Science.gov

Sample records for approach numerical modeling

  1. Accounting for Errors in Model Analysis Theory: A Numerical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Steven R.; Lindell, Rebecca S.

    2004-09-01

    By studying the patterns of a group of individuals' responses to a series of multiple-choice questions, researchers can utilize Model Analysis Theory to create a probability distribution of mental models for a student population. The eigenanalysis of this distribution yields information about what mental models the students possess, as well as how consistently they utilize said mental models. Although the theory considers the probabilistic distribution to be fundamental, there exists opportunities for random errors to occur. In this paper we will discuss a numerical approach for mathematically accounting for these random errors. As an example of this methodology, analysis of data obtained from the Lunar Phases Concept Inventory will be presented. Limitations and applicability of this numerical approach will be discussed.

  2. Oscillation threshold of a clarinet model: a numerical continuation approach.

    PubMed

    Karkar, Sami; Vergez, Christophe; Cochelin, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the oscillation threshold of single reed instruments. Several characteristics such as blowing pressure at threshold, regime selection, and playing frequency are known to change radically when taking into account the reed dynamics and the flow induced by the reed motion. Previous works have shown interesting tendencies, using analytical expressions with simplified models. In the present study, a more elaborated physical model is considered. The influence of several parameters, depending on the reed properties, the design of the instrument or the control operated by the player, are studied. Previous results on the influence of the reed resonance frequency are confirmed. New results concerning the simultaneous influence of two model parameters on oscillation threshold, regime selection and playing frequency are presented and discussed. The authors use a numerical continuation approach. Numerical continuation consists in following a given solution of a set of equations when a parameter varies. Considering the instrument as a dynamical system, the oscillation threshold problem is formulated as a path following of Hopf bifurcations, generalizing the usual approach of the characteristic equation, as used in previous works. The proposed numerical approach proves to be useful for the study of musical instruments. It is complementary to analytical analysis and direct time-domain or frequency-domain simulations since it allows to derive information that is hardly reachable through simulation, without the approximations needed for analytical approach. PMID:22280691

  3. Oscillation threshold of a clarinet model: A numerical continuation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkar, Sami; Vergez, Christophe; Cochelin, Bruno

    This paper focuses on the oscillation threshold of single reed instruments. Several characteristics such as blowing pressure at threshold, regime selection, and playing frequency are known to change radically when taking into account the reed dynamics and the flow induced by the reed motion. Previous works have shown interesting tendencies, using analytical expressions with simplified models. In the present study, a more elaborated physical model is considered. The influence of several parameters, depending on the reed properties, the design of the instrument or the control operated by the player, are studied. Previous results on the influence of the reed resonance frequency are confirmed. New results concerning the simultaneous influence of two model parameters on oscillation threshold, regime selection and playing frequency are presented and discussed. The authors use a numerical continuation approach. Numerical continuation consists in following a given solution of a set of equations when a parameter varies. Considering the instrument as a dynamical system, the oscillation threshold problem is formulated as a path following of Hopf bifurcations, generalizing the usual approach of the characteristic equation, as used in previous works. The proposed numerical approach proves to be useful for the study of musical instruments. It is complementary to analytical analysis and direct time-domain or frequency-domain simulations since it allows to derive information that is hardly reachable through simulation, without the approximations needed for analytical approach.

  4. A Parametric Approach to Numerical Modeling of TKR Contact Forces

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Hannah J.; Foucher, Kharma C.; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo knee contact forces are difficult to determine using numerical methods because there are more unknown forces than equilibrium equations available. We developed parametric methods for computing contact forces across the knee joint during the stance phase of level walking. Three-dimensional contact forces were calculated at two points of contact between the tibia and the femur, one on the lateral aspect of the tibial plateau, and one on the medial side. Muscle activations were parametrically varied over their physiologic range resulting in a solution space of contact forces. The obtained solution space was reasonably small and the resulting force pattern compared well to a previous model from the literature for kinematics and external kinetics from the same patient. Peak forces of the parametric model and the previous model were similar for the first half of the stance phase, but differed for the second half. The previous model did not take into account the transverse external moment about the knee and could not calculate muscle activation levels. Ultimately, the parametric model will result in more accurate contact force inputs for total knee simulators, as current inputs are not generally based on kinematics and kinetics inputs from TKR patients. PMID:19155015

  5. A participatory modelling approach to developing a numerical sediment dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Nicholas; McEwen, Lindsey; Parker, Chris; Staddon, Chad

    2016-04-01

    Fluvial geomorphology is recognised as an important consideration in policy and legislation in the management of river catchments. Despite this recognition, limited knowledge exchange occurs between scientific researchers and river management practitioners. An example of this can be found within the limited uptake of numerical models of sediment dynamics by river management practitioners in the United Kingdom. The uptake of these models amongst the applied community is important as they have the potential to articulate how, at the catchment-scale, the impacts of management strategies of land-use change affect sediment dynamics and resulting channel quality. This paper describes and evaluates a new approach which involves river management stakeholders in an iterative and reflexive participatory modelling process. The aim of this approach was to create an environment for knowledge exchange between the stakeholders and the research team in the process of co-constructing a model. This process adopted a multiple case study approach, involving four groups of river catchment stakeholders in the United Kingdom. These stakeholder groups were involved in several stages of the participatory modelling process including: requirements analysis, model design, model development, and model evaluation. Stakeholders have provided input into a number of aspects of the modelling process, such as: data requirements, user interface, modelled processes, model assumptions, model applications, and model outputs. This paper will reflect on this process, in particular: the innovative methods used, data generated, and lessons learnt.

  6. Approaches to Numerical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Inverno, Ray

    2005-07-01

    Introduction Ray d'Inverno; Preface C. J. S. Clarke; Part I. Theoretical Approaches: 1. Numerical relativity on a transputer array Ray d'Inverno; 2. Some aspects of the characteristic initial value problem in numerical relativity Nigel Bishop; 3. The characteristic initial value problem in general relativity J. M. Stewart; 4. Algebraic approachs to the characteristic initial value problem in general relativity Jõrg Frauendiener; 5. On hyperboidal hypersurfaces Helmut Friedrich; 6. The initial value problem on null cones J. A. Vickers; 7. Introduction to dual-null dynamics S. A. Hayward; 8. On colliding plane wave space-times J. B. Griffiths; 9. Boundary conditions for the momentum constraint Niall O Murchadha; 10. On the choice of matter model in general relativity A. D. Rendall; 11. A mathematical approach to numerical relativity J. W. Barrett; 12. Making sense of the effects of rotation in general relativity J. C. Miller; 13. Stability of charged boson stars and catastrophe theory Franz E. Schunck, Fjodor V. Kusmartsev and Eckehard W. Mielke; Part II. Practical Approaches: 14. Numerical asymptotics R. Gómez and J. Winicour; 15. Instabilities in rapidly rotating polytropes Scott C. Smith and Joan M. Centrella; 16. Gravitational radiation from coalescing binary neutron stars Ken-Ichi Oohara and Takashi Nakamura; 17. 'Critical' behaviour in massless scalar field collapse M. W. Choptuik; 18. Goudunov-type methods applied to general relativistic gravitational collapse José Ma. Ibánez, José Ma. Martí, Juan A. Miralles and J. V. Romero; 19. Astrophysical sources of gravitational waves and neutrinos Silvano Bonazzola, Eric Gourgoulhon, Pawel Haensel and Jean-Alain Marck; 20. Gravitational radiation from triaxial core collapse Jean-Alain Marck and Silvano Bonazzola; 21. A vacuum fully relativistic 3D numerical code C. Bona and J. Massó; 22. Solution of elliptic equations in numerical relativity using multiquadrics M. R. Dubal, S. R. Oliveira and R. A. Matzner; 23

  7. Optimising GPR modelling: A practical, multi-threaded approach to 3D FDTD numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millington, T. M.; Cassidy, N. J.

    2010-09-01

    The demand for advanced interpretational tools has lead to the development of highly sophisticated, computationally demanding, 3D GPR processing and modelling techniques. Many of these methods solve very large problems with stepwise methods that utilise numerically similar functions within iterative computational loops. Problems of this nature are readily parallelised by splitting the computational domain into smaller, independent chunks for direct use on cluster-style, multi-processor supercomputers. Unfortunately, the implications of running such facilities, as well as time investment needed to develop the parallel codes, means that for most researchers, the use of these advanced methods is too impractical. In this paper, we propose an alternative method of parallelisation which exploits the capabilities of the modern multi-core processors (upon which today's desktop PCs are built) by multi-threading the calculation of a problem's individual sub-solutions. To illustrate the approach, we have applied it to an advanced, 3D, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) GPR modelling tool in which the calculation of the individual vector field components is multi-threaded. To be of practical use, the FDTD scheme must be able to deliver accurate results with short execution times and we, therefore, show that the performance benefits of our approach can deliver runtimes less than half those of the more conventional, serial programming techniques. We evaluate implementations of the technique using different programming languages (e.g., Matlab, Java, C++), which will facilitate the construction of a flexible modelling tool for use in future GPR research. The implementations are compared on a variety of typical hardware platforms, having between one and eight processing cores available, and also a modern Graphical Processing Unit (GPU)-based computer. Our results show that a multi-threaded xyz modelling approach is easy to implement and delivers excellent results when implemented

  8. Comparing approaches for numerical modelling of tsunami generation by deformable submarine slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rebecca C.; Hill, Jon; Collins, Gareth S.; Piggott, Matthew D.; Kramer, Stephan C.; Parkinson, Samuel D.; Wilson, Cian

    2016-04-01

    Tsunami generated by submarine slides are arguably an under-considered risk in comparison to earthquake-generated tsunami. Numerical simulations of submarine slide-generated waves can be used to identify the important factors in determining wave characteristics. Here we use Fluidity, an open source finite element code, to simulate waves generated by deformable submarine slides. Fluidity uses flexible unstructured meshes combined with adaptivity which alters the mesh topology and resolution based on the simulation state, focussing or reducing resolution, when and where it is required. Fluidity also allows a number of different numerical approaches to be taken to simulate submarine slide deformation, free-surface representation, and wave generation within the same numerical framework. In this work we use a multi-material approach, considering either two materials (slide and water with a free surface) or three materials (slide, water and air), as well as a sediment model (sediment, water and free surface) approach. In all cases the slide is treated as a viscous fluid. Our results are shown to be consistent with laboratory experiments using a deformable submarine slide, and demonstrate good agreement when compared with other numerical models. The three different approaches for simulating submarine slide dynamics and tsunami wave generation produce similar waveforms and slide deformation geometries. However, each has its own merits depending on the application. Mesh adaptivity is shown to be able to reduce the computational cost without compromising the accuracy of results.

  9. Numerical prediction of kinetic model for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose using DAE-QMOM approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, N. M.; Wang, Q.

    2016-06-01

    Bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass consists of three fundamental processes; pre-treatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation. In enzymatic hydrolysis phase, the enzymes break the cellulose chains into sugar in the form of cellobiose or glucose. A currently proposed kinetic model for enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose that uses population balance equation (PBE) mechanism was studied. The complexity of the model due to integrodifferential equations makes it difficult to find the analytical solution. Therefore, we solved the full model of PBE numerically by using DAE-QMOM approach. The computation was carried out using MATLAB software. The numerical results were compared to the asymptotic solution developed in the author's previous paper and the results of Griggs et al. Besides confirming the findings were consistent with those references, some significant characteristics were also captured. The PBE model for enzymatic hydrolysis process can be solved using DAE-QMOM method. Also, an improved understanding of the physical insights of the model was achieved.

  10. A semi-nonlocal numerical approach for modeling of temperature-dependent crack-wave interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martowicz, Adam; Kijanka, Piotr; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical tools, which are used to simulate complex phenomena for models of complicated shapes suffer from either long computational time or accuracy. Hence, new modeling and simulation tools, which could offer reliable results within reasonable time periods, are highly demanded. Among other approaches, the nonlocal methods have appeared to fulfill these requirements quite efficiently and opened new perspectives for accurate simulations based on crude meshes of the model's degrees of freedom. In the paper, the preliminary results are shown for simulations of the phenomenon of temperature-dependent crack-wave interaction for elastic wave propagation in a model of an aluminum plate. Semi-nonlocal finite differences are considered to solve the problem of thermoelasticity - based on the discretization schemes, which were already proposed by the authors and taken from the previously published work. Numerical modeling is used to examine wave propagation primarily in the vicinity of a notch. Both displacement and temperature fields are sought in the investigated case study.

  11. Rate-Dependent Embedded Discontinuity Approach Incorporating Heterogeneity for Numerical Modeling of Rock Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saksala, Timo

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the embedded discontinuity approach is applied in finite element modeling of rock in compression and tension. For this end, a rate-dependent constitutive model based on (strong) embedded displacement discontinuity model is developed to describe the mode I, mode II and mixed mode fracture of rock. The constitutive model describes the bulk material as linear elastic until reaching the elastic limit. Beyond the elastic limit, the rate-dependent exponential softening law governs the evolution of the displacement jump. Rock heterogeneity is incorporated in the present approach by random description of the mineral texture of rock. Moreover, initial microcrack population always present in natural rocks is accounted for as randomly-oriented embedded discontinuities. In the numerical examples, the model properties are extensively studied in uniaxial compression. The effect of loading rate and confining pressure is also tested in the 2D (plane strain) numerical simulations. These simulations demonstrate that the model captures the salient features of rock in confined compression and uniaxial tension. The developed method has the computational efficiency of continuum plasticity models. However, it also has the advantage, over these models, of accounting for the orientation of introduced microcracks. This feature is crucial with respect to the fracture behavior of rock in compression as shown in this paper.

  12. A neural approach for the numerical modeling of two-dimensional magnetic hysteresis

    SciTech Connect

    Cardelli, E.; Faba, A.; Laudani, A.; Riganti Fulginei, F.; Salvini, A.

    2015-05-07

    This paper deals with a neural network approach to model magnetic hysteresis at macro-magnetic scale. Such approach to the problem seems promising in order to couple the numerical treatment of magnetic hysteresis to FEM numerical solvers of the Maxwell's equations in time domain, as in case of the non-linear dynamic analysis of electrical machines, and other similar devices, making possible a full computer simulation in a reasonable time. The neural system proposed consists of four inputs representing the magnetic field and the magnetic inductions components at each time step and it is trained by 2-d measurements performed on the magnetic material to be modeled. The magnetic induction B is assumed as entry point and the output of the neural system returns the predicted value of the field H at the same time step. A suitable partitioning of the neural system, described in the paper, makes the computing process rather fast. Validations with experimental tests and simulations for non-symmetric and minor loops are presented.

  13. Numerical investigation of dynamic microorgan devices as drug screening platforms. Part I: Macroscale modeling approach & validation.

    PubMed

    Tourlomousis, Filippos; Chang, Robert C

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic nature of in vitro drug metabolism models demands reliable numerical tools to determine key design parameter values towards high-fidelity cell-based platforms of in vivo drug metabolism. This paper represents the first of a two-part model-based investigation of a 3D dynamic microorgan device (DMD). The prescribed tissue model in this paper is precisely embedded within a DMD by 3D bioprinting hydrogel encapsulated liver cells into a patterned array of microchannels. A perfusing drug substrate is biotransformed by liver cells encapsulated within porous hydrogel walls. Therefore, the free and porous flow regime equations are first solved in tandem to derive the laminar velocity profile and wall shear stresses in the entire shear-mediated flow regime. These equations are then coupled with a convection-diffusion equation and Michaelis-Menten reaction terms, resulting in an effective convection-diffusion-cell kinetics model. A key consideration addressed herein is mechanotransduction where shear stresses on the encapsulated cells alter subcellular liver enzyme reaction rates. Cells are incorporated into the geometric model implicitly (macroscale) as enzyme reaction structures uniformly distributed throughout the DMD length. Transient simulations enable effluent drug metabolite profile determination wherein the proposed macroscale modeling approach is validated with an experimental drug flow study. PMID:26332859

  14. Numerical Analysis of the Microstructure-based Model for Layered Composites via MC and FEM Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunfang; Zeng, Qingfeng; Feng, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Laifei; Li, Liangjun; Zhang, Litong

    2016-02-01

    A numerical approach combining the Monte Carlo (MC) and the finite element method (FEM) is developed and applied to investigate the mechanical performance of layered composites. We consider a simplified two-dimensional layered composite model and mainly focus on the stress response with the effects of the grain orientation, grain boundary properties, and the laminated topological structure. The stress distribution in the materials is heterogeneous in each individual layer because of grain orientation. The stress level in the hard layers is higher than that in the soft layers from the point of view of global stress distribution. The average stress changes with the inner layer thickness and the number of layers. The average stress increases almost linearly with the modulus ratio for the homogeneous materials, whereas it is nonlinear for the heterogeneous polycrystalline layered materials.

  15. Geologic Observations and Numerical Modeling: A Combined Approach to Understanding Crater and Basin Formation and Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, R. W. K.; Head, J. W., III

    2014-12-01

    Impact cratering is a fundamental geological process throughout the Solar System. The Moon is an ideal location to document the impact cratering process due to the number and excellent state of preservation of large craters and basins, and the wide range of geological, geophysical, topographic, mineralogic, remote sensing and returned sample data. Despite the number and excellent preservation state of many large complex craters and basins, their formation and the origin of their structural features and the stages in their evolution remain contentious. To more comprehensively document the final stage of lunar impact basin formation, we have compiled detailed topographic, geological and mineralogic maps of several type examples of peak-ring and multi-ring basins, including the Orientale basin. These data include the mineralogic characteristics of basin ring structures and assist in the interpretation of the target stratigraphy, and the depth of origin of basin rings. Data for the current structure of basins is compared to numerical model outputs of basin-forming impacts, which track formation to the conclusion of dynamic processes (2 to 3 hours after impact). We use the Orientale basin as an example and provide combined correlations and interpretations that assign rings to various stages in the numerical models, and compare these candidates to crustal stratigraphy, with the ultimate aim of producing a consistent model for large crater/basin formation. The shock physics code iSALE is used to numerically model the basin-scale impacts. Constitutive equations and equations of state for materials analogous to the lunar crust (gabbroic anorthosite) and mantle (dunite) are used. Aspects of the numerically-produced lunar basins (e.g., material distribution and accumulated stress) are compared and contrasted to remote observations and geological maps of the Orientale rings and geological units, including ejecta and impact melt deposits.

  16. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Triaxially Braided Composites Utilizing a Modified Subcell Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cater, Christopher; Xiao, Xinran; Goldberg, Robert K.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2015-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical approach was performed for characterizing and modeling triaxially braided composites with a modified subcell modeling strategy. Tensile coupon tests were conducted on a [0deg/60deg/-60deg] braided composite at angles [0deg, 30deg, 45deg, 60deg and 90deg] relative to the axial tow of the braid. It was found that measured coupon strength varied significantly with the angle of the applied load and each coupon direction exhibited unique final failures. The subcell modeling approach implemented into the finite element software LS-DYNA was used to simulate the various tensile coupon test angles. The modeling approach was successful in predicting both the coupon strength and reported failure mode for the 0deg, 30deg and 60deg loading directions. The model over-predicted the strength in the 90deg direction; however, the experimental results show a strong influence of free edge effects on damage initiation and failure. In the absence of these local free edge effects, the subcell modeling approach showed promise as a viable and computationally efficient analysis tool for triaxially braided composite structures. Future work will focus on validation of the approach for predicting the impact response of the braided composite against flat panel impact tests.

  17. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Triaxially Braided Composites Utilizing a Modified Subcell Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cater, Christopher; Xiao, Xinran; Goldberg, Robert K.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2015-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical approach was performed for characterizing and modeling triaxially braided composites with a modified subcell modeling strategy. Tensile coupon tests were conducted on a [0deg/60deg/-60deg] braided composite at angles of 0deg, 30deg, 45deg, 60deg and 90deg relative to the axial tow of the braid. It was found that measured coupon strength varied significantly with the angle of the applied load and each coupon direction exhibited unique final failures. The subcell modeling approach implemented into the finite element software LS-DYNA was used to simulate the various tensile coupon test angles. The modeling approach was successful in predicting both the coupon strength and reported failure mode for the 0deg, 30deg and 60deg loading directions. The model over-predicted the strength in the 90deg direction; however, the experimental results show a strong influence of free edge effects on damage initiation and failure. In the absence of these local free edge effects, the subcell modeling approach showed promise as a viable and computationally efficient analysis tool for triaxially braided composite structures. Future work will focus on validation of the approach for predicting the impact response of the braided composite against flat panel impact tests.

  18. Unravelling the impact of inheritance within the Wilson Cycle: a combined mapping and numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenin, Pauline; Manatschal, Gianreto; Lavier, Luc

    2015-04-01

    Our study aims to unravel how structural, lithological and thermal heterogeneities may influence both orogenic and rift systems within the Wilson Cycle. To do this, we map first-order rift structural domains, timing of the main rift events as well as major heterogeneities and structures inherited from previous orogenies. Besides, we design numerical modelling experiments to investigate the relationships highlighted from the comparison of these maps. We apply this approach to the North Atlantic region, which underwent two major orogenic phases during the Palaeozoic: (1) the Caledonian orogeny - now extending from United-Kingdom to northern Norway and Eastern Greenland - resulted from the Late Ordovician closure of the large Iapetus ocean (> 2 000 km) and smaller Tornquist Seaway. It was followed by purely mechanical extensional orogenic collapse; (2) the Variscides of Southwestern Europe were essentially built from the Devono-Carboniferous suturing of several small oceanic basins (< 200 km) in addition to the large Rheic Ocean. The subsequent orogenic collapse was accompanied by significant magmatic activity, which resulted in mafic underplating and associated mantle depletion over the whole orogenic area. Our study is twofolds: On the one hand, we investigate how the size and maturity of the intervening oceanic basins affect subduction and orogeny, considering two end-members: (a) immature oceanic basins defined as hyperextended rift systems that never achieved steady state seafloor spreading; and (b) mature oceans characterized by a self-sustained magmatic system forming homogeneous oceanic crust. On the other hand, we study how post-orogenic collapse-related underplating and associated mantle depletion may impact subsequent rifting depending on the thermal state (e.g. the duration of relaxation time between the magmatic episode and the onset of rifting). Our results highlight a very different behaviour of the North Atlantic rift with respect to the Caledonian and

  19. Geophysical numerical modeling approach for characterizing and monitoring potential carbon sequestration injection sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalek, Kyle James

    Geological sequestration has been proposed as a viable option for mitigating the vast amount of CO2 being released into the atmosphere daily. Test sites for CO2 injection have been appearing across the world to ascertain the feasibility of capturing and sequestering carbon dioxide. A major concern with full scale implementation is monitoring and verifying the permanence of injected CO2. Geophysical methods, an exploration industry standard, are non-invasive imaging techniques that can be implemented to address that concern. Geophysical methods, seismic and electromagnetic, play a crucial role in monitoring the subsurface pre- and post-injection. Seismic techniques have been the most popular but electromagnetic methods are gaining interest. The primary goal of this project was to develop a new geophysical tool, a software program called GphyzCO2, to investigate the implementation of geophysical monitoring for detecting injected CO2 at test sites. The GphyzCO2 software consists of interconnected programs that encompass well logging, seismic, and electromagnetic methods. The software enables users to design and execute 3D surface-to-surface (conventional surface seismic) and borehole-to-borehole (cross-hole seismic and electromagnetic methods) numerical modeling surveys. The generalized flow of the program begins with building a complex 3D subsurface geological model, assigning properties to the models that mimic a potential CO2 injection site, numerically forward model a geophysical survey, and analyze the results. A test site located in Warren County, Ohio was selected as the test site for the full implementation of GphyzCO2. Specific interest was placed on a potential reservoir target, the Mount Simon Sandstone, and cap rock, the Eau Claire Formation. Analysis of the test site included well log data, physical property measurements (porosity), core sample resistivity measurements, calculating electrical permittivity values, seismic data collection, and seismic

  20. Mechanical Modelling of Pultrusion Process: 2D and 3D Numerical Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Ismet; Hattel, Jesper H.; Akkerman, Remko; Tutum, Cem C.

    2015-02-01

    The process induced variations such as residual stresses and distortions are a critical issue in pultrusion, since they affect the structural behavior as well as the mechanical properties and geometrical precision of the final product. In order to capture and investigate these variations, a mechanical analysis should be performed. In the present work, the two dimensional (2D) quasi-static plane strain mechanical model for the pultrusion of a thick square profile developed by the authors is further improved using generalized plane strain elements. In addition to that, a more advanced 3D thermo-chemical-mechanical analysis is carried out using 3D quadratic elements which is a novel application for the numerical modelling of the pultrusion process. It is found that the 2D mechanical models give relatively reasonable and accurate stress and displacement evolutions in the transverse direction as compared to the 3D model. Moreover, the generalized plane strain model predicts the longitudinal process induced stresses more similar to the ones calculated in the 3D model as compared with the plane strain model.

  1. Numerical damage models using a structural approach: application in bones and ligaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoux, P. J.; Bonnoit, J.; Chabrand, P.; Jean, M.; Pithioux, M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to apply knowledge of structural properties to perform numerical simulations with models of bones and knee ligaments exposed to dynamic tensile loading leading to tissue damage. Compact bones and knee ligaments exhibit the same geometrical pattern in their different levels of structural hierarchy from the tropocollagen molecule to the fibre. Nevertheless, their mechanical behaviours differ considerably at the fibril level. These differences are due to the contribution of the joints in the microfibril-fibril-fibre assembly and to the mechanical properties of the structural components. Two finite element models of the fibrous bone and ligament structure were used to describe damage in terms of elastoplastic laws or joint decohesion processes.

  2. Numerical investigation of dynamic microorgan devices as drug screening platforms. Part II: Microscale modeling approach and validation.

    PubMed

    Tourlomousis, Filippos; Chang, Robert C

    2016-03-01

    The authors have previously reported a rigorous macroscale modeling approach for an in vitro 3D dynamic microorgan device (DMD). This paper represents the second of a two-part model-based investigation where the effect of microscale (single liver cell-level) shear-mediated mechanotransduction on drug biotransformation is deconstructed. Herein, each cell is explicitly incorporated into the geometric model as single compartmentalized metabolic structures. Each cell's metabolic activity is coupled with the microscale hydrodynamic Wall Shear Stress (WSS) simulated around the cell boundary through a semi-empirical polynomial function as an additional reaction term in the mass transfer equations. Guided by the macroscale model-based hydrodynamics, only 9 cells in 3 representative DMD domains are explicitly modeled. Dynamic and reaction similarity rules based on non-dimensionalization are invoked to correlate the numerical and empirical models, accounting for the substrate time scales. The proposed modeling approach addresses the key challenge of computational cost towards modeling complex large-scale DMD-type system with prohibitively high cell densities. Transient simulations are implemented to extract the drug metabolite profile with the microscale modeling approach validated with an experimental drug flow study. The results from the author's study demonstrate the preferred implementation of the microscale modeling approach over that of its macroscale counterpart. PMID:26333066

  3. Field data and numerical modeling: A multiple lines of evidence approach for assessing vapor intrusion exposure risks.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Kelly G; Scammell, Madeleine K; McClean, Michael D; Suuberg, Eric M; Moradi, Ali; Roghani, Mohammadyousef; Ames, Jennifer; Friguglietti, Leigh; Indeglia, Paul A; Shen, Rui; Yao, Yijun; Heiger-Bernays, Wendy J

    2016-06-15

    USEPA recommends a multiple lines of evidence approach to make informed decisions at vapor intrusion sites because the vapor intrusion pathway is notoriously difficult to characterize. Our study uses this approach by incorporating groundwater, soil gas, indoor air field measurements and numerical models to evaluate vapor intrusion exposure risks in a Metro-Boston neighborhood known to exhibit lower than anticipated indoor air concentrations based on groundwater concentrations. We collected and evaluated five rounds of field sampling data over the period of one year. Field data results show a steep gradient in soil gas concentrations near the groundwater surface; however as the depth decreases, soil gas concentration gradients also decrease. Together, the field data and the numerical model results suggest that a subsurface feature is limiting vapor transport into indoor air spaces at the study site and that groundwater concentrations are not appropriate indicators of vapor intrusion exposure risks in this neighborhood. This research also reveals the importance of including relevant physical models when evaluating vapor intrusion exposure risks using the multiple lines of evidence approach. Overall, the findings provide insight about how the multiple lines of evidence approach can be used to inform decisions by using field data collected using regulatory-relevant sampling techniques, and a well-established 3-D vapor intrusion model. PMID:26977535

  4. Comparison of numerical approaches for modeling gravitationally-induced horizontal deviatoric stresses within a Hawaiian basaltic shield volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, E. C.; Le Corvec, N.; Galgana, G.

    2014-12-01

    Basaltic shield volcanoes are subjected to important gravitational loads that lead to their spreading. Such deformation influences the stress state within the volcano, thus the formation of faults and the location of earthquakes and the propagation of magmas and the potential eruption location. Using distinct numerical approaches constrained by geophysical data from the Hawai`i Island Shield Volcano (HISV), we studied the extent to which horizontal deviatoric stresses (HDS) induced from gravitational loading drives the process of volcanic spreading. Two distinct numerical approaches based on similar models were used: 1- the thin-sheet method, and 2- finite element models using COMSOL Multiphysics. We quantified depth integrals of vertical stress (i.e., the gravitational potential energy per unit area or GPE) and then we derived the HDS that balance the horizontal gradients in GPE. We performed the integration over series of single layers that encompasses the surface of variable topography down to a uniform depth of 10 km b.s.l. consistent with the base of the HISV. To compare the results of our numerical approaches we built a fine-scale, Island-wide, set of kinematically constrained deformation indicators (KCDI) using the slip-rate and fault style information from a comprehensive fault database for the HISV. We measure the success of each numerical approach by how well model HDS match the horizontal styles of the strain rates associated with KCDI. Thus far we find that the HDS obtained using the thin-sheet method match well with the KCDI. This may indicate that to first order that patterns of observed surface deformation on the HISV are governed by gradients in GPE. This provides a balance to the gravitationally-induced stresses associated with the volcano load. These HDS do not account for other competing sources of stress (e.g., flexure, magmatic, or hoop) that taken all together may combine to better explain the volcano spreading process for basaltic shield type

  5. Numerical modeling of thermocapillary two-phase flows with evaporation using a two-scalar approach for heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.; Bothe, D.

    2013-01-01

    A one-field model is derived from the sharp interface continuum mechanical balances for two-phase evaporative and thermocapillary flows. Emphasis is put on a clear distinction of the different velocities at the interface which appear due to phase transfer. The one-field model is solved numerically within a Finite Volume scheme and the interface is captured using an extended Volume of Fluid method, where the interface is reconstructed linearly with the PLIC technique. The numerical heat transfer is based on a two-scalar approach where two separate temperature fields are used for the temperature inside the two phases. This results in an accurate treatment of the interfacial heat transfer, specifically the interface temperature which is crucial numerically, both for evaporation and thermocapillarity. The method is validated for two-phase heat conduction, with analytical solution in case of no evaporation and with experimental measurement in case of incorporated evaporation effect. The method is applied to realistic cases dealing with non-uniformly heated thin liquid films, i.e. liquid films on (i) structured heated substrates and (ii) locally heated substrates. The numerical predictions in terms of flow pattern, surface deformation, temperature and velocity are compared with experiments conducted at the Université Libre de Bruxelles for (i) and at the Technische Universität Darmstadt for (ii). Qualitative agreement is achieved and shows the potential of this approach to simulate thermocapillary flows with dynamically deformable interfaces combined with evaporation.

  6. Numerical simulation of patient-specific left ventricular model with both mitral and aortic valves by FSI approach.

    PubMed

    Su, Boyang; Zhong, Liang; Wang, Xi-Kun; Zhang, Jun-Mei; Tan, Ru San; Allen, John Carson; Tan, Soon Keat; Kim, Sangho; Leo, Hwa Liang

    2014-02-01

    Intraventricular flow is important in understanding left ventricular function; however, relevant numerical simulations are limited, especially when heart valve function is taken into account. In this study, intraventricular flow in a patient-specific left ventricle has been modelled in two-dimension (2D) with both mitral and aortic valves integrated. The arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach was employed to handle the large mesh deformation induced by the beating ventricular wall and moving leaflets. Ventricular wall deformation was predefined based on MRI data, while leaflet dynamics were predicted numerically by fluid-structure interaction (FSI). Comparisons of simulation results with in vitro and in vivo measurements reported in the literature demonstrated that numerical method in combination with MRI was able to predict qualitatively the patient-specific intraventricular flow. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to simulate patient-specific ventricular flow taking into account both mitral and aortic valves. PMID:24332277

  7. Early Earth tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R.; Gerya, T.

    2014-12-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of remaining radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contributed to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the style of Early Earth tectonics. For a minor increase in temperature ΔTp < 175 K a subduction-collision style ensues which is largely similar to present day plate tectonics. For a moderate increase in ΔTp = 175-250 K subduction can still occur, however plates are strongly weakened and buckling, delamination and Rayleigh-Taylor style dripping of the plate is observed in addition. For higher temperatures ΔTp > 250 K no subduction can be observed anymore and tectonics is dominated by delamination and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. We conduct 3D petrological-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Early Earth conditions and a plume tectonics model setup. For varying crustal structures and an increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp, a thermal anomaly in the bottom temperature boundary introduces a plume. The model is able to self-sufficiently form depleted mantle lithosphere after repeated melt removal. New crust can be produced in the form of volcanics or plutonics. To simulate differentiation the newly formed crust can have a range in composition from basaltic over dacitic to granitic depending on its source rock. Models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and consequently large amounts of new formed crust which in turn influences the dynamics. Mantle and crust are convecting separately. Dome-shaped plutons of mafic or felsic composition can be observed in the crust. Between these domes elongated belts of upper crust, volcanics and sediments are formed. These structures look similar to, for example, the Kaapvaal craton in South Africa where the elongated shape of the Barberton

  8. Early Earth plume-lid tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Ria; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contribute to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature Tp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the predominant style of tectonics in the Archean Earth. We conduct 3D petrological-magmatic-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Archean conditions using a plume-lid tectonics model setup. For varying crustal compositions and a mantle potential temperature increase ΔTp = 250K (compared to present day conditions), a hot lower thermal boundary layer introduces spontaneously developing mantle plumes and after repeated melt removal, depleted mantle lithosphere is formed self-consistently. New crust is produced in the form of both volcanic and plutonic magmatism. Models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and production of new crust which in turn influences the dynamics. On short-term (10 ‑ 20Myr) rising diapirs and sinking basaltic crust lead to crustal overturn and to the formation of the typical Archean dome-and-keel pattern. On long-term a long (˜ 80Myr) passive 'growth phase' with strong growth of crust and lithosphere is observed. Both crust and lithosphere thickness are regulated by thermochemical instabilities assisted by lower crustal eclogitisation and a subcrustal small-scale convection area. Delamination of lower crust and lithosphere is initiated by linear or cylindrical eclogite drips and occurs as one 'catastrophic' event within a 20Myr 'removal phase'.

  9. Early Earth tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R.; Gerya, T.

    2015-12-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contribute to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature Tp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the predominant style of tectonics in the Early Earth. We conduct 3D petrological-magmatic-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Early Earth conditions using a plume tectonics model setup. For varying crustal structures and a mantle potential temperature increase (ΔTp, compared to present day conditions), a hot lower thermal boundary layer introduces spontaneously developing mantle plumes and after repeated melt removal, depleted mantle lithosphere is formed self-consistently. New crust is produced in the form of both volcanics and plutonics. For an increase in mantle potential temperature ΔTp= 250 K, presumably corresponding to an Archean mantle, models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and consequently large amounts of magmatism, which in turn influence the dynamics. In a first active phase (10-20 Ma) rising diapirs within the crust lead to the formation of the typical dome and keel pattern (e.g. Kaapvaal craton in South Africa, Pilbara craton in northwest Australia). A long passive phase follows with strong growth of crust and lithosphere. Both crust and lithosphere thickness are regulated by thermal-chemical instabilities assisted by lower crust eclogitization. Eclogitization depth is reached after ~80 Ma and linear or cylindrical drips originate at the crust or lithosphere bottom. Delamination of lower crust and lithosphere then occurs as one 'catastrophic' event within the next 20 Ma.

  10. A review of the theoretical and numerical approaches to modeling skyglow: Iterative approach to RTE, MSOS, and two-stream approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2016-09-01

    The study of diffuse light of a night sky is undergoing a renaissance due to the development of inexpensive high performance computers which can significantly reduce the time needed for accurate numerical simulations. Apart from targeted field campaigns, numerical modeling appears to be one of the most attractive and powerful approaches for predicting the diffuse light of a night sky. However, computer-aided simulation of night-sky radiances over any territory and under arbitrary conditions is a complex problem that is difficult to solve. This study addresses three concepts for modeling the artificial light propagation through a turbid stratified atmosphere. Specifically, these are two-stream approximation, iterative approach to Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) and Method of Successive Orders of Scattering (MSOS). The principles of the methods, their strengths and weaknesses are reviewed with respect to their implications for night-light modeling in different environments.

  11. Chemical processing of volcanic ash within eruption plume and cloud: a numerical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshyaripour, Gholam Ali; Hort, Matthias; Langmann, Baerbel; Brasseur, Guy

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic ash is recently identified as an active chemical agent in the Earth system. Generated mainly through lithospheric processes and magma fragmentation, it can pose significant impacts upon different components of the Earth system for e.g. atmosphere and hydrosphere on various temporal and spatial scales. While airborne in the atmosphere, transition metals contained in the ash can catalyze the sulfur oxidation cycle thereby indirectly affecting the volcanic radiative forcing. Moreover, upon deposition on the surface ocean, ash can release soluble iron that fertilizes Fe-limited areas of the ocean and stimulate the marine productivity and CO2 drawdown. Such impacts are provoked through interfacial processes and thus, are mainly induced by the ash surface composition. Recent studies suggest that in-plume and in-cloud processing of volcanic ash primarily control its surface composition. Direct evidences concerning such processes are, however, lacking. Here we present the results of our recent investigations on in-plume and in-cloud processing of volcanic ash. A 1D numerical model is developed that simulates the gas-ash-aerosol interactions in volcanic eruption plume and cloud at temperatures between 600 C and 0 C focusing on iron, sulfur and halogen chemistry. Results show that sulfuric acid and water vapor condense at 150 C and 50 C, respectively, generating a liquid coating at the ash surface that scavenges the surrounding gases (>95extremely acidic (pH

  12. Impact of hydrothermal alteration on lava dome stability: a numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detienne, Marie; Delmelle, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Lava domes are a common feature of many volcanoes worldwide. They represent a serious volcanic hazard as they are prone to repeated collapses, generating devastating debris avalanches and pyroclastic flows. While it has long been known that hydrothermal alteration degrades rock properties and weakens rock mass cohesion and strength, there is still little quantitative information allowing the description of this effect and its consequences for assessing the stability of a volcanic rock mass such as a lava dome. In this study, we use the finite difference numerical model FLAC 3D to investigate the impact of hydrothermal alteration on the stability of a volcanic dome lying on a flat surface. Different hydrothermal alteration distributions were tested to encompass the variability observed in natural lava domes. Rock shear strength parameters (minimum, maximum and mean cohesion "c" and friction angle "φ" values) representative of various degrees of hydrothermal rock alteration were used in the simulations. The model predicts that reduction of the basement rock's shear strength decreases the factor of safety significantly. A similar result is found by increasing the vertical and horizontal extension of hydrothermal alteration in the basement rocks. In addition, pervasive hydrothermal alteration within the lava dome is predicted to exert a strong negative influence on the factor of safety. Through reduction of rock porosity and permeability, hydrothermal alteration may also affect pore fluid pressure within a lava dome. The results of new FLAC 3D runs which simulate the effect of hydrothermal alteration-induced pore pressure changes on lava dome stability will be presented.

  13. Early Earth tectonics: A high-resolution 3D numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Ria; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    Early Earth had a higher amount of remaining radiogenic elements as well as a higher amount of leftover primordial heat. Both contributed to the increased temperature in the Earth's interior and it is mainly this increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp that controls the dynamics of the crust and upper mantle and the style of Early Earth tectonics. We conduct 3D petrological-thermomechanical numerical modelling experiments of the crust and upper mantle under Early Earth conditions using a plume tectonics model setup. For varying crustal structures and an increased mantle potential temperature ΔTp, a hot lower thermal boundary layer is used to introduce spontaneously developing mantle plumes. The model is able to self-sufficiently form depleted mantle lithosphere after repeated melt removal. New crust can be produced in the form of volcanics and/or plutonics. To simulate differentiation the newly formed crust can have a range in composition from basaltic to granitic depending on its source rock. For a major increase in the mantle temperature, presumably corresponding to an Archean mantle (ΔTp = 200 - 300K compared to present day conditions), models show large amounts of subcrustal decompression melting and consequently large amounts of volcanics, which in turn influence the dynamics. Mantle and crust are convecting separately. Dome-shaped felsic plutons can be observed in the crust. Between these domes elongated belts of downwelling basalt and sediments are formed. Both crust and lithosphere thickness are regulated by thermo-chemical instabilities assisted by lower crust eclogitization: linear or cylindrical drips originating at the crust or lithosphere bottom or delamination of lower crust or lithosphere. Very similar examples of dome and belt structures are still preserved in Archean cratons. One example is the Kaapvaal craton is South Africa where the elongated shape of the Barberton Greenstone Belt, mainly built from mafic rocks and sediments, is surrounded

  14. An integrated approach to flood hazard assessment on alluvial fans using numerical modeling, field mapping, and remote sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pelletier, J.D.; Mayer, L.; Pearthree, P.A.; House, P.K.; Demsey, K.A.; Klawon, J.K.; Vincent, K.R.

    2005-01-01

    Millions of people in the western United States live near the dynamic, distributary channel networks of alluvial fans where flood behavior is complex and poorly constrained. Here we test a new comprehensive approach to alluvial-fan flood hazard assessment that uses four complementary methods: two-dimensional raster-based hydraulic modeling, satellite-image change detection, fieldbased mapping of recent flood inundation, and surficial geologic mapping. Each of these methods provides spatial detail lacking in the standard method and each provides critical information for a comprehensive assessment. Our numerical model simultaneously solves the continuity equation and Manning's equation (Chow, 1959) using an implicit numerical method. It provides a robust numerical tool for predicting flood flows using the large, high-resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) necessary to resolve the numerous small channels on the typical alluvial fan. Inundation extents and flow depths of historic floods can be reconstructed with the numerical model and validated against field- and satellite-based flood maps. A probabilistic flood hazard map can also be constructed by modeling multiple flood events with a range of specified discharges. This map can be used in conjunction with a surficial geologic map to further refine floodplain delineation on fans. To test the accuracy of the numerical model, we compared model predictions of flood inundation and flow depths against field- and satellite-based flood maps for two recent extreme events on the southern Tortolita and Harquahala piedmonts in Arizona. Model predictions match the field- and satellite-based maps closely. Probabilistic flood hazard maps based on the 10 yr, 100 yr, and maximum floods were also constructed for the study areas using stream gage records and paleoflood deposits. The resulting maps predict spatially complex flood hazards that strongly reflect small-scale topography and are consistent with surficial geology. In

  15. Numerical modeling approach of sinkhole propagation using the eXtended FEM code 'roxol'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider-Löbens, Christiane; Wuttke, Manfred W.; Backers, Tobias; Krawczyk, Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    Subrosion and underground cavities lead to instability of the earth's surface. To minimize sinkhole hazard, it is necessary to have a better understanding of the processes and collapse mechanisms. Recent cases of subrosion in Germany that result in collapse structures (sinkholes) are used as a basis for this study. The aim is to simulate the collapse mechanism in order to specify the conditions in which sinkholes form. Using the XFEM code `roxol` (geomecon GmbH), it is possible to localize zones, in which rock failure occurs. Initiation of fracture propagation and interaction within these zones can be simulated. As a first approximation, we use a 2D model with simplified excavation and fault geometry and assume linear elastic, impermeable and non-poroelastic material behavior for the overburden layers; local stress field parameters are supplied by boundary conditions. We estimate the distribution of stress and strain in areas with critical loads to simulate failure under the influence of the stress field, material properties, as well as fault and joint geometry. Varying these parameters allows the calculation of the critical loads in which fractures propagate and failure occurs. The XFEM code `roxol` is a suitable approach to simulate the development of sinkholes. In this study, fracture propagation, as well as the interaction between existing joints are the most important parameters. Therefore, our first approach will be extended by local input parameters to develop predictions of time-dependent rock failure.

  16. The response of debris-covered glaciers to climate change: A numerical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Leif S.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are common in rapidly-eroding alpine landscapes. When thicker than a few centimeters, surface debris suppresses melt rates. Continuous debris cover can therefore reduce the mass balance gradient in the ablation zone, leading to increases in glacier length. In order to quantify feedbacks in the debris-glacier-climate system, we developed a 2D long-valley numerical glacier model that includes deposition of debris on the glacier surface, and both englacial and supraglacial debris advection. We ran 120 simulations in which a steady state debris-free glacier responds to a step increase of surface debris deposition. Simulated glaciers advance to new steady states in which ice accumulation equals ice ablation, and debris input equals debris loss from the glacier. The debris flux onto the glacier surface, and the details of the relationship between debris thickness and melt rate strongly control glacier length. Debris deposited near the equilibrium-line altitude, where ice discharge is high, results in the greatest glacier extension when other debris-related variables are held constant. Continuous debris cover reduces ice discharge gradients, ice thickness gradients, and velocity gradients relative to debris-free glaciers forced by the same climate. Debris-forced glacier extension decreases the ratio of accumulation zone to total glacier area (AAR). The model reproduces first-order relationships between debris cover, AARs, and glacier surface velocities reported from glaciers in High Asia. We also explore the response of debris-covered glaciers to increases in the equilibrium-line altitude (climate warming). We highlight the conditions required to generate a low surface velocity 'dead' ice terminal reach during a warming climate, and the associated increase of fractional glacier surface debris. We also compare our debris-covered glacier climate response results with data from glaciers in High Asia. Our model provides a quantitative, theoretical

  17. Impact of Mafic Underplating and Mantle Depletion on Subsequent Extension: a Numerical Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenin, P.; Lavier, L. L.; Manatschal, G.

    2015-12-01

    Orogenic processes leave pervasive and long-lasting structural and compositional heterogeneities such as suture zones, faults and magmatic intrusions in both the crust and the mantle. Intuitively, rifts are expected to take advantage of inherited weaknesses, thus to localize at former orogenic structures. This theory known asthe Wilson Cycle is well-illustrated in the northern North Atlantic, where extension follows the structural grain of the Caledonian orogen. However, the Alpine and southern North Atlantic rift systems are striking counterexamples, since both circumvent the core of the Variscan orogen to the southeast and to the west, respectively. Yet, one major distinctive feature between the Caledonides and the Variscides is the amount of post-orogenic magmatic activity. Indeed, while the Caledonian range orogenic collapse was essentially a-magmatic, widespread acidic intrusions and mafic underplating were emplaced in the Variscan continental crust. In this study we investigate how mafic underplating of the continental crust and associated upper mantle depletion may impact a subsequent extensional event. We design numerical models to compare the behavior of lithospheres with various distributions of lower crust and mantle heterogeneities under different thermal states. We show that the existence of a mafic layer in and / or a region of depleted mantle beneath a quartzite crust bearing weak heterogeneities results in delocalization of extension outside this area, in the case of thermally re-equilibrated lithospheres. Furthermore, the existence of a strong heterogeneity within the lower crust and / or the upper mantle triggers a necking instability, which may result in the formation of ribbons of little- or un-thinned continental crust between regions of more intense thinning. The wavelength of these ribbons compares well with the scale of the Flemish Cap and Galicia Bank, both of which developed over underplated Variscan lithosphere.

  18. Ash iron mobilization through physicochemical processing in volcanic eruption plumes: a numerical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshyaripour, G. A.; Hort, M.; Langmann, B.

    2015-08-01

    It has been shown that volcanic ash fertilizes the Fe-limited areas of the surface ocean through releasing soluble iron. As ash iron is mostly insoluble upon the eruption, it is hypothesized that heterogeneous in-plume and in-cloud processing of the ash promote the iron solubilization. Direct evidences concerning such processes are, however, lacking. In this study, a 1-D numerical model is developed to simulate the physicochemical interactions of the gas-ash-aerosol in volcanic eruption plumes focusing on the iron mobilization processes at temperatures between 600 and 0 °C. Results show that sulfuric acid and water vapor condense at ~ 150 and ~ 50 °C on the ash surface, respectively. This liquid phase then efficiently scavenges the surrounding gases (> 95 % of HCl, 3-20 % of SO2 and 12-62 % of HF) forming an extremely acidic coating at the ash surface. The low pH conditions of the aqueous film promote acid-mediated dissolution of the Fe-bearing phases present in the ash material. We estimate that 0.1-33 % of the total iron available at the ash surface is dissolved in the aqueous phase before the freezing point is reached. The efficiency of dissolution is controlled by the halogen content of the erupted gas as well as the mineralogy of the iron at ash surface: elevated halogen concentrations and presence of Fe2+-carrying phases lead to the highest dissolution efficiency. Findings of this study are in agreement with the data obtained through leaching experiments.

  19. A new approach to identify the sensitivity and importance of physical parameters combination within numerical models using the Lund-Potsdam-Jena (LPJ) model as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guodong; Mu, Mu

    2016-01-01

    An important source of uncertainty, which causes further uncertainty in numerical simulations, is that residing in the parameters describing physical processes in numerical models. Therefore, finding a subset among numerous physical parameters in numerical models in the atmospheric and oceanic sciences, which are relatively more sensitive and important parameters, and reducing the errors in the physical parameters in this subset would be a far more efficient way to reduce the uncertainties involved in simulations. In this context, we present a new approach based on the conditional nonlinear optimal perturbation related to parameter (CNOP-P) method. The approach provides a framework to ascertain the subset of those relatively more sensitive and important parameters among the physical parameters. The Lund-Potsdam-Jena (LPJ) dynamical global vegetation model was utilized to test the validity of the new approach in China. The results imply that nonlinear interactions among parameters play a key role in the identification of sensitive parameters in arid and semi-arid regions of China compared to those in northern, northeastern, and southern China. The uncertainties in the numerical simulations were reduced considerably by reducing the errors of the subset of relatively more sensitive and important parameters. The results demonstrate that our approach not only offers a new route to identify relatively more sensitive and important physical parameters but also that it is viable to then apply "target observations" to reduce the uncertainties in model parameters.

  20. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  1. Merging observations with numerical models in oceanography: some approaches and experiences gained within ECCO (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbach, P.

    2009-12-01

    Lagrange Multiplier method (LMM). The glaciological community has gained familiarity with this approach through the introdcution of control methods by MacAyeal (1992) in the context of inferring ice stream basal boundary conditions from observations. This presentation provides an overview of some of the challenges faced within ECCO, including the development of the required adjoint model of the MITgcm, the choice of control variables, the the role of prior uncertainties, the diverse mix of observations. As ECCO moves from a purely oceanographic to a coupled effort, initially including the sea-ice state, efforts will also be required to improve the connection between the ocean's interior and the margins, in particular in the vicinity of the marine ice shelves.

  2. Numerical Modelling of Reinforced Concrete Slabs under Blast Loads of Close-in Detonations Using the Lagrangian Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaib, M.; Daoud, O.

    2015-07-01

    This paper includes an investigation for the deformations, including deflections and damage modes, which occur in reinforced concrete (RC) slabs when subjected to blast loads of explosions. The slab considered for the investigation is a one-way square RC slab with the dimensions of 1000 x 1000 x 40 mm, fixed supported at two opposite sides. It was subjected to close-in detonations of three different charge weights for a constant standoff distance. For the study, the slab was analysed using the numerical method by means of nonlinear finite element analysis. The slab was modelled as 3-D structural continuum using LS-DYNA software. For concrete modelling, two constitutive models were selected, namely the KCC and Winfrith concrete models. Blast loads were applied to the slab through the Lagrangian approach, and the blast command available in the software, namely LOAD_BLAST_ENHANCED, was selected for the application. The deflections and damage modes results obtained were compared to those from a previously published experiment. From the study, both the KCC and Winfrith concrete models effectively and satisfactorily estimated the actual slab maximum deflection. For damage modes, the KCC model appeared to be capable to capture satisfactorily the general damage mode including flexural cracks. However, the model could not capture the local shear mode at the middle of slab (spallation) because the Lagrangian approach does not simulate the interaction between the ambient air and the solid slab.

  3. Two-Phase Fluid Leakage through Faults Using a Multi-Scale Analytical-Numerical Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Nordbotten, J. M.; Doster, F.; Celia, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Fluid flow through faults must be considered in many applications including geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), deep storage of hazardous waste, groundwater contamination, and petroleum engineering. In the case of CO2 storage, the presence of faults is of concern, because they can act as leakage pathways. Therefore, modeling tools that can accurately and efficiently quantify fluid leakage through faults in basin-scale models are necessary. In basin-scale models, the flow around and through faults is a local-scale process and this local-scale variation is important when determining leakage rates. We present a multi-scale modeling approach based on embedding local-scale analytical solutions within basin-scale numerical models. At the local scale, steady-state analytical solutions that represent fluid flow in the vicinity of leaky faults, including any vertical flow effects, are derived. Using both numerical simulations and analytical solutions, an empirical model representing fault properties, permeabilities and widths, is also developed. The combination of this empirical fault model and the analytical solutions captures the local-scale effects of leakage through faults. The local-scale model is used within a multi-scale modeling framework to determine the flow in and around faults and the associated local-scale pressure and saturation corrections that are applied to the coarse model. Here, a fault is viewed as a 2-D surface on one side of a coarse-scale grid block. The corrections relate local-scale pressure and saturation at the fault to coarse-scale pressures and saturations in numerical grid blocks. The corrections are used to determine the vertical and lateral flow in the fault and horizontal flows perpendicular and parallel to the fault in the grid block. At every coarse-scale time step, the local-scale fault model is implemented using the coarse-scale information from the previous time step. The resulting leakage rates and pressure and saturation

  4. A Combined Remote Sensing-Numerical Modelling Approach to the Stability Analysis of Delabole Slate Quarry, Cornwall, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havaej, Mohsen; Coggan, John; Stead, Doug; Elmo, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Rock slope geometry and discontinuity properties are among the most important factors in realistic rock slope analysis yet they are often oversimplified in numerical simulations. This is primarily due to the difficulties in obtaining accurate structural and geometrical data as well as the stochastic representation of discontinuities. Recent improvements in both digital data acquisition and incorporation of discrete fracture network data into numerical modelling software have provided better tools to capture rock mass characteristics, slope geometries and digital terrain models allowing more effective modelling of rock slopes. Advantages of using improved data acquisition technology include safer and faster data collection, greater areal coverage, and accurate data geo-referencing far exceed limitations due to orientation bias and occlusion. A key benefit of a detailed point cloud dataset is the ability to measure and evaluate discontinuity characteristics such as orientation, spacing/intensity and persistence. This data can be used to develop a discrete fracture network which can be imported into the numerical simulations to study the influence of the stochastic nature of the discontinuities on the failure mechanism. We demonstrate the application of digital terrestrial photogrammetry in discontinuity characterization and distinct element simulations within a slate quarry. An accurately geo-referenced photogrammetry model is used to derive the slope geometry and to characterize geological structures. We first show how a discontinuity dataset, obtained from a photogrammetry model can be used to characterize discontinuities and to develop discrete fracture networks. A deterministic three-dimensional distinct element model is then used to investigate the effect of some key input parameters (friction angle, spacing and persistence) on the stability of the quarry slope model. Finally, adopting a stochastic approach, discrete fracture networks are used as input for 3D

  5. Joint flow-seismic inversion for characterizing fractured reservoirs: theoretical approach and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. R.; Kang, P. K.; Zheng, Y.; Fang, X.; Fehler, M. C.; Burns, D.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Characterizing fractured geologic formations is essential in exploration geophysics, petroleum engineering, and in the assessment of deep geologic nuclear waste disposal. Traditionally, seismic interpretation and flow modeling have been performed independently, typically following a unidirectional workflow. Here, we present a methodology to characterize fractured geologic media by integrating flow and seismic data. The goal of our work is twofold: on one hand, reduce that uncertainty by incorporating dynamic flow measurements into the seismic interpretation; on the other, improve the predictability of groundwater flow and transport models by making joint use of seismic and flow data. The basic tenet of our proposed framework is that there is a strong dependence between fracture permeability (which drives the flow response) and fracture compliance (which drives the seismic response). This connection has long been recognized [1], and recent works have pointed to the potential of exploiting that connection [2-3]. By means of synthetic models, we show that: (1) owing to the strong (but highly uncertain) dependence of fracture permeability on fracture compliance, the modeled flow response in a fractured reservoir is highly sensitive to the geophysical interpretation; and (2) by incorporating flow data (well pressures and production curves) into the inversion workflow, we can simultaneously reduce the error in the seismic interpretation and improve predictions of the reservoir flow dynamics. [1] L. J. Pyrak-Nolte and J. P. Morris, Int. J. Rock. Mech. Min. 37, 245 (2000). [2] S. Brown and X. Fang, SEG Technical Program Expanded Abstracts , 1 (2012). [3] C. L. Petrovitch, L. J. Pyrak-Nolte, and D. D. Nolte, Geophys. Res. Lett. (2013).

  6. Perovskite sensing materials for syngas composition monitoring and biomass gasifier numerical model validation: A preliminary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallozzi, V.; Di Carlo, A.; Zaza, F.; Villarini, M.; Carlini, M.; Bocci, E.

    2016-06-01

    Biomass gasification represents a suitable choice for global environmental impact reduction, but more efforts on the process efficiency need to be conducted in order to enhance the use of this technology. Studies on inputs and outputs of the process, as well as measurements and controls of syngas composition and correlated organic and inorganic impurities, are crucial points for the optimization of the entire process: models of the system and sensing devices are, thus, very attractive for this purpose. In particular, perovskite based chemoresistive sensors could represent a promising technology, since their simplicity in function, relatively low cost and direct high temperature operation. The aim of this work is to develop a steam fluidized bed biomass gasifier model, for the prediction of the process gas composition, and new perovskite compounds, LaFeO3 based, as sensing material of chemoresistive sensors for syngas composition and impurities measurements. Chemometric analysis on the combustion synthesis via citrate-nitrate technique of LaFeO3 was also performed, in order to evaluate the relationship between synthesis conditions and perovskite materials and, thus, sensor properties. Performance of different sensors will be tested, in next works, with the support of the developed gasifier model.

  7. Numerical approach to Zeeman line radiative transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yoichi

    1991-10-01

    An accelerated lambda iteration (ALI) method, a version of the operator perturbation technique, is formulated for applications to Zeeman line formation problems in the presence of magnetic fields. This approach has proven to be quite an effective and flexible numerical device, being applicable to extensive problems (e.g., LTE one-way integration problem, noncoherent scattering etc.). In addition to its general formulation, a specialized practical version is also proposed which is limited to scattering (or multi-level) problems under the assumption of complete frequency redistribution (CRD), but requiring much less computing time. In order to examine the computational efficiency of this ALI method, numerical examples are presented concerning line formation in a magnetic field for several simple cases (LTE Milne-Eddington model, noncoherent CRD scattering, angle-dependent coherent scattering), showing a reasonably rapid convergence with notable numerical stability. Comparisons with other recent numerical techniques confirm the distinguished superiority of the present method.

  8. Numerical Modelling of Gelating Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Babovsky, Hans

    2008-09-01

    The numerical simulation of the gel phase transition of an aerosol system is an interesting and demanding task. Here, we follow an approach first discussed in [6, 8] which turns out as a useful numerical tool. We investigate several improvements and generalizations. In the center of interest are coagulation diffusion systems, where the aerosol dynamics is supplemented with diffusive spreading in physical space. This leads to a variety of scenarios (depending on the coagulation kernel and the diffusion model) for the spatial evolution of the gelation area.

  9. A numerical modelling approach to investigate the surface processes response to normal fault growth in multi-rift settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechlivanidou, Sofia; Cowie, Patience; Finch, Emma; Gawthorpe, Robert; Attal, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    This study uses a numerical modelling approach to explore structural controls on erosional/depositional systems within rifts that are characterized by complex multiphase extensional histories. Multiphase-rift related topography is generated by a 3D discrete element model (Finch et al., Basin Res., 2004) of normal fault growth and is used to drive the landscape evolution model CHILD (Tucker et al., Comput. Geosci., 2001). Fault populations develop spontaneously in the discrete element model and grow by both tip propagation and segment linkage. We conduct a series of experiments to simulate the evolution of the landscape (55x40 km) produced by two extensional phases that differ in the direction and in the amount of extension. In order to isolate the effects of fault propagation on the drainage network development, we conduct experiments where uplift/subsidence rates vary both in space and time as the fault array evolves and compare these results with experiments using a fixed fault array geometry with uplift rate/subsidence rates that vary only spatially. In many cases, areas of sediment deposition become uplifted and vise-versa due to complex elevation changes with respect to sea level as the fault array develops. These changes from subaerial (erosional) to submarine (depositional) processes have implications for sediment volumes and sediment caliber as well as for the sediment routing systems across the rift. We also explore the consequences of changing the angle between the two phases of extension on the depositional systems and we make a comparison with single-phase rift systems. Finally, we discuss the controls of different erodibilities on sediment supply and detachment-limited versus transport-limited end-member models for river erosion. Our results provide insights into the nature and distribution of sediment source areas and the sediment routing in rift systems where pre-existing rift topography and normal fault growth exert a fundamental control on

  10. Towards quantitative sea ice reconstructions in the northern North Atlantic: A combined biomarker and numerical modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Juliane; Wagner, Axel; Fahl, Kirsten; Stein, Ruediger; Prange, Matthias; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2011-06-01

    Organic geochemical analyses of marine surface sediments from the continental margins of East Greenland and West Spitsbergen provide for a biomarker-based estimate of recent sea ice conditions in the northern North Atlantic. By means of the sea ice proxy IP 25 and phytoplankton derived biomarkers (e.g. brassicasterol and dinosterol) we reconstruct sea ice and sea surface conditions, respectively. The combination of IP 25 with a phytoplankton marker (in terms of a phytoplankton marker-IP 25 index; PIP 25) proves highly valuable to properly interpret the sea ice proxy signal as an under- or overestimation of sea ice coverage can be circumvented. A comparison of this biomarker-based assessment of the sea ice distribution in the study area with (1) modern remote sensing data and (2) numerical modelling results reveal a good agreement between organic geochemical, satellite and modelling observations. The reasonable simulation of modern sea ice conditions by means of a regional ocean-sea ice model demonstrates the feasibility to effectively integrate the complex atmospheric and oceanic circulation features as they prevail in the study area. The good correlation between modelled sea ice parameters and the biomarker-based estimate of sea ice coverage substantiates that linking proxy and model data occurs to be a promising concept in terms of a cross-evaluation. This combinatory approach may provide a first step towards quantitative sea ice reconstructions by means of IP 25. Future IP 25 studies on marine surface sediments from the Arctic realm, however, are recommended to extend and validate this new attempt of using IP 25 in combination with a phytoplankton marker as a quantitative measure for sea ice reconstructions.

  11. On continuous and discontinuous approaches for modeling groundwater flow in heterogeneous media using the Numerical Manifold Method: Model development and comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mengsu; Wang, Yuan; Rutqvist, Jonny

    2015-06-01

    One major challenge in modeling groundwater flow within heterogeneous geological media is that of modeling arbitrarily oriented or intersected boundaries and inner material interfaces. The Numerical Manifold Method (NMM) has recently emerged as a promising method for such modeling, in its ability to handle boundaries, its flexibility in constructing physical cover functions (continuous or with gradient jump), its meshing efficiency with a fixed mathematical mesh (covers), its convenience for enhancing approximation precision, and its integration precision, achieved by simplex integration. In this paper, we report on developing and comparing two new approaches for boundary constraints using the NMM, namely a continuous approach with jump functions and a discontinuous approach with Lagrange multipliers. In the discontinuous Lagrange multiplier method (LMM), the material interfaces are regarded as discontinuities which divide mathematical covers into different physical covers. We define and derive stringent forms of Lagrange multipliers to link the divided physical covers, thus satisfying the continuity requirement of the refraction law. In the continuous Jump Function Method (JFM), the material interfaces are regarded as inner interfaces contained within physical covers. We briefly define jump terms to represent the discontinuity of the head gradient across an interface to satisfy the refraction law. We then make a theoretical comparison between the two approaches in terms of global degrees of freedom, treatment of multiple material interfaces, treatment of small area, treatment of moving interfaces, the feasibility of coupling with mechanical analysis and applicability to other numerical methods. The newly derived boundary-constraint approaches are coded into a NMM model for groundwater flow analysis, and tested for precision and efficiency on different simulation examples. We first test the LMM for a Dirichlet boundary and then test both LMM and JFM for an

  12. The impact of watershed management on coastal morphology: A case study using an integrated approach and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaras, Achilleas G.; Koutitas, Christopher G.

    2014-04-01

    Coastal morphology evolves as the combined result of both natural- and human- induced factors that cover a wide range of spatial and temporal scales of effect. Areas in the vicinity of natural stream mouths are of special interest, as the direct connection with the upstream watershed extends the search for drivers of morphological evolution from the coastal area to the inland as well. Although the impact of changes in watersheds on the coastal sediment budget is well established, references that study concurrently the two fields and the quantification of their connection are scarce. In the present work, the impact of land-use changes in a watershed on coastal erosion is studied for a selected site in North Greece. Applications are based on an integrated approach to quantify the impact of watershed management on coastal morphology through numerical modeling. The watershed model SWAT and a shoreline evolution model developed by the authors (PELNCON-M) are used, evaluating with the latter the performance of the three longshore sediment transport rate formulae included in the model formulation. Results document the impact of crop abandonment on coastal erosion (agricultural land decrease from 23.3% to 5.1% is accompanied by the retreat of ~ 35 m in the vicinity of the stream mouth) and show the effect of sediment transport formula selection on the evolution of coastal morphology. Analysis denotes the relative importance of the parameters involved in the dynamics of watershed-coast systems, and - through the detailed description of a case study - is deemed to provide useful insights for researchers and policy-makers involved in their study.

  13. Prediction of Groundwater Flow and Transport Processes in an Urban Area: A Combined Approach of Field Testing and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Andrea; Moeck, Christian; Radny, Dirk; Borer, Paul; Affolter, Annette; Epting, Jannis; Huggenberger, Peter; Auckenthaler, Adrian; Schirmer, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Drinking water supply in urban areas is challenging due to different kinds of water use and potential groundwater contamination. We investigate an area where drinking water production is close to different contaminated sites. The study site is characterized by a high complexity of the tectonic and geological setting with a gravel and a karstic aquifer. The two aquifers are partly connected, partly disconnected by an aquitard. To avoid drinking water contamination, artificial groundwater recharge with surface water into the gravel aquifer is used to create a hydraulic barrier between the contaminated sites and the water abstraction wells. Trace compounds, that were found in former times in the surface water but not nowadays, are still detected in the extracted drinking water. Different studies have been performed such as numerical modeling, intensive groundwater monitoring and investigation of drilling cores to get a differentiated overview of the distribution of the contaminants. Back-diffusion from the matrix due to changing hydraulic boundary was stated to be the reason for the actual distribution of the contaminants. In a first approach due to the lack of experimental data or evidence from field measurements, the permeabilities of the karstic aquifer were assumed as homogeneous. In our study, we seek to identify the flow and transport processes within the system including the fracture network in a combined approach of field work and 3D modeling with FEFLOW. During a field campaign we acquired water samples for the analysis of stable water isotopes as well as organic and inorganic compounds. Furthermore, tritium and helium samples were taken to estimate water ages and to determine the flow through the fracture networks. A combination of existing and recently obtained data was used to build and validate a 3D flow and transport model. The simulation of different scenarios such as the water flow for varying injection and extraction rates as well as particle

  14. The Competent Use of the Analytic Method in the Solution of Algebraic Word Problems: A Didactical Model Based on a Numerical Approach with Junior High Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubio, Guillermo; del Valle, Rafael

    2004-01-01

    The study proves that a didactical model based in a method to solve word problems of increasing complexity which uses a numerical approach was essential to develop the analytical ability and the competent use of the algebraic language with students from three different performance levels in elementary algebra. It is shown that before using the…

  15. Exceptional ablation season 2009 on the Zhadang Glacier, Central Tibet - An approach combining field measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maussion, Fabien; Huintjes, Eva; Schneider, Christoph; Scherer, Dieter

    2010-05-01

    The central goal of the project DynRG-TiP (Dynamic Response of Glaciers on the Tibetan Plateau) is improving our understanding of atmosphere-cryosphere interactions on the Tibetan Plateau (TiP) by adding new data and improved methods combining field studies, remote sensing and numerical modelling. The setup of two automatic weather stations (AWS) on the slopes of Zhadang (north exposed) and Tangse River No. 2 Glacier (south exposed) - 5.850 m a.s.l, Western Nyainqentanglha Mountains (NyM) - in May 2009, joining the previous installations of the Chinese co-operating partners from the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, make the Zhadang glacier one of the most extensively equipped and best observed glaciers in Central Asia. Based on previous studies (Kang et al., 2009), a summer ablation lower than 2 m w.e. was expected at the positions of the AWS. However, at the time of the second field campaign in October 2009, both stations had fallen over. This incidence occurred already in mid-July, despite of the mast being fixed three meters deep in the ice. At that time approximately half of the ablation period had passed and the estimated lowering of the surface already summed up to about 2 m. The ice-atmosphere interaction processes leading to this exceptional high melt rates are studied using the data gathered from the two AWS, supplemented by the output of the mesoscale Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-ARW) model. The downscaling approach using two-way nesting, following Box et al., 2006 and Caldwell et al., 2009, allows substantial improvements in surface mass balance (SMB) computations, providing additional spatial information on long-term time series. A first assessment of the downscaling capabilities of the WRF modelling system is realized for the ablation season 2009, analyzing the output of a 2 km grid resolution nested domain centered on the NyM. References: Box, J. E., Bromwich, D. H., Veenhuis, B. A., Bai, L.-S., Stroeve, J. C., Rogers, J. C., Steffen, K

  16. Estimating the subsurface temperature of Hessen/Germany based on a GOCAD 3D structural model - a comparison of numerical and geostatistical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, W.; Bär, K.; Sass, I.

    2012-04-01

    Based on a 3D structural GOCAD model of the German federal state Hessen the subsurface temperature distribution is computed. Since subsurface temperature data for greater depth are typically sparse, two different approaches for estimating the spatial subsurface temperature distribution are tested. One approach is the numerical computation of a 3D purely conductive steady state temperature distribution. This numerical model is based on measured thermal conductivity data for all relevant geological units, together with heat flow measurements and surface temperatures. The model is calibrated using continuous temperature-logs. Here only conductive heat transfer is considered as data for convective heat transport at great depth are currently not available. The other approach is by 3D ordinary Kriging; applying a modified approach where the quality of the temperature measurements is taken into account. A difficult but important part here is to derive good variograms for the horizontal and vertical direction. The variograms give necessary information about the spatial dependence. Both approaches are compared and discussed. Differences are mainly related due to convective processes, which are reflected by the interpolation result, but not by the numerical model. Therefore, a comparison of the two results is a good way to obtain information about flow processes in such great depth. This way an improved understanding of this mid enthalpy geothermal reservoir (1000 - 6000 m) is possible. Future work will be the reduction of the small but - especially for depth up to approximately 1000 m - relevant paleoclimate signal.

  17. THE VISUAL BEACH NUMERICAL MODEL: A DIAGNOSTIC AND PROGNOSTIC MODELING APPROACH TO ACHIEVING US BEACHES AESTHETIC AND PUBLIC HEALTH PROTECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the BEACH Act of 2000, EPA has committed to a program to monitor beach water quality and develop strategies, including modeling, for timely notification of the public when bacterial contamination poses a risk to bathers. EPA's goal is to manage 100% of significant public be...

  18. Numerical study of the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane using a model based on a kinetic theory approach. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rajagopal, K.R.

    1993-11-01

    In the previous report the linearized stability results for the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane, modeled by a constitutive theory based on the kinetic theory approach were presented. In this report, the authors derive the governing equations for the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane, modeled by the constitutive theory proposed by Boyle and Massoudi (1990). The governing equations obtained will be solved numerically to obtain the basic solutions.

  19. Numerical Modelling of the Triggering of Microseismicity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Using a Discrete Fracture Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruel, D.; Baujard, C.

    2005-05-01

    Heat extraction from deep engineered fractured formations is currently under investigation at the Soultz sous Forêts site with the support of the European Commission. The challenge is to develop a reservoir at great depth and to circulate a fluid in order to recover heat and produce electricity. The pilot project evolved toward a three well system at 5 km in depth with temperatures close to 200 C. Massive hydraulic tests performed to develop the reservoir have shown from the recorded micro-seismic signature, that fractures can easily be re-activated. The discussion now focusses on the hydraulic significance of the shear failure mechanism, considered as the source of the accoustic emissions. To improve our understanding of these coupled hydrau-mechanical processes, a numerical model was presented [1], based on a 3D random description of fracture networks. Local flow rules along equivalent 1D channels connecting the fractures can account for (i) a normal closure versus effective stress law together with (ii) a dilatant behaviour during shearing motion when a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion is met. The purpose of the present work is to simulate injection tests in some synthetic fracture network using power law distributions for the fracture size, and to analyse the spatio-temporal growth of the sheared zones. Assuming that this process is analogue to the triggering of the microseismicity, we then perform an evaluation of the so called SBRC reservoir characterisation method [2] stating that the spatial position of the triggering front in an homogeneous isotropic poroelastic medium with a hydraulic diffusivity Dh is at time t given by √4 π Dh t. We conclude to its validity, although it is found sensitive to the hypothesis of critically stressed pre-existing fractures. The connectivity of the sub-set of subcritically oriented fractures plays a major role in the succes of a stimulation treatment and controls an equivalent macro-cohesion behaviour at the reservoir scale

  20. A numerical method based on the Fourier-Fourier transform approach for modeling 1-D electron plasma evolution. [in earth bow shock region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical method is presented for studying one-dimensional electron plasma evolution under typical interplanetary conditions. The method applies the Fourier-Fourier transform approach to a plasma model that is a generalization of the electrostatic Vlasov-Poisson system of equations. Conservation laws that are modified to include the plasma model generalization and also the boundary effects of nonperiodic solutions are given. A new conservation law for entropy in the transformed space is then introduced. These conservation laws are used to verify the numerical solutions. A discretization error analysis is presented. Two numerical instabilities and the methods used for their suppression are treated. It is shown that in interplanetary plasma conditions, the bump-on-tail instability produces significant excitation of plasma oscillations at the Bohm-Gross frequency and its second harmonic. An explanation of the second harmonic excitation is given in terms of wave-wave coupling during the growth phase of the instability.

  1. Numerical modeling of Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Chable, S.; Rogier, F.

    2005-05-16

    A stationary plasma thruster is numerically studied using different levels. An one dimensional modeling is first analyzed and compared with experimental results. A simplified model of oscillations thruster is proposed and used to control the amplitude of oscillations. A two dimensional numerical method is discussed and applied to the computation of the flow in the exhaust.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Ocean Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Robert N.

    2007-01-01

    The modelling of ocean circulation is important not only for its own sake, but also in terms of the prediction of weather patterns and the effects of climate change. This book introduces the basic computational techniques necessary for all models of the ocean and atmosphere, and the conditions they must satisfy. It describes the workings of ocean models, the problems that must be solved in their construction, and how to evaluate computational results. Major emphasis is placed on examining ocean models critically, and determining what they do well and what they do poorly. Numerical analysis is introduced as needed, and exercises are included to illustrate major points. Developed from notes for a course taught in physical oceanography at the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University, this book is ideal for graduate students of oceanography, geophysics, climatology and atmospheric science, and researchers in oceanography and atmospheric science. Features examples and critical examination of ocean modelling and results Demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches Includes exercises to illustrate major points and supplement mathematical and physical details

  3. Numerical simulations of Mediterranean heavy precipitation events with the WRF model: A verification exercise using different approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassola, F.; Ferrari, F.; Mazzino, A.

    2015-10-01

    An intercomparison of eight different microphysics parameterization schemes available in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and an analysis of the sensitivity of predicted precipitation to horizontal resolution are presented in this paper. Three different case studies, corresponding to severe rainfall events occurred over the Liguria region (Italy) between October 2010 and November 2011, have been considered. In all the selected cases, the formation of a quasi-stationary mesoscale convective system over the Ligurian Sea interacting with local dynamical effects (orographically-induced low-level wind and temperature gradients) played a crucial role in the generation of severe precipitations. The data set used to evaluate model performances has been extracted from the official regional network, composed of about 150 professional WMO-compliant stations. Two different strategies have been exploited to assess the model skill in forecasting precipitation: a traditional approach, where forecasts and observations are matched on a point-by-point basis, and an object-based method where model success is based on the correct localization and intensity of precipitation patterns. This last method overcomes the known fictitious models performance degradation for increasing spatial resolution. As remarkable results of this analysis, a clear role of horizontal resolution on the model performances accompanied by the identification of a set of best-performing parameterization schemes emerge. The outcomes presented here offer important suggestions for operational weather prediction systems under potentially dangerous heavy precipitations triggered by the mechanisms discussed throughout the paper.

  4. Assessing the Impacts of Flooding Caused by Extreme Rainfall Events Through a Combined Geospatial and Numerical Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, J. R.; Amora, A. M.; Makinano-Santillan, M.; Marqueso, J. T.; Cutamora, L. C.; Serviano, J. L.; Makinano, R. M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a combined geospatial and two dimensional (2D) flood modeling approach to assess the impacts of flooding due to extreme rainfall events. We developed and implemented this approach to the Tago River Basin in the province of Surigao del Sur in Mindanao, Philippines, an area which suffered great damage due to flooding caused by Tropical Storms Lingling and Jangmi in the year 2014. The geospatial component of the approach involves extraction of several layers of information such as detailed topography/terrain, man-made features (buildings, roads, bridges) from 1-m spatial resolution LiDAR Digital Surface and Terrain Models (DTM/DSMs), and recent land-cover from Landsat 7 ETM+ and Landsat 8 OLI images. We then used these layers as inputs in developing a Hydrologic Engineering Center Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC HMS)-based hydrologic model, and a hydraulic model based on the 2D module of the latest version of HEC River Analysis System (RAS) to dynamically simulate and map the depth and extent of flooding due to extreme rainfall events. The extreme rainfall events used in the simulation represent 6 hypothetical rainfall events with return periods of 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 years. For each event, maximum flood depth maps were generated from the simulations, and these maps were further transformed into hazard maps by categorizing the flood depth into low, medium and high hazard levels. Using both the flood hazard maps and the layers of information extracted from remotely-sensed datasets in spatial overlay analysis, we were then able to estimate and assess the impacts of these flooding events to buildings, roads, bridges and landcover. Results of the assessments revealed increase in number of buildings, roads and bridges; and increase in areas of land-cover exposed to various flood hazards as rainfall events become more extreme. The wealth of information generated from the flood impact assessment using the approach can be very useful to the

  5. Effects of magma and conduit conditions on transitions between effusive and explosive activity: a numerical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, B. B.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Clarke, A. B.; Voight, B.

    2013-12-01

    Transitions between effusive and explosive eruptions, common at silicic volcanoes, can occur between distinct eruptive episodes or can occur as changes between effusive and explosive phases within a single episode. The precise causes of these transitions are difficult to determine due to the multitude of mechanisms and variables that can influence fragmentation thresholds. Numerical modeling of magma ascent within a volcanic conduit allows the influence of key variables to be extensively tested. We study the effect of different variables on the mass eruption rate at the vent using a conservative, 1-D, two-phase, steady-state model that allows for lateral gas loss at shallow depths. Several fragmentation criteria are also tested. We are able to generate a number of regime diagrams for a variety of magma and conduit conditions that constrain transitions from effusive to explosive episodes. We show that a transition to explosive activity can occur without changes in the bulk chemistry, crystal volume fraction, or gas mass fraction of the magma. Eruptive style can be controlled by the pressure gradient within the conduit caused by either overpressure in the chamber or varying lava dome size at the vent. Specific results are sensitive to both magma temperature and conduit geometry. It is important that these variables are well constrained when applying this model to different volcanic systems. We apply our model to the recent activity at Merapi Volcano in Indonesia. We constrain model input and output parameters using current petrologic, seismic, and geodetic studies of the Merapi system, and vary critical parameters over reasonable ranges as documented in the literature. Our model is able to reproduce eruption rates observed during both the 2006 effusive and 2010 explosive/effusive eruptions. Our modeling suggests that a combination of chamber overpressure, increased volatile content, and decreased crystal content due to the voluminous injection of new magma into the

  6. An algebraic approach to BCJ numerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yi-Jian; Feng, Bo

    2013-03-01

    One important discovery in recent years is that the total amplitude of gauge theory can be written as BCJ form where kinematic numerators satisfy Jacobi identity. Although the existence of such kinematic numerators is no doubt, the simple and explicit construction is still an important problem. As a small step, in this note we provide an algebraic approach to construct these kinematic numerators. Under our Feynman-diagram-like construction, the Jacobi identity is manifestly satisfied. The corresponding color ordered amplitudes satisfy off-shell KK-relation and off-shell BCJ relation similar to the color ordered scalar theory. Using our construction, the dual DDM form is also established.

  7. Does fluid infiltration affect the motion of sediment grains? - A 3-D numerical modelling approach using SPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartzke, Gerhard; Rogers, Benedict D.; Fourtakas, Georgios; Mokos, Athanasios; Huhn, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    The processes that cause the creation of a variety of sediment morphological features, e.g. laminated beds, ripples, or dunes, are based on the initial motion of individual sediment grains. However, with experimental techniques it is difficult to measure the flow characteristics, i.e., the velocity of the pore water flow in sediments, at a sufficient resolution and in a non-intrusive way. As a result, the role of fluid infiltration at the surface and in the interior affecting the initiation of motion of a sediment bed is not yet fully understood. Consequently, there is a strong need for numerical models, since these are capable of quantifying fluid driven sediment transport processes of complex sediment beds composed of irregular shapes. The numerical method Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) satisfies this need. As a meshless and Lagrangian technique, SPH is ideally suited to simulating flows in sediment beds composed of various grain shapes, but also flow around single grains at a high temporal and spatial resolution. The solver chosen is DualSPHysics (www.dual.sphysics.org) since this is validated for a range of flow conditions. For the present investigation a 3-D numerical flume model was generated using SPH with a length of 4.0 cm, a width of 0.05 cm and a height of 0.2 cm where mobile sediment particles were deposited in a recess. An experimental setup was designed to test sediment configurations composed of irregular grain shapes (grain diameter, D50=1000 μm). Each bed consisted of 3500 mobile objects. After the bed generation process, the entire domain was flooded with 18 million fluid particles. To drive the flow, an oscillating motion perpendicular to the bed was applied to the fluid, reaching a peak value of 0.3 cm/s, simulating 4 seconds of real time. The model results showed that flow speeds decreased logarithmically from the top of the domain towards the surface of the beds, indicating a fully developed boundary layer. Analysis of the fluid

  8. Combination of microscopic model and VoF-multiphase approach for numerical simulation of nodular cast iron solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasic, E.; Huang, C.; Jakumeit, J.; Hediger, F.

    2015-06-01

    The ongoing increase in the size and capacity of state-of-the-art wind power plants is highlighting the need to reduce the weight of critical components, such as hubs, main shaft bearing housings, gear box housings and support bases. These components are manufactured as nodular iron castings (spheroid graphite iron, or SGI). A weight reduction of up to 20% is achievable by optimizing the geometry to minimize volume, thus enabling significant downsizing of wind power plants. One method for enhancing quality control in the production of thick-walled SGI castings, and thus reducing tolerances and, consequently, enabling castings of smaller volume is via a casting simulation of mould filling and solidification based on a combination of microscopic model and VoF-multiphase approach. Coupled fluid flow with heat transport and phase transformation kinetics during solidification is described by partial differential equations and solved using the finite volume method. The flow of multiple phases is described using a volume of fluid approach. Mass conservation equations are solved separately for both liquid and solid phases. At the micro-level, the diffusion-controlled growth model for grey iron eutectic grains by Wetterfall et al. is combined with a growth model for white iron eutectic grains. The micro-solidification model is coupled with macro-transport equations via source terms in the energy and continuity equations. As a first step the methodology was applied to a simple geometry to investigate the impact of mould-filling on the grey-to-white transition prediction in nodular cast iron.

  9. Leakage detection of Marcellus Shale natural gas at an Upper Devonian gas monitoring well: a 3-d numerical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwei; Anderson, Nicole; Dilmore, Robert; Soeder, Daniel J; Bromhal, Grant

    2014-09-16

    Potential natural gas leakage into shallow, overlying formations and aquifers from Marcellus Shale gas drilling operations is a public concern. However, before natural gas could reach underground sources of drinking water (USDW), it must pass through several geologic formations. Tracer and pressure monitoring in formations overlying the Marcellus could help detect natural gas leakage at hydraulic fracturing sites before it reaches USDW. In this study, a numerical simulation code (TOUGH 2) was used to investigate the potential for detecting leaking natural gas in such an overlying geologic formation. The modeled zone was based on a gas field in Greene County, Pennsylvania, undergoing production activities. The model assumed, hypothetically, that methane (CH4), the primary component of natural gas, with some tracer, was leaking around an existing well between the Marcellus Shale and the shallower and lower-pressure Bradford Formation. The leaky well was located 170 m away from a monitoring well, in the Bradford Formation. A simulation study was performed to determine how quickly the tracer monitoring could detect a leak of a known size. Using some typical parameters for the Bradford Formation, model results showed that a detectable tracer volume fraction of 2.0 × 10(-15) would be noted at the monitoring well in 9.8 years. The most rapid detection of tracer for the leak rates simulated was 81 days, but this scenario required that the leakage release point was at the same depth as the perforation zone of the monitoring well and the zones above and below the perforation zone had low permeability, which created a preferred tracer migration pathway along the perforation zone. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the time needed to detect CH4 leakage at the monitoring well was very sensitive to changes in the thickness of the high-permeability zone, CH4 leaking rate, and production rate of the monitoring well. PMID:25144442

  10. The impact of the Tsukiyoshi fault on the hydrogeological conditions in the Tono Area,Japan: A numerical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndiweni, C.; Karasaki, K.; Doughty, C.; Botha, J. F.; Saegusa, H.

    2011-12-01

    Faults are commonly believed to act as either barriers to horizontal ground-water flow normal to the fault, conduits to horizontal flow parallel to the fault, or a combination of both. In addition, enhanced vertical permeability has also been observed as a common feature. We use numerical modeling to investigate the effects of vertical anisotropy of a dipping fault zone on the distribution of hydraulic head within and around the fault. The Tsukiyoshi Fault in the Tono region of Japan extends through the center of the assessment area and has an E-W strike. According to the results of borehole investigations, the fault has N80W strike, 70 degree dip, 10-30 m width and approximately 30 m vertical off-set. Model results show that for anisotropy ratios (A = kz/kx) of greater than 100, hydrostatic conditions are achieved within the fault zone, despite the existence of significant vertical flow rates. A hydraulic head difference of about 40 m across the fault is observed and confirmed by our model, suggesting that the fault acts as barrier to flow normal to it. We consider the pressure response to two shafts pumping in the upper parts of the fractured granitic formation near the fault. The response to pumping is monitored at two boreholes (DH-15 and DH-2) on the same side of the fault as the pumping shafts. The responses at the two boreholes are vertically invariant and highlight the effects of enhanced vertical permeability around the fault. This suggests that the fault controls the hydrology in this area. Particle tracking is used to investigate and demonstrate the effects of the fault on pathlines.

  11. A tabulated chemistry approach for numerical modeling of diesel spray evaporation in a 'stabilized cool flame' environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kolaitis, D.I.; Founti, M.A.

    2006-04-15

    Droplet evaporation in a 'stabilized cool flame' environment leads to a homogeneous, heated air-fuel vapor mixture that can be subsequently either burnt or utilized in fuel-reforming applications for fuel cell systems. The paper investigates the locally occurring physico-chemical phenomena in an atmospheric pressure, diesel spray, stabilized cool flame reactor, utilizing a tabulated chemistry approach in conjunction with a two-phase, Eulerian-Lagrangian computational fluid dynamics code. Actual diesel oil physical properties are used to model spray evaporation in the two-phase simulations, whereas the corresponding chemistry is represented by n-heptane. A lookup table is constructed by performing a plethora of perfectly stirred reactor simulations, utilizing a semidetailed n-heptane oxidation chemical kinetics mechanism. The overall exothermicity of the preignition n-heptane oxidation chemistry and the fuel consumption rates are examined as a function of selected independent parameters, namely temperature, fuel concentration, and residence time; their influence on cool flame reactivity is thoroughly studied. It is shown that the tabulated chemistry approach allows accurate investigation of the chemical phenomena with low computational cost. The two-phase flow inside the stabilized cool flame reactor is simulated, utilizing the developed lookup table. Predictions are presented for a variety of test cases and are compared to available experimental data, with satisfactory agreement. Model validation tests indicate that prediction quality improves with increasing values of air temperature at the reactor's inlet. (author)

  12. MHD flow of Cattanneo-Christov heat flux model for Williamson fluid over a stretching sheet with variable thickness: Using numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salahuddin, T.; Malik, M. Y.; Hussain, Arif; Bilal, S.; Awais, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present analysis inspects the numerical investigation of MHD flow of Williamson fluid model over a sheet with variable thickness. Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model, an amended form of Fourier's law, is used to explore the heat transfer phenomena. The governing non-linear problem is presented and transformed into self-similar form by using similarity approach. The developed non-linear problem is solved numerically by using implicit finite difference scheme known as Keller box method. The effects of relevant physical parameters on velocity and temperature profiles are taken into consideration. The important finds are as follows: influence of Hartmann number M on velocity and temperature profile is opposite. Large values of wall thickness parameter α and Weissenberg number λ are suitable for reduction of velocity profile. A comparative investigation between the previously published results and the present results is found to be in good agreement.

  13. Exploring the mesoscale activity in the Solomon Sea: A complementary approach with a numerical model and altimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdeau, L.; Verron, J.; Melet, A.; Kessler, W.; Marin, F.; Djath, B.

    2014-04-01

    The Solomon Sea is an area of high level of eddy kinetic energy (EKE), and represents a transit area for the low-latitude western boundary currents (LLWBCs) connecting the subtropics to the equatorial Pacific and playing a major role in ENSO dynamics. This study aims at documenting the surface mesoscale activity in the Solomon Sea for the first time. Our analysis is based on the joint analysis of altimetric data and outputs from a 1/12° model simulation. The highest surface EKE is observed in the northern part of the basin and extends southward to the central basin. An eddy tracking algorithm is used to document the characteristics and trajectories of coherent mesoscale vortices. Cyclonic eddies, generated in the south basin, are advected to the north by the LLWBCs before merging with stationary mesoscale structures present in the mean circulation. Anticyclonic eddies are less numerous. They are generated in the southeastern basin, propagate westward, reach the LLWBCs, and dissipate. The seasonal and interannual modulations of the mesoscale activity are well marked. At seasonal time scale, maximum (minimum) activity is in May-June (September). At interannual time scale, the mesoscale activity is particularly enhanced during La Niña conditions. If instabilities of the regional circulations seem to explain the generation of mesoscale features, the modulation of the mesoscale activity seems to be rather related with the intrusion at Solomon Strait of the surface South Equatorial Current, rather than to the LLWBCs, by modulating the horizontal and vertical shears suitable for instabilities.

  14. Comparison of two numerical modelling approaches to a field experiment of unsaturated radon transport in a covered uranium mill tailings soil (Lavaugrasse, France).

    PubMed

    Saâdi, Zakaria; Guillevic, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainties on the mathematical modelling of radon ((222)Rn) transport in an unsaturated covered uranium mill tailings (UMT) soil at field scale can have a great impact on the estimation of the average measured radon exhalation rate to the atmosphere at the landfill cover. These uncertainties are usually attributed to the numerical errors from numerical schemes dealing with soil layering, and to inadequate modelling of physical processes at the soil/plant/atmosphere interface and of the soil hydraulic and transport properties, as well as their parameterization. In this work, we demonstrate how to quantify these uncertainties by comparing simulation results from two different numerical models to experimental data of radon exhalation rate and activity concentration in the soil-gas measured in a covered UMT-soil near the landfill site Lavaugrasse (France). The first approach is based on the finite volume compositional (i.e., water, radon, air) transport model TOUGH2/EOS7Rn (Transport Of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat version 2/Equation Of State 7 for Radon; Saâdi et al., 2014), while the second one is based on the finite difference one-component (i.e., radon) transport model TRACI (Transport de RAdon dans la Couche Insaturée; Ferry et al., 2001). Transient simulations during six months of variable rainfall and atmospheric air pressure showed that the model TRACI usually overestimates both measured radon exhalation rate and concentration. However, setting effective unsaturated pore diffusivities of water, radon and air components in soil-liquid and gas to their physical values in the model EOS7Rn, allowed us to enhance significantly the modelling of these experimental data. Since soil evaporation has been neglected, none of these two models was able to simulate the high radon peaks observed during the dry periods of summer. However, on average, the radon exhalation rate calculated by EOS7Rn was 34% less than that was calculated by TRACI, and much closer to the

  15. Numerical models of galactic dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elstner, Detlef

    The state of the art for dynamo models in spiral galaxies is reviewed. The comparison of numerical models with special properties of observed magnetic fields yields constraints for the turbulent diffusivity and the α-effect. The derivation of the turbulence parameters from the vertical structure of the interstellar medium gives quite reasonable values for modelling the regular magnetic fields in galaxies with an α2Ω-dynamo. Considering the differences of the turbulence between spiral arms and interarm regions, the observed interarm magnetic fields are recovered in the numerical models due to the special properties of the α2Ω-dynamo.

  16. Identification of sea surface temperature (SST) variability areas through a statistical approach using remote sensing and numerical ocean model data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeches, Jesus; Vicen-Bueno, Raul; Pennucci, Giuliana; Russo, Aniello

    2015-05-01

    An understanding of environmental variability (stability/instability) is important to support operational planning of expeditionary warfare and littoral operations, as well as for preparing the Recognized Environmental Picture (REP). Specifically, the identification of environmentally stable/unstable areas helps the planning of maritime operations, increasing their likelihood of success. The purpose of the paper is to describe a methodology to form and interpret an initial spatial-temporal variability characterization of maritime areas from Remote Sensing (RS) and Numerical Ocean Model (NOM) data. As a case study, the analysis of the sea surface tem- perature (SST) in the Black Sea from historical time-series of RS imagery and NOM data is considered. The results of the analysis are validated with in situ measurements from moorings. Identification of gaps of geospatial information is also done in this study. The analysis is focused on monthly spatial-temporal variability of the SST, generating stability maps displaying the geospatial distribution of environmentally stable/unstable areas along a year. The results show how the proposed methodology captures the temporal variability of the SST in the Black Sea, being compared with in situ measurements, and provides useful information for the identification of environmentally stable/unstable areas. The results show a general agreement in the variability with both RS and NOM data, when RS imagery may be used for the present analysis, i.e. when low cloud coverage is given. This paper demonstrates that when RS imagery gaps are not negligible (e.g. due to high cloud occurrence in winter season), these gaps could be filled with NOM data.

  17. Damping-induced size effect in surface plasmon resonance in metallic nano-particles: Comparison of RPA microscopic model with numerical finite element simulation (COMSOL) and Mie approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluczyk, K.; Jacak, W.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate metal nano-particle size influence on plasmon resonance within theoretical and numerical approaches and compare results with available experimental data in order to improve resolution of optical identification of metallic nano-particle size and shape. The developed microscopic approach is the quantum random phase approximation model of plasmons in metallic nano-particles including plasmon damping by electron scattering and by radiative losses (i.e., by the so-called Lorentz friction). The numerical approach is by the finite element method solution of Maxwell equations for incident planar wave in spherical (also nano-rod, spheroid) geometry upon the system COMSOL and Mie treatment, supplemented with phenomenologically modeled dielectric function of metallic nano-particle. Comparison with experimental data for light extinction in Au and Ag nano-particle colloidal solutions with different particle sizes is presented. The crucial role of the Lorentz friction in the size effect of plasmon resonance in large (e.g., 20-60 nm for Au in vacuum) metallic nanoparticles is evidenced.

  18. Numerical Based Linear Model for Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Li,Y.; Krinsky, S.; Rehak, M.

    2009-05-04

    In this paper, we discuss an algorithm for constructing a numerical linear optics model for dipole magnets from a 3D field map. The difference between the numerical model and K. Brown's analytic approach is investigated and clarified. It was found that the optics distortion due to the dipoles' fringe focusing must be properly taken into account to accurately determine the chromaticities. In NSLS-II, there are normal dipoles with 35-mm gap and dipoles for infrared sources with 90-mm gap. This linear model of the dipole magnets is applied to the NSLS-II lattice design to match optics parameters between the DBA cells having dipoles with different gaps.

  19. Numerical noise in ocean and estuarine models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.; Carey, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate methods for solving the shallow water equations may lead to solutions exhibiting large fictitious, numerically-induced oscillations. The analysis of the discrete dispersion relation and modal solutions of small wavelengths provides a powerful technique for assessing the sensitivity of alternative numerical schemes to irregular data which may lead to such oscillatory numerical noise. For those schemes where phase speed vanishes at a finite wavenumber or there are multiple roots for wavenumber, oscillation modes can exist which are uncoupled from the dynamics of the problem. The discrete modal analysis approach is used here to identify two classes of spurious oscillation modes associated respectively with the two different asymptotic limits corresponding to estuarine and large scale ocean models. The analysis provides further insight into recent numerical results for models which include large spatial scales and Coriolis acceleration. ?? 1984.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  1. Mathematical modeling of electrocardiograms: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Boulakia, Muriel; Cazeau, Serge; Fernández, Miguel A; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric; Zemzemi, Nejib

    2010-03-01

    This paper deals with the numerical simulation of electrocardiograms (ECG). Our aim is to devise a mathematical model, based on partial differential equations, which is able to provide realistic 12-lead ECGs. The main ingredients of this model are classical: the bidomain equations coupled to a phenomenological ionic model in the heart, and a generalized Laplace equation in the torso. The obtention of realistic ECGs relies on other important features--including heart-torso transmission conditions, anisotropy, cell heterogeneity and His bundle modeling--that are discussed in detail. The numerical implementation is based on state-of-the-art numerical methods: domain decomposition techniques and second order semi-implicit time marching schemes, offering a good compromise between accuracy, stability and efficiency. The numerical ECGs obtained with this approach show correct amplitudes, shapes and polarities, in all the 12 standard leads. The relevance of every modeling choice is carefully discussed and the numerical ECG sensitivity to the model parameters investigated. PMID:20033779

  2. Urban pavement surface temperature. Comparison of numerical and statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Mario; Khalifa, Abderrahmen; Bues, Michel; Bouilloud, Ludovic; Martin, Eric; Chancibaut, Katia

    2015-04-01

    The forecast of pavement surface temperature is very specific in the context of urban winter maintenance. to manage snow plowing and salting of roads. Such forecast mainly relies on numerical models based on a description of the energy balance between the atmosphere, the buildings and the pavement, with a canyon configuration. Nevertheless, there is a specific need in the physical description and the numerical implementation of the traffic in the energy flux balance. This traffic was originally considered as a constant. Many changes were performed in a numerical model to describe as accurately as possible the traffic effects on this urban energy balance, such as tires friction, pavement-air exchange coefficient, and infrared flux neat balance. Some experiments based on infrared thermography and radiometry were then conducted to quantify the effect fo traffic on urban pavement surface. Based on meteorological data, corresponding pavement temperature forecast were calculated and were compared with fiels measurements. Results indicated a good agreement between the forecast from the numerical model based on this energy balance approach. A complementary forecast approach based on principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-square regression (PLS) was also developed, with data from thermal mapping usng infrared radiometry. The forecast of pavement surface temperature with air temperature was obtained in the specific case of urban configurtation, and considering traffic into measurements used for the statistical analysis. A comparison between results from the numerical model based on energy balance, and PCA/PLS was then conducted, indicating the advantages and limits of each approach.

  3. Numerical FEM modeling in dental implantology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roateşi, Iulia; Roateşi, Simona

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to a numerical approach of the stress and displacement calculation of a system made up of dental implant, ceramic crown and surrounding bone. This is the simulation of a clinical situation involving both biological - the bone tissue, and non-biological - the implant and the crown, materials. On the other hand this problem deals with quite fine technical structure details - the threads, tapers, etc with a great impact in masticatory force transmission. Modeling the contact between the implant and the bone tissue is important to a proper bone-implant interface model and implant design. The authors proposed a three-dimensional numerical model to assess the biomechanical behaviour of this complex structure in order to evaluate its stability by determining the risk zones. A comparison between this numerical analysis and clinical cases is performed and a good agreement is obtained.

  4. Thermoelectricity of interacting particles: a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shunda; Wang, Jiao; Casati, Giulio; Benenti, Giuliano

    2015-09-01

    A method for computing the thermopower in interacting systems is proposed. This approach, which relies on Monte Carlo simulations, is illustrated first for a diatomic chain of hard-point elastically colliding particles and then in the case of a one-dimensional gas with (screened) Coulomb interparticle interaction. Numerical simulations up to N>10^{4} particles confirm the general theoretical arguments for momentum-conserving systems and show that the thermoelectric figure of merit increases linearly with the system size. PMID:26465458

  5. Numerical approach for unstructured quantum key distribution

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Patrick J.; Metodiev, Eric M.; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows for communication with security guaranteed by quantum theory. The main theoretical problem in QKD is to calculate the secret key rate for a given protocol. Analytical formulas are known for protocols with symmetries, since symmetry simplifies the analysis. However, experimental imperfections break symmetries, hence the effect of imperfections on key rates is difficult to estimate. Furthermore, it is an interesting question whether (intentionally) asymmetric protocols could outperform symmetric ones. Here we develop a robust numerical approach for calculating the key rate for arbitrary discrete-variable QKD protocols. Ultimately this will allow researchers to study ‘unstructured' protocols, that is, those that lack symmetry. Our approach relies on transforming the key rate calculation to the dual optimization problem, which markedly reduces the number of parameters and hence the calculation time. We illustrate our method by investigating some unstructured protocols for which the key rate was previously unknown. PMID:27198739

  6. Numerical approach for unstructured quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Coles, Patrick J; Metodiev, Eric M; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows for communication with security guaranteed by quantum theory. The main theoretical problem in QKD is to calculate the secret key rate for a given protocol. Analytical formulas are known for protocols with symmetries, since symmetry simplifies the analysis. However, experimental imperfections break symmetries, hence the effect of imperfections on key rates is difficult to estimate. Furthermore, it is an interesting question whether (intentionally) asymmetric protocols could outperform symmetric ones. Here we develop a robust numerical approach for calculating the key rate for arbitrary discrete-variable QKD protocols. Ultimately this will allow researchers to study 'unstructured' protocols, that is, those that lack symmetry. Our approach relies on transforming the key rate calculation to the dual optimization problem, which markedly reduces the number of parameters and hence the calculation time. We illustrate our method by investigating some unstructured protocols for which the key rate was previously unknown. PMID:27198739

  7. Numerical approach for unstructured quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Patrick J.; Metodiev, Eric M.; Lütkenhaus, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) allows for communication with security guaranteed by quantum theory. The main theoretical problem in QKD is to calculate the secret key rate for a given protocol. Analytical formulas are known for protocols with symmetries, since symmetry simplifies the analysis. However, experimental imperfections break symmetries, hence the effect of imperfections on key rates is difficult to estimate. Furthermore, it is an interesting question whether (intentionally) asymmetric protocols could outperform symmetric ones. Here we develop a robust numerical approach for calculating the key rate for arbitrary discrete-variable QKD protocols. Ultimately this will allow researchers to study `unstructured' protocols, that is, those that lack symmetry. Our approach relies on transforming the key rate calculation to the dual optimization problem, which markedly reduces the number of parameters and hence the calculation time. We illustrate our method by investigating some unstructured protocols for which the key rate was previously unknown.

  8. A Numerical Approach to Ion Channel Modelling Using Whole-Cell Voltage-Clamp Recordings and a Genetic Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Gurkiewicz, Meron; Korngreen, Alon

    2007-01-01

    The activity of trans-membrane proteins such as ion channels is the essence of neuronal transmission. The currently most accurate method for determining ion channel kinetic mechanisms is single-channel recording and analysis. Yet, the limitations and complexities in interpreting single-channel recordings discourage many physiologists from using them. Here we show that a genetic search algorithm in combination with a gradient descent algorithm can be used to fit whole-cell voltage-clamp data to kinetic models with a high degree of accuracy. Previously, ion channel stimulation traces were analyzed one at a time, the results of these analyses being combined to produce a picture of channel kinetics. Here the entire set of traces from all stimulation protocols are analysed simultaneously. The algorithm was initially tested on simulated current traces produced by several Hodgkin-Huxley–like and Markov chain models of voltage-gated potassium and sodium channels. Currents were also produced by simulating levels of noise expected from actual patch recordings. Finally, the algorithm was used for finding the kinetic parameters of several voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels models by matching its results to data recorded from layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the rat cortex in the nucleated outside-out patch configuration. The minimization scheme gives electrophysiologists a tool for reproducing and simulating voltage-gated ion channel kinetics at the cellular level. PMID:17784781

  9. Numerical approach to a problem of hydroelectric resources management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushenkov, V. A.; Ferreira, M. M. A.; Ribeiro, A. F.; Smirnov, G. V.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we consider a simplified model for a system of hydro-electric power stations with reversible turbines. The objective of our work is to obtain the optimal profit of power production satisfying restrictions on the water level in the reservoirs. Two different numerical approaches are applied and compared. These approaches center on global optimization techniques (Chen-Burer algorithm) and on Projection Estimation Refinement method (PER method) used to reduce the dimension of the problem.

  10. Novel Numerical Approaches to Loop Quantum Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Loop Quantum Gravity (LQG) is an (as yet incomplete) approach to the quantization of gravity. When applied to symmetry reduced cosmological spacetimes (Loop Quantum Cosmology or LQC) one of the predictions of the theory is that the Big Bang is replaced by a Big Bounce, i.e. a previously existing contracting universe underwent a bounce at finite volume before becoming our expanding universe. The evolution equations of LQC take the form of difference equations (with the discretization given by the theory) that in the large volume limit can be approximated by partial differential equations (PDEs). In this talk I will first discuss some of the unique challenges encountered when trying to numerically solve these difference equations. I will then present some of the novel approaches that have been employed to overcome the challenges. I will here focus primarily on the Chimera scheme that takes advantage of the fact that the LQC difference equations can be approximated by PDEs in the large volume limit. I will finally also briefly discuss some of the results that have been obtained using these numerical techniques by performing simulations in regions of parameter space that were previously unreachable. This work is supported by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation and by NSF grant PHYS1068743.

  11. Numerical Approach of Interactions of Proton Beams and Dense Plasmas with Quantum-Hydrodynamic/Particle-in-Cell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya; Li, Lian; Jiang, Wei; Yi, Lin

    2016-07-01

    A one dimensional quantum-hydrodynamic/particle-in-cell (QHD/PIC) model is used to study the interaction process of an intense proton beam (injection density of 1017 cm‑3) with a dense plasma (initial density of ~ 1021 cm‑3), with the PIC method for simulating the beam particle dynamics and the QHD model for considering the quantum effects including the quantum statistical and quantum diffraction effects. By means of the QHD theory, the wake electron density and wakefields are calculated, while the proton beam density is calculated by the PIC method and compared to hydrodynamic results to justify that the PIC method is a more suitable way to simulate the beam particle dynamics. The calculation results show that the incident continuous proton beam when propagating in the plasma generates electron perturbations as well as wakefields oscillations with negative valleys and positive peaks where the proton beams are repelled by the positive wakefields and accelerated by the negative wakefields. Moreover, the quantum correction obviously hinders the electron perturbations as well as the wakefields. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the quantum effects in the interaction of a proton beam with cold dense plasmas, such as in the metal films. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405067, 11105057, 11275007)

  12. Application of a characteristic periods-based (CPB) approach to estimate earthquake-induced displacements of landslides through dynamic numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martino, S.; Lenti, L.; Delgado, J.; Garrido, J.; Lopez-Casado, C.

    2016-07-01

    The interaction between seismic waves and slopes is an important topic to provide reliable scenarios for earthquake-(re)triggered landslides. The physical properties of seismic waves as well as slope topography and geology can significantly modify the local seismic response, influencing landslide triggering. A novel approach is here applied to two case studies in Andalusia (southern Spain) for computing the expected earthquake-induced displacements of existing landslide masses. Towards this aim, dynamic stress-strain numerical modelling was carried out using a selection of seismic signals characterized by different spectral content and energy. In situ geophysical measurements, consisting of noise records and temporary seismometric arrays, were carried out to control the numerical outputs in terms of local seismic response. The results consist of relationships between the characteristic period, Tm, of the seismic signals and the characteristic periods of the landslide masses, related to the thickness (Ts) and length (Tl), respectively. These relationships show that the larger the horizontal dimension (i.e. length of landslide) of a landslide is, the more effective the contribution (to the resulting coseismic displacement) of the long-period seismic waves is, as the maximum displacements are expected for a low Tm at each energy level of the input. On the other hand, when the local seismic response mainly depends on stratigraphy (i.e. landslide thickness), the maximum expected displacements occur close to the resonance period of the landslide, except for high-energy seismic inputs.

  13. Application of a Characteristic Periods-Based (CPB) approach to estimate earthquake-induced displacements of landslides through dynamic numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martino, S.; Lenti, L.; Delgado, J.; Garrido, J.; Casado, C. Lopez

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between seismic waves and slope is an important topic to provide reliable scenarios for earthquake-(re)triggered landslides. The physical properties of seismic waves as well as slope topography and geology can significantly modify the local seismic response, influencing landslide triggering. A novel approach is here applied to two case studies in Andalusia (southern Spain) for computing the expected earthquake-induced displacements of existing landslide masses. Towards this aim, dynamic stress-strain numerical modelling was carried out using a selection of seismic signals characterized by different spectral content and energy. In situ geophysical measurements, consisting of noise records and temporary seismometric arrays, were carried out to control the numerical outputs in terms of the local seismic response. The results consist of relationships between the characteristic period, Tm, of the seismic signals and the characteristic periods of the landslide masses, related to the thickness (Ts) and length (Tl), respectively. These relationships show that the larger the horizontal dimension (i.e., length of landslide) of a landslide is, the more effective the contribution (to the resulting co-seismic displacement) of the long-period seismic waves is, as the maximum displacements are expected for a low Tm at each energy level of the input. On the other hand, when the local seismic response mainly depends on stratigraphy (i.e., landslide thickness), the maximum expected displacements occur close to the resonance period of the landslide, except for high-energy seismic inputs.

  14. A Numerical Model for Atomtronic Circuit Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng W.; Straatsma, Cameron J. E.; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2015-07-16

    A model for studying atomtronic devices and circuits based on finite-temperature Bose-condensed gases is presented. The approach involves numerically solving equations of motion for atomic populations and coherences, derived using the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian and the Heisenberg picture. The resulting cluster expansion is truncated at a level giving balance between physics rigor and numerical demand mitigation. This approach allows parametric studies involving time scales that cover both the rapid population dynamics relevant to nonequilibrium state evolution, as well as the much longer time durations typical for reaching steady-state device operation. This model is demonstrated by studying the evolution of a Bose-condensed gas in the presence of atom injection and extraction in a double-well potential. In this configuration phase locking between condensates in each well of the potential is readily observed, and its influence on the evolution of the system is studied.

  15. Numerical model for atomtronic circuit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Weng W.; Straatsma, Cameron J. E.; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2015-07-01

    A model for studying atomtronic devices and circuits based on finite-temperature Bose-condensed gases is presented. The approach involves numerically solving equations of motion for atomic populations and coherences, derived using the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian and the Heisenberg picture. The resulting cluster expansion is truncated at a level giving balance between physics rigor and numerical demand mitigation. This approach allows parametric studies involving time scales that cover both the rapid population dynamics relevant to nonequilibrium state evolution, as well as the much longer time durations typical for reaching steady-state device operation. The model is demonstrated by studying the evolution of a Bose-condensed gas in the presence of atom injection and extraction in a double-well potential. In this configuration phase locking between condensates in each well of the potential is readily observed, and its influence on the evolution of the system is studied.

  16. Infrared radiation parameterizations in numerical climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Kratz, David P.; Ridgway, William

    1991-01-01

    This study presents various approaches to parameterizing the broadband transmission functions for utilization in numerical climate models. One-parameter scaling is applied to approximate a nonhomogeneous path with an equivalent homogeneous path, and the diffuse transmittances are either interpolated from precomputed tables or fit by analytical functions. Two-parameter scaling is applied to parameterizing the carbon dioxide and ozone transmission functions in both the lower and middle atmosphere. Parameterizations are given for the nitrous oxide and methane diffuse transmission functions.

  17. Comprehensive numerical modelling of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Cohen, B.I.; Dubois, P.F.

    1991-01-03

    We outline a plan for the development of a comprehensive numerical model of tokamaks. The model would consist of a suite of independent, communicating packages describing the various aspects of tokamak performance (core and edge transport coefficients and profiles, heating, fueling, magnetic configuration, etc.) as well as extensive diagnostics. These codes, which may run on different computers, would be flexibly linked by a user-friendly shell which would allow run-time specification of packages and generation of pre- and post-processing functions, including workstation-based visualization of output. One package in particular, the calculation of core transport coefficients via gyrokinetic particle simulation, will become practical on the scale required for comprehensive modelling only with the advent of teraFLOP computers. Incremental effort at LLNL would be focused on gyrokinetic simulation and development of the shell.

  18. Numerical models of complex diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yu.; Talbot, C.; Poliakov, A. N. B.

    1993-12-01

    Numerically modelled diapirs that rise into overburdens with viscous rheology produce a large variety of shapes. This work uses the finite-element method to study the development of diapirs that rise towards a surface on which a diapir-induced topography creeps flat or disperses ("erodes") at different rates. Slow erosion leads to diapirs with "mushroom" shapes, moderate erosion rate to "wine glass" diapirs and fast erosion to "beer glass"- and "column"-shaped diapirs. The introduction of a low-viscosity layer at the top of the overburden causes diapirs to develop into structures resembling a "Napoleon hat". These spread lateral sheets.

  19. Numerical approach to Coulomb gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.; Bowman, Patrick O.

    2008-07-01

    We calculate the ghost two-point function in Coulomb gauge QCD with a simple model vacuum gluon wave function using Monte Carlo integration. This approach extends the previous analytic studies of the ghost propagator with this ansatz, where a ladder-rainbow expansion was unavoidable for calculating the path integral over gluon field configurations. The new approach allows us to study the possible critical behavior of the coupling constant, as well as the Coulomb potential derived from the ghost dressing function. We demonstrate that IR enhancement of the ghost correlator or Coulomb form factor fails to quantitatively reproduce confinement using Gaussian vacuum wave functional.

  20. Numerical methods used in fusion science numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, M.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of burning plasma is very complicated physics, which is dominated by multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena. To understand such phenomena, numerical simulations are indispensable. Fundamentals of numerical methods used in fusion science numerical modeling are briefly discussed in this paper. In addition, the parallelization technique such as open multi processing (OpenMP) and message passing interface (MPI) parallel programing are introduced and the loop-level parallelization is shown as an example.

  1. Numerical Modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakis, Iraklis; Giannopoulos, Antonios; Pajewski, Lara

    2014-05-01

    Numerical methods are needed in order to solve Maxwell's equations in complicated and realistic problems. Over the years a number of numerical methods have been developed to do so. Amongst them the most popular are the finite element, finite difference implicit techniques, frequency domain solution of Helmontz equation, the method of moments, transmission line matrix method. However, the finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) is considered to be one of the most attractive choice basically because of its simplicity, speed and accuracy. FDTD first introduced in 1966 by Kane Yee. Since then, FDTD has been established and developed to be a very rigorous and well defined numerical method for solving Maxwell's equations. The order characteristics, accuracy and limitations are rigorously and mathematically defined. This makes FDTD reliable and easy to use. Numerical modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a very useful tool which can be used in order to give us insight into the scattering mechanisms and can also be used as an alternative approach to aid data interpretation. Numerical modelling has been used in a wide range of GPR applications including archeology, geophysics, forensic, landmine detection etc. In engineering, some applications of numerical modelling include the estimation of the effectiveness of GPR to detect voids in bridges, to detect metal bars in concrete, to estimate shielding effectiveness etc. The main challenges in numerical modelling of GPR for engineering applications are A) the implementation of the dielectric properties of the media (soils, concrete etc.) in a realistic way, B) the implementation of the geometry of the media (soils inhomogeneities, rough surface, vegetation, concrete features like fractures and rock fragments etc.) and C) the detailed modelling of the antenna units. The main focus of this work (which is part of the COST Action TU1208) is the accurate and realistic implementation of GPR antenna units into the FDTD

  2. Investigation of Geomorphic and Seismic Effects on the 1959 Madison Canyon, Montana, Landslide Using an Integrated Field, Engineering Geomorphology Mapping, and Numerical Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, A.; Gischig, V.; Stead, D.; Clague, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present an integrated approach to investigate the seismically triggered Madison Canyon landslide (volume = 20 Mm3), which killed 26 people in Montana, USA, in 1959. We created engineering geomorphological maps and conducted field surveys, long-range terrestrial digital photogrammetry, and preliminary 2D numerical modelling with the objective of determining the conditioning factors, mechanisms, movement behaviour, and evolution of the failure. We emphasise the importance of both endogenic (i.e. seismic) and exogenic (i.e. geomorphic) processes in conditioning the slope for failure and hypothesise a sequence of events based on the morphology of the deposit and seismic modelling. A section of the slope was slowly deforming before a magnitude-7.5 earthquake with an epicentre 30 km away triggered the catastrophic failure in August 1959. The failed rock mass rapidly fragmented as it descended the slope towards Madison River. Part of the mass remained relatively intact as it moved on a layer of pulverised debris. The main slide was followed by several debris slides, slumps, and rockfalls. The slide debris was extensively modified soon after the disaster by the US Army Corps of Engineers to provide a stable outflow channel from newly formed Earthquake Lake. Our modelling and observations show that the landslide occurred as a result of long-term damage of the slope induced by fluvial undercutting, erosion, weathering, and past seismicity, and due to the short-term triggering effect of the 1959 earthquake. Static models suggest the slope was stable prior to the 1959 earthquake; failure would have required a significant reduction in material strength. Preliminary dynamic models indicate that repeated seismic loading was a critical process for catastrophic failure. Although the ridge geometry and existing tension cracks in the initiation zone amplified ground motions, the most important factors in initiating failure were pre-existing discontinuities and seismically induced

  3. Magnetized CMB observables: A dedicated numerical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo; Kunze, Kerstin E.

    2008-03-15

    Large-scale magnetic fields affect the scalar modes of the geometry whose ultimate effect is to determine the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB in what follows). For the first time, a consistent numerical approach to the magnetized CMB anisotropies is pursued with the aim of assessing the angular power spectra of temperature and polarization when the scalar modes of the geometry and a stochastic background of inhomogeneous magnetic fields are simultaneously present in the plasma. The effects related to the magnetized nature of the plasma are taken into account both at the level of the dynamical equations and at the level of the initial conditions of the Einstein-Boltzmann hierarchy. The temperature and polarization observables are exploited to infer the peculiar signatures of a pre-equality magnetic field. Using the extrapolated best fit to the three-year WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe) data the increase and distortions of the first seven peaks in the temperature autocorrelations are monitored for different values of the regularized magnetic field intensity and for the physical range of spectral indices. Similar analyses are also conducted for the first few anticorrelation (and corrrelation) peaks of the temperature-polarization power spectra. Possible interesting degeneracies and stimulating perspectives are pointed out and explored.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilseven, E.; Mendoza, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity.

    PubMed

    Ilseven, E; Mendoza, M

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems. PMID:26986435

  6. Numerical Modeling of Nanoelectronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Bowen, R. Chris; Boykin, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Nanoelectronic Modeling 3-D (NEMO 3-D) is a computer program for numerical modeling of the electronic structure properties of a semiconductor device that is embodied in a crystal containing as many as 16 million atoms in an arbitrary configuration and that has overall dimensions of the order of tens of nanometers. The underlying mathematical model represents the quantummechanical behavior of the device resolved to the atomistic level of granularity. The system of electrons in the device is represented by a sparse Hamiltonian matrix that contains hundreds of millions of terms. NEMO 3-D solves the matrix equation on a Beowulf-class cluster computer, by use of a parallel-processing matrix vector multiplication algorithm coupled to a Lanczos and/or Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm that solves for eigenvalues. In a recent update of NEMO 3-D, a new strain treatment, parameterized for bulk material properties of GaAs and InAs, was developed for two tight-binding submodels. The utility of the NEMO 3-D was demonstrated in an atomistic analysis of the effects of disorder in alloys and, in particular, in bulk In(x)Ga(l-x)As and in In0.6Ga0.4As quantum dots.

  7. A new numerical approach to solve Thomas-Fermi model of an atom using bio-inspired heuristics integrated with sequential quadratic programming.

    PubMed

    Raja, Muhammad Asif Zahoor; Zameer, Aneela; Khan, Aziz Ullah; Wazwaz, Abdul Majid

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel bio-inspired computing approach is developed to analyze the dynamics of nonlinear singular Thomas-Fermi equation (TFE) arising in potential and charge density models of an atom by exploiting the strength of finite difference scheme (FDS) for discretization and optimization through genetic algorithms (GAs) hybrid with sequential quadratic programming. The FDS procedures are used to transform the TFE differential equations into a system of nonlinear equations. A fitness function is constructed based on the residual error of constituent equations in the mean square sense and is formulated as the minimization problem. Optimization of parameters for the system is carried out with GAs, used as a tool for viable global search integrated with SQP algorithm for rapid refinement of the results. The design scheme is applied to solve TFE for five different scenarios by taking various step sizes and different input intervals. Comparison of the proposed results with the state of the art numerical and analytical solutions reveals that the worth of our scheme in terms of accuracy and convergence. The reliability and effectiveness of the proposed scheme are validated through consistently getting optimal values of statistical performance indices calculated for a sufficiently large number of independent runs to establish its significance. PMID:27610319

  8. Numerical modeling of flow through orifice meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholesiami, M. Z.; Patel, B. R.

    1988-03-01

    Numerical modeling is performed for turbulent flow through orifice meters using Creare's computer program FLUENT. FLUENT solves the time averaged Navier-Stokes equations in 2-D and 3-D Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates. Turbulence is simulated using a two equation k-epsilon or algebraic stress turbulence model. It is shown that an 80 x 60 grid distribution is sufficient to resolve the flow field around the orifice. The variations in discharge coefficient are studied as a result of variation in beta ratio, Reynolds number, upstream and downstream boundary conditions, pipe surface roughness, and upstream swirl. The effects of beta ratio and Reynolds number on the discharge coefficient are shown to be similar to the experimental data. It is also shown that the surface roughness can increase the discharge coefficient by about 0.7 percent for the range of roughness heights encountered in practice. The numerical modeling approach would be most effective if it is combined with a systematic experimental program that can supply the necessary boundary conditions. It is recommended that numerical modeling be used for the study of other flow meters.

  9. Numerical modeling of fresh concrete flow through porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolařík, F.; Patzák, B.; Zeman, J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper focuses on a numerical modeling of a non-Newtonian fluid flow in a porous domain. It presents combination of a homogenization approach to obtain permeability from the underlying micro-structure with coupling of a Stokes and Darcy flow through the interface on the macro level. As a numerical method we employed the Finite Element method. The results obtained from the homogenization approach are validated against fully resolved solution computed by direct numerical simulation.

  10. Numerical homogenization on approach for stokesian suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, B. M.; Berlyand, L. V.; Karpeev, D. A.

    2012-01-20

    swimming resulting from bacterial alignment can significantly alter other macroscopic properties of the suspension, such as the oxygen diffusivity and mixing rates. In order to understand the unique macroscopic properties of active suspensions the connection between microscopic swimming and alignment dynamics and the mesoscopic pattern formation must be clarified. This is difficult to do analytically in the fully general setting of moderately dense suspensions, because of the large number of bacteria involved (approx. 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3} in experiments) and the complex, time-dependent geometry of the system. Many reduced analytical models of bacterial have been proposed, but all of them require validation. While comparison with experiment is the ultimate test of a model's fidelity, it is difficult to conduct experiments matched to these models assumptions. Numerical simulation of the microscopic dynamics is an acceptable substitute, but it runs into the problem of having to discretize the fluid domain with a fine-grained boundary (the bacteria) and update the discretization as the domain evolves (bacteria move). This leads to a prohibitively high number of degrees of freedom and prohibitively high setup costs per timestep of simulation. In this technical report we propose numerical methods designed to alleviate these two difficulties. We indicate how to (1) construct an optimal discretization in terms of the number of degrees of freedom per digit of accuracy and (2) optimally update the discretization as the simulation evolves. The technical tool here is the derivation of rigorous error bounds on the error in the numerical solution when using our proposed discretization at the initial time as well as after a given elapsed simulation time. These error bounds should guide the construction of practical discretization schemes and update strategies. Our initial construction is carried out by using a theoretically convenient, but practically prohibitive spectral basis, which

  11. Modeling Biodegradation and Reactive Transport: Analytical and Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y; Glascoe, L

    2005-06-09

    The computational modeling of the biodegradation of contaminated groundwater systems accounting for biochemical reactions coupled to contaminant transport is a valuable tool for both the field engineer/planner with limited computational resources and the expert computational researcher less constrained by time and computer power. There exists several analytical and numerical computer models that have been and are being developed to cover the practical needs put forth by users to fulfill this spectrum of computational demands. Generally, analytical models provide rapid and convenient screening tools running on very limited computational power, while numerical models can provide more detailed information with consequent requirements of greater computational time and effort. While these analytical and numerical computer models can provide accurate and adequate information to produce defensible remediation strategies, decisions based on inadequate modeling output or on over-analysis can have costly and risky consequences. In this chapter we consider both analytical and numerical modeling approaches to biodegradation and reactive transport. Both approaches are discussed and analyzed in terms of achieving bioremediation goals, recognizing that there is always a tradeoff between computational cost and the resolution of simulated systems.

  12. Avoiding numerical pitfalls in social force models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Gerta; Treml, Franz; Gödel, Marion

    2013-06-01

    The social force model of Helbing and Molnár is one of the best known approaches to simulate pedestrian motion, a collective phenomenon with nonlinear dynamics. It is based on the idea that the Newtonian laws of motion mostly carry over to pedestrian motion so that human trajectories can be computed by solving a set of ordinary differential equations for velocity and acceleration. The beauty and simplicity of this ansatz are strong reasons for its wide spread. However, the numerical implementation is not without pitfalls. Oscillations, collisions, and instabilities occur even for very small step sizes. Classic solution ideas from molecular dynamics do not apply to the problem because the system is not Hamiltonian despite its source of inspiration. Looking at the model through the eyes of a mathematician, however, we realize that the right hand side of the differential equation is nondifferentiable and even discontinuous at critical locations. This produces undesirable behavior in the exact solution and, at best, severe loss of accuracy in efficient numerical schemes even in short range simulations. We suggest a very simple mollified version of the social force model that conserves the desired dynamic properties of the original many-body system but elegantly and cost efficiently resolves several of the issues concerning stability and numerical resolution.

  13. Numerical modeling of the acoustic guitar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine; Derveaux, Grégoire; Joly, Patrick; Bécache, Eliane

    2003-10-01

    An interactive DVD has been created, based on a numerical model of the acoustic guitar. In a first chapter, the retained physical model is described and illustrated, from the pluck to the 3D radiation field. The second chapter is devoted to the presentation of the numerical tools used for solving the equations of the model. Numerical simulations of plate vibrations and radiated sound pressure are shown in the third chapter. A number of simulated sounds are presented and analyzed in the fourth chapter. In addition, the DVD includes a discussion between a guitar maker, an acoustician, a guitar player and a mathematician. This discussion is entitled ``towards a common language.'' Its aim is to show the interest of simulations with respect to complementary professional approaches of the instrument. This DVD received the Henri Poincaré Prize from the 8th Research Film Festival of Nancy (June 2003), sponsored by the CNRS, in the category ``Documents for the scientific community and illustrations of the research for teaching purpose.''

  14. Avoiding numerical pitfalls in social force models.

    PubMed

    Köster, Gerta; Treml, Franz; Gödel, Marion

    2013-06-01

    The social force model of Helbing and Molnár is one of the best known approaches to simulate pedestrian motion, a collective phenomenon with nonlinear dynamics. It is based on the idea that the Newtonian laws of motion mostly carry over to pedestrian motion so that human trajectories can be computed by solving a set of ordinary differential equations for velocity and acceleration. The beauty and simplicity of this ansatz are strong reasons for its wide spread. However, the numerical implementation is not without pitfalls. Oscillations, collisions, and instabilities occur even for very small step sizes. Classic solution ideas from molecular dynamics do not apply to the problem because the system is not Hamiltonian despite its source of inspiration. Looking at the model through the eyes of a mathematician, however, we realize that the right hand side of the differential equation is nondifferentiable and even discontinuous at critical locations. This produces undesirable behavior in the exact solution and, at best, severe loss of accuracy in efficient numerical schemes even in short range simulations. We suggest a very simple mollified version of the social force model that conserves the desired dynamic properties of the original many-body system but elegantly and cost efficiently resolves several of the issues concerning stability and numerical resolution. PMID:23848804

  15. An Efficient Numerical Approach for Nonlinear Fokker-Planck equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, Dustin; Vedula, Prakash

    2009-03-01

    Fokker-Planck equations which are nonlinear with respect to their probability densities that occur in many nonequilibrium systems relevant to mean field interaction models, plasmas, classical fermions and bosons can be challenging to solve numerically. To address some underlying challenges in obtaining numerical solutions, we propose a quadrature based moment method for efficient and accurate determination of transient (and stationary) solutions of nonlinear Fokker-Planck equations. In this approach the distribution function is represented as a collection of Dirac delta functions with corresponding quadrature weights and locations, that are in turn determined from constraints based on evolution of generalized moments. Properties of the distribution function can be obtained by solution of transport equations for quadrature weights and locations. We will apply this computational approach to study a wide range of problems, including the Desai-Zwanzig Model (for nonlinear muscular contraction) and multivariate nonlinear Fokker-Planck equations describing classical fermions and bosons, and will also demonstrate good agreement with results obtained from Monte Carlo and other standard numerical methods.

  16. NUMERICAL MODELS FOR PREDICTING WATERSHED ACIDIFICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three numerical models of watershed acidification, including the MAGIC II, ETD, and ILWAS models, are reviewed, and a comparative study is made of the specific process formulations that are incorporated in the models to represent hydrological, geochemical, and biogeochemical proc...

  17. Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Liu

    2000-03-03

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the conceptual and numerical models used for modeling of unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid (water and air) flow and solute transport processes. This is in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0030 Conceptual and Numerical Models for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Processes, Rev 00''. The conceptual and numerical modeling approaches described in this AMR are used for models of UZ flow and transport in fractured, unsaturated rock under ambient and thermal conditions, which are documented in separate AMRs. This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR), the Near Field Environment PMR, and the following models: Calibrated Properties Model; UZ Flow Models and Submodels; Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes Model; Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Seepage Model; Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model; Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA); and UZ Radionuclide Transport Models.

  18. Numerical propulsion system simulation - An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Lester D.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The tremendous progress being made in computational engineering and the rapid growth in computing power that is resulting from parallel processing now make it feasible to consider the use of computer simulations to gain insights into the complex interactions in aerospace propulsion systems and to evaluate new concepts early in the design process before a commitment to hardware is made. Described here is a NASA initiative to develop a Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) capability.

  19. Numerical propulsion system simulation: An interdisciplinary approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Lester D.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1991-01-01

    The tremendous progress being made in computational engineering and the rapid growth in computing power that is resulting from parallel processing now make it feasible to consider the use of computer simulations to gain insights into the complex interactions in aerospace propulsion systems and to evaluate new concepts early in the design process before a commitment to hardware is made. Described here is a NASA initiative to develop a Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) capability.

  20. Numerical modeling for dilute and dense sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.; Ziebarth, J. P.; Wang, T. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have successfully implemented a numerical model for spray-combustion calculations. In this model, the governing gas-phase equations in Eulerian coordinate are solved by a time-marching multiple pressure correction procedure based on the operator-splitting technique. The droplet-phase equations in Lagrangian coordinate are solved by a stochastic discrete particle technique. In order to simplify the calculation procedure for the circulating droplets, the effective conductivity model is utilized. The k-epsilon models are utilized to characterize the time and length scales of the gas phase in conjunction with turbulent modulation by droplets and droplet dispersion by turbulence. This method entails random sampling of instantaneous gas flow properties and the stochastic process requires a large number of computational parcels to produce the satisfactory dispersion distributions even for rather dilute sprays. Two major improvements in spray combustion modelings were made. Firstly, we have developed a probability density function approach in multidimensional space to represent a specific computational particle. Secondly, we incorporate the Taylor Analogy Breakup (TAB) model for handling the dense spray effects. This breakup model is based on the reasonable assumption that atomization and drop breakup are indistinguishable processes within a dense spray near the nozzle exit. Accordingly, atomization is prescribed by injecting drops which have a characteristic size equal to the nozzle exit diameter. Example problems include the nearly homogeneous and inhomogeneous turbulent particle dispersion, and the non-evaporating, evaporating, and burning dense sprays. Comparison with experimental data will be discussed in detail.

  1. On numerical modeling of one-dimensional geothermal histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugerud, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical models of one-dimensional geothermal histories are one way of understanding the relations between tectonics and transient thermal structure in the crust. Such models can be powerful tools for interpreting geochronologic and thermobarometric data. A flexible program to calculate these models on a microcomputer is available and examples of its use are presented. Potential problems with this approach include the simplifying assumptions that are made, limitations of the numerical techniques, and the neglect of convective heat transfer. ?? 1989.

  2. Numerical geometry of map and model assessment.

    PubMed

    Wriggers, Willy; He, Jing

    2015-11-01

    We are describing best practices and assessment strategies for the atomic interpretation of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) maps. Multiscale numerical geometry strategies in the Situs package and in secondary structure detection software are currently evolving due to the recent increases in cryo-EM resolution. Criteria that aim to predict the accuracy of fitted atomic models at low (worse than 8Å) and medium (4-8 Å) resolutions remain challenging. However, a high level of confidence in atomic models can be achieved by combining such criteria. The observed errors are due to map-model discrepancies and due to the effect of imperfect global docking strategies. Extending the earlier motion capture approach developed for flexible fitting, we use simulated fiducials (pseudoatoms) at varying levels of coarse-graining to track the local drift of structural features. We compare three tracking approaches: naïve vector quantization, a smoothly deformable model, and a tessellation of the structure into rigid Voronoi cells, which are fitted using a multi-fragment refinement approach. The lowest error is an upper bound for the (small) discrepancy between the crystal structure and the EM map due to different conditions in their structure determination. When internal features such as secondary structures are visible in medium-resolution EM maps, it is possible to extend the idea of point-based fiducials to more complex geometric representations such as helical axes, strands, and skeletons. We propose quantitative strategies to assess map-model pairs when such secondary structure patterns are prominent. PMID:26416532

  3. Problem-Reduction Approach To Handwritten Numeral Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hu-chen; Hua, Xiaoming; Jing, Dia; Xiong, Fanlun; Hu, Fupei; Hua, Lu-lin; Hruschka, W. R.

    1988-03-01

    In this paper a problem-reduction approach is applied to handwritten numeral recognition and a recognition system is built. A problem-reduction representation (PRR) is used as the structural model for the character into which the semantics is injected. A powerful feature point extraction technique is designed to extract turnabouts on the strokes of a character with the windows of variable size. In terms of this point, a character is segmented into a series of line segments, each with one head and one tail. A nondirection analysis algorithm in problem-reduction approach is used to analyze characters. A heuristic ordered search method according to attributes is developed. A high recognition rate is obtained.

  4. Two numerical models for landslide dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungr, Oldrich; McDougall, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Two microcomputer-based numerical models (Dynamic ANalysis (DAN) and three-dimensional model DAN (DAN3D)) have been developed and extensively used for analysis of landslide runout, specifically for the purposes of practical landslide hazard and risk assessment. The theoretical basis of both models is a system of depth-averaged governing equations derived from the principles of continuum mechanics. Original features developed specifically during this work include: an open rheological kernel; explicit use of tangential strain to determine the tangential stress state within the flowing sheet, which is both more realistic and beneficial to the stability of the model; orientation of principal tangential stresses parallel with the direction of motion; inclusion of the centripetal forces corresponding to the true curvature of the path in the motion direction and; the use of very simple and highly efficient free surface interpolation methods. Both models yield similar results when applied to the same sets of input data. Both algorithms are designed to work within the semi-empirical framework of the "equivalent fluid" approach. This approach requires selection of material rheology and calibration of input parameters through back-analysis of real events. Although approximate, it facilitates simple and efficient operation while accounting for the most important characteristics of extremely rapid landslides. The two models have been verified against several controlled laboratory experiments with known physical basis. A large number of back-analyses of real landslides of various types have also been carried out. One example is presented. Calibration patterns are emerging, which give a promise of predictive capability.

  5. Numerical wind speed simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1981-09-01

    A relatively simple stochastic model for simulating wind speed time series that can be used as an alternative to time series from representative locations is described in this report. The model incorporates systematic seasonal variation of the mean wind, its standard deviation, and the correlation speeds. It also incorporates systematic diurnal variation of the mean speed and standard deviation. To demonstrate the model capabilities, simulations were made using model parameters derived from data collected at the Hanford Meteorology Station, and results of analysis of simulated and actual data were compared.

  6. Study cosmic ray modulation near the heliopause: A numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.; Zhang, M.; Potgieter, M. S.; Feng, X.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    By incorporating the MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) global heliospheric data into the Parker's cosmic-rays (CRs) transport equation, we constructed a hybrid galactic cosmic ray transport model to study the galactic cosmic-rays (GCR) behaviour near the heliopause(HP). Based on this hybrid model, we found that: (1)By increasing the ratio of the parallel diffusion coefficient to the perpendicular diffusion coefficient in the outer heliosheath (the region near HP and beyond), the simulated radial flux gradient near the HP increases as well. As this ratio multiplying factor reaches 1010, the flux experiences a sudden jump near the HP, similar to what Voyager 1 had observed in 2012. (2)After increasing the ratio of the diffusion coefficients beyond the HP, more pseudo- particles in our numerical approach which have been traced from the upwind nose region exit in the downwind tail region. It is thus possible that they diffuse more directly from the tail region to the nose region.

  7. Survey of numerical electrostimulation models.

    PubMed

    Reilly, J Patrick

    2016-06-21

    This paper evaluates results of a survey of electrostimulation models of myelinated nerve. Participants were asked to determine thresholds of excitation for 18 cases involving different characteristics of the neuron, the stimulation waveform, and the electrode arrangement. Responses were received from 7 investigators using 10 models. Excitation thresholds differed significantly among these models. For example, with a 2 ms monophasic stimulus pulse and an electrode/fiber distance of 1 cm, thresholds from the least to greatest value differed by a factor of 8.3; with a 5 μs pulse, thresholds differed by the factor 3.8. Significant differences in reported simulations point to the need for experimental validation. Additional efforts are needed to develop computational models for unmyelinated C-fibers, A-delta fibers, CNS neurons, and CNS Synapses. PMID:27223870

  8. Survey of numerical electrostimulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, J. Patrick

    2016-06-01

    This paper evaluates results of a survey of electrostimulation models of myelinated nerve. Participants were asked to determine thresholds of excitation for 18 cases involving different characteristics of the neuron, the stimulation waveform, and the electrode arrangement. Responses were received from 7 investigators using 10 models. Excitation thresholds differed significantly among these models. For example, with a 2 ms monophasic stimulus pulse and an electrode/fiber distance of 1 cm, thresholds from the least to greatest value differed by a factor of 8.3; with a 5 μs pulse, thresholds differed by the factor 3.8. Significant differences in reported simulations point to the need for experimental validation. Additional efforts are needed to develop computational models for unmyelinated C-fibers, A-delta fibers, CNS neurons, and CNS Synapses.

  9. Numerical analysis of electrical defibrillation. The parallel approach.

    PubMed

    Ng, K T; Hutchinson, S A; Gao, S

    1995-01-01

    Numerical modeling offers a viable tool for studying electrical defibrillation, allowing the behavior of field quantities to be observed easily as the different system parameters are varied. One numerical technique, namely the finite-element method, has been found particularly effective for modeling complex thoracic anatomies. However, an accurate finite-element model of the thorax often requires a large number of elements and nodes, leading to a large set of equations that cannot be solved effectively with the computational power of conventional computers. This is especially true if many finite-element solutions need to be achieved within a reasonable time period (eg, electrode configuration optimization). In this study, the use of massively parallel computers to provide the memory and reduction in solution time for solving these large finite-element problems is discussed. Both the uniform and unstructured grid approaches are considered. Algorithms that allow efficient mapping of uniform and unstructured grids to data-parallel and message-passing parallel computers are discussed. An automatic iterative procedure for electrode configuration optimization is presented. The procedure is based on the minimization of an objective function using the parallel direct search technique. Computational performance results are presented together with simulation results. PMID:8656104

  10. Numerical modeling of transport barrier formation

    SciTech Connect

    Tokar, Mikhail Z.

    2010-04-01

    In diverse media the characteristics of mass and heat transfer may undergo spontaneous and abrupt changes in time and space. This can lead to the formation of regions with strongly reduced transport, so called transport barriers (TB). The presence of interfaces between regions with qualitatively and quantitatively different transport characteristics impose severe requirements to methods and numerical schemes used by solving of transport equations. In particular the assumptions made in standard methods about the solution behavior by representing its derivatives fail in points where the transport changes abruptly. The situation is complicated further by the fact that neither the formation time nor the positions of interfaces are known a priori. A numerical approach, operating reliably under such conditions, is proposed. It is based on the introduction of a new dependent variable related to the variation after one time step of the original one integrated over the volume. In the vicinity of any grid knot the resulting differential equation is approximated by a second order ordinary differential equation with constant coefficients. Exact analytical solutions of these equations are conjugated between knots by demanding the continuity of the total solution and its first derivative. As an example the heat transfer in media with heat conductivity decreasing abruptly when the temperature e-folding length exceeds a critical value is considered. The formation of TB both at a heating power above the critical level and caused with radiation energy losses non-linearly dependent on the temperature is modeled.

  11. Numerical Computation of Sensitivities and the Adjoint Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the numerical computation of sensitivities via the adjoint approach in optimization problems governed by differential equations. We focus on the adjoint problem in its weak form. We show how one can avoid some of the problems with the adjoint approach, such as deriving suitable boundary conditions for the adjoint equation. We discuss the convergence of numerical approximations of the costate computed via the weak form of the adjoint problem and show the significance for the discrete adjoint problem.

  12. BOOK REVIEW Analytical and Numerical Approaches to Mathematical Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, John M.

    2007-08-01

    The 319th Wilhelm-and-Else-Heraeus Seminar 'Mathematical Relativity: New Ideas and Developments' took place in March 2004. Twelve of the invited speakers have expanded their one hour talks into the papers appearing in this volume, preceded by a foreword by Roger Penrose. The first group consists of four papers on 'differential geometry and differential topology'. Paul Ehrlich opens with a very witty review of global Lorentzian geometry, which caused this reviewer to think more carefully about how he uses the adjective 'generic'. Robert Low addresses the issue of causality with a description of the 'space of null geodesics' and a tentative proposal for a new definition of causal boundary. The underlying review of global Lorentzian geometry is continued by Antonio Masiello, looking at variational approaches (actually valid for more general semi-Riemannian manifolds). This group concludes with a very clear review of pp-wave spacetimes from José Flores and Miguel Sánchez. (This reviewer was delighted to see a reproduction of Roger Penrose's seminal (1965) picture of null geodesics in plane wave spacetimes which attracted him into the subject.) Robert Beig opens the second group 'analytic methods and differential equations' with a brief but careful discussion of symmetric (regular) hyperbolicity for first (second) order systems, respectively, of partial differential equations. His description is peppered with examples, many specific to relativstic continuum mechanics. There follows a succinct review of linear elliptic boundary value problems with applications to general relativity from Sergio Dain. The numerous examples he provides are thought-provoking. The 'standard cosmological model' has been well understood for three quarters of a century. However recent observations suggest that the expansion in our Universe may be accelerating. Alan Rendall provides a careful discussion of the changes, both mathematical and physical, to the standard model which might be needed

  13. Advanced numerical methods and software approaches for semiconductor device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    CAREY,GRAHAM F.; PARDHANANI,A.L.; BOVA,STEVEN W.

    2000-03-23

    In this article the authors concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to drift-dominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the drift-diffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of upwind and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter-Gummel approach, Petrov-Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), entropy variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of the methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. They have included numerical examples from the recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and they emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, they briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.

  14. Advanced Numerical Methods and Software Approaches for Semiconductor Device Simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Carey, Graham F.; Pardhanani, A. L.; Bova, S. W.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we concisely present several modern strategies that are applicable to driftdominated carrier transport in higher-order deterministic models such as the driftdiffusion, hydrodynamic, and quantum hydrodynamic systems. The approaches include extensions of “upwind” and artificial dissipation schemes, generalization of the traditional Scharfetter – Gummel approach, Petrov – Galerkin and streamline-upwind Petrov Galerkin (SUPG), “entropy” variables, transformations, least-squares mixed methods and other stabilized Galerkin schemes such as Galerkin least squares and discontinuous Galerkin schemes. The treatment is representative rather than an exhaustive review and several schemes are mentioned only briefly with appropriate reference to the literature. Some of themore » methods have been applied to the semiconductor device problem while others are still in the early stages of development for this class of applications. We have included numerical examples from our recent research tests with some of the methods. A second aspect of the work deals with algorithms that employ unstructured grids in conjunction with adaptive refinement strategies. The full benefits of such approaches have not yet been developed in this application area and we emphasize the need for further work on analysis, data structures and software to support adaptivity. Finally, we briefly consider some aspects of software frameworks. These include dial-an-operator approaches such as that used in the industrial simulator PROPHET, and object-oriented software support such as those in the SANDIA National Laboratory framework SIERRA.« less

  15. Characterization of compression behaviors of fully covered biodegradable polydioxanone biliary stent for human body: A numerical approach by finite element model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhui; Zhang, Peihua

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a study of the compression behaviors of fully covered biodegradable polydioxanone biliary stents (FCBPBs) developed for human body by finite element method. To investigate the relationship between the compression force and structure parameter (monofilament diameter and braid-pin number), nine numerical models based on actual biliary stent were established, the simulation and experimental results are in good agreement with each other when calculating the compression force derived from both experiment and simulation results, indicating that the simulation results can be provided a useful reference to the investigation of biliary stents. The stress distribution on FCBPBSs was studied to optimize the structure of FCBPBSs. In addition, the plastic dissipation analysis and plastic strain of FCBPBSs were obtained via the compression simulation, revealing the structure parameter effect on the tolerance. PMID:27183432

  16. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Christian; Su, Yanqing; Parmigiani, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the complex non-linear physics that governs volcanic eruptions is contingent on our ability to characterize the dynamics of bubbles and its effect on the ascending magma. The exsolution and migration of bubbles has also a great impact on the heat and mass transport in and out of magma bodies stored at shallow depths in the crust. Multiphase systems like magmas are by definition heterogeneous at small scales. Although mixture theory or homogenization methods are convenient to represent multiphase systems as a homogeneous equivalent media, these approaches do not inform us on possible feedbacks at the pore-scale and can be significantly misleading. In this presentation, we discuss the development and application of bubble-scale multiphase flow modeling to address the following questions : How do bubbles impact heat and mass transport in magma chambers ? How efficient are chemical exchanges between the melt and bubbles during magma decompression? What is the role of hydrodynamic interactions on the deformation of bubbles while the magma is sheared? Addressing these questions requires powerful numerical methods that accurately model the balance between viscous, capillary and pressure stresses. We discuss how these bubble-scale models can provide important constraints on the dynamics of magmas stored at shallow depth or ascending to the surface during an eruption.

  17. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Mani Sarathy, S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model's predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018.

  18. Waste glass melter numerical and physical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Peters, R.D.; Lessor, D.L.; Lowery, P.S.; Elliott, M.L.

    1991-10-01

    Results of physical and numerical simulation modeling of high-level liquid waste vitrification melters are presented. Physical modeling uses simulant fluids in laboratory testing. Visualization results provide insight into convective melt flow patterns from which information is derived to support performance estimation of operating melters and data to support numerical simulation. Numerical simulation results of several melter configurations are presented. These are in support of programs to evaluate melter operation characteristics and performance. Included are investigations into power skewing and alternating current electric field phase angle in a dual electrode pair reference design and bi-modal convective stability in an advanced design. 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Numerical modeling for underground nuclear test monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Steven R.; Kamm, James R.

    The symposium for Numerical Modeling for Underground Nuclear Test Monitoring was held March 23-25 in Durango, Colo. Funded by the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (OACN) and hosted by the Source Region Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the meetings's purpose was to discuss the state-of-the-art in numerical simulations of nuclear explosion phenomenology with applications to test-ban monitoring. In particular, we wished to focus on the uniqueness of model fits to data, the measurement and characterization of material response models, advanced modeling techniques, and applications of modeling to monitoring problems.The concept for the meeting arose through discussions with Marv Denny, who was on assignment at Department of Energy Headquarters from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In these conversations, the following question was discussed: how are numerical modeling techniques being used to understand the effects of explosion- source phenomenology on test-ban treaty monitoring? Numerical studies are becoming increasingly important in the evaluation of capabilities for proliferation monitoring; this trend has accelerated with the curtailment of the nuclear testing program. During these discussions, the issue of the uniqueness and limitations of numerical models arose. It was decided to address these questions by convening a group of experts to present and discuss the problems associated with modeling of close-in data from explosions.

  20. Estimation of Flood Frequencies under Changing Climate Conditions During 21st Century by means of a Numerical Coupled Atmospheric-Hydrologic Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavvas, M. L.; Trinh, T. Q.; Ishida, K.; Fischer, I.; Nosacka, J.; Brown, K.

    2015-12-01

    Effect of climate change on hydrologic flow regimes, particularly extreme events, necessitates modeling of future flows in order to best inform water resources management. The presented modeling approach simulated future flows in the Cache Creek watershed in California, over the 21st century using a hydro-climate model (WEHY-HCM) forced by future climate projections. The future climate projections, based on four emission scenarios, simulated by two GCMs (ECHAM5 and CCSM3) under several initial conditions, were dynamically downscaled using MM5, a regional climate model. The downscaled future precipitation data were bias-corrected before being input into the fully physically-based WEHY watershed hydrology model to simulate the flows at hourly intervals along the main Cache Creek branch and its tributaries during 2010-2099. The results suggest an increasing trend in flood peak discharge magnitudes at the outlet of the studied watershed throughout the 21st century. Similarly, estimates of the 100 and 200-year flood discharge magnitudes increase throughout the study period toward future in the 21st century. The differences among the historical flood frequency, and the flood frequencies during the first half and second half of the 21st century are indicative of the ongoing non-stationarity in the 21st century hydro-climate regime of the study region.

  1. Ferrofluids: Modeling, numerical analysis, and scientific computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, Ignacio

    This dissertation presents some developments in the Numerical Analysis of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) describing the behavior of ferrofluids. The most widely accepted PDE model for ferrofluids is the Micropolar model proposed by R.E. Rosensweig. The Micropolar Navier-Stokes Equations (MNSE) is a subsystem of PDEs within the Rosensweig model. Being a simplified version of the much bigger system of PDEs proposed by Rosensweig, the MNSE are a natural starting point of this thesis. The MNSE couple linear velocity u, angular velocity w, and pressure p. We propose and analyze a first-order semi-implicit fully-discrete scheme for the MNSE, which decouples the computation of the linear and angular velocities, is unconditionally stable and delivers optimal convergence rates under assumptions analogous to those used for the Navier-Stokes equations. Moving onto the much more complex Rosensweig's model, we provide a definition (approximation) for the effective magnetizing field h, and explain the assumptions behind this definition. Unlike previous definitions available in the literature, this new definition is able to accommodate the effect of external magnetic fields. Using this definition we setup the system of PDEs coupling linear velocity u, pressure p, angular velocity w, magnetization m, and magnetic potential ϕ We show that this system is energy-stable and devise a numerical scheme that mimics the same stability property. We prove that solutions of the numerical scheme always exist and, under certain simplifying assumptions, that the discrete solutions converge. A notable outcome of the analysis of the numerical scheme for the Rosensweig's model is the choice of finite element spaces that allow the construction of an energy-stable scheme. Finally, with the lessons learned from Rosensweig's model, we develop a diffuse-interface model describing the behavior of two-phase ferrofluid flows and present an energy-stable numerical scheme for this model. For a

  2. Numerical flow modeling of power plant windboxes

    SciTech Connect

    LaRose, J.A.; Hopkins, M.W.

    1995-12-31

    Numerical flow modeling has become an increasingly important design and analysis tool for improving the air distribution to power plant burners. Uniform air distribution allows the burners to perform as designed to achieve the lowest possible emissions and best fuel burn-out. Modifications can be made internal to the existing windbox to improve the burner-to-burner and burner peripheral air distributions. These modifications can include turning vanes, flow splitters, perforated plate, and burner shrouding. Numerical modeling allows the analysis of design trade-offs between adding flow resistance, fan power, and windbox modification construction cost. Numerical modeling has advantages over physical modeling in that actual geometric scales and air temperatures are used. Advantages over a field data based study include the ability to quickly and cheaply analyze a variety of design options without actually modifying the windbox, and the availability of significantly more data with which to interpret the results. Costs to perform a numerical study are generally one-half to one-third of the cost to perform a physical flow model and can be one-forth of the cost to perform a field study. The continued development of affordable, high speed, large memory workstations and reliable, commercially available computation fluid dynamics (CFD) software allows practical analyses of power plant windboxes. This paper discusses (1) the impact of air distribution on burner performance, (2) the methodology used to perform numerical flow modeling of power plant windboxes, and (3) the results from several windbox analyses including available post-modification observations.

  3. Evaluation of wave runup predictions from numerical and parametric models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Thompson, David M.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Long, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    Wave runup during storms is a primary driver of coastal evolution, including shoreline and dune erosion and barrier island overwash. Runup and its components, setup and swash, can be predicted from a parameterized model that was developed by comparing runup observations to offshore wave height, wave period, and local beach slope. Because observations during extreme storms are often unavailable, a numerical model is used to simulate the storm-driven runup to compare to the parameterized model and then develop an approach to improve the accuracy of the parameterization. Numerically simulated and parameterized runup were compared to observations to evaluate model accuracies. The analysis demonstrated that setup was accurately predicted by both the parameterized model and numerical simulations. Infragravity swash heights were most accurately predicted by the parameterized model. The numerical model suffered from bias and gain errors that depended on whether a one-dimensional or two-dimensional spatial domain was used. Nonetheless, all of the predictions were significantly correlated to the observations, implying that the systematic errors can be corrected. The numerical simulations did not resolve the incident-band swash motions, as expected, and the parameterized model performed best at predicting incident-band swash heights. An assimilated prediction using a weighted average of the parameterized model and the numerical simulations resulted in a reduction in prediction error variance. Finally, the numerical simulations were extended to include storm conditions that have not been previously observed. These results indicated that the parameterized predictions of setup may need modification for extreme conditions; numerical simulations can be used to extend the validity of the parameterized predictions of infragravity swash; and numerical simulations systematically underpredict incident swash, which is relatively unimportant under extreme conditions.

  4. On the relation of pore-scale heterogeneities and bacterial mobility to bioavailability and in-situ biodegradation of chemical species in porous media: a numerical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharasoo, M. G.; Centler, F.; Fetzer, I.; Thullner, M.

    2010-12-01

    Reactive processes, for example nutrient cycling or degradation of organic contaminants, in subsurface environments like soils or aquifers are driven by microorganisms residing in these porous environments. These natural porous media are characterized by heterogeneities at various scales and the heterogeneous structure of the medium shapes both the transport of chemical species and the distribution of microorganisms, both of which are altering the accessibility and availability of the chemical species to the located microorganisms within the medium. Effective reaction rates that describe the biodegradation of contaminants and resulted microbial distribution patterns thus depend not only on the growth and degradation capacity of the indigenous microbial population but also on the pore-scale heterogeneities of a medium and on the ability of microorganisms to relocate within the medium. The interaction of these properties will control the bacterial distribution patterns and in consequence the bioavailability and realized biodegradation rate of chemical species. To obtain a better and quantitative understanding of the bioavailability of biodegradable compounds in porous media, a numerical pore-network model has been developed, which is capable of considering the transport of an arbitrary number of chemical species, as well as their consumption/production by an arbitrary number of (bio)geochemical reactions. These simulations are further combined with the individual-based simulation of the growth and chemotactic mobility of microbial cells within the pore network. The model allows for considering various ranges of heterogeneities as well as pore-specific limitations of intra-pore bioavailability. Simulations are performed for studying the link between pore-scale heterogeneity and the distribution of bacteria, which will allow assess the bioavailability of biodegradable species and their effective biodegradation rates in such media.

  5. Numerical modeling of polar mesocyclones generation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Dennis; Stepanenko, Victor

    2013-04-01

    parameters, lateral boundary conditions are varied in the typically observed range. The approach is fully nonlinear: we use a three-dimensional non-hydrostatic mesoscale model NH3D_MPI [1] coupled with one-dimensional water body model LAKE. A key method used in the present study is the analysis of eddy kinetic and available potential energy budgets. References 1. Mikushin, D.N., and Stepanenko, V.M., The implementation of regional atmospheric model numerical algorithms for CBEA-based clusters. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Parallel Processing and Applied Mathematics, 2010, vol. 6067, p. 525-534. 2. Rasmussen, E., and Turner, J. (eds), Polar Lows: Mesoscale Weather Systems in the Polar Regions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003, 612 pp. 3. Yanase, W., and Niino, H., Dependence of Polar Low Development on Baroclinicity and Physical Processes: An Idealized High-Resolution Experiment, J. Atmos. Sci., 2006, vol. 64, p. 3044-3067.

  6. Evolution of the Lake Victoria basin in the context of coeval rift initiation in East Africa: a 3D numerical model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichura, Henry; Quinteros, Javier; Melnick, Daniel; Brune, Sascha; Schwanghart, Wolfgang; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2015-04-01

    Over the last four years sedimentologic and thermochronologic studies in the western and eastern branches of the Cenozoic East African Rift System (EARS) have supported the notion of a broadly contemporaneous onset of normal faulting and rift-basin formation in both segments. These studies support previous interpretations based on geophysical investigations from which an onset of rifting during the Paleogene had been postulated. In light of these studies we explore the evolution of the Lake Victoria basin, a shallow, unfaulted sedimentary basin centered between both branches of the EARS and located in the interior of the East African Plateau (EAP). We quantify the fluvial catchment evolution of the Lake Victoria basin and assess the topographic response of African crust to the onset of rifting in both branches. Furthermore, we evaluate and localize the nature of strain and flexural rift-flank uplift in both branches. We use a 3D numerical forward model that includes nonlinear temperature- and stress-dependent elasto-visco-plastic rheology. The model is able to reproduce the flexural response of variably thick lithosphere to rift-related deformation processes such as lithospheric thinning and asthenospheric upwelling. The model domain covers the entire EAP and integrates extensional processes in a heterogeneous, yet cold and thick cratonic block (Archean Tanzania craton), which is surrounded by mechanically weaker Proterozoic mobile belts, which are characterized by thinner lithosphere ("thin spots"). The lower limits of the craton (170 km) and the mobile belts (120 km) are simulated by different depths of the 1300 °C lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. We assume a constant extension rate of 4 mm/a throughout the entire simulation of 30 Ma and neglect the effect of dynamic topography and magmatism. Even though the model setup is very simple and the resolution is not high enough to calculate realistic rift-flank uplift, it intriguingly reveals important topographic

  7. Numerical models for the evaluation of geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    We have carried out detailed simulations of various fields in the USA (Bada, New Mexico; Heber, California); Mexico (Cerro Prieto); Iceland (Krafla); and Kenya (Olkaria). These simulation studies have illustrated the usefulness of numerical models for the overall evaluation of geothermal systems. The methodology for modeling the behavior of geothermal systems, different approaches to geothermal reservoir modeling and how they can be applied in comprehensive evaluation work are discussed.

  8. Numerical modelling in biosciences using delay differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, Gennadii A.; Rihan, Fathalla A.

    2000-12-01

    Our principal purposes here are (i) to consider, from the perspective of applied mathematics, models of phenomena in the biosciences that are based on delay differential equations and for which numerical approaches are a major tool in understanding their dynamics, (ii) to review the application of numerical techniques to investigate these models. We show that there are prima facie reasons for using such models: (i) they have a richer mathematical framework (compared with ordinary differential equations) for the analysis of biosystem dynamics, (ii) they display better consistency with the nature of certain biological processes and predictive results. We analyze both the qualitative and quantitative role that delays play in basic time-lag models proposed in population dynamics, epidemiology, physiology, immunology, neural networks and cell kinetics. We then indicate suitable computational techniques for the numerical treatment of mathematical problems emerging in the biosciences, comparing them with those implemented by the bio-modellers.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Ocean Acoustic Wavefields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappert, Frederick

    1997-08-01

    The U.S. Navy requires real-time ``acoustic performance prediction'' models in order to optimize sonar tactics in naval combat situations. The need for numerical models that solve the acoustic wave equation in realistic ocean environments is being met by a collaborative effort between university researchers, industrial contractors, and navy laboratory workers. This paper discusses one particularly successful numerical model, called the PE/SSF model, that was originally developed by the author. Here PE stands for Parabolic Equation, a good approximation to the elliptic Helmholtz equation; and SSF stands for the Split-Step Fourier algorithm, a highly efficient marching algorithm for solving parabolic type equations. These techniques are analyzed, and examples are displayed of ocean acoustic wavefields generated by the PE/SSF model.

  10. Numerical modelling of rapid, flow-like landslides across 3-D terrains: a Tsunami Squares approach to El Picacho landslide, El Salvador, September 19, 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiajia; Ward, Steven N.; Xiao, Lili

    2015-06-01

    Flow-like landslides are rapidly moving fluid-solid mixtures that can cause significant destruction along paths that run far from their original sources. Existing models for run out prediction and motion simulation of flow-like landslides have many limitations. In this paper, we develop a new method named `Tsunami Squares' to simulate the generation, propagation and stoppage of flow-like landslides based on conservation of volume and momentum. Landslide materials in the new method form divisible squares that are displaced, then further fractured. The squares move under the influence of gravity-driven acceleration and suffer decelerations due to basal and dynamic frictions. Distinctively, this method takes into account solid and fluid mechanics, particle interactions and flow regime transitions. We apply this approach to simulate the 1982 El Picacho landslide in San Salvador, capital city of El Salvador. Landslide products from Tsunami Squares such as run out distance, velocities, erosion and deposition depths and impacted area agree well with field investigated and eyewitness data.

  11. Probing modified gravity with atom-interferometry: A numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlögel, Sandrine; Clesse, Sébastien; Füzfa, André

    2016-05-01

    Refined constraints on chameleon theories are calculated for atom-interferometry experiments, using a numerical approach consisting in solving for a four-region model the static and spherically symmetric Klein-Gordon equation for the chameleon field. By modeling not only the test mass and the vacuum chamber but also its walls and the exterior environment, the method allows one to probe new effects on the scalar field profile and the induced acceleration of atoms. In the case of a weakly perturbing test mass, the effect of the wall is to enhance the field profile and to lower the acceleration inside the chamber by up to 1 order of magnitude. In the thin-shell regime, results are found to be in good agreement with the analytical estimations, when measurements are realized in the immediate vicinity of the test mass. Close to the vacuum chamber wall, the acceleration becomes negative and potentially measurable. This prediction could be used to discriminate between fifth-force effects and systematic experimental uncertainties, by doing the experiment at several key positions inside the vacuum chamber. For the chameleon potential V (ϕ )=Λ4 +α/ϕα and a coupling function A (ϕ )=exp (ϕ /M ), one finds M ≳7 ×1016 GeV , independently of the power-law index. For V (ϕ )=Λ4(1 +Λ /ϕ ), one finds M ≳1014 GeV . A sensitivity of a ˜10-11 m /s2 would probe the model up to the Planck scale. Finally, a proposal for a second experimental setup, in a vacuum room, is presented. In this case, Planckian values of M could be probed provided that a ˜10-10 m /s2 , a limit reachable by future experiments. Our method can easily be extended to constrain other models with a screening mechanism, such as symmetron, dilaton and f(R) theories.

  12. Numerical study of the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane using a model based on a kinetic theory approach. Quarterly report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Kinetic theory approaches in the formulation of rapid flows of granular materials have attracted considerable attention in recent years. There are several models which have been suggested to describe the rapid flow of granular materials which are derived a using a statistical approach. Boyle and Massoudi (1989) have written comprehensive survey article of the constitutive equations and the laws governing the flow of granular materials. A major difference between the continuum theories discussed previously and the theories based on a statistical approach is the concept of {open_quotes}granular temperature{close_quotes} which is introduced in the latter approach. Granular temperature describes the fluctuating, velocity of the flow of granular solids and in this sense is similar to the temperature in a gas due to the fluctuating motion of the gas molecules. However, it is not clear how this quantity can be measured. Several models have been proposed by various investigators using ideas of kinetic theory. In a previous report the governing equations for the flow of granular materials down an inclined plane, modeled by the constitutive theory proposed by Boyle and Massoudi (1990), were derived. The authors ended up with two coupled ordinary differential equations. In this work these equations are solved as numerically subjected to the appropriate boundary conditions. The effect of various non-dimensional parameters on the volume fraction and velocity are presented in the form of graphs in this report.

  13. Numerical modeling tools for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J.; Childs, Edward P.

    1992-01-01

    Development of general numerical simulation tools for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was the objective of this study. Physical models of important CVD phenomena were developed and implemented into the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The resulting software can address general geometries as well as the most important phenomena occurring with CVD reactors: fluid flow patterns, temperature and chemical species distribution, gas phase and surface deposition. The physical models are documented which are available and examples are provided of CVD simulation capabilities.

  14. Numerical modeling of nonintrusive inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.; Morgan, J.; Sale, K.

    1992-12-01

    A wide variety of nonintrusive inspection systems have been proposed in the past several years for the detection of hidden contraband in airline luggage and shipping containers. The majority of these proposed techniques depend on the interaction of radiation with matter to produce a signature specific to the contraband of interest, whether drugs or explosives. In the authors` role as diagnostic specialists in the Underground Test Program over the past forty years, L-Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a technique expertise in the combined numerical and experimental modeling of these types of system. Based on their experience, they are convinced that detailed numerical modeling provides a much more accurate estimate of the actual performance of complex experiments than simple analytical modeling. Furthermore, the construction of detailed numerical prototypes allows experimenters to explore the entire region of parameter space available to them before committing their ideas to hardware. This sort of systematic analysis has often led to improved experimental designs and reductions in fielding costs. L-Division has developed an extensive suite of computer codes to model proposed experiments and possible background interactions. These codes allow one to simulate complex radiation sources, model 3-dimensional system geometries with {open_quotes}real world{close_quotes} complexity, specify detailed elemental distributions, and predict the response of almost any type of detector. In this work several examples are presented illustrating the use of these codes in modeling experimental systems at LLNL and their potential usefulness in evaluating nonintrusive inspection systems is discussed.

  15. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    Numerical and laboratory models are often used to investigate the evolution of deformation processes at various scales in crust and lithosphere. In both approaches, the freedom in choice of simulation method, materials and their properties, and deformation laws could affect model outcomes. To assess the role of modelling method and to quantify the variability among models, we have performed a comparison of laboratory and numerical experiments. Here, we present results of 11 numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference and distinct element techniques. We present three experiments that describe shortening of a sand-like, brittle wedge. The material properties of the numerical ‘sand', the model set-up and the boundary conditions are strictly prescribed and follow the analogue setup as closely as possible. Our first experiment translates a non-accreting wedge with a stable surface slope of 20 degrees. In agreement with critical wedge theory, all models maintain the same surface slope and do not deform. This experiment serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions for taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work. The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup, which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. The models accommodate shortening by formation of forward and backward shear zones. We compare surface slope, rate of dissipation of energy, root-mean-square velocity, and the location, dip angle and spacing of shear zones. We show that we successfully simulate sandbox-style brittle behaviour using different numerical modelling techniques and that we obtain the same styles of deformation behaviour in numerical and laboratory experiments at similar levels of variability. The GeoMod2008 Numerical Team: Markus Albertz, Michelle Cooke, Tony Crook, David Egholm, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Yury Mishin

  16. A numerical model of combustion in gasless pyrotechnic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Boddington, T.; Cottrell, A.; Laye, P.G.

    1989-04-01

    A simple numerical model has been developed for the propagation of a combustion wave through a gasless pyrotechnic mixture. A pseudo one-dimensional approach has been adopted in which an allowance for heat loss has been made by the inclusion of a simple Newtonian heat transfer term. Implementation requires a knowledge of the thermal and kinetic properties of the pyrotechnic mixture. The model reproduces the observed trends in burning velocity and predicts conditions leading to combustion failure.

  17. Numerical comparison of strong Langmuir turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Mei-Mei; Nicholson, D. R.

    1987-01-01

    Two models of Langmuir turbulence, the nonlinear Schroedinger equation and the Zakharov equations, are solved numerically for an initial value problem in which the electric field evolves from an almost flat initial condition via the modulational instability and finally saturates into a set of solitons. The two models agree well with each other only when the initial dimensionless electric field has an amplitude less than unity. An analytic soliton gas model consisting of equal-amplitude, randomly spaced, zero-speed solitons is remarkably good at reproducing the time-averaged Fourier spectra in both cases.

  18. Numerical Modelling Of Pumpkin Balloon Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, D.

    Tensys have been involved in the numerical formfinding and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures for 15 years. They have recently broadened this range of activities into the `lighter than air' field with significant involvement in aerostat and heavy-lift hybrid airship design. Since early 2004 they have been investigating pumpkin balloon instability on behalf of the NASA ULDB programme. These studies are undertaken using inTENS, an in-house finite element program suite based upon the Dynamic Relaxation solution method and developed especially for the non-linear analysis and patterning of membrane structures. The paper describes the current state of an investigation that started with a numerical simulation of the lobed cylinder problem first studied by Calladine. The influence of material properties and local geometric deformation on stability is demonstrated. A number of models of complete pumpkin balloons have then been established, including a 64-gore balloon with geometry based upon Julian Nott's Endeavour. This latter clefted dramatically upon initial inflation, a phenomenon that has been reproduced in the numerical model. Ongoing investigations include the introduction of membrane contact modelling into inTENS and correlation studies with the series of large-scale ULDB models currently in preparation.

  19. Numerical modeling of explosions for nuclear monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring the Earth for underground nuclear explosions requires a detailed understanding of the explosion source. In this context, "source" refers to the source of seismic waves, and it is generated by the complex nonlinear near-source motion that accompanies the nuclear explosion. In particular, nuclear monitoring requires understanding the transition from the hydrodynamic to elastic regimes, and propagation of waveforms from the source to stations at distances of hundreds to thousands of kilometers. In the transition region, shear strength is critically important, as are changes in shear strength as the shock wave propagates. Numerical modeling using 1D spherically symmetric, 2D axisymmetric and full 3D calculations provides important insights into the seismic source and the waveforms it generates. Important considerations for numerical modeling include emplacement conditions (tamped or in a cavity), source type (chemical or nuclear), material models for strength and strength reduction, and geologic conditions including topography and tectonic stresses in the source region. In addition to calculating the near source ground motion, we propagate the near source solution to regional and teleseismic distances where the observations of seismic signals from nuclear explosions are made. The objectives of nuclear monitoring are detection of seismic events (earthquakes, quarry blasts and other sources in addition to nuclear explosions), accurate location of these events, discrimination of nuclear explosions from other types of sources, and estimation of nuclear explosion yield. Numerical modeling is particularly important for discrimination and yield estimation. Numerical modeling is used to understand unexpected anomalies that occur, such as the large surface waves generated by the three North Korean nuclear tests, which may have been caused by a difference in tectonic stress state between North Korea and other test sites. Another important issue that can be addressed

  20. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  1. Comparison between 2 methods of solid-liquid extraction for the production of Cinchona calisaya elixir: an experimental kinetics and numerical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Naviglio, Daniele; Formato, Andrea; Gallo, Monica

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the extraction process for the production of China elixir starting from the same vegetable mixture, as performed by conventional maceration or a cyclically pressurized extraction process (rapid solid-liquid dynamic extraction) using the Naviglio Extractor. Dry residue was used as a marker for the kinetics of the extraction process because it was proportional to the amount of active principles extracted and, therefore, to their total concentration in the solution. UV spectra of the hydroalcoholic extracts allowed for the identification of the predominant chemical species in the extracts, while the organoleptic tests carried out on the final product provided an indication of the acceptance of the beverage and highlighted features that were not detectable by instrumental analytical techniques. In addition, a numerical simulation of the process has been performed, obtaining useful information about the timing of the process (time history) as well as its mathematical description. PMID:25154593

  2. A Numerical Optimization Approach for Tuning Fuzzy Logic Controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Garg, Devendra P.

    1998-01-01

    This paper develops a method to tune fuzzy controllers using numerical optimization. The main attribute of this approach is that it allows fuzzy logic controllers to be tuned to achieve global performance requirements. Furthermore, this approach allows design constraints to be implemented during the tuning process. The method tunes the controller by parameterizing the membership functions for error, change-in-error and control output. The resulting parameters form a design vector which is iteratively changed to minimize an objective function. The minimal objective function results in an optimal performance of the system. A spacecraft mounted science instrument line-of-sight pointing control is used to demonstrate results.

  3. Numerical modeling and simulation of flow through porous fabric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zheng; Li, Xiaolin

    We designed a numerical scheme to model the permeability of the fabric surface in an incompressible fluid by coupling the projection method with the Ghost Fluid Method in the front tracking framework. The pressure jump condition is obtained by adding a source term to the Poisson's equation in the projection step without modifications on its coefficients. The numerical results suggest that this approach has the ability to reproduce the relationship between pressure drop and relative velocity observed in the experiments. We use this algorithm to study the effects of porosity on the drag force and stability of parachutes during its inflation and deceleration.

  4. Multiscale numerical modeling of levee breach processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kees, C. E.; Farthing, M. W.; Akkerman, I.; Bazilevs, Y.

    2010-12-01

    One of the dominant failure modes of levees during flood and storm surge events is erosion-based breach formation due to high velocity flow over the back (land-side) slope. Modeling the breaching process numerically is challenging due to both physical and geometric complexity that develops and evolves during the overtopping event. The surface water flows are aerated and sediment-laden mixtures in the supercritical and turbulent regimes. The air/water free surface may undergo perturbations on the same order as the depth or even topological change (breaking). Likewise the soil/fluid interface is characterized by evolving headcuts, which are essentially moving discontinuities in the soil surface elevation. The most widely used models of levee breaching are nevertheless based on depth-integrated models of flow, sediment transport, and bed morphology. In this work our objective is to explore models with less restrictive modeling assumptions, which have become computationally tractable due to advances in both numerical methods and high-performance computing hardware. In particular, we present formulations of fully three-dimensional flow, transport, and morphological evolution for overtopping and breaching processes and apply recently developed finite element and level set methods to solve the governing equations for relevant test problems.

  5. Numerical simulations and modeling of turbulent combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuenot, B.

    Turbulent combustion is the basic physical phenomenon responsible for efficient energy release by any internal combustion engine. However it is accompanied by other undesirable phenomena such as noise, pollutant species emission or damaging instabilities that may even lead to the system desctruction. It is then crucial to control this phenomenon, to understand all its mecanisms and to master it in industrial systems. For long time turbulent combustion has been explored only through theory and experiment. But the rapid increase of computers power during the last years has allowed an important development of numerical simulation, that has become today an essential tool for research and technical design. Direct numerical simulation has then allowed to rapidly progress in the knowledge of turbulent flame structures, leading to new modelisations for steady averaged simulations. Recently large eddy simulation has made a new step forward by refining the description of complex and unsteady flames. The main problem that arises when performing numerical simulation of turbulent combustion is linked to the description of the flame front. Being very thin, it can not however be reduced to a simple interface as it is the location of intense chemical transformation and of strong variations of thermodynamical quantities. Capturing the internal structure of a zone with a thickness of the order of 0.1 mm in a computation with a mesh step 10 times larger being impossible, it is necessary to model the turbulent flame. Models depend on the chemical structure of the flame, on the ambiant turbulence, on the combustion regime (flamelets, distributed combustion, etc.) and on the reactants injection mode (premixed or not). One finds then a large class of models, from the most simple algebraic model with a one-step chemical kinetics, to the most complex model involving probablity density functions, cross-correlations and multiple-step or fully complex chemical kinetics.

  6. A numerical approach for the direct computation of flows including fluid-solid interaction: Modeling contact angle, film rupture, and dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahady, K.; Afkhami, S.; Kondic, L.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient method for including fluid-solid interactions into direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. This method is found to be as powerful as our earlier formulation [K. Mahady et al., "A volume of fluid method for simulating fluid/fluid interfaces in contact with solid boundaries," J. Comput. Phys. 294, 243 (2015)], while outperforming the earlier method in terms of computational efficiency. The performance and efficacy of the presented method are demonstrated by computing contact angles of droplets at equilibrium. Furthermore, we study the instability of films due to destabilizing fluid-solid interactions, and discuss the influence of contact angle and inertial effects on film breakup. In particular, direct simulation results show an increase in the final characteristic length scales when compared to the predictions of a linear stability analysis, suggesting significant influence of nonlinear effects. Our results also show that emerging length scales differ, depending on a number of physical dimensions considered.

  7. Numerical modelling of swirling diffusive flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Santos, Teresa; Perez, Ruben; Szasz, Robert Z.; Gutkowski, Artur N.; Castro, Francisco

    2016-03-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics has been used to study the mixing and combustion of two confined jets whose setup and operating conditions are those of the benchmark of Roback and Johnson. Numerical model solves 3D transient Navier Stokes for turbulent and reactive flows. Averaged velocity profiles using RNG swirl dominated k-epsilon model have been validated with experimental measurements from other sources for the non reactive case. The combustion model is Probability Density Function. Bearing in mind the annular jet has swirl number over 0.5, a vortex breakdown appears in the axis of the burner. Besides, the sudden expansion with a ratio of 2 in diameter between nozzle exits and the test chamber produces the boundary layer separation with the corresponding torus shape recirculation. Contrasting the mixing and combustion models, the last one produces the reduction of the vortex breakdown.

  8. Numerical modeling of flowing soft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Federico; Benzi, Roberto; Bernaschi, Massimo; Perlekar, Prasad; Sbragaglia, Mauro; Succi, Sauro

    2012-11-01

    The structural properties of soft-flowing and non-ergodic materials, such as emulsions, foams and gels shares similarities with the three basic states of matter (solid, liquid and gas). The macroscopic properties are characterized by non-standard features such as non-Newtonian rheology, long-time relaxation, caging effects, enhanced viscosity, structural arrest, hysteresis, dynamic disorder, aging and related phenomena. Large scale non-homogeneities can develop, even under simple shear conditions, by means of the formation of macroscopic bands of widely different viscosities (``shear banding'' phenomena). We employ a numerical model based on the Lattice Boltzmann method to perform numerical simulations of soft-matter under flowing conditions. Results of 3d simulations are presented and compared to previous 2d investigations.

  9. A flexible numerical approach for quantification of epistemic uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Park, Eun-Jae; Xiu, Dongbin

    2013-05-01

    In the field of uncertainty quantification (UQ), epistemic uncertainty often refers to the kind of uncertainty whose complete probabilistic description is not available, largely due to our lack of knowledge about the uncertainty. Quantification of the impacts of epistemic uncertainty is naturally difficult, because most of the existing stochastic tools rely on the specification of the probability distributions and thus do not readily apply to epistemic uncertainty. And there have been few studies and methods to deal with epistemic uncertainty. A recent work can be found in [J. Jakeman, M. Eldred, D. Xiu, Numerical approach for quantification of epistemic uncertainty, J. Comput. Phys. 229 (2010) 4648–4663], where a framework for numerical treatment of epistemic uncertainty was proposed. The method is based on solving an encapsulation problem, without using any probability information, in a hypercube that encapsulates the unknown epistemic probability space. If more probabilistic information about the epistemic variables is known a posteriori, the solution statistics can then be evaluated at post-process steps. In this paper, we present a new method, similar to that of Jakeman et al. but significantly extending its capabilities. Most notably, the new method (1) does not require the encapsulation problem to be in a bounded domain such as a hypercube; (2) does not require the solution of the encapsulation problem to converge point-wise. In the current formulation, the encapsulation problem could reside in an unbounded domain, and more importantly, its numerical approximation could be sought in L{sup p} norm. These features thus make the new approach more flexible and amicable to practical implementation. Both the mathematical framework and numerical analysis are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new approach.

  10. A flexible numerical approach for quantification of epistemic uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoxiao; Park, Eun-Jae; Xiu, Dongbin

    2013-05-01

    In the field of uncertainty quantification (UQ), epistemic uncertainty often refers to the kind of uncertainty whose complete probabilistic description is not available, largely due to our lack of knowledge about the uncertainty. Quantification of the impacts of epistemic uncertainty is naturally difficult, because most of the existing stochastic tools rely on the specification of the probability distributions and thus do not readily apply to epistemic uncertainty. And there have been few studies and methods to deal with epistemic uncertainty. A recent work can be found in [J. Jakeman, M. Eldred, D. Xiu, Numerical approach for quantification of epistemic uncertainty, J. Comput. Phys. 229 (2010) 4648-4663], where a framework for numerical treatment of epistemic uncertainty was proposed. The method is based on solving an encapsulation problem, without using any probability information, in a hypercube that encapsulates the unknown epistemic probability space. If more probabilistic information about the epistemic variables is known a posteriori, the solution statistics can then be evaluated at post-process steps. In this paper, we present a new method, similar to that of Jakeman et al. but significantly extending its capabilities. Most notably, the new method (1) does not require the encapsulation problem to be in a bounded domain such as a hypercube; (2) does not require the solution of the encapsulation problem to converge point-wise. In the current formulation, the encapsulation problem could reside in an unbounded domain, and more importantly, its numerical approximation could be sought in Lp norm. These features thus make the new approach more flexible and amicable to practical implementation. Both the mathematical framework and numerical analysis are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new approach.

  11. Dynamical Approach Study of Spurious Numerics in Nonlinear Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Mansour, Nagi (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The last two decades have been an era when computation is ahead of analysis and when very large scale practical computations are increasingly used in poorly understood multiscale complex nonlinear physical problems and non-traditional fields. Ensuring a higher level of confidence in the predictability and reliability (PAR) of these numerical simulations could play a major role in furthering the design, understanding, affordability and safety of our next generation air and space transportation systems, and systems for planetary and atmospheric sciences, and in understanding the evolution and origin of life. The need to guarantee PAR becomes acute when computations offer the ONLY way of solving these types of data limited problems. Employing theory from nonlinear dynamical systems, some building blocks to ensure a higher level of confidence in PAR of numerical simulations have been revealed by the author and world expert collaborators in relevant fields. Five building blocks with supporting numerical examples were discussed. The next step is to utilize knowledge gained by including nonlinear dynamics, bifurcation and chaos theories as an integral part of the numerical process. The third step is to design integrated criteria for reliable and accurate algorithms that cater to the different multiscale nonlinear physics. This includes but is not limited to the construction of appropriate adaptive spatial and temporal discretizations that are suitable for the underlying governing equations. In addition, a multiresolution wavelets approach for adaptive numerical dissipation/filter controls for high speed turbulence, acoustics and combustion simulations will be sought. These steps are corner stones for guarding against spurious numerical solutions that are solutions of the discretized counterparts but are not solutions of the underlying governing equations.

  12. Feedbacks Between Numerical and Analytical Models in Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, V. A.; Cardenas, M. B.; Toundykov, D.; Cohn, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogeology is a relatively young discipline which combines elements of Earth science and engineering. Mature fundamental disciplines (e.g., physics, chemistry, fluid mechanics) have centuries-long history of mathematical modeling even prior to discovery of Darcy's law. Thus, in hydrogeology, relatively few classic analytical models (such those by Theis, Polubarinova-Kochina, Philip, Toth, Henry, Dagan, Neuman) were developed by the early 1970's. The advent of computers and practical demands refocused mathematical models towards numerical techniques. With more diverse but less mathematically-oriented training, most hydrogeologists shifted from analytical methods to use of standardized computational software. Spatial variability in internal properties and external boundary conditions and geometry, and the added complexity of chemical and biological processes will remain major challenges for analytical modeling. Possibly, analytical techniques will play a subordinate role to numerical approaches in many applications. On the other hand, the rise of analytical element modeling of groundwater flow is a strong alternative to numerical models when data demand and computational efficiency is considered. The hallmark of analytical models - transparency and accuracy - will remain indispensable for scientific exploration of complex phenomena and for benchmarking numerical models. Therefore, there will always be feedbacks and complementarities between numerical and analytical techniques, as well as a certain ideological schism among various views to modeling. We illustrate the idea of feedbacks by reviewing evolution of Joszef Toth's analytical model of gravity driven flow systems. Toth's (1963) approach was to reduce the flow domain to a rectangle which allowed for closed-form solution of the governing equations. Succeeding numerical finite-element models by Freeze and Witherspoon (1966-1968) explored the effects of geometry and heterogeneity on regional groundwater flow

  13. A numerical approach for groundwater flow in unsaturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, F.; Guarracino, L.; Saliba, R.

    2006-07-01

    In this article, a computational tool to simulate groundwater flow in variably saturated non-deformable fractured porous media is presented, which includes a conceptual model to obtain analytical expressions of water retention and hydraulic conductivity curves for fractured hard rocks and a numerical algorithm to solve the Richards equation. To calculate effective saturation and relative hydraulic conductivity curves we adopt the Brooks-Corey model assuming fractal laws for both aperture and number of fractures. A standard Galerkin formulation was employed to solve the Richards' equation together with a Crank-Nicholson scheme with Richardson extrapolation for the time discretization.The main contribution of this paper is to group an analytical model of the authors with a robust numerical algorithm designed to solve adequately the highly non-linear Richards' equation generating a tool for porous media engineering.

  14. Numerical integration of population models satisfying conservation laws: NSFD methods.

    PubMed

    Mickens, Ronald E

    2007-10-01

    Population models arising in ecology, epidemiology and mathematical biology may involve a conservation law, i.e. the total population is constant. In addition to these cases, other situations may occur for which the total population, asymptotically in time, approach a constant value. Since it is rarely the situation that the equations of motion can be analytically solved to obtain exact solutions, it follows that numerical techniques are needed to provide solutions. However, numerical procedures are only valid if they can reproduce fundamental properties of the differential equations modeling the phenomena of interest. We show that for population models, involving a dynamical conservation law the use of nonstandard finite difference (NSFD) methods allows the construction of discretization schemes such that they are dynamically consistent (DC) with the original differential equations. The paper will briefly discuss the NSFD methodology, the concept of DC, and illustrate their application to specific problems for population models. PMID:22876826

  15. Numerical modeling of two-dimensional confined flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model of two-dimensional confined flows is presented. The flow in the duct is partitioned into finite streams. The difference equations are then obtained by applying conservation principles directly to the individual streams. A listing of a computer code based on this approach in FORTRAN 4 language is presented. The code computes two dimensional compressible turbulent flows in ducts when the duct area along the flow is specified and the pressure gradient is unknown.

  16. Modern perspectives on numerical modeling of cardiac pacemaker cell.

    PubMed

    Maltsev, Victor A; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V; Stern, Michael D; Lakatta, Edward G

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent "coupled-clock" theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  17. Modern Perspectives on Numerical Modeling of Cardiac Pacemaker Cell

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V.; Stern, Michael D.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent “coupled-clock” theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies, such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  18. HABITAT MODELING APPROACHES FOR RESTORATION SITE SELECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous modeling approaches have been used to develop predictive models of species-environment and species-habitat relationships. These models have been used in conservation biology and habitat or species management, but their application to restoration efforts has been minimal...

  19. Posttraumatic Orbital Emphysema: A Numerical Model

    PubMed Central

    Skorek, Andrzej; Kłosowski, Paweł; Plichta, Łukasz; Zmuda Trzebiatowski, Marcin; Lemski, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is a common symptom accompanying orbital fracture. The pathomechanism is still not recognized and the usually assumed cause, elevated pressure in the upper airways connected with sneezing or coughing, does not always contribute to the occurrence of this type of fracture. Observations based on the finite model (simulating blowout type fracture) of the deformations of the inferior orbital wall after a strike in its lower rim. Authors created a computer numeric model of the orbit with specified features—thickness and resilience modulus. During simulation an evenly spread 14400 N force was applied to the nodular points in the inferior rim (the maximal value not causing cracking of the outer rim, but only ruptures in the inferior wall). The observation was made from 1 · 10−3 to 1 · 10−2 second after a strike. Right after a strike dislocations of the inferior orbital wall toward the maxillary sinus were observed. Afterwards a retrograde wave of the dislocation of the inferior wall toward the orbit was noticed. Overall dislocation amplitude reached about 6 mm. Based on a numeric model of the orbit submitted to a strike in the inferior wall an existence of a retrograde shock wave causing orbital emphysema has been found. PMID:25309749

  20. Posttraumatic orbital emphysema: a numerical model.

    PubMed

    Skorek, Andrzej; Kłosowski, Paweł; Plichta, Lukasz; Raczyńska, Dorota; Zmuda Trzebiatowski, Marcin; Lemski, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is a common symptom accompanying orbital fracture. The pathomechanism is still not recognized and the usually assumed cause, elevated pressure in the upper airways connected with sneezing or coughing, does not always contribute to the occurrence of this type of fracture. Observations based on the finite model (simulating blowout type fracture) of the deformations of the inferior orbital wall after a strike in its lower rim. Authors created a computer numeric model of the orbit with specified features-thickness and resilience modulus. During simulation an evenly spread 14400 N force was applied to the nodular points in the inferior rim (the maximal value not causing cracking of the outer rim, but only ruptures in the inferior wall). The observation was made from 1 · 10(-3) to 1 · 10(-2) second after a strike. Right after a strike dislocations of the inferior orbital wall toward the maxillary sinus were observed. Afterwards a retrograde wave of the dislocation of the inferior wall toward the orbit was noticed. Overall dislocation amplitude reached about 6 mm. Based on a numeric model of the orbit submitted to a strike in the inferior wall an existence of a retrograde shock wave causing orbital emphysema has been found. PMID:25309749

  1. Numerical bifurcation analysis of the bipedal spring-mass model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merker, Andreas; Kaiser, Dieter; Hermann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The spring-mass model and its numerous extensions are currently one of the best candidates for templates of human and animal locomotion. However, with increasing complexity, their applications can become very time-consuming. In this paper, we present an approach that is based on the calculation of bifurcations in the bipedal spring-mass model for walking. Since the bifurcations limit the region of stable walking, locomotion can be studied by computing the corresponding boundaries. Originally, the model was implemented as a hybrid dynamical system. Our new approach consists of the transformation of the series of initial value problems on different intervals into a single boundary value problem. Using this technique, discontinuities can be avoided and sophisticated numerical methods for studying parametrized nonlinear boundary value problems can be applied. Thus, appropriate extended systems are used to compute transcritical and period-doubling bifurcation points as well as turning points. We show that the resulting boundary value problems can be solved by the simple shooting method with sufficient accuracy, making the application of the more extensive multiple shooting superfluous. The proposed approach is fast, robust to numerical perturbations and allows determining complete manifolds of periodic solutions of the original problem.

  2. Numerical modeling of vertical cavity semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.W.; Hadley, G.R.

    1996-08-01

    A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) is a diode laser whose optical cavity is formed by growing or depositing DBR mirror stacks that sandwich an active gain region. The resulting short cavity supports lasing into a single longitudinal mode normal to the wafer, making these devices ideal for a multitude of applications, ranging from high-speed communication to high-power sources (from 2D arrays). This report describes the development of a numerical VCSEL model, whose goal is to both further their understanding of these complex devices and provide a tool for accurate design and data analysis.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Unsteady Thermofluid Dynamics in Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok

    2003-01-01

    A finite volume based network analysis procedure has been applied to model unsteady flow without and with heat transfer. Liquid has been modeled as compressible fluid where the compressibility factor is computed from the equation of state for a real fluid. The modeling approach recognizes that the pressure oscillation is linked with the variation of the compressibility factor; therefore, the speed of sound does not explicitly appear in the governing equations. The numerical results of chilldown process also suggest that the flow and heat transfer are strongly coupled. This is evident by observing that the mass flow rate during 90-second chilldown process increases by factor of ten.

  4. Numerical weather prediction model tuning via ensemble prediction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvinen, H.; Laine, M.; Ollinaho, P.; Solonen, A.; Haario, H.

    2011-12-01

    This paper discusses a novel approach to tune predictive skill of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. NWP models contain tunable parameters which appear in parameterizations schemes of sub-grid scale physical processes. Currently, numerical values of these parameters are specified manually. In a recent dual manuscript (QJRMS, revised) we developed a new concept and method for on-line estimation of the NWP model parameters. The EPPES ("Ensemble prediction and parameter estimation system") method requires only minimal changes to the existing operational ensemble prediction infra-structure and it seems very cost-effective because practically no new computations are introduced. The approach provides an algorithmic decision making tool for model parameter optimization in operational NWP. In EPPES, statistical inference about the NWP model tunable parameters is made by (i) generating each member of the ensemble of predictions using different model parameter values, drawn from a proposal distribution, and (ii) feeding-back the relative merits of the parameter values to the proposal distribution, based on evaluation of a suitable likelihood function against verifying observations. In the presentation, the method is first illustrated in low-order numerical tests using a stochastic version of the Lorenz-95 model which effectively emulates the principal features of ensemble prediction systems. The EPPES method correctly detects the unknown and wrongly specified parameters values, and leads to an improved forecast skill. Second, results with an atmospheric general circulation model based ensemble prediction system show that the NWP model tuning capacity of EPPES scales up to realistic models and ensemble prediction systems. Finally, a global top-end NWP model tuning exercise with preliminary results is published.

  5. A Mechanistic Stochastic Ricker Model: Analytical and Numerical Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadrich, Tamar; Katriel, Guy

    The Ricker model is one of the simplest and most widely-used ecological models displaying complex nonlinear dynamics. We study a discrete-time population model, which is derived from simple assumptions concerning individual organisms’ behavior, using the “site-based” approach, developed by Brännström, Broomhead, Johansson and Sumpter. In the large-population limit the model converges to the Ricker model, and can thus be considered a mechanistic version of the Ricker model, derived from basic ecological principles, and taking into account the demographic stochasticity inherent to finite populations. We employ several analytical and precise numerical methods to study the model, showing how each approach contributes to understanding the model’s dynamics. Expressing the model as a Markov chain, we employ the concept of quasi-stationary distributions, which are computed numerically, and used to examine the interaction between complex deterministic dynamics and demographic stochasticity, as well as to calculate mean times to extinction. A Gaussian Markov chain approximation is used to obtain quantitative asymptotic approximations for the size of fluctuations of the stochastic model’s time series around the deterministic trajectory, and for the correlations between successive fluctuations. Results of these approximations are compared to results obtained from quasi-stationary distributions and from direct simulations, and are shown to be in good agreement.

  6. Numerical modeling of magnetic induction tomography using the impedance method.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Airton; Wolff, Julia G B

    2011-02-01

    This article discusses the impedance method in the forward calculation in magnetic induction tomography (MIT). Magnetic field and eddy current distributions were obtained numerically for a sphere in the field of a coil and were compared with an analytical model. Additionally, numerical and experimental results for phase sensitivity in MIT were obtained and compared for a cylindrical object in a planar array of sensors. The results showed that the impedance method provides results that agree very well with reality in the frequency range from 100 kHz to 20 MHz and for low conductivity objects (10 S/m or less). This opens the possibility of using this numerical approach in image reconstruction in MIT. PMID:21229327

  7. Numerical and Experimental Approach for the Optimal Design of a Dual Plate Under Ballistic Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jeonghoon; Chung, Dong-Teak; Park, Myung Soo

    To predict the behavior of a dual plate composed of 5052-aluminum and 1002-cold rolled steel under ballistic impact, numerical and experimental approaches are attempted. For the accurate numerical simulation of the impact phenomena, the appropriate selection of the key parameter values based on numerical or experimental tests are critical. This study is focused on not only the optimization technique using the numerical simulation but also numerical and experimental procedures to obtain the required parameter values in the simulation. The Johnson-Cook model is used to simulate the mechanical behaviors, and the simplified experimental and the numerical approaches are performed to obtain the material properties of the model. The element erosion scheme for the robust simulation of the ballistic impact problem is applied by adjusting the element erosion criteria of each material based on numerical and experimental results. The adequate mesh size and the aspect ratio are chosen based on parametric studies. Plastic energy is suggested as a response representing the strength of the plate for the optimization under dynamic loading. Optimized thickness of the dual plate is obtained to resist the ballistic impact without penetration as well as to minimize the total weight.

  8. Convecting reference frames and invariant numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihlo, Alexander; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2014-09-01

    In the recent paper by Bernardini et al. [1] the discrepancy in the performance of finite difference and spectral models for simulations of flows with a preferential direction of propagation was studied. In a simplified investigation carried out using the viscous Burgers equation the authors attributed the poorer numerical results of finite difference models to a violation of Galilean invariance in the discretization and propose to carry out the computations in a reference frame moving with the bulk velocity of the flow. Here we further discuss this problem and relate it to known results on invariant discretization schemes. Non-invariant and invariant finite difference discretizations of Burgers equation are proposed and compared with the discretization using the remedy proposed by Bernardini et al.

  9. Physical and numerical modeling of Joule-heated melters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyler, L. L.; Skarda, R. J.; Crowder, R. S., III; Trent, D. S.; Reid, C. R.; Lessor, D. L.

    1985-10-01

    The Joule-heated ceramic-lined melter is an integral part of the high level waste immobilization process under development by the US Department of Energy. Scaleup and design of this waste glass melting furnace requires an understanding of the relationships between melting cavity design parameters and the furnace performance characteristics such as mixing, heat transfer, and electrical requirements. Developing empirical models of these relationships through actual melter testing with numerous designs would be a very costly and time consuming task. Additionally, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been developing numerical models that simulate a Joule-heated melter for analyzing melter performance. This report documents the method used and results of this modeling effort. Numerical modeling results are compared with the more conventional, physical modeling results to validate the approach. Also included are the results of numerically simulating an operating research melter at PNL. Physical Joule-heated melters modeling results used for qualiying the simulation capabilities of the melter code included: (1) a melter with a single pair of electrodes and (2) a melter with a dual pair (two pairs) of electrodes. The physical model of the melter having two electrode pairs utilized a configuration with primary and secondary electrodes. The principal melter parameters (the ratio of power applied to each electrode pair, modeling fluid depth, electrode spacing) were varied in nine tests of the physical model during FY85. Code predictions were made for five of these tests. Voltage drops, temperature field data, and electric field data varied in their agreement with the physical modeling results, but in general were judged acceptable.

  10. Physical and numerical modeling of Joule-heated melters

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Skarda, R.J.; Crowder, R.S. III; Trent, D.S.; Reid, C.R.; Lessor, D.L.

    1985-10-01

    The Joule-heated ceramic-lined melter is an integral part of the high level waste immobilization process under development by the US Department of Energy. Scaleup and design of this waste glass melting furnace requires an understanding of the relationships between melting cavity design parameters and the furnace performance characteristics such as mixing, heat transfer, and electrical requirements. Developing empirical models of these relationships through actual melter testing with numerous designs would be a very costly and time consuming task. Additionally, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been developing numerical models that simulate a Joule-heated melter for analyzing melter performance. This report documents the method used and results of this modeling effort. Numerical modeling results are compared with the more conventional, physical modeling results to validate the approach. Also included are the results of numerically simulating an operating research melter at PNL. Physical Joule-heated melters modeling results used for qualiying the simulation capabilities of the melter code included: (1) a melter with a single pair of electrodes and (2) a melter with a dual pair (two pairs) of electrodes. The physical model of the melter having two electrode pairs utilized a configuration with primary and secondary electrodes. The principal melter parameters (the ratio of power applied to each electrode pair, modeling fluid depth, electrode spacing) were varied in nine tests of the physical model during FY85. Code predictions were made for five of these tests. Voltage drops, temperature field data, and electric field data varied in their agreement with the physical modeling results, but in general were judged acceptable. 14 refs., 79 figs., 17 tabs.

  11. Numerical modelling of morphodynamics—Vilaine Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vested, Hans Jacob; Tessier, Caroline; Christensen, Bo Brahtz; Goubert, Evelyne

    2013-04-01

    The main objective of this paper is to develop a method to simulate long-term morphodynamics of estuaries dominated by fine sediments, which are subject to both tidal flow and meteorologically induced variations in freshwater run-off and wave conditions. The method is tested on the Vilaine Estuary located in South Brittany, France. The estuary is subject to a meso-macrotidal regime. The semi-diurnal tidal range varies from around 2.5 to 5 m at neap and spring, respectively. The freshwater input is controlled by a dam located approximately 8 km from the mouth of the estuary. Sediments are characterised as mostly fines, but more sandy areas are also found. The morphology of the estuary is highly influenced by the dam. It is very dynamic and changes in a complicated manner with the run-off from the dam, the tide and the wave forcing at the mouth of the estuary. Extensive hydrodynamic and sediment field data have been collected in the past and provide a solid scientific basis for studying the estuary. Based on a conceptual understanding of the morphodynamics, a numerical morphological model with coupled hydrodynamic, surface wave and sediment transport models is formulated. The numerical models are calibrated to reproduce sediment concentrations, tidal flat altimetry and overall sediment fluxes. Scaling factors are applied to a reference year to form quasi-realistic hydrodynamic forcing and river run-off, which allow for the simulations to be extended to other years. The simulation results are compared with observed bathymetric changes in the estuary during the period 1998-2005. The models and scaling factors are applied to predict the morphological development over a time scale of up to 10 years. The influence of the initial conditions and the sequence of external hydrodynamic forcing, with respect to the morphodynamic response of the estuary, are discussed.

  12. A numerically analytical approach to studying oscillation processes for earth's poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, Yu. G.; Perepelkin, V. V.; Krylov, S. S.

    2015-08-01

    The fine dynamic effects that make it possible to improve the accuracy of predicting the trajectory of pole motion are revealed by using a numerically analytical approach in modeling the pole oscillatory motion, the key component of which is the Chandler component.

  13. Adaptive Numerical Algorithms in Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, Gabor; vanderHolst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; DeZeeuw, Darren; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Nakib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2010-01-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising of several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit numerical

  14. Adaptive numerical algorithms in space weather modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; van der Holst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; De Zeeuw, Darren L.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Najib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2012-02-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different relevant physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit

  15. DANA: distributed numerical and adaptive modelling framework.

    PubMed

    Rougier, Nicolas P; Fix, Jérémy

    2012-01-01

    DANA is a python framework ( http://dana.loria.fr ) whose computational paradigm is grounded on the notion of a unit that is essentially a set of time dependent values varying under the influence of other units via adaptive weighted connections. The evolution of a unit's value are defined by a set of differential equations expressed in standard mathematical notation which greatly ease their definition. The units are organized into groups that form a model. Each unit can be connected to any other unit (including itself) using a weighted connection. The DANA framework offers a set of core objects needed to design and run such models. The modeler only has to define the equations of a unit as well as the equations governing the training of the connections. The simulation is completely transparent to the modeler and is handled by DANA. This allows DANA to be used for a wide range of numerical and distributed models as long as they fit the proposed framework (e.g. cellular automata, reaction-diffusion system, decentralized neural networks, recurrent neural networks, kernel-based image processing, etc.). PMID:22994650

  16. Numerical modeling of pulsatile turbulent flow in stenotic vessels.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Sonu S; Frankel, Steven H

    2003-08-01

    Pulsatile turbulent flow in stenotic vessels has been numerically modeled using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation approach. The commercially available computational fluid dynamics code (CFD), FLUENT, has been used for these studies. Two different experiments were modeled involving pulsatile flow through axisymmetric stenoses. Four different turbulence models were employed to study their influence on the results. It was found that the low Reynolds number k-omega turbulence model was in much better agreement with previous experimental measurements than both the low and high Reynolds number versions of the RNG (renormalization-group theory) k-epsilon turbulence model and the standard k-epsilon model, with regard to predicting the mean flow distal to the stenosis including aspects of the vortex shedding process and the turbulent flow field. All models predicted a wall shear stress peak at the throat of the stenosis with minimum values observed distal to the stenosis where flow separation occurred. PMID:12968569

  17. Numerical modeling of spray combustion with an advanced VOF method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yen-Sen; Shang, Huan-Min; Shih, Ming-Hsin; Liaw, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the technical development and validation of a multiphase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical method using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) model and a Lagrangian tracking model which can be employed to analyze general multiphase flow problems with free surface mechanism. The gas-liquid interface mass, momentum and energy conservation relationships are modeled by continuum surface mechanisms. A new solution method is developed such that the present VOF model can be applied for all-speed flow regimes. The objectives of the present study are to develop and verify the fractional volume-of-fluid cell partitioning approach into a predictor-corrector algorithm and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the present approach by simulating benchmark problems including laminar impinging jets, shear coaxial jet atomization and shear coaxial spray combustion flows.

  18. Submarine sand volcanos: experiments and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, P.; Ngoma, J.; Delenne, J.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid overpressure at the bottom of a soil layer may generate fracturation in preferential paths for a cohesive material. But the case of sandy soils is rather different: a significant internal flow is allowed within the material and can potentially induce hydro-mechanical instabilities whose most common example is fluidization. Many works have been devoted to fluidization but very few have the issue of initiation and development of a fluidized zone inside a granular bed, prior entire fluidization of the medium. In this contribution, we report experimental results and numerical simulations on a model system of immersed sand volcanos generated by a localized upward spring of liquid, injected at constant flow-rate at the bottom of a granular layer. Such a localized state of fluidization is relevant for some industrial processes (spouted bed, maintenance of navigable waterways,…) and for several geological issues (kimberlite volcano conduits, fluid venting, oil recovery in sandy soil, More precisely, what is presented here is a comparison between experiments, carried out by direct visualization throughout the medium, and numerical simulations, based on DEM modelling of the grains coupled to resolution of NS equations in the liquid phase (LBM). There is a very good agreement between the experimental phenomenology and the simulation results. When the flow-rate is increased, three regimes are successively observed: static bed, fluidized cavity that does not extend to the top of the layer, and finally fluidization over the entire height of layer that creates a fluidized chimney. A very strong hysteretic effect is present here with an extended range of stability for fluidized cavities when flow-rate is decreased back. This can be interpreted in terms force chains and arches. The influences of grain diameter, layer height and injection width are studied and interpreted using a model previously developed by Zoueshtiagh [1]. Finally, growing rate of the fluidized zone and

  19. Advanced Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Atmospheric Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnlein, Christian; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Gerz, Thomas

    The present chapter introduces the method of computational simulation to predict and study turbulent atmospheric flows. This includes a description of the fundamental approach to computational simulation and the practical implementation using the technique of large-eddy simulation. In addition, selected contributions from IPA scientists to computational model development and various examples for applications are given. These examples include homogeneous turbulence, convective boundary layers, heated forest canopy, buoyant thermals, and large-scale flows with baroclinic wave instability.

  20. Integrating Numerical Groundwater Modeling Results With Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkowski, M. S.; Robinson, B. A.; Linger, S. P.

    2001-12-01

    Many different types of data are used to create numerical models of flow and transport of groundwater in the vadose zone. Results from water balance studies, infiltration models, hydrologic properties, and digital elevation models (DEMs) are examples of such data. Because input data comes in a variety of formats, for consistency the data need to be assembled in a coherent fashion on a single platform. Through the use of a geographic information system (GIS), all data sources can effectively be integrated on one platform to store, retrieve, query, and display data. In our vadoze zone modeling studies in support of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environmental Restoration Project, we employ a GIS comprised of a Raid storage device, an Oracle database, ESRI's spatial database engine (SDE), ArcView GIS, and custom GIS tools for three-dimensional (3D) analysis. We store traditional GIS data, such as, contours, historical building footprints, and study area locations, as points, lines, and polygons with attributes. Numerical flow and transport model results from the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code (FEHM) are stored as points with attributes, such as fluid saturation, or pressure, or contaminant concentration at a given location. We overlay traditional types of GIS data with numerical model results, thereby allowing us to better build conceptual models and perform spatial analyses. We have also developed specialized analysis tools to assist in the data and model analysis process. This approach provides an integrated framework for performing tasks such as comparing the model to data and understanding the relationship of model predictions to existing contaminant source locations and water supply wells. Our process of integrating GIS and numerical modeling results allows us to answer a wide variety of questions about our conceptual model design: - Which set of locations should be identified as contaminant sources based on known historical building operations

  1. Numerical Modeling of Ocular Dysfunction in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Vera, J.; Myers, J. G.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A. J.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Upon introduction to microgravity, the near-loss of hydrostatic pressure causes a marked cephalic (headward) shift of fluid in an astronaut's body. The fluid shift, along with other factors of spaceflight, induces a cascade of interdependent physiological responses which occur at varying time scales. Long-duration missions carry an increased risk for the development of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath, kinking of the optic nerve and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. In the cases of VIIP found to date, the initial onset of symptoms occurred after several weeks to several months of spaceflight, by which time the gross bodily fluid distribution is well established. We are developing a suite of numerical models to simulate the effects of fluid shift on the cardiovascular, central nervous and ocular systems. These models calculate the modified mean volumes, flow rates and pressures that are characteristic of the altered quasi-homeostatic state in microgravity, including intracranial and intraocular pressures. The results of the lumped models provide initial and boundary data to a 3D finite element biomechanics simulation of the globe, optic nerve head and retrobulbar subarachnoid space. The integrated set of models will be used to investigate the evolution of the biomechanical stress state in the ocular tissues due to long-term exposure to microgravity.

  2. A methodology for validating numerical ground water models.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ahmed E

    2004-01-01

    Ground water validation is one of the most challenging issues facing modelers and hydrogeologists. Increased complexity in ground water models has created a gap between model predictions and the ability to validate or build confidence in predictions. Specific procedures and tests that can be easily adapted and applied to determine the validity of site-specific ground water models do not exist. This is true for both deterministic and stochastic models, with stochastic models posing the more difficult validation problem. The objective of this paper is to propose a general validation approach that addresses important issues recognized in previous validation studies, conferences, and symposia. The proposed method links the processes for building, calibrating, evaluating, and validating models in an iterative loop. The approach focuses on using collected validation data to reduce uncertainty in the model and narrow the range of possible outcomes. This method is designed for stochastic numerical models utilizing Monte Carlo simulation approaches, but it can be easily adapted for deterministic models. The proposed methodology relies on the premise that absolute validity is not theoretically possible, nor is it a regulatory requirement. Rather, the proposed methodology highlights the importance of testing various aspects of the model and using diverse statistical tools for rigorous checking and confidence building in the model and its predictions. It is this confidence that will encourage regulators and the public to accept decisions based on the model predictions. This validation approach will be applied to a model, described in this paper, dealing with an underground nuclear test site in rural Nevada. PMID:15161152

  3. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  4. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller–Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin–Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time. PMID:26130967

  5. Transient Numerical Modeling of Catalytic Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a transient model of catalytic combustion suitable for isolated channels and monolith reactors. The model is a lumped two-phase (gas and solid) model where the gas phase is quasi-steady relative to the transient solid. Axial diffusion is neglected in the gas phase; lateral diffusion, however, is accounted for using transfer coefficients. The solid phase includes axial heat conduction and external heat loss due to convection and radiation. The combustion process utilizes detailed gas and surface reaction models. The gas-phase model becomes a system of stiff ordinary differential equations while the solid phase reduces, after discretization, into a system of stiff ordinary differential-algebraic equations. The time evolution of the system came from alternating integrations of the quasi-steady gas and transient solid. This work outlines the numerical model and presents some sensitivity studies on important parameters including internal transfer coefficients, catalytic surface site density, and external heat-loss (if applicable). The model is compared to two experiments using CO fuel: (1) steady-state conversion through an isothermal platinum (Pt) tube and (2) transient propagation of a catalytic reaction inside a small Pt tube. The model requires internal mass-transfer resistance to match the experiments at lower residence times. Under mass-transport limited conditions, the model reasonably predicted exit conversion using global mass-transfer coefficients. Near light-off, the model results did not match the experiment precisely even after adjustment of mass-transfer coefficients. Agreement improved for the first case after adjusting the surface kinetics such that the net rate of CO adsorption increased compared to O2. The CO / O2 surface mechanism came from a sub-set of reactions in a popular CH4 / O2 mechanism. For the second case, predictions improved for lean conditions with increased external heat loss or adjustment of the kinetics as in the

  6. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  7. A Numerical Model of Viscoelastic Flow in Microchannels

    SciTech Connect

    Trebotich, D; Colella, P; Miller, G; Liepmann, D

    2002-11-14

    The authors present a numerical method to model non-Newtonian, viscoelastic flow at the microscale. The equations of motion are the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the Oldroyd-B constitutive equation. This constitutive equation is chosen to model a Boger fluid which is representative of complex biological solutions exhibiting elastic behavior due to macromolecules in the solution (e.g., DNA solution). The numerical approach is a projection method to impose the incompressibility constraint and a Lax-Wendroff method to predict velocities and stresses while recovering both viscous and elastic limits. The method is second-order accurate in space and time, free-stream preserving, has a time step constraint determined by the advective CFL condition, and requires the solution of only well-behaved linear systems amenable to the use of fast iterative methods. They demonstrate the method for viscoelastic incompressible flow in simple microchannels (2D) and microducts (3D).

  8. Benchmarking numerical freeze/thaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Anbergen, Hauke; Molson, John; Grenier, Christophe; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    The modeling of freezing and thawing of water in porous media is of increasing interest, and for which very different application areas exist. For instance, the modeling of permafrost regression with respect to climate change issues is one area, while others include geotechnical applications in tunneling and for borehole heat exchangers which operate at temperatures below the freezing point. The modeling of these processes requires the solution of a coupled non-linear system of partial differential equations for flow and heat transport in space and time. Different code implementations have been developed in the past. Analytical solutions exist only for simple cases. Consequently, an interest has arisen in benchmarking different codes with analytical solutions, experiments and purely numerical results, similar to the long-standing DECOVALEX and the more recent "Geothermal Code Comparison" activities. The name for this freezing/ thawing benchmark consortium is INTERFROST. In addition to the well-known so-called Lunardini solution for a 1D case (case T1), two different 2D problems will be presented, one which represents melting of a frozen inclusion (case TH2) and another which represents the growth or thaw of permafrost around a talik (case TH3). These talik regions are important for controlling groundwater movement within a mainly frozen ground. First results of the different benchmark results will be shown and discussed.

  9. Numerical Modeling of Suspension HVOF Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, M.; Moghtadernejad, S.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional two-way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme is used to simulate suspension high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying process. The mass, momentum, energy, and species equations are solved together with the realizable k-ɛ turbulence model to simulate the gas phase. Suspension is assumed to be a mixture of solid particles [mullite powder (3Al2O3·2SiO2)], ethanol, and ethylene glycol. The process involves premixed combustion of oxygen-propylene, and non-premixed combustion of oxygen-ethanol and oxygen-ethylene glycol. One-step global reaction is used for each mentioned reaction together with eddy dissipation model to compute the reaction rate. To simulate the droplet breakup, Taylor Analogy Breakup model is applied. After the completion of droplet breakup, and solvent evaporation/combustion, the solid suspended particles are tracked through the domain to determine the characteristics of the coating particles. Numerical simulations are validated against the experimental results in the literature for the same operating conditions. Seven or possibly eight shock diamonds are captured outside the nozzle. In addition, a good agreement between the predicted particle temperature, velocity, and diameter, and the experiment is obtained. It is shown that as the standoff distance increases, the particle temperature and velocity reduce. Furthermore, a correlation is proposed to determine the spray cross-sectional diameter and estimate the particle trajectories as a function of standoff distance.

  10. Foehn wind detection using numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimescu, A.; Caian, M.

    2010-09-01

    In Romania, foehn is a short-lived atmospheric phenomenon, of a low to average intensity, not always highlighted by weather station observations. When such situations occur additional data are resorted to, rendering a continuous, aggregate image, in comparison to the punctual information yielded by weather stations. This paper aims to describe how foehn is detected in northern Oltenia (the Inner Carpathian-Balkan Curvature), using numerical modelling. Results generated by the RegCM3 Regional Climatic Model thus represent an undisputed tool, their most important advantage being the 10-km spatial resolution. The presence of foehn in northern Oltenia and its climatic peculiarities have been disclosed through the analysis in time and space of the meteorological elements specific to the phenomenon (air temperature, wind speed and direction etc) over a 40-year interval (1961-2000). The paper presents a new methodology that can be used to estimate the probability of production and the foehn characteristics (intensity, duration etc.). Interpretation of the RegCM3 model results has led to the statistical analysis of foehn occurrences within the studied area during the cold season (December, January and February). The resulted climatology, with fine resolution, can be used in foehn forecast of predictability.

  11. Free versus anchored numerical estimation: A unified approach.

    PubMed

    Opfer, John E; Thompson, Clarissa A; Kim, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Children's number-line estimation has produced a lively debate about representational change, supported by apparently incompatible data regarding descriptive adequacy of logarithmic (Opfer, Siegler, & Young, 2011) and cyclic power models (Slusser, Santiago, & Barth, 2013). To test whether methodological differences might explain discrepant findings, we created a fully crossed 2×2 design and assigned 96 children to one of four cells. In the design, we crossed anchoring (free, anchored) and sampling (over-, even-), which were candidate factors to explain discrepant findings. In three conditions (free/over-sampling, free/even-sampling, and anchored/over-sampling), the majority of children provided estimates better fit by the logarithmic than cyclic power function. In the last condition (anchored/even-sampling), the reverse was found. Results suggest that logarithmically-compressed numerical estimates do not depend on sampling, that the fit of cyclic power functions to children's estimates is likely an effect of anchors, and that a mixed log/linear model provides a useful model for both free and anchored numerical estimation. PMID:26774104

  12. A new approach to turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perot, B.; Moin, P.

    1996-01-01

    A new approach to Reynolds averaged turbulence modeling is proposed which has a computational cost comparable to two equation models but a predictive capability approaching that of Reynolds stress transport models. This approach isolates the crucial information contained within the Reynolds stress tensor, and solves transport equations only for a set of 'reduced' variables. In this work, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data is used to analyze the nature of these newly proposed turbulence quantities and the source terms which appear in their respective transport equations. The physical relevance of these quantities is discussed and some initial modeling results for turbulent channel flow are presented.

  13. Numerical Models of Ophiolite Genesis and Obduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilmette, C.; Beaumont, C.; Jamieson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Ophiolites are relics of oceanic lithosphere tectonically emplaced in continental settings. They are diagnostic features of continental suture zones, where they mark past plate boundaries. Even after having been studied for more than 40 years, the mechanisms involved in the genesis and subsequent obduction of ophiolites over continental margins are still debated. We present the results of 2D thermal-mechanical numerical models that successfully reproduce characteristics of natural examples like the Semail, Bay of Islands, Yarlung-Zangbo, and Coast Range ophiolites. The numerical models are upper mantle scale and use pressure-, temperature- and strain-dependent viscous-plastic rheologies. Both divergent and convergent velocity boundary conditions are used and tectonic boundary forces are monitored. The models start with the rifting of a stable continent, followed by development of an ocean ridge and accretion of oceanic lithosphere at a total rate of 3 cm/y. Once a specified ocean size/age is achieved, the velocity boundary conditions are reversed leading to convergence and the spontaneous inception of a suduction zone at the mid-ocean ridge. We present results for models including different ages of oceans (40 to 90 Ma) and different convergence velocities (5 to 15 cm/y). The interaction between the lower plate passive margin and the oceanic upper plate results in 5 different tectonic styles. These differ mainly by the presence or absence of oceanic spreading in the upper plate (back-arc basin), leading to supra-subduction zone ophiolites vs. MORB-type, and by the behaviour of the oceanic slab, e.g., slab rollback vs. breakoff. The evolution of effective slab pull is interpreted to be the major control on the resulting tectonic style. Low effective slab pull models (young oceans and fast convergence rates) fail to obduct an ophiolite. Strong effective slab pull models (old oceans and lower convergence rates) result in subduction zone retreat and spontaneous oceanic

  14. Numerical simulations and modeling for stochastic biological systems with jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Xiaoling; Wang, Ke

    2014-05-01

    This paper gives a numerical method to simulate sample paths for stochastic differential equations (SDEs) driven by Poisson random measures. It provides us a new approach to simulate systems with jumps from a different angle. The driving Poisson random measures are assumed to be generated by stationary Poisson point processes instead of Lévy processes. Methods provided in this paper can be used to simulate SDEs with Lévy noise approximately. The simulation is divided into two parts: the part of jumping integration is based on definition without approximation while the continuous part is based on some classical approaches. Biological explanations for stochastic integrations with jumps are motivated by several numerical simulations. How to model biological systems with jumps is showed in this paper. Moreover, method of choosing integrands and stationary Poisson point processes in jumping integrations for biological models are obtained. In addition, results are illustrated through some examples and numerical simulations. For some examples, earthquake is chose as a jumping source which causes jumps on the size of biological population.

  15. Numerical models of wind-driven circulation in lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Powell, T.M.; Dillon, T.M.

    1976-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of numerical modelling of large-scale wind-driven circulation in lakes is presented. The governing equations which describe this motion are discussed along with the appropriate numerical techniques necessary to solve them in lakes. The numerical models are categorized into three large primary groups: the layered models, the Ekman-type models, and the other three-dimensional models. Discussions and comparison of models are given and future research directions are suggested. ?? 1976.

  16. Comparison between analytical and numerical solution of mathematical drying model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahari, N.; Rasmani, K.; Jamil, N.

    2016-02-01

    Drying is often related to the food industry as a process of shifting heat and mass inside food, which helps in preserving food. Previous research using a mass transfer equation showed that the results were mostly concerned with the comparison between the simulation model and the experimental data. In this paper, the finite difference method was used to solve a mass equation during drying using different kinds of boundary condition, which are equilibrium and convective boundary conditions. The results of these two models provide a comparison between the analytical and the numerical solution. The result shows a close match between the two solution curves. It is concluded that the two proposed models produce an accurate solution to describe the moisture distribution content during the drying process. This analysis indicates that we have confidence in the behaviour of moisture in the numerical simulation. This result demonstrated that a combined analytical and numerical approach prove that the system is behaving physically. Based on this assumption, the model of mass transfer was extended to include the temperature transfer, and the result shows a similar trend to those presented in the simpler case.

  17. Numerical modeling of subaqueous sand dune morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doré, Arnaud; Bonneton, Philippe; Marieu, Vincent; Garlan, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    The morphodynamic evolution of subaqueous sand dunes is investigated, using a 2-D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes numerical model. A laboratory experiment where dunes are generated under stationary unidirectional flow conditions is used as a reference case. The model reproduces the evolution of the erodible bed until a state of equilibrium is reached. In particular, the simulation exhibits the different stages of the bed evolution, e.g., the incipient ripple generation, the nonlinear bed form growing phase, and the dune field equilibrium phase. The results show good agreement in terms of dune geometrical dimensions and time to equilibrium. After the emergence of the first ripple field, the bed growth is driven by cascading merging sequences between bed forms of different heights. A sequence extracted from the simulation shows how the downstream bed form is first eroded before merging with the upstream bed form. Superimposed bed forms emerge on the dune stoss sides during the simulation. An analysis of the results shows that they emerge downstream of a slight deflection on the dune profile. The deflection arises due to a modification of the sediment flux gradient consecutive to a reduction in the turbulence relaxation length while the upstream bed form height decreases. As they migrate, superimposed bed forms grow on the dune stoss side and eventually provoke the degeneration of the dune crest. Cascading merging sequences and superimposed bed forms dynamics both influence the dune field evolution and size and therefore play a fundamental role in the dune field self-organization process.

  18. Numerical modeling of fluidic flow meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, D.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    The transient fluid flow in fluidic flow meters has been modeled using Creare.x's flow modeling computer program FLUENT/BFC that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. The numerical predictions of fluid flow in a fluidic flow meter have been compared with the available experimental results for a particular design, termed the PC-4 design. Overall flow structures such as main jet bending, and primary and secondary vortices predicted by FLUENT/BFC are in excellent agreement with flow visualization results. The oscillation frequencies of the PC-4 design have been predicted for a range of flow rates encompassing laminar and turbulent flow and the results are in good agreement with experiments. The details of the flow field predictions reveal that an important factor that determines the onset of oscillations in the fluidic flow meter is the feedback jet momentum relative to the main jet momentum. The insights provided by the analysis of the PC-4 fluidic flow meter design have led to an improved design. The improved design has sustained oscillations at lower flow rates compared with the PC-4 design and has a larger rangeability.

  19. Understanding Etna flank instability through numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apuani, Tiziana; Corazzato, Claudia; Merri, Andrea; Tibaldi, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    As many active volcanoes, Mount Etna shows clear evidence of flank instability, and different mechanisms were suggested to explain this flank dynamics, based on the recorded deformation pattern and character. Shallow and deep deformations, mainly associated with both eruptive and seismic events, are concentrated along recognised fracture and fault systems, mobilising the eastern and south-eastern flank of the volcano. Several interacting causes were postulated to control the phenomenon, including gravity force, magma ascent along the feeding system, and a very complex local and/or regional tectonic activity. Nevertheless, the complexity of such dynamics is still an open subject of research and being the volcano flanks heavily urbanised, the comprehension of the gravitative dynamics is a major issue for public safety and civil protection. The present research explores the effects of the main geological features (in particular the role of the subetnean clays, interposed between the Apennine-Maghrebian flysch and the volcanic products) and the role of weakness zones, identified by fracture and fault systems, on the slope instability process. The effects of magma intrusions are also investigated. The problem is addressed by integrating field data, laboratory tests and numerical modelling. A bi- and tri-dimensional stress-strain analysis was performed by a finite difference numerical code (FLAC and FLAC3D), mainly aimed at evaluating the relationship among geological features, volcano-tectonic structures and magmatic activity in controlling the deformation processes. The analyses are well supported by dedicated structural-mechanical field surveys, which allowed to estimate the rock mass strength and deformability parameters. To take into account the uncertainties which inevitably occur in a so complicated model, many efforts were done in performing a sensitivity analysis along a WNW-ESE section crossing the volcano summit and the Valle del Bove depression. This was

  20. Numerical model of circumpolar Antarctic ice shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Extensive floating ice shelves in the Antarctic have been proposed to explain the discrepancies between Pleistocene high sea levels shown by dated coral reefs and coeval low sea levels inferred from glacial ice volumes calculated from oxygen isotope ratios in deep sea cores. A numerical model using the floating shelf creep analysis of Weertman (1957) has provided a plausible basis for the acceptance of such shelves. Shelf outer limits were set at 55/sup 0/S in East Antarctica and 58/sup 0/S in West Antarctica, based in part on diatom-deficient deep sea sediments deposited prior to the Holocene. Precipitation varied from 10 gm cm/sup -2/yr/sup -1/ at 75/sup 0/S to 80 gm cm/sup -2/yr/sup -1/ at 55/sup 0/S. Mean air temperatures varied from -35/sup 0/C at the 75/sup 0/S coast to -17/sup 0/C at the outer limits. Isotope ratios were those of present Antarctic precipitation at corresponding model shelf temperatures. In the calculation, a steady state is assumed. Integration begins at the coast with summation over successive years as creep and continental ice discharge move the integration element to the outer limits. The oceanic oxygen isotope ratio change required by the discrepancies in the record is 0.40 to 0.50 ppmil. Using the flow law constant of 4.2 and a creep activation energy of 134 kjoules mol/sup -1/, the resulting change is 0.44 ppmil. Difference results reflect the uncertainties associated with the critical creep constants used in the modeling. Nevertheless, the results suggest that a quantity of Antarctic shelf ice comparable to ice volumes in major Northern glacial areas existed at times during the Pleistocene.

  1. First principles numerical model of avalanche-induced arc discharges in electron-irradiated dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beers, B. L.; Pine, V. W.; Hwang, H. C.; Bloomberg, H. W.; Lin, D. L.; Schmidt, M. J.; Strickland, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    The model consists of four phases: single electron dynamics, single electron avalanche, negative streamer development, and tree formation. Numerical algorithms and computer code implementations are presented for the first three phases. An approach to developing a code description of fourth phase is discussed. Numerical results are presented for a crude material model of Teflon.

  2. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Propagation in Naturally Fractured Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Prodanovic, M.; Olson, J. E.; Schultz, R.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing consists of injecting fluid at high pressure and high flowrate to the wellbore for the purpose of enhancing production by generating a complex fracture network. Both tensile failure and shear failure occur during the hydraulic fracturing treatment. The shear event can be caused by slip on existing weak planes such as faults or natural fractures. From core observation, partially cemented and fully cemented opening mode natural fractures, often with considerable thickness are widely present. Hydraulic fractures can propagate either within the natural fracture (tensile failure) or along the interface between the natural fracture and the rock matrix (tensile/shear failure), depending on the relative strength of cement and rock matrix materials, the bonding strength of interface, as well as the presence of any heterogeneities. In this study, we evaluate the fracture propagation both experimentally and numerically. We embed one or multiple inclusions of different mechanical properties within synthetic hydrostone samples in order to mimic cemented natural fractures and rock. A semi-circular bending test is performed for each set of properties. A finite element model built with ABAQUS is used to mimic the semi-circular bending test and study the fracture propagation path, as well as the matrix-inclusion bonding interface status. Mechanical properties required for the numerical model are measured experimentally. The results indicate that the match between experiment and modeling fracture path are extremely sensitive to the chosen interface (bonding) model and related parameters. The semi-circular bending test is dry and easily conducted, providing a good platform for validating numerical approaches. A validated numerical model will enable us to add pressurized fluid within the crack and simulate hydraulic fracture-natural fracture interaction in the reservoir conditions, ultimately providing insights into the extent of the fracture network.

  3. Numerical Modelling of Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Michael D.

    Mesoscale atmospheric dispersion is more complicated than smaller-scale dispersion because the mean wind field can no longer be considered steady or horizontally homogeneous over mesoscale time and space scales. Wind shear also plays a more important role on the mesoscale, and horizontal dispersion can be enhanced and even dominated by vertical wind shear through either the simultaneous or delayed interaction of horizontal differential advection and vertical mixing over one or two diurnal periods. The CSU mesoscale atmospheric dispersion modelling system has been used in this study to simulate the transport and diffusion of a perfluorocarbon gas for episodic releases made during two North American mesoscale dispersion field experiments, the 1980 Great Plains tracer experiment and the 1983 Cross-Appalachian Tracer Experiment (CAPTEX). Ground -level and elevated tracer concentrations were measured out to distances of 600 km from the source in the first experiment and 1100 km in the second. The physiography of the two experimental domains was quite different, permitting isolation and examination of the roles of terrain forcing and differential advection in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion. Suites of numerical experiments of increasing complexity were carried out for both case studies. The experiments differed in the realism of their representation of both the synoptic-scale flow and the underlying terrain. The Great Plains nocturnal low-level jet played an important role in the first case while temporal changes in the synoptic -scale flow were very significant in the second case. The contributions of differential advection and mesoscale deformation to mesoscale dispersion dominated those of small-scale turbulent diffusion for both cases, and Pasquill's (1962) delayed-shear-enhancement mechanism for lateral dispersion was found to be particularly important. This study was also the first quantitative evaluation of the CSU mesoscale dispersion modelling system with

  4. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.

    2009-04-01

    Numerical modelling of brittle deformation in the uppermost crust can be challenging owing to the requirement of an accurate pressure calculation, the ability to achieve post-yield deformation and localisation, and the choice of rheology (plasticity law). One way to approach these issues is to conduct model comparisons that can evaluate the effects of different implementations of brittle behaviour in crustal deformation models. We present a comparison of three brittle shortening experiments for fourteen different numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference, boundary element and distinct element techniques. Our aim is to constrain and quantify the variability among models in order to improve our understanding of causes leading to differences between model results. Our first experiment of translation of a stable sand-like wedge serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions (e.g., taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work). The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. All models accommodate shortening by in-sequence formation of forward shear zones. We analyse the location, dip angle and spacing of thrusts in detail as previous comparisons have shown that these can be highly variable in numerical and analogue models of crustal shortening and extension. We find that an accurate implementation of boundary friction is important for our models. Our results are encouraging in the overall agreement in their dynamic evolution, but show at the same time the effort that is needed to understand shear zone evolution. GeoMod2008 Team: Markus Albertz, Michele Cooke, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Kristin Hughes, Katrin Huhn, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Christophe Pascal, Anton Popov, Guido Schreurs, Christopher Beaumont, Tony Crook, Mario Del Castello and Yves Leroy

  5. Numerical and Experimental Approaches Toward Understanding Lava Flow Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C.; Crawford, I. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have performed numerical modeling and experimental studies to quantify the heat transfer from a lava flow into an underlying particulate substrate. This project was initially motivated by a desire to understand the transfer of heat from a lava flow into the lunar regolith. Ancient regolith deposits that have been protected by a lava flow may contain ancient solar wind, solar flare, and galactic cosmic ray products that can give insight into the history of our solar system, provided the records were not heated and destroyed by the overlying lava flow. In addition, lava-substrate interaction is an important aspect of lava fluid dynamics that requires consideration in lava emplacement models Our numerical model determines the depth to which the heat pulse will penetrate beneath a lava flow into the underlying substrate. Rigorous treatment of the temperature dependence of lava and substrate thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, density, and latent heat release are imperative to an accurate model. Experiments were conducted to verify the numerical model. Experimental containers with interior dimensions of 20 x 20 x 25 cm were constructed from 1 inch thick calcium silicate sheeting. For initial experiments, boxes were packed with lunar regolith simulant (GSC-1) to a depth of 15 cm with thermocouples embedded at regular intervals. Basalt collected at Kilauea Volcano, HI, was melted in a gas forge and poured directly onto the simulant. Initial lava temperatures ranged from ~1200 to 1300 °C. The system was allowed to cool while internal temperatures were monitored by a thermocouple array and external temperatures were monitored by a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) video camera. Numerical simulations of the experiments elucidate the details of lava latent heat release and constrain the temperature-dependence of the thermal conductivity of the particulate substrate. The temperature-dependence of thermal conductivity of particulate material is not well known

  6. Numerical Modeling of Inclusion Behavior in Liquid Metal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellot, Jean-Pierre; Descotes, Vincent; Jardy, Alain

    2013-09-01

    Thermomechanical performance of metallic alloys is directly related to the metal cleanliness that has always been a challenge for metallurgists. During liquid metal processing, particles can grow or decrease in size either by mass transfer with the liquid phase or by agglomeration/fragmentation mechanisms. As a function of numerical density of inclusions and of the hydrodynamics of the reactor, different numerical modeling approaches are proposed; in the case of an isolated particle, the Lagrangian technique coupled with a dissolution model is applied, whereas in the opposite case of large inclusion phase concentration, the population balance equation must be solved. Three examples of numerical modeling studies achieved at Institut Jean Lamour are discussed. They illustrate the application of the Lagrangian technique (for isolated exogenous inclusion in titanium bath) and the Eulerian technique without or with the aggregation process: for precipitation and growing of inclusions at the solidification front of a Maraging steel, and for endogenous inclusions in the molten steel bath of a gas-stirred ladle, respectively.

  7. Numerical modeling of electron noise in nanoscale Si devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungemann, Christoph

    2007-06-01

    A deterministic solver for the Langevin Boltzmann equation is presented, which is based on a spherical harmonics expansion, box integration, and a maximum entropy dissipation principle. The numerical properties of this method are very similar to the classical approaches (drift-diffusion or hydrodynamic models), and the same numerical methods can be used (ac analysis, adjoint method, harmonic balance, etc). Since the equations can be solved directly in the frequency domain, the full frequency range down to zero frequency is accessible. In addition, rare events can be simulated without excessive CPU times. This is demonstrated for a silicon NPN BJT. Not only the terminal current noise is calculated, but also the spatial origin of noise and the corresponding Green's functions.

  8. The numerical renormalization group and multi-orbital impurity models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichselbaum, Andreas; Stadler, K. M.; von Delft, J.; Yin, Z. P.; Kotliar, G.; Mitchell, Andrew

    The numerical renormalization group (NRG) is a highly versatile and accurate method for the simulation of (effective) fermionic impurity models. Despite that the cost of NRG is exponential in the number of orbitals, by now, symmetric three-band calculations have become available on a routine level. Here we present a recent detailed study on the spin-orbital separation in a three-band Hund metal with relevance for iron-pnictides via the dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). In cases, finally, where the orbital symmetry is broken, we demonstrate that interleaved NRG still offers an accurate alternative approach within the NRG with dramatically improved numerical efficiency at comparable accuracy relative to conventional NRG.

  9. Numerical approaches to isolated many-body quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodrubetz, Michael H.

    Ultracold atoms have revolutionized atomic and condensed matter physics. In addition to having clean, controllable Hamiltonians, ultracold atoms are near-perfect realizations of isolated quantum systems, in which weak environmental coupling can be neglected on experimental time scales. This opens new opportunities to explore these systems not just in thermal equilibrium, but out of equilibrium as well. In this dissertation, we investigate some properties of closed quantum systems, utilizing a combination of numerical and analytical techniques. We begin by applying full configuration-interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) to the Fermi polaron, which we use as a test bed to improve the algorithm. In addition to adapting standard QMC techniques, we introduce novel controlled approximations that allow mitigation of the sign problem and simulation directly in the thermodynamic limit. We also contrast the sign problem of FCIQMC with that of more standard techniques, focusing on FCIQMC's capacity to work in a second quantized determinant space. Next, we discuss nonequilibrium dynamics near a quantum critical point, focusing on the one-dimensional transverse-field Ising (TFI) chain. We show that the TFI dynamics exhibit critical scaling, within which the spin correlations exhibit qualitatively athermal behavior. We provide strong numerical evidence for the universality of dynamic scaling by utilizing time-dependent matrix product states to simulate a non-integrable model in the same equilibrium universality class. As this non-integrable model has been realized experimentally, we investigate the robustness of our predictions against the presence of open boundary conditions and disorder. We find that the qualitatively athermal correlations remain visible, although other phenomena such as even/odd effects become relevant within the finite size scaling theory. Finally, we investigate the properties of the integrable TFI model upon varying the strength of a non

  10. Heat transfer enhancement in nanofluids. A numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fariñas Alvariño, P.; Sáiz Jabardo, J. M.; Arce, A.; Lamas Galdo, M. I.

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the reported investigation is to asses the effect of brownian and thermophoretic diffusion in nanofluids convective heat transfer. In order to capture these effects, a new equation for particles distribution had to be consider. Momentum and energy equations have been reformulated in order to include brownian and thermophretic diffusion. These modes of diffusion have been suggested extensively in the literature but their effect on momentum and energy transport has not yet been numerically analyzed. In order to obtain a solution for the modified set of governing equations, a new CFD solver had to be devised. The new solver has been applied to a case study involving hydrodynamic and thermally developing laminar flow regime in a pipe. Pure base fluid solutions have been used to asses the accuracy of the model. Numerical nanofluid solutions compare reasonably well with both experimental results obtained elsewhere and the Churchill and Ozoe correlation. The observed heat transfer enhancement by the nanofluid has been attributed to its transport properties rather than to another transport mechanism.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Transit-Time Ultrasonic Flowmeters by a Direct Approach.

    PubMed

    Luca, Adrian; Marchiano, Regis; Chassaing, Jean-Camille

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the development of a computational code for the numerical simulation of wave propagation through domains with a complex geometry consisting in both solids and moving fluids. The emphasis is on the numerical simulation of ultrasonic flowmeters (UFMs) by modeling the wave propagation in solids with the equations of linear elasticity (ELE) and in fluids with the linearized Euler equations (LEEs). This approach requires high performance computing because of the high number of degrees of freedom and the long propagation distances. Therefore, the numerical method should be chosen with care. In order to minimize the numerical dissipation which may occur in this kind of configuration, the numerical method employed here is the nodal discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method. Also, this method is well suited for parallel computing. To speed up the code, almost all the computational stages have been implemented to run on graphical processing unit (GPU) by using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming model from NVIDIA. This approach has been validated and then used for the two-dimensional simulation of gas UFMs. The large contrast of acoustic impedance characteristic to gas UFMs makes their simulation a real challenge. PMID:27019484

  12. Numerical Aspects of Solving Differential Equations: Laboratory Approach for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witt, Ana

    1997-01-01

    Describes three labs designed to help students in a first course on ordinary differential equations with three of the most common numerical difficulties they might encounter when solving initial value problems with a numerical software package. The goal of these labs is to help students advance to independent work on common numerical anomalies.…

  13. Mathematical approaches to bone reformation phenomena and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Oharu, Shinnosuke; Takata, Takashi; Tamura, Akio

    2003-09-01

    Bone remodeling is metabolism of the bone through repetition of the resorption by osteoclasts and formation by osteoblasts. Osteoblasts produce inorganic calcium phosphate, which is converted to hydroxyapatite, and organic matrix consisting mainly of type I collagen, and then they deposit new bone to the part of the bone resorbed by osteoclasts. Osteoclasts dissociate calcium by secreting acid and degrade organic components by releasing lysosomal enzymes. Moreover, osteocytes in the bone play an important role in sensing various physical loads and conveying signals to activate osteoblasts. These three kinds of cells are linked to each other and perform the bone remodeling. Appropriate parameters representing the states of the bone and marrow are introduced and a mathematical model describing the bone remodeling phenomena is presented. The model involves an interface equation which determines the surface of the bone. The associated discrete model is formulated and its stable solvability is verified. Results of numerical simulations on a computer aided design system are visualized and then compared to clinical bone data. This work may be applied to medical science and in particular to dentistry.

  14. Precise numerical modeling of next generation multimode fiber based links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymiuk, L.; Stepniak, G.

    2015-12-01

    In order to numerically model modern multimode fiber based links we are required to take into account modal and chromatic dispersion, profile dispersion and spectral dependent coupling. In this paper we propose a complete numerical model which not only is precise but also versatile. Additionally to the detailed mathematical description of the model we provide also a bunch of numerical calculations performed with the use of the model.

  15. Numerical models for high beta magnetohydrodynamic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamentals of numerical magnetohydrodynamics for highly conducting, high-beta plasmas are outlined. The discussions emphasize the physical properties of the flow, and how elementary concepts in numerical analysis can be applied to the construction of finite difference approximations that capture these features. The linear and nonlinear stability of explicit and implicit differencing in time is examined, the origin and effect of numerical diffusion in the calculation of convective transport is described, and a technique for maintaining solenoidality in the magnetic field is developed. Many of the points are illustrated by numerical examples. The techniques described are applicable to the time-dependent, high-beta flows normally encountered in magnetically confined plasmas, plasma switches, and space and astrophysical plasmas. 40 refs.

  16. Numerical simulation methods for the Rouse model in flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Michael P.; Milner, Scott T.

    2011-11-01

    Simulation of the Rouse model in flow underlies a great variety of numerical investigations of polymer dynamics, in both entangled melts and solutions and in dilute solution. Typically a simple explicit stochastic Euler method is used to evolve the Rouse model. Here we compare this approach to an operator splitting method, which splits the evolution operator into stochastic linear and deterministic nonlinear parts and takes advantage of an analytical solution for the linear Rouse model in terms of the noise history. We show that this splitting method has second-order weak convergence, whereas the Euler method has only first-order weak convergence. Furthermore, the splitting method is unconditionally stable, in contrast to the limited stability range of the Euler method. Similar splitting methods are applicable to a broad class of problems in stochastic dynamics in which noise competes with ordering and flow to determine steady-state order parameter structures.

  17. Numerical modelling and image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W.; Gibson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The development of diffuse optical tomography as a functional imaging modality has relied largely on the use of model-based image reconstruction. The recovery of optical parameters from boundary measurements of light propagation within tissue is inherently a difficult one, because the problem is nonlinear, ill-posed and ill-conditioned. Additionally, although the measured near-infrared signals of light transmission through tissue provide high imaging contrast, the reconstructed images suffer from poor spatial resolution due to the diffuse propagation of light in biological tissue. The application of model-based image reconstruction is reviewed in this paper, together with a numerical modelling approach to light propagation in tissue as well as generalized image reconstruction using boundary data. A comprehensive review and details of the basis for using spatial and structural prior information are also discussed, whereby the use of spectral and dual-modality systems can improve contrast and spatial resolution. PMID:19581256

  18. An approach to solving large reliability models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Mark A.; Veeraraghavan, Malathi; Dugan, Joanne Bechta; Trivedi, Kishor S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a unified approach to the problem of solving large realistic reliability models. The methodology integrates behavioral decomposition, state trunction, and efficient sparse matrix-based numerical methods. The use of fault trees, together with ancillary information regarding dependencies to automatically generate the underlying Markov model state space is proposed. The effectiveness of this approach is illustrated by modeling a state-of-the-art flight control system and a multiprocessor system. Nonexponential distributions for times to failure of components are assumed in the latter example. The modeling tool used for most of this analysis is HARP (the Hybrid Automated Reliability Predictor).

  19. An Object Model for a Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, D.; Bhalla, P. N.; Pratap, V.; Reddy, P.

    1998-01-01

    Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS) is a packet of software which numerically simulates the behavior of a rocket engine. Different parameters of the components of an engine is the input to these programs. Depending on these given parameters the programs output the behaviors of those components. These behavioral values are then used to guide the design of or to diagnose a model of a rocket engine "built" by a composition of these programs simulating different components of the engine system. In order to use this software package effectively one needs to have a flexible model of a rocket engine. These programs simulating different components then should be plugged into this modular representation. Our project is to develop an object based model of such an engine system. We are following an iterative and incremental approach in developing the model, as is the standard practice in the area of object oriented design and analysis of softwares. This process involves three stages: object modeling to represent the components and sub-components of a rocket engine, dynamic modeling to capture the temporal and behavioral aspects of the system, and functional modeling to represent the transformational aspects. This article reports on the first phase of our activity under a grant (RENS) from the NASA Lewis Research center. We have utilized Rambaugh's object modeling technique and the tool UML for this purpose. The classes of a rocket engine propulsion system are developed and some of them are presented in this report. The next step, developing a dynamic model for RENS, is also touched upon here. In this paper we will also discuss the advantages of using object-based modeling for developing this type of an integrated simulator over other tools like an expert systems shell or a procedural language, e.g., FORTRAN. Attempts have been made in the past to use such techniques.

  20. Wave chaos in dielectric resonators: Asymptotic and numerical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tureci, Hakan E.

    Dielectric optical micro-resonators and micro-lasers represent a realization of a wave-chaotic system, where the lack of symmetry in the resonator shape leads to non-integrable ray dynamics in the short-wavelength limit. Understanding and controlling the emission properties of such resonators requires the investigation of the correspondence between classical phase space structures of the ray motion inside the resonator and wave-functions. Semi-classical approaches to the resonances of deformed cylindrical resonators are analyzed first within the closed limit, which corresponds to the quantum billiard problem from the field of quantum chaos. The results are then generalized to the dielectric case. We develop an efficient numerical algorithm to calculate the quasi-bound modes of dielectric resonators, which play a crucial role in determining the emission properties of micro-lasers based on dielectric resonators. Resonances based on stable periodic ray orbits of dielectric cavities are constructed in the short-wavelength limit using the parabolic equation method, and an associated wavevector quantization rule for the complex wavenumbers is derived. The effect of discrete symmetries of the resonator is analyzed and shown to give rise to quasi-degenerate multiplets. A recent experiment on lasing emission from deformed GaN micro-cavities is analyzed, leading to the appearance of scarred modes and non-specular effects in the farfield emission pattern. A framework is presented for treating the non-linear laser equations in a form suitable for treating the dielectric micro-lasers.

  1. Noise reduction in a Raman ring laser driven by a chaotic pump: numerical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Teubel, A.; Rza-cedillaz-dotewski, K.

    1989-04-01

    The theory of a single-mode, ring-cavity Raman laser is investigated for a broadband, chaotic pump. The numerical simulations are performed with a realistic model of the noisy pump. A significant reduction of the fluctuations, found in an approximate approach of an earlier paper (M. Lewenstein and K. Rza-cedillaz-dotewski, Opt. Commun. 63, 174 (1987)), is confirmed. In addition we find a dramatic narrowing of the spectral line.

  2. Aspects and Strategies of Numerical Modelling of Underground Coal Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuttke, M. W.; Han, J.; Liu, G.; Kessels, W.; Schmidt, M.; Gusat, D.; Fischer, Chr.; Hirner, A.; Meyer, U.

    2009-04-01

    Numerical modelling of underground coal fires has become a valuable tool even for practical fire extinction work. The approaches, methods and finally codes that are used depend on the targets that are aimed at by the particular modelling task. The most general one is to fully understand the processes that sustain or suppress the fire. Another purpose is to produce realistic data for regions that are not accessible (e . g. underneath a burning coal seam) or couldn't be investigated (e.g due to limited resources) to estimate the complete energy budget of the fire. Last but not least one would like to forecast the fire dynamics to predict the future damage or to assess the effectivenees of extinction work. These purposes require the consideration of all aspects with respect to thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes. At the moment there is no single code that completely covers all these aspects with every degree of complexity. Within the Sino-German project "Innovative Technologies for Exploration, Extinction and Monitoring of Coal Fires in North China" we apply existing codes with different foci with respect to THMC processes and try to combine all codes to one comprehensive model. Besides the sophisticated academic modelling approach we also pursue the concept of "Onsite" modelling to enable fire fighting personnel to perform simplified modelling tasks even by means of web-based applications.

  3. Formation and evolution of galaxies: Analytical and numerical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bing

    2001-08-01

    The effects of viscosity and clumpiness are investigated in the context of the formation and the dynamical evolution of galaxies by analytical models and numerical simulations. The major motivation of this investigation is to study how these two factors can alter the angular momentum behavior of the galaxies formed in the bottom-up formation scenario as indicated by the hierarchical CDM cosmology. We analytically modify the standard disk formation model to incorporate the effect of viscous evolution. We derive generic analytic solutions for the disk-halo system after adiabatic compression of the dark halo, with free choice of the input virialized dark halo density profile and of the specific angular momentum distribution. We derive limits on the final density profile of the halo in the central regions due to the condensation of gas. The viscous evolution can redistribute angular momentum distribution by driving material inwards to form a proto- bulge which can be formed by the bar instability in the proto-disk, and by spreading gas to large radius to form pure exponential stellar disk if the viscous evolution timescale and star formation timescale are similar. The `disk-halo' conspiracy is found to be formed better by the disk-halo interaction during the viscous evolution of disk. We investigate the relationship between the assumed initial conditions, such as halo `formation', or assembly, redshift zf, spin parameter λ, baryonic fraction F, and final disk properties such as global star formation timescale, gas fraction, and bulge-to-disk ratio. We find that the present properties of disks, such as the scale length, are compatible with a higher initial formation redshift if the re-distribution by viscous evolution is included than if it is ignored. The numerical simulations confirm many results derived in the analytical model. Further it is found that pure viscous evolution can be unstable. Possibly feedback from star formation is required to maintain a stable

  4. Modelling approaches for angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Taraboletti, G; Giavazzi, R

    2004-04-01

    The development of a functional vasculature within a tumour is a requisite for its growth and progression. This fact has led to the design of therapies directed toward the tumour vasculature, aiming either to prevent the formation of new vessels (anti-angiogenic) or to damage existing vessels (vascular targeting). The development of agents with different mechanisms of action requires powerful preclinical models for the analysis and optimization of these therapies. This review concerns 'classical' assays of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, recent approaches to target identification (analysis of gene and protein expression), and the study of morphological and functional changes in the vasculature in vivo (imaging techniques). It mainly describes assays designed for anti-angiogenic compounds, indicating, where possible, their application to the study of vascular-targeting agents. PMID:15120043

  5. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Qiang

    2014-11-12

    The rational design of materials, the development of accurate and efficient material simulation algorithms, and the determination of the response of materials to environments and loads occurring in practice all require an understanding of mechanics at disparate spatial and temporal scales. The project addresses mathematical and numerical analyses for material problems for which relevant scales range from those usually treated by molecular dynamics all the way up to those most often treated by classical elasticity. The prevalent approach towards developing a multiscale material model couples two or more well known models, e.g., molecular dynamics and classical elasticity, each of which is useful at a different scale, creating a multiscale multi-model. However, the challenges behind such a coupling are formidable and largely arise because the atomistic and continuum models employ nonlocal and local models of force, respectively. The project focuses on a multiscale analysis of the peridynamics materials model. Peridynamics can be used as a transition between molecular dynamics and classical elasticity so that the difficulties encountered when directly coupling those two models are mitigated. In addition, in some situations, peridynamics can be used all by itself as a material model that accurately and efficiently captures the behavior of materials over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Peridynamics is well suited to these purposes because it employs a nonlocal model of force, analogous to that of molecular dynamics; furthermore, at sufficiently large length scales and assuming smooth deformation, peridynamics can be approximated by classical elasticity. The project will extend the emerging mathematical and numerical analysis of peridynamics. One goal is to develop a peridynamics-enabled multiscale multi-model that potentially provides a new and more extensive mathematical basis for coupling classical elasticity and molecular dynamics, thus enabling next

  6. Large-signal numerical and analytical HBT models

    SciTech Connect

    Teeter, D.A.; East, J.R.; Mains, R.K.; Haddad, G.I. )

    1993-05-01

    Several large-signal HBT models are investigated in this paper to determine their usefulness at millimeter-wave frequencies. The most detailed model involves numerically solving moments of the Boltzmann Transport Equation. A description of the numerical model is given along with several simulated results. The numerical model is then used to evaluate two analytical HBT models, the conventional Gummel-Poon model and a modified Ebers-Moll model. It is found that the commonly used Gummel-Poon model exhibits poor agreement with numerical and experimental data at millimeter-wave frequencies due to neglect of transit-time delays. Improved agreement between measured and modeled data result by including transit-time effects in an Ebers-Moll model. This simple model has direct application to millimeter-wave power amplifier and oscillator design. Several measured results are presented to help verify the simple model.

  7. Validation of Numerical Shallow Water Models for Tidal Lagoons

    SciTech Connect

    Eliason, D.; Bourgeois, A.

    1999-11-01

    An analytical solution is presented for the case of a stratified, tidally forced lagoon. This solution, especially its energetics, is useful for the validation of numerical shallow water models under stratified, tidally forced conditions. The utility of the analytical solution for validation is demonstrated for a simple finite difference numerical model. A comparison is presented of the energetics of the numerical and analytical solutions in terms of the convergence of model results to the analytical solution with increasing spatial and temporal resolution.

  8. Advanced in turbulence physics and modeling by direct numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    The advent of direct numerical simulations of turbulence has opened avenues for research on turbulence physics and turbulence modeling. Direct numerical simulation provides values for anything that the scientist or modeler would like to know about the flow. An overview of some recent advances in the physical understanding of turbulence and in turbulence modeling obtained through such simulations is presented.

  9. Numerical considerations for Lagrangian stochastic dispersion models: Eliminating rogue trajectories, and the importance of numerical accuracy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When Lagrangian stochastic models for turbulent dispersion are applied to complex flows, some type of ad hoc intervention is almost always necessary to eliminate unphysical behavior in the numerical solution. This paper discusses numerical considerations when solving the Langevin-based particle velo...

  10. Numerical simulation and modeling of combustion in scramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Ryan James

    In the last fifteen years the development of a viable scramjet has quickly approached the following long term goals: responsive sub-orbital space access; long-range, prompt global strike; and high-speed transportation. Nonetheless, there are significant challenges that need to be resolved. These challenges include high skin friction drag and high heat transfer rates, inherent to vehicles in sustained, hypersonic flight. Another challenge is sustaining combustion. Numerical simulation and modeling was performed to provide insight into reducing skin friction drag and sustaining combustion. Numerical simulation was used to investigate boundary layer combustion, which has been shown to reduce skin friction drag. The objective of the numerical simulations was to quantify the effect of fuel injection parameters on boundary layer combustion and ultimately on the change in the skin friction coefficient and heat transfer rate. A qualitative analysis of the results suggest that the reduction in the skin friction coefficient depends on multiple parameters and potentially an interaction between parameters. Sustained combustion can be achieved through a stabilized detonation wave. Additionally, stabilizing a detonation wave will yield rapid combustion. This will allow for a shorter and lighter-weight engine system, resulting in less required combustor cooling. A stabilized detonation wave was numerically modeled for various inlet and geometric cases. The effect of fuel concentration, inlet Mach number, and geometric configuration on the stability of a detonation wave was quantified. Correlations were established between fuel concentration, inlet speed, geometric configuration and parameters characterizing the detonation wave. A linear relationship was quantified between the fuel concentration and the parameters characterizing the detonation wave.