds of research designs are most appropriate? What kinds of…

  16. Undergraduate Internships for Social Science Majors: Development and Longitudinal Evaluation of a Model Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosmann, Michael R.

    This program report traces the development of the University of Virginia's undergraduate internship program. The original internship program was established in 1973 to provide social science majors, chiefly psychology majors, with opportunities to apply academically derived knowledge and skills in community service areas. Funded by a federal…

  17. Undergraduate Internships for Social Science Majors: Development and Longitudinal Evaluation of a Model Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosmann, Michael R.

    This program report traces the development of the University of Virginia's undergraduate internship program. The original internship program was established in 1973 to provide social science majors, chiefly psychology majors, with opportunities to apply academically derived knowledge and skills in community service areas. Funded by a federal…

  18. Ecological Forecasting in the Applied Sciences Program and Input to the Decadal Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skiles, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Ecological forecasting uses knowledge of physics, ecology and physiology to predict how ecosystems will change in the future in response to environmental factors. Further, Ecological Forecasting employs observations and models to predict the effects of environmental change on ecosystems. In doing so, it applies information from the physical, biological, and social sciences and promotes a scientific synthesis across the domains of physics, geology, chemistry, biology, and psychology. The goal is reliable forecasts that allow decision makers access to science-based tools in order to project changes in living systems. The next decadal survey will direct the development Earth Observation sensors and satellites for the next ten years. It is important that these new sensors and satellites address the requirements for ecosystem models, imagery, and other data for resource management. This presentation will give examples of these model inputs and some resources needed for NASA to continue effective Ecological Forecasting.

  19. NASA Applied Sciences Program. Overview Presentation; Discovering and Demonstrating Innovative and Practical Applications of Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Goal 1: Enhance Applications Research Advance the use of NASA Earth science in policy making, resource management and planning, and disaster response. Key Actions: Identify priority needs, conduct applied research to generate innovative applications, and support projects that demonstrate uses of NASA Earth science. Goal 2: Increase Collaboration Establish a flexible program structure to meet diverse partner needs and applications objectives. Key Actions: Pursue partnerships to leverage resources and risks and extend the program s reach and impact. Goal 3:Accelerate Applications Ensure that NASA s flight missions plan for and support applications goals in conjunction with their science goals, starting with mission planning and extending through the mission life cycle. Key Actions: Enable identification of applications early in satellite mission lifecycle and facilitate effective ways to integrate end-user needs into satellite mission planning

  20. Passionate Scholarship--Notes on Values, Knowing and Method in Feminist Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du Bois, Barbara

    Feminist social science and scholarship must create theory grounded in the actual experience and language of women. Throughout the history of social science, conceptions and theories of female sexuality, psychology, and social roles have derived from men's beliefs about women. The history of social science theory on women proves that science and…

  1. A social History of Soviet Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idlis, G. M.; Tomilin, Konstantin

    The archive includes a great number of archive materials, recollections, interviews, letters, diaries, bibliography, internet sources concerning history of bolshevik and stalinist purges against scientists in the USSR since 1917 till 1968. The archive is categorized by few divisions: scientists, university teachers, associate professors, professors, members of the Academy of Science of the USSR, Corresponding-Members of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. A great number of research articles and recollections by purged are included. The articles are written not only by historians of science but by scientists also. A great role by P.L. Kapitza in the saving of Soviet science from purges is underlined. The project was realized under the support by SOROS foundation (2000), Russian Foundation for fundamental Research (2002-2004) and Russian State National Foundation (2007).

  2. Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 1, 1986 through March 31, 1987 is summarized.

  3. Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April l, 1988 through September 30, 1988.

  4. Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April, 1986 through September 30, 1986 is summarized.

  5. Defending Climate Science: Applying Lessons From Creationist Attacks on Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, S. F.; McCaffrey, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Although climate science faces many obstacles—a lack of teacher training, inadequate state science standards, the difficulty of finding a place for such a multidisciplinary science in traditional subjects—it is the well-funded and organized assault on climate science that perhaps presents the greatest challenge for climate literacy. Attacks on climate science often follow the same set of tactics developed over many decades by creationist forces in their long campaign against evolution. This talk focuses on recognizing these tactics, and suggests ways to counter them in order to promote climate literacy and an understanding of the nature of science.

  6. Science during crisis: the application of social science during major environmental crises

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machlis, Gary; Ludwig, Kris

    2014-01-01

    Historical and contemporary experience suggests that science plays an increasingly critical role in governmental and institutional responses to major environmental crises. Recent examples include major western wildfires (2009), the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010), the Fukushima nuclear accident (2011), and Hurricane Sandy (2012). The application of science during such crises has several distinctive characteristics, as well as essential requirements if it is to be useful to decision makers. these include scope conditions that include coupled natural/human systems, clear statement of uncertainties and limitations, description of cascading consequences, accurate sense of place, estimates of magnitude of impacts, identification of beneficiaries and those adversely affected, clarity and conciseness, compelling visualization and presentation, capacity to speak "truth to power", and direct access to decision makers. In this chapter, we explore the role and significance of science – including all relevant disciplines and focusing attention on the social sciences – in responding to major environmental crises. We explore several important questions: How is science during crisis distinctive? What social science is most useful during crises? What distinctive characteristics are necessary for social science to make meaningful contributions to emergency response and recovery? How might the social sciences be integrated into the strategic science needed to respond to future crises? The authors, both members of the Department of the Interior's innovative Strategic Sciences Group, describe broad principles of engagement as well as specific examples drawn from history, contemporary efforts (such as during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill), and predictions of environmental crises still to be confronted.

  7. 78 FR 31977 - NASA Applied Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-28

    ... advisory capacity to the Director, Earth Science Division. The meeting will be held for the purpose of... Overview of 2014 Budget Highlight from Earth Science Division Senior Review It is imperative that...

  8. Applying social and behavioral theory as a template in containing and confining VRE.

    PubMed

    Curry, V J; Cole, M

    2001-08-01

    Infection control professionals play several important roles--surveyors, educators, and ultimately change agents--in the identification and prevention of nosocomial infections in hospitals. The medical and surgical intensive care units (ICUs) in a large inner-city teaching hospital experienced an increased patient colonization rate with vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE). Intervening in this problem required a multifaceted approach to control the spread of VRE and to change behavior by shifting social norms at multiple levels throughout the ICU community. The success of the interventions could be best explained by applying the use of several behavioral science models. The Ecological Model of Behavior Change, the Health Belief Model, and Social Cognitive Theory can be applied and are consistent with the successful interventions. This multifaceted approach to intervening in this problem consists of five levels of influence: (1) intrapersonal or individual factors, (2) interpersonal factors, (3) institutional factors, (4) community factors, and (5) public factors. We implemented educational inservices and developed references, policies, and programs directed at each of the five levels of influence. The Health Belief Model and Social Cognitive Theory were employed for intervention, and behavior change was based on modeling, observational learning, and vicarious reinforcement. Within six months of initial implementation, the number of positive VRE surveillance cultures and positive clinical isolates decreased significantly in both the medical and surgical ICUs. Two years later, there continues to be a marked reduction of VRE. PMID:11858418

  9. Science Students and the Social Sciences: Strange Bedfellows?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeong, Foong May

    2014-01-01

    With various internet resources available to students, the main aim of a good university education today should not merely be to provide students with content knowledge, but rather to equip them with essential skills necessary to develop into lifelong learners. Among science educators, repeated calls have been made to promote a more holistic…

  10. Science Students and the Social Sciences: Strange Bedfellows?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeong, Foong May

    2014-01-01

    With various internet resources available to students, the main aim of a good university education today should not merely be to provide students with content knowledge, but rather to equip them with essential skills necessary to develop into lifelong learners. Among science educators, repeated calls have been made to promote a more holistic…

  11. Methods for model selection in applied science and engineering.

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Richard V., Jr.

    2004-10-01

    Mathematical models are developed and used to study the properties of complex systems and/or modify these systems to satisfy some performance requirements in just about every area of applied science and engineering. A particular reason for developing a model, e.g., performance assessment or design, is referred to as the model use. Our objective is the development of a methodology for selecting a model that is sufficiently accurate for an intended use. Information on the system being modeled is, in general, incomplete, so that there may be two or more models consistent with the available information. The collection of these models is called the class of candidate models. Methods are developed for selecting the optimal member from a class of candidate models for the system. The optimal model depends on the available information, the selected class of candidate models, and the model use. Classical methods for model selection, including the method of maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods, as well as a method employing a decision-theoretic approach, are formulated to select the optimal model for numerous applications. There is no requirement that the candidate models be random. Classical methods for model selection ignore model use and require data to be available. Examples are used to show that these methods can be unreliable when data is limited. The decision-theoretic approach to model selection does not have these limitations, and model use is included through an appropriate utility function. This is especially important when modeling high risk systems, where the consequences of using an inappropriate model for the system can be disastrous. The decision-theoretic method for model selection is developed and applied for a series of complex and diverse applications. These include the selection of the: (1) optimal order of the polynomial chaos approximation for non-Gaussian random variables and stationary stochastic processes, (2) optimal pressure load model to be applied to a spacecraft during atmospheric re-entry, and (3) optimal design of a distributed sensor network for the purpose of vehicle tracking and identification.

  12. Science, Technology and the Social Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morehouse, Ward, Ed.

    The collective theme of these seven essays calls for a new perspective on science and technology so that they are dedicated to the pursuit of truth and human liberties rather than to power, control, and exploitation. The authors of the essays are with various international development and research centers and projects in seven countries. John…

  13. The Hybridization of Social Science Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Mattei

    1996-01-01

    Describes the growth of science as a twofold process: (1) the fragmentation of formal disciplines; and (2) a recombination of the specialties resulting from this fragmentation. Discusses the division of disciplines into specialized subfields that has led to the development of hybrid specialties, and maintains that the concept of hybridization is…

  14. Social Science Perspectives on Citizenship Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Richard E., Ed.; Dynneson, Thomas L., Ed.

    This anthology examines the role and current conditions of citizenship in the United States' society. The compilation of essays by eminent social scientists and educators explore the concept of citizenship from various disciplinary perspectives: educational (Thomas L. Dynneson and Richard E. Gross); political (Robert B. Woyach); historical (Kerry…

  15. Toward a transnational history of the social sciences.

    PubMed

    Heilbron, Johan; Guilhot, Nicolas; Jeanpierre, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Historical accounts of the social sciences have too often accepted local or national institutions as a self-evident framework of analysis, instead of considering them as being embedded in transnational relations of various kinds. Evolving patterns of transnational mobility and exchange cut through the neat distinction between the local, the national, and the inter-national, and thus represent an essential component in the dynamics of the social sciences, as well as a fruitful perspective for rethinking their historical development. In this programmatic outline, it is argued that a transnational history of the social sciences may be fruitfully understood on the basis of three general mechanisms, which have structured the transnational flows of people and ideas in decisive ways: (a) the functioning of international scholarly institutions, (b) the transnational mobility of scholars, and (c) the politics of trans-national exchange of nonacademic institutions. The article subsequently examines and illustrates each of these mechanisms. PMID:18409207

  16. The Use of the History of Science to Promote Student Understanding of the Social Aspects of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korth, Willard William

    Six classes of biology students studied a two-week unit based on a case history of the cell theory. The change produced in pupils' conceptions of the social aspects of science was assessed using the "Test on Social Aspects of Science." This contains statements based on a theoretical model of the social aspects of science developed by reviewing…

  17. Social science research in malaria prevention, management and control in the last two decades: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mwenesi, Halima Abdullah

    2005-09-01

    In the recent past, considerable progress has been made in understanding how human behavior and social organization, macro- and micro-level economic processes, and health and political systems affect responses to malaria at global, national, community, household, and individual levels. Advances in malaria-related social, behavioral, economic, evaluation, health systems, and policy (social science) research have resulted in improvements in the design and implementation of malaria prevention, management and control (PMC) strategies. Indeed, the past two decades chronicle dramatic advances in the implementation of evidence-based interventions, drawn not only from biomedical but also from social science research. Malaria awareness-raising, advocacy, case management, and prevention efforts have reaped the benefits of social science research and as a result, many programs are implemented and evaluated in a more effective manner than in the past. However, the pace at which findings from social science research are integrated into program and policy implementation is unsatisfactory. Additionally, examples remain of programs that fail to utilize findings from social science research and as a result, achieve minimal results. Furthermore, there is a sizeable body of knowledge that is underutilized and which, if assimilated into programs and policies, could accelerate progress in malaria PMC. Examples include information on meaningful community participation, gender, socio-economic status, and health systems. Regrettably, although social science input is necessary for almost all interventions for malaria management and control, the numbers of scientists working in this area are dismal in most of the key disciplines-medical anthropology; demography; geography and sociology; health economics and health policy; social psychology; social epidemiology; and behavior-change communication. Further, skills of program workers charged with implementation of interventions and strategies at country level are most often inadequate. The Special Program for Research and training in tropical diseases (TDR) and the multi-lateral initiative on malaria (MIM) have remained in the forefront of capacity building for this area of research, but additional efforts are needed to bring more applied social scientists into the fold. Their skills are necessary to ensure that social science findings get to program planners and implementers in a useful form that allows for more rapid and appropriate integration of the results into malaria PMC programs and policies. A re-thinking of the current focus within capacity building efforts is proposed. PMID:16011829

  18. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized. The Institute conducts unclassified basic research in applied mathematics in order to extend and improve problem solving capabilities in science and engineering, particularly in aeronautics and space.

  19. Social Media and Science: where do we go from here?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohon, W.; Robinson, S.; Arrowsmith, R.; Semken, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    What is black and white and 'read' all over? Facebook, that's what. As of December 2012 Facebook had over 618 million daily users, and over a billion monthly users from around the world (http://newsroom.fb.com/Key-Facts). Twitter has more than 130 million active users and generates as many as 340 million Tweets a day (http://blog.twitter.com/2012/03/twitter-turns-six.html). Social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter are not the future of communication, they are the reality, and scientists (and science organizations) need to become part of the conversation. More than half of the teenage and adult population of the US belongs to a social network or are using another form of social media on a regular basis. This creates an opportunity for organizations to use the well-established functionality and pervasiveness of social media platforms to communicate important scientific information and discoveries. In addition, the informal environment of social media allows scientists to interact with non-scientists in a friendly and non-threatening way that can be used to create engagement scenarios that continue the cycle of discussions, experiments, analysis and conclusions that typify science. Social media also provides scientists with the means and opportunity to improve the way science is viewed by the public while improving general science literacy and integrating scientific discoveries into the fabric of the lives of non-scientists. Many questions remain regarding the best way to utilize the opportunities that social media present. For instance, how can we reach a broader, more diverse audience? What are realistic expectations about the effects of social media? How do we improve the quality of content? How can we use social media to communicate scientific information in innovative ways? And perhaps most importantly, how do we know if we are communicating successfully? The EarthScope National Office will share our experiences creating a social media program from the ground up, and address some of these important, fundamental questions. We'll also share our opinions and thoughts about the future of online scientific communication, the ever-changing role of social media in communicating scientific discoveries and ways that the community can work together to enhance the role of social media in science.

  20. Math and science illiteracy: Social and economic impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.L.

    1994-05-01

    Today`s highly competitive global economy is being driven by increasingly rapid technological development. This paper explores the problems of math and science illiteracy in the United States and the potential impact on our economic survival in this environment during the next century. Established educational methods that reward task performance, emphasize passive lecture, and fail to demonstrate relevance to real life are partly to blame. Social norms, stereotypes, and race and gender bias also have an impact. To address this crisis, we need to question the philosophy of an educational system that values task over concept. Many schools have already initiated programs at all grade levels to make math and science learning more relevant, stimulating, and fun. Teaching methods that integrate math and science learning with teamwork, social context, and other academic subjects promote the development of higher-order thinking skills and help students see math and science as necessary skills.

  1. Searching the History of the Social Sciences Online; Searching the History of Science Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Robert E.

    1985-01-01

    Search terms and user aids are noted in review of databases covering historical material in the hard and social sciences--U.S. Political Science Documents, ERIC, Language and Language Behavior Abstracts, POPLINE and Population Bibliography, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Child Abuse and Neglect, GEOREF, International Pharmaceuticals Abstracts,…

  2. Turning Visitors into Citizens: Using Social Science for Civic Engagement in Informal Science Education Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunten, Alexis; Arvizu, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    How can museums and other informal learning institutions cultivate greater civic engagement among the visiting public around important social issues? This case study of the National Network of Ocean and Climate Change Interpreters' (NNOCCI) professional learning community illustrates how insights from the social sciences can be productively…

  3. Turning Visitors into Citizens: Using Social Science for Civic Engagement in Informal Science Education Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunten, Alexis; Arvizu, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    How can museums and other informal learning institutions cultivate greater civic engagement among the visiting public around important social issues? This case study of the National Network of Ocean and Climate Change Interpreters' (NNOCCI) professional learning community illustrates how insights from the social sciences can be productively…

  4. Applying Social Justice Principles through School-Based Restorative Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von der Embse, Nathan; von der Embse, Daniel; von der Embse Meghan; Levine, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Social justice has recently received attention within the school psychology community. Yet, social justice is a nebulous term, as opined by Connelly (2009), who cautioned against searching for what is wrong and instead striving for the highest standards and recognizing needs of every unique child. Shriberg and colleagues (2008) have sought to…

  5. Collaborative Research and Social Change: Applied Anthropology in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stull, Donald D., Ed.; Schensul, Jean J., Ed.

    Promoting social change is the goal of the seven community case studies reported in this book. Each study is a "natural experiment" that involved long-term research, close collaboration between researchers and the host community, and the application of research methods and findings to social change goals within the community. The following reports…

  6. Applying Social Justice Principles through School-Based Restorative Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von der Embse, Nathan; von der Embse, Daniel; von der Embse Meghan; Levine, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Social justice has recently received attention within the school psychology community. Yet, social justice is a nebulous term, as opined by Connelly (2009), who cautioned against searching for what is wrong and instead striving for the highest standards and recognizing needs of every unique child. Shriberg and colleagues (2008) have sought to…

  7. Integrating Genetics and Social Science: Genetic Risk Scores

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, Daniel W.; Israel, Salomon

    2014-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome and the advent of low-cost genome-wide assays that generate millions of observations of individual genomes in a matter of hours constitute a disruptive innovation for social science. Many public-use social science datasets have or will soon add genome-wide genetic data. With these new data come technical challenges, but also new possibilities. Among these, the lowest hanging fruit and the most potentially disruptive to existing research programs is the ability to measure previously invisible contours of health and disease risk within populations. In this article, we outline why now is the time for social scientists to bring genetics into their research programs. We discuss how to select genetic variants to study. We explain how the polygenic architecture of complex traits and the low penetrance of individual genetic loci pose challenges to research integrating genetics and social science. We introduce genetic risk scores as a method of addressing these challenges and provide guidance on how genetic risk scores can be constructed. We conclude by outlining research questions that are ripe for social science inquiry. PMID:25343363

  8. On Location Learning: Authentic Applied Science with Networked Augmented Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, Eric; Klopfer, Eric; Perry, Judy

    2007-01-01

    The learning of science can be made more like the practice of science through authentic simulated experiences. We have created a networked handheld Augmented Reality environment that combines the authentic role-playing of Augmented Realities and the underlying models of Participatory Simulations. This game, known as Outbreak @ The Institute, is…

  9. On Location Learning: Authentic Applied Science with Networked Augmented Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, Eric; Klopfer, Eric; Perry, Judy

    2007-01-01

    The learning of science can be made more like the practice of science through authentic simulated experiences. We have created a networked handheld Augmented Reality environment that combines the authentic role-playing of Augmented Realities and the underlying models of Participatory Simulations. This game, known as Outbreak @ The Institute, is…

  10. Scientific Method in Teaching Physics in Languages and Social Sciences Department of High—Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagl, Mirko G.; Obadović, Dušanka Ž.; Stojanović, Maja M.

    2010-01-01

    The expansion of scientific materials in the last few decades, demands that the contemporary educational system should select and develop methods of effective learning in the process of acquiring skills and knowledge usable and feasible for a longer period of time. Grammar schools as general educational institutions possess all that is necessary for the development of new teaching methods and fitting into contemporary social tendencies. In the languages and social sciences department in of grammar schools physics is the only natural sciences subject present during all four years. The classical approach to teaching is tiring as such and creates aversion towards learning physic when it deals with pupils oriented towards social sciences. The introduction of scientific methods raises the motivation to a substantial level and when applied both the teacher and pupils forget when the class starts or ends. The assignment has shown the analysis of initial knowledge of physics of the pupils attending the first grade of languages and social sciences department of of grammar schools as a preparation for the introduction of the scientific method, the analysis of the initial test with the topic of gravitation, as well as the analysis of the final test after applying the scientific method through the topic of gravitation. The introduction of the scientific method has duly justified the expectations and resulted in increasing the level of achievement among the pupils in the experimental class.

  11. Response: From Fish and Bicycles to a Science of Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Jeanne Cay

    2012-01-01

    John Brekke challenges the field and profession of social work to define and develop the "science of social work". This response to Brekke's paper identifies the premises undergirding a discussion of the science of social work related to (1) a definition of "science";; (2 ) an organizing principle for social work; (3) a recognition that the task…

  12. Difficulties Associated with the Application of Social Science Data in Policy Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Frank

    The paper discusses problems faced by policy makers in utilizing social science research in decision making on educational issues and problems. The term social science research is interpreted as including both educational evaluation and educational research. The history of social science research and critical issues associated with social science…

  13. Response: From Fish and Bicycles to a Science of Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Jeanne Cay

    2012-01-01

    John Brekke challenges the field and profession of social work to define and develop the "science of social work". This response to Brekke's paper identifies the premises undergirding a discussion of the science of social work related to (1) a definition of "science";; (2 ) an organizing principle for social work; (3) a recognition that the task…

  14. Habitus, social fields, and circuits in rural science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Carol B.; Shumar, Wesley; Hammond, Lorie; Carlone, Heidi; Kimmel, Sue; Tschida, Christina

    2010-06-01

    Schooling and science education are embedded within larger socio-cultural, political and economic contexts, influenced by global flows of capital, labor, ideas, and images. In this article we consider the ways in which ethnography traces the web of interactions (circuits), in a rural community and the ways that science inquiry was associated with character education. Our discussion examines the relationship between social fields, habitus, and meritocracy under new and ever-changing neoliberal conditions. These macro-level forces play out in everyday practices in the community and reveal schools, as well as science education, as sites for struggle.

  15. Socially Responsible Science Is More than “Good Science”

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of scientist carries an array of responsibilities. The most obvious is accurate and reliable research that can be depended upon by fellow researchers. Scientists also have a responsibility to oppose misuse or abuse in the application of research findings, and to attend to both the limitations and the foreseeable impacts of their work. In addition, as members of society, scientists have a responsibility to participate in discussions and decisions regarding the appropriate use of science in addressing societal issues and concerns, and to bring their specialized knowledge and expertise to activities and discussions that promote the education of students and fellow citizens, thereby enhancing and facilitating informed decision making and democracy. PMID:25574272

  16. The MAVEN mission to Mars: Communicating science through social media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, T.; Renfrow, S.

    2012-12-01

    While science literacy rates in the U.S. have recently increased, overall levels remain remarkably low.There are opportunities for the public to learn about science and to engage directly with real-life practitioners. It is the responsibility of science education and communications professionals to provide these opportunities and to assess the effectiveness of each platform. At the University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), we utilize a diverse, well-tested approach to introduce science to the public and to give scientists access to the broadest possible audience. This poster will focus on NASA's MAVEN mission to Mars and the social media outlets we have incorporated into our Education and Public Outreach (EPO) program in order to introduce rather complex science concepts to the public. We'll examine several evaluation tools that are used to provide ongoing, immediate feedback regarding our strategies and to guide long-term efforts. MAVEN educators and scientists are capitalizing on the recent excitement surrounding Mars science and the public's fascination with the search for life to bring the science of the mission directly to a variety of audiences. Our EPO professionals are using cross-platform, transportable content to maximize exposure and create pathways for two-way interactions between our audience and mission experts. We are using social media tools to build a community that will join us in the MAVEN journey and its important scientific discoveries.

  17. Toward critical spatial thinking in the social sciences and humanities

    PubMed Central

    Goodchild, Michael F.; Janelle, Donald G.

    2010-01-01

    The integration of geographically referenced information into the conceptual frameworks and applied uses of the social sciences and humanities has been an ongoing process over the past few centuries. It has gained momentum in recent decades with advances in technologies for computation and visualization and with the arrival of new data sources. This article begins with an overview of this transition, and argues that the spatial integration of information resources and the cross-disciplinary sharing of analysis and representation methodologies are important forces for the integration of scientific and artistic expression, and that they draw on core concepts in spatial (and spatio-temporal) thinking. We do not suggest that this is akin to prior concepts of unified knowledge systems, but we do maintain that the boundaries to knowledge transfer are disintegrating and that our abilities in problem solving for purposes of artistic expression and scientific development are enhanced through spatial perspectives. Moreover, approaches to education at all levels must recognize the need to impart proficiency in the critical and efficient application of these fundamental spatial concepts, if students and researchers are to make use of expanding access to a broadening range of spatialized information and data processing technologies. PMID:20454588

  18. Differences in short-term memory span of social sciences, science and engineering, and business majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Naeem Ullah

    This study investigated the difference in the short-term memory span of students of three major groups, namely Social Sciences, Science and Engineering, and Business. This study was designed to answer the following two questions: (1) Is there a difference between short-term memory span, measured by digit span, among the students in or intended for Social Sciences, Science and Engineering, and Business majors? (2) Is there a difference of short-term memory span, measured by word span, among students in or intended for Social Sciences, Science and Engineering, and Business majors? For answering these two questions, inferential and descriptive statistics were used. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the means of the scores of digit span and word span among the three major groups. The means of digit span and word span among the three groups were compared to find out if a statistically significant difference existed among them or not. The observations were recorded at the level of significance at alpha = .05, and highly significant at alpha = .01. The answer to the first question is yes. The results of this study showed a statistically significant difference in the means of the digit span of the three major groups of students in or intended for Social Sciences, Science and Engineering, and Business. The mean scaled score for digit span was 12.88 for Social Sciences, 14.27 for Science and Engineering, and 15.33 for Business majors, respectively. The means of the free recalls word span of the three groups was 7.23 for Social Sciences, 7.89 for Science and Engineering, and 7.12 for Business majors, respectively. No significant difference was observed in the means of the word span of the three groups. In general observations, it is noted that students want to stay in the subjects or majors in which they can perform well or feel comfortable. In addition to this, students are screened in the school system due to levels of performance or selection pressure. Students' academic performances are dependent on their academic environment and on their inherited construct of short-term and long-term memory span. The use of the memory in certain majors, such as Science and Engineering and Business, are more demanding as compared to Social Science majors. For example, for Science and Engineering majors, students need to memorize complex structures and also need to keep larger information at a stretch in their short-term memory to incorporate it into incoming and outgoing information. Of the other memory related constructs, the present study examined only the short-term memory of the students of different majors, and it was found that the students of the Social Sciences had a shorter digit span as compared to the Science and Engineering and Business majors. Business major students had the largest digit span as compared to the Social Sciences and Science and Engineering majors. This supports the idea that memory construct plays a role in the selection of student majors.

  19. Child Development Associate. Social Science: Children in the Cosmos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oscar Rose Junior Coll., Midwest City, OK.

    This Child Development Associate (CDA) training module, one of a series of 18, is designed to help the CDA intern provide learning experiences in the social sciences for young children. The module stipulates competency-based objectives and provides essential information, suggestions, examples and learning activities on three topics related to the…

  20. Recent Gerontological Developments in Psychology and Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carp, Frances M.; Nydegger, Corinne

    1975-01-01

    Reports to members of other Sections of the Gerontological Society recent developments in Psychology and Social Sciences Section (P & SS) which might be of interest to them. Three areas mentioned include sex and aging comparative studies on aging, and adult education. Presented in the Vice-Presidential Symposium at the annual meeting of…

  1. Socializing Respect and Knowledge in a Racially Integrated Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solis, Jorge; Kattan, Shlomy; Baquedano-Lopez, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    In this article we examine the socialization of respect in a racially integrated science classroom in Northern California that employed a character education program called Tribes. We focus on the ways scripts derived from this program are enacted during Community Circle activities and how breaches to these scripts and the norms of respectful…

  2. Data Archives for the Social Sciences: Purposes, Operations and Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasatir, David

    Social science data, existing in a format that can be manipulated by computing machinery, can be used for many purposes in addition to those for which they were initially collected. Scholars and government planners should hve ready and equal access to such material and these groups will be best served if they are informed regarding the…

  3. Literature for History-Social Science. Kindergarten through Grade Eight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    The use of literature in the history-social science curriculum has been found to be an effective means of generating students' interest, enhancing their understanding, and enriching the curriculum. This annotated guide contains listings of books to be used in teaching students in grades K-8 that have been selected as particularly helpful in the…

  4. A Science of Social Work? Response to John Brekke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Ian

    2014-01-01

    I take the opportunity provided by John Brekke's (2012) article to respond to the general assumptions and approaches that may be brought when considering the question of a science of social work. I consider first, what should be our frames of reference, our communities of interest, or our boundaries of inclusion, for such a discussion?…

  5. Course Goals in Social Science, Grades K-12. Critique Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Multnomah County Intermediate Education District, Portland, OR.

    This document on course goals in the social sciences is one part of a critique series dealing with the development and evaluation of course goals in six subject matter areas for grades K-12. The series provides an initial pool of course-level goals that are expected to be of considerable value in assisting educators with goal definition related to…

  6. Obtaining Original Publications in the Educational and Related Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard Van Leer Foundation, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Guidelines are presented for obtaining educational and social science research documents from several information retrieval, clearinghouse, and document delivery services. The guide is international in scope; services are from all parts of the world, and addresses are given for correspondence from within and outside the United States. Contained in…

  7. Preparing Students for Science in the Face of Social Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramschreiber, Terry; Westmoreland, David

    2015-01-01

    Science educators often teach topics that are largely resolved in the scientific community yet remain controversial in broader society. In such cases, students may perceive the teacher as biased. We present two exercises that foster more objective learning about the scientific underpinnings of socially controversial topics. The first exercise…

  8. On Using GIS to Teach in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Jill S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how a professor can harness the power of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and use GIS to teach in the social sciences. She shows examples of how GIS can illustrate concepts during lecture or discussion, and provides two specific GIS assignments: one for undergraduate students and the other for graduate…

  9. Social Science Libraries Section. Special Libraries Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Three papers on the nonconventional literature and social science libraries were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. In "Grey Material: A Scandinavian View," Birgitta Bergdahl (Sweden) outlines the etymology and meaning of the concept of "grey literature" (which can include reports, theses,…

  10. A Social Science Bibliography of Leisure and Recreation Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdge, Rabel J.; And Others

    This bibliography provides an accessible source to social science research in leisure, recreation, and sports. Topical areas covered include: (1) bibliographic sources on leisure and recreation; (2) philosophical issues in leisure; (3) theories of leisure and recreation; (4) methods in leisure and recreation research; (5) evaluation of leisure and…

  11. Preparing Students for Science in the Face of Social Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramschreiber, Terry; Westmoreland, David

    2015-01-01

    Science educators often teach topics that are largely resolved in the scientific community yet remain controversial in broader society. In such cases, students may perceive the teacher as biased. We present two exercises that foster more objective learning about the scientific underpinnings of socially controversial topics. The first exercise…

  12. Tuning in to Young Viewers: Social Science Perspectives on Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBeth, Tannis M., Ed.

    Research indicates that children are especially vulnerable to the effects of television viewing. Taking a psychological, social-science perspective, this book explores how television viewing affects children. Chapter 1, "Introduction," (MacBeth) discusses the issues involved, how researchers go about studying media effects, whether television…

  13. The Treatment of Wife Abuse in Recent Social Science Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardell, Laurie; And Others

    This paper reviews the social science literature dealing with gender relations in marriage and the issues of wife abuse. It is argued that the old anti-woman biases of the literature have not really diminished under the impact of feminism. The sexist assumptions and victim-blaming focus of the new battery literature are examined through…

  14. Behavioral and Social Science Research: A National Resource. Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Robert McC., Ed.; And Others

    Areas of behavioral and social science research that have achieved significant breakthroughs in knowledge or application or that show future promise of achieving such breakthroughs are discussed in 12 papers. For example, the paper on formal demography shows how mathematical or statistical techniques can be used to explain and predict change in…

  15. Using Geography To Integrate Science and Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dircks, Henry

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on geography in secondary education, offering reasons why geography is becoming more popular in schools. Provides four activities that integrate science and social studies through geography. Includes topics such as ecological disasters, monsoons, the ozone layer, and global warming. (CMK)

  16. Teaching for Thinking in History and the Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Carol Lynn H.

    "Critical thinking" has been defined as reasonable, reflective thinking that is focused on deciding what to believe or do. Since the social sciences require practitioners to ask relevant questions, develop appropriate evaluation criteria, generalize from observed facts, conceptualize hypotheses, and make judgements, critical thinking skills should…

  17. On Using GIS to Teach in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Jill S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how a professor can harness the power of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and use GIS to teach in the social sciences. She shows examples of how GIS can illustrate concepts during lecture or discussion, and provides two specific GIS assignments: one for undergraduate students and the other for graduate…

  18. Tuning in to Young Viewers: Social Science Perspectives on Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacBeth, Tannis M., Ed.

    Research indicates that children are especially vulnerable to the effects of television viewing. Taking a psychological, social-science perspective, this book explores how television viewing affects children. Chapter 1, "Introduction," (MacBeth) discusses the issues involved, how researchers go about studying media effects, whether television…

  19. Theoretical and Methodological Approaches to Social Sciences and Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Varela, Asuncion, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This is a unique and groundbreaking collection of questions and answers coming from higher education institutions on diverse fields and across a wide spectrum of countries and cultures. It creates routes for further innovation, collaboration amidst the Sciences (both Natural and Social), the Humanities, and the private and public sectors of…

  20. Organizing for Social Science/Citizenship Improvement: A Rural Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Beverly; Hoffmeyer, Carl

    An instructional change model, known as OSSI (Organizing for Social Science Improvement) which helps small rural school administrators and teachers learn about, respond to, and effectively adapt new ideas to local instructional settings, is described. The OSSI project was begun in 1979, when 29 districts in east Texas had documented student and…

  1. Social Science Research on Southeast Asian Refugee Settlement in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indra, Doreen Marie

    Surveyed in this paper is the social science research on Southeast Asian refugee settlement in Canada. According to the survey, the body of literature on Indochinese immigrants is substantially larger than those on other ethnocultural Canadian populations of comparable size. Policy analysis is well developed, and there now exists sufficient…

  2. Articulation in the Social Sciences: Who Needs It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Robert A.

    Addressing the general subject of "Articulation and the Student," this speech proposes administrative approaches to the problems of articulation between social science programs at the high school, community college, and four-year college levels. Problems are organized in the form of an acrostic--"SOCIETY," which stands for (1) Substance, (2)…

  3. Guide to Social Science Resources in Women's Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakes, Elizabeth H.; Sheldon, Kathleen E.

    This annotated bibliography describes the contents and critically evaluates 654 social science books and collections of journal articles in women's studies. The objective is to assist in research and in the organization of undergraduate or graduate courses on women. The resources are presented in nine sections. Section I covers anthropology,…

  4. Science, Technology, and Society in the Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiddie, Laura

    1990-01-01

    Highlights some current resources for teaching science-related social issues in elementary and secondary classrooms from the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) database. Issues covered are varied and include population growth, environmental concerns, bioethical questions, hunger and food resources, water resources, nuclear energy, and…

  5. TEACHING OF SOCIAL SCIENCE MATERIAL IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOX, ROBERT S.; AND OTHERS

    OBJECTIVES WERE--(1) TO UTILIZE THE WORKING MATERIALS CREATED DURING THE PREVIOUS YEAR, (2) TO EXPLORE THE NEED FOR A SET OF RESOURCE MATERIALS DIRECTED TOWARD HELPING THE CLASSROOM TEACHER GAIN KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS TO HELP IN THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL SCIENCE, (3) TO FIELD-TEST THE RESOURCE MATERIALS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS, (4) TO DEVELOP AND TEST…

  6. The Perspective of Women Managing Research Teams in Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomas, Marina; Castro, Diego

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a research study that focuses on how women manage research teams. More specifically, the study aims to ascertain the perception of female researchers who are leaders of research groups in social sciences with regard to the formation, operation and management of their research teams. Fifteen interviews were carried out, eight…

  7. Puerto Ricans in Historical and Social Science Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Clara E.

    This review of the literature on Puerto Ricans in historical and social science research focuses on major English-language books. The review finds that colonialism has been a major factor in, an orienting influence of, and a focus for critical writing about Puerto Ricans. In general, books published before 1970 were reflective, implicitly or…

  8. Using WebQuests in the Social Sciences Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kachina, Olga A.

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates if WebQuests have been an effective instructional tool for teaching Social Sciences subjects. In order to obtain an answer to this question, a review of scholarly literature from 1995 to the present has been undertaken and action research in 8th grade U.S. history course was conducted. The literature investigation has…

  9. The National Science Foundation: Funding Opportunities for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaskyte, Kristina

    2005-01-01

    This article introduces the National Science Foundation as a potential funding source for social work researchers and describes the experience of one faculty member in seeking funding from this source. The author provides an overview of the foundation, discusses its programmatic structure, proposal preparation, selection criteria, and review…

  10. Funds of Relationality: Social Bonds and Science Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smardon, Regina

    2011-01-01

    In this response to Konstantinos Alexakos, Jayson K. Jones, and Victor H. Rodriguez, I will focus primarily on the importance of relationality for the development of a science learner identity. Along the way I will review (1) The cultural dynamics involved with the formation and sustenance of relationships in social life; (2) The methodological…

  11. The Future of Teaching Research in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Current literature on teaching research methodology in the social sciences highlights the changing nature of our world in terms of its complexity and diversity, and points to how this affects the way in which we search for answers to related problems (Brew 2003, 3; Tashakkori and Teddlie 2003, 74). New ways of approaching research problems that…

  12. Science, Technology, and Society in the Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiddie, Laura

    1990-01-01

    Highlights some current resources for teaching science-related social issues in elementary and secondary classrooms from the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) database. Issues covered are varied and include population growth, environmental concerns, bioethical questions, hunger and food resources, water resources, nuclear energy, and…

  13. A Guide to Federal Funding in the Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficklen, Myra

    This guide is intended to help colleges and universities identify sources of federal funding in the social sciences. Brief summaries of federal program grants for institutions and for individuals are provided. Each summary includes a description of the grant, the amount of money available, and deadlines for applications. Grants for research and…

  14. Visions of the Future. Social Science Activities Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melnick, Rob; And Others

    Intended to put both national and global issues into perspective and help students make decisions about their futures, this supplementary social science activities text provides students with various approaches for thinking about future resources. The program can be integrated into high school classes focusing on government problems, current…

  15. The National Science Foundation: Funding Opportunities for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaskyte, Kristina

    2005-01-01

    This article introduces the National Science Foundation as a potential funding source for social work researchers and describes the experience of one faculty member in seeking funding from this source. The author provides an overview of the foundation, discusses its programmatic structure, proposal preparation, selection criteria, and review…

  16. Using Likert-Type Scales in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croasmun, James T.; Ostrom, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Likert scales are useful in social science and attitude research projects. The General Self-Efficacy Exam is a test used to determine whether factors in educational settings affect participant's learning self-efficacy. The original instrument had 10 efficacy items and used a 4-point Likert scale. The Cronbach's alphas for the original test ranged…

  17. Social Sciences in Forestry. A Current Selected Bibliography, No. 61.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Judith L., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Provided in this document is a bibliography of selected materials addressing the interface between forestry and the social sciences. Materials include articles appearing in United States and foreign professional journals, bibliographies, conference proceedings, and other types of publications. A subject-matter classification scheme, in outline…

  18. Socializing Respect and Knowledge in a Racially Integrated Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solis, Jorge; Kattan, Shlomy; Baquedano-Lopez, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    In this article we examine the socialization of respect in a racially integrated science classroom in Northern California that employed a character education program called Tribes. We focus on the ways scripts derived from this program are enacted during Community Circle activities and how breaches to these scripts and the norms of respectful…

  19. Theoretical and Methodological Approaches to Social Sciences and Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Varela, Asuncion, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This is a unique and groundbreaking collection of questions and answers coming from higher education institutions on diverse fields and across a wide spectrum of countries and cultures. It creates routes for further innovation, collaboration amidst the Sciences (both Natural and Social), the Humanities, and the private and public sectors of…

  20. A Science of Social Work? Response to John Brekke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Ian

    2014-01-01

    I take the opportunity provided by John Brekke's (2012) article to respond to the general assumptions and approaches that may be brought when considering the question of a science of social work. I consider first, what should be our frames of reference, our communities of interest, or our boundaries of inclusion, for such a discussion?…

  1. Ranciere and the Poetics of the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelletier, Caroline

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the significance of Jacques Ranciere's work for methodological debates in the social sciences, and education specifically. It explores the implications of constructing research as an aesthetic, rather than primarily a methodological, endeavour. What is at stake in this distinction is the means by which research intervenes in…

  2. Career Activities in Social Science: Grades 7, 8, 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boise City Independent School District, ID.

    The career activities guide in social science, part of an Idaho State Department of Vocational Education career exploration series for grades 7, 8, and 9, is designed as supplementary material to enrich the regular curriculum. Any one activity in the guide might be used without involving any other activities. The cross-referenced index indicates…

  3. Social Sciences and Constitutional Rights--the Consequences of Uncertainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, Ronald M.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the theoretical basis of court decisions involving school integration, analyzing the relationship between education, constitutional law, and the social sciences. Concludes that court decisions dealing with the equal protection clause are based on interpretive judgments, rather than on causal judgments drawn from statistical theory. (JG)

  4. Can Social Science Data Be Used in Judicial Decisionmaking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, William E.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the importance of social science data in influencing federal court decisions, particularly in cases involving school integration, and concludes that the impact of such data on judicial decision-making in the field of constitutional law is less than is generally presumed. (JG)

  5. Virginia History and Social Science Standards of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the Middle States Council for the Social Studies, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents the history and social science standards of Virginia for history, geography, economics, and civics (K-3); Virginia studies (grade 4); U.S. history (grades 5-6); civics/economics (grade 7); world history (grades 8-9); world geography (grade 10); U.S. history (grade 11); and U.S. and Virginia government (grade 12). (CMK)

  6. Update 76: Selected Recent Works in the Social Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Mary L., Ed.; Lusignan, Louise, Ed.

    This is a selected bibliography of current reference and acquisition tools in the social sciences. The tools include sourcebooks, dictionaries, indexes, conference proceedings, special bibliographies, directories, research reports, and journals. Most citations represent works published since 1970 and new editions of important earlier works.…

  7. Philosophy's Contribution to Social Science Research on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammersley, Martyn

    2006-01-01

    This article offers a Weberian perspective on philosophy's relationship to social science research in education. Two key areas where it can make an important contribution are discussed: methodology, and the clarification of value principles that necessarily frame inquiries. In relation to both areas, it is claimed that some researchers…

  8. 78 FR 57178 - NASA Applied Sciences Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ...., Washington, DC 20546. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Peter Meister, Science Mission Directorate, NASA... . ] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The meeting will be open to the public up to the capacity of the room. The agenda...

  9. Unpacking the Relationship Between Science Education and Applied Scientific Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Amanda; Schunn, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Scientific literacy has many meanings: it can be thought of as foundational knowledge, foundational critical thinking skills, or the application of these two foundations to everyday decision making. Here, we examine the far transfer scenario: do increases in science education lead to everyday decision-making becoming more consistent with consensus scientific knowledge? We report on a large sample of employees of a mixed urban/rural county representing a diverse range of careers, who completed an anonymous survey about their environmental conservation actions at home, as well as their general education level and their science coursework. Across broad and narrow measures of science education, we find little impact on action. Possible causes of this failure of transfer and the implications for changes in science instruction are discussed.

  10. Unpacking the Relationship Between Science Education and Applied Scientific Literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowell, Amanda; Schunn, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Scientific literacy has many meanings: it can be thought of as foundational knowledge, foundational critical thinking skills, or the application of these two foundations to everyday decision making. Here, we examine the far transfer scenario: do increases in science education lead to everyday decision-making becoming more consistent with consensus scientific knowledge? We report on a large sample of employees of a mixed urban/rural county representing a diverse range of careers, who completed an anonymous survey about their environmental conservation actions at home, as well as their general education level and their science coursework. Across broad and narrow measures of science education, we find little impact on action. Possible causes of this failure of transfer and the implications for changes in science instruction are discussed.

  11. PREFACE: Inverse Problems in Applied Sciences—towards breakthrough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jin; Iso, Yuusuke; Nakamura, Gen; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2007-06-01

    These are the proceedings of the international conference `Inverse Problems in Applied Sciences—towards breakthrough' which was held at Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan on 3-7 July 2006 (http://coe.math.sci.hokudai.ac.jp/sympo/inverse/). There were 88 presentations and more than 100 participants, and we are proud to say that the conference was very successful. Nowadays, many new activities on inverse problems are flourishing at many centers of research around the world, and the conference has successfully gathered a world-wide variety of researchers. We believe that this volume contains not only main papers, but also conveys the general status of current research into inverse problems. This conference was the third biennial international conference on inverse problems, the core of which is the Pan-Pacific Asian area. The purpose of this series of conferences is to establish and develop constant international collaboration, especially among the Pan-Pacific Asian countries, and to lead the organization of activities concerning inverse problems centered in East Asia. The first conference was held at City University of Hong Kong in January 2002 and the second was held at Fudan University in June 2004. Following the preceding two successes, the third conference was organized in order to extend the scope of activities and build useful bridges to the next conference in Seoul in 2008. Therefore this third biennial conference was intended not only to establish collaboration and links between researchers in Asia and leading researchers worldwide in inverse problems but also to nurture interdisciplinary collaboration in theoretical fields such as mathematics, applied fields and evolving aspects of inverse problems. For these purposes, we organized tutorial lectures, serial lectures and a panel discussion as well as conference research presentations. This volume contains three lecture notes from the tutorial and serial lectures, and 22 papers. Especially at this flourishing time, it is necessary to carefully analyse the current status of inverse problems for further development. Thus we have opened with the panel discussion entitled `Future of Inverse Problems' with panelists: Professors J Cheng, H W Engl, V Isakov, R Kress, J-K Seo, G Uhlmann and the commentator: Elaine Longden-Chapman from IOP Publishing. The aims of the panel discussion were to examine the current research status from various viewpoints, to discuss how we can overcome any difficulties and how we can promote young researchers and open new possibilities for inverse problems such as industrial linkages. As one output, the panel discussion has triggered the organization of the Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) which has led to its first international congress in the summer of 2007. Another remarkable outcome of the conference is, of course, the present volume: this is the very high quality online proceedings volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Readers can see in these proceedings very well written tutorial lecture notes, and very high quality original research and review papers all of which show what was achieved by the time the conference was held. The electronic publication of the proceedings is a new way of publicizing the achievement of the conference. It has the advantage of wide circulation and cost reduction. We believe this is a most efficient method for our needs and purposes. We would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge all the people who helped to organize the conference. Guest Editors Jin Cheng, Fudan University, Shanghai, China Yuusuke Iso, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan Gen Nakamura, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan Masahiro Yamamoto, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan

  12. Applying Historic Science Communication Lessons to Today's Global Change Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocchio, L. E.

    2009-12-01

    As global population surges towards seven billion and anthropogenic impacts ricochet throughout Earth’s environment, effective science communication has become essential. In today’s digital world where science communication must contend with stiff competition for audience attention, it is crucial to understand the lessons gleaned from a century worth of science communication research. Starting in the early part of the twentieth century a cadre of American scientists began to advocate for better public understanding of science, arguing that better understanding of science meant a better quality of life, better public affairs deliberations, and the elevation of democracy and culture. To improve science communication, many models of the communication process have been developed since then. Starting in the 1940s, science communication researchers adopted the linear communication model of electrical engineering. Over time, the one-way scientific communication of the linear model came to be identified with the deficit model approach—which assumes little prior scientific knowledge on the part of the receiver. A major failure of the deficit model was witnessed during the Mad Cow Disease outbreak in the UK: beef safety was over-simplified in the communication process, people were given a false sense of security, many ended up sick, and public trust in government plummeted. Of the many lessons learned from failures of the deficit model, arguably, the most significant lesson is that the public’s prior knowledge and life experience is always brought to bear on the message, i.e. the message must be contextualized. Here, we examine the major science communication lessons of the past century and discuss how they can inform more effective global change communication.

  13. Applied aerodynamics experience for secondary science teachers and students

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbitt, John D., III; Carroll, Bruce F.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Aerospace Engineering, Mechanics & Engineering Science at the University of Florida in conjunction with the Alachua County, Florida School Board has embarked on a four-year project of university-secondary school collaboration designed to enhance mathematics and science instruction in secondary school classrooms. The goals are to provide teachers with a fundamental knowledge of flight sciences, and to stimulate interest among students, particularly women and minorities, toward careers in engineering, mathematics, and science. In the first year of the project, all thirteen of the eighth grade physical science teachers and all 1200 of the eighth grade physical science students in the county participated. The activities consisted of a three-day seminar taught at the college level for the teachers, several weeks of classroom instruction for all the students, and an airport field trip for a subgroup of about 430 students that included an orientation flight in a Cessna 172 aircraft. The project brought together large numbers of middle school students, teachers, undergraduate and graduate engineering students, school board administrators, and university engineering faculty.

  14. Experiences & Tools from Modeling Instruction Applied to Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervenec, J.; Landis, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Framework for K-12 Science Education calls for stronger curricular connections within the sciences, greater depth in understanding, and tasks higher on Bloom's Taxonomy. Understanding atmospheric sciences draws on core knowledge traditionally taught in physics, chemistry, and in some cases, biology. If this core knowledge is not conceptually sound, well retained, and transferable to new settings, understanding the causes and consequences of climate changes become a task in memorizing seemingly disparate facts to a student. Fortunately, experiences and conceptual tools have been developed and refined in the nationwide network of Physics Modeling and Chemistry Modeling teachers to build necessary understanding of conservation of mass, conservation of energy, particulate nature of matter, kinetic molecular theory, and particle model of light. Context-rich experiences are first introduced for students to construct an understanding of these principles and then conceptual tools are deployed for students to resolve misconceptions and deepen their understanding. Using these experiences and conceptual tools takes an investment of instructional time, teacher training, and in some cases, re-envisioning the format of a science classroom. There are few financial barriers to implementation and students gain a greater understanding of the nature of science by going through successive cycles of investigation and refinement of their thinking. This presentation shows how these experiences and tools could be used in an Earth Science course to support students developing conceptually rich understanding of the atmosphere and connections happening within.

  15. B. F. Skinner and G. H. Mead: on biological science and social science.

    PubMed Central

    Blackman, D E

    1991-01-01

    Skinner's contributions to psychology provide a unique bridge between psychology conceptualized as a biological science and psychology conceptualized as a social science. Skinner focused on behavior as a naturally occurring biological phenomenon of interest in its own right, functionally related to surrounding events and, in particular (like phylogenesis), subject to selection by its consequences. This essentially biological orientation was further enhanced by Skinner's emphasis on the empirical foundations provided by laboratory-based experimental analyses of behavior, often with nonhuman subjects. Skinner's theoretical writings, however, also have affinity with the traditions of constructionist social science. The verbal behavior of humans is said to be subject, like other behavior, to functional analyses in terms of its environment, in this case its social context. Verbal behavior in turn makes it possible for us to relate to private events, a process that ultimately allows for the development of consciousness, which is thus said to be a social product. Such ideas make contact with aspects of G. H. Mead's social behaviorism and, perhaps of more contemporary impact in psychology, L. Vygotsky's general genetic law of cultural development. Failure to articulate both the biological and the social science aspects of Skinner's theoretical approach to psychology does a disservice to his unique contribution to a discipline that remains fragmented between two intellectual traditions. PMID:2037828

  16. What is Social Sciences and Humanities Research "Worth,"? Neoliberalism and the Framing of Social Sciences and Humanities Work in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson-Harden, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This article offers a critique of the discursive politics represented in attempts to frame social sciences and humanities work in the mould of neoliberal knowledge capitalism. The critique offered is inspired by Foucault's critical thought on neoliberalism and an interpretation of "neoliberal governmentality" that flows from his…

  17. The Ghetto Underclass: Social Science Perspectives. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, William Julius, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This volume presents the research findings of numerous scholars on the theme, The Ghetto Underclass: Social Science Perspectives. The following 13 articles are included: (1) "The Cost of Racial and Class Exclusion in the Inner City" (L. Wacquant and W. Wilson); (2) "Urban Industrial Transition and the Underclass" (J. Kasarda); (3) "Absent Fathers…

  18. What is Social Sciences and Humanities Research "Worth,"? Neoliberalism and the Framing of Social Sciences and Humanities Work in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson-Harden, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This article offers a critique of the discursive politics represented in attempts to frame social sciences and humanities work in the mould of neoliberal knowledge capitalism. The critique offered is inspired by Foucault's critical thought on neoliberalism and an interpretation of "neoliberal governmentality" that flows from his…

  19. Humphry Davy: science and social mobility.

    PubMed

    Knight, D M

    2000-01-01

    Humphry Davy (1778-1829) was one of the first professional scientists, earning his living and rising spectacularly from an impoverished upbringing in Cornwall to be President of the Royal Society and a baronet. He owed his rise to patronage as well as to his range of abilities: as a lecturer, as a chemical theorist and as a very early applied scientist. But his exalted position brought him little happiness, for he could not satisfy all the hopes put upon him as the successor to Sir Joseph Banks. Admired rather than loved, he became unpopular and was seen as haughty. In his last two years, spent wandering lonely and sickly in Italy and the Alps, he sought to make sense of his life, writing dialogues as his bequest to the new generation. PMID:11196988

  20. Global aspirations, local realities: the role of social science research in controlling neglected tropical diseases.

    PubMed

    Bardosh, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) are both drivers and manifestations of poverty and social inequality. Increased advocacy efforts since the mid-2000s have led to ambitious new control and elimination targets set for 2020 by the World Health Organisation. While these global aspirations represent significant policy momentum, there are multifaceted challenges in controlling infectious diseases in resource-poor local contexts that need to be acknowledged, understood and engaged. However a number of recent publications have emphasised the "neglected" status of applied social science research on NTDs. In light of the 2020 targets, this paper explores the social science/NTD literature and unpacks some of the ways in which social inquiry can help support effective and sustainable interventions. Five priority areas are discussed, including on policy processes, health systems capacity, compliance and resistance to interventions, education and behaviour change, and community participation. The paper shows that despite the multifaceted value of having anthropological and sociological perspectives integrated into NTD programmes, contemporary efforts underutilise this potential. This is reflective of the dominance of top-down information flows and technocratic approaches in global health. To counter this tendency, social research needs to be more than an afterthought; integrating social inquiry into the planning, monitoring and evaluating process will help ensure that flexibility and adaptability to local realities are built into interventions. More emphasis on social science perspectives can also help link NTD control to broader social determinants of health, especially important given the major social and economic inequalities that continue to underpin transmission in endemic countries. PMID:25320672

  1. Handbook of Parenting. Volume 4: Social Conditions and Applied Parenting. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H., Ed.

    Concerned with social contexts and culture as they apply to parenting, this volume, the fourth of five on parenting, deals specifically with socially defined groups of parents and social conditions that promote variations in parenting. The volume consists of the following 15 chapters: (1) "Ethnic and Minority Parenting" (Cynthia Garcia Coll and…

  2. Handbook of Parenting. Volume 4: Social Conditions and Applied Parenting. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H., Ed.

    Concerned with social contexts and culture as they apply to parenting, this volume, the fourth of five on parenting, deals specifically with socially defined groups of parents and social conditions that promote variations in parenting. The volume consists of the following 15 chapters: (1) "Ethnic and Minority Parenting" (Cynthia Garcia Coll and…

  3. Geometric and Applied Optics, Science (Experimental): 5318.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Robert C.

    This unit of instruction presents a laboratory-oriented course which relates the sources and behaviors of light to man's control and uses of light. Successful completion of Algebra I and Plane Geometry is strongly recommended as indicators of success. The course is recommended if the student plans further studies in science, optical technology, or…

  4. Unpacking the Relationship between Science Education and Applied Scientific Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowell, Amanda; Schunn, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Scientific literacy has many meanings: it can be thought of as foundational knowledge, foundational critical thinking skills, or the application of these two foundations to everyday decision making. Here, we examine the far transfer scenario: do increases in science education lead to everyday decision-making becoming more consistent with consensus…

  5. Data-intensive science applied to broad-scale citizen science.

    PubMed

    Hochachka, Wesley M; Fink, Daniel; Hutchinson, Rebecca A; Sheldon, Daniel; Wong, Weng-Keen; Kelling, Steve

    2012-02-01

    Identifying ecological patterns across broad spatial and temporal extents requires novel approaches and methods for acquiring, integrating and modeling massive quantities of diverse data. For example, a growing number of research projects engage continent-wide networks of volunteers ('citizen-scientists') to collect species occurrence data. Although these data are information rich, they present numerous challenges in project design, implementation and analysis, which include: developing data collection tools that maximize data quantity while maintaining high standards of data quality, and applying new analytical and visualization techniques that can accurately reveal patterns in these data. Here, we describe how advances in data-intensive science provide accurate estimates in species distributions at continental scales by identifying complex environmental associations. PMID:22192976

  6. Applying the Science of Learning: Evidence-Based Principles for the Design of Multimedia Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    During the last 100 years, a major accomplishment of psychology has been the development of a science of learning aimed at understanding how people learn. In attempting to apply the science of learning, a central challenge of psychology and education is the development of a science of instruction aimed at understanding how to present material in…

  7. Socially situated activities and identities: Second-grade dual language students and the social construction of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, Nadine

    Latina and Latino American students are among the lowest achievers in science, when compared to European and Asian American students, and are highly underrepresented in science careers. Studies suggested that a part of this problem is students' lack of access to science, due to their status as English language learners and their perceived status as deficient students. This study investigated the social construction of science in a second grade dual language urban classroom that offered bilingual students access to science, while positioning them as competent, capable learners. What participants valued in science was interpreted from their stated beliefs and attitudes, as well as their patterned ways of reading, writing, and talking. A bilingual European American teacher and three Latina and Latino focal students were observed over the course of 10 weeks, as they enacted a science unit, in English, on habitats. Science lessons were videotaped, documented with field notes, and transcribed. Interviews with the teacher and students were audiotaped and transcribed, and relevant curriculum documents, and teacher- and student-generated documents, copied. Gee's (1999) d/Discourse analysis system was applied to the transcripts of science lessons and interviews as a way to understand how participants used language to construct situated activities and identities in science. Curriculum documents were analyzed to understand the positioning of the teacher and students by identifying the situated activities and roles recommended. Students' nonfiction writing and published nonfiction texts were analyzed for linguistic structures, semantic relationships and conventions of science writing. Results indicated that the teacher drew on traditional and progressive pedagogical practices that shaped her and her students' science activities and situated identities. The teacher employed traditional talk strategies to build science themes, while students enacted their roles as compliant learners, but the teacher also provided curricular structures for students to engage in science as knowledge brokers, researching and writing from nonfiction books, and authoring original texts. Conclusions drawn suggest that teachers should be aware that students are multiply positioned as learners, d/Discourse analysis can be a useful tool for studying classroom practices, and science is relational as well as discipline-centered.

  8. Toward an Applied Science of Education: Some Key Questions and Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reif, F.

    1978-01-01

    Goals discussed for developing education into an effective applied science include working toward intellectual standards similar to those in other successful applied sciences, teaching higher level cognitive skills, improving educational delivery through exploitation of current technological means, and striving for the excellence and…

  9. Integration of molecular pathology, epidemiology and social science for global precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Akihiro; Milner, Danny A; Giovannucci, Edward L; Nishihara, Reiko; Tan, Andy S; Kawachi, Ichiro; Ogino, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    The precision medicine concept and the unique disease principle imply that each patient has unique pathogenic processes resulting from heterogeneous cellular genetic and epigenetic alterations and interactions between cells (including immune cells) and exposures, including dietary, environmental, microbial and lifestyle factors. As a core method field in population health science and medicine, epidemiology is a growing scientific discipline that can analyze disease risk factors and develop statistical methodologies to maximize utilization of big data on populations and disease pathology. The evolving transdisciplinary field of molecular pathological epidemiology (MPE) can advance biomedical and health research by linking exposures to molecular pathologic signatures, enhancing causal inference and identifying potential biomarkers for clinical impact. The MPE approach can be applied to any diseases, although it has been most commonly used in neoplastic diseases (including breast, lung and colorectal cancers) because of availability of various molecular diagnostic tests. However, use of state-of-the-art genomic, epigenomic and other omic technologies and expensive drugs in modern healthcare systems increases racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities. To address this, we propose to integrate molecular pathology, epidemiology and social science. Social epidemiology integrates the latter two fields. The integrative social MPE model can embrace sociology, economics and precision medicine, address global health disparities and inequalities, and elucidate biological effects of social environments, behaviors and networks. We foresee advancements of molecular medicine, including molecular diagnostics, biomedical imaging and targeted therapeutics, which should benefit individuals in a global population, by means of an interdisciplinary approach of integrative MPE and social health science. PMID:26636627

  10. Schizotypy as An Organizing Framework for Social and Affective Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Alex S.; Mohr, Christine; Ettinger, Ulrich; Chan, Raymond C. K.; Park, Sohee

    2015-01-01

    Schizotypy, defined in terms of commonly occurring personality traits related to the schizophrenia spectrum, has been an important construct for understanding the neurodevelopment and stress-diathesis of schizophrenia. However, as schizotypy nears its sixth decade of application, it is important to acknowledge its impressively rich literature accumulating outside of schizophrenia research. In this article, we make the case that schizotypy has considerable potential as a conceptual framework for understanding individual differences in affective and social functions beyond those directly involved in schizophrenia spectrum pathology. This case is predicated on (a) a burgeoning literature noting anomalies in a wide range of social functioning, affiliative, positive and negative emotional, expressive, and social cognitive systems, (b) practical and methodological features associated with schizotypy research that help facilitate empirical investigation, and (c) close ties to theoretical constructs of central importance to affective and social science (eg, stress diathesis, neural compensation). We highlight recent schizotypy research, ie providing insight into the nature of affective and social systems more generally. This includes current efforts to clarify the neurodevelopmental, neurobiological, and psychological underpinnings of affiliative drives, hedonic capacity, social cognition, and stress responsivity systems. Additionally, we discuss neural compensatory and resilience factors that may mitigate the expression of stress-diathesis and functional outcome, and highlight schizotypy’s potential role for understanding cultural determinants of social and affective functions. PMID:25810057

  11. Social Science and the Bayesian Probability Explanation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jie; Zhao, Lei

    2014-03-01

    C. G. Hempel, one of the logical empiricists, who builds up his probability explanation model by using the empiricist view of probability, this model encountered many difficulties in the scientific explanation in which Hempel is difficult to make a reasonable defense. Based on the bayesian probability theory, the Bayesian probability model provides an approach of a subjective probability explanation based on the subjective probability, using the subjectivist view of probability. On the one hand, this probability model establishes the epistemological status of the subject in the social science; On the other hand, it provides a feasible explanation model for the social scientific explanation, which has important methodological significance.

  12. Social and Behavioral Sciences: Report of the Project 2061 Phase I Social and Behavioral Sciences Panel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appley, Mortimer H.; Maher, Winifred B.

    This is one of five panel reports that have been prepared as part of the first phase of Project 2061, a long-term, multipurpose undertaking of the American Association for the Advancement of Science designed to help reform science, mathematics, and technology education in the United States. Major sections included are: (1) "Orienting Concepts"…

  13. Understanding University Reform in Japan through the Prism of the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Roger

    2008-01-01

    This article looks at current university reforms in Japan through two slightly different social science prisms: how social science methodologies and theories can help us understand those reforms better and how social science teaching in universities will be affected by the current reform processes. (Contains 3 tables and 7 notes.)

  14. High Society: Are Our Social Sciences as Relevant to Government as They Might Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickham, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Taking up a theme raised by Stuart Cunningham in a recent issue of the "AUR"--that the innovations of Australia's humanities, creative arts, and social sciences are not getting the recognition that they deserve from the nation's government--this paper, dealing only with the social sciences, offers a cautionary note. If the social sciences are to…

  15. 75 FR 65363 - Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network... promote and publicize the Basic Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet) initiative... Behavioral and Social Science Opportunity Network (OppNet) is a trans-NIH initiative to expand the...

  16. Social Science and Evidence-based Everything: The Case of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakley, Ann

    2002-01-01

    Pressures for evidence in social science and educational research suggest a need for systematic research review and synthesis. Four challenges this poses for the social sciences are (1) critical consideration of how the social sciences differ from medicine; (2) reduction of bias in evaluation; (3) better methods for assessing different research…

  17. The State of Social Science History in the Late 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kousser, J. Morgan

    1989-01-01

    Examines definitions of and attitudes toward social science history (SSH), questioning its place in the history and social science curriculum. Reports on a questionnaire (included) sent to members of the Social Science History Association to assess the place of SSH in education. Concludes that SSH is firmly established in several disciplines and…

  18. Scanning force microscopy in the applied biological sciences.

    PubMed

    Reich, Z; Kapon, R; Nevo, R; Pilpel, Y; Zmora, S; Scolnik, Y

    2001-10-01

    Fifteen years after its invention, the scanning force microscope (SFM) is rooted deep in the biological sciences. Here we discuss the use of SFM in biotechnology and biomedical research. The spectrum of applications reviewed includes imaging, force spectroscopy and mapping, as well as sensor applications. It is our hope that this review will be useful for researchers considering the use of SFM in their studies but are uncertain about its scope of capabilities. For the benefit of readers unfamiliar with SFM technology, the fundamentals of SFM imaging and force measurement are also briefly introduced. PMID:14538069

  19. Why Chicago? The Rise of the Chicago School of Urban Social Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Albert

    1980-01-01

    The article presents a brief historical account of the emergence of urban social sciences from 1900 to the 1930s in Chicago (centered at the University of Chicago) and assesses how these developments influenced contemporary social science research on urban social life. A major legacy of early Chicago social scientists is identified as…

  20. Reversals of national fortune, and social science methodologies.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Jared

    2014-12-16

    Among non-European regions colonized by Europeans, regions that were relatively richer five centuries ago (like Mexico, Peru, and India) tend to be poorer today, while regions that originally were relatively poorer (like the United States, Chile, and Australia) tend now to be richer. Acemoglu, Johnson, and Robinson (abbreviated AJR) established the generality of this reversal of fortune. Chanda, Cook, and Putterman (abbreviated CCP) have now reanalyzed it, taking as a unit of analysis populations rather than geographic regions. That is, India's population was Indian 500 y ago and is still overwhelmingly Indian today, whereas the United States' population was Native American 500 years ago but is overwhelmingly Old World (especially European) today. Reversals of fortune disappeared when CCP analyzed populations rather than geographic regions: for instance, the geographic region of the modern United States has become relatively richer since AD 1500, but the predominantly European population now occupying the United States was already relatively rich in AD 1500. Evidently, European colonists carried ingredients of wealth with them. I discuss the biological and cultural baggage transported by European immigrants and associated with wealth. Among that baggage, AJR emphasize institutions, CCP emphasize social capital, and I identify many different elements only loosely coupled to each other. This paper discusses the problem, especially acute in the social sciences, of "operationalizing" intuitive concepts (such as mass, temperature, wealth, and innovation) so that they can be measured. Basic concepts tend to be harder to define, operationalize, and measure in the social sciences than in the laboratory sciences. PMID:25385597

  1. On Location Learning: Authentic Applied Science with Networked Augmented Realities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, Eric; Klopfer, Eric; Perry, Judy

    2007-02-01

    The learning of science can be made more like the practice of science through authentic simulated experiences. We have created a networked handheld Augmented Reality environment that combines the authentic role-playing of Augmented Realities and the underlying models of Participatory Simulations. This game, known as Outbreak @ The Institute, is played across a university campus where players take on the roles of doctors, medical technicians, and public health experts to contain a disease outbreak. Players can interact with virtual characters and employ virtual diagnostic tests and medicines. They are challenged to identify the source and prevent the spread of an infectious disease that can spread among real and/or virtual characters according to an underlying model. In this paper, we report on data from three high school classes who played the game. We investigate students' perception of the authenticity of the game in terms of their personal embodiment in the game, their experience playing different roles, and their understanding of the dynamic model underlying the game.

  2. Physiology and applied sciences in Nepal: 1st annual conference

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing number of medical schools in Nepal, there is an expected increase in the number of Nepalese physiologists. The first medical school was established in the 1970s. We report here about the first annual conference of Nepalese physiologists on 27-28 September 2013 organized by the Department of Clinical Physiology of the Nepalese Army Institute of Health Sciences (NAIHS) and Kathmandu University School of Medical Sciences (KUMS). Nepalese physiologists are trying to form their own physiological society. In this regard, NAIHS and KUMS have played an important role to bring physiologists from different parts of Nepal involved in teaching, learning, and research activities in medical schools. There were a number of foreign invitees (India, Israel, Italy, Japan, and Sweden). There were plenary presentations on the topics that are relevant in Nepal, e.g., high-altitude physiology and wilderness medicine. The final session of the conference was an open session meeting of Nepalese physiologists. There was an open interaction about establishing Nepalese Physiological Society. After much deliberation, there was an agreement to register the society in Kathmandu with the current ad hoc committee which will elect the first executive body of the society. PMID:24580838

  3. Minitheories: A Modular Approach to Learning Applied to Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claxton, Guy

    Perspectives on a psychological approach to learning are offered in this paper. Specific emphasis is directed to the assumption that children possess "minitheories." Minitheories are defined as attempts to make sense of particular kinds of experiences and are explained and delimited by the domain of experience to which they currently apply. This…

  4. Introduction to Circular Accelerators - Basic Science and Applied Research

    SciTech Connect

    Trubnikov, Grigory

    2010-01-05

    This paper gives an introduction to history and overview of circular particle accelerators, reviews acceleration methods and basic principles of: weak and strong focusing, transverse and longitudinal particle motion, optic elements operation. The classification of circular machines is given. Author overviews future projects and technological applied research of particle accelerators.

  5. Field Crop Nutrition--Applied Science Concepts. Student Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Charles R.

    This manual is designed to help agricultural education students to determine and provide the proper kinds and amounts of nutrients for the field crops they produce. The manual provides many learning situations regarding field crops--for example, determining nutrient needs, diagnosing nutrient shortages, and selecting and applying fertilizer and…

  6. Social Studies and Social Sciences: A Fifty-Year Perspective. Bulletin No. 78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wronski, Stanley P., Ed.; Bragaw, Donald H., Ed.

    This publication documents the development of the social studies during the past 50 years. This collection of essays updates major trends in history, political science, sociology, economics, psychology, anthropology, and geography. Unlike two earlier collections, this book has an emphasis on the continuing problems, trends, and issues in both the…

  7. Human Reproduction: Social and Technological Aspects. Innovations: The Social Consequences of Science and Technology Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Mary C.; And Others

    This module is part of an interdisciplinary program designed to educate the general citizenry regarding the issues of science/technology/society that have important consequences for both present and future social policies. Specifically, the program provides an opportunity for students to assess the effects of selected technological innovations in…

  8. Funds of relationality: social bonds and science learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smardon, Regina

    2011-12-01

    In this response to Konstantinos Alexakos, Jayson K. Jones, and Victor H. Rodriguez, I will focus primarily on the importance of relationality for the development of a science learner identity. Along the way I will review (1) The cultural dynamics involved with the formation and sustenance of relationships in social life; (2) The methodological advantages of ethnographic inquiry for exploring funds of relationality; (3) The importance of relationality for science innovation throughout the pipeline of scientific training from K-12 schooling all the way through scientific breakthrough; (4) The absolutely vital role that relationality plays in creating a science learner identity. Finally I highlight how collaborative ethnography, in particular, is an excellent tool for seeking out funds of relationality that can be marshaled in the classroom as well as contributing to conceptual advancement in the theoretical vocabulary of relational sociology.

  9. Social and ethical dimensions of nanoscale science and engineering research.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Aldrin E

    2006-07-01

    Continuing advances in human ability to manipulate matter at the atomic and molecular levels (i.e. nanoscale science and engineering) offer many previously unimagined possibilities for scientific discovery and technological development. Paralleling these advances in the various science and engineering sub-disciplines is the increasing realization that a number of associated social, ethical, environmental, economic and legal dimensions also need to be explored. An important component of such exploration entails the identification and analysis of the ways in which current and prospective researchers in these fields conceptualize these dimensions of their work. Within the context of a National Science Foundation funded Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program in nanomaterials processing and characterization at the University of Central Florida (2002-2004), here I present for discussion (i) details of a "nanotechnology ethics" seminar series developed specifically for students participating in the program, and (ii) an analysis of students' and participating research faculty's perspectives concerning social and ethical issues associated with nanotechnology research. I conclude with a brief discussion of implications presented by these issues for general scientific literacy and public science education policy. PMID:16909148

  10. On the Control of Science: Four Views, IV. On the Social Deployment of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mencher, Alan G.

    1971-01-01

    Suggests that it is the social responsibility of scientists and engineers to correct the vast and dangerous misconceptions about themselves, for there is a real danger that festering anti-scientism could eventually destroy science. Although political processes are used to decide community choices, scientific literacy is a continuing necessity. (AL)

  11. Social Activism in Elementary Science Education: A Science, Technology, and Society Approach to Teach Global Warming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Benjamin T.; Ma, Li; Lee, Okhee; Lambert, Julie

    2006-01-01

    As part of a large-scale instructional intervention research, this study examined elementary students' science knowledge and awareness of social activism with regard to an increased greenhouse effect and global warming. The study involved fifth-grade students from five elementary schools of varying demographic makeup in a large urban school…

  12. Psychiatry as a Behavioral Science. The Behavioral and Social Sciences Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburg, David A., Ed.

    This book is another in a series prepared in connection with the Survey of the Behavioral Social Sciences (BASS) conducted between 1967 and 1969. The task here is to provide several illustrative lines of research in sufficient depth to convey the flavor of scientific work on psychiatric problems to a wide range of readers. The report is primarily…

  13. Social Activism in Elementary Science Education: A Science, Technology, and Society Approach to Teach Global Warming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Benjamin T.; Ma, Li; Lee, Okhee; Lambert, Julie

    2006-01-01

    As part of a large-scale instructional intervention research, this study examined elementary students' science knowledge and awareness of social activism with regard to an increased greenhouse effect and global warming. The study involved fifth-grade students from five elementary schools of varying demographic makeup in a large urban school…

  14. Social Problem Solving through Science: An Approach to Critical, Place-Based, Science Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Cory A.

    2010-01-01

    The Social Problem Solving through Science (SPSS) project engaged middle school-aged youth in the study of local environmental challenges with implications for human health and well-being, both globally and locally. Students considered environmental risk factors in a series of structured activities to develop background knowledge on environmental…

  15. Stable Rules: Science and Social Transmission. Studies in the Learning Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathan, Henry

    In laying the groundwork for a co-operative scientific inquiry in the field of learning sciences the following five areas of access to the study are considered in this introductory inquiry statement: 1) genetic sociology (symbolic systems and early socialization); 2) experimental ethnography (the effect of literacy on the structure of skill and…

  16. Science/Technology/Society: Activities and Resources for Secondary Science and Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Laurel R., Ed.

    This book contains 45 activities suitable for use in secondary science and social studies classes. Except for the first four activities, which are quick attention getters, all the activities are presented in a standard format. Each begins with an introduction, that provides a brief overview of the activity's content and the teaching strategies…

  17. Psychiatry as a Behavioral Science. The Behavioral and Social Sciences Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburg, David A., Ed.

    This book is another in a series prepared in connection with the Survey of the Behavioral Social Sciences (BASS) conducted between 1967 and 1969. The task here is to provide several illustrative lines of research in sufficient depth to convey the flavor of scientific work on psychiatric problems to a wide range of readers. The report is primarily…

  18. Science Student Role: Evidence of Social Structural Norms Specific to School Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Marie-Claire; Nieswandt, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Sociocultural studies of science education have consistently recognized the dialectic nature of students' agency to create and author positions for themselves and the structural constraints that may influence them. This mixed-methods study explores one particular aspect of these potential constraints: the possibility of a social structure specific…

  19. "Hypothetical machines": the science fiction dreams of Cold War social science.

    PubMed

    Lemov, Rebecca

    2010-06-01

    The introspectometer was a "hypothetical machine" Robert K. Merton introduced in the course of a 1956 how-to manual describing an actual research technique, the focused interview. This technique, in turn, formed the basis of wartime morale research and consumer behavior studies as well as perhaps the most ubiquitous social science tool, the focus group. This essay explores a new perspective on Cold War social science made possible by comparing two kinds of apparatuses: one real, the other imaginary. Even as Merton explored the nightmare potential of such machines, he suggested that the clear aim of social science was to build them or their functional equivalent: recording machines to access a person's experiential stream of reality, with the ability to turn this stream into real-time data. In this way, the introspectometer marks and symbolizes a broader entry during the Cold War of science-fiction-style aspirations into methodological prescriptions and procedural manuals. This essay considers the growth of the genre of methodological visions and revisions, painstakingly argued and absorbed, but punctuated by sci-fi aims to transform "the human" and build newly penetrating machines. It also considers the place of the nearly real-, and the artificial "near-substitute" as part of an experimental urge that animated these sciences. PMID:20718281

  20. Recent advances in applying decision science to managing national forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marcot, Bruce G.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Runge, Michael C.; Thompson, Frank R.; McNulty, Steven; Cleaves, David; Tomosy, Monica; Fisher, Larry A.; Andrew, Bliss

    2012-01-01

    Management of federal public forests to meet sustainability goals and multiple use regulations is an immense challenge. To succeed, we suggest use of formal decision science procedures and tools in the context of structured decision making (SDM). SDM entails four stages: problem structuring (framing the problem and defining objectives and evaluation criteria), problem analysis (defining alternatives, evaluating likely consequences, identifying key uncertainties, and analyzing tradeoffs), decision point (identifying the preferred alternative), and implementation and monitoring the preferred alternative with adaptive management feedbacks. We list a wide array of models, techniques, and tools available for each stage, and provide three case studies of their selected use in National Forest land management and project plans. Successful use of SDM involves participation by decision-makers, analysts, scientists, and stakeholders. We suggest specific areas for training and instituting SDM to foster transparency, rigor, clarity, and inclusiveness in formal decision processes regarding management of national forests.

  1. Applying Science and Technology to Combat WMD Terrorism

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C R; Werne, R W; Colston, B W; Hartmann-Siantar, C L

    2006-05-04

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing and fielding advanced strategies that dramatically improve the nation's capabilities to prevent, prepare for, detect, and respond to terrorist use of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive (CBRNE) weapons. The science, technology, and integrated systems we provide are informed by and developed with key partners and end users. LLNL's long-standing role as one of the two principle U.S. nuclear weapons design laboratories has led to significant resident expertise for health effects of exposure to radiation, radiation detection technologies, characterization of radioisotopes, and assessment and response capabilities for terrorist nuclear weapons use. This paper provides brief overviews of a number of technologies developed at LLNL that are being used to address national security needs to confront the growing threats of CBRNE terrorism.

  2. Applying science and technology to combat WMD terrorism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuest, Craig R.; Werne, Roger W.; Colston, Billy W.; Hartmann-Siantar, Christine L.

    2006-05-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing and fielding advanced strategies that dramatically improve the nation's capabilities to prevent, prepare for, detect, and respond to terrorist use of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive (CBRNE) weapons. The science, technology, and integrated systems we provide are informed by and developed with key partners and end users. LLNL's long-standing role as one of the two principle U.S. nuclear weapons design laboratories has led to significant resident expertise for health effects of exposure to radiation, radiation detection technologies, characterization of radioisotopes, and assessment and response capabilities for terrorist nuclear weapons use. This paper provides brief overviews of a number of technologies developed at LLNL that are being used to address national security needs to confront the growing threats of CBRNE terrorism.

  3. Applying science and mathematics to big data for smarter buildings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young M; An, Lianjun; Liu, Fei; Horesh, Raya; Chae, Young Tae; Zhang, Rui

    2013-08-01

    Many buildings are now collecting a large amount of data on operations, energy consumption, and activities through systems such as a building management system (BMS), sensors, and meters (e.g., submeters and smart meters). However, the majority of data are not utilized and are thrown away. Science and mathematics can play an important role in utilizing these big data and accurately assessing how energy is consumed in buildings and what can be done to save energy, make buildings energy efficient, and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper discusses an analytical tool that has been developed to assist building owners, facility managers, operators, and tenants of buildings in assessing, benchmarking, diagnosing, tracking, forecasting, and simulating energy consumption in building portfolios. PMID:23819911

  4. Applied Science Division annual report, Environmental Research Program FY 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.; Novakov, T.

    1984-05-01

    The primary concern of the Environmental Research Program is the understanding of pollutant formation, transport, and transformation and the impacts of pollutants on the environment. These impacts include global, regional, and local effects on the atmosphere and hydrosphere, and on certain aspects of human health. This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. During FY 1983, research concentrated on atmospheric physics and chemistry, applied physics and laser spectroscopy, combustion theory and phenomena, environmental effects of oil shale processing, freshwater ecology and acid precipitation, trace element analysis for the investigation of present and historical environmental impacts, and a continuing survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring.

  5. Applied Science Division annual report, Environmental Research Program FY 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.; Novakov, T.

    1985-03-01

    The objective of the Environmental Research Program is to understand the formation, transformation, transport, and effects of energy-related pollutants on the environment. The effects studied include those on global, regional, and local scales and involve the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. During FY 1984, research concentrated on atmospheric physics and chemistry, applied physics and laser spectroscopy, combustion theory and phenomena, environmental effects of oil shale processing, toxicology studies of biological systems, and trace element analysis for the investigation of present and historical environmental impacts.

  6. Urbanization and the carbon cycle: Contributions from social science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcotullio, Peter J.; Hughes, Sara; Sarzynski, Andrea; Pincetl, Stephanie; Sanchez Peña, Landy; Romero-Lankao, Patricia; Runfola, Daniel; Seto, Karen C.

    2014-10-01

    This paper outlines the contributions of social science to the study of interactions between urbanization patterns and processes and the carbon cycle, and identifies gaps in knowledge and priority areas for future social scientific research contributions. While previously studied as a unidimensional process, we conceptualize urbanization as a multidimensional, social and biophysical process driven by continuous changes across space and time in various subsystems including biophysical, built environment, and socio-institutional (e.g., economic, political, demographic, behavioral, and sociological). We review research trends and findings focused on the socio-institutional subsystem of the urbanization process, and particularly the dynamics, relationships, and predictions relevant to energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Our findings suggest that a multidimensional perspective of urbanization facilitates a wider spectrum of research relevant to carbon cycle dynamics, even within the socio-institutional subsystem. However, there is little consensus around the details and mechanisms underlying the relationship between urban socio-institutional subsystems and the carbon cycle. We argue that progress in understanding the relationship between urbanization and the carbon cycle may be achieved if social scientists work collaboratively with each other as well as with scientists from other disciplines. From this review, we identify research priorities where collaborative social scientific efforts are necessary in conjunction with other disciplinary approaches to generate a more complete understanding of urbanization as a process and its relationship to the carbon cycle.

  7. NASA Applied Sciences' DEVELOP National Program: Training the Next Generation of Remote Sensing Scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Lauren; Brozen, Madeline; Hillyer, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception over a decade ago, the DEVELOP National Program has provided students with experience in utilizing and integrating satellite remote sensing data into real world-applications. In 1998, DEVELOP began with three students and has evolved into a nationwide internship program with over 200 students participating each year. DEVELOP is a NASA Applied Sciences training and development program extending NASA Earth science research and technology to society. Part of the NASA Science Mission Directorate s Earth Science Division, the Applied Sciences Program focuses on bridging the gap between NASA technology and the public by conducting projects that innovatively use NASA Earth science resources to research environmental issues. Project outcomes focus on assisting communities to better understand environmental change over time. This is accomplished through research with global, national, and regional partners to identify the widest array of practical uses of NASA data. DEVELOP students conduct research in areas that examine how NASA science can better serve society. Projects focus on practical applications of NASA s Earth science research results. Each project is designed to address at least one of the Applied Sciences focus areas, use NASA s Earth observation sources and meet partners needs. DEVELOP research teams partner with end-users and organizations who use project results for policy analysis and decision support, thereby extending the benefits of NASA science and technology to the public.

  8. Holistic science: An understanding of science education encompassing ethical and social issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekpour, Susan

    Science has often been viewed, by the majority of our educators and the general public, as being objective and emotionless. Based on this view, our educators teach science in the same manner, objectively and in an abstract form. This manner of teaching has hindered our learners' ability for active learning and distanced them from the subject matter. In this action research, I have examined holistic science pedagogy in conjunction with a constructivism theory. In holistic science pedagogy, scientific knowledge is combined with subjective personal experiences and social issues. There is an interaction between student and scientific data when the student's context, relationships, and lived experiences that play a role in the scientific recognition of the world were incorporated into the learning process. In this pedagogical model, the factual content was viewed from the context of social and ethical implications. By empowering learners with this ability, science knowledge will no longer be exclusive to a select group. This process empowers the general population with the ability to understand scientific knowledge and therefore the ability to make informed decisions based on this knowledge. The goal was to make curriculum developers more conscious of factors that can positively influence the learning process and increase student engagement and understanding within the science classroom. The holistic approach to science pedagogy has enlightened and empowered our adult learners more effectively. Learners became more actively engaged in their own process of learning. Teachers must be willing to listen and implement student suggestions on improving the teaching/learning process. Teachers should be willing to make the effort in connecting with their students by structuring courses so the topics would be relevant to the students in relation to real world and social/ethical and political issues. Holistic science pedagogy strives for social change through the empowerment of adult learners with scientific knowledge. This research has demonstrated that learners can better understand the decision-making process and more easily relate their experiences, and therefore their knowledge, to social/political and ethical issues.

  9. Compression bandaging for chronic oedema: applying science to reality.

    PubMed

    Elwell, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Among other risk factors, chronic venous insufficiency predisposes an individual to chronic oedema. The use of compression bandaging in the intensive phase of treatment is indicated to reduce distortion, lymphorrhoea, and achieve wound healing. When applying a compression bandage, it is essential that the clinician considers the laws that underpin the theory of compression. Owing to the physical properties of the bandages, the use of inelastic compression is favoured for the management of chronic oedema, in view of the high static stiffness index achieved on application. It is essential that the bandaging regime is individualised to meet the specific needs of the patient. This includes the frequency of bandage change, while considering the extent of oedema reduction and holistic needs of the patient. PMID:26288892

  10. Social acceleration and the network effect: a defence of social 'science fiction' and network determinism.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Robert

    2010-06-01

    This essay is a response to Judy Wajcman's essay 'Life in the fast lane? Towards a sociology of technology and time' (2008: 59-77). In that article Wajcman argued that recent developments in the sociology of temporal change had been marked by a tendency in social theory towards a form of 'science fiction'--a sociological theorizing, she maintains, that bears no real relation to actual, empirically provable developments in the field and should therefore be viewed as not contributing to 'a richer analysis of the relationship between technology and time' (2008: 61). This reply argues that as Wajcman suggests in her essay, there is indeed an 'urgent need for increased dialogue to connect social theory with detailed empirical studies' (2008: 59) but that the most fruitful way to proceed would not be through a constraining of 'science fiction' social theorizing but, rather, through its expansion--and more, that 'science fiction' should take the lead in the process. This essay suggests that the connection between social theory and empirical studies would be strengthened by a wider understanding of the function of knowledge and research in the context of what is termed 'true originality' and 'routine originality'. The former is the domain of social theory and the latter resides within traditional sociological disciplines. It is argued that both need each other to advance our understanding of society, especially in the context of the fast-changing processes of technological development. The example of 'technological determinism' is discussed as illustrative of how 'routine originality' can harden into dogma without the application of 'true originality' to continually question (sometimes through ideas that may appear to border on 'science fiction') comfortable assumptions that may have become 'routine' and shorn of their initial 'originality'. PMID:20579058

  11. Social Ecology and Environmental Psychology as Applied to the Design and Renovation of American University Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumwiede, Robert William

    This paper focuses on making specific connections between basic social and psychological needs of campus residents and the principles of architectural design that can be applied to the design and renovation of educational facilities. Various research was used to select six "principles of social ecology" that were cross-referenced with five design…

  12. On the almost inconceivable misunderstandings concerning the subject of value-free social science.

    PubMed

    Black, Donald

    2013-12-01

    A value judgment says what is good or bad, and value-free social science simply means social science free of value judgments. Yet many sociologists regard value-free social science as undesirable or impossible and readily make value judgments in the name of sociology. Often they display confusion about such matters as the meaning of value-free social science, value judgments internal and external to social science, value judgments as a subject of social science, the relevance of objectivity for value-free social science, and the difference between the human significance of social science and value-free social science. But why so many sociologists are so value-involved - and generally so unscientific - is sociologically understandable: The closest and most distant subjects attract the least scientific ideas. And during the past century sociologists have become increasingly close to their human subject. The debate about value-free social science is also part of an epistemological counterrevolution of humanists (including many sociologists) against the more scientific social scientists who invaded and threatened to expropriate the human subject during the past century. PMID:24320074

  13. Drug delivery with topically applied nanoparticles: science fiction or reality.

    PubMed

    Lademann, J; Richter, H; Meinke, M C; Lange-Asschenfeldt, B; Antoniou, C; Mak, W C; Renneberg, R; Sterry, W; Patzelt, A

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of topically applied drugs is determined by their action mechanism and their potential capacity of passing the skin barrier. Nanoparticles are assumed to be efficient carrier systems for drug delivery through the skin barrier. For flexible nanoparticles like liposomes, this effect has been well demonstrated. The penetration properties of solid nanoparticles are currently under intensive investigation. The crucial advantage of nanoparticles over non-particulate substances is their capability to penetrate deeply into the hair follicles where they can be stored for several days. There is no evidence, yet, that solid particles ≥40 nm are capable of passing through the healthy skin barrier. Therefore and in spite of the long-standing research efforts in this field, commercially available solid nanoparticle-based products for drug delivery through the healthy skin are still missing. Nevertheless, the prospects for the clinical use of nanoparticles in drug delivery are tremendous. They can be designed as transport systems delivering drugs efficiently into the hair follicles in the vicinity of specific target structures. Once deposited at these structures, specific signals might trigger the release of the drugs and exert their effects on the target cells. In this article, examples of such triggered drug release are presented. PMID:23921109

  14. Applying science and strategy to operating room workforce management.

    PubMed

    Butler, Victoria; Clinton, Christopher; Sagi, Harsha K; Kenney, Robert; Barsoum, Wael K

    2012-01-01

    The traditional means of planning nurse staffing for operating rooms are either poorly translated to the setting or do not provide decision makers with a platform to defend their needs, especially in an era of health care reform. The surgical operations department of the Cleveland Clinic initiated a quality improvement project aimed at applying a scientific method to operating room staffing. One goal was to provide a defensible plan for allocating direct caregiver positions. A second goal was to provide a quick and easy way for nurse managers and directors to track positions and graphically depict the effect of vacancies and orientation on their staffing budgets. Using an objective, scientific method allows position requests to be approved quickly and allows managers to feel much more comfortable functioning in a "lean" mode because they know needed positions will be approved quickly. Managers and directors also have found that graphically depicting numbers of vacant positions, as well as staff in orientation, could quickly relate a story visually rather than getting "bogged down" in narrative (often losing finance administrators along the way). PMID:23198610

  15. 34 CFR 637.4 - What definitions apply to the Minority Science and Engineering Improvement Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Improvement Program? (a) Definitions in EDGAR. The following terms used in this part are defined in 34 CFR... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What definitions apply to the Minority Science and... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MINORITY SCIENCE...

  16. 34 CFR 637.4 - What definitions apply to the Minority Science and Engineering Improvement Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Improvement Program? (a) Definitions in EDGAR. The following terms used in this part are defined in 34 CFR... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What definitions apply to the Minority Science and... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MINORITY SCIENCE...

  17. 34 CFR 637.4 - What definitions apply to the Minority Science and Engineering Improvement Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Improvement Program? (a) Definitions in EDGAR. The following terms used in this part are defined in 34 CFR... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What definitions apply to the Minority Science and... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MINORITY SCIENCE...

  18. 34 CFR 637.4 - What definitions apply to the Minority Science and Engineering Improvement Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Improvement Program? (a) Definitions in EDGAR. The following terms used in this part are defined in 34 CFR... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What definitions apply to the Minority Science and... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MINORITY SCIENCE...

  19. 34 CFR 637.4 - What definitions apply to the Minority Science and Engineering Improvement Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Improvement Program? (a) Definitions in EDGAR. The following terms used in this part are defined in 34 CFR... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What definitions apply to the Minority Science and... Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION MINORITY SCIENCE...

  20. Birth of a Field: George Baron, Educational Administration and the Social Sciences in England, 1946-1978

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Gary

    2014-01-01

    "Educational administration and the social sciences", the landmark text coedited by Baron and Taylor in 1969, represented the study of educational administration as an applied interdisciplinary field. George Baron's own academic career reveals the struggles involved in the construction of this new field and the resistance and…

  1. Birth of a Field: George Baron, Educational Administration and the Social Sciences in England, 1946-1978

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCulloch, Gary

    2014-01-01

    "Educational administration and the social sciences", the landmark text coedited by Baron and Taylor in 1969, represented the study of educational administration as an applied interdisciplinary field. George Baron's own academic career reveals the struggles involved in the construction of this new field and the resistance and…

  2. Educacion y Ciencias Sociales en el Mundo Moderno. [Education and the Social Sciences in the Modern World].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimoldi, Horacio J. A.

    The document, written in Spanish, discusses the relationship between research in the social sciences and the role of the university in social science education. The author considers the education of researchers, the application of research, the need for interdisciplinary research methods, and problems involved in cross-cultural studies. He states…

  3. Educacion y Ciencias Sociales en el Mundo Moderno. [Education and the Social Sciences in the Modern World].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimoldi, Horacio J. A.

    The document, written in Spanish, discusses the relationship between research in the social sciences and the role of the university in social science education. The author considers the education of researchers, the application of research, the need for interdisciplinary research methods, and problems involved in cross-cultural studies. He states…

  4. Reversals of national fortune, and social science methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Jared

    2014-01-01

    Among non-European regions colonized by Europeans, regions that were relatively richer five centuries ago (like Mexico, Peru, and India) tend to be poorer today, while regions that originally were relatively poorer (like the United States, Chile, and Australia) tend now to be richer. Acemoglu, Johnson, and Robinson (abbreviated AJR) established the generality of this reversal of fortune. Chanda, Cook, and Putterman (abbreviated CCP) have now reanalyzed it, taking as a unit of analysis populations rather than geographic regions. That is, India's population was Indian 500 y ago and is still overwhelmingly Indian today, whereas the United States' population was Native American 500 years ago but is overwhelmingly Old World (especially European) today. Reversals of fortune disappeared when CCP analyzed populations rather than geographic regions: for instance, the geographic region of the modern United States has become relatively richer since AD 1500, but the predominantly European population now occupying the United States was already relatively rich in AD 1500. Evidently, European colonists carried ingredients of wealth with them. I discuss the biological and cultural baggage transported by European immigrants and associated with wealth. Among that baggage, AJR emphasize institutions, CCP emphasize social capital, and I identify many different elements only loosely coupled to each other. This paper discusses the problem, especially acute in the social sciences, of “operationalizing” intuitive concepts (such as mass, temperature, wealth, and innovation) so that they can be measured. Basic concepts tend to be harder to define, operationalize, and measure in the social sciences than in the laboratory sciences. PMID:25385597

  5. Social Science and Health Research: Growth at the National Institutes of Health

    PubMed Central

    Bachrach, Christine A.; Abeles, Ronald P.

    2004-01-01

    Programs within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have recently taken steps to enhance social science contributions to health research. A June 2000 conference convened by the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research highlighted the role of the social sciences in health research and developed an agenda for advancing such research. The conference and agenda underscored the importance of research on basic social scientific concepts and constructs, basic social science research on the etiology of health and illness, and the application of basic social science constructs in health services, treatment, and prevention research. Recent activities at NIH suggest a growing commitment to social science research and its integration into interdisciplinary multilevel studies of health. PMID:14713689

  6. Socially constructed learning in early childhood science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleer, Marilyn

    1991-12-01

    This paper outlines the findings of a study in which the concept of electricity was introduced to young children in a child care centre. Three areas were examined: first, the perceived difficulties associated with the teaching of science to very young children (3 5 year olds); second, a discussion of the approach used to teach electricity to young children, and finally, the study and its findings. When the teaching of electricity (through a unit on torches) followed a socially constructed approach to learning, all of the children were able to connect up a simple electric circuit and talk about the electricity flowing around the circuit.

  7. The Stewardship Science Academic Alliance: A Model of Education for Fundamental and Applied Low-energy Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cizewski, J. A.

    2014-06-01

    The Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) were inaugurated in 2002 by the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U. S. Department of Energy. The purpose is to enhance connections between NNSA laboratories and the activities of university scientists and their students in research areas important to NNSA, including low-energy nuclear science. This paper highlights some of the ways that the SSAA fosters education and training of graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in low-energy nuclear science, preparing them for careers in fundamental and applied research and development.

  8. The Stewardship Science Academic Alliance: A Model of Education for Fundamental and Applied Low-energy Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J.A.

    2014-06-15

    The Stewardship Science Academic Alliances (SSAA) were inaugurated in 2002 by the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U. S. Department of Energy. The purpose is to enhance connections between NNSA laboratories and the activities of university scientists and their students in research areas important to NNSA, including low-energy nuclear science. This paper highlights some of the ways that the SSAA fosters education and training of graduate students and postdoctoral scholars in low-energy nuclear science, preparing them for careers in fundamental and applied research and development.

  9. Social Science Curriculum Guide and Selected Multi-Media, 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaydosh, Ronald

    GRADES OR AGES: Grades 10-12. SUBJECT MATTER: Social science. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The extensive introductory material includes rationale, definitions of the social science core disciplines, glossary of terms, and descriptions of concepts. The course material includes political science, history, economics, geography, sociology,…

  10. Middle School Science Teachers' Perceptions of Social Justice: A Study of Two Female Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upadhyay, Bhaskar

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this qualitative study is to document two middle school science teachers' perceptions of social justice and how these teachers implement various aspects of social justice in their science instruction. The two teachers teach science in an urban school that serves students from low-income, immigrant, and ethnic minority families. The…

  11. Complementary Social Sciences Courses in the Alberta High School Curriculum: A Conceptual Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staszenski, Donna; Smits, Hans

    2008-01-01

    In keeping with Alberta Education's goals and responsibilities to develop and evaluate curriculum and to set standards and assess outcomes, the Ministry is reviewing the status and purpose of social sciences courses as part of the high school curriculum. The present social sciences curriculum was revised in 1985. As part of the social sciences…

  12. Implementation of the NCSS Guidelines for Teaching Science-Related Social Issues: Exemplar Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Robert A., Ed.

    This document contains the Guidelines for Teaching Science-Related Social Issues adopted in 1982 by the National Council for the Social Studies and 10 examplar lessons each keyed to particular guidelines and drawing upon contemporary issues. The premise upon which the guidelines are based is that science is a social issue and that the examination…

  13. Trash Conflicts: A Science and Social Studies Curriculum on the Ethics of Disposal. An Interdisciplinary Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballin, Amy; And Others

    Designed for middle school science and social studies classes, this document is a curriculum on waste disposal. Mathematics and language skills also are incorporated into many of the activities. In the study of trash disposal, science students benefit from understanding the social issues related to the problem. Social studies students need…

  14. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1993 through March 31, 1994. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustics and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  15. Evaluating science outside the trial box: applying Daubert to the Federal Sentencing Guidelines' criminal history score.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Daniel A

    2006-01-01

    A limited amount of research exists examining the ability of the Criminal History Score of the Federal Sentencing Guidelines (Guidelines) to achieve one of its most essential objectives: prediction of recidivism. Building on the work of Schopp [Schopp, R. (2001). Competency, condemnation, and commitment: An integrated theory of mental health law. Washington D.C.: American Psychological Association], it is suggested that the scientific admissibility framework and the underlying principles announced by the United States Supreme Court in Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceutical [Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals Inc., 507 U.S. 579, 113 S.Ct. 2786 (1993)] should be expanded beyond the constraints of the evidentiary admissibility phase of trial and should apply to legislative and administrative rules that have: a) an empirically testable purpose and b) a substantial impact on the rights of individuals. Such an analysis offers a useful mechanism for understanding the strengths and weaknesses of social science being used by legal institutions. Based upon a hypothetical Daubert analysis, the scientific validity of the Guidelines' Criminal History Score is assessed and demonstrated to be insufficient. The law and policy implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:16530267

  16. Standardization and Omics Science: Technical and Social Dimensions Are Inseparable and Demand Symmetrical Study

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Fiona; Jones, Mavis; Ozdemir, Vural; Graham, Janice E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Standardization is critical to scientists and regulators to ensure the quality and interoperability of research processes, as well as the safety and efficacy of the attendant research products. This is perhaps most evident in the case of “omics science,” which is enabled by a host of diverse high-throughput technologies such as genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. But standards are of interest to (and shaped by) others far beyond the immediate realm of individual scientists, laboratories, scientific consortia, or governments that develop, apply, and regulate them. Indeed, scientific standards have consequences for the social, ethical, and legal environment in which innovative technologies are regulated, and thereby command the attention of policy makers and citizens. This article argues that standardization of omics science is both technical and social. A critical synthesis of the social science literature indicates that: (1) standardization requires a degree of flexibility to be practical at the level of scientific practice in disparate sites; (2) the manner in which standards are created, and by whom, will impact their perceived legitimacy and therefore their potential to be used; and (3) the process of standardization itself is important to establishing the legitimacy of an area of scientific research. PMID:20455752

  17. A World Apart? Bridging the Gap between Theory and Applied Social Gerontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Jon; Applebaum, Robert; Kunkel, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on the premise that there is inadequate attention to the link between theory and applied research in social gerontology. The article contends that applied research studies do not often or effectively employ a theoretical framework and that theory-based articles, including theory-based research, are not often focused on…

  18. A World Apart? Bridging the Gap between Theory and Applied Social Gerontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Jon; Applebaum, Robert; Kunkel, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on the premise that there is inadequate attention to the link between theory and applied research in social gerontology. The article contends that applied research studies do not often or effectively employ a theoretical framework and that theory-based articles, including theory-based research, are not often focused on…

  19. Participation of Primary School Pupils Who Stay at Institution of Social Services and Child Protection Dormitories in Social Science Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Sibel; Sahin Taskin, Cigdem

    2008-01-01

    This research aims to understand to what extent primary school pupils who stay at the Institution of Social Services and Child Protection dormitories participate in social science lessons. Data were obtained from pupils staying at the Institution of Social Services and Child Protection dormitories and attending primary schools in Istanbul and…

  20. "We Learn How to Predict and Be a Scientist": Early Science Experiences and Kindergarten Children's Social Meanings about Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mantzicopoulos, Panayota; Samarapungavan, Ala; Patrick, Helen

    2009-01-01

    We examine kindergarten children's emerging social meanings about science as a function of their participation in integrated science inquiry and literacy activities associated with the Scientific Literacy Project (SLP). We describe changes in 123 SLP kindergarten children's narrative accounts of learning science in school during three different…

  1. Scientific Story Telling & Social Media The role of social media in effectively communicating science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkhuis, D.; Peart, L.

    2012-12-01

    Scientific discourse generally takes place in appropriate journals, using the language and conventions of science. That's fine, as long as the discourse remains in scientific circles. It is only outside those circles that the rules and techniques of engaging social media tools gain importance. A young generation of scientists are eager to share their experiences by using social media, but is this effective? And how can we better integrate all outreach & media channels to engage general audiences? How can Facebook, Twitter, Skype and YouTube be used as synergy tools in scientific story telling? Case: during IODP Expedtion 342 (June-July 2012) onboard the scientific drillship JOIDES Resolution an onboard educator and videographer worked non-stop fort two months on an integrated outreach plan that tried and tested the limits of all social media tools available to interact with an international public while at sea. The results are spectacular!

  2. Earth Matters: Promoting Science Exploration through Blogs and Social Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, K.; Voiland, A. P.; Carlowicz, M. J.; Simmon, R. B.; Allen, J.; Scott, M.; Przyborski, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observatory (EO) is a 13-year old online publication focusing on the communication of NASA Earth science research, including climate change, weather, geology, oceanography, and solar flares. We serve two primary audiences: the "attentive public"--people interested in and willing to seek out information about science, technology, and the environment--and popular media. We use the EO website (earthobservatory.nasa.gov) to host a variety of content including image-driven stories (natural events and research-based), articles featuring NASA research and, more recently, blogs that give us the ability to increase interaction with our users. For much of our site's history, our communication has been largely one way, and we have relied primarily on traditional online marketing techniques such as RSS and email listservs. As the information ecosystem evolves into one in which many users expect to play a more active role in distributing and even developing content through social media, we've experimented with various social media outlets (blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Google+, etc.) that offer new opportunities for people to interact with NASA data, scientists, and the EO editorial team. As part of our explorations, we are learning about how, and to what extent, these outlets can be used for interaction and outright promotion and how to achieve those goals with existing personnel and resources.

  3. Engaging bodies in the public imagination: bioarchaeology as social science, science, and humanities.

    PubMed

    Stojanowski, Christopher M; Duncan, William N

    2015-01-01

    Bioarchaeology is the contextual analysis of biological remains from past societies. It is a young and growing discipline born during the latter half of the twentieth century from its roots in physical anthropology and archaeology. Although often associated with the study of ancient diet and disease, bioarchaeology leverages variable temporal scales and its global scope to provide a uniquely comparative perspective on human life that transcends traditional boundaries of the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Here, we explore the public face of bioarchaeology and consider the trends in publication practices that reflect diversifying research strategies. Bioarchaeology is a popular topic on web-based science news aggregators. However, we identify a disconnect between bioarchaeology's traditional research emphases, emerging research foci, and findings that actually spark the public imagination. A majority of popular news articles emphasize basic discovery or "natural curiosities." Publication data indicate the field also remains regionally focused with relatively little emphasis on nomothetic goals. Nevertheless, bioarchaeology can do more to leverage its historical perspective and corporeal emphasis to engage a number of topics with importance across traditional academic boundaries. Big data, comparative, multi-investigator, interdisciplinary projects on violence, colonialism, and health offer the most obvious potential for driving research narratives in the biological and social sciences. Humanistic approaches that explore emotional connections to the past can also have merit. The diversity of research outlets and products indicates the field must embrace the importance of nontraditional activities in its value structure to maximize our potential in public arenas. PMID:24677226

  4. From the Mathematical Kinetic Theory to Modelling Complex Systems in Applied Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellomo, Nicola

    This paper deals with the design of a nonequilibrium statistical mechanics theory developed to model large systems of interacting individuals. Interactions being ruled, not only by laws of classical mechanics, but also by some intelligent or organized behaviour. The paper technically shows, also by reasoning on specific examples, how the theory can be applied to model large complex systems in natural and applied sciences.

  5. Integrating Science in Applied Psychology Programs: A Student-Operated Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonius, Daniel; Brown, Adam D.; Todman, McWelling; Safran, Jeremy D.

    2007-01-01

    As a requirement of APA accreditation, many PhD programs in applied psychology subscribe to some variant of the scientist-practitioner model. However, critics have argued that integrating science into an applied psychology curriculum may be too challenging a task. This article describes the development of The New School Psychology Bulletin, a…

  6. Applied mathematical sciences research at Argonne, April 1, 1981-March 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    This report reviews the research activities in Applied Mathematical Sciences at Argonne National Laboratory for the period April 1, 1981, through March 31, 1982. The body of the report discusses various projects carried out in three major areas of research: applied analysis, computational mathematics, and software engineering. Information on section staff, visitors, workshops, and seminars is found in the appendices.

  7. Crossing borders between social and physical sciences in post-event investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruin, I.; Gruntfest, E.; Lutoff, C.; Anquetin, S.; Scolobig, A.; Creutin, J.-D.; Borga, M.

    2009-04-01

    In natural hazard research social and physical scientists tend to approach post-event investigations within their narrow disciplinary lenses. Efforts that are called trans-disciplinary often add social science but do not integrate it effectively. For example, an economist might be brought in to address a question of "value" without any understanding or interest in the context in which the value will be applied (e.g., Merrell et al. 2002, Simmons and Sutter 2005). At the same time, social scientists would benefit from some knowledge of geology, meteorology, hydrology, forecasting operations, and hazard detection systems in order, for instance, to understand the nature and types of uncertainty in the physical systems. Proactive partnership between social and physical scientists in post-event investigations needs a background knowledge and a preparation about several issues from both sides. Moreover neither physical nor social scientists necessarily understand and appreciate the contributions that they can reciprocally bring to their works. Post-event collaborations between social and physical science are rare. The few examples of multi-disciplinary work, when examined closely, are not integrated collaborative projects but patchwork quilts of a variety of specialists taking separate aspects of an issue. There are examples where social scientists and engineers are engaged in one project, but the efforts tend to include social scientists as an "add on" to an existing physical science investigation. In this way, true integration of information, data and knowledge from different fields is lacking and the result is that neither the physical nor the social science perspectives gain a comprehensive picture of the issue under scrutiny. Looking at the flash flood problem, the atmospheric and hydrological generating mechanisms of the phenomenon are poorly understood, leading to highly uncertain forecasts of and warnings for these events. On the other hand warning and crisis response to such violent and fast events is not a straightforward process. In both the social and physical aspect of the problem, space and time scales involved either in hydro-meteorology, human behavior and social organizations sciences are of crucial importance. Interdisciplinary collaboration is particularly important here because those involved with such events, including scholars, hydrologists, meteorologists, road users, emergency managers and civil security services, all have different time and space frameworks that they use for decision-making, forecasting, warnings and research. This presentation will show examples of original findings that emerged from a successful collaboration among different scientific disciplines. Working with geophysical scientists drives us to analyze social data from a different angle, integrating time and space scales as they are used to do in hydrometeorological research. This comprehensive, coupled natural—human system approach over time and space is rarely used but it has been shown to be especially pertinent to integrate social and physical components of the flash flood risk. (Ruin et al., 2008, Ruin et al., 2009, Creutin et al., 2009). Based on these examples we propose to develop a new network, DELUGE (Disasters Evolving Lessons Using Global Experience), to address trans-disciplinary efforts and capacity building related to post-disaster field techniques to change the post-event field experience enterprise and assure that practitioners, forecasters, researchers, students, and others learn from experience to reduce losses. DELUGE is an interdisciplinary, international network aimed at developing a sustainable community of meteorologists, hydrologists, geographers, anthropologists, engineers, planners, economists, and sociologists working together to create a set of guidelines for post-disaster investigations to reduce losses from short-fuse flood events, particularly flash floods, debris flows and landslides (hereafter termed flash floods). Flash-floods, debris flows, and landslides often develop at space and time scales that conventional observation systems are not able to monitor for rainfall and river discharge.

  8. Cleveland Diocesan Social Science Program. Social Studies Unit in Formation: A Supplement to the Social Science Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catholic Board of Education, Diocese of Cleveland, OH.

    Historical and cultural world understandings are presented to secondary students in this social studies teaching supplement to guidelines described in documents SO 003 186 and SO 003 188. The objective of the activity units is to encourage the students to become inquirers into the values of the non-western and western world. Emphasis is upon…

  9. Early Careers of Recent U.S. Social Science PhDs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Emory; Rudd, Elizabeth; Nerad, Maresi

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we analyse findings of the largest, most comprehensive survey of the career paths of social science PhD graduates to date, "Social Science PhDs--Five+Years Out (SS5)". "SS5" surveyed more than 3,000 graduates of U.S. PhD programmes in six social science fields six to ten years after earning their PhD. The survey collected data on…

  10. Promoting Behavior Change Using Social Norms: Applying a Community Based Social Marketing Tool to Extension Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Warner, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Most educational programs are designed to produce lower level outcomes, and Extension educators are challenged to produce behavior change in target audiences. Social norms are a very powerful proven tool for encouraging sustainable behavior change among Extension's target audiences. Minor modifications to program content to demonstrate the…

  11. Science, the public, and social elites: how the general public, scientists, top politicians and managers perceive science.

    PubMed

    Prpić, Katarina

    2011-11-01

    This paper finds that the Croatian public's and the social elites' perceptions of science are a mixture of scientific and technological optimism, of the tendency to absolve science of social responsibility, of skepticism about the social effects of science, and of cognitive optimism and skepticism. However, perceptions differ significantly according to the different social roles and the wider value system of the observed groups. The survey data show some key similarities, as well as certain specificities in the configuration of the types of views of the four groups--the public, scientists, politicians and managers. The results suggest that the well-known typology of the four cultures reveals some of the ideologies of the key actors of scientific and technological policy. The greatest social, primarily educational and socio-spatial, differentiation of the perceptions of science was found in the general public. PMID:22397082

  12. An Alternative to Von Glasersfeld's Subjectivism in Science Education: Deweyan Social Constructivism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Jim

    1997-01-01

    Discusses von Glasersfeld's view of constructivism in science and mathematics educational research and practice. Provides a social constructivist alternative to von Glaserfeld's subjectivist constructivism. Discusses the practical art of experimental construction and objectivity in science education. (Author/JRH)

  13. Foundations of “new” social science: Institutional legitimacy from philosophy, complexity science, postmodernism, and agent-based modeling

    PubMed Central

    Henrickson, Leslie; McKelvey, Bill

    2002-01-01

    Since the death of positivism in the 1970s, philosophers have turned their attention to scientific realism, evolutionary epistemology, and the Semantic Conception of Theories. Building on these trends, Campbellian Realism allows social scientists to accept real-world phenomena as criterion variables against which theories may be tested without denying the reality of individual interpretation and social construction. The Semantic Conception reduces the importance of axioms, but reaffirms the role of models and experiments. Philosophers now see models as “autonomous agents” that exert independent influence on the development of a science, in addition to theory and data. The inappropriate molding effects of math models on social behavior modeling are noted. Complexity science offers a “new” normal science epistemology focusing on order creation by self-organizing heterogeneous agents and agent-based models. The more responsible core of postmodernism builds on the idea that agents operate in a constantly changing web of interconnections among other agents. The connectionist agent-based models of complexity science draw on the same conception of social ontology as do postmodernists. These recent developments combine to provide foundations for a “new” social science centered on formal modeling not requiring the mathematical assumptions of agent homogeneity and equilibrium conditions. They give this “new” social science legitimacy in scientific circles that current social science approaches lack. PMID:12011408

  14. Liberal Arts Engineers: Applied Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Laurie

    1997-03-01

    As a university without an engineering school, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has sought ways to enhance its appeal to students interested in the sciences. Building on strong undergraduate and graduate programs in the physical and biomedical sciences, we have developed a program for students who are interested in the practical applications of the sciences, but desire more of a basic science focus than a typical engineering program would provide. We think of these students as "liberal arts engineers." The program leads to a B.S. degree in Applied Sciences, and is administered through the Curriculum in Applied and Materials Sciences. This interdisciplinary unit is composed of faculty with primary appointments in the departments of Physics and Astronomy, Chemistry, Computer Science, Biomedical Engineering, Dental Research, and Orthopaedics, among others. Students in the program pursue tracks in digital systems, electronic materials, biomaterials, and polymers. I will describe the program as it has evolved, and the outcome of our dozen years of experience with it. I will also touch on our graduate program in Materials Science, which we began in fall 1996.

  15. Abandoning evolution. The forgotten history of antievolution activism and the transformation of American social science.

    PubMed

    Lienesch, Michael

    2012-12-01

    From its inception, antievolution activism has been aimed not only at the natural sciences but also, and almost as often, at the social sciences. Although almost entirely overlooked by scholars, this activism played a significant part in the development of American social science in the early twentieth century. Analyzing public writings and private papers of antievolution activists, academic social scientists, and university officials from the 1920s, this essay recalls this forgotten history, showing how antievolution activism contributed to the abandonment of evolutionary theory and the adoption of a set of secular, scientific, and professional characteristics that have come to define much of modern social science. PMID:23488237

  16. Medical social sciences. Their potential contributions to medical education reforms in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Borie, Hussein M

    2012-07-01

    This article emphasizes a holistic definition of health. It then introduces the concept of Medical social sciences, and drawing from the literature, argues for the inevitability of social sciences in medical education, especially in the health systems of developing countries including the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). This is followed by a brief history of medical education in KSA, and an examination of some important social science issues. Finally, this article suggests how a holistic approach involving inputs from the social and behavioral sciences could be incorporated into undergraduate medical education to produce medical professionals who could better meet the community and public health needs of the country. PMID:22821303

  17. International Co-operation and Trends in Social Science Information Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozsa, Gyorgy; Foldi, Tamas

    1980-01-01

    Identifies the role and mechanism of information transfer in the social sciences, and surveys selected, significant institutions and organizations (mostly international), which promote such transfer. (RAA)

  18. The Standard Model in the history of the Natural Sciences, Econometrics, and the social sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, W. P., Jr.

    2010-07-01

    In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, scientists appropriated Newton's laws of motion as a model for the conduct of any other field of investigation that would purport to be a science. This early form of a Standard Model eventually informed the basis of analogies for the mathematical expression of phenomena previously studied qualitatively, such as cohesion, affinity, heat, light, electricity, and magnetism. James Clerk Maxwell is known for his repeated use of a formalized version of this method of analogy in lectures, teaching, and the design of experiments. Economists transferring skills learned in physics made use of the Standard Model, especially after Maxwell demonstrated the value of conceiving it in abstract mathematics instead of as a concrete and literal mechanical analogy. Haavelmo's probability approach in econometrics and R. Fisher's Statistical Methods for Research Workers brought a statistical approach to bear on the Standard Model, quietly reversing the perspective of economics and the social sciences relative to that of physics. Where physicists, and Maxwell in particular, intuited scientific method as imposing stringent demands on the quality and interrelations of data, instruments, and theory in the name of inferential and comparative stability, statistical models and methods disconnected theory from data by removing the instrument as an essential component. New possibilities for reconnecting economics and the social sciences to Maxwell's sense of the method of analogy are found in Rasch's probabilistic models for measurement.

  19. HIV, sex, and social change: applying ESID principles to HIV prevention research.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M Isabel; Bowen, G Stephen; Gay, Caryl L; Mattson, Tiffany R; Bital, Evelyne; Kelly, Jeffrey A

    2003-12-01

    The HIV epidemic has been the most significant public health crisis of the last 2 decades. Although Experimental Social Innovation and Dissemination (ESID) principles have been used by many HIV prevention researchers, the clearest application is the series of model-building and replication experiments conducted by Kelly and colleagues. The model mobilized, trained, and engaged key opinion leaders to serve as behavior change and safe-sex endorsers in their social networks. This paper illustrates how ESID principles were used to develop, test, and disseminate an innovative social model and discusses the challenges of applying ESID methodology in the midst of a public health emergency. PMID:14703268

  20. NASA Applied Sciences' DEVELOP Program Fosters the Next Generation of Earth Remote Sensing Scientists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, Lauren M.; Brozen, Madeline W.; Gleason, Jonathan L.; Silcox, Tracey L.; Rea, Mimi; Holley, Sharon D.; Renneboog, Nathan; Underwood, Lauren W.; Ross, Kenton W.

    2009-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing technology and the science associated with the evaluation of the resulting data are constantly evolving. To meet the growing needs related to this industry, a team of personnel that understands the fundamental science as well as the scientific applications related to remote sensing is essential. Therefore, the workforce that will excel in this field requires individuals who not only have a strong academic background, but who also have practical hands-on experience with remotely sensed data, and have developed knowledge of its real-world applications. NASA's DEVELOP Program has played an integral role in fulfilling this need. DEVELOP is a NASA Science Mission Directorate Applied Sciences training and development program that extends the benefits of NASA Earth science research and technology to society.