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Sample records for applied tensile strain

  1. Tensile-strength apparatus applies high strain-rate loading with minimum shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotrill, H. E., Jr.; Mac Glashan, W. F., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Tensile-strength testing apparatus employs a capillary bundle through which a noncompressible fluid is extruded and a quick-release valve system. This apparatus applies the test loads at relatively constant very high strain rates with minimal shock and vibration to the tensile specimen and apparatus.

  2. Development of a novel bioreactor to apply shear stress and tensile strain simultaneously to cell monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, Liam T.; McHugh, Peter E.; McCormack, Brendan A.; Muir, Gordon; Quinlan, Nathan J.; Heraty, Kevin B.; Murphy, Bruce P.

    2006-10-01

    To date many bioreactor experiments have investigated the cellular response to isolated in vitro forces. However, in vivo, wall shear stress (WSS) and tensile hoop strain (THS) coexist. This article describes the techniques used to build and validate a novel vascular tissue bioreactor, which is capable of applying simultaneous wall shear stress and tensile stretch to multiple cellular substrates. The bioreactor design presented here combines a cone and plate rheometer with flexible substrates. Using such a combination, the bioreactor is capable of applying a large range of pulsatile wall shear stress (-30to+30dyn/cm2) and tensile hoop strain (0%-12%). The WSS and THS applied to the cellular substrates were validated and calibrated. In particular, curves were produced that related the desired WSS to the bioreactor control parameters. The bioreactor was shown to be biocompatible and noncytotoxic and suitable for cellular mechanical loading studies in physiological condition, i.e., under simultaneous WSS and THS conditions.

  3. Change of the V I curve and critical current with applied tensile strain due to cracking of filaments in Bi2223 composite tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, J. K.; Ochiai, S.; Okuda, H.; Sugano, M.; Oh, S. S.

    2008-11-01

    The critical current at 77 K of multifilamentary Bi2223 composite tape was studied under applied tensile strain experimentally and analytically. Beyond the irreversible strain, the critical currents (IC) decreased significantly with increasing applied tensile strain (ɛc), due to the enhanced cracking of the Bi2223 filaments. The voltage generation in the voltage-current relation was calculated by the current share model in which the transport current is shared by the Bi2223 filament and Ag near the cracked portion. Then the critical current was estimated with a 1 µV cm-1 criterion. By the application of the current share model to the experimental result, the effective crack length responsible for the reduction in critical current was estimated, with which the change of critical current could be described satisfactorily as a function of applied strain.

  4. Advanced resistivity model for arbitrary magnetization orientation applied to a series of compressive- to tensile-strained (Ga,Mn)As layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, W.; Daeubler, J.; Dreher, L.; Glunk, M.; Schoch, W.; Schwaiger, S.; Sauer, R.

    2008-05-01

    The longitudinal and transverse resistivities of differently strained (Ga,Mn)As layers are theoretically and experimentally studied as a function of the magnetization orientation. The strain in the series of (Ga,Mn)As layers is gradually varied from compressive to tensile using (In,Ga)As templates with different In concentrations. Analytical expressions for the resistivities are derived from a series expansion of the resistivity tensor with respect to the direction cosines of the magnetization. In order to quantitatively model the experimental data, terms up to the fourth order have to be included. The expressions derived are generally valid for any single-crystalline cubic and tetragonal ferromagnet and apply to arbitrary surface orientations and current directions. The model phenomenologically incorporates the longitudinal and transverse anisotropic magnetoresistance as well as the anomalous Hall effect. The resistivity parameters obtained from a comparison between experiment and theory are found to systematically vary with the strain in the layer.

  5. Cyclic tensile strain upregulates collagen synthesis in isolated tendon fascicles

    SciTech Connect

    Screen, Hazel R.C. . E-mail: H.R.C.Screen@qmul.ac.uk; Shelton, Julia C.; Bader, Dan L.; Lee, David A.

    2005-10-21

    Mechanical stimulation has been implicated as an important regulatory factor in tendon homeostasis. In this study, a custom-designed tensile loading system was used to apply controlled mechanical stimulation to isolated tendon fascicles, in order to examine the effects of 5% cyclic tensile strain at 1 Hz on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. Sample viability and gross structural composition were maintained over a 24 h loading period. Data demonstrated no statistically significant differences in cell proliferation or glycosaminoglycan production, however, collagen synthesis was upregulated with the application of cyclic tensile strain over the 24 h period. Moreover, a greater proportion of the newly synthesised matrix was retained within the sample after loading. These data provide evidence of altered anabolic activity within tendon in response to mechanical stimuli, and suggest the importance of cyclic tensile loading for the maintenance of the collagen hierarchy within tendon.

  6. Tensile and Microindentation Stress-Strain Curves of Al-6061

    DOE Data Explorer

    Weaver, Jordan S [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT); Khosravani, Ali [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Castillo, Andrew [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kalidind, Surya R [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-13

    Recent spherical microindentation stress-strain protocols were developed and validated on Al-6061 (DOI: 10.1186/s40192-016-0054-3). The scaling factor between the uniaxial yield strength and the indentation yield strength was determined to be about 1.9. The microindentation stress-strain protocols were then applied to a microstructurally graded sample in an effort to extract high throughput process-property relationships. The tensile and microindentation force-displacement and stress-strain data are presented in this data set.

  7. Maximizing Tensile Strain in Germanium Nanomembranes for Enhanced Optoelectronic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Perez, Jose Roberto

    Silicon, germanium, and their alloys, which provide the leading materials platform of microelectronics, are extremely inefficient light emitters because of their indirect fundamental energy band gap. This basic materials property has so far hindered the development of group-IV photonic-active devices, including light emitters and diode lasers, thereby significantly limiting our ability to integrate electronic and photonic functionalities at the chip level. Theoretical studies have predicted that tensile strain in Ge lowers the direct energy band gap relative to the indirect one, and that, with sufficient strain, Ge becomes direct-band gap, thus enabling facile interband light emission and the fabrication of Group IV lasers. It has, however, not been possible to impart sufficient strain to Ge to reach the direct-band gap goal, because bulk Ge fractures at much lower strains. Here it is shown that very thin sheets of Ge(001), called nanomembranes (NMs), can be used to overcome this materials limitation. Germanium nanomembranes (NMs) in the range of thicknesses from 20nm to 100nm were fabricated and then transferred and mounted to a flexible substrate [a polyimide (PI) sheet]. An apparatus was developed to stress the PI/NM combination and provide for in-situ Raman measurements of the strain as a function of applied stress. This arrangement allowed for the introduction of sufficient biaxial tensile strain (>1.7%) to transform Ge to a direct-band gap material, as determined by photoluminescence (PL) measurements and theory. Appropriate shifts in the emission spectrum and increases in PL intensities were observed. The advance in this work was nanomembrane fabrication technology; i.e., making thin enough Ge sheets to accept sufficiently high levels of strain without fracture. It was of interest to determine if the strain at which fracture ultimately does occur can be raised, by evaluating factors that initiate fracture. Attempts to assess the effect of free edges (enchant

  8. Electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of silicane under tensile strain

    SciTech Connect

    Jamdagni, Pooja Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Kumar, Ashok; Thakur, Anil

    2015-05-15

    The electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of fully hydrogenated silicene i.e. silicane in stable configuration are studied by means of density functional theory based calculations. The band gap of silicane monolayer can be flexibly reduced to zero when subjected to bi-axial tensile strain, leading to semi-conducting to metallic transition, whereas the static dielectric constant for in-plane polarization increases monotonically with increasing strain. Also the EEL function show the red shift in resonance peak with tensile strain. Our results offer useful insight for the application of silicane monolayer in nano-optical and electronics devices.

  9. Electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of silicane under tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamdagni, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Munish; Thakur, Anil; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-05-01

    The electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of fully hydrogenated silicene i.e. silicane in stable configuration are studied by means of density functional theory based calculations. The band gap of silicane monolayer can be flexibly reduced to zero when subjected to bi-axial tensile strain, leading to semi-conducting to metallic transition, whereas the static dielectric constant for in-plane polarization increases monotonically with increasing strain. Also the EEL function show the red shift in resonance peak with tensile strain. Our results offer useful insight for the application of silicane monolayer in nano-optical and electronics devices.

  10. Tensile strain mapping in flat germanium membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rhead, S. D. Halpin, J. E.; Myronov, M.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Wilson, N. R.; Leadley, D. R.; Shah, V. A.; Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P.; Reparaz, J. S.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2014-04-28

    Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction has been used as a non-destructive probe of the local crystalline quality of a thin suspended germanium (Ge) membrane. A series of reciprocal space maps were obtained with ∼4 μm spatial resolution, from which detailed information on the strain distribution, thickness, and crystalline tilt of the membrane was obtained. We are able to detect a systematic strain variation across the membranes, but show that this is negligible in the context of using the membranes as platforms for further growth. In addition, we show evidence that the interface and surface quality is improved by suspending the Ge.

  11. Three-dimensional development of tensile pre-strained annulus fibrosus cells for tissue regeneration: An in-vitro study

    SciTech Connect

    Chuah, Yon Jin; Lee, Wu Chean; Wong, Hee Kit; Kang, Yuejun; Hee, Hwan Tak

    2015-02-01

    Prior research has investigated the immediate response after application of tensile strain on annulus fibrosus (AF) cells for the past decade. Although mechanical strain can produce either catabolic or anabolic consequences to the cell monolayer, little is known on how to translate these findings into further tissue engineering applications. Till to date, the application and effect of tensile pre-strained cells to construct a three-dimensional (3D) AF tissue remains unknown. This study aims to investigate the effect of tensile pre-strained exposure of 1 to 24 h on the development of AF pellet culture for 3 weeks. Equibiaxial cyclic tensile strain was applied on AF monolayer cells over a period of 24 h, which was subsequently developed into a cell pellet. Investigation on cellular proliferation, phenotypic gene expression, and histological changes revealed that tensile pre-strain for 24 h had significant and lasting effect on the AF tissue development, with enhanced cell proliferation, and up-regulation of collagen type I, II, and aggrecan expression. Our results demonstrated the regenerative ability of AF cell pellets subjected to 24 h tensile pre-straining. Knowledge on the effects of tensile pre-strain exposure is necessary to optimize AF development for tissue reconstruction. Moreover, the tensile pre-strained cells may further be utilized in either cell therapy to treat mild disc degeneration disease, or the development of a disc construct for total disc replacement. - Highlights: • Establishment of tensile pre-strained cell line population for annulus development. • Tensile strain limits collagen gene expression declination in monolayer culture. • Tensile pre-strained cells up-regulate their matrix protein in 3D pellet culture.

  12. Tensile stress-strain behavior of boron/aluminum laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, J. A.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The tensile stress-strain behavior of five types of boron/aluminum laminates was investigated. Longitudinal and transverse stress-strain curves were obtained for monotonic loading to failure and for three cycles of loading to successively higher load levels. The laminate strengths predicted by assuming that the zero deg plies failed first correlated well with the experimental results. The stress-strain curves for all the boron/aluminum laminates were nonlinear except at very small strains. Within the small linear regions, elastic constants calculated from laminate theory corresponded to those obtained experimentally to within 10 to 20 percent. A limited amount of cyclic loading did not affect the ultimate strength and strain for the boron/aluminum laminates. The laminates, however, exhibited a permanent strain on unloading. The Ramberg-Osgood equation was fitted to the stress-strain curves to obtain average curves for the various laminates.

  13. Absence of rippling in graphene under biaxial tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Bipul; Mahadevan, Priya

    2010-10-01

    Recent experiments [C. H. Lui, L. Liu, K. F. Mak, G. W. Flynn, and T. F. Heinz, Nature (London) 462, 339 (2009)10.1038/nature08569] on graphene grown on ultraflat substrates have found no rippling in graphene when subject to temperature cycling. Unsupported/unstrained films of graphene as well as films grown on various substrates on the other hand have been found to show rippling effects. As graphene grown on a substrate is invariably strained, we examine the behavior of the out-of-plane acoustic-phonon mode with biaxial tensile strain. This mode is generally associated with the rippling of graphene. We find that it can be fit to a relation of the form w2=Ak4+Bk2 , where w and k are the frequency and wave vector, respectively. The coefficient A is found to show a weak dependence on strain while B is found to increase linearly with strain. The strain-induced hardening explains the absence of rippling in graphene subject to biaxial strain. In addition, we find that graphene when subject to a biaxial tensile strain is found to undergo a structural transition with the mode at K going soft at a strain percentage of 15%.

  14. Tensile stress-strain behavior of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    The tensile stress-strain behavior of a variety of graphite/epoxy laminates was examined. Longitudinal and transverse specimens from eleven different layups were monotonically loaded in tension to failure. Ultimate strength, ultimate strain, and strss-strain curves wee obtained from four replicate tests in each case. Polynominal equations were fitted by the method of least squares to the stress-strain data to determine average curves. Values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, derived from polynomial coefficients, were compared with laminate analysis results. While the polynomials appeared to accurately fit the stress-strain data in most cases, the use of polynomial coefficients to calculate elastic moduli appeared to be of questionable value in cases involving sharp changes in the slope of the stress-strain data or extensive scatter.

  15. Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Alviso, C T; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

    2009-03-10

    TR-55 rubber specimens were previously subjected to an aging process consisting of the application of a tensile strain of approximately 67%, 100%, 133%, or 167% elongation for 4, 8, 12, or 16 h at either 250 C or room temperature. Control specimens at the same temperatures/durations were not subjected to tensile strain. The specimens were allowed to recover at room temperature without external stimuli for over 100 days before tensile testing. A single dog bone was cut from each specimen and a stress-strain curve was obtained. The elastic modulus of each specimen was calculated. Specimens aged under tensile strain exhibited rubber-like behavior dependent on the aging elongation and duration. This behavior was not evident in the unstrained controls. For the unstrained controls, exposure to 250 C resulted in an increase in modulus relative to the unheated material independent of the heating duration. The tensile strain applied during the aging process caused a reduction in modulus relative to the controls; lower moduli were observed for the shorter aging durations. Slippage of the specimens in the grips prevented determination of ultimate strength, as all specimens either slipped completely out of the grip before failure or failed at the original grip edge after slipping.

  16. Optical strain measuring techniques for high temperature tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of optical techniques used for the analysis of in-plane displacements or strains are reviewed. The application would be for the high temperature, approximately 1430 C (2600 F), tensile testing of ceramic composites in an oxidizing atmosphere. General descriptions of the various techniques and specifics such as gauge lengths and sensitivities are noted. Also, possible problems with the use of each method in the given application are discussed.

  17. Tensile-strained germanium microdisks with circular Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kurdi, M.; Prost, M.; Ghrib, A.; Elbaz, A.; Sauvage, S.; Checoury, X.; Beaudoin, G.; Sagnes, I.; Picardi, G.; Ossikovski, R.; Boeuf, F.; Boucaud, P.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the combination of germanium microdisks tensily strained by silicon nitride layers and circular Bragg reflectors. The microdisks with suspended lateral Bragg reflectors form a cavity with quality factors up to 2000 around 2 μm. This represents a key feature to achieve a microlaser with a quasi-direct band gap germanium under a 1.6% biaxial tensile strain. We show that lowering the temperature significantly improves the quality factor of the quasi-radial modes. Linewidth narrowing is observed in a range of weak continuous wave excitation powers. We finally discuss the requirements to achieve lasing with these kind of structures.

  18. Tuning the Electro-optical Properties of Germanium Nanowires by Tensile Strain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter we present the electrical and electro-optical characterization of single crystalline germanium nanowires (NWs) under tensile strain conditions. The measurements were performed on vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) grown germanium (Ge) NWs, monolithically integrated into a micromechanical 3-point strain module. Uniaxial stress is applied along the ⟨111⟩ growth direction of individual, 100 nm thick Ge NWs while at the same time performing electrical and optical characterization at room temperature. Compared to bulk germanium, an anomalously high and negative-signed piezoresistive coefficient has been found. Spectrally resolved photocurrent characterization on strained NWs gives experimental evidence on the strain-induced modifications of the band structure. Particularly we are revealing a rapid decrease in resistivity and a red-shift in photocurrent spectra under high strain conditions. For a tensile strain of 1.8%, resistivity decreased by a factor of 30, and the photocurrent spectra shifted by 88 meV. Individual stressed NWs are recognized as an ideal platform for the exploration of strain-related electronic and optical effects and may contribute significantly to the realization of novel optoelectronic devices, strain-enhanced field-effect transistors (FETs), or highly sensitive strain gauges. PMID:23146072

  19. High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of DOP-26 Iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Carmichael Jr, Cecil Albert; George, Easo P

    2007-11-01

    The iridium alloy DOP-26 was developed through the Radioisotope Power Systems Program in the Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy. It is used for clad vent set cups containing radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for spacecraft. This report describes mechanical testing results for DOP-26. Specimens were given a vacuum recrystallization anneal of 1 hour at 1375 C and tested in tension in orientations parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the sheet from which they were fabricated. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1090 C and strain rates ranging from 1 x 10{sup -3} to 50 s{sup -1}. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr. The yield stress (YS) and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing strain rate. Between 600 and 1090 C, the ductility showed a slight increase with increasing temperature. Within the scatter of the data, the ductility did not depend on the strain rate. The reduction in area (RA), on the other hand, decreased with increasing strain rate. The YS and UTS values did not differ significantly for the longitudinal and transverse specimens. The ductility and RA values of the transverse specimens were marginally lower than those of the longitudinal specimens.

  20. Tensile strain-induced softening of iron at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoqing; Schönecker, Stephan; Simon, Eszter; Bergqvist, Lars; Zhang, Hualei; Szunyogh, László; Zhao, Jijun; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2015-11-01

    In weakly ferromagnetic materials, already small changes in the atomic configuration triggered by temperature or chemistry can alter the magnetic interactions responsible for the non-random atomic-spin orientation. Different magnetic states, in turn, can give rise to substantially different macroscopic properties. A classical example is iron, which exhibits a great variety of properties as one gradually removes the magnetic long-range order by raising the temperature towards its Curie point of  = 1043 K. Using first-principles theory, here we demonstrate that uniaxial tensile strain can also destabilise the magnetic order in iron and eventually lead to a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition at temperatures far below . In consequence, the intrinsic strength of the ideal single-crystal body-centred cubic iron dramatically weakens above a critical temperature of ~500 K. The discovered strain-induced magneto-mechanical softening provides a plausible atomic-level mechanism behind the observed drop of the measured strength of Fe whiskers around 300-500 K. Alloying additions which have the capability to partially restore the magnetic order in the strained Fe lattice, push the critical temperature for the strength-softening scenario towards the magnetic transition temperature of the undeformed lattice. This can result in a surprisingly large alloying-driven strengthening effect at high temperature as illustrated here in the case of Fe-Co alloy.

  1. Tensile strain-induced softening of iron at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoqing; Schönecker, Stephan; Simon, Eszter; Bergqvist, Lars; Zhang, Hualei; Szunyogh, László; Zhao, Jijun; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2015-01-01

    In weakly ferromagnetic materials, already small changes in the atomic configuration triggered by temperature or chemistry can alter the magnetic interactions responsible for the non-random atomic-spin orientation. Different magnetic states, in turn, can give rise to substantially different macroscopic properties. A classical example is iron, which exhibits a great variety of properties as one gradually removes the magnetic long-range order by raising the temperature towards its Curie point of  = 1043 K. Using first-principles theory, here we demonstrate that uniaxial tensile strain can also destabilise the magnetic order in iron and eventually lead to a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition at temperatures far below . In consequence, the intrinsic strength of the ideal single-crystal body-centred cubic iron dramatically weakens above a critical temperature of ~500 K. The discovered strain-induced magneto-mechanical softening provides a plausible atomic-level mechanism behind the observed drop of the measured strength of Fe whiskers around 300–500 K. Alloying additions which have the capability to partially restore the magnetic order in the strained Fe lattice, push the critical temperature for the strength-softening scenario towards the magnetic transition temperature of the undeformed lattice. This can result in a surprisingly large alloying-driven strengthening effect at high temperature as illustrated here in the case of Fe-Co alloy. PMID:26556127

  2. Tensile strain-induced softening of iron at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqing; Schönecker, Stephan; Simon, Eszter; Bergqvist, Lars; Zhang, Hualei; Szunyogh, László; Zhao, Jijun; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2015-01-01

    In weakly ferromagnetic materials, already small changes in the atomic configuration triggered by temperature or chemistry can alter the magnetic interactions responsible for the non-random atomic-spin orientation. Different magnetic states, in turn, can give rise to substantially different macroscopic properties. A classical example is iron, which exhibits a great variety of properties as one gradually removes the magnetic long-range order by raising the temperature towards its Curie point of  TC°= 1043 K. Using first-principles theory, here we demonstrate that uniaxial tensile strain can also destabilise the magnetic order in iron and eventually lead to a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition at temperatures far below TC°. In consequence, the intrinsic strength of the ideal single-crystal body-centred cubic iron dramatically weakens above a critical temperature of ~500 K. The discovered strain-induced magneto-mechanical softening provides a plausible atomic-level mechanism behind the observed drop of the measured strength of Fe whiskers around 300-500 K. Alloying additions which have the capability to partially restore the magnetic order in the strained Fe lattice, push the critical temperature for the strength-softening scenario towards the magnetic transition temperature of the undeformed lattice. This can result in a surprisingly large alloying-driven strengthening effect at high temperature as illustrated here in the case of Fe-Co alloy. PMID:26556127

  3. Tensile strain engineering of germanium micro-disks on free-standing SiO2 beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Attili, Abdelrahman Z.; Kako, Satoshi; Husain, Muhammad K.; Gardes, Frederic Y.; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko; Saito, Shinichi

    2016-04-01

    Tensile strain is required to enhance light-emitting direct-gap recombinations in germanium (Ge), which is a promising group IV material for realizing a monolithic light source on Si. Ge micro-disks on free-standing SiO2 beams were fabricated using Ge-on-Insulator wafers for applying tensile strain to Ge in a structure compatible with an optical confinement. We have studied the nature of the strain by Raman spectroscopy in comparison with finite-element computer simulations. We show the impacts of the beam design on the corresponding strain value, orientation, and uniformity, which can be exploited for Ge light emission applications. It was found that the tensile strain values are larger if the length of the beam is smaller. We confirmed that both uniaxial and biaxial strain can be applied to Ge disks, and maximum strain values of 1.1 and 0.6% have been achieved, as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. From the photoluminescence spectra of Ge micro-disks, we have also found a larger energy-splitting between the light-hole and the heavy-hole bands in shorter beams, indicating the impact of tensile strain.

  4. Polar semiconductor ZnO under inplane tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alahmed, Zeyad; Fu, Huaxiang

    2008-01-01

    Zinc oxide under biaxial inplane tensile strains is studied theoretically by first-principles density functional calculations. Different material properties (including structural response of cell shape, chemical bonding, total-energy curvature, electrical polarization, Born effective charge, electronic band dispersion, optical interband transitions, and effective masses) are examined. We found that (1) the c/a ratio decreases in a rather linear fashion with the increasing tensile strain when the inplane lattice constant (denoted as a ) of ZnO is varied below a critical transition value of atr=1.067a0 ( a0 is the equilibrium inplane cell length). However, at a=atr , ZnO exhibits a pronounced structural discontinuity in c/a ratio, as well as in cell volume. (2) The structural discontinuity results from the existence of two energy minima (labeled as A and B), both being metastable. Minimum A is energetically favorable when a is below atr , while minimum B is more stable when a exceeds atr . (3) As the inplane lattice constant approaches atr from below, ZnO becomes markedly soft along the polar c axis, promising a large electromechanical response. (4) At a=atr , spontaneous polarization in ZnO collapses, leading to a polar-nonpolar phase transformation. (5) Despite that the spontaneous polarization vanishes when a=atr , Born effective charge of Zn atom nevertheless increases, demonstrating an interesting anticorrelation. (6) Above atr , covalent overlapping charge largely disappears between those polar Zn-O bonds collinear with the c axis, indicating that the bonds are predominantly ionic. (7) The polar-nonpolar structural transformation simultaneously gives rise to a direct-indirect band gap transition. When a is above atr , the valence band maximum is no longer at zone center Γ but at zone-edge H point. Occurrence of indirect band gap originates from the fact that the orbital energy of the top valence state at H shows a sensitive dependence on the inplane strain. (8

  5. Applying strain into graphene by SU-8 resist shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Makoto; Hibino, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the use of the shrinkage of SU-8 resist caused by thermal annealing to apply strain into graphene grown by the chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) method. We demonstrate that the shrinkage of resist deposited on top of graphene on a substrate induces a local tensile strain within a distance of 1–2 μm from the edge of the resist. The thermal shrinkage of SU-8 will allow us to design the local strain in graphene on substrates. We also show that the shrinkage induces a large tensile strain in graphene suspended between two bars of SU-8. We expect that a much larger strain can be induced by suppressing defects in CVD-grown graphene.

  6. Examination of a Rock Failure Criterion Based on Circumferential Tensile Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, , Y.; Kiyama, , T.; Ishijima, Y.; Kodama, J.

    Uniaxial compression, triaxial compression and Brazialian tests were conducted on several kinds of rock, with particular attention directed to the principal tensile strain. In this paper we aim to clarify the effects of the experimental environment-such as confining pressure, loading rate, water content and anisotropy-on the critical tensile strain, i.e., the measured principal tensile strain at peak load.It was determined that the chain-type extensometer is a most suitable method for measuring the critical tensile strain in uniaxial compression tests. It is also shown that the paper-based strain gage, whose effective length is less than or equal to a tenth of the specimen's diameter and glued on with a rubber-type adhesive, can be effectively used in the Brazilian tests.The effect of confining pressure PC on the critical tensile strain ɛTC in the brittle failure region was between -0.02 × 10-10 Pa-1 and 0.77 × 10-10 Pa-1. This pressure sensitivity is small compared to the critical tensile strain values of around -0.5 × 10-2. The strain rate sensitivities ∂ɛTC/∂{log(d|ɛ|/dt)} were observed in the same way as the strength constants in other failure criteria. They were found to be from -0.10 × 10-3 to -0.52 × 10-3 per order of magnitude in strain rate in the triaxial tests. The average magnitude of the critical tensile strain ɛTC increased due to the presence of water by 4% to 20% for some rocks, and decreased by 22% for sandstone. It can at least be said that the critical tensile strain is less sensitive to water content than the uniaxial compressive strength under the experimental conditions reported here. An obvious anisotropy was observed in the P-wave velocity and in the uniaxial compressive strength of Pombetsu sandstone. It was not observed, however, in the critical tensile strain, although the data do show some variation.A "tensile strain criterion" was proposed, based on the above experimental results. This criterion signifies that stress begins

  7. Multiscale Computer Simulation of Tensile and Compressive Strain in Polymer- Coated Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian

    2009-01-01

    While the low thermal conductivities of silica aerogels have made them of interest to the aerospace community as lightweight thermal insulation, the application of conformal polymer coatings to these gels increases their strength significantly, making them potentially useful as structural materials as well. In this work we perform multiscale computer simulations to investigate the tensile and compressive strain behavior of silica and polymer-coated silica aerogels. Aerogels are made up of clusters of interconnected particles of amorphous silica of less than bulk density. We simulate gel nanostructure using a Diffusion Limited Cluster Aggregation (DLCA) procedure, which produces aggregates that exhibit fractal dimensions similar to those observed in real aerogels. We have previously found that model gels obtained via DLCA exhibited stress-strain curves characteristic of the experimentally observed brittle failure. However, the strain energetics near the expected point of failure were not consistent with such failure. This shortcoming may be due to the fact that the DLCA process produces model gels that are lacking in closed-loop substructures, compared with real gels. Our model gels therefore contain an excess of dangling strands, which tend to unravel under tensile strain, producing non-brittle failure. To address this problem, we have incorporated a modification to the DLCA algorithm that specifically produces closed loops in the model gels. We obtain the strain energetics of interparticle connections via atomistic molecular statics, and abstract the collective energy of the atomic bonds into a Morse potential scaled to describe gel particle interactions. Polymer coatings are similarly described. We apply repeated small uniaxial strains to DLCA clusters, and allow relaxation of the center eighty percent of the cluster between strains. The simulations produce energetics and stress-strain curves for looped and nonlooped clusters, for a variety of densities and

  8. High-strain rate tensile characterization of graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester based nanocomposites using split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Brahmananda

    The dynamic response of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced and carboxyl terminated butadiene nitrile (CTBN) toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites are characterized under both dynamic tensile and compressive loading. Dynamic direct tensile tests are performed applying the reverse impact Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The specimen geometry for tensile test is parametrically optimized by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using ANSYS Mechanical APDLRTM. Uniform stress distribution within the specimen gage length has been verified using high-speed digital photography. The on-specimen strain gage installation is substituted by a non-contact Laser Occlusion Expansion Gage (LOEG) technique for infinitesimal dynamic tensile strain measurements. Due to very low transmitted pulse signal, an alternative approach based on incident pulse is applied for obtaining the stress-time history. Indirect tensile tests are also performed combining the conventional SHPB technique with Brazilian disk test method for evaluating cylindrical disk specimens. The cylindrical disk specimen is held snugly in between two concave end fixtures attached to the incident and transmission bars. Indirect tensile stress is estimated from the SHPB pulses, and diametrical transverse tensile strain is measured using LOEG. Failure diagnosis using high-speed digital photography validates the viability of utilizing this indirect test method for characterizing the tensile properties of the candidate vinyl ester based nanocomposite system. Also, quasi-static indirect tensile response agrees with previous investigations conducted using the traditional dog-bone specimen in quasi-static direct tensile tests. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Finally, the conventional compressive SHPB tests are performed. It is observed that both

  9. Effect of Strain Rate on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Epoxy-Impregnated Bundle Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    The tensile tests for high tensile strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB) carbon fiber epoxy-impregnated bundle composite at various strain rates ranging from 3.33 × 10-5 to 6.0 × 102 s-1 (various crosshead speeds ranging from 8.33 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 101 m/s) were investigated. The statistical distributions of the tensile strength were also evaluated. The results clearly demonstrated that the tensile strength of bundle composite slightly increased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed) and the Weibull modulus of tensile strength for the bundle composite decreased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed), there is a linear relation between the Weibull modulus and the average tensile strength on log-log scale.

  10. Analysis of optical gain threshold in n-doped and tensile-strained germanium heterostructure diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prost, M.; El Kurdi, M.; Aniel, F.; Zerounian, N.; Sauvage, S.; Checoury, X.; BÅ`uf, F.; Boucaud, P.

    2015-09-01

    The optical emission of germanium-based luminescent and/or laser devices can be enhanced by tensile strain and n-type doping. In this work, we study by simulation the interplay between electrical transport and optical gain in highly n-doped and intrinsic germanium p-n heterostructure diodes under tensile strain. The effects of strain and doping on carrier mobilities and energy distribution are taken into account. Whereas the n-doping of Ge enhances the filling of the indirect L and Brillouin zone-center conduction band states, the n-doping also reduces the carrier injection efficiency, which is detrimental for the achievement of optical gain at reduced current densities. For applied biaxial strains larger than 1.25%, i.e., far before reaching the cross-over from indirect to direct band gap regime, undoped germanium exhibits a lower optical gain threshold as compared to doped germanium. We also show that the threshold current needed to reach transparency in germanium heterostructures has been significantly underestimated in the previous works.

  11. Effect of tensile strain on the negative differential resistance in the WTe2 armchair nanoribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Bahniman; Gupta, Abhishek; Bishnoi, Bhupesh

    2014-04-01

    In this work, we have studied the charge transport characteristics of WTe2 armchair nanoribbon and analyzed the variation in results by applying tensile strain to the nanoribbon. Tungsten ditelluride (WTe2) is a member of the transition metal dichalcogenides family. WTe2 is orthorhombic in structure with lattice parameters a = 0.6282 nm, b = 0.3496 nm, c = 1.407 nm. We have simulated the model using first-principle density functional tight binding theory and the non-equilibrium Green’s function method to study the effect of strain on the transport characteristics. The obtained results are compared with that of the perfectly relaxed nanoribbon. We have applied uniaxial (ɛ xx) and biaxial (ɛ xx = ɛ yy) tensile strain to the nanoribbon. We present the ID-VDS characteristics, transmission spectrum and conductance for different cases. Negative differential resistance (NDR) is observed in all the cases along with a change in peak-to-valley current ratio (PVCR) and negative differential resistance region (NDRR).

  12. Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotubes Under Realistic Temperature and Strain Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chen-Yu; Cho, Kyeong-Jae; Srivastava, Deepak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Strain rate and temperature dependence of the tensile strength of single-wall carbon nanotubes has been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. The tensile failure or yield strain is found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and strain rate. A transition state theory based predictive model is developed for the tensile failure of nanotubes. Based on the parameters fitted from high-strain rate and temperature dependent molecular dynamics simulations, the model predicts that a defect free micrometer long single-wall nanotube at 300 K, stretched with a strain rate of 1%/hour, fails at about 9 plus or minus 1% tensile strain. This is in good agreement with recent experimental findings.

  13. Experimental and numerical study on tensile strength of concrete under different strain rates.

    PubMed

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10(-7) s(-1) to 10(-4) s(-1) in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  14. Experimental and Numerical Study on Tensile Strength of Concrete under Different Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10−7 s−1 to 10−4 s−1 in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  15. Effect of strain rate on formability in warm deep drawing of high tensile strength steel sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihara, Shoichiro; Iwamatsu, Go

    2014-10-01

    In tensile test of the high tensile strength steel, tensile strength isdrastically decreased as the temperature is raised. Then, the strain rate sensitivity exponent of high tensile strength steel (SUS631) in this study is high at 800 degrees especially. Also, elongation is increased as the temperature is raised. In deep drawing, the maximum punch load of the high tensile strength steel is examined on difference punch speed at 600 and 800 degrees. On the other hand, finite element (FE) simulation was used for the possibility to evaluate the forming load on difference punch speed in warm deep drawing. In FE simulation, we have considered both the strain hardening exponent and the strain rate sensitivity exponent (m-value) because we cannot neglect m-value 0.184 at 800 degrees. The tendency of the forming load in the experiments agrees the results in FE simulation.

  16. Effect of Strain-Induced Martensite on Tensile Properties and Hydrogen Embrittlement of 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Suk; Bak, Sang Hwan; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Room temperature tensile tests have been conducted at different strain rates ranging from 2 × 10-6 to 1 × 10-2/s on hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 stainless steel (SS). Using a ferritescope and neutron diffraction, the amount of strain-induced martensite (SIM) has been in situ measured at the center region of the gage section of the tensile specimens or ex situ measured on the fractured tensile specimens. The ductility, tensile stress, hardness, and the amount of SIM increase with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and decrease in hydrogen-charged one. Specifically, SIM that forms during tensile tests is beneficial in increasing the ductility, strain hardening, and tensile stress of 304 SS, irrespective of the presence of hydrogen. A correlation of the tensile properties of hydrogen-free and hydrogen-charged 304 SS and the amount of SIM shows that hydrogen suppresses the formation of SIM in hydrogen-charged 304 SS, leading to a ductility loss and localized brittle fracture. Consequently, we demonstrate that hydrogen embrittlement of 304 SS is related to hydrogen-suppressed formation of SIM, corresponding to the disordered phase, according to our proposition. Compelling evidence is provided by the observations of the increased lattice expansion of martensite with decreasing strain rate in hydrogen-free 304 SS and its lattice contraction in hydrogen-charged one.

  17. Highly tunable magnetism in silicene doped with Cr and Fe atoms under isotropic and uniaxial tensile strain

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Rui; Ni, Jun; Chen, Ying

    2015-12-28

    We have investigated the magnetic properties of silicene doped with Cr and Fe atoms under isotropic and uniaxial tensile strain by the first-principles calculations. We find that Cr and Fe doped silicenes show strain-tunable magnetism. (1) The magnetism of Cr and Fe doped silicenes exhibits sharp transitions from low spin states to high spin states by a small isotropic tensile strain. Specially for Fe doped silicene, a nearly nonmagnetic state changes to a high magnetic state by a small isotropic tensile strain. (2) The magnetic moments of Fe doped silicene also show a sharp jump to ∼2 μ{sub B} at a small threshold of the uniaxial strain, and the magnetic moments of Cr doped silicene increase gradually to ∼4 μ{sub B} with the increase of uniaxial strain. (3) The electronic and magnetic properties of Cr and Fe doped silicenes are sensitive to the magnitude and direction of the external strain. The highly tunable magnetism may be applied in the spintronic devices.

  18. Suspended germanium cross-shaped microstructures for enhancing biaxial tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Satomi; Kako, Satoshi; Oda, Katsuya; Ido, Tatemi; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    We fabricate a suspended germanium cross-shaped microstructure to biaxially enhance residual tensile strain using a germanium epilayer directly grown on a silicon-on-insulator substrate. Such a suspended germanium system with enhanced biaxial tensile strain will be a promising platform for incorporating optical cavities toward the realization of germanium lasers. We demonstrate systematic control over biaxial tensile strain and photoluminescence peaks by changing structural geometry. The photoluminescence peaks corresponding to the direct recombination between the conduction Γ valley and two strain-induced separated valence bands have been clearly assigned. A maximum biaxial strain of 0.8% has been achieved, which is almost half of that required to transform germanium into a direct band-gap semiconductor.

  19. Effect of tensile strain on the electronic structure of Ge: A first-principles calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Miao; Di, Zengfeng E-mail: shijin.zhao@shu.edu.cn; Hu, Lijuan; Zhao, Shi-Jin E-mail: shijin.zhao@shu.edu.cn

    2014-09-21

    Taking the change of L-point conduction band valley degeneracy under strain into consideration, we investigate the effect of biaxially tensile strain (parallel to the (001), (110), and (111) planes) and uniaxially tensile strain (along the [001], [110], and [111] directions) on the electronic structure of Ge using density functional theory calculations. Our calculation shows that biaxial tension parallel to (001) is the most efficient way to transform Ge into a direct bandgap material among all tensile strains considered. [111]-tension is the best choice among all uniaxial approaches for an indirect- to direct-bandgap transition of Ge. The calculation results, which are further elaborated by bond-orbital approximation, provide a useful guidance on the optical applications of Ge through strain engineering.

  20. Enhanced electroluminescence from a free-standing tensilely strained germanium nanomembrane light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jingming, Chen; Bin, Shu; Jibao, Wu; Linxi, Fan; Heming, Zhang; Huiyong, Hu; Rongxi, Xuan; Jianjun, Song

    2015-10-01

    Ge has become a promising material for Si-based optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEIC) due to its pseudo-direct bandgap. In this paper we achieved tensilely strained Ge free-standing nanomembrane (NM) light-emitting diode (LED), using silicon nitride thin film with high stress. The tensile stress in the Ge layer can be controlled by adjustable process parameters. An expected redshift of electroluminescence (EL) in Ge NM LED is observed at room temperature, which has been attributed to the shrinking of its direct bandgap relative to its indirect bandgap. An EL with dramatically increased intensity was observed around 1876 nm at a tensile strain of 1.92%, which demonstrates the direct-band recombination in tensilely strained Ge NM. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central University of China (No. 7214428001).

  1. Tuning quantum dot luminescence below the bulk band gap using tensile strain.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Paul J; Yerino, Christopher D; Sun, Meng; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana L; Dorogan, Vitaliy G; Mazur, Yuriy; Salamo, Gregory; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2013-06-25

    Self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs) grown under biaxial tension could enable novel devices by taking advantage of the strong band gap reduction induced by tensile strain. Tensile SAQDs with low optical transition energies could find application in the technologically important area of mid-infrared optoelectronics. In the case of Ge, biaxial tension can even cause a highly desirable crossover from an indirect- to a direct-gap band structure. However, the inability to grow tensile SAQDs without dislocations has impeded progress in these directions. In this article, we demonstrate a method to grow dislocation-free, tensile SAQDs by employing the unique strain relief mechanisms of (110)-oriented surfaces. As a model system, we show that tensile GaAs SAQDs form spontaneously, controllably, and without dislocations on InAlAs(110) surfaces. The tensile strain reduces the band gap in GaAs SAQDs by ~40%, leading to robust type-I quantum confinement and photoluminescence at energies lower than that of bulk GaAs. This method can be extended to other zinc blende and diamond cubic materials to form novel optoelectronic devices based on tensile SAQDs. PMID:23701255

  2. Tensile strain-induced magnetism transition in multilayer graphene with excess electrons: Stability of the edge-quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lei; Diao, Dongfeng

    2015-12-15

    The stability of edge-quantum well-induced strong magnetism of multilayer armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) with excess electrons was investigated under applied tensile strain by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results indicated that: (1) The strain along the armchair edge direction led to a transition of the multilayer AGNRs from ferromagnetic state to nonmagnetic state when the strain increased to a critical value; (2) The strain induced bond length changes reduced the stability of the edge-quantum well in terms of the reduction of the electrons capturing capacity; and (3) The spin splitting of the energy bands near the Fermi level reduced with the increase of the strain, resulting in the decrease of the spin moment. This finding suggests that the magnetic properties of graphene have strong dependence on its strain states, which is crucial to the design of graphene-based magnetic devices.

  3. Mechanical characterization of sub-100-nm-thick Au thin films by electrostatically actuated tensile testing with several strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyun-Jin; Kawase, Shinya; Hanasaki, Itsuo; Isono, Yoshitada

    2014-02-01

    We have developed the tensile testing device based on MEMS technology and applied it to the Au thin films with thickness in the sub-100-nm regime. The specimen was fabricated by thermal deposition and sputtering processes in the course of device fabrication. This technique of device fabrication in combination with the specimen realizes the precise loading direction without preloading before tensile tests. The loads were applied electrostatically by the comb-drive actuator. The obtained Young’s modulus was 28 ± 3 GPa and was insensitive to the strain rate. The 0.2% yield strength was in the range from 192 to 519 MPa with a trend of decrease with decreasing strain rate in the range from 5 × 10-5 to 5 × 10-2 s-1.

  4. Measurement of lacunar bone strains and crack formation during tensile loading by digital volume correlation of second harmonic generation images.

    PubMed

    Wentzell, Scott; Nesbitt, Robert Sterling; Macione, James; Kotha, Shiva

    2016-07-01

    The maintenance of healthy bone tissue depends upon the ability of osteocytes to respond to mechanical cues on the cellular level. The combination of digital volume correlation and second harmonic generation microscopy offers the opportunity to investigate the mechanical microenvironment of intact bone on the scale of individual osteocytes. Adult human femurs were imaged under tensile loads of 5 and 15MPa and volumes of approximately 492×429×31μm(3) were analyzed, along with an image of a bone microcrack under the same loading conditions. Principal strains were significantly higher in three-dimensional digital volume correlation when compared to two-dimensional digital image correlation. The average maximum principal strain magnitude was 5.06-fold greater than the applied global strain, with peak strains of up to 23.14-fold over global strains measured at the borders of osteocyte lacunae. Finally, a microcrack that initiated at an osteocyte lacunae had its greatest tensile strain magnitudes at the crack expansion front in the direction of a second lacunae, but strain at the crack border was reduced to background strain magnitudes upon breaching the second lacunae. This serveed to demonstrate the role of lacunae in initiating, mediating and terminating microcrack growth. PMID:26807766

  5. Strain rate effects on tensile strength of iron green bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Kuroyanagi, Yuki; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Gustafsson, Gustaf

    2015-09-01

    Impact tensile strength of iron green bodies with densities of 7.2 and 7.4 g/cm3 was examined by Brazilian test using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky bar) method. The powder material used for the experiments was a press-ready premix containing Distaloy AE, graphite, and lubricant. During dynamic compression, the failure behavior of specimens was observed using a high-speed video camera. The failure stress and failure behavior of dynamic compressive tests were compared with those of static compressive tests.

  6. Tensile behaviour of geopolymer-based materials under medium and high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, Costantino; Asprone, Domenico; Forni, Daniele; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Bozza, Anna; Prota, Andrea; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Geopolymers are a promising class of inorganic materials typically obtained from an alluminosilicate source and an alkaline solution, and characterized by an amorphous 3-D framework structure. These materials are particularly attractive for the construction industry due to mechanical and environmental advantages they exhibit compared to conventional systems. Indeed, geopolymer-based concretes represent a challenge for the large scale uses of such a binder material and many research studies currently focus on this topic. However, the behaviour of geopolymers under high dynamic loads is rarely investigated, even though it is of a fundamental concern for the integrity/vulnerability assessment under extreme dynamic events. The present study aims to investigate the effect of high dynamic loading conditions on the tensile behaviour of different geopolymer formulations. The dynamic tests were performed under different strain rates by using a Hydro-pneumatic machine and a modified Hopkinson bar at the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The results are processed in terms of stress-strain relationships and strength dynamic increase factor at different strain-rate levels. The dynamic increase factor was also compared with CEB recommendations. The experimental outcomes can be used to assess the constitutive laws of geopolymers under dynamic load conditions and implemented into analytical models.

  7. Dependence of electronic properties of germanium on the in-plane biaxial tensile strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. H.; Yu, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. M.; Lu, P. F.; Gao, T.; Li, M.; Manzoor, S.

    2013-10-01

    The hybrid HSE06 functional with the spin-orbit coupling effects is used to calculate the habituation of the electronic properties of Ge on the (0 0 1), (1 1 1), (1 0 1) in-plane biaxial tensile strains (IPBTSs). Our motivation is to explore the nature of electronic properties of tensile-strained Ge on different substrate orientations. The calculated results demonstrate that one of the most effective and practical approaches for transforming Ge into a direct transition semiconductor is to introduce (0 0 1) IPBTS to Ge. At 2.3% (0 0 1) IPBTS, Ge becomes a direct bandgap semiconductor with 0.53 eV band gap, in good agreement with the previous theoretical and experimental results. We find that the (1 1 1) and (1 0 1) IPBTSs are not efficient since the shear strain and inner displacement of atoms introduced by them quickly decrease the indirect gap of Ge. By investigating the dependence of valence band spin-orbit splitting on strain, we prove that the dependency relationship and the coupled ways between the valence-band states of tensile-strained Ge are closely related to the symmetry of strain tensor, i.e., the symmetry of the substrate orientation. The first- and second-order coefficients describing the dependence of indirect gap, direct gap, the valence band spin-orbit coupling splitting, and heavy-hole-light-hole splitting of Ge on IPBTSs have been obtained by the least squares polynomial fitting. These coefficients are significant to quantitatively modulate the electronic properties of Ge by tensile strain and design tensile-strained Ge devices by semiconductor epitaxial technique.

  8. Impurity effects on high-temperature tensile ductility of iridium alloys at high strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; George, E.P.; Lee, E.H.; Ohriner, E.K.; Heatherly, L.; Cohron, J.W.

    1999-12-17

    The current study was undertaken to determine what effects, if any, larger amounts of certain impurities (Al,Cr,Fe,Ni, and Si) might have on the physical metallurgy and mechanical properties of the DOP-26 iridium alloy. This report summarizes the effects of these impurities on grain growth behavior and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility. Comparisons are made to the grain growth behavior and high-strain-rate tensile properties of the DOP-26 alloy without intentional impurity additions.

  9. Tensile-strained InxGa1-xP membranes for cavity optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Garrett D.; Yu, Pen-Li; Gärtner, Claus; Siquans, Karoline; Moghadas Nia, Ramon; Schmöle, Jonas; Hoelscher-Obermaier, Jason; Purdy, Thomas P.; Wieczorek, Witlef; Regal, Cindy A.; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the optomechanical properties of tensile-strained ternary InxGa1-xP nanomembranes grown on GaAs. This material system combines the benefits of highly strained membranes, similar to those based on stoichiometric silicon nitride, with the unique properties of thin-film semiconductor single crystals, as previously demonstrated with suspended GaAs. Here, we employ lattice mismatch in epitaxial growth to impart an intrinsic tensile strain to a monocrystalline thin film (approximately 30 nm thick). These structures exhibit mechanical quality factors of 2 × 106 or beyond at room temperature and 17 K for eigenfrequencies up to 1 MHz, yielding Q × f products of 2 × 1012 Hz for a tensile stress of ˜170 MPa. Incorporating such membranes in a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity, we extract an upper limit to the total optical loss (including both absorption and scatter) of 40 ppm at 1064 nm and room temperature. Further reductions of the In content of this alloy will enable tensile stress levels of 1 GPa, with the potential for a significant increase in the Q × f product, assuming no deterioration in the mechanical loss at this composition and strain level. This materials system is a promising candidate for the integration of strained semiconductor membrane structures with low-loss semiconductor mirrors and for realizing stacks of membranes for enhanced optomechanical coupling.

  10. Effects of strain rate, test temperature and test environment on tensile properties of vandium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbi, A.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Eatherly, W.S.; Gibson, L.T.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile testing was carried out on SS-3 tensile specimens punched from 0.762-mm-thick sheets of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and small heats of V-3Cr-3Ti and V-6Cr-6Ti. The tensile specimens were annealed at 1000{degrees} for 2 h to obtain a fully recrystallized, fine grain microstructure with a grain size in the range of 10-19 {mu}m. Room temperature tests at strain rates ranging from 10{sup {minus}3} to 5 x 10{sup {minus}1}/s were carried out in air; elevated temperature testing up to 700{degrees}C was conducted in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} torr (<10{sup {minus}3} Pa). To study the effect of atomic hydrogen on ductility, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in an ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) with a hydrogen leak system.

  11. Effects of Applied Strain on Rates of Ageing: Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campion, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    One of the stated intents of this project has been to make some assessment of effects of strain on rates of ageing of project thermoplastics exposed to project fluids. To this end, certain straining jigs which apply in various modes - tensile, four-point bending and crack growth using compact tension samples - were designed and made for holding samples during fluid exposures. During testing, features of the thermoplastics have been observed which have tended to confuse apparent strain effects on the polymers' aged performance, but recent assessments of the topic and its data have led to considerable progress being made in identifying test procedures necessary for strain and related effects on chemical deterioration to manifest themselves. It is the intent of this report to provide a summary of what has been determined on strain and related effects thus far, and provide recommendations for clarifying them in Phase 2 by means of further test procedures which will increase and focus the severity of the conditions applying. The choice of flexible pipe rather than umbilicals service for assessing service strain conditions reflects the major interest of project members. However, Tefzel data are still provided.

  12. Unusual Enhancement in Intrinsic Thermal Conductivity of Multilayer Graphene by Tensile Strains

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Youdi; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Huang, Baoling

    2015-01-01

    High basal plane thermal conductivity k of multi-layer graphene makes it promising for thermal management applications. Here we examine the effects of tensile strain on thermal transport in this system. Using a first principles Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach, we calculate the room-temperature in-plane lattice k of multi-layer graphene (up to four layers) and graphite under different isotropic tensile strains. The calculated in-plane k of graphite, finite mono-layer graphene and 3-layer graphene agree well with previous experiments. The dimensional transitions of the intrinsic k and the extent of the diffusive transport regime from mono-layer graphene to graphite are presented. We find a peak enhancement of intrinsic k for multi-layer graphene and graphite with increasing strain and the largest enhancement amplitude is about 40%. In contrast the calculated intrinsic k with tensile strain decreases for diamond and diverges for graphene, we show that the competition between the decreased mode heat capacities and the increased lifetimes of flexural phonons with increasing strain contribute to this k behavior. Similar k behavior is observed for 2-layer hexagonal boron nitride systems, suggesting that it is an inherent thermal transport property in multi-layer systems assembled of purely two dimensional atomic layers. This study provides insights into engineering k of multi-layer graphene and boron nitride by strain and into the nature of thermal transport in quasi-two-dimensional and highly anisotropic systems.

  13. Tensile strains give rise to strong size effects for thermal conductivities of silicene, germanene and stanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Y. D.; Lindsay, L.; Shi, S. Q.; Zheng, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Based on first principles calculations and self-consistent solution of the linearized Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach within a three-phonon scattering framework, we characterize lattice thermal conductivities k of freestanding silicene, germanene and stanene under different isotropic tensile strains and temperatures. We find a strong size dependence of k for silicene with tensile strain, i.e., divergent k with increasing system size; however, the intrinsic room temperature k for unstrained silicene converges with system size to 19.34 W m-1 K-1 at 178 nm. The room temperature k of strained silicene becomes as large as that of bulk silicon at 84 μm, indicating the possibility of using strain in silicene to manipulate k for thermal management. The relative contribution to the intrinsic k from out-of-plane acoustic modes is largest for unstrained silicene, ~39% at room temperature. The single mode relaxation time approximation, which works reasonably well for bulk silicon, fails to appropriately describe phonon thermal transport in silicene, germanene and stanene within the temperature range considered. For large samples of silicene, k increases with tensile strain, peaks at ~7% strain and then decreases with further strain. In germanene and stanene, increasing strain hardens and stabilizes long wavelength out-of-plane acoustic phonons, and leads to similar k behaviors to those of silicene. These findings further our understanding of phonon dynamics in group-IV buckled monolayers and may guide transfer and fabrication techniques for these freestanding samples and engineering of k by size and strain for applications of thermal management and thermoelectricity.Based on first principles calculations and self-consistent solution of the linearized Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach within a three-phonon scattering framework, we characterize lattice thermal conductivities k of freestanding silicene, germanene and stanene under

  14. Localized strain measurements of the intervertebral disc annulus during biaxial tensile testing.

    PubMed

    Karakolis, Thomas; Callaghan, Jack P

    2015-01-01

    Both inter-lamellar and intra-lamellar failures of the annulus have been described as potential modes of disc herniation. Attempts to characterize initial lamellar failure of the annulus have involved tensile testing of small tissue samples. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a method of measuring local surface strains through image analysis of a tensile test conducted on an isolated sample of annular tissue in order to enhance future studies of intervertebral disc failure. An annulus tissue sample was biaxial strained to 10%. High-resolution images captured the tissue surface throughout testing. Three test conditions were evaluated: submerged, non-submerged and marker. Surface strains were calculated for the two non-marker conditions based on motion of virtual tracking points. Tracking algorithm parameters (grid resolution and template size) were varied to determine the effect on estimated strains. Accuracy of point tracking was assessed through a comparison of the non-marker conditions to a condition involving markers placed on tissue surface. Grid resolution had a larger effect on local strain than template size. Average local strain error ranged from 3% to 9.25% and 0.1% to 2.0%, for the non-submerged and submerged conditions, respectively. Local strain estimation has a relatively high potential for error. Submerging the tissue provided superior strain estimates. PMID:25145810

  15. Strain Rate Sensitivity of Epoxy Resin in Tensile and Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical response of E-862 and PR-520 resins is investigated in tensile and shear loadings. At both types of loading the resins are tested at strain rates of about 5x10(exp 5), 2, and 450 to 700 /s. In addition, dynamic shear modulus tests are carried out at various frequencies and temperatures, and tensile stress relaxation tests are conducted at room temperature. The results show that the toughened PR-520 resin can carry higher stresses than the untoughened E-862 resin. Strain rate has a significant effect on the response of both resins. In shear both resins show a ductile response with maximum stress that is increasing with strain rate. In tension a ductile response is observed at low strain rate (approx. 5x10(exp 5) /s), and brittle response is observed at the medium and high strain rates (2, and 700 /s). The hydrostatic component of the stress in the tensile tests causes premature failure in the E-862 resin. Localized deformation develops in the PR-520 resin when loaded in shear. An internal state variable constitutive model is proposed for modeling the response of the resins. The model includes a state variable that accounts for the effect of the hydrostatic component of the stress on the deformation.

  16. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzar, B.; Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 104 to 4 × 104 s-1. The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading.

  17. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    SciTech Connect

    Erzar, B. Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y.

    2013-12-28

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 10{sup 4} to 4 × 10{sup 4} s{sup −1}. The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading.

  18. Radiative and non-radiative recombinations in tensile strained Ge microstrips: Photoluminescence experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Virgilio, M.; Schroeder, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Capellini, G.

    2015-12-21

    Tensile germanium microstrips are candidate as gain material in Si-based light emitting devices due to the beneficial effect of the strain field on the radiative recombination rate. In this work, we thoroughly investigate their radiative recombination spectra by means of micro-photoluminescence experiments at different temperatures and excitation powers carried out on samples featuring different tensile strain values. For sake of comparison, bulk Ge(001) photoluminescence is also discussed. The experimental findings are interpreted in light of a numerical modeling based on a multi-valley effective mass approach, taking in to account the depth dependence of the photo-induced carrier density and of the self-absorption effect. The theoretical modeling allowed us to quantitatively describe the observed increase of the photoluminescence intensity for increasing values of strain, excitation power, and temperature. The temperature dependence of the non-radiative recombination time in this material has been inferred thanks to the model calibration procedure.

  19. Cyclic Tensile Strain Induces Tenogenic Differentiation of Tendon-Derived Stem Cells in Bioreactor Culture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Wang, Qiang; Li, Yudong; Gan, Yibo; Li, Pei; Li, Songtao; Zhou, Yue; Zhou, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Different loading regimens of cyclic tensile strain impose different effects on cell proliferation and tenogenic differentiation of TDSCs in three-dimensional (3D) culture in vitro, which has been little reported in previous literatures. In this study we assessed the efficacy of TDSCs in a poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone)/collagen (P(LLA-CL)/Col) scaffold under mechanical stimulation in the custom-designed 3D tensile bioreactor, which revealed that cyclic tensile strain with different frequencies (0.3 Hz, 0.5 Hz, and 1.0 Hz) and amplitudes (2%, 4%, and 8%) had no influence on TDSC viability, while it had different effects on the proliferation and the expression of type I collagen, tenascin-C, tenomodulin, and scleraxis of TDSCs, which was most obvious at 0.5 Hz frequency with the same amplitude and at 4% amplitude with the same frequency. Moreover, signaling pathway from microarray analysis revealed that reduced extracellular matrix (ECM) receptor interaction signaling initiated the tendon genius switch. Cyclic tensile strain highly upregulated genes encoding regulators of NPM1 and COPS5 transcriptional activities as well as MYC related transcriptional factors, which contributed to cell proliferation and differentiation. In particular, the transcriptome analysis provided certain new insights on the molecular and signaling networks for TDSCs loaded in these conditions. PMID:26229962

  20. Tensile strains give rise to strong size effects for thermal conductivities of silicene, germanene and stanene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kuang, Youdi D.; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Shi, Sanqiang Q.; Zhen, Guangping P.

    2016-01-11

    Based on first principles calculations and self-consistent solution of linearized Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach within a three-phonon scattering framework, we characterize lattice thermal conductivities k of freestanding silicene, germanene and stanene under different isotropic tensile strains and temperatures. We find a strong size dependence of k for silicene with tensile strain, i.e., divergent k with increasing system size, in contrast, the intrinsic room temperature k for unstrained silicene converges with system size to 19.34 W/m–1 K–1 by 178 nm. The room temperature k of strained silicene becomes as large as that of bulk silicon by 84 m, indicatingmore » the possibility of using strain in silicene to manipulate k for thermal management. The relative contribution to the intrinsic k from out-of-plane acoustic modes is largest for unstrained silicene, –39% at room temperature. The single mode relaxation time approximation, which works reasonably well for bulk silicon, fails to appropriately describe phonon thermal transport in silicene, germanene and stanene within the temperature range considered. For large samples of silicene, k increases with tensile strain, peaks at –7% strain and then decreases with further strain. In germanene and stanene increasing strain hardens and stabilizes long wavelength out-of-plane acoustic phonons, and leads to similar k behaviors to those of silicene. As a result, these findings further our understanding of phonon dynamics in group-IV buckled monolayers and may guide transfer and fabrication techniques of these freestanding samples and engineering k by size and strain for applications of thermal management and thermoelectricity.« less

  1. Tensile strains give rise to strong size effects for thermal conductivities of silicene, germanene and stanene.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Y D; Lindsay, L; Shi, S Q; Zheng, G P

    2016-02-14

    Based on first principles calculations and self-consistent solution of the linearized Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach within a three-phonon scattering framework, we characterize lattice thermal conductivities k of freestanding silicene, germanene and stanene under different isotropic tensile strains and temperatures. We find a strong size dependence of k for silicene with tensile strain, i.e., divergent k with increasing system size; however, the intrinsic room temperature k for unstrained silicene converges with system size to 19.34 W m(-1) K(-1) at 178 nm. The room temperature k of strained silicene becomes as large as that of bulk silicon at 84 μm, indicating the possibility of using strain in silicene to manipulate k for thermal management. The relative contribution to the intrinsic k from out-of-plane acoustic modes is largest for unstrained silicene, ∼39% at room temperature. The single mode relaxation time approximation, which works reasonably well for bulk silicon, fails to appropriately describe phonon thermal transport in silicene, germanene and stanene within the temperature range considered. For large samples of silicene, k increases with tensile strain, peaks at ∼7% strain and then decreases with further strain. In germanene and stanene, increasing strain hardens and stabilizes long wavelength out-of-plane acoustic phonons, and leads to similar k behaviors to those of silicene. These findings further our understanding of phonon dynamics in group-IV buckled monolayers and may guide transfer and fabrication techniques for these freestanding samples and engineering of k by size and strain for applications of thermal management and thermoelectricity. PMID:26815838

  2. Investigation of high elastoplastic straining of shells of revolution under complex tensile and torque loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artem'eva, A. A.; Bazhenov, V. G.; Zhegalov, D. V.; Kazakov, D. A.; Nagornykh, E. V.

    2015-11-01

    A method of the numerical solution of nonlinear unsteady problems of axisymmetric elastoplastic straining of shells of revolution with allowance for torque loading at high strains is proposed. The method is based on the geometrically nonlinear theory of the Timoshenko shells and the plasticity theory with due allowance for combined isotropic and kinematic hardening. The problem is solved with the use of the variational difference method. Results of numerical and experimental investigations of elastoplastic straining of cylindrical shells under proportional and sequential kinematic tensile and torque loading are reported.

  3. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    SciTech Connect

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  4. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K. C.; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19′ phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:24931632

  5. Intergranular Strain Evolution in Titanium During Tensile Loading: Neutron Diffraction and Polycrystalline Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloaguen, David; Oum, Guy; Legrand, Vincent; Fajoui, Jamal; Moya, Marie-José; Pirling, Thilo; Kockelmann, Winfried

    2015-11-01

    Intergranular strains due to tensile plastic deformation were investigated in a commercially pure Ti. Neutron diffraction has been used to characterize the evolution of residual elastic strain in grains with different crystallographic orientations. Experimental data have been obtained for the macroscopic stress-strain curve and the intergranular strain evolution in the longitudinal and transverse direction relative to the uniaxial loading axis. The elasto-plastic self-consistent (EPSC) approach was used to model the deformation behavior of the studied material. Comparison between the neutron measurements and the model predictions shows that in most cases the EPSC approach can predict the lattice strain evolution and capture the plastic anisotropy observed in the experiments.

  6. Computational Simulation of the High Strain Rate Tensile Response of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2002-01-01

    A research program is underway to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. Under these types of loading conditions, the material response can be highly strain rate dependent and nonlinear. State variable constitutive equations based on a viscoplasticity approach have been developed to model the deformation of the polymer matrix. The constitutive equations are then combined with a mechanics of materials based micromechanics model which utilizes fiber substructuring to predict the effective mechanical and thermal response of the composite. To verify the analytical model, tensile stress-strain curves are predicted for a representative composite over strain rates ranging from around 1 x 10(exp -5)/sec to approximately 400/sec. The analytical predictions compare favorably to experimentally obtained values both qualitatively and quantitatively. Effective elastic and thermal constants are predicted for another composite, and compared to finite element results.

  7. Experimental Study on Tensile Behavior of Carbon Fiber and Carbon Fiber Reinforced Aluminum at Different Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuanxin; Wang, Ying; Jeelani, Shaik; Xia, Yuanming

    2007-01-01

    In this study, dynamic and quasi-static tensile behaviors of carbon fiber and unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced aluminum composite have been investigated. The complete stress strain curves of fiber bundles and the composite at different strain rates were obtained. The experimental results show that carbon fiber is a strain rate insensitive material, but the tensile strength and critical strain of the Cf/Al composite increased with increasing of strain rate because of the strain rate strengthening effect of aluminum matrix. Based on experimental results, a fiber bundles model has been combined with Weibull strength distribution function to establish a one-dimensional damage constitutive equation for the Cf/Al composite.

  8. Direct-bandgap light-emitting germanium in tensilely strained nanomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Pérez, Jose R.; Boztug, Cicek; Chen, Feng; Sudradjat, Faisal F.; Paskiewicz, Deborah M.; Jacobson, RB; Lagally, Max G.; Paiella, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Silicon, germanium, and related alloys, which provide the leading materials platform of electronics, are extremely inefficient light emitters because of the indirect nature of their fundamental energy bandgap. This basic materials property has so far hindered the development of group-IV photonic active devices, including diode lasers, thereby significantly limiting our ability to integrate electronic and photonic functionalities at the chip level. Here we show that Ge nanomembranes (i.e., single-crystal sheets no more than a few tens of nanometers thick) can be used to overcome this materials limitation. Theoretical studies have predicted that tensile strain in Ge lowers the direct energy bandgap relative to the indirect one. We demonstrate that mechanically stressed nanomembranes allow for the introduction of sufficient biaxial tensile strain to transform Ge into a direct-bandgap material with strongly enhanced light-emission efficiency, capable of supporting population inversion as required for providing optical gain. PMID:22084063

  9. Smooth-particle applied mechanics: Conservation of angular momentum with tensile stability and velocity averaging.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Wm G; Hoover, Carol G; Merritt, Elizabeth C

    2004-01-01

    Smooth-particle applied mechanics (SPAM) provides several approaches to approximate solutions of the continuum equations for both fluids and solids. Though many of the usual formulations conserve mass, (linear) momentum, and energy, the angular momentum is typically not conserved by SPAM. A second difficulty with the usual formulations is that tensile stress states often exhibit an exponentially fast high-frequency short-wavelength instability, "tensile instability." We discuss these twin defects of SPAM and illustrate them for a rotating elastic body. We formulate ways to conserve angular momentum while at the same time delaying the symptoms of tensile instability for many sound-traversal times. These ideas should prove useful in more general situations. PMID:14995750

  10. Regulation of matrix metalloproteinase expression by dynamic tensile strain in rat fibrochondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Deschner, J.; Rath-Deschner, B.; Agarwal, S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective We sought to determine the molecular basis for the anticatabolic effects of mechanical signals on fibrocartilage cells by studying the expression of a variety of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, we examined whether the effects of biomechanical strain on MMP gene expression are sustained. Methods Fibrochondrocytes from temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs were exposed to dynamic tensile strain for various time intervals in the presence of interleukin (IL)-1β. The regulation of the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and synthesis of MMPs and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMPs) were examined by end-point and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) as well as Western blot analysis. Results Fibrochondrocytes expressed mRNA for MMP-2, -3, -7, -8, -9, -11, -13, -14, -16, -17, and -19 as well as TIMP-1, -2, and -3, IL-1β induced a significant (P <0.05) upregulation of mRNA for MMP-3, -7, -8, -9, -13, -16, -17, and -19. The IL-1β-stimulated upregulation of these MMPs was significantly (P <0.05) abrogated by dynamic tensile strain. However, MMP-2, -11, -14, and TIMPs were not affected by either IL-1β or tensile strain. Biomechanical strain also inhibited the IL-1β-stimulated protein synthesis of MMP-3, -7, -8, -9, -13, -16, and -17. Application of mechanical strain for various time intervals during a 24-h incubation with IL-1β showed that the suppressive effects of mechanical signals are sustained. Conclusions The data provide evidence that biomechanical signals can downregulate the catabolic activity of fibrocartilage cells in an inflammatory environment by inhibiting the expression of a variety of MMPs. Furthermore, the matrix-protective effects of biomechanical signals are sustained even in an inflammatory environment. PMID:16290189

  11. Unusual Enhancement in Intrinsic Thermal Conductivity of Multilayer Graphene by Tensile Strains

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kuang, Youdi; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Huang, Baoling

    2015-01-01

    High basal plane thermal conductivity k of multi-layer graphene makes it promising for thermal management applications. Here we examine the effects of tensile strain on thermal transport in this system. Using a first principles Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach, we calculate the room-temperature in-plane lattice k of multi-layer graphene (up to four layers) and graphite under different isotropic tensile strains. The calculated in-plane k of graphite, finite mono-layer graphene and 3-layer graphene agree well with previous experiments. The dimensional transitions of the intrinsic k and the extent of the diffusive transport regime from mono-layer graphene to graphite are presented.more » We find a peak enhancement of intrinsic k for multi-layer graphene and graphite with increasing strain and the largest enhancement amplitude is about 40%. In contrast the calculated intrinsic k with tensile strain decreases for diamond and diverges for graphene, we show that the competition between the decreased mode heat capacities and the increased lifetimes of flexural phonons with increasing strain contribute to this k behavior. Similar k behavior is observed for 2-layer hexagonal boron nitride systems, suggesting that it is an inherent thermal transport property in multi-layer systems assembled of purely two dimensional atomic layers. This study provides insights into engineering k of multi-layer graphene and boron nitride by strain and into the nature of thermal transport in quasi-two-dimensional and highly anisotropic systems.« less

  12. Flexible nanomembrane photonic-crystal cavities for tensilely strained-germanium light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jian; Cui, Xiaorui; Wang, Xiaowei; Sookchoo, Pornsatit; Lagally, Max G.; Paiella, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Flexible photonic-crystal cavities in the form of Si-column arrays embedded in polymeric films are developed on Ge nanomembranes using direct membrane assembly. The resulting devices can sustain large biaxial tensile strain under mechanical stress, as a way to enhance the Ge radiative efficiency. Pronounced emission peaks associated with photonic-crystal cavity resonances are observed in photoluminescence measurements. These results show that ultrathin nanomembrane active layers can be effectively coupled to an optical cavity, while still preserving their mechanical flexibility. Thus, they are promising for the development of strain-enabled Ge lasers, and more generally uniquely flexible optoelectronic devices.

  13. Strain localization during tensile Hopkinson bar testing of commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moćko, Wojciech; Kruszka, Leopold; Brodecki, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the analysis was to determine the strain localization for various specimen shapes (type A and type B according to PN-EN ISO 26203-1 standard) and different loading conditions, i.e. quasi- static and dynamic. Commercially pure titanium (Grade 2) and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Grade 5) were selected for the tests. Tensile loadings were applied out using servo-hydraulic testing machine and tensile Hopkinson bar with pre-tension. The results were recorded using ARAMIS system cameras and fast camera Phantom V1210, respectively at quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Further, specimens outline was determined on the basis of video data using TEMA MOTION software. The strain distribution on the specimen surface was estimated using digital image correlation method. The larger radius present in the specimen of type B in comparison to specimen of type A, results in slight increase of the elongation for commercially pure titanium at both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. However this effect disappears for Ti6Al4V alloy. The increase of the elongation corresponds to the stronger necking effect. Material softening due to increase of temperature induced by plastic work was observed at dynamic loading conditions. Moreover lower elongation at fracture point was found at high strain rates for both materials.

  14. Nonvolatile Three-Step Ferroelectric Switching in Tensile Strained BiFeO3 Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Hong; Chu, Kanghyun; Kim, Kwang-Eun; Yang, Chan-Ho

    2014-03-01

    Misfit strain has been one of key control parameters to improve the magnetoelectric coupling between ferroelectricity and magnetism in multiferroic epitaxial thin films. Lately, it was discovered that a bulk-like phase of multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3) , through compressive or tensile misfit strain, can be transformed into a highly-elongated tetragonal-like phase or an orthorhombic phase, respectively, thereby offering new chances into magnetoelectric applications. Although the heteroepitaxial misfit strains via (001) interfaces have been intensively studied, strain effects arising from the other directional interfaces such as (110) have not been studied much. In this talk, we present the uniaxial-tensile-strain effects on the (110) oriented BiFeO3 thin films. Our detailed piezoresponse force microscopy analysis, X-ray reciprocal space mapping, and Landau free energy modeling give strong evidences of electrically switchable, non-volatile, three out-of-plane polarization states. These findings provide useful implications for a new type of magnetoelectric devices based on phase competition.

  15. Influence of the tensile strain on CH4 dissociation on Cu(1 0 0) surface: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Feng; Li, Kai; Xie, Guangyou; Wang, Ying; Jiao, Menggai; Tang, Hao; Wu, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Tensile strain is widespread on the catalyst surface due to the lattice mismatch between the catalyst and substrate, such as Cu/MgO in this work. Thus, it is important to investigate the influence of tensile strain on the catalytic properties. In this study, we have investigated the CH4 dissociation on Cu(1 0 0) surface by considering the tensile strain. Our results showed that compared with the unstrained Cu(1 0 0) surface, the most stable sites for dissociation species CHx (x = 0-3) and H adsorption on strained surface remain unchanged. The surface strain strengthens CHx (x = 0-3) adsorption, while weakens H adsorption. The elementary reaction for CH4 dissociation with the largest electronic energy barrier changes from CH → C + H on the unstrained surface to CH4 → CH3 + H on the strained surface (for strain equal to and larger than 3%), in agreement with the experimental observation that CH4 dissociation into CH3 and H is the most difficult reaction. The tensile strain accelerates C migration while has no obvious influence for C polymerization. Both DFT calculations and microkinetic model demonstrated that the strain hinders the CH4 dissociation process on Cu(1 0 0) surface. CH4 dissociation rate depends sensitively on the magnitude of the surface tensile strain.

  16. Tensile and compressive stress-strain behavior of heat treated boron-aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.; Tenney, D. R.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess the effects of heat treatment and cyclic mechanical loading on the tensile and compressive stress-strain behavior of six boron-aluminum composites having different laminate orientations and being subjected to different heat treatments. The heat treatments were as-fabricated, T6, and T6N consisting of T6 treatment followed by cryogenic quench in liquid nitrogen prior to testing. All laminates were tested in monotonic and cyclic compression, while the tensile-test data are taken from the literature for comparison purposes. It is shown that the linear elastic range of the T6- and T6N-condition specimens is larger than that of the as-fabricated specimens, and that cyclic loading in tension or compression strain hardens the specimens and extends the linear elastic range. For laminates containing 0-deg plies, the stress-strain behavior upon unloading is found to be nonlinear, whereas the other laminates exhibit a linear behavior upon unloading. Specimens in the T6 and T6N conditions show higher strain hardening than the as-fabricated specimens.

  17. Tensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yungang; Wang, Zhiguo; Yang, Ping; Zu, Xiaotao; Yang, Li; Sun, Xin; Gao, Fei

    2012-11-01

    Developing approaches to effectively induce and control the magnetic states is critical to the use of magnetic nanostructures in quantum information devices but is still challenging. Here we have demonstrated, by employing the density functional theory calculations, an existence of infinite magnetic sheets with structural integrity and magnetic homogeneity. Examination from a series of transition metal dichalcogenides shows that the biaxial tensile strained NbS2 and NbSe2 structures can be magnetized with a ferromagnetic character due to the competitive effects of through-bond interaction and through-space interaction. The estimated Curie temperatures (387 and 542 K under the 10% strain for NbS2 and NbSe2 structures, respectively) suggest that the unique ferromagnetic character can be achieved above room temperature. The self-exchange of population between 4d orbitals of Nb atom that leads to the exchange splitting is the mechanism behind the transition of the spin moment. The induced magnetic moments can be significantly enhanced by the tensile strain, even giving rise to half-metallic character with the strong spin polarization around the Fermi level. Given the recent progress that the desired strain can be achieved on two-dimensional nanostructures, such as graphene and BN layer in a controlled way, we believe that our calculated results are suitable for experimental verification and implementation opening a new path to explore the spintronics in pristine two-dimensional nanostructures.

  18. Electro-mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes: Effect of Small Tensile and Torsional Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Yang, Liu; Han, Jie; Liu, J. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We present a simple picture to calculate the bandgap ($E_g$) of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in the presence of uniform torsional and tensile strain ($\\sigma$). We find that under tensile strain, $ absolute value of dE_g/d\\sigma$ of zig-zag tubes is approximately equal to $3t_0$, where $t_0$ is the hopping parameter. Further, $ absolute value of dE_g/d\\sigma$ decreases as the chirality changes to armchair, where it takes the value zero. The sign of $dE_g/d\\sigma$ follows the $(N_x-N_y) *mod 3$(equal to - 1, 0 and +1) rule. In contrast to the above, we show that under torsional strain, $absolute value of dE_g/d\\sigma$ of armchair tubes is approximately equal to $3t_0$ and continually decreases as the chirality changes to zig-zag, where is takes a small value. The sign of $dE_g/d\\sigma$ again follows the $(N_x-N_y)*mod 3$ rule. Finally, we predict a change in the sign of $dE_g/d\\sigma$ as function of strain, corresponding to a change in the value of $q$ that corresponds to the bandgap minimum.

  19. Influence of strain rate on the quasi-static tensile strength of Kevlar 29 narrow fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Increasing the strain rate from 3 x 10/sup -4/ min/sup -1/ to 1.4 min/sup -1/ resulted in a 20% increase in fabric strength. Similar changes in strength with strain rate were obtained for warp yarns removed from the fabrics. Static and sliding loop yarn tests, and tests in which yarn was interwoven through wires, were used to determine effect of abrasion, bending and lateral compression as a function of strain rate. Results eliminated yarn damage by abrasion and demonstrated that unwoven yarn strength, in presence of bending or lateral compression, was dependent on strain rate. Yarn and fiber pullout tests showed that increasing strain rate caused a transition from stick-slip to smooth curves. Results suggested a mechanism whereby strain-rate dependent frictional behavior of Kevlar influences woven fabric strength. It appears that friction restrains highly loaded fibers in a fabric from adjusting their position to relieve stress concentrations. Yarn tensile strength is influenced by strain rate when the fiber arrangement has been altered by weaving or when bending or lateral compressive forces are also present.

  20. Electrothermal fracturing of tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blinn, H. O.; Hanks, J. G.; Perkins, H. P.

    1970-01-01

    Pulling device consisting of structural tube, connecting rod, spring-loaded nuts, loading rod, heating element, and three bulkheads fractures tensile specimens. Alternate heating and cooling increases tensile loading by increments until fracturing occurs. Load cell or strain gage, applied to pulling rod, determines forces applied.

  1. Heterogeneously-Grown Tunable Tensile Strained Germanium on Silicon for Photonic Devices.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Michael; Saladukha, Dzianis; Goley, Patrick S; Ochalski, Tomasz J; Murphy-Armando, Felipe; Bodnar, Robert J; Hudait, Mantu K

    2015-12-01

    The growth, structural and optical properties, and energy band alignments of tensile-strained germanium (ε-Ge) epilayers heterogeneously integrated on silicon (Si) were demonstrated for the first time. The tunable ε-Ge thin films were achieved using a composite linearly graded InxGa1-xAs/GaAs buffer architecture grown via solid source molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis confirmed a pseudomorphic ε-Ge epitaxy whereby the degree of strain varied as a function of the In(x)Ga(1-x)As buffer indium alloy composition. Sharp heterointerfaces between each ε-Ge epilayer and the respective In(x)Ga(1-x)As strain template were confirmed by detailed strain analysis using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Low-temperature microphotoluminescence measurements confirmed both direct and indirect bandgap radiative recombination between the Γ and L valleys of Ge to the light-hole valence band, with L-lh bandgaps of 0.68 and 0.65 eV demonstrated for the 0.82 ± 0.06% and 1.11 ± 0.03% strained Ge on Si, respectively. Type-I band alignments and valence band offsets of 0.27 and 0.29 eV for the ε-Ge/In(0.11)Ga(0.89)As (0.82%) and ε-Ge/In(0.17)Ga(0.83)As (1.11%) heterointerfaces, respectively, show promise for ε-Ge carrier confinement in future nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Therefore, the successful heterogeneous integration of tunable tensile-strained Ge on Si paves the way for the design and implementation of novel Ge-based photonic devices on the Si technology platform. PMID:26561963

  2. Effect of strain rate on the tensile material properties of human placenta.

    PubMed

    Manoogian, Sarah J; Bisplinghoff, Jill A; McNally, Craig; Kemper, Andrew R; Santago, Anthony C; Duma, Stefan M

    2009-09-01

    Automobile crashes are the largest cause of injury death for pregnant females and the leading cause of traumatic fetal injury mortality in the United States. Computational models, useful tools to evaluate the risk of fetal loss in motor vehicle crashes, are based on a limited number of quasistatic material tests of the placenta. This study presents a total of 64 uniaxial tensile tests on coupon specimens from six human placentas at three strain rates. Material properties of the placental tissue were evaluated at strain rates of 0.07/s, 0.70/s, and 7.00/s. The test data have average failure strains of 0.34, 0.36, and 0.37, respectively. Failure stresses of 10.8 kPa, 11.4 kPa, and 18.6 kPa correspond to an increase in strain rate from 0.07/s to 7.0/s. The results indicate rate dependence only when comparing the highest strain rate of 7.0/s to either of the lower rates. There is no significant rate dependence between 0.07/s and 0.70/s. When compared with previous testing of placental tissue, the current study addresses the material response to more strain rates as well as provides a much larger set of available data. In summary, tensile material properties for the placenta have been determined for use in computational modeling of pregnant occupant kinematics in events ranging from low impact activities to severe impacts such as in motor vehicle crashes. PMID:19725697

  3. Effects of temperature and strain rate on the tensile behaviors of SIMP steel in static lead bismuth eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Yan, Wei; Sha, Wei; Wang, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2016-05-01

    In order to assess the susceptibility of candidate structural materials to liquid metal embrittlement, this work investigated the tensile behaviors of ferritic-martensitic steel in static lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). The tensile tests were carried out in static lead bismuth eutectic under different temperatures and strain rates. Pronounced liquid metal embrittlement phenomenon is observed between 200 °C and 450 °C. Total elongation is reduced greatly due to the liquid metal embrittlement in LBE environment. The range of ductility trough is larger under slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test.

  4. A modified Weibull model for tensile strength distribution of carbon nanotube fibers with strain rate and size effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gengzhi; Pang, John H. L.; Zhou, Jinyuan; Zhang, Yani; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Zheng, Lianxi

    2012-09-01

    Fundamental studies on the effects of strain rate and size on the distribution of tensile strength of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers are reported in this paper. Experimental data show that the mechanical strength of CNT fibers increases from 0.2 to 0.8 GPa as the strain rate increases from 0.00001 to 0.1 (1/s). In addition, the influence of fiber diameter at low and high strain rate conditions was investigated further with statistical analysis. A modified Weibull distribution model for characterizing the tensile strength distribution of CNT fibers taking into account the effect of strain rate and fiber diameter is proposed.

  5. The effect of tensile hysteresis and contact resistance on the performance of strain-resistant elastic-conductive webbing.

    PubMed

    Shyr, Tien-Wei; Shie, Jing-Wen; Jhuang, Yan-Er

    2011-01-01

    To use e-textiles as a strain-resistance sensor they need to be both elastic and conductive. Three kinds of elastic-conductive webbings, including flat, tubular, and belt webbings, made of Lycra fiber and carbon coated polyamide fiber, were used in this study. The strain-resistance properties of the webbings were evaluated in stretch-recovery tests and measured within 30% strain. It was found that tensile hysteresis and contact resistance significantly influence the tensile elasticity and the resistance sensitivity of the webbings. The results showed that the webbing structure definitely contributes to the tensile hysteresis and contact resistance. The smaller the friction is among the yarns in the belt webbing, the smaller the tensile hysteresis loss. However the close proximity of the conductive yarns in flat and tubular webbings results in a lower contact resistance. PMID:22319376

  6. The Effect of Tensile Hysteresis and Contact Resistance on the Performance of Strain-Resistant Elastic-Conductive Webbing

    PubMed Central

    Shyr, Tien-Wei; Shie, Jing-Wen; Jhuang, Yan-Er

    2011-01-01

    To use e-textiles as a strain-resistance sensor they need to be both elastic and conductive. Three kinds of elastic-conductive webbings, including flat, tubular, and belt webbings, made of Lycra fiber and carbon coated polyamide fiber, were used in this study. The strain-resistance properties of the webbings were evaluated in stretch-recovery tests and measured within 30% strain. It was found that tensile hysteresis and contact resistance significantly influence the tensile elasticity and the resistance sensitivity of the webbings. The results showed that the webbing structure definitely contributes to the tensile hysteresis and contact resistance. The smaller the friction is among the yarns in the belt webbing, the smaller the tensile hysteresis loss. However the close proximity of the conductive yarns in flat and tubular webbings results in a lower contact resistance. PMID:22319376

  7. The in vitro passive elastic response of chicken pectoralis muscle to applied tensile and compressive deformation.

    PubMed

    Mohammadkhah, Melika; Murphy, Paula; Simms, Ciaran K

    2016-09-01

    The mechanics of passive skeletal muscle are important in impact biomechanics, surgical simulation, and rehabilitation engineering. Existing data from porcine tissue has shown a significant tension/compression asymmetry, which is not captured by current constitutive modelling approaches using a single set of material parameters, and an adequate explanation for this effect remains elusive. In this paper, the passive elastic deformation properties of chicken pectoralis muscle are assessed for the first time, to provide deformation data on a skeletal muscle which is very different to porcine tissue. Uniaxial, quasi-static compression and tensile tests were performed on fresh chicken pectoralis muscle in the fibre and cross-fibre directions, and at 45° to the fibre direction. Results show that chicken muscle elastic behaviour is nonlinear and anisotropic. The tensile stress-stretch response is two orders of magnitude larger than in compression for all directions tested, which reflects the tension/compression asymmetry previously observed in porcine tissue. In compression the tissue is stiffest in the cross-fibre direction. However, tensile deformation applied at 45° gives the stiffest response, and this is different to previous findings relating to porcine tissue. Chicken muscle tissue is most compliant in the fibre direction for both tensile and compressive applied deformation. Generally, a small percentage of fluid exudation was observed in the compressive samples. In the future these data will be combined with microstructural analysis to assess the architectural basis for the tension/compression asymmetry now observed in two different species of skeletal muscle. PMID:27281164

  8. Transformation strain dependence on applied stress in equiatomic nickel-titanium alloys of powder-metallurgical origin

    SciTech Connect

    Ramon, P.

    1983-06-01

    The strain-temperature behavior of Ni-Ti samples upon martensitic phase transformation was investigated as a function of applied uniaxial tensile and compressive stresses. The samples were cycled in temperature when they were held in grips, which permitted a deadweight axial stress to be applied. It was found in the absence of an applied stress that the strains upon transformation were nearly isotropic. By contrast, as the uniaxial tensile stress was increased, the axial and circumferential strains became increasingly different, i.e., the axial strain corresponded to an expansion upon transformation on cooling and the circumferential strain to a contraction. The magnitudes of these strains increased progressively with increasing stress. Similar results were obtained for uniaxial compressive stresses, except that the axial strain corresponded to a contraction and the circumferential strain to an expansion upon transformation on cooling. The observation that the transformation strain increases with increasing applied stress is explained on the basis of a preferred activation model (PAM). The phenomenological theory of Wechsler-Lieberman and Read (WLR) is applied, and the semiaxes of the total distortion ellipsoid calculated. The calculated total distortions predict the saturation limit of phase transformation strains with increasing applied uniaxial tensile stress.

  9. Stretching molecules under extreme tensile strain: density functional theory versus multireference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedziora, Gary; Barr, Stephen; Berry, Rajiv; Moller, James; Breitzman, Timothy

    A more refined understanding of how molecules behave under extreme tensile strain is desirable for modeling fracture initiation in polymers and other mecho-chemical studies. We investigated several quantum mechanical methods for use in multiscale models of highly strained polymers where bond breaking occurs. A small set of molecules and a protocol for stretching them were used as model test systems. The results from these tests using several functionals were compared with complete active space self-consistent field results. These test systems provide unique challenges for quantum mechanical models. Quantum mechanics is required for accurate bond breaking prediction because the results are dependent on the conformation and secondary electronic structure effects such as hyperconjugation. GGA methods with unrestricted solutions to the Kohn-Sham equations provide adequate results for our purposes even though there are some minor flaws based on the spin symmetry breaking.

  10. Grating-coupled mid-infrared light emission from tensilely strained germanium nanomembranes

    SciTech Connect

    Boztug, Cicek; Yin, Jian; Paiella, Roberto; Sánchez-Pérez, José R.; Lagally, Max G.

    2013-11-11

    Mechanically stressed nanomembranes are used to demonstrate mid-infrared interband light emission from Ge within the 2.1–2.5 μm atmospheric transmission window. Large biaxial tensile strain is introduced in these samples to convert Ge into a (near-) direct-bandgap semiconductor and to red-shift its luminescence. A diffractive array of Ge pillars is used to outcouple the long-wavelength interband radiation, which is otherwise primarily emitted in the sample plane. An order-of-magnitude strain-induced enhancement in radiative efficiency is also reported, together with the observation of luminescence signatures associated with photonic-crystal cavity modes. These results are promising for the development of silicon-compatible lasers for mid-infrared optoelectronics applications.

  11. Wideband model of a reflective tensile-strained bulk semiconductor optical amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, M. J.

    2014-05-01

    Reflective semiconductor optical amplifiers (RSOAs) have shown promise for applications in WDM optical networks and in fiber ring mode-locked lasers. Polarization insensitive SOAs can be fabricated using tensile-strained bulk material and a rectangular cross section waveguide. The introduction of tensile strain can be used to compensate for the different confinement factors experienced by the waveguide TE and TM modes. There is a need for models that can be used to predict RSOA static characteristics such as the dependency of the signal gain on bias current and input optical power, the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum and noise figure. In this paper we extend our prior work on non-reflective SOAs to develop a static model that includes facet reflections. The model uses a detailed band structure description, which is used to determine the wavelength and carrier density dependency of the material gain and additive spontaneous emission. The model and includes a full geometrical description of the amplifier waveguide, including the input taper and the position dependency of the TE/TM confinement factors. The amplified signal and spontaneous emission are described by detailed travelling-wave equations and numerically solved in conjunction with a carrier density rate equation. The model uses material and geometric parameters for a commercially available RSOA. The versatility of the model is shown by several simulations that are used to predict the SOA operational characteristics as well as internal variables such as the amplified spontaneous emission and signal and the carrier density.

  12. Magnetism and Raman Spectroscopy of Pristine and Hydrogenated TaSe2 Monolayer tuned by Tensile and Pure Shear Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Sugata; Simpson, Jeffrey; Einstein, T. L.; Walker, Angela R. Hight

    2D-materials with controllable optical, electronic and magnetic properties are desirable for novel nanodevices. Here we studied these properties for both pristine and hydrogenated TaSe2 (TaSe2-H) monolayer (ML) in the framework of DFT using the PAW method. We considered uniaxial and biaxial tensile strain, as well as shear strain along the basal planes in the range between 1% and 16%. Previous theoretical works (e.g.) considered only symmetrical biaxial tensile. Pristine ML is ferromagnetic for uniaxial tensile strain along ◯ or ŷ. For tensile strain in ŷ, the calculated magnetic moments of the Ta atoms are twice those for the same strain in ◯. Under pure shear strain (expansion along ŷ and compression along ◯), a pristine ML is ferromagnetic, but becomes non-magnetic when the strain directions are interchanged. Due to carrier-mediated double-exchange, the pristine ML is ferromagnetic when the Se-Ta-Se bond angle is < 82° and the ML thickness is < 3.25Å. We find that all Raman-active phonon modes show obvious red-shifting due to bond elongation and the E2 modes degeneracy is lifted as strain increases. For a TaSe2-H ML, the same trends were observed. Results show the ability to tune the properties of 2D-materials.

  13. Unusual Enhancement in Intrinsic Thermal Conductivity of Multilayer Graphene by Tensile Strains.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Youdi; Lindsay, Lucas; Huang, Baoling

    2015-09-01

    Using the Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach with the inputs of interatomic force constants from the self-consistent charge density functional tight binding method, we calculate the room-temperature in-plane lattice thermal conductivities k of multilayer graphene (up to four layers) and graphite under different isotropic tensile strains. The calculated in-plane k of graphite, finite monolayer graphene and 3-layer graphene agree well with previous experiments. For unstrained graphene systems, both the intrinsic k and the extent of the diffusive transport regime present a drastic dimensional transition in going from monolayer to 2-layer graphene and thereafter a gradual transition to the graphite limit. We find a peak enhancement of intrinsic k for multilayer graphene and graphite with increasing strain with the largest enhancement amplitude ∼40%. Competition between the decreased mode heat capacities and the increased lifetimes of flexural phonons with increasing strain contribute to this k behavior. Similar k behavior is observed for 2-layer hexagonal boron nitride systems. This study provides insights into engineering k of multilayer graphene and boron nitride by strain and into the nature of thermal transport in quasi-two-dimensional and highly anisotropic systems. PMID:26241731

  14. Cyclic Equibiaxial Tensile Strain Alters Gene Expression of Chondrocytes via Histone Deacetylase 4 Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chongwei; Wei, Xiaochun; Lv, Zhi; Sun, Xiaojuan; Wang, Shaowei; Zhang, Yang; Jiao, Qiang; Wang, Xiaohu; Li, Yongping; Wei, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This paper aims to investigate whether equibiaxial tensile strain alters chondrocyte gene expression via controlling subcellular localization of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). Materials and Methods Murine chondrocytes transfected with GFP-HDAC4 were subjected to 3 h cyclic equibiaxial tensile strain (CTS, 6% strain at 0.25 Hz) by a Flexcell® FX-5000™ Tension System. Fluorescence microscope and western blot were used to observe subcellular location of HDAC4. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The concentration of Glycosaminoglycans in culture medium was quantified by bimethylmethylene blue dye; Collagen II protein was evaluated by western blot. Cells phenotype was identified by immunohistochemistry. Cell viability was evaluated by live-dead cell detect kit. Okadaic acid, an inhibitor of HDAC4 nuclear relocation, was used to further validate whether HDAC4 nuclear relocation plays a role in gene expression in response to tension stimulation. Results 87.5% of HDAC4 was located in the cytoplasm in chondrocytes under no loading condition, but it was relocated to the nucleus after CTS. RT-PCR analysis showed that levels of mRNA for aggrecan, collagen II, LK1 and SOX9 were all increased in chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to no loading control chondrocytes; in contrast, the levels of type X collagen, MMP-13, IHH and Runx2 gene expression were decreased in the chondrocytes subjected to CTS as compared to control chondrocytes. Meanwhile, CTS contributed to elevation of glycosaminoglycans and collagen II protein, but did not change collagen I production. When Okadaic acid blocked HDAC4 relocation from the cytoplasm to nucleus, the changes of the chondrocytes induced by CTS were abrogated. There was no chondrocyte dead detected in this study in response to CTS. Conclusions CTS is able to induce HDAC4 relocation from cytoplasm to nucleus. Thus, CTS alters chondrocytes gene expression in association with the relocation of HDAC4 induced

  15. Dynamic tensile stress-strain characteristics of carbon/epoxy laminated composites in through-thickness direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Kenji; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    The effect of strain rate up to approximately ɛ˙ = 102/s on the tensile stress-strain properties of unidirectional and cross-ply carbon/epoxy laminated composites in the through-thickness direction is investigated. Waisted cylindrical specimens machined out of the laminated composites in the through-thickness direction are used in both static and dynamic tests. The dynamic tensile stress-strain curves up to fracture are determined using the split Hopkinson bar (SHB). The low and intermediate strain-rate tensile stress-strain relations up to fracture are measured on an Instron 5500R testing machine. It is demonstrated that the ultimate tensile strength and absorbed energy up to fracture increase significantly, while the fracture strain decreases slightly with increasing strain rate. Macro- and micro-scopic examinations reveal a marked difference in the fracture surfaces between the static and dynamic tension specimens.

  16. Biaxial Tensile Test of Cold Rolled IF Steel Sheet for Large Plastic Strain Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enatsu, Ryotaro; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2011-08-01

    Deformation behavior of cold rolled IF steel sheet (SPCE) under biaxial tension has been investigated for large plastic strain range over 15%. The test material was bent and TIG welded to form a tubular specimen with an outer diameter of 46.2 mm and wall thickness of 0.8 mm. The tubular specimens have been subjected to linear stress paths in the first quadrant of stress space with the use of a servo-controlled tension-internal pressure testing machine developed by one of the authors [T. Kuwabara, K. Yoshida, K. Narihara, S. Takahashi, Anisotropic plastic deformation of extruded aluminum alloy tube under axial forces and internal pressure, Int. J. Plasticity 21, 101-117 (2005)]. Moreover, biaxial tensile tests using a cruciform specimen have also been carried out to more precisely measure the deformation behavior for a small strain range following initial yielding. True stress-true plastic strain curves, contours of plastic work in stress space and the directions of plastic strain rates have been measured and compared with those calculated using selected yield functions: the von Mises, Hill's quadratic and Yld2000-2d [Barlat, F., Brem, J.C., Yoon, J.W., Chung, K., Dick, R.E., Lege, D.J., Pourboghrat, F., Choi, S.H., Chu, E., Plane stress yield function for aluminum alloy sheets—Part 1: Theory. Int. J. Plasticity 19, 1297-1319 (2003)]. The plastic deformation behavior up to a work equivalent plastic strain of ɛ0p = 0.19 has been successfully measured. It is found that the test material exhibits differential hardening and that the Yld2000-2d yield function with an exponent of six most closely predicts the contours of plastic work and the directions of plastic strain rates.

  17. In-situ observation of strain evolution in CP-Ti during uniaxial tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettles, C. J.; Gibson, M. A.; Stevenson, A. W.; Tomus, D.; Lynch, P. A.

    2010-07-01

    First results are presented for in-situ tensile loading experiments performed on the Powder Diffraction beamline at the Australian Synchrotron facility. For direct measurement of strain evolution, the beamline was fitted with a uniaxial tensile stage and a high-resolution CCD detector. Precise calibration of the experimental diffraction geometry, taking into account slight misalignment of the detector (pitch, roll, yaw), was achieved by simulation of the ring patterns recorded from the standard reference material LaB 6 (660). The material examined was a commercially pure titanium strip, which from prior electron microscopy studies, was found to have an average grain size of ˜20-30 μm. Tensile specimens conformed to ASTM E8, with a gauge length of 25 mm. To probe the bulk material properties all experiments were performed at 20 keV. In these preliminary experiments, measurement of the relative change in the interplanar lattice spacing was used to monitor the elastic response in seven crystallographic orientations during the loading cycle. To overcome problems encountered with grain size and associated discontinuous Debye-Scherrer ring patterns, two strategies were implemented to measure the Bragg peak (2 θB) positions. In cases where the radial integration routine provided inconsistent results for peak determination, a new approach based on determining the averaged sum of 2 θB positions from individual spots making up the ring pattern was utilised. Results obtained for the diffraction elastic modulus were found to be in agreement with predictions based on the single-crystal and Neerfield-Hill crystal coupling models.

  18. Tensile Stress-Strain Results for 304L and 316L Stainless-Steel Plate at Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; S. D. Snow; T. E. Rahl

    2007-07-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting moderate strain rate (10 to 200 per second) research on stainless steel materials in support of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). For this research, strain rate effects are characterized by comparison to quasi-static tensile test results. Considerable tensile testing has been conducted resulting in the generation of a large amount of basic material data expressed as engineering and true stress-strain curves. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of quasi-static tensile testing of 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steels in order to add to the existing data pool for these materials and make the data more readily available to other researchers, engineers, and interested parties. Standard tensile testing of round specimens in accordance with ASTM procedure A 370-03a were conducted on 304L and 316L stainless-steel plate materials at temperatures ranging from -20 °F to 600 °F. Two plate thicknesses, eight material heats, and both base and weld metal were tested. Material yield strength, Young’s modulus, ultimate strength, ultimate strain, failure strength and failure strain were determined, engineering and true stress-strain curves to failure were developed, and comparisons to ASME Code minimums were made. The procedures used during testing and the typical results obtained are described in this paper.

  19. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, J.O.

    1994-09-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to a least 1093{degrees}C (2000{degrees}F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work was to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite`s potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests were conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests were performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating tests specimens up to 1093{degrees}C (2000{degrees}F). Tensile stress-strain data were obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  20. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to at least 1093 C (2000F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work is to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite's potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests are conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests are performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating test specimens up to 1093 C (2000 F). Tensile stress-strain data are obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  1. Tensile Stress Strain Behavior of Polypropylene Toughened with Bi-Modal Sebs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mae, Hiroyuki; Omiya, Masaki; Kishimoto, Kikuo

    The objective is to characterize the effect of the bimodal distribution of rubber particles and its blend ratio on the mechanical properties of the thermoplastic polypropylene blended with two different styrene-ethylene-butadiene-styrene tri-block copolymer (SEBS) at the intermediate and high strain rates. Tensile tests are conducted at the nominal strain rates from 10-1 to 102 (1/sec). Phase morphology is investigated to estimate the bi-modal rubber particle size distribution. In addition, the in-situ observation is conducted during uniaxially stretching within transmission electron microscopy (TEM) step by step to investigate the deformation events depending on the elongation of samples. The elastic modulus increased gradually as the blend ratio of large rubber particle increased. An increase in the rupture strain was found for the bimodal rubber-particle distributed blend system where the blend ratios of small rubber particle and large rubber particle were the same. This is because the smaller particles dominant blend systems show the band-like craze deformation while the localized plastic deformation is taken place in the larger particles dominated blend systems. The synergistic effect of these rubber particles gives rise to a strong increase in the ductility of these bimodal rubber-particle distributed polypropylene systems.

  2. Correlation Between Microstructures and Tensile Properties of Strain-Based API X60 Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Ro, Yunjo; Lee, Chang Sun; Hwang, Byoungchul; Shin, Sang Yong

    2016-03-01

    The correlation between the microstructures and tensile properties of strain-based American Petroleum Institute (API) X60 pipeline steels was investigated. Eight types of strain-based API X60 pipeline steels were fabricated by varying the chemical compositions, such as C, Ni, Cr, and Mo, and the finish cooling temperatures, such as single-phase and dual-phase regions. In the 4N and 5C steels, the volume fractions of bainitic ferrite (BF) and the secondary phases increased with the increasing C and adding Cr instead of Ni. In the 5C and 6NC steels, the volume fractions of acicular ferrite (AF) and BF decreased with increasing C and adding Ni, whereas the volume fractions of polygonal ferrite (PF) and the secondary phases increased. In the 6NC and 6NM steels, the volume fraction of BF was increased by adding Mo instead of Cr, whereas the volume fractions of PF and the secondary phases decreased. In the steels rolled in the single-phase region, the volume fraction of polygonal ferrite ranged from 40 to 60 pct and the volume fraction of AF ranged from 20 to 40 pct. In the steels rolled in the dual-phase region, however, the volume fraction of PF was more than 70 pct and the volume fraction of AF was below 20 pct. The strength of the steels with a high volume fraction of AF was higher than those of the steels with a high volume fraction of PF, whereas the yield point elongation and the strain hardening exponent were opposite. The uniform elongation after the thermal aging process decreased with increasing volume fraction of PF, whereas the uniform elongation increased with increasing volume fraction of AF. The strain hardening exponent increased with increasing volume fraction of PF, but decreased with increasing volume fraction of AF and effective grain size.

  3. Correlation Between Microstructures and Tensile Properties of Strain-Based API X60 Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Ro, Yunjo; Lee, Chang Sun; Hwang, Byoungchul; Shin, Sang Yong

    2016-06-01

    The correlation between the microstructures and tensile properties of strain-based American Petroleum Institute (API) X60 pipeline steels was investigated. Eight types of strain-based API X60 pipeline steels were fabricated by varying the chemical compositions, such as C, Ni, Cr, and Mo, and the finish cooling temperatures, such as single-phase and dual-phase regions. In the 4N and 5C steels, the volume fractions of bainitic ferrite (BF) and the secondary phases increased with the increasing C and adding Cr instead of Ni. In the 5C and 6NC steels, the volume fractions of acicular ferrite (AF) and BF decreased with increasing C and adding Ni, whereas the volume fractions of polygonal ferrite (PF) and the secondary phases increased. In the 6NC and 6NM steels, the volume fraction of BF was increased by adding Mo instead of Cr, whereas the volume fractions of PF and the secondary phases decreased. In the steels rolled in the single-phase region, the volume fraction of polygonal ferrite ranged from 40 to 60 pct and the volume fraction of AF ranged from 20 to 40 pct. In the steels rolled in the dual-phase region, however, the volume fraction of PF was more than 70 pct and the volume fraction of AF was below 20 pct. The strength of the steels with a high volume fraction of AF was higher than those of the steels with a high volume fraction of PF, whereas the yield point elongation and the strain hardening exponent were opposite. The uniform elongation after the thermal aging process decreased with increasing volume fraction of PF, whereas the uniform elongation increased with increasing volume fraction of AF. The strain hardening exponent increased with increasing volume fraction of PF, but decreased with increasing volume fraction of AF and effective grain size.

  4. The Tensile Mechanical Properties of Thermomechanically Consolidated Titanium at Different Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Cun; Ma, Mingxing; Jia, Mingtu; Raynova, Stiliana; Yan, Jianqiang; Zhang, Deliang

    2015-11-01

    The microstructures, tensile mechanical properties, and fracture behavior of a commercially pure (CP) titanium disk (called PF/Ti disk) and a CP titanium bar (called PE/Ti bar) made by powder compact forging (PCF) and powder compact extrusion (PCE) respectively have been studied. With increasing the strain rate from 10-4 to 10-1 s-1, the yield strength of the PF/Ti disk and PE/Ti bar increased from 708 to 811 MPa and from 672 to 764 MPa, respectively; their UTS increased from 824 to 1009 MPa and from 809 to 926 MPa, respectively, and their elongation to fracture decreased from 21 to 8 pct and from 25 to 17.8 pct, respectively. With a low strain rate of 10-4 s-1, the PF/Ti disk did not show any cavities at unbonded or weakly bonded interparticle boundaries, but the PE/Ti bar showed a small number of cavities with sizes of around 1 μm. With a high strain rate of 10-2 s-1, the PF/Ti disk showed a small number of cavities with sizes in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 μm, while for the PE/Ti bar, the cavities grew into microcracks of up to 20 μm long. The findings suggest that close to 100 pct of consolidation is rapidly achieved by PCF at 1573 K (1300 °C) and PCE at 1523 K (1250 °C), respectively, possibly due to the dissolution of the particle oxide surface films during heating and rapid diffusion bonding between the fresh particle surfaces during PCF and PCE.

  5. Induction of tenascin-C by cyclic tensile strain versus growth factors: distinct contributions by Rho/ROCK and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Chiquet, Matthias; Sarasa-Renedo, Ana; Tunç-Civelek, Vildan

    2004-09-17

    Expression of the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein tenascin-C is induced in fibroblasts by growth factors as well as by tensile strain. Mechanical stress can act on gene regulation directly, or indirectly via the paracrine release of soluble factors by the stimulated cells. To distinguish between these possibilities for tenascin-C, we asked whether cyclic tensile strain and soluble factors, respectively, induced its mRNA via related or separate mechanisms. When cyclic strain was applied to chick embryo fibroblasts cultured on silicone membranes, tenascin-C mRNA and protein levels were increased twofold within 6 h compared to the resting control. Medium conditioned by strained cells did not stimulate tenascin-C mRNA in resting cells. Tenascin-C mRNA in resting cells was increased by serum; however, cyclic strain still caused an additional induction. Likewise, the effect of TGF-beta1 or PDGF-BB was additive to that of cyclic strain, whereas IL-4 or H2O2 (a reactive oxygen species, ROS) did not change tenascin-C mRNA levels. Antagonists for distinct mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) inhibited tenascin-C induction by TGF-beta1 and PDGF-BB, but not by cyclic strain. Conversely, a specific inhibitor of Rho-dependent kinase strongly attenuated the response of tenascin-C mRNA to cyclic strain, but had limited effect on induction by growth factors. The data suggest that regulation of tenascin-C in fibroblasts by cyclic strain occurs independently from soluble mediators and MAPK pathways; however, it requires Rho/ROCK signaling. PMID:15363633

  6. Differential analysis of band-edge photoluminescence spectra of germanium single crystals with different orientations under biaxial tensile strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'yanov, A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The previously published photoluminescence spectra of bulk germanium single crystals with orientations (100), (110), and (111) under different biaxial tensile strains have been investigated using the differential method proposed by the author for the analysis of luminescence spectra of semiconductors. An increase in the strain for all these orientations of the single crystals leads to a shift in the maxima of the differential spectra in the region of direct radiative transitions toward lower photon energies due to the narrowing of the germanium direct band gap. At the same time, the positions of the maxima of the differential spectra in the region of indirect radiative transitions remain almost unchanged. This indicates that the germanium indirect band gap does not depend on the tensile strains, at least for their values of ˜0.2-0.3%.

  7. Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Superalloys to Resist Environment-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720, ATI 718Plus alloy, Haynes 282, and Inconel 740. Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  8. Silicon doping of HVPE GaN bulk-crystals avoiding tensile strain generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Patrick; Röder, Christian; Habel, Frank; Leibiger, Gunnar; Beyer, Franziska C.; Gärtner, Günter; Eichler, Stefan; Mikolajick, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Doped GaN:Si crystals were grown in a commercially available vertical HVPE reactor. The templates used for the HVPE heteroepitaxy were so-called FACELO seeds, with a starting GaN layer thickness of 3-4 μm. The FWHM of the 0002 and the 30\\bar{3}2 reflection of the HVPE-grown GaN:Si crystals with a thickness of 3 mm are {{31}\\prime\\prime} and {{78}\\prime\\prime} , respectively, indicating excellent crystal quality. Hall measurements resulted in a charge carrier concentration of 1.5× {{10}18} cm-3, while exhibiting a mobility of 250 cm-2V-1 s-1. These values coincide with the values extracted from FTIR measurements and the lineshape fitting of the A1(LO)/plasmon coupled phonon mode of the confocal Raman measurements. SIMS investigations yielded a silicon atom concentration of 1.8× {{10}18} cm-3. This indicates an activation of the dopant atoms of approximately 90%. The TDD determined by CL dark spot counting was 2× {{10}6} cm-2. Within the measurement accuracy, the confocal Raman measurements did not show a tensile strain generation due to the silicon doping with resulting charge carrier concentrations of 1.5× {{10}18} cm-3.

  9. Thickness-dependent electronic structure in ultrathin LaNiO3 films under tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hyang Keun; Hyun, Seung Ill; Chang, Young Jun; Moreschini, Luca; Sohn, Chang Hee; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Shim, Ji Hoon; Noh, Tae Won

    2016-01-01

    We investigated electronic-structure changes of tensile-strained ultrathin LaNi O3 (LNO) films from ten to one unit cells (UCs) using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We found that there is a critical thickness tc between four and three UCs below which Ni eg electrons are confined in two-dimensional space. Furthermore, the Fermi surfaces (FSs) of LNO films below tc consist of two orthogonal pairs of one-dimensional (1D) straight parallel lines. Such a feature is not accidental as observed in constant-energy surfaces at all binding energies, which is not explained by first-principles calculations or the dynamical mean-field theory. The ARPES spectra also show anomalous spectral behaviors, such as no quasiparticle peak at the Fermi momentum but fast band dispersion comparable to the bare-band one, which is typical in a 1D system. As its possible origin, we propose 1D FS nesting, which also accounts for FS superstructures observed in ARPES.

  10. High-k gate stacks on low bandgap tensile strained Ge and GeSn alloys for field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Wirths, Stephan; Stange, Daniela; Pampillón, Maria-Angela; Tiedemann, Andreas T; Mussler, Gregor; Fox, Alfred; Breuer, Uwe; Baert, Bruno; San Andrés, Enrique; Nguyen, Ngoc D; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Ikonic, Zoran; Mantl, Siegfried; Buca, Dan

    2015-01-14

    We present the epitaxial growth of Ge and Ge0.94Sn0.06 layers with 1.4% and 0.4% tensile strain, respectively, by reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition on relaxed GeSn buffers and the formation of high-k/metal gate stacks thereon. Annealing experiments reveal that process temperatures are limited to 350 °C to avoid Sn diffusion. Particular emphasis is placed on the electrical characterization of various high-k dielectrics, as 5 nm Al2O3, 5 nm HfO2, or 1 nmAl2O3/4 nm HfO2, on strained Ge and strained Ge0.94Sn0.06. Experimental capacitance-voltage characteristics are presented and the effect of the small bandgap, like strong response of minority carriers at applied field, are discussed via simulations. PMID:25531887

  11. A combined fracture-micromechanics model for tensile strain-softening in brittle materials, based on propagation of interacting microcracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, Bernhard; Hellmich, Christian; Mang, Herbert A.

    2007-02-01

    Strain-softening is the decline in stress at increasing strain. Although microcracking is a commonly accepted reason for strain-softening, the majority of theoretical developments involve macroscopic damage evolution laws. To improve this situation, we propose a micromechanics-based damage evolution law by combining (i) the propagation criterion for a single penny-shaped crack embedded in an infinite matrix subjected to remote stresses (taken from linear-elastic fracture mechanics) and (ii) stiffness estimates for representative material volumes comprising interacting microcracks (taken from continuum micromechanics). This combination allows for modelling tensile strain-softening as a result of propagation of interacting microcracks, i.e. as a microstructural effect. The initial degree of damage, i.e. the initial microcrack size and the number of microcracks per unit volume, implies two different types of model-predicted tensile strain-softening behaviour under strain control: (i) continuous strain-softening, which occurs in case of initial damage above a critical value, and (ii) an instantaneous stress drop at the peak load (snap-back), which occurs in case of initial damage below a critical value. Copyright

  12. Theoretical investigation of tensile strained GeSn waveguide with Si₃N₄ liner stressor for mid-infrared detector and modulator applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfang; Liu, Yan; Yan, Jing; Zhang, Chunfu; Hao, Yue; Han, Genquan

    2015-03-23

    We theoretically investigate a tensile strained GeSn waveguide integrated with Si₃N₄ liner stressor for the applications in mid-infrared (MIR) detector and modulator. A substantial tensile strain is induced in a 1 × 1 μm² GeSn waveguide by the expansion of 500 nm Si₃N₄ liner stressor and the contour plots of strain are simulated by the finite element simulation. Under the tensile strain, the direct bandgap E(G,Γ) of GeSn is significantly reduced by lowering the Γ conduction valley in energy and lifting of degeneracy of valence bands. Absorption coefficients of tensile strained GeSn waveguides with different Sn compositions are calculated. As the Si₃N₄ liner stressor expands by 1%, the cut-off wavelengths of tensile strained Ge(0.97)Sn(0.03), Ge(0.95)Sn(0.05), and Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) waveguide photodetectors are extended to 2.32, 2.69, and 4.06 μm, respectively. Tensile strained Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) waveguide electro-absorption modulator based on Franz-Keldysh (FK) effect is demonstrated in theory. External electric field dependence of cut-off wavelength and propagation loss of tensile strained Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) waveguide is observed, due to the FK effect. PMID:25837129

  13. Hydrogen gettering and strain-induced platelet nucleation in tensilely strained Si0.4Ge0.6/Ge for layer exfoliation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitera, Arthur J.; Fitzgerald, E. A.

    2005-05-01

    We show that tensilely strained epitaxial layers getter interstitially dissolved hydrogen and accelerate the nucleation of platelets. Both of these result in subsurface crack propagation leading to surface blistering and eventual exfoliation of a H+-implanted semiconductor surface. In this work, a strained Si0.4Ge0.6 layer was used to enhance the exfoliation kinetics of relaxed Ge/Si1-xGex/Si virtual substrates by gettering hydrogen and providing a preferential nucleation site for platelets. Using platelet morphology and strain relaxation data, a nucleation and growth model was formulated accounting for both chemical and strain energy contributions to the free energy of platelet formation, revealing two kinetically limited growth regimes for platelets in tensilely strained Si0.4Ge0.6 films. Low-temperature (<200°C) annealing nucleates 1011-cm-2 platelets which grow in the strain-limited regime with minimal loss of hydrogen to surface effusion. At 250 °C, platelet growth is diffusion limited, requiring transport of H2 molecules to the strained layer. Subsequent annealing of strained Si0.4Ge0.6/Ge gettering structures at a temperature exceeding 300 °C results in significantly improved surface blistering kinetics over samples which do not contain a gettering layer. Incorporation of tensilely strained layers has the potential of reducing the implantation dose and annealing temperature necessary for layer transfer. Combined with virtual substrate bonding, they provide a promising solution for economical integration of high-performance semiconductors with silicon.

  14. Strain gradient plasticity theory applied to machining

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Raphael; Laheurte, Raynald; Darnis, Philippe; Gerard, Alain; Cahuc, Olivier

    2011-05-04

    Machining is the most common manufacturing process. A good behaviour law is necessary in the simulation of machining processes (analytical and finite element modeling). Usually, commonly used behaviour laws such as Jonhson-Cook can bring unsatisfactory results especially for high strain and large deformation processes. Significant differences can appear between experimental and simulation results. The aim of this paper is to present the choices made regarding the behaviour law in this context. This study develops a large deformation strain-gradient theoretical framework with hypothesis linked to metal cutting processes. The theoretical framework has the potential of expressing moments at the tool tip as they were observed in experiments. It will be shown that the theory has the capability of interpreting the complex phenomena found in machining and more particularly in high speed machining.

  15. Strain gradient plasticity theory applied to machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Raphaël; Laheurte, Raynald; Darnis, Philippe; Gérard, Alain; Cahuc, Olivier

    2011-05-01

    Machining is the most common manufacturing process. A good behaviour law is necessary in the simulation of machining processes (analytical and finite element modeling). Usually, commonly used behaviour laws such as Jonhson-Cook can bring unsatisfactory results especially for high strain and large deformation processes. Significant differences can appear between experimental and simulation results. The aim of this paper is to present the choices made regarding the behaviour law in this context. This study develops a large deformation strain-gradient theoretical framework with hypothesis linked to metal cutting processes. The theoretical framework has the potential of expressing moments at the tool tip as they were observed in experiments. It will be shown that the theory has the capability of interpreting the complex phenomena found in machining and more particularly in high speed machining.

  16. Osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells in collagen matrices: effect of uniaxial cyclic tensile strain on bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2) mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Sumanasinghe, Ruwan D; Bernacki, Susan H; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2006-12-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) differentiate down an osteogenic pathway with appropriate mechanical and/or chemical stimuli. This study describes the successful culture of hMSCs in 3D collagen matrices under mechanical strain. Bone marrow-derived hMSCs were seeded in linear 3D type I collagen matrices and subjected to 0%, 10%, or 12% uniaxial cyclic tensile strain at 1 Hz for 4 h/day for 7 or 14 days. Cell viability studies indicated that hMSCs remained viable throughout the culture period irrespective of the applied strain level. Real-time RT-PCR studies indicated a significant increase in BMP-2 mRNA expression levels in hMSCs strained at 10% compared to the same day unstrained controls after both 7 and 14 days. An increase in BMP-2 was also observed in hMSCs subjected to 12% strain, but the increase was significant only in the 14-day sample. This is the first report of the culture of bone marrow-derived hMSCs in 3D collagen matrices under cyclic strain, and the first demonstration that strain alone can induce osteogenic differentiation without the addition of osteogenic supplements. Induction of bone differentiation in 3D culture is a critical step in the creation of bioengineered bone constructs. PMID:17518682

  17. Charge transport in NdNiO3 thin films: Effects of mn-doping versus tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Mahesh; Aziz, Fozia; Rana, Rakesh; Late, Ravikiran; Rana, D. S.; Mavani, K. R.

    2014-04-01

    We have performed a comparative study of total three films, two films of NdNiO3 deposited on SrTiO3 (STO) and NdGaO3 (NGO) single-crystals and one 10% Mn-doped thin film of NdNi0.9Mn0.1O3 deposited on NGO. We find that both, the enhanced tensile strain and the Mn-doping drive the system to an insulating state from a metallic state at high temperatures. NdNiO3/NGO film shows a metal-insulator transition, which disappears in the other two films due to opening of charge-transfer gap. These results reveal that the effect of tensile strain on the resistivity of NdNiO3 is profound at low temperatures, whereas Mn-doping clearly dominates at high temperatures.

  18. Effects of surface cracks and strain rate on the tensile behavior of Balmoral Red granite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardoukhi, Ahmad; Hokka, Mikko; Kuokkala, Veli-Tapani

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental procedure for studying the effects of surface cracks on the mechanical behavior of Balmoral Red granite under dynamic and quasi-static loading. Three different thermal shocks were applied on the surface of the Brazilian Disc test samples by keeping a flame torch at a fixed distance from the sample surface for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Microscopy clearly shows that the number of the surface cracks increases with the duration of the thermal shock. After the thermal shock, the Brazilian Disc tests were performed using a servohydraulic materials testing machine and a compression Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) device. The results show that the tensile strength of the rock decreases and the rate sensitivity of the rock increases as more cracks are introduced to the structure. The DIC analysis of the Brazilian disc tests shows that the fracture of the sample initiates at the center of the samples or slightly closer to the incident bar contact point. This is followed by crushing of the samples at both contact points with the stress bars.

  19. Effects of Finish Cooling Temperature on Tensile Properties After Thermal Aging of Strain-Based API X60 Linepipe Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Lee, Dong Ho; Shin, Sang Yong; Lee, Sunghak; Ro, Yunjo; Lee, Chang Sun; Hwang, Byoungchul

    2015-09-01

    Two types of strain-based American Petroleum Institute (API) X60 linepipe steels were fabricated at two finish cooling temperatures, 673 K and 723 K (400 °C and 450 °C), and the effects of the finish cooling temperatures on the tensile properties after thermal aging were investigated. The strain-based API X60 linepipe steels consisted mainly of polygonal ferrite (PF) or quasi-polygonal ferrite and the volume fraction of acicular ferrite increased with the increasing finish cooling temperature. In contrast, the volume fractions of bainitic ferrite (BF) and secondary phases decreased. The tensile properties before and after thermal aging at 473 K and 523 K (200 °C and 250 °C) were measured. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and yield ratio increased with the increasing thermal aging temperature. The strain hardening rate in the steel fabricated at the higher finish cooling temperature decreased rapidly after thermal aging, probably due to the Cottrell atmosphere, whereas the strain hardening rate in the steel fabricated at the lower finish cooling temperature changed slightly after thermal aging. The uniform elongation and total elongation decreased with increasing thermal aging temperature, probably due to the interactions between carbon atoms and dislocations. The uniform elongation decreased rapidly with the decreasing volume fractions of BF and martensite and secondary phases. The yield ratio increased with the increasing thermal aging temperature, whereas the strain hardening exponent decreased. The strain hardening exponent of PL steel decreased rapidly after thermal aging because of the large number of mobile dislocations between PF and BF or martensite or secondary phases.

  20. Microstructure- and Strain Rate-Dependent Tensile Behavior of Fiber Laser-Welded DP980 Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qiang; Guo, Wei; Peng, Peng; Li, Minggao; Zhu, Ying; Zou, Guisheng

    2016-02-01

    DP980 steels were butt-welded by fiber laser welding. The microstructures, microhardness distribution, and tensile behavior of the joint were investigated. The results showed that the fusion zone (FZ) consisted of fully martensite with higher hardness compared to the base metal (BM). A softened zone (20 HV0.2 drop) was produced in heat-affected zone due to martensite tempering during the laser welding. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and yield strength (YS) of the laser-welded joint were not degraded compared to BM with the existence of softened zone. The UTS and YS of the welded joint increased with the increase of tensile strain rate. The work hardening exponents of the BM and welded joint showed weak positive strain rate dependence. The deformation of softened zone was restrained by the hardened FZ during loading, resulting in a higher work hardening rate of softened zone than that of BM. The failure of welded joint occurred in the BM instead of softened zone. The fracture surfaces of the joint exhibited typical ductile fracture over strain rate from 0.0001 to 0.1 s-1.

  1. Non-destructive and three-dimensional measurement of local strain development during tensile deformation in an aluminium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Miura, H.; Toda, H.

    2015-08-01

    Anisotropy of mechanical responses depending on crystallographic orientation causes inhomogeneous deformation on the mesoscopic scale (grain size scale). Investigation of the local plastic strain development is important for discussing recrystallization mechanisms, because the sites with higher local plastic strain may act as potential nucleation sites for recrystallization. Recently, high-resolution X-ray tomography, which is non-destructive inspection method, has been utilized for observation of the materials structure. In synchrotron radiation X-ray tomography, more than 10,000 microstructural features, like precipitates, dispersions, compounds and hydrogen pores, can be observed in aluminium alloys. We have proposed employing these microstructural features as marker gauges to measure local strains, and then have developed a method to calculate the three-dimensional strain distribution by tracking the microstructural features. In this study, we report the development of local plastic strain as a function of the grain microstructure in an aluminium alloy by means of this three-dimensional strain measurement technique. Strongly heterogeneous strain development was observed during tensile loading to 30%. In other words, some parts of the sample deform little whereas another deforms a lot. However, strain in the whole specimen was keeping harmony. Comparing the microstructure with the strain concentration that is obtained by this method has a potential to reveal potential nucleation sites of recrystallization.

  2. Interaction of heat production, strain rate and stress power in a plastically deforming body under tensile test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paglietti, A.

    1982-01-01

    At high strain rates the heat produced by plastic deformation can give rise to a rate dependent response even if the material has rate independent constitutive equations. This effect has to be evaluated when interpreting a material test, or else it could erroneously be ascribed to viscosity. A general thermodynamic theory of tensile testing of elastic-plastic materials is given in this paper; it is valid for large strain at finite strain rates. It enables discovery of the parameters governing the thermodynamic strain rate effect, provides a method for proper interpretation of the results of the tests of dynamic plasticity, and suggests a way of planning experiments in order to detect the real contribution of viscosity.

  3. Measurement of the extent of strain relief in InGaAs layers grown under tensile strain on InP(100) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maigné, P.; Gendry, M.; Venet, T.; Tahri, Y.; Hollinger, G.

    1996-07-01

    High resolution x-ray diffraction has been used to investigate the structural properties of InxGa1-xAs epitaxial layers grown under tension on InP(100) substrates. The nominal indium composition (x=0.42) corresponds to a small lattice mismatch and a two dimensional growth mode. We have also included for comparison two samples grown under compression covering the mostly strained and the mostly relaxed regimes. Our results show that the residual strain and the asymmetry in strain relaxation along <011> directions are always larger for layers under tension. This can be explained by the difference in dislocation glide velocity induced by a different indium content, by the dissociation of perfect dislocations and partially by the difference in thermal expansion coefficients between substrate and epilayer. The larger asymmetry in strain relaxation for tensile strain layers is interpreted by the existence of microcracks aligned in the [011] direction.

  4. Tensile strained Ge tunnel field-effect transistors: k · p material modeling and numerical device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Kuo-Hsing; De Meyer, Kristin; Verhulst, Anne S.; Van de Put, Maarten; Soree, Bart; Magnus, Wim; Vandenberghe, William G.

    2014-01-28

    Group IV based tunnel field-effect transistors generally show lower on-current than III-V based devices because of the weaker phonon-assisted tunneling transitions in the group IV indirect bandgap materials. Direct tunneling in Ge, however, can be enhanced by strain engineering. In this work, we use a 30-band k · p method to calculate the band structure of biaxial tensile strained Ge and then extract the bandgaps and effective masses at Γ and L symmetry points in k-space, from which the parameters for the direct and indirect band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) models are determined. While transitions from the heavy and light hole valence bands to the conduction band edge at the L point are always bridged by phonon scattering, we highlight a new finding that only the light-hole-like valence band is strongly coupling to the conduction band at the Γ point even in the presence of strain based on the 30-band k · p analysis. By utilizing a Technology Computer Aided Design simulator equipped with the calculated band-to-band tunneling BTBT models, the electrical characteristics of tensile strained Ge point and line tunneling devices are self-consistently computed considering multiple dynamic nonlocal tunnel paths. The influence of field-induced quantum confinement on the tunneling onset is included. Our simulation predicts that an on-current up to 160 (260) μA/μm can be achieved along with on/off ratio > 10{sup 6} for V{sub DD} = 0.5 V by the n-type (p-type) line tunneling device made of 2.5% biaxial tensile strained Ge.

  5. Cyclic Tensile Strain Suppresses Catabolic Effects of Interleukin-1β in Fibrochondrocytes From the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sudha; Long, Ping; Gassner, Robert; Piesco, Nicholas P.; Buckley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To discern the effects of continuous passive motion on inflamed temporomandibular joints (TMJ). Methods The effects of continuous passive motion on TMJ were simulated by exposing primary cultures of rabbit TMJ fibrochondrocyte monolayers to cyclic tensile strain (CTS) in the presence of recombinant human interleukin-1β (rHuIL-1β) in vitro. The messenger RNA (mRNA) induction of rHuIL-1β response elements was examined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. The synthesis of nitric oxide was examined by Griess reaction, and the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was examined by radioimmunoassay. The synthesis of proteins was examined by Western blot analysis of the cell extracts, and synthesis of proteoglycans via incorporation of 35S-sodium sulfate in the culture medium. Results Exposure of TMJ fibrochondrocytes to rHuIL-1β resulted in the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), which were paralleled by NO and PGE2 production. Additionally, IL-1β induced significant levels of collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase 1 [MMP-1]) within 4 hours, and this was sustained over a period of 48 hours. Concomitant application of CTS abrogated the catabolic effects of IL-1β on TMJ chondrocytes by inhibiting iNOS, COX-2, and MMP-1 mRNA production and NO, PGE2, and MMP-1 synthesis. CTS also counteracted cartilage degradation by augmenting expression of mRNA for tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 that is inhibited by rHuIL-1β. In parallel, CTS also counteracted rHuIL-1β–induced suppression of proteoglycan synthesis. Nevertheless, the presence of an inflammatory signal was a prerequisite for the observed CTS actions, because fibrochondrocytes, when exposed to CTS alone, did not exhibit any of the effects described above. Conclusion CTS acts as an effective antagonist of rHuIL-1β by potentially diminishing its catabolic actions on TMJ fibrochondrocytes. Furthermore, CTS actions appear

  6. Resistance fail strain gage technology as applied to composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. E.; Brinson, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Existing strain gage technologies as applied to orthotropic composite materials are reviewed. The bonding procedures, transverse sensitivity effects, errors due to gage misalignment, and temperature compensation methods are addressed. Numerical examples are included where appropriate. It is shown that the orthotropic behavior of composites can result in experimental error which would not be expected based on practical experience with isotropic materials. In certain cases, the transverse sensitivity of strain gages and/or slight gage misalignment can result in strain measurement errors.

  7. High strain rate and quasi-static tensile behaviour of Ti-6Al-4V after cyclic damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galán López, J.; Verleysen, P.; Degrieck, J.

    2012-08-01

    It is common that energy absorbing structural elements are subjected to a number of loading cycles before a crash event. Several studies have shown that previous fatigue can significantly influence the tensile properties of some materials, and hence the behaviour of structural elements made of them. However, when the capacity of absorbing energy of engineering materials is determined, fresh material without any fatigue damage is most often used. This study investigates the effect of fatigue damage on the dynamic tensile properties of Ti-6Al-4V in thin-sheet form. Results are completed with tests at quasi-static strain rates and observations of the fracture surfaces, and compared with results obtained from other alloys and steel grades. The experiments show that the dynamic properties of Ti-6Al-4V are not affected by a number of fatigue loading cycles high enough to significantly reduce the energy absorbing capabilities of EDM machined samples.

  8. Tensile strain-rate sensitivity of tungsten/niobium composites at 1300 to 1600 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Titran, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The tensile behavior of continuous tungsten fiber reinforced niobium composites (W/Nb), fabricated by an arc-spray process, was studied in the 1300 to 1600 K temperature range. The tensile properties of the fiber and matrix components as well as of the composites were measured and were compared to rule of mixtures (ROM) predictions. The deviation from the ROM was found to depend upon the chemistry of the tungsten alloy fibers, with positive deviations for ST300/Nb (i.e., stronger composite strength than the ROM) and negative or zero deviations for 218/Nb.

  9. Growth and characterization of highly tensile strained Ge1-xSnx formed on relaxed InyGa1-yP buffer layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Loke, Wan Khai; Yin, Tingting; Zhang, Zheng; D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Dong, Yuan; Liang, Gengchiau; Pan, Jisheng; Shen, Zexiang; Yoon, Soon Fatt; Tok, Eng Soon; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2016-03-01

    Ge0.94Sn0.06 films with high tensile strain were grown on strain-relaxed InyGa1-yP virtual substrates using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The in-plane tensile strain in the Ge0.94Sn0.06 film was varied by changing the In mole fraction in InxGa1-xP buffer layer. The tensile strained Ge0.94Sn0.06 films were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. An in-plane tensile strain of up to 1% in the Ge0.94Sn0.06 was measured, which is much higher than that achieved using other buffer systems. Controlled thermal anneal experiment demonstrated that the strain was not relaxed for temperatures up to 500 °C. The band alignment of the tensile strained Ge0.94Sn0.06 on In0.77Ga0.23P was obtained by high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Ge0.94Sn0.06/In0.77Ga0.23P interface was found to be of the type I band alignment, with a valence band offset of 0.31 ± 0.12 eV and a conduction band offset of 0.74 ± 0.12 eV.

  10. Development of a Plane Strain Tensile Geometry to Assess Shear Fracture in Dual Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. D.; Matlock, D. K.; De Moor, E.; Speer, J. G.

    2014-10-01

    A geometrically modified sample capable of generating a triaxial stress state when tested on a standard uniaxial tensile frame was developed to replicate shear fractures observed during stretch bend tests and industrial sheet stamping operations. Seven commercially produced dual phase (DP) steels were tested using the geometrically modified sample, and the modified sample successfully produced shear fractures on a unique shear plane for all steels. For each steel, void densities were determined, based on metallographic analyses, as a function of imposed displacement. Microstructural properties of ferrite and martensite grain size, martensite volume fraction (MVF), retained austenite content, Vickers hardness, average nanoindentation hardness, average ferrite and martensite constituent hardness, and tensile properties were obtained in order to evaluate potential correlations with void data. A linear correlation was observed between Vickers hardness and the average nanoindentation hardness, verifying the ability of nanoindentation to produce data consistent with more traditional hardness measurement techniques. A linear relationship was observed between the number of voids present at 90% failure displacement and the martensite/ferrite hardness ratio, indicating that a decrease in relative hardness difference in a microstructure can suppress void formation, and potentially extend formability limits. The void population appeared independent of MVF, grain size, and tensile properties suggesting that constituent hardness may be a dominant parameter when considering suppression of void nucleation in DP steels.

  11. Conduction band structure and electron mobility in uniaxially strained Si via externally applied strain in nanomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Euaruksakul, Chanan; Liu, Zheng; Himpsel, F. J.; Liu, Feng; Lagally, Max G.

    2011-08-01

    Strain changes the band structure of semiconductors. We use x-ray absorption spectroscopy to study the change in the density of conduction band (CB) states when silicon is uniaxially strained along the [1 0 0] and [1 1 0] directions. High stress can be applied to silicon nanomembranes, because their thinness allows high levels of strain without fracture. Strain-induced changes in both the sixfold degenerate Δ valleys and the eightfold degenerate L valleys are determined quantitatively. The uniaxial deformation potentials of both Δ and L valleys are directly extracted using a strain tensor appropriate to the boundary conditions, i.e., confinement in the plane in the direction orthogonal to the straining direction, which correspond to those of strained CMOS in commercial applications. The experimentally determined deformation potentials match the theoretical predictions well. We predict electron mobility enhancement created by strain-induced CB modifications.

  12. Micromechanical poroelastic finite element and shear-lag models of tendon predict large strain dependent Poisson's ratios and fluid expulsion under tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, Hossein; Freedman, Benjamin R; Connizzo, Brianne K; Soslowsky, Louis J; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2015-08-01

    As tendons are loaded, they reduce in volume and exude fluid to the surrounding medium. Experimental studies have shown that tendon stretching results in a Poisson's ratio greater than 0.5, with a maximum value at small strains followed by a nonlinear decay. Here we present a computational model that attributes this macroscopic observation to the microscopic mechanism of the load transfer between fibrils under stretch. We develop a finite element model based on the mechanical role of the interfibrillar-linking elements, such as thin fibrils that bridge the aligned fibrils or macromolecules such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the interfibrillar sliding and verify it with a theoretical shear-lag model. We showed the existence of a previously unappreciated structure-function mechanism whereby the Poisson's ratio in tendon is affected by the strain applied and interfibrillar-linker properties, and together these features predict tendon volume shrinkage under tensile loading. During loading, the interfibrillar-linkers pulled fibrils toward each other and squeezed the matrix, leading to the Poisson's ratio larger than 0.5 and fluid expulsion. In addition, the rotation of the interfibrillar-linkers with respect to the fibrils at large strains caused a reduction in the volume shrinkage and eventual nonlinear decay in Poisson's ratio at large strains. Our model also predicts a fluid flow that has a radial pattern toward the surrounding medium, with the larger fluid velocities in proportion to the interfibrillar sliding. PMID:25934322

  13. Effect of strain rate on the tensile properties of unirradiated and irradiated V-4Cr-4Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowcliffe, A. F.; Zinkle, S. J.; Hoelzer, D. T.

    2000-12-01

    Tensile tests were carried out on an annealed, unirradiated V-4Cr-4Ti alloy from RT to 850°C at strain rates ranging from 10-1 to 10-5 s-1. Below 300°C, where interstitial solutes are relatively immobile, deformation is homogeneous, and the strain rate sensitivity (SRS) of the yield and flow stress is positive. Between 300°C and 700°C, the formation of solute atmospheres at locked dislocations results in dynamic strain-aging (DSA), deformation becomes heterogeneous, and the SRS of the flow stress is negative; in this regime the lower yield stress is independent of strain rate. Above 700°C, substitutional solutes are also mobile, DSA declines, and the material enters a power law creep regime in which the SRS becomes positive again. Following neutron irradiation to 0.5 dpa at temperatures ⩽400°C, severe flow localization occurs due to the high number density of <1 1 0> and <1 1 1> loops. However, above 400°C, strain hardening capacity returns but without the Lüders extension. At 500°C, after several percent plastic deformation, DSA occurs as interstitial solutes are released from the defect structure.

  14. Tunable electronic and optical properties of monolayer silicane under tensile strain: A many-body study

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Huabing; Wang, Shudong; Li, Yunhai; Wang, Jinlan; Yip, Joanne

    2014-08-14

    The electronic structure and optical response of silicane to strain are investigated by employing first-principles calculations based on many-body perturbation theory. The bandgap can be efficiently engineered in a broad range and an indirect to direct bandgap transition is observed under a strain of 2.74%; the semiconducting silicane can even be turned into a metal under a very large strain. The transitions derive from the persistent downward shift of the lowest conduction band at the Γ-point upon an increasing strain. The quasi-particle bandgaps of silicane are sizable due to the weak dielectric screening and the low dimension; they are rapidly reduced as strain increases while the exciton bound energy is not that sensitive. Moreover, the optical absorption edge of the strained silicane significantly shifts towards a low photon energy region and falls into the visible light range, which might serve as a promising candidate for optoelectronic devices.

  15. Studies on tensile properties and fracture behavior of Al-6Si-0.5Mg (-Cu or/and Ni) alloys at various strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, A.; Gulshan, F.; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the effects of various strain rates on the tensile properties of Al-6Si-0.5Mg cast alloys with Cu or/and Ni additions and to establish data on the stress-strain behavior of the alloys with applications in automotive engineering. Experimental alloys of the following composition were prepared by melt processing technique. Both microstructure and the mechanical properties were investigated. The uniaxial tension test was carried out at strain rates ranging from 10-4s-1 to 10-2s-1. Tensile strengths were found to increase with ageing temperature and the maximum being attained at peak age condition (1hr at 225°C). The additions of Cu or/and Ni resulted in an increase in tensile strength and 2wt% Cu content alloy (Al-6Si-0.5Mg-2Cu) showed maximum strength. Evaluation of tensile properties at three strain rates (10-4, 10-3 and 10-2s-1) showed that strain rates affected the tensile properties significantly. At higher strain rates the strength was better but ductility was poor.

  16. Grain growth behavior and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of iridium alloy DOP-26

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; Gubbi, A.N.; Lin, Y.; Cohron, J.W.; Lee, E.H.; George, E.P.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes results of studies conducted to date under the Iridium Alloy Characterization and Development subtask of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program to characterize the properties of the new-process iridium-based DOP-26 alloy used for the Cassini space mission. This alloy was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the early 1980`s and is currently used by NASA for cladding and post-impact containment of the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for interplanetary spacecraft. Included within this report are data generated on grain growth in vacuum or low-pressure oxygen environments; a comparison of grain growth in vacuum of the clad vent set cup material with sheet material; effect of grain size, test temperature, and oxygen exposure on high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility; and grain growth in vacuum and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of welded DOP-26. The data for the new-process material is compared to available old-process data.

  17. Semiconductor-topological insulator transition of two-dimensional SbAs induced by biaxial tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengli; Xie, Meiqiu; Cai, Bo; Zhang, Haijun; Ma, Yandong; Chen, Zhongfang; Zhu, Zhen; Hu, Ziyu; Zeng, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    A stibarsen [derived from Latin stibium (antimony) and arsenic] or allemontite, is a natural form of arsenic antimonide (SbAs) with the same layered structure as arsenic and antimony. Thus, exploring the two-dimensional SbAs nanosheets is of great importance to gain insights into the properties of group V-V compounds at the atomic scale. Here, we propose a class of two-dimensional V-V honeycomb binary compounds, SbAs monolayers, which can be tuned from semiconductor to topological insulator. By ab initio density functional theory, both α-SbAs and γ-SbAs display a significant direct band gap, while others are indirect semiconductors. Interestingly, in an atomically thin β-SbAs polymorph, spin-orbital coupling is significant, which reduces its band gap by 200 meV. Especially under biaxial tensile strain, the gap of β-SbAs can be closed and reopened with concomitant change of band shapes, which is reminiscent of band inversion known in many topological insulators. In addition, we find that the Z2 topological invariant is 1 for β-SbAs under the tensile strain of 12%, and the nontrivial topological feature of β-SbAs is also confirmed by the gapless edge states which cross linearly at the Γ point. These ultrathin group-V-V semiconductors with outstanding properties are highly favorable for applications in alternative optoelectronic and quantum spin Hall devices.

  18. Inherently-Forced Tensile Strain in Nanodiamond-Derived Onion-like Carbon: Consequences in Defect-Induced Electrochemical Activation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, Jung-Min; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Park, Jong-Keuk; Baik, Young-Joon; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the nanodiamond-derived onion-like carbon (OLC) as function of synthesis temperature (1000~1400 °C), by high-resolution electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, visible-Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The temperature dependences of the obtained properties (averaged particle size, tensile strain, defect density, density of states, electron transfer kinetics, and electrochemical oxidation current) unanimously coincided: they initially increased and saturated at 1200 °C. It was attributed to the inherent tensile strains arising from (1) the volume expansion associated with the layer-wise diamond-to-graphite transformation of the core, which caused forced dilation of the outer shells during their thermal synthesis; (2) the extreme curvature of the shells. The former origin was dominant over the latter at the outermost shell, of which the relevant evolution in defect density, DOS and electron transfer kinetics determined the electrochemical performances. In detection of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) using the OLC as electrode, their oxidation peak currents were enhanced by factors of 15~60 with annealing temperature. Their limit of detection and the linear range of detection, in the post-treatment-free condition, were as excellent as those of the nano-carbon electrodes post-treated by Pt-decoration, N-doping, plasma, or polymer. PMID:27032957

  19. Inherently-Forced Tensile Strain in Nanodiamond-Derived Onion-like Carbon: Consequences in Defect-Induced Electrochemical Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, Jung-Min; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Park, Jong-Keuk; Baik, Young-Joon; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed the nanodiamond-derived onion-like carbon (OLC) as function of synthesis temperature (1000~1400 °C), by high-resolution electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, visible-Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The temperature dependences of the obtained properties (averaged particle size, tensile strain, defect density, density of states, electron transfer kinetics, and electrochemical oxidation current) unanimously coincided: they initially increased and saturated at 1200 °C. It was attributed to the inherent tensile strains arising from (1) the volume expansion associated with the layer-wise diamond-to-graphite transformation of the core, which caused forced dilation of the outer shells during their thermal synthesis; (2) the extreme curvature of the shells. The former origin was dominant over the latter at the outermost shell, of which the relevant evolution in defect density, DOS and electron transfer kinetics determined the electrochemical performances. In detection of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) using the OLC as electrode, their oxidation peak currents were enhanced by factors of 15~60 with annealing temperature. Their limit of detection and the linear range of detection, in the post-treatment-free condition, were as excellent as those of the nano-carbon electrodes post-treated by Pt-decoration, N-doping, plasma, or polymer.

  20. CO oxidation by MoS2-supported Au19 nanoparticles: effects of vacancy formation and tensile strain.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonho; Shin, Kihyun; Bang, Kihoon; Kim, Hyun You; Lee, Hyuck Mo

    2016-05-21

    The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of CO activated by MoS2-supported Au19 nanoparticles (NPs) was studied using density functional theory calculations. Of particular interest were the effects of the physical/chemical modification of a MoS2 support on the CO oxidation pathway and the activation of specific reactive centers, i.e., the Au atoms of Au19 or the Au-MoS2 perimeter sites. We systematically modified MoS2 by introducing an S vacancy or 5% tensile strain and studied the shift of each reaction step and the overall change in the reaction pathway and activity. Despite the lack of direct involvement of the Au-MoS2 perimeter in the reaction, the combination of an S vacancy and the tensile strain in the MoS2 support was found to improve the stability and catalytic activity of Au NPs for CO oxidation. The results show that support modification can provide information for new pathways for the rational design of Au-based catalysts. PMID:27118269

  1. Inherently-Forced Tensile Strain in Nanodiamond-Derived Onion-like Carbon: Consequences in Defect-Induced Electrochemical Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, Jung-Min; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Park, Jong-Keuk; Baik, Young-Joon; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the nanodiamond-derived onion-like carbon (OLC) as function of synthesis temperature (1000~1400 °C), by high-resolution electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, visible-Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The temperature dependences of the obtained properties (averaged particle size, tensile strain, defect density, density of states, electron transfer kinetics, and electrochemical oxidation current) unanimously coincided: they initially increased and saturated at 1200 °C. It was attributed to the inherent tensile strains arising from (1) the volume expansion associated with the layer-wise diamond-to-graphite transformation of the core, which caused forced dilation of the outer shells during their thermal synthesis; (2) the extreme curvature of the shells. The former origin was dominant over the latter at the outermost shell, of which the relevant evolution in defect density, DOS and electron transfer kinetics determined the electrochemical performances. In detection of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) using the OLC as electrode, their oxidation peak currents were enhanced by factors of 15~60 with annealing temperature. Their limit of detection and the linear range of detection, in the post-treatment-free condition, were as excellent as those of the nano-carbon electrodes post-treated by Pt-decoration, N-doping, plasma, or polymer. PMID:27032957

  2. Tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Inaoka, Takeshi Furukawa, Takuro; Toma, Ryo; Yanagisawa, Susumu

    2015-09-14

    By means of a hybrid density-functional method, we investigate the tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge. We consider [001], [111], and [110] uniaxial tensility and (001), (111), and (110) biaxial tensility. Under the condition of no normal stress, we determine both normal compression and internal strain, namely, relative displacement of two atoms in the primitive unit cell, by minimizing the total energy. We identify those strain types which can induce the band-gap transition, and evaluate the critical strain coefficient where the gap transition occurs. Either normal compression or internal strain operates unfavorably to induce the gap transition, which raises the critical strain coefficient or even blocks the transition. We also examine how each type of tensile strain decreases the band-gap energy, depending on its orientation. Our analysis clearly shows that synergistic operation of strain orientation and band anisotropy has a great influence on the gap transition and the gap energy.

  3. Role of RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin contractility in the induction of tenascin-C by cyclic tensile strain.

    PubMed

    Sarasa-Renedo, Ana; Tunç-Civelek, Vildan; Chiquet, Matthias

    2006-05-01

    In chick embryo fibroblasts, the mRNA for extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C is induced 2-fold by cyclic strain (10%, 0.3 Hz, 6 h). This response is attenuated by inhibiting Rho-dependent kinase (ROCK). The RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway is primarily involved in actin dynamics. Here, we demonstrate its crucial importance in regulating tenascin-C expression. Cyclic strain stimulated RhoA activation and induced fibroblast contraction. Chemical activators of RhoA synergistically enhanced the effects of cyclic strain on cell contractility. Interestingly, tenascin-C mRNA levels perfectly matched the extent of RhoA/ROCK-mediated actin contraction. First, RhoA activation by thrombin, lysophosphatidic acid, or colchicine induced tenascin-C mRNA to a similar extent as strain. Second, RhoA activating drugs in combination with cyclic strain caused a super-induction (4- to 5-fold) of tenascin-C mRNA, which was again suppressed by ROCK inhibition. Third, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin A abolished induction of tenascin-C mRNA by chemical RhoA activators in combination with cyclic strain. Lastly, we found that myosin II activity is required for tenascin-C induction by cyclic strain. We conclude that RhoA/ROCK-controlled actin contractility has a mechanosensory function in fibroblasts that correlates directly with tenascin-C gene expression. Previous RhoA/ROCK activation, either by chemical or mechanical signals, might render fibroblasts more sensitive to external tensile stress, e.g., during wound healing. PMID:16448650

  4. Dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Trujillo, Carl P; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The current work applies the recently developed Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE). Similar to the Taylor Impact Rod, Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion is a strongly integrated test, probing a wide range of strain rates and stress states. However, the stress state is primarily tensile enabling investigation of dynamic tensile failure modes. Here we investigate the influence of this propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their response under dynamic tensile extrusion loading. The results of the Dyn-Ten-Ext technique are compared with two classic techniques. Both polymers have been investigated using Tensile Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The quasistatic and dynamic responses of both fluoro-polymers have been extensively characterized. The two polymers exhibit significantly different failure behavior under tensile loading at moderate strain rates. Polytetrafluoroethylene resists formation of a neck and exhibits significant strain hardening. Independent of temperature or strain rate, PTFE sustains true strains to failure of approximately 1.5. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, on the other hand, consistently necks at true strains of approximately 0.05.

  5. The molecular kink paradigm for rubber elasticity: Numerical simulations of explicit polyisoprene networks at low to moderate tensile strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.

    2011-08-01

    Based on recent molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations of small isoprene molecules, we propose a new ansatz for rubber elasticity. We envision a network chain as a series of independent molecular kinks, each comprised of a small number of backbone units, and the strain as being imposed along the contour of the chain. We treat chain extension in three distinct force regimes: (Ia) near zero strain, where we assume that the chain is extended within a well defined tube, with all of the kinks participating simultaneously as entropic elastic springs, (II) when the chain becomes sensibly straight, giving rise to a purely enthalpic stretching force (until bond rupture occurs) and, (Ib) a linear entropic regime, between regimes Ia and II, in which a force limit is imposed by tube deformation. In this intermediate regime, the molecular kinks are assumed to be gradually straightened until the chain becomes a series of straight segments between entanglements. We assume that there exists a tube deformation tension limit that is inversely proportional to the chain path tortuosity. Here we report the results of numerical simulations of explicit three-dimensional, periodic, polyisoprene networks, using these extension-only force models. At low strain, crosslink nodes are moved affinely, up to an arbitrary node force limit. Above this limit, non-affine motion of the nodes is allowed to relax unbalanced chain forces. Our simulation results are in good agreement with tensile stress vs. strain experiments.

  6. Tensile strain / transverse compressive stress effects in Nb{sub 3}Sn multifilamentary wires with CuNb reinforcing stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, K.; Shoji, Y.; Noto, K.

    1997-06-01

    In order to improve the strain/stress characteristics of the critical current I{sub c}, the use of external CuNb reinforcing stabilizer, instead of the conventional Cu stabilizer, with bronze processed Nb{sub 3}Sn multifilamentary superconducting wires was examined up to the magnetic field of 14T and at a temperature of 4.2K. Although the axial tensile strain sensitivity of I{sub c} was not changed, the strain for peak I{sub c} as well as the reversible strain limit increased by 0.14% when the Cu stabilizer was replaced by the CuNb reinforcing stabilizer. On the other hand, the transverse compressive stress sensitivity of I{sub c} decreased and the reversible stress limit increased. An increase in both a bronze to Nb ratio and Sn content in bronze matrix resulted in a higher stress tolerance and, as a consequence, the contribution of the CuNb reinforcement became relatively small.

  7. Effect of test temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1997-04-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of wrought GlidCop AL25 (ITER grade zero, IGO) solutionized and aged CuCrZr, and cold-worked and aged and solutionized and aged Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500{degrees}C at strain rates between 4 x 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} and 0.06 s{sup {minus}1}. The measured room temperature electrical conductivity ranged from 64 to 90% IACS for the different alloys. All of the alloys were relatively insensitive to strain rate at room temperature, but the strain rate sensitivity of GlidCop Al25 increased significantly with increasing temperature. The CuNiBe alloys exhibited the best combination of high strength and high conductivity at room temperature. The strength of CuNiBe decreased slowly with increasing temperature. However, the ductility of CuNiBe decreased rapidly with increasing temperature due to localized deformation near grain boundaries, making these alloy heats unsuitable for typical structural applications above 300{degrees}C. The strength and uniform elongation of GlidCop Al25 decreased significantly with increasing temperature at a strain rate of 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}, whereas the total elongation was independent of test temperature. The strength and ductility of CuCrZr decreased slowly with increasing temperature.

  8. Tensile stress-strain and work hardening behaviour of P9 steel for wrapper application in sodium cooled fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, J.; Choudhary, B. K.; Isaac Samuel, E.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Tensile flow behaviour of P9 steel with different silicon content has been examined in the framework of Hollomon, Ludwik, Swift, Ludwigson and Voce relationships for a wide temperature range (300-873 K) at a strain rate of 1.3 × 10 -3 s -1. Ludwigson equation described true stress ( σ)-true plastic strain ( ɛ) data most accurately in the range 300-723 K. At high temperatures (773-873 K), Ludwigson equation reduces to Hollomon equation. The variations of instantaneous work hardening rate ( θ = dσ/ dɛ) and θσ with stress indicated two-stage work hardening behaviour. True stress-true plastic strain, flow parameters, θ vs. σ and θσ vs. σ with respect to temperature exhibited three distinct temperature regimes and displayed anomalous behaviour due to dynamic strain ageing at intermediate temperatures. Rapid decrease in flow stress and flow parameters, and rapid shift in θ- σ and θσ- σ towards lower stresses with increase in temperature indicated dominance of dynamic recovery at high temperatures.

  9. Characterization of Tensile Properties, Limiting Strains, and Deep Drawing Behavior of AA5754-H22 Sheet at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicker, Sudhy S.; Singh, Har Govind; Panda, Sushanta Kumar; Dashwood, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Automotive industries are very much interested in characterization of formability improvement of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures before designing tools, heating systems, and processing sequences for fabrication of auto-body panels by warm forming technology. In this study, tensile tests of AA5754-H22 aluminum alloy were carried out at five different temperatures and three different strain rates to investigate the deformation behavior correlating with Cowper-Symonds constitutive equation. Laboratory scale warm forming facilities were designed and fabricated to perform limiting dome height and deep drawing tests to evaluate forming limit strains and drawability of sheet metal at different tool temperatures. The forming limit strain and dome height improved significantly when both the die and punch were heated to 200 °C. Remarkable improvement in deep drawn cup depth was observed when die and punch temperatures were maintained at 200 and 30 °C, respectively, producing a non-isothermal temperature gradient of approximately 93 °C across the blank from flange to center. The forming behavior at different isothermal and non-isothermal conditions were predicted successfully using a thermo-mechanical FE model incorporating temperature-dependent properties in Barlat-89 yield criterion coupled with Cowper-Symonds hardening model, and the thinning/failure location in deformed cups were validated implementing the experimental limiting strains as damage model.

  10. Control of Sn Precipitation and Strain Relaxation in Compositionally Step-Graded Ge1-xSnx Buffer Layers for Tensile-Strained Ge Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Yosuke; Tsutsui, Norimasa; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Sakai, Akira; Zaima, Shigeaki

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between Sn precipitation and strain relaxation in Ge1-xSnx buffer layers grown by the compositionally step-graded (CSG) method on a virtual Ge substrate. We found that the strain in the upper Ge1-xSnx layers is reduced by Sn precipitation rather than the lateral propagation of misfit dislocations at the interfaces of upper Ge1-xSnx layers in the CSG method. The critical misfit strain was increased to 5.8 ×10-3 compared with that in our previous work by lowering the temperature of the postdeposition annealing, and a Sn content of 6.3% in the Ge1-xSnx buffer layer was achieved with a large degree of strain relaxation using only two stacked layers of the CSG structure. An in-plane tensile strain of 0.62% in a 30-nm-thick Ge layer fabricated on these Ge1-xSnx buffer layers was achieved.

  11. Numerical simulations of rubber networks at moderate to high tensile strains using a purely enthalpic force extension curve for individual chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.

    2009-12-01

    We report the results of numerical simulations of random, three-dimensional, periodic, tetrafunctional networks in response to a volume-preserving tensile strain. For the intranode force, we use a polynomial fit to a purely enthalpic ab initio force extension curve for extended polyisoprene. The simulation includes a relaxation procedure to minimize the node forces and enforces chain rupture when the extension of a network chain reaches the ab initio rupture strain. For the reasonable assumption that the distribution of network chain lengths is Gaussian, we find that the calculated snap-back velocity, temperature increase due to chain ruptures and predicted tensile stress versus strain curve are consistent with experimental data in the moderate to high extension regime. Our results show that a perfect tetrafunctional polyisoprene network is extremely robust, capable of supporting tensile stresses at least a factor of 10 greater than what is observed experimentally.

  12. Numerical simulations of rubber networks at moderate to high tensile strains using a purely enthalpic force extension curve for individual chains

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, David Edward

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of numerical simulations of random, three-dimensional, periodic, tetrafunctional networks in response to a volume-preserving tensile strain. For the intranode force, we use a polynomial fit to a purely enthalpic ab initio force extension curve for extended polyisoprene. The simulation includes a relaxation procedure to minimize the node forces and enforces chain rupture when the extension of a network chain reaches the ab initio rupture strain. For the reasonable assumption that the distribution of network chain lengths is Gaussian, we find that the calculated snap-back velocity, temperature increase due to chain ruptures and predicted tensile stress versus strain curve are consistent with experimental data in the moderate to high extension regime. Our results show that a perfect tetrafunctional polyisoprene network is extremely robust, capable of supporting tensile stresses at least a factor of 10 greater than what is observed experimentally.

  13. Tensile-Strained GeSn Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor Devices on Si(111) Using Solid Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieten, Ruben R.; Maeda, Tatsuro; Jevasuwan, Wipakorn; Hattori, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Noriyuki; Miura, Shu; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Locquet, Jean-Pierre

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate tensile-strained GeSn metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) devices on Si(111) substrates using solid phase epitaxy of amorphous GeSn layers. Amorphous GeSn layers are obtained by limiting the adatom surface mobility during deposition. Subsequent annealing transforms the amorphous layer into single-crystalline GeSn by solid phase epitaxy. Single-crystalline GeSn layers with 4.5% Sn and 0.33% tensile strain are fabricated on Si(111) substrates. To verify the structural quality of thin-film GeSn as a channel material, we fabricate ultrathin GeSn p-channel MOSFETs (pMOSFETs) on Si(111). We demonstrate junctionless depletion-mode operation of tensile-strained GeSn(111) pMOSFETs on Si substrates.

  14. Tuning the energy gap of bilayer α-graphyne by applying strain and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hang; Wu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Yu; Wan-Lin, Guo

    2016-02-01

    Our density functional theory calculations show that the energy gap of bilayer α-graphyne can be modulated by a vertically applied electric field and interlayer strain. Like bilayer graphene, the bilayer α-graphyne has electronic properties that are hardly changed under purely mechanical strain, while an external electric field can open the gap up to 120 meV. It is of special interest that compressive strain can further enlarge the field induced gap up to 160 meV, while tensile strain reduces the gap. We attribute the gap variation to the novel interlayer charge redistribution between bilayer α-graphynes. These findings shed light on the modulation of Dirac cone structures and potential applications of graphyne in mechanical-electric devices. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB932604 and 2012CB933403), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51472117 and 51535005), the Research Fund of State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures, China (Grant No. 0414K01), the Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics (NUAA) Fundamental Research Funds, China (Grant No. NP2015203), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions.

  15. Tensile Lattice Strain Accelerates Oxygen Surface Exchange and Diffusion in La1–xSrxCoO3−δ Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The influence of lattice strain on the oxygen exchange kinetics and diffusion in oxides was investigated on (100) epitaxial La1–xSrxCoO3−δ (LSC) thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. Planar tensile and compressively strained LSC films were obtained on single-crystalline SrTiO3 and LaAlO3. 18O isotope exchange depth profiling with ToF-SIMS was employed to simultaneously measure the tracer surface exchange coefficient k* and the tracer diffusion coefficient D* in the temperature range 280–475 °C. In accordance with recent theoretical findings, much faster surface exchange (∼4 times) and diffusion (∼10 times) were observed for the tensile strained films compared to the compressively strained films in the entire temperature range. The same strain effect—tensile strain leading to higher k* and D*—was found for different LSC compositions (x = 0.2 and x = 0.4) and for surface-etched films. The temperature dependence of k* and D* is discussed with respect to the contributions of strain states, formation enthalpy of oxygen vacancies, and vacancy mobility at different temperatures. Our findings point toward the control of oxygen surface exchange and diffusion kinetics by means of lattice strain in existing mixed conducting oxides for energy conversion applications. PMID:23527691

  16. Mechanical strains and electric fields applied to topologically imprinted elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burridge, D. J.; Mao, Y.; Warner, M.

    2006-08-01

    We analyze and predict the behavior of a chirally imprinted elastomer under a mechanical strain and an electric field, applied along the helical axis. As the strain and/or field increases, the system is deformed from a conical or transverse imprinted state towards an ultimately nematic one. At a critical strain and/or field there is a first-order transition to a low imprinting efficiency state. This transition is accompanied by a discontinuous global rotation of the director toward the axis of the imprinted helix, measured by the cone angle, θ . We show that the threshold electric field required for switching this transition can be conveniently low, provided an appropriate prestrain is imposed. We suggest that these properties may give rise to a “chiral pump.”

  17. Influence of phosphorus on the tensile stress strain curves in copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandström, Rolf

    2016-03-01

    Copper canisters are planned to be used for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Sweden. The canisters will be exposed to slow plastic straining over extensive periods of time. To be able to predict the mechanical properties a range of basic models have previously been developed for copper with and without phosphorus (Cu-OFP, Cu-OF). Already with the small amount of phosphorus added in the canisters (60 wt. ppm) dramatic improvements in the measured creep strength and the creep ductility are found. The basic models are further developed in the present paper. The influence of phosphorus on slow strain rate tests is analysed. It is shown that the main effect of phosphorus is that it prevents brittle rupture, which is modelled by taking creep cavitation into account.

  18. Neutron Bragg-edge-imaging for strain mapping under in situ tensile loading

    SciTech Connect

    Woracek, R.; Penumadu, D.; Kardjilov, N.; Hilger, A.; Strobl, M.; Wimpory, R. C.; Manke, I.; Banhart, J.

    2011-05-01

    Wavelength selective neutron radiography at a cold neutron reactor source was used to measure strain and determine (residual) stresses in a steel sample under plane stress conditions. We present a new technique that uses an energy-resolved neutron imaging system based on a double crystal monochromator and is equipped with a specially developed (in situ) biaxial load frame to perform Bragg edge based transmission imaging. The neutron imaging technique provides a viewing area of 7 cm by 7 cm with a spatial resolution on the order of {approx} 100 {mu}m. The stress-induced shifts of the Bragg edge corresponding to the (110) lattice plane were resolved spatially for a ferritic steel alloy A36 (ASTM international) sample. Furthermore it is demonstrated that results agree with comparative data obtained using neutron diffraction and resistance based strain-gauge rosettes.

  19. Measurement of compressive and tensile strain in the railway structures with FBG sensor packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Young-Jin; Nam, Soon-Sung; Kwon, Hyung-seok

    2009-03-01

    For monitoring of railway structures, optical fiber sensors are very convenient. The fiber sensors are very small and do not disturb the structural properties. They also have several merits such as electro-magnetic immunity, long signal transmission, good accuracy and multiplicity of one sensor line. Strain measurement technologies with fiber optic sensors have been investigated as a part of smart structure. In this paper, we investigated the possibilities of fiber optic sensor application to the monitoring of railway structures. We expect that the fiber optic sensors have much less noises than electrical strain gauges because of electro-magnetic immunity while railways operate electric power of 22000 volts. Fiber optic sensors showed good durability and long term stability for continuous monitoring of the railway structures as well as good response to the structural behaviors during construction.

  20. Quantitative strain and slope evaluation on a double lap joint tensile test using ESPSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molimard, J.; Bounda, D.; Vautrin, A.

    2006-08-01

    The present study is based on the use of electronical speckle pattern shearing interferometry (ESPSI) on a double lap joint, the joined parts being two steel blocks and two composite plates. ESPSI is used to investigate de strain maps close to the end of the bonding in the center part of the specimen. The ESPSI set-up allows to get the full field strain and slope maps of a given surface. Its architecture is based on optical fibres which gives a portable assembly that can be used in a civil/mechanical engineering laboratory. This presentation emphases the advantages of such a method and its performances. Last some results are given and compared to an analytical approach.

  1. The relationship between the n-value and applied strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolaio, Ciro; Bruzzone, Pierluigi; Roth, Felix

    2013-07-01

    The most popular fit for describing the volt-ampere characteristic of a superconducting material is a power law with exponent n. Usually for a Nb3Sn wire the n-index is parametrized as a function of the sole critical current (Ic). An experiment to determine whether the n-index also shows an explicit dependence on the strain (ɛ) has been performed for an ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) wire. From the same wire, three pairs of samples were prepared. The three pairs were mounted on two Ti-ITER barrels, on two 316L stainless steel barrels and on two INCONEL™ alloy C-276 barrels, and heat treated. The critical current was then measured in the field range of 9-15 T. From the Ic measurements it was possible to derive three n versus Ic curves. Each curve corresponds to a different applied strain, as the three barrel materials have different thermal contraction coefficients. By analysing the three curves, the explicit dependence of the n-index on the strain is evaluated. In the strain range covered by the measurements (up to ≈-0.65% intrinsic strain), the n-value scales with the sole critical current Ic.

  2. Measurement of stress and strain applied to electrochemically aligned collagen fibres by second-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goami, Nobutaka; Yoshiki, Keisuke; Namazu, Takahiro; Inoue, Shozo

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we developed a novel strain measurement technique for electrochemically aligned collagen (ELAC) fibres using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. The ELAC fibres were prepared by a typical electrochemical method and were subjected to cross-linking. For comparison with natural collagen fibres, polarization dependency of the prepared ELAC fibres and that of a human Achilles' tendon were evaluated. The results showed that, because of crosslinking, the ELAC fibres exhibit polarization dependency similar to that of the tendon but only in a region close to the tendon. The relationship between SHG and the applied strain was determined by a combination of SHG microscopy and tensile tests. The SHG from the ELAC fibres changed in the high strain region because of the applied stress.

  3. Strain rate dependence of the tensile properties of V-(4--5%)Cr-(4--5%)Ti irradiated in EBR-II and HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.; Robertson, J.P.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1998-03-01

    Elevated temperature tensile tests performed on V-(405)Cr-(4-5)Ti indicate that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate for irradiation and test temperatures near 200 C, and decreases with increasing strain rate for irradiation and test temperatures near 400 C. This observation is in qualitative agreement with the temperature-dependent strain rate effects observed on unirradiated specimens, and implies that some interstitial solute remains free to migrate in irradiated specimens. Additional strain rate data at different temperatures are needed.

  4. The theoretical strength of rubber: numerical simulations of polyisoprene networks at high tensile strains evidence the role of average chain tortuosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.

    2013-10-01

    The ultimate stress and strain of polyisoprene rubber were studied by numerical simulations of three-dimensional random networks, subjected to tensile strains high enough to cause chain rupture. Previously published molecular chain force extension models and a numerical network construction procedure were used to perform the simulations for network crosslink densities between 2 × 1019 and 1 × 1020 cm-3, corresponding to experimental dicumyl-peroxide concentrations of 1-5 parts per hundred. At tensile failure (defined as the point of maximum stress), we find that the fraction of network chains ruptured is between 0.1% and 1%, depending on the crosslink density. The fraction of network chains that are taut, i.e. their end-to-end distance is greater than their unstretched contour length, ranges between 10% and 15% at failure. Our model predicts that the theoretical (defect-free) failure stress should be about twice the highest experimental value reported. For extensions approaching failure, tensile stress is dominated by the network morphology and purely enthalpic bond distortion forces and, in this regime, the model has essentially no free parameters. The average initial chain tortuosity (τ) appears to be an important statistical property of rubber networks; if the stress is scaled by τ and the tensile strain is scaled by τ-1, we obtain a master curve for stress versus strain, valid for all crosslink densities. We derive an analytic expression for the average tortuosity, which is in agreement with values calculated in the simulations.

  5. A novel culture morphology resulting from applied mechanical strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grymes, R. A.; Sawyer, C.

    1997-01-01

    To demonstrate that cells both perceive and respond to external force, a strain/relaxation regimen was applied to normal human fetal and aged dermal fibroblasts cultured as monolayers on flexible membranes. The precisely controlled protocol of stretch (20% elongation of the culture membrane) at 6.67 cycles/min caused a progressive change in the monolayers, such that the original randomly distributed pattern of cells became a symmetric, radial distribution as the cell bodies aligned parallel to the applied force. High cell density interfered with the success of re-alignment in the fetal cell cultures observed, which may reflect a preference in this cell strain for cell-cell over cell-matrix contacts. The chronologically aged cells observed did not demonstrate this feature, aligning efficiently at all seeding densities examined. The role of microfilaments in force perception and transmission was investigated through the addition of cytochalasin D in graded doses. Both intercellular interactions and cytoskeletal integrity mediate the morphological response to mechanical strain.

  6. The influence of deformation-induced residual stresses on the post-forming tensile stress/strain behavior of dual-phase steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hance, Brandon Michael

    It was hypothesized that, in dual-phase (DP) steels, strain partitioning between ferrite (alpha) and martensite (alpha') during deformation results in a distribution of post-deformation residual stresses that, in turn, affects the subsequent strength, work hardening behavior and formability when the strain path is changed. The post-forming deformation-induced residual stress state was expected to depend upon the microstructure, the amount of strain and the prestrain path. The primary objective of this research program was to understand the influence of deformation-induced residual stresses on the post-forming tensile stress/strain behavior of DP steels. Three commercially produced sheet steels were considered in this analysis: (1) a DP steel with approximately 15 vol. % martensite, (2) a conventional high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steel, and (3) a conventional, ultra-low-carbon interstitial-free (IF) steel. Samples of each steel were subjected to various prestrain levels in various plane-stress forming modes, including uniaxial tension, plane strain and balanced biaxial stretching. Neutron diffraction experiments confirmed the presence of large post-forming deformation-induced residual stresses in the ferrite phase of the DP steel. The deformation-alphainduced residual stress state varied systematically with the prestrain mode, where the principal residual stress components are proportional to the principal strain components of the prestrain mode, but opposite in sign. For the first time, and by direct experimental correlation, it was shown that deformation-induced residual stresses greatly affect the post-forming tensile stress/strain behavior of DP steels. As previously reported in the literature, the formability (residual tensile ductility) of the IF steel and the HSLA steel was adversely affected by strain path changes. The DP steel presents a formability advantage over the conventional IF and HSLA steels, and is expected to be particularly well suited for

  7. Modulating the electronic properties of germanium nanowires via applied strain and surface passivation.

    PubMed

    Sk, Mahasin Alam; Ng, Man-Fai; Huang, Lin; Lim, Kok Hwa

    2013-04-28

    We report a systematic study on the surface passivation and strain effects on the electronic properties of hydrogenated germanium nanowires (H-GeNWs) with different growth orientations and diameters using density functional theory calculations. We show that increasing the coverage percentage of halogen passivations--fluorine (F) and chlorine (Cl) in particular--reduces the band gap of the GeNWs drastically but not linearly, depending on the chemical environment of the passivation sites. Moreover, we find that in general, applying strain--either compression or tensile--can only induce a decreased band gap in GeNWs but exception is found in <110> GeNWs: an increased band gap can be induced which is determined to be related to their surface structures. The current work reveals that electronic response upon structural changes caused by external factors is more sensitive in <110> GeNWs than in <100> GeNWs, suggesting that GeNWs with selected growth orientation can be applied in specialized applications that require different degrees of sensitivity or robustness. PMID:23493789

  8. Use of Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Several Superalloys to Resist Environmentally-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720(TradeMark) ATI 718Plus(Registered TradeMark) alloy, Haynes 282(Trademark), and Inconel 740(TradeMark) Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  9. Simulation investigation of tensile strained GeSn fin photodetector with Si(3)N(4) liner stressor for extension of absorption wavelength.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfang; Liu, Yan; Yan, Jing; Zhang, Chunfu; Hao, Yue; Han, Genquan

    2015-01-26

    In this paper, we design a biaxial tensile strained GeSn photodetector with fin structure wrapped in Si(3)N(4) liner stressor. A large biaxial tensile strain is induced in GeSn fins by the expansion of Si(3)N(4) liner stressor. The distribution of tensile strain in GeSn fins was calculated by a finite element simulation. It is observed that magnitude of the strain increases with the reduction of fin thickness T(fin). Under the biaxial tensile strain, the direct band gap E(G,Γ) of GeSn fin photodetector is significantly reduced by lowering Γ conduction valley in energy and lifting of degeneracy of valence bands. As the 30 nm Si(3)N(4) liner stressor expanses by 1%, a E(G,Γ) reduction of ~0.14 eV is achieved in Ge(0.92)Sn(0.08) fins with a T(fin) of 100 nm. The cut-off wavelengths of strained Ge(0.96)Sn(0.04), Ge(0.92)Sn(0.08) and Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) fin photodetectors with a T(fin) of 100 nm are extended to 2.4, 3.3, and 4 μm, respectively. GeSn fin photodetector integrated with Si(3)N(4) liner stressor provides an effective technique for extending the absorption edge of GeSn with Sn composition less than 10% to mid-infrared wavelength. PMID:25835833

  10. Temperature increase of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes due to plastic heat dissipation during tensile tests at 0.1-10 s-1 strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellouin de Menibus, Arthur; Auzoux, Quentin; Besson, Jacques; Crépin, Jérôme

    2014-11-01

    This study is focused on the impact of rapid Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) representative strain rates (about 1 s-1 NEA, 2010) on the behavior and fracture of unirradiated cold work stress relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes. Uniaxial ring tests (HT) and plane strain ring tensile tests (PST) were performed in the 0.1-10 s-1 strain rate range, at 25 °C. The local temperature increase due to plastic dissipation was measured with a high-speed infrared camera. Limited temperature increases were measured at 0.1 s-1 strain rate. Limited but not strongly localized temperature increases were measured at 1 s-1. Large temperature increase were measured at 5 and 10 s-1 (142 °C at 5 s-1 strain rate in HT tests). The local temperature increase induced heterogeneous temperature fields, which enhanced strain localization and resulted in a reduction of the plastic elongation at fracture.

  11. Effect of tensile strain on grain connectivity and flux pinning in Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox tapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, D. C.; Ekin, J. W.; van Eck, H. J. N.; Dhallé, M.; ten Haken, B.; Davidson, M. W.; Schwartz, J.

    2006-01-01

    The grain-to-grain connectivity in Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox tapes is still poorly understood, even though they have been commercially available in long lengths for several years. This letter explains the effects of tensile strain on the grain-to-grain connectivity in Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox tapes. The different length scales at which damage to the grain structure occurs are studied with magneto-optical imaging, scanning-electron microscopy, and transport current. These data show that the initial degradation in critical current when strain exceeds the irreversible strain limit is caused by microcracks (˜100-500nm in width) that form mainly at high-angle grain boundaries. Filament-wide cracks (˜5-10μm in width) form at locations of lower grain density in the filaments at strains far exceeding the irreversible strain limit. However, in contrast to previous reports, a careful analysis of the pinning force as a function of tensile strain, taking into account current sharing with the normal matrix by using the offset criterion, shows that intragranular flux pinning is not affected by strain in any significant way.

  12. Mass Detection in Viscous Fluid Utilizing Vibrating Micro- and Nanomechanical Mass Sensors under Applied Axial Tensile Force.

    PubMed

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Jeng, Yeau-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Vibrating micro- and nanomechanical mass sensors are capable of quantitatively determining attached mass from only the first three (two) measured cantilever (suspended) resonant frequencies. However, in aqueous solutions that are relevant to most biological systems, the mass determination is challenging because the quality factor (Q-factor) due to fluid damping decreases and, as a result, usually just the fundamental resonant frequencies can be correctly identified. Moreover, for higher modes the resonance coupling, noise, and internal damping have been proven to strongly affect the measured resonances and, correspondingly, the accuracy of estimated masses. In this work, a technique capable of determining the mass for the cantilever and also the position of nanobeads attached on the vibrating micro-/nanomechanical beam under intentionally applied axial tensile force from the measured fundamental flexural resonant frequencies is proposed. The axial force can be created and controlled through an external electrostatic or magnetostatic field. Practicality of the proposed technique is confirmed on the suspended multi-walled carbon nanotube and the rectangular silicon cantilever-based mass sensors. We show that typically achievable force resolution has a negligibly small impact on the accuracy of mass measurement. PMID:26287190

  13. Mass Detection in Viscous Fluid Utilizing Vibrating Micro- and Nanomechanical Mass Sensors under Applied Axial Tensile Force

    PubMed Central

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Jeng, Yeau-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Vibrating micro- and nanomechanical mass sensors are capable of quantitatively determining attached mass from only the first three (two) measured cantilever (suspended) resonant frequencies. However, in aqueous solutions that are relevant to most biological systems, the mass determination is challenging because the quality factor (Q-factor) due to fluid damping decreases and, as a result, usually just the fundamental resonant frequencies can be correctly identified. Moreover, for higher modes the resonance coupling, noise, and internal damping have been proven to strongly affect the measured resonances and, correspondingly, the accuracy of estimated masses. In this work, a technique capable of determining the mass for the cantilever and also the position of nanobeads attached on the vibrating micro-/nanomechanical beam under intentionally applied axial tensile force from the measured fundamental flexural resonant frequencies is proposed. The axial force can be created and controlled through an external electrostatic or magnetostatic field. Practicality of the proposed technique is confirmed on the suspended multi-walled carbon nanotube and the rectangular silicon cantilever-based mass sensors. We show that typically achievable force resolution has a negligibly small impact on the accuracy of mass measurement. PMID:26287190

  14. Anterior cruciate ligament strain and tensile forces for weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing exercises: a guide to exercise selection.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Macleod, Toran D; Wilk, Kevin E; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2012-03-01

    There is a growing body of evidence documenting loads applied to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) for weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing exercises. ACL loading has been quantified by inverse dynamics techniques that measure anterior shear force at the tibiofemoral joint (net force primarily restrained by the ACL), ACL strain (defined as change in ACL length with respect to original length and expressed as a percentage) measured directly in vivo, and ACL tensile force estimated through mathematical modeling and computer optimization techniques. A review of the biomechanical literature indicates the following: ACL loading is generally greater with non-weight-bearing compared to weight-bearing exercises; with both types of exercises, the ACL is loaded to a greater extent between 10° to 50° of knee flexion (generally peaking between 10° and 30°) compared to 50° to 100° of knee flexion; and loads on the ACL change according to exercise technique (such as trunk position). Squatting with excessive forward movement of the knees beyond the toes and with the heels off the ground tends to increase ACL loading. Squatting and lunging with a forward trunk tilt tend to decrease ACL loading, likely due to increased hamstrings activity. During seated knee extension, ACL force decreases when the resistance pad is positioned more proximal on the anterior aspect of the lower leg, away from the ankle. The evidence reviewed as part of this manuscript provides objective data by which to rank exercises based on loading applied to the ACL. The biggest challenge in exercise selection post-ACL reconstruction is the limited knowledge of the optimal amount of stress that should be applied to the ACL graft as it goes through its initial incorporation and eventual maturation process. Clinicians may utilize this review as a guide to exercise selection and rehabilitation progression for patients post-ACL reconstruction. PMID:22387600

  15. Tensile Strain Effects on the Magneto-transport in Calcium Manganese Oxide Thin Films: Comparison with its Hole-doped Counterpart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Bridget; Neubauer, Samuel; Chaudhry, Adeel; Hart, Cacie; Ferrone, Natalie; Houston, David; Yong, Grace; Kolagani, Rajeswari

    Magnetoresistance properties of the epitaxial thin films of doped rare earth manganites are known to be influenced by the effect of bi-axial strain induced by lattice mismatch with the substrate. In hole-doped manganites, the effect of both compressive and tensile strain is qualitatively consistent with the expected changes in unit cell symmetry from cubic to tetragonal, leading to Jahn-Teller strain fields that affect the energy levels of Mn3 + energy levels. Recent work in our laboratory on CaMnO3 thin films has pointed out that tetragonal distortions introduced by tensile lattice mismatch strain may also have the effect of modulating the oxygen content of the films in agreement with theoretical models that propose such coupling between strain and oxygen content. Our research focuses on comparing the magneto-transport properties of hole-doped manganite LaCaMnO3 thin films with that of its electron doped counter parts, in an effort to delineate the effects of oxygen stoichiometry changes on magneto-transport from the effects of Jahn-Teller type strain. Towson University Office of Undergraduate Research, Fisher Endowment Grant and Undergraduate Research Grant from the Fisher College of Science and Mathematics, Seed Funding Grant from the School of Emerging technologies and the NSF Grant ECCS 112856.

  16. The Effect of Gradations in Mineral Content, Matrix Alignment, and Applied Strain on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Morphology within Collagen Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Mozdzen, Laura C; Thorpe, Stephen D; Screen, Hazel R C; Harley, Brendan A C

    2016-07-01

    The tendon-bone junction is a unique, mechanically dynamic, structurally graded anatomical zone, which transmits tensile loads between tendon and bone. Current surgical repair techniques rely on mechanical fixation and can result in high re-failure rates. A new class of collagen biomaterial that contains discrete mineralized and structurally aligned regions linked by a continuous interface to mimic the graded osteotendinous insertion has been recently described. Here the combined influence of graded biomaterial environment and increasing levels of applied strain (0%-20%) on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) orientation and alignment have been reported. In osteotendinous scaffolds, which contain opposing gradients of mineral content and structural alignment characteristic of the native osteotendinous interface, MSC nuclear, and actin alignment is initially dictated by the local pore architecture, while applied tensile strain enhances cell alignment in the direction of strain. Comparatively, in layered scaffolds that do not contain any structural alignment cues, MSCs are randomly oriented in the unstrained condition, then become oriented in a direction perpendicular to applied strain. These findings provide an initial understanding of how scaffold architecture can provide significant, potentially competitive, feedback influencing MSC orientation under applied strain, and form the basis for future tissue engineering efforts to regenerate the osteotendinous enthesis. PMID:27245787

  17. Characterization of Damage in Triaxial Braid Composites Under Tensile Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites utilizing flattened, large tow yarns in woven or braided forms are being used in many aerospace applications. Their complex fiber architecture and large unit cell size present challenges in both understanding deformation processes and measuring reliable material properties. This report examines composites made using flattened 12k and 24k standard modulus carbon fiber yarns in a 0 /+60 /-60 triaxial braid architecture. Standard straight-sided tensile coupons are tested with the 0 axial braid fibers either parallel with or perpendicular to the applied tensile load (axial or transverse tensile test, respectively). Nonuniform surface strain resulting from the triaxial braid architecture is examined using photogrammetry. Local regions of high strain concentration are examined to identify where failure initiates and to determine the local strain at the time of initiation. Splitting within fiber bundles is the first failure mode observed at low to intermediate strains. For axial tensile tests splitting is primarily in the 60 bias fibers, which were oriented 60 to the applied load. At higher strains, out-of-plane deformation associated with localized delamination between fiber bundles or damage within fiber bundles is observed. For transverse tensile tests, the splitting is primarily in the 0 axial fibers, which were oriented transverse to the applied load. The initiation and accumulation of local damage causes the global transverse stress-strain curves to become nonlinear and causes failure to occur at a reduced ultimate strain. Extensive delamination at the specimen edges is also observed.

  18. Observation of heavy- and light-hole split direct bandgap photoluminescence from tensile-strained GeSn (0.03% Sn)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Thomas R.; Yeo, Yung Kee; Ryu, Mee-Yi; Beeler, Richard T.; Kouvetakis, John

    2014-09-01

    Temperature- (T-) and laser power-dependent photoluminescence (PL) measurements have been made for the tensile-strained, undoped GeSn (0.03% Sn) film grown on Si substrate. The PL results show not only clear strain-split direct bandgap transitions to the light-hole (LH) and heavy-hole (HH) bands at energies of 0.827 and 0.851 eV at 10 K, respectively, but also clearly show both strong direct and indirect bandgap related PL emissions at almost all temperatures, which are rarely observed. This split of PL emissions can be directly observed only at low T and moderate laser power, and the two PL peaks merge into one broad PL peak at room temperature, which is mainly due to the HH PL emission rather than LH transition. The evolution of T-dependent PL results also clearly show the competitive nature between the direct and indirect bandgap related PL transitions as T changes. The PL analysis also indicates that the energy gap reduction in Γ valley could be larger, whereas the bandgap reduction in L valley could be smaller than the theory predicted. As a result, the separation energy between Γ and L valleys (˜86 meV at 300 K) is smaller than theory predicted (125 meV) for this Ge-like sample, which is mainly due to the tensile strain. This finding strongly suggests that the indirect-to-direct bandgap transition of Ge1-ySny could be achieved at much lower Sn concentration than originally anticipated if one utilizes the tensile strain properly. Thus, Ge1-ySny alloys could be attractive materials for the fabrication of direct bandgap Si-based light emitting devices.

  19. Elevated temperature tensile properties of irradiated 20/25/Nb stainless steel fuel pin cladding at low and high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravenor, J. G.; Douglas, J.

    1988-09-01

    Tensile specimens were prepared from 20/25/Nb stainless steel fuel pin cladding irradiated in a Commercial Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (CAGR) at temperatures in the range 622-866 K and integrated fast neutron doses up to 16 × 10 24n/ m2. The tests were performed in air at temperatures in the range 298-873 K at strain rates from 2 × 10 -5s-1 to 7.2 s -1. The tensile properties varied with irradiation temperature, test temperature and strain rate. At lower irradiation temperature, strengthening produced by fast neutron damage was accompanied by reduced elongation. Strengthening was also observed at higher irradiation temperatures, possibly due to precipitation phenomena. The maximum irradiation embrittlement was observed in tests at 873 K at low strain rates between 2 × 10 -4s-1 and 2 × 10 -5s-1. The failure mode of embrittled specimens irradiated at higher temperatures was characterized by prematurely ruptured ductile fibres, rather than by intergranular cracking.

  20. Increased molecular mobility in humid silk fibers under tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydel, Tilo; Knoll, Wiebke; Greving, Imke; Dicko, Cedric; Koza, Michael M.; Krasnov, Igor; Müller, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Silk fibers are semicrystalline nanocomposite protein fibers with an extraordinary mechanical toughness that changes with humidity. Diffusive or overdamped motion on a molecular level is absent in dry silkworm silk, but present in humid silk at ambient temperature. This microscopic diffusion distinctly depends on the externally applied macroscopic tensile force. Quasielastic and inelastic neutron-scattering data as a function of humidity and of tensile strain on humid silk fibers support the model that both the adsorbed water and parts of the amorphous polymers participate in diffusive motion and are affected by the tensile force. It is notable that the quasielastic linewidth of humid silk at 100% relative humidity increases significantly with the applied force. The effect of the tensile force is discussed in terms of an increasing alignment of the polymer chains in the amorphous fraction with increasing tensile stress which changes the geometrical restrictions of the diffusive motions.

  1. High-speed tensile test instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, P. H.; Twigg, J. N.; Roland, D. F.; Schrader, H. S.; Pathak, J. A.; Roland, C. M.

    2007-04-01

    A novel high-speed tensile test instrument is described, capable of measuring the mechanical response of elastomers at strain rates ranging from 10 to 1600 s-1 for strains through failure. The device employs a drop weight that engages levers to stretch a sample on a horizontal track. To improve dynamic equilibrium, a common problem in high speed testing, equal and opposite loading was applied to each end of the sample. Demonstrative results are reported for two elastomers at strain rates to 588 s-1 with maximum strains of 4.3. At the higher strain rates, there is a substantial inertial contribution to the measured force, an effect unaccounted for in prior works using the drop weight technique. The strain rates were essentially constant over most of the strain range and fill a three-decade gap in the data from existing methods.

  2. Microcracking damage and the fracture process in relation to strain rate in human cortical bone tensile failure.

    PubMed

    Zioupos, Peter; Hansen, Ulrich; Currey, John D

    2008-10-20

    It is difficult to define the 'physiological' mechanical properties of bone. Traumatic failures in-vivo are more likely to be orders of magnitude faster than the quasistatic tests usually employed in-vitro. We have reported recently [Hansen, U., Zioupos, P., Simpson, R., Currey, J.D., Hynd, D., 2008. The effect of strain rate on the mechanical properties of human cortical bone. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering/Transactions of the ASME 130, 011011-1-8] results from tests on specimens of human femoral cortical bone loaded in tension at strain rates (epsilon ) ranging from low (0.08s(-1)) to high (18s(-1)). Across this strain rate range the modulus of elasticity generally increased, stress at yield and failure and strain at failure decreased for rates higher than 1s(-1), while strain at yield was invariant for most strain rates and only decreased at rates higher than 10s(-1). The results showed that strain rate has a stronger effect on post-yield deformation than on initiation of macroscopic yielding. In general, specimens loaded at high strain rates were brittle, while those loaded at low strain rates were much tougher. Here, a post-test examination of the microcracking damage reveals that microcracking was inversely related to the strain rate. Specimens loaded at low strain rates showed considerable post-yield strain and also much more microcracking. Partial correlation and regression analysis suggested that the development of post-yield strain was a function of the amount of microcracking incurred (the cause), rather than being a direct result of the strain rate (the excitation). Presumably low strain rates allow time for microcracking to develop, which increases the compliance of the specimen, making them tougher. This behaviour confirms a more general rule that the degree to which bone is brittle or tough depends on the amount of microcracking damage it is able to sustain. More importantly, the key to bone toughness is its ability to avoid a ductile

  3. 1.55 µm spot-size converter integrated polarization-insensitive quantum-well semiconductor optical amplifier with tensile-strained barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong; Chen, Sihai; Yi, Xinjian; Zhu, Guangxi

    2004-07-01

    A 1.55 µm polarization-insensitive lateral tapered spot-size converter integrated semiconductor optical amplifier (SSC-SOA) with tensile-strained barriers was investigated. The optical amplifier structure used a conventional ridge guide for the active layers and a second larger ridge for the passive waveguide. Low beam divergence of 12° × 15° results in about 3.1 dB coupling losses with -1 dB positional tolerances of ±2.3 µm and ±1.6 µm in horizontal and vertical directions using an anti-reflection coated flat-ended single-mode fibre. The active layer of SSC-SOA consisted of a tensile-strained barrier multiple-quantum-well structure. The SSC-SOA exhibited a signal gain of 25.5 dB and a saturation output power of 11.2 dB m with excellent polarization insensitivity (less than 0.5 dB) at 200 mA.

  4. Effects of tensile strain on the peculiarities of PEO penetration into the nanoporous structure of PET deformed via the crazing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rukhlya, E G; Yarysheva, L M; Volynskii, A L; Bakeev, N F

    2016-04-14

    Solvent crazing involves the development of a highly dispersed fibrillar-porous structure with dimensions of pores and craze fibrils of about 2-20 nm, and crazing by itself can be treated as a universal method for the development of nanoscale porosity. The penetration and release of poly(ethylene oxide) macromolecules into and from the crazes during the development of the nanoporous structure of poly(ethylene terephthalate) have been studied. In particular, PET has been deformed in dilute or semidilute (unentangled as well as entangled) solutions of PEO (a Mw of 4 and 40 kDa) via the mechanism of solvent crazing. Hydrodynamic coil radii Rh, blob sizes ξ, and concentration ranges (crossover and entanglement concentrations) have been determined for the PEO solutions. The evolution of the craze structure (change in porosity W and pore diameters d) has been described as a function of the tensile strain of PET during its drawing in an adsorption-active medium and in the PEO solutions. PEO has been shown to penetrate into the nanoporous structure of the crazes under the conditions corresponding to Rh≤d and ξ < d. It has been shown that coagulation processes in the structure of crazed PET, PEO adsorption at the highly developed surface of PET, and the mechanism of PEO transport in the nanopores are equally important factors affecting the direction of the macromolecule mass transfer in the nanopores (penetration or release) and PEO content variation as a function of PET tensile strain. PMID:26979240

  5. Influence of the tensile strain rate on the mechanical properties and phase composition of VNS 9-Sh TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terent'ev, V. F.; Slizov, A. K.; Prosvirnin, D. V.; Sirotinkin, V. P.; Ashmarin, A. A.; Gol'dberg, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of the strain rate on the mechanical properties and the phase composition of a sheet VNS 9-Sh (23Kh15N5AM3-Sh) TRIP steel is studied during static tension. The strain rate is changed in the range from 8.3 × 10-5 to 25 × 10-3 s-1. The dependence of the mechanical properties on the strain rate is found to be nonlinear. The TRIP effect is most pronounced at a strain rate of (8.3-17) × 10-5 s-1. In this strain rate, the deformation martensite content increases significantly, from 50 to 87%, as is detected by X-ray diffraction.

  6. Controlled rippling of graphene via irradiation and applied strain modify its mechanical properties: a nanoindentation simulation study.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Asencio, J; Ruestes, C J; Bringa, E M; Caturla, M J

    2016-05-18

    Ripples present in free standing graphene have an important influence on the mechanical behavior of this two-dimensional material. In this study, we show through nanoindentation simulations, how out-of-plane displacements can be modified by strain, resulting in softening of the membrane under compression and stiffening under tension. Irradiation also induces changes in the mechanical properties of graphene. Interestingly, compressed samples, irradiated at low doses are stiffened by the irradiation, whereas the samples under tensile strain do not show significant changes in their mechanical properties. These simulations indicate that vacancies produced by the energetic ions cannot be the ones directly responsible for this behavior. However, changes in roughness induced by the momentum transferred from the energetic ions to the membrane, can explain these differences. These results provide an alternative explanation to recent experimental observations of the stiffening of graphene under low dose irradiation, as well as the paths to tailor the mechanical properties of this material via applied strain and irradiation. PMID:27145734

  7. Enhancement of photoluminescence from n-type tensile-strained GeSn wires on an insulator fabricated by lateral liquid-phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Takayoshi; Matsue, Masahiro; Tominaga, Kohei; Kajimura, Keiko; Amamoto, Takashi; Hosoi, Takuji; Watanabe, Heiji

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the optical properties of undoped and n-type GeSn wires fabricated by a lateral liquid-phase epitaxial method. The Sn concentration was approximately 0.5% in the region from the seed to near the wire end. Moreover, the Sn concentration increased to 6% at the wire end, whereas Si diffusion from the seed was enhanced and extended to 200 μm from the seed. Tensile strain gradually decreased from 0.5% close the seed to 0.25% at the wire end. The photoluminescence (PL) peak was red-shifted by Sn incorporation into the Ge wires, and a PL peak at 0.66 eV was observed from the wire end. Upon n-type doping, the PL intensity of the GeSn layers was significantly enhanced to approximately 10 times higher than that of the undoped GeSn wires.

  8. Lattice strain and damage evolution of 9-12/%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel during in situ tensile test by x-ray diffraction and small angle scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, X.; Wu, X.; Mo, K.; Chen, X,; Almer, J. D.; Ilavsky, J.; Haeffner, D. R.; Stubbins, J. F.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Illinois

    2010-01-01

    In situ X-ray diffraction and small angle scattering measurements during tensile tests were performed on 9-12% Cr ferritic/martensitic steels. The lattice strains in both particle and matrix phases, along two principal directions, were directly measured. The load transfer between particle and matrix was calculated based on matrix/particle elastic mismatch, matrix plasticity and interface decohesion. In addition, the void or damage evolution during the test was measured using small angle X-ray scattering. By combining stress and void evolution during deformation, the critical interfacial strength for void nucleation was determined, and compared with pre-existing void nucleation criteria. These comparisons show that models overestimate the measured critical strength, and require a larger particle size than measured to match the X-ray observations.

  9. Release of Tensile Strain on Engineered Human Tendon Tissue Disturbs Cell Adhesions, Changes Matrix Architecture, and Induces an Inflammatory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Monika L.; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas; Zeltz, Cedric; Heinemeier, Katja M.; Christensen, Lise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Gullberg, Donald; Kjaer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading of tendon cells results in an upregulation of mechanotransduction signaling pathways, cell-matrix adhesion and collagen synthesis, but whether unloading removes these responses is unclear. We investigated the response to tension release, with regard to matrix proteins, pro-inflammatory mediators and tendon phenotypic specific molecules, in an in vitro model where tendon-like tissue was engineered from human tendon cells. Tissue sampling was performed 1, 2, 4 and 6 days after surgical de-tensioning of the tendon construct. When tensile stimulus was removed, integrin type collagen receptors showed a contrasting response with a clear drop in integrin subunit α11 mRNA and protein expression, and an increase in α2 integrin mRNA and protein levels. Further, specific markers for tendon cell differentiation declined and normal tendon architecture was disturbed, whereas pro-inflammatory molecules were upregulated. Stimulation with the cytokine TGF-β1 had distinct effects on some tendon-related genes in both tensioned and de-tensioned tissue. These findings indicate an important role of mechanical loading for cellular and matrix responses in tendon, including that loss of tension leads to a decrease in phenotypical markers for tendon, while expression of pro-inflammatory mediators is induced. PMID:24465881

  10. The tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite posterior to hydrostatic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.

    1983-10-01

    The effects of prehydrostatic loading on microstructural changes and tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite have been examined. Scanning electron micrographs show that formation of microcracks associated with delamination between basal planes occurs under hydrostatic loading. Hydrostatic loading on specimens results in the decrease in tensile strength and increase in residual strain generated by the applied tensile stress at various levels, indicating that the graphite material is weakened by hydrostatic loading. A relationship between residual strain and applied tensile stress for graphite hydrostatically-loaded at several pressure levels can be approximately expressed as ɛ = ( AP + B) σn over a wide range hydrostatic pressure, where ɛ, P and σ denote residual strain, hydrostatic pressure and applied tensile stress, respectively; A, B and n are constants. The effects of prehydrostatic loading on the tensile stress-strain behavior of the graphite were examined in more detail. The ratio of stress after hydrostatic loading to that before hydrostatic loading on the stress-strain relationship remains almost unchanged irrespective of strain.

  11. Tuning magnetism of monolayer MoS{sub 2} by doping vacancy and applying strain

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Huiling; Yang, Baishun; Han, Ruilin; Du, Xiaobo; Yan, Yu; Wang, Dingdi

    2014-03-31

    In view of important role of inducing and manipulating the magnetism in two-dimensional materials for the development of low-dimensional spintronic devices, the influences of strain on electronic structure and magnetic properties of commonly observed vacancies doped monolayer MoS{sub 2} are investigated using first-principles calculations. It is shown that unstrained V{sub S}, V{sub S2}, and V{sub MoS3} doped monolayer MoS{sub 2} systems are nonmagnetic, while the ground state of unstrained V{sub MoS6} doped system is magnetic and the magnetic moment is contributed mainly by six Mo atoms around V{sub MoS6}. In particular, tensile strain can induce magnetic moments in V{sub S}, V{sub S2}, and V{sub MoS3} doped monolayer MoS{sub 2} due to the breaking of Mo–Mo metallic bonds around the vacancies, while the magnetization induced by V{sub MoS6} can be effectively manipulated by equibiaxial strain due to the change of Mo–Mo metallic bonds around V{sub MoS6} under strains.

  12. Coexistent compressive and tensile strain in Ag thin films on Si(1 1 1)-(7×7) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, D. K.; Bhattacharjee, K.; Satpati, B.; Roy, S.; Kuri, G.; Satyam, P. V.; Dev, B. N.

    2007-09-01

    Growth and strain behavior of thin Ag films on Si substrates have been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction studies. Ag islands formed on Si at room temperature growth show strongly preferred heights and flat top. At low coverage [ ≳1 monolayer (ML)], Ag islands with (1 1 1) orientation containing two atomic layers of Ag are overwhelmingly formed [D.K. Goswami, K. Bhattacharjee, B. Satpati, S. Roy, P.V. Satyam, B.N. Dev, Surf. Sci. 601 (2007) 603]. A thicker (40 ML) annealed film shows two closely spaced Ag(1 1 1) diffraction peaks—one weak and broad and the other narrow and more intense. The broad peak corresponds to an average expansion (0.21%) and the narrow intense peak corresponds to a contraction (0.17%) of the Ag(1 1 1) planar spacing compared to the bulk value. This coexistence of compressive and tensile strain can be explained in terms of changes in the Ag lattice during the heating-cooling cycle due to thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Ag and Si.

  13. Effect of Biaxial Stretching at Temperatures and Strain Histories Comparable to Injection Stretch Blow Moulding on Tensile Modulus for Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. W.; Menary, G. H.; Harkin-Jones, E. M. A.; Armstrong, C. G.; Martin, P. J.

    2007-04-01

    This study is particularly relevant to the injection stretch blow moulding (ISBM) process where PET material is typically biaxially stretched to form bottles for the water and carbonated soft drinks industry. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of biaxial stretching on the mechanical properties of Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) using a custom built biaxial testing machine. An initially amorphous PET sample was prepared via injection moulding to form a square sample (76mm × 76mm) suitable for stretching on the machine. This sample was then subjected to a series of biaxial tests (simultaneous and sequential) within a temperature range between 85°C and 110 °C, strain rates in the range of 1s-1 to 32s-1 and stretch ratios in the range of 1.5 to 3. Specimens were subsequently cut from the biaxial stretched sheets and used to measure the tensile modulus. Results showed that there is almost no effect found for strain rate and temperature on modulus development whilst stretch ratio and mode of deformation played the most important role on modulus development on PET under biaxial deformation.

  14. Stress reduction in an isotropic plate with a hole by applied induced strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sensharma, Pradeep K.; Palantera, Markku J.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1992-01-01

    Recently there has been much interest in adaptive structures that can respond to a varying environment by changing their properties. Shape memory alloys and piezoelectric materials can be used as induced strain actuators to reduce stresses in the regions of stress concentration. The objective of the work was to find the maximum possible reduction in the stress concentration factor in an isotropic plate with a hole by applying induced strains in a small area near the hole. Induced strains were simulated by thermal expansion.

  15. Resistance-foil strain-gage technology as applied to composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. E.; Brinson, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    A general review of existing strain-gage technologies as applied to orthotropic-composite materials is given. The specific topics addressed are gage-bonding procedures, transverse-sensitivity effects, errors due to gage misalignment, and temperature-compensation methods. The discussion is supplemented by numerical examples where appropriate. It is shown that the orthotropic behavior of composites can result in experimental error which would not be expected based on practical experience with isotropic materials. In certain cases, the transverse sensitivity of strain gages and/or slight gage misalignment can result in strain-measurement errors exceeding 50 percent.

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor α–Dependent Proinflammatory Gene Induction Is Inhibited by Cyclic Tensile Strain in Articular Chondrocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Long, Ping; Gassner, Robert; Agarwal, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Objective To understand the intracellular mechanisms of the action of mechanical strain on articular chondrocytes during inflammation. Methods One of the major mediators responsible for cartilage destruction in inflamed articular joints is tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Therefore, in this study we examined the intracellular mechanisms of actions of cyclic tensile strain (CTS) on the recombinant human TNFα (rHuTNFα)–induced proinflammatory pathways in primary cultures of chondrocytes. The expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) for TNFα-dependent proinflammatory proteins was examined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. The synthesis of proinflammatory proteins was examined by Western blot analysis in cell extracts, followed by semiquantitative measurement of bands using densitometric analysis. Nitric oxide production was measured by Griess reaction, and prostaglandin E2 production was assessed by radioimmunoassays. The proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes was assessed by incorporation of Na235SO4 in chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. Results By exposing chondrocytes to CTS in the presence of TNFα in vitro, we showed that CTS is an effective antagonist of TNFα actions and acts as both an antiinflammatory signal and a reparative signal. CTS of low magnitude suppresses TNFα-induced mRNA expression of multiple proinflammatory proteins involved in catabolic responses, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, and collagenase. CTS also counteracts cartilage degradation by augmenting induction of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2. Additionally, CTS augments the reparative process via abrogation of TNFα-induced suppression of proteoglycan synthesis. Nonetheless, CTS acts on chondrocytes in a TNFα-dependent manner, since exposure of chondrocytes to CTS alone had no effect on these parameters. Conclusion CTS of low magnitude acts as an effective antagonist of TNFα not only by inhibiting the TNF

  17. Tensile Fracture of Ductile Materials. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    For brittle materials, circular voids play an important role relative to fracture, intensifing both tensile and compressive stresses. A maximum intensified tensile stress failure criterion applies quite well to brittle materials. An attempt was made to explore the possibility of extending the approach to the tensile fracture of ductile materials. The three dimensional voids that exist in reality are modelled by circular holes in sheet metal. Mathematical relationships are sought between the shape and size of the hole, after the material is plastically deformed, and the amount of deformation induced. Then, the effect of hole shape, size and orientation on the mechanical properties is considered experimentally. The presence of the voids does not affect the ultimate tensile strength of the ductile materials because plastic flow wipes out the stress intensification caused by them. However, the shape and orientation of the defect is found to play an important role in affecting the strain at fracture.

  18. Elastic-plastic strain acceptance criterion for structures subject to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Solonick, W.

    1996-11-01

    Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local, or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

  19. Elastic-Plastic Strain Acceptance Criteria for Structures Subject to Rapidly Applied Transient Dynamic Loading

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Solonick

    2003-04-01

    Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on material ductility considerations only and are set as a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local , or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

  20. Reflectance difference laser measurements applied to the study of the stress/strain state in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucedo-Zárate, Carlos H.; López-López, Maximo; Sánchez-López, Carlos; Correa-Figueroa, Jose Luis; Huerta-Ruelas, Jorge A.

    2009-09-01

    Development of experimental setup to study strain/stress state in materials emerges from a need to evaluate by a nondestructive and non-invasive technique the performance in new materials like semiconductor heterostructures, composite materials and alloys. The system was designed and built to be used as a multi-functional experimental setup. The main purpose is to characterize materials in elastic and plastic regime by reflectance difference laser measurements and strain gages. This system allows the generalization of results obtained from a theoretical model based in Finite Element Model and experimental measurements taken in finite specific points with strain gages. A NI™ platform is used for signal conditioning and processing. System built is described which includes an optical setup to measure reflectance difference laser (RDL), and a flexor which applies deformation in a link, with a micrometer. A correlation bigger than 0.95 was found between optical signal, strain gage signal, and finite element modeling.

  1. Effect of uniaxial tensile stress on the isomer shift of 57Fe in fcc stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratner, E.; Ron, M.

    1982-05-01

    The electron wave-function response to uniaxial tensile stress in fcc steels (SS310 and SS316) was investigated through the isomer shift of the Mössbauer effect. Stresses up to 12 kbar (the ultimate tensile stress is approximately 14 kbar) were applied at room temperature. The isomer shift changes linearly in these circumstances. It is concluded that, as in the case of hydrostatic pressure, the paramount factor here is the volume strain of the wave functions of 4S electrons.

  2. A new approach for structural health monitoring by applying anomaly detection on strain sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichias, Konstantinos; Pijpers, Richard; Meeuwissen, Erik

    2014-03-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems help to monitor critical infrastructures (bridges, tunnels, etc.) remotely and provide up-to-date information about their physical condition. In addition, it helps to predict the structure's life and required maintenance in a cost-efficient way. Typically, inspection data gives insight in the structural health. The global structural behavior, and predominantly the structural loading, is generally measured with vibration and strain sensors. Acoustic emission sensors are more and more used for measuring global crack activity near critical locations. In this paper, we present a procedure for local structural health monitoring by applying Anomaly Detection (AD) on strain sensor data for sensors that are applied in expected crack path. Sensor data is analyzed by automatic anomaly detection in order to find crack activity at an early stage. This approach targets the monitoring of critical structural locations, such as welds, near which strain sensors can be applied during construction and/or locations with limited inspection possibilities during structural operation. We investigate several anomaly detection techniques to detect changes in statistical properties, indicating structural degradation. The most effective one is a novel polynomial fitting technique, which tracks slow changes in sensor data. Our approach has been tested on a representative test structure (bridge deck) in a lab environment, under constant and variable amplitude fatigue loading. In both cases, the evolving cracks at the monitored locations were successfully detected, autonomously, by our AD monitoring tool.

  3. Mechanical strain applied to human fibroblasts differentially regulates skeletal myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Michael R; Cao, Thanh V; Campbell, David H; Standley, Paul R

    2012-08-01

    Cyclic short-duration stretches (CSDS) such as those resulting from repetitive motion strain increase the risk of musculoskeletal injury. Myofascial release is a common technique used by clinicians that applies an acyclic long-duration stretch (ALDS) to muscle fascia to repair injury. When subjected to mechanical strain, fibroblasts within muscle fascia secrete IL-6, which has been shown to induce myoblast differentiation, essential for muscle repair. We hypothesize that fibroblasts subjected to ALDS following CSDS induce myoblast differentiation through IL-6. Fibroblast conditioned media and fibroblast-myoblast cocultures were used to test fibroblasts' ability to induce myoblast differentiation. The coculture system applies strain to fibroblasts only but still allows for diffusion of potential differentiation mediators to unstrained myoblasts on coverslips. To determine the role of IL-6, we utilized myoblast unicultures ± IL-6 (0-100 ng/ml) and cocultures ± α-IL-6 (0-200 μg/ml). Untreated uniculture myoblasts served as a negative control. After 96 h, coverslips (n = 6-21) were microscopically analyzed and quantified by blinded observer for differentiation endpoints: myotubes per square millimeter (>3 nuclei/cell), nuclei/myotube, and fusion efficiency (%nuclei within myotubes). The presence of fibroblasts and fibroblast conditioned media significantly enhanced myotube number (P < 0.05). However, in coculture, CSDS applied to fibroblasts did not reproduce this effect. ALDS following CSDS increased myotube number by 78% and fusion efficiency by 96% vs. CSDS alone (P < 0.05). Fibroblasts in coculture increase IL-6 secretion; however, IL-6 secretion did not correlate with enhanced differentiation among strain groups. Exogenous IL-6 in myoblast uniculture failed to induce differentiation. However, α-IL-6 attenuated differentiation in all coculture groups (P < 0.05). Fibroblasts secrete soluble mediators that have profound effects on several measures of myoblast

  4. Mechanical strain applied to human fibroblasts differentially regulates skeletal myoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Michael R.; Cao, Thanh V.; Campbell, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic short-duration stretches (CSDS) such as those resulting from repetitive motion strain increase the risk of musculoskeletal injury. Myofascial release is a common technique used by clinicians that applies an acyclic long-duration stretch (ALDS) to muscle fascia to repair injury. When subjected to mechanical strain, fibroblasts within muscle fascia secrete IL-6, which has been shown to induce myoblast differentiation, essential for muscle repair. We hypothesize that fibroblasts subjected to ALDS following CSDS induce myoblast differentiation through IL-6. Fibroblast conditioned media and fibroblast-myoblast cocultures were used to test fibroblasts' ability to induce myoblast differentiation. The coculture system applies strain to fibroblasts only but still allows for diffusion of potential differentiation mediators to unstrained myoblasts on coverslips. To determine the role of IL-6, we utilized myoblast unicultures ± IL-6 (0–100 ng/ml) and cocultures ± α-IL-6 (0–200 μg/ml). Untreated uniculture myoblasts served as a negative control. After 96 h, coverslips (n = 6–21) were microscopically analyzed and quantified by blinded observer for differentiation endpoints: myotubes per square millimeter (>3 nuclei/cell), nuclei/myotube, and fusion efficiency (%nuclei within myotubes). The presence of fibroblasts and fibroblast conditioned media significantly enhanced myotube number (P < 0.05). However, in coculture, CSDS applied to fibroblasts did not reproduce this effect. ALDS following CSDS increased myotube number by 78% and fusion efficiency by 96% vs. CSDS alone (P < 0.05). Fibroblasts in coculture increase IL-6 secretion; however, IL-6 secretion did not correlate with enhanced differentiation among strain groups. Exogenous IL-6 in myoblast uniculture failed to induce differentiation. However, α-IL-6 attenuated differentiation in all coculture groups (P < 0.05). Fibroblasts secrete soluble mediators that have profound effects on several measures of

  5. Static and dynamic tensile behaviour of aluminium processed by high pressure torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verleysen, Patricia; Oelbrandt, Wouter; Naghdy, Soroosh; Kestens, Leo

    2015-09-01

    High pressure torsion (HPT) is a severe plastic deformation technique in which a small, disk-like sample is subjected to a torsional deformation under a high hydrostatic pressure. In present study, the static and dynamic tensile behaviour of commercially pure aluminium (99.6 wt%) processed by HPT is studied. The high strain rate tensile behaviour is characterized using a purpose-developed miniature split Hopkinson tensile bar setup by which strain rates up to 5 × 103 s-1 can be reached. During the tests, the deformation of a speckle pattern applied to the samples is recorded, by which local information on the strain is obtained using a digital image correlation technique. Electron back scatter diffraction images are used to investigate the microstructural evolution, more specifically the grain refinement obtained by HPT. The fracture surfaces of the tensile samples are studied by scanning electron microscopy. Results show that the imposed severe plastic deformation significantly increases the tensile strength, however, at the expense of ductility. The strain rate only has a minor influence on the materials tensile behaviour.

  6. Approaches for Tensile Testing of Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Martin, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    For angleply composites, lamina tension and compression strengths are commonly determined by applying classical lamination theory to test data obtained from testing of angleply composite specimens. For textile composites such as 2D triaxial braids, analysis is more complex and standard test methods do not always yield reliable strength measurements. This paper describes recent research focused on development of more reliable tensile test methods for braided composites and presents preliminary data for various approaches. The materials investigated in this work have 0deg+/-60 2D triaxial braid architecture with nearly equal fiber volume fraction in each of the three fiber directions. Flat composite panels are fabricated by resin transfer molding (RTM) using six layers of the braided preform aligned along the 0deg fiber direction. Various epoxy resins are used as matrix materials. Single layer panels are also fabricated in order to examine local variations in deformation related to the braid architecture. Specimens are cut from these panels in the shape of standard straight-sided coupons, an alternative bowtie geometry, and an alternative notched geometry. Axial tensile properties are measured using specimens loaded along the 0deg fiber direction. Transverse tensile properties are measured using specimens loaded perpendicular to the 0deg fibers. Composite tubes are also fabricated by RTM. These tubes are tested by internal pressurization using a soft rubbery material sealed between the inside diameter of the tube and the load fixtures. The ends of the tube are unconstrained, so the primary load is in the hoop direction. Tubes are fabricated with the 0deg fibers aligned along the tube axis by overbraiding the preform on a mandrel. Since the loading is in the hoop direction, testing of the overbraided tube provides a measure of transverse tensile strength. Previous work has indicated that straight-sided coupons yield a transverse tensile strength that is much lower

  7. Validation and qualification of surface-applied fibre optic strain sensors using application-independent optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schukar, Vivien G.; Kadoke, Daniel; Kusche, Nadine; Münzenberger, Sven; Gründer, Klaus-Peter; Habel, Wolfgang R.

    2012-08-01

    Surface-applied fibre optic strain sensors were investigated using a unique validation facility equipped with application-independent optical reference systems. First, different adhesives for the sensor's application were analysed regarding their material properties. Measurements resulting from conventional measurement techniques, such as thermo-mechanical analysis and dynamic mechanical analysis, were compared with measurements resulting from digital image correlation, which has the advantage of being a non-contact technique. Second, fibre optic strain sensors were applied to test specimens with the selected adhesives. Their strain-transfer mechanism was analysed in comparison with conventional strain gauges. Relative movements between the applied sensor and the test specimen were visualized easily using optical reference methods, digital image correlation and electronic speckle pattern interferometry. Conventional strain gauges showed limited opportunities for an objective strain-transfer analysis because they are also affected by application conditions.

  8. Tensile properties of amorphous diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Lavan, D.A.; Hohlfelder, R.J.; Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.; Mitchell, M.A.; Ashby, C.I.

    1999-12-02

    The strength and modulus of amorphous diamond, a new material for surface micromachined MEMS and sensors, was tested in uniaxial tension by pulling laterally with a flat tipped diamond in a nanoindenter. Several sample designs were attempted. Of those, only the single layer specimen with a 1 by 2 {micro}m gage cross section and a fixed end rigidly attached to the substrate was successful. Tensile load was calculated by resolving the measured lateral and normal forces into the applied tensile force and frictional losses. Displacement was corrected for machine compliance using the differential stiffness method. Post-mortem examination of the samples was performed to document the failure mode. The load-displacement data from those samples that failed in the gage section was converted to stress-strain curves using carefully measured gage cross section dimensions. Mean fracture strength was found to be 8.5 {+-} 1.4 GPa and the modulus was 831 {+-} 94 GPa. Tensile results are compared to hardness and modulus measurements made using a nanoindenter.

  9. Experimental validation of applied strain sensors: importance, methods and still unsolved challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habel, Wolfgang R.; Schukar, Vivien G.; Mewis, Franziska; Kohlhoff, Harald

    2013-09-01

    Fiber-optic strain sensors are increasingly used in very different technical fields. Sensors are provided with specifications defined by the manufacturer or ascertained by the interested user. If deformation sensors are to be used to evaluate the long-term behavior of safety-relevant structures or to monitor critical structure components, their performance and signal stability must be of high quality to enable reliable data recording. The measurement system must therefore be validated according to established technical rules and standards before its application and after. In some cases, not all details of the complex characteristic and performance of applied fiber-optic sensors are sufficiently understood, or can be validated because of a lack of knowledge and methods to check the sensors' behavior. This contribution focusses therefore on the importance of serious validation in avoiding a decrease or even deterioration of the sensors' function. Methods for validation of applied sensors are discussed and should reveal weaknesses in validation of embedded or integrated fiber-optic deformation and/or strain sensors. An outlook to some research work that has to be carried out to ensure a well-accepted practical use of fiber-optic sensors is given.

  10. Dynamic tensile response of a carbon-fiber-reinforced LCP composite and its temperature sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Victor P. W.; Yuan, J.; Lim, C. T.

    2001-06-01

    The tensile mechanical behavior of a short carbon fiber filled liquid crystalline polymer (LCP) composite, Vectra A230, was examined under static extension and dynamic loading at three temperatures. Dynamic tension was applied using a pendulum-type tensile spilt Hopkinson bar device. Specimens fabricated according to both the mould flow and transverse directions were tested. The stress-strain curves at various strain rates and temperatures were determined and found to be sensitive to strain rate as well as temperature for both types of specimens. With reference to the properties of pure LCP, mechanical anisotropy and fiber reinforcement effects were characterized and are discussed. Failed specimens were observed suing an optical microscope. Deformation and failure mechanisms in the microstructure of the LCP composite were studied to understand the effects of strain rate and temperature on material strength and failure strain.

  11. Elongation Transducer For Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.; Stokes, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    Extensometer transducer measures elongation of tensile-test specimen with negligible distortion of test results. Used in stress-versus-strain tests of small specimens of composite materials. Clamping stress distributed more evenly. Specimen clamped gently between jaw and facing surface of housing. Friction force of load points on conical tips onto specimen depends on compression of spring, adjusted by turning cover on housing. Limp, light nylon-insulated electrical leads impose minimal extraneous loads on measuring elements.

  12. Deformation and failure of cartilage in the tensile mode

    PubMed Central

    Sasazaki, Yoshihiro; Shore, Roger; Seedhom, Bahaa B

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to visualize, at the ultrastructural level, the deformation and failure mechanism of cartilage matrix in the tensile mode. Full-thickness dumbbell-shaped specimens were prepared from adult bovines. There were two specimen groups; in the ‘parallel’ group the specimen axis was parallel to the split lines defining the preferential orientation of the collagen in the articular surface, and in the ‘perpendicular’ group the specimen axis was perpendicular to the split lines. Specimens were placed with the articular surface uppermost and subjected to a graded series of strain within individual mini-tension devices, while observed with stereomicroscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Thereafter, the changes in the ultrastructure were observed with both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The mechanism of cartilage failure in the tensile mode comprised the following stages, whether the strain was applied parallel or perpendicular to the split line. (1) At 0% strain a fibrillar meshwork within the articular surface was predominantly orientated in the direction of the split line. (2) As strain increased, the fibrillar meshwork became more orientated in the parallel group and reorientated in the perpendicular group in the direction of the applied strain. (3) After complete reorientation of the fibrillar meshwork in the direction of the applied strain, the initial sign of failure was rupture of the fibrillar meshwork within the articular surface. (4) Subsequently, the rupture rapidly propagated into the deeper layers. Greater strains were required for fibrillar reorientation and complete rupture in the ‘perpendicular group’ than in the parallel group. PMID:16761971

  13. Effect of High Tensile Strain Rate on the Evolution of Microstructure in Fe-Mn-C-Al Twinning-Induced Plasticity (TWIP) Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tuhin; Saha, Rajib; Bera, Supriya; Dahmen, Kirsten; Ghosh, Mainak; Haldar, Arunansu; Bleck, Wolfgang; Chowdhury, Sandip Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Fe-17.8Mn-0.52C-0.5Al TWIP steel has been investigated under high-strain rate conditions. Twinning along with stacking faults and high dislocation densities in the austenite matrix has been evaluated by X-ray diffraction line profile analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The samples strained at 100 s-1 show a gradient in the evolution of the dislocation density along the gage length except the fracture end where the density shows a decrease. In case of the samples strained at 1 s-1, the evolution of density shows attainment of a near-saturation stage. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows that the decrease in the dislocation density as well as near-saturation stage is due to dynamic recovery as well as dynamic recrystallization at region near the fracture end. The dynamically recrystallized grains are related to the deformed matrix through twin relationship.

  14. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs. PMID:26354724

  15. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-09-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs.

  16. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  17. Electronic and optical properties of silicene under uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strains: A first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-07-01

    The uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strain mediated electronic band structures and dielectric properties of silicene have been investigated. It is found that on applying uni- and bi-axial strains, the band gap opens for smaller strain in silicene. However, on further increase of strain beyond 8% silicene changed into metal. The ultimate tensile strength estimated is 3.4 GPa. Imaginary part of dielectric function shows that the inter-band transitions are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial tensile strains and are blue shifted for uni- and bi-axial compressive strains. Electron energy loss (EEL) function shows that the π+σ plasmon energies are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial strains and blue-shifted for compressive strains. The π plasmons disappears for tensile and asymmetric strains. Bi-axial asymmetric strain is found to have no influence on inter-band transitions and π+σ plasmon energies.

  18. High temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The various components of a high temperature tensile testing system are evaluated. The objective is the high temperature tensile testing of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 specimens at test temperatures up to 1650 C (3000 F). Testing is to be conducted in inert gases and air. Gripping fixtures, specimen configurations, furnaces, optical strain measuring systems, and temperature measurement techniques are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques are also noted.

  19. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  20. Image Correlation Applied to Single Crystal Plasticity Experiments and Comparison to Strain Gage Data

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, M M; Florando, J N; Lassila, D H; Schmidt, T; Tyson II, J

    2005-06-29

    Full-field optical techniques are becoming increasingly popular for measuring the deformation of materials, especially in materials that exhibit non-uniform behavior. While there are many full-field techniques available (e.g. moire interferometry, electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI), holography, and image correlation [1]), for our study of the deformation of single crystals, the image correlation technique was chosen for its insensitivity to vibrations and ability to measure large strains. While the theory and development of the algorithms for image correlation have been presented elsewhere [2,3] a comparative study to a conventional strain measurement device, such as a strain gage rosette, is desired to test the robustness and accuracy of the technique. The 6 Degrees of Freedom (6DOF) experiment, which was specifically designed to validate dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations [4], is ideally suited to compare the two methods. This experiment is different from previous experiments on single crystals in that it allows the crystal to deform essentially unconstrained, in both the elastic and plastic regimes, by allowing the bottom of the sample to move as the sample is being compressed. This unconstrained motion prevents the internal crystal planes from rotating during the deformation as typically seen in the pioneering work of Schmid [5] and Taylor [6]. In the early development of the 6DOF apparatus, stacked strain gage rosettes were used to provide the strain data [7]. While very accurate at small strains, strain gages provide an averaged measurement over a small area and cannot be used to measure the inhomogeneous plastic strains that typically occur during the 6DOF experiment. An image correlation technique can measure the full-field in-plane and out-of-plane deformation that occurs in single crystals, and a comparison to the strain gage data at small strains can test the accuracy of the method.

  1. A Shearing-Stretching Device That Can Apply Physiological Fluid Shear Stress and Cyclic Stretch Concurrently to Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Meza, Daphne; Abejar, Louie; Rubenstein, David A; Yin, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) morphology and functions can be highly impacted by the mechanical stresses that the cells experience in vivo. In most areas in the vasculature, ECs are continuously exposed to unsteady blood flow-induced shear stress and vasodilation-contraction-induced tensile stress/strain simultaneously. Investigations on how ECs respond to combined shear stress and tensile strain will help us to better understand how an altered mechanical environment affects EC mechanotransduction, dysfunction, and associated cardiovascular disease development. In the present study, a programmable shearing and stretching device that can apply dynamic fluid shear stress and cyclic tensile strain simultaneously to cultured ECs was developed. Flow and stress/strain conditions in the device were simulated using a fluid structure interaction (FSI) model. To characterize the performance of this device and the effect of combined shear stress-tensile strain on EC morphology, human coronary artery ECs (HCAECs) were exposed to concurrent shear stress and cyclic tensile strain in the device. Changes in EC morphology were evaluated through cell elongation, cell alignment, and cell junctional actin accumulation. Results obtained from the numerical simulation indicated that in the "in-plane" area of the device, both fluid shear stress and biaxial tensile strain were uniform. Results obtained from the in vitro experiments demonstrated that shear stress, alone or combined with cyclic tensile strain, induced significant cell elongation. While biaxial tensile strain alone did not induce any appreciable change in EC elongation. Fluid shear stress and cyclic tensile strain had different effects on EC actin filament alignment and accumulation. By combining various fluid shear stress and cyclic tensile strain conditions, this device can provide a physiologically relevant mechanical environment to study EC responses to physiological and pathological mechanical stimulation. PMID:26810848

  2. Lifetime and failure strain prediction for material subjected to non-stationary tensile loading conditions: applications to Zircaloy - 4. [Monkman-Grant relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Bocek, M.

    1982-01-01

    The life fraction rule (LFR) is used to calculate the lifetime of materials subjected to stress and temperature ramp loading. The solutions for the individual nonstationary temperature and stress loading conditions can be applied to predict also the lifetime of structures loaded by superimposed ramps solely on the basis of normal 'iso'-stress rupture data. The concept is applied to tensional stress and temperature cycling as well. As compared with the peculiarities of the problem, the agreement between experiments and calculations is encouraging. 16 refs.

  3. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Tao-Hsing

    2015-11-01

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions.

  4. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Tao-Hsing

    2015-11-15

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions.

  5. Simultaneous 2D Strain Sensing Using Polymer Planar Bragg Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Manuel; Eisenbeil, Waltraud; Schmauss, Bernhard; Hellmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of polymer planar Bragg gratings for multi-axial strain sensing and particularly highlight simultaneous 2D strain measurement. A polymer planar Bragg grating (PPBG) fabricated with a single writing step in bulk polymethylmethacrylate is used for measuring both tensile and compressive strain at various angles. It is shown that the sensitivity of the PPBG strongly depends on the angle between the optical waveguide into which the grating is inscribed and the direction along which the mechanical load is applied. Additionally, a 2D PPBG fabricated by writing two Bragg gratings angularly displaced from each other into a single polymer platelet is bonded to a stainless steel plate. The two reflected wavelengths exhibit different sensitivities while tested toward tensile and compressive strain. These characteristics make 2D PPBG suitable for measuring multi-axial tensile and compressive strain. PMID:25686313

  6. Simultaneous 2D strain sensing using polymer planar Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Manuel; Eisenbeil, Waltraud; Schmauss, Bernhard; Hellmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of polymer planar Bragg gratings for multi-axial strain sensing and particularly highlight simultaneous 2D strain measurement. A polymer planar Bragg grating (PPBG) fabricated with a single writing step in bulk polymethylmethacrylate is used for measuring both tensile and compressive strain at various angles. It is shown that the sensitivity of the PPBG strongly depends on the angle between the optical waveguide into which the grating is inscribed and the direction along which the mechanical load is applied. Additionally, a 2D PPBG fabricated by writing two Bragg gratings angularly displaced from each other into a single polymer platelet is bonded to a stainless steel plate. The two reflected wavelengths exhibit different sensitivities while tested toward tensile and compressive strain. These characteristics make 2D PPBG suitable for measuring multi-axial tensile and compressive strain. PMID:25686313

  7. Characterization and modeling of tensile behavior of ceramic woven fabric composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Wen-Shyong; Chen, Wennei Y.; Parvizi-Majidi, Azar; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the tensile behavior of SiC/SiC fabric composites. In the characterization effort, the stress-strain relation and damage evolution are studied with a series of loading and unloading tensile test experiments. The stress-strain relation is linear in response to the initial loading and becomes nonlinear when loading exceeds the proportional limit. Transverse cracking has been observed to be a dominant damage mode governing the nonlinear deformation. The damage is initiated at the inter-tow pores where fiber yarns cross over each other. In the modeling work, the analysis is based upon a fiber bundle model, in which fiber undulation in the warp and fill directions and gaps among fiber yarns have been taken into account. Two limiting cases of fabric stacking arrangements are studied. Closed form solutions are obtained for the composite stiffness and Poisson's ratio. Transverse cracking in the composite is discussed by applying a constant failure strain criterion.

  8. Identification of a keratinase-producing bacterial strain and enzymatic study for its improvement on shrink resistance and tensile strength of wool- and polyester-blended fabric.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shao-Bo; Huang, Zheng-Hua; Zhang, Xing-Qun; Cao, Zhang-Jun; Zhou, Mei-Hua; Hong, Feng

    2011-01-01

    A wool-degrading bacterium was isolated from decomposition wool fabrics in China. The strain, named 3096-4, showed excellent capability of removing cuticle layer of wool fibers, as demonstrated by removing cuticle layer completely within 48 h. According to the phenotypic characteristics and 16S rRNA profile, the isolate was classified as Pseudomonas. Bacteria growth and keratinase activity of the isolate were determined during cultivation on raw wool at different temperatures, initial pH, and rotation speed using orthogonal matrix method. Maximum growth and keratinase activity of the bacterium were observed under the condition including 30 °C, initial pH 7.6, and rotational speeds 160 rpm. The keratinase-containing crude enzyme prepared from 3096-4 was evaluated in the treatment of wool fabrics. The optimal condition of our enzymatic improvement of shrink resistance was the combination of 30 °C, initial pH 7.6, and rotation speeds 160 rpm. After the optimized treatment, the wool fabrics felting shrink was 4.1% at 6 h, and textile strength was not lost. PMID:20607444

  9. Comparative Study of Various E. coli Strains for Biohydrogen Production Applying Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Bakonyi, Péter; Nemestóthy, Nándor; Bélafi-Bakó, Katalin

    2012-01-01

    The proper strategy to establish efficient hydrogen-producing biosystems is the biochemical, physiological characterization of hydrogen-producing microbes followed by metabolic engineering in order to give extraordinary properties to the strains and, finally, bioprocess optimization to realize enhanced hydrogen fermentation capability. In present paper, it was aimed to show the utility both of strain engineering and process optimization through a comparative study of wild-type and genetically modified E. coli strains, where the effect of two major operational factors (substrate concentration and pH) on bioH2 production was investigated by experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM) was used to determine the suitable conditions in order to obtain maximum yields. The results revealed that by employing the genetically engineered E. coli (DJT 135) strain under optimized conditions (pH: 6.5; Formate conc.: 1.25 g/L), 0.63 mol H2/mol formate could be attained, which was 1.5 times higher compared to the wild-type E. coli (XL1-BLUE) that produced 0.42 mol H2/mol formate (pH: 6.4; Formate conc.: 1.3 g/L). PMID:22666156

  10. Voltage generation from individual BaTiO(3) nanowires under periodic tensile mechanical load.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoyu; Hu, Jie; Suryavanshi, Abhijit P; Yum, Kyungsuk; Yu, Min-Feng

    2007-10-01

    Direct tensile mechanical loading of an individual single-crystal BaTiO(3) nanowire was realized to reveal the direct piezoelectric effect in the nanowire. Periodic voltage generation from the nanowire was produced by a periodically varying tensile mechanical strain applied with a precision mechanical testing stage. The measured voltage generation from the nanowire was found to be directly proportional to the applied strain rate and was successfully modeled through the consideration of an equivalent circuit for a piezoelectric nanowire under low-frequency operation. The study, besides demonstrating a controlled experimental method for the study of direct piezoelectric effect in nanostructures, implies also the use of such perovskite piezoelectric nanowires for efficient energy-harvesting applications. PMID:17894515

  11. In situ tensile and creep testing of lithiated silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, Steven T.; Kraft, Oliver; Thompson, Carl V.; Mönig, Reiner

    2013-12-23

    We present experimental results for uniaxial tensile and creep testing of fully lithiated silicon nanowires. A reduction in the elastic modulus is observed when silicon nanowires are alloyed with lithium and plastic deformation becomes possible when the wires are saturated with lithium. Creep testing was performed at fixed force levels above and below the tensile strength of the material. A linear dependence of the strain-rate on the applied stress was evident below the yield stress of the alloy, indicating viscous deformation behavior. The observed inverse exponential relationship between wire radius and strain rate below the yield stress indicates that material transport was controlled by diffusion. At stress levels approaching the yield strength of fully lithiated silicon, power-law creep appears to govern the strain-rate dependence on stress. These results have direct implications on the cycling conditions, rate-capabilities, and charge capacity of silicon and should prove useful for the design and construction of future silicon-based electrodes.

  12. Effects on diversity of soil fungal community and fate of an artificially applied Beauveria bassiana strain assessed through 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Jacqueline; Galidevara, Sandhya; Strohmeier, Stephan; Devi, K Uma; Reineke, Annette

    2013-10-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana is widely used as a biological control agent (BCA) for insect pest control, with fungal propagules being either incorporated into the potting media or soil or sprayed directly onto the foliage or soil. To gain a better understanding of entomopathogenic fungal ecology when applied as a BCA to the soil environment, a case study using tag-encoded 454 pyrosequencing of fungal ITS sequences was performed to assess the fate and potential effect of an artificially applied B. bassiana strain on the diversity of soil fungal communities in an agricultural field in India. Results show that the overall fungal diversity was not influenced by application of B. bassiana during the 7 weeks of investigation. Strain-specific microsatellite markers indicated both an establishment of the applied B. bassiana strain in the treated plot and its spread to the neighboring nontreated control plot. These results might be important for proper risk assessment of entomopathogenic fungi-based BCAs. PMID:23736813

  13. Tuning the Schottky contacts in the phosphorene and graphene heterostructure by applying strain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Biao; Wu, Li-Juan; Zhao, Yu-Qing; Wang, Lin-Zhi; Caii, Meng-Qiu

    2016-07-20

    The structures and electronic properties of the phosphorene and graphene heterostructure are investigated by density functional calculations using the hybrid Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) functional. The results show that the intrinsic properties of phosphorene and graphene are preserved due to the weak van der Waals contact. But the electronic properties of the Schottky contacts in the phosphorene and graphene heterostructure can be tuned from p-type to n-type by the in-plane compressive strains from -2% to -4%. After analyzing the total band structure and density of states of P atom orbitals, we find that the Schottky barrier height (SBH) is determined by the P-pz orbitals. What is more, the variation of the work function of the phosphorene monolayer and the graphene electrode and the Fermi level shift are the nature of the transition of Schottky barrier from n-type Schottky contact to p-type Schottky contact in the phosphorene and graphene heterostructure under different in-plane strains. We speculate that these are general results of tuning of the electronic properties of the Schottky contacts in the phosphorene and graphene heterostructure by controlling the in-plane compressive strains to obtain a promising method to design and fabricate a phosphorene-graphene based field effect transistor. PMID:27398801

  14. Impacts of additive uniaxial strain on hole mobility in bulk Si and strained-Si p-MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuo, Zhao; Lei, Guo; Jing, Wang; Jun, Xu; Zhihong, Liu

    2009-10-01

    Hole mobility changes under uniaxial and combinational stress in different directions are characterized and analyzed by applying additive mechanical uniaxial stress to bulk Si and SiGe-virtual-substrate-induced strained-Si (s-Si) p-MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors) along (110) and (100) channel directions. In bulk Si, a mobility enhancement peak is found under uniaxial compressive strain in the low vertical field. The combination of (100) direction uniaxial tensile strain and substrate-induced biaxial tensile strain provides a higher mobility relative to the (110) direction, opposite to the situation in bulk Si. But the combinational strain experiences a gain loss at high field, which means that uniaxial compressive strain may still be a better choice. The mobility enhancement of SiGe-induced strained p-MOSFETs along the (110) direction under additive uniaxial tension is explained by the competition between biaxial and shear stress.

  15. Effect of the strain-induced melt activation (SIMA) process on the tensile properties of a new developed super high strength aluminum alloy modified by Al-5Ti-1B grain refiner

    SciTech Connect

    Haghparast, Amin; Nourimotlagh, Masoud; Alipour, Mohammad

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the effect of Al-5Ti-1B grain refiners and modified strain-induced melt activation process on an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was studied. The optimum level of Ti was found to be 0.1 wt.%. The specimens subjected to deformation ratio of 40% (at 300 Degree-Sign C) and various heat treatment times (10-40 min) and temperature (550-600 Degree-Sign C) regimes were characterized in this study. Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Microstructural examinations were conducted by optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometry. The optimum temperature and time in strain-induced melt activation process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min, respectively. T6 heat treatment including quenching to room temperature and aging at 120 Degree-Sign C for 24 h was employed to reach to the maximum strength. Significant improvements in mechanical properties were obtained with the addition of grain refiner combined with T6 heat treatment. After the T6 heat treatment, the average tensile strength increased from 283 MPa to 587 and 332 MPa to 617 for samples refined with 2 wt.% Al-5Ti-1B before and after strain-induced melt activation process and extrusion process, respectively. Ultimate strength of Ti-refined specimens without SIMA process has a lower value than globular microstructure specimens after SIMA and extrusion process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Al-5Ti-1B on the aluminum alloy produced by SIMA process was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-5Ti-1B is an effective in reducing the grain and reagent fine microstructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimum temperature and time in SIMA process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UTS of globular structure specimens have a more value than Ti-refined specimens.

  16. Band gap engineering in polymers through chemical doping and applied mechanical strain.

    PubMed

    Lanzillo, Nicholas A; Breneman, Curt M

    2016-08-17

    We report simulations based on density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory exploring the band gaps of common crystalline polymers including polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene. Our reported band gaps of 8.6 eV for single-chain polyethylene and 9.1 eV for bulk crystalline polyethylene are in excellent agreement with experiment. The effects of chemical doping along the polymer backbone and side-groups are explored, and the use mechanical strain as a means to modify the band gaps of these polymers over a range of several eV while leaving the dielectric constant unchanged is discussed. This work highlights some of the opportunities available to engineer the electronic properties of polymers with wide-reaching implications for polymeric dielectric materials used for capacitive energy storage. PMID:27324304

  17. Band gap engineering in polymers through chemical doping and applied mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzillo, Nicholas A.; Breneman, Curt M.

    2016-08-01

    We report simulations based on density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory exploring the band gaps of common crystalline polymers including polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene. Our reported band gaps of 8.6 eV for single-chain polyethylene and 9.1 eV for bulk crystalline polyethylene are in excellent agreement with experiment. The effects of chemical doping along the polymer backbone and side-groups are explored, and the use mechanical strain as a means to modify the band gaps of these polymers over a range of several eV while leaving the dielectric constant unchanged is discussed. This work highlights some of the opportunities available to engineer the electronic properties of polymers with wide-reaching implications for polymeric dielectric materials used for capacitive energy storage.

  18. Range-resolved signal processing for fibre segment interferometry applied to dynamic long-gauge length strain sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kissinger, Thomas; Correia, Ricardo; Charrett, Thomas O. H.; James, Stephen W.; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2015-09-01

    A range-resolved interferometric signal processing technique using sinusoidal optical frequency modulation is applied to fibre segment interferometry. Here, six optical fibre segments of gauge length 12.5 cm are used as interferometric strain sensors and are formed between seven weak, broadband fibre Bragg gratings, acting as in-fibre partial reflectors. In a very simple and cost-effective optical setup using injection current modulation of a laser diode source, interferometric measurement of acoustic wave propagation in a metal rod is used to demonstrate the capabilities of the technique.

  19. Tensile Deformation of Polyethylenes: Crystallinity Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crist, Buckley; Metaxas, Costas

    2004-03-01

    The crystalline fraction of polyethylene can be reduced by increasing the cooling rate, the molecular weight or the fraction of comonomer. All three methods have been used in this study of tensile deformation which shows that true stress - true strain behavior depends systematically on morphology. The dependence of uniaxial yield stress on crystal thickness is well understood in terms of dislocation nucleation. Post yield flow is dominated by the strain hardening rate that is larger in polyethylenes of lower crystallinity. Noncrystalline polymer evidently reduces the plastic compliance while providing for elastic (reversible) strains. These observations are examined in terms of old and new theories for deformation of semicrystalline polymers.

  20. Incipient and Progressive Damage in Polyethylene Under Extreme Tensile Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, Jevan; Brown, Eric; Trujillo, Carl P.; Martinez, Daniel Tito; Gray, George T. III

    2012-06-07

    The Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) test was developed at LANL by Gray and coworkers to probe the tensile response of materials at large strains (>1) and high strain-rates (>1000/s) by firing projectiles through a conical die at 300-700 m/s. This technique has recently been applied to various polymers, such as the fluoropolymers PTFE (Teflon) and the chemically similar PCTFE, which respectively exhibited catastrophic fragmentation and distributed dynamic necking. This work details investigations of the Dyn-Ten-Ext response of high density polyethylene, both to failure and sub-critical conditions. At large extrusion ratios ({approx}7.4) and high velocities, such as those previously employed, HDPE catastrophically fragmented in a craze-like manner in the extruded jet. At more modest extrusion ratios and high velocities the specimen extruded a stable jet that ruptured cleanly, and at lower velocities was recovered intact after sustaining substantial internal damage. Thermomechanical finite element simulations showed that the damage corresponded to a locus of shear stress in the presence of hydrostatic tension. X-ray computed tomography corroborated the prediction of a shear damage mechanism by finding the region of partially damaged material to consist of macroscopic shear-mode cracks nearly aligned with the extrusion axis, originating from the location of damage inception.

  1. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W. F.; Toben, P. T.; Soppet, W. K.; Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    1994-03-03

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  2. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components.

  3. Pressure reversal study through tensile tests

    SciTech Connect

    Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Wright, A.L.; Yahr, G.T.; Robertson, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    This paper is a summary of the results from a study of the variables related to pressure reversal and was sponsored by the US Department of Transportation, Office of Pipeline Safety. The circumferential pipe stress, which is the most significant variable in pressure reversal, was examined by using tensile specimens and then relating the results to pressurized pipe. A model is proposed that gives some insight into how pressure reversal can be minimized when a section of pipe is being hydrotested. Twenty tensile specimens from X-42 electric resistance welded (ERW) pipe and twenty specimens from X-52 ERW pipe were tested. Each specimen had a machined flaw. The flaw regions were monitored using strain gages and photoelasticity. These tensile tests represent the first phase of a research effort to examine and understand the variables related to pressure reversal. The second phase of this effort will be with pipe specimens and presently is in progress.

  4. In Situ Radiography During Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory system for testing specimens of metal-, ceramic-, and intermetallic-matrix composite materials incorporates both electromechanical tensile-testing subsystem and either of two imaging subsystems that take x-ray photographs of specimens before, during, and after tensile tests. Used to test specimens of reaction-bonded silicon nitride reinforced with silicon carbide fibers (SiC/RBSN) considered for high-temperature service in advanced aircraft turbine engines. Provides data on effects of preexisting flaws (e.g., high-density impurities and local variations of density) on fracture behavior. Accumulated internal damage monitored during loading. X-ray source illuminates specimen in load frame while specimen is pulled. X-ray images on film correlated with stress-vs.-strain data from tensile test.

  5. Dynamic tensile characterization of pig skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatam, H.; Liu, Q.; Ravi-Chandar, K.

    2014-04-01

    The strain-rate dependent response of porcine skin oriented in the fiber direction is explored under tensile loading. Quasi-static response was obtained at strain rates in the range of 10-3 s-1 to 25 s-1. Characterization of the response at even greater strain rates is accomplished by measuring the spatio-temporal evolution of the particle velocity and strain in a thin strip subjected to high speed impact loading that generates uniaxial stress conditions. These experiments indicate the formation of shock waves; the shock Hugoniot that relates particle velocity to the shock velocity and the dynamic stress to dynamic strain is obtained directly through experimental measurements, without any assumptions regarding the constitutive properties of the material. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Influence of strain on water adsorption and dissociation on rutile TiO2(110) surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Long; Shu, Da-Jun; Li, Shao-Chun; Wang, Mu

    2016-06-01

    The influence of externally applied strain on water adsorption and dissociation on a defect-free rutile TiO2(110) surface is studied by using first-principles calculations. We found that while compressive strain makes water adsorption and dissociation less favorable, tensile strain increases the energy gain of water adsorption, and decreases the energy cost of water dissociation. Specifically, dissociative water becomes more stable than molecular water when an 8% tensile in-plane strain is applied. Moreover, the dissociation barrier decreases with increasing strain more rapidly for more isolated water. The rate of decrease of this barrier for nearly isolated water is 0.017 eV per 1% biaxial strain. This demonstrates that applying strain is a possible way to engineer the surface adsorption and dissociation of water on a TiO2(110) surface, and therefore engineer the relevant surface reactivity. PMID:27138099

  7. Dynamic behavior of nano-voids in magnesium under hydrostatic tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponga, Mauricio; Ramabathiran, Amuthan A.; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Ortiz, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the mechanisms responsible for nano-void growth in single crystal magnesium under dynamic hydrostatic tensile stress. A key conclusion derived from our study is that there is no secondary strain hardening near the nano-void. This behavior, which is in remarkable contrast to face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic materials, greatly limits the peak stress and explains the relatively lower spall strength of magnesium. The lack of secondary strain hardening is due to the fact that pyramidal dislocations do not interact with basal or prismatic dislocations. Our analysis also shows that for loads applied at moderate strain rates (\\overset{\\centerdot}{ε} ≤slant {{10}6} s‑1) the peak stress, dislocation velocity and temperature distribution converge asymptotically. However at very high strain rates (\\overset{\\centerdot}{ε} ≥slant {{10}8} s‑1), there is a sharp transition in these quantities.

  8. Role of mechanical loads in inducing in-cycle tensile stress in thermally grown oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, R.; Jansz, M.; Mossaddad, M.; Raghavan, S.; Okasinski, J.S.; Almer, J.D.; Perez, H.P.; Imbrie, P.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction results tracking the strain behavior of the various layers during a cycle, under thermo-mechanical conditions are presented in this work. The quantitative strain measurements here show that the thermally grown oxide briefly experiences in-plane tensile stress ({sigma}{sub 22} = +36.4 MPa) with increased mechanical loading during ramp-up in the thermal cycle. These findings are the first in situ experimental observations of these strains under thermo-mechanical conditions, envisaged to serve as a catalyst for crack initiation. The depth resolved measurements of strain taken during applied thermal and mechanical load in this work are a significant step towards achieving realistic testing conditions.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Damage using an Elastic-Viscoplastic Model with Directional Tensile Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I

    2003-03-17

    A new continuum model for directional tensile failure has been developed that can simulate weakening and void formation due to directional tensile failure. The model is developed within the context of a properly invariant nonlinear thermomechanical theory. A second order damage tensor is introduced which allows simulation of weakening to tension applied in one direction, without weakening to subsequent tension applied in perpendicular directions. This damage tensor can be advected using standard methods in computer codes. Porosity is used as an isotropic measure of volumetric void strain and its evolution is influenced by tensile failure. The rate of dissipation due to directional tensile failure takes a particularly simple form, which can be analyzed easily. Specifically, the model can be combined with general constitutive equations for porous compaction and dilation, as well as viscoplasticity. A robust non-iterative numerical scheme for integrating these evolution equations is proposed. This constitutive model has been implemented into an Eulerian shock wave code with adaptive mesh refinement. A number of simulations of complicated shock loading of different materials have been performed including problems of fracture of rock. These simulations show that directionality of damage can play a significant role in material failure.

  10. In-situ lattice-strain analysis of a ferroelectric thin film under an applied pulse electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Sakata, O.; Yasui, S.; Yamada, T.; Funakubo, H.; Yabashi, M.

    2010-06-23

    We developed an in-situ measurement system for characterizing the relationship between ferroelectricity and lattice distortion of a ferroelectric thin film at BL13XU, SPring-8. The dielectric polarization obtained and the lattice strain evaluated provide us with the electrostrictive coefficient of the film. The system for the method consists of a refractive lens for two dimensional micron focusing, ferroelectric characterization system, high-precision four-circle diffractometer, and time-resolved photon counting system. It enables in-situ measurements of the electric polarization of the film and an electric-field-induced strain using nano-second order time-resolved synchrotron diffraction. We applied the method to determining the lattice constant distorted by the electric field and the polarization value of a 410 nm-thick BiFeO{sub 3} thin film. The piezoelectric constant d{sub 33} evaluated was about 28 pm/V. The polarization observed allowed us to evaluate an electrostrictive coefficient Q of 1{center_dot}4x10{sup -2} m{sup 4}/C{sup 2}.

  11. Development of a synchrotron biaxial tensile device for in situ characterization of thin films mechanical response.

    PubMed

    Geandier, G; Thiaudière, D; Randriamazaoro, R N; Chiron, R; Djaziri, S; Lamongie, B; Diot, Y; Le Bourhis, E; Renault, P O; Goudeau, P; Bouaffad, A; Castelnau, O; Faurie, D; Hild, F

    2010-10-01

    We have developed on the DIFFABS-SOLEIL beamline a biaxial tensile machine working in the synchrotron environment for in situ diffraction characterization of thin polycrystalline films mechanical response. The machine has been designed to test compliant substrates coated by the studied films under controlled, applied strain field. Technological challenges comprise the sample design including fixation of the substrate ends, the related generation of a uniform strain field in the studied (central) volume, and the operations from the beamline pilot. Preliminary tests on 150 nm thick W films deposited onto polyimide cruciform substrates are presented. The obtained results for applied strains using x-ray diffraction and digital image correlation methods clearly show the full potentialities of this new setup. PMID:21034098

  12. Critical current versus strain research at the University of Twente

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eck, H. J. N.; van der Laan, D. C.; Dhallé, M.; ten Haken, B.; ten Kate, H. H. J.

    2003-09-01

    At the University of Twente a U-shaped spring has been used to investigate the mechanical properties of a large variety of superconducting tapes and wires. Several mechanisms are responsible for the degradation of critical current as a function of applied strain. A change in its intrinsic parameters causes a reversible critical current dependence in Nb3Sn. The critical current reaches a maximum at a wire-dependent tensile strain level, and decreases when this tensile strain is either released or further increased. In Bi-based tapes the critical current is virtually insensitive to tensile strain up to a sample-dependent irreversible strain limit. When this limit is exceeded, the critical current decreases steeply and irreversibly. This behaviour is attributed to microstructural damage to the filaments. This cracking of the filaments is verified by a magneto-optical strain experiment. Recent experiments suggest that in MgB2 the degradation of critical current is caused by a change in intrinsic properties and damage to the microstructure. Magneto-optical imaging can be used to investigate the influence of applied strain on the microstructure of MgB2, as is done successfully with Bi-based tapes. In all these conductors the thermal precompression of the filaments plays an important role. In Nb3Sn it determines the position of the maximum and in Bi-based and MgB2 conductors it is closely related to the irreversible strain limit.

  13. Straining graphene using thin film shrinkage methods.

    PubMed

    Shioya, Hiroki; Craciun, Monica F; Russo, Saverio; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Tarucha, Seigo

    2014-03-12

    Theoretical works suggest the possibility and usefulness of strain engineering of graphene by predicting remarkable properties, such as Dirac cone merging, bandgap opening and pseudo magnetic field generation. However, most of these predictions have not yet been confirmed because it is experimentally difficult to control the magnitude and type (e.g., uniaxial, biaxial, and so forth) of strain in graphene devices. Here we report two novel methods to apply strain without bending the substrate. We employ thin films of evaporated metal and organic insulator deposited on graphene, which shrink after electron beam irradiation or heat application. These methods make it possible to apply both biaxial strain and in-plane isotropic compressive strain in a well-controlled manner. Raman spectroscopy measurements show a clear splitting of the degenerate states of the G-band in the case of biaxial strain, and G-band blue shift without splitting in the case of in-plane isotropic compressive strain. In the case of biaxial strain application, we find out the ratio of the strain component perpendicular to the stretching direction is at least three times larger than what was previously observed, indicating that shrinkage of the metal or organic insulator deposited on graphene induces both tensile and compressive strain in this atomically thin material. Our studies present for the first time a viable way to apply strain to graphene without the need to bend the substrate. PMID:24490629

  14. Straining Graphene Using Thin Film Shrinkage Methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical works suggest the possibility and usefulness of strain engineering of graphene by predicting remarkable properties, such as Dirac cone merging, bandgap opening and pseudo magnetic field generation. However, most of these predictions have not yet been confirmed because it is experimentally difficult to control the magnitude and type (e.g., uniaxial, biaxial, and so forth) of strain in graphene devices. Here we report two novel methods to apply strain without bending the substrate. We employ thin films of evaporated metal and organic insulator deposited on graphene, which shrink after electron beam irradiation or heat application. These methods make it possible to apply both biaxial strain and in-plane isotropic compressive strain in a well-controlled manner. Raman spectroscopy measurements show a clear splitting of the degenerate states of the G-band in the case of biaxial strain, and G-band blue shift without splitting in the case of in-plane isotropic compressive strain. In the case of biaxial strain application, we find out the ratio of the strain component perpendicular to the stretching direction is at least three times larger than what was previously observed, indicating that shrinkage of the metal or organic insulator deposited on graphene induces both tensile and compressive strain in this atomically thin material. Our studies present for the first time a viable way to apply strain to graphene without the need to bend the substrate. PMID:24490629

  15. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Deformation Mechanism in AZ31B Mg Alloy Sheets Under Pulsed Electric-Assisted Tensile and Compressive Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Se-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Song, Jung Han; Choi, Seogou; Han, Heung Nam; Kim, Daeyong

    2016-06-01

    The uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain responses of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under pulsed electric current are reported. Tension and compression tests with pulsed electric current showed that flow stresses dropped instantaneously when the electric pulses were applied. Thermo-mechanical-electrical finite element analyses were also performed to investigate the effects of Joule heating and electro-plasticity on the flow responses of AZ31B sheets under electric-pulsed tension and compression tests. The proposed finite element simulations could reproduce the measured uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain curves under pulsed electric currents, when the temperature-dependent flow stress hardening model and thermal properties of AZ31B sheet were properly described in the simulations. In particular, the simulation results that fit best with experimental results showed that almost 100 pct of the electric current was subject to transform into Joule heating during electrically assisted tensile and compressive tests.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Deformation Mechanism in AZ31B Mg Alloy Sheets Under Pulsed Electric-Assisted Tensile and Compressive Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Se-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Song, Jung Han; Choi, Seogou; Han, Heung Nam; Kim, Daeyong

    2016-04-01

    The uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain responses of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under pulsed electric current are reported. Tension and compression tests with pulsed electric current showed that flow stresses dropped instantaneously when the electric pulses were applied. Thermo-mechanical-electrical finite element analyses were also performed to investigate the effects of Joule heating and electro-plasticity on the flow responses of AZ31B sheets under electric-pulsed tension and compression tests. The proposed finite element simulations could reproduce the measured uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain curves under pulsed electric currents, when the temperature-dependent flow stress hardening model and thermal properties of AZ31B sheet were properly described in the simulations. In particular, the simulation results that fit best with experimental results showed that almost 100 pct of the electric current was subject to transform into Joule heating during electrically assisted tensile and compressive tests.

  17. Tensile Hoop Behavior of Irradiated Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Jaramillo, Roger A; Hendrich, WILLIAM R; Packan, Nicolas H

    2007-03-01

    A method for evaluating the room temperature ductility behavior of irradiated Zircaloy-4 nuclear fuel cladding has been developed and applied to evaluate tensile hoop strength of material irradiated to different levels. The test utilizes a polyurethane plug fitted within a tubular cladding specimen. A cylindrical punch is used to compress the plug axially, which generates a radial displacement that acts upon the inner diameter of the specimen. Position sensors track the radial displacement of the specimen outer diameter as the compression proceeds. These measurements coupled with ram force data provide a load-displacement characterization of the cladding response to internal pressurization. The development of this simple, cost-effective, highly reproducible test for evaluating tensile hoop strain as a function of internal pressure for irradiated specimens represents a significant advance in the mechanical characterization of irradiated cladding. In this project, nuclear fuel rod assemblies using Zircaloy-4 cladding and two types of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel pellets were irradiated to varying levels of burnup. Fuel pellets were manufactured with and without thermally induced gallium removal (TIGR) processing. Fuel pellets manufactured by both methods were contained in fuel rod assemblies and irradiated to burnup levels of 9, 21, 30, 40, and 50 GWd/MT. These levels of fuel burnup correspond to fast (E > 1 MeV) fluences of 0.27, 0.68, 0.98, 1.4 and 1.7 1021 neutrons/cm2, respectively. Following irradiation, fuel rod assemblies were disassembled; fuel pellets were removed from the cladding; and the inner diameter of cladding was cleaned to remove residue materials. Tensile hoop strength of this cladding material was tested using the newly developed method. Unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding was also tested. With the goal of determining the effect of the two fuel types and different neutron fluences on clad ductility, tensile hoop strength tests were

  18. Dynamic Tensile Strength of Coal under Dry and Saturated Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yixin; Liu, Shimin; Jiang, Yaodong; Wang, Kai; Huang, Yaqiong

    2016-05-01

    The tensile failure characterization of dry and saturated coals under different impact loading conditions was experimentally investigated using a Split Hopkinson pressure bar. Indirect dynamic Brazilian disc tension tests for coals were carried out. The indirect tensile strengths for different bedding angles under different impact velocities, strain rates and loading rates are analyzed and discussed. A high-speed high-resolution digital camera was employed to capture and record the dynamic failure process of coal specimens. Based on the experimental results, it was found that the saturated specimens have stronger loading rate dependence than the dry specimens. The bedding angle has a smaller effect on the dynamic indirect tensile strength compared to the impact velocity. Both shear and tensile failures were observed in the tested coal specimens. Saturated coal specimens have higher indirect tensile strength than dry ones.

  19. The relation between the tensile strength and the hardness of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, O

    1930-01-01

    This report presents methods determining the hardness and tensile strength of metals by showing the effect and dependence of the hardness numbers on the strain-hardening. Relations between the hardness numbers and the ordinary stress-strain diagrams and tensile strength are given. Procedures for finding the Brinell strength are also presented.

  20. Characterization of ovine utero-placental interface tensile failure.

    PubMed

    Klinich, K D; Miller, C S; Hu, J; Samorezov, J E; Pearlman, M D; Schneider, L W; Rupp, J D

    2012-10-01

    Data on the strength of the utero-placental interface (UPI) would help improve understanding of the mechanisms of placental abruption (premature separation of the placenta from the uterus) during motor-vehicle crashes involving pregnant occupants. An ovine model was selected for study because like the human, its placenta has a villous attachment structure. Uteri with intact placentas were obtained from three sheep as by-products of another research study. The samples were harvested between 102 and 119 days of the 145-day gestational period. Rectangular specimens with areas measuring 15 mm × 5 mm were cut through the thickness of the placenta and uterus. Each subject provided eight samples, of which four were tested at a nominal strain rate of 0.10 strains/sec and the remainder was tested at a nominal strain rate of 1.0 strains/sec. Sutures were used to secure the uterine side of the specimens to the test fixture, while mechanical clamps were used to attach the placenta side. A FARO arm scanner recorded the initial geometry of the tissue, and a random dot pattern applied to the placenta and uterus tissue allowed visualization of displacement. For the structure of the UPI, mean tensile failure strain and standard deviations are 0.37 (0.11) and 0.37 (0.18) for the 0.10 and 1.0 strain rates, respectively (p-value = 0.970) while the associated failure stresses are 6.5 (1.37) and 15.0 (5.08) kPa, (p-value = 0.064). The results from sheep UPI testing provide the first estimate of the human UPI structural failure tolerance. PMID:22809672

  1. Predicting Tensile Stretchability of Trimmed AA6111-T4 Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin; Golovashchenko, Sergey F.

    2014-02-15

    An integrated manufacturing process simulation framework has been developed to predict the trimmed edge tensile stretchability of AA6111-T4 sheets by incorporating the burr geometry, damage, and plastic strain from trimming simulations into subsequent tensile stretchability simulations. The influence of the trimming die clearances on the predicted tensile stretching ductility (stretchability) is studied and quantitatively compared with experimental measurements. Stretchability is found to decrease with increasing cutting clearances, and simulation results have successfully captured experimentally observed edge crack initiation and failure mode variations for different trimming clearances. Subsequent computational sensitivity studies reveal that while deburring of previously trimmed edges has little influence on tensile stretchability, removal of trimmed edge initial plastic strain may significantly enhance the subsequent trimmed edge stretchability.

  2. Estimation of hyphal tensile strength in production-scale Aspergillus oryzae fungal fermentations.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng Jian; Shukla, Vivek; Wenger, Kevin; Fordyce, Andrew; Pedersen, Annemarie Gade; Marten, Mark

    2002-03-20

    Fragmentation of filamentous fungal hyphae depends on two phenomena: hydrodynamic stresses, which lead to hyphal breakage, and hyphal tensile strength, which resists breakage. The goal of this study was to use turbulent hydrodynamic theory to develop a correlation that allows experimental data of morphology and hydrodynamics to be used to estimate relative (pseudo) tensile strength (sigma(pseudo)) of filamentous fungi. Fed-batch fermentations were conducted with a recombinant strain of Aspergillus oryzae in 80 m(3) fermentors, and measurements were made of both morphological (equivalent hyphal length, L) and hydrodynamic variables (specific power input, epsilon; kinematic viscosity, v). We found that v increased over 100-fold during these fermentations and, hence, Kolmogorov microscale (lambda) also changed significantly with time. In the impeller discharge zone, where hyphal fragmentation is thought to actually take place, lambda was calculated to be 700-3500 microm, which is large compared to the size of typical fungal hyphae (100-300 microm). This result implies that eddies in the viscous subrange are responsible for fragmentation. Applying turbulent theory for this subrange, it was possible to calculate sigma(pseudo)from morphological and hydrodynamic measurements. Pseudo tensile strength was not constant but increased to a maximum during the first half and then decreased during the second half of each fermentation, presumably due to differences in physiological state. When a literature correlation for hyphal fragmentation rate (k(frag)) was modified by adding a term to account for viscosity and tensile strength, the result was better qualitative agreement with morphological data. Taken together, these results imply hyphal tensile strength can change significantly over the course of large-scale, fed-batch fungal fermentations and that existing fragmentation and morphology models may be improved if they accounted for variations in hyphal tensile strength with

  3. Tunable electronic properties of silicon nanowires under strain and electric bias

    SciTech Connect

    Nduwimana, Alexis; Wang, Xiao-Qian

    2014-07-15

    The electronic structure characteristics of silicon nanowires under strain and electric bias are studied using first-principles density functional theory. The unique wire-like structure leads to distinct spatial distribution of carriers, which can be tailored by applying tensile and compressive strains, as well as by an electric bias. Our results indicate that the combined effect of strain and electric bias leads to tunable electronic structures that can be used for piezo-electric devices.

  4. Multi-scale investigation of tensile creep of ultra-high performance concrete for bridge applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garas Yanni, Victor Youssef

    achieving satisfactory microstructural refinement at the same temperature input despite the maximum temperature applied. For the first time, the presence of a 10 microm (394 micro inch) wide porous fiber-cementitious matrix interface was demonstrated by nanoindentation and SEM for non-thermally treated UHPC only. Tensile creep at 90 days increased by 64% and 46% upon eliminating fibers for thermally and non-thermally treated UHPC, respectively. Increases in creep upon reducing the fiber content suggested that fibers carry part of the sustained load and thus reduce creep. Tensile creep strain was proportional to the stress applied up to 60% of the ultimate strength. No tensile creep failure occurred for a period of 1 year for pre-cracked UHPC under stress level of 40%. Also, no tensile creep failure occurred for a period of 90 days under stress level of 60%. Tensile creep failure occurred at stress levels of 70% and 80%. This study showed that fibers cannot be accounted for as shear reinforcement in lieu of stirrups unless micro-defect-free fiber-matrix interface is achieved.

  5. Dynamic tensile strength of glass fiber reinforced pultruded composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.; Kumar, M.M.; Hui, D.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the stress-strain behavior, fracture strength, influence of low temperature, and energy absorption in the diametral tensile splitting fracturing of a Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite. Experiments were conducted at low-temperature in a thermal chamber installed on a servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. The tensile strength was determined by diametral compression of disc samples at 24, {minus}5 and {minus}40 C.

  6. Tensile and compressive mechanical behavior of twinned silicon carbide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Li, Jingbo; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2010-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with the Tersoff potential were used to study the response of twinned SiC nanowires under tensile and compressive strains. The critical strain of the twinned nanowires can be enhanced by twin-stacking faults, and their critical strains are larger than those of perfect nanowires with the same diameters. Under axial tensile strain, the bonds of the nanowires are just stretched before failure. The failure behavior is found to depend on the twin segment thickness and the diameter of the nanowires. An atomic chain is observed for the thin nanowires with small twin segment thickness under tension strain. Under axial compressive strain, the collapse of the twinned SiC nanowires exhibits two differently failure modes, depending on the length and diameter of the nanowires, i.e. shell buckling for short length nanowires and columnar buckling for longer length nanowires.

  7. Tensile testing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.; Ellingsworth, J. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An improved mechanical extensometer is described for use with a constant load creep test machine. The dead weight of the extensometer is counterbalanced by two pairs of weights connected through a pulley system and to rod extension and leading into the furnace where the test sample is undergoing elevated temperature (above 500 F.) tensile testing. Novel gripper surfaces, conical tip and flat surface are provided in each sampling engaging platens to reduce the grip pressure normally required for attachment of the extensometer to the specimen and reduce initial specimen bending normally associated with foil-gage metal testing.

  8. Tensile testing apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackburn, L. B.; Ellingsworth, J. R.

    1985-08-01

    An improved mechanical extensometer is described for use with a constant load creep test machine. The dead weight of the extensometer is counterbalanced by two pairs of weights connected through a pulley system and to rod extension and leading into the furnace where the test sample is undergoing elevated temperature (above 500 F.) tensile testing. Novel gripper surfaces, conical tip and flat surface are provided in each sampling engaging platens to reduce the grip pressure normally required for attachment of the extensometer to the specimen and reduce initial specimen bending normally associated with foil-gage metal testing.

  9. High temperature tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Stevens, C.O.

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests have been performed on V-4Cr-4Ti at 750 and 800 C in order to extend the data base beyond the current limit of 700 C. From comparison with previous measurements, the yield strength is nearly constant and tensile elongations decrease slightly with increasing temperature between 300 and 800 C. The ultimate strength exhibits an apparent maximum near 600 C (attributable to dynamic strain aging) but adequate strength is maintained up to 800 C. The reduction in area measured on tensile specimens remained high ({approximately}80%) for test temperatures up to 800 C, in contrast to previous reported results.

  10. Load partitioning between single bulk grains in a two-phase duplex stainless steel during tensile loading.

    SciTech Connect

    Hedstrom, P.; Han, T. S.; Lienert, U.; Almer, J. D.; Oden, M.; X-Ray Science Division; Lulea Univ.; Royal Inst. of Tech.; Yonsei Univ.; Linkoping Univ.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice strain tensor evolution for single bulk grains of austenite and ferrite in a duplex stainless steel during tensile loading to 0.02 applied strain has been investigated using in situ high-energy X-ray measurements and finite-element modeling. Single-grain X-ray diffraction lattice strain data for the eight austenite and seven ferrite grains measured show a large variation of residual lattice strains, which evolves upon deformation to the point where some grains with comparable crystallographic orientations have lattice strains different by 1.5 x 10{sup -3}, corresponding to a stress of -300MPa. The finite-element simulations of the 15 measured grains in three different spatial arrangements confirmed the complex deformation constraint and importance of local grain environment.

  11. Demonstration of concurrent tensile testing and magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Brinker, Spencer; Klatt, Dieter

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a technique used to measure the mechanical properties of soft tissues and has already shown its diagnostic potential for pathologies involving fibrogenesis and neurodegeneration. Experimental investigation of loading during MRE is fairly unexplored and may help to better understand changing mechanical properties in relation to organ function. Tensile testing is a common technique for examining mechanical properties of materials and is used as the simultaneous comparison method with MRE in this study. 3D MRE data was acquired during quasistatic uniaxial tensile loading of an Ecoflex 0010 cylindrical specimen. Individual MRE scans at 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5kHz where performed on engineering strain increments of 20% from 0% to 140% while tensile reaction force was recorded using a load cell attached to an adjustable elongation slide. Tensile stress-strain relation resembled the Fung hyperelastic strain energy model. We observe that the MRE shear storage modulus is related to the state of tensile deformation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous tensile testing during MRE and the new design can potentially be used for MRE calibration using pre-tension. PMID:27429072

  12. True stress-strain curve acquisition for irradiated stainless steel including the range exceeding necking strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki; Kitsunai, Yuji; Koshiishi, Masato

    2015-10-01

    True stress-strain curves were obtained for irradiated 316L stainless steel by a tensile test and by a curve estimation procedure. In the tensile test, the digital image correlation technique together with iterative finite element analysis was applied in order to identify curves for strain larger than the necking strain. The true stress-strain curves were successfully obtained for the strain of more than 0.4 whereas the necking strain was about 0.2 in the minimum case. The obtained true stress-strain curves were approximated well with the Swift-type equation including the post-necking strain even if the exponential constant n was fixed to 0.5. Then, the true stress-strain curves were estimated by a curve estimation procedure, which was referred to as the K-fit method. Material properties required for the K-fit method were the yield and ultimate strengths or only the yield strength. Some modifications were made for the K-fit method in order to improve estimation accuracy for irradiated stainless steels.

  13. Change in dynamic young's modulus of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite during tensile and compressive stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.; Oku, T.

    1983-12-01

    The effect of mechanical stresses on the dynamic Young's modulus measured by the ultrasonic wave method was examined for an isotropic graphite. Young's modulus of the graphite decreased with increasing applied stress, though the amount of its decrease was different between tensile and compressive stresses. The change in Young's modulus under mechanical stresses clearly corresponded to the stress-strain behavior of the graphite. Change in pore volume caused by mechanical stressing plays an important role in the decrease in Young's modulus under tension and compression. The change in Young's modulus was well represented by the formula E/E 0 = exp(- Aɛ + B) within a limited strain. A and B in the equation appeared to differ between tension and compression. The strain above which the formula showed deviation would be associated with the formation of cracks as observed in previous work.

  14. Effect of additives on the tensile performance and protein solubility of industrial oilseed residual based plastics.

    PubMed

    Newson, William R; Kuktaite, Ramune; Hedenqvist, Mikael S; Gällstedt, Mikael; Johansson, Eva

    2014-07-16

    Ten chemical additives were selected from the literature for their proposed modifying activity in protein-protein interactions. These consisted of acids, bases, reducing agents, and denaturants and were added to residual deoiled meals of Crambe abyssinica (crambe) and Brassica carinata (carinata) to modify the properties of plastics produced through hot compression molding at 130 °C. The films produced were examined for tensile properties, protein solubility, molecular weight distribution, and water absorption. Of the additives tested, NaOH had the greatest positive effect on tensile properties, with increases of 105% in maximum stress and 200% in strain at maximum stress for crambe and a 70% increase in strain at maximum stress for carinata. Stiffness was not increased by any of the applied additives. Changes in tensile strength and elongation for crambe and elongation for carinata were related to changes in protein solubility. Increased pH was the most successful in improving the protein aggregation and mechanical properties within the complex chemistry of residual oilseed meals. PMID:24971658

  15. A Constitutive Model of 6111-T4 Aluminum Alloy Sheet Based on the Warm Tensile Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Lin; Meng, Fanzhi; Song, Yanli; Liu, Jianing; Qin, Xunpeng; Suo, Lianbing

    2014-03-01

    As main light-weight material, aluminum alloy sheets have been widely applied to produce auto body panels. In order to predict the formability and springback of aluminum alloy sheets, a precise constitutive model is a necessity. In this article, a series of warm tensile tests were conducted on Gleeble-1500D thermal mechanical simulator for 6111-T4 aluminum alloy sheets. The corresponding strain rate ranged from 0.015 to 1.5 s-1, and the temperature ranged from 25 to 350 °C. The relationship between the temperature, the strain rate, and the flow stress were discussed. A constitutive model based on the updated Fields-Backofen equation was established to describe the flow behavior of 6111-T4 aluminum alloy during the warm tensile tests. Subsequently, the average absolute relative error (AARE) was introduced to verify the predictability of the constitutive model. The value of AARE at the uniform plastic deformation stage was calculated to be 1.677%, which demonstrates that the predicted flow stress values were in accordance with the experimental ones. The constitutive model was validated by the fact that the simulated results of the warm tensile tests coincided with the experimental ones.

  16. Tensile Instability in a Thick Elastic Body.

    PubMed

    Overvelde, Johannes T B; Dykstra, David M J; de Rooij, Rijk; Weaver, James; Bertoldi, Katia

    2016-08-26

    A range of instabilities can occur in soft bodies that undergo large deformation. While most of them arise under compressive forces, it has previously been shown analytically that a tensile instability can occur in an elastic block subjected to equitriaxial tension. Guided by this result, we conducted centimeter-scale experiments on thick elastomeric samples under generalized plane strain conditions and observed for the first time this elastic tensile instability. We found that equibiaxial stretching leads to the formation of a wavy pattern, as regions of the sample alternatively flatten and extend in the out-of-plane direction. Our work uncovers a new type of instability that can be triggered in elastic bodies, enlarging the design space for smart structures that harness instabilities to enhance their functionality. PMID:27610857

  17. Effect of Muscle Loads and Torque Applied to the Tibia on the Strain Behavior of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament: An In Vitro Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Fujiya, Hiroto; Kousa, Petteri; Fleming, Braden C; Churchill, David L; Beynnon, Bruce D

    2011-01-01

    Background Very little is known about the effects of applied torque about the long axis of the tibia in combination with muscle loads on anterior cruciate ligament biomechanics. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of muscle contraction and tibial torques applied about the long axis of the tibia on anterior cruciate ligament strain behavior. Methods Six cadaver knee specimens were used to measure the strain behaviour of the anterior cruciate ligament. Internal and external axial torques were applied to the tibia when the knee was between 30° and 120° of flexion in combination with the conditions of no muscle load, isolated quadriceps load, and simultaneous quadriceps and hamstring loading. Findings The highest anterior cruciate ligament strain values were measured when the muscles were not loaded, when the knee was at 120° of flexion, and when internal tibial torques were applied to the knee. During muscle loading the highest anterior cruciate ligament strain values were measured at 30° of flexion and then the strain values gradually decreased with increase in knee flexion. During co-contraction of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles the anterior cruciate ligament was unstrained or minimally strained at 60°, 90° and 120° of knee flexion. Intepretation This study suggests that quadriceps and hamstring muscle co-contraction has a potential role in reducing the anterior cruciate ligament strain values when the knee is in deep flexion. These results can be used to gain insight into anterior cruciate ligament injury mechanisms and to design rehabilitation regimens. PMID:21816523

  18. Tensile Yielding of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Srivastava, Deepak; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The tensile yielding of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been studied using Molecular Dynamics simulations and a Transition State Theory based model. We find a strong dependence of the yielding on the strain rate. A critical strain rate has been predicted above/below which yielding strain of a MWCNT is larger/smaller than that of the corresponding single-wall carbon nanotubes. At experimentally feasible strain rate of 1% /hour and T = 300K, the yield strain of a MWCNT is estimated to be about 3-4 % higher than that of an equivalent SWCNT (Single Wall Carbon Nanotube), in good agreement with recent experimental observations.

  19. Deformation mechanisms of bent Si nanowires governed by the sign and magnitude of strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihua; Kong, Deli; Xin, Tianjiao; Shu, Xinyu; Zheng, Kun; Xiao, Lirong; Sha, Xuechao; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Ze; Han, Xiaodong; Zou, Jin

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the deformation mechanisms of bent Si nanowires are investigated at the atomic scale with bending strain up to 12.8%. The sign and magnitude of the applied strain are found to govern their deformation mechanisms, in which the dislocation types (full or partial dislocations) can be affected by the sign (tensile or compressive) and magnitude of the applied strain. In the early stages of bending, plastic deformation is controlled by 60° full dislocations. As the bending increases, Lomer dislocations can be frequently observed. When the strain increases to a significant level, 90° partial dislocations induced from the tensile surfaces of the bent nanowires are observed. This study provides a deeper understanding of the effect of the sign and magnitude of the bending strain on the deformation mechanisms in bent Si nanowires.

  20. The transpressional strain model applied to strike-slip, oblique-convergent and oblique-divergent deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krantz, R. W.

    1995-08-01

    Zones of distributed shear deformation associated with strike-slip and oblique-convergent or oblique-divergent systems accommodate complex three-dimensional strains. Current models suggest that structural orientations within the zones depend on not only the magnitude of shear strain but also the degree of convergence or divergence. The transpressional strain model of Sanderson and Marchini is further developed here, and this study also focuses on relating structural orientations in map view to the magnitude of shear and the degree of convergence or divergence, and to the magnitudes of horizontal and vertical strains. Results include both the mathematical derivation and a set of nomograms relating the model parameters. Applications of the model to field examples and laboratory analogs show how the model can be used to determine the degree of convergence or divergence, and to calculate strain parameters. The model provides geologists with a method to evaluate and predict structural orientations, and to test map and cross-section interpretations.

  1. Dynamic tensile properties of human placenta.

    PubMed

    Manoogian, Sarah J; Bisplinghoff, Jill A; McNally, Craig; Kemper, Andrew R; Santago, Anthony C; Duma, Stefan M

    2008-12-01

    Automobile crashes are the largest cause of injury death for pregnant females and the leading cause of traumatic fetal injury mortality in the United States. Computational models, useful tools to evaluate the risk of fetal loss in motor vehicle crashes, are based on a limited number of quasi-static material tests of the placenta. This study presents a total of 20 dynamic uniaxial tensile tests on the maternal side of the placenta and 10 dynamic uniaxial tensile tests on the chorion layer of the placenta. These tests were completed from 6 human placentas to determine material properties at a strain rate of 7.0 strains/s. The results show that the average peak strain at failure for both the maternal portion and the chorion layer of the placenta are similar with a value of 0.56 and 0.61, respectively. However, the average failure stress for the chorion layer, 167.8 kPa, is much higher than the average failure stress for the placenta with the chorionic plate removed, 18.6 kPa. This is due to differences in the structure and function of these layers in the placenta. In summary, dynamic loading data for the placenta have been determined for use in computational modeling of pregnant occupant kinematics in motor vehicle crashes. Moreover the computational model should utilize the material properties for the placenta without the chorion layer. PMID:18996533

  2. Can a strain yield a qubit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Colin

    2015-03-01

    A Josepshon qubit is designed via the application of a tensile strain to a topological insulator surface, sandwiched between two s-wave superconductors. The strain applied leads to a shift in Dirac point without changing the conducting states existing on the surface of a topological insulator. This strain applied can be tuned to form a π-junction in such a structure. Combining two such junctions in a ring architecture leads to the ground state of the ring being in a doubly degenerate state- ``0'' and ``1'' states of the qubit. A qubit designed this way is easily controlled via the tunable strain. We report on the conditions necessary to design such a qubit. Finally the operating time of a single qubit phase gate is derived. This work was supported by funds from Dept. of Science and Technology (Nanomission), Govt. of India, Grant No. SR/NM/NS-1101/2011.

  3. Mechanical strain effects on black phosphorus nanoresonators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui-Xia; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Park, Harold S; Rabczuk, Timon

    2016-01-14

    We perform classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effects of mechanical strain on single-layer black phosphorus nanoresonators at different temperatures. We find that the resonant frequency is highly anisotropic in black phosphorus due to its intrinsic puckered configuration, and that the quality factor in the armchair direction is higher than in the zigzag direction at room temperature. The quality factors are also found to be intrinsically larger than those in graphene and MoS2 nanoresonators. The quality factors can be increased by more than a factor of two by applying tensile strain, with uniaxial strain in the armchair direction being the most effective. However, there is an upper bound for the quality factor increase due to nonlinear effects at large strains, after which the quality factor decreases. The tension induced nonlinear effect is stronger along the zigzag direction, resulting in a smaller maximum strain for quality factor enhancement. PMID:26649476

  4. Continuum model of tensile fracture of metal melts and its application to a problem of high-current electron irradiation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Alexander E. E-mail: mayer.al.evg@gmail.com; Mayer, Polina N.

    2015-07-21

    A continuum model of the metal melt fracture is formulated on the basis of the continuum mechanics and theory of metastable liquid. A character of temperature and strain rate dependences of the tensile strength that is predicted by the continuum model is verified, and parameters of the model are fitted with the use of the results of the molecular dynamics simulations for ultra-high strain rates (≥1–10/ns). A comparison with experimental data from literature is also presented for Al and Ni melts. Using the continuum model, the dynamic tensile strength of initially uniform melts of Al, Cu, Ni, Fe, Ti, and Pb within a wide range of strain rates (from 1–10/ms to 100/ns) and temperatures (from melting temperature up to 70–80% of critical temperature) is calculated. The model is applied to numerical investigation of a problem of the high-current electron irradiation of Al, Cu, and Fe targets.

  5. Tensile stress-dependent fracture behavior and its influences on photovoltaic characteristics in flexible PbS/CdS thin-film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Min; Yeon, Deuk Ho; Mohanty, Bhaskar Chandra; Cho, Yong Soo

    2015-03-01

    Tensile stress-dependent fracture behavior of flexible PbS/CdS heterojunction thin-film solar cells on indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates is investigated in terms of the variations of fracture parameters with applied strains and their influences on photovoltaic properties. The PbS absorber layer that exhibits only mechanical cracks within the applied strain range from ∼0.67 to 1.33% is prepared by chemical bath deposition at different temperatures of 50, 70, and 90 °C. The PbS thin films prepared at 50 °C demonstrate better mechanical resistance against the applied bending strain with the highest crack initiating bending strain of ∼1.14% and the lowest saturated crack density of 0.036 μm(-1). Photovoltaic properties of the cells depend on the deposition temperature and the level of applied tensile stress. The values of short-circuit current density and fill factor are dramatically reduced above a certain level of applied strain, while open-circuit voltage is nearly maintained. The dependency of photovoltaic properties on the progress of fractures is understood as related to the reduced fracture energy and toughness, which is limitedly controllable by microstructural features of the absorber layer. PMID:25664648

  6. Reproducible strain measurement in electronic devices by applying integer multiple to scanning grating in scanning moiré fringe imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Suhyun; Jung, Younheum; Kim, Joong Jung; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum; Kondo, Yukihito

    2014-10-01

    Scanning moiré fringe (SMF) imaging by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the strain field in the channel of a transistor with a CoSi2 source and drain. Nanometer-scale SMFs were formed with a scanning grating size of ds at integer multiples of the Si crystal lattice spacing dl (ds ˜ ndl, n = 2, 3, 4, 5). The moiré fringe formula was modified to establish a method for quantifying strain measurement. We showed that strain fields in a transistor measured by SMF images were reproducible with an accuracy of 0.02%.

  7. Highly Stretchable Strain Sensors Using an Electrospun Polyurethane Nanofiber/Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Daqing; Wang, Qinghe; Yu, Jixian; Hao, Wentao; Lu, Hongbo; Zhang, Guobing; Wang, Xianghua; Qiu, Longzhen

    2016-06-01

    A highly flexible and stretchable strain sensor has been prepared by coating chemical reduction of graphene oxide on electrospun polyurethane nanofiber mats. The sensor exhibits an ohmic behavior regardless of applied strains and the current monotonically increases with the increase of the tensile strain. The morphology and stability of electrospun polyurethane nanocomposite mats were also studied. The flexible and stretchable strain sensor has great potential for practical application such as efficient human-motion detection. This cheap and simple process of graphene layer provides an effective fabrication for graphene stretchable electronic devices and strain sensors due to excellent stability and electrical proper. PMID:27427641

  8. Micromechanical analysis on tensile modulus of structured magneto-rheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. W.; Li, R.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, X. J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposed a micromechanical model to investigate the tensile modulus of structured magnetorheological elastomers (MRE) to understand its anisotropic properties. A three parameter representative volume element (RVE) model was presented to describe the microscopic structure, where particles could be organized in layer-like or chain-like structure. And the tensile modulus is defined as a ratio of stress to strain in the stretched direction. We then applied effective medium theory to derive a theoretical model for the modulus of MRE in the absence of magnetic field, considering the influence of particles configuration and volume fraction. In addition, the effect of magnetic field on magneto-induced stress inside MRE is evaluated to further establish a multi-scale model which explains the magneto-rheological effect of structured MRE. The proposed model was then compared with finite element analysis and ‘free energy’ model. It demonstrated that the proposed model match better with the finite element solutions than that of ‘free energy’ method. The advantage of the proposed model is that it couples the magnetic field and displacement field, and considers the influence of both particles spatial energy and the relative position on magneto-rheological effect. The stiffer or softer of MREs induced by an applied magnetic field under tensile stress is predicted that is conformed to previous studies.

  9. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  10. Capturing tensile size-dependency in polymer nanofiber elasticity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Wang, Jun; Han, Ray P S

    2015-02-01

    As the name implies, tensile size-dependency refers to the size-dependent response under uniaxial tension. It defers markedly from bending size-dependency in terms of onset and magnitude of the size-dependent response; the former begins earlier but rises to a smaller value than the latter. Experimentally, tensile size-dependent behavior is much harder to capture than its bending counterpart. This is also true in the computational effort; bending size-dependency models are more prevalent and well-developed. Indeed, many have questioned the existence of tensile size-dependency. However, recent experiments seem to support the existence of this phenomenon. Current strain gradient elasticity theories can accurately predict bending size-dependency but are unable to track tensile size-dependency. To rectify this deficiency a higher-order strain gradient elasticity model is constructed by including the second gradient of the strain into the deformation energy. Tensile experiments involving 10 wt% polycaprolactone nanofibers are performed to calibrate and verify our model. The results reveal that for the selected nanofibers, their size-dependency begins when their diameters reduce to 600 nm and below. Further, their characteristic length-scale parameter is found to be 1095.8 nm. PMID:25460923

  11. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  12. First in-situ lattice strains measurements under load at VULCAN

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ke; Skorpenske, Harley David; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Wang, Xun-Li; Cakmak, Ercan

    2011-01-01

    The engineering materials diffractometer, VULCAN, at the Spallation Neutron Source began commissioning on June 26, 2009. This instrument is designed for materials science and engineering studies. In situ lattice strain measurements of a model metallic material under monotonic tensile load have been performed on VULCAN. The tensile load was applied under two different strain rates, and neutron diffraction measurements were carried out in both high-intensity and high-resolution modes. These experiments demonstrated VULCAN's in situ study capability of deformation behaviors even during the early phases of commissioning.

  13. Copper damage modeling with the tensile hopkinson bar and gas gun

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D. L.; Thissell, W. R.; Trujillo, C. P.; Schwartz, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile damage nucleation in recovered copper tensile Hopkinson bar specimens has been modeled using the 2D EPIC code. The model has also been successfully applied to spallation gas gun data to greatly expand the pressure range. The split tensile Hopkinson pressure bar permits the creation of damage at fairly high strain rates (10{sup 4}/s) with large plastic strains (100%). Careful momentum trapping allows incipient damage states to be arrested and recovered for metallurgical examination. The use of notched samples allows the pressure - flow stress, or triaxiality, to be varied from 1/3 to about 1.2 to study the interplay of pressure and deviatoric stress. In this paper, we will concentrate on modeling the nucleation of ductile damage in pure copper (Hitachi). With the same material, we also study spallation in a gas gun experiment to obtain the nucleation stress under high pressure and small plastic strain. The goal of the modeling is to obtain a unified nucleation model suitable for both.

  14. Hydration dependent viscoelastic tensile behavior of cornea.

    PubMed

    Hatami-Marbini, Hamed

    2014-08-01

    The cornea is a protective transparent connective tissue covering the front of the eye. The standard uniaxial tensile experiments are among the most popular techniques for investigating biomechanical properties of the cornea. This experimental method characterizes the stress-strain response of corneal strips immersed in a bathing solution. In the present study, the important roles of corneal hydration on tensile viscoelastic properties were investigated. The thickness was used as a surrogate for hydration and uniaxial tensile experiments were performed on bovine corneal samples with four different average thickness (hydration), i.e., 1100 μm (4.87 mg water/mg dry tissue), 900 μm (4.13 mg water/mg dry tissue), 700 μm (3.20 mg water/mg dry tissue), and 500 μm (1.95 mg water/mg dry tissue). The samples were immersed in mineral oil in order to prevent their swelling during the experiments. A quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) model was used to analyze the experimental measurements and determine viscoelastic material constants. It was observed that both maximum and equilibrium (relaxed) stresses were exponentially increased with decreasing tissue thickness (hydration). Furthermore, the QLV model successfully captured the corneal viscoelastic response with an average R (2) value greater than 0.99. Additional experiments were conducted in OBSS in order to confirm that these significant changes in viscoelastic properties were because of corneal hydration and not the bathing solution. The findings of this study suggest that extra care must be taken in interpreting the results of earlier uniaxial tensile testings and their correspondence to the corneal biomechanical properties. PMID:24668183

  15. Design and Testing of the Strain Transducer for Measuring Deformations of Pipelines Operating in the Mining-deformable Ground Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawedzki, Waclaw; Tarnowski, Jerzy

    2015-10-01

    Design and laboratory test results of the strain transducer intended for monitoring and assessing stress states of pipelines sited in mining areas are presented in this paper. This transducer allows measuring strains of pipelines subjected to external forces - being the mining operations effect. Pipeline strains can have a direct influence on a tightness loss and penetration of the transported fluid into the environment. The original strain gauge transducer was proposed for performing measurements of strains. It allows measuring circumferential strains and determining the value and direction of the main longitudinal strain. This strain is determined on the basis of measuring component longitudinal strains originating from axial forces and the resultant bending moment. The main purpose of investigations was the experimental verification of the possibility of applying the strain transducer for measuring strains of polyethylene pipelines. The obtained results of the transducer subjected to influences of tensile and compression forces are presented and tests of relaxation properties of polyethylene are performed.

  16. Reproducible strain measurement in electronic devices by applying integer multiple to scanning grating in scanning moiré fringe imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhyun Jung, Younheum; Kim, Joong Jung; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum; Kondo, Yukihito

    2014-10-15

    Scanning moiré fringe (SMF) imaging by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the strain field in the channel of a transistor with a CoSi{sub 2} source and drain. Nanometer-scale SMFs were formed with a scanning grating size of d{sub s} at integer multiples of the Si crystal lattice spacing d{sub l} (d{sub s} ∼ nd{sub l}, n = 2, 3, 4, 5). The moiré fringe formula was modified to establish a method for quantifying strain measurement. We showed that strain fields in a transistor measured by SMF images were reproducible with an accuracy of 0.02%.

  17. Critical current of a rapid-quenched Nb3Al conductor under transverse compressive and axial tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeber, B.; Ferreira, A.; Mondonico, G.; Buta, F.; Senatore, C.; Flükiger, R.; Takeuchi, T.

    2011-03-01

    The electromechanical behavior of a Nb3Al wire manufactured according to the RHQT process (rapid-heating, quenching and transformation) has been investigated at magnetic fields between 15 and 19 T at 4.2 K. Of particular interest was the critical current, Ic, as a function of transverse pressure up to 300 MPa and as a function of axial tensile stress. The studied wires are pieces of a 870 m long copper stabilized Nb3Al wire with a rectangular cross section of 1.81 mm × 0.80 mm. It was observed that the critical current at 300 MPa transverse pressure, applied to the narrow side, is reduced to 93%, 90% and 88% of its stress free value at 15 T, 17 T and 19 T, respectively. After unloading from 300 MPa Ic recovers to 94% and 97% at 19 T and 15 T, respectively. A field dependence of the effect is visible above 200 MPa. For completeness, the critical current was also measured under axial tensile strain. The maximum of Ic is at 0.15% applied strain and irreversibility has been observed above 0.26%. Finally a stress versus strain measurement at 4.2 K has been carried out allowing the conversion from axial strain to stress.

  18. The dynamic tensile strength of ice and ice-silicate mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of icy media is measured at strain rates on the order of 10,000/sec to aid in the understanding of impact and cratering phenomena. Compressed samples consisting of ice and ice-silicate mixtures with 5 and 30 wt % sand were impacted at temperatures between 230 and 250 K by projectile plexiglas plates imparting the required strain rates in less than 0.75 microsec. Taking the tensile stress corresponding to the transition from intact to spalled or fragmented samples as the dynamic tensile strength, strengths of 17, 20 and 22 MPa were obtained for the pure ice, 5 wt % sand, and 30 wt % sand specimens, respectively. The values lie considerably above those observed in static testing. A continuum fracturing model is used to obtain relations between tensile strength and stress rate as well as to derive stress and damage histories during tensile loading and the size distribution of icy fragments as a function of strain rate.

  19. Tensile-stressed microelectromechanical apparatus and tiltable micromirrors formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.

    2007-01-09

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which includes a pair of tensile-stressed actuators suspending a platform above a substrate to tilt the platform relative to the substrate. A tensile stress built into the actuators initially tilts the platform when a sacrificial material used in fabrication of the MEM apparatus is removed. Further tilting of the platform can occur with a change in the ambient temperature about the MEM apparatus, or by applying a voltage to one or both of the tensile-stressed actuators. The MEM apparatus can be used to form a tiltable micromirror or an array of such devices, and also has applications for thermal management within satellites.

  20. Actuator Exerts Tensile Or Compressive Axial Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozzi, John; Richards, Cuyler H.

    1994-01-01

    Compact, manually operated mechanical actuator applies controlled, limited tensile or compressive axial force. Designed to apply loads to bearings during wear tests in clean room. Intended to replace hydraulic actuator. Actuator rests on stand and imparts axial force to part attached to clevis inside or below stand. Technician turns control screw at one end of lever. Depending on direction of rotation of control screw, its end of lever driven downward (for compression) or upward (for tension). Lever pivots about clevis pin at end opposite of control screw; motion drives downward or upward link attached via shearpin at middle of lever. Link drives coupling and, through it, clevis attached to part loaded.

  1. How does a Mycobacterium change its spots? Applying molecular tools to track diverse strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Defining genetic diversity in the wake of the release of several Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) genome sequences has become a major emphasis in the molecular biology and epidemiology of Johne’s disease research. These data can now be used to define the extent of strain diversity ...

  2. Community structure of Aspergillus flavus and persistence of the atoxigenic strain A flavus AF36 in applied fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic metabolites produced by several fungi in Aspergillus Section Flavi that frequently contaminate crops. Aflatoxins impact the value of crops. The use of atoxigenic strains of A. flavus to displace aflatoxin producers is a proven method to reduce aflatoxin contamin...

  3. Analysis of 3D strain in the human medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kolaczek, S; Hewison, C; Caterine, S; Ragbar, M X; Getgood, A; Gordon, K D

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a method to evaluate three-dimensional strain in meniscal tissue using medical imaging. Strain is calculated by tracking small teflon markers implanted within the meniscal tissue using computed tomography imaging. The results are presented for strains in the middle and posterior third of the medial menisci of 10 human cadaveric knees, under simulated physiologically relevant loading. In the middle position, an average compressive strain of 3.4% was found in the medial-lateral direction, and average tensile strains of 1.4% and 3.5% were found in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions respectively at 5° of knee flexion with an applied load of 1× body weight. In the posterior position, under the same conditions, average compressive strains of 2.2% and 6.3% were found in the medial-lateral and superior-inferior directions respectively, and an average tensile strain of 3.8% was found in the anterior-posterior direction. No statistically significant difference between strain in the middle or posterior of the meniscus or between the global strains is uncovered. PMID:27484043

  4. Tensile stress distribution sensors based on amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristoforou, E.; Reilly, R. E.

    1993-02-01

    In this paper, we report experimental results on the response of tensile stress sensors based on the magnetostrictive delay line technique, operating under pulsed field excitation. Their operation is based on the change of the magnetic circuit due to the change of the relative permeability of an amorphous ribbon when tensile stress is applied on it. They are low compliance sensors and can be used in cases where large displacement of the active core is not desirable.

  5. Variation in susceptibility of laboratory and field strains of three stored-grain insect species to beta-cyfluthrin and chlorpyrifos-methyl plus deltamethrin applied to concrete surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of beta-cyfluthrin and chlorpyrifos-methyl plus deltamethrin applied to clean, concrete floors of empty bins prior to grain storage against field strains of stored-grain insects is unknown. We exposed adults of 16 strains of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst); 8 strains ...

  6. Effect of surface strain on oxygen adsorption on Zr (0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xing; Khafizov, Marat; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2014-02-01

    The effect of surface strain on oxygen adsorption on Zr (0 0 0 1) surface is investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It is demonstrated that both surface strain and interactions between oxygen adsorbates influence the adsorption process. Oxygen binding to zirconium becomes stronger as the strain changes from compressive to tensile. When oxygen coverage is low and the oxygen interactions are negligible, surface face-centered cubic sites are the most stable for O binding. At high coverage and under compression, octahedral sites between second and third Zr layers become most favorable because the interactions between adsorbates are weakened by positive charge screening. Calculations with both single-layer adsorption model and multiple-layer adsorption model demonstrate that compressive strain at the Zr/oxide interface will provide a thermodynamic driving force for oxygen to incorporate from the surface into the bulk of Zr, while binding oxygen to the Zr surface will be easier when tensile strain is applied.

  7. Tensile buckling of advanced turboprops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Aiello, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical studies were conducted to determine analytically the tensile buckling of advanced propeller blades (turboprops) in centrifugal fields, as well as the effects of tensile buckling on other types of structural behavior, such as resonant frequencies and flutter. Theoretical studies were also conducted to establish the advantages of using high performance composite turboprops as compared to titanium. Results show that the vibration frequencies are not affected appreciably prior to 80 percent of the tensile speed. Some frequencies approach zero as the tensile buckling speed is approached. Composites provide a substantial advantage over titanium on a buckling speed to weight basis. Vibration modes change as the rotor speed is increased and substantial geometric coupling is present.

  8. Tensile Testing: A Simple Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Tensile testing may be used to decide, say, which steel to use in various constructions. Analogous testing can be done simply in the classroom using plasticine and helps to introduce pupils to the various properties studied in materials science.

  9. Control of biaxial strain in single-layer molybdenite using local thermal expansion of the substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechinger, Gerd; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Buscema, Michele; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Steele, Gary A.; Kuc, Agnieszka; Heine, Thomas; Schüller, Christian; Korn, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Single-layer MoS2 is a direct-gap semiconductor whose electronic band structure strongly depends on the strain applied to its crystal lattice. While uniaxial strain can be easily applied in a controlled way, e.g., by bending of a flexible substrate with the atomically thin MoS2 layer on top, experimental realization of biaxial strain is more challenging. Here, we exploit the large mismatch between the thermal expansion coefficients of MoS2 and a silicone-based substrate to apply a controllable biaxial tensile strain by heating the substrate with a focused laser. The effect of this biaxial strain is directly observable in optical spectroscopy as a redshift of the MoS2 photoluminescence. We also demonstrate the potential of this method to engineer more complex strain patterns by employing highly absorptive features on the substrate to achieve non-uniform heat profiles. By comparison of the observed redshift to strain-dependent band structure calculations, we estimate the biaxial strain applied by the silicone-based substrate to be up to 0.2%, corresponding to a band gap modulation of 105 meV per percentage of biaxial tensile strain.

  10. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Cameron M

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  11. An experimental investigation on the tensile moduli and strengths of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeow, Y. T.; Brinson, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a series of tensile tests on some graphite/epoxy laminates, at rates varying from 0.002 to 2 in./min are examined. The loads were applied at various angles to the fiber directions in each case. The rate-dependent behavior of the stress-strain response is assessed. Evidence is presented to indicate that failure first occurs on inner plies, and that, in some cases, moduli increase with increasing stress (or strain) level. Lamination theory is used to predict the moduli, and comparisons with experiment are given. This theory is also used in conjunction with three failure theories to predict ultimate strengths (with varying degrees of success). Further, two approaches to ply unloading after first-ply failure are used and discussed. One is a standard method found in the literature while the other is a proposed 'strength-of-materials' type of technique which is computationally much simpler.

  12. The effects of high magnitude cyclic tensile load on cartilage matrix metabolism in cultured chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Honda, K; Ohno, S; Tanimoto, K; Ijuin, C; Tanaka, N; Doi, T; Kato, Y; Tanne, K

    2000-09-01

    Excessive mechanical load is thought to be responsible for the onset of osteoarthrosis (OA), but the mechanisms of cartilage destruction caused by mechanical loads remain unknown. In this study we applied a high magnitude cyclic tensile load to cultured chondrocytes using a Flexercell strain unit, which produces a change in cell morphology from a polygonal to spindle-like shape, and examined the protein level of cartilage matrixes and the gene expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta and TNF-alpha. Toluidine blue staining, type II collagen immunostaining, and an assay of the incorporation of [35S]sulfate into proteoglycans revealed a decrease in the level of cartilage-specific matrixes in chondrocyte cultures subjected to high magnitude cyclic tensile load. PCR-Southern blot analysis showed that the high magnitude cyclic tensile load increased the mRNA level of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9, IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and TIMP-1 in the cultured chondrocytes, while the mRNA level of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 was unchanged. Moreover, the induction of MMP-1, MMP-3 and MMP-9 mRNA expression was observed in the presence of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. These findings suggest that excessive mechanical load directly changes the metabolism of cartilage by reducing the matrix components and causing a quantitative imbalance between MMPs and TIMPs. PMID:11043401

  13. Effect of strain on electronic and thermoelectric properties of few layers to bulk MoS₂.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Swastibrata; Pandey, Tribhuwan; Singh, Abhishek K

    2014-11-21

    The sensitive dependence of the electronic and thermoelectric properties of MoS₂ on applied strain opens up a variety of applications in the emerging area of straintronics. Using first-principles-based density functional theory calculations, we show that the band gap of a few layers of MoS₂ can be tuned by applying normal compressive (NC) strain, biaxial compressive (BC) strain, and biaxial tensile (BT) strain. A reversible semiconductor-to-metal transition (S-M transition) is observed under all three types of strain. In the case of NC strain, the threshold strain at which the S-M transition occurs increases when the number of layers increase and becomes maximum for the bulk. On the other hand, the threshold strain for the S-M transition in both BC and BT strains decreases when the number of layers increase. The difference in the mechanisms for the S-M transition is explained for different types of applied strain. Furthermore, the effect of both strain type and the number of layers on the transport properties are also studied using Botzmann transport theory. We optimize the transport properties as a function of the number of layers and the applied strain. 3L- and 2L-MoS₂ emerge as the most efficient thermoelectric materials under NC and BT strain, respectively. The calculated thermopower is large and comparable to some of the best thermoelectric materials. A comparison among the feasibility of these three types of strain is also discussed. PMID:25354843

  14. Tensile properties of human knee joint cartilage: I. Influence of ionic conditions, weight bearing, and fibrillation on the tensile modulus.

    PubMed

    Akizuki, S; Mow, V C; Müller, F; Pita, J C; Howell, D S; Manicourt, D H

    1986-01-01

    The flow-independent (intrinsic) tensile modulus of the extracellular matrix of human knee joint cartilage has been measured for normal, fibrillated, and osteoarthritic (removed from total knee joint replacements) cartilage. The modulus was determined in our isometric tensile apparatus and measured at equilibrium. We found a linear equilibrium stress-strain behavior up to approximately 15% strain. The modulus was measured for tissues from the high and low weight-bearing areas of the joint surfaces, the medial femoral condyle and lateral patello femoral groove, and from different zones (surface, subsurface, middle, and middle-deep) within the tissue. For all specimens, the intrinsic tensile modulus was always less than 30 MPa. Tissues from low weight-bearing areas (LWA) are stiffer than those from high weight-bearing areas (HWA). The tensile modulus of the ECM correlates strongly with the collagen/proteoglycan ratio; it is higher for LWA than for HWA. Osteoarthritic cartilage from total knee replacement procedures has a tensile stiffness less than 2 MPa. PMID:3783297

  15. Strain Engineering of the Electronic Properties in -doped Oxide Superlattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    You, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jun Hee; Okamoto, Satoshi; Cooper, Valentino R; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-01-01

    Strain effects on the electronic properties of (LaTiO3)1/(SrTiO3)N superlattices were investigated using density functional theory. Under biaxial in-plane strain within the range of 5% // 5%, the dxy orbital electrons are highly localized at the interfaces whereas the dyz and dxz orbital electrons are more distributed in the SrTiO3 (STO) spacer layers. For STO thickness N 3 unit cells (u.c.), the dxy orbital electrons form two-dimensional (2D) electron gases (2DEGs). The quantized energy levels of the 2DEG are insensitive to the STO spacer thickness, but are strongly dependent on the applied biaxial in-plane strain. As the in-plane strain changes frommore » compressive to tensile, the quantized energy levels of the dxy orbitals decrease thereby creating more states with 2D character. In contrast to the dxy orbital, the dyz and dxz orbitals always have three-dimensional (3D) transport characteristics and their energy levels increase as the strain changes from compressive to tensile. Since the charge densities in the dxy orbital and the dyz and dxz orbitals respond to biaxial in-plane strain in an opposite way, the transport dimensionality of the majority carriers can be controlled between 2D and 3D by applying biaxial in-plane strain.« less

  16. The Uniaxial Tensile Response of Porous and Microcracked Ceramic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Amit; Shyam, Amit; Watkins, Thomas R; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Stafford, Randall; Hemker, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The uniaxial tensile stress-strain behavior of three porous ceramic materials was determined at ambient conditions. Test specimens in the form of thin beams were obtained from the walls of diesel particulate filter honeycombs and tested using a microtesting system. A digital image correlation technique was used to obtain full-field 2D in-plane surface displacement maps during tensile loading, and in turn, the 2D strains obtained from displacement fields were used to determine the Secant modulus, Young s modulus and initial Poisson s ratio of the three porous ceramic materials. Successive unloading-reloading experiments were performed at different levels of stress to decouple the linear elastic, anelastic and inelastic response in these materials. It was found that the stress-strain response of these materials was non-linear and that the degree of nonlinearity is related to the initial microcrack density and evolution of damage in the material.

  17. Tensile and compressive behavior of a swirl mat composite

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B.

    1998-07-01

    The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the US Department of Energy to provide the experimentally-based, durability-driven design guidelines necessary to assure long-term structural integrity of automotive composite components. The initial focus of the ORNL Durability Project was on one representative reference material--an isocyanurate (polyurethane) reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass. The present report describes tensile and compressive testing and results for the reference composite. Behavior trends and proportional limit are established for both tension and compression. Damage development due to tensile loading and strain rate effects are discussed.

  18. Micromechanical modeling of unidirectional continuous sigma fiber-reinforced Ti-6Al-4V subjected to transverse tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W.; Bowen, P.

    2002-09-01

    A micromodeling analysis of unidirectionally reinforced Ti-6-4/SM1140+ composites subjected to transverse tensile loading has been performed using the finite-element method (FEM). The composite is assumed to the infinite and regular, with either hexagonal or rectangular arrays of fibers in an elastic-plastic matrix. Unit cells of these arrays are applied in this modeling analysis. Factors affecting transverse properties of the composites, such as thermal residual stresses caused by cooling from the composite processing temperature, fiber-matrix interface conditions, fiber volume fraction, fiber spacing, fiber packing, and test temperature are discussed. Predictions of stress-strain curves are compared with experimental results. A hexagonal fiber-packing model with a weak fiber-matrix interfacial strength predicts the transverse tensile behavior of the composite Ti-6-4/SM1140+ most accurately.

  19. Correlation of infrared thermographic patterns and acoustic emission signals with tensile deformation and fracture processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, B.; Raj, Baldev; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2001-04-01

    During tensile deformation, part of the mechanical work done on the specimen is transformed into heat and acoustic activity. The amount of acoustic activity and the thermal emissions depend on the test conditions and the deformation behavior of the specimen during loading. Authors have used thermography and acoustic emission (AE) simultaneously for monitoring tensile deformation in AISI type 316 SS. Tensile testing was carried out at 298 K at three different strain rates. It has been shown that the simultaneous use of these techniques can provide complementary information for characterizing the tensile deformation and fracture processes.

  20. Experimental Study of Highly Sensitive Sensor Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator for Wireless Strain Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao; Zhongqing; Hara, Motoaki; Mitsui, Misato; Sano, Koji; Nagasawa, Sumito; Kuwano, Hiroki

    2012-07-01

    We developed a highly sensitive strain sensor employing a surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator for a wireless sensing system. The aim of this study is to monitor the distribution of the strain in the earth crust or giant infrastructures, such as bridges, skyscrapers and power plants, for disaster prevention. A SAW strain sensor was fabricated using LiNbO3 and a quartz substrate, and applied in a tensile test by attaching the steel specimen based on Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS Z2441-1). The results confirmed that the developed sensor could detect a strain of 10-6 order with linearity.

  1. The thermal conductivity in hybridised graphene and boron nitride nanoribbons modulated with strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xue-Kun; Xie, Zhong-Xiang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2016-03-01

    Thermal transport properties in hybridised graphene and boron nitride ribbons (HGBNRs) under different strains are studied by using reverse nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that the effect of strains on the thermal conductivity is different for different types of strains. When the tensile and shear strains are applied, the thermal conductivity can be modulated at least up to 50% at room temperature as the strain ε ranges from 0 to 0.2. However, when the compressive and flexural strains are respectively applied, the thermal conductivity is insensitive to the variation of the strain. In addition, it is also found that the thermal conductivity of HGBNRs depends sensitively on the dimension of the hybridised ribbon and the relative amount of h-BN to graphene. A brief analysis of these results is given.

  2. In situ identification of elastic-plastic strain distribution in a microalloyed transformation induced plasticity steel using digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari, M.; Zarei-Hanzaki, A.; Yadegari, M.; Soltani, N.; Asghari, A.

    2014-03-01

    A non-contact strain measurement technique, based on an in-situ digital image correlation (DIC) method in association with magnetic martensite point measurement (Feritoscopy testing) was applied to study inhomogeneous deformation corresponding to martensitic transformation of a microalloyed low carbon transformation induced plasticity steel during tensile straining. The progress of inhomogeneous deformation is traced by the strain maps. The microstructural observation is used to validate the DIC results. The experimental steel shows continuous yielding with a high true fracture strength of 1410±10 MPa at 25 °C along with the lack of tensile necking. The DIC results show that the yield point is controlled by stress-assisted martensite transformation, which in turn induces the strain inhomogeneity. The latter starts prior to the yield point after straining to 0.016. The microstructural evolution reveals the ɛ-martensite is obtained through stress-assisted martensite formation. After yielding, thanks to the strain-induced martensite transformation, the deformation inhomogeneity in strain maps is increased with strain, corresponding to increasing the volume fraction of martensite. The results suggest that the continuous yielding and initial strain hardening is controlled by stress-assisted martensite formation while the higher total elongation to fracture (80%) and the tensile necking behavior is mainly influenced by the strain-induced martensite transformation.

  3. Emergence of Hyper-Resistant Escherichia coli MG1655 Derivative Strains after Applying Sub-Inhibitory Doses of Individual Constituents of Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Chueca, Beatriz; Berdejo, Daniel; Gomes-Neto, Nelson J; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of food preservation by using essential oils (EOs) and their individual constituents (ICs) is attracting enormous interest worldwide. Until now, researchers considered that treatments with such antimicrobial compounds did not induce bacterial resistance via a phenotypic (i.e., transient) response. Nevertheless, the emergence of genotypic (i.e., stable) resistance after treatment with these compounds had not been previously tested. Our results confirm that growth of Escherichia coli MG1655 in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs carvacrol, citral, and (+)-limonene oxide do not increase resistance to further treatments with either the same IC (direct resistance) or with other preservation treatments (cross-resistance) such as heat or pulsed electric fields (PEF). Bacterial mutation frequency was likewise lower when those IC's were applied; however, after 10 days of re-culturing cells in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs, we were able to isolate several derivative strains (i.e., mutants) displaying an increased minimum inhibitory concentration to those ICs. Furthermore, when compared to the wild type (WT) strain, they also displayed direct resistance and cross-resistance. Derivative strains selected with carvacrol and citral also displayed morphological changes involving filamentation along with cell counts at late-stationary growth phase that were lower than the WT strain. In addition, co-cultures of each derivative strain with the WT strain resulted in a predominance of the original strain in absence of ICs, indicating that mutants would not out-compete WT cells under optimal growth conditions. Nevertheless, growth in the presence of ICs facilitated the selection of these resistant mutants. Thus, as a result, subsequent food preservation treatments of these bacterial cultures might be less effective than expected for WT cultures. In conclusion, this study recommends that treatment with ICs at sub

  4. Emergence of Hyper-Resistant Escherichia coli MG1655 Derivative Strains after Applying Sub-Inhibitory Doses of Individual Constituents of Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Beatriz; Berdejo, Daniel; Gomes-Neto, Nelson J.; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of food preservation by using essential oils (EOs) and their individual constituents (ICs) is attracting enormous interest worldwide. Until now, researchers considered that treatments with such antimicrobial compounds did not induce bacterial resistance via a phenotypic (i.e., transient) response. Nevertheless, the emergence of genotypic (i.e., stable) resistance after treatment with these compounds had not been previously tested. Our results confirm that growth of Escherichia coli MG1655 in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs carvacrol, citral, and (+)-limonene oxide do not increase resistance to further treatments with either the same IC (direct resistance) or with other preservation treatments (cross-resistance) such as heat or pulsed electric fields (PEF). Bacterial mutation frequency was likewise lower when those IC's were applied; however, after 10 days of re-culturing cells in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs, we were able to isolate several derivative strains (i.e., mutants) displaying an increased minimum inhibitory concentration to those ICs. Furthermore, when compared to the wild type (WT) strain, they also displayed direct resistance and cross-resistance. Derivative strains selected with carvacrol and citral also displayed morphological changes involving filamentation along with cell counts at late-stationary growth phase that were lower than the WT strain. In addition, co-cultures of each derivative strain with the WT strain resulted in a predominance of the original strain in absence of ICs, indicating that mutants would not out-compete WT cells under optimal growth conditions. Nevertheless, growth in the presence of ICs facilitated the selection of these resistant mutants. Thus, as a result, subsequent food preservation treatments of these bacterial cultures might be less effective than expected for WT cultures. In conclusion, this study recommends that treatment with ICs at sub

  5. Improved Flat Specimens For Tensile And Fatigue Testing Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worthem, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    Improved shape proposed for flat, reduced-gauge-section specimens for tensile and fatigue testing of advanced composite materials at ambient and high temperatures. Typical specimen consists of flat bar 15.2 centimeters long, 1.27 centimeters wide, and 0.318 centimeters thick, with full-width tab regions at ends, 3.81-centimeters-long gauge section of reduced width in middle, and two transition regions where width tapers between tab and gauge widths along 6.35-centimeters-radius circular arc tangent to edge of gauge section. Specimen gripped by squeezing between tabs in tab regions, and tensile test load applied via tab grips. Configuration reduces undesired concentrations of stresses in transition and tab regions, forcing tensile failure to occur in gauge section and ensuring more-consistent results in tensile tests.

  6. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  7. Impact tensile properties and strength development mechanism of glass for reinforcement fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.; Oshima, K.; Kawada, H.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, impact tensile properties of E-glass were investigated by fiber bundle testing under a high strain rate. The impact tests were performed employing two types of experiments. One is the tension-type split Hopkinson pressure bar system, and the other is the universal high-speed tensile-testing machine. As the results, it was found that not only the tensile strength but also the fracture strain of E-glass fiber improved with the strain rate. The absorbed strain energy of this material significantly increased. It was also found that the degree of the strain rate dependency of E-glass fibers on the tensile strength was varied according to fiber diameter. As for the strain rate dependency of the glass fiber under tensile loading condition, change of the small crack-propagation behaviour was considered to clarify the development of the fiber strength. The tensile fiber strength was estimated by employing the numerical simulation based on the slow crack-growth model (SCG). Through the parametric study against the coefficient of the crack propagation rate, the numerical estimation value was obtained for the various testing conditions. It was concluded that the slow crack-growth behaviour in the glass fiber was an essential for the increase in the strength of this material.

  8. BRIEF COMMUNICATION: Demonstration of an in situ on-chip tensile tester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Siddharth S.; Baker, Michael S.; Beuth, Jack L.; de Boer, Maarten P.

    2009-08-01

    Polycrystalline silicon (polysilicon) strength data reported in the literature usually present results from only a limited number of trials because of the difficulties in applying high forces to the high-strength specimens. These forces are most often applied by off-chip actuators, which can pose cumbersome alignment issues. Here we demonstrate a compact on-chip tester using a thermal actuator to apply stress to a self-aligning tensile specimen via a prehensile grip mechanism. Preliminary characteristic strength and Weibull modulus values of 3.05 GPa and 12.8, respectively, are reported, in good agreement with other literature data. By querying the fracture strain of the material, this distinct measurement approach complements other methods of testing the strength of brittle polysilicon. Instrinsic test time is 5 min or less, and the area occupied is relatively small compared to other on-chip tensile test devices. This will enable many trials for high confidence in polysilicon strength distribution in future work.

  9. Tensile properties of impact ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Kellackey, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    A special test apparatus was developed to measure the tensile strength of impact ices perpendicular to the direction of growth. The apparatus consists of a split tube carefully machined to minimize the effect of the joint on impact ice strength. The tube is supported in the wind tunnel by two carefully aligned bearings. During accretion the tube is turned slowly in the icing cloud to form a uniform coating of ice on the split tube specimen. The two halves of the split tube are secured firmly by a longitudinal bolt to prevent relative motion between the two halves during ice accretion and handling. Tensile test strength results for a variety of icing conditions were obtained. Both glaze and rime ice conditions were investigated. In general, the tensile strength of impact ice was significantly less than refrigerator ice. Based on the limited data taken, the median strength of rime ice was less than glaze ice. However, the mean values were similar.

  10. Tensile Test For Arboform Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavanescu (Mazurchevici), Simona; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Nedelcu, Dumitru

    2015-07-01

    Petroleum-based plastic materials constitute a major environmental problem due to their low biodegradability and accumulation in various environments. Therefore, searching for novel biodegradable plastics is received particular attention. Our studied material, "Liquid wood" produced from lignin, natural fibres and natural additives, is completely biodegradable in natural environment, in normal conditions. This paper presents the behaviour of Arboform and Arboform reinforced with Aramidic Fibers tensile test analysis. Experimental data show that the tensile strength reached an average value of 15.8 MPa, the modulus of elasticity after tests is 3513.3MPA for Arboform and for the reinforcement the tensile strength is 23.625MPa, the modulus of elasticity after tests is 3411.5MPA, the materials present a brittle behaviour. The high mechanical properties of newly developed material, better than of other ordinary plastics, recommend it as a potential environment-friendly substituent for synthetic plastics, which are present in all fields of activity.

  11. Tensile deformation of 2618 and Al-Fe-Si-V aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leng, Y.; Porr, W. C., Jr.; Gangloff, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    The present study experimentally characterizes the effects of elevated temperature on the uniaxial tensile behavior of ingot metallurgy 2618 Al alloy and the rapidly solidified FVS 0812 P/M alloy by means of two constitutive formulations: the Ramberg/Osgood equation and the Bodner-Partom (1975) incremental formulation for uniaxial tensile loading. The elastoplastic strain-hardening behavior of the ingot metallurgy alloy is equally well represented by either formulation. Both alloys deform similarly under decreasing load after only 1-5 percent uniform tensile strain, a response which is not described by either constitutive relation.

  12. Nonlinear and Anisotropic Tensile Properties of Graft Materials used in Soft Tissue Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, Jonathon H; Elliott, Dawn M

    2010-01-01

    Background The mechanical properties of extracellular matrix grafts that are intended to augment or replace soft tissues should be comparable to the native tissue. Such grafts are often used in fiber-reinforced tissue applications that undergo multi-axial loading and therefore knowledge of the anisotropic and nonlinear properties are needed, including the moduli and Poisson's ratio in two orthogonal directions within the plane of the graft. The objective of this study was to measure the tensile mechanical properties of several marketed grafts: Alloderm, Restore, CuffPatch, and OrthADAPT. Methods The degree of anisotropy and nonlinearity within each graft was evaluated from uniaxial tensile tests and compared to their native tissue. Results The Alloderm graft was anisotropic in both the toe and linear-region of the stress-strain response, was highly nonlinear, and generally had low properties. The Restore and CuffPatch grafts had similar stress-strain responses, were largely isotropic, had a linear-region modulus of 18 MPa, and were nonlinear. OrthADAPT was anisotropic in the linear region (131 vs 47 MPa) and was highly nonlinear. The Poisson ratio for all grafts was between 0.4 and 0.7, except for the parallel orientation of Restore which was greater than 1.0. Interpretation Having an informed understanding of how the available grafts perform mechanically will allow for better assessment by the physician for which graft to apply depending upon its application. PMID:20129728

  13. Lamb wave ultrasonic evaluation of welded AA2024 specimens at tensile static and fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, M. V.; Byakov, A. V.; Shah, R. T.; Lyubutin, P. S.; Panin, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of Lamb waves ultrasonic testing technique applied for evaluation of different stress-strain and damaged state of aluminum specimens at static and fatigue loading in order to develop a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) approach. The experimental results of tensile testing of AA2024T3 specimens with welded joints are presented. Piezoelectric transducers used as actuators and sensors were adhesively bonded to the specimen's surface using two component epoxy. The set of static and cyclic tensile tests with two frequencies of acoustic testing (50 kHz and 335 kHz) were performed. The recorded signals were processed to calculate the maximum envelope in order to evaluate the changes of the stress-strain state of the specimen and its microstructure during static tension. The registered data are analyzed and discussed in terms of signal attenuation due to the formation of fatigue defects during cyclic loading. Understanding the relations between acoustic signal features and fatigue damages will provide us the ability to determine the damage state of the structure and its residual lifetime in order to design a robust SHM system.

  14. Force-strain relation of bundles of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Tan; Ren, Yu; Wu, Ping; Liao, Kin

    2006-07-01

    The force-strain relation and tensile strength of carbon nanotube bundles are studied based on the assumption that the tensile strength of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) obeys the Weibull distribution, with nonlinear stress-strain behavior. The Weibull modulus of the CNT that characterizes the dispersion of tensile strength can be estimated in terms of the maximum sustained force and the failure strain of the bundle. Bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were subjected to tensile testing using a nanomechanical testing device. Results show that the nonlinear behavior of SWNTs does affect the force-strain relation of SWNT bundles, more apparent at large strain.

  15. Tensile Properties, Ferrite Contents, and Specimen Heating of Stainless Steels in Cryogenic Gas Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, T.; Yuri, T.; Ono, Y.

    2006-03-01

    We performed tensile tests at cryogenic temperatures below 77 K and in helium gas environment for SUS 304L and SUS 316L in order to obtain basic data of mechanical properties of the materials for liquid hydrogen tank service. We evaluate tensile curves, tensile properties, ferrite contents, mode of deformation and/or fracture, and specimen heating during the testing at 4 to 77 K. For both SUS 304L and 316L, tensile strength shows a small peak around 10 K, and specimen heating decreases above 30 K. The volume fraction of α-phase increases continuously up to 70 % with plastic strain, at approximately 15 % plastic strain for 304L and up to 35 % for 316L. There was almost no clear influence of testing temperature on strain-induced martensitic transformation at the cryogenic temperatures.

  16. Strain distribution in the proximal Human femur during in vitro simulated sideways fall.

    PubMed

    Zani, Lorenzo; Erani, Paolo; Grassi, Lorenzo; Taddei, Fulvia; Cristofolini, Luca

    2015-07-16

    This study assessed: (i) how the magnitude and direction of principal strains vary for different sideways fall loading directions; (ii) how the principal strains for a sideways fall differ from physiological loading directions; (iii) the fracture mechanism during a sideways fall. Eleven human femurs were instrumented with 16 triaxial strain gauges each. The femurs were non-destructively subjected to: (a) six loading configurations covering the range of physiological loading directions; (b) 12 configurations simulating sideways falls. The femurs were eventually fractured in a sideways fall configuration while high-speed cameras recorded the event. When the same force magnitude was applied, strains were significantly larger in a sideways fall than for physiological loading directions (principal compressive strain was 70% larger in a sideways fall). Also the compressive-to-tensile strain ratio was different: for physiological loading the largest compressive strain was only 30% larger than the largest tensile strain; but for the sideways fall, compressive strains were twice as large as the tensile strains. Principal strains during a sideways fall were nearly perpendicular to the direction of principal strains for physiological loading. In the most critical regions (medial part of the head-neck) the direction of principal strain varied by less than 9° between the different physiological loading conditions, whereas it varied by up to 17° between the sideways fall loading conditions. This was associated with a specific fracture mechanism during sideways fall, where failure initiated on the superior-lateral side (compression) followed by later failure of the medially (tension), often exhibiting a two-peak force-displacement curve. PMID:25843261

  17. Effects of Strain Rates on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanism of DP780 Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengci; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Kuang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of DP780 dual phase steel were measured by quasi-static and high-speed tensile tests at strain rates between 0.001 and 1000 s-1 at room temperature. The deformation and fracture mechanisms were analyzed by observation of the tensile fracture and microstructure near the fracture. Dynamic factor and feret ratio quantitative methods were applied to study the effect of strain rate on the microstructure and properties of DP780 steel. The constitutive relation was described by a modified Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong model. The results showed that the strain rate sensitivity of yield strength is bigger than that of ultimate tensile strength; as strain rate increased, the formation of microcracks and voids at the ferrite/martensite interface can be alleviated; the strain rate effect is unevenly distributed in the plastic deformation region. Moreover, both models can effectively describe the experimental results, while the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model is more accurate because the strain-hardening rate of this model is independent of strain rate.

  18. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  19. Tensile properties of the inferior glenohumeral ligament.

    PubMed

    Bigliani, L U; Pollock, R G; Soslowsky, L J; Flatow, E L; Pawluk, R J; Mow, V C

    1992-03-01

    The tensile properties of the inferior glenohumeral ligament have been determined in 16 freshly frozen cadaver shoulders. The inferior glenohumeral ligament was divided into three anatomical regions: a superior band, an anterior axillary pouch, and a posterior axillary pouch. This yielded 48 bone-ligament-bone specimens, which were tested to failure in uniaxial tension. The superior band was consistently the thickest region, averaging 2.79 mm. The thickness of the inferior glenohumeral ligament decreased from antero-superiorly to postero-inferiorly. The resting length of all three anatomical regions was not statistically different. Total specimen strain to failure for all bone-ligament-bone specimens averaged 27%. Variations occurred between the three regions, with the anterior pouch specimens failing at a higher strain (34%) than those from the superior band (24%) or the posterior pouch (23%). Strain to failure for the ligament midsubstance (11%) was found to be significantly less than that for the entire specimen (27%). Thus, larger strain must occur near the insertion sites of the inferior glenohumeral ligament. Stress at failure was found to be nearly identical for the three regions of the ligament, averaging 5.5 MPa. These values are lower than those reported for other soft tissues, such as the anterior cruciate ligament and patellar tendon. The anterior pouch was found to be less stiff than the other two regions, perhaps suggesting that it is composed of more highly crimped collagen fibers. Three failure sites were seen for the inferior glenohumeral ligament: the glenoid insertion (40%), the ligament substance (35%), and the humeral insertion (25%). In addition, significant capsular stretching occurred before failure, regardless of the failure mode. PMID:1740736

  20. Elastic-plastic analysis of the SS-3 tensile specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests of most irradiated specimens of vanadium alloys are conducted using the miniature SS-3 specimen which is not ASTM approved. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analysis of the specimen was conducted to show that, as long as the ultimate to yield strength ratio is less than or equal to 1.25 (which is satisfied by many irradiated materials), the stress-plastic strain curve obtained by using such a specimen is representative of the true material behavior.

  1. Theory of strain-controlled magnetotransport and stabilization of the ferromagnetic insulating phase in manganite thin films.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anamitra; Cole, William S; Woodward, Patrick; Randeria, Mohit; Trivedi, Nandini

    2013-04-12

    We show that applying strain on half-doped manganites makes it possible to tune the system to the proximity of a metal-insulator transition and thereby generate a colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) response. This phase competition not only allows control of CMR in ferromagnetic metallic manganites but can be used to generate CMR response in otherwise robust insulators at half-doping. Further, from our realistic microscopic model of strain and magnetotransport calculations within the Kubo formalism, we demonstrate a striking result of strain engineering that, under tensile strain, a ferromagnetic charge-ordered insulator, previously inaccessible to experiments, becomes stable. PMID:25167302

  2. Effect of strain on the electronic transport properties of mono- and bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Fen; Du, Xu

    It has been theoretically proposed that strain can have a significant impact on the electronic and charge transport properties of mono- and bilayer graphene. Experimental study of such ''strain engineering'' in field effect devices has been limited, mainly due to the challenge in creating an effective tuning knob of strain. Here we report the fabrication and characterization of suspended graphene field effect transistor (FET) on a Polyimide substrate, where uniaxial strain is applied by bending the substrate. Magnetotransport measurement of both mono- and bilayer graphene FETs are carried out with variable strain, from compressive to tensile, over wide range of temperature (4.2-300K). The impact of the strain on the conductivity of graphene will be discussed and compared to the theoretical predictions on strain-induced gauge field and flexural phonon scatterings.

  3. Manual for LDEF tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    One of the experiments aboard the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) consists of a tray of approximately one hundred tensile specimens of several candidate space structure composite materials. During the LDEF flight the materials will be subjected to the space environment and to possible contamination during launch and recovery. Tensile tests of representative samples were made before the LDEF flight to obtain baseline data. Similar tests will be made on control specimens stored on earth for the length of the LDEF flight and on recovered flight specimens. This manual codifies the details of testing, data acquisition, and handling used in obtaining the baseline data so that the same procedures and equipment will be used on the subsequent tests.

  4. A magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool for quantitative analysis of strain induced cellular reorientation and actin alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademolhosseini, F.; Liu, C.-C.; Lim, C. J.; Chiao, M.

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available cell strain tools, such as pneumatically actuated elastomer substrates, require special culture plates, pumps, and incubator setups. In this work, we present a magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool (MACSAT) that can be implemented using off-the-shelf components and conventional incubators. We determine the strain field on the MACSAT elastomer substrate using numerical models and experimental measurements and show that a specific region of the elastomer substrate undergoes a quasi-uniaxial 2D stretch, and that cells confined to this region of the MACSAT elastomer substrate undergo tensile, compressive, or zero axial strain depending on their angle of orientation. Using the MACSAT to apply cyclic strain on endothelial cells, we demonstrate that actin filaments within the cells reorient away from the stretching direction, towards the directions of minimum axial strain. We show that the final actin orientation angles in strained cells are spread over a region of compressive axial strain, confirming previous findings on the existence of a varied pre-tension in the actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. We also demonstrate that strained cells exhibit distinctly different values of actin alignment coherency compared to unstrained cells and therefore propose that this parameter, i.e., the coherency of actin alignment, can be used as a new readout to determine the occurrence/extent of actin alignment in cell strain experiments. The tools and methods demonstrated in this study are simple and accessible and can be easily replicated by other researchers to study the strain response of other adherent cells.

  5. Tensile properties of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber in an epoxy matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    The fiber performance and reinforcement potential for fiber composites of a special PAN-based graphite fiber were evaluated by testing the fiber's tensile properties in an epoxy matrix. Representative strand samples were taken from 30 spools of single-end, 1500-filament fiber to make over 5000 fiber/epoxy strand specimens using the filament-winding process. Characteristics studied were fiber uniformity, strength and modulus distributions at room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures, stress-strain behavior, the effect of strain rate on fiber strength, and acoustic emission during tensile loading to failure. The fiber was found to have a 3570-MPa failure stress, a 1.7% failure strain, a 206-GPa modulus, and a density of 1.77 Mg/cu m at 23 C. Liquid-nitrogen temperature and various strain rates had no significant effect on fiber tensile properties.

  6. Tensile stress and creep in thermally grown oxide.

    PubMed

    Veal, Boyd W; Paulikas, Arvydas P; Hou, Peggy Y

    2006-05-01

    Structural components that operate at high temperatures (for example, turbine blades) rely on thermally grown oxide (TGO), commonly alumina, for corrosion protection. Strains that develop in TGOs during operation can reduce the protectiveness of the TGO. However, the occurrence of growth strains in TGOs, and mechanisms that cause them, are poorly understood. It is accepted that compressive strains can develop as oxygen and metal atoms meet to form new growth within constrained oxide. More controversial is the experimental finding that large tensile stresses, close to 1 GPa, develop during isothermal growth conditions in alumina TGO formed on a FeCrAlY alloy. Using a novel technique based on synchrotron radiation, we have confirmed these previous results, and show that the tensile strain develops as the early oxide, (Fe,Cr,Al)(2)O(3), converts to alpha-Al2O3 during the growth process. This allows us to model the strain behaviour by including creep and this diffusion-controlled phase change. PMID:16604078

  7. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  8. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  9. High-temperature tensile tester for ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M.

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus measures tensile strength of rigid, low-density ceramic materials at temperatures up to 1375 K. Tensile grips mate with tensile specimen and form top and bottom of lightweight furnace. Apparatus can only be used with rigid materials and grips must be stronger than material under test.

  10. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  11. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  12. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  13. Microstructure Evolution and Analysis of A [011] Orientation, Single-Crystal, Nickel-Based Superalloy During Tensile Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Sugui; Zhang, Shu; Li, Chenxi; Yu, Huichen; Su, Yong; Yu, Xingfu; Yu, Lili

    2012-10-01

    By means of the elastic-plastic finite-element method (FEM) for calculating the distribution features of the von Mises stress and strain energy density, the influences of the applied stress on the von Mises stress of the γ'/ γ phases and the rafting of the γ' phase for the [011] orientation, single-crystal, nickel-based superalloy are investigated. The results show that, after being fully heat treated, the microstructure of the [011] orientation, single-crystal, nickel-based superalloy consists of the cuboidal γ' phase embedded coherently in the γ matrix, and the cuboidal γ' phase on (100) plane is regularly arranged along a 45 deg angle relative to the [011] orientation. Compared with the matrix channel of [010] orientation, the bigger von Mises stress is produced within the [001] matrix channel when the tensile stress is applied along the [011] orientation. Under the action of the larger principal stress component, the bigger expanding lattice strain occurs on the (001) plane of the cuboidal γ' phase along the [010] direction, which may trap the Al, Ti atoms with a bigger atomic radius for promoting the directional growth of the γ' phase into the stripe-like rafted structure along the [001] orientation. The changes of the interatomic potential energy, misfit stress, and interfacial energy during the tensile creep are thought to be the driving forces of promoting the elements' diffusion and directional growth of the γ' phase.

  14. Strain enhancement of acoustic phonon limited mobility in monolayer TiS3.

    PubMed

    Aierken, Yierpan; Çakır, Deniz; Peeters, Francois M

    2016-06-01

    Strain engineering is an effective way to tune the intrinsic properties of a material. Here, we show by using first-principles calculations that both uniaxial and biaxial tensile strain applied to monolayer TiS3 are able to significantly modify its intrinsic mobility. From the elastic modulus and the phonon dispersion relation we determine the tensile strain range where structure dynamical stability of the monolayer is guaranteed. Within this region, we find more than one order of enhancement of the acoustic phonon limited mobility at 300 K (100 K), i.e. from 1.71 × 10(4) (5.13 × 10(4)) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) to 5.53 × 10(5) (1.66 × 10(6)) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). The degree of anisotropy in both mobility and effective mass can be tuned by using tensile strain. Furthermore, we can either increase or decrease the band gap of TiS3 monolayer by applying strain along different crystal directions. This property allows us to use TiS3 not only in electronic but also in optical applications. PMID:27171542

  15. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  16. Effect of Tensile Stress on Cavitation Erosion and Damage of Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibi, M.; Inaba, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kishimoto, K.; Hayabusa, K.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation erosion tests for epoxy, unsaturated polyester, polycarbonate, and acrylic resin were conducted under various tensile stress conditions (Tensile-Cavitation test). A new testing device was designed to conduct the Tensile-Cavitation test and observe specimen surface during the experiment based on ASTM G32. When tensile stress of 1.31 MPa was loaded on epoxy resin, cracks occurred on the specimen after 0.5 hours during cavitation erosion. When no tensile stress was loaded on the epoxy resin, the damage was general cavitation erosion only. As well as the epoxy resin, unsaturated polyester resin applied tensile stress of 1.31 MPa and polycarbonate resin of 6.54 MPa indicated erosion damages and cracks. When tensile stress of 6.54 MPa was loaded on acrylic resin, the erosion damage was almost the same as the results without tensile stress. We confirmed that anti-cavitation property of epoxy resin was higher than those of acrylic and polycarbonate without tensile stress while the damage of epoxy resin was much serious than that of acrylic resins under tensile stress loadings.

  17. Nonlinear acoustic approach to material characterisation of polymers and composites in tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Solodov, I; Pfleiderer, K; Gerhard, H; Busse, G

    2004-04-01

    The paper reports on experimental study of elastic nonlinearity of polymers and glass fibre-reinforced (GFR-) composites in a wide range of tensile stress applied (up to a fracture limit). Focused slanted transmission mode (FSTM) of air-coupled ultrasound is adapted for remote generation and detection of flexural waves in the samples of plastics. Local noncontact measurements of flexural wave velocity as a function of static strain are used to calculate the second-order nonlinearity parameters beta2 and study their behaviour through a loading cycle. Molecular untangling and crazing phenomena are identified, respectively, with maxima of positive and negative beta2 in thermoplastics. In composites, mechanics of fibre-matrix interaction is considered for brittle and plastic fractures. Hysteresis in velocity variation during loading-unloading cycle is used as an indicator of residual defect accumulation. PMID:15047422

  18. In situ stress observation in oxide films and how tensile stress influences oxygen ion conduction

    PubMed Central

    Fluri, Aline; Pergolesi, Daniele; Roddatis, Vladimir; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Many properties of materials can be changed by varying the interatomic distances in the crystal lattice by applying stress. Ideal model systems for investigations are heteroepitaxial thin films where lattice distortions can be induced by the crystallographic mismatch with the substrate. Here we describe an in situ simultaneous diagnostic of growth mode and stress during pulsed laser deposition of oxide thin films. The stress state and evolution up to the relaxation onset are monitored during the growth of oxygen ion conducting Ce0.85Sm0.15O2-δ thin films via optical wafer curvature measurements. Increasing tensile stress lowers the activation energy for charge transport and a thorough characterization of stress and morphology allows quantifying this effect using samples with the conductive properties of single crystals. The combined in situ application of optical deflectometry and electron diffraction provides an invaluable tool for strain engineering in Materials Science to fabricate novel devices with intriguing functionalities. PMID:26912416

  19. In situ stress observation in oxide films and how tensile stress influences oxygen ion conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluri, Aline; Pergolesi, Daniele; Roddatis, Vladimir; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Many properties of materials can be changed by varying the interatomic distances in the crystal lattice by applying stress. Ideal model systems for investigations are heteroepitaxial thin films where lattice distortions can be induced by the crystallographic mismatch with the substrate. Here we describe an in situ simultaneous diagnostic of growth mode and stress during pulsed laser deposition of oxide thin films. The stress state and evolution up to the relaxation onset are monitored during the growth of oxygen ion conducting Ce0.85Sm0.15O2-δ thin films via optical wafer curvature measurements. Increasing tensile stress lowers the activation energy for charge transport and a thorough characterization of stress and morphology allows quantifying this effect using samples with the conductive properties of single crystals. The combined in situ application of optical deflectometry and electron diffraction provides an invaluable tool for strain engineering in Materials Science to fabricate novel devices with intriguing functionalities.

  20. In situ stress observation in oxide films and how tensile stress influences oxygen ion conduction.

    PubMed

    Fluri, Aline; Pergolesi, Daniele; Roddatis, Vladimir; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Many properties of materials can be changed by varying the interatomic distances in the crystal lattice by applying stress. Ideal model systems for investigations are heteroepitaxial thin films where lattice distortions can be induced by the crystallographic mismatch with the substrate. Here we describe an in situ simultaneous diagnostic of growth mode and stress during pulsed laser deposition of oxide thin films. The stress state and evolution up to the relaxation onset are monitored during the growth of oxygen ion conducting Ce0.85Sm0.15O2-δ thin films via optical wafer curvature measurements. Increasing tensile stress lowers the activation energy for charge transport and a thorough characterization of stress and morphology allows quantifying this effect using samples with the conductive properties of single crystals. The combined in situ application of optical deflectometry and electron diffraction provides an invaluable tool for strain engineering in Materials Science to fabricate novel devices with intriguing functionalities. PMID:26912416

  1. Strain Engineering for Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Based Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tingting; Penumatcha, Ashish V; Appenzeller, Joerg

    2016-04-26

    Using electrical characteristics from three-terminal field-effect transistors (FETs), we demonstrate substantial strain induced band gap tunability in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) in line with theoretical predictions and optical experiments. Devices were fabricated on flexible substrates, and a cantilever sample holder was used to apply uniaxial tensile strain to the various multilayer TMD FETs. Analyzing in particular transfer characteristics, we argue that the modified device characteristics under strain are clear evidence of a band gap reduction of 100 meV in WSe2 under 1.35% uniaxial tensile strain at room temperature. Furthermore, the obtained device characteristics imply that the band gap does not shrink uniformly under strain relative to a reference potential defined by the source/drain contacts. Instead, the band gap change is only related to a change of the conduction band edge of WSe2, resulting in a decrease in the Schottky barrier (SB) for electrons without any change for hole injection into the valence band. Simulations of SB device characteristics are employed to explain this point and to quantify our findings. Last, our experimental results are compared with DFT calculations under strain showing excellent agreement between theoretical predictions and the experimental data presented here. PMID:27043387

  2. Molecular dynamic simulation of stress evolution analysis in Cu nanowire under ultra-high strain-rate simple tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan-Ching; Pen, Dar-Jen; Chen, Jiun-Nan

    2014-04-01

    This study analyses the behaviour of atoms associated with the propagation of stress waves in Cu nanowires (NWs) during uniaxial tensile deformation using molecular dynamic simulation. Maximum local stress (MLS) and virial stress (VS) methods are adopted to express dynamic stress in ⟨100⟩ Cu NWs under tension. Simulation results indicated that the VS method enhances the averaging effect at ultra-high strain rates (above 1010 s-1), leading to serious undervaluation of yield stress. However, the MLS method provides superior prediction results for the dynamic mechanical responses of NWs under tension at the ultra-high strain rate than does the VS. At a strain rate of 7 × 1010 s-1, the double-peak stress phenomenon was observed in the stress-strain curve using the MLS method. The response time (Trs) to wave propagation, observed at an ultra-high strain rate, is responsible for the accumulation of the elastic stress that is applied at the beginning of tensile loading in a short period, producing the first stress peak. Following plastic deformation, the encounter of the wavefronts with the reduced tensile stress causes the fully constructive interference effect in the middle of the tensile NWs, producing the second stress peak. The results explain the dynamic mechanical behaviour of NWs, contributing to future applications of subsonic manufacturing.

  3. A Study of Influencing Factors on the Tensile Response of a Titanium Matrix Composite With Weak Interfacial Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    The generalized method of cells micromechanics model is utilized to analyze the tensile stress-strain response of a representative titanium matrix composite with weak interfacial bonding. The fiber/matrix interface is modeled through application of a displacement discontinuity between the fiber and matrix once a critical debonding stress has been exceeded. Unidirectional composites with loading parallel and perpendicular to the fibers are examined, as well as a cross-ply laminate. For each of the laminates studied, analytically obtained results are compared to experimental data. The application of residual stresses through a cool-down process was found to have a significant effect on the tensile response. For the unidirectional laminate with loading applied perpendicular to the fibers, fiber packing and fiber shape were shown to have a significant effect on the predicted tensile response. Furthermore, the interface was characterized through the use of semi-emperical parameters including an interfacial compliance and a "debond stress;" defined as the stress level across the interface which activates fiber/matrix debonding. The results in this paper demonstrate that if architectural factors are correctly accounted for and the interface is appropriately characterized, the macro-level composite behavior can be correctly predicted without modifying any of the fiber or matrix constituent properties.

  4. Local structural excitations in model glass systems under applied load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swayamjyoti, S.; Löffler, J. F.; Derlet, P. M.

    2016-04-01

    The potential-energy landscape of a model binary Lennard-Jones structural glass is investigated as a function of applied external strain, in terms of how local structural excitations (LSEs) respond to the load. Using the activation relaxation technique and nudged elastic band methods, the evolving structure and barrier energy of such LSEs are studied in detail. For the case of a tensile/compressive strain, the LSE barrier energies generally decrease/increase, whereas under pure shear, it may either increase or decrease resulting in a broadening of the barrier energy distribution. It is found that how a particular LSE responds to an applied strain is strongly controlled by the LSE's far-field internal stress signature prior to loading.

  5. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  6. On the tensile strength of insect swarms.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T

    2016-01-01

    Collective animal groups are often described by the macroscopic patterns they form. Such global patterns, however, convey limited information about the nature of the aggregation as a whole. Here, we take a different approach, drawing on ideas from materials testing to probe the macroscopic mechanical properties of mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. By manipulating ground-based visual features that tend to position the swarms in space, we apply an effective tensile load to the swarms, and show that we can quasi-statically pull single swarms apart into multiple daughter swarms. Our results suggest that swarms surprisingly have macroscopic mechanical properties similar to solids, including a finite Young's modulus and yield strength, and that they do not flow like viscous fluids. PMID:27559838

  7. Dynamic tensile failure mechanics of the musculoskeletal neck using a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Yliniemi, Eno M; Pellettiere, Joseph A; Doczy, Erica J; Nuckley, David J; Perry, Chris E; Ching, Randal P

    2009-05-01

    Although the catapult phase of pilot ejections has been well characterized in terms of human response to compressive forces, the effect of the forces on the human body during the ensuing ejection phases (including windblast and parachute opening shock) has not been thoroughly investigated. Both windblast and parachute opening shock have been shown to induce dynamic tensile forces in the human cervical spine. However, the human tolerance to such loading is not well known. Therefore, the main objective of this research project was to measure human tensile neck failure mechanics to provide data for computational modeling, anthropometric test device development, and improved tensile injury criteria. Twelve human cadaver specimens, including four females and eight males with a mean age of 50.1+/-9 years, were subjected to dynamic tensile loading through the musculoskeletal neck until failure occurred. Failure load, failure strain, and tensile stiffness were measured and correlated with injury type and location. The mean failure load for the 12 specimens was 3100+/-645 N, mean failure strain was 16.7+/-5.4%, and mean tensile stiffness was 172+/-54.5 N/mm. The majority of injuries (8) occurred in the upper cervical spine (Oc-C3), and none took place in the midcervical region (C3-C5). The results of this study assist in filling the existing void in dynamic tensile injury data and will aid in developing improved neck injury prevention strategies. PMID:19388771

  8. High-temperature tensile properties of fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jablonski, David A.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of tensile properties of unidirectional silicon carbide fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SiC/RBSN) composite specimens were carried out in air at 25, 1300, and 1500 C, using a new testing technique and a specially designed gripping system that minimizes bending moment and assures that failure always occurred in the gage section. The material was found to display metallike stress-strain behavior at all temperatures tested, and a noncatastrophic failure beyond the matrix fracture. The tensile properties were found to be temperature dependent, with the values of the ultimate tensile strength decreasing with temperature, from 543 MPa at 25 C to 169 at 1500 C.

  9. Interface stress development in the Cu/Ag nanostructured multilayered film during the tensile deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Su, R.; Nie, Z. H.; Zhang, Q. H.; Li, X. J.; Li, L. E-mail: ydwang@mail.neu.edu.cn; Zhou, X. T.; Wang, Y. D. E-mail: ydwang@mail.neu.edu.cn; Wu, Y. D.; Hui, X. D.; Wang, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Cu/Ag nanostructured multilayered films (NMFs) with different stacking sequences were investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction during the tensile deformations for interface stress study. The lattice strains were carefully traced and the stress partition, which usually occurs in the multiphase bulk metallic materials during plastic deformations, was first quantitatively analyzed in the NMFs here. The interface stress of the Cu/Ag NMFs was carefully analyzed during the tensile deformation and the results revealed that the interface stress was along the loading direction and exhibited three-stage evolution. This tensile interface stress has a detrimental effect on the deformation, leading to the early fracture of the NMFs.

  10. Establishing Correlations for Predicting Tensile Properties Based on the Shear Punch Test and Vickers Microhardness data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milot, Timothy S.

    A series of mechanical tests was performed on a matrix of pressure vessel alloys to establish correlations between shear punch tests (SPT), microhardness (Hv), and tensile data. The purpose is to estimate tensile properties from SPT and Hv data. Small specimen testing is central to characterization of irradiation-induced changes in alloys used for nuclear applications. SPT have the potential for estimating tensile yield and ultimate strengths, strain hardening and ductility data, by using TEM disks, for example. Additional insight into SPT was gained by performing finite element analysis (FEA) simulations.

  11. Tensile deformation and failure of amyloid and amyloid-like protein fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J.

    2014-03-01

    Here we report a series of full atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of six amyloid or amyloid-like protein fibrils in order to systematically understand the effect of different secondary structure motifs on the mechanical tensile and failure response of cross-\\beta protein fibrils. We find a similar failure behavior across the six structures; an initial failure event occurs at small strains involving cooperative rupture of a group of hydrogen bonds, followed by a slow one-by-one hydrogen bond rupture process as the remaining \\beta -sheets peel off with very low applied stress. We also find that the ultimate tensile strength of the protein fibrils investigated scales directly with the number of hydrogen bonds per unit area which break in the initial rupture event. Our results provide insights into structure-property relationships in protein fibrils important for disease and engineering applications and lay the groundwork for the development of materials selection criteria for the design of de novo amyloid-based functional biomaterials.

  12. Application of slip-band visualization technique to tensile analysis of laser-welded aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchiar, -; Yoshida, Sanichiro J.; Widiastuti, Rini; Kusnowo, A.; Takahashi, Kunimitsu; Sato, Shunichi

    1997-03-01

    Recently we have developed a new optical interferometric technique capable of visualizing slip band occurring in a deforming solid-state object. In this work we applied this technique to a tensile analysis of laser-welded aluminum plate samples, and successfully revealed stress concentration that shows strong relationships with the tensile strength and the fracture mechanism. We believe that this method is a new, convenient way to analyze the deformation characteristics of welded objects and evaluate the quality of welding. The analysis has been made for several types of aluminum alloys under various welding conditions, and has shown the following general results. When the penetration is deep, a slip band starts appearing at the fusion zone in an early stage of the elastic region of the strain-stress curve and stays there till the sample fractures at that point. When the penetration is shallow, a slip band appears only after the yield point and moves vigorously over the whole surface of the sample till a late stage of plastic deformation when the slip band stays at the fusion zone where the sample eventually fractures. When the penetration depth is medium, some intermediate situation of the above two extreme cases is observed.

  13. Effect of tensile mean stress on fatigue behavior of single-crystal and directionally solidified superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Two nickel base superalloys, single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf, were studied in view of the potential usage of the former and usage of the latter as blade materials for the turbomachinery of the space shuttle main engine. The baseline zero mean stress (ZMS) fatigue life (FL) behavior of these superalloys was established, and then the effect of tensile mean stress (TMS) on their FL behavior was characterized. At room temperature these superalloys have lower ductilities and higher strengths than most polycrystalline engineering alloys. The cycle stress-strain response was thus nominally elastic in most of the fatigue tests. Therefore, a stress range based FL prediction approach was used to characterize both the ZMS and TMS fatigue data. In the past, several researchers have developed methods to account for the detrimental effect of tensile mean stress on the FL for polycrystalline engineering alloys. However, the applicability of these methods to single crystal and directionally solidified superalloys has not been established. In this study, these methods were applied to characterize the TMS fatigue data of single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf and were found to be unsatisfactory. Therefore, a method of accounting for the TMS effect on FL, that is based on a technique proposed by Heidmann and Manson was developed to characterize the TMS fatigue data of these superalloys. Details of this method and its relationship to the conventionally used mean stress methods in FL prediction are discussed.

  14. Accurate strain measurements in highly strained Ge microbridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassenq, A.; Tardif, S.; Guilloy, K.; Osvaldo Dias, G.; Pauc, N.; Duchemin, I.; Rouchon, D.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Widiez, J.; Escalante, J.; Niquet, Y.-M.; Geiger, R.; Zabel, T.; Sigg, H.; Faist, J.; Chelnokov, A.; Rieutord, F.; Reboud, V.; Calvo, V.

    2016-06-01

    Ge under high strain is predicted to become a direct bandgap semiconductor. Very large deformations can be introduced using microbridge devices. However, at the microscale, strain values are commonly deduced from Raman spectroscopy using empirical linear models only established up to ɛ100 = 1.2% for uniaxial stress. In this work, we calibrate the Raman-strain relation at higher strain using synchrotron based microdiffraction. The Ge microbridges show unprecedented high tensile strain up to 4.9% corresponding to an unexpected Δω = 9.9 cm-1 Raman shift. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the Raman strain relation is not linear and we provide a more accurate expression.

  15. Scaffold metamaterial and its application as strain sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; Ren, Mengxin Pi, Biao; Cai, Wei Xu, Jingjun; Wu, Yang

    2015-08-31

    In this paper, strain sensors based on planar scaffold metamaterial design are demonstrated. The optical properties of such metamaterials are studied, which are proved to be highly dependent on the deformation of the structure. Fabricating such metamaterial on compliant polymeric substrate, the geometric parameters could be tuned with external strain and hence are found to control the reflection resonance condition of the metamaterial. Such mechanical tunability provides the opportunity to realize efficient strain sensors and about 27 nm resonance wavelength shift is observed by applying as much as 37% tensile strain. Furthermore, distinct from most of the previous works, our structures are based on “intaglio” design, which could be manufactured directly by one step fabrication using focused ion beam cutting, hence makes the fabrication process much simpler.

  16. Tensile properties of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.; McDonald, R.E.; Booker, M.K.; Bodine, G.C.

    1982-02-01

    Tensile properties of commercial heats of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo alloy are presented for test temperatures in the range from room temperature to 760/sup 0/C. Data included the effects of melting practice, compositional differences, strain rate (8.0 to 0.00008/min), postweld heat treatment (1 through 112 h at 732/sup 0/C), tempering temperature (732 and 746/sup 0/C versus 760/sup 0/C), isothermal annealing (1038/sup 0/C for 1 h and 704/sup 0/C for 24 h followed by AC), and thermal aging (5000 and 11,600 h at 538, 593, and 649/sup 0/C). The average-to-minimum property range for the yield and ultimate tensile strengths was compared with the similar data range for standard 9 Cr-1 Mo alloy. Tensile data on commercial heats were used to set the room-temperature specified minimum values for the alloy. The conservativeness of the specified minimum values was checked against the data at several strain rates, data after postweld heat treatment at 732/sup 0/C up to 112 h, and data on thermally aged material.

  17. Tensile Properties of GRCop-84

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Loewenthal, William S.; Yun, Hee-Man

    2012-01-01

    This is a chapter in the final report on GRCop-84 for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Second Generation/Project Constellation Program. It contains information on the tensile properties of GRCop-84. GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) was produced by extrusion and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIPing). Some of the extrusions were rolled to plate and sheet while other extrusions were drawn into tubing. The material was further subjected to various heat treatments corresponding to annealing, anticipated typical brazing conditions, an end-of-life condition and various elevated temperature exposures to attempt to improve creep resistance. As anticipated, cold work increased strength while decreasing ductility. Annealing at 600 C (1112 F) and higher temperatures was effective. An exposure for 100 h at 500 C (932 F) resulted in an increase in strength rather than the anticipated decrease. High temperature simulated-braze cycles and thermal exposures lowered the strength of GRCop-84, but the deceases were small compared to precipitation strengthened copper alloys. It was observed that the excess Cr could form large precipitates that lower the reduction in area though it appears a minimum amount is required. Overall, GRCop-84 exhibits good stability of its tensile properties, which makes it an excellent candidate for rocket engine liners and many other high temperature applications.

  18. Separation of the strain components for use in strainrange partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Halford, G. R.; Nachtigall, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Two methods are presented for separating the inelastic strain components of a complex hysteresis loop so that strainrange partitioning formulas can be applied to accurately determine cyclic life at elevated temperatures. These methods are required only if lower bounds established by strainrange partitioning concepts have been deemed inadequate in the establishment of expected lifetime. In one method, rapid loading and unloading is applied in the tensile and compressive half to isolate the plastic strain. In the second method, the creep is measured at a discrete number of points along the hysteresis loop by combining load-control tests into the general pattern of strain cycling under arbitrary temperature. Both methods are shown to give good results.

  19. Biodegradation of soil-applied pesticides by selected strains of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) and their effects on bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Myresiotis, Charalampos K; Vryzas, Zisis; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, Euphemia

    2012-04-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the influence of four PGPR strains on the degradation of five soil applied pesticides and their effects on bacterial growth. Interactions of Bacillus subtilis GB03, Bacillus subtilis FZB24, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens IN937a and Bacillus pumilus SE34 with two concentrations of acibenzolar-S-methyl, metribuzin, napropamide, propamocarb hydrochloride and thiamethoxam in liquid culture and soil microcosm were studied. The degradation of acibenzolar-S-methyl by all PGPR tested in low and high concentration, was 5.4 and 5.7 times, respectively, faster than that in non-inoculated liquid culture medium. At the end of the 72-h liquid cultured experiments, 8-18, 9-11, 15-36 and 11-22% of metribuzin, napropamide, propamocarb hydrochloride and thiamethoxam, respectively, had disappeared from PGPR inoculated medium. Under the soil microcosm experimental conditions, the half-lives of acibenzolar-S-methyl incubated in the presence of PGPR strains spiked at 1.0 and 10.0 mg kg(-1) were 10.3-16.4 and 9.2-15.9 days, respectively, markedly lower compared with >34.2 days in the control. From the rest pesticides studied degradation of propamocarb hydrochloride and thiamethoxam was enhanced in the presence of B. amyloliquefaciens IN937a and B. pumilus SE34. Acibenzolar-S-methyl, propamocarb hydrochloride and thiamethoxam significantly increased the PGPR growth. However, the stimulatory effect was related to the level of pesticide spiked. PMID:21870159

  20. The effect of spherical inclusions in metallic glass nanowires under tensile test and its relation to atomic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda, Matias; Gutierrez, Gonzalo; Amigo, Nicolas

    The plastic behavior of crystalline metals is well understood. It is know that this regime is mainly mediated by nucleation and propagation of dislocations as well as by grain boundary sliding. In metallic glasses (MGs) the plastic behavior is quite different from their crystalline counterparts and a relationship between atomic-micro structure and properties remains one of the barriers that has hampered the progress to wide applications of MGs. In particular it would be desirable to have studies which directly relate the evolution of the shear bands (SBs) and glass matrix structure to each step of the applied strain, which would allow us to easily connect the evolution of the atomic structure to the stress-strain curve. Here we present a computational tensile test which shows the evolution of the atomic structure according to the strain is applied for a Cu50Zr50 metallic glass nanowire at 300 K with a Cu-Zr b2 inclusion in the center of the system with three different radius from 20 to 60 Å. The system consists of a million atoms and the local structure is analyzed by means of the Voronoi polyhedral technique and the nucleation and propagation of SBs by monitoring the local atomic shear strain. CONICyT PhD Fellowship No. 21140904.

  1. Strain effects on the electronic properties in δ -doped oxide superlattices

    DOE PAGESBeta

    You, Jeong Ho; Lee, Jun Hee; Okamoto, Satoshi; Cooper, Valentino; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2015-02-07

    We investigated strain effects on the electronic properties of (LaTiO3)1/(SrTiO3)N superlattices using density functional theory. Under biaxial in-plane strain within the range of -5% ≤ ε// ≤ 5%, the dxy orbital electrons are highly localized at the interfaces whereas the dyz and dxz orbital electrons are more distributed in the SrTiO3 (STO) spacer layers. For STO thickness N ≥ 3 unit cells (u.c.), the dxy orbital electrons form two-dimensional (2D) electron gases (2DEGs). The quantized energy levels of the 2DEG are insensitive to the STO spacer thickness, but are strongly dependent on the applied biaxial in-plane strain. As the in-planemore » strain changes from compressive to tensile, the quantized energy levels of the dxy orbitals decrease thereby creating more states with 2D character. In contrast to the dxy orbital, the dyz and dxz orbitals always have three-dimensional (3D) transport characteristics and their energy levels increase as the strain changes from compressive to tensile. In conclusion, since the charge densities in the dxy orbital and the dyz and dxz orbitals respond to biaxial in-plane strain in an opposite way, the transport dimensionality of the majority carriers can be controlled between 2D and 3D by applying biaxial in-plane strain.« less

  2. Hoop Tensile Properties of Ceramic Matrix Composite Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; DiCarlo, James A.; Yun, HeeMan; Barnett, Terry

    2004-01-01

    Tensile stress-strain properties in the hoop direction were obtained for 100-mm diameter SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite cylinders using ring specimens machined form the cylinder ends. The cylinders were fabricated from 2D balanced SiC fabric with several material variants, including wall thickness (6,8, and 12 plies), SiC fiber type (Sylramic, Sylramic-iBN, Hi-Nicalon, and Hi-Nicalon S), fiber sizing type, and matrix type (full CVI SiC, and partial CVI SiC plus slurry cast + melt-infiltrated SiC-Si). Fiber ply splices existed in all the hoops. Tensile hoop measurements are made at room temperature and 1200 C using hydrostatic ring test facilities. The failure mode of the hoops, determined through microstructural examination, is presented. The hoop properties are compared with in-plane data measured on flat panels using same material variants, but containing no splices.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF TENSILE STRENGTH OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    A task was undertaken to compare various properties of different glovebox gloves, having various compositions, for use in gloveboxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One aspect of this project was to determine the tensile strength (TS) of the gloves. Longitudinal tensile samples were cut from 15 different gloves and tensile tested. The stress, load, and elongation at failure were determined. All of the gloves that are approved for glovebox use and listed in the glovebox procurement specification met the tensile and elongation requirements. The Viton{reg_sign} compound gloves are not listed in the specification, but exhibited lower tensile strengths than permissible based on the Butyl rubber requirements. Piercan Polyurethane gloves were the thinnest samples and exhibited the highest tensile strength of the materials tested.

  4. Tensile Properties of Hydrogels and of Snake Skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Savitzky, Alan H.; Rivera, Gabriel; Gehrke, Stevin H.

    2002-01-01

    Stimulus-responsive or 'smart' gels are of potential interest as sensors and actuators, in industrial separations, and as permeable delivery systems. In most applications, a certain degree of mechanical strength and toughness will be required, yet the large-strain behavior of gels has not been widely reported. Some exceptions include work on gelatin and other food gels, some characterization of soft gels applicable for in-vitro cell growth studies, and toughness determinations on commercial contact lens materials. In general, it can be anticipated that the gel stiffness will increase with increasing degree of crosslinking, but the tensile strength may go through a maximum. Gel properties can be tailored by varying not only the degree of crosslinking, but also the polymer concentration and the nature of the polymer backbone (e.g. its stiffness or solubility). Polypeptides provide an especially interesting case, where secondary structure affects trends in moduli and conformational transitions may accompany phase changes. A few papers on the tensile properties of responsive gels have begun to appear. The responsive hydrogel chosen for the present study, crosslinked hydroxypropylcellulose, shrinks over a rather narrow temperature range near 44 C. Some vertebrate skin is also subject to substantial strain. Among reptiles, the morphologies of the skin and scales show wide variations. Bauer et al. described the mechanical properties and histology of gecko skin; longitudinal tensile properties of snake skin were examined by Jayne with reference to locomotion. The present measurements focus on adaptations related to feeding, including the response of the skin to circumferential tension. Tensile properties will be related to interspecific and regional variation in skin structure and folding.

  5. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2006-01-10

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  6. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2007-08-21

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  7. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2007-07-17

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  8. Tensile properties of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avva, V. Sarma; Sadler, Robert L.; Lyon, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    The importance of textile composite materials in aerospace structural applications has been gaining momentum in recent years. With a view to better understand the suitability of these materials in aerospace applications, an experimental program was undertaken to assess the mechanical properties of these materials. Specifically, the braided textile preforms were infiltrated with suitable polymeric matrices leading to the fabrication of composite test coupons. Evaluation of the tensile properties and the analyses of the results in the form of strength moduli, Poisson's ratio, etc., for the braided composites are presented. Based on our past experience with the textile coupons, the fabrication techniques have been modified (by incorporating glass microballoons in the matrix and/or by stabilizing the braid angle along the length of the specimen with axial fibers) to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of the textile composites. This paper outlines the preliminary experimental results obtained from testing these composites.

  9. Band diagram of strained graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Sanjay; Melnik, Roderick; Bonilla, Luis

    2016-04-01

    The influence of ripple waves on the band diagram of zigzag strained graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is analyzed by utilizing the finite element method. Such waves have their origin in electromechanical effects. With a novel model, we demonstrate that electron-hole band diagrams of GNRs are highly influenced (i.e. level crossing of the bands are possible) by two combined effects: pseudo-magnetic fields originating from electroelasticity theory and external magnetic fields. In particular, we show that the level crossing point can be observed at large external magnetic fields (B ≈ 100T ) in strained GNRs, when the externally applied tensile edge stress is on the order of -100 eV/nm and the amplitude of the out-of-plane ripple waves is on the order of 1nm.

  10. Tensile strength of cementitious materials under triaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Shuji

    1998-11-01

    A general tension-compression-compression (sigmasb1, sigmasb2=sigmasb3) failure criterion for brittle materials is mathematically developed using FEM analysis and experimentally verified by use of the cementitious composite axial tensile test (CCATT). This tensile failure criterion is based on the stress concentration derived from the classical theory of elasticity. This analytical approach shows the upper bound of the tension-compression-compression failure surface for brittle materials. Since the CCATT applies confining hydraulic pressure, a tensile specimen is subjected to triaxial loading defined by the principal stress ratio sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|. When lateral pressure increases, tensile strength decreases; therefore, stress concentration is defined as a function of the principal stress ratio. The model has three distinct regions of behavior corresponding to the principal stress ratio, 0≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|<0.9 (high-lateral pressure), 0.9≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|<3.0 (medium-lateral pressure), 3.0≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2| (low-lateral pressure). The experimental failure line shows true tensile strength of cementitious materials under low-lateral pressure. The predicted nominal stress fsb{ta} with large size specimens for the CCATT is written as$fsb{ta}=gamma*{1/{Kt}}*alpha* pwhere gamma$ is the size effect obtained by experimental results; Kt is the stress concentration factor derived from triaxial loading. Tensile strength values from the CCATT are compared to experimental results from other tests such as the uniaxial tensile test and the split cylinder test. CCATT results are analyzed using Weibull theory to measure material reliability and to develop characteristic stresses for construction design. Failure analysis using fractography was conducted on fractured cementitious materials and composites. The failure analysis on test specimens correlated well with FEM stress distributions and with the principal stress ratio. The observed fracture behavior (fracture

  11. Human Annulus Fibrosus Dynamic Tensile Modulus Increases with Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sounok; Jacobs, Nathan T; Boxberger, John I; Elliott, Dawn M

    2012-01-01

    The annulus fibrosus (AF) of the intervertebral disc experiences cyclic tensile loading in vivo at various states of mechanical equilibrium. Disc degeneration is associated with alterations in the biochemical composition of the AF including decreased water content, decreased proteoglycan concentration, and increased collagen deposition that affect mechanical function of the AF in compression and shear. Such changes may also affect the dynamic viscoelastic properties of the AF and thus alter the disc's ability to dissipate energy under physiologic loading. The objectives of this study were to quantify the dynamic viscoelastic properties of human AF in circumferential tension and to determine the effect of degeneration on these properties. Nondegenerated and degenerated human AF tensile samples were tested in uniaxial tension over a spectrum of loading frequencies spanning 0.01Hz to 2Hz at several states of equilibrium strain to determine the dynamic viscoelastic properties (dynamic modulus, phase angle) using a linear viscoelastic model. The AF dynamic modulus increased at higher equilibrium strain levels. The AF behaved more elastically at higher frequencies with a decreased phase angle. Degeneration resulted in a higher dynamic modulus at all strain levels but had no effect on phase angle. The findings from this study elucidate the effect of degeneration on the dynamic viscoelastic properties of human AF and lend insight into the mechanical role of the AF in cyclic loading conditions. PMID:22247579

  12. DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF IMMATURE BOVINE ARTICULAR CARTILAGE IN TENSION AND COMPRESSION, AND NONLINEAR VISCOELASTIC MODELING OF THE TENSILE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seonghun; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Very limited information is currently available on the constitutive modeling of the tensile response of articular cartilage and its dynamic modulus at various loading frequencies. The objectives of this study were to 1) formulate and experimentally validate a constitutive model for the intrinsic viscoelasticity of cartilage in tension, 2) confirm the hypothesis that energy dissipation in tension is less than in compression at various loading frequencies, and 3) test the hypothesis that the dynamic modulus of cartilage in unconfined compression is dependent upon the dynamic tensile modulus. Methods Experiment 1: Immature bovine articular cartilage samples were tested in tensile stress relaxation and cyclical loading. A proposed reduced relaxation function was fitted to the stress-relaxation response and the resulting material coefficients were used to predict the response to cyclical loading. Adjoining tissue samples were tested in unconfined compression stress relaxation and cyclical loading. Experiment 2: Tensile stress relaxation experiments were performed at varying strains to explore the strain-dependence of the viscoelastic response. Results The proposed relaxation function successfully fit the experimental tensile stress-relaxation response, with R2 =0.970±0.019 at 1 % strain and R2 =0.992±0.007 at 2 % strain. The predicted cyclical response agreed well with experimental measurements, particularly for the dynamic modulus at various frequencies. The relaxation function, measured from 2% to 10% strain, was found to be strain-dependent, indicating that cartilage is nonlinearly viscoelastic in tension. Under dynamic loading, the tensile modulus at 10 Hz was ~2.3 times the value of the equilibrium modulus. In contrast, the dynamic stiffening ratio in unconfined compression was ~24. The energy dissipation in tension was found to be significantly smaller than in compression (dynamic phase angle of 16.2±7.4° versus 53.5±12.8° at 10−3 Hz). A very

  13. Improvement of Measurement Accuracy of Strain of Thin Film by CCD Camera with a Template Matching Method Using the 2ND-ORDER Polynomial Interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Hyub; Shin, Myung-Soo; Kang, Dong-Joong; Lim, Sung-Jo; Ha, Jong-Eun

    In this study, a system for non-contact in-situ measurement of strain during tensile test of thin films by using CCD camera with marking surface of specimen by black pen was implemented as a sensing device. To improve accuracy of measurement when CCD camera is used, this paper proposed a new method for measuring strain during tensile test of specimen with micrometer size. The size of pixel of CCD camera determines resolution of measurement, but the size of pixel can not satisfy the resolution required in tensile test of thin film because the extension of the specimen is very small during the tensile test. To increase resolution of measurement, the suggested method performs an accurate subpixel matching by applying 2nd order polynomial interpolation method to the conventional template matching. The algorithm was developed to calculate location of subpixel providing the best matching value by performing single dimensional polynomial interpolation from the results of pixel-based matching at a local region of image. The measurement resolution was less than 0.01 times of original pixel size. To verify the reliability of the system, the tensile test for the BeNi thin film was performed, which is widely used as a material in micro-probe tip. Tensile tests were performed and strains were measured using the proposed method and also the capacitance type displacement sensor for comparison. It is demonstrated that the new strain measurement system can effectively describe a behavior of materials after yield during the tensile test of the specimen at microscale with easy setup and better accuracy.

  14. Highly strain-sensitive magnetostrictive tunnel magnetoresistance junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Hayes, Patrick; Rott, Karsten; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Meyners, Dirk

    2015-06-01

    Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) junctions with CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB layers are promising for strain sensing applications due to their high TMR effect and magnetostrictive sense layer (CoFeB). TMR junctions available even in submicron dimensions can serve as strain sensors for microelectromechanical systems devices. Upon stress application, the magnetization configuration of such junctions changes due to the inverse magnetostriction effect resulting in strain-sensitive tunnel resistance. Here, strain sensitivity of round-shaped junctions with diameters of 11.3 μm, 19.2 μm, 30.5 μm, and 41.8 μm were investigated on macroscopic cantilevers using a four-point bending apparatus. This investigation mainly focuses on changes in hard-axis TMR loops caused by the stress-induced anisotropy. A macrospin model is proposed, supported by micromagnetic simulations, which describes the complete rotation of the sense layer magnetization within TMR loops of junctions, exposed to high stress. Below 0.2‰ tensile strain, a representative junction with 30.5 μm diameter exhibits a very large gauge factor of 2150. For such high gauge factor a bias field H = - 3.2 kA / m is applied in an angle equal to 3 π / 2 toward the pinned magnetization of the reference layer. The strain sensitivity strongly depends on the bias field. Applying stress along π / 4 against the induced magnetocrystalline anisotropy, both compressive and tensile strain can be identified by a unique sensor. More importantly, a configuration with a gauge factor of 400 at zero bias field is developed which results in a straightforward and compact measuring setup.

  15. Analysis of tensile deformation and failure in austenitic stainless steels: Part II - Irradiation dose dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Weon; Byun, Thak Sang

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation effects on the stable and unstable deformation and fracture behavior of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) have been studied in detail based on the equivalent true stress versus true strain curves. An iterative finite element simulation technique was used to obtain the equivalent true stress-true strain data from experimental tensile curves. The simulation result showed that the austenitic stainless steels retained high strain hardening rate during unstable deformation even after significant irradiation. The strain hardening rate was independent of irradiation dose up to the initiation of a localized necking. Similarly, the equivalent fracture stress was nearly independent of dose before the damage (embrittlement) mechanism changed. The fracture strain and tensile fracture energy decreased with dose mostly in the low dose range <˜2 dpa and reached nearly saturation values at higher doses. It was also found that the fracture properties for EC316LN SS were less sensitive to irradiation than those for 316 SS, although their uniform tensile properties showed almost the same dose dependencies. It was confirmed that the dose dependence of tensile fracture properties evaluated by the linear approximation model for nominal stress was accurate enough for practical use without elaborate calculations.

  16. Effect of initial orientation on the tensile properties of commercially pure titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Subhasis; Ghosh, Atasi; Gurao, N. P.

    2016-05-01

    Effect of crystallographic texture on uniaxial tensile deformation of commercially pure titanium was studied using in situ as well as post-mortem electron backscatter diffraction and elastoplastic self-consistent simulations. Correlation of mechanical properties and strain hardening response with deformation micromechanisms like different modes of slip and twinning was established. Tensile specimens were machined along rolling direction in the plane perpendicular to normal and transverse direction (sample A and C, respectively) as well as along transverse direction in the plane normal to rolling direction (sample B) to obtain different initial texture from cold rolled and annealed plate of commercially pure titanium. Sample B showed higher strength but lower strain hardening rate and ductility than the orientations A and C. It showed extension twinning with lateral thickening while the other samples showed coexistence of extension and contraction twinning. Schmid factor accounted for most of the observed twinning although some contraction twinning in sample A is attributed to the effect of internal stresses. A combination of in situ tensile test in a field emission gun scanning electron microscope with electron backscatter diffraction facility and elastoplastic self-consistent simulations aid in obtaining high-fidelity Voce hardening parameters for different slip and twinning systems in commercially pure titanium. The variation in tensile properties can be explained on the basis of propensity of twinning which tends to provide strain hardening at lower strain but contributes to failure at higher strain.

  17. Tensile Properties of Contractile and Synthetic Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Kozaburo

    Tensile properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of synthetic and contractile phenotypes were determined using a newly developed tensile test system. Synthetic and contractile VSMCs were isolated from the rabbit thoracic aorta with an explant and an enzymatic digestion method, respectively. Each cell floated in Hanks' balanced salt solution of 37°C was attached to the fine tips of a pair of micropipettes with a cell adhesive and, then, stretched at the rate of 6µm/sec by moving one of the micropipettes with a linear actuator. Load applied to the cell was measured with a cantilever-type load cell; its elongation was determined from the distance between the micropipette tips using a video dimension analyzer. The synthetic and contractile VSMCs were not broken even at the tensile force of 2.4µN and 3.4µN, respectively. Their stiffness was significantly higher in contractile phenotype (0.17N/m) than in synthetic one (0.09N/m). The different tensile properties between synthetic and contractile cells are attributable to the differences in cytoskeletal structures and contractile apparatus.

  18. Analysis of Tensile Deformation and Failure in Austenitic Stainless Steels: Part I- Temperature Dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Weon; Byun, Thak Sang

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the temperature dependence of deformation and failure behaviors in the austenitic stainless steels (annealed 304, 316, 316LN, and 20% cold-worked 316LN) in terms of equivalent true stress-true strain curves. The true stress-true strain curves up to the final fracture were calculated from the tensile test data obtained at -150 ~ 450oC using an iterative technique of finite element simulation. Analysis was largely focused on the necking deformation and fracture: Key parameters such as the strain hardening rate, equivalent fracture stress, fracture strain, and tensile fracture energy were evaluated, and their temperature dependencies were investigated. It was shown that a significantly high strain hardening rate was still retained during unstable deformation although overall strain hardening rate beyond the onset of necking was lower than that of the uniform deformation. The values of the parameters except for fracture strain decreased with temperature up to 200oC and were saturated as the temperature came close to the maximum test temperature 450oC. The fracture strain increased and had a maximum at -50oC to 20oC before decreasing with temperature. It was explained that these temperature dependencies of fracture properties were associated with a change in the dominant strain hardening mechanism with test temperature. Also, it was seen that the pre-straining of material has little effect on the strain hardening rate during necking deformation and on fracture properties.

  19. Slip Line Field Applied To Deep Drawing

    SciTech Connect

    Miguel, V.; Coello, J.; Calatayud, A.; Martinez, A.; Benet, J

    2007-05-17

    Slip Line Field is a numerical method applied for modelling plane-strain processes. This method has been successfully checked properly for sheet drawing. Flange deformation in deep drawing is considered without change in thickness. A drawing mechanical test has been developed in order to reproduce the flange stresses state in sheet strips with the rolling direction selected. The fundamentals of this test, and some experimental results obtained from it, have been presented previously in different Congresses. In this work, an algorithm based on SLF has been implemented and theoretical results evaluated for different conditions. The algorithm have been applied to a mild DDQ steel and to a DDQ AISI 304 stainless steel. Theoretical and experimental results are compared. A good concordance in them has been found out under some conditions. One of the most important aspects is that it must not be considered tensile material properties but a modified behavior under multiaxial conditions.

  20. Tensile and fatigue behavior of tungsten/copper composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Kim, Y. S.

    1989-01-01

    Work on W/Cu unidirectional composites was initiated to study the behavior of this ductile-ductile composite system under thermomechanical fatigue and to examine the applicability of fatigue-life prediction methods for thermomechanical fatigue of this metal matrix composite. The first step was to characterize the tensile behavior of four ply, 10 vol. percent W/Cu plates at room and elevated temperatures. Fatigue tests were conducted in load control on 0 degree specimens at 260 C. The maximum cyclic stress was varied but the minimum cyclic stress was kept constant. All tests were performed in vacuum. The strain at failure increased with increasing maximum cyclic stress.

  1. Tensile Properties of Poly (N-vinyl caprolactam) Gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgret, Leslie D.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    N-vinyl caprolactam was copolymerized with ethylene glycol dimethacrylate using a free-radical initiator in alcohol/water solution. The resulting gels were thermally-responsive in water, undergoing an approximate fivefold reversible volume shrinkage between room temperature and ca. 50 C. Tensile testing showed that the stress-strain behavior was qualitatively different in the collapsed state above the temperature-induced transition. At the higher temperature, gels were stiffer, more ductile, and showed greater time dependence. Implications for the design of gel actuators are briefly discussed.

  2. A Weibull characterization for tensile fracture of multicomponent brittle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Necessary to the development and understanding of brittle fiber reinforced composites is a means to statistically describe fiber strength and strain-to-failure behavior. A statistical characterization for multicomponent brittle fibers is presented. The method, which is an extension of usual Weibull distribution procedures, statistically considers the components making up a fiber (e.g., substrate, sheath, and surface) as separate entities and taken together as in a fiber. Tensile data for silicon carbide fiber and for an experimental carbon-boron alloy fiber are evaluated in terms of the proposed multicomponent Weibull characterization.

  3. Machining technique prevents undercutting in tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moscater, R. E.; Royster, D. M.

    1968-01-01

    Machining technique prevents undercutting at the test section in tensile specimens when machining the four corners of the reduced section. Made with a gradual taper in the test section, the width of the center of the tensile specimen is less than the width at the four corners of the reduced section.

  4. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  5. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  6. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  7. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  8. 7 CFR 29.6040 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.6040 Section 29.6040 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6040 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco...

  9. Ductile-to-brittle transition in tensile failure of particle-reinforced metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauert, Aude; Rossoll, Andreas; Mortensen, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    We present an analytical micromechanical model designed to simulate the tensile stress-strain behaviour and failure of damaging composites containing a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. One internal damage micromechanism is considered, namely particle fracture, which is assumed to obey a Weibull distribution. Final composite tensile failure occurs when one of two possible failure criteria is reached, given by (i) the onset of tensile instability, or (ii) an "avalanche-like" propagation of particle breaks to neighbouring particles. We show that an experimentally observed transition from failure by tensile instability to abrupt failure resulting from an increase of matrix strength can be mimicked by the model because local load-sharing (i.e. load transfer from a broken particle to its immediate neighbours) is accounted for.

  10. Strain engineering of Dirac cones in graphyne

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gaoxue; Kumar, Ashok; Pandey, Ravindra; Si, Mingsu

    2014-05-26

    6,6,12-graphyne, one of the two-dimensional carbon allotropes with the rectangular lattice structure, has two kinds of non-equivalent anisotropic Dirac cones in the first Brillouin zone. We show that Dirac cones can be tuned independently by the uniaxial compressive strain applied to graphyne, which induces n-type and p-type self-doping effect, by shifting the energy of the Dirac cones in the opposite directions. On the other hand, application of the tensile strain results into a transition from gapless to finite gap system for the monolayer. For the AB-stacked bilayer, the results predict tunability of Dirac-cones by in-plane strains as well as the strain applied perpendicular to the plane. The group velocities of the Dirac cones show enhancement in the resistance anisotropy for bilayer relative to the case of monolayer. Such tunable and direction-dependent electronic properties predicted for 6,6,12-graphyne make it to be competitive for the next-generation electronic devices at nanoscale.

  11. Creep Strain and Strain Rate Response of 2219 Al Alloy at High Stress Levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. B.; Wagner, John A.; Lisagor, W. Barry

    1998-01-01

    As a result of high localized plastic deformation experienced during proof testing in an International Space Station connecting module, a study was undertaken to determine the deformation response of a 2219-T851 roll forging. After prestraining 2219-T851 Al specimens to simulate strains observed during the proof testing, creep tests were conducted in the temperature range from ambient temperature to 107 C (225 F) at stress levels approaching the ultimate tensile strength of 2219-T851 Al. Strain-time histories and strain rate responses were examined. The strain rate response was extremely high initially, but decayed rapidly, spanning as much as five orders of magnitude during primary creep. Select specimens were subjected to incremental step loading and exhibited initial creep rates of similar magnitude for each load step. Although the creep rates decreased quickly at all loads, the creep rates dropped faster and reached lower strain rate levels for lower applied loads. The initial creep rate and creep rate decay associated with primary creep were similar for specimens with and without prestrain; however, prestraining (strain hardening) the specimens, as in the aforementioned proof test, resulted in significantly longer creep life.

  12. An Interlaminar Tensile Strength Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.; Jackson, Wade C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to determine interlaminar tensile strength, sigma(sub 3c), of a fiber reinforced composite material using a curved beam. The specimen was a unidirectional curved beam, bent 90 deg, with straight arms. Attached to each arm was a hinged loading mechanism that was held by the grips of a tension testing machine. Geometry effects of the specimen, including the effects of loading arm length, inner radius, thickness, and width, were studied. The data sets fell into two categories: low strength corresponding to a macroscopic flaw related failure and high strength corresponding to a microscopic flaw related failure. From the data available, the specimen width and loading arm length had little effect on sigma(sub 3c). The inner radius was not expected to have a significant effect on sigma(sub 3c), but this conclusion could not be confirmed because of differences in laminate quality for each curve geometry. The thicker specimens had the lowest value of sigma(sub 3c) because of poor laminate quality.

  13. Chain Ends and the Ultimate Tensile Strength of Polyethylene Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, Thomas C.; Robbins, Mark O.

    Determining the tensile yield mechanisms of oriented polymer fibers remains a challenging problem in polymer mechanics. By maximizing the alignment and crystallinity of polyethylene (PE) fibers, tensile strengths σ ~ 6 - 7 GPa have been achieved. While impressive, first-principal calculations predict carbon backbone bonds would allow strengths four times higher (σ ~ 20 GPa) before breaking. The reduction in strength is caused by crystal defects like chain ends, which allow fibers to yield by chain slip in addition to bond breaking. We use large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to determine the tensile yield mechanism of orthorhombic PE crystals with finite chains spanning 102 -104 carbons in length. The yield stress σy saturates for long chains at ~ 6 . 3 GPa, agreeing well with experiments. Chains do not break but always yield by slip, after nucleation of 1D dislocations at chain ends. Dislocations are accurately described by a Frenkel-Kontorova model, parametrized by the mechanical properties of an ideal crystal. We compute a dislocation core size ξ = 25 . 24 Å and determine the high and low strain rate limits of σy. Our results suggest characterizing such 1D dislocations is an efficient method for predicting fiber strength. This research was performed within the Center for Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments (CMEDE) under the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute at Johns Hopkins University. Financial support was provided by Grant W911NF-12-2-0022.

  14. Effect of Heat Treatment and Layer Orientation on the Tensile Strength of a Crystalline Rock Under Brazilian Test Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha Roy, Debanjan; Singh, T. N.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of heat treatment and the layer orientation on the tensile properties of granitic gneiss were studied under the unconfined stress condition. The tensile strength of the samples was studied using a Brazilian configuration, and the geochemical and microstructural properties were studied using the X-ray diffraction technique as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The fracture pattern and the geometrical analyses were performed using the digital photographs. The results show that both the heat treatment and layer orientation have strong control on the tensile strength, force-parallel and layer-parallel strains, and on the tensile fracture geometry. A general decrease in the tensile strength of the rock was documented with the increasing heat treatment. Although, in the heat-treated samples, X-ray diffraction study do not reveal any major change in the mineral composition, but the SEM shows the development of several micro-cracks in the grains. In the samples with different layer orientation, along with the changes in the tensile strength and layer-parallel to force-parallel strain ratio, the layer activation under shear stress is also noticed. Here, the ratio between the tensile to shear stress, acting along the layers is thought to be the major controlling factor of the tensile properties of rocks, which has many applications in mining, civil constructions, and waste disposal work.

  15. Behaviour of filamentary MgB2 wires subjected to tensile stress at 4.2 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, P.; Kopera, L.; Melišek, T.; Rindfleisch, M.; Haessler, W.; Hušek, I.

    2013-10-01

    Different filamentary MgB2 wires have been subjected to tensile stress at 4.2 K. Stress-strain and critical current versus stress and strain characteristics of wires differing by filament architecture, sheath materials, deformation and heat treatment were measured and compared. It was found that the linear increase of critical current due to the pre-compression effect (ranging from 5% up to ≈20%) is affected by thermal expansion and the strength of used metallic sheaths. The values of irreversible strain ɛirr and stress σirr depend dominantly on the applied outer sheath and its final heat treatment conditions. Consequently, the strain-tolerance of MgB2 wires is influenced by several parameters and it is difficult to see a clear relation between Ic(ɛ) and σ(ɛ) characteristics. The lowest ɛirr was measured for Monel sheathed wires (0.3-0.6%), medium for GlidCop® sheath (0.48-0.6%), and the highest ɛirr = 0.6-0.9% were obtained for MgB2 wires reinforced by the stainless steel 316L annealed at temperature between 600 and 800 ° C. The highest ɛirr = 0.9% and σirr = 900 MPa were measured for the work-hardened steel, which is not considerably softened by the heat treatment at 600 ° C/2.5 h.

  16. Microstructure evolution and FEM analysis of a [111] oriented single crystal nickel-based superalloy during tensile creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Sugui; Li, Qiuyang; Su, Yong; Yu, Huichen; Xie, Jun; Zhang, Shu

    2015-03-01

    By means of the elastic-plastic stress-strain finite element method (FEM), the distribution of the von Mises stress and strain energy density in the regions near the interfaces of the cuboidal γ/ γ' phases is calculated to investigate the rafted behaviors of γ' phase in a [111] oriented single crystal (SC) nickel-based superalloy. Results show that, after fully heat treated, the microstructure of the superalloy consists of the cuboidal γ' phase embedded coherently in the γ matrix and arranged regularly along the <100> orientation. And the parameters and misfits of γ'/ γ phases in the alloy increase with the temperature. After crept for 50 h, the γ' phase in alloy has transformed into the mesh-like rafted structure on (010) plane along [001] and [100] orientations. When the tensile stress is applied along [111] direction, the change of the strain energy on the planes of the cuboidal γ' phase results in the directional diffusion of the elements. Thereinto, compared with (010) plane, the bigger expanding strain occurs on (100) and (001) planes along the [010], [001] and [010], [100] directions, which may trap the Al and Ti atoms with bigger radius to promote the directional growth of γ' phase on (010) plane along [100] and [001] directions. This is thought to be the main reason for the γ' phase directionally growing into the mesh-like rafted structure on (010) plane.

  17. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ Xray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  18. The evolution of internal stress and dislocation during tensile deformation in a 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel investigated by high-energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangming; Zhou, Zhangjian; Mo, Kun; Miao, Yinbin; Liu, Xiang; Almer, Jonathan; Stubbins, James F.

    2015-12-01

    An application of high-energy wide angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction to investigate the tensile deformation of 9Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) ODS steel is presented. With tensile loading and in-situ X-ray exposure, the lattice strain development of matrix was determined. The lattice strain was found to decrease with increasing temperature, and the difference in Young's modulus of six different reflections at different temperatures reveals the temperature dependence of elastic anisotropy. The mean internal stress was calculated and compared with the applied stress, showing that the strengthening factor increased with increasing temperature, indicating that the oxide nanoparticles have a good strengthening impact at high temperature. The dislocation density and character were also measured during tensile deformation. The dislocation density decreased with increasing of temperature due to the greater mobility of dislocation at high temperature. The dislocation character was determined by best-fit methods for different dislocation average contrasts with various levels of uncertainty. The results shows edge type dislocations dominate the plastic strain at room temperature (RT) and 300 °C, while the screw type dislocations dominate at 600 °C. The dominance of edge character in 9Cr F/M ODS steels at RT and 300 °C is likely due to the pinning effect of nanoparticles for higher mobile edge dislocations when compared with screw dislocations, while the stronger screw type of dislocation structure at 600 °C may be explained by the activated cross slip of screw segments.

  19. Distributed strain measurement of welded tubular joint with long gauge FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, H.; Kageyama, K.; Ohara, K.; Uzawa, K.; Kanai, M.; Igawa, H.

    2008-04-01

    Strain along a welded joint submitted to a load can fluctuate because of inhomogeneity in thickness or residual stress distributions and defects. Inversely, strain fluctuation may represent such inhomogeneities or defects. We applied the distributed strain sensing technique with a long gauge FBG to monitoring strain distributions along a welded tubular joint of a steel pipe. By using this sensing technique, we can measure a strain distribution at an arbitrary position along a FBG with the high spatial resolution less than 1 mm. In the tensile test of the steel pipe, we could successfully measure the strain distribution along the weld line of about 100 mm in length. We also observed the strain fluctuating sharply in some areas and acoustic emissions were simultaneously detected by the other sensors. In some areas where sharp fluctuations occurred, defects were observed by also computer tomography carried out after the tensile test. Applications for the sensing technique include health monitoring for other joint configurations, such as fastening and bonding.

  20. Scanning transmission electron microscopy strain measurement from millisecond frames of a direct electron charge coupled device

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Knut; Rosenauer, Andreas; Ryll, Henning; Ordavo, Ivan; Ihle, Sebastian; Soltau, Heike; Strueder, Lothar; Volz, Kerstin; Zweck, Josef

    2012-11-19

    A high-speed direct electron detection system is introduced to the field of transmission electron microscopy and applied to strain measurements in semiconductor nanostructures. In particular, a focused electron probe with a diameter of 0.5 nm was scanned over a fourfold quantum layer stack with alternating compressive and tensile strain and diffracted discs have been recorded on a scintillator-free direct electron detector with a frame time of 1 ms. We show that the applied algorithms can accurately detect Bragg beam positions despite a significant point spread each 300 kV electron causes during detection on the scintillator-free camera. For millisecond exposures, we find that strain can be measured with a precision of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, enabling, e.g., strain mapping in a 100 Multiplication-Sign 100 nm{sup 2} region with 0.5 nm resolution in 40 s.

  1. Strain intensity factor approach for predicting the strength of continuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A method was previously developed to predict the fracture toughness (stress intensity factor at failure) of composites in terms of the elastic constants and the tensile failing strain of the fibers. The method was applied to boron/aluminum composites made with various proportions of 0 to + or - 45 deg plies. Predicted values of fracture toughness were in gross error because widespread yielding of the aluminum matrix made the compliance very nonlinear. An alternate method was developed to predict the strain intensity factor at failure rather than the stress intensity factor because the singular strain field was not affected by yielding as much as the stress field. Strengths of specimens containing crack-like slits were calculated from predicted failing strains using uniaxial stress-strain curves. Predicted strengths were in good agreement with experimental values, even for the very nonlinear laminates that contained only + or - 45 deg plies. This approach should be valid for other metal matrix composites that have continuous fibers.

  2. The role of local strains from prior cold work on stress corrosion cracking of α-brass in Mattsson's solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ulaganathan, Jaganathan Newman, Roger C.

    2014-06-01

    The dynamic strain rate ahead of a crack tip formed during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) under a static load is assumed to arise from the crack propagation. The strain surrounding the crack tip would be redistributed as the crack grows, thereby having the effect of dynamic strain. Recently, several studies have shown cold work to cause accelerated crack growth rates during SCC, and the slip-dissolution mechanism has been widely applied to account for this via a supposedly increased crack-tip strain rate in cold worked material. While these interpretations consider cold work as a homogeneous effect, dislocations are generated inhomogeneously within the microstructure during cold work. The presence of grain boundaries results in dislocation pile-ups that cause local strain concentrations. The local strains generated from cold working α-brass by tensile elongation were characterized using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). The role of these local strains in SCC was studied by measuring the strain distributions from the same regions of the sample before cold work, after cold work, and after SCC. Though, the cracks did not always initiate or propagate along boundaries with pre-existing local strains from the applied cold work, the local strains surrounding the cracked boundaries had contributions from both the crack propagation and the prior cold work. - Highlights: • Plastic strain localization has a complex relationship with SCC susceptibility. • Surface relief created by cold work creates its own granular strain localization. • Cold work promotes crack growth but several other factors are involved.

  3. Strain-effect transistors: Theoretical study on the effects of external strain on III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors on flexible substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Shervin, Shahab; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Ravipati, Srikanth; Lee, Keon-Hwa; Bulashevich, Kirill; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2015-11-09

    This paper presents strain-effect transistors (SETs) based on flexible III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through theoretical calculations. We show that the electronic band structures of InAlGaN/GaN thin-film heterostructures on flexible substrates can be modified by external bending with a high degree of freedom using polarization properties of the polar semiconductor materials. Transfer characteristics of the HEMT devices, including threshold voltage and transconductance, are controlled by varied external strain. Equilibrium 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is enhanced with applied tensile strain by bending the flexible structure with the concave-side down (bend-down condition). 2DEG density is reduced and eventually depleted with increasing compressive strain in bend-up conditions. The operation mode of different HEMT structures changes from depletion- to enchantment-mode or vice versa depending on the type and magnitude of external strain. The results suggest that the operation modes and transfer characteristics of HEMTs can be engineered with an optimum external bending strain applied in the device structure, which is expected to be beneficial for both radio frequency and switching applications. In addition, we show that drain currents of transistors based on flexible InAlGaN/GaN can be modulated only by external strain without applying electric field in the gate. The channel conductivity modulation that is obtained by only external strain proposes an extended functional device, gate-free SETs, which can be used in electro-mechanical applications.

  4. Strain-effect transistors: Theoretical study on the effects of external strain on III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervin, Shahab; Kim, Seung-Hwan; Asadirad, Mojtaba; Ravipati, Srikanth; Lee, Keon-Hwa; Bulashevich, Kirill; Ryou, Jae-Hyun

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents strain-effect transistors (SETs) based on flexible III-nitride high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMTs) through theoretical calculations. We show that the electronic band structures of InAlGaN/GaN thin-film heterostructures on flexible substrates can be modified by external bending with a high degree of freedom using polarization properties of the polar semiconductor materials. Transfer characteristics of the HEMT devices, including threshold voltage and transconductance, are controlled by varied external strain. Equilibrium 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is enhanced with applied tensile strain by bending the flexible structure with the concave-side down (bend-down condition). 2DEG density is reduced and eventually depleted with increasing compressive strain in bend-up conditions. The operation mode of different HEMT structures changes from depletion- to enchantment-mode or vice versa depending on the type and magnitude of external strain. The results suggest that the operation modes and transfer characteristics of HEMTs can be engineered with an optimum external bending strain applied in the device structure, which is expected to be beneficial for both radio frequency and switching applications. In addition, we show that drain currents of transistors based on flexible InAlGaN/GaN can be modulated only by external strain without applying electric field in the gate. The channel conductivity modulation that is obtained by only external strain proposes an extended functional device, gate-free SETs, which can be used in electro-mechanical applications.

  5. Embedded optical fibres as strain sensors in polymer matrix fibre composites: The influence of adhesion in strain transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekroth, M.

    1994-06-01

    Optical fibers can serve as strain sensors embedded in load carrying polymer matrix fiber composites. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of chemical bonding between the optical fiber, its protective polyimide coating and the surrounding composite, in strain transfer from the composite to the optical fiber. The degree of adhesion was determined by measuring the force during debonding and pull-out of the optical fiber from the composite. Debonding occurred between the quartz fiber and the coating for both untreated and ammonia modified fibers. The PTFE coated fibers debonded between the coating and the composite. The modified fibers debonded at a lower applied load than the untreated fibers. The strain during tensile loading was measured both with conventional resistance strain gages mounted on the specimen surfaces, and optically with a Mach-Zehnder-interferometer. The optically measured strains, obtained with the untreated fiber and the modified fibers, were all in good agreement with the response from the resistance strain gages. It is concluded that the chemical bonding between the quartz fiber/coating/composite consequently has little or no influence on the strain transfer. Internal stresses (mechanical pressure and friction forces) arising from the laminate fabrication process are sufficient for strain transfer.

  6. Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens

    DOEpatents

    Liu, K.C.

    1993-08-24

    Apparatus is described for gripping a plate-type tensile specimen having generally T-shaped end regions in a dynamic tension fatigue testing apparatus comprising an annular housing having an open-ended elongated cavity therein, a plurality of hydraulic piston means supported by the housing in a spaced array about the cavity, and a specimen-supporting plate means overlying the piston means at one end of the elongated cavity and displaceable by said piston means in a longitudinal direction with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cavity, said apparatus for gripping a flat plate-type tensile specimen comprising: a pair of elongated pull rods each having oppositely disposed first and second end regions; a pair of mounting means carried by said plate means with each mounting means for pivotally attaching the first end region of each of said pull rods in a central region of said plate means for supporting said pair of elongated pull rods in a side-by-side relationship along a common longitudinal centerline within said cavity; recess means in the second end region of each of said pull rods in adjacently disposed surface regions thereof with said recess means facing one another and each adapted to receive one side of one of the generally T-shaped end regions of the plate-type tensile specimen; and load-bearing means positionable in each of said recess means and adapted to bear against a shoulder on each side of the generally T-shaped end region of the plate-type tensile specimen when a tensile loading is applied thereon.

  7. Investigation on the tensile behavior of fiber metal laminates based on self-reinforced polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byoung-Eon; Park, Tom; Kim, Jeong; Kang, Beom-Soo; Song, Woo-Jin

    2013-12-01

    Mechanical tests have been carried out to accurately evaluate the tensile properties of fiber metal laminates (FMLs). The FMLs in this paper comprised of a layer of self-reinforced polypropylene (SRPP) sandwiched between two layers of aluminum alloy 5052-H34. In this study, nonlinear tensile and fracture behavior of FMLs under the in-plane loading conditions has been investigated with numerical simulations and theoretical analysis. The numerical simulation based on finite element modeling using the ABAQUS/Explicit and the theoretical constitutive model based on a volume fraction approach and a modified classical lamination theory, which incorporates the elastic-plastic behavior of the aluminum alloy are used to predict the mechanical properties such as stress-strain response and deformation behavior of FMLs. In addition, through comparing the numerical simulations and the theoretical analysis with experimental results, it was concluded that a numerical simulation model adopted describes with sufficient accuracy the overall tensile stress-strain curve.

  8. Acoustic emission studies on welded and thermally treated AISI 304 stainless steel during tensile deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, P.; Barat, P.; Jayakumar, T.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Rajagopalan, C.; Raj, B.

    1997-10-15

    The present investigations are planned to study the influence of prior martensites formed due to cold treatment as 77K in AISI 304 SS welded specimens, on strain-induced martensites occurred during tensile deformation using AE technique. AE parameters like count rate and root mean square (r.m.s.) voltage have been used to characterize AE activities generated during tensile deformation process in as-welded and welded-treated samples. Frequency spectrum analysis of AE signals captured from the samples has been done to understand the dynamic behavior of the martensite phase formation. Tensile properties of these samples have also been reported. Volume fraction of the magnetic phase (martensite and delta ferrite) formed in these samples are measured before and after straining. X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique has been used to support the presence of delta ferrite (formed during welding) and martensite in the weld region.

  9. Tensile Deformation of a Nickel-base Alloy at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Ajit K.; Venkatesh, Anand; Marthandam, Vikram; Ghosh, Arindam

    2008-08-01

    The results of tensile testing involving Waspaloy indicate that the failure strain was gradually reduced at temperatures ranging between ambient and 300 °C. Further, serrations were observed in the engineering stress versus strain diagrams in the temperature range of 300-600 °C. The reduced failure strain and the formation of serrations in these temperature regimes could be the result of dynamic strain aging of this alloy. The extent of work hardening due to plastic deformation was reduced at temperatures above 300 °C. A combination of ductile and intergranular brittle failures was seen at temperatures above 600 °C. γ' was detected at all tested temperatures.

  10. Ten deg off-axis tensile test for intralaminar shear characterization of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental investigation was conducted to assess the suitability of the 10 deg off-axis tensile test specimen for the intralaminar shear characterization of unidirectional composites. Composite mechanics, a combined-stress failure criterion, and a finite element analysis were used to determine theoretically the stress-strain variation across the specimen width and the relative stress and strain magnitudes at the 10 deg plane. Strain gages were used to measure the strain variation across the specimen width at specimen midlength and near the end tabs. Specimens from Mod-I/epoxy, T-300/epoxy, and S-glass/epoxy were used in the experimental program. It was found that the 10 deg off-axis tensile test specimen is suitable for intralaminar shear characterization and it is recommended that it should be considered as a possible standard test specimen for such a characterization.

  11. Strain-Induced Energy Band Gap Opening in Two-Dimensional Bilayered Silicon Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Z.; Zhou, R.; Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Zhuang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    This work presents a theoretical study of the structural and electronic properties of bilayered silicon film (BiSF) under in-plane biaxial strain/stress using density functional theory (DFT). Atomic structures of the two-dimensional (2-D) silicon films are optimized by using both the local-density approximation (LDA) and generalized gradient approximation (GGA). In the absence of strain/stress, five buckled hexagonal honeycomb structures of the BiSF with triangular lattice have been obtained as local energy minima, and their structural stability has been verified. These structures present a Dirac-cone shaped energy band diagram with zero energy band gaps. Applying a tensile biaxial strain leads to a reduction of the buckling height. Atomically flat structures with zero buckling height have been observed when the AA-stacking structures are under a critical biaxial strain. Increase of the strain between 10.7% and 15.4% results in a band-gap opening with a maximum energy band gap opening of ˜0.17 eV, obtained when a 14.3% strain is applied. Energy band diagrams, electron transmission efficiency, and the charge transport property are calculated. Additionally, an asymmetric energetically favorable atomic structure of BiSF shows a non-zero band gap in the absence of strain/stress and a maximum band gap of 0.15 eV as a -1.71% compressive strain is applied. Both tensile and compressive strain/stress can lead to a band gap opening in the asymmetric structure.

  12. Measuring strain using digital image correlation of second harmonic generation images.

    PubMed

    Wentzell, Scott; Sterling Nesbitt, Robert; Macione, James; Kotha, Shiva

    2013-08-01

    The micromechanical environment of bone is crucial to understanding both bone fracture and mechanobiological responses of osteocytes, yet few techniques exist that are capable of measuring strains on the micrometer scale. A method for measuring micrometer level strains has been developed based on digital image correlation (DIC) of second harmonic generation microscopy (SHGM) images. Bovine tibias milled into thin sections were imaged using SHGM under loads of 0 and 15 MPa. Strains were measured using DIC and compared to applied strain values. First and second principal strains decreased in magnitude as the analysis region area increased from 1750 µm(2) to 60,920 µm(2), converging to 1.23 ± 0.74 and -0.745 ± 0.9816 times the applied strain respectively. A representative sample histogram revealed regions of pure tensile and compressive strain, and that strains were highly heterogeneous ranging from 8410 to -8840 microstrain for an applied 2870 microstrain. Comparison with applied strain measures suggested that analysis sizes of 1750 µm(2) and greater were measuring strains on the tissue scale, and higher resolution is required for collagen fibrillar strains. Regions of low SHGM intensity ("dark" regions) were seen which are believed to be lacunar and perilacunar regions of low collagen density. However, no significant differences in strain magnitude were present in dark regions versus regions of high signal intensity. The proposed technique is effective for strains on the size order of bone microarchitecture, and would be useful for studies into the mechanical microenvironment during loading. The technique also has potential for in vivo studies in small animal models. PMID:23845730

  13. Comparison of Elevated Temperature Tensile Properties and Fatigue Behavior of Two Variants of a Woven SiC/SiC Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Brewer, David N.; Sreeramesh, Kalluri

    2005-01-01

    Tensile properties (elastic modulus, proportional limit strength, in-plane tensile strength, and strain at failure) of two variants of a woven SiC/SiC composite, manufactured during two separate time periods (9/99 and 1/01), were determined at 1038 and 1204 C by conducting tensile tests on specimens machined from plates. Continuous cycling fatigue tests (R = 0.05) and 20 cpm) were also conducted at the same two temperatures on specimens from both composites. In this study, average tensile properties, 95% confidence intervals associated with the tensile properties, and geometric mean fatigue lives of both composite materials are compared. The observed similarities and differences in the tensile properties are highlighted and an attempt is made to understand the relationship, if any, between the tensile properties and the fatigue behaviors of the two woven composites.

  14. The elevated temperature tensile properties of S-200E commercially pure beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Henshall, G.A.; Torres, S.G.; Hanafee, J.E.

    1995-03-01

    Experiments were performed at 300-100 C in longitudinal and transverse orientations at quasi-static strain rate 5.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}s{sup {minus}1}. Results show that the stress-strain curve is smooth, without yield points or serrations. Yield stress and ultimate tensile stress decrease monotonically with temperature. Similar strengths were measured for both orientations. Failure elongation vs temperature is complex.

  15. Analysis of Tensile Deformation and Failure in Austenitic Stainless Steels: Part II- Irradiation Dose Dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Weon; Byun, Thak Sang

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation effects on stable and unstable deformations and fracture behaviors in irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs) have been studied in detail based on the equivalent true stress versus true strain curves. An iterative technique in finite element simulation was used to obtain the equivalent true stress-true strain data from experimental tensile curves. It was shown that the strain hardening rate was retained at a high level on unstable deformation after significant irradiation and was independent of the irradiation dose up to the initiation of a localized necking. The equivalent fracture stress was nearly independent of irradiation dose before the damage (embrittlement) mechanism changed. In low dose range (< ~ 2dpa), the fracture strain and tensile fracture energy decreased rapidly with dose and at higher doses they decreased gradually to saturated levels, which were still high for irradiated materials. It was also found that the fracture properties for EC316LN SS were less sensitive to irradiation dose than those for 316 SS, although their uniform tensile properties showed almost the same dose dependencies. It was confirmed that the dose dependence of tensile fracture properties evaluated by the linear approximation model for nominal stress was accurate enough for practical use without elaborate calculations.

  16. Correlation Between Tensile Strength and Hardness of Electron Beam Welded TC4-DT Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Shi, Yaowu; Li, Xiaoyan; Lei, Yongping

    2013-06-01

    Correlation between tensile strength and hardness for damage-tolerant Ti-6Al-4V (TC4-DT) alloy and its electron beam welded joints was investigated. Yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and strain hardening coefficient of base metal and weld metal were obtained using uniaxial tensile tests. Microhardness of the base metal, heat affected zone, and weld metal was measured. Then, the linear correlations among the yield strength, tensile strength, and hardness were proposed. Moreover, correlation between strain hardening coefficient and the ratio of YS to UTS (YS/UTS) was established. The results indicate that microhardness can be used to predict the YS and UTS of the TC4-DT welded joint successfully. In addition, the strain hardening coefficient can be predicted by the YS/UTS. The prediction of strength and strain hardening coefficient is in agreement with the experiments. The correlations are applicable and valuable for the strength prediction of narrow welded fusion zone and heat affected zone based on the microhardness measurement.

  17. Effects of Uniaxial and Biaxial Strain on Few-Layered Terrace Structures of MoS₂ Grown by Vapor Transport.

    PubMed

    McCreary, Amber; Ghosh, Rudresh; Amani, Matin; Wang, Jin; Duerloo, Karel-Alexander N; Sharma, Ankit; Jarvis, Karalee; Reed, Evan J; Dongare, Avinash M; Banerjee, Sanjay K; Terrones, Mauricio; Namburu, Raju R; Dubey, Madan

    2016-03-22

    One of the most fascinating properties of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is its ability to be subjected to large amounts of strain without experiencing degradation. The potential of MoS2 mono- and few-layers in electronics, optoelectronics, and flexible devices requires the fundamental understanding of their properties as a function of strain. While previous reports have studied mechanically exfoliated flakes, tensile strain experiments on chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown few-layered MoS2 have not been examined hitherto, although CVD is a state of the art synthesis technique with clear potential for scale-up processes. In this report, we used CVD-grown terrace MoS2 layers to study how the number and size of the layers affected the physical properties under uniaxial and biaxial tensile strain. Interestingly, we observed significant shifts in both the Raman in-plane mode (as high as -5.2 cm(-1)) and photoluminescence (PL) energy (as high as -88 meV) for the few-layered MoS2 under ∼1.5% applied uniaxial tensile strain when compared to monolayers and few-layers of MoS2 studied previously. We also observed slippage between the layers which resulted in a hysteresis of the Raman and PL spectra during further applications of strain. Through DFT calculations, we contended that this random layer slippage was due to defects present in CVD-grown materials. This work demonstrates that CVD-grown few-layered MoS2 is a realistic, exciting material for tuning its properties under tensile strain. PMID:26881920

  18. Apparatus for measuring tensile and compressive properties of solid materials at cryogenic temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Gonczy, John D.; Markley, Finley W.; McCaw, William R.; Niemann, Ralph C.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for evaluating the tensile and compressive properties of material samples at very low or cryogenic temperatures employs a stationary frame and a dewar mounted below the frame. A pair of coaxial cylindrical tubes extend downward towards the bottom of the dewar. A compressive or tensile load is generated hydraulically and is transmitted by the inner tube to the material sample. The material sample is located near the bottom of the dewar in a liquid refrigerant bath. The apparatus employs a displacement measuring device, such as a linear variable differential transformer, to measure the deformation of the material sample relative to the amount of compressive or tensile force applied to the sample.

  19. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, J.L.

    1982-05-28

    A method and apparatus is described for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  20. Method and apparatus for determining tensile strength

    DOEpatents

    Ratigan, Joe L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the statistical distribution of apparent tensile strength of rock, the size effect with respect to tensile strength, as well as apparent deformation modulus of both intact and fractured or jointed rock. The method is carried out by inserting a plug of deformable material, such as rubber, in an opening of a specimen to be tested. The deformable material is loaded by an upper and lower platen until the specimen ruptures, whereafter the tensile strength is calculated based on the parameters of the test specimen and apparatus.

  1. Dynamic tensile strength of lunar rock types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, S. N.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of four rocks are determined. A flat plate impact experiment is employed to generate approximately one-microsecond-duration tensile stress pulses in rock samples by superposing rarefaction waves to induce fracture. It is noted that the effect of chemical weathering and other factors has not been explicitly studied. The given tensile strengths are based on a series of experiments on each rock where determination of incipient spallation is made by terminal microscopic examination. The data are generally consistent with previous determinations, at least one of which was for a significantly chemically altered but physically coherent rock.

  2. Reversible stress and strain limits of the critical current of practical REBCO and BSCCO wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamura, K.; Machiya, S.; Nishijima, G.

    2016-09-01

    Practical REBCO and BSCCO-2223 tape-shaped wires are now manufactured on an industrial scale. They are a typical composite material consisting of superconducting layer/filaments together with functional components. These functional components affect directly the stress and strain dependences of the critical current. When applying an external stress R, the critical current I c was measured. Then the external stress was reduced to R = 0 and the recovered critical current I cr was again measured. The tensile stress and strain dependences of both normalized critical currents divided by the original value, I c/I c0 and I cr/I c0 were investigated. In general I cr/I c0 recovered close to unity when the applied stress was low, but its recovering level decreased gradually with increasing applied stress. The definition of the reversible stress and strain limits was investigated and its validity was proved using the cyclic loading test. The original definition of reversible stress and strain limits of critical current relates to: (1) when releasing the applied stress and strain, the I c shall recover to the original value, and (2) when applying the cyclic stresses, the I c shall keep the original value. Here, as a practical definition for the reversible stress and strain limits, the tensile stress and strain at 99% recovery of I c have been proposed. On the other hand, it was made clear that the stress and strain at I c 95% retention are not valid for use commonly as a criterion of reversible stress and strain limits for both practical REBCO and BSCCO-2223 wires.

  3. The tensile behavior of demineralized bovine cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Bowman, S M; Zeind, J; Gibson, L J; Hayes, W C; McMahon, T A

    1996-11-01

    Bone is frequently modeled as a two-phase composite of hydroxyapatite mineral crystals dispersed throughout an organic collagen matrix. However, because of the numerous limitations (e.g. small sample size, poor strain measuring techniques, rapid demineralization with acids) of previous mechanical tests of bone with its hydroxyapatite chemically removed, we have determined new, accurate data on the material properties of the demineralized bone matrix for use in these composite models. We performed tensile tests on waisted specimens of demineralized bovine cortical bone from six humeral diaphyses. Specimens were demineralized over 14 days with a 0.5 M disodium EDTA solution that was replaced daily. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to track the demineralization process and to determine the effectiveness of our demineralization protocol. Mechanical tests were performed at room temperature under displacement control at an approximate strain rate of 0.5% per s. We imposed nine preconditioning cycles before a final ramp to failure, and measured gauge length displacements using a non-invasive optical technique. The resulting stress-strain curves were similar to the tensile behavior observed in mechanical tests of other collagenous tissues, exhibiting an initial non-linear 'toe' region, followed by a linear region and subsequent failure without evidence of yielding. We found an average modulus, ultimate stress, and ultimate strain of 613 MPa (S.D. = 113 MPa), 61.5 MPa (S.D. = 13.1 MPa), and 12.3% (S.D. = 0.5%), respectively. Our average modulus is approximately half the value frequently used in current composite bone analyses. These data should also have clinical relevance because the early strength of healing fractured bone depends largely on the material properties of the collagen matrix. PMID:8894931

  4. ROLE OF SCALE FACTOR DURING TENSILE TESTING OF SMALL SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Gussev, Maxim N; Busby, Jeremy T; Field, Kevin G; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Gray, Mr. Sean

    2014-01-01

    The influence of scale factor (tensile specimen geometry and dimensions) on mechanical test results was investigated for different widely used types of small specimens (SS-1, SS-2, SS-3, and SS-J3) and a set of materials. It was found that the effect of scale factor on the accurate determination of yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, and uniform elongation values was weak; however, clear systematic differences were observed and should be accounted for during interpretation of results. In contrast, total elongation values were strongly sensitive to variations in specimen geometry. Modern experimental methods like digital image correlation allow the impact of scale factor to be reduced. Using these techniques, it was shown that true stress true strain curves describing strain-hardening behavior were very close for different specimen types. The limits of miniaturization are discussed, and an ultra-miniature specimen concept was suggested and evaluated. This type of specimen, as expected, may be suitable for SEM and TEM in situ testing.

  5. Tensile Behavior of Single-Crystal Tin Whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. S.; Sarkar, R.; Xie, H.-X.; Mayer, C.; Rajagopalan, J.; Chawla, N.

    2014-04-01

    The growth of metallic (predominantly Sn) whiskers from pure metallic platings has been studied for over 50 years. While the phenomenon of Sn whiskering has been studied for decades, very little is known about the mechanical properties of these materials. This can be attributed to the difficulty in handling, gripping, and testing such fine-diameter and high-aspect-ratio whiskers. We report on the stress-strain behavior of Sn whiskers inside a dual-beam focused ion beam (FIB) with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Lift-out of the whiskers was conducted in situ in the FIB, and the whiskers were tested using a microelectromechanical system tensile testing stage. Using this technique, the whiskers had minimum exposure to ambient air and were not handled by hand. SEM images after fracture enabled reliable calculation of the whisker cross-sectional area. Tests on two different whiskers revealed relatively high tensile strengths of 720 MPa and 880 MPa, respectively, and a limited strain to failure of ˜2% to 3%. For both whiskers, the Young's modulus was between 42 GPa and 45 GPa. It is interesting to note that the whiskers were quite strong and had limited ductility. These findings are intriguing and provide a basis for further work to understand the effect of Sn whisker mechanical properties on short circuits in electronics.

  6. Characteristic tensile strength and Weibull shape parameter of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Claude A.

    2007-06-01

    Recently, it has been argued [N. M. Pugno and R. S. Ruoff, J. Appl. Phys. 99, 024301 (2006)] that available carbon-nanotube (CNT) tensile strength data do not obey the "classical" Weibull statistical model. In this paper we formulate Weibull's theory in a manner suitable for assessing CNT fracture-strength data and demonstrate that, on taking into account the area S subjected to uniform tensile stresses, the data are consistent with Weibull's model. Based on available data, a characteristic strength σC (S=1μm2) equal to 17.6±2.5GPa in conjunction with a shape parameter m equal to 2.77±0.34 provides a good description of the CNT fracture strength. In terms of effective strengths, and on assuming that the relevant area-scaling laws apply, carbon nanotubes and diamond nanofilms exhibit similar features for stressed areas ranging from 1to104μm2.

  7. Interaction of Bearing and Tensile Loads on Creep Properties of Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodine, E G; Carlson, R L; Manning, G K

    1956-01-01

    The interaction of bearing and tensile loads on the creep behavior of joints was studied. A specimen was designed for this study which possessed some of the general features of pin and rivet joint connections and an apparatus was constructed to apply both bearing and tensile loads to the joint model. Deformation measurements were made by use of a photogrid printed on the joint model.

  8. An Assessment of Variability in the Average Tensile Properties of a Melt-Infiltrated SiC/SiC Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Brewer, David N.; Calomino, Anthony M.

    2004-01-01

    Woven SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs), manufactured by the slurry-cast, melt-infiltration process are under consideration as combustor liner materials in aircraft gas turbine engines. Tensile properties (elastic modulus, proportional limit strength, in-plane tensile strength and strain to failure) of the CMC, manufactured during two separate time periods (9/99 and 1/01) were determined at 816 and 1024 C by conducting tensile tests on specimens machined from the CMC plates. A total of 24 tensile tests were conducted for each temperature and CMC variant combination. In this study average tensile properties of the two cMC variants were statistically compared to evaluate significant differences, if any, within the CMC's properties.

  9. Acoustic emission for characterising the crack propagation in strain-hardening cement-based composites (SHCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, S.C.; Pirskawetz, S.; Zijl, G.P.A.G. van; Schmidt, W.

    2015-03-15

    This paper presents the analysis of crack propagation in strain-hardening cement-based composite (SHCC) under tensile and flexural load by using acoustic emission (AE). AE is a non-destructive technique to monitor the development of structural damage due to external forces. The main objective of this research was to characterise the cracking behaviour in SHCC in direct tensile and flexural tests by using AE. A better understanding of the development of microcracks in SHCC will lead to a better understanding of pseudo strain-hardening behaviour of SHCC and its general performance. ARAMIS optical deformation analysis was also used in direct tensile tests to observe crack propagation in SHCC materials. For the direct tensile tests, SHCC specimens were prepared with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibre with three different volume percentages (1%, 1.85% and 2.5%). For the flexural test beam specimens, only a fibre dosage of 1.85% was applied. It was found that the application of AE in SHCC can be a good option to analyse the crack growth in the specimens under increasing load, the location of the cracks and most importantly the identification of matrix cracking and fibre rupture or slippage.

  10. Tensile set behavior of Foley catheter balloons.

    PubMed

    Joseph, R; Ramesh, P; Sivakumar, R

    1999-01-01

    The removal of indwelling urinary balloon catheters from patients is usually associated with many problems. The problems such as balloon deflation failure; encrustations on balloons, eyes, and lumen; and catheter associated infections are widely discussed in the literature. The tensile set exhibited by the catheter balloon material could also play a role and further complicate the removal process. This article addresses this issue by comparing the tensile set behavior of the balloon material from three commercially available Foley catheters. The balloon materials were subjected to aging in synthetic urine at 37 degrees C for 28 days to simulate clinical conditions. The deflation time of catheter balloons aged in similar conditions were also measured. It was found that different brands of catheters exhibited statistically significant differences in their properties. The tensile set data of the aged samples could be correlated with the deflation time of the balloons. The clinical significance of the tensile set is also highlighted. PMID:10029146

  11. Tensile properties of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, H.; Trada, Mohan

    2013-08-01

    Kinetic epoxy resin was filled with nanoclay to increase tensile properties of the composite for civil and structural. This project manufactured samples with different percentages by weight of nanoclay in the composites in steps of 1 wt %, which were then post-cured in an oven. The samples were then subjected to tensile tests. The results showed that the composite with 3 wt % of nanoclay produced the highest yield and tensile strengths. However, the Young's modulus increased with increasing nanoparticulate loading. It is hoped that the discussion and results in this work would not only contribute towards the further development of nanoclay reinforced epoxy composites with enhanced material properties, but also provide useful information for the studies of fracture toughness, tensile properties and flexural properties of other composites.

  12. Self-repairing, interferometric waveguide sensor with a large strain range.

    PubMed

    Song, Young J; Peters, Kara J

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrate a polymer waveguide, Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor fabricated through a self-writing process in a photopolymerizable resin bath between two silica optical fibers. The measurable strain range is extended through sensor self-repair and strain measurements are demonstrated up to 150% applied tensile strain. The sensor fabrication and repair is performed in the ultraviolet wavelength range, while the sensor interrogation is performed in the near-infrared wavelength range. A hybrid sensor is fabricated by splicing a short segment of multimode optical fiber to the input single-mode optical fiber. The hybrid sensor provides the high quality of waveguide fabrication previously demonstrated through self-writing between multimode optical fibers with the high fringe visibility of single-mode propagation. The peak frequency shift of the reflected spectrum Fabry-Perot sensor is extremely linear with applied strain for the hybrid sensor, with a sensitivity of 2.3×10(-3) per nanometer per percent strain. The calibrated peak frequency shift with applied strain is the same for both the original sensor and the repaired sensor; therefore, the fact that the sensor has self-repaired does not need to be known. Additionally, this calibration is the same between multiple sensor fabrications. In contrast to a conventional air gap Fabry-Perot cavity sensor, no decrease in the fringe visibility is observed over the measurable strain range. PMID:23033107

  13. High temperature strain gage apparent strain compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, T. C., Sr.

    1992-01-01

    Once an installed strain gage is connected to a strain indicating device and the instrument is balanced, a subsequent change in temperature of the gage installation will generally produce a resistance change in the gage. This purely temperature-induced resistance will be registered by the indicating device as a strain and is referred to as 'apparent strain' to distinguish it from strain due to applied stress. One desirable technique for apparent strain compensation is to employ two identical gages with identical mounting procedures which are connected with a 'half bridge' configuration where gages see the same thermal environment but only one experiences a mechanical strain input. Their connection in adjacent arms of the bridge will then balance the thermally induced apparent strains and, in principle, only the mechanical strain remains. Two approaches that implement this technique are discussed.

  14. Reversible uniaxial strain tuning in atomically thin WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Robert; Niehues, Iris; Schneider, Robert; Drüppel, Matthias; Deilmann, Thorsten; Rohlfing, Michael; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Steffen; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Bratschitsch, Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    Due to their unique band structure, single layers of transition metal dichalcogenides are promising for new atomic-scale physics and devices. It has been shown that the band structure and the excitonic transitions can be tuned by straining the material. Recently, the discovery of single-photon emission from localized excitons has put monolayer WSe2 in the spotlight. The localized light emitters might be related to local strain potentials in the monolayer. Here, we measure strain-dependent energy shifts for the A, B, C, and D excitons for uniaxial tensile strain up to 1.4% in monolayer WSe2 by performing absorption measurements. A gauge factor of -54\\tfrac{{{meV}}}{ % }, -50\\tfrac{{{meV}}}{ % }, +17\\tfrac{{{meV}}}{ % }, and -22\\tfrac{{{meV}}}{ % } is derived for the A, B, C, and D exciton, respectively. These values are in good agreement with ab initio GW-BSE calculations. Furthermore, we examine the spatial strain distribution in the WSe2 monolayer at different applied strain levels. We find that the size of the monolayer is crucial for an efficient transfer of strain from the substrate to the monolayer.

  15. Grain boundary sliding measurements during tensile creep of a single-phase alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, C.R.; Lin, H.T.; Becher, P.F.

    1998-06-01

    The grain boundary sliding (GBS) behavior of a single-phase (relatively coarse-grained) alumina material was studied after tensile creep experiments were performed at 1,500 C at stress levels of 20 and 35 MPa. Specimens tested at 35 MPa exhibited a number of modes of GBS, including Mode II (shear) displacements, Mode I (opening) displacements, out-of-plane sliding displacements, and in-plane grain rotation. Strains in the grain boundaries due to Mode II GBS displacements ranged from 940% to 4,400%. Average Mode II GBS displacements ranged from 0.08 to 0.28 {micro}m in samples tested for 120 and 480 min, respectively, at 35 MPa. The GBS displacements were shown to fit a Weibull distribution. Tensile creep under a 35 MPa stress yielded a GBS rate of 9.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} {micro}m/s, while the 20 MPa stress resulted in a GBS rate of 2.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} {micro}m/s. The average Mode II GBS displacements increased linearly with specimen strain, suggesting that GBS may play an important role in creep cavitation during tensile creep. The data also revealed that compatibility and constraint rules appear to govern GBS behavior during tensile creep. GBS behavior during compressive creep will be compared to the tensile creep GBS measurements presented.

  16. Effect of particle size and volume fraction on tensile properties of fly ash/polyurea composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jing; Schaaf, Kristin; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Nemat-Nasser, Siavouche

    2010-04-01

    Fly ash, which consists of hollow particles with porous shells, was introduced into polyurea elastomer. A one-step method was chosen to fabricate pure polyurea and the polyurea matrix for the composites based on Isonate® 2143L (diisocyanate) and Versalink® P-1000 (diamine). Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the fracture surfaces of the composites. Particle size and volume fraction were varied to study their effects on the tensile properties of the composites. The tensile properties of the pure polyurea and fly ash/polyurea (FA/PU) composites were tested using an Instron load frame with a 1 kN Interface model 1500ASK-200 load cell. Results showed that fly ash particles were distributed homogeneously in the polyurea matrix, and all of the composites displayed rubber-like tensile behavior similar to that of pure polyurea. The tensile strength of the composites was influenced by both the fly ash size and the volume fraction. Compared to the largest particle size or the highest volume fraction, an increase in tensile strength was achieved by reducing particle size and/or volume fraction. The strain at break of the composites also increased by using fine particles. In addition, the composites filled with 20% fly ash became softer. These samples showed lower plateau strength and larger strain at break than the other composites.

  17. Tensile actuators of carbon nanotube coiled yarn based on polydiacetylene–pluronic copolymers as temperature indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee Uk; Kim, Hyunsoo; Chun, Kyoung-Yong; Kwon, Cheong Hoon; Lima, Márcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2016-07-01

    Most polydiacetylenes (PDAs) have been studied as chromatic sensors or temperature indicators because of their phase transition that is accompanied by a color change from blue to red. Here, we focus on the structural change based on the polydiacetylene phase transition for a temperature-responsive tensile actuator at low temperature using a copolymer composed of PDA and pluronic in a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) coiled yarn. In this paper, we do not focus on the general color change phenomenon of PDA. We demonstrate that the volume change of PDA in the MWCNT coiled yarn provides ∼180% tensile strain at low temperature (∼53 °C). Insertion of the pluronic copolymer into the coiled yarn composed of PDA and MWCNT caused the tensile actuation temperature to decrease by ∼6 °C (with tensile actuation of ∼230%) compared to an actuator without pluronic copolymer. Furthermore, we could verify that the large tensile actuation was also predominantly affected by the melting of the nonpolymerized diacetylene (DA) monomer and the pluronic copolymer. MWCNT coiled yarn actuators with PDA-pluronic copolymer can be easily prepared, have a large tensile actuation, and are actuated at low temperature. It could be used as temperature indicators in the food, drugs, and medical fields.

  18. Characteristics of the tensile mechanical properties of fresh and dry forewings of beetles.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Wanyong; Chen, Jinxiang; Wu, Zhishen; Xie, Juan; Wang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Based on a tensile experiment and observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), this study demonstrated the characteristics of the tensile mechanical properties of the fresh and dry forewings of two types of beetles. The results revealed obvious differences in the tensile fracture morphologies and characteristics of the tensile mechanical properties of fresh and dry forewings of Cybister tripunctatus Olivier and Allomyrina dichotoma. For fresh forewings of these two types of beetles, a viscous, flow-like, polymer matrix plastic deformation was observed on the fracture surfaces, with soft morphologies and many fibers being pulled out, whereas on the dry forewings, the tensile fracture surfaces were straightforward, and there were no features resembling those found on the fresh forewings. The fresh forewings exhibited a greater fracture strain than the dry forewings, which was caused by the relative slippage of hydroxyl inter-chain bonds due to the presence of water in the fibers and proteins in the fresh forewings. Our study is the first to demonstrate the phenomenon of sudden stress drops caused by the fracturing of the lower skin because the lower skin fractured before the forewings of A. dichotoma reached their ultimate tensile strength. We also investigated the reasons underlying this phenomenon. This research provides a much better understanding of the mechanical properties of beetle forewings and facilitates the correct selection of study objects for biomimetic materials and development of the corresponding applications. PMID:27157727

  19. Effect of in-plane magnetic field and applied strain in quantum spin Hall systems: Application to InAs/GaSb quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lun-Hui; Xu, Dong-Hui; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Zhou, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery of quantized spin Hall effect in InAs/GaSb quantum wells [Du, Knez, Sullivan, and Du, Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 096802 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.096802], we theoretically study the effects of in-plane magnetic field and strain effect to the quantization of charge conductance by using Landauer-B ütikker formalism. Our theory predicts a robustness of the conductance quantization against the in-plane magnetic field up to a very high field of 20 T. We use a disordered hopping term to model the strain and show that the strain may help the quantization of the conductance. Relevance to the experiments will be discussed.

  20. The effect of mechanical strains in soft tissues of the shoulder during load carriage.

    PubMed

    Hadid, Amir; Belzer, Noa; Shabshin, Nogah; Zeilig, Gabi; Gefen, Amit; Epstein, Yoram

    2015-11-26

    Soldiers and recreational backpackers are often required to carry heavy loads during military operations or hiking. Shoulder strain appears to be one of the limiting factors of load carriage due to skin and underlying soft tissue deformations, trapped nerves, or obstruction of blood vessels. The present study was aimed to determine relationships between backpack weights and the state of loads in the shoulder׳s inner tissues, with a special focus on the deformations in the brachial plexus. Open-MRI scans were used for developing and then verifying a three-dimensional, non-linear, large deformation, finite element model of the shoulder. Loads were applied at the strap-shoulder contact surfaces of the model by pulling the strap towards the shoulder until the desired load was reached. Increasing the strap tensile forces up to a load that represents 35kg backpack resulted in gradual increase in strains within the underlying soft tissues: the maximal tensile strain in the brachial plexus for a 25kg backpack was 12%, and while carrying 35kg, the maximal tensile strain increased to 16%. The lateral aspect of the brachial plexus was found to be more vulnerable to deformation-inflicted effects than the medial aspect. This is due to the anatomy of the clavicle that poorly shields the plexus from compressive loads applied during load carriage, while the neural tissue in the medial aspect of the shoulder is better protected by the clavicle. The newly developed model can serve as a tool to estimate soft tissue deformations in the brachial plexus for heavy backpack loads, up to 35kg. This method will allow further development of new strap structures and materials for alleviating the strains applied on the shoulder soft tissues. PMID:26542788

  1. Reversible strain-induced magnetization switching in FeGa nanomagnets: Pathway to a rewritable, non-volatile, non-toggle, extremely low energy straintronic memory.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Hasnain; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    We report reversible strain-induced magnetization switching between two stable/metastable states in ~300 nm sized FeGa nanomagnets delineated on a piezoelectric PMN-PT substrate. Voltage of one polarity applied across the substrate generates compressive strain in a nanomagnet and switches its magnetization to one state, while voltage of the opposite polarity generates tensile strain and switches the magnetization back to the original state. The two states can encode the two binary bits, and, using the right voltage polarity, one can write either bit deterministically. This portends an ultra-energy-efficient non-volatile "non-toggle" memory. PMID:26657829

  2. Reversible strain-induced magnetization switching in FeGa nanomagnets: Pathway to a rewritable, non-volatile, non-toggle, extremely low energy straintronic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Hasnain; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-12-01

    We report reversible strain-induced magnetization switching between two stable/metastable states in ~300 nm sized FeGa nanomagnets delineated on a piezoelectric PMN-PT substrate. Voltage of one polarity applied across the substrate generates compressive strain in a nanomagnet and switches its magnetization to one state, while voltage of the opposite polarity generates tensile strain and switches the magnetization back to the original state. The two states can encode the two binary bits, and, using the right voltage polarity, one can write either bit deterministically. This portends an ultra-energy-efficient non-volatile “non-toggle” memory.

  3. Reversible strain-induced magnetization switching in FeGa nanomagnets: Pathway to a rewritable, non-volatile, non-toggle, extremely low energy straintronic memory

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Hasnain; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    We report reversible strain-induced magnetization switching between two stable/metastable states in ~300 nm sized FeGa nanomagnets delineated on a piezoelectric PMN-PT substrate. Voltage of one polarity applied across the substrate generates compressive strain in a nanomagnet and switches its magnetization to one state, while voltage of the opposite polarity generates tensile strain and switches the magnetization back to the original state. The two states can encode the two binary bits, and, using the right voltage polarity, one can write either bit deterministically. This portends an ultra-energy-efficient non-volatile “non-toggle” memory. PMID:26657829

  4. Tensile Fracture Strength of Brisbane Tuff by Static and Cyclic Loading Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erarslan, N.; Alehossein, H.; Williams, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    This research presents the results of laboratory experiments during the investigation of tensile strength-strain characteristics of Brisbane tuff disc specimens under static and diametral cyclic loading. Three different cyclic loading methods were used; namely, sinusoidal cyclic loading, type I and II increasing cyclic loading with various amplitude values. The first method applied the stress amplitude-cycle number (s-n) curve approach to the measurement of the indirect tensile strength (ITS) and fracture toughness ( K IC) values of rocks for the first time in the literature. The type I and II methods investigated the effect of increasing cyclic loading on the ITS and K IC of rocks. For Brisbane tuff, the reduction in ITS was found to be 30 % under sinusoidal loading, whereas type I and II increasing cyclic loading caused a maximum reduction in ITS of 36 %. The maximum reduction of the static K IC of 46 % was obtained for the highest amplitude type I cyclic loading tested. For sinusoidal cyclic loading, a maximum reduction of the static K IC of 30 % was obtained. A continuous irreversible accumulation of damage was observed in dynamic cyclic tests conducted at different amplitudes and mean stress levels. Scanning electron microscope images showed that fatigue damage in Brisbane tuff is strongly influenced by the failure of the matrix because of both inter-granular fracturing and trans-granular fracturing. The main characteristic was grain breakage under cyclic loading, which probably starts at points of contact between grains and is accompanied by the production of very small fragments, probably due to frictional sliding within the weak matrix.

  5. Analytical Modeling of the High Strain Rate Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The results presented here are part of an ongoing research program to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. State variable constitutive equations originally developed for metals have been modified in order to model the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymeric matrix materials. To account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses, which are significant in polymers, the classical 5 plasticity theory definitions of effective stress and effective plastic strain are modified by applying variations of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion. To verify the revised formulation, the shear and tensile deformation of a representative toughened epoxy is analyzed across a wide range of strain rates (from quasi-static to high strain rates) and the results are compared to experimentally obtained values. For the analyzed polymers, both the tensile and shear stress-strain curves computed using the analytical model correlate well with values obtained through experimental tests. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented within a strength of materials based micromechanics method to predict the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. In the micromechanics, the unit cell is divided up into a number of independently analyzed slices, and laminate theory is then applied to obtain the effective deformation of the unit cell. The composite mechanics are verified by analyzing the deformation of a representative polymer matrix composite (composed using the representative polymer analyzed for the correlation of the polymer constitutive equations) for several fiber orientation angles across a variety of strain rates. The computed values compare favorably to experimentally obtained results.

  6. Ultra-high amplified strain on 200 mm optical Germanium-On-Insulator (GeOI) substrates: towards CMOS compatible Ge lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reboud, V.; Gassenq, A.; Guilloy, K.; Osvaldo Dias, G.; Escalante, J. M.; Tardif, S.; Pauc, N.; Hartmann, J. M.; Widiez, J.; Gomez, E.; Bellet Amalric, E.; Fowler, D.; Rouchon, D.; Duchemin, I.; Niquet, Y. M.; Rieutord, F.; Faist, J.; Geiger, R.; Zabel, T.; Marin, E.; Sigg, H.; Chelnokov, A.; Calvo, V.

    2016-03-01

    Currently, one of the main challenges in the field of silicon photonics is the fabrication of efficient laser sources compatible with the microelectronic fabrication technology. An alternative to the complexity of integration of group III-V laser compounds is advancing from high tensile strains applied to germanium leading to improved emission properties by transforming the material from an indirect to a direct bandgap semiconductor. Theory predicts this transformation occurs at around 4.7% uniaxial tensile strain or 2.0% bi-axial tensile strain. Here, we report on ultrahigh strains obtained by amplifying the residual strain from novel optical Germanium-On-Insulator (GeOI) substrates fabricated by Smart CutTM technology and patterned with micro-bridges and micro-crosses. The high crystalline quality of the GeOI layers dramatically declined the mechanical failure limits when liberating the Ge microbridges. Record level Raman shift of 8.1 cm-1 for biaxial (micro-crosses) and 8.7 cm-1 for uniaxial stress (micro-bridges) were reached by carefully designing the geometry of the micro-structures. The photoluminescence (PL) evolution is compared to theoretical calculations based on the tight-binding model revealing a detailed understanding of the influence of strain on the germanium optical properties.

  7. Tensile failure behavior of plain carbon steels at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wray, P. J.

    1984-11-01

    The onset of tensile instability and the occurrence of fracture in plain carbon steels containing up to 1.89C has been examined in the temperature range 500 to 1300 °C and the strain-rate range 6 X lO-6 to 2 × 10-2 s-1. In the ferrite-plus-pearlite mixtures at temperatures below the eutectoid temperature, the work-hardening exponent decreases with increasing amount of pearlite, and there is a corresponding decrease in the Considére strain. However, the onset of necking is delayed to well beyond the Considére strain, and these mixtures are inherently ductile even at the eutectoid composition. In the austenite region, the general intrusion of dynamic recrystallization compctes with intergranular embrittlement at temperatures below about 1050 °C. The embrittlement is related to precipitation which takes place either during cooling (MnS) or at the deformation temperature [AIN, Nb (CN), etc.]. In hypereutectoid steels, the ductility of austenite-plus-cementite and pearlite-plus-cementite mixtures diminishes drastically with decreasing temperature and increasing amount of cementite. The areas of possible fracture modes are mapped in temperature-strain rate and temperature-carbon content space.

  8. Infarcted rat myocardium: Data from biaxial tensile and uniaxial compressive testing and analysis of collagen fibre orientation.

    PubMed

    Sirry, Mazin S; Butler, J Ryan; Patnaik, Sourav S; Brazile, Bryn; Bertucci, Robbin; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ron; Davies, Neil H; Liao, Jun; Franz, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Myocardial infarction was experimentally induced in rat hearts and harvested immediately, 7, 14 and 28 days after the infarction induction. Anterior wall infarct samples underwent biaxial tensile and uniaxial compressive testing. Orientation of collagen fibres was analysed following mechanical testing. In this paper, we present the tensile and compressive stress-strain raw data, the calculated tensile and compressive moduli and the measured angles of collagen orientation. The presented data is associated with the research article titled "Characterisation of the mechanical properties of infarcted myocardium in the rat under biaxial tension and uniaxial compression" (Sirry et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:27579338

  9. A cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by miniature pulse tube cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L. B.; Liu, S. X.; Gu, K. X.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    This paper introduces a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus for micro-samples cooled by a miniature pulse tube cryocooler. At present, tensile tests are widely applied to measure the mechanical properties of materials; most of the cryogenic tensile testing apparatus are designed for samples with standard sizes, while for non-standard size samples, especially for microsamples, the tensile testing cannot be conducted. The general approach to cool down the specimens for tensile testing is by using of liquid nitrogen or liquid helium, which is not convenient: it is difficult to keep the temperature of the specimens at an arbitrary set point precisely, besides, in some occasions, liquid nitrogen, especially liquid helium, is not easily available. To overcome these limitations, a cryogenic tensile testing apparatus cooled by a high frequency pulse tube cryocooler has been designed, built and tested. The operating temperatures of the developed tensile testing apparatus cover from 20 K to room temperature with a controlling precision of ±10 mK. The apparatus configurations, the methods of operation and some cooling performance will be described in this paper.

  10. Electronic and magnetic properties of armchair MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons under both external strain and electric field, studied by first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ting; Dong, Jinming; Zhou, Jian; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-08-14

    The electronic and magnetic properties of armchair edge MoS{sub 2} nanoribbons (MoS{sub 2}-ANRs) underboth the external strain and transverse electric field (E{sub t}) have been systematically investigated by using the first-principles calculations. It is found that: (1) If no electric field is applied, an interesting structural phase transition would appear under a large tensile strain, leading to a new phase MoS{sub 2}-A'NR, and inducing a big jump peak of the band gap in the transition region. But, the band gap response to compressive strains is much different from that to tensile strain, showing no the structural phase transition. (2) Under the small tensile strains (<10%), the combined E{sub t} and tensile strain give rise to a positive superposition (resonant) effect on the band gap reduction at low E{sub t} (<3 V/nm), and oppositely a negative superposition (antiresonant) one at high E{sub t} (>4 V/nm). On the other hand, the external compressive strains have always presented the resonant effect on the band gap reduction, induced by the electric field. (3) After the structural phase transition, an external large tensile strain could greatly reduce the critical field E{sub tc} causing the band gap closure, and make the system become a ferromagnetic (FM) metal at a relative low E{sub t} (e.g., <4 V/nm), which is very helpful for its promising applications in nano-mechanical spintronics devices. (4) At high E{sub t} (>10 V/nm), the magnetic moments of both the MoS{sub 2}-ANR and MoS{sub 2}-A'NR in their FM states could be enhanced greatly by a tensile strain. Our numerical results of effectively tuning physical properties of MoS{sub 2}-ANRs by combined external strain and electric field may open their new potential applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  11. A magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool for quantitative analysis of strain induced cellular reorientation and actin alignment.

    PubMed

    Khademolhosseini, F; Liu, C-C; Lim, C J; Chiao, M

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available cell strain tools, such as pneumatically actuated elastomer substrates, require special culture plates, pumps, and incubator setups. In this work, we present a magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool (MACSAT) that can be implemented using off-the-shelf components and conventional incubators. We determine the strain field on the MACSAT elastomer substrate using numerical models and experimental measurements and show that a specific region of the elastomer substrate undergoes a quasi-uniaxial 2D stretch, and that cells confined to this region of the MACSAT elastomer substrate undergo tensile, compressive, or zero axial strain depending on their angle of orientation. Using the MACSAT to apply cyclic strain on endothelial cells, we demonstrate that actin filaments within the cells reorient away from the stretching direction, towards the directions of minimum axial strain. We show that the final actin orientation angles in strained cells are spread over a region of compressive axial strain, confirming previous findings on the existence of a varied pre-tension in the actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. We also demonstrate that strained cells exhibit distinctly different values of actin alignment coherency compared to unstrained cells and therefore propose that this parameter, i.e., the coherency of actin alignment, can be used as a new readout to determine the occurrence/extent of actin alignment in cell strain experiments. The tools and methods demonstrated in this study are simple and accessible and can be easily replicated by other researchers to study the strain response of other adherent cells. PMID:27587150

  12. Novel approach to tensile testing of micro- and nanoscale fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, E. P. S.; Lim, C. T.

    2004-08-01

    Due to the strength and size of the micro- and nanoscale fibers, larger conventional universal testing machines are not suitable in performing stretch test of such fibers. Existing microtensile testing machines are custom-made and are complex and expensive to construct. Here, a novel method of using an existing atomic force microscope (AFM)-based nanoindenation system for the tensile testing of microscale or bundled nanoscale fibers is proposed. The microscale poly (L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) fiber (˜25 μm diameter) was used as an example to illustrate this technique. The microfiber was first attached to a nanoindenter tip and the base via a custom-made holder to ensure that the microfiber was taut and vertically aligned. The force transducer of the nanoindenter was used to measure the tensile force required to stretch the microfiber. The microfiber was stretched using the stepper motor of the AFM system. The elongation of the microfiber was measured by subtracting the elongation of the transducer spring from the total elongation of the microfiber and transducer spring. A plot of the load against elongation of the microfiber was then obtained. The stress and strain of the microfiber was measured by subtracting the elongation of the transducer spring from the total elongation of the microfiber was then obtained. The stress and strain of the microfiber was obtained by dividing the load and elongation by cross-sectional area and gauge length, respectively. With this data, the mechanical behavior of the sample at small strains can be studied. This system is able to provide a high load resolution of 80 nN and displacement resolution of 0.5 nm. However, maximum load and sample elongation is limited and handling of the sample still remains a challenge.

  13. Strain-mediated electric-field control of exchange bias in a Co90Fe10/BiFeO3/SrRuO3/PMN-PT heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Wu, S Z; Miao, J; Xu, X G; Yan, W; Reeve, R; Zhang, X H; Jiang, Y

    2015-01-01

    The electric-field (E-field) controlled exchange bias (EB) in a Co90Fe10/BiFeO3 (BFO)/SrRuO3/PMN-PT heterostructure has been investigated under different tensile strain states. The in-plane tensile strain of the BFO film is changed from +0.52% to +0.43% as a result of external E-field applied to the PMN-PT substrate. An obvious change of EB by the control of non-volatile strain has been observed. A magnetization reversal driven by E-field has been observed in the absence of magnetic field. Our results indicate that a reversible non-volatile E-field control of a ferromagnetic layer through strain modulated multiferroic BFO could be achieved at room temperature. PMID:25752272

  14. Strain-mediated electric-field control of exchange bias in a Co90Fe10/BiFeO3/SrRuO3/PMN-PT heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. Z.; Miao, J.; Xu, X. G.; Yan, W.; Reeve, R.; Zhang, X. H.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-03-01

    The electric-field (E-field) controlled exchange bias (EB) in a Co90Fe10/BiFeO3 (BFO)/SrRuO3/PMN-PT heterostructure has been investigated under different tensile strain states. The in-plane tensile strain of the BFO film is changed from +0.52% to +0.43% as a result of external E-field applied to the PMN-PT substrate. An obvious change of EB by the control of non-volatile strain has been observed. A magnetization reversal driven by E-field has been observed in the absence of magnetic field. Our results indicate that a reversible non-volatile E-field control of a ferromagnetic layer through strain modulated multiferroic BFO could be achieved at room temperature.

  15. Strain-mediated electric-field control of exchange bias in a Co90Fe10/BiFeO3/SrRuO3/PMN-PT heterostructure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, S. Z.; Miao, J.; Xu, X. G.; Yan, W.; Reeve, R.; Zhang, X. H.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The electric-field (E-field) controlled exchange bias (EB) in a Co90Fe10/BiFeO3 (BFO)/SrRuO3/PMN-PT heterostructure has been investigated under different tensile strain states. The in-plane tensile strain of the BFO film is changed from +0.52% to +0.43% as a result of external E-field applied to the PMN-PT substrate. An obvious change of EB by the control of non-volatile strain has been observed. A magnetization reversal driven by E-field has been observed in the absence of magnetic field. Our results indicate that a reversible non-volatile E-field control of a ferromagnetic layer through strain modulated multiferroic BFO could be achieved at room temperature. PMID:25752272

  16. Hot Tensile Behavior and Self-consistent Constitutive Modeling of TA15 Titanium Alloy Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Baoyu; Liu, Gang; Zhao, Huijun; Zhou, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Hot tensile behavior of TA15 sheets with bimodal microstructure was studied through tensile tests from 750 to 850 °C with an interval of 25 °C and at strain rates of 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 s-1. Results of the tensile tests reveal that the flow stress reaches peak values at specific strains, and then softening or steady-state flow occurs. Metallographic examination of deformed specimens shows that the primary α-phase becomes equiaxed, while the secondary α-phase and the lamellar β-phase are curved until crushed, indicating that the deformation occurred mainly in the secondary α-phase and the lamellar β-phase. A self-consistent model was developed to predict the plastic flow behavior of the TA15 sheets. Model parameters were determined according to the composition contents of individual phases and the stress-strain curves. The stress-strain curves at 775 °C and at the strain rates of 0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 s-1 were predicted by the proposed model, showing good agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Analytical modeling of uniaxial strain effects on the performance of double-gate graphene nanoribbon field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The effects of uniaxial tensile strain on the ultimate performance of a dual-gated graphene nanoribbon field-effect transistor (GNR-FET) are studied using a fully analytical model based on effective mass approximation and semiclassical ballistic transport. The model incorporates the effects of edge bond relaxation and third nearest neighbor (3NN) interaction. To calculate the performance metrics of GNR-FETs, analytical expressions are used for the charge density, quantum capacitance, and drain current as functions of both gate and drain voltages. It is found that the current under a fixed bias can change several times with applied uniaxial strain and these changes are strongly related to strain-induced changes in both band gap and effective mass of the GNR. Intrinsic switching delay time, cutoff frequency, and Ion/Ioff ratio are also calculated for various uniaxial strain values. The results indicate that the variation in both cutoff frequency and Ion/Ioff ratio versus applied tensile strain inversely corresponds to that of the band gap and effective mass. Although a significant high frequency and switching performance can be achieved by uniaxial strain engineering, tradeoff issues should be carefully considered. PMID:24506842

  18. Metastability and relaxation in tensile SiGe on Ge(001) virtual substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Frigerio, Jacopo; Lodari, Mario; Chrastina, Daniel Mondiali, Valeria; Isella, Giovanni; Bollani, Monica

    2014-09-21

    We systematically study the heteroepitaxy of SiGe alloys on Ge virtual substrates in order to understand strain relaxation processes and maximize the tensile strain in the SiGe layer. The degree of relaxation is measured by high-resolution x-ray diffraction, and surface morphology is characterized by atomic force microscopy. The results are analyzed in terms of a numerical model, which considers dislocation nucleation, multiplication, thermally activated glide, and strain-dependent blocking. Relaxation is found to be sensitive to growth rate and substrate temperature as well as epilayer misfit and thickness, and growth parameters are found which allow a SiGe film with over 4 GPa of tensile stress to be obtained.

  19. Effects of Sample Geometry and Loading Rate onTensile Ductility of TRIP800 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Soulami, Ayoub; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Guzman, O.; Chen, Weinong W.

    2012-04-15

    The effects of sample geometry and loading rate on the tensile ductility of a commercial grade Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel are examined in this paper. Quasistatic tensile tests were performed for the 1.2mm gauge TRIP800 steel sheets with two geometries: sub-sized ASTM E-8 and a custom designed miniature tensile sample. Sample geometry effects on post-uniform elongation are discussed together with other experimental data reported in the open literature. Further discussions on the effects of sample geometry are cast in the context of mesh-size dependent ductility in finite element-based engineering simulations. The quasi-static tensile curve for the miniature sample is then compared with the split Hopkinson bar results at the loading rates of 1700-S-1 and 2650-S-1 with the same sample design. In contrary to the typical strain rate sensitivity results for mild steel where the dynamic strength increase at high strain rate usually occurs at the price of ductility reduction, our results show that the TRIP800 under examination has positive strain rate sensitivity on both strength and ductility. Images of the deformation process captured by high speed camera together with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) near the fracture zone are also used to elucidate the different deformation modes at different loading rates.

  20. Toward predicting tensile strength of pharmaceutical tablets by ultrasound measurement in continuous manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Sonia M; Callegari, Gerardo; Drazer, German; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2016-06-30

    An ultrasound measurement system was employed as a non-destructive method to evaluate its reliability in predicting the tensile strength of tablets and investigate the benefits of incorporating it in a continuous line, manufacturing solid dosage forms. Tablets containing lactose, acetaminophen, and magnesium stearate were manufactured continuously and in batches. The effect of two processing parameters, compaction force and level of shear strain were examined. Young's modulus and tensile strength of tablets were obtained by ultrasound and diametrical mechanical testing, respectively. It was found that as the blend was exposed to increasing levels of shear strain, the speed of sound in the tablets decreased and the tablets became both softer and mechanically weaker. Moreover, the results indicate that two separate tablet material properties (e.g., relative density and Young's modulus) are necessary in order to predict tensile strength. A strategy for hardness prediction is proposed that uses the existing models for Young's modulus and tensile strength of porous materials. Ultrasound testing was found to be very sensitive in differentiating tablets with similar formulation but produced under different processing conditions (e.g., different level of shear strain), thus, providing a fast, and non-destructive method for hardness prediction that could be incorporated to a continuous manufacturing process. PMID:27157310

  1. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  2. Tuning Magnetism and Electronic Phase Transitions by Strain and Electric Field in Zigzag MoS2 Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liangzhi; Tang, Chun; Zhang, Yi; Heine, Thomas; Chen, Changfeng; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2012-10-18

    Effective modulation of physical properties via external control may open various potential nanoelectronic applications of single-layer MoS2 nanoribbons (MoS2NRs). We show by first-principles calculations that the magnetic and electronic properties of zigzag MoS2NRs exhibit sensitive response to applied strain and electric field. Tensile strain in the zigzag direction produces reversible modulation of magnetic moments and electronic phase transitions among metallic, half-metallic, and semiconducting states, which stem from the energy-level shifts induced by an internal electric polarization and the competing covalent/ionic interactions. A simultaneously applied electric field further enhances or suppresses the strain-induced modulations depending on the direction of the electric field relative to the internal polarization. These findings suggest a robust and efficient approach to modulating the properties of MoS2NRs by a combination of strain engineering and electric field tuning. PMID:26292229

  3. High temperature, short term tensile strength of C6000/PMR-15 composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digiovanni, P. R.; Paterson, D.

    1985-01-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on 0 unidirectionally reinforced Celion 6000 graphite fibers in PMR-15 polyimide matrix. Tensile strengths for coupons subjected to short and long term uniform temperatures were obtained. Thick coupons, heated on one side to produce significant transient through thickness temperature gradients, were tested and compared to the strength of specimens with uniform temperature distributions. All coupons were radiantly heated and reached maximum test temperatures within 15 sec. Tensile loads were applied to the coupons after 15 sec of elevated temperature exposure. Loading rates were selected so that specimen failures occurred within a maximum of 45 sec after reaching the test temperature. Results indicate that significant tensile strength remains beyond the material post cure temperature.

  4. Tensile and creep properties of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel for fusion energy application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, M. D.; Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Varaprasad Reddy, G.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2011-10-01

    Tensile and creep properties of a reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel for Indian Test Blanket Module (TBM) to be tested in ITER have been evaluated. The tensile strength was found to decrease with temperature; the rate of decrease being slower in the intermediate temperature range of 450-650 K. Tensile ductility of the steel decreased with increase in temperature up to 650 K, followed by a rapid increase beyond 650 K. Creep studies have been carried out at 773, 823 and 873 K over a stress range of 100-300 MPa. The variation of minimum creep rate with applied stress followed a power law, ɛ = Aσ n. The ' n' value decreased with increase in temperature. The creep rupture life was found to relate inversely with minimum creep rate through the Monkman-Grant relation, t r · ɛ = constant. The tensile and creep properties of the steel were comparable with those of Eurofer 97.

  5. The development of a tensile-shear punch correlation for yield properties of model austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G.; Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.

    1997-08-01

    The effective shear yield and maximum strengths of a set of neutron-irradiated, isotopically tailored austentic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The dependence on composition and neutron dose showed the same trends as were observed in the corresponding miniature tensile specimen study conducted earlier. A single tensile-shear punch correlation was developed for the three alloys in which the maximum shear stress or Tresca criterion was successfully applied to predict the slope. The correlation will predict the tensile yield strength of the three different austenitic alloys tested to within {+-}53 MPa. The accuracy of the correlation improves with increasing material strength, to within {+-} MPa for predicting tensile yield strengths in the range of 400-800 MPa.

  6. Influence of strain rate on the mechanical behaviour in tension of bovine cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latella, C.; Dotta, M.; Forni, D.; Tesio, N.; Cadoni, E.

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical behaviour of bones when subjected to tension loading in a wide range of strain-rates is fundamental to develop protection systems. The paper presents the preliminary tests on the tensile behaviour of bovine cortical bone at medium and high strain rates. Two special apparatus, both installed at the DynaMat Laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland, a Hydro-Pneumatic Machine and a Modified Hopkinson Bar respectively for medium and high strain-rate tests have been used. Flat shape specimens (having 10 mm of gauge length, 5 mm width and 3 mm thickness) have been obtained from 15 bovine femurs with the same age. The paper describes the preparation techniques of the samples and the experimental results obtained. The bovine cortical bone shown a quite important strain rate dependency.

  7. Strain Engineered Direct-indirect Band Gap Transition and its Mechanism in 2D Phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xihong; Wei, Qun; Copple, Andrew

    Phosphorene, a two-dimensional puckered honeycomb structure of black phosphorus, showed promising properties for applications in nano-electronics. In this work, we report strain effect on the electronic band structure of phosphorene, using first principles density-functional theory (DFT) including standard DFT and hybrid functional methods. It was found that phosphorene can withstand a tensile strain up to 30%. The band gap of phosphorene experiences a direct-indirect-direct transition when axial strain is applied. The origin of the gap transition was revealed and a general mechanism was developed to explain energy shifts with strain according to the bond nature of near-band-edge electronic orbitals. Effective masses of carriers in the armchair direction are an order of magnitude smaller than that of the zigzag axis indicating the armchair direction is favored for carrier transport. Ref: X.-H. Peng, Qun Wei, A. Copple, Phys. Rev. B 90, 085402 (2014).

  8. Strain distribution in the intervertebral disc under unconfined compression and tension load by the optimized digital image correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Tai-Yong; Yang, Xiu-Ping; Li, Kun; Gao, Li-Lan; Zhang, Chun-Qiu; Guo, Yue-Hong

    2014-04-01

    The unconfined compression and tension experiments of the intervertebral disc were conducted by applying an optimized digital image correlation technique, and the internal strain distribution was analysed for the disc. It was found that the axial strain values of different positions increased obviously with the increase in loads, while inner annulus fibrosus and posterior annulus fibrosus experienced higher axial strains than the outer annulus fibrosus and anterior annulus fibrosus. Deep annulus fibrosus exhibited higher compressive and tensile axial strains than superficial annulus fibrosus for the anterior region, while there was an opposite result for the posterior region. It was noted that all samples demonstrated a nonlinear stress-strain profile in the process of deforming, and an elastic region was shown once the sample was deformed beyond its toe region. PMID:24718863

  9. Strain effect on the Néel temperature of SrTcO3 from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Lan; Dai, Cheng-Min; Chen, Gao-Yuan; Chen, Da; Zang, Tao-Cheng; Ge, Li-Juan; Zhou, Wei; Zhu, Yan

    2015-10-01

    Generalized gradient approximation with on-site Coulomb corrections (GGA+U) method is used to investigate the effect of biaxial strain on the Néel temperature of SrTcO3. A series of hypothetical strains on SrTcO3 are considered to simulate its being applied in SrTcO3-based devices. It is found that a tensile strain will decrease TN, while a compressive strain less than 6.6% will increase TN. At a compressive strain between 5.5% and 6.7%, a highest TN which is about 26.6% higher than that of the bulk material can be obtained. The higher TN can be experimentally achieved by growing SrTcO3 on the common substrate STO/LSAT/NGO/LAO. Our work provides a theoretical basis for the application of high-TN SrTcO3 in small devices.

  10. Digital and analog readout systems for fiber-optic strain sensors as applied to the monitoring of roller element bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Juan C.; Conkey, Andrew P.; Perez, Robert X.; Taylor, Henry F.

    2003-11-01

    A rotating machinery test rig was instrumented with fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensors for condition monitoring of rolling element bearings. Strain variations produced by ball passes were observed and analyzed in the time and frequency domain. Wavelength division multiplexing was utilized to simultaneously monitor the sensors with analog and digital readout systems-analog for high bandwidth and digital for high dynamic range and the monitoring of multiple sensors. The effects of imbalance on the shaft, changes in rotational speed, effects on the rotor system, and detection of bearing defects were investigated. Frequency peaks observed in the bearing sensor spectra closely matched predicted values. Imbalance and rotational speed tests showed good agreement with expected trends, and bearing defects were successfully detected.

  11. Chemical Origins of Permanent Set in a Peroxide Cured Filled Silicone Elastomer - Tensile and 1H NMR Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S; Deteresa, S; Shields, A; Sawvel, A; Balazs, B; Maxwell, R S

    2004-10-29

    The aging of a commercial filled siloxane polymeric composite in states of high stress and Co-60 {gamma}-radiation exposure has been studied. DC-745 is a commercially available silicone elastomer consisting of dimethyl, methyl-phenyl, and vinyl-methyl siloxane monomers crosslinked with a peroxide vinyl specific curing agent. It is filled with {approx}30 wt.% mixture of high and low surface area silicas. This filled material is shown to be subject to permanent set if exposed to radiation while under tensile stress. Tensile modulus measurements show that the material gets marginally softer with combined radiation exposure and tensile strain as compared to material exposed to radiation without tensile strain. In addition, the segmental dynamics as measured by both uniaxial NMR relaxometry and Multiple Quantum NMR methods indicate that the material is undergoes radiatively-induced crosslinking in the absence of tensile strain and a combination of crosslinking and strain dependent increase in dynamic order parameter for the network chains. The MQ-NMR also suggests a small change in the number of polymer chains associated with the silica filler surface. Comparison of the prediction of the relative change in crosslink density from the NMR data as well as solvent swelling data and from that predicted from the Tobolsky model suggest that degradation leads to a deviation from Gaussian chain statistics and the formation of increased numbers of elastically ineffective network chains.

  12. Influence of thermal residual stresses on the elastic phase-strain

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, N.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Goldstone, J.A.

    1996-04-01

    The development of elastic lattice phase strains in a 15 vol. pct TiC particulate reinforced 2219-T6 Al composite was modeled as a function of tensile uniaxial loading by finite element method (FEM). In the relationship of applied stress vs. elastic lattice phase strain, the slopes vary with the applied load even before the macroscopic yielding. The slopes for the phase-strain perpendicular to loading follow nonmonotonic changes with loading, while, in the direction parallel to loading, the slopes change monotonically with the applied load. In this investigation, we have demonstrated via FEM that thermal residual stresses from thermal expansion mismatch between phases affect initiation of matrix plasticity. And the differences in the matrix plasticity initiation influence the internal stress distribution. The changes in the slope are dictated by the internal stress transfer between phases. FEM models with and without thermal history show significant differences in the response of elastic strain component, a mechanics equivalent of the lattice elastic strain. Agreement with experiment can only be obtained by including the thermal history. From a simple elasto-plastic spring model we are able to demonstrate that, with matrix plasticity propagating as predicted by FEM, the elastic strain component responds similarly to the more rigorous numerical predictions, suggesting that the morphology of elastic strain evolution is dictated by the development of matrix plasticity.

  13. Structural anisotropy results in strain-tunable electronic and optical properties in monolayer GeX and SnX (X = S, Se, Te)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Le; Wu, Fugen; Li, Jingbo

    2016-03-01

    Using first-principles calculations, the structural and electronic properties of group-IV monochalcogenide monolayers are investigated. It is demonstrated that all the monolayers employed here possess moderate indirect bandgaps. In-plane elastic stiffness calculation demonstrates the structural anisotropy in these materials, further resulting in anisotropic response to in-plane strains in their electronic properties and anisotropic optical properties. The bandgaps of GeX and SnX monolayers can be linearly reduced by applied in-plane compressive strains and the semiconductor-to-metal transition can be realized under large compressive strains; while tensile strains exert less influence on the electronic properties in comparison to compressive strains. Some monolayers will experience indirect-to-direct bandgap transition when subjected to proper strains. A further insight into the variation of bandgaps of these monolayers can be obtained from the changing band edges.

  14. Tensile bond strength of repaired amalgam.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, F; Hey, J H; Czech, D; Ambrose, E R

    1992-03-01

    This study evaluated the tensile strength of repaired high-copper amalgams and analyzed the different treatments of the amalgam interface prior to repair. One hundred specimens were divided into 10 groups: group 1 was left intact and was considered as the control group. In groups 2 through 8, the specimens were sectioned into halves after 10 days and were reconstructed with new amalgam. Groups 9 and 10 were condensed with time intervals of 15 minutes and all specimens were subjected to tensile loads in a Universal Testing Machine. The tensile strengths at the junction between old and new amalgam ranged between 50% to 79% of those of the control group and verified that the same type of amalgam and uncontaminated interfaces had higher strengths. The results also suggested that if an amalgam repair is anticipated, additional retention is critical to the longevity of the restoration. PMID:1507091

  15. TOPAS-based humidity insensitive polymer planar Bragg gratings for temperature and multi-axial strain sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberger, M.; Hessler, S.; Belle, S.; Schmauss, B.; Hellmann, R.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of humidity insensitive polymer planar Bragg gratings written into planar TOPAS substrates for measuring temperature as well as multi-axial tensile and compressive strain. The polymer planar Bragg gratings are realized by a rapid fabrication process using a KrF excimer laser which illuminates a stacked mask configuration consisting of an amplitude mask and a phase mask with a grating period of 1036.79 nm. We determine the UV-induced refractive index modification of the integrated waveguide by phase shifting Mach Zehnder interferometry and investigate its light guiding properties. The integrated polymer planar Bragg grating (PPBG) reflects a wavelength of 1576.5 nm with a reflectivity of about 93% and shows almost no sensitivity against relative humidity. Therefore, the TOPAS-PPBG is well-suited for measuring temperature as well as tensile and compressive strain. Temperature measurements are feasible up to 116°C. An observed temperature hysteresis disappears after three consecutive temperature cycles, after which the TOPAS-PPBG is characterized by a sensitivity of -6.5 pm/°C. Furthermore, tensile and compressive strain is applied at different angles showing an angle-dependent sensitivity of the PPBG making it a suitable candidate for multi-axial strain sensing.

  16. Simultaneous tunability of the electronic and phononic gaps in SnS2 under normal compressive strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Babu; Manjanath, Aaditya; Singh, Abhishek K.

    2016-03-01

    Controlled variation of the electronic properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials by applying strain has emerged as a promising way to design materials for customized applications. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we show that while the electronic structure and indirect band gap of SnS2 do not change significantly with the number of layers, they can be reversibly tuned by applying biaxial tensile (BT), biaxial compressive (BC), and normal compressive (NC) strains. Mono to multilayered SnS2 exhibit a reversible semiconductor to metal (S-M) transition with applied strain. For bilayer (2L) SnS2, the S-M transition occurs at the strain values of 17%, -26%, and -24% under BT, BC, and NC strains, respectively. Due to weaker interlayer coupling, the critical strain value required to achieve the S-M transition in SnS2 under NC strain is much higher than for MoS2. From a stability viewpoint, SnS2 becomes unstable at very low strain values on applying BC (-6.5%) and BT strains (4.9%), while it is stable even up to the transition point (-24%) in the case of NC strain. In addition to the reversible tuning of the electronic properties of SnS2, we also show tunability in the phononic band gap of SnS2, which increases with applied NC strain. This gap increases three times faster than for MoS2. This simultaneous tunability of SnS2 at the electronic and phononic levels with strain, makes it a potential candidate in field effect transistors (FETs) and sensors as well as frequency filter applications.

  17. Strain sensitivity and superconducting properties of Nb3Sn from first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marzi, G.; Morici, L.; Muzzi, L.; della Corte, A.; Buongiorno Nardelli, M.

    2013-04-01

    Using calculations from first principles based on density-functional theory we have studied the strain sensitivity of the A15 superconductor Nb3Sn. The Nb3Sn lattice cell was deformed in the same way as observed experimentally on multifilamentary, technological wires subject to loads applied along their axes. The phonon dispersion curves and electronic band structures along different high-symmetry directions in the Brillouin zone were calculated, at different levels of applied strain, ɛ, on both the compressive and the tensile side. Starting from the calculated averaged phonon frequencies and electron-phonon coupling, the superconducting characteristic critical temperature of the material, Tc, has been calculated by means of the Allen-Dynes modification of the McMillan formula. As a result, the characteristic bell-shaped Tc versus ɛ curve, with a maximum at zero intrinsic strain, and with a slight asymmetry between the tensile and compressive sides, has been obtained. These first-principle calculations thus show that the strain sensitivity of Nb3Sn has a microscopic and intrinsic origin, originating from shifts in the Nb3Sn critical surface. In addition, our computations show that variations of the superconducting properties of this compound are correlated to stress-induced changes in both the phononic and electronic properties. Finally, the strain function describing the strain sensitivity of Nb3Sn has been extracted from the computed Tc(ɛ) curve, and compared to experimental data from multifilamentary, composite wires. Both curves show the expected bell-shaped behavior, but the strain sensitivity of the wire is enhanced with respect to the theoretical predictions for bulk, perfectly binary and stoichiometric Nb3Sn. An understanding of the origin of this difference might open potential pathways towards improvement of the strain tolerance in such systems.

  18. Electroluminescence from metal/oxide/strained-Si tunneling diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, M. H.; Chen, M.-J.; Chen, T. C.; Wang, P.-L.; Liu, C. W.

    2005-05-01

    The metal-oxide-silicon light-emitting diode under biaxial tensile mechanical strain is studied. The emission line shape of the device can be fitted by the electron-hole-plasma recombination model. The energy gap of strained Si extracted by the light emission spectra at the temperature of 120 K is reduced by 15 meV under 0.13% biaxial tensile strain. The light intensity of the device under 0.13% biaxial tensile strain increases 9% as compared to the relaxed-Si device. The upshift of valence band edge under mechanical strain to increase the majority hole concentration at the oxide/Si interface may be responsible for this light emission enhancement. The mechanical strain is measured by Raman spectroscopy, strain gauge, and analyzed by the finite element method.

  19. Evaluation of ultimate tensile strength using Miniature Disk Bend Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Kundan; Pooleery, Arun; Madhusoodanan, K.; Singh, R. N.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Shriwastaw, R. S.; Dutta, B. K.; Sinha, R. K.

    2015-06-01

    Correlations for evaluation of Ultimate Tensile Strength (UTS) using Miniature Disk Bend Test (MDBT) or Small Punch Test (SPT) has been an open issue since the development of the techniques. The larger plastic strains, in tri-axial state of stress during SPT, make the translation to the equivalent uniaxial parameter less certain. Correlations based on Pmax of load-displacement curve are also in disagreement as the point corresponding to Pmax does not represent a necking situation as in case of UTS, in a uniaxial tensile test. In present work, an attempt has been made for locating necking zone, which appears prior to Pmax, through experiments and FEM analyses. Experimental results on disk specimens from 20MnMoNi55, CrMoV ferritic steel and SS304LN materials along with FEM analyses found that load corresponding to 0.48 mm displacement is to be very close to the necking zone, and gives best fit for a UTS correlation.

  20. Dynamic compressive and tensile strengths of spark plasma sintered alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girlitsky, I.; Zaretsky, E.; Kalabukhov, S.; Dariel, M. P.; Frage, N.

    2014-06-01

    Fully dense submicron grain size alumina samples were manufactured from alumina nano-powder using Spark Plasma Sintering and tested in two kinds of VISAR-instrumented planar impact tests. In the first kind, samples were loaded by 1-mm tungsten impactors, accelerated to a velocity of about 1 km/s. These tests were aimed at studying the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL) of Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)-processed alumina and the decay, with propagation distance, of the elastic precursor wave. In the tests of the second kind, alumina samples of 3-mm thickness were loaded by 1-mm copper impactors accelerated to 100-1000 m/s. These tests were aimed at studying the dynamic tensile (spall) strength of the alumina specimens. The tensile fracture of the un-alloyed alumina shows a monotonic decline of the spall strength with the amplitude of the loading stress pulse. Analysis of the decay of the elastic precursor wave allowed determining the rate of the irreversible (inelastic) strains in the SPS-processed alumina at the initial stages of the shock-induced inelastic deformation and to clarify the mechanisms responsible for the deformation. The 1-% addition of Cr2O3 decreases the HEL of the SPS-processed alumina by 5-% and its spall strength by 50% but barely affects its static properties.